WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface passivation technique

  1. Techniques for active passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roscioli, Joseph R.; Herndon, Scott C.; Nelson, Jr., David D.

    2016-12-20

    In one embodiment, active (continuous or intermittent) passivation may be employed to prevent interaction of sticky molecules with interfaces inside of an instrument (e.g., an infrared absorption spectrometer) and thereby improve response time. A passivation species may be continuously or intermittently applied to an inlet of the instrument while a sample gas stream is being applied. The passivation species may have a highly polar functional group that strongly binds to either water or polar groups of the interfaces, and once bound presents a non-polar group to the gas phase in order to prevent further binding of polar molecules. The instrument may be actively used to detect the sticky molecules while the passivation species is being applied.

  2. Application of various surface passivation layers in solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ji Youn; Lee, Soo Hong

    2004-01-01

    In this work, we have used different techniques for surface passivation: conventional thermal oxidation (CTO), rapid thermal oxidation (RTO), and plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD). The surface passivation qualities of eight different single and combined double layers have been investigated both on phosphorus non-diffused p-type Float Zone (FZ) silicon wafers and on diffused emitters (100 Ω/□ and 40 Ω/□). CTO/SiN 1 passivates very well not only on a non-diffused surface (τ eff = 1361 μs) but also on an emitter (τ eff = 414 μs). However, we concluded that RTO/SiN 1 and RTO/SiN 2 stacks were more suitable than CTO/SiN stacks for surface passivation in solar cells since those stacks had relatively good passivation qualities and suitable optical reflections. RTO/SiN 1 for rear-surface passivation and RTO/SiN 2 for front-surface passivation were applied to the fabrication of solar cells. We achieved efficiencies of 18.5 % and 18.8 % on 0.5 Ω-cm (FZ) silicon with planar and textured front surfaces, respectively. An excellent open circuit voltage (V oc ) of 675.6 mV was obtained for the planar cell.

  3. Surface passivation for CdTe devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reese, Matthew O.; Perkins, Craig L.; Burst, James M.; Gessert, Timothy A.; Barnes, Teresa M.; Metzger, Wyatt K.

    2017-08-01

    In one embodiment, a method for surface passivation for CdTe devices is provided. The method includes adjusting a stoichiometry of a surface of a CdTe material layer such that the surface becomes at least one of stoichiometric or Cd-rich; and reconstructing a crystalline lattice at the surface of the CdTe material layer by annealing the adjusted surface.

  4. Improvement of crystalline silicon surface passivation by hydrogen plasma treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, I.; Vetter, M.; Orpella, A.; Voz, C.; Puigdollers, J.; Alcubilla, R.; Kharchenko, A.V.; Roca i Cabarrocas, P.

    2004-01-01

    A completely dry low-temperature process has been developed to passivate 3.3 Ω cm p-type crystalline silicon surface with excellent results. Particularly, we have investigated the use of a hydrogen plasma treatment, just before hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC x :H) deposition, without breaking the vacuum. We measured effective lifetime, τ eff , through a quasi-steady-state photoconductance technique. Experimental results show that hydrogen plasma treatment improves surface passivation compared to classical HF dip. S eff values lower than 19 cm s -1 were achieved using a hydrogen plasma treatment and an a-SiC x :H film deposited at 300 deg. C

  5. Surface science techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Bracco, Gianangelo

    2013-01-01

    The book describes the experimental techniques employed to study surfaces and interfaces. The emphasis is on the experimental method. Therefore all chapters start with an introduction of the scientific problem, the theory necessary to understand how the technique works and how to understand the results. Descriptions of real experimental setups, experimental results at different systems are given to show both the strength and the limits of the technique. In a final part the new developments and possible extensions of the techniques are presented. The included techniques provide microscopic as well as macroscopic information. They cover most of the techniques used in surface science.

  6. L2-gain and passivity techniques in nonlinear control

    CERN Document Server

    van der Schaft, Arjan

    2017-01-01

    This standard text gives a unified treatment of passivity and L2-gain theory for nonlinear state space systems, preceded by a compact treatment of classical passivity and small-gain theorems for nonlinear input-output maps. The synthesis between passivity and L2-gain theory is provided by the theory of dissipative systems. Specifically, the small-gain and passivity theorems and their implications for nonlinear stability and stabilization are discussed from this standpoint. The connection between L2-gain and passivity via scattering is detailed. Feedback equivalence to a passive system and resulting stabilization strategies are discussed. The passivity concepts are enriched by a generalised Hamiltonian formalism, emphasising the close relations with physical modeling and control by interconnection, and leading to novel control methodologies going beyond passivity. The potential of L2-gain techniques in nonlinear control, including a theory of all-pass factorizations of nonlinear systems, and of parametrization...

  7. Passive RF component technology materials, techniques, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Guoan

    2012-01-01

    Focusing on novel materials and techniques, this pioneering volume provides you with a solid understanding of the design and fabrication of smart RF passive components. You find comprehensive details on LCP, metal materials, ferrite materials, nano materials, high aspect ratio enabled materials, green materials for RFID, and silicon micromachining techniques. Moreover, this practical book offers expert guidance on how to apply these materials and techniques to design a wide range of cutting-edge RF passive components, from MEMS switch based tunable passives and 3D passives, to metamaterial-bas

  8. Analysis of passive surface-wave noise in surface microseismic data and its implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forghani-Arani, F.; Willis, M.; Haines, S.; Batzle, M.; Davidson, M.

    2011-01-01

    Tight gas reservoirs are projected to be a major portion of future energy resources. Because of their low permeability, hydraulic fracturing of these reservoirs is required to improve the permeability and reservoir productivity. Passive seismic monitoring is one of the few tools that can be used to characterize the changes in the reservoir due to hydraulic fracturing. Although the majority of the studies monitoring hydraulic fracturing exploit down hole microseismic data, surface microseismic monitoring is receiving increased attention because it is potentially much less expensive to acquire. Due to a broader receiver aperture and spatial coverage, surface microseismic data may be more advantageous than down hole microseismic data. The effectiveness of this monitoring technique, however, is strongly dependent on the signal-to-noise ratio of the data. Cultural and ambient noise can mask parts of the waveform that carry information about the subsurface, thereby decreasing the effectiveness of surface microseismic analysis in identifying and locating the microseismic events. Hence, time and spatially varying suppression of the surface-wave noise ground roll is a critical step in surface microseismic monitoring. Here, we study a surface passive dataset that was acquired over a Barnett Shale Formation reservoir during two weeks of hydraulic fracturing, in order to characterize and suppress the surface noise in this data. We apply techniques to identify the characteristics of the passive ground roll. Exploiting those characteristics, we can apply effective noise suppression techniques to the passive data. ?? 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  9. Surface science techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Walls, JM

    2013-01-01

    This volume provides a comprehensive and up to the minute review of the techniques used to determine the nature and composition of surfaces. Originally published as a special issue of the Pergamon journal Vacuum, it comprises a carefully edited collection of chapters written by specialists in each of the techniques and includes coverage of the electron and ion spectroscopies, as well as the atom-imaging methods such as the atom probe field ion microscope and the scanning tunnelling microscope. Surface science is an important area of study since the outermost surface layers play a crucial role

  10. Dual Electrolytic Plasma Processing for Steel Surface Cleaning and Passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, L.; Zhang, P.; Shi, J.; Liang, J.; Tian, W. B.; Zhang, Y. M.; Sun, Z. M.

    2017-10-01

    To remove the rust on rebars and passivate the fresh surfaces, electrodes reversing electrolytic plasma processing (EPP) was proposed and conducted in a 10 wt.% Na2CO3 aqueous solution. The morphology and the composition of the surface were investigated by SEM and XPS. Experimental results show that the rust on the surface was removed effectively by cathode EPP, and a passive film containing Cr2O3 was achieved by the succeeding anode EPP treatment, by a simple operation of reversing the bias. The corrosion resistance was evaluated in a 3.5 wt.% NaCl aqueous solution using an electrochemical workstation. In comparison, the corrosion resistance was improved by the succeeding anode EPP treatment, which is evidenced by a positive shift of the open-circuit potential, an increase in the electrochemical impedance representing the inner layer by 76.8% and the decrease in the corrosion current density by 49.6%. This is an effective and environment-friendly technique to clean and passivate rebars and similar steel materials.

  11. Passive water control at the surface of a superhydrophobic lichen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlett, Christopher A E; Shirtcliffe, Neil James; Pyatt, F Brian; Newton, Michael I; McHale, Glen; Koch, Kerstin

    2011-12-01

    Some lichens have a super-hydrophobic upper surface, which repels water drops, keeping the surface dry but probably preventing water uptake. Spore ejection requires water and is most efficient just after rainfall. This study was carried out to investigate how super-hydrophobic lichens manage water uptake and repellence at their fruiting bodies, or podetia. Drops of water were placed onto separate podetia of Cladonia chlorophaea and observed using optical microscopy and cryo-scanning-electron microscopy (cryo-SEM) techniques to determine the structure of podetia and to visualise their interaction with water droplets. SEM and optical microscopy studies revealed that the surface of the podetia was constructed in a three-level structural hierarchy. By cryo-SEM of water-glycerol droplets placed on the upper part of the podetium, pinning of the droplet to specific, hydrophilic spots (pycnidia/apothecia) was observed. The results suggest a mechanism for water uptake, which is highly sophisticated, using surface wettability to generate a passive response to different types of precipitation in a manner similar to the Namib Desert beetle. This mechanism is likely to be found in other organisms as it offers passive but selective water control.

  12. Review paper: Semiconductor nanoparticles with surface passivation and surface plasmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Dae-Ryong; Kim, Jongmin; Nahm, Changwoo; Choi, Hongsik; Nam, Seunghoon; Park, Byungwoo

    2011-09-01

    Semiconductor nanoparticles have recently attracted a significant amount of attention from the materials science community. Nanoparticles with diameters in the range of 1 nm to 20 nm exhibit unique physical properties that give rise to many potential applications. Two fundamental factors are crucial as regards the novel properties of semiconductor nanoparticles. The first is the large surface-to-volume ratio. In this regard, the surface states are likely to trap electrons and/or holes, and induce a nonradiative recombination of these charge carriers, leading to a reduction in the luminescent and photovoltaic efficiency. The second approach takes advantage of the surface-plasmon resonance from metal nanostructures to semiconductors. The interactions between the semiconductor nanoparticles and the surface plasmons generate enhanced emission by electromagnetic-field amplification, and also causes the suppression of the emission by the energy transfer between the semiconductor and the metal nanoparticles. Therefore, surface passivation and surface plasmon in semiconductor nanoparticles with controlled nanostructures are important when attempting to improve both the luminescent and photovoltaic efficiency.

  13. NPR and ANSI Containment Study Using Passive Cooling Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, J. J.; Iotti, R. C.; Wright, R. F.

    1993-01-01

    Passive containment cooling study of NPR (New Production Reactor) and ANSI (Advanced Neutron Source) following postulated loss of coolant accident with a coincident station blackout due to total loss of all alternating current power are studied analytically and experimentally. All the reactor and containment cooling under this condition would rely on the passive cooling system which removes reactor decay heat and provides emergency core and containment cooling. Containment passive emergency core and containment cooling. Containment passive cooling for this study takes place in the annulus between containment steel shell and concrete shield building by natural convection air flow and concrete shield building by natural convection air flow and thermal radiation. Various heat transfer coefficients inside annular air space were investigated by running the modified Contempt code Contempt-Npr. In order to verify proper heat transfer coefficient, temperature, heat flux and velocity profiles were measured inside annular air space of the test facility which is a 24 foot (7.3m) high, steam heated inner cylinder of three foot (.91m) diameter and five and halt foot (1.7m) diameter outer cylinder. Comparison of Contempt-Npr and WGOTHIC was done for reduced scale Npr. It is concluded that Npr and ANSI containments can be passively cooled with air alone without extended cooling surfaces or passive water spray

  14. Surface Passivation for Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deligiannis, D.

    2017-01-01

    Silicon heterojunction solar cells (SHJ) are currently one of the most promising solar cell technologies in the world. The SHJ solar cell is based on a crystalline silicon (c-Si) wafer, passivated on both sides with a thin intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) layer. Subsequently, p-type

  15. Accelerometer Sensor Specifications to Predict Hydrocarbon Using Passive Seismic Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Md Khir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The ambient seismic ground noise has been investigated in several surveys worldwide in the last 10 years to verify the correlation between observed seismic energy anomalies at the surface and the presence of hydrocarbon reserves beneath. This is due to the premise that anomalies provide information about the geology and potential presence of hydrocarbon. However a technology gap manifested in nonoptimal detection of seismic signals of interest is observed. This is due to the fact that available sensors are not designed on the basis of passive seismic signal attributes and mainly in terms of amplitude and bandwidth. This is because of that fact that passive seismic acquisition requires greater instrumentation sensitivity, noise immunity, and bandwidth, with active seismic acquisition, where vibratory or impulsive sources were utilized to receive reflections through geophones. Therefore, in the case of passive seismic acquisition, it is necessary to select the best monitoring equipment for its success or failure. Hence, concerning sensors performance, this paper highlights the technological gap and motivates developing dedicated sensors for optimal solution at lower frequencies. Thus, the improved passive seismic recording helps in oil and gas industry to perform better fracture mapping and identify more appropriate stratigraphy at low frequencies.

  16. Bismuth Passivation Technique for High-Resolution X-Ray Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervenak, James; Hess, Larry

    2013-01-01

    The Athena-plus team requires X-ray sensors with energy resolution of better than one part in 3,000 at 6 keV X-rays. While bismuth is an excellent material for high X-ray stopping power and low heat capacity (for large signal when an X-ray is stopped by the absorber), oxidation of the bismuth surface can lead to electron traps and other effects that degrade the energy resolution. Bismuth oxide reduction and nitride passivation techniques analogous to those used in indium passivation are being applied in a new technique. The technique will enable improved energy resolution and resistance to aging in bismuth-absorber-coupled X-ray sensors. Elemental bismuth is lithographically integrated into X-ray detector circuits. It encounters several steps where the Bi oxidizes. The technology discussed here will remove oxide from the surface of the Bi and replace it with nitridized surface. Removal of the native oxide and passivating to prevent the growth of the oxide will improve detector performance and insulate the detector against future degradation from oxide growth. Placing the Bi coated sensor in a vacuum system, a reduction chemistry in a plasma (nitrogen/hydrogen (N2/H2) + argon) is used to remove the oxide and promote nitridization of the cleaned Bi surface. Once passivated, the Bi will perform as a better X-ray thermalizer since energy will not be trapped in the bismuth oxides on the surface. A simple additional step, which can be added at various stages of the current fabrication process, can then be applied to encapsulate the Bi film. After plasma passivation, the Bi can be capped with a non-diffusive layer of metal or dielectric. A non-superconducting layer is required such as tungsten or tungsten nitride (WNx).

  17. Surface passivation of high purity granular metals: zinc, cadmium, lead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirozhenko L. A.

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available For the high purity metals (99.9999%, such as zinc, cadmium, and lead, which are widely used as initial components in growing semiconductor and scintillation crystals (CdTe, CdZnTe, ZnSe, (Cd, Zn, Pb WO4, (Cd, Zn, Pb MoO4 et al., it is very important to ensure reliable protection of the surface from oxidation and adsorption of impurities from the atmosphere. The specific features of surface passivation of high purity cadmium, lead and zinc are not sufficiently studied and require specific methodologies for further studies. The use of organic solutions in the schemes of chemical passivation of the investigated metals avoids hydrolysis of the obtained protective films. The use of organic solvents with pure cation and anion composition as the washing liquid prevents chemisorption of ions present in the conventionally used distilled water. This keeps the original purity of the granular metals. Novel compositions of etchants and etching scheme providing simultaneous polishing and passivation of high purity granular Zn, Cd and Pb are developed. Chemical passivation allows storing metals in the normal atmospheric conditions for more than half a year for Zn and Cd and up to 30 days for Pb without changing the state of the surface. The use of the glycerol-DMF solution in the processes for obtaining Pb granules provides self-passivation of metal surfaces and eliminates the additional chemical processing while maintaining the quality of corrosion protection.

  18. Application of a passive electrochemical noise technique to localized corrosion of candidate radioactive waste container materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korzan, M.A.

    1994-05-01

    One of the key engineered barriers in the design of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is the waste canister that encapsulates the spent fuel elements. Current candidate metals for the canisters to be emplaced at Yucca Mountain include cast iron, carbon steel, Incoloy 825 and titanium code-12. This project was designed to evaluate passive electrochemical noise techniques for measuring pitting and corrosion characteristics of candidate materials under prototypical repository conditions. Experimental techniques were also developed and optimized for measurements in a radiation environment. These techniques provide a new method for understanding material response to environmental effects (i.e., gamma radiation, temperature, solution chemistry) through the measurement of electrochemical noise generated during the corrosion of the metal surface. In addition, because of the passive nature of the measurement the technique could offer a means of in-situ monitoring of barrier performance

  19. Use of coupled passivants and consolidants on calcite mineral surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, K.L.; Cygan, R.T.; Brinker, C.J.; Ashley, C.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Scotto, C.S. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States). Optical Sciences Div.

    1997-02-01

    Deterioration of monuments, buildings, and works of art constructed of carbonate-based stone potentially can be arrested by applying a combination of chemical passivants and consolidants that prevent hydrolytic attack and mechanical weakening. The authors used molecular modeling and laboratory synthesis to develop an improved passivating agent for the calcite mineral surface based on binding strength and molecular packing density. The effectiveness of the passivating agent with and without a linked outer layer of consolidant against chemical weathering was determined through leaching tests conducted with a pH-stat apparatus at pH 5 and 25 C. For the range of molecules considered, modeling results indicate that the strongest-binding passivant is the trimethoxy dianionic form of silylalkylaminocarboxylate (SAAC). The same form of silylalkylphosphonate (SAP) is the second strongest binder and the trisilanol neutral form of aminoethylaminopropylsilane (AEAPS) is ranked third. Short-term leaching tests on calcite powders coated with the trisilanol derivative of SAAC, the triethoxy neutral form of SAP, and the trimethoxy neutral form of AEAPS show that the passivant alone does not significantly slow the dissolution rate. However, all passivants when linked to the sol consolidant result in decreased rates. Combined AEAPS plus consolidant results in a coating that performs better than the commercial product Conservare{reg_sign} OH and at least as well as Conservare{reg_sign} H. The modeling results indicate that there may be a threshold binding energy for the passivant above which the dissolution rate of calcite is actually enhanced. More strongly-binding passivants may aid in the dissolution mechanism or dissociate in aqueous solution exposing the calcite surface to water.

  20. Semiconductor surface and interface passivation by cyanide treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, H.; Takahashi, M.; Maida, O.; Asano, A.; Kubota, T.; Ivančo, J.; Nakajima, A.; Akimoto, K.

    2004-08-01

    Cyanide treatment which simply involves immersion of semiconductors in cyanide solutions can passivate interface states as well as surface states. When Si surfaces are treated with KCN solutions, a surface photovoltage greatly increases, and the surface recombination velocity is calculated to be decreased from ˜3000 cm/s to less than 200 cm/s. When the cyanide treatment is applied to ultrathin SiO 2/single-crystalline Si structure, interface states are passivated. The passivation of the SiO 2/Si interface states increases the energy conversion efficiency of MOS solar cells to 16.2% and decreases the leakage current density for MOS diodes to 1/3-1/8. When the cyanide treatment is performed on polycrystalline (poly-) Si, defect states in Si up to at least 0.5 μm depth from the surface are passivated, resulting in a vast increase in the energy conversion efficiency of solar cells and a decrease in the dark current density of MOS diodes to 1/100-1/15 that without cyanide treatment. The defect passivation is attributed to the formation of SiCN bonds from defect states. SiCN bonds are found not to be ruptured by heat treatment at 800 °C and AM 1.5 100 mW/cm 2 irradiation for more than 1000 h. Density functional calculations show that the thermal and irradiation stability results from strong SiCN bonds with the bond energy of 4.5 eV. When the cyanide treatment is performed on oxide/GaAs(1 0 0) structure, the interface state density decreases to ˜50%. The cyanide treatment can also passivate defect states in Cu 2O films, resulting in increases in the carrier density and the band-to-band photoluminescence intensity.

  1. Reducing roll motion by passive free surface tanks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik Dam; Nielsen, Christian S.

    2014-01-01

    Roll stabilisation of motorised vessels plays an important part in reducing passenger discomfort and increasing safety and cargo capacity. Passive free surface tanks are considered a low-cost stabilising method, which is efficient at all speeds without increasing hull resistance. In this study, a...... and the design of a free surface tank is explained. The effects of the passive free surface tank are evaluated and a significant damping effect is observed, particularly in cases with resonant roll.......Roll stabilisation of motorised vessels plays an important part in reducing passenger discomfort and increasing safety and cargo capacity. Passive free surface tanks are considered a low-cost stabilising method, which is efficient at all speeds without increasing hull resistance. In this study......, a mathematical model for evaluating the performance of a passive free surface tank is established. This is done by coupling a roll model to a fluid flow model. As a numerical example, the seakeeping abilities of a container vessel are evaluated. The necessary methods for performing the simulation are presented...

  2. Laser direct writing of oxide structures on hydrogen-passivated silicon surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müllenborn, Matthias; Birkelund, Karen; Grey, Francois

    1996-01-01

    A focused laser beam has been used to induce oxidation of hydrogen-passivated silicon. The scanning laser beam removes the hydrogen passivation locally from the silicon surface, which immediately oxidizes in air. The process has been studied as a function of power density and excitation wavelength...... be generated by laser direct oxidation and complemented with nanometer resolution by scanning probe techniques. The combined micro- and nanoscale pattern can be transferred to the silicon in a single etching step by either wet or dry etching techniques. (C) 1996 American Institute of Physics....

  3. Ionospheric wave and irregularity measurements using passive radio astronomy techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, W.C.; Mahoney, M.J.; Jacobson, A.R.; Knowles, S.H.

    1988-01-01

    The observation of midlatitude structures using passive radio astronomy techniques is discussed, with particular attention being given to the low-frequency radio telescope at the Clark Lake Radio Observatory. The present telescope operates in the 10-125-MHz frequency range. Observations of the ionosphere at separations of a few kilometers to a few hundreds of kilometers by the lines of sight to sources are possible, allowing the determination of the amplitude, wavelength, direction of propagation, and propagation speed of ionospheric waves. Data are considered on large-scale ionospheric gradients and the two-dimensional shapes and sizes of ionospheric irregularities. 10 references

  4. A passive infrared ice detection technique for helicopter applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dershowitz, Adam L.; Hansman, R. John, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A technique has been developed, and successfully tested, to detect icing remotely on helicopter rotor blades. Using passive infrared (IR) thermometry it is possible to detect the warming caused by latent heat released as supercooled water freezes. During icing, the ice accretion region on the leading edge of the blade is found to be warmer than the uniced trailing edge resulting in a chordwise temperature profile characteristic of icing. Preliminary tests, using an IR Thermal video system, were conducted on a static model in the NASA Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) for a variety of wet (glaze) and dry (rime) ice conditions. A prototype detector system was built consisting of a single point IR pyrometer, and experiments were run on a small scale rotor model. Using this prototype detector, the characteristic chordwise temperature profiles were again observed for a range of icing conditions. Several signal processing methods were investigated, to allow automatic recognition of the icing signature. Additionally, several implementation issues were considered. Based on both the static and subscale rotor tests, where ice was successfully detected, the passive IR technique appears to be promising for rotor ice detection.

  5. Modern techniques of surface science

    CERN Document Server

    Woodruff, D Phil

    2016-01-01

    This fully revised, updated and reorganised third edition provides a thorough introduction to the characterisation techniques used in surface science and nanoscience today. Each chapter brings together and compares the different techniques used to address a particular research question, including how to determine the surface composition, surface structure, surface electronic structure, surface microstructure at different length scales (down to sub-molecular), and the molecular character of adsorbates and their adsorption or reaction properties. Readers will easily understand the relative strengths and limitations of the techniques available to them and, ultimately, will be able to select the most suitable techniques for their own particular research purposes. This is an essential resource for researchers and practitioners performing materials analysis, and for senior undergraduate students looking to gain a clear understanding of the underlying principles and applications of the different characterisation tec...

  6. Surface Passivation of CIGS Solar Cells Using Gallium Oxide

    KAUST Repository

    Garud, Siddhartha

    2018-02-27

    This work proposes gallium oxide grown by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition, as a surface passivation material at the CdS buffer interface of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells. In preliminary experiments, a metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structure is used to compare aluminium oxide, gallium oxide, and hafnium oxide as passivation layers at the CIGS-CdS interface. The findings suggest that gallium oxide on CIGS may show a density of positive charges and qualitatively, the least interface trap density. Subsequent solar cell results with an estimated 0.5 nm passivation layer show an substantial absolute improvement of 56 mV in open-circuit voltage (VOC), 1 mA cm−2 in short-circuit current density (JSC), and 2.6% in overall efficiency as compared to a reference (with the reference showing 8.5% under AM 1.5G).

  7. Potential dependence of surface crystal structure of iron passive films in borate buffer solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Huihua; Nanjo, Hiroshi; Qian, Pu; Santosa, Arifin; Ishikawa, Ikuo; Kurata, Yoshiaki

    2007-01-01

    The effect of passivation potential on surface crystal structure, apparent thickness and passivity of oxide films formed on pure iron prepared by plasma sputter deposition was investigated. The crystallinity was improved with passivation potential and the width of atomically flat terraces was expanded to 6 nm when passivating at 750 mV for 15 min, as observed by ex situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) after aging in air (<30% RH). Apparent thickness and passivity are linearly dependent on passivation potential. The former weakly depends on passivation duration, the latter strongly depends on passivation duration. This is well explained by the correlation between crystal structure and passivity

  8. A charge transport study in diamond, surface passivated by high-k dielectric oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovi, Kiran Kumar, E-mail: KiranKumar.Kovi@angstrom.uu.se; Majdi, Saman; Gabrysch, Markus; Isberg, Jan [Division for Electricity, Department of Engineering Sciences, Box 534, Uppsala University, Uppsala SE-751 21 (Sweden)

    2014-11-17

    The recent progress in the growth of high-quality single-crystalline diamond films has sparked interest in the realization of efficient diamond power electronic devices. However, finding a suitable passivation is essential to improve the reliability and electrical performance of devices. In the current work, high-k dielectric materials such as aluminum oxide and hafnium oxide were deposited by atomic layer deposition on intrinsic diamond as a surface passivation layer. The hole transport properties in the diamond films were evaluated and compared to unpassivated films using the lateral time-of-flight technique. An enhancement of the near surface hole mobility in diamond films of up to 27% is observed when using aluminum oxide passivation.

  9. Surface analysis the principal techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Vickerman, John C

    2009-01-01

    This completely updated and revised second edition of Surface Analysis: The Principal Techniques, deals with the characterisation and understanding of the outer layers of substrates, how they react, look and function which are all of interest to surface scientists. Within this comprehensive text, experts in each analysis area introduce the theory and practice of the principal techniques that have shown themselves to be effective in both basic research and in applied surface analysis. Examples of analysis are provided to facilitate the understanding of this topic and to show readers how they c

  10. Passive anti-frosting surfaces using microscopic ice arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Farzad; Nath, Saurabh; Iliff, Grady; Boreyko, Jonathan

    2017-11-01

    Despite exceptional advances in surface chemistry and micro/nanofabrication, no engineered surface has been able to passively suppress the in-plane growth of frost occurring in humid, subfreezing environments. Motivated by this, and inspired by the fact that ice itself can evaporate nearby liquid water droplets, we present a passive anti-frosting surface in which the majority of the surface remains dry indefinitely. We fabricated an aluminum surface exhibiting an array of small metallic fins, where a wicking micro-groove was laser-cut along the top of each fin to produce elevated water ``stripes'' that freeze into ice. As the saturation vapor pressure of ice is less than that of supercooled liquid water, the ice stripes serve as overlapping humidity sinks that siphon all nearby moisture from the air and prevent condensation and frost from forming anywhere else on the surface. Our experimental results show that regions between stripes remain dry even after 24 hours of operation under humid and supercooled conditions. We believe that the presented anti-frosting technology has the potential to help solve the world's multi-billion dollar frosting problem that adversely affects transportation, power generation, and HVAC systems.

  11. The protective nature of passivation films on zinc: surface charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muster, Tim H.; Cole, Ivan S.

    2004-01-01

    The influence of oxide surface charge on the corrosion performance of zinc metals was investigated. Oxidised zinc species (zinc oxide, zinc hydroxychloride, zinc hydroxysulfate and zinc hydroxycarbonate) with chemical compositions similar to those produced on zinc during atmospheric corrosion were formed as particles from aqueous solution, and as passive films deposited onto zinc powder, and rolled zinc, surfaces. Synthesized oxides were characterised by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and electron probe X-ray microanalysis. The zeta potentials of various oxide particles, as determined by microelectrophoresis, are reported as a function of pH. Particulates containing a majority of zinc hydroxycarbonate and zinc hydroxysulfate crystallites were found to possess a negative surface charge below pH 6, whilst zinc oxide-hydroxide and zinc hydroxychloride crystallites possessed isoelectric points (IEP's) higher than pH 8. The ability of chloride species to pass through a bed of 3 μm diameter zinc powder was found to increase for surfaces possessing carboxy and sulfate surface species, suggesting that negatively charged surfaces can aid in the repulsion of chloride ions. Electrochemical analysis of the open-circuit potential as a function of time at a fixed pH of 6.5 showed that the chemical composition of passive films on zinc plates influenced the ability of chloride ions to access anodic sites for periods of approximately 1 h

  12. A comparison between active and passive techniques for measurements of radon emanation factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Coto, I. [Dept. Fisica Aplicada, University of Huelva, Huelva (Spain)], E-mail: Israel.lopez@dfa.uhu.es; Mas, J.L. [Dept. de Fisica Aplicada I, E.U.P., University of Seville, Seville (Spain); San Miguel, E.G.; Bolivar, J.P. [Dept. Fisica Aplicada, University of Huelva, Huelva (Spain); Sengupta, D. [Department of Geology and Geophysics, I.I.T. Kharagpur, West Bengal (India)

    2009-05-15

    Some radon related parameters have been determined through two different techniques (passive and active) in soil and phosphogypsum samples. Emanation factors determined through these techniques show a good agreement for soil samples while for phosphogympsum samples appear large discrepancies. In this paper, these discrepancies are analyzed and explained if non-controlled radon leakages in the passive technique are taken into account.

  13. Structure and stability of surface passivation layers on semiconductor materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluth, George Jonathan

    The structure and stability of passivating layers on silicon surfaces have been examined on the molecular level using the methods of surface science. Hydrogen-terminated surfaces were prepared through wet chemical treatment with ammonium fluoride. The oxidation of these surfaces was studied using high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS), which showed that oxidation occurred through oxygen insertion in silicon backbonds, while the hydrogen termination remained intact. Oxygen was observed in both the surface layer and bulk layers, suggesting that initial oxidation was not restricted to layer-by-layer growth. Because the surface did oxidize with time, other passivating treatments, specifically self-assembled monolayers, were examined. The thermal stability of alkylsiloxane monolayers on oxidized Si(100) was studied in vacuum. Using HREELS it was found that the monolayers were stable up to 740 K. Above that temperature, they began to decompose through cleavage of C-C bonds, resulting in a reduction in chain length. The thermal stability of alkyl monolayers, which form directly on silicon without requiring an oxide layer, was also examined. These monolayers were stable to 620 K, significantly lower than the alkylsiloxane monolayers. Desorption was accompanied by the appearance of Si-H bonds, suggesting that desorption took place through a hydrogen elimination reaction. The thermal behavior of these two different monolayers highlighted the importance of bonding between the surface and the chains. The bonding of alkylsiloxane monolayers was examined in more detail by forming them on both SiOsb2 and Sisb3Nsb4. It was found that cross linking between adjacent head groups was critical to the formation of high quality monolayers. Bonding between the chains and the surface was of secondary importance, but played a key role in the initial stages of growth, when nucleation occurred. The chemical stability of alkylsiloxane monolayers on oxidized silicon was also

  14. Multi-channel Analysis of Passive Surface Waves (MAPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, J.; Cheng, F. Mr; Xu, Z.; Wang, L.; Shen, C.; Liu, R.; Pan, Y.; Mi, B.; Hu, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Urbanization is an inevitable trend in modernization of human society. In the end of 2013 the Chinese Central Government launched a national urbanization plan—"Three 100 Million People", which aggressively and steadily pushes forward urbanization. Based on the plan, by 2020, approximately 100 million people from rural areas will permanently settle in towns, dwelling conditions of about 100 million people in towns and villages will be improved, and about 100 million people in the central and western China will permanently settle in towns. China's urbanization process will run at the highest speed in the urbanization history of China. Environmentally friendly, non-destructive and non-invasive geophysical assessment method has played an important role in the urbanization process in China. Because human noise and electromagnetic field due to industrial life, geophysical methods already used in urban environments (gravity, magnetics, electricity, seismic) face great challenges. But humanity activity provides an effective source of passive seismic methods. Claerbout pointed out that wavefileds that are received at one point with excitation at the other point can be reconstructed by calculating the cross-correlation of noise records at two surface points. Based on this idea (cross-correlation of two noise records) and the virtual source method, we proposed Multi-channel Analysis of Passive Surface Waves (MAPS). MAPS mainly uses traffic noise recorded with a linear receiver array. Because Multi-channel Analysis of Surface Waves can produces a shear (S) wave velocity model with high resolution in shallow part of the model, MPAS combines acquisition and processing of active source and passive source data in a same flow, which does not require to distinguish them. MAPS is also of ability of real-time quality control of noise recording that is important for near-surface applications in urban environment. The numerical and real-world examples demonstrated that MAPS can be

  15. Energy Conservation and Passive Solar Techniques in Campus Renovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probasco, Jack; And Others

    1981-01-01

    The analysis of a building from an energy conservation and passive solar potential has three aspects: building envelope, landscaping, and room utilization. Typical conservation and solar control modifications are listed. (Author/MLF)

  16. Surface modification of passive iron by alkyl-phosphonic acid layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paszternak, A. [Chemical Research Center of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, 1025 Budapest, Pusztaszeri ut 59-67 (Hungary); Stichleutner, S. [Research Group for Nuclear Methods in Structural Chemistry, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Chemistry, Eoetvoes Lorand University, 1117 Budapest, Pazmany P. setany 1/a (Hungary); Felhosi, I.; Keresztes, Z. [Chemical Research Center of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, 1025 Budapest, Pusztaszeri ut 59-67 (Hungary); Nagy, F.; Kuzmann, E.; Vertes, A.; Homonnay, Z. [Research Group for Nuclear Methods in Structural Chemistry, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Chemistry, Eoetvoes Lorand University, 1117 Budapest, Pazmany P. setany 1/a (Hungary); Peto, G. [Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, 1121 Budapest, Konkoly Thege ut 29-33 (Hungary); Kalman, E. [Chemical Research Center of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, 1025 Budapest, Pusztaszeri ut 59-67 (Hungary)], E-mail: erika.kalman@chemres.hu

    2007-12-01

    Phosphonate layer formation on passive iron surface has been investigated by electrochemical, conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy (CEMS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. Electrochemical methods revealed that the prepassivation of iron surface results in stabilization of the phosphonate layer exhibiting favorable corrosion resistance. The rate of anodic dissolution is continuously decreasing due to the time-dependent formation of a protective phosphonate layer. The large R{sub ct} values of 1-20 M{omega} cm{sup 2} indicate rather high blocking effect of metal dissolution by the phosphonate layer. The phosphonate layer formation has been also followed by the decrease of capacitance. CEMS investigations were carried out to evaluate the differences in the composition of the passive layer as a result of the phosphonate treatment. Moessbauer spectroscopy indicated the presence of iron phosphonate. Changes in morphology due to the phosphonate layer formation have been observed.

  17. Light Enhanced Hydrofluoric Acid Passivation: A Sensitive Technique for Detecting Bulk Silicon Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Nicholas E.

    2016-01-01

    A procedure to measure the bulk lifetime (>100 µsec) of silicon wafers by temporarily attaining a very high level of surface passivation when immersing the wafers in hydrofluoric acid (HF) is presented. By this procedure three critical steps are required to attain the bulk lifetime. Firstly, prior to immersing silicon wafers into HF, they are chemically cleaned and subsequently etched in 25% tetramethylammonium hydroxide. Secondly, the chemically treated wafers are then placed into a large plastic container filled with a mixture of HF and hydrochloric acid, and then centered over an inductive coil for photoconductance (PC) measurements. Thirdly, to inhibit surface recombination and measure the bulk lifetime, the wafers are illuminated at 0.2 suns for 1 min using a halogen lamp, the illumination is switched off, and a PC measurement is immediately taken. By this procedure, the characteristics of bulk silicon defects can be accurately determined. Furthermore, it is anticipated that a sensitive RT surface passivation technique will be imperative for examining bulk silicon defects when their concentration is low (<1012 cm-3). PMID:26779939

  18. Backscattering technique to surface inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anjos, M.J. dos; Lopes, R.T.

    1989-01-01

    A new surface inspection system, starting of the backscattering of the gamma radiation is described. A cesium 137 source of 7,4x10 10 Bq (2Ci) and one cintillation detector are used. One calibration curve of the system was obtained. This technique can be very useful when the acess to one of the side of the object in inspection is limited. The scattering angle choosed was 115 0 . The object used was composed of aluminium, brass and stainless steel. The localization of defects is simple and ummediate. (V.R.B.)

  19. Surface Passivation Studies on n+pp+ Bifacial Solar Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhaila Sepeai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bifacial solar cell is a specially designed solar cell for the production of electricity from both sides of the solar cell. It is an active field of research to make photovoltaics (PV more competitive by increasing its efficiency and lowering its costs. We developed an n+pp+ structure for the bifacial solar cell. The fabrication used phosphorus-oxy-trichloride (POCl3 diffusion to form the emitter and Al diffusion using conventional screen printing to produce the back surface field (BSF. The n+pp+ bifacial solar cell was a sandwiched structure of antireflective coatings on both sides, Argentum (Ag as a front contact and Argentum/Aluminum (Ag/Al as a back contact. This paper reports the solar cell performance with different surface passivation or antireflecting coatings (ARC. Silicon nitride (SiN deposited by Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD, thermally grown silicon dioxide (SiO2, PECVD-SiO2, and SiO2/SiN stack were used as ARC. The efficiency obtained for the best bifacial solar cell having SiN as the ARC is 8.32% for front surface illumination and 3.21% for back surface illumination.

  20. A REVIEW ON HEAT DISSIPATING PASSIVE COOLING TECHNIQUES FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS AT TROPICAL REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. PRAKASH

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Thermal comfort is very essential for the occupants in a residential building without air-conditioning system especially in tropical region. Passive cooling is the only solution to achieve the required thermal comfort without sacrificing occupant’s health with zero energy consumption. All passive cooling techniques are broadly categorized under (i solar and heat protection, (ii heat modulation and (iii heat dissipation techniques. This paper reviews various techniques and advancements in passive cooling of buildings through heat dissipation approach. In the heat dissipation approach, the heat generated from various sources are reduced by natural ventilation and natural cooling.

  1. A study of the sensitivity of long-range passive ranging techniques to atmospheric scintillation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Villiers, J

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to quantify and improve the sensitivity of monocular passive ranging techniques in sequences that are degraded by the the quasi-periodic inter frame motion and localised blurring associated with atmospheric scintillation. Ranges from...

  2. The impact of land surface temperature on soil moisture anomaly detection from passive microwave observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Parinussa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available For several years passive microwave observations have been used to retrieve soil moisture from the Earth's surface. Low frequency observations have the most sensitivity to soil moisture, therefore the current Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS and future Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP satellite missions observe the Earth's surface in the L-band frequency. In the past, several satellite sensors such as the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-EOS (AMSR-E and WindSat have been used to retrieve surface soil moisture using multi-channel observations obtained at higher microwave frequencies. While AMSR-E and WindSat lack an L-band channel, they are able to leverage multi-channel microwave observations to estimate additional land surface parameters. In particular, the availability of Ka-band observations allows AMSR-E and WindSat to obtain coincident surface temperature estimates required for the retrieval of surface soil moisture. In contrast, SMOS and SMAP carry only a single frequency radiometer and therefore lack an instrument suited to estimate the physical temperature of the Earth. Instead, soil moisture algorithms from these new generation satellites rely on ancillary sources of surface temperature (e.g. re-analysis or near real time data from weather prediction centres. A consequence of relying on such ancillary data is the need for temporal and spatial interpolation, which may introduce uncertainties. Here, two newly-developed, large-scale soil moisture evaluation techniques, the triple collocation (TC approach and the Rvalue data assimilation approach, are applied to quantify the global-scale impact of replacing Ka-band based surface temperature retrievals with Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA surface temperature output on the accuracy of WindSat and AMSR-E based surface soil moisture retrievals. Results demonstrate that under sparsely vegetated conditions, the use of

  3. Optical near-field lithography on hydrogen-passivated silicon surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Steen; Müllenborn, Matthias; Birkelund, Karen

    1996-01-01

    We report on a novel lithography technique for patterning of hydrogen-passivated amorphous silicon surfaces. A reflection mode scanning near-field optical microscope with uncoated fiber probes has been used to locally oxidize a thin amorphous silicon layer. Lines of 110 nm in width, induced...... by the optical near field, were observed after etching in potassium hydroxide. The uncoated fibers can also induce oxidation without light exposure, in a manner similar to an atomic force microscope, and linewidths of 50 nm have been achieved this way. (C) 1996 American Institute of Physics....

  4. Monocrystalline silicon surface passivation by Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/porous silicon combined treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Rabha, M., E-mail: rabha2222@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de Photovoltaïque, Centre de Recherches et des Technologies de l’Energie, Technopole de Borj-Cédria, BP 95, 2050 Hammam-Lif (Tunisia); Salem, M. [Laboratoire de Photovoltaïque, Centre de Recherches et des Technologies de l’Energie, Technopole de Borj-Cédria, BP 95, 2050 Hammam-Lif (Tunisia); El Khakani, M.A. [Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique (INRS), 1650, Blvd. Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Québec J3X 1S2, 6 Canada (Canada); Bessais, B. [Laboratoire de Photovoltaïque, Centre de Recherches et des Technologies de l’Energie, Technopole de Borj-Cédria, BP 95, 2050 Hammam-Lif (Tunisia); Gaidi, M. [Laboratoire de Photovoltaïque, Centre de Recherches et des Technologies de l’Energie, Technopole de Borj-Cédria, BP 95, 2050 Hammam-Lif (Tunisia); Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique (INRS), 1650, Blvd. Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Québec J3X 1S2, 6 Canada (Canada); Emirates college of technology, Millennium Tower, Sheikh Hamdan Street, P.O. Box: 41009, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2013-05-15

    In this paper, we report on the effect of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/porous silicon combined treatment on the surface passivation of monocrystalline silicon (c-Si). Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films with a thickness of 5, 20 and 80 nm are deposited by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). It was demonstrated that Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating is a very interesting low temperature solution for surface passivation. The level of surface passivation is determined by techniques based on photoconductance and FTIR. As a result, the effective minority carrier lifetime increase from 2 μs to 7 μs at a minority carrier density (Δn) of 1 × 10{sup 15} cm{sup −3} and the reflectivity reduce from 28% to about 7% after Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/PS coating.

  5. Effectiveness of passive stretching versus hold relax technique in flexibility of hamstring muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gauri Shankar

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To compare the effectiveness of passive stretching and hold relax technique in the flexibility of hamstring muscle. Methods: A total of 80 normal healthy female subjects between age group 20-30 years referred to the department of physiotherapy, Sumandeep Vidyapeeth University, sampling method being convenient sampling. The subjects were randomly divided in two groups i.e. passive stretching group (n=40 and PNF group (n=40 and given passive stretching and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation technique respectively. Active knee extension range was measured before and after the intervention by goniometer. Results: t test showed a highly significant (p=0.000 increase in range of motion in PNF group. Conclusion: Proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation technique is more effective in increasing hamstring flexibility than the passive stretching.

  6. A Ga 2O 3 passivation technique compatible with GaAs device processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, M.; Passlack, M.; Mannaerts, J. P.; Harris, T. D.; Schnoes, M. L.; Opila, R. L.; Krautter, H. W.

    1997-04-01

    Electronic and structural properties of ex-situ fabricated Ga 2O 3GaAs interfaces have been investigated. The fabrication comprises thermal desorption of native oxide and subsequent Ga 2O 3 film deposition on (100) GaAs wafers in ultra-high vacuum. Interfacial x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed the absence of As xO y indicating thermodynamic stability of the oxide-GaAs interface. A low interface recombination velocity S of 9000 cm/s equivalent to an interface state density Dit in the upper 10 10 cm -2 eV -1 range has been inferred. The technique provides excellent passivation for GaAs wafers or surfaces exposed to room air and/or processing environments during fabrication of devices such as FETs, HBTs, etc.

  7. Surface passivation of high-purity germanium gamma-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexiev, D.; Butcher, K.S.A.; Edmondson, M.; Lawson, E.M.

    1993-01-01

    The experimental work consists of two parts. The first involves fabrication of hyper-pure germanium gamma ray detectors using standard surface treatment, chemical etchings and containment in a suitable cryostat. Then, after cooling the detectors to 77 K, γ-ray emissions from radioisotopes are resolved, resolution, depletion depth, V R versus I R characteristics and /N A -N D / of the germanium are measured. The second part of the work involves investigation of surface states in an effort to achieve long-term stability of operating characteristics. Several methods are used: plasma hydrogenation, a-Si and a-Ge pinch-off effect and simple oxidation. A-Ge and a-Si thicknesses were measured using Rutherford backscattering techniques; surface states were measured with deep level transient spectroscopy and diode reverse current versus reverse voltage plots. Some scanning electron microscope measurements were used in determining major film contaminants during backscattering of a-Si and a-Ge films. Surface passivation studies revealed unexpected hole trapping defects generated when a-Ge:H film is applied. The a-Si:H films were found to be mechanically strong, no defect traps were found and preliminary results suggest that such films will be good passivants. 14 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs., 13 ills

  8. Selection and Assessment of Passive Cooling Techniques for Residential Buildings in Oman Using a Bioclimatic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Al-Azri

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Passive cooling is an ancient technique used in air reconditioning and ventilation. Despite its historical use, its relevance in building design has never ceased. To be sure, with the increasing interest in saving energy and preserving the environment, passive cooling stands out as a sustainable possibility. However, this is not always a viable option, and its practicality is determined mainly by the system's functionality, the type of activities involved in the space to be cooled, and the surrounding area's bioclimatic variables (i.e. temperature, humidity, and diurnal temperature differences. In areas under consideration for passive cooling systems, bioclimatic charts are helpful. Comprehensive charts, in which yearlong hourly meteorological data are projected on a psychrometric chart, help to determine the fits required by a particular location. In this paper, psychrometric charts were developed for eight locations in Oman, and a systematic procedure on the selection and viability of using passive cooling techniques is provided through meteorological data. Givoni's passive cooling zones are used and the applicability of each technique is quantified. The eight study locations are widely scattered around and Oman, and possess great geographical diversity. The presented results can help delineate the applicability of each passive cooling technique for residential buildings at each of the study locations and their proximities.

  9. Ambient plasma treatment of silicon wafers for surface passivation recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jia; Prinz, Markus; Markert, Thomas; Aberle, Armin G.; Mueller, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    In this work, the effect of an ambient plasma treatment powered by compressed dry air on the passivation quality of silicon wafers coated with intrinsic amorphous silicon sub-oxide is investigated. While long-time storage deteriorates the effective lifetime of all samples, a short ambient plasma treatment improves their passivation qualities. By studying the influence of the plasma treatment parameters on the passivation layers, an optimized process condition was identified which even boosted the passivation quality beyond its original value obtained immediately after deposition. On the other hand, the absence of stringent requirement on gas precursors, vacuum condition and longtime processing makes the ambient plasma treatment an excellent candidate to replace conventional thermal annealing in industrial heterojunction solar cell production.

  10. TOPICAL REVIEW: Current status and issues in the surface passivation technology of mercury cadmium telluride infrared detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnihotri, O. P.; Musca, C. A.; Faraone, L.

    1998-08-01

    Surface passivation has been recognized as a crucial step in the fabrication of mercury cadmium telluride photoconductive as well as photovoltaic detectors. The subject has attracted considerable attention in the past and several reviews existed by 1991. The subject matter, however, received added impetus with the development of techniques like MOCVD and MBE and recently there has been considerable work on MCT passivation using in situ grown II-VI semiconductors. In this report, we have tried to give the present status and identify the issues particularly with reference to the recent work on the subject.

  11. Dispersion analysis of passive surface-wave noise generated during hydraulic-fracturing operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forghani-Arani, Farnoush; Willis, Mark; Snieder, Roel; Haines, Seth S.; Behura, Jyoti; Batzle, Mike; Davidson, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Surface-wave dispersion analysis is useful for estimating near-surface shear-wave velocity models, designing receiver arrays, and suppressing surface waves. Here, we analyze whether passive seismic noise generated during hydraulic-fracturing operations can be used to extract surface-wave dispersion characteristics. Applying seismic interferometry to noise measurements, we extract surface waves by cross-correlating several minutes of passive records; this approach is distinct from previous studies that used hours or days of passive records for cross-correlation. For comparison, we also perform dispersion analysis for an active-source array that has some receivers in common with the passive array. The active and passive data show good agreement in the dispersive character of the fundamental-mode surface-waves. For the higher mode surface waves, however, active and passive data resolve the dispersive properties at different frequency ranges. To demonstrate an application of dispersion analysis, we invert the observed surface-wave dispersion characteristics to determine the near-surface, one-dimensional shear-wave velocity.

  12. Application of Linear Prediction Technique to Passive Synthetic Aperture Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou Yunshan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A method for the synthesis of an aperture with improved angular resolution and array gain is described. The proposed method explores the merit of linear prediction technique to improve the performance of conventional ETAM (extended towed array measurements method. Previous efforts to improve the ETAM method generally focused on how to get more accurate estimation of overlap correlator, with an aim to reduce bearing estimation variance. In this paper, however, we discuss how to further improve the angular resolution when the effective synthetic aperture is rather limited. We resort to linear prediction technique to further extend the synthetic aperture obtained by ETAM, which produces a much longer virtual aperture. Results from simulations and lake experiment showed that the proposed LP-ETAM method achieved better angular resolution than ETAM.

  13. Application of Linear Prediction Technique to Passive Synthetic Aperture Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yunshan; Huang, Jianguo; Jiang, Min; Jin, Yong

    2010-12-01

    A method for the synthesis of an aperture with improved angular resolution and array gain is described. The proposed method explores the merit of linear prediction technique to improve the performance of conventional ETAM (extended towed array measurements) method. Previous efforts to improve the ETAM method generally focused on how to get more accurate estimation of overlap correlator, with an aim to reduce bearing estimation variance. In this paper, however, we discuss how to further improve the angular resolution when the effective synthetic aperture is rather limited. We resort to linear prediction technique to further extend the synthetic aperture obtained by ETAM, which produces a much longer virtual aperture. Results from simulations and lake experiment showed that the proposed LP-ETAM method achieved better angular resolution than ETAM.

  14. Application of Linear Prediction Technique to Passive Synthetic Aperture Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Yong Jin; Min Jiang; Yunshan Hou; Jianguo Huang

    2010-01-01

    A method for the synthesis of an aperture with improved angular resolution and array gain is described. The proposed method explores the merit of linear prediction technique to improve the performance of conventional ETAM (extended towed array measurements) method. Previous efforts to improve the ETAM method generally focused on how to get more accurate estimation of overlap correlator, with an aim to reduce bearing estimation variance. In this paper, however, we discuss how to further impro...

  15. Passive control of flow structure interaction between a sphere and free-surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akilli Huseyin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Flow characteristics for both a smooth and a vented sphere such as velocity vectors, patterns of streamlines, vorticity contours, stream-wise fluctuations, cross-stream velocity fluctuations and Reynolds stress correlations between a sphere and free-surface for various submerged ratio at Re =5,000 are studied by using dye visualization and the particle image velocimetry technique. Passive control of flow structure interaction between sphere and free surface was examined by using a modified geometry which has a 15% sphere diameter hole passing through the sphere equator. Both of the spheres were separately placed beneath the free surface with different positions from touching to the free surface to two sphere diameters below the free surface. It is demonstrated that reattachment point of the separated flow to the free surface varies for both of the sphere cases as the sphere position alters vertically through the water flow while the flow structure for the vented sphere occurs considerably symmetrical due to forming of a pair of counter-rotating ring vortices.

  16. Silicon surface passivation using thin HfO2 films by atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gope, Jhuma; Vandana; Batra, Neha; Panigrahi, Jagannath; Singh, Rajbir; Maurya, K.K.; Srivastava, Ritu; Singh, P.K.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • HfO 2 films using thermal ALD are studied for silicon surface passivation. • As-deposited thin film (∼8 nm) shows better passivation with surface recombination velocity (SRV) <100 cm/s. • Annealing improves passivation quality with SRV ∼20 cm/s for ∼8 nm film. - Abstract: Hafnium oxide (HfO 2 ) is a potential material for equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) scaling in microelectronics; however, its surface passivation properties particularly on silicon are not well explored. This paper reports investigation on passivation properties of thermally deposited thin HfO 2 films by atomic layer deposition system (ALD) on silicon surface. As-deposited pristine film (∼8 nm) shows better passivation with <100 cm/s surface recombination velocity (SRV) vis-à-vis thicker films. Further improvement in passivation quality is achieved with annealing at 400 °C for 10 min where the SRV reduces to ∼20 cm/s. Conductance measurements show that the interface defect density (D it ) increases with film thickness whereas its value decreases after annealing. XRR data corroborate with the observations made by FTIR and SRV data.

  17. Techniques for removing contaminated concrete surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halter, J.M.; Sullivan, R.G.

    1981-01-01

    This discussion compares various techniques that have been used to clean concrete surfaces by removing the surface. Three techniques which have been investigated by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory for removing surfaces are also described: the water cannon, the concrete spaller, and high-pressure water jet. The equipment was developed with the assumption that removal of the top 1/8 to 1/4 in. of surface would remove most of the contamination. If the contamination has gone into cracks or deep voids in the surface, the removal processes can be repeated until the surface is acceptable

  18. Improved CVD Techniques for Depositing Passivation Layers of ICs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-10-01

    Gases. ... 216 Effects of Substrate Surface . . . . . . eco . yt . . . . . 216 Applicability of Results to Other CVD Reco ytms .. . 216 Post-Deposition...October 11, - eCo .,1,Nolp.4,ardNok, ZE6 1970). 193) 363. D. S. Zoroglu and L. E. Cak EE~rf5 358, Staff Article, "How Phosphorus Abets IC Destruc- Eeto...lmghthroghpt, b sipleIn these reactors, thke substrate wafers are placed and qafv to operate, and easy to maintainl. Tile captal cst o theo lkptlnt

  19. Technique for measuring very high surface velocities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maron, Y.

    1977-01-01

    An interferometric technique for measuring displacements of surfaces moving at velocities in the range of a few millimeters per microsecond is presented. The Doppler shift of frequency of light scattered from such surfaces is too high to be detectable by known devices. The present technique is based upon monitoring the signal resulting from the interference between two beams reflected from the surface at different incidence angles. Measurement systems for specularly as well as diffusely reflecting surfaces are described. Light source with very modest temporal coherence delivering about 100 mw power is required. The accuracy of the technique is discussed. (author)

  20. Chalcogen passivation of GaAs(1 0 0) surfaces: theoretical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szucs, B.; Hajnal, Z.; Frauenheim, Th.; Gonzalez, C.; Ortega, J.; Perez, R.; Flores, F.

    2003-01-01

    In this work, structural and electronic properties of Se- and S-passivated GaAs(1 0 0) surface reconstructions are investigated by density functional theory (DFT) based methods. We have performed total energy minimization of several model geometries of the reconstructed surfaces at different stoichiometry. The common feature is the appearance of a chalcogen layer on top of the Ga terminated surface, forming a Ga-chalcogenid like monolayer. In the case of selenium (Se), monomeric first layer formation is predicted, while in extrem chemically circumstances the sulphur (S) passivated surface can also reconstruct forming S-dimers

  1. Nonlinear optical techniques for surface studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Y.R.

    1981-09-01

    Recent effort in developing nonlinear optical techniques for surface studies is reviewed. Emphasis is on monolayer detection of adsorbed molecules on surfaces. It is shown that surface coherent antiStokes Raman scattering (CARS) with picosecond pulses has the sensitivity of detecting submonolayer of molecules. On the other hand, second harmonic or sum-frequency generation is also sensitive enough to detect molecular monolayers. Surface-enhanced nonlinear optical effects on some rough metal surfaces have been observed. This facilitates the detection of molecular monolayers on such surfaces, and makes the study of molecular adsorption at a liquid-metal interface feasible. Advantages and disadvantages of the nonlinear optical techniques for surface studies are discussed

  2. Surface-Passivated AlGaN Nanowires for Enhanced Luminescence of Ultraviolet Light Emitting Diodes

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Haiding

    2017-12-19

    Spontaneously-grown, self-aligned AlGaN nanowire ultraviolet light emitting diodes still suffer from low efficiency partially because of the strong surface recombination caused by surface states, i.e., oxidized surface and high density surface states. Several surface passivation methods have been introduced to reduce surface non-radiative recombination by using complex and toxic chemicals. Here, we present an effective method to suppress such undesirable surface recombination of the AlGaN nanowires via diluted potassium hydroxide (KOH) solution; a commonly used chemical process in semiconductor fabrication which is barely used as surface passivation solution in self-assembled nitride-based nanowires. The transmission electron microscopy investigation on the samples reveals almost intact nanowire structures after the passivation process. We demonstrated an approximately 49.7% enhancement in the ultraviolet light output power after 30-s KOH treatment on AlGaN nanowires grown on titanium-coated silicon substrates. We attribute such a remarkable enhancement to the removal of the surface dangling bonds and oxidized nitrides (Ga-O or Al-O bonds) at the surface as we observe the change of the carrier lifetime before and after the passivation. Thus, our results highlight the possibility of employing this process for the realization of high performance nanowire UV emitters.

  3. A new structure for comparing surface passivation materials of GaAs solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desalvo, Gregory C.; Barnett, Allen M.

    1989-01-01

    The surface recombination velocity (S sub rec) for bare GaAs is typically as high as 10 to the 6th power to 10 to the 7th power cm/sec, which dramatically lowers the efficiency of GaAs solar cells. Early attempts to circumvent this problem by making an ultra thin junction (xj less than .1 micron) proved unsuccessful when compared to lowering S sub rec by surface passivation. Present day GaAs solar cells use an GaAlAs window layer to passivate the top surface. The advantages of GaAlAs in surface passivation are its high bandgap energy and lattice matching to GaAs. Although GaAlAs is successful in reducing the surface recombination velocity, it has other inherent problems of chemical instability (Al readily oxidizes) and ohmic contact formation. The search for new, more stable window layer materials requires a means to compare their surface passivation ability. Therefore, a device structure is needed to easily test the performance of different passivating candidates. Such a test device is described.

  4. Surface passivation of GaAs nanowires by the atomic layer deposition of AlN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shtrom, I. V., E-mail: igorstrohm@mail.ru; Bouravleuv, A. D. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Samsonenko, Yu. B.; Khrebtov, A. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg National Research Academic University—Nanotechnology Research and Education Center (Russian Federation); Soshnikov, I. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Reznik, R. R.; Cirlin, G. E., E-mail: cirlin@beam.ioffe.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg National Research Academic University—Nanotechnology Research and Education Center (Russian Federation); Dhaka, V.; Perros, A.; Lipsanen, H. [Aalto University (Finland)

    2016-12-15

    It is shown that the atomic layer deposition of thin AlN layers can be used to passivate the surface states of GaAs nanowires synthesized by molecular-beam epitaxy. Studies of the optical properties of samples by low-temperature photoluminescence measurements shows that the photoluminescence-signal intensity can be increased by a factor of up to five by passivating the nanowires with a 25-Å-thick AlN layer.

  5. Bayesian techniques for surface fuel loading estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathy Gray; Robert Keane; Ryan Karpisz; Alyssa Pedersen; Rick Brown; Taylor Russell

    2016-01-01

    A study by Keane and Gray (2013) compared three sampling techniques for estimating surface fine woody fuels. Known amounts of fine woody fuel were distributed on a parking lot, and researchers estimated the loadings using different sampling techniques. An important result was that precise estimates of biomass required intensive sampling for both the planar intercept...

  6. Advanced passivation techniques for Si solar cells with high-κ dielectric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Huijuan; Lin, Tingjui; Letha, Ayra Jagadhamma; Hwang, Huey-Liang; Kyznetsov, Fedor A.; Smirnova, Tamara P.; Saraev, Andrey A.; Kaichev, Vasily V.

    2014-09-01

    Electronic recombination losses at the wafer surface significantly reduce the efficiency of Si solar cells. Surface passivation using a suitable thin dielectric layer can minimize the recombination losses. Herein, advanced passivation using simple materials (Al2O3, HfO2) and their compounds H(Hf)A(Al)O deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) was investigated. The chemical composition of Hf and Al oxide films were determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The XPS depth profiles exhibit continuous uniform dense layers. The ALD-Al2O3 film has been found to provide negative fixed charge (-6.4 × 1011 cm-2), whereas HfO2 film provides positive fixed charge (3.2 × 1012 cm-2). The effective lifetimes can be improved after oxygen gas annealing for 1 min. I-V characteristics of Si solar cells with high-κ dielectric materials as passivation layers indicate that the performance is significantly improved, and ALD-HfO2 film would provide better passivation properties than that of the ALD-Al2O3 film in this research work.

  7. Advanced passivation techniques for Si solar cells with high-κ dielectric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng, Huijuan; Lin, Tingjui; Letha, Ayra Jagadhamma; Hwang, Huey-Liang; Kyznetsov, Fedor A.; Smirnova, Tamara P.; Saraev, Andrey A.; Kaichev, Vasily V.

    2014-01-01

    Electronic recombination losses at the wafer surface significantly reduce the efficiency of Si solar cells. Surface passivation using a suitable thin dielectric layer can minimize the recombination losses. Herein, advanced passivation using simple materials (Al 2 O 3 , HfO 2 ) and their compounds H (Hf) A (Al) O deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) was investigated. The chemical composition of Hf and Al oxide films were determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The XPS depth profiles exhibit continuous uniform dense layers. The ALD-Al 2 O 3 film has been found to provide negative fixed charge (−6.4 × 10 11  cm −2 ), whereas HfO 2 film provides positive fixed charge (3.2 × 10 12  cm −2 ). The effective lifetimes can be improved after oxygen gas annealing for 1 min. I-V characteristics of Si solar cells with high-κ dielectric materials as passivation layers indicate that the performance is significantly improved, and ALD-HfO 2 film would provide better passivation properties than that of the ALD-Al 2 O 3 film in this research work.

  8. Glider-Based Passive Acoustic Monitoring Techniques in the Southern California Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    included: two Seagliders from APL/UW, a Slocum glider and two freely drifting vertically profiling floats from WHOI, a freely drifting float from NOAA...organizations. The Seagliders were able to dive to 1000 m to detect beaked whales, in addition to the Slocum glider from Woods Hole that was equipped with...1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Glider -based Passive Acoustic Monitoring Techniques in

  9. Wettability Switching Techniques on Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verplanck Nicolas

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The wetting properties of superhydrophobic surfaces have generated worldwide research interest. A water drop on these surfaces forms a nearly perfect spherical pearl. Superhydrophobic materials hold considerable promise for potential applications ranging from self cleaning surfaces, completely water impermeable textiles to low cost energy displacement of liquids in lab-on-chip devices. However, the dynamic modification of the liquid droplets behavior and in particular of their wetting properties on these surfaces is still a challenging issue. In this review, after a brief overview on superhydrophobic states definition, the techniques leading to the modification of wettability behavior on superhydrophobic surfaces under specific conditions: optical, magnetic, mechanical, chemical, thermal are discussed. Finally, a focus on electrowetting is made from historical phenomenon pointed out some decades ago on classical planar hydrophobic surfaces to recent breakthrough obtained on superhydrophobic surfaces.

  10. Robust technique allowing manufacturing superoleophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormashenko, Edward; Grynyov, Roman; Chaniel, Gilad; Taitelbaum, Haim; Bormashenko, Yelena

    2013-04-01

    We report the robust technique allowing manufacturing of superhydrophobic and oleophobic (omniphobic) surfaces with industrial grade low density polyethylene. The reported process includes two stages: (1) hot embossing of polyethylene with micro-scaled steel gauzes; (2) treatment of embossed surfaces with cold radiofrequency plasma of tetrafluoromethane. The reported surfaces demonstrate not only pronounced superhydrophobicity but also superoleophobicity. Superoleophobicity results from the hierarchical nano-scaled topography of fluorinated polyethylene surface. The observed superoleophobicity is strengthened by the hydrophobic recovery. The stability of the Cassie wetting regime was studied.

  11. Evaluation of the rockburst potential in longwall coal mining using passive seismic velocity tomography and image subtraction technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Navid

    2017-09-01

    Rockburst is a typical dynamic disaster in underground coal mines which its occurrences relate to the mechanical quality of coal seam and surrounding rock mass and also the condition of stress distribution. The main aim of this paper is to study the potential of rockburst in a longwall coal mine by using of passive seismic velocity tomography and image subtraction technique. For this purpose, first by mounting an array of receivers on the surface above the active panel, the mining-induced seismic data as a passive source for several continuous days were recorded. Then, the three-dimensional tomograms using simultaneous iteration reconstruction technique (SIRT) for each day are created and by employing the velocity filtering, the overstressed zones are detected. In addition, the two-dimensional seismic velocity tomograms in coal seam level by slicing the three-dimensional tomograms are obtained. Then the state of stress changes in successive days by applying the image subtraction technique on these two-dimensional tomograms is considered. The results show that the compilation of filtered three-dimensional tomograms and subtracted images is an appropriate approach for detecting the overstressed zones around the panel and subsequent evaluation of rockburst potential. The research conclusion proves that the applied approach in this study in combination with field observations of rock mass status can effectively identify the rockburst-prone areas during the mining operation and help to improve the safety condition.

