WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface orbital availability

  1. Optimal selection of Orbital Replacement Unit on-orbit spares - A Space Station system availability model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwaab, Douglas G.

    1991-01-01

    A mathematical programing model is presented to optimize the selection of Orbital Replacement Unit on-orbit spares for the Space Station. The model maximizes system availability under the constraints of logistics resupply-cargo weight and volume allocations.

  2. MRI of the orbit with surface coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuther, G.; Requardt, H.; Siemens A.G., Erlangen

    1986-01-01

    MRI of the orbit is strongly improved by the use of surface coils due to a higher signal-to-noise ratio. Oblique views without moving the patient present the optic nerve in full length on one slice. First experience with a small number of cases demonstrates normal anatomy and lesions in detail only at T 1 -weighted pulse sequences. Losses in contrast variation and detail accuracy are caused by movements of the eyeballs. Edge artifacts due to chemical shifting impair the image quality. So far there are no pinters towards tissue-specific signal intensity behaviour. Procedure and most favourable parameters at 1 tesla are given. (orig.) [de

  3. Contamination of optical surfaces in Earth orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinser, Donald L.; Weller, Robert A.; Mendenhall, M. H.; Wiedlocher, D. E.; Nichols, R.; Tucker, D.; Whitaker, A.

    1992-01-01

    Glass and glass ceramic samples exposed to the low earth orbit environment for approximately 5.5 years on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) were found to display limited degradation in optical transmission. Commercial optical quality fused silica samples display decreases in transmission in the 200 to 400 nm wavelength region, and this degradation appears to be a consequence of surface contamination. The contamination, found only on internal surfaces of samples, was measured by medium energy backscattering spectrometry and found to be primarily carbon. Additional thin film contamination by a species with atomic mass near 64, which was present at the level of about 8 x 10 exp 14/sq. cm has not been identified. These observations are consistent with the interpretation that organic binders used in the black absorbing paint (Chem Glaze Z-306) inside the sample holding tray were concentrated in the vicinity of the samples and photolytically cracked by solar UV radiation. The resulting decomposition products were deposited on the interior sample surface and gave rise to the optical transmission loss. No detectable contamination was observed on the external or space exposed surface of the samples. No measurable damage was detected which could be attributed to the direct action of gamma or UV radiation on the glass samples. These results emphasize the need for special precautions in the preparation of spacecraft carrying precision optical components on long duration missions.

  4. Scalable Lunar Surface Networks and Adaptive Orbit Access, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Innovative network architecture, protocols, and algorithms are proposed for both lunar surface networks and orbit access networks. Firstly, an overlaying...

  5. Mechanisms available for cooling plants’ surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prokhorov Alexey Anatolievich

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The essay briefly touches upon the main mechanisms to cool down the plats’ surfaces that lead to condensation of atmospheric moisture; methods for experimental verification of these mechanisms are presented therein.

  6. Spin torque on the surface of graphene in the presence of spin orbit splitting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Chen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We study theoretically the spin transfer torque of a ferromagnetic layer coupled to (deposited onto a graphene surface in the presence of the Rashba spin orbit coupling (RSOC. We show that the RSOC induces an effective magnetic field, which will result in the spin precession of conduction electrons. We derive correspondingly the generalized Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG equation, which describes the precessional motion of local magnetization under the influence of the spin orbit effect. Our theoretical estimate indicates that the spin orbit spin torque may have significant effect on the magnetization dynamics of the ferromagnetic layer coupled to the graphene surface.

  7. Scalable Lunar Surface Networks and Adaptive Orbit Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xudong

    2015-01-01

    Teranovi Technologies, Inc., has developed innovative network architecture, protocols, and algorithms for both lunar surface and orbit access networks. A key component of the overall architecture is a medium access control (MAC) protocol that includes a novel mechanism of overlaying time division multiple access (TDMA) and carrier sense multiple access with collision avoidance (CSMA/CA), ensuring scalable throughput and quality of service. The new MAC protocol is compatible with legacy Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) 802.11 networks. Advanced features include efficiency power management, adaptive channel width adjustment, and error control capability. A hybrid routing protocol combines the advantages of ad hoc on-demand distance vector (AODV) routing and disruption/delay-tolerant network (DTN) routing. Performance is significantly better than AODV or DTN and will be particularly effective for wireless networks with intermittent links, such as lunar and planetary surface networks and orbit access networks.