  12. Protective capping and surface passivation of III-V nanowires by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhaka, Veer, E-mail: veer.dhaka@aalto.fi; Perros, Alexander; Kakko, Joona-Pekko; Haggren, Tuomas; Lipsanen, Harri [Department of Micro- and Nanosciences, Micronova, Aalto University, P.O. Box 13500, FI-00076 (Finland); Naureen, Shagufta; Shahid, Naeem [Research School of Physics & Engineering, Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 2601 (Australia); Jiang, Hua; Kauppinen, Esko [Department of Applied Physics and Nanomicroscopy Center, Aalto University, P.O. Box 15100, FI-00076 (Finland); Srinivasan, Anand [School of Information and Communication Technology, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Electrum 229, S-164 40 Kista (Sweden)

    2016-01-15

    Low temperature (∼200 °C) grown atomic layer deposition (ALD) films of AlN, TiN, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, GaN, and TiO{sub 2} were tested for protective capping and surface passivation of bottom-up grown III-V (GaAs and InP) nanowires (NWs), and top-down fabricated InP nanopillars. For as-grown GaAs NWs, only the AlN material passivated the GaAs surface as measured by photoluminescence (PL) at low temperatures (15K), and the best passivation was achieved with a few monolayer thick (2Å) film. For InP NWs, the best passivation (∼2x enhancement in room-temperature PL) was achieved with a capping of 2nm thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. All other ALD capping layers resulted in a de-passivation effect and possible damage to the InP surface. Top-down fabricated InP nanopillars show similar passivation effects as InP NWs. In particular, capping with a 2 nm thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer increased the carrier decay time from 251 ps (as-etched nanopillars) to about 525 ps. Tests after six months ageing reveal that the capped nanostructures retain their optical properties. Overall, capping of GaAs and InP NWs with high-k dielectrics AlN and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} provides moderate surface passivation as well as long term protection from oxidation and environmental attack.

  13. Protective capping and surface passivation of III-V nanowires by atomic layer deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veer Dhaka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Low temperature (∼200 °C grown atomic layer deposition (ALD films of AlN, TiN, Al2O3, GaN, and TiO2 were tested for protective capping and surface passivation of bottom-up grown III-V (GaAs and InP nanowires (NWs, and top-down fabricated InP nanopillars. For as-grown GaAs NWs, only the AlN material passivated the GaAs surface as measured by photoluminescence (PL at low temperatures (15K, and the best passivation was achieved with a few monolayer thick (2Å film. For InP NWs, the best passivation (∼2x enhancement in room-temperature PL was achieved with a capping of 2nm thick Al2O3. All other ALD capping layers resulted in a de-passivation effect and possible damage to the InP surface. Top-down fabricated InP nanopillars show similar passivation effects as InP NWs. In particular, capping with a 2 nm thick Al2O3 layer increased the carrier decay time from 251 ps (as-etched nanopillars to about 525 ps. Tests after six months ageing reveal that the capped nanostructures retain their optical properties. Overall, capping of GaAs and InP NWs with high-k dielectrics AlN and Al2O3 provides moderate surface passivation as well as long term protection from oxidation and environmental attack.

  14. Optimization of the Surface Structure on Black Silicon for Surface Passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xiaojie; Zhou, Chunlan; Wang, Wenjing

    2017-03-01

    Black silicon shows excellent anti-reflection and thus is extremely useful for photovoltaic applications. However, its high surface recombination velocity limits the efficiency of solar cells. In this paper, the effective minority carrier lifetime of black silicon is improved by optimizing metal-catalyzed chemical etching (MCCE) method, using an Al2O3 thin film deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) as a passivation layer. Using the spray method to eliminate the impact on the rear side, single-side black silicon was obtained on n-type solar grade silicon wafers. Post-etch treatment with NH4OH/H2O2/H2O mixed solution not only smoothes the surface but also increases the effective minority lifetime from 161 μs of as-prepared wafer to 333 μs after cleaning. Moreover, adding illumination during the etching process results in an improvement in both the numerical value and the uniformity of the effective minority carrier lifetime.

  15. Optimization of the Surface Structure on Black Silicon for Surface Passivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xiaojie; Zhou, Chunlan; Wang, Wenjing

    2017-12-01

    Black silicon shows excellent anti-reflection and thus is extremely useful for photovoltaic applications. However, its high surface recombination velocity limits the efficiency of solar cells. In this paper, the effective minority carrier lifetime of black silicon is improved by optimizing metal-catalyzed chemical etching (MCCE) method, using an Al 2 O 3 thin film deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) as a passivation layer. Using the spray method to eliminate the impact on the rear side, single-side black silicon was obtained on n-type solar grade silicon wafers. Post-etch treatment with NH 4 OH/H 2 O 2 /H 2 O mixed solution not only smoothes the surface but also increases the effective minority lifetime from 161 μs of as-prepared wafer to 333 μs after cleaning. Moreover, adding illumination during the etching process results in an improvement in both the numerical value and the uniformity of the effective minority carrier lifetime.

  16. Passive water control at the surface of a superhydrophobic lichen

    OpenAIRE

    Hamlett, Christopher; Shirtcliffe, Neil; Pyatt, F. Brian; Newton, Michael; McHale, Glen; Koch, Kerstin

    2011-01-01

    Some lichens have a super-hydrophobic upper surface, which repels water drops, keeping the surface dry but probably preventing water uptake. Spore ejection requires water and is most efficient just after rainfall. This study was carried out to investigate how super-hydrophobic lichens manage water uptake and repellence at their fruiting bodies, or podetia. Drops of water were placed onto separate podetia of Cladonia chlorophaea and observed using optical microscopy and cryo-scanning-electron ...

  17. Preparation, characterization and dissolution of passive oxide film on the 400 series stainless steel surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathyaseelan, V.S.; Rufus, A.L.; Chandramohan, P.; Subramanian, H.; Velmurugan, S., E-mail: svelu@igcar.gov.in

    2015-12-15

    Full system decontamination of Primary Heat Transport (PHT) system of Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs) resulted in low decontamination factors (DF) on stainless steel (SS) surfaces. Hence, studies were carried out with 403 SS and 410 SS that are the material of construction of “End-Fitting body” and “End-Fitting Liner tubes”. Three formulations were evaluated for the dissolution of passive films formed over these alloys viz., i) Two-step process consisting of oxidation and reduction reactions, ii) Dilute Chemical Decontamination (DCD) and iii) High Temperature Process. The two-step and high temperature processes could dissolve the oxide completely while the DCD process could remove only 60%. Various techniques like XRD, Raman spectroscopy and SEM-EDX were used for assessing the dissolution process. The two-step process is time consuming, laborious while the high temperature process is less time consuming and is recommended for SS decontamination. - Graphical abstract: SEM micrograph of the oxide film formed in an autoclave over the 403 SS and 410 SS surfaces, the “End-Fitting Body and End-Fitting Liner” materials of Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR). - Highlights: • The oxides formed over 403 and 410 SS are spinels similar to magnetite. • Oxide is duplex in nature with chromium rich inner layer. • Dilute Chemical Decontamination process could dissolve only 60% of the oxide. • Oxidation-Reduction process dissolves 100% oxide layer but time consuming. • High Temperature process is 100% efficient and less time consuming.

  18. A COMPARISON BETWEEN ACTIVE AND PASSIVE TECHNIQUES FOR UNDERWATER 3D APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Bianco

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In the field of 3D scanning, there is an increasing need for more accurate technologies to acquire 3D models of close range objects. Underwater exploration, for example, is very hard to perform due to the hostile conditions and the bad visibility of the environment. Some application fields, like underwater archaeology, require to recover tridimensional data of objects that cannot be moved from their site or touched in order to avoid possible damages. Photogrammetry is widely used for underwater 3D acquisition, because it requires just one or two digital still or video cameras to acquire a sequence of images taken from different viewpoints. Stereo systems composed by a pair of cameras are often employed on underwater robots (i.e. ROVs, Remotely Operated Vehicles and used by scuba divers, in order to survey archaeological sites, reconstruct complex 3D structures in aquatic environment, estimate in situ the length of marine organisms, etc. The stereo 3D reconstruction is based on the triangulation of corresponding points on the two views. This requires to find in both images common points and to match them (correspondence problem, determining a plane that contains the 3D point on the object. Another 3D technique, frequently used in air acquisition, solves this point-matching problem by projecting structured lighting patterns to codify the acquired scene. The corresponding points are identified associating a binary code in both images. In this work we have tested and compared two whole-field 3D imaging techniques (active and passive based on stereo vision, in underwater environment. A 3D system has been designed, composed by a digital projector and two still cameras mounted in waterproof housing, so that it can perform the various acquisitions without changing the configuration of optical devices. The tests were conducted in a water tank in different turbidity conditions, on objects with different surface properties. In order to simulate a typical

  19. Germanium nitride and oxynitride films for surface passivation of Ge radiation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maggioni, G., E-mail: maggioni@lnl.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia G. Galilei, Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Viale dell’Universita’2, I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Carturan, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia G. Galilei, Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Viale dell’Universita’2, I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Fiorese, L. [Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Viale dell’Universita’2, I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria dei Materiali e delle Tecnologie Industriali, Università di Trento, Via Mesiano 77, I-38050 Povo, Trento (Italy); Pinto, N.; Caproli, F. [Scuola di Scienze e Tecnologie, Sezione di Fisica, Università di Camerino, Via Madonna delle Carceri 9, Camerino (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Napoli, D.R. [Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Viale dell’Universita’2, I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Giarola, M.; Mariotto, G. [Dipartimento di Informatica—Università di Verona, Strada le Grazie 15, I-37134 Verona (Italy)

    2017-01-30

    Highlights: • A surface passivation method for HPGe radiation detectors is proposed. • Highly insulating GeNx- and GeOxNy-based layers are deposited at room temperature. • Deposition parameters affect composition and electrical properties of the layers. • The improved performance of a GeNx-coated HPGe diode is assessed. - Abstract: This work reports a detailed investigation of the properties of germanium nitride and oxynitride films to be applied as passivation layers to Ge radiation detectors. All the samples were deposited at room temperature by reactive RF magnetron sputtering. A strong correlation was found between the deposition parameters, such as deposition rate, substrate bias and atmosphere composition, and the oxygen and nitrogen content in the film matrix. We found that all the films were very poorly crystallized, consisting of very small Ge nitride and oxynitride nanocrystallites, and electrically insulating, with the resistivity changing from three to six orders of magnitude as a function of temperature. A preliminary test of these films as passivation layers was successfully performed by depositing a germanium nitride film on the intrinsic surface of a high-purity germanium (HPGe) diode and measuring the improved performance, in terms of leakage current, with respect to a reference passivated diode. All these interesting results allow us to envisage the application of this coating technology to the surface passivation of germanium-based radiation detectors.

  20. Potassium ions in SiO2: electrets for silicon surface passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla, Ruy S.; Wilshaw, Peter R.

    2018-01-01

    This manuscript reports an experimental and theoretical study of the transport of potassium ions in thin silicon dioxide films. While alkali contamination was largely researched in the context of MOSFET instability, recent reports indicate that potassium ions can be embedded into oxide films to produce dielectric materials with permanent electric charge, also known as electrets. These electrets are integral to a number of applications, including the passivation of silicon surfaces for optoelectronic devices. In this work, electric field assisted migration of ions is used to rapidly drive K+ into SiO2 and produce effective passivation of silicon surfaces. Charge concentrations of up to ~5  ×  1012 e cm‑2 have been achieved. This charge was seen to be stable for over 1500 d, with decay time constants as high as 17 000 d, producing an effectively passivated oxide–silicon interface with SRV  <  7 cm s‑1, in 1 Ω cm n-type material. This level of charge stability and passivation effectiveness has not been previously reported. Overall, this is a new and promising methodology to enhance surface passivation for the industrial manufacture of silicon optoelectronic devices.

  1. An enhanced surface passivation effect in InGaN/GaN disk-in-nanowire light emitting diodes for mitigating Shockley–Read–Hall recombination

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Chao

    2015-07-24

    We present a detailed study on the effects of dangling bond passivation and the comparison of different sulfides passivation process on the properties of InGaN/GaN quantum-disk (Qdisk)-in-nanowire based light emitting diodes (NW-LEDs). Our results demonstrated the first organic sulfide passivation process for nitride nanowires (NWs). The results from Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence (PL) measurements, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) showed octadecylthiol (ODT) effectively passivated the surface states, and altered the surface dynamic charge, thereby recovered the band-edge emission. The effectiveness of the process with passivation duration was also studied. Moreover, we also compared the electro-optical performance of NW-LEDs emitting at green wavelength before and after ODT passivation. We have shown that the Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) non-radiative recombination of NW-LEDs can be greatly reduced after passivation by ODT, which led to a much faster increasing trend of quantum efficiency, and higher peak efficiency. Our results highlighted the research opportunity in employing this technique for further design and realization of high performance NW-LEDs and NW-lasers.

  2. Effects of Active and Passive Control Techniques on Mach 1.5 Cavity Flow Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selin Aradag

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Supersonic flow over cavities has been of interest since 1960s because cavities represent the bomb bays of aircraft. The flow is transient, turbulent, and complicated. Pressure fluctuations inside the cavity can impede successful weapon release. The objective of this study is to use active and passive control methods on supersonic cavity flow numerically to decrease or eliminate pressure oscillations. Jet blowing at several locations on the front and aft walls of the cavity configuration is used as an active control method. Several techniques are used for passive control including using a cover plate to separate the flow dynamics inside and outside of the cavity, trailing edge wall modifications, such as inclination of the trailing edge, and providing curvature to the trailing edge wall. The results of active and passive control techniques are compared with the baseline case in terms of pressure fluctuations, sound pressure levels at the leading edge, trailing edge walls, and cavity floor and in terms of formation of the flow structures and the results are presented. It is observed from the results that modification of the trailing edge wall is the most effective of the control methods tested leading to up to 40 dB reductions in cavity tones.

  3. Silicon surface passivation by an organic overlayer of 9,10-phenanthrenequinone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avasthi, Sushobhan; Qi, Yabing; Vertelov, Grigory K.; Schwartz, Jeffrey; Kahn, Antoine; Sturm, James C.

    2010-05-01

    Merged organic-silicon heterojunction devices require the passivation of dangling bonds at the silicon surface, preferably with a low-temperature process. In this paper, we demonstrate the high-quality passivation of the silicon (100) surface using an organic molecule (9,10-phenanthrenequinone, PQ). PQ reacts with the dangling bonds, thus providing a bridge between organic semiconductors and silicon. We measure low recombination velocities (˜150 cm/s) at the PQ-silicon interface. Metal/organic-insulator/silicon capacitors and transistors prove that at PQ-silicon interface, the Fermi level can be modulated. The formation of an inversion layer with electron mobility of 600 cm2/V•s further demonstrates the passivation quality of PQ.

  4. Passivity-based control technique for integration of DG resources into the power grid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehrasa, Majid; Adabi, M. Ebrahim; Pouresmaeil, Edris

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with a control method for integration of Distributed Generation (DG) sources to the power grid. The proposed control strategy has been designed based on passivity technique and provides compensation for the active, reactive, and harmonic current components of loads during...... for the d and q axis in the control loop of DG, which are defined based on the objectives of proposed method. The effectiveness of the proposed control scheme is validated with injection of maximum available power from the DG resources to the power grid, correction of power factor between the grid current...... the connection of DG link to the grid. The proper switching functions of interfaced converter have been defined based on the passivity method through the achieving space equations and suitable series damping injection. The proposed control plan is completed by setting suitable reference current components...

  5. Multi-Frequency Target Detection Techniques for DVB-T Based Passive Radar Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Martelli

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the possibility to improve target detection capability in a DVB-T- based passive radar sensor by jointly exploiting multiple digital television channels broadcast by the same transmitter of opportunity. Based on the remarkable results obtained by such a multi-frequency approach using other signals of opportunity (i.e., FM radio broadcast transmissions, we propose appropriate modifications to the previously devised signal processing techniques for them to be effective in the newly considered scenarios. The resulting processing schemes are extensively applied against experimental DVB-T-based passive radar data pertaining to different surveillance applications. The obtained results clearly show the effectiveness of the proposed multi-frequency approaches and demonstrate their suitability for application in the considered scenarios.

  6. Surface Passivation and Junction Formation Using Low Energy Hydrogen Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonash, S. J.

    1985-01-01

    New applications for high current, low energy hydrogen ion implants on single crystal and polycrystal silicon grain boundaries are discussed. The effects of low energy hydrogen ion beams on crystalline Si surfaces are considered. The effect of these beams on bulk defects in crystalline Si is addressed. Specific applications of H+ implants to crystalline Si processing are discussed. In all of the situations reported on, the hydrogen beams were produced using a high current Kaufman ion source.

  7. Characterization of Al2O3 surface passivation of silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albadri, Abdulrahman M.

    2014-01-01

    A study of the passivation of silicon surface by aluminum oxide (Al 2 O 3 ) is reported. A correlation of fixed oxide charge density (Q f ) and interface trap density (D it ) on passivation efficiency is presented. Low surface recombination velocity (SRV) was obtained even by as-deposited Al 2 O 3 films and this was found to be associated to the passivation of interface states. Fourier transfer infrared spectroscopy spectra show the existence of an interfacial silicon oxide thin layer in both as-deposited and annealed Al 2 O 3 films. Q f is found positive in as-deposited films and changing to negative upon subsequent annealing, providing thus an enhancement of the passivation in p-type silicon wafers, associated to field effects. Secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis confirms the correlation between D it and hydrogen concentration at the Al 2 O 3 /Si interface. A lowest SRV of 15 cm/s was obtained after an anneal at 400 °C in nitrogen atmosphere. - Highlights: • Al 2 O 3 provides superior passivation for silicon surfaces. • Atomic layer deposition-Al 2 O 3 was deposited at a low temperature of 200 °C. • A lowest surface passivation velocity of 15 cm/s was obtained after an anneal at 400 °C in nitrogen. • As-deposited Al 2 O 3 films form very thin SiO 2 layer responsible of low interface trap densities. • High negative fixed charge density of (− 2 × 10 12 cm −2 ) was achieved upon annealing at 400 °C

  8. Antibacterial Effect of Surface Pretreatment Techniques against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-23

    Feb 23, 2018 ... of dentin chips were obtained from the cavity walls, and the number of bacteria recovered was counted. Kruskal–Wallis ... Keywords: Antibacterial effect, cavity surface pretreatment techniques, cavity preparation, dental, dental ... wavelengths for removing oral soft and dental hard tissues without pain relief, ...

  9. Electronic structure and band alignment of 9,10-phenanthrenequinone passivated silicon surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avasthi, Sushobhan; Qi, Yabing; Vertelov, Grigory K.; Schwartz, Jeffrey; Kahn, Antoine; Sturm, James C.

    2011-07-01

    In this work we demonstrate that the room-temperature deposition of the organic molecule 9,10-phenanthrenequinone (PQ) reduces the surface defect density of the silicon (100) surface by chemically bonding to the surface dangling bonds. Using various spectroscopic measurements we have investigated the electronic structure and band alignment properties of the PQ/Si interface. The band-bending at the PQ-passivated silicon surface is negligible for both n- and p-type substrates, demonstrating a low density of surface defects. Finally we show that PQ forms a semiconducting wide-bandgap type-I heterojunction with silicon.

  10. Tablet surface characterisation by various imaging techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seitavuopio, Paulus; Rantanen, Jukka; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterise tablet surfaces using different imaging and roughness analytical techniques including optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), laser profilometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The test materials compressed were potassium chloride (KCl......) and sodium chloride (NaCl). It was found that all methods used suggested that the KCl tablets were smoother than the NaCl tablets and higher compression pressure made the tablets smoother. Imaging methods like optical microscopy and SEM can give useful information about the roughness of the sample surface......, but they do not provide quantitative information about surface roughness. Laser profilometry and AFM on the other hand provide quantitative roughness data from two different scales, laser profilometer from 1 mm and atomic force microscope from 90 microm scale. AFM is a powerful technique but other imaging...

  11. Surface passivation of efficient nanotextured black silicon solar cells using thermal atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Cheng; Lin, Che-Wei; Chen, Hsin-Jui; Chang, Che-Wei; Huang, Jhih-Jie; Yang, Ming-Jui; Tjahjono, Budi; Huang, Jian-Jia; Hsu, Wen-Ching; Chen, Miin-Jang

    2013-10-09

    Efficient nanotextured black silicon solar cells passivated by an Al2O3 layer are demonstrated. The broadband antireflection of the nanotextured black silicon solar cells was provided by fabricating vertically aligned silicon nanowire (SiNW) arrays on the n(+) emitter. A highly conformal Al2O3 layer was deposited upon the SiNW arrays by the thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD) based on the multiple pulses scheme. The nanotextured black silicon wafer covered with the Al2O3 layer exhibited a low total reflectance of ∼1.5% in a broad spectrum from 400 to 800 nm. The Al2O3 passivation layer also contributes to the suppressed surface recombination, which was explored in terms of the chemical and field-effect passivation effects. An 8% increment of short-circuit current density and 10.3% enhancement of efficiency were achieved due to the ALD Al2O3 surface passivation and forming gas annealing. A high efficiency up to 18.2% was realized in the ALD Al2O3-passivated nanotextured black silicon solar cells.

  12. Excellent Silicon Surface Passivation Achieved by Industrial Inductively Coupled Plasma Deposited Hydrogenated Intrinsic Amorphous Silicon Suboxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Ge

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an alternative method of depositing a high-quality passivation film for heterojunction silicon wafer solar cells, in this paper. The deposition of hydrogenated intrinsic amorphous silicon suboxide is accomplished by decomposing hydrogen, silane, and carbon dioxide in an industrial remote inductively coupled plasma platform. Through the investigation on CO2 partial pressure and process temperature, excellent surface passivation quality and optical properties are achieved. It is found that the hydrogen content in the film is much higher than what is commonly reported in intrinsic amorphous silicon due to oxygen incorporation. The observed slow depletion of hydrogen with increasing temperature greatly enhances its process window as well. The effective lifetime of symmetrically passivated samples under the optimal condition exceeds 4.7 ms on planar n-type Czochralski silicon wafers with a resistivity of 1 Ωcm, which is equivalent to an effective surface recombination velocity of less than 1.7 cms−1 and an implied open-circuit voltage (Voc of 741 mV. A comparison with several high quality passivation schemes for solar cells reveals that the developed inductively coupled plasma deposited films show excellent passivation quality. The excellent optical property and resistance to degradation make it an excellent substitute for industrial heterojunction silicon solar cell production.

  13. Excellent c-Si surface passivation by low-temperature atomic layer deposited titanium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Baochen; Hoex, Bram; Aberle, Armin G.; Bhatia, Charanjit S.; Chi, Dongzhi

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrate that thermal atomic layer deposited (ALD) titanium oxide (TiO x ) films are able to provide a—up to now unprecedented—level of surface passivation on undiffused low-resistivity crystalline silicon (c-Si). The surface passivation provided by the ALD TiO x films is activated by a post-deposition anneal and subsequent light soaking treatment. Ultralow effective surface recombination velocities down to 2.8 cm/s and 8.3 cm/s, respectively, are achieved on n-type and p-type float-zone c-Si wafers. Detailed analysis confirms that the TiO x films are nearly stoichiometric, have no significant level of contaminants, and are of amorphous nature. The passivation is found to be stable after storage in the dark for eight months. These results demonstrate that TiO x films are also capable of providing excellent passivation of undiffused c-Si surfaces on a comparable level to thermal silicon oxide, silicon nitride, and aluminum oxide. In addition, it is well known that TiO x has an optimal refractive index of 2.4 in the visible range for glass encapsulated solar cells, as well as a low extinction coefficient. Thus, the results presented in this work could facilitate the re-emergence of TiO x in the field of high-efficiency silicon wafer solar cells.

  14. Parametric exponentially correlated surface emission model for L-band passive microwave soil moisture retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surface soil moisture is an important parameter in hydrology and climate investigations. Current and future satellite missions with L-band passive microwave radiometers can provide valuable information for monitoring the global soil moisture. A factor that can play a significant role in the modeling...

  15. Excellent c-Si surface passivation by low-temperature atomic layer deposited titanium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Baochen; Hoex, Bram; Aberle, Armin G.; Chi, Dongzhi; Bhatia, Charanjit S.

    2014-06-01

    In this work, we demonstrate that thermal atomic layer deposited (ALD) titanium oxide (TiOx) films are able to provide a—up to now unprecedented—level of surface passivation on undiffused low-resistivity crystalline silicon (c-Si). The surface passivation provided by the ALD TiOx films is activated by a post-deposition anneal and subsequent light soaking treatment. Ultralow effective surface recombination velocities down to 2.8 cm/s and 8.3 cm/s, respectively, are achieved on n-type and p-type float-zone c-Si wafers. Detailed analysis confirms that the TiOx films are nearly stoichiometric, have no significant level of contaminants, and are of amorphous nature. The passivation is found to be stable after storage in the dark for eight months. These results demonstrate that TiOx films are also capable of providing excellent passivation of undiffused c-Si surfaces on a comparable level to thermal silicon oxide, silicon nitride, and aluminum oxide. In addition, it is well known that TiOx has an optimal refractive index of 2.4 in the visible range for glass encapsulated solar cells, as well as a low extinction coefficient. Thus, the results presented in this work could facilitate the re-emergence of TiOx in the field of high-efficiency silicon wafer solar cells.

  16. Silicon surface passivation by PEDOT: PSS functionalized by SnO2 and TiO2 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Tecedor, M.; Karazhanov, S. Zh; Vásquez, G. C.; Haug, H.; Maestre, D.; Cremades, A.; Taeño, M.; Ramírez-Castellanos, J.; González-Calbet, J. M.; Piqueras, J.; You, C. C.; Marstein, E. S.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we present a study of silicon surface passivation based on the use of spin-coated hybrid composite layers. We investigate both undoped poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/poly-(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS), as well as PEDOT:PSS functionalized with semiconducting oxide nanomaterials (TiO2 and SnO2). The hybrid compound was deposited at room temperature by spin coating—a potentially lower cost, lower processing time and higher throughput alternative compared with the commonly used vacuum-based techniques. Photoluminescence imaging was used to characterize the electronic properties of the Si/PEDOT:PSS interface. Good surface passivation was achieved by PEDOT:PSS functionalized by semiconducting oxides. We show that control of the concentration of semiconducting oxide nanoparticles in the polymer is crucial in determining the passivation performance. A charge carrier lifetime of about 275 μs has been achieved when using SnO2 nanoparticles at a concentration of 0.5 wt.% as a filler in the composite film. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), energy dispersive x-ray in an SEM, and μ-Raman spectroscopy have been used for the morphological, chemical and structural characterization. Finally, a simple model of a photovoltaic device based on PEDOT:PSS functionalized with semiconducting oxide nanoparticles has been fabricated and electrically characterized.

  17. ZnO nanowire photodetectors based on Schottky contact with surface passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dakuan; Sheng, Yun; Wang, Jianyu; Gao, Fan; Yan, Shancheng; Wang, Junzhuan; Pan, Lijia; Wan, Qing; Shi, Yi

    2017-07-01

    Performance characteristics, such as dark current and response time, of ZnO nanowire (NW) photodetectors are usually degraded by H2O/O2 adsorption on the NW surfaces. In this work, ZnO NW photodetectors based on Au Schottky contact through passivating surface states were investigated. ZnO NW photodetectors were fabricated with a lateral electrode structure, in which Au served as Au/ZnO Schottky contact and semi-transparent top electrode. Specifically, passivation of the surface states of ZnO NWs by using highly intensive UV irradiation effectively improved the photoresponse. A physical model based on surface band theory was developed to understand the origin of the performance improvement of the photodetector. The present device architecture prevents ZnO NWs photodetector from H2O/O2 adsorption in air and efficiently extracts photogenerated carriers across a diametrical direction.

  18. Reactivity and control of III-V surfaces for passivation and Schottky barrier formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruno, Giovanni

    2004-01-01

    The N-for-As, P-for-As and Sb-for-As anion exchange reactions at GaAs surfaces, and the N-for-P anion exchange reaction at the GaP surface have been investigated with the aim at the formation of a thin high-gap surface layer for passivation of GaAs and GaP. Among the investigated anion exchange reactions, the P-for-As results in the formation of a ternary alloys GaP y As 1-y not effective for GaAs passivation. The Sb-for-As anion exchange does not occur and results in segregation of Sb at the GaAs surface. The Sb overlayer is effective in the chemical passivation of GaAs. The N-for-As anion exchange by a remote N 2 -H 2 (a mixture of 97% N 2 -3% H 2 ) radiofrequency plasma nitridation procedure forms a very thin (∼5 Angst) GaN layer that is successful in the electronic and chemical passivation of GaAs(1 0 0) surfaces. The N 2 -H 2 (a mixture of 97% N 2 -3% H 2 ) nitridation has been found completely different from the pure N 2 nitridation which, in contrast, do not provide GaAs passivation, because the formation of Ga-N bonds accompanies with AsN and the segregation of elemental As at the GaN/GaAs interface. GaAs-GaN based Schottky structures have also been deposited and characterized by I-V measurements. A chemical and kinetic mechanism for the anion exchange reactions which takes into account also the competitive formation of PAs, AsN, and PN isoelectronic compounds is proposed

  19. Fermi surface mapping: Techniques and visualization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotenberg, E. [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States). Dept. of Physics; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Advanced Light Source (ALS); Denlinger, J. D. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Kevan, S. D. [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States). Dept. of Physics; Goodman, K. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tobin, J. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mankey, G. J. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-04-01

    Angle-resolved photoemission (ARP) of valence bands is a mature technique that has achieved spectacular success in band-mapping metals, semiconductors, and insulators. The purpose of the present study was the development of experimental and analytical techniques in ARP which take advantage of third generation light sources. Here the authors studied the relatively simple Cu surface in preparation for other metals. Copper and related metals themselves are of current interest, especially due to its role as an interlayer in spin valves and other magnetic heterostructures. A major goal of this study was the development of a systematic technique to quickly (i.e. in a few hours of synchrotron beamtime) measure the FS and separate it into bulk and surface FS`s. Often, one needs to avoid bulk features altogether, which one can achieve by carefully mapping their locations in k-space. The authors will also show how they systematically map Fermi surfaces throughout large volumes of k-space, and, by processing the resulting volume data sets, provide intuitive pictures of FS`s, both bulk and surface.

  20. Layered insulator hexagonal boron nitride for surface passivation in quantum dot solar cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanmugam, Mariyappan; Jain, Nikhil; Jacobs-Gedrim, Robin; Yu, Bin; Xu, Yang

    2013-01-01

    Single crystalline, two dimensional (2D) layered insulator hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), is demonstrated as an emerging material candidate for surface passivation on mesoporous TiO 2 . Cadmium selenide (CdSe) quantum dot based bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cell employed h-BN passivated TiO 2 as an electron acceptor exhibits photoconversion efficiency ∼46% more than BHJ employed unpassivated TiO 2 . Dominant interfacial recombination pathways such as electron capture by TiO 2 surface states and recombination with hole at valence band of CdSe are efficiently controlled by h-BN enabled surface passivation, leading to improved photovoltaic performance. Highly crystalline, confirmed by transmission electron microscopy, dangling bond-free 2D layered h-BN with self-terminated atomic planes, achieved by chemical exfoliation, enables efficient passivation on TiO 2 , allowing electronic transport at TiO 2 /h-BN/CdSe interface with much lower recombination rate compared to an unpassivated TiO 2 /CdSe interface

  1. Passivation Of High-Temperature Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    Surfaces of high-temperature superconductors passivated with native iodides, sulfides, or sulfates formed by chemical treatments after superconductors grown. Passivating compounds nearly insoluble in and unreactive with water and protect underlying superconductors from effects of moisture. Layers of cuprous iodide and of barium sulfate grown. Other candidate passivating surface films: iodides and sulfides of bismuth, strontium, and thallium. Other proposed techniques for formation of passivating layers include deposition and gas-phase reaction.

  2. Tablet surface characterisation by various imaging techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seitavuopio, Paulus; Rantanen, Jukka; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterise tablet surfaces using different imaging and roughness analytical techniques including optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), laser profilometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The test materials compressed were potassium chloride (KCl......) and sodium chloride (NaCl). It was found that all methods used suggested that the KCl tablets were smoother than the NaCl tablets and higher compression pressure made the tablets smoother. Imaging methods like optical microscopy and SEM can give useful information about the roughness of the sample surface...

  3. Description of measurement techniques for surface contaminations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourrez, E.

    2001-01-01

    The needs of evaluation of the surface contamination are numerous in the processes of production and management of radioactive waste. The market of radiation protection materials proposes a lot of devices answering to the almost all these needs. These device have however their conditions and particular limits for use. To realize correct measurements it is use the device, the technique and the methods adapted to the need, by taking into account the optimization of economical aspect. (N.C.)

  4. Botswana water and surface energy balance research program. Part 2: Large scale moisture and passive microwaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandegriend, A. A.; Owe, M.; Chang, A. T. C.

    1992-01-01

    The Botswana water and surface energy balance research program was developed to study and evaluate the integrated use of multispectral satellite remote sensing for monitoring the hydrological status of the Earth's surface. The research program consisted of two major, mutually related components: a surface energy balance modeling component, built around an extensive field campaign; and a passive microwave research component which consisted of a retrospective study of large scale moisture conditions and Nimbus scanning multichannel microwave radiometer microwave signatures. The integrated approach of both components are explained in general and activities performed within the passive microwave research component are summarized. The microwave theory is discussed taking into account: soil dielectric constant, emissivity, soil roughness effects, vegetation effects, optical depth, single scattering albedo, and wavelength effects. The study site is described. The soil moisture data and its processing are considered. The relation between observed large scale soil moisture and normalized brightness temperatures is discussed. Vegetation characteristics and inverse modeling of soil emissivity is considered.

  5. Impurity diffusion, point defect engineering, and surface/interface passivation in germanium

    KAUST Repository

    Chroneos, Alexander I.

    2012-01-26

    In recent years germanium has been emerging as a mainstream material that could have important applications in the microelectronics industry. The principle aim of this study is to review investigations of the diffusion of technologically important p- and n-type dopants as well as surface and interface passivation issues in germanium. The diffusion of impurities in germanium is interrelated to the formation of clusters whenever possible, and possibilities for point defect engineering are discussed in view of recent results. The importance of electrically active defects on the Ge surface and interfaces is addressed considering strategies to suppress them and to passivate the surfaces/interfaces, bearing in mind their importance for advanced devices. © 2012 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Ordered supramolecular oligothiophene structures on passivated silicon surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Renjie

    buckypapers. This novel technique could construct CNT films with reproducible properties, which also had the potential to be scale-up for industrial mass production. Based on the microcombing approach, dispersion issue of the long, straight, and highly aligned CNTs was investigated by adding PVA matrix into the microcombed CNT sheets. It was found although microcombing promoted the formation of agglomerated strands of the long, straight, and aligned CNTs, this was not an adverse problem in impairing the composite performance. When matrix was added, those agglomerated strands were wrapped together which maintained a more stable and better contact between nanotubes than those in the dry films. The as-produced CNT/PVA composite films exhibit an electrical conductivity of 1.84x105 S/m, Young's modulus of 119 GPa, tensile strength of 2.9 GPa, and toughness of 52.4 J/cm3, which represent improvements over those of uncombed samples by 300%, 100%, 120%, and 200%, respectively, demonstrating the effectiveness and reliability of microcombing in producing high-performance CNT/polymer composite films.

  7. Surface diffusion studies by optical diffraction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, X.D.

    1992-11-01

    The newly developed optical techniques have been combined with either second harmonic (SH) diffraction or linear diffraction off a monolayer adsorbate grating for surface diffusion measurement. Anisotropy of surface diffusion of CO on Ni(l10) was used as a demonstration for the second harmonic dim reaction method. The linear diffraction method, which possesses a much higher sensitivity than the SH diffraction method, was employed to study the effect of adsorbate-adsorbate interaction on CO diffusion on Ni(l10) surface. Results showed that only the short range direct CO-CO orbital overlapping interaction influences CO diffusion but not the long range dipole-dipole and CO-NI-CO interactions. Effects of impurities and defects on surface diffusion were further explored by using linear diffraction method on CO/Ni(110) system. It was found that a few percent S impurity can alter the CO diffusion barrier height to a much higher value through changing the Ni(110) surface. The point defects of Ni(l10) surface seem to speed up CO diffusion significantly. A mechanism with long jumps over multiple lattice distance initiated by CO filled vacancy is proposed to explain the observed defect effect

  8. Performance of Multiple Passive Islanding Detection Technique for Synchronous Type of DG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimie Nadia Ab Salam

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Placing DG closer to the load in the system can improve the grid reliability and power quality, however it can lead to some technical issues such as islanding which requires attention from utility and Independent Power Producer (IPP. One of the important issues in power system distribution is islanding detection for protecting the DG when islanding operation occurred. The detection technique is employed so that the islanding event can be detected within the time frame. The main reason of detecting islanding situation at distribution level is to monitor the DG output or system parameters thus can determine the occurrence of islanding situation from the change of these parameters. Therefore, this paper presents the performance of multiple parameters of passive islanding detection technique in distribution system connected with synchronous type of DG. Sixteen passive parameters including rate of change of frequency (df/dt, rate of change of voltage (dv/dt, rate of change of active power (dp/dt, and rate of change of reactive power (dq/dt are evaluated. The sensitivity analysis of these parameters are determined via simulation in terms of variation of loads, fault events and load switching on various events that are islanding and non-islanding events. The analysis indicates that each parameter displays a different pattern of sensitivity towards islanding event.

  9. Surface Passivation of GaN Nanowires for Enhanced Photoelectrochemical Water-Splitting

    KAUST Repository

    Varadhan, Purushothaman

    2017-02-08

    Hydrogen production via photoelectrochemical water-splitting is a key source of clean and sustainable energy. The use of one-dimensional nanostructures as photoelectrodes is desirable for photoelectrochemical water-splitting applications due to the ultralarge surface areas, lateral carrier extraction schemes, and superior light-harvesting capabilities. However, the unavoidable surface states of nanostructured materials create additional charge carrier trapping centers and energy barriers at the semiconductor-electrolyte interface, which severely reduce the solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency. In this work, we address the issue of surface states in GaN nanowire photoelectrodes by employing a simple and low-cost surface treatment method, which utilizes an organic thiol compound (i.e., 1,2-ethanedithiol). The surface-treated photocathode showed an enhanced photocurrent density of −31 mA/cm at −0.2 V versus RHE with an incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency of 18.3%, whereas untreated nanowires yielded only 8.1% efficiency. Furthermore, the surface passivation provides enhanced photoelectrochemical stability as surface-treated nanowires retained ∼80% of their initial photocurrent value and produced 8000 μmol of gas molecules over 55 h at acidic conditions (pH ∼ 0), whereas the untreated nanowires demonstrated only <4 h of photoelectrochemical stability. These findings shed new light on the importance of surface passivation of nanostructured photoelectrodes for photoelectrochemical applications.

  10. Efficiency improvement of multicrystalline silicon solar cells after surface and grain boundaries passivation using vanadium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derbali, L.; Ezzaouia, H.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Evaporation of vanadium pentoxide onto the front surface leads to reduce the surface reflectivity considerably. ► An efficient surface passivation can be obtained after thermal treatment of obtained films. ► Efficiency of the obtained solar cells has been improved noticeably after thermal treatment of deposited thin films. - Abstract: The aim of this work is to investigate the effect of vanadium oxide deposition onto the front surface of multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) substrat, without any additional cost in the fabrication process and leading to an efficient surface and grain boundaries (GBs) passivation that have not been reported before. The lowest reflectance of mc-Si coated with vanadium oxide film of 9% was achieved by annealing the deposited film at 600 °C. Vanadium pentoxide (V 2 O 5 ) were thermally evaporated onto the surface of mc-Si substrates, followed by a short annealing duration at a temperature ranging between 600 °C and 800 °C, under O 2 atmosphere. The chemical composition of the films was analyzed by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Surface and cross-section morphology were determined by atomic force microscope (AFM) and a scanning electron microscope (SEM), respectively. The deposited vanadium oxide thin films make the possibility of combining in one processing step an antireflection coating deposition along with efficient surface state passivation, as compared to a reference wafer. Silicon solar cells based on untreated and treated mc-Si wafers were achieved. We showed that mc-silicon solar cells, subjected to the above treatment, have better short circuit currents and open-circuit voltages than those made from untreated wafers. Thus, the efficiency of obtained solar cells has been improved.

  11. Minimal-Sensing, Passive Force Identification Techniques for a Composite Structural Missile Component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Stites

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural health monitoring systems are often limited to the use of one sensor due to cost, complexity, and weight restrictions. Therefore, there is a need to develop load and damage identification techniques that utilize only one sensor. Two passive force estimation techniques are investigated in this work. The techniques focus on either the shape or the amplitude of the magnitude of the applied force in the frequency domain. Both techniques iteratively reduce an underdetermined set of equations of motion into many overdetermined systems of equations to solve for the force estimates. The techniques are shown to locate and quantify impulsive impacts with over 97% accuracy and non-impulsive impacts with at least 87% accuracy. A filament-wound rocket motor casing is used as a test structure. Impacts not acting at a specific input degree of freedom are also accurately located depending on the distance away from the modeled input degrees of freedom, and damaging impact forces are quantified by making assumptions about the impulsive nature of the applied force.

  12. Experimental Studies of Active and Passive Flow Control Techniques Applied in a Twin Air-Intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshoy Ranjan Paul

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The flow control in twin air-intakes is necessary to improve the performance characteristics, since the flow traveling through curved and diffused paths becomes complex, especially after merging. The paper presents a comparison between two well-known techniques of flow control: active and passive. It presents an effective design of a vortex generator jet (VGJ and a vane-type passive vortex generator (VG and uses them in twin air-intake duct in different combinations to establish their effectiveness in improving the performance characteristics. The VGJ is designed to insert flow from side wall at pitch angle of 90 degrees and 45 degrees. Corotating (parallel and counterrotating (V-shape are the configuration of vane type VG. It is observed that VGJ has the potential to change the flow pattern drastically as compared to vane-type VG. While the VGJ is directed perpendicular to the side walls of the air-intake at a pitch angle of 90 degree, static pressure recovery is increased by 7.8% and total pressure loss is reduced by 40.7%, which is the best among all other cases tested for VGJ. For bigger-sized VG attached to the side walls of the air-intake, static pressure recovery is increased by 5.3%, but total pressure loss is reduced by only 4.5% as compared to all other cases of VG.

  13. Surface passivation of HgCdTe by CdZnTe and its characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T. S.; Choi, K. K.; Jeoung, Y. T.; Kim, H. K.; Kim, J. M.; Kim, Y. H.; Chang, J. M.; Song, W. S.; Kim, S. U.; Park, M. J.; Lee, S. D.

    1997-06-01

    In this paper, we report the results of capacitance-voltage measurements conducted on several metal-insulator semiconductor (MIS) capacitors in which HgCdTe surfaces are treated with various surface etching and oxidation processes. CdZnTe passivation layers were deposited on HgCdTe surfaces by thermal evaporation after the surfaces were etched with 0.5-2.0% bromine in methanol solution, or thin oxide layers (tox ˜ few ten Å) were grown on the surfaces, in order to investigate effects of the surface treatments on the electrical properties of the surfaces, as determined from capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements at 80K and 1 MHz. A negative flat band voltage has been observed for MIS capacitors fabricated after etching of HgCdTe surfaces with bromine in methanol solutions, which is reported to make the surface Te-rich. It is inferred that residual Te on the surface is a positive charge, Te4+. C-V characteristics for MIS capacitors fabricated on oxide surfaces grown by air-exposure and electrolytic process have shown large hysteresis effects, from which it is inferred that imperfect and electrically active oxide compounds and HgTe particles near the surface become slow interface states.

  14. Development of experimental in-situ Pu monitoring system based on passive gamma spectroscopy technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, C.P.; Vinod, M.; Paulson, M.; Das, D.; Ananthakrishnan, T.S.; Pithawa, C.K.; Debdas, A.; Udagatti, S.V.; Singh, Pratap; Rajendra Kumar

    2013-01-01

    To meet the requirements of in-situ 239 Pu monitoring at various stages of fuel reprocessing for NRB, an indigenous Pu monitoring system is developed by Electronics Division, BARC. The system is based on passive gamma spectroscopy technique and utilizes an advanced scintillation detector along-with compact spectroscopy hardware. The system hardware and application software have been installed at Control Lab, PREFRE-2, Tarapur for testing and evaluation. Quantification accuracy of better than 10% is achieved during the initial phase of evaluation. The system is targeted for quantification of Pu in samples drawn from Pu purification cycles with operational frequency of 3-5 samples in Round-The-Clock shifts. The system will significantly minimize manual handling of Pu samples in comparison with the existing methods. (author)

  15. Review of passive-blind detection in digital video forgery based on sensing and imaging techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Junjie; Jia, Lili; You, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Advances in digital video compression and IP communication technologies raised new issues and challenges concerning the integrity and authenticity of surveillance videos. It is so important that the system should ensure that once recorded, the video cannot be altered; ensuring the audit trail is intact for evidential purposes. This paper gives an overview of passive techniques of Digital Video Forensics which are based on intrinsic fingerprints inherent in digital surveillance videos. In this paper, we performed a thorough research of literatures relevant to video manipulation detection methods which accomplish blind authentications without referring to any auxiliary information. We presents review of various existing methods in literature, and much more work is needed to be done in this field of video forensics based on video data analysis and observation of the surveillance systems.

  16. Chest physiotherapy using passive expiratory techniques does not reduce bronchiolitis severity: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochat, Isabelle; Leis, Patricia; Bouchardy, Marie; Oberli, Christine; Sourial, Hendrika; Friedli-Burri, Margrit; Perneger, Thomas; Barazzone Argiroffo, Constance

    2012-03-01

    Chest physiotherapy (CP) using passive expiratory manoeuvres is widely used in Western Europe for the treatment of bronchiolitis, despite lacking evidence for its efficacy. We undertook an open randomised trial to evaluate the effectiveness of CP in infants hospitalised for bronchiolitis by comparing the time to clinical stability, the daily improvement of a severity score and the occurrence of complications between patients with and without CP. Children bronchiolitis in a tertiary hospital during two consecutive respiratory syncytial virus seasons were randomised to group 1 with CP (prolonged slow expiratory technique, slow accelerated expiratory flow, rarely induced cough) or group 2 without CP. All children received standard care (rhinopharyngeal suctioning, minimal handling, oxygen for saturation ≥92%, fractionated meals). Ninety-nine eligible children (mean age, 3.9 months), 50 in group 1 and 49 in group 2, with similar baseline variables and clinical severity at admission. Time to clinical stability, assessed as primary outcome, was similar for both groups (2.9 ± 2.1 vs. 3.2 ± 2.8 days, P = 0.45). The rate of improvement of a clinical and respiratory score, defined as secondary outcome, only showed a slightly faster improvement of the respiratory score in the intervention group when including stethoacoustic properties (P = 0.044). Complications were rare but occurred more frequently, although not significantly (P = 0.21), in the control arm. In conclusion, this study shows the absence of effectiveness of CP using passive expiratory techniques in infants hospitalised for bronchiolitis. It seems justified to recommend against the routine use of CP in these patients.

  17. Advanced surface passivation of epitaxial boron emitters for high-efficiency ultrathin crystalline silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Woojun; Moore, James; Lochtefeld, Anthony; Kotulak, Nicole; Scheiman, David; Barnett, Allen; Jenkins, Phillip; Walters, Robert

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we demonstrated an enhanced surface passivation of epitaxially grown boron-doped Si emitters by replacing thermal SiO2 as a passivation layer employed in a 15.9% efficient 21-µm Si solar cell (88 cm2) on stainless steel with a remote-plasma atomic layer deposition (ALD) of an Al2O3 film. A thin Al2O3 film deposited by remote-plasma ALD was very effective at reducing the emitter saturation current density (J 0e) of epitaxial p+-emitter to 16.2 fA/cm2, compared to the J 0e of 184.9 fA/cm2 by thermal SiO2 films. This reduction in J 0e enables an increase in an implied open-circuit voltage (iV oc) from 630 to 688 mV. Quokka simulation shows that about a 1.1% absolute efficiency increase in the calculated baseline efficiency of a 15.1% of the ultrathin Si solar cell can be achievable by enhancing emitter surface passivation without changing the concentration in either the epi-emitter or epi-base. Finally, our results show that a high efficiency of 17.3% can be reached from the calculated baseline efficiency of 15.1% using the optimized conditions of an epitaxially grown emitter in combination with increasing the base doping concentration and improved base recombination lifetime.

  18. Electronic passivation of silicon surfaces by thin films of atomic layer deposited gallium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, T. G.; Cuevas, A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes the application of gallium oxide (Ga 2 O 3 ) thin films to crystalline silicon solar cells. Effective passivation of n- and p-type crystalline silicon surfaces has been achieved by the application of very thin Ga 2 O 3 films prepared by atomic layer deposition using trimethylgallium (TMGa) and ozone (O 3 ) as the reactants. Surface recombination velocities as low as 6.1 cm/s have been recorded with films less than 4.5 nm thick. A range of deposition parameters has been explored, with growth rates of approximately 0.2 Å/cycle providing optimum passivation. The thermal activation energy for passivation of the Si-Ga 2 O 3 interface has been found to be approximately 0.5 eV. Depassivation of the interface was observed for prolonged annealing at increased temperatures. The activation energy for depassivation was measured to be 1.9 eV.

  19. Using Dimensionality Reduction Techniques for Refining Passive Indoor Positioning Systems Based on Radio Fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-de-Teruel, Pedro E; Canovas, Oscar; Garcia, Felix J

    2017-04-15

    Indoor positioning methods based on fingerprinting and radio signals rely on the quality of the radio map. For example, for room-level classification purposes, it is required that the signal observations related to each room exhibit significant differences in their RSSI values. However, it is difficult to verify and visualize that separability since radio maps are constituted by multi-dimensional observations whose dimension is directly related to the number of access points or monitors being employed for localization purposes. In this paper, we propose a refinement cycle for passive indoor positioning systems, which is based on dimensionality reduction techniques, to evaluate the quality of a radio map. By means of these techniques and our own data representation, we have defined two different visualization methods to obtain graphical information about the quality of a particular radio map in terms of overlapping areas and outliers. That information will be useful to determine whether new monitors are required or some existing ones should be moved. We have performed an exhaustive experimental analysis based on a variety of different scenarios, some deployed by our own research group and others corresponding to a well-known existing dataset widely analyzed by the community, in order to validate our proposal. As we will show, among the different combinations of data representation methods and dimensionality reduction techniques that we discuss, we have found that there are some specific configurations that are more useful in order to perform the refinement process.

  20. Surface passivation at low temperature of p- and n-type silicon wafers using a double layer a-Si:H/SiNx:H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Focsa, A.; Slaoui, A.; Charifi, H.; Stoquert, J.P.; Roques, S.

    2009-01-01

    Surface passivation of bare silicon or emitter region is of great importance towards high efficiency solar cells. Nowadays, this is usually accomplished by depositing an hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride (a-SiNx:H) layer on n + p structures that serves also as an excellent antireflection layer. On the other hand, surface passivation of p-type silicon is better assured by an hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) layer but suffers from optical properties. In this paper, we reported the surface passivation of p-type and n-type silicon wafers by using an a-Si:H/SiNx:H double layer formed at low temperature (50-400 deg. C) with ECR-PECVD technique. We first investigated the optical properties (refraction index, reflectance, and absorbance) and structural properties by FTIR (bonds Si-H, N-H) of the deposited films. The hydrogen content in the layers was determined by elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA). The passivation effect was monitored by measuring the minority carrier effective lifetime vs. different parameters such as deposition temperature and amorphous silicon layer thickness. We have found that a 10-15 nm a-Si film with an 86 nm thick SiN layer provides an optimum of the minority carriers' lifetime. It increases from an initial value of about 50-70 μs for a-Si:H to about 760 and 800 μs for a-Si:H/SiNx:H on Cz-pSi and FZ-nSi, respectively, at an injection level 2 x 10 15 cm -3 . The effective surface recombination velocity, S eff , for passivated double layer on n-type FZ Si reached 11 cm/s and for FZ-pSi-14 cm/s, and for Cz-pSi-16-20 cm/s. Effect of hydrogen in the passivation process is discussed.

  1. Behind the Nature of Titanium Oxide Excellent Surface Passivation and Carrier Selectivity of c-Si

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plakhotnyuk, Maksym; Crovetto, Andrea; Hansen, Ole

    We present an expanded study of the passivation properties of titanium dioxide (TiO2) on p-type crystalline silicon (c-Si). We report a low surface recombination velocity (16 cm/s) for TiO2 passivation layers with a thin tunnelling oxide interlayer (SiO2 or Al2O3) on p-type crystalline silicon (c......-Si). The TiO2 films were deposited by thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD) at temperatures in the range of 80-300  ̊C using titanium tetrachloride (TiCl4) as Ti precursor and water as the oxidant. The influence of TiO2 thickness (5, 10, 20 nm), presence of additional tunneling interlayer (SiO2 or Al2O3...

  2. Insulated gate and surface passivation structures for GaN-based power transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatabe, Zenji; Asubar, Joel T.; Hashizume, Tamotsu

    2016-10-01

    structures as well as different characterization methods, including our own photo-assisted C-V technique, essential for understanding and developing successful surface passivation and interface control schemes, are given in the subsequent section. Finally we highlight the important progress in GaN MIS interfaces that have recently pushed the frontier of nitride-based device technology.

  3. Insulated gate and surface passivation structures for GaN-based power transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yatabe, Zenji; Asubar, Joel T; Hashizume, Tamotsu

    2016-01-01

    variety of AlGaN/GaN MIS structures as well as different characterization methods, including our own photo-assisted C – V technique, essential for understanding and developing successful surface passivation and interface control schemes, are given in the subsequent section. Finally we highlight the important progress in GaN MIS interfaces that have recently pushed the frontier of nitride-based device technology. (topical review)

  4. Control surfaces of aquatic vertebrates: active and passive design and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, Frank E; Lauder, George V

    2017-12-01

    Aquatic vertebrates display a variety of control surfaces that are used for propulsion, stabilization, trim and maneuvering. Control surfaces include paired and median fins in fishes, and flippers and flukes in secondarily aquatic tetrapods. These structures initially evolved from embryonic fin folds in fishes and have been modified into complex control surfaces in derived aquatic tetrapods. Control surfaces function both actively and passively to produce torque about the center of mass by the generation of either lift or drag, or both, and thus produce vector forces to effect rectilinear locomotion, trim control and maneuvers. In addition to fins and flippers, there are other structures that act as control surfaces and enhance functionality. The entire body can act as a control surface and generate lift for stability in destabilizing flow regimes. Furthermore, control surfaces can undergo active shape change to enhance their performance, and a number of features act as secondary control structures: leading edge tubercles, wing-like canards, multiple fins in series, finlets, keels and trailing edge structures. These modifications to control surface design can alter flow to increase lift, reduce drag and enhance thrust in the case of propulsive fin-based systems in fishes and marine mammals, and are particularly interesting subjects for future research and application to engineered systems. Here, we review how modifications to control surfaces can alter flow and increase hydrodynamic performance. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. On the Active and Passive Flow Separation Control Techniques over Airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, Tohid; Banazadeh Neishabouri, Nafiseh

    2017-10-01

    In the present work, recent advances in the field of the active and passive flow separation control, particularly blowing and suction flow control techniques, applied on the common airfoils are briefly reviewed. This broad research area has remained the point of interest for many years as it is applicable to various applications. The suction and blowing flow control methods, among other methods, are more technically feasible and market ready techniques. It is well established that the uniform and/or oscillatory blowing and suction flow control mechanisms significantly improve the lift-to-drag ratio, and further, postpone the boundary layer separation as well as the stall. The oscillatory blowing and suction flow control, however, is more efficient compared to the uniform one. A wide range of parameters is involved in controlling the behavior of a blowing and/or suction flow control, including the location, length, and angle of the jet slots. The oscillation range of the jet slot is another substantial parameter.

  6. Oxidation precursor dependence of atomic layer deposited Al2O3 films in a-Si:H(i)/Al2O3 surface passivation stacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Yuren; Zhou, Chunlan; Jia, Endong; Wang, Wenjing

    2015-03-01

    In order to obtain a good passivation of a silicon surface, more and more stack passivation schemes have been used in high-efficiency silicon solar cell fabrication. In this work, we prepared a-Si:H(i)/Al2O3 stacks on KOH solution-polished n-type solar grade mono-silicon(100) wafers. For the Al2O3 film deposition, both thermal atomic layer deposition (T-ALD) and plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) were used. Interface trap density spectra were obtained for Si passivation with a-Si films and a-Si:H(i)/Al2O3 stacks by a non-contact corona C-V technique. After the fabrication of a-Si:H(i)/Al2O3 stacks, the minimum interface trap density was reduced from original 3 × 1012 to 1 × 1012 cm-2 eV-1, the surface total charge density increased by nearly one order of magnitude for PE-ALD samples and about 0.4 × 1012 cm-2 for a T-ALD sample, and the carrier lifetimes increased by a factor of three (from about 10 μs to about 30 μs). Combining these results with an X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, we discussed the influence of an oxidation precursor for ALD Al2O3 deposition on Al2O3 single layers and a-Si:H(i)/Al2O3 stack surface passivation from field-effect passivation and chemical passivation perspectives. In addition, the influence of the stack fabrication process on the a-Si film structure was also discussed in this study.

  7. Temporal observations of surface soil moisture using a passive microwave sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, T.J.; O'Neill, P.

    1987-01-01

    A series of 10 aircraft flights was conducted over agricultural fields to evaluate relationships between observed surface soil moisture and soil moisture predicted using passive microwave sensor observations. An a priori approach was used to predict values of surface soil moisture for three types of fields: tilled corn, no-till corn with soybean stubble, and idle fields with corn stubble. Acceptable predictions were obtained for the tilled corn fields, while poor results were obtained for the others. The source of error is suspected to be the density and orientation of the surface stubble layer; however, further research is needed to verify this explanation. Temporal comparisons between observed, microwave predicted, and soil water-simulated moisture values showed similar patterns for tilled well-drained fields. Divergences between the observed and simulated measurements were apparent on poorly drained fields. This result may be of value in locating and mapping hydrologic contributing areas

  8. Surface blemish detection from passive imagery using learned fuzzy set concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurbuz, S.; Carver, A.; Schalkoff, R.

    1997-12-01

    An image analysis method for real-time surface blemish detection using passive imagery and fuzzy set concepts is described. The method develops an internal knowledge representation for surface blemish characteristics on the basis of experience, thus facilitating autonomous learning based upon positive and negative exemplars. The method incorporates fuzzy set concepts in the learning subsystem and image segmentation algorithms, thereby mimicking human visual perception. This enables a generic solution for color image segmentation. This method has been applied in the development of ARIES (Autonomous Robotic Inspection Experimental System), designed to inspect DOE warehouse waste storage drums for rust. In this project, the ARIES vision system is used to acquire drum surface images under controlled conditions and subsequently perform visual inspection leading to the classification of the drum as acceptable or suspect

  9. Computer simulation, nuclear techniques and surface analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reis, A. D.

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This article is about computer simulation and surface analysis by nuclear techniques, which are non-destructive. The “energy method of analysis” for nuclear reactions is used. Energy spectra are computer simulated and compared with experimental data, giving target composition and concentration profile information. Details of prediction stages are given for thick flat target yields. Predictions are made for non-flat targets having asymmetric triangular surface contours. The method is successfully applied to depth profiling of 12C and 18O nuclei in thick targets, by deuteron (d,p and proton (p,α induced reactions, respectively.

    Este artículo trata de simulación por ordenador y del análisis de superficies mediante técnicas nucleares, que son no destructivas. Se usa el “método de análisis en energía” para reacciones nucleares. Se simulan en ordenador espectros en energía que se comparan con datos experimentales, de lo que resulta la obtención de información sobre la composición y los perfiles de concentración de la muestra. Se dan detalles de las etapas de las predicciones de espectros para muestras espesas y planas. Se hacen predicciones para muestras no planas que tienen contornos superficiales triangulares asimétricos. Este método se aplica con éxito en el cálculo de perfiles en profundidad de núcleos de 12C y de 18O en muestras espesas a través de reacciones (d,p y (p,α inducidas por deuterones y protones, respectivamente.

  10. Passive synthetic aperture sonar techniques in combination with tow ship noise canceling: application to a triplet towed array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colin, M.E.G.D.; Groen, J.

    2002-01-01

    An important issue in research on passive ASW operations is improvement in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and bearing resolution for targets emitting low frequency signals. One of the techniques believed to improve these characteristics is Synthetic Aperture Sonar (SAS). The method is based on the

  11. Si surface passivation by SiOx:H films deposited by a low-frequency ICP for solar cell applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, H P; Wei, D Y; Xu, S; Xiao, S Q; Xu, L X; Huang, S Y; Guo, Y N; Khan, S; Xu, M

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogenated silicon suboxide (SiO x :H) thin films are fabricated by a low-frequency inductively coupled plasma of hydrogen-diluted SiH 4 + CO 2 at a low temperature (100 °C). Introduction of a small amount of oxygen into the film results in a predominantly amorphous structure, wider optical bandgap, increased H content, lower conductivity and higher activation energy. The minority carrier lifetime in the SiO x :H-passivated p-type Si substrate is up to 428 µs with a reduced incubation layer at the interface. The associated surface recombination velocity is as low as 70 cm s -1 . The passivation behaviour dominantly originates from the H-related chemical passivation. The passivation effect is also demonstrated by the excellent photovoltaic performance of the heterojunction solar cell with the SiO x :H-based passivation and emitter layers.

  12. Strategies for Reduced Acid and Metalliferous Drainage by Pyrite Surface Passivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gujie Qian

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Acid and metalliferous drainage (AMD is broadly accepted to be a major global environmental problem facing the mining industry, requiring expensive management and mitigation. A series of laboratory-scale kinetic leach column (KLC experiments, using both synthetic and natural mine wastes, were carried out to test the efficacy of our pyrite passivation strategy (developed from previous research for robust and sustainable AMD management. For the synthetic waste KLC tests, initial treatment with lime-saturated water was found to be of paramount importance for maintaining long-term circum-neutral pH, favourable for the formation and preservation of the pyrite surface passivating layer and reduced acid generation rate. Following the initial lime-saturated water treatment, minimal additional alkalinity (calcite-saturated water was required to maintain circum-neutral pH for the maintenance of pyrite surface passivation. KLC tests examining natural potentially acid forming (PAF waste, with much greater peak acidity than that of the synthetic waste, blended with lime (≈2 wt % with and without natural non-acid-forming (NAF waste covers, were carried out. The addition of lime and use of NAF covers maintained circum-neutral leachate pH up to 24 weeks. During this time, the net acidity generated was found to be significantly reduced by the overlying NAF cover. If the reduced rate of acidity production from the natural PAF waste is sustained, the addition of smaller (more economically-feasible amounts of lime, together with application of NAF wastes as covers, could be trialled as a potential cost-effective AMD mitigation strategy.

  13. Passive and active correlation techniques for the detection of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deyglun, Clement; Carasco, Cedric; Perot, Bertrand; Eleon, Cyrille; Sannie, Guillaume; Boudergui, Karim; Corre, Gwenole; Konzdrasovs, Vladimir; Pras, Philippe

    2013-06-01

    In the frame of the French trans-governmental R and D program against CBRN-E threats, CEA (French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission) is studying the detection of Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) by neutron interrogation with the Associated Particle Technique (APT). Coincidences including at least 3 fission neutrons or gamma rays induced by tagged neutrons are used to detect and distinguish SNM from benign materials in which lower multiplicity events of 1 or 2 particles are produced by (n, 2n) or (n, n'γ) reactions. Coincidence are detected by fast plastic scintillators and correlated with tagged neutrons to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. Dedicated data acquisition electronics (DAQ) has been developed with independent FPGA cards associated to each detector, so that the acquisition window can be opened by any of the plastic scintillators. DAQ tests in passive mode are presented, in which acquisition is triggered by the sum signal of all detectors. The system time and energy calibration and resolution are reported, as well as the qualification of numerical simulations thanks to experimental data acquired with simple setups using a 252 Cf source. Numerical studies for the design and performance of cargo container inspection are also performed with the MCNP-PoliMi computer code and the ROOT data analysis package. SNM detection in iron cargo is quite straightforward but in organic matrix, data processing will need to combine more information to evidence SNM. (authors)

  14. Comparison of techniques active and passive in measurement of radon concentration (222Ra) in the air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Evaldo Paulo de

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to perform a study comparing radon concentration measurements between two techniques used to measure radon gas in the air: one using LEXAN polycarbonate plastic detectors and the other the continuous monitor in AlphaGUARD passive mode. The concentrations of radon gas within radon emanation chambers were measured using calibrated / traceable sources generating 222 Rn through 226 Ra. In calibration the 'calibration factor' or 'sensitivity' was determined for the LEXAN plastic detector. The calibration work of the dosimeters was carried out at the Radon Laboratory of the Environmental Analysis Division - DIRAD IRD/CNEN and at the Natural Radioactivity Laboratory (LRN) of the Center for the Development of Nuclear Technology (CDTN/CNEN). The 'calibration factor' or 'sensitivity' was found to be 32.34 (traits.cm -2 )/(kBq.d.m -3 ). This factor was used to determine the radon concentration measured by the LEXAN plastic detectors. Also in the calibration, the efficiencies for LEXAN (94.1% ± 9.7%) and AlphaGUARD (92.5% ± 7.2%) were determined. The statistical analysis used showed good parity in the results of the measurements. It was concluded that the results were satisfactory and will serve as a good reference for studies related to the radon air meters used in this work. (author)

  15. Inertial focusing and passive micro-mixing techniques for rare cells capturing microfluidic platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phadke, Manisha; Shaner, Sebastian; Shah, Shreyas; Rodriguez, Ygnacio; Wibowo, Denni; Whulanza, Yudan; Teriete, Peter; Allen, Jeff; Kassegne, Sam

    2018-02-01

    Isolation and capture of rare cells continues to be a daunting task that is still looking for an innovative and efficient method. While a variety of approaches have been suggested over the past several years, immunocapturing in a microfluidic platform carries a substantial promise as shown by recent published works. In this paper, we introduced a combination of inertial focusing and passive micro-mixing through 3D chevron-type features in a microchannel to induce chaotic mixing within antibody-coated microchannels and, ultimately, promote rare cell capture. The device introduced in this work contains curved microchannels that consist of a series of staggered chevron grooves. The curved channels enable inertial focusing while the chevron grooves allow for chaotic mixing. The microfluidics platform microfabricated through soft lithography has a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) foundation and was thinly coated with an alginate hydrogel derivatized with streptavidin. We submitted that our qualitative and quantitative results demonstrated the potentials in advancements in rare cell isolation through this integration of two techniques.