  8. Orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Guochang

    2008-01-01

    This is the first book of the satellite era which describes orbit theory with analytical solutions of the second order with respect to all possible disturbances. Based on such theory, the algorithms of orbits determination are completely revolutionized.

  9. Laboratory investigations: Low Earth orbit environment chemistry with spacecraft surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Jon B.

    1990-01-01

    Long-term space operations that require exposure of material to the low earth orbit (LEO) environment must take into account the effects of this highly oxidative atmosphere on material properties and the possible contamination of the spacecraft surroundings. Ground-based laboratory experiments at Los Alamos using a newly developed hyperthermal atomic oxygen (AO) source have shown that not only are hydrocarbon based materials effected but that inorganic materials such as MoS2 are also oxidized and that thin protective coatings such as Al2O3 can be breached, producing oxidation of the underlying substrate material. Gas-phase reaction products, such as SO2 from oxidation of MoS2 and CO and CO2 from hydrocarbon materials, have been detected and have consequences in terms of spacecraft contamination. Energy loss through gas-surface collisions causing spacecraft drag has been measured for a few select surfaces and has been found to be highly dependent on the surface reactivity.

  10. Orbital

    OpenAIRE

    Yourshaw, Matthew Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Orbital is a virtual reality gaming experience designed to explore the use of traditional narrative structure to enhance immersion in virtual reality. The story structure of Orbital was developed based on the developmental steps of 'The Hero's Journey,' a narrative pattern identified by Joseph Campbell. Using this standard narrative pattern, Orbital is capable of immersing the player quickly and completely for the entirety of play time. MFA

  11. Acoustically Induced Microparticle Orbiting and Clustering on a Solid Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Fattah, A.; Tarimala, S.; Roberts, P. M.

    2008-12-01

    Behavior of colloidal particles in the bulk solution or at interfaces under the effect of high-frequency acoustics is critical to many seemingly different applications ranging from enhanced oil recovery to improved mixing in microfluidic channels and from accelerated contaminant extractions to surface cleaning, drug delivery and microelectronics. It can be detrimental or beneficial, depending on the application. In medical research, flow cytometry and microfluidics, for example, acoustically induced clustering of tracer particles and/or their sticking to the walls of channels, vessels, or tubes often becomes a problem. On the other hand, it can be tailored to enhance processes such as mixing in microfluidic devices, particle separation and sizing, and power generation microdevices. To better understand the underlying mechanisms, microscopic visualization experiments were performed in which polystyrene fluorescent (468/508 nm wavelength) microspheres with a mean diameter of 2.26-µm and density of 1.05 g/cm3, were suspended in either de-ionized water or a 0.1M NaCl solution. The freshly-prepared colloidal suspension was injected into a parallel-plate glass flow cell, which was subjected to high-frequency acoustics (200-500 kHz) through a piezoelectric transducer attached to one of the cell's outer walls. When the suspending medium is de-ionized water, acoustic stimulation of the cell at 313 kHz induced three distinct particle behaviors: 1) entrainment and bulk transport via wavelength-scale Rayleigh streaming, 2) transport via direct radiation forces to concentrate at nodal or anti-nodal planes, and 3) entrapment via boundary layer vorticular microstreaming resulting in mobile particles orbiting deposited particles. This latter phenomenon is intriguing. It occurs at specific frequencies and the shape of the orbits is determined by the applied frequency, whereas the rotation speed is proportional to the applied amplitude. At the higher ionic strength, on the other

  12. Orbitally-paced variations of water availability in the SE Asian Monsoon region following the Miocene Climate Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitmann, Emma O.; Ji, Shunchuan; Nie, Junsheng; Breecker, Daniel O.

    2017-09-01

    surface which are both influenced by precession-controlled 35°N summer insolation. We then use orbital configurations to predict lithology. Coincidence of obliquity minima (strong ASM) and 35°N summer insolation maxima (strong ASM) drives strong ASM and high PET, resulting in soil formation in an environment with relatively large seasonal changes in water availability. Coincidence of obliquity maxima (weak ASM) and 35°N summer insolation maxima (strong ASM) moderates the ASM, results in high PET, and thus drives overprinting of soils by capillary fringe carbonates above a deepened and relatively stable water table. Coincidence of obliquity and insolation minima also moderates the ASM but results in low PET and thus a high water table, which explains the previously documented occurrence of aquatic plants in this section. This context allows us to assign an orbital configuration to atmospheric pCO2 determined from the paleosols. Our best estimate of pCO2 during the times of intermediate ice volume is 475 + 650 / - 230 ppmV (median value with error reported as 84th-16th percentile values). Southern hemisphere control of ASM variability during the Middle Miocene may have resulted in larger orbital scale water availability variations compared with the Pleistocene.

  13. Scalable Lunar Surface Networks and Adaptive Orbit Access, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Based on our proposed innovations and accomplished work in Phase I, we will focus on developing the new MAC protocol and hybrid routing protocol for lunar surface...

  14. Tropical sea surface temperatures and the earth's orbital eccentricity cycles

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gupta, S.M.; Fernandes, A.A.; Mohan, R.

    The tropical oceanic warm pools are climatologically important regions because their sea surface temperatures (SSTs) are positively related to atmospheric greenhouse effect and the cumulonimbus-cirrus cloud anvil. Such a warm pool is also present...

  15. Mars Relays Satellite Orbit Design Considerations for Global Support of Robotic Surface Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastrup, Rolf; Cesarone, Robert; Cook, Richard; Knocke, Phillip; McOmber, Robert

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses orbit design considerations for Mars relay satellite (MRS)support of globally distributed robotic surface missions. The orbit results reported in this paper are derived from studies of MRS support for two types of Mars robotic surface missions: 1) the mars Environmental Survey (MESUR) mission, which in its current definition would deploy a global network of up to 16 small landers, and 2)a Small Mars Sample Return (SMSR) mission, which included four globally distributed landers, each with a return stage and one or two rovers, and up to four additional sets of lander/rover elements in an extended mission phase.

  16. Molecular orbital study of the chemisorption of carbon monoxide on a tungsten (100) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, T.H.; Rabalais, J.W.

    1978-01-01

    The adsorption energies of carbon monoxide chemisorbed at various sites on a tungsten (100) surface have been calculated by extended Hueckel molecular orbital theory (EHMO). The concept of a 'surface molecule' in which CO is bonded to an array of tungsten atoms Wsub(n) has been employed. Dissociative adsorption in which C occupies a four-fold, five-coordination site and O occupies either a four- or two-fold site has been found to be the most stable form for CO on a W surface. Stable one-fold and two-fold sites of molecularly adsorbed CO have also been found in which the CO group is normal to the surface plane and the C atom is nearest the surface. Adsorption energies and molecular orbitals for the stable molecularly and dissociatively adsorbed CO sites are compared with the experimental data on various types of adsorbed CO, i.e. virgin-, α-, and β-CO. Models are suggested for each of these adsorption types. The strongest bonding interactions occur between the CO 5sigma orbital and the totally symmetric 5d and 6s orbitals of the Wsub(n) cluster. Possible mechanisms for conversion of molecularly adsorbed CO to dissociatively adsorbed CO are proposed and the corresponding activation energies are estimated. (Auth.)

  17. Proto-jet configurations in RADs orbiting a Kerr SMBH: symmetries and limiting surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugliese, D.; Stuchlík, Z.

    2018-05-01

    Ringed accretion disks (RADs) are agglomerations of perfect-fluid tori orbiting around a single central attractor that could arise during complex matter inflows in active galactic nuclei. We focus our analysis to axi-symmetric accretion tori orbiting in the equatorial plane of a supermassive Kerr black hole; equilibrium configurations, possible instabilities, and evolutionary sequences of RADs were discussed in our previous works. In the present work we discuss special instabilities related to open equipotential surfaces governing the material funnels emerging at various regions of the RADs, being located between two or more individual toroidal configurations of the agglomerate. These open structures could be associated to proto-jets. Boundary limiting surfaces are highlighted, connecting the emergency of the jet-like instabilities with the black hole dimensionless spin. These instabilities are observationally significant for active galactic nuclei, being related to outflows of matter in jets emerging from more than one torus of RADs orbiting around supermassive black holes.

  18. Solar flux incident on an orbiting surface after reflection from a planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modest, M. F.