  16. Phenanthrene binding by humic acid–protein complexes as studied by passive dosing technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Jian; Wang, Zhenyu; Ghosh, Saikat; Xing, Baoshan

    2014-01-01

    This work investigated the binding behavior of phenanthrene by humic acids (HA-2 and HA-5), proteins (bovine serum albumin (BSA)), lysozyme and pepsin), and their complexes using a passive dosing technique. All sorption isotherms were fitted well with Freundlich model and the binding capability followed an order of HA-5 > HA-2 > BSA > pepsin > lysozyme. In NaCl solution, phenanthrene binding to HA-BSA complexes was much higher than the sum of binding to individual HA and BSA, while there was no enhancement for HA-pepsin. Positively charged lysozyme slightly lowered phenanthrene binding on both HAs due to strong aggregation of HA-lysozyme complexes, leading to reduction in the number of binding sites. The binding enhancement by HA-BSA was observed under all tested ion species and ionic strengths. This enhancement can be explained by unfolding of protein, reduction of aggregate size and formation of HA-BSA complexes with favorable conformations for binding phenanthrene. Highlights: • Phenanthrene binding capability followed an order: HA-5>HA-2>BSA>pepsin>lysozyme. • Phenanthrene binding to HA-BSA was enhanced relative to individual HA and BSA. • Binding enhancement to HA-BSA was observed under all tested solution conditions. • The enhancement is related to BSA unfolding, size reduction and HA-BSA complexation. -- Phenanthrene binding to HA-BSA complexes is much higher than the sum to individual HA and BSA while there was no binding enhancement to HA-pepsin or HA-lysozyme

  17. Reverse Non-Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics Demonstrate That Surface Passivation Controls Thermal Transport at Semiconductor-Solvent Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannah, Daniel C; Gezelter, J Daniel; Schaller, Richard D; Schatz, George C

    2015-06-23

    We examine the role played by surface structure and passivation in thermal transport at semiconductor/organic interfaces. Such interfaces dominate thermal transport in semiconductor nanomaterials owing to material dimensions much smaller than the bulk phonon mean free path. Utilizing reverse nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we calculate the interfacial thermal conductance (G) between a hexane solvent and chemically passivated wurtzite CdSe surfaces. In particular, we examine the dependence of G on the CdSe slab thickness, the particular exposed crystal facet, and the extent of surface passivation. Our results indicate a nonmonotonic dependence of G on ligand-grafting density, with interfaces generally exhibiting higher thermal conductance for increasing surface coverage up to ∼0.08 ligands/Å(2) (75-100% of a monolayer, depending on the particular exposed facet) and decreasing for still higher coverages. By analyzing orientational ordering and solvent penetration into the ligand layer, we show that a balance of competing effects is responsible for this nonmonotonic dependence. Although the various unpassivated CdSe surfaces exhibit similar G values, the crystal structure of an exposed facet nevertheless plays an important role in determining the interfacial thermal conductance of passivated surfaces, as the density of binding sites on a surface determines the ligand-grafting densities that may ultimately be achieved. We demonstrate that surface passivation can increase G relative to a bare surface by roughly 1 order of magnitude and that, for a given extent of passivation, thermal conductance can vary by up to a factor of ∼2 between different surfaces, suggesting that appropriately tailored nanostructures may direct heat flow in an anisotropic fashion for interface-limited thermal transport.

  18. Amine treatment induced perovskite nanowire network in perovskite solar cells: efficient surface passivation and carrier transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ke; Cui, Can; Wang, Peng; Lin, Ping; Qiang, Yaping; Xu, Lingbo; Xie, Jiangsheng; Yang, Zhengrui; Zhu, Xiaodong; Yu, Xuegong; Yang, Deren

    2018-02-01

    In the fabrication of high efficiency organic-inorganic metal halide perovskite solar cells (PSCs), an additional interface modifier is usually applied for enhancing the interface passivation and carrier transport. In this paper, we develop an innovative method with in-situ growth of one-dimensional perovskite nanowire (1D PNW) network triggered by Lewis amine over the perovskite films. To our knowledge, this is the first time to fabricate PSCs with shape-controlled perovskite surface morphology, which improved power conversion efficiency (PCE) from 14.32% to 16.66% with negligible hysteresis. The amine molecule can passivate the trap states on the polycrystalline perovskite surface to reduce trap-state density. Meanwhile, as a fast channel, the 1D PNWs would promote carrier transport from the bulk perovskite film to the electron transport layer. The PSCs with 1D PNW modification not only exhibit excellent photovoltaic performances, but also show good stability with only 4% PCE loss within 30 days in the ambient air without encapsulation. Our results strongly suggest that in-situ grown 1D PNW network provides a feasible and effective strategy for nanostructured optoelectronic devices such as PSCs to achieve superior performances.

  19. Method for surface passivation and protection of cadmium zinc telluride crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mescher, Mark J.; James, Ralph B.; Schlesinger, Tuviah E.; Hermon, Haim

    2000-01-01

    A method for reducing the leakage current in CZT crystals, particularly Cd.sub.1-x Zn.sub.x Te crystals (where x is greater than equal to zero and less than or equal to 0.5), and preferably Cd.sub.0.9 Zn.sub.0.1 Te crystals, thereby enhancing the ability of these crystal to spectrally resolve radiological emissions from a wide variety of radionuclides. Two processes are disclosed. The first method provides for depositing, via reactive sputtering, a silicon nitride hard-coat overlayer which provides significant reduction in surface leakage currents. The second method enhances the passivation by oxidizing the CZT surface with an oxygen plasma prior to silicon nitride deposition without breaking the vacuum state.

  20. Surface analysis and techniques in biology

    CERN Document Server

    Smentkowski, Vincent S

    2014-01-01

    This book highlights state-of-the-art surface analytical instrumentation, advanced data analysis tools, and the use of complimentary surface analytical instrumentation to perform a complete analysis of biological systems.

  1. Passivating surface states on water splitting hematite photoanodes with alumina overlayers

    KAUST Repository

    Le Formal, Florian

    2011-01-24

    Hematite is a promising material for inexpensive solar energy conversion via water splitting but has been limited by the large overpotential (0.5-0.6 V) that must be applied to afford high water oxidation photocurrent. This has conventionally been addressed by coating it with a catalyst to increase the kinetics of the oxygen evolution reaction. However, surface recombination at trapping states is also thought to be an important factor for the overpotential, and herein we investigate a strategy to passivate trapping states using conformal overlayers applied by atomic layer deposition. While TiO2 overlayers show no beneficial effect, we find that an ultra-thin coating of Al2O3 reduces the overpotential required with state-of-the-art nano-structured photo-anodes by as much as 100 mV and increases the photocurrent by a factor of 3.5 (from 0.24 mA cm-2 to 0.85 mA cm-2) at +1.0 V vs. the reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE) under standard illumination conditions. The subsequent addition of Co2+ ions as a catalyst further decreases the overpotential and leads to a record photocurrent density at 0.9 V vs. RHE (0.42 mA cm-2). A detailed investigation into the effect of the Al2O3 overlayer by electrochemical impedance and photoluminescence spectroscopy reveals a significant change in the surface capacitance and radiative recombination, respectively, which distinguishes the observed overpotential reduction from a catalytic effect and confirms the passivation of surface states. Importantly, this work clearly demonstrates that two distinct loss processes are occurring on the surface of high-performance hematite and suggests a viable route to individually address them. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011.

  2. Active and Passive Remote Sensing Data Time Series for Flood Detection and Surface Water Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bioresita, Filsa; Puissant, Anne; Stumpf, André; Malet, Jean-Philippe

    2017-04-01

    As a consequence of environmental changes surface waters are undergoing changes in time and space. A better knowledge of the spatial and temporal distribution of surface waters resources becomes essential to support sustainable policies and development activities. Especially because surface waters, are not only a vital sweet water resource, but can also pose hazards to human settlements and infrastructures through flooding. Floods are a highly frequent disaster in the world and can caused huge material losses. Detecting and mapping their spatial distribution is fundamental to ascertain damages and for relief efforts. Spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is an effective way to monitor surface waters bodies over large areas since it provides excellent temporal coverage and, all-weather day-and-night imaging capabilities. However, emergent vegetation, trees, wind or flow turbulence can increase radar back-scatter returns and pose problems for the delineation of inundated areas. In such areas, passive remote sensing data can be used to identify vegetated areas and support the interpretation of SAR data. The availability of new Earth Observation products, for example Sentinel-1 (active) and Sentinel-2 (passive) imageries, with both high spatial and temporal resolution, have the potential to facilitate flood detection and monitoring of surface waters changes which are very dynamic in space and time. In this context, the research consists of two parts. In the first part, the objective is to propose generic and reproducible methodologies for the analysis of Sentinel-1 time series data for floods detection and surface waters mapping. The processing chain comprises a series of pre-processing steps and the statistical modeling of the pixel value distribution to produce probabilistic maps for the presence of surface waters. Images pre-processing for all Sentinel-1 images comprise the reduction SAR effect like orbit errors, speckle noise, and geometric effects. A modified

  3. Passivation of metal surface states: microscopic origin for uniform monolayer graphene by low temperature chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Insu; Yang, Heejun; Lee, Sung-Hoon; Heo, Jinseong; Seo, David H; Shin, Jaikwang; Chung, U-In; Kim, Zheong Gou; Chung, Hyun-Jong; Seo, Sunae

    2011-03-22

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations were used to investigate the surface morphology and electronic structure of graphene synthesized on Cu by low temperature chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Periodic line patterns originating from the arrangements of carbon atoms on the Cu surface passivate the interaction between metal substrate and graphene, resulting in flawless inherent graphene band structure in pristine graphene/Cu. The effective elimination of metal surface states by the passivation is expected to contribute to the growth of monolayer graphene on Cu, which yields highly enhanced uniformity on the wafer scale, making progress toward the commercial application of graphene.

  4. False-positive result when a diphenylcarbazide spot test is used on trivalent chromium-passivated zinc surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reveko, Valeriia; Lampert, Felix; Din, Rameez Ud

    2018-01-01

    A colorimetric 1,5-diphenylcarbazide (DPC)-based spot test can be used to identify hexavalent chromium on various metallic and leather surfaces. DPC testing on trivalent chromium-passivated zinc surfaces has unexpectedly given positive results in some cases, apparently indicating the presence...... was used for the initial detection of hexavalent chromium on new and 1-year-aged trivalent chromium-passivated zinc surfaces. Then, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was performed for all samples. Results The DPC spot test indicated the presence of hexavalent chromium in aged, but not new, trivalent...

  5. Surface-related reduction of photoluminescence in GaAs quantum wires and its recovery by new passivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiozaki, Nanako; Anantathanasarn, Sanguan; Sato, Taketomo; Hashizume, Tamotsu; Hasegawa, Hideki

    2005-01-01

    Etched GaAs quantum wires (QWRs) and selectively grown (SG) QWRs were fabricated, and dependence of their photoluminescence (PL) properties on QWR width (W) and QWR distance to surface (d) were investigated. PL intensity greatly reduced with reduction of W and d, due to non-radiative recombination through surface states. Surface passivation by growing a Si interface control layer (Si-ICL) on group III-terminated surfaces greatly improved PL properties

  6. Surface passivity largely governs the bioaccessibility of nickel-based powder particles at human exposure conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedberg, Yolanda S; Herting, Gunilla; Latvala, Siiri; Elihn, Karine; Karlsson, Hanna L; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger

    2016-11-01

    The European chemical framework REACH requires that hazards and risks posed by chemicals, including alloys and metals, are identified and proven safe for humans and the environment. Therefore, differences in bioaccessibility in terms of released metals in synthetic biological fluids (different pH (1.5-7.4) and composition) that are relevant for different human exposure routes (inhalation, ingestion, and dermal contact) have been assessed for powder particles of an alloy containing high levels of nickel (Inconel 718, 57 wt% nickel). This powder is compared with the bioaccessibility of two nickel-containing stainless steel powders (AISI 316L, 10-12% nickel) and with powders representing their main pure alloy constituents: two nickel metal powders (100% nickel), two iron metal powders and two chromium metal powders. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, microscopy, light scattering, and nitrogen absorption were employed for the particle and surface oxide characterization. Atomic absorption spectroscopy was used to quantify released amounts of metals in solution. Cytotoxicity (Alamar blue assay) and DNA damage (comet assay) of the Inconel powder were assessed following exposure of the human lung cell line A549, as well as its ability to generate reactive oxygen species (DCFH-DA assay). Despite its high nickel content, the Inconel alloy powder did not release any significant amounts of metals and did not induce any toxic response. It is concluded, that this is related to the high surface passivity of the Inconel powder governed by its chromium-rich surface oxide. Read-across from the pure metal constituents is hence not recommended either for this or any other passive alloy. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Solar chimney integrated with passive evaporative cooler applied on glazing surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Touma, Albert; Ghali, Kamel; Ghaddar, Nesreen; Ismail, Nagham

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the performance of a hybrid system applied on glazing surfaces for reducing the space cooling load and radiation asymmetry. The proposed system combines the principles of passive evaporative cooling with the natural buoyant flow in solar chimneys to entrain outdoor air and attenuate the window surface temperature. A predictive heat and mass transport model combining the evaporative cooler, glazing section, solar chimney and an office space is developed to study the system performance in harshly hot climates. The developed model was validated through experiments conducted in a twin climatic chamber for given ambient temperature, humidity, and solar radiation conditions. Good agreement was found between the measured and the predicted window temperatures and space loads at maximum discrepancy lower than 4.3%. The proposed system is applied to a typical office space to analyze its effectiveness in reducing the window temperature, the space load and radiation asymmetry, while maintaining the indoor comfort conditions. Results have shown that the system is reduced the space load by −19.8% and attenuated the radiation asymmetry significantly for office spaces having window-to-wall ratio of 40% in climate of Riyadh, KSA. The system performance diminished when applied in locations suffering from humid weather climates. - Highlights: • A passive evaporative-cooled solar chimney system is introduced to decrease window temperature. • A mathematical model is developed of the system to predict induce air flow and window surface temperature. • The model is validated with experiments in twin room climatic chamber and using artificial solar lamps. • The system reduces window maximum temperature by 5 °C in the hot dry climate of Riyadh, KSA. • It reduced the space load by 19.4% for office spaces at window-to-wall ratio of 40% in Riyadh, KSA.

  8. Passive Solar Techniques to Improve Thermal Comfort and Reduce Energy Consumption of Domestic Use

    OpenAIRE

    Naci Kalkan; Ihsan Dagtekin

    2016-01-01

    Passive design responds to improve indoor thermal comfort and minimize the energy consumption. The present research analyzed the how efficiently passive solar technologies generate heating and cooling and provide the system integration for domestic applications. In addition to this, the aim of this study is to increase the efficiency of solar systems system with integration some innovation and optimization. As a result, outputs of the project might start a new sector to provide environmentall...

  9. Surface passivation investigation on ultra-thin atomic layer deposited aluminum oxide layers for their potential application to form tunnel layer passivated contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Zheng; Ling, Zhi Peng; Nandakumar, Naomi; Kaur, Gurleen; Ke, Cangming; Liao, Baochen; Aberle, Armin G.; Stangl, Rolf

    2017-08-01

    The surface passivation performance of atomic layer deposited ultra-thin aluminium oxide layers with different thickness in the tunnel layer regime, i.e., ranging from one atomic cycle (∼0.13 nm) to 11 atomic cycles (∼1.5 nm) on n-type silicon wafers is studied. The effect of thickness and thermal activation on passivation performance is investigated with corona-voltage metrology to measure the interface defect density D it(E) and the total interface charge Q tot. Furthermore, the bonding configuration variation of the AlO x films under various post-deposition thermal activation conditions is analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Additionally, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(styrene sulfonate) is used as capping layer on ultra-thin AlO x tunneling layers to further reduce the surface recombination current density to values as low as 42 fA/cm2. This work is a useful reference for using ultra-thin ALD AlO x layers as tunnel layers in order to form hole selective passivated contacts for silicon solar cells.

  10. Adaptive Response Surface Techniques in Reliability Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enevoldsen, I.; Faber, M. H.; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    1993-01-01

    Problems in connection with estimation of the reliability of a component modelled by a limit state function including noise or first order discontinuitics are considered. A gradient free adaptive response surface algorithm is developed. The algorithm applies second order polynomial surfaces...

  11. Influence of deposition temperature of thermal ALD deposited Al2O3 films on silicon surface passivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Batra

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of deposition temperature (Tdep and subsequent annealing time (tanl of atomic layer deposited aluminum oxide (Al2O3 films on silicon surface passivation (in terms of surface recombination velocity, SRV is investigated. The pristine samples (as-deposited show presence of positive fixed charges, QF. The interface defect density (Dit decreases with increase in Tdep which further decreases with tanl up to 100s. An effective surface passivation (SRV<8 cm/s is realized for Tdep ≥ 200 °C. The present investigation suggests that low thermal budget processing provides the same quality of passivation as realized by high thermal budget process (tanl between 10 to 30 min.

  12. A New Moonquake Catalog from Apollo 17 Seismic Data II: Lunar Surface Gravimeter: Implications of Expanding the Passive Seismic Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, D.; Dimech, J. L.; Weber, R. C.

    2017-12-01

    Apollo 17's Lunar Surface Gravimeter (LSG) was deployed on the Moon in 1972, and was originally intended to detect gravitational waves as a confirmation of Einstein's general theory of relativity. Due to a design problem, the instrument did not function as intended. However, remotely-issued reconfiguration commands permitted the instrument to act effectively as a passive seismometer. LSG recorded continuously until Sept. 1977, when all surface data recording was terminated. Because the instrument did not meet its primary science objective, little effort was made to archive the data. Most of it was eventually lost, with the exception of data spanning the period March 1976 until Sept. 1977, and a recent investigation demonstrated that LSG data do contain moonquake signals (Kawamura et al., 2015). The addition of useable seismic data at the Apollo 17 site has important implications for event location schemes, which improve with increasing data coverage. All previous seismic event location attempts were limited to the four stations deployed at the Apollo 12, 14, 15, and 16 sites. Apollo 17 extends the functional aperture of the seismic array significantly to the east, permitting more accurate moonquake locations and improved probing of the lunar interior. Using the standard location technique of linearized arrival time inversion through a known velocity model, Kawamura et al. (2015) used moonquake signals detected in the LSG data to refine location estimates for 49 deep moonquake clusters, and constrained new locations for five previously un-located clusters. Recent efforts of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package Data Recovery Focus Group have recovered some of the previously lost LSG data, spanning the time period April 2, 1975 to June 30, 1975. In this study, we expand Kawamura's analysis to the newly recovered data, which contain over 200 known seismic signals, including deep moonquakes, shallow moonquakes, and meteorite impacts. We have completed initial

  13. Surface passivation of GaInAsSb photodiodes with thioacetamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salesse, A.; Joullie, A.; Chevrier, F.; Cuminal, Y.; Ferblantier, G.; Christol, P. [Institut d' Electronique du Sud (IES-CEM2), UMR CNRS 5507, Case 067, Universite Montpellier 2, 34 095 Montpellier Cedex 05 (France); Calas, P. [UMR CNRS 5073 CHIMIE, Case 017, Universite Montpellier 2, 34 095 Montpellier Cedex 05 (France); Nieto, J. [Instituto de Investigacion en Comunicacion Optica (IICO), Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Alvaro Obregon 64, San Luis Potosi (Mexico)

    2007-04-15

    AlGaAsSb/GaInAsSb heterojunction mesa photodiodes having 2.2 {mu}m cutoff wavelength, grown by MBE on (p) GaSb substrates, have been passivated using thioacetamide CH{sub 4}CSNH{sub 2} and ammonium sulphide (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S. Superior characteristics were obtained from devices processed with thioacetamide in acid medium (pH=2.4). At room temperature the surface leakage currents were suppressed, and the photodiodes showed R{sub 0}A product as high as 16 {omega}cm{sup 2} and detectivity D{sup *}(2 {mu}m,0 V){proportional_to}10{sup 10} cmHz{sup 1/2}W{sup -1}. A model explaining sulfuration mechanisms with thioacetamide and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S is proposed. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Neural tension technique is no different from random passive movements in reducing spasticity in patients with traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, Jakob; Nielsen, Dorthe; Holm, Karl

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Neural tension technique (NTT) is a therapy believed to reduce spasticity and to increase range of motion (ROM). This study compared the ability of NTT and random passive movements (RPMs) to reduce spasticity in the knee flexors in 10 spastic patients with brain injury. Methods: An RCT...... was found. Conclusions: An objective evaluation of NTT demonstrates that it does not reduce spasticity. However, it does increase ROM with the same effect as RPM. [Box: see text]....

  15. S-wave velocity measurements along levees in New Orleans using passive surface wave methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, K.; Lorenzo, J. M.; Craig, M. S.; Gostic, A.

    2017-12-01

    In order to develop non-invasive methods for levee inspection, geophysical investigations were carried out at four sites along levees in the New Orleans area: 17th Street Canal, London Avenue Canal, Marrero Levee, and Industrial Canal. Three of the four sites sustained damage from Hurricane Katrina in 2005 and have since been rebuilt. The geophysical methods used include active and passive surface wave methods, and capacitively coupled resistivity. This paper summarizes the acquisition and analysis of the 1D and 2D passive surface wave data. Twelve wireless seismic data acquisition units with 2 Hz vertical component geophones were used to record data. Each unit includes a GPS receiver so that all units can be synchronized over any distance without cables. The 1D passive method used L shaped arrays of three different sizes with geophone spacing ranging from 5 to 340 m. Ten minutes to one hour of ambient noise was recorded with each array, and total data acquisition took approximately two hours at each site. The 2D method used a linear array with a geophone spacing of 5m. Four geophones were moved forward every 10 minutes along 400 1000 m length lines. Data acquisition took several hours for each line. Recorded ambient noise was processed using the spatial autocorrelation method and clear dispersion curves were obtained at all sites (Figure 1a). Minimum frequencies ranged from 0.4 to 0.7 Hz and maximum frequencies ranged from 10 to 30 Hz depending on the site. Non-linear inversion was performed and 1D and 2D S-wave velocity models were obtained. The 1D method penetrated to depths ranging from 200 to 500 m depending on the site (Figure 1b). The 2D method penetrated to a depth of 40 60 m and provided 400 1000 m cross sections along the levees (Figure 2). The interpretation focused on identifying zones beneath the levees or canal walls having low S-wave velocities corresponding to saturated, unconsolidated sands, or low-rigidity clays. Resultant S-wave velocity profiles

  16. A direct methanol fuel cell system with passive fuel delivery based on liquid surface tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuming; Liang, Yung C.

    The existing direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) systems are fed with a fixed concentration of fuel, which are either a diluted methanol solution or an active fuel delivery driven by an attached active pump. Both approaches limit the power conversion density or degrade the overall efficiency of the DMFC system significantly. Such disadvantages become more severe in small-scale DMFCs, which require a high conversion efficiency and a small physical space suitable for portable electronics. In this paper, passive fuel delivery based on a surface tension driving mechanism was designed and integrated in a laboratory-made prototype to achieve consumption depending on fuel concentration and power-free fuel delivery. Unidirectional methanol-to-water smooth flow is achieved through the capillaries of a Teflon PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) membrane based on the difference in liquid surface tension. The prototype was demonstrated to exhibit a better polarization performance and to last for an extended operating time compared to conventional DMFCs. Its high efficiency and load regulation performance were also demonstrated in contrast to an active DMFC supplied with a constant concentration fuel. The fuel delivery driven by the liquid surface tension effect demonstrated here is believed to be more applicable for future small-scale DMFCs for portable electronics.

  17. Active and passive controls of Jeffrey nanofluid flow over a nonlinear stretching surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, Tasawar; Aziz, Arsalan; Muhammad, Taseer; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    This communication explores magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) boundary-layer flow of Jeffrey nanofluid over a nonlinear stretching surface with active and passive controls of nanoparticles. A nonlinear stretching surface generates the flow. Effects of thermophoresis and Brownian diffusion are considered. Jeffrey fluid is electrically conducted subject to non-uniform magnetic field. Low magnetic Reynolds number and boundary-layer approximations have been considered in mathematical modelling. The phenomena of impulsing the particles away from the surface in combination with non-zero mass flux condition is known as the condition of zero mass flux. Convergent series solutions for the nonlinear governing system are established through optimal homotopy analysis method (OHAM). Graphs have been sketched in order to analyze that how the temperature and concentration distributions are affected by distinct physical flow parameters. Skin friction coefficient and local Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are also computed and analyzed. Our findings show that the temperature and concentration distributions are increasing functions of Hartman number and thermophoresis parameter.

  18. Colossal positive magnetoresistance in surface-passivated oxygen-deficient strontium titanite

    KAUST Repository

    David, Adrian

    2015-05-15

    Modulation of resistance by an external magnetic field, i.e. magnetoresistance effect, has been a long-lived theme of research due to both fundamental science and device applications. Here we report colossal positive magnetoresistance (CPMR) (>30,000% at a temperature of 2 K and a magnetic field of 9 T) discovered in degenerate semiconducting strontium titanite (SrTiO3) single crystals capped with ultrathin SrTiO3/LaAlO3 bilayers. The low-pressure high-temperature homoepitaxial growth of several unit cells of SrTiO3 introduces oxygen vacancies and high-mobility carriers in the bulk SrTiO3, and the three-unit-cell LaAlO3 capping layer passivates the surface and improves carrier mobility by suppressing surface-defect-related scattering. The coexistence of multiple types of carriers and inhomogeneous transport lead to the emergence of CPMR. This unit-cell-level surface engineering approach is promising to be generalized to others oxides, and to realize devices with high-mobility carriers and interesting magnetoelectronic properties.

  19. Effect of Ultrasonic Nano-Crystal Surface Modification (UNSM) on the Passivation Behavior of Aged 316L Stainless Steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki-Tae; Lee, Jung-Hee; Kim, Young-Sik

    2017-06-27

    Stainless steels have good corrosion resistance in many environments but welding or aging can decrease their resistance. This work focused on the effect of aging time and ultrasonic nano-crystal surface modification on the passivation behavior of 316L stainless steel. In the case of slightly sensitized 316L stainless steel, increasing the aging time drastically decreased the pitting potential, increased the passive current density, and decreased the resistance of the passive film, even though aging did not form chromium carbide and a chromium depletion zone. This behavior is due to the micro-galvanic corrosion between the matrix and carbon segregated area, and this shows the importance of carbon segregation in grain boundaries to the pitting corrosion resistance of stainless steel, in addition to the formation of the chromium depletion zone. UNSM (Ultrasonic Nano Crystal Surface Modification)-treatment to the slightly sensitized 316L stainless steel increased the pitting potential, decreased the passive current density, and increased the resistance of the passive film. However, in the case of heavily sensitized 316L stainless steel, UNSM-treatment decreased the pitting potential, increased the passive current density, and decreased the resistance of the passive film. This behavior is due to the dual effects of the UNSM-treatment. That is, the UNSM-treatment reduced the carbon segregation, regardless of whether the stainless steel 316L was slightly or heavily sensitized. However, since this treatment made mechanical flaws in the outer surface in the case of the heavily sensitized stainless steel, UNSM-treatment may eliminate chromium carbide, and this flaw can be a pitting initiation site, and therefore decrease the pitting corrosion resistance.

  20. Antibacterial effect of surface pretreatment techniques against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (CFU/ml), respectively, among the groups evaluated (P < 0.05). Er:YAG laser irradiation and its combinations with other antibacterial surface pretreatment applications also inhibited the bacterial growth with, respectively, 1444, 406, and 294 CFU/ml bacterial recovery being more efficient than KTP laser irradiation and ozone ...

  1. Research and development of photovoltaic power system. Research on surface passivation for high-efficiency silicon solar cells; Taiyoko hatsuden system no kenkyu kaihatsu. Hyomen passivation no kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, T. [Tokyo Univ. of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Technology

    1994-12-01

    This paper reports the result obtained during fiscal 1994 on research on surface passivation of high-efficiency silicon solar cells. In research on carrier recombination on SiO2/doped silicon interface, measurements were carried out on minority carrier life with respect to p-type silicon substrates with which phosphorus with high and low concentrations are diffused uniformly on the surface and non-uniformly on the back and then oxidized. The measurements were performed for the purpose of evaluating the carrier recombination at p-n junctions. Effective life time of oxidized test samples increased longer than that of prior to the oxidization as a result of effect of surface passivation contributing remarkably. In research on reduction in carrier recombination on SiO2/Si interface by using H radical annealing, experiments were conducted by using a method that uses more active H-atoms. As a result, it was revealed that the reduction effect is recognized at as low temperature as 200{degree}C, and photo-bias effect is also noticeable. Other research activities included analytic research on minority carrier recombination on micro crystalline silicon/crystalline silicon interface, and experimental research on evaluation of minority carrier life of poly-crystalline silicon wafers. 6 figs.

  2. Effect of surface passivation on corrosion resistance and antibacterial properties of Cu-bearing 316L stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jinlong; Xu, Dake; Shahzad, M. Babar; Kang, Qiang; Sun, Ying; Sun, Ziqing; Zhang, Shuyuan; Ren, Ling; Yang, Chunguang; Yang, Ke

    2016-11-01

    The resistance for pitting corrosion, passive film stability and antibacterial performance of 316L-Cu SS passivated by nitric acid solution containing certain concentration of copper sulfate, were studied by electrochemical cyclic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and co-culture with bacteria. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used to analyze the Cu2+ ions release from 316L-Cu SS surface. XPS analysis proved that the enrichment of CuO, Cr2O3 and Cr(OH)3 on the surface of specimen could simultaneously guarantee a better corrosion resistance and stable antibacterial properties. The biocompatibility evaluation determined by RTCA assay also indicated that the 316L-Cu SS after antibacterial passivation was completely biocompatible.

  3. Monitoring ambient ozone with a passive measurement technique method, field results and strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheeren, BA; Adema, EH

    1996-01-01

    A low-cost, accurate and sensitive passive measurement method for ozone has been developed and tested. The method is based on the reaction of ozone with indigo carmine which results in colourless reaction products which are detected spectrophotometrically after exposure. Coated glass filters are

  4. A passive and conservative technique for the retrieval of foreign bodies in lower second premolar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Rahaman Jarallah Al Ghamdi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Metallic obstructions in the root canal space render its removal or negotiation by-passing one of the most challenging procedures encountered in the endodontic retreatment which may jeopardize the tooth structures, several procedures had been advocated. In this case, due to limited available equipment negotiating these obstructions by passive and conservative approach had been implemented.

  5. Experimental comparison of bearing estimation techniques for short passive towed sonar arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colin, M.E.G.D.; Groen, J.; Quesson, B.A.J.

    2004-01-01

    Although Low Frequency Active Sonar (LFAS) is considered one of the best means of detection and localization of a submarine in shallow water, the use of an active system is not always possible for tactical reasons. It is therefore interesting to include a passive mode in these systems by using the

  6. Passive wireless surface acoustic wave sensors for monitoring sequestration sites CO2 emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yizhong [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Chyu, Minking [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Wang, Qing-Ming [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2013-02-14

    University of Pittsburgh’s Transducer lab has teamed with the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) to conduct a comprehensive study to develop/evaluate low-cost, efficient CO2 measuring technologies for geological sequestration sites leakage monitoring. A passive wireless CO2 sensing system based on surface acoustic wave technology and carbon nanotube nanocomposite was developed. Surface acoustic wave device was studied to determine the optimum parameters. Delay line structure was adopted as basic sensor structure. CNT polymer nanocomposite was fabricated and tested under different temperature and strain condition for natural environment impact evaluation. Nanocomposite resistance increased for 5 times under pure strain, while the temperature dependence of resistance for CNT solely was -1375ppm/°C. The overall effect of temperature on nanocomposite resistance was -1000ppm/°C. The gas response of the nanocomposite was about 10% resistance increase under pure CO2 . The sensor frequency change was around 300ppm for pure CO2 . With paralyne packaging, the sensor frequency change from relative humidity of 0% to 100% at room temperature decreased from over 1000ppm to less than 100ppm. The lowest detection limit of the sensor is 1% gas concentration, with 36ppm frequency change. Wireless module was tested and showed over one foot transmission distance at preferred parallel orientation.

  7. Development of a Passive Microwave Surface Melt Record for Antarctica and Antarctic Ice Shelves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmosky, C. C.; Reasons, J.; Morgan, N. J.

    2015-12-01

    Antarctica contains the largest mass of ice in the world and much time and energy has gone into researching the ice-ocean-atmosphere-land dynamics that, in a warming climate, have the potential to significantly affect sea levels throughout the world. While there are many datasets currently available to researchers examining sea ice extent and volume, glacier thickness, ice shelf retreat and expansion, and atmospheric variables such as temperature and wind speeds, there is not currently a dataset that offers surface melt extent of land ice in the southern hemisphere. The database outlined here uses the Cross-Polarized Gradient Ratio (XPGR) to show surface melt extent on a daily basis for all of Antarctica. XPGR utilizes passive microwave satellite imagery in the 19 GHz and 37GHz frequencies to determine the presence or absence of greater than 1% liquid water in the top layers of ice. Daily XPGR melt occurrence (1987-2014) was calculated for both the ice sheet as well as ice shelves on Antarctica, and is available as a GIS shapefile or asci text file.

  8. Innovative techniques for removing concrete surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFarland, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    This report centers on the use of heat to decompose contaminated concrete to facilitate its removal. It discusses the use of electrical resistance heating and induction heating to cause differential expansion between the reinforcing steel and the concrete in order to spall the concrete. It introduces the concept of using induction heating to both decompose and spall steel impregnated concrete, acknowledging the work of Charles H. Henager in this field. The techniques are offered as theoretical and untested possibilities. Their practical application depends upon the effectiveness of alternatives and upon further development of these concepts

  9. Effect of PECVD SiNx/SiOy Nx –Si interface property on surface passivation of silicon wafer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Xiao-Jie; Zhou Chun-Lan; Zhou Su; Wang Wen-Jing; Zhu Jun-Jie

    2016-01-01

    It is studied in this paper that the electrical characteristics of the interface between SiO y N x /SiN x stack and silicon wafer affect silicon surface passivation. The effects of precursor flow ratio and deposition temperature of the SiO y N x layer on interface parameters, such as interface state density Di t and fixed charge Q f , and the surface passivation quality of silicon are observed. Capacitance–voltage measurements reveal that inserting a thin SiO y N x layer between the SiN x and the silicon wafer can suppress Q f in the film and D it at the interface. The positive Q f and D it and a high surface recombination velocity in stacks are observed to increase with the introduced oxygen and minimal hydrogen in the SiO y N x film increasing. Prepared by deposition at a low temperature and a low ratio of N 2 O/SiH 4 flow rate, the SiO y N x /SiN x stacks result in a low effective surface recombination velocity (S eff ) of 6 cm/s on a p-type 1 Ω·cm–5 Ω·cm FZ silicon wafer. The positive relationship between S eff and D it suggests that the saturation of the interface defect is the main passivation mechanism although the field-effect passivation provided by the fixed charges also make a contribution to it. (paper)

  10. High reduction of interfacial charge recombination in colloidal quantum dot solar cells by metal oxide surface passivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jin; Kuga, Yuki; Mora-Seró, Iván; Toyoda, Taro; Ogomi, Yuhei; Hayase, Shuzi; Bisquert, Juan; Shen, Qing

    2015-03-12

    Bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells based on colloidal QDs and metal oxide nanowires (NWs) possess unique and outstanding advantages in enhancing light harvesting and charge collection in comparison to planar architectures. However, the high surface area of the NW structure often brings about a large amount of recombination (especially interfacial recombination) and limits the open-circuit voltage in BHJ solar cells. This problem is solved here by passivating the surface of the metal oxide component in PbS colloidal quantum dot solar cells (CQDSCs). By coating thin TiO2 layers onto ZnO-NW surfaces, the open-circuit voltage and power conversion efficiency have been improved by over 40% in PbS CQDSCs. Characterization by transient photovoltage decay and impedance spectroscopy indicated that the interfacial recombination was significantly reduced by the surface passivation strategy. An efficiency as high as 6.13% was achieved through the passivation approach and optimization for the length of the ZnO-NW arrays (device active area: 16 mm2). All solar cells were tested in air, and exhibited excellent air storage stability (without any performance decline over more than 130 days). This work highlights the significance of metal oxide passivation in achieving high performance BHJ solar cells. The charge recombination mechanism uncovered in this work could shed light on the further improvement of PbS CQDSCs and/or other types of solar cells.

  11. Relation of lifetime to surface passivation for atomic-layer-deposited Al2O3 on crystalline silicon solar cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Young Joon; Song, Hee Eun; Chang, Hyo Sik

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We investigated the relation of potassium contamination on Si solar wafer to lifetime. • We deposited Al 2 O 3 layer by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on Si solar wafer after several cleaning process. • Potassium can be left on Si surface by incomplete cleaning process and degrade the Al 2 O 3 passivation quality. - Abstract: We investigated the relation of potassium contamination on a crystalline silicon (c-Si) surface after potassium hydroxide (KOH) etching to the lifetime of the c-Si solar cell. Alkaline solution was employed for saw damage removal (SDR), texturing, and planarization of a textured c-Si solar wafer prior to atomic layer deposition (ALD) Al 2 O 3 growth. In the solar-cell manufacturing process, ALD Al 2 O 3 passivation is utilized to obtain higher conversion efficiency. ALD Al 2 O 3 shows excellent surface passivation, though minority carrier lifetime varies with cleaning conditions. In the present study, we investigated the relation of potassium contamination to lifetime in solar-cell processing. The results showed that the potassium-contaminated samples, due to incomplete cleaning of KOH, had a short lifetime, thus establishing that residual potassium can degrade Al 2 O 3 surface passivation

  12. Techniques of Ozone Monitoring in a Mountain Forest Region: Passive and Continuous Sampling, Vertical and Canopy Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo Gerosa

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Ozone is the most harmful air pollutant for plant ecosystems in the Mediterranean and Alpine areas due to its biological and economic damage to crops and forests. In order to evaluate the relation between ozone exposure and vegetation injury under on-field conditions, suitable ozone monitoring techniques were investi-gated. In the framework of a 5-year research project aimed at ozone risk assessment on forests, both continuous analysers and passive samplers were employed during the summer seasons (1994�1998 in different sites of a wide mountain region (80 x 40 km2 on the southern slope of the European Alps. Continuous analysers allowed the recording of ozone hourly concentration means necessary both to calculate specific exposure indexes (such as AOT, SUM, W126 and to record daily time-courses. Passive samplers, even though supplied only weekly mean concentration values, made it possible to estimate the altitude concentration gradient useful to correct the altitude dependence of ozone concentrations to be inserted into exposure indexes. In-canopy ozone profiles were also determined by placing passive samplers at different heights inside the forest canopy. Vertical ozone soundings by means of tethered balloons (kytoons allowed the measurement of the vertical concentration gradient above the forest canopy. They also revealed ozone reservoirs aloft and were useful to explain the ozone advection dynamic in mountain slopes where ground measurement proved to be inadequate. An intercomparison between passive (PASSAM, CH and continuous measurements highlighted the necessity to accurately standardize all the exposure operations, particularly the pre- and postexposure conservation at cold temperature to avoid dye (DPE activity. Advantages and disadvantages from each mentioned technique are discussed.

  13. Atomic models for anionic ligand passivation of cation-rich surfaces of IV-VI, II-VI, and III-V colloidal quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Yoo, Dongsuk; Kim, Yong-Hyun

    2016-12-22

    We formulated atomic models of cation-rich surfaces passivated with anionic ligands for IV-VI, II-VI, and III-V colloidal quantum dots, employing electron counting models and quantum mechanical calculations. We found that the fractional dangling bonds of cation-rich (100) and (111) surfaces could be greatly stabilized by dimerization-anion passivation and amine-anion co-passivation.

  14. Laser ablation and photostimulated passivation of the surface of Cd1–хZnхTe crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zagoruiko Yu. A.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A new physical method of Cd1–хZnхTe-detectors passivation is proposed — the treatment of crystal surface by a laser ablation (LA with subsequent photostimulated passivation (PhSP, during wich a high-resistance oxide layer is formed on it’s surface after the surface cleaning under intensive light irradiation effect. It is shown that the method of LA+PhSP is manufacturable and in comparison with PhSP and PhESP methods developed earlier provides a thick, homogeneous and high-oxide films, which significantly increases the surface resistivity of Cd1–хZnхTe samples and reduces leakage currents in them.

  15. Effective surface treatment for GaN metal-insulator-semiconductor high-electron-mobility transistors using HF plus N2 plasma prior to SiN passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shih-Chien; Trinh, Hai-Dang; Dai, Gu-Ming; Huang, Chung-Kai; Dee, Chang-Fu; Yeop Majlis, Burhanuddin; Biswas, Dhrubes; Chang, Edward Yi

    2016-01-01

    An effective surface cleaning technique is demonstrated for the GaN metal-insulator-semiconductor high-electron-mobility transistor (MIS-HEMT) passivation process. In this study, dilute HF solution and in situ N2 plasma treatments were adopted to remove the native oxide and recover the nitrogen-vacancy defects at the GaN surface before device passivation. To investigate the correlation between the properties of the SiN/GaN interface and the device performance, the GaN MIS-HEMTs were characterized using current-voltage (I-V) measurement, capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurement, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. With the application of this surface treatment technique, the device exhibits improved I-V characteristics with low leakage current, low dynamic ON-resistance, and good C-V response with a steep slope. Overall, the results reveal that the oxide-related bonds and nitrogen-vacancy defects at the SiN/GaN interface are the root cause of the GaN MIS-HEMTs performance degradation.

  16. Ab initio investigation of the passivation effect of the acrylonitrile molecule on the Si(100)-(2 × 1) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usanmaz, D., E-mail: demetusanmaz@gmail.com [Physics Program, Middle East Technical University, Northern Cyprus Campus, Kalkanlı, Güzelyurt, KKTC, Mersin 10 (Turkey); Srivastava, G.P. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-17

    Highlights: • Different bonding configurations of acrylonitrile molecule on the Si(2 × 1) surface based on reported experimental results have been investigated. • The acrylonitrile molecule has the minimum energy configuration at the on-top adsorption site. • The adsorption of the acrylonitrile molecule passivates the Si(2 × 1) surface both chemically as well as electronically. • The resulting surface structure is passivated both chemically as well as electronically. - Abstract: Based on pseudopotentials and the density functional theory, we have investigated the atomic geometry and electronic structure of the acrylonitrile molecule adsorbed on the Si(100)-(2 × 1) surface. By considering different bonding configurations based on reported experimental results, we have investigated several possible geometries. Our total energy results suggest that the acrylonitrile molecule has the minimum energy configuration at the on-top adsorbtion site. The electronic surface properties of the most stable structure have been discussed. Our results show that the adsorption of this molecule fully passivates the Si(001)(2 × 1) surface.

  17. Al-Si alloy point contact formation and rear surface passivation for silicon solar cells using double layer porous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moumni, Besma; Ben Jaballah, Abdelkader; Bessais, Brahim

    2012-01-01

    Lowering the rear surface recombination velocities by a dielectric layer has fascinating advantages compared with the standard fully covered Al back-contact silicon solar cells. In this work the passivation effect by double layer porous silicon (PS) (wide band gap) and the formation of Al-Si alloy in narrow p-type Si point contact areas for rear passivated solar cells are analysed. As revealed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, we found that a thin passivating aluminum oxide (Al 2 O 3 ) layer is formed. Scanning electron microscopy analysis performed in cross sections shows that with bilayer PS, liquid Al penetrates into the openings, alloying with the Si substrate at depth and decreasing the contact resistivity. At the solar cell level, the reduction in the contact area and resistivity leads to a minimization of the fill factor losses.

  18. A highly sensitive radioimmunoassay technique for subtyping the antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, C.T.; Nath, N.; Berberian, H.; Dodd, R.Y.

    1978-01-01

    A highly sensitive technique for determining the subtype specificity of antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs) is described. Immunoadsorbent consisting of controlled pore glass coated with subtype specific HBsAg was used to remove homologous antibody from the test samples before testing them for residual antibody by a commercially available radioimmunoassay (RIA). A total of 73 anti-HBs-positive samples from asymptomatic blood donors were tested. In nearly 80% of these samples the subtype reactivity could be determined by this technique. Only 67% could be typed by conventional liquid phase absorption RIA and 22% by passive hemagglutination inhibition techniques. Among the samples with low anti-HBs titer, ad and ay subtypes were found with equal frequency; however, with the increase in anti-HBs titer, considerably higher proportion of ad specificity was detected. (Auth.)

  19. Impact of microcrystalline silicon carbide growth using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition on crystalline silicon surface passivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomaska, M.; Beyer, W.; Neumann, E.; Finger, F.; Ding, K.

    2015-01-01

    Highly crystalline microcrystalline silicon carbide (μc-SiC:H) with excellent optoelectronic material properties is a promising candidate as highly transparent doped layer in silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cells. These high quality materials are usually produced using hot wire chemical vapor deposition under aggressive growth conditions giving rise to the removal of the underlying passivation layer and thus the deterioration of the crystalline silicon (c-Si) surface passivation. In this work, we introduced the n-type μc-SiC:H/n-type μc-SiO x :H/intrinsic a-SiO x :H stack as a front layer configuration for p-type SHJ solar cells with the μc-SiO x :H layer acting as an etch-resistant layer against the reactive deposition conditions during the μc-SiC:H growth. We observed that the unfavorable expansion of micro-voids at the c-Si interface due to the in-diffusion of hydrogen atoms through the layer stack might be responsible for the deterioration of surface passivation. Excellent lifetime values were achieved under deposition conditions which are needed to grow high quality μc-SiC:H layers for SHJ solar cells. - Highlights: • High surface passivation quality was preserved after μc-SiC:H deposition. • μc-SiC:H/μc-SiO x :H/a-SiO x :H stack a promising front layer configuration • Void expansion at a-SiO x :H/c-Si interface for deteriorated surface passivation • μc-SiC:H provides a high transparency and electrical conductivity.

  20. A surface acoustic wave passive and wireless sensor for magnetic fields, temperature, and humidity

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Bodong

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report an integrated single-chip surface acoustic wave sensor with the capability of measuring magnetic field, temperature, and humidity. The sensor is fabricated using a thermally sensitive LiNbO3 substrate, a humidity sensitive hydrogel coating, and a magnetic field sensitive impedance load. The sensor response to individually and simultaneously changing magnetic field, temperature and humidity is characterized by connecting a network analyzer directly to the sensor. Analytical models for each measurand are derived and used to compensate noise due to cross sensitivities. The results show that all three measurands can be monitored in parallel with sensitivities of 75 ppm/°C, 0.13 dB/%R.H. (at 50%R.H.), 0.18 dB/Oe and resolutions of 0.1 °C, 0.4%R.H., 1 Oe for temperature, humidity and magnetic field, respectively. A passive wireless measurement is also conducted on a current line using, which shows the sensors capability to measure both temperature and current signals simultaneously.

  1. Antibacterial performance of polypropylene nonwoven fabric wound dressing surfaces containing passive and active components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xin, Zhirong, E-mail: xinzhirong2012@126.com [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Yantai University, Yantai 264005 (China); Du, Shanshan; Zhao, Chunyu; Chen, Hao; Sun, Miao [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Yantai University, Yantai 264005 (China); Yan, Shunjie [State Key Laboratory of Polymer Physics and Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Luan, Shifang, E-mail: sfluan@ciac.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Polymer Physics and Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); Yin, Jinghua [State Key Laboratory of Polymer Physics and Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China)

    2016-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • PNVP and PHMG components were covalently immobilized on PP{sub NWF} surface. • PP{sub NWF}-g-PNVP-PHMG possessed bacterial adhesion-resistant and bactericidal capabilities. • PP{sub NWF}-g-PNVP-PHMG obviously suppressed platelet and red blood cell adhesion. - Abstract: A growing number of wound dressing-related nosocomial infections necessitate the development of novel antibacterial strategies. Herein, polypropylene non-woven fabric (PP{sub NWF}) was facilely modified with passive and active antibacterial components, namely photografting polymerization both N-Vinyl-2-pyrrolidone (NVP) and glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) monomers, and the introduction of guanidine polymer through the reaction between active amino groups and epoxy groups. The modified samples were confirmed by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. Water contact angle measurement, antibacterial test, platelet and red blood cell adhesion were used to evaluate the hydrophilicity, antibacterial properties and hemocompatibility of the samples. It was found that the antibacterial properties were obviously enhanced, meanwhile significantly suppressing platelet and red blood cell adhesion after the above modification. This PP{sub NWF} samples that possess antifouling and antimicrobial properties, have great potential in wound dressing applications.

  2. Antibacterial performance of polypropylene nonwoven fabric wound dressing surfaces containing passive and active components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xin, Zhirong; Du, Shanshan; Zhao, Chunyu; Chen, Hao; Sun, Miao; Yan, Shunjie; Luan, Shifang; Yin, Jinghua

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • PNVP and PHMG components were covalently immobilized on PP NWF surface. • PP NWF -g-PNVP-PHMG possessed bacterial adhesion-resistant and bactericidal capabilities. • PP NWF -g-PNVP-PHMG obviously suppressed platelet and red blood cell adhesion. - Abstract: A growing number of wound dressing-related nosocomial infections necessitate the development of novel antibacterial strategies. Herein, polypropylene non-woven fabric (PP NWF ) was facilely modified with passive and active antibacterial components, namely photografting polymerization both N-Vinyl-2-pyrrolidone (NVP) and glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) monomers, and the introduction of guanidine polymer through the reaction between active amino groups and epoxy groups. The modified samples were confirmed by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. Water contact angle measurement, antibacterial test, platelet and red blood cell adhesion were used to evaluate the hydrophilicity, antibacterial properties and hemocompatibility of the samples. It was found that the antibacterial properties were obviously enhanced, meanwhile significantly suppressing platelet and red blood cell adhesion after the above modification. This PP NWF samples that possess antifouling and antimicrobial properties, have great potential in wound dressing applications.

  3. A surface acoustic wave response detection method for passive wireless torque sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yanping; Kong, Ping; Qi, Hongli; Liu, Hongye; Ji, Xiaojun

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents an effective surface acoustic wave (SAW) response detection method for the passive wireless SAW torque sensor to improve the measurement accuracy. An analysis was conducted on the relationship between the response energy-entropy and the bandwidth of SAW resonator (SAWR). A self-correlation method was modified to suppress the blurred white noise and highlight the attenuation characteristic of wireless SAW response. The SAW response was detected according to both the variation and the duration of energy-entropy ascension of an acquired RF signal. Numerical simulation results showed that the SAW response can be detected even when the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is 6dB. The proposed SAW response detection method was evaluated with several experiments at different conditions. The SAW response can be well distinguished from the sinusoidal signal and the noise. The performance of the SAW torque measurement system incorporating the detection method was tested. The obtained repeatability error was 0.23% and the linearity was 0.9934, indicating the validity of the detection method.

  4. An investigation into the effective surface passivation of quantum dots by a photo-assisted chemical method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, So-Yeong; Park, Hyun-Su; Kim, Do-yeon; Kim, Bum-Sung; Lee, Chan Gi; Kim, Woo-Byoung

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we have developed an effective amino passivation process for quantum dots (QDs) at room temperature and have investigated a passivation mechanism using a photo-assisted chemical method. As a result of the reverse reaction of the H2O molecules, the etching kinetics of the photo-assisted chemical method increased upon increasing the 3-amino-1-propanol (APOL)/H2O ratio of the etching solution. Photon-excited electron-hole pairs lead to strong bonding between the organic and surface atoms of the QDs, and results in an increase of the quantum yield (QY%). This passivation method is also applicable to CdSe/ZnSe core/shell structures of QDs, due to the passivation of mid-gap defects states at the interface. The QY% of the as-synthesized CdSe QDs is dramatically enhanced by the amino passivation from 37% to 75% and the QY% of the CdSe/ZnSe core/shell QDs is also improved by ˜28%.

  5. An investigation into the effective surface passivation of quantum dots by a photo-assisted chemical method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So-Yeong Joo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we have developed an effective amino passivation process for quantum dots (QDs at room temperature and have investigated a passivation mechanism using a photo-assisted chemical method. As a result of the reverse reaction of the H2O molecules, the etching kinetics of the photo-assisted chemical method increased upon increasing the 3-amino-1-propanol (APOL/H2O ratio of the etching solution. Photon-excited electron-hole pairs lead to strong bonding between the organic and surface atoms of the QDs, and results in an increase of the quantum yield (QY%. This passivation method is also applicable to CdSe/ZnSe core/shell structures of QDs, due to the passivation of mid-gap defects states at the interface. The QY% of the as-synthesized CdSe QDs is dramatically enhanced by the amino passivation from 37% to 75% and the QY% of the CdSe/ZnSe core/shell QDs is also improved by ∼28%.

  6. A chelating dendritic ligand capped quantum dot: preparation, surface passivation, bioconjugation and specific DNA detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dejian; Li, Yang; Hall, Elizabeth A. H.; Abell, Chris; Klenerman, David

    2011-01-01

    Herein we report the synthesis of a new chelating dendritic ligand (CDL) and its use in the preparation a compact, stable and water-soluble quantum dot (QD), and further development of specific DNA sensor. The CDL, which contains a chelative dihydrolipoic acid moiety for strong QD surface anchoring and four dendritic carboxylic acidgroups, provides a stable, compact and entangled hydrophilic coating around the QD that significantly increases the stability of the resulting water-soluble QD. A CDL-capped CdSe/ZnS core/shell QD (CDL-QD) has stronger fluorescence than that capped by a monodendate single-chain thiol, 3-mercapto-propionic acid (MPA-QD). In addition, the fluorescence of the CDL-QD can be enhanced by 2.5-fold by treatments with Zn2+ or S2- ions, presumably due to effective passivation of the surface defects. This level of fluorescence enhancement obtained for the CDL-QD is much greater than that for the MPA-QD. Further, by coupling a short single-stranded DNA target to the QD via the CDL carboxylic acidgroup, a functional QD-DNA conjugate that can resist non-specific adsorption and hybridize quickly to its complementary DNAprobe has been obtained. This functional QD-DNA conjugate is suitable for specific quantification of short, labelled complementary probes at the low DNAprobe:QD copy numbers via a QD-sensitised dyefluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) response with 500 pM sensitivity on a conventional fluorimeter.Herein we report the synthesis of a new chelating dendritic ligand (CDL) and its use in the preparation a compact, stable and water-soluble quantum dot (QD), and further development of specific DNA sensor. The CDL, which contains a chelative dihydrolipoic acid moiety for strong QD surface anchoring and four dendritic carboxylic acidgroups, provides a stable, compact and entangled hydrophilic coating around the QD that significantly increases the stability of the resulting water-soluble QD. A CDL-capped CdSe/ZnS core/shell QD (CDL-QD) has

  7. Effective surface passivation of multi-shelled InP quantum dots through a simple complexing with titanium species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Jung-Ho; Kim, Min-Seok; Han, Chang-Yeol; Jang, Eun-Pyo; Do, Young Rag; Yang, Heesun

    2018-01-01

    Fluorescent efficiency of various visible quantum dots (QDs) has been incessantly improved to meet industrially high standard mainly through the advance in core/shell heterostructural design, however, their stability against degradable environments appears still lacking. The most viable strategy to cope with this issue was to exploit chemically inert oxide phases to passivate QD surface in the form of either individual overcoating or matrix embedding. Herein, we report a simple but effective means to passivate QD surface by complexing its organic ligands with a metal alkoxide of titanium isopropoxide (Ti(i-PrO)4). For this, highly efficient red-emitting InP QDs with a multi-shell structure of ZnSeS intermediate plus ZnS outer shell are first synthesized and then the surface of resulting InP/ZnSeS/ZnS QDs is in-situ decorated with Ti(i-PrO)4. The presence of Tisbnd O species from Ti(i-PrO)4 on QD surface is verified by x-ray photoelectron and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analyses. Two comparative dispersions of pristine versus Ti(i-PrO)4-complexed QDs are exposed for certain periods of time to UV photon and heat and their temporal changes in photoluminescence are monitored, resulting in a huge improvement in QD stability from the latter ones through Ti(i-PrO)4-mediated better surface passivation.

  8. Investigation of GaAs and InP surface passivation phenomena by sulfur; Badanie zjawiska pasywacji powierzchni GaAs i InP przy pomocy siarki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Przyborowska, K.; Surma, B. [Instytut Technologii Materialow Elektronicznych, Warsaw (Poland); Zakroczymski, T. [Polska Akademia Nauk, Warsaw (Poland). Inst. Chemii Fizycznej

    1997-12-01

    Some different chemical methods for sulfur passivation of GaAs and InP surface have been tried. The photoluminescence intensity has been compared for surfaces being sulfurized in different processes. Surface composition have been analysed by means of Auger electron spectroscopy. It has been found that passivation by sulfur of A{sup III}B{sup V} compounds diminishes the concentration of surface states and can be applied for preparing the epi-ready plates. 5 refs, 3 figs.

  9. Passivation of the surfaces of single crystal gadolinium molybdate (Gd2(MoO4)3) against attack by hydrofluoric acid by inert ion beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhalla, A.; Cross, L.E.; Tongson, L.

    1978-01-01

    The passivation effect from inert ion beam bombardment has been studied on a ferroelectric surface. The mechanism in these materials may have some additional contributions because of the polarization charges of the domains and the dipole effect (ion beam and surface species) on the surfaces. For these studies Gd 2 (MoO 4 ) 3 (GMO) crystals were selected. Two possible mechanisms of passivation of GMO surfaces when bombarded with ion beams are discussed

  10. Surface modification and preparation techniques for textile materials

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jacob John, Maya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available as it improves various properties – such as softness, dyeability, absorbance and wettability. In this chapter, the most commonly used surface modification techniques, ranging from plasma treatment to nanocoatings, for both natural and synthetic fibres have been...

  11. Technical Needs for Prototypic Prognostic Technique Demonstration for Advanced Small Modular Reactor Passive Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Coble, Jamie B.; Hirt, Evelyn H.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Mitchell, Mark R.; Wootan, David W.; Berglin, Eric J.; Bond, Leonard J.; Henager, Charles H.

    2013-05-17

    This report identifies a number of requirements for prognostics health management of passive systems in AdvSMRs, documents technical gaps in establishing a prototypical prognostic methodology for this purpose, and describes a preliminary research plan for addressing these technical gaps. AdvSMRs span multiple concepts; therefore a technology- and design-neutral approach is taken, with the focus being on characteristics that are likely to be common to all or several AdvSMR concepts. An evaluation of available literature is used to identify proposed concepts for AdvSMRs along with likely operational characteristics. Available operating experience of advanced reactors is used in identifying passive components that may be subject to degradation, materials likely to be used for these components, and potential modes of degradation of these components. This information helps in assessing measurement needs for PHM systems, as well as defining functional requirements of PHM systems. An assessment of current state-of-the-art approaches to measurements, sensors and instrumentation, diagnostics and prognostics is also documented. This state-of-the-art evaluation, combined with the requirements, may be used to identify technical gaps and research needs in the development, evaluation, and deployment of PHM systems for AdvSMRs. A preliminary research plan to address high-priority research needs for the deployment of PHM systems to AdvSMRs is described, with the objective being the demonstration of prototypic prognostics technology for passive components in AdvSMRs. Greater efficiency in achieving this objective can be gained through judicious selection of materials and degradation modes that are relevant to proposed AdvSMR concepts, and for which significant knowledge already exists. These selections were made based on multiple constraints including the analysis performed in this document, ready access to laboratory-scale facilities for materials testing and measurement, and

  12. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and electrochemical analysis of passivated electrolytic tin plate surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azzerri, N.; Splendorini, L.; Battistoni, C.; Paparazzo, E.

    1982-01-01

    The passive layer of cathodic dichromate (CDC) and dichromate dipped (DCD) passivated tin plate was investigated by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electrochemical analysis. Electrochemical results were compared with atomic absorption spectroscopy and glow discharge spectroscopy data and are discussed in relation to the solid state properties of the passive layer compounds. XPS depth profiles were obtained by using a ''first-principles model'' for quantitative purposes and the results are evaluated on the basis of the analytical approach employed. (Auth.)

  13. Verification of passive cooling techniques in the Super-FRS beam collimators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douma, C. A.; Gellanki, J.; Najafi, M. A.; Moeini, H.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Rigollet, C.; Kuiken, O. J.; Lindemulder, M. F.; Smit, H. A. J.; Timersma, H. J.

    2016-08-01

    The Super FRagment Separator (Super-FRS) at the FAIR facility will be the largest in-flight separator of heavy ions in the world. One of the essential steps in the separation procedure is to stop the unwanted ions with beam collimators. In one of the most common situations, the heavy ions are produced by a fission reaction of a primary 238U-beam (1.5 GeV/u) hitting a 12C target (2.5 g/cm2). In this situation, some of the produced ions are highly charged states of 238U. These ions can reach the collimators with energies of up to 1.3 GeV/u and a power of up to 500 W. Under these conditions, a cooling system is required to prevent damage to the collimators and to the corresponding electronics. Due to the highly radioactive environment, both the collimators and the cooling system must be suitable for robot handling. Therefore, an active cooling system is undesirable because of the increased possibility of malfunctioning and other complications. By using thermal simulations (performed with NX9 of Siemens PLM), the possibility of passive cooling is explored. The validity of these simulations is tested by independent comparison with other simulation programs and by experimental verification. The experimental verification is still under analysis, but preliminary results indicate that the explored passive cooling option provides sufficient temperature reduction.

  14. Radicals and ions controlling by adjusting the antenna-substrate distance in a-Si:H deposition using a planar ICP for c-Si surface passivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, H.P., E-mail: haipzhou@uestc.edu.cn [School of Energy Science and Engineering, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, 2006 Xiyuan Ave., West High-Tech Zone, Chengdu, Sichuan, 611731 (China); Plasma Sources and Application Center, NIE, and Institute of Advanced Studies, Nanyang Technological University, 637616 (Singapore); Xu, S., E-mail: shuyan.xu@nie.edu.sg [Plasma Sources and Application Center, NIE, and Institute of Advanced Studies, Nanyang Technological University, 637616 (Singapore); Xu, M. [Key Laboratory of Information Materials of Sichuan Province & School of Electrical and Information Engineering, Southwest University for Nationalities, Chengdu, 610041 (China); Xu, L.X.; Wei, D.Y. [Plasma Sources and Application Center, NIE, and Institute of Advanced Studies, Nanyang Technological University, 637616 (Singapore); Xiang, Y. [School of Energy Science and Engineering, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, 2006 Xiyuan Ave., West High-Tech Zone, Chengdu, Sichuan, 611731 (China); Xiao, S.Q. [Key Laboratory of Advanced Process Control for Light Industry (Ministry of Education), Department of Electronic Engineering, Jiangnan University, Wuxi, 214122 (China)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • A planar ICP was used to grow a-Si:H films for c-Si surface passivation. • The direct- and remote-plasma was compared for high-quality c-Si surface passivation. • The remote ICP with controlled plasma species and ion bombardments is preferable for the surface passivation of c-Si. - Abstract: Being a key issue in the research and fabrication of silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cells, crystalline silicon (c-Si) surface passivation is theoretically and technologically intricate due to its complicate dependence on plasma characteristics, material properties, and plasma-material interactions. Here amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) grown by a planar inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactor working under different antenna-substrate distances of d was used for the surface passivation of low-resistivity p-type c-Si. It is found that the microstructures (i.e., the crystallinity, Si-H bonding configuration etc.) and passivation function on c-Si of the deposited a-Si:H were profoundly influenced by the parameter of d, which primarily determines the types of growing precursors of SiH{sub n}/H contributing to the film growth and the interaction between the plasma and growing surface. c-Si surface passivation is analyzed in terms of the d-dependent a-Si:H properties and plasma characteristics. The controlling of radical types and ion bombardment on the growing surface through adjusting parameter d is emphasized.

  15. Passive New UV Polarimeter for Remote Surface and Atmospheric Sensing, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Our imaging polarimeter concept makes available for the first time, the passive remote imagery of all four Stokes vector components at UV wavelengths shorter than...

  16. The effect of light soaking on crystalline silicon surface passivation by atomic layer deposited Al2O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Baochen; Stangl, Rolf; Mueller, Thomas; Lin, Fen; Bhatia, Charanjit S.; Hoex, Bram

    2013-01-01

    The effect of light soaking of crystalline silicon wafer lifetime samples surface passivated by thermal atomic layer deposited (ALD) Al2O3 is investigated in this paper. Contrary to other passivation materials used in solar cell applications (i.e., SiO2, SiNx), using thermal ALD Al2O3, an increase in effective carrier lifetime after light soaking under standard testing conditions is observed for both p-type (˜45%) and n-type (˜60%) FZ c-Si lifetime samples. After light soaking and storing the samples in a dark and dry environment, the effective lifetime decreases again and practically returns to the value before light soaking. The rate of lifetime decrease after light soaking is significantly slower than the rate of lifetime increase by light soaking. To investigate the underlying mechanism, corona charge experiments are carried out on p-type c-Si samples before and after light soaking. The results indicate that the negative fixed charge density Qf present in the Al2O3 films increases due to the light soaking, which results in an improved field-effect passivation. Numerical calculations also confirm that the improved field-effect passivation is the main contributor for the increased effective lifetime after light soaking. To further understand the light soaking phenomenon, a kinetic model—a charge trapping/de-trapping model—is proposed to explain the time dependent behavior of the lifetime increase/decrease observed under/after light soaking. The trap model fits the experimental results very well. The observed light enhanced passivation for ALD Al2O3 passivated c-Si is of technological relevance, because solar cell devices operate under illumination, thus an increase in solar cell efficiency due to light soaking can be expected.

  17. New technique of machining high precision mirror surface press roller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongsen, Deng

    1991-03-01

    High precision mirror surface press roller machining technique of corrosion and grinding proof is one of the key techniques that the production enterprises as well as the machining and manufacturing of the following industries sought to resolve for a long time: plastics, papermaking, rubber, film, and chip production. In Oct. 1984, a new comprehensive machining technique of metal brush coating, grinding with abrasive belt, as well as buffing was used to conduct nearly 20 experiments. In Jan. 1985, a pair of middle convex high precision mirror surface press rollers was successfully machined. The technical process is described.

  18. Numerical Analysis of the Cavity Flow subjected to Passive Controls Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melih Guleren, Kursad; Turk, Seyfettin; Mirza Demircan, Osman; Demir, Oguzhan

    2018-03-01

    Open-source flow solvers are getting more and more popular for the analysis of challenging flow problems in aeronautical and mechanical engineering applications. They are offered under the GNU General Public License and can be run, examined, shared and modified according to user’s requirements. SU2 and OpenFOAM are the two most popular open-source solvers in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) community. In the present study, some passive control methods on the high-speed cavity flows are numerically simulated using these open-source flow solvers along with one commercial flow solver called ANSYS/Fluent. The results are compared with the available experimental data. The solver SU2 are seen to predict satisfactory the mean streamline velocity but not turbulent kinetic energy and overall averaged sound pressure level (OASPL). Whereas OpenFOAM predicts all these parameters nearly as the same levels of ANSYS/Fluent.

  19. Comparison of positive-pressure, passive ultrasonic, and laser-activated irrigations on smear-layer removal from the root canal surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahar-Helft, Sharonit; Sarp, Ayşe Sena Kabaş; Stabholtz, Adam; Gutkin, Vitaly; Redenski, Idan; Steinberg, Doron

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of three irrigation techniques for smear-layer removal with 17% EDTA. Cleaning and shaping the root canal system during endodontic treatment produces a smear layer and hard tissue debris. Three irrigation techniques were tested for solution infiltration of this layer: positive-pressure irrigation, passive ultrasonic irrigation, and laser-activated irrigation. Sixty extracted teeth were divided into six equal groups; 17% EDTA was used for 60 sec irrigation of five of the groups. The groups were as follows: Group 1, treated only with ProTaper™ F3 Ni-Ti files; Group 2, positive-pressure irrigation, with a syringe; Group 3, passive ultrasonic irrigation, inserted 1 mm short of the working length; Group 4, passive ultrasonic irrigation, inserted in the upper coronal third of the root; Group 5, Er:YAG laser-activated irrigation, inserted 1 mm short of the working length; and Group 6, Er:YAG laser-activated irrigation, inserted in the upper coronal third of the root. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the smear layer is removed most efficiently using laser-activated irrigation at low energy with 17% EDTA, inserted either at the working length or only in the coronal upper third of the root. Amounts of Ca, P, and O were not significantly different on all treated dentin surfaces. Smear-layer removal was most effective when the root canals were irrigated using Er:YAG laser at low energy with 17% EDTA solution. Interestingly, removal of the smear layer along the entire canal was similar when the laser was inserted in the upper coronal third and at 1 mm short of the working length of the root canal. This effect was not observed with the ultrasonic and positive-pressure techniques.

  20. Development of a passive and remote magnetic microsensor with thin-film giant magnetoimpedance element and surface acoustic wave transponder

    KAUST Repository

    Al Rowais, Hommood

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a wireless magnetic field sensor consisting of a three-layer thin-film giant magnetoimpedance sensor and a surface acoustic wave device on one substrate. The goal of this integration is a passive and remotely interrogated sensor that can be easily mass fabricated using standard microfabrication tools. The design parameters, fabrication process, and a model of the integrated sensor are presented together with experimental results of the sensor. © 2011 American Institute of Physics.

  1. Passive Frequency Selective Surface Array as a Diffuser for Destroying Millimeter Wave Coherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saiful Islam

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design, construction, and testing of grounded frequency selective surface (FSS array as a diffuser for destroying millimeter wave coherence which is used to eliminate speckle in active millimeter wave imaging. To create stochastically independent illumination patterns, we proposed a diffuser based on random-phase distributions obtained by changing the incident frequency. The random-phase diffuser was obtained by mixing up the phase relations between the cells of a deterministic function (e.g., beam splitter. The slot length of FSS is the main design parameter used to optimize the phase shifting properties of the array. The critical parameters of the diffuser array design, such as phase relation with slot lengths, losses, and bandwidth, are discussed. We designed the FSS arrays with finite integral technique (FIT, fabricated by etching technique, and characterized the S-parameters with a free-space MVNA, and measured the radiation patterns with a BWO in motorized setup.

  2. Excellent c-Si surface passivation by thermal atomic layer deposited aluminum oxide after industrial firing activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, B.; Stangl, R.; Ma, F.; Mueller, T.; Lin, F.; Aberle, A. G.; Bhatia, C. S.; Hoex, B.

    2013-09-01

    We demonstrate that by using a water (H2O)-based thermal atomic layer deposited (ALD) aluminum oxide (Al2O3) film, excellent surface passivation can be attained on planar low-resistivity silicon wafers. Effective carrier lifetime values of up to 12 ms and surface recombination velocities as low as 0.33 cm s-1 are achieved on float-zone wafers after a post-deposition thermal activation of the Al2O3 passivation layer. This post-deposition activation is achieved using an industrial high-temperature firing process which is commonly used for contact formation of standard screen-printed silicon solar cells. Neither a low-temperature post-deposition anneal nor a silicon nitride capping layer is required in this case. Deposition temperatures in the 100-400 °C range and peak firing temperatures of about 800 °C (set temperature) are investigated. Photoluminescence imaging shows that the surface passivation is laterally uniform. Corona charging and capacitance-voltage measurements reveal that the negative fixed charge density near the AlOx/c-Si interface increases from 1.4 × 1012 to 3.3 × 1012 cm-2 due to firing, while the midgap interface defect density reduces from 3.3 × 1011 to 0.8 × 1011 cm-2 eV-1. This work demonstrates that direct firing activation of thermal ALD Al2O3 is feasible, which could be beneficial for solar cell manufacturing.

  3. Fluid Surface Damping: A Technique for Vibration Suppression of Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hany Ghoneim

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A fluid surface damping (FSD technique for vibration suppression of beamlikestructures is proposed. The technique is a modification of the surface layer damping method. Two viscoelastic surface layers containing fluid-filled cavities are attached symmetrically to the opposite surfaces of the beam. The cavities on one side are attached to the corresponding cavities on the other side via connection passages. As the beam vibrates, the fluid is pumped back and forth through the connecting passages. Therefore, in addition to the viscoelastic damping provided by the surface layers, the technique offers viscous damping due to the fluid flow through the passage. A mathematical model for the proposed technique is developed, normalized, and solved in the frequency domain to investigate the effect of various parameters on the vibration suppression of a cantilever beam. The steady-state frequency response for a base white-noise excitation is calculated at the beam's free tip and over a frequency range containing the first five resonant frequencies. The parameters investigated are the flow-through passage viscous resistance, the length and location of the layers, the hydraulic capacitance of the fluid-filled cavities, and inertia of the moving fluid (hydraulic inertance. Results indicate that the proposed technique has promising potential in the field of vibration suppression of beamlike structures. With two FSD elements, all peak vibration amplitudes can be well suppressed over the entire frequency spectrum studied.

  4. Passive solar technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, D

    1981-04-01

    The present status of passive solar technology is summarized, including passive solar heating, cooling and daylighting. The key roles of the passive solar system designer and of innovation in the building industry are described. After definitions of passive design and a summary of passive design principles are given, performance and costs of passive solar technology are discussed. Passive energy design concepts or methods are then considered in the context of the overall process by which building decisions are made to achieve the integration of new techniques into conventional design. (LEW).

  5. Surface passivation: a new way to reduce self-output in LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}/Li lithium ion rechargeable batteries; Passivation de surface: une nouvelle voie pour reduire l`autodecharge dans les batteries rechargeables a ions lithium LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}/Li

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigala, C.; Blyr, A.; Tarascon, J.M. [Amiens Univ., 80 (France). Laboratoire de Reactivite et de Chimie des Solides; Amatucci, G. [Bellcore, (United States); Alphonse, P. [Toulouse-3 Univ., 31 (France). Laboratoire de Chimie des Materiaux Inorganiques

    1996-12-31

    The new generation of performing rechargeable lithium-ion batteries (``rocking-chair``-type) are penalized by important self-output phenomena linked with the use of highly oxidizing positive electrodes. In order to limit this problem in LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}/C batteries, two different passivation techniques were used in order to limit the surface contact between the positive electrode and the electrolyte. Thanks to these treatments, a significant reduction of the percentage of irreversible capacity losses is effectively observed. (J.S.) 3 refs.

  6. Surface passivation and carrier selectivity of the thermal-atomic-layer-deposited TiO2 on crystalline silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plakhotnyuk, Maksym M.; Schüler, Nadine; Shkodin, Evgeniy; Ammapet Vijayan, Ramachandran; Masilamani, Sangaravadivel; Varadharajaperumal, Muthubalan; Crovetto, Andrea; Hansen, Ole

    2017-08-01

    Here, we demonstrate the use of an ultrathin TiO2 film as a passivating carrier-selective contact for silicon photovoltaics. The effective lifetime, surface recombination velocity, and diode quality dependence on TiO2 deposition temperature with and without a thin tunneling oxide interlayer (SiO2 or Al2O3) on p-type crystalline silicon (c-Si) are reported. 5-, 10-, and 20-nm-thick TiO2 films were deposited by thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD) in the temperature range of 80-300 °C using titanium tetrachloride (TiCl4) and water. TiO2 thin-film passivation layers alone result in a lower effective carrier lifetime compared with that with an interlayer. However, SiO2 and Al2O3 interlayers enhance the TiO2 passivation of c-Si surfaces. Further annealing at 200 °C in N2 gas enhances the surface passivation quality of TiO2 tremendously. From these findings, design principles for TiO2-Si heterojunction with optimized photovoltage, interface quality, and electron extraction to maximize the photovoltage of TiO2-Si heterojunction photovoltaic cells are formulated. Diode behaviour was analysed with the help of experimental, analytical, and simulation methods. It is predicted that TiO2 with a high carrier concentration is a preferable candidate for high-performance solar cells. The possible reasons for performance degradation in those devices with and without interlayers are also discussed.

  7. High-performance printed carbon nanotube thin-film transistors array fabricated by a nonlithography technique using hafnium oxide passivation layer and mask.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Suresh Kumar Raman; Chan-Park, Mary B

    2012-12-01

    The large-scale application of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWCNTs) for printed electronics requires scalable, repeateable, as well as noncontaminating assembly techniques. Previously explored nanotube deposition methods include serial methods such as inkjet printing and parallel methods such as spin-coating with photolithography. The serial methods are usually slow, whereas the photolithography-related parallel methods result in contamination of the nanotubes. In this paper, we report a reliable clean parallel method for fabrication of arrays of carbon nanotube-based field effect transistors (CNTFETs) involving shadow mask patterning of a passivating layer of Hafnium oxide (HfO(2)) over the nanotube (CNT) active channel regions and plasma etching of the unprotected nanotubes. Pure (99%) semiconducting SWCNTs are first sprayed over the entire surface of a wafer substrate followed by a two-step shadow masking procedure to first deposit metal electrodes and then a HfO(2) isolation/passivation layer over the device channel region. The exposed SWCNT network outside the HfO(2) protected area is removed with oxygen plasma etching. The HfO(2) thus serves as both the device isolation mask during the plasma etching and as a protective passivating layer in subsequent use. The fabricated devices on SiO(2)/Si substrate exhibit good device performance metrics, with on/off ratio ranging from 1 × 10(1) to 3 × 10(5) and mobilities of 4 to 23 cm(2)/(V s). The HfO(2)/Si devices show excellent performance with on/off ratios of 1 × 10(2) to 2 × 10(4) and mobilities of 8 to 56 cm(2)/(V s). The optimum devices (on HfO(2)/Si) have an on/off ratio of 1 × 10(4) and mobility as high as 46 cm(2)/(V s). This HfO(2)-based patterning method enables large scale fabrication of CNTFETs with no resist residue or other contamination on the device channel. Further, shadow masking circumvents the need for expensive and area-limited lithography patterning process. The device

  8. Improved Oxygen Evolution Kinetics and Surface States Passivation of Ni-Bi Co-Catalyst for a Hematite Photoanode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Dang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the combinational surface kinetics enhancement and surface states passivation of nickel-borate (Ni-Bi co-catalyst for a hematite (Fe2O3 photoanode. The Ni-Bi-modified Fe2O3 photoanode exhibits a cathodic onset potential shift of 230 mV and a 2.3-fold enhancement of the photocurrent at 1.23 V, versus the reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE. The borate (Bi in the Ni-Bi film promotes the release of protons for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER.

  9. Surface Sensitive Techniques for Advanced Characterization of Luminescent Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Hendrik C. Swart

    2017-01-01

    The important role of surface sensitive characterization techniques such as Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS), time of flight scanning ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) and High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) for the characterization of different phosphor materials is discussed in this short review by giving selective examples from previous obtained results. AES is used to monitor surface reactions during electron bombardment and al...

  10. Spectral signatures of soil, snow and sea ice as observed by passive microwave and thermal infrared techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmugge, T.

    1984-01-01

    There have been many passive microwave observations of soil, snow, and sea ice surfaces made during the past several years. These measurements have been from tower, aircraft, and spacecraft platforms covering the wavelength range from 0.8 cm to 50 cm. Based on these data it can be concluded that the longer wavelengths (greater than 5 cm) are more effective for soil moisture observations because of a greater capability to penetrate vegetation, while the shorter wavelengths (1 to 3 cm) are best for snow and sea ice observations since the dominant process is volume scattering by the ice grains in the snow and the brine cells in sea ice. Because it is the intensity of a thermal emission process that is being measured, thermal infrared measurements are necessary to separate the emissivity and temperature effects in the microwave emission.

  11. Positioning Your Library for Solar (and Financial) Gain. Improving Energy Efficiency, Lighting, and Ventilation with Primarily Passive Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shane, Jackie

    2012-01-01

    This article stresses the importance of building design above technology as a relatively inexpensive way to reduce energy costs for a library. Emphasis is placed on passive solar design for heat and daylighting, but also examines passive ventilation and cooling, green roofs, and building materials. Passive design is weighed against technologies…

  12. Surface composition of Ru containing duplex stainless steel after passivation in non-oxidizing media

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Myburg, G

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available - .tron Spectroscopy AES and X-ray Photoelectron ..Spectroscopy XPS studies of the passive layers that formed spontaneously on experimental DSSs .containing Ru 0 or 0.3% in HCl and H SO solu-24 tions in order to understand the role of the different...

  13. A "Green" Passivation of Zinc containing surfaces as an alternative to chromate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Maahn, Ernst emanuel; Møller, Per

    1996-01-01

    With view to a replacement for chromate passivation, Molyphos was developed under the Danish Materials Programme I (MUP I). In the Danish Materials Programme II(MUP II), the further development of Molyphos a molybdate phosphate conversion coating has been undertaken by application of a sealer to ...

  14. Annealing studies of substoichiometric amorphous SiO{sub x} layers for c-Si surface passivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einsele, F.; Beyer, W.; Rau, U. [IEF-5 Photovoltaik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    We investigate thermal stability of amorphous substoichiometric silicon-oxide alloys with oxygen concentrations from 0 to 10 at-%. Annealing experiments, including effective lifetime measurements, hydrogen effusion, and infrared absorption spectroscopy, yield a surface passivation on p-type float-zone crystalline silicon wafers with maximum effective lifetimes up to 1.5 ms. The thermal stability of the passivation increases with increasing oxygen concentration of the films. For oxygen concentrations above 5%, we observe a decrease of passivation due to the formation of voids in the material, which shows in a low temperature peak of the H effusion spectra. Annealing leads to a structural transition of the material which is accompanied by an increase in effective lifetime. The stretching mode absorptions of Si- O-Si molecular vibrations near 1000 cm{sup -1} shift towards higher wavenumbers, both with increased oxygen concentration and upon annealing of the films. For increased oxygen concentrations, the Si-H stretching modes shift from predominantly 2000 cm{sup -1} to 2090 cm{sup -1}.(copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  15. Low Cost, Low Power, Passive Muon Telescope for Interrogating Martian Sub-Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedar, Sharon; Tanaka, Hirukui; Naudet, Charles; Plaut, Jeffrey J.; Jones, Cathleen E.; Webb, Frank H.

    2012-01-01

    It has been demonstrated on Earth that a low power, passive muon detector can penetrate deep into geological structures up to several kilometers in size providing high density images of their interiors. Muon tomography is an entirely new class of planetary instrumentation that is ideally suited to address key areas in Mars Science, such as: the search for life and habitable environments, the distribution and state of water and ice and the level of geologic activity on Mars today.

  16. Metastability of a-SiO{sub x}:H thin films for c-Si surface passivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serenelli, L., E-mail: luca.serenelli@enea.it [ENEA Research centre “Casaccia”, via Anguillarese 301, 00123 Rome (Italy); DIET University of Rome “Sapienza”, via Eudossiana 18, 00184 Rome (Italy); Martini, L. [DIET University of Rome “Sapienza”, via Eudossiana 18, 00184 Rome (Italy); Imbimbo, L. [ENEA Research centre “Casaccia”, via Anguillarese 301, 00123 Rome (Italy); DIET University of Rome “Sapienza”, via Eudossiana 18, 00184 Rome (Italy); Asquini, R. [DIET University of Rome “Sapienza”, via Eudossiana 18, 00184 Rome (Italy); Menchini, F.; Izzi, M.; Tucci, M. [ENEA Research centre “Casaccia”, via Anguillarese 301, 00123 Rome (Italy)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • a-SiO{sub x}:H film deposition by RF-PECVD is optimized from SiH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} gas mixture. • Metastability of a-SiO{sub x}:H/c-Si passivation is investigated under thermal annealing and UV exposure. • A correlation between passivation metastability and Si−H bonds is found by FTIR spectra. • A metastability model is proposed. - Abstract: The adoption of a-SiO{sub x}:H films obtained by PECVD in heterojunction solar cells is a key to further increase their efficiency, because of its transparency in the UV with respect to the commonly used a-Si:H. At the same time this layer must guarantee high surface passivation of the c-Si to be suitable in high efficiency solar cell manufacturing. On the other hand the application of amorphous materials like a-Si:H and SiN{sub x} on the cell frontside expose them to the mostly energetic part of the sun spectrum, leading to a metastability of their passivation properties. Moreover as for amorphous silicon, thermal annealing procedures are considered as valuable steps to enhance and stabilize thin film properties, when performed at opportune temperature. In this work we explored the reliability of a-SiO{sub x}:H thin film layers surface passivation on c-Si substrates under UV exposition, in combination with thermal annealing steps. Both p- and n-type doped c-Si substrates were considered. To understand the effect of UV light soaking we monitored the minority carriers lifetime and Si−H and Si−O bonding, by FTIR spectra, after different exposure times to light coming from a deuterium lamp, filtered to UV-A region, and focused on the sample to obtain a power density of 50 μW/cm{sup 2}. We found a certain lifetime decrease after UV light soaking in both p- and n-type c-Si passivated wafers according to a a-SiO{sub x}:H/c-Si/a-SiO{sub x}:H structure. The role of a thermal annealing, which usually enhances the as-deposited SiO{sub x} passivation properties, was furthermore considered. In

  17. In-situ IR reflexion spectroscopy characterization of the passivation layer developed on the surface of lithium electrodes in organic medium; Passivation de surface: une nouvelle voie pour reduire l`autodecharge dans les batteries rechargeables a ions lithium LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}/Li

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barusseau, S. [Alcatel Alsthom Recherche, 91 - Marcoussis (France); Perton, F. [SAFT, Advanced and Industrial Battery Group, 86 - Poitiers (France); Rakotondrainibe, A.; Lamy, C. [Poitiers Univ., 86 (France). Laboratoire de Chimie 1, ``Electrochimie et Interactions``

    1996-12-31

    the development of lithium metal batteries is hindered by the bad reversibility of the Li{sup +}/Li pair, due to dendrites formation which limits the amount of active matter and can generate short-circuits. The chemical and electrochemical phenomena which take place at the electrode/organic electrolyte interface lead to the formation of a complex passivation film which is of prime importance for the functioning of this type of batteries. The in-situ infrared reflection spectroscopy is well adapted to the chemical study of the passivation layer. Two different techniques were used: the substraction normalized interfacial transform infrared spectroscopy (SNIFTIRS) and the electro-chemically modulated infrared reflectance spectroscopy. These methods have shown that the passivation layer that develops on the surface of the lithium electrode in contact with organic solutions (propylene carbonate, ethylene carbonate and dimethoxyethane) is mainly made of lithium alkyl carbonates (ROCO{sub 2}Li) and lithium carbonates (Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}). (J.S.) 14 refs.

  18. Modelling the passive microwave signature from land surfaces: a review of recent results and application to the SMOS & SMAP soil moisture retrieval algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two passive microwave missions are currently operating at L-band to monitor surface soil moisture (SM) over continental surfaces. The SMOS sensor, based on an innovative interferometric technology enabling multi-angular signatures of surfaces to be measured, was launched in November 2009....

  19. Excellent c-Si surface passivation by thermal atomic layer deposited aluminum oxide after industrial firing activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, B; Stangl, R; Ma, F; Mueller, T; Lin, F; Aberle, A G; Bhatia, C S; Hoex, B

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate that by using a water (H 2 O)-based thermal atomic layer deposited (ALD) aluminum oxide (Al 2 O 3 ) film, excellent surface passivation can be attained on planar low-resistivity silicon wafers. Effective carrier lifetime values of up to 12 ms and surface recombination velocities as low as 0.33 cm s −1 are achieved on float-zone wafers after a post-deposition thermal activation of the Al 2 O 3 passivation layer. This post-deposition activation is achieved using an industrial high-temperature firing process which is commonly used for contact formation of standard screen-printed silicon solar cells. Neither a low-temperature post-deposition anneal nor a silicon nitride capping layer is required in this case. Deposition temperatures in the 100–400 °C range and peak firing temperatures of about 800 °C (set temperature) are investigated. Photoluminescence imaging shows that the surface passivation is laterally uniform. Corona charging and capacitance–voltage measurements reveal that the negative fixed charge density near the AlO x /c-Si interface increases from 1.4 × 10 12 to 3.3 × 10 12 cm −2 due to firing, while the midgap interface defect density reduces from 3.3 × 10 11 to 0.8 × 10 11 cm −2 eV −1 . This work demonstrates that direct firing activation of thermal ALD Al 2 O 3 is feasible, which could be beneficial for solar cell manufacturing. (paper)

  20. Robotic Arm Manipulator Using Active Control for Sample Acquisition and Transfer, and Passive Mode for Surface Compliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Underhill, Michael L.; Trease, Brian P.; Lindemann, Randel A.

    2010-01-01

    A robotic arm that consists of three joints with four degrees of freedom (DOF) has been developed. It can carry an end-effector to acquire and transfer samples by using active control and comply with surface topology in a passive mode during a brief surface contact. The three joints are arranged in such a way that one joint of two DOFs is located at the shoulder, one joint of one DOF is located at the elbow, and one joint of one DOF is located at the wrist. Operationally, three DOFs are moved in the same plane, and the remaining one on the shoulder is moved perpendicular to the other three for better compliance with ground surface and more flexibility of sample handling. Three out of four joints are backdriveable, making the mechanism less complex and more cost effective

  1. Probing droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces by synchrotron radiation scattering techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Accardo, Angelo

    2014-06-10

    Droplets on artificially structured superhydrophobic surfaces represent quasi contact-free sample environments which can be probed by X-ray microbeams and nanobeams in the absence of obstructing walls. This review will discuss basic surface wettability concepts and introduce the technology of structuring surfaces. Quasi contact-free droplets are compared with contact-free droplets; processes related to deposition and evaporation on solid surfaces are discussed. Droplet coalescence based on the electrowetting effect allows the probing of short-time mixing and reaction processes. The review will show for several materials of biological interest that structural processes related to conformational changes, nucleation and assembly during droplet evaporation can be spatially and temporally resolved by raster-scan diffraction techniques. Orientational ordering of anisotropic materials deposited during solidification at pinning sites facilitates the interpretation of structural data. 2014 International Union of Crystallography.

  2. Surface Sensitive Techniques for Advanced Characterization of Luminescent Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swart, Hendrik C

    2017-08-04

    The important role of surface sensitive characterization techniques such as Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS), time of flight scanning ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) and High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) for the characterization of different phosphor materials is discussed in this short review by giving selective examples from previous obtained results. AES is used to monitor surface reactions during electron bombardment and also to determine the elemental composition of the surfaces of the materials, while XPS and TOF-SIMS are used for determining the surface chemical composition and valence state of the dopants. The role of XPS to determine the presence of defects in the phosphor matrix is also stated with the different examples. The role of HRTEM in combination with Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) for nanoparticle characterization is also pointed out.

  3. Surface Sensitive Techniques for Advanced Characterization of Luminescent Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrik C. Swart

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The important role of surface sensitive characterization techniques such as Auger electron spectroscopy (AES, X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS, time of flight scanning ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS and High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM for the characterization of different phosphor materials is discussed in this short review by giving selective examples from previous obtained results. AES is used to monitor surface reactions during electron bombardment and also to determine the elemental composition of the surfaces of the materials, while XPS and TOF-SIMS are used for determining the surface chemical composition and valence state of the dopants. The role of XPS to determine the presence of defects in the phosphor matrix is also stated with the different examples. The role of HRTEM in combination with Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS for nanoparticle characterization is also pointed out.

  4. Manipulation of K center charge states in silicon nitride films to achieve excellent surface passivation for silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vivek; Tracy, Clarence; Schroder, Dieter; Herasimenka, Stanislau; Dauksher, William; Bowden, Stuart

    2014-02-01

    High quality surface passivation (Seff textured p- and n-type solar grade Czochralski silicon substrates by externally injecting and storing positive or negative charges (>±8 × 1012 cm-2) into a dual layer stack of Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) Silicon Nitride (SiNx)/PECVD Silicon Oxide (SiO2) films using a corona charging tool. We demonstrate long term stability and uniform charge distribution in the SiNx film by manipulating the charge on K center defects while negating the requirement of a high temperature thermal oxide step.

  5. Data Analysis Techniques for a Lunar Surface Navigation System Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelmins, David; Sands, O. Scott; Swank, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    NASA is interested in finding new methods of surface navigation to allow astronauts to navigate on the lunar surface. In support of the Vision for Space Exploration, the NASA Glenn Research Center developed the Lunar Extra-Vehicular Activity Crewmember Location Determination System and performed testing at the Desert Research and Technology Studies event in 2009. A significant amount of sensor data was recorded during nine tests performed with six test subjects. This paper provides the procedure, formulas, and techniques for data analysis, as well as commentary on applications.

  6. Using GNSS-R techniques to investigate the near sub-surface of Mars with the Deep Space Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, H. M.; Bell, D. J.; Jin, C.; Decrossas, E.; Asmar, S.; Lazio, J.; Preston, R. A.; Ruf, C. S.; Renno, N. O.

    2017-12-01

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems Reflectometry (GNSS-R) has shown that passive measurements using separate active sources can infer the soil moisture, snow pack depth and other quantities of scientific interest. Here, we expand upon this method and propose that a passive measurement of the sub-surface dielectric profile of Mars can be made by using multipath interference between reflections off the surface and subsurface dielectric discontinuities. This measurement has the ability to reveal changes in the soil water content, the depth of a layer of sand, thickness of a layer of ice, and even identify centimeter-scale layering which may indicate the presence of a sedimentary bed. We have created a numerical ray tracing model to understand the potential of using multipath interference techniques to investigate the sub-surface dielectric properties and structure of Mars. We have further verified this model using layered beds of sand and concrete in laboratory experiments and then used the model to extrapolate how this technique may be applied to future Mars missions. We will present new results demonstrating how to characterize a multipath interference patterns as a function of frequency and/or incidence angle to measure the thickness of a dielectric layer of sand or ice. Our results demonstrate that dielectric discontinuities in the subsurface can be measured using this passive sensing technique and it could be used to effectively measure the thickness of a dielectric layer in the proximity of a landed spacecraft. In the case of an orbiter, we believe this technique would be effective at measuring the seasonal thickness of CO2 ice in the Polar Regions. This is exciting because our method can produce similar results to traditional ground penetrating radars without the need to have an active radar transmitter in-situ. Therefore, it is possible that future telecommunications systems can serve as both a radio and a scientific instrument when used in conjunction with

  7. Laser techniques for radioactive decontamination gives metallic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobar Alracon, L.; Molina, G.; Vizuet Gonzalez, J.

    1998-01-01

    In this work it presented the prototype for system decontamination at diverse component with removable superficial contamination, using the technique gives laser ablation, for the evaporation at the pollutant. It discusses the principle in the fact that system, as well as the different elements that compose it. The are presented the obtained results when irradiating with a laser a surface without radioactive contamination to verify the system operation

  8. The surface modification of clay particles by RF plasma technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Keol

    In this study, the surface coatings of ball clay, organoclay and exfoliated clay prepared by sol-gel process were done by RF plasma polymerization to improve the surface activity of the clay filler. Characterization of the above plasma-treated clays has been carried out by various techniques. The effects of plasma-treated clays as substitute of carbon black in styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) and ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM) on the curing and mechanical properties were investigated. After plasma treatment, the tensile properties of organo and exfoliated clay were not unsatisfactory to that of carbon black filler system. Moreover, only 10 phr filler loading of plasma-treated organoclay in EPDM vulcanizates showed better results than 40 phr filler loading of carbon black in EPDM vulcanizates. The main objective of this study was to verify the applicability of the plasma technique for modifying clay surfaces for their use in the tire manufacturing industry. Another purpose was to reveal the advantage of the plasma technique used to obtain modified-clay and improved properties that those materials can display.

  9. Surface passivation and optical characterization of Al2O3/a-SiCx stacks on c-Si substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Gema; Ortega, Pablo R; Voz, Cristóbal; Martín, Isidro; Colina, Mónica; Morales, Anna B; Orpella, Albert; Alcubilla, Ramón

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the surface passivation of aluminum oxide/amorphous silicon carbide (Al2O3/a-SiCx) stacks on both p-type and n-type crystalline silicon (c-Si) substrates as well as the optical characterization of these stacks. Al2O3 films of different thicknesses were deposited by thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD) at 200 °C and were complemented with a layer of a-SiCx deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) to form anti-reflection coating (ARC) stacks with a total thickness of 75 nm. A comparative study has been carried out on polished and randomly textured wafers. We have experimentally determined the optimum thickness of the stack for photovoltaic applications by minimizing the reflection losses over a wide wavelength range (300-1200 nm) without compromising the outstanding passivation properties of the Al2O3 films. The upper limit of the surface recombination velocity (S eff,max) was evaluated at a carrier injection level corresponding to 1-sun illumination, which led to values below 10 cm/s. Reflectance values below 2% were measured on textured samples over the wavelength range of 450-1000 nm.

  10. Determination of equilibrium factor between radon and its progeny using surface barrier detector for various shapes of passive radon dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamil, K.; Fazal-ur-Rehman; Ali, S.; Khan, H.A.

    1997-01-01

    In the field of radon dosimetry, it is customary to measure radon ( 222 Rn) concentration while potential health hazard is due to the radon short-lived progeny. When radon is in secular equilibrium, the measured activity of radon equals the activity of radon's progeny. However, in practical cases an inequilibrium between radon and its progeny exists which is measured in terms of the equilibrium factor. To determine the equilibrium factor between radon and its progeny in a closed environment various shapes of passive dosimeters based upon solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) are employed. In order to observe the dependence of equilibrium factor upon shapes or effective volumes, experiments have been performed replacing the SSNTDs with a surface barrier detector in Karlsruhe diffusion chamber, pen-type and box-type dosimeters. Using the collected alpha spectra, the equilibrium factor has been determined for a radon-air mixture in a custom designed radon chamber simulating a closed environment of a room. The results show that the radon equilibrium factor is about 0.20 for different shapes of dosimeters studied in this research. It is concluded that the determination of equilibrium factor between radon and its progeny does not depend upon effective volume or shape of the passive dosimeters using alpha spectroscopic data acquired by surface barrier detector. (orig.)

  11. Evaluation of surface decarburization depth by magnetic Barkhausen noise technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stupakov, O., E-mail: stupak@fzu.c [Institute of Physics of the AS CR, v.v.i., Na Slovance 2, 18221 Prague (Czech Republic); Perevertov, O.; Tomas, I. [Institute of Physics of the AS CR, v.v.i., Na Slovance 2, 18221 Prague (Czech Republic); Skrbek, B. [Technical University of Liberec, Studentska 2, 46117 Liberec (Czech Republic)

    2011-06-15

    Industrially unfavorable process of steel surface decarburization was induced by annealing in air. Two methods of after-anneal surface treatment were used: an acid pickling and a sand blasting. The obtained decarburized layers were examined by optical microscope, wave dispersive spectrometer, and surface X-ray diffraction method. Magnetic Barkhausen noise technique was tested for applicability of non-destructive characterization of the decarburized layer depth. A newly introduced parameter, Barkhausen noise coercivity, was proposed for practical use due to its sensitivity to decarburization and stability to measurement conditions. Other magnetic parameters, e.g. number of Barkhausen noise counts, were found to be sensitive to the compressive residual stress caused by the sand blasting. - Research highlights: Barkhausen coercivity shows good stability and sensitivity to decarburization depth. Number of Barkhausen noise counts indicates compressive residual stress. Rms value of Barkhausen noise shows nonmonotonic dependence on decarburization depth.

  12. Sea Surface Salinity and Wind Retrieval Algorithm Using Combined Passive-Active L-Band Microwave Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yueh, Simon H.; Chaubell, Mario J.

    2011-01-01

    Aquarius is a combined passive/active L-band microwave instrument developed to map the salinity field at the surface of the ocean from space. The data will support studies of the coupling between ocean circulation, the global water cycle, and climate. The primary science objective of this mission is to monitor the seasonal and interannual variation of the large scale features of the surface salinity field in the open ocean with a spatial resolution of 150 kilometers and a retrieval accuracy of 0.2 practical salinity units globally on a monthly basis. The measurement principle is based on the response of the L-band (1.413 gigahertz) sea surface brightness temperatures (T (sub B)) to sea surface salinity. To achieve the required 0.2 practical salinity units accuracy, the impact of sea surface roughness (e.g. wind-generated ripples and waves) along with several factors on the observed brightness temperature has to be corrected to better than a few tenths of a degree Kelvin. To the end, Aquarius includes a scatterometer to help correct for this surface roughness effect.

  13. Oxidation precursor dependence of atomic layer deposited Al2O3 films in a-Si:H(i)/Al2O3 surface passivation stacks

    OpenAIRE

    Xiang, Yuren; Zhou, Chunlan; Jia, Endong; Wang, Wenjing

    2015-01-01

    In order to obtain a good passivation of a silicon surface, more and more stack passivation schemes have been used in high-efficiency silicon solar cell fabrication. In this work, we prepared a-Si:H(i)/Al2O3 stacks on KOH solution-polished n-type solar grade mono-silicon(100) wafers. For the Al2O3 film deposition, both thermal atomic layer deposition (T-ALD) and plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) were used. Interface trap density spectra were obtained for Si passivation with a-S...

  14. Experiences With an Optimal Estimation Algorithm for Surface and Atmospheric Parameter Retrieval From Passive Microwave Data in the Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scarlat, Raul Cristian; Heygster, Georg; Pedersen, Leif Toudal

    2017-01-01

    the brightness temperatures observed by a passive microwave radiometer. The retrieval method inverts the forward model and produces ensembles of the seven parameters, wind speed, integrated water vapor, liquid water path, sea and ice temperature, sea ice concentration and multiyear ice fraction. The method...... compared with the Arctic Systems Reanalysis model data as well as columnar water vapor retrieved from satellite microwave sounders and the Remote Sensing Systems AMSR-E ocean retrieval product in order to determine the feasibility of using the same setup over pure surface with 100% and 0% sea ice cover......, respectively. Sea ice concentration retrieval shows good skill for pure surface cases. Ice types retrieval is in good agreement with scatterometer backscatter data. Deficiencies have been identified in using the forward model over sea ice for retrieving atmospheric parameters, that are connected...

  15. Assessment of inhalation and ingestion doses from exposure to radon gas using passive and active detecting techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, A. H.; Jafaar, M. S. [Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia)

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess an environmental hazard of radon exhalation rate from the samples of soil and drinking water in selected locations in Iraqi Kurdistan, passive (CR-39NTDs) and active (RAD7) detecting techniques has been employed. Long and short term measurements of emitted radon concentrations were estimated for 124 houses. High and lower radon concentration in soil samples was in the cities of Hajyawa and Er. Tyrawa, respectively. Moreover, for drinking water, high and low radon concentration was in the cities of Similan and Kelak, respectively. A comparison between our results with that mentioned in international reports had been done. Average annual dose equivalent to the bronchial epithelium, stomach and whole body in the cities of Kelak and Similan are estimated, and it was varied from 0.04{+-}0.01 mSv to 0.547{+-}0.018 mSv, (2.832{+-}0.22)x10{sup -5} to (11.972{+-}2.09)x10{sup -5} mSv, and (0.056 {+-}0.01) x10{sup -5} to (0.239{+-}0.01)x10{sup -5} mSv, respectively. This indicated that the effects of dissolved radon on the bronchial epithelium are much than on the stomach and whole body. (authors)

  16. Study of indoor radon levels in some radioactive areas of Himachal Pradesh: an inter-comparison of active and passive techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajwa, B.S.; Singh, S.; Sharma, N.; Virk, H.S.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Indoor radon levels measurements were carried using both the active and passive techniques in the dwellings of some villages, known to be located in the vicinity of uranium mineralized zones of Hamirpur district, Himachal Pradesh. Even in the passive technique using S.S.N.T.D., both the bare -slide and twin chamber dosemeter cup modes were utilized. An attempt has also been made to assess the levels of the indoor radon in these dwellings and inhalation dose rates of the population living in these villages. The average value of radon concentration levels using the bare-slide mode varies from 109.0 to 741.5 Bq/m3 in these dwellings, where as the maximum radon level using the twin cup dosemeter technique was found to be 140.3 Bq/m3. As usual the radon concentrations were found to be varying with seasonal changes, building materials etc. The radon survey in the dwellings of these villages has also been carried out using the Alpha-Guard technique, which is based on the pulse ionization chamber. The indoor radon concentration levels measured using the active technique of Alpha Guard have been found to be quite different from those measured in these dwellings by the passive technique of S.S.N.T.D.; indicating the importance of the S.S.N.T.D. in the long -term integrated measurement of the indoor radon levels in the dwellings. (authors)

  17. Optimization and Application of Surface Segmentation Technique for Tomographic PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Liuyang; Adrian, Ronald; Wilson, Brandon; Prestridge, Kathy; Team

    2014-11-01

    Tomographic PIV is a widely used 3D flow measurement technique. It utilizes images recorded by multiple cameras to reconstruct the intensity distribution of a measured volume. The 3D3C velocity field is then computed by 3D cross-correlation. Surface segmentation aims to reduce computational cost. It extracts from a cloud of particles an image of those particles that lie on a mathematically prescribed surface. 2D2C velocity fields are computed on stacks of orthogonal surfaces, then assembled to construct the full 3D3C velocity field. We investigate the reconstruction of adaptive surfaces aligned with the main flow direction minimizing the out-of-plane motion. Numerical assessment is performed on curved-surface reconstruction for Taylor-Couette flow. An optimizing 2D interrogation scheme involving volumetric deformation is proposed to improve the accuracy of the 3D3C velocity field. The numerical test is performed on a synthetic vortex ring showing good measurement accuracy. Experimental results measuring the shock-driven turbulent mixing will also be presented. References

  18. Surface Recombination of Crystalline Silicon Substrates Passivated by Atomic-Layer-Deposited AlOx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafune, Koji; Miki, Shohei; Matsutani, Ryosuke; Hamano, Junpei; Yoshida, Haruhiko; Tachibana, Tomihisa; Lee, Hyun Ju; Ogura, Atsuhi; Ohshita, Yoshio; Satoh, Shin-ichi

    2012-04-01

    AlOx films as passivation layers for p-type crystalline silicon were prepared by atomic layer deposition with ozone as an oxidant, and the effects of the AlOx film thickness and deposition temperature on the maximum recombination velocity (Smax) were evaluated. Smax is improved by increasing the layer thickness but saturates at a layer thickness of about 30 nm. In the case of samples deposited at room temperature, Smax is improved fivefold when the thickness is increased from 20 to 33 nm. Smax also improved as the deposition temperature was increased to 300 °C then deteriorated when it was further increased to 350 °C. After postdeposition annealing, we obtained an Smax of 8.5 cm/s.

  19. Antibacterial performance of polypropylene nonwoven fabric wound dressing surfaces containing passive and active components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Zhirong; Du, Shanshan; Zhao, Chunyu; Chen, Hao; Sun, Miao; Yan, Shunjie; Luan, Shifang; Yin, Jinghua

    2016-03-01

    A growing number of wound dressing-related nosocomial infections necessitate the development of novel antibacterial strategies. Herein, polypropylene non-woven fabric (PPNWF) was facilely modified with passive and active antibacterial components, namely photografting polymerization both N-Vinyl-2-pyrrolidone (NVP) and glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) monomers, and the introduction of guanidine polymer through the reaction between active amino groups and epoxy groups. The modified samples were confirmed by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. Water contact angle measurement, antibacterial test, platelet and red blood cell adhesion were used to evaluate the hydrophilicity, antibacterial properties and hemocompatibility of the samples. It was found that the antibacterial properties were obviously enhanced, meanwhile significantly suppressing platelet and red blood cell adhesion after the above modification. This PPNWF samples that possess antifouling and antimicrobial properties, have great potential in wound dressing applications.

  20. Microwave remote sensing: Active and passive. Volume 2 - Radar remote sensing and surface scattering and emission theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Moore, R. K.; Fung, A. K.

    1982-01-01

    The fundamental principles of radar backscattering measurements are presented, including measurement statistics, Doppler and pulse discrimination techniques, and associated ambiguity functions. The operation of real and synthetic aperture sidelooking airborne radar systems is described, along with the internal and external calibration techniques employed in scattering measurements. Attention is given to the physical mechanisms responsible for the scattering emission behavior of homogeneous and inhomogeneous media, through a discussion of surface roughness, dielectric properties and inhomogeneity, and penetration depth. Simple semiempirical models are presented. Theoretical models involving greater mathematical sophistication are also given for extended ocean and bare soil surfaces, and the more general case of a vegetation canopy over a rough surface.

  1. Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) Product Specification Document

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichle, Rolf H.; Ardizzone, Joseph V.; Kim, Gi-Kong; Lucchesi, Robert A.; Smith, Edmond B.; Weiss, Barry H.

    2015-01-01

    This is the Product Specification Document (PSD) for Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) data for the Science Data System (SDS) of the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) project. The L4_SM data product provides estimates of land surface conditions based on the assimilation of SMAP observations into a customized version of the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System, Version 5 (GEOS-5) land data assimilation system (LDAS). This document applies to any standard L4_SM data product generated by the SMAP Project. The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission will enhance the accuracy and the resolution of space-based measurements of terrestrial soil moisture and freeze-thaw state. SMAP data products will have a noteworthy impact on multiple relevant and current Earth Science endeavors. These include: Understanding of the processes that link the terrestrial water, the energy and the carbon cycles, Estimations of global water and energy fluxes over the land surfaces, Quantification of the net carbon flux in boreal landscapes Forecast skill of both weather and climate, Predictions and monitoring of natural disasters including floods, landslides and droughts, and Predictions of agricultural productivity. To provide these data, the SMAP mission will deploy a satellite observatory in a near polar, sun synchronous orbit. The observatory will house an L-band radiometer that operates at 1.40 GHz and an L-band radar that operates at 1.26 GHz. The instruments will share a rotating reflector antenna with a 6 meter aperture that scans over a 1000 km swath.

  2. Surface passivation of natural graphite electrode for lithium ion battery by chlorine gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Satoshi; Mazej, Zoran; Zemva, Boris; Ohzawa, Yoshimi; Nakajima, Tsuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Surface lattice defects would act as active sites for electrochemical reduction of propylene carbonate (PC) as a solvent for lithium ion battery. Effect of surface chlorination of natural graphite powder has been investigated to improve charge/discharge characteristics of natural graphite electrode in PC-containing electrolyte solution. Chlorination of natural graphite increases not only surface chlorine but also surface oxygen, both of which would contribute to the decrease in surface lattice defects. It has been found that surface-chlorinated natural graphite samples with surface chlorine concentrations of 0.5-2.3 at% effectively suppress the electrochemical decomposition of PC, highly reducing irreversible capacities, i.e. increasing first coulombic efficiencies by 20-30% in 1 mol L-1 LiClO4-EC/DEC/PC (1:1:1 vol.). In 1 mol L-1 LiPF6-EC/EMC/PC (1:1:1 vol.), the effect of surface chlorination is observed at a higher current density. This would be attributed to decrease in surface lattice defects of natural graphite powder by the formation of covalent C-Cl and C=O bonds.

  3. Identification of the Rayleigh surface waves for estimation of viscoelasticity using the surface wave elastography technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoming

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this Letter to the Editor is to demonstrate an effective method for estimating viscoelasticity based on measurements of the Rayleigh surface wave speed. It is important to identify the surface wave mode for measuring surface wave speed. A concept of start frequency of surface waves is proposed. The surface wave speeds above the start frequency should be used to estimate the viscoelasticity of tissue. The motivation was to develop a noninvasive surface wave elastography (SWE) technique for assessing skin disease by measuring skin viscoelastic properties. Using an optical based SWE system, the author generated a local harmonic vibration on the surface of phantom using an electromechanical shaker and measured the resulting surface waves on the phantom using an optical vibrometer system. The surface wave speed was measured using a phase gradient method. It was shown that different standing wave modes were generated below the start frequency because of wave reflection. However, the pure symmetric surface waves were generated from the excitation above the start frequency. Using the wave speed dispersion above the start frequency, the viscoelasticity of the phantom can be correctly estimated.

  4. Resent developments in high-frequency surface-wave techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, J.; Pan, Y.; Zeng, C.

    2012-12-01

    High-frequency Rayleigh-wave methods, such as Multi-channel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW), are getting increasingly attention in the near-surface geophysics and geotechnique community in the last 20 years because of their non-invasive, non-destructive, efficient, and low-cost advantages and their success in environmental and engineering applications. They are viewed by near-surface geophysics community as the one of most promise techniques in the future. However, they face unique problems related to extremely irregular velocity variations in near-surface geology or man-made constructions, for example, highway, foundation, dam, levee, jetty, etc., which are not solvable by techniques or algorithms widely used in earthquake seismology or oil/gas seismic exploration. We present solutions to the problems associated with near-surface materials that possess velocity inverse and high Poisson's ratio. Calculation of dispersion curves by existing algorithms may fail for some special velocity models due to velocity inverse (a high-velocity layer on the top of a low-velocity layer). Two velocity models are most common in near-surface applications. One is a low-velocity half space model and the other a high-velocity topmost layer. The former model results in a complex matrix that no roots can be found in the real number domain, which implies that no phase velocities can be calculated in certain frequency ranges based on current exist algorithms. A solution is to use the real part of the root of the complex number. It is well-known that phase velocities approach about 91% of the shear (S)-wave velocity of the topmost layer when wavelengths are much shorter than the thickness of the topmost layer. The later model, however, results in that phase velocities in a high-frequency range calculated using the current algorithms approach a velocity associated with the S-wave velocity of the second layer NOT the topmost layer. A solution to this problem is to use a two-layer model to

  5. Key techniques for vision measurement of 3D object surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huachao; Zhang, Shubi; Guo, Guangli; Liu, Chao; Yu, Ruipeng

    2006-11-01

    Digital close-range photogrammetry system and machine vision are widely used in production control, quality inspection. The main aim is to provide accurate 3D objects or reconstruction of an object surface and give an expression to an object shape. First, the key techniques of camera calibration and target image positioning for 3D object surface vision measurement were briefly reviewed and analyzed in this paper. Then, an innovative and effect method for precise space coordinates measurements was proposed. Test research proved that the thought and methods we proposed about image segmentation, detection and positioning of circular marks were effective and valid. A propriety weight value for adding parameters, control points and orientation elements in bundle adjustment with self-calibration are advantageous to gaining high accuracy of space coordinates. The RMS error of check points is less than +/-1 mm, which can meet the requirement in industrial measurement with high accuracy.

  6. Calibration of the Chemcatcher passive sampler for monitoring selected polar and semi-polar pesticides in surface water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunold, Roman; Schaefer, Ralf Bernhard; Paschke, Albrecht; Schueuermann, Gerrit; Liess, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Passive sampling is a powerful method for continuous pollution monitoring, but calibration experiments are still needed to generate sampling rates in order to estimate water concentrations for polar compounds. We calibrated the Chemcatcher device with an uncovered SDB-XC Empore disk as receiving phase for 12 polar and semi-polar pesticides in aquatic environments in flow-through tank experiments at two water flow velocities (0.135 m/s and 0.4 m/s). In the 14-day period of exposure the uptake of test substances in the sampler remained linear, and all derived sampling rates R s were in the range of 0.1 to 0.5 L/day. By additionally monitoring the release of two preloaded polar pesticides from the SDB-XC disks over time, very high variation in release kinetics was found, which calls into question the applicability of performance reference compounds. Our study expands the applicability of the Chemcatcher for monitoring trace concentrations of pesticides with frequent occurrence in water. - We calibrated the Chemcatcher passive sampler for current-use polar pesticides in surface waters, allowing its application in future monitoring studies

  7. Interpretation of EIS data on passive steel surfaces in aqueous sulfuric acid solution in terms of carrier migration and recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, Gabor; Kerner, Zsolt; Schiller, Robert [Central Research Institute for Physics, Atomic Energy Research Institute, P.O.B. 49, Budapest H-1525 (Hungary)

    2007-12-31

    A model is proposed for the description of the interplay of charge carrier migration, effected by external voltage and combination within very thin passive oxide layers. This theory is used to describe the electrochemical impedance spectra of passive stainless steel in sulfuric acid, a prototype of such surfaces. A simple R{sub s}-Z{sub mr} vertical stroke vertical stroke R{sub p} circuit is considered with Z{sub mr} accounting for dispersion and R{sub p} for the Faraday process. Z{sub mr} is based on a continuous time random walk (CTRW) expression and it is seen to be independent of voltage. R{sub p} shows a strong voltage dependence which can be understood in the negative voltage range as a Butler-Volmer-Erdey-Gruz process, whereas in the positive range it can be described in terms of tunneling across the oxide. Curve fitting results in parameters characteristic to oxide structure and process kinetics. All fitted quantities are seen to be realistic with the exception of charge carrier density which turned out to be much too high, indicating that mobility might not obey the classical, frequency-independent law. (author)

  8. Cu-Cu diffusion bonding enhancement at low temperature by surface passivation using self-assembled monolayer of alkane-thiol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, C. S.; Lim, D. F.; Singh, S. G.; Goulet, S. K.; Bergkvist, M.

    2009-11-01

    Self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of 1-hexanethiol is applied on copper (Cu) surface to retard surface oxidation during exposure in the ambient. This SAM layer can be desorbed effectively with an annealing step in inert N2 ambient to provide a clean Cu surface. Using this passivation method with SAM, wafers covered with thin Cu layer are passivated, stored, desorbed, and bonded at 250 °C. The bonded Cu layer presents clear evidence of substantial interdiffusion and grain growth despite prolonged exposure in the ambient. This method of passivation is proven to be effective and can be further optimized to enable high quality Cu-Cu direct bonding at low temperature for application in three-dimensional integration.

  9. U-Zr alloy: XPS and TEM study of surface passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paukov, M.; Tkach, I.; Huber, F.; Gouder, T.; Cieslar, M.; Drozdenko, D.; Minarik, P.; Havela, L.

    2018-05-01

    Surface reactivity of Uranium metal is an important factor limiting its practical applications. Bcc alloys of U with various transition metals are much less reactive than pure Uranium. So as to specify the mechanism of surface protection, we have been studying the U-20 at.% Zr alloy by photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The surface was studied in as-obtained state, in various stages of surface cleaning, and during an isochronal annealing cycle. The analysis based on U-4f, Zr-3p, and O-1 s spectra shows that a Zr-rich phase segregates at the surface at temperatures exceeding 550 K, which provides a self-assembled coating. The comparison of oxygen exposure of the stoichiometric and coated surfaces shows that the coating is efficiently preventing the oxidation of uranium even at elevated temperatures. The coating can be associated with the UZr2+x phase. TEM study indicated that the coating is about 20 nm thick. For the clean state, the U-4f core-level lines of the bcc alloy are practically identical to those of α-U, revealing similar delocalization of the 5f electronic states.

  10. Passive cavity surface-emitting lasers: option of temperature-insensitive lasing wavelength for uncooled dense wavelength division multiplexing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchukin, V. A.; Ledentsov, N. N.; Slight, T.; Meredith, W.; Gordeev, N. Y.; Nadtochy, A. M.; Payusov, A. S.; Maximov, M. V.; Blokhin, S. A.; Blokhin, A. A.; Zadiranov, Yu. M.; Maleev, N. A.; Ustinov, V. M.; Choquette, K. D.

    2016-03-01

    A concept of passive cavity surface-emitting laser is proposed aimed to control the temperature shift of the lasing wavelength. The device contains an all-semiconductor bottom distributed Bragg reflector (DBR), in which the active medium is placed, a dielectric resonant cavity and a dielectric top DBR, wherein at least one of the dielectric materials has a negative temperature coefficient of the refractive index, dn/dT < 0. This is shown to be the case for commonly used dielectric systems SiO2/TiO2 and SiO2/Ta2O5. Two SiO2/TiO2 resonant structures having a cavity either of SiO2 or TiO2 were deposited on a substrate, their optical power reflectance spectra were measured at various temperatures, and refractive index temperature coefficients were extracted, dn/dT = 0.0021 K-1 for SiO2 and dn/dT = -0.0092 K-1 for TiO2. Using such dielectric materials allows designing passive cavity surface-emitting lasers having on purpose either positive, or zero, or negative temperature shift of the lasing wavelength dλ/dT. A design for temperature-insensitive lasing wavelength (dλ/dT = 0) is proposed. Employing devices with temperature-insensitive lasing wavelength in wavelength division multiplexing systems may allow significant reducing of the spectral separation between transmission channels and an increase in number of channels for a defined spectral interval enabling low cost energy efficient uncooled devices.

  11. Improved Nanomechanical Test Techniques for Surface Engineered Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen R. Goodes

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The development and implementation of a wide range of innovative nanomechanical test techniques to solve tribological problems in applications as diverse as biomedical and automotive are described in this review. For improved wear resistance and durability, the importance of understanding the system response rather than the coating-only properties is emphasized. There are many applications involving mechanical contact where the key to understanding the problem is to test at higher load and to combine reliable measurements taken across different length scales using both nano- and micro-indentation and related wear measurement techniques which more closely simulate contact conditions to fully understand the mechanical behaviour and hence deliver improved application performance. Results are presented with the NanoTest platform for applications for biomedical devices and surface engineering of lightweight alloys for the automotive industry. By combining results with different techniques it is possible to postulate predictive design rules – based on the elastic and plastic deformation energies involved in contact - to aid the reliable optimisation of mechanical properties in the various contact situations in the different applications.

  12. Recent advances in the surface forces apparatus (SFA) technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israelachvili, J.; Min, Y.; Akbulut, M.; Alig, A.; Carver, G.; Greene, W.; Kristiansen, K.; Meyer, E.; Pesika, N.; Rosenberg, K.; Zeng, H.

    2010-03-01

    The surface forces apparatus (SFA) has been used for many years to measure the physical forces between surfaces, such as van der Waals (including Casimir) and electrostatic forces in vapors and liquids, adhesion and capillary forces, forces due to surface and liquid structure (e.g. solvation and hydration forces), polymer, steric and hydrophobic interactions, bio-specific interactions as well as friction and lubrication forces. Here we describe recent developments in the SFA technique, specifically the SFA 2000, its simplicity of operation and its extension into new areas of measurement of both static and dynamic forces as well as both normal and lateral (shear and friction) forces. The main reason for the greater simplicity of the SFA 2000 is that it operates on one central simple-cantilever spring to generate both coarse and fine motions over a total range of seven orders of magnitude (from millimeters to ångstroms). In addition, the SFA 2000 is more spacious and modulated so that new attachments and extra parts can easily be fitted for performing more extended types of experiments (e.g. extended strain friction experiments and higher rate dynamic experiments) as well as traditionally non-SFA type experiments (e.g. scanning probe microscopy and atomic force microscopy) and for studying different types of systems.

  13. Passive buoyant tracers in the ocean surface boundary layer: 2. Observations and simulations of microplastic marine debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, K.; Kukulka, T.; Proskurowski, G.; Law, K. L.

    2015-11-01

    This paper is the second of a two-part series that investigates passive buoyant tracers in the ocean surface boundary layer (OSBL). The first part examines the influence of equilibrium wind-waves on vertical tracer distributions, based on large eddy simulations (LESs) of the wave-averaged Navier-Stokes equation. Motivated by observations of buoyant microplastic marine debris (MPMD), this study applies the LES model and the parametric one-dimensional column model from part one to examine the vertical distributions of MPMD. MPMD is widely distributed in vast regions of the subtropical gyres and has emerged as a major open ocean pollutant whose distribution is subject to upper ocean turbulence. The models capture shear-driven turbulence, Langmuir turbulence (LT), and enhanced turbulent kinetic energy input due to breaking waves (BWs). Model results are only consistent with observations of MPMD profiles and the relationship between surface concentrations and wind speed if LT effects are included. Neither BW nor shear-driven turbulence is capable of deeply submerging MPMD, suggesting that the observed vertical MPMD distributions are a characteristic signature of wave-driven LT. Thus, this study demonstrates that LT substantially increases turbulent transport in the OSBL, resulting in deep submergence of buoyant tracers. The parametric model is applied to 11 years of observations in the North Atlantic and North Pacific subtropical gyres to show that surface measurements substantially underestimate MPMD concentrations by a factor of 3-13.

  14. The passivation of uranium metal surfaces by nitrogen bombardment — the formation of uranium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Geoffrey C.; Holmes, Nigel R.

    1988-05-01

    As part of a detailed investigation of the behaviour of metallic uranium in various atmospheres, we have examined the reaction between nitrogen gas and uranium metal. At room temperature there was no evidence of reaction between nitrogen gas and a clean metal surface; the only changes observed could be attributed to reaction between the metal and traces of oxygen (less than 0.1 ppm) in the nitrogen gas. Reaction between the metal and nitrogen was induced, however, by accelerating nitrogen towards the surface using a fast atom gun. The resulting nitrided surface was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and its oxidation behaviour was monitored over an extended period in UHV and in air.

  15. The passivation of uranium metal surfaces by nitrogen bombardment - the formation of uranium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, G.C.; Holmes, N.R.

    1988-01-01

    As part of a detailed investigation of the behaviour of metallic uranium in various atmospheres, we have examined the reaction between nitrogen gas and uranium metal. At room temperature there was no evidence of reaction between nitrogen gas and a clean metal surface; the only changes observed could be attributed to reaction between the metal and traces of oxygen (less than 0.1 ppm) in the nitrogen gas. Reaction between the metal and nitrogen was induced, however, by accelerating nitrogen towards the surface using a fast atom gun. The resulting nitrided surface was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and its oxidation behaviour was monitored over an extended period in UHV and in air. (orig.)

  16. Calibration and verification of surface contamination meters --- Procedures and techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuler, C; Butterweck, G.; Wernli, C.; Bochud, F.; Valley, J.-F.

    2007-03-01

    A standardised measurement procedure for surface contamination meters (SCM) is presented. The procedure aims at rendering surface contamination measurements to be simply and safely interpretable. Essential for the approach is the introduction and common use of the radionuclide specific quantity 'guideline value' specified in the Swiss Radiation Protection Ordinance as unit for the measurement of surface activity. The according radionuclide specific 'guideline value count rate' can be summarized as verification reference value for a group of radionuclides ('basis guideline value count rate'). The concept can be generalized for SCM of the same type or for SCM of different types using he same principle of detection. A SCM multi source calibration technique is applied for the determination of the instrument efficiency. Four different electron radiation energy regions, four different photon radiation energy regions and an alpha radiation energy region are represented by a set of calibration sources built according to ISO standard 8769-2. A guideline value count rate representing the activity per unit area of a surface contamination of one guideline value can be calculated for any radionuclide using instrument efficiency, radionuclide decay data, contamination source efficiency, guideline value averaging area (100 cm 2 ), and radionuclide specific guideline value. n this way, instrument responses for the evaluation of surface contaminations are obtained for radionuclides without available calibration sources as well as for short-Iived radionuclides, for which the continuous replacement of certified calibration sources can lead to unreasonable costs. SCM verification is based on surface emission rates of reference sources with an active area of 100 cm 2 . The verification for a given list of radionuclides is based on the radionuclide specific quantity guideline value count rate. Guideline value count rates for groups of radionuclides can be represented within the maximum

  17. 46 CFR 170.295 - Special consideration for free surface of passive roll stabilization tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... is calculated in accordance with § 170.285(a); and (2) The slack surface in the roll stabilization... in the roll tank on Graph 170.295. (3) Construct a line A on Graph 170.295 so that the area under line A between T = 0 and the angle at which the deck edge is immersed or 28 degrees, whichever is...

  18. Surface Passivation of MoO₃ Nanorods by Atomic Layer Deposition toward High Rate Durable Li Ion Battery Anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, B; Shahid, Muhammad; Nagaraju, D H; Anjum, D H; Hedhili, Mohamed N; Alshareef, H N

    2015-06-24

    We demonstrate an effective strategy to overcome the degradation of MoO3 nanorod anodes in lithium (Li) ion batteries at high-rate cycling. This is achieved by conformal nanoscale surface passivation of the MoO3 nanorods by HfO2 using atomic layer deposition (ALD). At high current density such as 1500 mA/g, the specific capacity of HfO2-coated MoO3 electrodes is 68% higher than that of bare MoO3 electrodes after 50 charge/discharge cycles. After 50 charge/discharge cycles, HfO2-coated MoO3 electrodes exhibited specific capacity of 657 mAh/g; on the other hand, bare MoO3 showed only 460 mAh/g. Furthermore, we observed that HfO2-coated MoO3 electrodes tend to stabilize faster than bare MoO3 electrodes because nanoscale HfO2 layer prevents structural degradation of MoO3 nanorods. Additionally, the growth temperature of MoO3 nanorods and the effect of HfO2 layer thickness was studied and found to be important parameters for optimum battery performance. The growth temperature defines the microstructural features and HfO2 layer thickness defines the diffusion coefficient of Li-ions through the passivation layer to the active material. Furthermore, ex situ high resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction were carried out to explain the capacity retention mechanism after HfO2 coating.

  19. Surface Passivation of MoO3 Nanorods by Atomic Layer Deposition Towards High Rate Durable Li Ion Battery Anodes

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Bilal

    2015-06-03

    We demonstrate an effective strategy to overcome the degradation of MoO3 nanorod anodes in Lithium (Li) ion batteries at high rate cycling. This is achieved by conformal nanoscale surface passivation of the MoO3 nanorods by HfO2 using atomic layer deposition (ALD). At high current density such as 1500 mA/g, the specific capacity of HfO2 coated MoO3 electrodes is 68% higher than bare MoO3 electrodes after 50 charge/discharge cycles. After 50 charge/discharge cycles, HfO2 coated MoO3 electrodes exhibited specific capacity of 657 mAh/g, on the other hand, bare MoO3 showed only 460 mAh/g. Furthermore, we observed that HfO2 coated MoO3 electrodes tend to stabilize faster than bare MoO3 electrodes because nanoscale HfO2 layer prevents structural degradation of MoO3 nanorods. Additionally, the growth temperature of MoO3 nanorods and the effect of HfO2 layer thickness was studied and found to be important parameters for optimum battery performance. The growth temperature defines the microstructural features and HfO2 layer thickness defines the diffusion coefficient of Li–ions through the passivation layer to the active material. Furthermore, ex–situ HRTEM, X–ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy and X–ray diffraction was carried out to explain the capacity retention mechanism after HfO2 coating.

  20. Entrance surface dose measurements in mammography using thermoluminescence technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera, T.; Vega C, H.R.; Manzanares A, E; Azorin, J.; Gonzalez, P.R.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Of the various techniques that can be used for personnel dosimetry, thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) has emerged as a superior technique due to its manifold advantages over other methods of dose estimation. Various phosphors have been therefore investigated regarding their suitability for dosimetry. In this paper, a dosimetry system based on thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) from zirconium oxide phosphors embedded in polytetrafluorethylene (ZrO 2 +PTFE) was developed for entrance surface doses (ES) measurements in mammography. Small ZrO 2 pellets of 5 mm in diameter and 0.8 mm in thickness were used. The reproducibility of measurements and linearity of ZrO 2 were also studied. The results were compared with those obtained from LiF:Mg,Cu,P usually used for the determination of absorbed dose in mammography. Measurements both per unit air kerma and In vivo were performed using a mammography unit model DMR (General Electric). The results showed that ZrO 2 TLDs can be used for the same X-ray dosimetry applications as LiF:Mg,Cu,P, with each type having the disadvantage of a response dependent on energy, particularly at low energies. These results indicate a considerable potential for use in routine control and In vivo ES measurements in mammography. (Author)

  1. Study of indoor radon levels in some radioactive areas of Himachal Pradesh: an inter-comparison of active and passive techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajwa, B.S.; Singh, S.; Sharma, N.; Virk, H.S.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Indoor radon levels measurements were carried using both the active and passive techniques in the dwellings of some villages, known to be located in the vicinity of uranium mineralized zones of Hamirpur district, Himachal Pradesh. Even in the passive technique using Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (S.S.N.T.D.), both the bare-slide and twin chamber dosemeter cup modes were utilized. An attempt has also been made to assess the levels of the indoor radon in these dwellings and inhalation dose rates of the population living in these villages. The average value of radon concentration levels using the bare-slide mode varies from 109.0 to 741.5 Bq/m3 in these dwellings, where as the maximum radon level using the twin cup dosemeter technique was found to be 140.3 Bq/m3. As usual the radon concentrations were found to be varying with seasonal changes, building materials etc. The radon survey in the dwellings of these villages has also been carried out using the Alpha- Guard technique, which is based on the pulse ionization chamber. The indoor radon concentration levels measured using the active technique of Alpha Guard have been found to be quite different from those measured in these dwellings by the passive technique of S.S.N.T.D.; indicating the importance of the S.S.N.T.D. in the long-term integrated measurement of the indoor radon levels in the dwellings. (authors)

  2. Oxidation of hydrogen-passivated silicon surfaces by scanning near-field optical lithography using uncoated and aluminum-coated fiber probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Steen; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Birkelund, Karen

    1997-01-01

    Optically induced oxidation of hydrogen-passivated silicon surfaces using a scanning near-field optical microscope was achieved with both uncoated and aluminum-coated fiber probes. Line scans on amorphous silicon using uncoated fiber probes display a three-peak profile after etching in potassium...

  3. Relation of lifetime to surface passivation for atomic-layer-deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on crystalline silicon solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Young Joon [Graduate School of Energy Science and Technology, Chungnam National University, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Hee Eun, E-mail: hsong@kier.re.kr [Photovoltaic Center, Korea Institute of Energy Research, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Hyo Sik, E-mail: hschang@cnu.ac.kr [Graduate School of Energy Science and Technology, Chungnam National University, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • We investigated the relation of potassium contamination on Si solar wafer to lifetime. • We deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on Si solar wafer after several cleaning process. • Potassium can be left on Si surface by incomplete cleaning process and degrade the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} passivation quality. - Abstract: We investigated the relation of potassium contamination on a crystalline silicon (c-Si) surface after potassium hydroxide (KOH) etching to the lifetime of the c-Si solar cell. Alkaline solution was employed for saw damage removal (SDR), texturing, and planarization of a textured c-Si solar wafer prior to atomic layer deposition (ALD) Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} growth. In the solar-cell manufacturing process, ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} passivation is utilized to obtain higher conversion efficiency. ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} shows excellent surface passivation, though minority carrier lifetime varies with cleaning conditions. In the present study, we investigated the relation of potassium contamination to lifetime in solar-cell processing. The results showed that the potassium-contaminated samples, due to incomplete cleaning of KOH, had a short lifetime, thus establishing that residual potassium can degrade Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface passivation.

  4. Effective Surface Passivation of InP Nanowires by Atomic-Layer-Deposited Al2O3with POxInterlayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, L E; Cavalli, A; Verheijen, M A; Haverkort, J E M; Bakkers, E P A M; Kessels, W M M

    2017-10-11

    III/V semiconductor nanostructures have significant potential in device applications, but effective surface passivation is critical due to their large surface-to-volume ratio. For InP such passivation has proven particularly difficult, with substantial depassivation generally observed following dielectric deposition on InP surfaces. We present a novel approach based on passivation with a phosphorus-rich interfacial oxide deposited using a low-temperature process, which is critical to avoid P-desorption. For this purpose we have chosen a PO x layer deposited in a plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (ALD) system at room temperature. Since PO x is known to be hygroscopic and therefore unstable in atmosphere, we encapsulate this layer with a thin ALD Al 2 O 3 capping layer to form a PO x /Al 2 O 3 stack. This passivation scheme is capable of improving the photoluminescence (PL) efficiency of our state-of-the-art wurtzite (WZ) InP nanowires by a factor of ∼20 at low excitation. If we apply the rate equation analysis advocated by some authors, we derive a PL internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of 75% for our passivated wires at high excitation. Our results indicate that it is more reliable to calculate the IQE as the ratio of the integrated PL intensity at room temperature to that at 10 K. By this means we derive an IQE of 27% for the passivated wires at high excitation (>10 kW cm -2 ), which constitutes an unprecedented level of performance for undoped InP nanowires. This conclusion is supported by time-resolved PL decay lifetimes, which are also shown to be significantly higher than previously reported for similar wires. The passivation scheme displays excellent long-term stability (>7 months) and is additionally shown to substantially improve the thermal stability of InP surfaces (>300 °C), significantly expanding the temperature window for device processing. Such effective surface passivation is a key enabling technology for InP nanowire devices such as

  5. Electrochemical characterization of anode passivation mechanisms in copper electrorefining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moats, Michael Scott

    Anode passivation can decrease productivity and quality while increasing costs in modern copper electrorefineries. This investigation utilized electrochemical techniques to characterize the passivation behavior of anode samples from ten different operating companies. It is believed that this collection of anodes is the most diverse set ever to be assembled to study the effect of anode composition on passivation. Chronopotentiometry was the main electrochemical technique, employing a current density of 3820 A m-2. From statistical analysis of the passivation characteristics, increasing selenium, tellurium, silver, lead and nickel were shown to accelerate passivation. Arsenic was the only anode impurity that inhibited passivation. Oxygen was shown to accelerate passivation when increased from 500 to 1500 ppm, but further increases did not adversely affect passivation. Nine electrolyte variables were also examined. Increasing the copper, sulfuric acid or sulfate concentration of the electrolyte accelerated passivation. Arsenic in the electrolyte had no effect on passivation. Chloride and optimal concentrations of thiourea and glue delayed passivation. Linear sweep voltammetry, cyclic voltammetry, and impedance spectroscopy provided complementary information. Analysis of the electrochemical results led to the development of a unified passivation mechanism. Anode passivation results from the formation of inhibiting films. Careful examination of the potential details, especially those found in the oscillations just prior to passivation, demonstrated the importance of slimes, copper sulfate and copper oxide. Slimes confine dissolution to their pores and inhibit diffusion. This can lead to copper sulfate precipitation, which blocks more of the surface area. Copper oxide forms because of the resulting increase in potential at the interface between the copper sulfate and anode. Ultimate passivation occurs when the anode potential is high enough to stabilize the oxide film in

  6. Recent Progress in Characterization of Dust over Land Surfaces with Space-borne Passive Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, N. Christina

    2008-01-01

    Among the many components that contribute to air pollution, airborne mineral dust plays an important role due to its biogeochemical impact on the ecosystem and its radiative-forcing effect on the climate system. In East Asia, dust storms frequently accompany the cold and dry air masses that occur as part of springtime cold front systems. Outbreaks of Asian dust storms occur often in the arid and semi-arid areas of northwestern China -about 1.6x10(exp 6) square kilometers including the Gobi and Taklimakan deserts- with continuous expanding of spatial coverage. These airborne dust particles, originating in desert areas far from polluted regions, interact with anthropogenic sulfate and soot aerosols emitted from Chinese mega-cities during their transport over the mainland. Adding the intricate effects of clouds and marine aerosols, dust particles reaching the marine environment can have drastically different properties than those from their sources. Furthermore, these aerosols, once generated over the source regions, can be transported out of the boundary layer into the free troposphere and can travel thousands of kilometers across the Pacific into the United States and beyond. In this paper, we will demonstrate the capability of a new satellite algorithm to retrieve aerosol properties (e.g., optical thickness, single scattering albedo) over bright-reflecting surfaces such as urban areas and deserts. Such retrievals have been difficult to perform using previously available algorithms that use wavelengths from the mid-visible to the near IR because they have trouble separating the aerosol signal from the contribution due to the bright surface reflectance. This new algorithm, called Deep Blue, utilizes blue-wavelength measurements from instruments such as SeaWiFS and MODIS to infer the properties of aerosols, since the surface reflectance over land in the blue part of the spectrum is much lower than for longer wavelength channels. Reasonable agreements have been

  7. Fabrication and surface passivation of porous 6H-SiC by atomic layer deposited films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Weifang; Ou, Yiyu; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2016-01-01

    Porous 6H-SiC samples with different thicknesses were fabricated through anodic etching in diluted hydrofluoric acid. Scanning electron microscope images show that the dendritic pore formation in 6HSiC is anisotropic, which has different lateral and vertical formation rates. Strong photoluminesce......Porous 6H-SiC samples with different thicknesses were fabricated through anodic etching in diluted hydrofluoric acid. Scanning electron microscope images show that the dendritic pore formation in 6HSiC is anisotropic, which has different lateral and vertical formation rates. Strong...... above the 6H-SiC crystal band gap, which suggests that the strong photoluminescence is ascribed to surface state produced during the anodic etching....

  8. Control of Ambipolar Transport in SnO Thin-Film Transistors by Back-Channel Surface Passivation for High Performance Complementary-like Inverters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hao; Liang, Lingyan; Cao, Hongtao; Dai, Mingzhi; Lu, Yicheng; Wang, Mei

    2015-08-12

    For ultrathin semiconductor channels, the surface and interface nature are vital and often dominate the bulk properties to govern the field-effect behaviors. High-performance thin-film transistors (TFTs) rely on the well-defined interface between the channel and gate dielectric, featuring negligible charge trap states and high-speed carrier transport with minimum carrier scattering characters. The passivation process on the back-channel surface of the bottom-gate TFTs is indispensable for suppressing the surface states and blocking the interactions between the semiconductor channel and the surrounding atmosphere. We report a dielectric layer for passivation of the back-channel surface of 20 nm thick tin monoxide (SnO) TFTs to achieve ambipolar operation and complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) like logic devices. This chemical passivation reduces the subgap states of the ultrathin channel, which offers an opportunity to facilitate the Fermi level shifting upward upon changing the polarity of the gate voltage. With the advent of n-type inversion along with the pristine p-type conduction, it is now possible to realize ambipolar operation using only one channel layer. The CMOS-like logic inverters based on ambipolar SnO TFTs were also demonstrated. Large inverter voltage gains (>100) in combination with wide noise margins are achieved due to high and balanced electron and hole mobilities. The passivation also improves the long-term stability of the devices. The ability to simultaneously achieve field-effect inversion, electrical stability, and logic function in those devices can open up possibilities for the conventional back-channel surface passivation in the CMOS-like electronics.

  9. Response Surface Methods For Spatially-Resolved Optical Measurement Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danehy, P. M.; Dorrington, A. A.; Cutler, A. D.; DeLoach, R.

    2003-01-01

    Response surface methods (or methodology), RSM, have been applied to improve data quality for two vastly different spatially-resolved optical measurement techniques. In the first application, modern design of experiments (MDOE) methods, including RSM, are employed to map the temperature field in a direct-connect supersonic combustion test facility at NASA Langley Research Center. The laser-based measurement technique known as coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is used to measure temperature at various locations in the combustor. RSM is then used to develop temperature maps of the flow. Even though the temperature fluctuations at a single point in the flowfield have a standard deviation on the order of 300 K, RSM provides analytic fits to the data having 95% confidence interval half width uncertainties in the fit as low as +/- 30 K. Methods of optimizing future CARS experiments are explored. The second application of RSM is to quantify the shape of a 5-meter diameter, ultra-lightweight, inflatable space antenna at NASA Langley Research Center. Photogrammetry is used to simultaneously measure the shape of the antenna at approximately 500 discrete spatial locations. RSM allows an analytic model to be developed that describes the shape of the majority of the antenna with an uncertainty of 0.4 mm, with 95% confidence. This model would allow a quantitative comparison between the actual shape of the antenna and the original design shape. Accurately determining this shape also allows confident interpolation between the measured points. Such a model could, for example, be used for ray tracing of radio-frequency waves up to 95 GHz. to predict the performance of the antenna.

  10. Transferring metallic nano-island on hydrogen passivated silicon surface for nano-electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, J; Troadec, C; Joachim, C

    2009-01-01

    In a planar configuration, precise positioning of ultra-flat metallic nano-islands on semiconductor surface opens a way to construct nanostructures for atomic scale interconnects. Regular triangular Au nano-islands have been grown on atomically flat MoS 2 substrates and manipulated by STM to form nanometer gap metal-pads connector for single molecule electronics study. The direct assembly of regular shaped metal nano-islands on H-Si(100) is not achievable. Here we present how to transfer Au triangle nano-islands from MoS 2 onto H-Si(100) in a clean manner. In this experiment, clean MoS 2 substrates are patterned as array of MoS 2 pillars with height of 8 μm. The Au triangle nano-islands are grown on top of the pillars. Successful printing transfer of these Au nano-islands from the MoS 2 pillars to the H-Si(100) is demonstrated.

  11. Submicron Surface Vibration Profiling Using Doppler Self-Mixing Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Doppler self-mixing laser probing techniques are often used for vibration measurement with very high accuracy. A novel optoelectronic probe solution is proposed, based on off-the-shelf components, with a direct reflection optical scheme for contactless characterization of the target’s movement. This probe was tested with two test bench apparatus that enhance its precision performance, with a linear actuator at low frequency (35 µm, 5–60 Hz, and its dynamics, with disc shaped transducers for small amplitude and high frequency (0.6 µm, 100–2500 Hz. The results, obtained from well-established signal processing methods for self-mixing Doppler signals, allowed the evaluation of vibration velocity and amplitudes with an average error of less than 10%. The impedance spectrum of piezoelectric (PZ disc target revealed a maximum of impedance (around 1 kHz for minimal Doppler shift. A bidimensional scan over the PZ disc surface allowed the categorization of the vibration mode (0, 1 and explained its deflection directions. The feasibility of a laser vibrometer based on self-mixing principles and supported by tailored electronics able to accurately measure submicron displacements was, thus, successfully demonstrated.

  12. Incorporating an Inert Polymer into the Interlayer Passivates Surface Defects in Methylammonium Lead Halide Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Shiqing; Zhang, Xuning; Qin, Liang; Wang, Rong; Zhou, Jiyu; Leng, Xuanye; Qiu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Yuan; Zhou, Huiqiong; Tang, Zhiyong

    2017-10-17

    The hysteresis effect and instability are important concerns in hybrid perovskite photovoltaic devices that hold great promise in energy conversion applications. In this study, we show that the power conversion efficiency (PCE), hysteresis, and device lifetime can be simultaneously improved for methylammoniumlead halide (CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3-x Cl x ) solar cells after incorporating poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) into the PC 61 BM electron extraction layer (EEL). By choosing appropriate molecular weights of PMMA, we obtain a 30 % enhancement of PCE along with effectively lowered hysteresis and device degradation, adopting inverted planar device structure. Through the combinatorial study using Kelvin probe force microscopy, diode mobility measurements, and irradiation-dependent solar cell characterization, we attribute the enhanced device parameters (fill factor and open circuit voltage) to the surface passivation of CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3-x Cl x , leading to mitigating charge trapping at the cathode interface and resultant Shockley-Read-Hall charge recombination. Beneficially, modified by inert PMMA, CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3-x Cl x solar cells display a pronounced retardation in performance degradation, resulting from improved film quality in the PC 61 BM layer incorporating PMMA which increases the protection for underneath perovskite films. This work enables a versatile and effective interface approach to deal with essential concerns for solution-processed perovskite solar cells by air-stable and widely accessible materials. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Influence of Surface Passivation on AlN Barrier Stress and Scattering Mechanism in Ultra-thin AlN/GaN Heterostructure Field-Effect Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Y. J.; Song, X. B.; Wang, Y. G.; Fang, Y. L.; Feng, Z. H.

    2016-08-01

    Ultra-thin AlN/GaN heterostructure field-effect transistors (HFETs) with, and without, SiN passivation were fabricated by the same growth and device processes. Based on the measured DC characteristics, including the capacitance-voltage ( C- V) and output current-voltage ( I- V) curves, the variation of electron mobility with gate bias was found to be quite different for devices with, and without, SiN passivation. Although the AlN barrier layer is ultra thin ( c. 3 nm), it was proved that SiN passivation induces no additional tensile stress and has no significant influence on the piezoelectric polarization of the AlN layer using Hall and Raman measurements. The SiN passivation was found to affect the surface properties, thereby increasing the electron density of the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) under the access region. The higher electron density in the access region after SiN passivation enhanced the electrostatic screening for the non-uniform distributed polarization charges, meaning that the polarization Coulomb field scattering has a weaker effect on the electron drift mobility in AlN/GaN-based devices.

  14. Investigations on alluvial deposits through borehole stratigraphy, radiocarbon dating and passive seismic technique (Carnic Alps, NE Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viero, Alessia; Marchi, Lorenzo; Cavalli, Marco; Crema, Stefano; Fontana, Alessandro; Mozzi, Paolo; Venturini, Corrado

    2016-04-01

    their extent and the maximum depths. Two passive seismic campaigns were carried out near the borehole site and along the But valley at different elevations. The aim was to investigate the depth of the buried bedrock and therefore to indirectly characterize the thickness of alluvial deposits. We calibrated the fundamental frequency of each site by constraining average shear velocity of the alluvial sediments close to the borehole site with known stratigraphy. Eight HVSR (Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratio, Nakamura, 1989) were carried out, and thus a first sketch of the buried valley floor along a longitudinal profile of about 5 km was depicted. The values of the derived bedrock depth allow to quantify the differences in thickness between the alluvial deposits and the Moscardo Torrent fan deposits. This information helps to address the contribution of the debris-flow processes in damming the upper But River during the last five centuries. The results confirm the role of debris-flow deposits from the Moscardo Torrent in shaping the morphology of the valley floor of But River and show suitability of an integrated approach, encompassing log stratigraphy, geophysical surveys and analysis of historical documents, for gaining insights on the evolution of alpine valleys. Reference Nakamura, Y., 1989. A method for dynamic characteristic estimation of subsurface using microtremor on the ground surface. Quarterly Report of Railway Technical Research Institute, 30(1): 25-33.

  15. Stability of Al2O3 and Al2O3/a-SiNx:H stacks for surface passivation of crystalline silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dingemans, G.; Hoex, B.; Sanden, M. C. M. van de; Kessels, W. M. M.; Engelhart, P.; Seguin, R.; Einsele, F.

    2009-01-01

    The thermal and ultraviolet (UV) stability of crystalline silicon (c-Si) surface passivation provided by atomic layer deposited Al 2 O 3 was compared with results for thermal SiO 2 . For Al 2 O 3 and Al 2 O 3 /a-SiN x :H stacks on 2 Ω cm n-type c-Si, ultralow surface recombination velocities of S eff eff 800 deg. C) used for screen printed c-Si solar cells. Effusion measurements revealed the loss of hydrogen and oxygen during firing through the detection of H 2 and H 2 O. Al 2 O 3 also demonstrated UV stability with the surface passivation improving during UV irradiation.

  16. Comparison of Passive Stiffness Changes in the Supraspinatus Muscle after Double-row and Knotless Transosseous-equivalent Rotator Cuff Repair Techniques: A Cadaveric Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatta, Taku; Giambini, Hugo; Hooke, Alexander W.; Zhao, Chunfeng; Sperling, John W.; Steinmann, Scott P.; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Itoi, Eiji; An, Kai-Nan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the alteration of passive stiffness in the supraspinatus muscle after double-row (DR) and knotless transosseous-equivalent (KL-TOE) repair techniques, using the shear wave elastography (SWE) in cadavers with rotator cuff tears. We also aimed to compare altered muscular stiffness after these repairs to that obtained from shoulders with intact rotator cuff tendon. Methods Twelve fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulders with rotator cuff tear (tear size; small [6], medium-large [6]) were used. Passive stiffness of four anatomical regions in the supraspinatus muscle was measured based on an established SWE method. Each specimen underwent DR and KL-TOE footprint repairs at 30° glenohumeral abduction. SWE values, obtained at 0°, 10°, 20°, 30°, 60°, and 90° abduction, were assessed in 3 different conditions: preoperative (torn) and postoperative conditions with the 2 techniques. The increase ratio of SWE values after repair was compared among the four regions to assess stiffness distribution. In addition, SWE values were obtained on 12 shoulders with intact rotator cuff tendons as control. Results In shoulders with medium-large size tears, supraspinatus muscles showed an increased passive stiffness after rotator cuff repairs, and this was significantly observed at adducted positions. KL-TOE repair showed uniform stiffness changes among the four regions of the supraspinatus muscle (mean, 189-218% increase after repair), whereas, DR repair caused a significantly heterogeneous stiffness distribution within the muscle (mean, 187-319% after repair, P = 0.002). Although a repair-induced increase in muscle stiffness was observed also in small size tear, there were no significant differences in repaired stiffness changes between DR and KL-TOE (mean, 127-138% and 127-130% after repairs, respectively). Shoulders with intact rotator cuff tendon showed uniform SWE values among the four regions of the supraspinatus muscle (mean, 38.2-43.0 kPa). Conclusion Passive

  17. Influence of a-Si:H deposition power on surface passivation property and thermal stability of a-Si:H/SiNx:H stacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Li

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H layers for passivating crystalline silicon surfaces has been well documented in the literature for well over a decade. One limitation of such layers however has arisen from their inability to withstand temperatures much above their deposition temperature without significant degradation. This limitation is of importance particularly with multicrystalline silicon materials where temperatures of at least 400°C are needed for effective hydrogenation of the crystallographic defects such as grain boundaries. To address this limitation, in this work the surface passivation quality and thermal stability of a stack passivating system, combining a layer of intrinsic a-Si:H and a capping layer of silicon nitride (SiNx:H, on p-type crystalline silicon wafers is studied and optimized. In particular the sensitivity of different microwave (MW power levels for underlying a-Si:H layer deposition are examined. Both effective minority carrier lifetime (ζeff measurement and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectrometry were employed to study the bonding configurations, passivating quality and thermal stability of the a-Si:H/SiNx:H stacks. It is established that the higher MW power could result in increased as-deposited ζeff and implied Voc (iVoc values, indicating likely improved surface passivation quality, but that this combination degrades more quickly when exposed to prolonged thermal treatments. The more dihydride-rich film composition corresponding to the higher MW power appears to be beneficial for bond restructuring by hydrogen interchanges when exposed to short term annealing, however it also appears more susceptible to providing channels for hydrogen out-effusion which is the likely cause of the poorer thermal stability for prolonged high temperature exposure compared with stacks with underlying a-Si:H deposited with lower MW power.

  18. Study of engineering surfaces using laser-scattering techniques

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Senthilkumar (Newgen Imaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    tour the surfaces on to which they are deposited. Silver, gold, and copper films, in partic- ular, tend to be slightly lumpy, adding additional fractions of ...... This introduces some surface modifications due to recovery of the surface, or solidification of the melt region etc. On-line measurements are feasible. However, the results.

  19. Acoustic techniques for studying soil-surface seals and crusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    The impact of raindrops on a soil surface during a rainstorm may cause soil-surface sealing and upon drying, soil crusting. Soil-surface sealing is a result of the clogging of interaggregate pores by smaller suspended particles in the water and by structural deformation of the soil fabric, which red...

  20. Comparison of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, radioimmunoassay, complement fixation, anticomplement immunofluorescence and passive haemaglutination techniques for detecting cytomegalovirus IgG antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, J.C.; Hannington, G.; Bakir, T.M.F.; Stern, H.; Kangro, H.; Griffiths, P.D.; Heath, R.B.

    1982-01-01

    The radioimmunoassay (RIA) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) techniques were found to be comparable in sensitivity and specificity for detecting cytomegalovirus IgG antibody, and 10 to 100 times more sensitive than complement-fixation (CF), anticomplement immunofluorescence (ACIF) and passive haemagglutination (PHA). In screening tests for antibody, the frequency of false-positive and -negative results was 0.6% for RIA and ELISA, 1.5% for CF, 1.6% for ACIF and 3.6% for PHA. PHA was the least satisfactory test, largely because of technical problems. (author)

  1. Optical and electrical characterization of n-GaAs surfaces passivated by N{sub 2}-H{sub 2} plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Augelli, V.; Ligonzo, T.; Minafra, A.; Schiavulli, L.; Capozzi, V. E-mail: capozzi@ba.infn.it; Perna, G.; Ambrico, M.; Losurdo, M

    2003-05-01

    The passivation of GaAs (1 0 0) surface has been performed by using remote N{sub 2}-H{sub 2} (3% in H{sub 2}) RF plasma nitridation. The samples, consisting of n-doped GaAs wafers, show photoluminescence enhancement when the nitridation time and exposure to the plasma are in a narrow temporal window, so that a very thin (about 10 A) GaN layer is deposited on the GaAs surface. Pure N{sub 2} nitridation does not provide an efficient passivation, because it results in GaN layers with As and AsN{sub x} segregation at the GaN/GaAs interface. Increase of Au-GaAs Schottky barrier with the insertion of GaN interlayer and improvement of current-voltage characteristic have been observed.

  2. Blasting and Passivation Treatments for ASTM F139 Stainless Steel for Biomedical Applications: Effects on Surface Roughness, Hardening, and Localized Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barboza, Adriana L. Lemos; Kang, Kyung Won; Bonetto, Rita D.; Llorente, Carlos L.; Bilmes, Pablo D.; Gervasi, Claudio A.

    2015-01-01

    Due to the combination of good biofunctionality and biocompatibility at low cost, AISI 316 low carbon vacuum melting (LVM) stainless steel, as considered in ASTM F139 standard, is often the first choice for medical implants, particularly for use in orthopedic surgery. Proper surface finish must be provided to ensure adequate interactions of the alloy with human body tissues that in turn allows the material to deliver the desired performance. Preliminary studies performed in our laboratory on AISI 316LVM stainless steel surfaces modified by glass bead blasting (from industrial supplier) followed by different nitric acid passivation conditions disclosed the necessity to extend parameters of the surface treatments and to further consider roughness, pitting corrosion resistance, and surface and subsurface hardening measurements, all in one, as the most effective characterization strategy. This was the approach adopted in the present work. Roughness assessment was performed by means of amplitude parameters, functional parameters, and an estimator of the fractal dimension that characterizes surface topography. We clearly demonstrate that the blasting treatment should be carried out under controlled conditions in order to obtain similar surface and subsurface properties. Otherwise, a variation in one of the parameters could modify the surface properties, exerting a profound impact on its application as biomaterial. A passivation step is necessary to offset the detrimental effect of blasting on pitting corrosion resistance.

  3. High-beam-quality, efficient operation of passively Q-switched Yb:YAG/Cr:YAG laser pumped by photonic-crystal surface-emitting laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaoyang; Tokita, Shigeki; Fujioka, Kana; Nishida, Hiro; Hirose, Kazuyoshi; Sugiyama, Takahiro; Watanabe, Akiyoshi; Ishizaki, Kenji; Noda, Susumu; Miyanaga, Noriaki; Kawanaka, Junji

    2017-07-01

    A passively Q-switched Yb:YAG/Cr:YAG laser pumped by a photonic-crystal surface-emitting laser (PCSEL) was developed. Yb:YAG crystal was cryogenically cooled by liquid nitrogen at 77 K. Excellent Gaussian beam profile ( M 2 = 1.02) and high slope efficiency of 58% were demonstrated without using a coupling optics between a laser material and PCSEL.

  4. Accuracy of implant transfer with open-tray and closed-tray impression techniques and surface detail reproduction of the tooth during impression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakimeh Siadat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Accurate recording of implant location is required to achieve passive fit and have the implants without stress concentration. The aim of this in-vitro study was to evaluate the dimensional and angular accuracy of open-tray and closed-tray impression techniques using polyether impression material and also to assess the surface detail reproduction of the tooth while impression making.Materials and Methods: One reference metal model with 2 implants (Implantium on the position of the maxillary second premolar and first molar and one molar tooth for evaluation of surface details was prepared. 27 polyether impressions of these models were made (9 using open-tray, 9 using closed-tray techniques and 9 were made just of the surface of the teeth without any implants. Impressions were poured with ADA type IV stone. Coordinate Measuring Machine was used for measuring the dimensional accuracy and video measuring machine for surface detail reproduction. All of these measurements were compared with the measurements on the reference model. Data were analyzed by and compared by T-test and One-way ANOVA.Results: There was a significant statistical difference between open-tray and closed-tray techniques (P0.05.Conclusion: The accuracy of open-tray impression technique was more than closed-tray technique. The surface detail reproduction of the tooth was not affected by impression technique.

  5. Chronic Achilles tendinopathy: a case study of treatment incorporating active and passive tissue warm-up, Graston Technique, ART, eccentric exercise, and cryotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miners, Andrew L; Bougie, Tracy L

    2011-12-01

    To describe the subjective pain and functional improvements of a patient with chronic Achilles tendinopathy following a treatment plan incorporating active and passive tissue warm-up, followed respectively by soft tissue mobilization utilizing both Graston Technique(®) and Active Release Techniques(®), eccentric exercise, and static stretching in combination with cryotherapy. The primary characterization of chronic Achilles tendinopathy is gradual onset of pain and dysfunction focused in one or both Achilles tendons arising secondary to a history of repetitive use or excessive overload. Conservative treatment is commonly the initial strategy for patient management. Tissue heating, soft tissue mobilization, eccentric training, and static stretching with cryotherapy were implemented to reduce pain and improve function. A specific protocol of heat, soft tissue mobilization, eccentric exercise, stretching, and cryotherapy appeared to facilitate a rapid and complete recovery from chronic Achilles tendinopathy.

  6. Atmosphere–Surface Fluxes of CO2 using Spectral Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lise Lotte; Larsen, Søren Ejling

    2010-01-01

    Different flux estimation techniques are compared here in order to evaluate air–sea exchange measurement methods used on moving platforms. Techniques using power spectra and cospectra to estimate fluxes are presented and applied to measurements of wind speed and sensible heat, latent heat and CO2...... fluxes. Momentum and scalar fluxes are calculated from the dissipation technique utilizing the inertial subrange of the power spectra and from estimation of the cospectral amplitude, and both flux estimates are compared to covariance derived fluxes. It is shown how even data having a poor signal......-to-noise ratio can be used for flux estimations....

  7. Mitigation of wear damage by laser surface alloying technique

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Adebiyi, ID

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Today's increasingly extreme and aggressive production environments require that machine components be made with materials having specific surface properties such as good wear resistance. Unfortunately, nature does not provide such materials...

  8. A simple technique to assess bacterial attachment to metal surfaces

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sonak, S.; Bhosle, N.B.

    There are several methods to assess bacterial adhesion to metal surfaces. Although these methods are sensitive, they are time consuming and need expensive chemicals and instruments. Hence, their use in assessing bacterial adhesion is limited...

  9. Surface Optimization Techniques for Deployable Reflectors, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Under this and several other programs, CTD has developed TEMBOREG deployable solid-surface reflectors (TEMBOREG Reflectors) to provide future NASA and Air Force...

  10. Geophysical techniques in the historical center of Venice (Italy): preliminary results from HVSR and multichannel analysis of surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisani, Sebastiano; Rocca, Michele; Boaga, Jacopo

    2014-05-01

    This presentation aims to outline the preliminary findings related to an extensive seismic survey conducted in the historical center of Venice, Italy. The survey was conducted via noninvasive and low-cost seismic techniques based on surface waves analysis and microtremor methods, mainly using single station horizontal to vertical spectral ratio techninques (HVSR) and multichannel analysis of surface waves in passive (ReMI) and active (MASW) configurations. The importance and the fragility of the cultural heritage of Venice, coupled with its peculiar geological and geotechnical characteristics, stress the importance of a good knowledge of its geological architecture and seismic characteristics as an opportunity to improve restoration and conservation planning. Even if Venice is located in a relatively low seismic hazard zone, a local characterization of soil resonance frequencies and surficial shear waves velocities could improve the planning of engineering interventions, furnishing important information on possible local effects related to seismic amplification and possible coupling within buildings and soil resonance frequencies. In the specific we collected more than 50 HVSR single station noise measurements and several passive and active multichannel analysis of surface waves located in the historical center. In this work we report the characteristics of the conducted seismic surveys (instrumentation, sampling geometry, etc.) and the preliminary findings of our analysis. Moreover, we discuss briefly the practical issues, mainly of logistic nature, of conducting this kind of surveys in a peculiar and crowed historical center as represented by Venice urban contest. Acknowledgments Instrumentation acquired in relation to the project co-financed by Regione Veneto, POR-CRO, FESR, 2007-2013, action 1.1.1. "Supporto ad attività di ricerca, processi e reti di innovazione e alla creazione di imprese in settori a elevato contenuto tecnologico"

  11. A novel technique for the visualization of tablet punch surfaces: Characterization of surface modification, wear and sticking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Karawi, Claudia; Kaiser, Thomas; Leopold, Claudia S

    2017-09-15

    The surface quality of tablets is strongly related to the surface quality of the tablet punch. Therefore, regular control of the punch surfaces is needed to determine the surface properties, the wear status and sticking tendency of the punches. The aim of the present study was to develop and evaluate a new technique to visualize and evaluate tablet punch surfaces using high-resolution impression molding combined with 3D surface analysis. Standardized 3D surface texture parameters were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA) to characterized differently surface-modified punches, punches with different wear status and the sticking pattern on the punch surfaces. It could be shown that the presented technique was precise enough to differentiate between differently coated and texturized punches, to evaluate the abrasive wear status of the investigated punches, and to visualize and assess punch tip sticking behavior. In conclusion, this novel technique may serve as a valuable tool for systematic punch surface characterization, wear status check-up and optimization of the punch surface quality e.g. for improvement of the anti-sticking behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. DETECTING GLASS SURFACE CORROSION WITH IMAGE PROCESSING TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafet AKDENİZ

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Glass is a kind of amorphous materials that exhibits a transition from rigid to viscous state and finally liquid state when heated. For daily usage, it is desirable to have different forms and differenttransparencies for different purposes. Most widely used one is the one with high transparency and flat surface.One of the detrimental effects that glass is undergone during the storage or usage periods is corrosion. In this work, a way for detecting corrosion on the glass surface by image processing methodis presented.

  13. Assimilation of the ESA CCI Soil Moisture ACTIVE and PASSIVE Product into the SURFEX Land Surface Model using the Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blyverket, J.; Hamer, P.; Bertino, L.; Lahoz, W. A.

    2017-12-01

    The European Space Agency Climate Change Initiative for soil moisture (ESA CCI SM) was initiated in 2012 for a period of six years, the objective for this period was to produce the most complete and consistent global soil moisture data record based on both active and passive sensors. The ESA CCI SM products consist of three surface soil moisture datasets: The ACTIVE product and the PASSIVE product were created by fusing scatterometer and radiometer soil moisture data, respectively. The COMBINED product is a blended product based on the former two datasets. In this study we assimilate globally both the ACTIVE and PASSIVE product at a 25 km spatial resolution. The different satellite platforms have different overpass times, an observation is mapped to the hours 00.00, 06.00, 12.00 or 18.00 if it falls within a 3 hour window centred at these times. We use the SURFEX land surface model with the ISBA diffusion scheme for the soil hydrology. For the assimilation routine we apply the Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter (ETKF). The land surface model is driven by perturbed MERRA-2 atmospheric forcing data, which has a temporal resolution of one hour and is mapped to the SURFEX model grid. Bias between the land surface model and the ESA CCI product is removed by cumulative distribution function (CDF) matching. This work is a step towards creating a global root zone soil moisture product from the most comprehensive satellite surface soil moisture product available. As a first step we consider the period from 2010 - 2016. This allows for comparison against other global root zone soil moisture products (SMAP Level 4, which is independent of the ESA CCI SM product).

  14. Visualization of brain surface structures by weighted summation technique using multislice MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machida, Yoshio; Hatanaka, Masahiko; Hagiwara, Masayuki; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Tadatoki; Katada, Kazuhiro.

    1991-01-01

    Surface anatomy scanning (SAS) technique which visualizes brain surface structures has been developed since 1987. In this paper, we propose a modified method called 'multislice SAS', which also generates such surface structure images, and has several advantages compared with conventional SAS technique. The conventional SAS technique uses a very long echo time sequence (e.g. SE(3000, 250)) with a thick slice and a surface coil to enhance CSF on the brain surface. Our modified technique also uses a long echo time sequence. But, added multislice images, each appropriately weighted, are used in stead of a thick slice and a surface coil. Our basic studies have shown that this modified method has the following advantage: Several surface images with slightly different summation directions are obtained, and they are used for stereographic display and cine display. This is very useful for visualizing the spatial relationship of brain surface structures. By choosing appropriate weighting, we can obtain clinically legible surface images. This technique dose not require a surface coil. It means that flexibility of selecting imaging direction is high. We can make a lot of modifications, because the original multislice images of weighted summation are arbitrary. And we also clarify some limitation or disadvantage of this modified method. In conclusion, we think that this technique is one of the practical approaches for surface anatomy imaging. (author)

  15. Surface adsorption technique for the treatment of textile wastewaters ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reductions in color and pH variation of the effluent were monitored through absorbance and pH measurements throughout the process. Concentration levels of Ni2+ in the wastewater ranged ... for treated samples to be employed for domestic purposes. Key Words: Effluents Treatment, Nickel, Chromium, Surface adsorption ...

  16. GIS Technique Applied To Surface Water Survey In South Western ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A GIS is used to study the surface water in Ibadan. Data which relates to the physical parameters of the study area, were used in this study. These included a SPOT-multispectral imagery, topographic and geological maps of Ibadan, which were analyzed and interpreted. The enhancement of the digital image (SPOT- ...

  17. Surface morphology of contact lenses probed with microscopy techniques

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Guryča, Vilém; Hobzová, Radka; Přádný, Martin; Širc, Jakub; Michálek, Jiří

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 4 (2007), s. 215-222 ISSN 1367-0484 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1QS400500558 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : atomic force microscopy * scanning electron microscopy * surface roughness Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  18. Performance enhancement of sub-nanosecond diode-pumped passively Q-switched Yb:YAG microchip laser with diamond surface cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, W Z; Chen, Yi-Fan; Su, K W; Huang, K F; Chen, Y F

    2012-09-24

    We experimentally confirm that diamond surface cooling can significantly enhance the output performance of a sub-nanosecond diode-end-pumped passively Q-switched Yb:YAG laser. It is found that the pulse energy obtained with diamond cooling is approximately 1.5 times greater than that obtained without diamond cooling, where a Cr(4+):YAG absorber with the initial transmission of 84% is employed. Furthermore, the standard deviation of the pulse amplitude peak-to-peak fluctuation is found to be approximately 3 times lower than that measured without diamond cooling. Under a pump power of 3.9 W, the passively Q-switched Yb:YAG laser can generate a pulse train of 3.3 kHz repetition rate with a pulse energy of 287 μJ and with a pulse width of 650 ps.

  19. Magnetic resonance-guided vascular catheterization: feasibility using a passive tracking technique at 0.2 Telsa in a pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, F K; Reither, K; Branding, G; Wendt, M; Wolf, K J

    1999-11-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate in an animal model the feasibility of a passive tracking technique for catheter visualization of magnetic resonance (MR)-guided endovascular procedures. All experiments were performed in a 0.2 Tesla open MR system. Susceptibility-based catheters and guide wires were introduced into the aorta and were advanced selectively into the splenic and renal arteries under MR guidance. Based on a previously acquired contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) data set, the catheter positioning was performed by using a single-slice true fast imaging with steady state precession (FISP) sequence with a frame rate of 1.3 seconds. Contrast-enhanced MRA was performed in all animals. All catheters were advanced without complications into the aorta and were introduced into the proximal parts of the right renal and splenic arteries under MR guidance. Catheter manipulations were more difficult in the distal parts of these vessels due to the more complex anatomy. Passive catheter tracking is a valuable and technically robust alternative to active tracking methods, because it does not require additional hardware and, thus, can be implemented and used easily with any open MR imaging system. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 1999;10:841-844. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Micro reflectance difference techniques: Optical probes for surface exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lastras-Martinez, L.F.; Del Pozo-Zamudio, O.; Herrera-Jasso, R.; Ulloa-Castillo, N.A.; Balderas-Navarro, R.E.; Ortega-Gallegos, J.; Lastras-Martinez, A. [Instituto de Investigacion en Comunicacion Optica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Alvaro Obregon 64, 78000 San Luis Potosi, S.L.P. (Mexico)

    2012-06-15

    Micro reflectance difference spectroscopy ({mu}-RDS) is a promising tool for the in-situ and ex-situ characterization of semiconductors surfaces and interfaces. We discuss and compare two different approaches used to measure {mu}-RD spectra. One is based on a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera, while the other uses a laser and a XY translation stage. To show the performance of these systems, we have measured surface optical anisotropies of GaSb(001) sample on which anisotropic strains have been generated by preferential mechanical polishing along [110] and [1 anti 10] directions. The spectrometers are complementary and the selection of one of them depends on the sample to be investigated and on experimental conditions. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Evaluation of surface decarburization depth by magnetic Barkhausen noise technique

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stupakov, Oleksandr; Perevertov, Oleksiy; Tomáš, Ivan; Skrbek, B.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 323, č. 12 (2011), s. 1692-1697 ISSN 0304-8853 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/09/1323; GA ČR GP102/09/P108 Grant - others:AVČR(CZ) M100100906 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : Barkhausen noise * steel surface decarburization * residual stress * magnetic non-destructive testing Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.780, year: 2011

  2. Surface Analytical Techniques for Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion. A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    natural waters and colonize surfaces to produce biofilms. The biofilms are varied in composition but usually include bacteria, algae, and fungi, in...potential and dissolved oxgen oicitlauios associated ivith ate Anain, sp.ference andd tentation l biofili ptiuder a 61h light/dark regime. Ligtht ...depositing bacteria. and (c) crosssco thilrough pie 1%ed %en natural waters! has re Ited i areas conducive t acteri: should be known TING WAGNER AND RAY ON

  3. Chemical reaction on solid surface observed through isotope tracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Ken-ichi

    1983-01-01

    In order to know the role of atoms and ions on solid surfaces as the partners participating in elementary processes, the literatures related to the isomerization and hydrogen exchanging reaction of olefines, the hydrogenation of olefines, the metathesis reaction and homologation of olefines based on solid catalysts were reviewed. Various olefines, of which the hydrogen atoms were substituted with deuterium at desired positions, were reacted using various solid catalysts such as ZnO, K 2 CO 3 on C, MoS 2 (single crystal and powder) and molybdenum oxide (with various carriers), and the infra-red spectra of adsorbed olefines on catalysts, the isotope composition of reaction products and the production rate of the reaction products were measured. From the results, the bonding mode of reactant with the atoms and ions on solid surfaces, and the mechanism of the elementary process were considered. The author emphasized that the mechanism of the chemical reaction on solid surfaces and the role of active points or catalysts can be made clear to the considerable extent by combining isotopes suitably. (Yoshitake, I.)

  4. Data of ALD Al2O3 rear surface passivation, Al2O3 PERC cell performance, and cell efficiency loss mechanisms of Al2O3 PERC cell

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Haibing; Lv, Jun; Bao, Yameng; Xuan, Rongwei; Sun, Shenghua; Sneck, Sami; Li, Shuo; Modanese, Chiara; Savin, Hele; Wang, Aihua; Zhao, Jianhua

    2017-01-01

    This data article is related to the recently published article ‘20.8% industrial PERC solar cell: ALD Al2O3 rear surface passivation, efficiency loss mechanisms analysis and roadmap to 24%’ (Huang et al., 2017) [1]. This paper is about passivated emitter and rear cell (PERC) structures and it describes the quality of the Al2O3 rear-surface passivation layer deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD), in relation to the processing parameters (e.g. pre-clean treatment, deposition temperature, g...

  5. Multiple sectioning and perforation techniques for TEM sub-surface studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E.H.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1978-01-01

    Techniques for preparing multiple electron transparent regions at several depth levels below the surface of a metal disk specimen are described. These techniques are relatively rapid and find application in many areas involving surface studies. Examples are shown of multiple thin areas produced at intervals of approximately 200 nm below the original surface of a stainless steel bombarded with 4 MeV Ni +2 ions for void swelling studies

  6. Visible-light-induced surface graft polymerization via camphorquinone impregnation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziani-Cherif, Houcine; Abe, Yusuke; Imachi, Kou; Matsuda, Takehisa

    2002-02-01

    A surface modification method that is particularly applicable to complexly shaped fabricated devices has long been awaited. In this article, we describe the visible-light-induced surface photograft polymerization technique by which an inner surface of the device is modified by visible-light irradiation through the external surface. Comphorquione, as a photoradical initiator, was impregnated on a segmented polyurethane surface by solvent soaking, followed by visible-light irradiation in the presence of monomers such as acrylamide and poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate. The resultant surfaces were highly wettable with water, and surface chemical compositional analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the surface was graft-polymerized with these monomers. The simple and widespread applicability of this surface modification technique to biomedical devices is discussed. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res 59: 386-389, 2002

  7. Assessment of soil compaction properties based on surface wave techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jihan Syamimi Jafri, Nur; Rahim, Mohd Asri Ab; Zahid, Mohd Zulham Affandi Mohd; Faizah Bawadi, Nor; Munsif Ahmad, Muhammad; Faizal Mansor, Ahmad; Omar, Wan Mohd Sabki Wan

    2018-03-01

    Soil compaction plays an important role in every construction activities to reduce risks of any damage. Traditionally, methods of assessing compaction include field tests and invasive penetration tests for compacted areas have great limitations, which caused time-consuming in evaluating large areas. Thus, this study proposed the possibility of using non-invasive surface wave method like Multi-channel Analysis of Surface Wave (MASW) as a useful tool for assessing soil compaction. The aim of this study was to determine the shear wave velocity profiles and field density of compacted soils under varying compaction efforts by using MASW method. Pre and post compaction of MASW survey were conducted at Pauh Campus, UniMAP after applying rolling compaction with variation of passes (2, 6 and 10). Each seismic data was recorded by GEODE seismograph. Sand replacement test was conducted for each survey line to obtain the field density data. All seismic data were processed using SeisImager/SW software. The results show the shear wave velocity profiles increase with the number of passes from 0 to 6 passes, but decrease after 10 passes. This method could attract the interest of geotechnical community, as it can be an alternative tool to the standard test for assessing of soil compaction in the field operation.

  8. Damage identification in beams by a response surface based technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teidj S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, identification of damage in uniform homogeneous metallic beams was considered through the propagation of non dispersive elastic torsional waves. The proposed damage detection procedure consisted of the following sequence. Giving a localized torque excitation, having the form of a short half-sine pulse, the first step was calculating the transient solution of the resulting torsional wave. This torque could be generated in practice by means of asymmetric laser irradiation of the beam surface. Then, a localized defect assumed to be characterized by an abrupt reduction of beam section area with a given height and extent was placed at a known location of the beam. Next, the response in terms of transverse section rotation rate was obtained for a point situated afterwards the defect, where the sensor was positioned. This last could utilize in practice the concept of laser vibrometry. A parametric study has been conducted after that by using a full factorial design of experiments table and numerical simulations based on a finite difference characteristic scheme. This has enabled the derivation of a response surface model that was shown to represent adequately the response of the system in terms of the following factors: defect extent and severity. The final step was performing the inverse problem solution in order to identify the defect characteristics by using measurement.

  9. Effective optimization of surface passivation on porous silicon carbide using atomic layer deposited Al2O3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Weifang; Iwasa, Yoshimi; Ou, Yiyu

    2017-01-01

    Porous silicon carbide (B–N co-doped SiC) produced by anodic oxidation showed strong photoluminescence (PL) at around 520 nm excited by a 375 nm laser. The porous SiC samples were passivated by atomic layer deposited (ALD) aluminum oxide (Al2O3) films, resulting in a significant enhancement...... of the PL intensity (up to 689%). The effect of thickness, annealing temperature, annealing duration and precursor purge time on the PL intensity of ALD Al2O3 films was investigated. In order to investigate the penetration depth and passivation effect in porous SiC, the samples were characterized by X...... effective method to enhance the luminescence efficiency of porous SiC....

  10. Correlating the silicon surface passivation to the nanostructure of low-temperature a-Si:H after rapid thermal annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macco, Bart; Melskens, Jimmy; Podraza, Nikolas J.; Arts, Karsten; Pugh, Christopher; Thomas, Owain; Kessels, Wilhelmus M. M.

    2017-07-01

    Using an inductively coupled plasma, hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films have been prepared at very low temperatures (advantage of the low-temperature approach is the facile suppression of undesired epitaxial growth. The correlation between the a-Si:H nanostructure and the activation of a-Si:H/c-Si interface passivation, upon annealing, has been studied in detail. This yields a structural model that qualitatively describes the different processes that take place in the a-Si:H films during annealing. The presented experimental findings and insights can prove to be useful in the further development of very thin a-Si:H passivation layers for use in silicon heterojunction solar cells.

  11. Surface-Water Techniques: On Demand Training Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been collecting streamflow information since 1889 using nationally consistent methods. The need for such information was envisioned by John Wesley Powell as a key component for settlement of the arid western United States. Because of Powell?s vision the nation now has a rich streamflow data base that can be analyzed with confidence in both space and time. This means that data collected at a stream gaging station in Maine in 1903 can be compared to data collected in 2007 at the same gage in Maine or at a different gage in California. Such comparisons are becoming increasingly important as we work to assess climate variability and anthropogenic effects on streamflow. Training employees in proper and consistent techniques to collect and analyze streamflow data forms a cornerstone for maintaining the integrity of this rich data base.

  12. Passive cooling techniques through reflective and radiative roofs in tropical houses in Southeast Asia: A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karam M. Al-Obaidi

    2014-09-01

    Exploring these approaches in detail allows us to rethink how to effectively adapt these techniques to overcome the build-up of heat in modern tropical houses in Southeast Asia. This study reviews the physical characteristics of these approaches to guide architects and building designers. Results indicate a great reduction in operational cost. However, the significant differences in the performance of colour and material properties should be considered, given that the selected approach strongly affects the required thermal conditions of a building.

  13. Comparison of techniques for estimating PAH bioavailability: Uptake in Eisenia fetida, passive samplers and leaching using various solvents and additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergknut, Magnus [Department of Chemistry, Environmental Chemistry, Umeaa University, SE-90187 Umeaa (Sweden)]. E-mail: magnus.bergknut@chem.umu.se; Sehlin, Emma [Department of Chemistry, Environmental Chemistry, Umeaa University, SE-90187 Umeaa (Sweden); Lundstedt, Staffan [Department of Chemistry, Environmental Chemistry, Umeaa University, SE-90187 Umeaa (Sweden); Andersson, Patrik L. [Department of Chemistry, Environmental Chemistry, Umeaa University, SE-90187 Umeaa (Sweden); Haglund, Peter [Department of Chemistry, Environmental Chemistry, Umeaa University, SE-90187 Umeaa (Sweden); Tysklind, Mats [Department of Chemistry, Environmental Chemistry, Umeaa University, SE-90187 Umeaa (Sweden)

    2007-01-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate different techniques for assessing the availability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil. This was done by comparing the amounts (total and relative) taken up by the earthworm Eisenia fetida with the amounts extracted by solid-phase microextraction (SPME), semi-permeable membrane devices (SPMDs), leaching with various solvent mixtures, leaching using additives, and sequential leaching. Bioconcentration factors of PAHs in the earthworms based on equilibrium partitioning theory resulted in poor correlations to observed values. This was most notable for PAHs with high concentrations in the studied soil. Evaluation by principal component analysis (PCA) showed distinct differences between the evaluated techniques and, generally, there were larger proportions of carcinogenic PAHs (4-6 fused rings) in the earthworms. These results suggest that it may be difficult to develop a chemical method that is capable of mimicking biological uptake, and thus estimating the bioavailability of PAHs. - The total and relative amounts of PAHs extracted by abiotic techniques for assessing the bioavailability of PAHs was found to differ from the amounts taken up by Eisenia fetida.

  14. Negligible water surface charge determined using Kelvin probe and total reflection X-ray fluorescence techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapovalov, Vladimir L; Möhwald, Helmuth; Konovalov, Oleg V; Knecht, Volker

    2013-09-07

    The water surface charge has been extensively debated in recent decades. Electrophoretic mobilities of air bubbles in water and disjoining pressures between the surfaces of aqueous films suggest that the surface of water exhibits a significant negative charge. This is commonly attributed to a strong adsorption of hydroxide ions at the interface, though spectroscopic measurements and simulation studies suggest surface depletion of hydroxide ions. Alternatively, the negative surface charge could arise from surface contamination with trace charged surfactants. We have probed the variation in the surface charge of water with pH by measuring surface potentials using the Kelvin probe technique. Independently, the abundance in the interfacial layer of "reporter ions" (Rb(+) and Br(-)), which must be affected by a charged surface, has been monitored using the total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TRXF) technique. Special care was taken to prove the high sensitivity of this technique as well as to avoid surface contaminants. The magnitude of the surface charge was found to be below 1 e per 500 nm(2) (TRXF). No evidence of variations in the surface potential between pH 2-3 and pH 9-12 was detected within the accuracies of the methods (5 mV for Kelvin probe and 2 mV for TRXF). Hence, our findings suggest that the clean water surface exhibits negligible charge in a wide pH range.

  15. Surface modification technique of structural ceramics: ion implantation-assisted multi-arc ion plating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Zhijian; Miao Hezhuo; Si Wenjie; Qi Longhao; Li Wenzhi

    2003-01-01

    Through reviewing the advantages and disadvantages of the existed surface modification techniques, a new technique, ion implantation-assisted multi-arc ion plating, was proposed. Using the proposed technique, the surfaces of silicon nitride ceramics were modified by Ti ion implantation, and then three kinds of ternary coatings, (Ti,Al)N, (Ti,Zr)N and (Ti,Cr)N, were deposited on the as-implanted ceramics. The coatings prepared by this technique are of high-hardness and well adhesive to the ceramic substrates. The maximal hardness measured by nanoindentation tests is more than 40 GPa. The maximal critical load by nanoscratch tests is more than 60 mN. The cutting tools prepared by this technique with the presented coatings are of excellent performance in industrial applications. The technique may be promising for the surface modification of structural ceramics. (orig.)

  16. A passive technique for detecting copy-move forgery with rotation based on polar complex exponential transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emam, Mahmoud; Han, Qi; Yu, Liyang; Zhang, Ye; Niu, Xiamu

    2015-07-01

    Copy-move is one of the most common methods for image manipulation. Several methods have been proposed to detect and locate the tampered regions, while many methods failed when the copied regions are rotated before being pasted. A rotational invariant detecting method using Polar Complex Exponential Transform (PCET) is proposed in this paper. Firstly, the original image is divided into overlapping circular blocks, and PCET is employed to each block to extract the rotation-invariant robust features. Secondly, the Approximate Nearest Neighbors (ANN) of each feature vector are collected by Locality Sensitive Hashing (LSH). Experimental results show that the proposed technique is robust to rotation.

  17. Glacier surface melt characterization and trend analysis (1992-2011) in the Russian High Arctic from combined resolution-enhanced scatterometer and passive microwave data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, M.; Ramage, J. M.; Semmens, K. A.

    2012-12-01

    Global warming has been pronounced in the remote glacierized archipelagoes (Severnaya Zemlya, Novaya Zemlya and Franz Josef Land) of the Russian High Arctic (RHA) and its effect on the low altitude, high latitude small ice caps needs examination. The timing and spatial variability of snow melt onset, duration and intensity are key factors influencing mass balance and the ice marginal hydrological system as well as important indicators of glacial response to anthropogenic and natural forcings. Characterization and trend analysis of RHA glacier melt behaviors provide insight about assessing the mass loss rate under recent Arctic climate change. However, due to the harsh environment, long term records of glaciological data for RHA are limited, necessitating the application of remotely sensed data to accomplish the research. The high sensitivity to liquid water and the ability to penetrate non-precipitating clouds enables microwave remote sensing to detect glacier surface melt. The appearance of melt water in snow dramatically decreases the returned scatterometer radar signal from active microwave sensors and sharply augments passive microwave emission. Based on this feature, we combined resolution-enhanced ERS-1/2 C-band (1992-2000), QuickSCAT Ku-band (2000-2009), ASCAT C-band (2009-2011) scatterometer data and SSMI 37 GHz (1995-2007) vertically polarized passive microwave products from Brigham Young University and analyzed glacier surface melt trends from 1992 to 2011 with a spatial resolution downscaled to 4.45km. We concatenated scatterometer derived melt behaviors by overlapping years and refined the results based on passive microwave data. Cross-validation shows that melt timing to be consistent between the active and passive sensors. Trend analysis (α < 0.005) reveals that the average glacier surface melt onset date occurs earlier by approximately 0.85 days/year in Severnaya Zemlya which outpaced the mean advancing rate in the pan-Arctic. Surrounded by ocean

  18. Estimating surface soil moisture from SMAP observations using a Neural Network technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolassa, J; Reichle, R H; Liu, Q; Alemohammad, S H; Gentine, P; Aida, K; Asanuma, J; Bircher, S; Caldwell, T; Colliander, A; Cosh, M; Collins, C Holifield; Jackson, T J; Martínez-Fernández, J; McNairn, H; Pacheco, A; Thibeault, M; Walker, J P

    2018-01-01

    A Neural Network (NN) algorithm was developed to estimate global surface soil moisture for April 2015 to March 2017 with a 2-3 day repeat frequency using passive microwave observations from the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite, surface soil temperatures from the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System Model version 5 (GEOS-5) land modeling system, and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer-based vegetation water content. The NN was trained on GEOS-5 soil moisture target data, making the NN estimates consistent with the GEOS-5 climatology, such that they may ultimately be assimilated into this model without further bias correction. Evaluated against in situ soil moisture measurements, the average unbiased root mean square error (ubRMSE), correlation and anomaly correlation of the NN retrievals were 0.037 m 3 m -3 , 0.70 and 0.66, respectively, against SMAP core validation site measurements and 0.026 m 3 m -3 , 0.58 and 0.48, respectively, against International Soil Moisture Network (ISMN) measurements. At the core validation sites, the NN retrievals have a significantly higher skill than the GEOS-5 model estimates and a slightly lower correlation skill than the SMAP Level-2 Passive (L2P) product. The feasibility of the NN method was reflected by a lower ubRMSE compared to the L2P retrievals as well as a higher skill when ancillary parameters in physically-based retrievals were uncertain. Against ISMN measurements, the skill of the two retrieval products was more comparable. A triple collocation analysis against Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2) and Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) soil moisture retrievals showed that the NN and L2P retrieval errors have a similar spatial distribution, but the NN retrieval errors are generally lower in densely vegetated regions and transition zones.

  19. New Approaches to Underwater Surface Preparation and Painting (USPPT) Techniques (CD-ROM)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ledda, Jeffrey

    2006-01-01

    ...: 1 CD-ROM; 4 3/4 in.; 25.4 MB. ABSTRACT: This paper summarizes Oceaneering's findings for the ONR work entitled "New Approaches to Underwater Surface Preparation and Painting Techniques, Phase 2 Final Report...

  20. Quantitative study of Xanthosoma violaceum leaf surfaces using RIMAPS and variogram techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favret, Eduardo A; Fuentes, Néstor O; Molina, Ana M

    2006-08-01

    Two new imaging techniques (rotated image with maximum averaged power spectrum (RIMAPS) and variogram) are presented for the study and description of leaf surfaces. Xanthosoma violaceum was analyzed to illustrate the characteristics of both techniques. Both techniques produce a quantitative description of leaf surface topography. RIMAPS combines digitized images rotation with Fourier transform, and it is used to detect patterns orientation and characteristics of surface topography. Variogram relates the mathematical variance of a surface with the area of the sample window observed. It gives the typical scale lengths of the surface patterns. RIMAPS detects the morphological variations of the surface topography pattern between fresh and dried (herbarium) samples of the leaf. The variogram method finds the characteristic dimensions of the leaf microstructure, i.e., cell length, papillae diameter, etc., showing that there are not significant differences between dry and fresh samples. The results obtained show the robustness of RIMAPS and variogram analyses to detect, distinguish, and characterize leaf surfaces, as well as give scale lengths. Both techniques are tools for the biologist to study variations of the leaf surface when different patterns are present. The use of RIMAPS and variogram opens a wide spectrum of possibilities by providing a systematic, quantitative description of the leaf surface topography.

  1. Estrogen-, androgen- and aryl hydrocarbon receptor mediated activities in passive and composite samples from municipal waste and surface waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jálová, V; Jarošová, B; Bláha, L; Giesy, J P; Ocelka, T; Grabic, R; Jurčíková, J; Vrana, B; Hilscherová, K

    2013-09-01

    Passive and composite sampling in combination with in vitro bioassays and identification and quantification of individual chemicals were applied to characterize pollution by compounds with several specific modes of action in urban area in the basin of two rivers, with 400,000 inhabitants and a variety of industrial activities. Two types of passive samplers, semipermeable membrane devices (SPMD) for hydrophobic contaminants and polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) for polar compounds such as pesticides and pharmaceuticals, were used to sample wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) influent and effluent as well as rivers upstream and downstream of the urban complex and the WWTP. Compounds with endocrine disruptive potency were detected in river water and WWTP influent and effluent. Year-round, monthly assessment of waste waters by bioassays documented estrogenic, androgenic and dioxin-like potency as well as cytotoxicity in influent waters of the WWTP and allowed characterization of seasonal variability of these biological potentials in waste waters. The WWTP effectively removed cytotoxic compounds, xenoestrogens and xenoandrogens. There was significant variability in treatment efficiency of dioxin-like potency. The study indicates that the WWTP, despite its up-to-date technology, can contribute endocrine disrupting compounds to the river. Riverine samples exhibited dioxin-like, antiestrogenic and antiandrogenic potencies. The study design enabled characterization of effects of the urban complex and the WWTP on the river. Concentrations of PAHs and contaminants and specific biological potencies sampled by POCIS decreased as a function of distance from the city. © 2013.

  2. Fabrication of a wettability-gradient surface on copper by screen-printing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ding-Jun; Leu, Tzong-Shyng

    2015-08-01

    In this study, a screen-printing technique is utilized to fabricate a wettability-gradient surface on a copper substrate. The pattern definitions on the copper surface were freely fabricated to define the regions with different wettabilities, for which the printing definition technique was developed as an alternative to the existing costly photolithography techniques. This fabrication process using screen printing in tandem with chemical modification methods can easily realize an excellent wettability-gradient surface with superhydrophobicity and superhydrophilicity. Surface analyses were performed to characterize conditions in some fabrication steps. A water droplet movement sequence is provided to clearly demonstrate the droplet-driving effectiveness of the fabricated gradient surface. The droplet-driving efficiency offers a promising solution for condensation heat transfer applications in the foreseeable future.

  3. Explosive Contamination from Substrate Surfaces: Differences and Similarities in Contamination Techniques using RDX and C-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.J. Miller; T.S. Yoder

    2010-06-01

    The amount of time that an explosive is present on the surface of a material is dependent upon the original amount of explosive on the surface, temperature, humidity, rain, etc. This laboratory study focused on looking at similarities and differences in three different surface contamination techniques that are used when performance testing explosive trace detection equipment in an attempt to determine how effective the techniques are at replicating actual field samples. The three techniques used were dry transfer deposition of solutions using the Transportation Security Laboratory (TSL) patented dry transfer techniques (US patent 6470730), direct deposition of explosive standards, and fingerprinting of actual explosives. Explosives were deposited on the surface of one of five substrates using one of the three different deposition techniques. The process was repeated for each surface type using each contamination technique. The surface types used were: 50% cotton/50% polyester as found in T-shirts, 100% cotton with a smooth surface such as that found in a cotton dress shirt, 100% cotton on a rough surface such as that found on canvas or denim, suede leather such as might be found on jackets, purses, or shoes, and metal obtained from a car hood at a junk yard. The samples were not pre-cleaned prior to testing and contained sizing agents, and in the case of the metal, oil and dirt. The substrates were photographed using a Zeiss Discover V12 stereoscope with Axiocam ICc1 3 megapixel digital camera to determine the difference in the crystalline structure and surface contamination in an attempt to determine differences and similarities associated with current contamination techniques.

  4. Passivation of nanocrystalline TiO2 junctions by surface adsorbed phosphinate amphiphiles enhances the photovoltaic performance of dye sensitized solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Mingkui

    2009-01-01

    We report a new class of molecular insulators that electronically passivate the surface of nanocrystalline titania films for high performance dye sensitized solar cells (DSC). Using electrical impedance measurements we demonstrate that co-adsorption of dineohexyl bis-(3,3-dimethyl-butyl)-phosphinic acid (DINHOP), along with the amphiphilic ruthenium sensitizer Z907Na increased substantially the power output of the cells mainly due to a retardation of interfacial recombination of photo-generated charge carriers. The use of phosphinates as anchoring groups opens up new avenues for modification of the surface by molecular insulators, sensitizers and other electro-active molecules to realize the desired optoelectronic performance of devices based on oxide junctions. © 2009 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  5. Transport mechanism of reverse surface leakage current in AlGaN/GaN high-electron mobility transistor with SiN passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xue-Feng; Fan, Shuang; Chen, Yong-He; Kang, Di; Zhang, Jian-Kun; Wang, Chong; Mo, Jiang-Hui; Li, Liang; Ma, Xiao-Hua; Zhang, Jin-Cheng; Hao, Yue

    2015-02-01

    The transport mechanism of reverse surface leakage current in the AlGaN/GaN high-electron mobility transistor (HEMT) becomes one of the most important reliability issues with the downscaling of feature size. In this paper, the research results show that the reverse surface leakage current in AlGaN/GaN HEMT with SiN passivation increases with the enhancement of temperature in the range from 298 K to 423 K. Three possible transport mechanisms are proposed and examined to explain the generation of reverse surface leakage current. By comparing the experimental data with the numerical transport models, it is found that neither Fowler-Nordheim tunneling nor Frenkel-Poole emission can describe the transport of reverse surface leakage current. However, good agreement is found between the experimental data and the two-dimensional variable range hopping (2D-VRH) model. Therefore, it is concluded that the reverse surface leakage current is dominated by the electron hopping through the surface states at the barrier layer. Moreover, the activation energy of surface leakage current is extracted, which is around 0.083 eV. Finally, the SiN passivated HEMT with a high Al composition and a thin AlGaN barrier layer is also studied. It is observed that 2D-VRH still dominates the reverse surface leakage current and the activation energy is around 0.10 eV, which demonstrates that the alteration of the AlGaN barrier layer does not affect the transport mechanism of reverse surface leakage current in this paper. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61334002, 61106106, and 61474091), the Opening Project of Science and Technology on Reliability Physics and Application Technology of Electronic Component Laboratory, China (Grant No. ZHD201206), the New Experiment Development Funds for Xidian University, China (Grant No. SY1213), the 111 Project, China (Grant No. B12026), the Scientific Research Foundation for the Returned Overseas Chinese Scholars

  6. Capturing the surface texture and shape of pollen: a comparison of microscopy techniques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayandi Sivaguru

    Full Text Available Research on the comparative morphology of pollen grains depends crucially on the application of appropriate microscopy techniques. Information on the performance of microscopy techniques can be used to inform that choice. We compared the ability of several microscopy techniques to provide information on the shape and surface texture of three pollen types with differing morphologies. These techniques are: widefield, apotome, confocal and two-photon microscopy (reflected light techniques, and brightfield and differential interference contrast microscopy (DIC (transmitted light techniques. We also provide a first view of pollen using super-resolution microscopy. The three pollen types used to contrast the performance of each technique are: Croton hirtus (Euphorbiaceae, Mabea occidentalis (Euphorbiaceae and Agropyron repens (Poaceae. No single microscopy technique provided an adequate picture of both the shape and surface texture of any of the three pollen types investigated here. The wavelength of incident light, photon-collection ability of the optical technique, signal-to-noise ratio, and the thickness and light absorption characteristics of the exine profoundly affect the recovery of morphological information by a given optical microscopy technique. Reflected light techniques, particularly confocal and two-photon microscopy, best capture pollen shape but provide limited information on very fine surface texture. In contrast, transmitted light techniques, particularly differential interference contrast microscopy, can resolve very fine surface texture but provide limited information on shape. Texture comprising sculptural elements that are spaced near the diffraction limit of light (~250 nm; NDL presents an acute challenge to optical microscopy. Super-resolution structured illumination microscopy provides data on the NDL texture of A. repens that is more comparable to textural data from scanning electron microscopy than any other optical

  7. Application of response surface techniques to helicopter rotor blade optimization procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Joseph Lynn; Walsh, Joanne L.; Young, Katherine C.

    1995-01-01

    In multidisciplinary optimization problems, response surface techniques can be used to replace the complex analyses that define the objective function and/or constraints with simple functions, typically polynomials. In this work a response surface is applied to the design optimization of a helicopter rotor blade. In previous work, this problem has been formulated with a multilevel approach. Here, the response surface takes advantage of this decomposition and is used to replace the lower level, a structural optimization of the blade. Problems that were encountered and important considerations in applying the response surface are discussed. Preliminary results are also presented that illustrate the benefits of using the response surface.

  8. The research on surface characteristics of optical lens by 3D printing technique and precise diamond turning technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chien-Yao; Chang, Chun-Ming; Ho, Cheng-Fong; Lee, Tai-Wen; Lin, Ping-Hung; Hsu, Wei-Yao

    2017-06-01

    The advantage of 3D printing technique is flexible in design and fabrication. Using 3D printing technique, the traditional manufacturing limitations are not considered. The optical lens is the key component in an optical system. The traditional process to manufacture optical plastic lens is injection molding. However injection molding is only suitable for plastics lens, it cannot fabricate optical and mechanical components at same time. The assembly error of optical system can be reduced effectively with fabricating optical and mechanical components at same time. The process of printing optical and mechanical components simultaneously is proposed in previous papers, but the optical surface of printing components is not transparent. If we increase the transmittance of the optical surface, the printing components which fabricated by 3D printing process could be high transmission. Therefore, precise diamond turning technique has been used to turning the surface of 3D printing optical lens in this paper. The precise diamond turning techniques could process surfaces of components to meet the requirements of optical system. A 3D printing machine, Stratasys Connex 500, and a precise diamond turning machine, Precitech Freeform705XG, have been used in this paper, respectively. The dimension, roughness, transmission and printing types of 3D printing components have been discussed in this paper. After turning and polishing process, the roughness of 3D printing component is below 0.05 μm and the transmittance increase above 80 %. This optical module can be used in hand-held telescope and other system which need lens and special mechanical structure fabricated simultaneously.

  9. Self-cleaning Foliar Surfaces Characterization using RIMAPS Technique and Variogram Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosi, Pablo E.

    2002-01-01

    Along the last ten years many important studies about characterization of self-cleaning foliar surfaces have been done and focused new interest on this kind of surfaces.These studies were possible due to the development of a novel preparation technique for this biological material that let us observe the delicate structures of a foliar surface under scanning electron microscope (S.E.M.).This technique consists of replacing the natural water of the specimen by glycerol. Digital S.E.M. images from both self-cleaning and non-self-cleaning foliar surfaces were obtained and analyzed using RIMAPS technique and Variograms method. Our results revealed the existence of a common and exclusive geometrical pattern that is found in species which present self-cleaning foliar surfaces.This pattern combines at least nine different directions.The results from the Variograms method showed that the stomata play a key role in the determination of foliar surface roughness. In addition, spectra from RIMAPS technique constitute a fingerprint of a foliar surface so they can be used to find evolutionary relationships among species.Further studies will provide more detailed information to fully elucidate the self-cleaning pattern, so it might be possible to reproduce it on an artificial surface and make it self-cleaning

  10. Thiol passivation of MWIR type II superlattice photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salihoglu, O.; Muti, A.; Aydinli, A.

    2013-06-01

    Poor passivation on photodetectors can result in catastrophic failure of the device. Abrupt termination of mesa side walls during pixel definition generates dangling bonds that lead to inversion layers and surface traps leading to surface leakage currents that short circuit diode action. Good passivation, therefore, is critical in the fabrication of high performance devices. Silicondioxide has been the main stay of passivation for commercial photodetectors, deposited at high temperatures and high RF powers using plasma deposition techniques. In photodetectors based on III-V compounds, sulphur passivation has been shown to replace oxygen and saturate the dangling bonds. Despite its effectiveness, it degrades over time. More effort is required to create passivation layers which eliminate surface leakage current. In this work, we propose the use of sulphur based octadecanethiol (ODT), CH3(CH2)17SH, as a passivation layer for the InAs/GaSb superlattice photodetectors that acts as a self assembled monolayer (SAM). ODT SAMs consist of a chain of 18 carbon atoms with a sulphur atom at its head. ODT Thiol coating is a simple process that consist of dipping the sample into the solution for a prescribed time. Excellent electrical performance of diodes tested confirm the effectiveness of the sulphur head stabilized by the intermolecular interaction due to van der Walls forces between the long chains of ODT SAM which results in highly stable ultrathin hydrocarbon layers without long term degradation.

  11. Self-consistent Green’s-function technique for surfaces and interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Rosengaard, N. M.

    1991-01-01

    We have implemented an efficient self-consistent Green’s-function technique for calculating ground-state properties of surfaces and interfaces, based on the linear-muffin-tin-orbitals method within the tight-binding representation. In this approach the interlayer interaction is extremely short...... ranged, and only a few layers close to the interface need be treated self-consistently via a Dyson equation. For semi-infinite jellium, the technique gives work functions and surface energies that are in excellent agreement with earlier calculations. For the bcc(110) surface of the alkali metals, we find...

  12. The Effects of Acid Passivation, Tricresyl Phosphate Pre-Soak, and UV/Ozone Treatment on the Tribology of Perfluoropolyether-Lubricated 440C Stainless Steel Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shogrin, Bradley A.; Jones, William R., Jr.; Herrera-Fierro, Pilar

    1997-01-01

    The boundary-lubrication performance of perfluoropolyether (PFPE) thin films in the presence of passivated 440 C stainless steel is presented. The study utilized a standard ball-on-disc tribometer. Stainless steel surfaces were passivated with one of four techniques: 1) submersion in a chromic acid bath for 30 minutes at 46 C, 2) submersion in a chromic acid bath for 60 minutes at 56 C, 3) submersion in a tricresyl phosphate (TCP) bath for 2 days at 107 C, or 4) UV/Ozone treated for 15 minutes. After passivation, each disc had a 400 A film of PFPE (hexafluoropropene oxide) applied to it reproducibly (+/- 20%) and uniformly (+/- 15%) using a film deposition device. The lifetimes of these films were quantified by measuring the number of sliding wear cycles required to induce an increase in the friction coefficient from an initial value characteristic of the lubricated wear couple to a final, or failure value, characteristic of an unlubricated, unpassivated wear couple. The lubricated lifetime of the 440 C couple was not altered as a result of the various passivation techniques. The resulting surface chemistry of each passivation technique was examined using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). It was found that chromic acid passivation altered the Cr to Fe ratio of the surface. TCP passivation resulted in a FePO4 layer on the surface, while UV/Ozone passivation only removed the carbonaceous contamination layer. None of the passivation techniques were found to dramatically increase the oxide film thickness.

  13. Assessment of thermal load reduction due to the application of simple passive techniques in a house office building at the south of Libya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domanski, Roman; Azzain, Gassem

    2006-01-01

    The assessment of possible reduction of heating and cooling requirements of 300 m 2 house-office building has been presented in this paper, when simple Thermal Passive Techniques (TPT) have been applied to building's construction in Sebha city at the Libyan south. The known software for dynamic simulation (TRNSYS) has been used as an environment of digital experimentation for this study. A prototype represents the building has been constructed with the help of the available model of single thermal zone of TRNSYS (Type 19). The built-in ASHREA Transfer Function Method within this model has been used to calculate the heat flux through building's materials. Primarily, the thermal load on building's construction without TPTs has been evaluated under weather conditions of a Typical Meteorological Year (TMY) of Sebha city. Then, the building has been equipped with simple TPTs (such as the control of building materials, insulation, shading, infiltration and ventilation with windows resizing). This building was subjected to the same weather conditions and again the thermal load has been evaluated in order to report the percentage of reduction of thermal load. The simulation has been conducted successfully, where good assessment of reduction of annual heating and cooling demands in the building has been obtained. It is proved that, about (46%) of annual heating load and (48%) of annual cooling load can be reduced if suitable simple TPTs were incorporated in buildings.(Author)

  14. Proportional-integral and proportional-integral-derivative-based cyclic sleep controllers with anti-windup technique for energy-efficient and delay-aware passive optical networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Takahiro; Kubo, Ryogo

    2016-08-01

    In energy-efficient passive optical network (PON) systems, the increase in the queuing delays caused by the power-saving mechanism of optical network units (ONUs) is an important issue. Some researchers have proposed quality-of-service (QoS)-aware ONU cyclic sleep controllers in PON systems. We have proposed proportional (P) and proportional-derivative (PD)-based controllers to maintain the average queuing delay at a constant level regardless of the amount of downstream traffic. However, sufficient performance has not been obtained because of the sleep period limitation. In this paper, proportional-integral (PI) and proportional-integral-derivative (PID)-based controllers considering the sleep period limitation, i.e., using an anti-windup (AW) technique, are proposed to improve both the QoS and power-saving performance. Simulations confirm that the proposed controllers provide better performance than conventional controllers in terms of the average downstream queuing delay and the time occupancy of ONU active periods.

  15. Potentialities of some surface characterization techniques for the development of titanium biomedical alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.S. Vanzillotta

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Bone formation around a metallic implant is a complex process that involves micro- and nanometric interactions. Several surface treatments, including coatings were developed in order to obtain faster osseointegration. To understand the role of these surface treatments on bone formation it is necessary to choose adequate characterization techniques. Among them, we have selected electron microscopy, profilometry, atomic force microscopy (AFM and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS to describe them briefly. Examples of the potentialities of these techniques on the characterization of titanium for biomedical applications were also presented and discussed. Unfortunately more than one technique is usually necessary to describe conveniently the topography (scanning electron microsocopy, profilometry and/or AFM and the chemical state (XPS of the external layer of the material surface. The employment of the techniques above described can be useful especially for the development of new materials or products.

  16. Passive-solar construction handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, E.; Evans, D.; Gardstein, C.

    1981-02-01

    Many of the basic elements of passive solar design are reviewed. Passive solar construction is covered according to system type, each system type discussion including a general discussion of the important design and construction issues which apply to the particular system and case studies illustrating designed and built examples of the system type. The three basic types of passive solar systems discussed are direct gain, thermal storage wall, and attached sunspace. Thermal performance and construction information is presented for typical materials used in passive solar collector components, storage components, and control components. Appended are an overview of analysis methods and a technique for estimating performance. (LEW)

  17. Defect generation/passivation by low energy hydrogen implant for silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sopori, B.L.; Zhou, T.Q.; Rozgonyi, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    Low energy ion implant is shown to produce defects in silicon. These defects include surface damage, hydrogen agglomeration, formation of platelets with (111) habit plane and decoration of dislocations. Hydrogen also produces an inversion type of surface on boron doped silicon. These effects indicate that a preferred approach for passivation is to incorporate hydrogen from the back side of the cell. A backside H + implant technique is described. The results show that degree of passivation differs for various devices. A comparison of the defect structures of hydrogenated devices indicates that the structure and the distribution of defects in the bulk of the material plays a significant role in determining the degree of passivation

  18. Passivating ZnO Surface States by C60 Pyrrolidine Tris-Acid for Hybrid Solar Cells Based on Poly(3-hexylthiophene/ZnO Nanorod Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhong

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Construction of ordered electron acceptors is a feasible way to solve the issue of phase separation in polymer solar cells by using vertically-aligned ZnO nanorod arrays (NRAs. However, the inert charge transfer between conducting polymer and ZnO limits the performance enhancement of this type of hybrid solar cells. In this work, a fullerene derivative named C60 pyrrolidine tris-acid is used to modify the interface of ZnO/poly(3-hexylthiophene (P3HT. Results indicate that the C60 modification passivates the surface defects of ZnO and improves its intrinsic fluorescence. The quenching efficiency of P3HT photoluminescence is enhanced upon C60 functionalization, suggesting a more efficient charge transfer occurs across the modified P3HT/ZnO interface. Furthermore, the fullerene modified hybrid solar cell based on P3HT/ZnO NRAs displays substantially-enhanced performance as compared to the unmodified one and the devices with other modifiers, which is contributed to retarded recombination and enhanced exciton separation as evidenced by electrochemical impedance spectra. Therefore, fullerene passivation is a promising method to ameliorate the connection between conjugated polymers and metal oxides, and is applicable in diverse areas, such as solar cells, transistors, and light-emitting dioxides.

  19. Surface passivation of nano-textured fluorescent SiC by atomic layer deposited TiO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Weifang; Ou, Yiyu; Jokubavicius, Valdas

    2016-01-01

    Nano-textured surfaces have played a key role in optoelectronic materials to enhance the light extraction efficiency. In this work, morphology and optical properties of nano-textured SiC covered with atomic layer deposited (ALD) TiO2 were investigated. In order to obtain a high quality surface...

  20. Mobile depth profiling and sub-surface imaging techniques for historical paintings—A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfeld, Matthias, E-mail: matthias.alfeld@desy.de [University of Hamburg, Department of Chemistry, Martin-Luther-King Platz 6, D-20146 Hamburg (Germany); University of Antwerp, Department of Chemistry, Groenenbrogerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Broekaert, José A.C., E-mail: jose.broekaert@chemie.uni-hamburg.de [University of Hamburg, Department of Chemistry, Martin-Luther-King Platz 6, D-20146 Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-10-01

    Hidden, sub-surface paint layers and features contain valuable information for the art-historical investigation of a painting's past and for its conservation for coming generations. The number of techniques available for the study of these features has been considerably extended in the last decades and established techniques have been refined. This review focuses on mobile non-destructive subsurface imaging and depth profiling techniques, which allow for the in-situ investigation of easel paintings, i.e. paintings on a portable support. Among the techniques discussed are: X-ray radiography and infrared reflectography, which are long established methods and are in use for several decades. Their capabilities of element/species specific imaging have been extended by the introduction of energy/wavelength resolved measurements. Scanning macro-X-ray fluorescence analysis made it for the first time possible to acquire elemental distribution images in-situ and optical coherence tomography allows for the non-destructive study the surface paint layers in virtual cross-sections. These techniques and their variants are presented next to other techniques, such as Terahertz imaging, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance depth profiling and established techniques for non destructive testing (thermography, ultrasonic imaging and laser based interference methods) applied in the conservation of historical paintings. Next to selected case studies the capabilities and limitations of the techniques are discussed. - Highlights: • All mobile sub-surface and depth-profiling techniques for paintings are reviewed. • The number of techniques available has increased considerably in the last years. • X-ray radiography and infrared reflectography are still the most used techniques. • Scanning macro-XRF and optical coherence tomography begin to establish. • Industrial non destructive testing techniques support the preservation of paintings.

  1. Overview of systems and techniques for surface display of recombinant proteins in yeast S. cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Teparic

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade much effort has been devoted to the development of new expression systems and novel techniques for the surface display of heterologous proteins in yeast in order to improve their applications in biotechnology, food technology, pharmacology and medicine. Heterologous protein-encoding genes are generally fused with genes coding for yeast cell wall proteins or their fragments required for anchoring. The variety of reactions by which a protein can be displayed at the cell surface enables finding the appropriate one for each individual protein. However, it is still challenging how to improve the efficiency of display of protein complexes and increase the quantity of protein displayed on the yeast surface. Recently, synthetic protein chimeras that self-assemble into the scaffolds on the yeast surface displaying different proteins have been constructed. This review focuses on systems and techniques for display of recombinant proteins on the yeast cell surfaces and applications afforded by this technology.

  2. Core-level spectroscopic study of the evolution of the sulfur-passivated InP(001) surface during annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Z.; Dharma-wardana, M.W.; Lu, Z.H.; Cao, R.; Lewis, L.J.

    1997-01-01

    Core-level photoemission spectroscopy and theoretical predictions of structure and spectra are used to study the fully S-covered InP(001) surface and its evolution during annealing. The theory predicts a number of stable structures besides the lowest-energy ground state which is the fully S-covered (2x2)-reconstructed structure, where the surface has two types of S atoms. On annealing, a fascinating sequence of structures unfolds from the fully S-covered ground state as the other stable structures become energetically accessible. The surface S atoms exchange with bulk P atoms on annealing, forming new strong S endash P bonds while dissociating preexisting S endash S dimers. The S endash P bonds are tilted with the P atoms just above the surface and there is only one type of S atom in the structure. The measured excitation energies and spectra agree with theoretical predictions of the core-level spectra for the (2x2) reconstruction and its evolution to partial S coverages. We conclude that the annealed surface around 700 K is most likely to be a (2x2) reconstructed surface with the surface cell containing two S endash P bonds, with just one type of S atom. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  3. Conformational study of protein interactions with hydrogen-passivated amorphous silicon surfaces: Effect of pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahmi, Yamina; Filali, Larbi; Sib, Jamal Dine; Bouhekka, Ahmed; Benlakehal, Djamel; Bouizem, Yahya; Kebab, Aissa; Chahed, Larbi

    2017-11-01

    The adsorption of Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) proteins on amorphous silicon (a-Si) surfaces was studied with respect to solution pH. Thin films of a-Si were deposited using radio-frequency magnetron sputtering at room temperature and then treated in a hydrogen ambient to form a hydrogenated a-Si surface layer (a-Si:H). The interactions of the as-deposited and hydrogenated surfaces with the proteins at neutral, acidic, and basic environments was probed by means of Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflection (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy, Spectroscopic Ellipsometry (SE), and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), to study the influence of the charge of proteins on their adsorption and conformation on the a-Si:H surface, compared with the a-Si surface. The results show that the charge of the proteins has a significant effect on their interactions with these two substrates but in dissimilar ways. For the as-deposited substrate, these interactions are predictably coulombic since the surface is charged. For the hydrogenated substrate, the adsorption of the proteins depends on their conformation which is heavily affected by pH, and the size of their footprint (adsorption mode) on the surface.

  4. Optimization of freeform surfaces using intelligent deformation techniques for LED applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Annie Shalom; Neumann, Cornelius

    2018-04-01

    For many years, optical designers have great interests in designing efficient optimization algorithms to bring significant improvement to their initial design. However, the optimization is limited due to a large number of parameters present in the Non-uniform Rationaly b-Spline Surfaces. This limitation was overcome by an indirect technique known as optimization using freeform deformation (FFD). In this approach, the optical surface is placed inside a cubical grid. The vertices of this grid are modified, which deforms the underlying optical surface during the optimization. One of the challenges in this technique is the selection of appropriate vertices of the cubical grid. This is because these vertices share no relationship with the optical performance. When irrelevant vertices are selected, the computational complexity increases. Moreover, the surfaces created by them are not always feasible to manufacture, which is the same problem faced in any optimization technique while creating freeform surfaces. Therefore, this research addresses these two important issues and provides feasible design techniques to solve them. Finally, the proposed techniques are validated using two different illumination examples: street lighting lens and stop lamp for automobiles.

  5. Surface passivation and carrier selectivity of the thermal-atomic-layer-deposited TiO2 on crystalline silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plakhotnyuk, Maksym; Schüler, Nadine; Shkondin, Evgeniy

    2017-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate the use of an ultrathin TiO2 film as a passivating carrier-selective contact for silicon photovoltaics. The effective lifetime, surface recombination velocity, and diode quality dependence on TiO2 deposition temperature with and without a thin tunneling oxide interlayer (SiO2...... heterojunction with optimized photovoltage, interface quality, and electron extraction to maximize the photovoltage of TiO2–Si heterojunction photovoltaic cells are formulated. Diode behaviour was analysed with the help of experimental, analytical, and simulation methods. It is predicted that TiO2 with a high...... carrier concentration is a preferable candidate for high-performance solar cells. The possible reasons for performance degradation in those devices with and without interlayers are also discussed....

  6. Surface study of thioacetamide and zinc sulfide passivated long wavelength infrared type-II strained layer superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Koushik; Huang, Jun; Ghosh, Siddhartha; Xu, Runshen; Takoudis, Christos G.; Plis, Elena; Krishna, Sanjay; Ketharanathan, Sutharsan; Chriss, Matthew

    2011-06-01

    A pH adjusted acidic solution of thioacetamide (TAM) was used as a sulfidizing agent to treat long wavelength infrared (LWIR) superlattice surface for the first time. The results were compared against those for ammonium sulfide [(NH4)2S] which have been used earlier for the same purpose. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results revealed that TAM treatment attains a much pronounced degree of sulfidization on superlattice surface. Electrical measurements on mesa-etched diodes exhibited maximum zero bias dynamic resistance times area (R0A) value of 590 Ω-cm2, approximately a four times improvement compared to (NH4)2S treated diodes. XPS studies revealed the reappearance of detrimental oxides on the TAM treated surface after long term air exposure asserting the need for a suitable capping layer to preserve the quality of the surface. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used to cap the TAM treated surface with zinc sulfide (ZnS). Precise deposition of few monolayers of ZnS on TAM treated surface was further studied using XPS to understand the evolution of bond formations at the semiconductor-dielectric interface.

  7. Shear wave velocity investigation of soil liquefaction sites from the Tangshan, China M7.8 earthquake of 1976 using active and passive surface wave methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayen, Robert E; Tao, Xiaxin; Shi, Lijing; Shi, Hailiang

    2008-01-01

    An initial investigation of soil liquefaction sites from the July, 28 1976 Tangshan M7.8 earthquake was conducted between 1976 and 1978 by the National Ministry of Railways, China. These data are the basis of the ‘Chinese Method’ for assessment of liquefaction potential of silty-sand deposits, and are an important component of the worldwide data set for modern probabilistic methods for assessment of soil liquefaction using Bayesian updating and system reliability tools. We revisited 26 sites identified in the maps and published 198 report of the Ministry of Railways in order to investigate these locations with a suite of active- and passive-array surface wave methods. These sites are clustered along the north coast of the Bo Hai Sea in three areas: Lutai, Tianjin; Tangshan City and outlying village, Hebei; and Luannan county, Hebei. First, we gathered and evaluated the Rayleigh wave dispersion characteristics of the ground by comparing dispersion curves from the active source harmonic wave-spectral analysis of surface waves (SASW) method and the passive array Spatial Auto-Correlation method (SPAC). The dispersive properties of the liquefied ground as measured by these two methods were found to be almost identical. These tests were hybridized and the data sets merged in order to invert of shear wave velocities for analysis of liquefaction potential using a probabilistic framework. The data from high-values of seismic intensity near Tangshan city to low-intensities distant of the event in Luannan County segregate out into clusters of liquefied and non liquefied points clearly separated by liquefaction boundary curves developed from a large global data set of 310 sites

  8. Effect of surface passivation by SiN/SiO{sub 2} of AlGaN/GaN high-electron mobility transistors on Si substrate by deep level transient spectroscopy method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gassoumi, Malek, E-mail: malek.gassoumi@fsm.rnu.tn; Mosbahi, Hana; Zaidi, Mohamed Ali [Universite deMonastir, Laboratoire de Micro-Optoelectroniques et Nanostructures, Faculte des Sciences de Monastir (Tunisia); Gaquiere, Christophe [Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, Institut d' Electronique de Microelectronique et de Nanotechnologie IEMN, Departement hyperfrequences et Semiconducteurs (France); Maaref, Hassen [Universite deMonastir, Laboratoire de Micro-Optoelectroniques et Nanostructures, Faculte des Sciences de Monastir (Tunisia)

    2013-07-15

    Device performance and defects in AlGaN/GaN high-electron mobility transistors have been correlated. The effect of SiN/SiO{sub 2} passivation of the surface of AlGaN/GaN high-electron mobility transistors on Si substrates is reported on DC characteristics. Deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) measurements were performed on the device after the passivation by a (50/100 nm) SiN/SiO{sub 2} film. The DLTS spectra from these measurements showed the existence of the same electron trap on the surface of the device.

  9. Studying cell-surface interactions in vitro: a survey of experimental approaches and techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelis, Stefanie; Robelek, Rudolf; Wegener, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    A better understanding of the interactions of animal (or human) cells with in vitro surfaces is the key to the successful development, improvement and optimization of biomaterials for biomedical or biotechnological purposes. State-of-the-art experimental approaches and techniques are a prerequisite for further and deeper insights into the mechanisms and processes involved in cell-surface adhesion. This chapter provides a brief but not complete survey of optical, mechanical, electrochemical and acoustic devices that are currently used to study the structural and functional properties of the cell-surface junction. Each technique is introduced with respect to the underlying principles before example data are discussed. At the end of the chapter all techniques are compared in terms of their strengths, limitations and technical requirements.

  10. Evaluation of radon measuring technique using passive detector activated carbon; Avaliacao da tecnica de medicao do radonio utilizando detector passivo com carvao ativado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Paulo Roberto Rocha; Lessa, Edmilson de Lima; Oliveira, Evaldo Paulo de, E-mail: epoliveira@aluno.ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Div. de Radioprotecao Ambiental e Ocupacional

    2014-07-01

    This study aims to evaluate the efficiency of measuring the radioactive gas Radon ({sup 222} Rn) with passive detector activated carbon. Alpha Guard, exposure chamber, air sampler, default font Radio, calibrator flow, flow adjuster, ducts drivers: For this, various equipment to make the measurement system as were used. An assembly of such equipment, with specific sequence was used allowing for more efficient exposure of passive detectors Radon gas. Twenty samples were heated to remove moisture and then stored in desiccator until the experiment were made. The exhibition was held passive dosimeters being removed from the chamber, and one hour after, subjected to analysis by gamma spectrometry in germanium (HPGe) for an hour. Subsequently, other measurements were made at scheduled times and sequential for one hour. The results were presented in report form and spectra, measures and graphs generated by Alpha Guard were also extracted. Finally we calculated the efficiency of the passive meter activated carbon. (author)

  11. Enhancement of Natural Convection by Carbon Nanotube Films Covered Microchannel-Surface for Passive Electronic Cooling Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guang; Jiang, Shaohui; Yao, Wei; Liu, Changhong

    2016-11-16

    Owing to the outstanding properties of thermal conduction, lightweight, and chemical durability, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have revealed promising applications in thermal management materials. Meanwhile, the increasingly popular portable electronics and the rapid development of space technology need lighter weight, smaller size, and more effective thermal management devices. Here, a novel kind of heat dissipation devices based on the superaligned CNT films and underlying microchannels is proposed, and the heat dissipation properties are measured at the natural condition. Distinctive from previous studies, by combining the advantages of microchannels and CNTs, such a novel heat dissipation device enables superior natural convection heat transfer properties. Our findings prove that the novel CNT-based devices could show an 86.6% larger total natural heat dissipation properties than bare copper plate. Further calculations of the radiation and natural convection heat transfer properties demonstrate that the excellent passive cooling properties of these CNT-based devices are primarily caused by the reinforcement of the natural convection heat transfer properties. Furthermore, the heat dissipation mechanisms are briefly discussed, and we propose that the very high heat transfer coefficients and the porous structures of superaligned CNT films play critical roles in reinforcing the natural convection. The novel CNT-based heat dissipation devices also have advantages of energy-saving, free-noise, and without additional accessories. So we believe that the CNT-based heat dissipation devices would replace the traditional metal-finned heat dissipation devices and have promising applications in electronic devices, such as photovoltaic devices, portable electronic devices, and electronic displays.

  12. The two-thumb technique using an elevated surface is preferable for teaching infant cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Trang K; Hemway, Rae Jean; Perlman, Jeffrey M

    2012-10-01

    To determine whether the two-thumb technique is superior to the two-finger technique for administering chest compressions using the floor surface and the preferred location for performing infant cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) (ie, floor, table, or radiant warmer). Twenty Neonatal Resuscitation Program trained medical personnel performed CPR on a neonatal manikin utilizing the two-thumb vs two-finger technique, a compression to ventilation ratio of 30:2 for 2 minutes in random order on the floor, table, and radiant warmer. Compression depth favored the two-thumb over two-finger technique on the floor (27 ± 8 mm vs 23 ± 7), table (26 ± 7 mm vs 22 ± 7), and radiant warmer (29 ± 4 mm vs 23 ± 4) (all P CPR preferably using an elevated firm surface. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Experimental determination of void fraction in surface aeration using image processing technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadpur, Amir; Akhavan-Behabadi, Mohammad Ali; Ebrahimzaedh, Masoud; Hanafizadeh, Pedram; Raisee, Mehrdad [University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, a new method for determination of void fraction in surface aeration process is presented and discussed. The proposed method is based on the image processing technique. The experimental setup has been designed to create various surface aeration conditions in the water. Void fraction has been calculated for the wide range of water height, impeller immersion depth and rotational speed. Experiments have been performed in an open cubic tank with side length of 60 cm, equipped with one Rushton disk turbine. Moreover, the void fraction has been measured with level gauge method. The results showed that the image processing technique provides more accurate results than the level gauge measurements for void fraction calculation in surface aeration especially in low void fraction aeration. In addition, the experimental data revealed that increase in impeller immersion depth and rotational speed increase void fraction and oxygen transfer rate in surface aeration process.

  14. New short-time alignment technique for 70-meter antenna surface panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katow, M. S.

    1986-01-01

    With severely limited field modification time for upgrading the 64-m antenna to 70-m diameter, a new shorter time method for aligning the surface panels of the main reflector was needed. For each target on the surface panel, both distance (or range) and elevation angle measurements are made. A new technique for setting the surface panels at zenith look has been devised. This article describes the software required to convert the computed target distortions obtained from the JPL-IDEAS structural analysis computer program (defining the gravity load change from a 45-deg elevation angle to zenith look) into the theodolite reading at zenith look. The technique results in a perfectly shaped reflector at the 45-deg rigging elevation, with acceptable surface error tolerance.

  15. Noise suppression in surface microseismic data by τ-p transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forghani-Arani, Farnoush; Batzle, Mike; Behura, Jyoti; Willis, Mark; Haines, Seth; Davidson, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Surface passive seismic methods are receiving increased attention for monitoring changes in reservoirs during the production of unconventional oil and gas. However, in passive seismic data the strong cultural and ambient noise (mainly surface-waves) decreases the effectiveness of these techniques. Hence, suppression of surface-waves is a critical step in surface microseismic monitoring. We apply a noise suppression technique, based on the τ — p transform, to a surface passive seismic dataset recorded over a Barnett Shale reservoir undergoing a hydraulic fracturing process. This technique not only improves the signal-to-noise ratios of added synthetic microseismic events, but it also preserves the event waveforms.

  16. SU-E-T-622: Planning Technique for Passively-Scattered Involved-Node Proton Therapy of Mediastinal Lymphoma with Consideration of Cardiac Motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flampouri, S; Li, Z; Hoppe, B [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a treatment planning method for passively-scattered involved-node proton therapy of mediastinal lymphoma robust to breathing and cardiac motions. Methods: Beam-specific planning treatment volumes (bsPTV) are calculated for each proton field to incorporate pertinent uncertainties. Geometric margins are added laterally to each beam while margins for range uncertainty due to setup errors, breathing, and calibration curve uncertainties are added along each beam. The calculation of breathing motion and deformation effects on proton range includes all 4DCT phases. The anisotropic water equivalent margins are translated to distances on average 4DCT. Treatment plans are designed so each beam adequately covers the corresponding bsPTV. For targets close to the heart, cardiac motion effects on dosemaps are estimated by using a library of anonymous ECG-gated cardiac CTs (cCT). The cCT, originally contrast-enhanced, are partially overridden to allow meaningful proton dose calculations. Targets similar to the treatment targets are drawn on one or more cCT sets matching the anatomy of the patient. Plans based on the average cCT are calculated on individual phases, then deformed to the average and accumulated. When clinically significant dose discrepancies occur between planned and accumulated doses, the patient plan is modified to reduce the cardiac motion effects. Results: We found that bsPTVs as planning targets create dose distributions similar to the conventional proton planning distributions, while they are a valuable tool for visualization of the uncertainties. For large targets with variability in motion and depth, integral dose was reduced because of the anisotropic margins. In most cases, heart motion has a clinically insignificant effect on target coverage. Conclusion: A treatment planning method was developed and used for proton therapy of mediastinal lymphoma. The technique incorporates bsPTVs compensating for all common sources of uncertainties

  17. SU-E-T-622: Planning Technique for Passively-Scattered Involved-Node Proton Therapy of Mediastinal Lymphoma with Consideration of Cardiac Motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flampouri, S; Li, Z; Hoppe, B

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a treatment planning method for passively-scattered involved-node proton therapy of mediastinal lymphoma robust to breathing and cardiac motions. Methods: Beam-specific planning treatment volumes (bsPTV) are calculated for each proton field to incorporate pertinent uncertainties. Geometric margins are added laterally to each beam while margins for range uncertainty due to setup errors, breathing, and calibration curve uncertainties are added along each beam. The calculation of breathing motion and deformation effects on proton range includes all 4DCT phases. The anisotropic water equivalent margins are translated to distances on average 4DCT. Treatment plans are designed so each beam adequately covers the corresponding bsPTV. For targets close to the heart, cardiac motion effects on dosemaps are estimated by using a library of anonymous ECG-gated cardiac CTs (cCT). The cCT, originally contrast-enhanced, are partially overridden to allow meaningful proton dose calculations. Targets similar to the treatment targets are drawn on one or more cCT sets matching the anatomy of the patient. Plans based on the average cCT are calculated on individual phases, then deformed to the average and accumulated. When clinically significant dose discrepancies occur between planned and accumulated doses, the patient plan is modified to reduce the cardiac motion effects. Results: We found that bsPTVs as planning targets create dose distributions similar to the conventional proton planning distributions, while they are a valuable tool for visualization of the uncertainties. For large targets with variability in motion and depth, integral dose was reduced because of the anisotropic margins. In most cases, heart motion has a clinically insignificant effect on target coverage. Conclusion: A treatment planning method was developed and used for proton therapy of mediastinal lymphoma. The technique incorporates bsPTVs compensating for all common sources of uncertainties

  18. Investigation and Application of a New Passive Sampling Technique for in Situ Monitoring of Illicit Drugs in Waste Waters and Rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Changsheng; Zhang, Tingting; Hou, Song; Lv, Jiapei; Zhang, Yuan; Wu, Fengchang; Hua, Zhendong; Meng, Wei; Zhang, Hao; Xu, Jian

    2017-08-15

    Illicit drugs constitute a class of emerging contaminants that has been drawing significant concern due to its potent pharmacological and biological activities. In this study, an in situ passive sampling approach that uses diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) was successfully tested for measuring ketamine (KET), methamphetamine (METH), and amphetamine (AMP) in water. The diffusion coefficients of KET, METH, and AMP in diffusive gel were (8.13 ± 0.12) × 10 -6 , (8.55 ± 0.14) × 10 -6 , and (7.72 ± 0.18) × 10 -6 cm 2 s -1 at 22 °C, respectively. The capacities of an XAD binding gel for KET, METH, and AMP were 92, 57, and 45 μg per binding gel disc, which were suitable for long-term environmental monitoring. The DGT measurement of these drugs was not influenced by the pH (4 to 9) and the ionic strength (0.001 M - 0.1 M) and unaffected by the water flow, demonstrating the effectiveness of the XAD-based DGT for the in situ monitoring of illicit drugs. DGT samplers were deployed in a WWTP influent and natural rivers in Beijing, China. The ng L -1 levels of the drugs were high in the wastewater influent and low in river waters, with an insignificant fluctuation during the seven-day monitoring. The DGT-measured concentrations were comparable to the average concentrations determined by SPE method, which suggested that the average data measured by DGT could be substituted for high-frequency grab sampling. This study has demonstrated systematically for the first time that DGT is effective and accurate for monitoring illicit drugs in wastewater and surface waters, and provides a powerful tool to investigating the presence, transport, and environmental behaviors of these drugs in the aquatic ecosystem.

  19. Evaluation of Effect of Air Abrasion on Friction and Surface Micromorphology of Passive Stainless Steel Self-Ligated Brackets: An In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasir Sate Mizhir

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The friction that occur between arch wire and the brackets during arch wire sliding in fixed orthodontic appliance will affect negatively on the outcome of the orthodontic treatment in addition to the treatment time. The process of friction is a critical issue and should be understood properly by the orthodontist in order to provide the optimum treatment result in a short period of time. Aim: The aim of our study was to compare the effect of calcium carbonate air abrasive on static friction and micromorphology of bracket slot surface for two different stainless steel self-ligated brackets. Methods: 120 passive stainless steel self-ligated brackets from two different commercial brands where involved in the study (discovery® sl2.0, Dentaurum co. and Damon®, Ormco co.. The samples were divided randomly into 8 groups, and every group with 5 samples, the criteria for classification of these groups depend on bracket types and air abrasion periods. Round (18 inches NITI arch wire was used to slide through 3 brackets with the middle one 1 mm higher than the others, the distance of sliding through the brackets was 10 mm, the machine used for measurement included the (instron universal testing machine, the roughness of the bracket slot surface was analyzed be the machine of (scanning electron microscope. Results: The effect of air abrasive agent calcium carbonate on the both types of metal self-ligated brackets result in elevation the amount of static friction for (discovery® l2.0 by 35.157%, Damon® by 36.652%. Viewing the slot of the brackets under microscope by using (SEM device reveal great modification in surface of the slot with uneven and rougher surface when compared to the brackets of control group that appear with polished and smooth surface.

  20. Accuracy of Implant Position Transfer and Surface Detail Reproduction with Different Impression Materials and Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Alikhasi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of implant position transfer and surface detail reproduction using two impression techniques and materials.Materials and Methods: A metal model with two implants and three grooves of 0.25, 0.50 and 0.75 mm in depth on the flat superior surface of a die was fabricated. Ten regular-body polyether (PE and 10 regular-body polyvinyl siloxane (PVS impressions with square and conical transfer copings using open tray and closed tray techniques were made for each group. Impressions were poured with type IV stone, and linear and angular displacements of the replica heads were evaluated using a coordinate measuring machine (CMM. Also, accurate reproduction of the grooves was evaluated by a video measuring machine (VMM. These measurements were compared with the measurements calculated on the reference model that served as control, and the data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and t-test at P= 0.05.Results: There was less linear displacement for PVS and less angular displacement for PE in closed-tray technique, and less linear displacement for PE in open tray technique (P<0.001. Also, the open tray technique showed less angular displacement with the use of PVS impression material. Detail reproduction accuracy was the same in all the groups (P>0.05(.Conclusion: The open tray technique was more accurate using PE, and also both closed tray and open tray techniques had acceptable results with the use of PVS. The choice of impression material and technique made no significant difference in surface detail reproduction.Keywords: Dental Implants; Dental Impression Materials, Dental Impression Technique

  1. Statistical designs and response surface techniques for the optimization of chromatographic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Sergio Luis Costa; Bruns, Roy Edward; da Silva, Erik Galvão Paranhos; Dos Santos, Walter Nei Lopes; Quintella, Cristina Maria; David, Jorge Mauricio; de Andrade, Jailson Bittencourt; Breitkreitz, Marcia Cristina; Jardim, Isabel Cristina Sales Fontes; Neto, Benicio Barros

    2007-07-27

    This paper describes fundamentals and applications of multivariate statistical techniques for the optimization of chromatographic systems. The surface response methodologies: central composite design, Doehlert matrix and Box-Behnken design are discussed and applications of these techniques for optimization of sample preparation steps (extractions) and determination of experimental conditions for chromatographic separations are presented. The use of mixture design for optimization of mobile phases is also related. An optimization example involving a real separation process is exhaustively described. A discussion about model validation is presented. Some applications of other multivariate techniques for optimization of chromatographic methods are also summarized.

  2. Data of ALD Al2O3 rear surface passivation, Al2O3 PERC cell performance, and cell efficiency loss mechanisms of Al2O3 PERC cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibing Huang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This data article is related to the recently published article ‘20.8% industrial PERC solar cell: ALD Al2O3 rear surface passivation, efficiency loss mechanisms analysis and roadmap to 24%’ (Huang et al., 2017 [1]. This paper is about passivated emitter and rear cell (PERC structures and it describes the quality of the Al2O3 rear-surface passivation layer deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD, in relation to the processing parameters (e.g. pre-clean treatment, deposition temperature, growth per cycle, and film thickness and to the cell efficiency loss mechanisms. This dataset is made public in order to contribute to the limited available public data on industrial PERC cells, to be used by other researchers.

  3. Data of ALD Al2O3rear surface passivation, Al2O3PERC cell performance, and cell efficiency loss mechanisms of Al2O3PERC cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haibing; Lv, Jun; Bao, Yameng; Xuan, Rongwei; Sun, Shenghua; Sneck, Sami; Li, Shuo; Modanese, Chiara; Savin, Hele; Wang, Aihua; Zhao, Jianhua

    2017-04-01

    This data article is related to the recently published article '20.8% industrial PERC solar cell: ALD Al 2 O 3 rear surface passivation, efficiency loss mechanisms analysis and roadmap to 24%' (Huang et al., 2017) [1]. This paper is about passivated emitter and rear cell (PERC) structures and it describes the quality of the Al 2 O 3 rear-surface passivation layer deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD), in relation to the processing parameters (e.g. pre-clean treatment, deposition temperature, growth per cycle, and film thickness) and to the cell efficiency loss mechanisms. This dataset is made public in order to contribute to the limited available public data on industrial PERC cells, to be used by other researchers.

  4. Application of the thermal plasma technique in the treatment of stone surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez A, Z.I.

    2000-01-01

    The stone materials which form part of the cultural heritage of Mexico, are degraded under the united action of water, atmospheric gases, air pollution, temperature changes and the microorganisms action; provoking on the stone: fissures, crevices, scalings, fragmentations, pulverizations, etc. Therefore, the purpose of this work is to study the possibilities to apply a protective coating on the stone surfaces, previously clean and consolidated, through the thermal plasma technique. The purpose is to analyse the physical and chemical properties of three types of stone materials: quarry, tezontle and chiluca, usually used in constructions of cultural interest such as: historical monuments, churches, sculptures, etc., before and after to be submitted to the action of thermal plasma in order to examine the feasibility in the use of this coating technique in this type of applications. The application of conventional techniques to determine: porosity, density, absorption, low pressure water absorption and crystallization by total immersion of nuclear techniques such as: neutron activation analysis, x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy as well as of instrumental techniques: optical microscopy, mechanical assays of compression, flexure and surface area calculations, allowed to know the chemical and physical properties of the stone material before and after to be treated through the thermal plasma technique, projecting quartz on the stones surface at different distances and current intensity and showing the effect caused by the modifications or surface alterations present by cause of the application of that coating. the obtained results provide a general panorama of the application of this technique as an alternative to the maintenance of the architectural inheritance built in stone. (Author)

  5. 4D photogrammetric technique to study free surface water in open channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubé, Damien; Berkaoui, Amine; Vinatier, Fabrice; Bailly, Jean-Stéphane; Belaud, Gilles

    2015-04-01

    Characteristics of three-dimensional surface water are considered as the most valuable information to understand hydrodynamic phenomena in open channel flow. An accurate and coherent description of the free water surface morphology improves the accuracy of hydraulic models which study river processes. However, amongst existing techniques to measure three-dimensional surface, stereo-photogrammetry is clearly the most effective technique to obtain an instantaneous and high accurate 3D free water surface and it's suitable to both flume and field condition. Our study aims at developing this technique in two controlled channels, one in interior with glass borders (length: 6 m, width: 0.3 m and depth: 0.5 m) and one outside with cement borders (length: 13 m, width: 0.7 m and depth: 0.4 m). A system consisting in three NIKON-D3200 cameras, mounted to an adjustable tripod head, which is fixed to an inverted aluminium T-bar with the center camera higher than the two side cameras. Each camera is fitted with a 28 mm lens and cameras are synchronized using a Phottix(R) system. The system was mounted at a downstream position from the channel with an oblique configuration. A series of pictures taken at a 3 s interval during the water weight bearing were reported and analyzed using the Photoscan Pro(R) software for image matching. Validation procedure of the technique was realized using an orthophotography of the lateral border of the interior channel to delimit the line of water surface, and using a video capture of a slide fixed inside the outside channel. A high resolution and dynamic elevation map of the surface water was constructed. Our study give encouraging results, with a good capture of water surface morphology and a limited occlusion issues. The confrontation of the results with the validation dataset highlight limitations that need to be discussed with the audience.

  6. Passive Wireless SAW Humidity Sensors, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the preliminary development of passive wireless surface acoustic wave (SAW) based humidity sensors for NASA application to distributed...

  7. Tensile bond strength of hydroxyethyl methacrylate dentin bonding agent on dentin surface at various drying techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Ismiyatin

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are several dentin surface drying techniques to provide a perfect resin penetration on dentin. There are two techniques which will be compared in this study. The first technique was by rubbing dentin surface gently using cotton pellet twice, this technique is called blot dry technique. The second technique is by air blowing dentin surface for one second and continued by rubbing dentin surface gently using moist cotton. Purpose: This experiment was aimed to examine the best dentin surface drying techniques after 37% phosphoric acid etching to obtain the optimum tensile bond strength between hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA and dentin surface. Method: Bovine teeth was prepared flat to obtain the dentin surface and than was etched using 37% phosphoric acid for 15 seconds. After etching the dentin was cleaned using 20 cc plain water and dried with blot dry techniques (group I, or dried with air blow for one second (group II, or dried with air blow for one second, and continued with rubbing gently using moist cotton pellet (group III, and without any drying as control group (group IV. After these drying, the dentin surfaces were applied with resin dentin bonding agent and put into plunger facing the composite mould. The antagonist plunger was filled with composite resin. After 24 hours, therefore bond strength was measured using Autograph. Result: Data obtained was analyzed using One-Way ANOVA with 95% confidence level and continued with LSD test on p≤0.05. The result showed that the highest tensile bond strength was on group I, while the lowest on group IV. Group II and IV, III and IV, II and III did not show signigicant difference (p>0.05. Conclusion: Dentin surface drying techniques through gentle rubbing using cotton pellet twice (blot dry technique gave the greatest tensile bond strength.Latar belakang masalah: Tehnik pengeringan permukaan dentin agar resin dapat penetrasi dengan sempurna adalah dengan cara pengusapan secara

  8. Investigation of ozone zero phenomenon using new electrode and surface analysis technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, M.; Ochiai, Y.; Kawagoe, R.; Kato, Y.; Teranishi, K.; Suzuki, S.; Itoh, H.

    2011-07-01

    Results of our experimental investigation on the ozone zero phenomenon suggested us the importance of the electrode surface condition. This means that the main cause of the phenomenon, that is, temporal decrease of ozone concentration at the outlet of DBD type ozone generator and the recovery characteristics from the phenomenon are considered as the surface reaction process, which are influenced strongly by the surface condition. The surface condition is never constant during the ozone generation and varies gradually or remarkably with time depending on the experimental conditions. Therefore we have been continued to make clear the cause of the phenomenon, for example, the reproducibility of the phenomenon, using new electrodes and together with the surface analysis technique etc. In this paper, we describe on the above results and discussion.

  9. A novel and inexpensive technique for creating superhydrophobic surfaces using Teflon and sandpaper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Michael A.; Daniello, Robert J.; Rothstein, Jonathan P.

    2010-02-01

    Considerable efforts have been spent over the last decade developing hydrophobic surfaces exhibiting very large contact angles with water. Many of these methods require complex and expensive fabrication techniques. We demonstrate that sanding Teflon can produce superhydrophobic surfaces with advancing contact angles of up to 151° and contact angle hysteresis of less than 4°. Furthermore, we show that a wide range of both advancing contact angles and contact angle hysteresis can be achieved by varying the grit size of the sandpaper, allowing for future hysteresis and contact angle studies. Scanning electron microscopy images of the roughened surfaces depict the range and amplitude of length scales imparted on the surface by the sandpaper, which leads to deeper understanding of the state of wetting on the surface.

  10. Qualification and application of a surface plasmon resonance-based assay for monitoring potential HAHA responses induced after passive administration of a humanized anti Lewis-Y antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szolar, O H J; Stranner, S; Zinoecker, I; Mudde, G C; Himmler, G; Waxenecker, G; Nechansky, A

    2006-06-16

    A sensitive, surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based assay monitoring potential human-anti-human antibody (HAHA) reactions against the monoclonal antibody (mAb) IGN311 is presented. The latter is a fully humanized Lewis-Y carbohydrate specific mAb that is currently tested in a passive immune therapy approach in a clinical phase I trial. For the SPR experiments a BIACORE 3000 analyzer was used. The ligand IGN311 was covalently coupled to the carboxy-methylated dextran matrix of a CM5 research grade chip (BIACORE). In the course of a fully nested experimental design, a four parameter logistic equation was identified as appropriate calibration model ranging from 0.3 microg/mL (lower limit of quantitation, LLOQ) to 200 microg/mL (upper limit of quantitation, ULOQ) using an anti-idiotypic mAb ('HAHA mimic') as calibrator. The bias ranged from -2.4% to 5.5% and the intermediate precision expressed as 95% CI revealed values from 5.6% to 8.3%. Specificity was evaluated using six human serum matrices from healthy donors spiked with calibrator at the limit of quantitation (LOQ) with >80% of values being recovered with less than 25% relative error. The qualified assay was applied to monitor potentially induced HAHA reactivity in 11 patients from a clinical phase I trial with passively administered IGN311. Of the 11 patients, one high HAHA responder and several low responders were identified. Protein-G depletion experiments with human serum samples revealed that the observed response is predominantly caused by IgG binding to the ligand. The characteristics of these HAHA responses were all of the so-called 'Type I' which is defined by a peak response around day 15 that decreases from this point steadily suggesting that some kind of tolerance is established. Therefore, this type of HAHA response is regarded as non critical for the patient's safety.

  11. Critique of Sikkink and Keane's comparison of surface fuel sampling techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinton S. Wright; Roger D. Ottmar; Robert E. Vihnanek

    2010-01-01

    The 2008 paper of Sikkink and Keane compared several methods to estimate surface fuel loading in western Montana: two widely used inventory techniques (planar intersect and fixed-area plot) and three methods that employ photographs as visual guides (photo load, photoload macroplot and photo series). We feel, however, that their study design was inadequate to evaluate...

  12. A 3D edge detection technique for surface extraction in computed tomography for dimensional metrology applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yagüe-Fabra, J.A.; Ontiveros, S.; Jiménez, R.

    2013-01-01

    presents an edge detection method for the surface extraction based on a 3D Canny algorithm with sub-voxel resolution. The advantages of this method are shown in comparison with the most commonly used technique nowadays, i.e. the local threshold definition. Both methods are applied to reference standards...

  13. Characterization of thin films and surfaces by ion-beam analytical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelicon, P.; Budnar, M.; Zorko, B.; Razpet, A.

    1999-01-01

    The optimization of Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS) and Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (ERDA) at the tandetron facility of J. Stefan Inst.e is reported. The most recent applications of these techniques for the analysis of thin films and surfaces are presented. The construction of the isotope - resolved Time-Of-Flight ERDA telescope for depth profiling of light elements is reviewed.(author)

  14. Development of a surface isolation estimation technique suitable for application of polar orbiting satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, P. A.; Penn, L. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    A technique is developed for the estimation of total daily insolation on the basis of data derivable from operational polar-orbiting satellites. Although surface insolation and meteorological observations are used in the development, the algorithm is constrained in application by the infrequent daytime polar-orbiter coverage.

  15. A new technique for the identification of surface contamination in low temperature bolometric experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sangiorgio, S.; Arnaboldi, C.; Brofferio, C.; Bucci, C.; Capelli, S.; Carbone, L.; Clemenza, M.; Cremonesi, O.; Fiorini, E.; Foggetta, L.; Giuliani, A.; Gorla, P.; Nones, C.; Nucciotti, A.; Pavan, M.; Pedretti, M.; Pessina, G.; Pirro, S.; Previtali, E.; Salvioni, C.

    2011-01-01

    In the framework of the bolometric experiment CUORE, a new and promising technique has been developed in order to control the dangerous contamination coming from the surfaces close to the detector. In fact, by means of a composite bolometer, it is possible to partially overcome the loss of spatial resolution of the bolometer itself and to clearly identify events coming from outside.

  16. A noninvasive ultrasound elastography technique for measuring surface waves on the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Osborn, Thomas; Kalra, Sanjay

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to demonstrate an ultrasound based surface wave elastography (SWE) technique for generating and detecting surface waves on the lung. The motivation was to develop a noninvasive technique for assessing superficial lung tissue disease including interstitial lung disease (ILD). ILD comprises a number of lung disorders in which the lung tissue is stiffened and damaged due to fibrosis of the lung tissue. Currently, chest radiographs and computed tomography (CT) are the most common clinical methods for evaluating lung disease, but they are associated with radiation and cannot measure lung mechanical properties. The novelty of SWE is to develop a noninvasive and nonionizing technique to measure the elastic properties of superficial lung tissue. We propose to generate waves on the lung surface through wave propagation from a local harmonic vibration excitation on the chest through an intercostal space. The resulting surface wave propagation on the lung is detected using an ultrasound probe through the intercostal space. To demonstrate that surface waves can be generated on the lung, an ex vivo muscle-lung model was developed to evaluate lung surface wave generation and detection. In this model, swine muscle was laid atop a swine lung. A vibration excitation of 0.1s 100Hz wave was generated on the muscle surface and the surface waves on the lung were detected using a linear array ultrasound probe at 5MHz. To test its feasibility for patient use, SWE was used to measure both lungs of an ILD patient through eight intercostal spaces. The mean wave speed was 1.71±0.20m/s (±SD) at the functional residual capacity, while the mean wave speed was 2.36±0.33m/s at the total lung capacity. These studies support the feasibility of SWE for noninvasive measurement of elastic properties of lung and demonstrate potential for assessment of ILD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Characterizing a New Surface-Based Shortwave Cloud Retrieval Technique, Based on Transmitted Radiance for Soil and Vegetated Surface Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick J. McBride

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an approach using the GEneralized Nonlinear Retrieval Analysis (GENRA tool and general inverse theory diagnostics including the maximum likelihood solution and the Shannon information content to investigate the performance of a new spectral technique for the retrieval of cloud optical properties from surface based transmittance measurements. The cumulative retrieval information over broad ranges in cloud optical thickness (τ, droplet effective radius (re, and overhead sun angles is quantified under two conditions known to impact transmitted radiation; the variability in land surface albedo and atmospheric water vapor content. Our conclusions are: (1 the retrieved cloud properties are more sensitive to the natural variability in land surface albedo than to water vapor content; (2 the new spectral technique is more accurate (but still imprecise than a standard approach, in particular for τ between 5 and 60 and re less than approximately 20 μm; and (3 the retrieved cloud properties are dependent on sun angle for clouds of  from 5 to 10 and re < 10 μm, with maximum sensitivity obtained for an overhead sun.

  18. Finite element analysis of transient viscous flow with free surface using filling pattern technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ki Don; Yang, Dong Yol; Jeong, Jun Ho

    2001-01-01

    The filling pattern technique based on the finite element method and Eulerian mesh advancement approach has been developed to analyze incompressible transient viscous flow with free surfaces. The governing equation for flow analysis is Navier-Stokes equation including inertia and gravity effects. The penalty and predictor-corrector methods are used effectively for finite element formulation. The flow front surface and the volume inflow rate are calculated using the filling pattern technique to select an adequate pattern among four filling patterns at each triangular control volume. Using the proposed numerical technique, the collapse of a dam has been analyzed to predict flow phenomenon of fluid and the predicted front positions versus time have been compared with the reported experimental result

  19. Superiority of localized surface plasmon resonance technique in characterization of ultra-thin metallic films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudheer; Tiwari, P.; Bhartiya, S.; Mukherjee, C.; Rai, S. K.; Rai, V. N.; Srivastava, A. K.

    2018-01-01

    The comparison and correlation of morphological, optical and crystallographic properties of ultra-thin Au films obtained using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), x-ray reflectivity (XRR), UV-visible transmission, and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXRD) are presented. The Au thin films of different thickness are grown on the glass substrate using the sputtering technique. The particle size, number density and the covered area fraction of Au thin film are obtained from FESEM images. The XRR technique is used to determine the film thickness and surface roughness. The localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) response of Au thin films is obtained using UV-Vis transmission spectroscopy. The LSPR peak position and its strength are correlated with film morphology and thickness. Finally, it is shown that LSPR based spectroscopy techniques can provide much better information about morphology and thickness of the Au films up to a resolution of ~1 nm.

  20. The use of surface geophysical techniques to detect fractures in bedrock; an annotated bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Mark R.; Haeni, F.P.

    1987-01-01

    This annotated bibliography compiles references about the theory and application of surface geophysical techniques to locate fractures or fracture zones within bedrock units. Forty-three publications are referenced, including journal articles, theses, conference proceedings, abstracts, translations, and reports prepared by private contractors and U.S. Government agencies. Thirty-one of the publications are annotated. The remainder are untranslated foreign language articles, which are listed only as bibliographic references. Most annotations summarize the location, geologic setting, surface geophysical technique used, and results of a study. A few highly relevant theoretical studies are annotated also. Publications that discuss only the use of borehole geophysical techniques to locate fractures are excluded from this bibliography. Also excluded are highly theoretical works that may have little or no known practical application.

  1. Atmospheric pressure surface sampling/ionization techniques for direct coupling of planar separations with mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasilis, Sofie P; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2010-06-18

    Planar separations, which include thin layer chromatography and gel electrophoresis, are in widespread use as important and powerful tools for conducting separations of complex mixtures. To increase the utility of planar separations, new methods are needed that allow in situ characterization of the individual components of the separated mixtures. A large number of atmospheric pressure surface sampling and ionization techniques for use with mass spectrometry have emerged in the past several years, and several have been investigated as a means for mass spectrometric read-out of planar separations. In this article, we review the atmospheric pressure surface sampling and ionization techniques that have been used for the read-out of planar separation media. For each technique, we briefly explain the operational basics and discuss the analyte type for which it is appropriate and some specific applications from the literature. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Explosive Contamination from Substrate Surfaces: Differences and Similarities in Contamination Techniques Using RDX and C-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, C. J.; Yoder, T. S.

    2010-06-01

    Explosive trace detection equipment has been deployed to airports for more than a decade. During this time, the need for standardized procedures and calibrated trace amounts for ensuring that the systems are operating properly and detecting the correct explosive has been apparent but a standard representative of a fingerprint has been elusive. Standards are also necessary to evaluate instrumentation in the laboratories during development and prior to deployment to determine sample throughput, probability of detection, false positive/negative rates, ease of use by operator, mechanical and/or software problems that may be encountered, and other pertinent parameters that would result in the equipment being unusable during field operations. Since many laboratories do not have access to nor are allowed to handle explosives, the equipment is tested using techniques aimed at simulating the actual explosives fingerprint. This laboratory study focused on examining the similarities and differences in three different surface contamination techniques that are used to performance test explosive trace detection equipment in an attempt to determine how effective the techniques are at replicating actual field samples and to offer scenarios where each contamination technique is applicable. The three techniques used were dry transfer deposition of standard solutions using the Transportation Security Laboratory’s (TSL) patented dry transfer techniques (US patent 6470730), direct deposition of explosive standards onto substrates, and fingerprinting of actual explosives onto substrates. RDX was deposited on the surface of one of five substrates using one of the three different deposition techniques. The process was repeated for each substrate type using each contamination technique. The substrate types used were: 50% cotton/50% polyester as found in T-shirts, 100% cotton with a smooth surface such as that found in a cotton dress shirt, 100% cotton on a rough surface such as that

  3. Using Three-Dimensional Passive Seismic Imaging to Capture Near-Surface Weathering and Its Influence on Overlying Vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, N. J.; Dueker, K. G.; Riebe, C. S.; Chen, P.; Flinchum, B. A.; Holbrook, W. S.

    2015-12-01

    In mountain landscapes, vegetation is tightly coupled to elevation through orographic effects on temperature and precipitation. However, at any given elevation, vegetation can vary markedly due to non-climatic factors such as lithology. For example, tree-canopy cover correlates strongly with bedrock composition in the Sierra Nevada, California, via mechanisms that remain poorly understood. We are exploring the hypothesis that vegetation varies across bedrock types in the Sierra Nevada due to differences in near-surface fracture density that influence the availability of water for plants. Our approach uses data collected from autonomous seismic nodes that record seismic energy generated by ambient sources such as wind, rivers, and road traffic. By deploying the nodes across the landscape in arrays spanning 200 m on a side, we can obtain a three-dimensional image of spatial variations in near-surface weathering. Data presented here will be derived from arrays deployed for 3 days each spanning an area of 0.04 km2 at each of three sites underlain by Sierra Nevada granites and granodiorites. To isolate the effects of lithology on vegetation, we chose sites that span a range of forest cover and mafic-mineral content but have similar microclimate (i.e., with similar aspect and elevation). Our data will provide a three-dimensional model of P- and S-wave velocity structure, which we can invert using a Hertz-Mindlin porosity model to constrain the thickness and degree of fracturing and thus the subsurface water-holding potential for plants. We will explore the hypothesis that the densest vegetation occurs within bedrock with the densest fracturing, due to enhanced availability of water in the near surface. We will present a comparison of our results from the Sierra Nevada and results from similar experiments at the Snowy Range and Blair Wallis field sites of the Wyoming Center for Environmental Hydrology and Geophysics.

  4. Intense Visible Luminescence in CdSe Quantum Dots by Efficiency Surface Passivation with H2O Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeoung Woo Park

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the effect of water (H2O cooling and heat treatment on the luminescence efficiency of core CdSe quantum dots (QDs. The photoluminescence (PL quantum yield of the CdSe QDs was enhanced up to ~85%, and some periodic bright points were observed in wide color ranges during the heat treatment of QDs mixed with H2O. The PL enhancement of QDs could be attributed to the recovery of QDs surface traps by unreacted ligands confined within the hydrophilic H2O molecule containers.

  5. Refractive index dispersion of swift heavy ion irradiated BFO thin films using Surface Plasmon Resonance technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paliwal, Ayushi [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Sharma, Savita [Department of Applied Physics, Delhi Technological University, Delhi (India); Tomar, Monika [Physics Department, Miranda House, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Singh, Fouran [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110075 (India); Gupta, Vinay, E-mail: drguptavinay@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India)

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • Investigated the optical properties of BiFeO{sub 3} (BFO) thin films after irradiation using SPR. • Otto configuration has been used to excite the surface plasmons using gold metal thin film. • BFO thin films were prepared by sol–gel spin coating technique. • Examined the refractive index dispersion of pristine and irradiated BFO thin film. - Abstract: Swift heavy ion irradiation (SHI) is an effective technique to induce defects for possible modifications in the material properties. There is growing interest in studying the optical properties of multiferroic BiFeO{sub 3} (BFO) thin films for optoelectronic applications. In the present work, BFO thin films were prepared by sol–gel spin coating technique and were irradiated using the 15 UD Pelletron accelerator with 100 MeV Au{sup 9+} ions at a fluence of 1 × 10{sup 12} ions cm{sup −2}. The as-grown films became rough and porous on ion irradiation. Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) technique has been identified as a highly sensitive and powerful technique for studying the optical properties of a dielectric material. Optical properties of BFO thin films, before and after irradiation were studied using SPR technique in Otto configuration. Refractive index is found to be decreasing from 2.27 to 2.14 on ion irradiation at a wavelength of 633 nm. Refractive index dispersion of BFO thin film (from 405 nm to 633 nm) before and after ion radiation was examined.

  6. Surface properties and corrosion behavior of Co-Cr alloy fabricated with selective laser melting technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Xian-zhen; Chen, Jie; Xiang, Nan; Wei, Bin

    2013-01-01

    We sought to study the corrosion behavior and surface properties of a commercial cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloy which was fabricated with selective laser melting (SLM) technique. For this purpose, specimens were fabricated using different techniques, such as SLM system and casting methods. Surface hardness testing, microstructure observation, surface analysis using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electrochemical corrosion test were carried out to evaluate the corrosion properties and surface properties of the specimens. We found that microstructure of SLM specimens was more homogeneous than that of cast specimens. The mean surface hardness values of SLM and cast specimens were 458.3 and 384.8, respectively; SLM specimens showed higher values than cast ones in hardness. Both specimens exhibited no differences in their electrochemical corrosion properties in the artificial saliva through potentiodynamic curves and EIS, and no significant difference via XPS. Therefore, we concluded that within the scope of this study, SLM-fabricated restorations revealed good surface properties, such as proper hardness, homogeneous microstructure, and also showed sufficient corrosion resistance which could meet the needs of dental clinics.

  7. Estimation of Shie Glacier Surface Movement Using Offset Tracking Technique with Cosmo-Skymed Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q.; Zhou, W.; Fan, J.; Yuan, W.; Li, H.; Sousa, J. J.; Guo, Z.

    2017-09-01

    Movement is one of the most important characteristics of glaciers which can cause serious natural disasters. For this reason, monitoring this massive blocks is a crucial task. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) can operate all day in any weather conditions and the images acquired by SAR contain intensity and phase information, which are irreplaceable advantages in monitoring the surface movement of glaciers. Moreover, a variety of techniques like DInSAR and offset tracking, based on the information of SAR images, could be applied to measure the movement. Sangwang lake, a glacial lake in the Himalayas, has great potentially danger of outburst. Shie glacier is situated at the upstream of the Sangwang lake. Hence, it is significant to monitor Shie glacier surface movement to assess the risk of outburst. In this paper, 6 high resolution COSMO-SkyMed images spanning from August to December, 2016 are applied with offset tracking technique to estimate the surface movement of Shie glacier. The maximum velocity of Shie glacier surface movement is 51 cm/d, which was observed at the end of glacier tongue, and the velocity is correlated with the change of elevation. Moreover, the glacier surface movement in summer is faster than in winter and the velocity decreases as the local temperature decreases. Based on the above conclusions, the glacier may break off at the end of tongue in the near future. The movement results extracted in this paper also illustrate the advantages of high resolution SAR images in monitoring the surface movement of small glaciers.

  8. Wet chemical synthesis and magnetic properties of single crystal Co nanochains with surface amorphous passivation Co layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Shao-Min

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study, for the first time, high-yield chain-like one-dimensional (1D Co nanostructures without any impurity have been produced by means of a solution dispersion approach under permanent-magnet. Size, morphology, component, and structure of the as-made samples have been confirmed by several techniques, and nanochains (NCs with diameter of approximately 60 nm consisting of single-crystalline Co and amorphous Co-capped layer (about 3 nm have been materialized. The as-synthesized Co samples do not include any other adulterants. The high-quality NC growth mechanism is proposed to be driven by magnetostatic interaction because NC can be reorganized under a weak magnetic field. Room-temperature-enhanced coercivity of NCs was observed, which is considered to have potential applications in spin filtering, high density magnetic recording, and nanosensors. PACS: 61.46.Df; 75.50; 81.07.Vb; 81.07.

  9. Silicon passivation study under low energy electron irradiation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cluzel, R.

    2010-01-01

    Backside illuminated thinned CMOS (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor) imaging system is a technology developed to increase the signal to noise ratio and the sensibility of such sensors. This configuration is adapted to the electrons detection from the energy range of [1 - 12 keV]. The impinging electron creates by multiplication several hundreds of secondary electrons close to the surface. A P ++ highly-doped passivation layer of the rear face is required to reduce the secondary electron surface recombination rate. Thanks to the potential barrier induced by the P ++ layer, the passivation layer increases the collected charges number and so the sensor collection gain. The goal of this study is to develop some experimental methods in order to determine the effect of six different passivation processes on the collection gain. Beforehand, the energy profile deposited by an incident electron is studied with the combination of Monte-Carlo simulations and some analytical calculations. The final collection gain model shows that the mirror effect from the passivation layer is a key factor at high energies whereas the passivation layer has to be as thin as possible at low energies. A first experimental setup which consists in irradiating P ++ /N large diodes allows to study the passivation process impacts on the surface recombinations. Thanks to a second setup based on a single event upset directly on thinned CMOS sensor, passivation techniques are discriminated in term of mirror effect and the implied spreading charges. The doping atoms activation laser annealing is turn out to be a multiplication gain inhomogeneity source impacting directly the matrix uniformity. (author)

  10. Imaging technique for detection of leaf surface contaminations with fission fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuta, Etsuko

    2011-01-01

    Fission fragments by the Fukushima Daiichi catastrophe were scattered over a large area. Between Tokyo and Fukushima, leaves were gathered up from March to June and measured their radioactivities by HPGe. Radionuclides of 129m Tc, 131 I, 134 Cs and 137 Cs were rightly detected. Also the leaf surface contaminations were shown as images by imaging technique which detected beta- and gamma-rays exposure. The clear images were gotten within 24 h exposure though a normal leaf image needs at least one week exposure in a shield box. The total PSL values of leaves depend on their activities of sampling points, so the imaging technique is able to use for detection of the spread of fission fragments and the relative concentration. Also the rain effect to leaves could be shown by imaging technique when leaves were washed in running water. The imaging technique is easy and useful for the nuclear catastrophe. (author)

  11. A review of the different techniques for solid surface acid-base characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chenhang; Berg, John C

    2003-09-18

    In this work, various techniques for solid surface acid-base (AB) characterization are reviewed. Different techniques employ different scales to rank acid-base properties. Based on the results from literature and the authors' own investigations for mineral oxides, these scales are compared. The comparison shows that Isoelectric Point (IEP), the most commonly used AB scale, is not a description of the absolute basicity or acidity of a surface, but a description of their relative strength. That is, a high IEP surface shows more basic functionality comparing with its acidic functionality, whereas a low IEP surface shows less basic functionality comparing with its acidic functionality. The choice of technique and scale for AB characterization depends on the specific application. For the cases in which the overall AB property is of interest, IEP (by electrokinetic titration) and H(0,max) (by indicator dye adsorption) are appropriate. For the cases in which the absolute AB property is of interest such as in the study of adhesion, it is more pertinent to use chemical shift (by XPS) and the heat of adsorption of probe gases (by calorimetry or IGC).

  12. Qademah Fault Passive Data

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In this field trip we collect passive data to 1. Convert passive to surface waves 2. Locate Qademah fault using surface wave migration INTRODUCTION: In this field trip we collected passive data for several days. This data will be used to find the surface waves using interferometry and then compared to active-source seismic data collected at the same location. A total of 288 receivers are used. A 3D layout with 5 m inline intervals and 10 m cross line intervals is used, where we used 12 lines with 24 receivers at each line. You will need to download the file (rec_times.mat), it contains important information about 1. Field record no 2. Record day 3. Record month 4. Record hour 5. Record minute 6. Record second 7. Record length P.S. 1. All files are converted from original format (SEG-2) to matlab format P.S. 2. Overlaps between records (10 to 1.5 sec.) are already removed from these files

  13. Bacterial Adhesion and Surface Roughness for Different Clinical Techniques for Acrylic Polymethyl Methacrylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Lucas Costa de Medeiros; da Silva-Neto, João Paulo; Dantas, Talita Souza; Naves, Lucas Zago; das Neves, Flávio Domingues; da Mota, Adérito Soares

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to assess the effect of different surface finishing and polishing protocols on the surface roughness and bacterial adhesion (S. sanguinis) to polymethyl methacrylates (PMMA). Fifty specimens were divided into 5 groups (n = 10) according to their fabrication method and surface finishing protocol: LP (3 : 1 ratio and laboratory polishing), NF (Nealon technique and finishing), NP (Nealon technique and manual polishing), MF (3 : 1 ratio and manual finishing), and MP (3 : 1 ratio and manual polishing). For each group, five specimens were submitted to bacterial adhesion tests and analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Two additional specimens were subjected to surface topography analysis by SEM and the remaining three specimens were subjected to surface roughness measurements. Data were compared by one-way ANOVA. The mean bacterial counts were as follows: NF, 19.6 ± 3.05; MP, 5.36 ± 2.08; NP, 4.96 ± 1.93; MF, 7.36 ± 2.45; and LP, 1.56 ± 0.62 (CFU). The mean surface roughness values were as follows: NF, 3.23 ± 0.15; MP, 0.52 ± 0.05; NP, 0.60 ± 0.08; MF, 2.69 ± 0.12; and LP, 0.07 ± 0.02 (μm). A reduction in the surface roughness was observed to be directly related to a decrease in bacterial adhesion. It was verified that the laboratory processing of PMMA might decrease the surface roughness and consequently the adhesion of S. sanguinis to this material.

  14. Detection of surface cracks in cladded pipes by the multiple-beam technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruber, G.J.

    1983-01-01

    Standard ultrasonic techniques usually yield reliable inspection results for the steel structures of the nuclear power industry. Stainless-steel cladding of pipes, vessels, and nozzles to reduce the susceptibility of the base material to cracking has, however, led to unexpected inspection difficulties. Some solutions to the ultrasonic inspection problems of cladded pipes were found in multiple-beam transducer design and the application of novel waveform-processing and pattern-recognition methods. The paper is divided into four parts. First, the problems of standard ultrasonic inspection techniques in detecting surface and near-surface cracks are presented. Next, signal-reducing and background-interference-producing mechanisms (beam skewing, defocusing, multiple grain-boundary and clad-base-material-interface scattering, focusing, etc.) are postulated to guide attempts to improve the reliability of crack detection. The two modes of operation of the multiple-beam array featured in the multiple-beam technique (Mode I - Inspection by Threshold Detection, and Mode II - Confirmation by Pattern Recognition) are then described. Finally, the results of a detection reliability evaluation study involving the multiple-beam technique and four other detection techniques and ten cladded plates containing thirty-three thumbnail-shaped notches are cited

  15. A wafer mapping technique for residual stress in surface micromachined films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiavone, G; Murray, J; Smith, S; Walton, A J; Desmulliez, M P Y; Mount, A R

    2016-01-01

    The design of MEMS devices employing movable structures is crucially dependant on the mechanical behaviour of the deposited materials. It is therefore important to be able to fully characterize the micromachined films and predict with confidence the mechanical properties of patterned structures. This paper presents a characterization technique that enables the residual stress in MEMS films to be mapped at the wafer level by using microstructures released by surface micromachining. These dedicated MEMS test structures and the associated measurement techniques are used to extract localized information on the strain and Young’s modulus of the film under investigation. The residual stress is then determined by numerically coupling this data with a finite element analysis of the structure. This paper illustrates the measurement routine and demonstrates it with a case study using electrochemically deposited alloys of nickel and iron, particularly prone to develop high levels of residual stress. The results show that the technique enables wafer mapping of film non-uniformities and identifies wafer-to-wafer differences. A comparison between the results obtained from the mapping technique and conventional wafer bow measurements highlights the benefits of using a procedure tailored to films that are non-uniform, patterned and surface-micromachined, as opposed to simple standard stress extraction methods. The presented technique reveals detailed information that is generally unexplored when using conventional stress extraction methods such as wafer bow measurements. (paper)

  16. A surface flaw sizing study by time-of-flight ultrasonic technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamy, C.A.

    1990-07-01

    In this work, sizing of inclined slits and surface cracks in ferritic steel using the ultrasonic time-of-flight technique was studied. The surface cracks were vertical and inclined, nut the slits were only inclined. It was surface Rayleigh wave that was converted to shear wave mode in the material. The specimens with surface crack were submitted to a three four point loading fracture mechanics tests, so that the region of the crack tip became under an increasing tensile stress. Thus, the ultrasonic crack sizing could be compared to the material stress intensity factor (K) of the material for different loadings. Results show that the greater the slope and/or lenght of the slits the greater its subsizing. Vertical cracks int he parent metal are reliably and accuratly sized; in the weld the same remark held if one increases the gain of ultrasonic flaw detector to compensate for the weld attenuation phenomenon. Sizing of inclined cracks in the parent metal shows the same trends of the inclined slits, differing only in slopes over 30 sup(0) where the sizing in surface cracks is no longer reliable. A new appraisal procedure here proposed made reliable these results. The techniques employed in this work lead to reliable and accurate results for sizing of different slits and cracks. It should be noted however that good results are only obtained if a tensile stress state exists in the neighbourhood of the c rack tip. (author)

  17. Synthesis of Ag-coated polystyrene colloids by an improved surface seeding and shell growth technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Chungui; Wang Enbo; Kang Zhenhui; Mao Baodong; Zhang Chao; Lan Yang; Wang Chunlei; Song Yanli

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, an improved surface seeding and shell growth technique was developed to prepare Ag-polystyrene core shell composite. Polyethyleneimine (PEI) could act as the linker between Ag ions (Ag nanoparticles) and polystyrene (PS) colloids and the reducing agent in the formation of Ag nanoparticles. Due to the multi-functional characteristic of PEI, Ag seeds formed in-situ and were immobilized on the surface of PEI-modified PS colloids and no free Ag clusters coexist with the Ag 'seeding' PS colloids in the system. Then, the additional agents could be added into the resulting dispersions straightly to produce a thick Ag nanoshell. The Ag nanoshell with controllable thickness was formed on the surface of PS by the 'one-pot' surface seeding and shell growth method. The Ag-coverage increased gradually with the increasing of mass ratio of AgNO 3 /PS. The optical properties of the Ag-PS colloids could be tailored by changing the coverage of Ag. - Graphical abstract: An improved surface seeding and shell growth technique was developed to prepare Ag-polystyrene core shell composite. The optical properties of the Ag-PS colloids could be tailored by changing the coverage of Ag. Display Omitted

  18. Overlayer structure of subphthalocyanine derivative deposited on Au (111) surface by a spray-jet technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hitoshi; Yamada, Toshiki; Miki, Hideki; Mashiko, Shinro

    2006-01-01

    A new spray-jet technique was used to deposit subphthalocyanine derivative (chloro[tri-tert-butyl subphthalocyaninato]boron (TBSubPc)) on Au (111) surface in an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) chamber. The deposited molecular overlayer was observed with UHV scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) at 77 K. The STM images showed that TBSubPc molecules formed a stripe pattern with regular spacing, indicating that they preferentially adsorbed along the herringbone structure of the Au (111) surface. This behavior was very similar to that of TBSubPc molecules deposited by thermal evaporation

  19. Removal of FePO4 and Fe3(PO4)2 crystals on the surface of passive fillers in Fe0/GAC reactor using the acclimated bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Bo; Zhou, Yuexi; Yang, Ping; Wang, Juling; Yang, Jinghui; Li, Huiqiang

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Fe 3 (PO 4 ) 2 and FePO 4 crystals would weaken treatment efficiency of Fe 0 /GAC reactor. ► Fe 3 (PO 4 ) 2 and FePO 4 crystals could be removed by the acclimated bacteria. ► FeS and sulfur in the passive film would be removed by the sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. ► Develop a cost-effective bio-regeneration technology for the passive fillers. - Abstract: As past studies presented, there is obvious defect that the fillers in the Fe 0 /GAC reactor begin to be passive after about 60 d continuous running, although the complicated, toxic and refractory ABS resin wastewater can be pretreated efficiently by the Fe 0 /GAC reactor. During the process, the Fe 3 (PO 4 ) 2 and FePO 4 crystals with high density in the passive film are formed by the reaction between PO 4 3− and Fe 2+ /Fe 3+ . Meanwhile, they obstruct the formation of macroscopic galvanic cells between Fe 0 and GAC, which will lower the wastewater treatment efficiency of Fe 0 /GAC reactor. In this study, in order to remove the Fe 3 (PO 4 ) 2 and FePO 4 crystals on the surface of the passive fillers, the bacteria were acclimated in the passive Fe 0 /GAC reactor. According to the results, it can be concluded that the Fe 3 (PO 4 ) 2 and FePO 4 crystals with high density in the passive film could be decomposed or removed by the joint action between the typical propionic acid type fermentation bacteria and sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB), whereas the PO 4 3− ions from the decomposition of the Fe 3 (PO 4 ) 2 and FePO 4 crystals were released into aqueous solution which would be discharged from the passive Fe 0 /GAC reactor. Furthermore, the remained FeS and sulfur (S) in the passive film also can be decomposed or removed easily by the oxidation of the sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. This study provides some theoretical references for the further study of a cost-effective bio-regeneration technology to solve the passive problems of the fillers in the zero-valent iron (ZVI) or Fe 0 /GAC reactor.

  20. SnO2 anode surface passivation by atomic layer deposited HfO2 improves li-ion battery performance

    KAUST Repository

    Yesibolati, Nulati

    2014-03-14

    For the first time, it is demonstrated that nanoscale HfO2 surface passivation layers formed by atomic layer deposition (ALD) significantly improve the performance of Li ion batteries with SnO2-based anodes. Specifically, the measured battery capacity at a current density of 150 mAg -1 after 100 cycles is 548 and 853 mAhg-1 for the uncoated and HfO2-coated anodes, respectively. Material analysis reveals that the HfO2 layers are amorphous in nature and conformably coat the SnO2-based anodes. In addition, the analysis reveals that ALD HfO2 not only protects the SnO2-based anodes from irreversible reactions with the electrolyte and buffers its volume change, but also chemically interacts with the SnO2 anodes to increase battery capacity, despite the fact that HfO2 is itself electrochemically inactive. The amorphous nature of HfO2 is an important factor in explaining its behavior, as it still allows sufficient Li diffusion for an efficient anode lithiation/delithiation process to occur, leading to higher battery capacity. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Efficient, Hysteresis-Free, and Stable Perovskite Solar Cells with ZnO as Electron-Transport Layer: Effect of Surface Passivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jing; Wu, Binghui; Chen, Ruihao; Wu, Youyunqi; Hui, Yong; Mao, Bing-Wei; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2018-01-19

    The power conversion efficiency of perovskite solar cells (PSCs) has ascended from 3.8% to 22.1% in recent years. ZnO has been well-documented as an excellent electron-transport material. However, the poor chemical compatibility between ZnO and organo-metal halide perovskite makes it highly challenging to obtain highly efficient and stable PSCs using ZnO as the electron-transport layer. It is demonstrated in this work that the surface passivation of ZnO by a thin layer of MgO and protonated ethanolamine (EA) readily makes ZnO as a very promising electron-transporting material for creating hysteresis-free, efficient, and stable PSCs. Systematic studies in this work reveal several important roles of the modification: (i) MgO inhibits the interfacial charge recombination, and thus enhances cell performance and stability; (ii) the protonated EA promotes the effective electron transport from perovskite to ZnO, further fully eliminating PSCs hysteresis; (iii) the modification makes ZnO compatible with perovskite, nicely resolving the instability of ZnO/perovskite interface. With all these findings, PSCs with the best efficiency up to 21.1% and no hysteresis are successfully fabricated. PSCs stable in air for more than 300 h are achieved when graphene is used to further encapsulate the cells. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Characteristics of depositional sequences, systems tracts and bounding surfaces in Early Ordovician greenhouse passive margin carbonates to Late Ordovician glacio-eustatic influenced foreland basin facies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pope, M.C.; Read, J.F. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Geology)

    1994-03-01

    Passive margin, cyclic carbonates of the Early Ordovician Knox Group, Appalachians are dominated by meter scale dolomitized carbonate cycles. These are stacked into 1 to 5 m.y. depositional sequences that appear to be relatively conformable. The sequences are defined by stacking patterns on Fischer plots that graph long term changes in accommodation with thick less dolomitized cycles in the TST, and thin, highly dolomitized cycles in the HST, becoming quartzose in the late HST and LST. Sequence and systems tract boundaries are subtle and typically marked by zones of cycles rather than single discrete surfaces. In contrast, sequences in the later Ordovician foreland basin fill locally show: (1) sequence bounding unconformities on the Knox, the Camp Nelson and on top of the Ordovician, (2) well defined low stand deposits as in the subaerial breccias and detrital dolomite muds veneering the Knox unconformity; redbeds and associated quartz sands and conglomerates with intercalated peritidal carbonate layers and their distal equivalent peritidal laminites; (3) TST's in the lower part of the Middle Ordovician limestones include regionally traceable cyclic peritidal carbonates or in the lower Lexington Limestone, transgressive high energy grainstones; (4) HST's consist of poorly cyclic deeper water up into shallow water grainstone bank and northward prograding peritidal carbonate facies; The ongoing study of detailed logs of outcrop and core should help refine the understanding of the fine scale makeup of sequences developed in these contrasting tectonic and global climatic settings.

  3. AlN Surface Passivation of GaN-Based High Electron Mobility Transistors by Plasma-Enhanced Atomic Layer Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzou, An-Jye; Chu, Kuo-Hsiung; Lin, I.-Feng; Østreng, Erik; Fang, Yung-Sheng; Wu, Xiao-Peng; Wu, Bo-Wei; Shen, Chang-Hong; Shieh, Jia-Ming; Yeh, Wen-Kuan; Chang, Chun-Yen; Kuo, Hao-Chung

    2017-04-01

    We report a low current collapse GaN-based high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) with an excellent thermal stability at 150 °C. The AlN was grown by N2-based plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) and shown a refractive index of 1.94 at 633 nm of wavelength. Prior to deposit AlN on III-nitrides, the H2/NH3 plasma pre-treatment led to remove the native gallium oxide. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectroscopy confirmed that the native oxide can be effectively decomposed by hydrogen plasma. Following the in situ ALD-AlN passivation, the surface traps can be eliminated and corresponding to a 22.1% of current collapse with quiescent drain bias ( V DSQ) at 40 V. Furthermore, the high temperature measurement exhibited a shift-free threshold voltage ( V th), corresponding to a 40.2% of current collapse at 150 °C. The thermal stable HEMT enabled a breakdown voltage (BV) to 687 V at high temperature, promising a good thermal reliability under high power operation.

  4. Application Of The SPV-based Surface Lifetime Technique To In-Line Monitoring Of Surface Cu Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amico, John; Savtchouk, Alexandre; Wilson, Matthew; Kim, Chul Hong; Yoo, Hyung Won; Lee, Chang Hwan; Kim, Tae Kyoung; Son, Sang Hoon

    2009-09-01

    Implementation of Cu interconnects into Silicon Integrated Circuits (IC's) has been instrumental in the continuing improvement of IC device performance. Copper as a well known Gate Oxide Integrity (GOI) killer [1, 2] requires extensive protocols to minimize the possibility of cross contamination. Despite such protocols the risk for cross contamination exists, and consequently there is the need for in-line Cu cross-contamination detection metrology. Preferably the metrology will be non-destructive, fast, and capable of mapping on product wafers. Up to now the most common approaches for monitoring Cu contamination in IC fabrication lines either measure Cu in the bulk Si, which is not applicable to Cu cross-contamination monitoring because Back-End-of-the-Line thermal budgets restrict the ability to diffuse the surface Cu into the bulk Si; or the techniques are not optimal for in-line monitoring due to their destructive, time-consuming, or costly nature. In this work we demonstrate for the first time the application of the ac-Surface Photo Voltage (ac-SPV) surface lifetime approach [3] to in-line, full wafer coverage mapping of low level (metrology system. Furthermore, because the metrology is non-contact (utilizing edge-grip handling) and non-destructive, it is directly applicable to measurement of production wafers. In-line fab data acquired using this metrology is presented and compared to data from Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS).

  5. Survey of Techniques for Deep Web Source Selection and Surfacing the Hidden Web Content

    OpenAIRE

    Khushboo Khurana; M.B. Chandak

    2016-01-01

    Large and continuously growing dynamic web content has created new opportunities for large-scale data analysis in the recent years. There is huge amount of information that the traditional web crawlers cannot access, since they use link analysis technique by which only the surface web can be accessed. Traditional search engine crawlers require the web pages to be linked to other pages via hyperlinks causing large amount of web data to be hidden from the crawlers. Enormous data is available in...

  6. Quantitative determination of the intensities of known components in spectra obtained from surface analytical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, G.C.

    1984-01-01

    Linear least-squares methods have been used to quantitatively decompose experimental data obtained from surface analytical techniques into its separate components. The mathematical procedure for accomplishing this is described and examples are given of the use of this method with data obtained from Auger electron spectroscopy [both N(E) and derivative], x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and low energy ion scattering spectroscopy. The requirements on the quality of the data are discussed

  7. Beta Autoradiography. An analytical technique to investigate radionuclides contamination on surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ficher, P.; Goutelard, F.; Siitari-Kauppi, M.

    2012-01-01

    In decommissioning of old buildings and after disposal of nuclear facilities (materials, glove boxes,...), the inventory of the radioactive contamination of various building materials needs to be obtained in order to fix the working condition for dismantling. The challenge of this study was to classify different building materials of a whole research laboratory that was dedicated to research on organic molecules labeled with H-3 and C-14. The problem of waste classification is essential for safety treatment of waste and also for its cost. The analytical technique of beta autoradiography particularly well known for biological researches has been tested to investigate radionuclides contamination on surface. This technique is mainly interesting for beta and alpha emitters but also sensitive to gamma radiation. The first step of this technique is the deposit of a film on the surface of material to be analyzed. Films can be deposited on the ground or also fixed on the walls or even on the ceiling. The film is a plastic sheet covered with an emulsion containing photostimulable crystals and Eu that is activated when the film is exposed on radioactive source. The exposed films are then scanned with the Cyclone Plus equipment to get a digitized image. This image represents the radioactivity of the surface studied. The possibility to re-use the films is very important to investigate a large area. This autoradiography technique has retained our attention for its sensitivity and moreover the possibility of 2-dimensional investigation has been found as a real advantage. However it remains now as a qualitative technique and new studies must be launched to prove its quantitative potentialities. The high spatial resolution was not as important as in biological observation, and the mm resolution is totally sufficient

  8. Passivation effects of atomic-layer-deposited aluminum oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotipalli R.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Atomic-layer-deposited (ALD aluminum oxide (Al2O3 has recently demonstrated an excellent surface passivation for both n- and p-type c-Si solar cells thanks to the presence of high negative fixed charges (Qf ~ 1012−1013 cm-2 in combination with a low density of interface states (Dit. This paper investigates the passivation quality of thin (15 nm Al2O3 films deposited by two different techniques: plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD and Thermal atomic layer deposition (T-ALD. Other dielectric materials taken into account for comparison include: thermally-grown silicon dioxide (SiO2 (20 nm, SiO2 (20 nm deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD and hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride (a-SiNx:H (20 nm also deposited by PECVD. With the above-mentioned dielectric layers, Metal Insulator Semiconductor (MIS capacitors were fabricated for Qf and Dit extraction through Capacitance-Voltage-Conductance (C-V-G measurements. In addition, lifetime measurements were carried out to evaluate the effective surface recombination velocity (SRV. The influence of extracted C-V-G parameters (Qf,Dit on the injection dependent lifetime measurements τ(Δn, and the dominant passivation mechanism involved have been discussed. Furthermore we have also studied the influence of the SiO2 interfacial layer thickness between the Al2O3 and silicon surface on the field-effect passivation mechanism. It is shown that the field effect passivation in accumulation mode is more predominant when compared to surface defect passivation.

  9. Passivation effects of atomic-layer-deposited aluminum oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotipalli, R.; Delamare, R.; Poncelet, O.; Tang, X.; Francis, L. A.; Flandre, D.

    2013-09-01

    Atomic-layer-deposited (ALD) aluminum oxide (Al2O3) has recently demonstrated an excellent surface passivation for both n- and p-type c-Si solar cells thanks to the presence of high negative fixed charges (Qf ~ 1012-1013 cm-2) in combination with a low density of interface states (Dit). This paper investigates the passivation quality of thin (15 nm) Al2O3 films deposited by two different techniques: plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) and Thermal atomic layer deposition (T-ALD). Other dielectric materials taken into account for comparison include: thermally-grown silicon dioxide (SiO2) (20 nm), SiO2 (20 nm) deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) and hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride (a-SiNx:H) (20 nm) also deposited by PECVD. With the above-mentioned dielectric layers, Metal Insulator Semiconductor (MIS) capacitors were fabricated for Qf and Dit extraction through Capacitance-Voltage-Conductance (C-V-G) measurements. In addition, lifetime measurements were carried out to evaluate the effective surface recombination velocity (SRV). The influence of extracted C-V-G parameters (Qf,Dit) on the injection dependent lifetime measurements τ(Δn), and the dominant passivation mechanism involved have been discussed. Furthermore we have also studied the influence of the SiO2 interfacial layer thickness between the Al2O3 and silicon surface on the field-effect passivation mechanism. It is shown that the field effect passivation in accumulation mode is more predominant when compared to surface defect passivation.

  10. Optimization of Coolant Technique Conditions for Machining A319 Aluminium Alloy Using Response Surface Method (RSM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainal Ariffin, S.; Razlan, A.; Ali, M. Mohd; Efendee, A. M.; Rahman, M. M.

    2018-03-01

    Background/Objectives: The paper discusses about the optimum cutting parameters with coolant techniques condition (1.0 mm nozzle orifice, wet and dry) to optimize surface roughness, temperature and tool wear in the machining process based on the selected setting parameters. The selected cutting parameters for this study were the cutting speed, feed rate, depth of cut and coolant techniques condition. Methods/Statistical Analysis Experiments were conducted and investigated based on Design of Experiment (DOE) with Response Surface Method. The research of the aggressive machining process on aluminum alloy (A319) for automotive applications is an effort to understand the machining concept, which widely used in a variety of manufacturing industries especially in the automotive industry. Findings: The results show that the dominant failure mode is the surface roughness, temperature and tool wear when using 1.0 mm nozzle orifice, increases during machining and also can be alternative minimize built up edge of the A319. The exploration for surface roughness, productivity and the optimization of cutting speed in the technical and commercial aspects of the manufacturing processes of A319 are discussed in automotive components industries for further work Applications/Improvements: The research result also beneficial in minimizing the costs incurred and improving productivity of manufacturing firms. According to the mathematical model and equations, generated by CCD based RSM, experiments were performed and cutting coolant condition technique using size nozzle can reduces tool wear, surface roughness and temperature was obtained. Results have been analyzed and optimization has been carried out for selecting cutting parameters, shows that the effectiveness and efficiency of the system can be identified and helps to solve potential problems.

  11. A simple, rapid and inexpensive technique to bind small peptides to polystyrene surfaces for immunoenzymatic assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuccuru, Maria Antonietta; Dessì, Daniele; Rappelli, Paola; Fiori, Pier Luigi

    2012-08-31

    Synthetic peptides are widely used in indirect ELISA to detect and characterize specific antibodies in biological samples. Small peptides are not efficiently immobilized on plastic surfaces by simple adsorption, and the conjugation to carrier proteins with different binding techniques is the method of choice. Common techniques to conjugate peptide antigens to carrier proteins and to subsequently purify such complexes are time consuming, expensive, and occasionally abrogate immunogenicity of peptides. In this report we describe a simple, fast and inexpensive alternative protocol to immobilize synthetic peptides to plastic surfaces for standard ELISA. The technique is based on use of maleimide-activated bovine serum albumin or keyhole limpet hemocyanin as a protein anchor adsorbed on the polystyrene surface of the microtiter plate. Following adsorption of the carrier protein, sulfhydryl-containing peptides are cross-linked with an in-well reaction, allowing their correct orientation and availability to antibody binding, avoiding the time consuming steps needed to purify the hapten-carrier complexes. The immunoreactivity of peptides was tested by using both monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies in standard ELISA assays, and compared with established coating methods. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. An overview of technologies for immobilization of enzymes and surface analysis techniques for immobilized enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad, Nur Royhaila; Marzuki, Nur Haziqah Che; Buang, Nor Aziah; Huyop, Fahrul; Wahab, Roswanira Abdul

    2015-01-01

    The current demands of sustainable green methodologies have increased the use of enzymatic technology in industrial processes. Employment of enzyme as biocatalysts offers the benefits of mild reaction conditions, biodegradability and catalytic efficiency. The harsh conditions of industrial processes, however, increase propensity of enzyme destabilization, shortening their industrial lifespan. Consequently, the technology of enzyme immobilization provides an effective means to circumvent these concerns by enhancing enzyme catalytic properties and also simplify downstream processing and improve operational stability. There are several techniques used to immobilize the enzymes onto supports which range from reversible physical adsorption and ionic linkages, to the irreversible stable covalent bonds. Such techniques produce immobilized enzymes of varying stability due to changes in the surface microenvironment and degree of multipoint attachment. Hence, it is mandatory to obtain information about the structure of the enzyme protein following interaction with the support surface as well as interactions of the enzymes with other proteins. Characterization technologies at the nanoscale level to study enzymes immobilized on surfaces are crucial to obtain valuable qualitative and quantitative information, including morphological visualization of the immobilized enzymes. These technologies are pertinent to assess efficacy of an immobilization technique and development of future enzyme immobilization strategies. PMID:26019635

  13. The effects of finishing and polishing techniques on surface roughness and color stability of nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gönülol, Nihan; Yilmaz, Fikret

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effects of different finishing and polishing techniques on the surface roughness and color stability of nanocomposites. Two nanohybrid (Grandio, Aelite Aesthetic Enamel), two nanofill (Filtek Supreme XT Dentin and Translucent), and a microhybrid (Filtek Z250) composites were used. Two hundred and eighty disc-shaped specimens were cured under a mylar strip. Seven specimens of each resin composite were randomly assigned to one of the seven polishing systems. A profilometer was used for assessing surface roughness. ΔE was calculated with a colorimeter at baseline and 48 h after storage in a coffee solution. The results were analysed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test (α=0.05). Regression analysis was used to examine the correlation between surface roughness and color stability (α=0.01). There was no significant difference in R(a) values between mylar strips and Sof-Lex polishing discs (p>0.05). The highest ΔE and R(a) values were obtained from Grandio (pGrandio presented the highest surface roughness and staining susceptibility after storage in coffee solution. Aelite Aesthetic Enamel, which did not include TEGDMA in its composition, showed the least discoloration. The composites with smaller filler size did not necessarily show low surface roughness and discoloration. Staining of composite resins was dependent on monomer structure, as well as surface irregularities. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Deposition of corrosion products from dowels on human dental root surfaces measured with proton microprobe technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brune, D.; Brunell, G.; Lindh, U.

    1982-06-01

    Distribution of copper, mercury and zinc on human teeth root surfaces adjacent to dowels of gold alloy or brass as well as dowels of brass in conjunction with an amalgam crown has been measured with a proton microprobe using PIXE techniques. Upper limits of the contents of gold and silver on the root surfaces were established. Pronounced concentration profiles of copper and zinc were observed on the root surfaces of teeth prepared with dowels of brass. The dowel of gold alloy revealed only zinc deposition. The major part of copper on the root surfaces is assumed to arise from corrosion of the dowels, and has been transported to the surface by diffusion through the dential tubuli. Zinc in the volume analysed is a constituent of dentin tissue as well as a corrosion product of the brass dowel. Part of the zinc level could also be ascribed to erosion of the zinc phosphate cement matrix. The volumes analysed were (25×25×25)μm 3. The levels of copper, mercury and zinc on the tooth root surfaces attained values up to about 200, 20 and 600 ppm, respectively.

  15. Laboratory insights into the detection of surface biosignatures by remote-sensing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poch, O.; Pommerol, A.; Jost, B.; Roditi, I.; Frey, J.; Thomas, N.

    2014-03-01

    With the progress of direct imaging techniques, it will be possible in the short or long-term future to retrieve more efficiently the information on the physical properties of the light reflected by rocky exoplanets (Traub et al., 2010). The search for visible-infrared absorption bands of peculiar gases (O2, CH4 etc.) in this light could give clues for the presence of life (Kaltenegger and Selsis, 2007). Even more uplifting would be the direct detection of life itself, on the surface of an exoplanet. Considering this latter possibility, what is the potential of optical remote-sensing methods to detect surface biosignatures? Reflected light from the surface of the Earth exhibits a strong surface biosignature in the form of an abrupt change of reflectance between the visible and infrared range of the spectrum (Seager et al., 2005). This spectral feature called "vegetation red-edge" is possibly the consequence of biological evolution selecting the right chemical structures enabling the plants to absorb the visible energy, while preventing them from overheating by reflecting more efficiently the infrared. Such red-edge is also found in primitive photosynthetic bacteria, cyanobacteria, that colonized the surface of the Earth ocean and continents billions of years before multicellular plants (Knacke, 2003). If life ever arose on an Earth-like exoplanet, one could hypothesize that some form of its surface-life evolves into similar photo-active organisms, also exhibiting a red-edge. In this paper, we will present our plan and preliminary results of a laboratory study aiming at precising the potentiality of remote sensing techniques in detecting such surface biosignatures. Using equipment that has been developed in our team for surface photometry studies (Pommerol 2011, Jost 2013, Pommerol 2013), we will investigate the reflectance spectra and bidirectional reflectance function of soils containing bacteria such as cyanobacteria, in various environmental conditions. We will

  16. Predicting muscle fatigue: a response surface approximation based on proper generalized decomposition technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, M; Grasa, J; Muñoz, M J; Miana-Mena, F J; González, D

    2017-04-01

    A novel technique is proposed to predict force reduction in skeletal muscle due to fatigue under the influence of electrical stimulus parameters and muscle physiological characteristics. Twelve New Zealand white rabbits were divided in four groups ([Formula: see text]) to obtain the active force evolution of in vitro Extensor Digitorum Longus muscles for an hour of repeated contractions under different electrical stimulation patterns. Left and right muscles were tested, and a total of 24 samples were used to construct a response surface based in the proper generalized decomposition. After the response surface development, one additional rabbit was used to check the predictive potential of the technique. This multidimensional surface takes into account not only the decay of the maximum repeated peak force, but also the shape evolution of each contraction, muscle weight, electrical input signal and stimulation protocol. This new approach of the fatigue simulation challenge allows to predict, inside the multispace surface generated, the muscle response considering other stimulation patterns, different tissue weight, etc.

  17. Oxidative stress prediction: A preliminary approach using a response surface based technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, M; Bragg-Gonzalo, L; Grasa, J; Muñoz, M J; González, D; Miana-Mena, F J

    2018-02-01

    A response surface was built to predict the lipid peroxidation level, generated in an iron-ascorbate in vitro model, of any organ, which is correlated with the oxidative stress injury in biological membranes. Oxidative stress studies are numerous, usually performed on laboratory animals. However, ethical concerns require validated methods to reduce the use of laboratory animals. The response surface described here is a validated method to replace animals. Tissue samples of rabbit liver, kidney, heart, skeletal muscle and brain were oxidized with different concentrations of FeCl 3 (0.1 to 8mM) and ascorbate (0.1mM), during different periods of time (0 to 90min) at 37°C. Experimental data obtained, with lipid content and antioxidant activity of each organ, allowed constructing a multidimensional surface capable of predicting, by interpolation, the lipid peroxidation level of any organ defined by its antioxidant activity and fat content, when exposed to different oxidant conditions. To check the predictive potential of the technique, two more experiments were carried out. First, in vitro oxidation data from lung tissue were collected. Second, the antioxidant capacity of kidney homogenates was modified by adding melatonin. Then, the response surface generated could predict lipid peroxidation levels produced in these new situations. The potential of this technique could be reinforced using collaborative databases to reduce the number of animals in experimental procedures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. In vitro study of microleakage of different techniques of surface preparation used in pits and fissures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrzad Javadi Nejad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of different techniques of surface preparation on the microleakage of a sealant applied with traditional acid etching and self-etched bonding agent. Study Design : A total of 60 extracted third molars were randomly assigned into six groups (n = 10/each. The occlusal surfaces were sealed with a sealant (Clinpro after one of the following pretreatments: (1 phosphoric acid etching; (2 Prompt L-Pop; (3 laser + etching; (4 laser + Prompt L-Pop; (5 air abrasion + etching; (6 air abrasion + Prompt L-Pop. The specimens were immersed in a 0.5% basic fuchsin solution. Buccolingual cuts parallel to the long axis of the tooth were made. The surfaces were scored 0--2 for extent of microleakage using a microscope and the data were analyzed statistically. Results : The poorest results were obtained with laser + Prompt L-Pop which showed a greater number of specimens with microleakage (80%. Air abrasion surface preparation + phosphoric acid etching showed less microleakage than the other groups (40%. Kruskal--Wallis and t-tests revealed no significant difference in microleakage between six groups. Conclusion : The self-etching adhesive studied seems an attractive alternative to the acid-etch technique for sealant application in young children where simplifications in the clinical procedure are warranted. No significant difference was noted between the different types of enamel preparation before fissure sealant.

  19. Limiter surface observation by infrared techniques, AES, and SEM in the JFT-2 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomay, Y.; Fujisawa, N.; Maeno, M.

    1979-01-01

    The surface characteristics of molybdenum rail-type limiters in the JFT-2 tokamak have been studied by means of infrared techniques, AES, and SEM. The maximum temperature of the limiter surface during the discharge was 550 0 C which is low enough to neglect the evaporation. The limiter surface was found to be eroded uniformly by exposure to the plasma, probably by ion sputtering. Microarcing with arc spots of 0.5-20 μm diameters was observed on the limiter exposed only to stable discharges. Since the arc current of microarcing is estimated to be 1-40 A, the return current can be supplied with electron flow to the nearby area of arc spots. Microarcing as well as ion sputtering may play important roles in limiter material injection into the plasma. (orig.)

  20. A Novel Technique for Mitigating Multipactor by Means of Magnetic Surface Roughness

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, Friedhelm; Boria, V E; Bruns, W; Galan, L; Gimeno, B; Montero, I; Raboso, D; Vicente, C

    2010-01-01

    Multipactor phenomena which are closely linked to the SEY (secondary electron yield)can be mitigated by many different methods including groves in the metal surface as well as using electric or magnetic bias fields. However frequently the application of global magnetic or electric bias field is not practicable considering the weight and power limitations on-board satellites. Additionally, surface grooves may degrade the RF performance. Here we present a novel technique which is based on a magnetostatic field pattern on the metallic surface with fast spatial modulation in the order of 30 micron. This field pattern is produced by proper magnetization of an underlying ferromagnetic layer such as nickel. Simulations and preliminary experimental results will be shown and a number of applications, both for particle accelerators and satellite microwave payloads are discussed.

  1. ESTIMATION OF SHIE GLACIER SURFACE MOVEMENT USING OFFSET TRACKING TECHNIQUE WITH COSMO-SKYMED IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Wang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Movement is one of the most important characteristics of glaciers which can cause serious natural disasters. For this reason, monitoring this massive blocks is a crucial task. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR can operate all day in any weather conditions and the images acquired by SAR contain intensity and phase information, which are irreplaceable advantages in monitoring the surface movement of glaciers. Moreover, a variety of techniques like DInSAR and offset tracking, based on the information of SAR images, could be applied to measure the movement. Sangwang lake, a glacial lake in the Himalayas, has great potentially danger of outburst. Shie glacier is situated at the upstream of the Sangwang lake. Hence, it is significant to monitor Shie glacier surface movement to assess the risk of outburst. In this paper, 6 high resolution COSMO-SkyMed images spanning from August to December, 2016 are applied with offset tracking technique to estimate the surface movement of Shie glacier. The maximum velocity of Shie glacier surface movement is 51 cm/d, which was observed at the end of glacier tongue, and the velocity is correlated with the change of elevation. Moreover, the glacier surface movement in summer is faster than in winter and the velocity decreases as the local temperature decreases. Based on the above conclusions, the glacier may break off at the end of tongue in the near future. The movement results extracted in this paper also illustrate the advantages of high resolution SAR images in monitoring the surface movement of small glaciers.

  2. Development of More Cost-Effective Methods for Long-Term Monitoring of Soil Vapor Intrusion to Indoor Air Using Quantitative Passive Diffusive-Adsorptive Sampling Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    chemicals during shipping and storage. The risk is reduced by carefully packing the samplers in clean containers that are impermeable to VOC vapors. The...consistent with the close proximity to the Pacific Ocean. Passive sub-slab samples were collected through a concrete slab outside of the building. 4.2 OF...15) in each location. Both locations were outside of a building where a concrete slab was accessible for drilling and coring. The primary COC was TCE

  3. Development and Evaluation of Passive Sampling and LC-MS Based Techniques for the Detection and Monitoring of Lipophilic Marine Toxins in Mesocosm and Field Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Fux, Elie

    2008-01-01

    The consumption of shellfish that accumulate marine biotoxins produced by harmful Algae can result in severe gastrointestinal or neurotoxic illnesses depending on the nature of the toxin. Therefore, it is essential that suitable monitoring programs are implemented in order to protect public health. This PhD study focused on aspects of the characteristics and monitoring of azaspiracids and toxins from Dinophysis spp. Passive samplers were used in this study in parallel with both indigenous and...

  4. Testing photogrammetry-based techniques for three-dimensional surface documentation in forensic pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanová, Petra; Hejna, Petr; Jurda, Mikoláš

    2015-05-01

    Three-dimensional surface technologies particularly close range photogrammetry and optical surface scanning have recently advanced into affordable, flexible and accurate techniques. Forensic postmortem investigation as performed on a daily basis, however, has not yet fully benefited from their potentials. In the present paper, we tested two approaches to 3D external body documentation - digital camera-based photogrammetry combined with commercial Agisoft PhotoScan(®) software and stereophotogrammetry-based Vectra H1(®), a portable handheld surface scanner. In order to conduct the study three human subjects were selected, a living person, a 25-year-old female, and two forensic cases admitted for postmortem examination at the Department of Forensic Medicine, Hradec Králové, Czech Republic (both 63-year-old males), one dead to traumatic, self-inflicted, injuries (suicide by hanging), the other diagnosed with the heart failure. All three cases were photographed in 360° manner with a Nikon 7000 digital camera and simultaneously documented with the handheld scanner. In addition to having recorded the pre-autopsy phase of the forensic cases, both techniques were employed in various stages of autopsy. The sets of collected digital images (approximately 100 per case) were further processed to generate point clouds and 3D meshes. Final 3D models (a pair per individual) were counted for numbers of points and polygons, then assessed visually and compared quantitatively using ICP alignment algorithm and a cloud point comparison technique based on closest point to point distances. Both techniques were proven to be easy to handle and equally laborious. While collecting the images at autopsy took around 20min, the post-processing was much more time-demanding and required up to 10h of computation time. Moreover, for the full-body scanning the post-processing of the handheld scanner required rather time-consuming manual image alignment. In all instances the applied approaches

  5. Improved DC and RF performance of InAlAs/InGaAs InP based HEMTs using ultra-thin 15 nm ALD-Al2O3 surface passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asif, Muhammad; Chen, Chen; Peng, Ding; Xi, Wang; Zhi, Jin

    2018-04-01

    Owing to the great influence of surface passivation on DC and RF performance of InP-based HEMTs, the DC and RF performance of InAlAs/InGaAs InP HEMTs were studied before and after passivation, using an ultra-thin 15 nm atomic layer deposition Al2O3 layer. Increase in Cgs and Cgd was significantly limited by scaling the thickness of the Al2O3 layer. For verification, an analytical small-signal equivalent circuit model was developed. A significant increase in maximum transconductance (gm) up to 1150 mS/mm, drain current (IDS) up to 820 mA/mm and fmax up to 369.7 GHz was observed, after passivation. Good agreement was obtained between the measured and the simulated results. This shows that the RF performance of InP-based HEMTs can be improved by using an ultra-thin ALD-Al2O3 surface passivation.

  6. Passive microwave remote sensing of soil moisture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, T.J.; Schmugge, T.J.

    1986-01-01

    Microwave remote sensing provides a unique capability for direct observation of soil moisture. Remote measurements from space afford the possibility of obtaining frequent, global sampling of soil moisture over a large fraction of the Earth's land surface. Microwave measurements have the benefit of being largely unaffected by cloud cover and variable surface solar illumination, but accurate soil moisture estimates are limited to regions that have either bare soil or low to moderate amounts of vegetation cover. A particular advantage of passive microwave sensors is that in the absence of significant vegetation cover soil moisture is the dominant effect on the received signal. The spatial resolutions of passive microwave soil moisture sensors currently considered for space operation are in the range 10–20 km. The most useful frequency range for soil moisture sensing is 1–5 GHz. System design considerations include optimum choice of frequencies, polarizations, and scanning configurations, based on trade-offs between requirements for high vegetation penetration capability, freedom from electromagnetic interference, manageable antenna size and complexity, and the requirement that a sufficient number of information channels be available to correct for perturbing geophysical effects. This paper outlines the basic principles of the passive microwave technique for soil moisture sensing, and reviews briefly the status of current retrieval methods. Particularly promising are methods for optimally assimilating passive microwave data into hydrologic models. Further studies are needed to investigate the effects on microwave observations of within-footprint spatial heterogeneity of vegetation cover and subsurface soil characteristics, and to assess the limitations imposed by heterogeneity on the retrievability of large-scale soil moisture information from remote observations

  7. Refractive index dispersion of swift heavy ion irradiated BFO thin films using Surface Plasmon Resonance technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paliwal, Ayushi; Sharma, Savita; Tomar, Monika; Singh, Fouran; Gupta, Vinay

    2016-07-01

    Swift heavy ion irradiation (SHI) is an effective technique to induce defects for possible modifications in the material properties. There is growing interest in studying the optical properties of multiferroic BiFeO3 (BFO) thin films for optoelectronic applications. In the present work, BFO thin films were prepared by sol-gel spin coating technique and were irradiated using the 15 UD Pelletron accelerator with 100 MeV Au9+ ions at a fluence of 1 × 1012 ions cm-2. The as-grown films became rough and porous on ion irradiation. Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) technique has been identified as a highly sensitive and powerful technique for studying the optical properties of a dielectric material. Optical properties of BFO thin films, before and after irradiation were studied using SPR technique in Otto configuration. Refractive index is found to be decreasing from 2.27 to 2.14 on ion irradiation at a wavelength of 633 nm. Refractive index dispersion of BFO thin film (from 405 nm to 633 nm) before and after ion radiation was examined.

  8. Identification and characterization of surface antigens in parasites, using radiolabelling techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramasamy, R.

    1982-04-01

    Surface proteins of Schistosoma sp and Leishmania sp were studied using 125-Iodine as tracer. The surface proteins were labelled by the Lactoperoxidase method and the proteins then separated using SDS PAG electrophoresis and autoradiography. The possible immunogens were then separated using immunoprecipitation and Fluorescent Antibody techniques using sera from patients or from artificially immunized rabbits. Four common antigens were identified from the surfaces of male and female adult worms, cercariae and schistosomulae of S.mansoni. These antigens, which had molecular weights of 150,000, 78,000, 45,000, and 22,000 were also isolated from the surfaces of S.haematobium adults. The surface antigens on promastigotes of a Kenyan strain of Leishmania donovani were separated into three protein antigens with molecular weights of 66,000, 59,000 and 43,000 respectively. The 59,000 molecular weight antigen was a glycoprotein and was common to promastigotes of an American and Indian strain of L.donovani and to L.braziliensis mexicana. None of the isolated antigens have been shown to have a protective effect when vaccinated into mice, but the study illustrates the value of radionuclide tracers in the unravelling of the mosaic of antigens which parasites possess

  9. Three-dimensional measuring technique for surface topography using a light-sectioning microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Linglin; Chen, Peifeng; Wang, Ying; Zhou, Le; Luo, Xi

    2012-03-10

    Three-dimensional (3D) surface topographic analysis, measurement, and assessment techniques have raised great interest not only among researchers but also among industrial users. Many industrial processes and applications are directly influenced by the small-scale roughness of surface finishes. This paper describes the development and implementation of a noncontact, three-dimensional, microtopography measuring system. The instrument is formed by combining a modified light-sectioning microscope subsystem with a computer subsystem. In particular, optical system characteristics of the light-sectioning microscope are investigated, and a textured steel sheet is measured to demonstrate good practical outcomes. Details of measuring processes and image processing algorithms are provided, such as procedures for measurement, image edge extraction, and 3D topography reconstruction. After the 3D topography of the measured surface has been reconstructed, the topography field description parameters are calculated. A standard roughness block was used for calibration of the surface microtopography measuring system. Results obtained showed the measurement method output has good agreement with the actual asperity (unevenness or roughness) of the surface. The computer subsystem is used to process and control asperity measurements and image generation, and for image acquisition and presentation.

  10. Controlling the Adhesion of Superhydrophobic Surfaces Using Electrolyte Jet Machining Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaolong; Liu, Xin; Lu, Yao; Zhou, Shining; Gao, Mingqian; Song, Jinlong; Xu, Wenji

    2016-04-05

    Patterns with controllable adhesion on superhydrophobic areas have various biomedical and chemical applications. Electrolyte jet machining technique (EJM), an electrochemical machining method, was firstly exploited in constructing dimples with various profiles on the superhydrophobic Al alloy surface using different processing parameters. Sliding angles of water droplets on those dimples firstly increased and then stabilized at a certain value with the increase of the processing time or the applied voltages of the EJM, indicating that surfaces with different adhesion force could be obtained by regulating the processing parameters. The contact angle hysteresis and the adhesion force that restricts the droplet from sliding off were investigated through experiments. The results show that the adhesion force could be well described using the classical Furmidge equation. On account of this controllable adhesion force, water droplets could either be firmly pinned to the surface, forming various patterns or slide off at designed tilting angles at specified positions on a superhydrophobic surface. Such dimples on superhydrophopbic surfaces can be applied in water harvesting, biochemical analysis and lab-on-chip devices.

  11. Controlling the Adhesion of Superhydrophobic Surfaces Using Electrolyte Jet Machining Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaolong; Liu, Xin; Lu, Yao; Zhou, Shining; Gao, Mingqian; Song, Jinlong; Xu, Wenji

    2016-01-01

    Patterns with controllable adhesion on superhydrophobic areas have various biomedical and chemical applications. Electrolyte jet machining technique (EJM), an electrochemical machining method, was firstly exploited in constructing dimples with various profiles on the superhydrophobic Al alloy surface using different processing parameters. Sliding angles of water droplets on those dimples firstly increased and then stabilized at a certain value with the increase of the processing time or the applied voltages of the EJM, indicating that surfaces with different adhesion force could be obtained by regulating the processing parameters. The contact angle hysteresis and the adhesion force that restricts the droplet from sliding off were investigated through experiments. The results show that the adhesion force could be well described using the classical Furmidge equation. On account of this controllable adhesion force, water droplets could either be firmly pinned to the surface, forming various patterns or slide off at designed tilting angles at specified positions on a superhydrophobic surface. Such dimples on superhydrophopbic surfaces can be applied in water harvesting, biochemical analysis and lab-on-chip devices. PMID:27046771

  12. Combining Surface Analytical and Computational Techniques to Investigate Orientation Effects of Immobilized Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Elisa Turla

    Controlling how proteins are immobilized (e.g. controlling their orientation and conformation) is essential for developing and optimizing the performance of in vitro protein-binding devices, such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The objective of this work is to develop new methodologies to study proteins and complex mixtures of proteins immobilized onto surfaces. The focus of this study was to control and characterize the orientation of protein G B1, an IgG antibody-binding domain of protein G, on well-defined surfaces as well as measure the effect of protein G B1 orientation on IgG antibody binding using a variety of surface analytical and computational techniques. The surface sensitivity of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) was used to distinguish between different proteins and their orientation by monitoring the changes in intensity of characteristic amino acid mass fragments. Amino acids distributed asymmetrically were used to calculate peak intensity ratios from ToF-SIMS data to determine the orientation of five different cysteine mutants of protein G B1 covalently attached to a maleimide surface. To study the effect of protein orientation on antibody binding, we formed multilayer protein films by binding IgG to protein G B1 films. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) detected protein coverages of 69-130 ng/cm2 (theoretical mass of a monolayer of protein G B1 is 110-160 ng/cm2). QCM-D and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis revealed that packing density along with orientation affected the antibody binding process. Spectra from ToF-SIMS using large Ar gas cluster ion sources distinguished between different proteins in multilayer protein systems. A Monte Carlo algorithm was developed to predict protein orientation on surfaces. Two distinct orientations of protein G B1 adsorbed onto a hydrophobic surface were found and characterized as two mutually exclusive sets of amino acids on the outermost

  13. Measurement and image processing evaluation of surface modifications of dental implants G4 pure titanium created by different techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulutsuz, A. G., E-mail: asligunaya@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yildiz Technical University, 34349 Besiktas, İstanbul (Turkey); Demircioglu, P., E-mail: pinar.demircioglu@adu.edu.tr; Bogrekci, I., E-mail: ismail.bogrekci@adu.edu.tr [Adnan Menderes University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aytepe, 09010, Aydin (Turkey); Durakbasa, M. N., E-mail: durakbasa@gmx.at [Department of Interchangeable Manufacturing and Industrial Metrology, Institute for Production Engineering and Laser Technology, Vienna University of Technology, Karlsplatz 13/3113 A-1040 Wien (Austria); Katiboglu, A. B., E-mail: abkatiboglu@hotmail.com [Istanbul University, Faculty of Dentistry, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2015-03-30

    Foreign substances and organic tissue interaction placed into the jaw in order to eliminate tooth loss involves a highly complex process. Many biological reactions take place as well as the biomechanical forces that influence this formation. Osseointegration denotes to the direct structural and functional association between the living bone and the load-bearing artificial implant's surface. Taking into consideration of the requirements in the manufacturing processes of the implants, surface characterizations with high precise measurement techniques are investigated and thus long-term success of dental implant is emphasized on the importance of these processes in this study. In this research, the detailed surface characterization was performed to identify the dependence of the manufacturing techniques on the surface properties by using the image processing methods and using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) for morphological properties in 3D and Taylor Hobson stylus profilometer for roughness properties in 2D. Three implant surfaces fabricated by different manufacturing techniques were inspected, and a machined surface was included into the study as a reference specimen. The results indicated that different surface treatments were strongly influenced surface morphology. Thus 2D and 3D precise inspection techniques were highlighted on the importance for surface characterization. Different image analyses techniques such as Dark-light technique were used to verify the surface measurement results. The computational phase was performed using image processing toolbox in Matlab with precise evaluation of the roughness for the implant surfaces. The relationship between the number of black and white pixels and surface roughness is presented. FFT image processing and analyses results explicitly imply that the technique is useful in the determination of surface roughness. The results showed that the number of black pixels in the image increases with increase in

  14. Measurement and image processing evaluation of surface modifications of dental implants G4 pure titanium created by different techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulutsuz, A. G.; Demircioglu, P.; Bogrekci, I.; Durakbasa, M. N.; Katiboglu, A. B.

    2015-03-01

    Foreign substances and organic tissue interaction placed into the jaw in order to eliminate tooth loss involves a highly complex process. Many biological reactions take place as well as the biomechanical forces that influence this formation. Osseointegration denotes to the direct structural and functional association between the living bone and the load-bearing artificial implant's surface. Taking into consideration of the requirements in the manufacturing processes of the implants, surface characterizations with high precise measurement techniques are investigated and thus long-term success of dental implant is emphasized on the importance of these processes in this study. In this research, the detailed surface characterization was performed to identify the dependence of the manufacturing techniques on the surface properties by using the image processing methods and using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) for morphological properties in 3D and Taylor Hobson stylus profilometer for roughness properties in 2D. Three implant surfaces fabricated by different manufacturing techniques were inspected, and a machined surface was included into the study as a reference specimen. The results indicated that different surface treatments were strongly influenced surface morphology. Thus 2D and 3D precise inspection techniques were highlighted on the importance for surface characterization. Different image analyses techniques such as Dark-light technique were used to verify the surface measurement results. The computational phase was performed using image processing toolbox in Matlab with precise evaluation of the roughness for the implant surfaces. The relationship between the number of black and white pixels and surface roughness is presented. FFT image processing and analyses results explicitly imply that the technique is useful in the determination of surface roughness. The results showed that the number of black pixels in the image increases with increase in surface

  15. Measurement and image processing evaluation of surface modifications of dental implants G4 pure titanium created by different techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulutsuz, A. G.; Demircioglu, P.; Bogrekci, I.; Durakbasa, M. N.; Katiboglu, A. B.

    2015-01-01

    Foreign substances and organic tissue interaction placed into the jaw in order to eliminate tooth loss involves a highly complex process. Many biological reactions take place as well as the biomechanical forces that influence this formation. Osseointegration denotes to the direct structural and functional association between the living bone and the load-bearing artificial implant's surface. Taking into consideration of the requirements in the manufacturing processes of the implants, surface characterizations with high precise measurement techniques are investigated and thus long-term success of dental implant is emphasized on the importance of these processes in this study. In this research, the detailed surface characterization was performed to identify the dependence of the manufacturing techniques on the surface properties by using the image processing methods and using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) for morphological properties in 3D and Taylor Hobson stylus profilometer for roughness properties in 2D. Three implant surfaces fabricated by different manufacturing techniques were inspected, and a machined surface was included into the study as a reference specimen. The results indicated that different surface treatments were strongly influenced surface morphology. Thus 2D and 3D precise inspection techniques were highlighted on the importance for surface characterization. Different image analyses techniques such as Dark-light technique were used to verify the surface measurement results. The computational phase was performed using image processing toolbox in Matlab with precise evaluation of the roughness for the implant surfaces. The relationship between the number of black and white pixels and surface roughness is presented. FFT image processing and analyses results explicitly imply that the technique is useful in the determination of surface roughness. The results showed that the number of black pixels in the image increases with increase in

  16. Evaluation of 3-dimensional superimposition techniques on various skeletal structures of the head using surface models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Gkantidis

    Full Text Available To test the applicability, accuracy, precision, and reproducibility of various 3D superimposition techniques for radiographic data, transformed to triangulated surface data.Five superimposition techniques (3P: three-point registration; AC: anterior cranial base; AC + F: anterior cranial base + foramen magnum; BZ: both zygomatic arches; 1Z: one zygomatic arch were tested using eight pairs of pre-existing CT data (pre- and post-treatment. These were obtained from non-growing orthodontic patients treated with rapid maxillary expansion. All datasets were superimposed by three operators independently, who repeated the whole procedure one month later. Accuracy was assessed by the distance (D between superimposed datasets on three form-stable anatomical areas, located on the anterior cranial base and the foramen magnum. Precision and reproducibility were assessed using the distances between models at four specific landmarks. Non parametric multivariate models and Bland-Altman difference plots were used for analyses.There was no difference among operators or between time points on the accuracy of each superimposition technique (p>0.05. The AC + F technique was the most accurate (D0.05, the detected structural changes differed significantly between different techniques (p<0.05. Bland-Altman difference plots showed that BZ superimposition was comparable to AC, though it presented slightly higher random error.Superimposition of 3D datasets using surface models created from voxel data can provide accurate, precise, and reproducible results, offering also high efficiency and increased post-processing capabilities. In the present study population, the BZ superimposition was comparable to AC, with the added advantage of being applicable to scans with a smaller field of view.

  17. Evaluation of 3-dimensional superimposition techniques on various skeletal structures of the head using surface models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkantidis, Nikolaos; Schauseil, Michael; Pazera, Pawel; Zorkun, Berna; Katsaros, Christos; Ludwig, Björn

    2015-01-01

    To test the applicability, accuracy, precision, and reproducibility of various 3D superimposition techniques for radiographic data, transformed to triangulated surface data. Five superimposition techniques (3P: three-point registration; AC: anterior cranial base; AC + F: anterior cranial base + foramen magnum; BZ: both zygomatic arches; 1Z: one zygomatic arch) were tested using eight pairs of pre-existing CT data (pre- and post-treatment). These were obtained from non-growing orthodontic patients treated with rapid maxillary expansion. All datasets were superimposed by three operators independently, who repeated the whole procedure one month later. Accuracy was assessed by the distance (D) between superimposed datasets on three form-stable anatomical areas, located on the anterior cranial base and the foramen magnum. Precision and reproducibility were assessed using the distances between models at four specific landmarks. Non parametric multivariate models and Bland-Altman difference plots were used for analyses. There was no difference among operators or between time points on the accuracy of each superimposition technique (p>0.05). The AC + F technique was the most accurate (D0.05), the detected structural changes differed significantly between different techniques (p<0.05). Bland-Altman difference plots showed that BZ superimposition was comparable to AC, though it presented slightly higher random error. Superimposition of 3D datasets using surface models created from voxel data can provide accurate, precise, and reproducible results, offering also high efficiency and increased post-processing capabilities. In the present study population, the BZ superimposition was comparable to AC, with the added advantage of being applicable to scans with a smaller field of view.

  18. Study of carboxylic functionalization of polypropylene surface using the underwater plasma technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, R. S.; Friedrich, J. F.; Wagner, M. H.

    2009-08-01

    Non-equilibrium solution plasma treatment of polymer surfaces in water offers the possibility of more dense and selective polymer surface functionalization in comparison to the well-known and frequently used low-pressure oxygen plasma. Functional groups are introduced when the polymer surface contacts the plasma moderated solution especially water solutions. The emission of ions, electrons, energy-rich neutrals and complexes, produced by the ion avalanche are limited by quenching, with the aid of the ambient water phase. The UV-radiation produced in plasma formation also helps to moderate the reaction solution further by producing additional excited, ionized/dissociated molecules. Thus, monotype functional groups equipped polymer surfaces, preferably OH groups, originating from the dissociated water molecules, could be produced more selectively. An interesting feature of the technique is its flexibility to use a wide variety of additives in the water phase. Another way to modify polymer surfaces is the deposition of plasma polymers carrying functional groups as carboxylic groups used in this work. Acetic acid, acrylic acid, maleic and itaconic acid were used as additive monomers. Acetic acid is not a chemically polymerizing monomer but it could polymerize by monomer/molecular fragmentation and recombination to a cross linked layer. The other monomers form preferably water-soluble polymers on a chemical way. Only the fragmented fraction of these monomers could form an insoluble coating by cross linking to substrate. The XPS analysis was used to track the alterations in -O-CO- bond percentage on the PP surface. To identify the -COOH groups on substrate surface unambiguously, which have survived the plasma polymerization process, the derivatization with trifluoroethanol was performed.

  19. Effect of different finishing techniques for restorative materials on surface roughness and bacterial adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aykent, Filiz; Yondem, Isa; Ozyesil, Atilla G; Gunal, Solen K; Avunduk, Mustafa C; Ozkan, Semiha

    2010-04-01

    The formation of biofilm and bacterial accumulation on dental materials may lead to the development of gingival inflammation and secondary caries. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of different surface finishing and polishing methods on surface roughness and the adhesion of S. mutans bacteria to 2 new-generation indirect composite resins, 1 direct composite resin, and 1 ceramic material. Forty specimens (10 x 10 x 2 mm) of each material, indirect composite resins (SR Adoro, Estenia), direct composite resin (Tetric), and a ceramic material (VITABLOCS Mark II), were fabricated. Specimens were divided into 4 groups (n=10) that were treated with 1 of the following 4 surface finishing techniques: diamond rotary cutting instrument, sandpaper discs (Sof-Lex), silicone-carbide rubber points (Shofu), or a felt wheel with diamond paste. Surface roughness was measured with a profilometer. Test specimens were covered with artificial saliva and mucin to produce pellicle. Bacterial suspension (10(9) CFU/ml) was then added to the pellicle-coated specimens, and bacterial adhesion was determined using a confocal laser microscope and image analyzing program. Data were analyzed with 2-way ANOVA, followed by Tukey HSD test, Pearson correlation, and regression analysis (alpha=.05). The highest surface roughness values were recorded in SR Adoro and diamond rotary cutting instrument groups. The lowest vital S. mutans adhesion was seen in the ceramic group and in SR Adoro indirect composite resin (Padhesion to indirect composite resin materials differed from that to ceramic material after surface treatments. A positive correlation was observed between surface roughness and the vital S. mutans adhesion. Copyright 2010 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Validation of a Novel Technique and Evaluation of the Surface Free Energy of Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senturk Parreidt, Tugce; Schmid, Markus; Hauser, Carolin

    2017-04-20

    Characterizing the physical properties of a surface is largely dependent on determining the contact angle exhibited by a liquid. Contact angles on the surfaces of rough and irregularly-shaped food samples are difficult to measure using a contact angle meter (goniometer). As a consequence, values for the surface energy and its components can be mismeasured. The aim of this work was to use a novel contact angle measurement method, namely the snake-based ImageJ program, to accurately measure the contact angles of rough and irregular shapes, such as food samples, and so enable more accurate calculation of the surface energy of food materials. In order to validate the novel technique, the contact angles of three different test liquids on four different smooth polymer films were measured using both the ImageJ software with the DropSnake plugin and the widely used contact angle meter. The distributions of the values obtained by the two methods were different. Therefore, the contact angles, surface energies, and polar and dispersive components of plastic films obtained using the ImageJ program and the Drop Shape Analyzer (DSA) were interpreted with the help of simple linear regression analysis. As case studies, the superficial characteristics of strawberry and endive salad epicarp were measured with the ImageJ program and the results were interpreted with the Drop Shape Analyzer equivalent according to our regression models. The data indicated that the ImageJ program can be successfully used for contact angle determination of rough and strongly hydrophobic surfaces, such as strawberry epicarp. However, for the special geometry of droplets on slightly hydrophobic surfaces, such as salad leaves, the program code interpolation part can be altered.

  1. Eddy current technique for detecting and sizing surface cracks in steel components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecco, V.S.; Carter, J.R.; Sullivan, S.P.

    1995-01-01

    Cracking has occurred in pressure vessel nozzles and girth welds due to thermal fatigue. Pipe welds, welds in support structures, and welds in reactor vault liner panels in nuclear facilities have failed because of cracks. Cracking can also occur in turbine rotor bore surfaces due to high cycle fatigue. Dye penetrant, magnetic particle and other surface NDT methods are used to detect cracks but cannot be used for depth sizing. Crack depth can be measured with various NDT methods such as ultrasonic time-of-flight diffraction (TOFD), potential drop, and eddy current. The TOFD technique can be difficult to implement on nozzle welds and is best suited for sizing deep cracks (>5 mm). The conventional eddy current method is easy to implement, but crack sizing is normally limited to shallow cracks ( 2 mm) cracks. Eddy current testing (ET) techniques are readily amenable to remote/automatic inspections. These new probes could augment present magnetic particle (MT) and dye penetrant (PT) testing through provision of reliable defect depth information. Reliable crack sizing permits identification of critical cracks for plant life extension and licensing purposes. In addition, performing PT and MT generates low level radioactive waste in some inspection applications in nuclear facilities. Replacing these techniques with ET for some components will eliminate some of this radioactive waste. (author)

  2. Surface Modification of Graphene Oxides by Plasma Techniques and Their Application for Environmental Pollution Cleanup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiangxue; Fan, Qiaohui; Chen, Zhongshan; Wang, Qi; Li, Jiaxing; Hobiny, Aatef; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Wang, Xiangke

    2016-02-01

    Graphene oxides (GOs) have come under intense multidisciplinary study because of their unique physicochemical properties and possible applications. The large amount of oxygen-containing functional groups on GOs leads to a high sorption capacity for the removal of various kinds of organic and inorganic pollutants from aqueous solutions in environmental pollution cleanup. However, the lack of selectivity results in difficulty in the selective removal of target pollutants from aqueous solutions in the presence of other coexisting pollutants. Herein, the surface grafting of GOs with special oxygen-containing functional groups using low-temperature plasma techniques and the application of the surface-modified GOs for the efficient removal of organic and inorganic pollutants in environmental pollution are reviewed. This paper gives an account of our research on the application of GO-based nanomaterials in environmental pollution cleanup, including: (1) the synthesis and surface grafting of functional groups on GOs, summarizing various types of low-temperature plasma techniques for the synthesis of graphene/GOs; and (2) the application of graphene/GOs and their composites for the efficient removal of organic and inorganic pollutants from aqueous solutions, including the interaction mechanism according to recently published results. © 2015 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Advancing the Frontiers in Nanocatalysis, Biointerfaces, and Renewable Energy Conversion by Innovations of Surface Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somorjai, G.A.; Frei, H.; Park, J.Y.

    2009-07-23

    The challenge of chemistry in the 21st century is to achieve 100% selectivity of the desired product molecule in multipath reactions ('green chemistry') and develop renewable energy based processes. Surface chemistry and catalysis play key roles in this enterprise. Development of in situ surface techniques such as high-pressure scanning tunneling microscopy, sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, time-resolved Fourier transform infrared methods, and ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy enabled the rapid advancement of three fields: nanocatalysts, biointerfaces, and renewable energy conversion chemistry. In materials nanoscience, synthetic methods have been developed to produce monodisperse metal and oxide nanoparticles (NPs) in the 0.8-10 nm range with controlled shape, oxidation states, and composition; these NPs can be used as selective catalysts since chemical selectivity appears to be dependent on all of these experimental parameters. New spectroscopic and microscopic techniques have been developed that operate under reaction conditions and reveal the dynamic change of molecular structure of catalysts and adsorbed molecules as the reactions proceed with changes in reaction intermediates, catalyst composition, and oxidation states. SFG vibrational spectroscopy detects amino acids, peptides, and proteins adsorbed at hydrophobic and hydrophilic interfaces and monitors the change of surface structure and interactions with coadsorbed water. Exothermic reactions and photons generate hot electrons in metal NPs that may be utilized in chemical energy conversion. The photosplitting of water and carbon dioxide, an important research direction in renewable energy conversion, is discussed.

  4. Investigation of Steel Surfaces Treated by a Hybrid Ion Implantation Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuther, H.; Richter, E.; Prokert, F.; Ueda, M.; Beloto, A. F.; Gomes, G. F.

    2004-01-01

    Implantation of nitrogen ions into stainless steel in combination with oxidation often results in a decrease or even complete removal of the chromium in the nitrogen containing outermost surface layer. While iron nitrides can be formed easily by this method, due to the absence of chromium, the formation of chromium nitrides is impossible and the beneficial influence of chromium in the steel for corrosion resistance cannot be used. To overcome this problem we use the following hybrid technique. A thin chromium layer is deposited on steel and subsequently implanted with nitrogen ions. Chromium can be implanted by recoil into the steel surface and thus the formation of iron/chromium nitrides should be possible. Both beam line ion implantation and plasma immersion ion implantation are used. Due to the variation of the process parameters, different implantation profiles and different compounds are produced. The produced layers are characterized by Auger electron spectroscopy, conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The obtained results show that due to the variation of the implantation parameters, the formation of iron/chromium nitrides can be achieved and that plasma immersion ion implantation is the most suitable technique for the enrichment of chromium in the outermost surface layer of the steel when compared to the beam line implantation.

  5. Characterization of Natural Dyes and Traditional Korean Silk Fabric by Surface Analytical Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jihye; Kang, Min Hwa; Lee, Kang-Bong; Lee, Yeonhee

    2013-01-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) are well established surface techniques that provide both elemental and organic information from several monolayers of a sample surface, while also allowing depth profiling or image mapping to be carried out. The static TOF-SIMS with improved performances has expanded the application of TOF-SIMS to the study of a variety of organic, polymeric and biological materials. In this work, TOF-SIMS, XPS and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) measurements were used to characterize commercial natural dyes and traditional silk fabric dyed with plant extracts dyes avoiding the time-consuming and destructive extraction procedures necessary for the spectrophotometric and chromatographic methods previously used. Silk textiles dyed with plant extracts were then analyzed for chemical and functional group identification of their dye components and mordants. TOF-SIMS spectra for the dyed silk fabric showed element ions from metallic mordants, specific fragment ions and molecular ions from plant-extracted dyes. The results of TOF-SIMS, XPS and FTIR are very useful as a reference database for comparison with data about traditional Korean silk fabric and to provide an understanding of traditional dyeing materials. Therefore, this study shows that surface techniques are useful for micro-destructive analysis of plant-extracted dyes and Korean dyed silk fabric. PMID:28809257

  6. Characterization of Natural Dyes and Traditional Korean Silk Fabric by Surface Analytical Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeonhee Lee

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS are well established surface techniques that provide both elemental and organic information from several monolayers of a sample surface, while also allowing depth profiling or image mapping to be carried out. The static TOF-SIMS with improved performances has expanded the application of TOF-SIMS to the study of a variety of organic, polymeric and biological materials. In this work, TOF-SIMS, XPS and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR measurements were used to characterize commercial natural dyes and traditional silk fabric dyed with plant extracts dyes avoiding the time-consuming and destructive extraction procedures necessary for the spectrophotometric and chromatographic methods previously used. Silk textiles dyed with plant extracts were then analyzed for chemical and functional group identification of their dye components and mordants. TOF-SIMS spectra for the dyed silk fabric showed element ions from metallic mordants, specific fragment ions and molecular ions from plant-extracted dyes. The results of TOF-SIMS, XPS and FTIR are very useful as a reference database for comparison with data about traditional Korean silk fabric and to provide an understanding of traditional dyeing materials. Therefore, this study shows that surface techniques are useful for micro-destructive analysis of plant-extracted dyes and Korean dyed silk fabric.

  7. Enhanced surface functionality via plasma modification and plasma deposition techniques to create more biologically relevant materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, Jeffrey C.

    Functionalizing nanoparticles and other unusually shaped substrates to create more biologically relevant materials has become central to a wide range of research programs. One of the primary challenges in this field is creating highly functionalized surfaces without modifying the underlying bulk material. Traditional wet chemistry techniques utilize thin film depositions to functionalize nanomaterials with oxygen and nitrogen containing functional groups, such as --OH and --NHx. These functional groups can serve to create surfaces that are amenable to cell adhesion or can act as reactive groups for further attachment of larger structures, such as macromolecules or antiviral agents. Additional layers, such as SiO2, are often added between the nanomaterial and the functionalized coating to act as a barrier films, adhesion layers, and to increase overall hydrophilicity. However, some wet chemistry techniques can damage the bulk material during processing. This dissertation examines the use of plasma processing as an alternative method for producing these highly functionalized surfaces on nanoparticles and polymeric scaffolds through the use of plasma modification and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition techniques. Specifically, this dissertation will focus on (1) plasma deposition of SiO2 barrier films on nanoparticle substrates; (2) surface functionalization of amine and alcohol groups through (a) plasma co-polymerization and (b) plasma modification; and (3) the design and construction of plasma hardware to facilitate plasma processing of nanoparticles and polymeric scaffolds. The body of work presented herein first examines the fabrication of composite nanoparticles by plasma processing. SiOxC y and hexylamine films were coated onto TiO2 nanoparticles to demonstrate enhanced water dispersion properties. Continuous wave and pulsed allyl alcohol plasmas were used to produce highly functionalized Fe2 O3 supported nanoparticles. Specifically, film composition was

  8. Application of MIMO Techniques in sky-surface wave hybrid networking sea-state radar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L.; Wu, X.; Yue, X.; Liu, J.; Li, C.

    2016-12-01

    The sky-surface wave hybrid networking sea-state radar system contains of the sky wave transmission stations at different sites and several surface wave radar stations. The subject comes from the national 863 High-tech Project of China. The hybrid sky-surface wave system and the HF surface wave system work simultaneously and the HF surface wave radar (HFSWR) can work in multi-static and surface-wave networking mode. Compared with the single mode radar system, this system has advantages of better detection performance at the far ranges in ocean dynamics parameters inversion. We have applied multiple-input multiple-output(MIMO) techniques in this sea-state radar system. Based on the multiple channel and non-causal transmit beam-forming techniques, the MIMO radar architecture can reduce the size of the receiving antennas and simplify antenna installation. Besides, by efficiently utilizing the system's available degrees of freedom, it can provide a feasible approach for mitigating multipath effect and Doppler-spread clutter in Over-the-horizon Radar. In this radar, slow-time phase-coded MIMO method is used. The transmitting waveforms are phase-coded in slow-time so as to be orthogonal after Doppler processing at the receiver. So the MIMO method can be easily implemented without the need to modify the receiver hardware. After the radar system design, the MIMO experiments of this system have been completed by Wuhan University during 2015 and 2016. The experiment used Wuhan multi-channel ionospheric sounding system(WMISS) as sky-wave transmitting source and three dual-frequency HFSWR developed by the Oceanography Laboratory of Wuhan University. The transmitter system located at Chongyang with five element linear equi-spaced antenna array and Wuhan with one log-periodic antenna. The RF signals are generated by synchronized, but independent digital waveform generators - providing complete flexibility in element phase and amplitude control, and waveform type and parameters

  9. Effects of different polishing techniques on the surface roughness of dental porcelains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Işil Sarikaya

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of different polishing techniques on the surface roughness of dental porcelains. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Fifty-five cylindirical specimens (15x2 mm were prepared for each feldspathic (Vita VMK 95, Ceramco III and low-fusing dental porcelain (Matchmaker. Fifty-five specimens of machinable feldspathic porcelain blocks (Vitablocs Mark II, (12x14x18 mm were cut into 2-mm-thick slices (12x14 mm with low speed saw. The prepared specimens were divided into 11 groups (n=5 representing different polishing techniques including control ((C no surface treatment, glaze (G and other 9 groups that were finished and polished with polishing discs (Sof-Lex (Sl, two porcelain polishing kits (NTI (Pk, Dialite II (Di, a diamond polishing paste (Sparkle (Sp, a zirconium silicate based cleaning and polishing prophy paste (Zircate (Zr, an aluminum oxide polishing paste (Prisma Gloss (Pg, and combinations of them. The surface roughness of all groups was measured with a profilometer. The data were analyzed with a 2-way analysis of variance, and the mean values were compared by the Tukey Honestly Significant Difference test (a=0.05. RESULTS: For all porcelain material groups, the lowest Ra values were observed in Group Gl, Group Sl, Group Pk, and Group Di, which were not significantly different from each other (p>0.05.When comparing the 4 different porcelain materials, the machinable feldspathic porcelain block group (Mark II demonstrated statistically significantly less Ra values than the other porcelain materials tested (p<0.05. No significant difference was observed between the VMK 95 and Ceramco III porcelain groups (p=0.919, also these groups demonstrated the highest Ra values. CONCLUSION: Subjected to surface roughness, the surfaces obtained with polishing and/or cleaning-prophy paste materials used alone were rougher compared to the surfaces finished using Sof-lex, Dialite, and NTI polishing kit

  10. An analysis of endothelial microparticles as a function of cell surface antibodies and centrifugation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venable, Adam S; Williams, Randall R; Haviland, David L; McFarlin, Brian K

    2014-04-01

    Chronic vascular disease is partially characterized by the presence of lesions along the vascular endothelial wall. Current FDA-approved clinical techniques lack the ability to measure very early changes in endothelial cell health. When endothelial cells are damaged, they release endothelial microparticles (EMPs) into circulation. Thus, blood EMP concentration may represent a useful cardiovascular disease biomarker. Despite the potential value of EMPs, current flow cytometry techniques may not consistently distinguish EMPs from other small cell particles. The purpose of this study was to use imaging flow cytometry to modify existing methods of identifying EMPs based on cell-surface receptor expression and visual morphology. Platelet poor plasma (PPP) was isolated using four different techniques, each utilizing a two-step serial centrifugation process. The cell-surface markers used in this study were selected based on those that are commonly reported in the literature. PPP (100μL) was labeled with CD31, CD42a, CD45, CD51, CD66b, and CD144 for 30-min in dark on ice. Based on replicated experiments, EMPs were best identified by cell-surface CD144 expression relative to other commonly reported EMP markers (CD31 & CD51). It is important to note that contaminating LMPs, GMPs, and PMPs were thought to be removed in the preparation of PPP. However, upon analysis of prepared samples staining CD31 against CD51 revealed a double-positive population that was less than 1% EMPs. In contrast, when using CD144 to identify EMPs, ~87% of observed particles were free of contaminating microparticles. Using a counterstain of CD42a, this purity can be improved to over 99%. More research is needed to understand how our improved EMP measurement method can be used in experimental models measuring acute vascular responses or chronic vascular diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparative Effect of Different Polymerization Techniques on the Flexural and Surface Properties of Acrylic Denture Bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gad, Mohammed M; Fouda, Shaimaa M; ArRejaie, Aws S; Al-Thobity, Ahmad M

    2017-05-22

    Polymerization techniques have been modified to improve physical and mechanical properties of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) denture base, as have the laboratory procedures that facilitate denture construction techniques. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of autoclave polymerization on flexural strength, elastic modulus, surface roughness, and the hardness of PMMA denture base resins. Major Base and Vertex Implacryl heat-polymerized acrylic resins were used to fabricate 180 specimens. According to the polymerization technique, tested groups were divided into: group I (water-bath polymerization), group II (short autoclave polymerization cycle, 60°C for 30 minutes, then 130°C for 10 minutes), and group III (long autoclave polymerization cycle, 60°C for 30 minutes, then 130°C for 20 minutes). Each group was divided into two subgroups based on the materials used. Flexural strength and elastic modulus were determined by a three-point bending test. Surface roughness and hardness were evaluated with a profilometer and Vickers hardness (VH) test, respectively. One-way ANOVA and the Tukey-Kramer multiple-comparison test were used for results analysis, which were statistically significant at p ≤ 0.05. Autoclave polymerization showed a significant increase in flexural strength and hardness of the two resins (p autoclave polymerization and water-bath polymerization (p > 0.05). Autoclave polymerization significantly increased the flexural properties and hardness of PMMA denture bases, while the surface roughness was within acceptable clinical limits. For a long autoclave polymerization cycle, it could be used as an alternative to water-bath polymerization. © 2017 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  12. A review of construction techniques available for surface and underground radioactive waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godfrey, D.G.; Davies, I.L.; MacKenzie, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    In terms of engineering requirements the construction of surface or indeed underground radioactive waste repositories is not unduly difficult. The civil engineering techniques likely to be required have generally been carried out previously, albeit not in the context of radioactive waste repositories in this country. The emphasis will have to be very much on the quality of construction. This paper emphasises the need for quality construction and describes the techniques likely to be used in the construction of repositories. Reference is made to the materials likely to be used in the construction of repositories and also to the need for being able to convince the designers, regulating authorities and the general public that the materials used will indeed last for the required time. Brief reference is made at the end of the paper to the civil engineering parameters requiring consideration in the location of repository siting. (author)

  13. Study of multilayer packaging delamination mechanisms using different surface analysis techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido-López, Álvaro; Tena, María Teresa

    2010-04-01

    Multilayer packaging, consisting of different layers joined by using an adhesive or an extrusion process, is widely used to promote different products, such as food, cosmetics, etc. The main disadvantage in using this form of packaging is the delamination process. In this work, different surface techniques (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) are used to analyse the delaminated surfaces in order to study the mechanisms that cause delamination of multilayer packaging. According to our results, the reaction of migrated molecules with adhesive-aluminium bonds is the main cause of the chemical delamination process. In contrast, the delamination of extruded materials would seem to be caused by the breaking of Van der Waals bonds.

  14. Source-model technique analysis of electromagnetic scattering by surface grooves and slits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotskovsky, Konstantin; Leviatan, Yehuda

    2011-04-01

    A computational tool, based on the source-model technique (SMT), for analysis of electromagnetic wave scattering by surface grooves and slits is presented. The idea is to use a superposition of the solution of the unperturbed problem and local corrections in the groove/slit region (the grooves and slits are treated as perturbations). In this manner, the solution is obtained in a much faster way than solving the original problem. The proposed solution is applied to problems of grooves and slits in otherwise planar or periodic surfaces. Grooves and slits of various shapes, both smooth ones as well as ones with edges, empty or filled with dielectric material, are considered. The obtained results are verified against previously published data. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  15. Comparison of segmentation techniques to determine the geometric parameters of structured surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacAulay, Gavin D; Giusca, Claudiu L; Leach, Richard K; Senin, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Structured surfaces, defined as surfaces characterized by topography features whose shape is defined by design specifications, are increasingly being used in industry for a variety of applications, including improving the tribological properties of surfaces. However, characterization of such surfaces still remains an issue. Techniques have been recently proposed, based on identifying and extracting the relevant features from a structured surface so they can be verified individually, using methods derived from those commonly applied to standard-sized parts. Such emerging approaches show promise but are generally complex and characterized by multiple data processing steps making performance difficult to assess. This paper focuses on the segmentation step, i.e. partitioning the topography so that the relevant features can be separated from the background. Segmentation is key for defining the geometric boundaries of the individual feature, which in turn affects any computation of feature size, shape and localization. This paper investigates the effect of varying the segmentation algorithm and its controlling parameters by considering a test case: a structured surface for bearing applications, the relevant features being micro-dimples designed for friction reduction. In particular, the mechanisms through which segmentation leads to identification of the dimple boundary and influences dimensional properties, such as dimple diameter and depth, are illustrated. It is shown that, by using different methods and control parameters, a significant range of measurement results can be achieved, which may not necessarily agree. Indications on how to investigate the influence of each specific choice are given; in particular, stability of the algorithms with respect to control parameters is analyzed as a means to investigate ease of calibration and flexibility to adapt to specific, application-dependent characterization requirements. (paper)

  16. Procedures and techniques for closure of near surface disposal facilities for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-12-01

    The overall objective of this report is to provide Member States with guidance on planning and implementation of closure of near surface disposal facilities for low and intermediate level radioactive waste. The specific objectives are to review closure concepts, requirements, and components of closure systems; to discuss issues and approaches to closure, including regulatory, economic, and technical aspects; and to present major examples of closure techniques used and/or considered by Member States. Some examples of closure experience from Member States are presented in the Appendix and were indexed separately

  17. Emerging surface characterization techniques for carbon steel corrosion: a critical brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, D; Lepkova, K; Becker, T

    2017-03-01

    Carbon steel is a preferred construction material in many industrial and domestic applications, including oil and gas pipelines, where corrosion mitigation using film-forming corrosion inhibitor formulations is a widely accepted method. This review identifies surface analytical techniques that are considered suitable for analysis of thin films at metallic substrates, but are yet to be applied to analysis of carbon steel surfaces in corrosive media or treated with corrosion inhibitors. The reviewed methods include time of flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry, X-ray absorption spectroscopy methods, particle-induced X-ray emission, Rutherford backscatter spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, electron probe microanalysis, near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, X-ray photoemission electron microscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, small-angle neutron scattering and neutron reflectometry, and conversion electron Moessbauer spectrometry. Advantages and limitations of the analytical methods in thin-film surface investigations are discussed. Technical parameters of nominated analytical methods are provided to assist in the selection of suitable methods for analysis of metallic substrates deposited with surface films. The challenges associated with the applications of the emerging analytical methods in corrosion science are also addressed.

  18. Emerging surface characterization techniques for carbon steel corrosion: a critical brief review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, D.; Lepkova, K.; Becker, T.

    2017-03-01

    Carbon steel is a preferred construction material in many industrial and domestic applications, including oil and gas pipelines, where corrosion mitigation using film-forming corrosion inhibitor formulations is a widely accepted method. This review identifies surface analytical techniques that are considered suitable for analysis of thin films at metallic substrates, but are yet to be applied to analysis of carbon steel surfaces in corrosive media or treated with corrosion inhibitors. The reviewed methods include time of flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry, X-ray absorption spectroscopy methods, particle-induced X-ray emission, Rutherford backscatter spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, electron probe microanalysis, near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, X-ray photoemission electron microscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, small-angle neutron scattering and neutron reflectometry, and conversion electron Moessbauer spectrometry. Advantages and limitations of the analytical methods in thin-film surface investigations are discussed. Technical parameters of nominated analytical methods are provided to assist in the selection of suitable methods for analysis of metallic substrates deposited with surface films. The challenges associated with the applications of the emerging analytical methods in corrosion science are also addressed.

  19. The study on surface characteristics of high transmission components by 3D printing technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Hui-Jean; Huang, Chien-Yao; Wang, Wan-Hsuan; Lin, Ping-Hung; Tsay, Ho-Lin; Hsu, Wei-Yao

    2017-06-01

    3D printing is a high freedom fabrication technique. Any components, which designed by 3D design software or scanned from real parts, can be printed. The printing materials include metals, plastics and biocompatible materials etc. Especially for those high transmission components used in optical system or biomedical field can be printed, too. High transmission lens increases the performances of optical system. And high transmission cover or shell using in biomedical field helps observers to see the structures inside, such as brain, bone, and vessels. But the surface of printed components is not transparent, even the inside layer is transparent. If we increase the transmittance of surface, the components which fabricated by 3D printing process could have high transmission. In this paper, we using illuminating and polishing methods to improve the transmittance of printing surface. The illuminating time is the experiment parameters in illuminating method. The roughness and transmission of printing components are the evaluating targets. A 3D printing machine, Stratasys Connex 500, has been used to print high transmittance components in this paper. The surface transmittance of printing components is increasing above 80 % by polishing method.

  20. 3D Surface Temperature Measurement of Plant Canopies Using Photogrammetry Techniques From A UAV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, M.; Lagouarde, J. P.

    2017-12-01

    Surface temperature of plant canopies and within canopies results from the coupling of radiative and energy exchanges processes which govern the fluxes at the interface soil-plant-atmosphere. As a key parameter, surface temperature permits the estimation of canopy exchanges using processes based modeling methods. However detailed 3D surface temperature measurements or even profile surface temperature measurements are rarely made as they have inherent difficulties. Such measurements would greatly improve multi-level canopy models such as NOAH (Chen and Dudhia 2001) or MuSICA (Ogée and Brunet 2002, Ogée et al 2003) where key surface temperature estimations, at present, are not tested. Additionally, at larger scales, canopy structure greatly influences satellite based surface temperature measurements as the structure impacts the observations which are intrinsically made at varying satellite viewing angles and solar heights. In order to account for these differences, again accurate modeling is required such as through the above mentioned multi-layer models or with several source type models such as SCOPE (Van der Tol 2009) in order to standardize observations. As before, in order to validate these models, detailed field observations are required. With the need for detailed surface temperature observations in mind we have planned a series of experiments over non-dense plant canopies to investigate the use of photogrammetry techniques. Photogrammetry is normally used for visible wavelengths to produce 3D images using cloud point reconstruction of aerial images (for example Dandois and Ellis, 2010, 2013 over a forest). From these cloud point models it should be possible to establish 3D plant surface temperature images when using thermal infrared array sensors. In order to do this our experiments are based on the use of a thermal Infrared camera embarked on a UAV. We adapt standard photogrammetry to account for limits imposed by thermal imaginary, especially the low

  1. Surface modification techniques for increased corrosion tolerance of zirconium fuel cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, James Patrick, IV

    Corrosion is a major issue in applications involving materials in normal and severe environments, especially when it involves corrosive fluids, high temperatures, and radiation. Left unaddressed, corrosion can lead to catastrophic failures, resulting in economic and environmental liabilities. In nuclear applications, where metals and alloys, such as steel and zirconium, are extensively employed inside and outside of the nuclear reactor, corrosion accelerated by high temperatures, neutron radiation, and corrosive atmospheres, corrosion becomes even more concerning. The objectives of this research are to study and develop surface modification techniques to protect zirconium cladding by the incorporation of a specific barrier coating, and to understand the issues related to the compatibility of the coatings examined in this work. The final goal of this study is to recommend a coating and process that can be scaled-up for the consideration of manufacturing and economic limits. This dissertation study builds on previous accident tolerant fuel cladding research, but is unique in that advanced corrosion methods are tested and considerations for implementation by industry are practiced and discussed. This work will introduce unique studies involving the materials and methods for accident tolerant fuel cladding research by developing, demonstrating, and considering materials and processes for modifying the surface of zircaloy fuel cladding. This innovative research suggests that improvements in the technique to modify the surface of zirconium fuel cladding are likely. Three elements selected for the investigation of their compatibility on zircaloy fuel cladding are aluminum, silicon, and chromium. These materials are also currently being investigated at other labs as alternate alloys and coatings for accident tolerant fuel cladding. This dissertation also investigates the compatibility of these three elements as surface modifiers, by comparing their microstructural and

  2. Surface passivation of n-type c-Si wafers by a-Si/SiO2/SiNx stack with <1 cm/s effective surface recombination velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herasimenka, Stanislau Y.; Tracy, Clarence J.; Sharma, Vivek; Vulic, Natasa; Dauksher, William J.; Bowden, Stuart G.

    2013-10-01

    The passivation quality of an a-Si/SiO2/SiNx (aSON) stack deposited by conventional PECVD at corona charging of SiNx is presented. textured n-type Czochralski (CZ) substrates. It was shown that very good passivation can be achieved using 60 ms on 5000 Ω-cm and 20.9 ms on 1.7 Ω-cm mirror polished float zone (FZ) material passivated with aSON stacks.

  3. Applications of passive remote surface acoustic wave sensors in high-voltage systems; Einsatz von passiven funkabfragbaren Oberflaechenwellensensoren in der elektrischen Energietechnik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teminova, R.

    2007-06-29

    Passive remote Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensors have been applied e.g. as temperature, pressure or torque sensors. Their important advantages over standard methods are their passive operating principle, which allows operation without any power supply, as well as the wireless high-frequency signal transmission over distances up to about 10..15 m even through (non metallic) housings. These properties of SAW sensors particularly qualify them for applications in high voltage operational equipment. First experience was gained in a long time field test of surge arrester monitoring based on SAW temperature sensors in a German high-voltage substation. Now, this system has been further developed at Darmstadt University of Technology for other applications, the first of them being an overhead line (OHL) conductor temperature measurement, the second one a temperature monitoring system for of high-voltage disconnectors. After designing and building the sensors, extensive laboratory tests were carried out applying high-voltage, high-current and thermal stress in order to approve the suitability for the intended application. All these tests confirmed the assumption that SAW sensors, due to their passive working principle, are not affected at all by any kind of electrical, magnetic or thermal stress that may occur during service. The complete temperature sensor consists of three parts: a sensor chip, an antenna which receives and transmits the signal from and to the radar unit and a body for installation and for protection against environmental impact. One must find a good compromise between optimizing of thermal, dielectric and high-frequency characteristics and at the same time taking into consideration a simple installation. These requirements on the SAW sensors turned out to be difficult to coordinate. To achieve a high measuring precision is especially difficult. First, a new sensor for OHL application was developed. The OHL conductor temperature sensor had been optimized

  4. Bone-like apatite coating on functionalized poly(etheretherketone) surface via tailored silanization layers technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Yanyan; Xiong, Chengdong; Zhang, Shenglan; Li, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Lifang

    2015-01-01

    Poly(etheretherketone) (PEEK) is a rigid semi-crystalline polymer with outstanding mechanical properties, bone-like stiffness and suitable biocompatibility that has attracted much interest as a biomaterial for orthopedic and dental implants. However, the bio-inert surface of PEEK limits its biomedical applications when direct osteointegration between the implants and the host tissue is desired. In this work, –PO 4 H 2 , –COOH and –OH groups were introduced on the PEEK surface by further chemical treatments of the vinyl-terminated silanization layers formed on the hydroxylation-pretreated PEEK surface. Both the surface-functionalized and pristine specimens were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and water contact angle measurements. When placed in 1.5 strength simulated body fluid (SBF) solution, apatite was observed to form uniformly on the functionalized PEEK surface and firmly attach to the substrate. The characterized results demonstrated that the coating was constituted by poorly crystallized bone-like apatite and the effect of surface functional groups on coating formation was also discussed in detail. In addition, in vitro biocompatibility of PEEK, in terms of pre-osteoblast cell (MC3T3-E1) attachment, spreading and proliferation, was remarkably enhanced by the bone-like apatite coating. Thus, this study provides a method to enhance the bioactivity of PEEK and expand its applications in orthopedic and dental implants. - Highlights: • –PO 4 H 2 , –COOH and –OH groups were successfully introduced onto PEEK surface via tailored silanization layer technique. • Bone-like apatite formed uniformly on surface-functionalized PEEK after immersion in SBF, and tightly adhered to the PEEK. • SEM, EDS, FTIR, XPS and XRD results showed that apatite layer is composed of low-crystalline bone-like apatite. • Bone-like apatite coating remarkably enhanced pre

  5. Bone-like apatite coating on functionalized poly(etheretherketone) surface via tailored silanization layers technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Yanyan [Chengdu Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xiong, Chengdong; Zhang, Shenglan [Chengdu Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 (China); Li, Xiaoyu [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Zhang, Lifang, E-mail: zhanglfcioc@163.com [Chengdu Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2015-10-01

    Poly(etheretherketone) (PEEK) is a rigid semi-crystalline polymer with outstanding mechanical properties, bone-like stiffness and suitable biocompatibility that has attracted much interest as a biomaterial for orthopedic and dental implants. However, the bio-inert surface of PEEK limits its biomedical applications when direct osteointegration between the implants and the host tissue is desired. In this work, –PO{sub 4}H{sub 2}, –COOH and –OH groups were introduced on the PEEK surface by further chemical treatments of the vinyl-terminated silanization layers formed on the hydroxylation-pretreated PEEK surface. Both the surface-functionalized and pristine specimens were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and water contact angle measurements. When placed in 1.5 strength simulated body fluid (SBF) solution, apatite was observed to form uniformly on the functionalized PEEK surface and firmly attach to the substrate. The characterized results demonstrated that the coating was constituted by poorly crystallized bone-like apatite and the effect of surface functional groups on coating formation was also discussed in detail. In addition, in vitro biocompatibility of PEEK, in terms of pre-osteoblast cell (MC3T3-E1) attachment, spreading and proliferation, was remarkably enhanced by the bone-like apatite coating. Thus, this study provides a method to enhance the bioactivity of PEEK and expand its applications in orthopedic and dental implants. - Highlights: • –PO{sub 4}H{sub 2}, –COOH and –OH groups were successfully introduced onto PEEK surface via tailored silanization layer technique. • Bone-like apatite formed uniformly on surface-functionalized PEEK after immersion in SBF, and tightly adhered to the PEEK. • SEM, EDS, FTIR, XPS and XRD results showed that apatite layer is composed of low-crystalline bone-like apatite. • Bone-like apatite coating

  6. Generating Inviscid and Viscous Fluid Flow Simulations over a Surface Using a Quasi-simultaneous Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturdza, Peter (Inventor); Martins-Rivas, Herve (Inventor); Suzuki, Yoshifumi (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A fluid-flow simulation over a computer-generated surface is generated using a quasi-simultaneous technique. The simulation includes a fluid-flow mesh of inviscid and boundary-layer fluid cells. An initial fluid property for an inviscid fluid cell is determined using an inviscid fluid simulation that does not simulate fluid viscous effects. An initial boundary-layer fluid property a boundary-layer fluid cell is determined using the initial fluid property and a viscous fluid simulation that simulates fluid viscous effects. An updated boundary-layer fluid property is determined for the boundary-layer fluid cell using the initial fluid property, initial boundary-layer fluid property, and an interaction law. The interaction law approximates the inviscid fluid simulation using a matrix of aerodynamic influence coefficients computed using a two-dimensional surface panel technique and a fluid-property vector. An updated fluid property is determined for the inviscid fluid cell using the updated boundary-layer fluid property.

  7. Optical properties of WO{sub 3} thin films using surface plasmon resonance technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paliwal, Ayushi; Sharma, Anjali; Gupta, Vinay, E-mail: drguptavinay@gmail.com, E-mail: vgupta@physics.du.ac.in [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Tomar, Monika [Department of Physics, Miranda House, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India)

    2014-01-28

    Indigenously assembled surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique has been exploited to study the thickness dependent dielectric properties of WO{sub 3} thin films. WO{sub 3} thin films (80 nm to 200 nm) have been deposited onto gold (Au) coated glass prism by sputtering technique. The structural, optical properties and surface morphology of the deposited WO{sub 3} thin films were studied using X-ray diffraction, UV-visible spectrophotometer, Raman spectroscopy, and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). XRD analysis shows that all the deposited WO{sub 3} thin films are exhibiting preferred (020) orientation and Raman data indicates that the films possess single phase monoclinic structure. SEM images reveal the variation in grain size with increase in thickness. The SPR reflectance curves of the WO{sub 3}/Au/prism structure were utilized to estimate the dielectric properties of WO{sub 3} thin films at optical frequency (λ = 633 nm). As the thickness of WO{sub 3} thin film increases from 80 nm to 200 nm, the dielectric constant is seen to be decreasing from 5.76 to 3.42, while the dielectric loss reduces from 0.098 to 0.01. The estimated value of refractive index of WO{sub 3} film is in agreement to that obtained from UV-visible spectroscopy studies. The strong dispersion in refractive index is observed with wavelength of incident laser light.

  8. Analysis of Occupational Accidents in Underground and Surface Mining in Spain Using Data-Mining Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanmiquel, Lluís; Bascompta, Marc; Rossell, Josep M; Anticoi, Hernán Francisco; Guash, Eduard

    2018-03-07

    An analysis of occupational accidents in the mining sector was conducted using the data from the Spanish Ministry of Employment and Social Safety between 2005 and 2015, and data-mining techniques were applied. Data was processed with the software Weka. Two scenarios were chosen from the accidents database: surface and underground mining. The most important variables involved in occupational accidents and their association rules were determined. These rules are composed of several predictor variables that cause accidents, defining its characteristics and context. This study exposes the 20 most important association rules in the sector-either surface or underground mining-based on the statistical confidence levels of each rule as obtained by Weka. The outcomes display the most typical immediate causes, along with the percentage of accidents with a basis in each association rule. The most important immediate cause is body movement with physical effort or overexertion, and the type of accident is physical effort or overexertion. On the other hand, the second most important immediate cause and type of accident are different between the two scenarios. Data-mining techniques were chosen as a useful tool to find out the root cause of the accidents.

  9. Application of photocuring technique on wood surface and its prospects in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattcacharia, S.K.; Khan, Mubarak A.

    2005-01-01

    Photocuring technique has unveiled a new horizon in polymer science. Application of photocuring technique on wood surface has enhanced the use of low grade wood. As Bangladesh is an overpopulated country, necessity of good quality wood is increasing day by day. So low grade wood, like Simul or Partex, locally produced particleboard, would come out with great use. As Partex board, produced from Jute sticks and various types of indigenous low grade wood and particle board are abundant in Bangladesh, so photocuring could play a major role to improve the quality of low grade wood and serve the nation. Already, a lot of research works were carried out by the local scientists to improve the wood surface using UV curing method. Different formulations were also developed by the local scientists using various oligomer, monomer and different types of additives. The used oligomers are epoxy, polyester, urethane, etc. and monomers of different functionalities and used additives are acrylic monomer, CaCO 3 , sand, MgSiO 3 , talc, etc. Thin films were prepared on glass plate with different formulations using UV radiation and different characteristics properties (pendulum hardness, abrasion, gloss (60 deg. and 20 deg.), microscratch hardness, weathering effect, adhesion strength, etc.) were studied. Now, a Pilot Plant has already been established with the financial assistance by the government of Bangladesh, worth US$ 3.5 million

  10. Analysis of Occupational Accidents in Underground and Surface Mining in Spain Using Data-Mining Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lluís Sanmiquel

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of occupational accidents in the mining sector was conducted using the data from the Spanish Ministry of Employment and Social Safety between 2005 and 2015, and data-mining techniques were applied. Data was processed with the software Weka. Two scenarios were chosen from the accidents database: surface and underground mining. The most important variables involved in occupational accidents and their association rules were determined. These rules are composed of several predictor variables that cause accidents, defining its characteristics and context. This study exposes the 20 most important association rules in the sector—either surface or underground mining—based on the statistical confidence levels of each rule as obtained by Weka. The outcomes display the most typical immediate causes, along with the percentage of accidents with a basis in each association rule. The most important immediate cause is body movement with physical effort or overexertion, and the type of accident is physical effort or overexertion. On the other hand, the second most important immediate cause and type of accident are different between the two scenarios. Data-mining techniques were chosen as a useful tool to find out the root cause of the accidents.

  11. Analysis of Occupational Accidents in Underground and Surface Mining in Spain Using Data-Mining Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanmiquel, Lluís; Bascompta, Marc; Rossell, Josep M.; Anticoi, Hernán Francisco; Guash, Eduard

    2018-01-01

    An analysis of occupational accidents in the mining sector was conducted using the data from the Spanish Ministry of Employment and Social Safety between 2005 and 2015, and data-mining techniques were applied. Data was processed with the software Weka. Two scenarios were chosen from the accidents database: surface and underground mining. The most important variables involved in occupational accidents and their association rules were determined. These rules are composed of several predictor variables that cause accidents, defining its characteristics and context. This study exposes the 20 most important association rules in the sector—either surface or underground mining—based on the statistical confidence levels of each rule as obtained by Weka. The outcomes display the most typical immediate causes, along with the percentage of accidents with a basis in each association rule. The most important immediate cause is body movement with physical effort or overexertion, and the type of accident is physical effort or overexertion. On the other hand, the second most important immediate cause and type of accident are different between the two scenarios. Data-mining techniques were chosen as a useful tool to find out the root cause of the accidents. PMID:29518921

  12. Effects of surface-mapping corrections and synthetic-aperture focusing techniques on ultrasonic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barna, B.A.; Johnson, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Improvements in ultrasonic imaging that can be obtained using algorithms that map the surface of targets are evaluated. This information is incorporated in the application of synthetic-aperture focusing techniques which also have the potential to improve image resolution. Images obtained using directed-beam (flat) transducers and the focused transducers normally used for synthetic-aperture processing are quantitatively compared by using no processing, synthetic-aperture processing with no corrections for surface variations, and synthetic-aperture processing with surface mapping. The unprocessed images have relatively poor lateral resolutions because echoes from two adjacent reflectors show interference effects which prevent their identification even if the spacing is larger than the single-hole resolution. The synthetic-aperture-processed images show at least a twofold improvement in lateral resolution and greatly reduced interference effects in multiple-hole images compared to directed-beam images. Perhaps more importantly, in images of test blocks with substantial surface variations portions of the image are displaced from their actual positions by several wavelengths. To correct for this effect an algorithm has been developed for calculating the surface variations. The corrected images produced using this algorithm are accurate within the experimental error. In addition, the same algorithm, when applied to the directed-beam data, produced images that are not only accurately positioned, but that also have a resolution comparable to conventional synthetic-aperture-processed images obtained from focused-transducer data. This suggests that using synthetic-aperture processing on the type of data normally collected during directed-beam ultrasonic inspections would eliminate the need to rescan for synthetic-aperture enhancement

  13. Influence of surface modification techniques on shear bond strength between different zirconia cores and veneering ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rismanchian, Mansour; Savabi, Omid; Ashtiani, Alireza Hashemi

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE Veneering porcelain might be delaminated from underlying zirconia-based ceramics. The aim of this study was the evaluation of the effect of different surface treatments and type of zirconia (white or colored) on shear bond strength (SBS) of zirconia core and its veneering porcelain. MATERIALS AND METHODS Eighty zirconia disks (40 white and 40 colored; 10 mm in diameter and 4 mm thick) were treated with three different mechanical surface conditioning methods (Sandblasting with 110 µm Al2O3 particle, grinding, sandblasting and liner application). One group had received no treatment. These disks were veneered with 3 mm thick and 5 mm diameter Cercon Ceram Kiss porcelain and SBS test was conducted (cross-head speed = 1 mm/min). Two and one way ANOVA, Tukey's HSD Past hoc, and T-test were selected to analyzed the data (α=0.05). RESULTS In this study, the factor of different types of zirconia ceramics (P=.462) had no significant effect on SBS, but the factors of different surface modification techniques (P=.005) and interaction effect (P=.018) had a significant effect on SBS. Within colored zirconia group, there were no significant differences in mean SBS among the four surface treatment subgroups (P=0.183). Within white zirconia group, "Ground group" exhibited a significantly lower SBS value than "as milled" or control (P=0.001) and liner (P=.05) groups. CONCLUSION Type of zirconia did not have any effect on bond strength between zirconia core and veneer ceramic. Surface treatment had different effects on the SBS of the different zirconia types and grinding dramatically decreased the SBS of white zirconia-porcelain. PMID:22259706

  14. Development of CDMS-II Surface Event Rejection Techniques and Their Extensions to Lower Energy Thresholds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofer, Thomas James [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2014-12-01

    The CDMS-II phase of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search, a dark matter direct-detection experiment, was operated at the Soudan Underground Laboratory from 2003 to 2008. The full payload consisted of 30 ZIP detectors, totaling approximately 1.1 kg of Si and 4.8 kg of Ge, operated at temperatures of 50 mK. The ZIP detectors read out both ionization and phonon pulses from scatters within the crystals; channel segmentation and analysis of pulse timing parameters allowed e ective ducialization of the crystal volumes and background rejection su cient to set world-leading limits at the times of their publications. A full re-analysis of the CDMS-II data was motivated by an improvement in the event reconstruction algorithms which improved the resolution of ionization energy and timing information. The Ge data were re-analyzed using three distinct background-rejection techniques; the Si data from runs 125 - 128 were analyzed for the rst time using the most successful of the techniques from the Ge re-analysis. The results of these analyses prompted a novel \\mid-threshold" analysis, wherein energy thresholds were lowered but background rejection using phonon timing information was still maintained. This technique proved to have signi cant discrimination power, maintaining adequate signal acceptance and minimizing background leakage. The primary background for CDMS-II analyses comes from surface events, whose poor ionization collection make them di cult to distinguish from true nuclear recoil events. The novel detector technology of SuperCDMS, the successor to CDMS-II, uses interleaved electrodes to achieve full ionization collection for events occurring at the top and bottom detector surfaces. This, along with dual-sided ionization and phonon instrumentation, allows for excellent ducialization and relegates the surface-event rejection techniques of CDMS-II to a secondary level of background discrimination. Current and future SuperCDMS results hold great promise for mid- to low

  15. Representation of a human head with bi-cubic B-splines technique based on the laser scanning technique in 3D surface anthropometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, B; Molenbroek, J F M

    2004-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) anthropometry based on the laser scanning technique not only provides one-dimensional measurements calculated in accordance with the landmarks which are pre-located on the human body surface manually, but also the 3D shape information between the landmarks. This new technique used in recent ergonomic research has brought new challenges to resolving the application problem that was generally avoided by anthropometric experts in their researches. The current research problem is concentrating on how to shift and develop one-dimensional measurements (1D landmarks) into three-dimensional measurements (3D land-surfaces). The main purpose of this paper is to test whether the function of B-splines can be used to fit 3D scanned human heads, and to for further study to develop a computer aided ergonomic design tool (CAED). The result shows that B-splines surfaces can effectively reconstruct 3D human heads based on the laser scanning technique.

  16. Determining Engineering Properties of the Shallow Lunar Subsurface using Seismic Surface Wave Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeluru, P. M.; Baker, G. S.

    2008-12-01

    The geology of Earth's moon has previously been examined via telescopic observations, orbiting spacecraft readings, lunar sample analysis, and also from some geophysical data. Previous researchers have examined layering of the moon and models exist explaining the velocity variations in the mantle and core. However, no studies (or datasets) currently exist regarding the engineering properties of the shallow (channel Analysis of Surface Wave (MASW), has greatly increased our ability to map subsurface variations in physical properties. The MASW method involves deployment of multiple seismometers to acquire 1-D or 2-D shear wave velocity profiles that can be directly related to various engineering properties. The advantage of this technique over drilling boreholes or any other geophysical technique is that it is less intensive, non-invasive, more cost- effective, and more robust because strong surface-wave records are almost guaranteed. In addition, data processing and analysis is fairly straightforward, and the MASW method allows for analysis of a large area of interest as compared to drilling boreholes. A new scheme using randomly distributed geophones (likely deployed from a mortar-type device) instead of a conventional linear array will be presented. A random array is necessary for lunar exploration because of the logistical constraints involved in deploying a linear or circular array robotically or by astronaut. Initial results indicate that robust dispersion curves (and thus subsurface models of engineering properties) can be obtained from the random array geometry. This random geometry will also be evaluated (a) for potential improvements in the resolution of the dispersion image and (b) as more accurate method for assessing azimuthal variations in the subsurface geology. Based on the extreme logistics imposed by lunar exploration and the anticipated engineering needs of lunar exploration, information obtained on the moon using this technique should prove to be

  17. Effect of surface pretreatment in the thermal atomic layer deposition of Al2O3 for passivation of crystal Si solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Shin, Hong-Sik; Jeong, Kwang-Seok; Oh, Sung-Kwen; Lee, Horyeong; Han, Kyumin; Lee, Yongwoo; Lee, Song-Jae; Lee, Ga-Won; Lee, Hi-Deok

    2014-08-01

    H2O or NH4OH (5%) precursor pretreatment in the chamber was carried out before the thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD) of an Al2O3 passivation layer on p-type crystal Si. It was found that the density of negative oxide fixed charges significantly increased, the Al-O combination at the interface changed, the Al/O atomic at the interface of Al2O3/Si decreased, and the effective lifetime increased. The pretreated samples with changes in the Al-O structure at the interface, which made the interface more oxygen-rich, were believed to be the reason for the improvement of the field effect passivation in Al2O3 passivated crystal Si solar cell applications.

  18. Mining for diagnostic information in body surface potential maps: A comparison of feature selection techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCullagh Paul J

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In body surface potential mapping, increased spatial sampling is used to allow more accurate detection of a cardiac abnormality. Although diagnostically superior to more conventional electrocardiographic techniques, the perceived complexity of the Body Surface Potential Map (BSPM acquisition process has prohibited its acceptance in clinical practice. For this reason there is an interest in striking a compromise between the minimum number of electrocardiographic recording sites required to sample the maximum electrocardiographic information. Methods In the current study, several techniques widely used in the domains of data mining and knowledge discovery have been employed to mine for diagnostic information in 192 lead BSPMs. In particular, the Single Variable Classifier (SVC based filter and Sequential Forward Selection (SFS based wrapper approaches to feature selection have been implemented and evaluated. Using a set of recordings from 116 subjects, the diagnostic ability of subsets of 3, 6, 9, 12, 24 and 32 electrocardiographic recording sites have been evaluated based on their ability to correctly asses the presence or absence of Myocardial Infarction (MI. Results It was observed that the wrapper approach, using sequential forward selection and a 5 nearest neighbour classifier, was capable of choosing a set of 24 recording sites that could correctly classify 82.8% of BSPMs. Although the filter method performed slightly less favourably, the performance was comparable with a classification accuracy of 79.3%. In addition, experiments were conducted to show how (a features chosen using the wrapper approach were specific to the classifier used in the selection model, and (b lead subsets chosen were not necessarily unique. Conclusion It was concluded that both the filter and wrapper approaches adopted were suitable for guiding the choice of recording sites useful for determining the presence of MI. It should be noted however

  19. New techniques for high-temperature melting measurements in volatile refractory materials via laser surface heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manara, D; Sheindlin, M; Heinz, W; Ronchi, C

    2008-11-01

    An original technique for the measurement of high-temperature phase transitions was implemented based on a laser-heating method, enabling chemically unstable, refractory materials to be melted under controlled conditions. This technique includes two independent but correlated methods: In the first, fast multichannel pyrometry is employed to measure thermograms and spectral emissivity; in the second, a low-power probe laser beam is used for the detection of reflectivity changes induced by phase transitions on the sample surface. The experiments are carried out under medium ( approximately 10(2) kPa) or high ( approximately 10(2) MPa) inert-gas pressures in order to kinetically suppress evaporation in volatile or chemically instable samples. Two models for the simulation of the laser-heating pulses are as well introduced. Some results are presented about the successful application of this technique to the study of the melting behavior of oxides such as UO(2+x), ZrO(2), and their mixed oxides. The method can be extended to a broad class of refractory materials.

  20. Surface-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry techniques for application in forensics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinan, Taryn; Kirkbride, Paul; Pigou, Paul E; Ronci, Maurizio; Kobus, Hilton; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2015-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) is an excellent analytical technique for the rapid and sensitive analysis of macromolecules (>700 Da), such as peptides, proteins, nucleic acids, and synthetic polymers. However, the detection of smaller organic molecules with masses below 700 Da using MALDI-MS is challenging due to the appearance of matrix adducts and matrix fragment peaks in the same spectral range. Recently, nanostructured substrates have been developed that facilitate matrix-free laser desorption ionization (LDI), contributing to an emerging analytical paradigm referred to as surface-assisted laser desorption ionization (SALDI) MS. Since SALDI enables the detection of small organic molecules, it is rapidly growing in popularity, including in the field of forensics. At the same time, SALDI also holds significant potential as a high throughput analytical tool in roadside, work place and athlete drug testing. In this review, we discuss recent advances in SALDI techniques such as desorption ionization on porous silicon (DIOS), nano-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS) and nano assisted laser desorption ionization (NALDI™) and compare their strengths and weaknesses with particular focus on forensic applications. These include the detection of illicit drug molecules and their metabolites in biological matrices and small molecule detection from forensic samples including banknotes and fingerprints. Finally, the review highlights recent advances in mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) using SALDI techniques. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Surface modification by cold-plasma technique for dental implants—Bio-functionalization with binding pharmaceuticals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masao Yoshinari

    2011-08-01

    At the bone tissue/implant interface, a thin calcium phosphate coating and rapid heating with infrared radiation were effective in controlling the dissolution without cracking the coating. These thin calcium phosphate coatings may directly promote osteogenisis, but also enable immobilization and subsequent drug delivery system (DDS of bisphosphonates. Simvastatin is also an effective candidate that is reported to increase the expression of BMP-2. The thin-film of hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO was plasma-polymerized onto titanium, and then HMDSO surface was activated by O2-plasma treatment. A quartz crystal microbalance (QCM-D technique demonstrated that simvastatin was immobilized on the plasma-treated surfaces due to introduction of O2-functional groups. At the soft tissue/implant interface, multi-grooved surface topographies and utilizing the adhesive proteins such as fibronectin or laminin-5 may help in providing a biological seal around the implant. At the oral fluid/implant interface, an alumina coating, F+-implantation and immobilization of anti-microbial peptides were responsible for inhibiting the biofilm accumulation.

  2. Preparation of high surface area and high conductivity polyaniline nanoparticles using chemical oxidation polymerization technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budi, S.; Yusmaniar; Juliana, A.; Cahyana, U.; Purwanto, A.; Imaduddin, A.; Handoko, E.

    2018-03-01

    In this work, polyaniline nanoparticles were synthesized using a chemical oxidation polymerization technique. The ammonium peroxydisulfate (APS)/aniline ratio, APS dropping time, and polymerization temperature were optimized to increase the surface area and conductivity of the polyaniline.The Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum confirmed the formation of emeraldine salt polyaniline. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns indicated that amorphous and crystalline phases of the polyaniline were formed with crystallinity less than 40%. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) micrographs showed that the finest nanoparticles with uniform size distribution were obtained at the polymerization temperature of 0°C. A surface area analyzer (SAA) showed that the highest Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area (SBET ) of 42.14 m2/gwas obtained from an APS/aniline ratio of 0.75 with a dropping time of 0 s at a polymerization temperature of 0°C. A four-point probe measurement conducted at 75–300K indicated relatively high conductivity of the semiconductor characteristic of the polyaniline.

  3. New technique to take samples from environmental surfaces using flocked nylon swabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedin, G; Rynbäck, J; Loré, B

    2010-08-01

    Environmental surfaces near infected and/or colonised patients in hospitals are commonly contaminated with potentially pathogenic micro-organisms. At present, however, there is no standardised method for taking samples from surfaces in order to perform quantitative cultures. Usually contact plates or swabs are used, but these methods may give different results. The recovery rate of traditional swabbing, e.g. cotton or rayon, is poor. With a new type of swab utilising flocked nylon, the recovery may be enhanced up to three times compared with a rayon swab. In this study, we inoculated reference strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus hirae onto a bedside table and took samples 1h later when inocula were dry. Sequential samples were taken from the same surface. A new sampling technique using two sequential nylon swabs for each sample was validated. The efficiency of the sampling, percentage recovery of the inoculum and the variation of culture results obtained from repeated experiments are described. Enhanced efficiency and higher recovery of inoculum were demonstrated using two sequential flocked nylon swabs for sampling. Copyright 2010 The Hospital Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Multivariate statistical techniques for the evaluation of surface water quality of the Himalayan foothills streams, Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Riffat Naseem; Hashmi, Muhammad Zaffar

    2017-10-01

    Himalayan foothills streams, Pakistan play an important role in living water supply and irrigation of farmlands; thus, the water quality is closely related to public health. Multivariate techniques were applied to check spatial and seasonal trends, and metals contamination sources of the Himalayan foothills streams, Pakistan. Grab surface water samples were collected from different sites (5-15 cm water depth) in pre-washed polyethylene containers. Fast Sequential Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (Varian FSAA-240) was used to measure the metals concentration. Concentrations of Ni, Cu, and Mn were high in pre-monsoon season than the post-monsoon season. Cluster analysis identified impaired, moderately impaired and least impaired clusters based on water parameters. Discriminant function analysis indicated spatial variability in water was due to temperature, electrical conductivity, nitrates, iron and lead whereas seasonal variations were correlated with 16 physicochemical parameters. Factor analysis identified municipal and poultry waste, automobile activities, surface runoff, and soil weathering as major sources of contamination. Levels of Mn, Cr, Fe, Pb, Cd, Zn and alkalinity were above the WHO and USEPA standards for surface water. The results of present study will help to higher authorities for the management of the Himalayan foothills streams.

  5. Analysis of corrosion layers in ancient Roman silver coins with high resolution surface spectroscopic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keturakis, Christopher J.; Notis, Ben; Blenheim, Alex; Miller, Alfred C.; Pafchek, Rob; Notis, Michael R.; Wachs, Israel E.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Five ancient silver alloy coins (225 BCE–244 CE) were analyzed using surface characterization techniques. • Both destructive and non-destructive surface characterization methods were developed. • Alloying with copper, even in small amounts, leads to the formation of an outer Cu 2 O corrosion layer. - Abstract: Determination of the microchemistry of surface corrosion layers on ancient silver alloy coins is important both in terms of understanding the nature of archaeological environmental conditions to which these ancient coins were exposed and also to help in their conservation. In this present study, five ancient silver alloy coins (225 BCE–244 CE) were used as test vehicles to measure their immediate surface microchemistry and evaluate the appropriateness and limitations of High Sensitivity-Low Energy Ion Scattering Spectroscopy (HS-LEIS, 0.3 nm depth analysis), High Resolution-X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (HR-XPS, 1–3 nm depth analysis) and High Resolution-Raman Spectroscopy (HR-Raman, ∼1000 nm depth analysis). Additional information about the deeper corrosion layers, up to ∼300–1000 nm, was provided by dynamic HS-LEIS and HR-Raman spectroscopy. While not archeologically significant, the use of these coins of small commercial value provides data that is more representative of the weaker signals typically obtained from ancient corroded objects, which can be in stark contrast to pristine data often obtained from carefully prepared alloys of known composition. The oldest coins, from 225 to 214 BCE, possessed an outermost surface layer containing Cu 2 O, Na, Al, Pb, and adsorbed hydrocarbons, while the more recent coins, from 98 to 244 CE, contained Cu 2 O, Ag, N, F, Na, Al, S, Cl, and adsorbed hydrocarbons in similar corresponding surface layers. It thus appears that alloying with copper, even in small amounts, leads to the formation of an outer Cu 2 O layer. Depth profiling revealed the presence of K, Na, Cl, and S as key

  6. A field comparison of multiple techniques to quantify groundwater - surface-water interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Pinzón, Ricardo; Ward, Adam S; Hatch, Christine E; Wlostowski, Adam N; Singha, Kamini; Gooseff, Michael N.; Haggerty, Roy; Harvey, Judson; Cirpka, Olaf A; Brock, James T

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater–surface-water (GW-SW) interactions in streams are difficult to quantify because of heterogeneity in hydraulic and reactive processes across a range of spatial and temporal scales. The challenge of quantifying these interactions has led to the development of several techniques, from centimeter-scale probes to whole-system tracers, including chemical, thermal, and electrical methods. We co-applied conservative and smart reactive solute-tracer tests, measurement of hydraulic heads, distributed temperature sensing, vertical profiles of solute tracer and temperature in the stream bed, and electrical resistivity imaging in a 450-m reach of a 3rd-order stream. GW-SW interactions were not spatially expansive, but were high in flux through a shallow hyporheic zone surrounding the reach. NaCl and resazurin tracers suggested different surface–subsurface exchange patterns in the upper ⅔ and lower ⅓ of the reach. Subsurface sampling of tracers and vertical thermal profiles quantified relatively high fluxes through a 10- to 20-cm deep hyporheic zone with chemical reactivity of the resazurin tracer indicated at 3-, 6-, and 9-cm sampling depths. Monitoring of hydraulic gradients along transects with MINIPOINT streambed samplers starting ∼40 m from the stream indicated that groundwater discharge prevented development of a larger hyporheic zone, which progressively decreased from the stream thalweg toward the banks. Distributed temperature sensing did not detect extensive inflow of ground water to the stream, and electrical resistivity imaging showed limited large-scale hyporheic exchange. We recommend choosing technique(s) based on: 1) clear definition of the questions to be addressed (physical, biological, or chemical processes), 2) explicit identification of the spatial and temporal scales to be covered and those required to provide an appropriate context for interpretation, and 3) maximizing generation of mechanistic understanding and reducing costs of

  7. Use of variance techniques to measure dry air-surface exchange rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesely, M. L.

    1988-07-01

    The variances of fluctuations of scalar quantities can be measured and interpreted to yield indirect estimates of their vertical fluxes in the atmospheric surface layer. Strong correlations among scalar fluctuations indicate a similarity of transfer mechanisms, which is utilized in some of the variance techniques. The ratios of the standard deviations of two scalar quantities, for example, can be used to estimate the flux of one if the flux of the other is measured, without knowledge of atmospheric stability. This is akin to a modified Bowen ratio approach. Other methods such as the normalized standard-deviation technique and the correlation-coefficient technique can be utilized effectively if atmospheric stability is evaluated and certain semi-empirical functions are known. In these cases, iterative calculations involving measured variances of fluctuations of temperature and vertical wind velocity can be used in place of direct flux measurements. For a chemical sensor whose output is contaminated by non-atmospheric noise, covariances with fluctuations of scalar quantities measured with a very good signal-to-noise ratio can be used to extract the needed standard deviation. Field measurements have shown that many of these approaches are successful for gases such as ozone and sulfur dioxide, as well as for temperature and water vapor, and could be extended to other trace substances. In humid areas, it appears that water vapor fluctuations often have a higher degree of correlation to fluctuations of other trace gases than do temperature fluctuations; this makes water vapor a more reliable companion or “reference” scalar. These techniques provide some reliable research approaches but, for routine or operational measurement, they are limited by the need for fast-response sensors. Also, all variance approaches require some independent means to estimate the direction of the flux.

  8. Amorphous silicon oxide layers for surface passivation and contacting of heterostructure solar cells of amorphous and crystalline silicon; Amorphe Siliziumoxidschichten zur Oberflaechenpassivierung und Kontaktierung von Heterostruktur-Solarzellen aus amorphen und kristallinem Silizium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einsele, Florian

    2010-02-05

    Atomic hydrogen plays a dominant role in the passivation of crystalline silicon surfaces by layers of amorphous silicon. In order to research into this role, this thesis presents the method of hydrogen effusion from thin amorphous films of silicon (a-Si:H) and silicon oxide (a-SiO{sub x}:H). The oxygen concentration of the sub-stoichiometric a-SiO{sub x}:H films ranges up to 10 at.-%. The effusion experiment yields information about the content and thermal stability of hydrogen and about the microstructure of the films. A mathematical description of the diffusion process of atomic hydrogen yields an analytical expression of the effusion rate R{sub E} depending on the linearly increasing temperature in the experiment. Fitting of the calculated effusion rates R{sub E} to measured effusion spectra yields the diffusion coefficient of atomic hydrogen in a-SiO{sub x}:H. With increasing oxygen concentration, the diffusion coefficient of hydrogen in the a-SiO{sub x}:H films decreases. This is attributed to an increasing Si-H bond energy due to back bonded oxygen, resulting in a higher stability of hydrogen in the films. This result is confirmed by an increasing thermal stability of the p-type c-Si passivation with a-SiO{sub x}:H of increasing oxygen concentrations up to 5 at.-%. The passivation reaches very low recombination velocities of S < 10 cm/s at the interface. However, for higher oxygen concentrations up to 10 at.-%, the passivation quality decreases significantly. Here, infrared spectroscopy of Si-H vibrational modes and hydrogen effusion show an increase of hydrogen-rich interconnected voids in the films. This microstructure results in a high amount of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) in the layers, which is not suitable for the saturation of c-Si interface defects. Annealing of the films at temperatures around 400 C leads to a release of H{sub 2} from the voids, as a result of which Si-Si bonds in the material reconstruct. Subsequently, hydrogen migration in the

  9. Passive Thermal Management of Foil Bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckner, Robert J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Systems and methods for passive thermal management of foil bearing systems are disclosed herein. The flow of the hydrodynamic film across the surface of bearing compliant foils may be disrupted to provide passive cooling and to improve the performance and reliability of the foil bearing system.

  10. An in vitro comparison of four surface preparation techniques for veneering a compomer to stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, F S; el-Mallakh, B F

    1997-01-01

    Compomers are a new class of materials reportedly having the anticariogenicity and the bonding ability to metals similar to glass ionomers while maintaining the high esthetic qualities of composite resins. The purpose of this study was to determine and evaluate the shear bond strength and fracture pattern of a compomer (Dyract) to stainless steel crowns (SSCs) using different mechanical and chemical retention procedures for possible future development of a chair-side technique of producing esthetic SSCs. Thirty-two Unitek SSCs, divided into four groups, were mounted in autopolymerizing acrylic resin so that the resulting specimen has the crown's flat lingual surface projecting above and parallel to the top surface of the acrylic resin block. Dyract was placed in transparent nylon cylinders (3 x 3 mm) and bonded to SSC's surfaces directly (group 1) or following sandblasting of the SSCs (group 2). In group 3, Dyract was bonded to stainless steel lingual cleats that were previously spot-welded to the SSCs. In group 4, Dyract was bonded to sandblasted SSC's surfaces using Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus dental adhesive. Specimens were placed in deionized water for 1 hr at 37 degrees C. Shear bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine. The mean (SD) shear bond strengths in MPa for groups 1-4 respectively were as follows: 2.998 (1.381), 9.518 (2.464), 13.909 (1.653), and 9.372 (3.723). One-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple range tests revealed a statistically significant difference between the groups (P mechanical means of retention that could be available in dental offices.

  11. A study on decontamination of TRU, Co, and Mo using plasma surface etching technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Y.D.; Kim, Y.S.; Paek, S.H.; Lee, K.H.; Jung, C.H.; Oh, W.Z.

    2001-01-01

    Recently dry decontamination/surface-cleaning technology using plasma etching has been focused in the nuclear industry. In this study, the applicability and the effectiveness of this new dry processing technique are experimentally investigated by examining the etching reaction of UO 2 , Co, and Mo in r.f. plasma with the etchant gas of CF 4 /O 2 mixture. UO 2 is chosen as a representing material for uranium and TRU (TRans-Uranic) compounds and metallic Co and Mo are selected because they are the principal contaminants in the spent nuclear components such as valves and pipes made of stainless steel or INCONEL. Results show that in all cases maximum etching rate is achieved when the mole fraction of O 2 to CF 4 /O 2 mixture gas is 20 %, regardless of temperature and r.f. power. (author)

  12. Sound speed measurements in tantalum using the front surface impact technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigg, P A; Scharff, R J; Hixson, R S

    2014-01-01

    Shock compression experiments were performed on tantalum to determine the longitudinal sound speed on the Hugoniot from 36 to 105 GPa. Tantalum samples were impacted directly on to lithium fluoride windows at velocities ranging from 2.5 to 5.0 km/s and the resulting particle velocity profiles at the sample/window interface were recorded using optical velocimetry techniques. The time of arrival of the rarefaction wave from the back surface of the tantalum sample was then used to determine the longitudinal sound speed at the corresponding impact stress. In contrast to recently reported work, we see no evidence of a phase transition in the tantalum in this stress range.

  13. Application of the rotating ring-disc-electrode technique to water oxidation by surface-bound molecular catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concepcion, Javier J; Binstead, Robert A; Alibabaei, Leila; Meyer, Thomas J

    2013-10-07

    We report here the application of a simple hydrodynamic technique, linear sweep voltammetry with a modified rotating-ring-disc electrode, for the study of water oxidation catalysis. With this technique, we have been able to reliably obtain turnover frequencies, overpotentials, Faradaic conversion efficiencies, and mechanistic information from single samples of surface-bound metal complex catalysts.

  14. An investigation of force, surface roughness and chip in surface grinding of SKD 11 tool steel using minimum quantity lubrication-MQL technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soepangkat, Bobby O. P.; Agustin, H. C. Kis; Subiyanto, H.

    2017-06-01

    This research aimed to analyze the viability of the minimum quantity of lubricant (MQL) technique towards normal force, tangential force, surface roughness and chip formation in surface grinding of SKD 11 tool steel. The three surface grinding parameters were varied including the type of cooling method (MQL and dry), table speed, and depth of cut. Based on statistical analysis, depth of cut is the most influential factor which affects the four responses in both dry and MQL grinding. MQL could reduce normal force and tangential force considerably, but produce higher surface roughness. In MQL grinding, the chips removal took place mostly by shearing and fracturing.

  15. Manufacturing Techniques and Surface Engineering of Polymer Based Nanoparticles for Targeted Drug Delivery to Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yichao Wang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of polymer based nanoparticles as a drug delivery carrier via pharmaceutical nano/microencapsulation has greatly promoted the development of nano- and micro-medicine in the past few decades. Poly(lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA and chitosan, which are biodegradable and biocompatible polymers, have been approved by both the Food & Drug Administration (FDA and European Medicine Agency (EMA, making them ideal biomaterials that can be advanced from laboratory development to clinical oral and parental administrations. PLGA and chitosan encapsulated nanoparticles (NPs have successfully been developed as new oral drug delivery systems with demonstrated high efficacy. This review aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the fabrication of PLGA and chitosan particulate systems using nano/microencapsulation methods, the current progress and the future outlooks of the nanoparticulate drug delivery systems. Especially, we focus on the formulations and nano/micro-encapsulation techniques using top-down techniques. It also addresses how the different phases including the organic and aqueous ones in the emulsion system interact with each other and subsequently influence the properties of the drug delivery system. Besides, surface modification strategies which can effectively engineer intrinsic physicochemical properties are summarised. Finally, future perspectives and potential directions of PLGA and chitosan nano/microencapsulated drug systems are outlined.

  16. Adaptive noise cancelling and time-frequency techniques for rail surface defect detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, B.; Iwnicki, S.; Ball, A.; Young, A. E.

    2015-03-01

    Adaptive noise cancelling (ANC) is a technique which is very effective to remove additive noises from the contaminated signals. It has been widely used in the fields of telecommunication, radar and sonar signal processing. However it was seldom used for the surveillance and diagnosis of mechanical systems before late of 1990s. As a promising technique it has gradually been exploited for the purpose of condition monitoring and fault diagnosis. Time-frequency analysis is another useful tool for condition monitoring and fault diagnosis purpose as time-frequency analysis can keep both time and frequency information simultaneously. This paper presents an ANC and time-frequency application for railway wheel flat and rail surface defect detection. The experimental results from a scaled roller test rig show that this approach can significantly reduce unwanted interferences and extract the weak signals from strong background noises. The combination of ANC and time-frequency analysis may provide us one of useful tools for condition monitoring and fault diagnosis of railway vehicles.

  17. Surface deformation of active volcanic areas retrieved with the SBAS-DInSAR technique: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Zeni

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comprehensive overview of the surface deformation retrieval capability of the Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR algorithm, referred to as Small BAseline Subset (SBAS technique, in the context of active volcanic areas. In particular, after a brief description of the algorithm some experiments relevant to three selected case-study areas are presented. First, we concentrate on the application of the SBAS algorithm to a single-orbit scenario, thus considering a set of SAR data composed by images acquired on descending orbits by the European Remote Sensing (ERS radar sensors and relevant to the Long Valley caldera (eastern California area. Subsequently, we address th