    1980-01-01

    Algorithms describing the solar radiation impinging on an infinitesimal surface after reflection from a gray and diffuse planet are derived. The following conditions apply: only radiation from the sunny half of the planet is taken into account; the radiation must fall on the top of the orbiting surface, and radiation must come from that part of the planet that can be seen from the orbiting body. A simple approximate formula is presented which displays excellent accuracy for all significant situations, with an error which is always less than 5% of the maximum possible reflected flux. Attention is also given to solar albedo flux on a surface directly facing the planet, the influence of solar position on albedo flux, and to solar albedo flux as a function of the surface-planet tilt angle.

  19. Observations of an aeolian landscape: From surface to orbit in Gale Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Mackenzie; Kocurek, Gary

    2016-12-01

    Landscapes derived solely from aeolian processes are rare on Earth because of the dominance of subaqueous processes. In contrast, aeolian-derived landscapes should typify Mars because of the absence of liquid water, the long exposure times of surfaces, and the presence of wind as the default geomorphic agent. Using the full range of available orbital and Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity images, wind-formed features in Gale Crater were cataloged and analyzed in order to characterize the aeolian landscape and to derive the evolution of the crater wind regime over time. Inferred wind directions show a dominance of regional northerly winds over geologic time-scales, but a dominance of topography-driven katabatic winds in modern times. Landscapes in Gale Crater show a preponderance of aeolian features at all spatial scales. Interpreted processes forming these features include first-cycle aeolian abrasion of bedrock, pervasive deflation, organization of available sand into bedforms, abundant cratering, and gravity-driven wasting, all of which occur over a background of slow physical weathering. The observed landscapes are proposed to represent a spectrum of progressive surface denudation from fractured bedrock, to retreating bedrock-capped mesas, to remnant hills capped by bedrock rubble, to desert pavement plains. This model of landscape evolution provides the mechanism by which northerly winds acting over ∼3 Ga excavated tens of thousands of cubic kilometers of material from the once sediment-filled crater, thus carving the intra-crater moat and exhuming Mount Sharp (Aeolis Mons). The current crater surface is relatively sand-starved, indicating that potential sediment deflation from the crater is greater than sediment production, and that most exhumation of Mount Sharp occurred in the ancient geologic past.

  20. UV SURFACE ENVIRONMENT OF EARTH-LIKE PLANETS ORBITING FGKM STARS THROUGH GEOLOGICAL EVOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rugheimer, S.; Sasselov, D. [Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden st., 02138 MA Cambridge (United States); Segura, A. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México (Mexico); Kaltenegger, L., E-mail: srugheimer@cfa.harvard.edu [Carl Sagan Institute, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2015-06-10

    The UV environment of a host star affects the photochemistry in the atmosphere, and ultimately the surface UV environment for terrestrial planets and therefore the conditions for the origin and evolution of life. We model the surface UV radiation environment for Earth-sized planets orbiting FGKM stars in the circumstellar Habitable Zone for Earth through its geological evolution. We explore four different types of atmospheres corresponding to an early-Earth atmosphere at 3.9 Gyr ago and three atmospheres covering the rise of oxygen to present-day levels at 2.0 Gyr ago, 0.8 Gyr ago, and modern Earth. In addition to calculating the UV flux on the surface of the planet, we model the biologically effective irradiance, using DNA damage as a proxy for biological damage. We find that a pre-biotic Earth (3.9 Gyr ago) orbiting an F0V star receives 6 times the biologically effective radiation as around the early Sun and 3520 times the modern Earth–Sun levels. A pre-biotic Earth orbiting GJ 581 (M3.5 V) receives 300 times less biologically effective radiation, about 2 times modern Earth–Sun levels. The UV fluxes calculated here provide a grid of model UV environments during the evolution of an Earth-like planet orbiting a range of stars. These models can be used as inputs into photo-biological experiments and for pre-biotic chemistry and early life evolution experiments.

  1. UV SURFACE ENVIRONMENT OF EARTH-LIKE PLANETS ORBITING FGKM STARS THROUGH GEOLOGICAL EVOLUTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rugheimer, S.; Sasselov, D.; Segura, A.; Kaltenegger, L.

    2015-01-01

    The UV environment of a host star affects the photochemistry in the atmosphere, and ultimately the surface UV environment for terrestrial planets and therefore the conditions for the origin and evolution of life. We model the surface UV radiation environment for Earth-sized planets orbiting FGKM stars in the circumstellar Habitable Zone for Earth through its geological evolution. We explore four different types of atmospheres corresponding to an early-Earth atmosphere at 3.9 Gyr ago and three atmospheres covering the rise of oxygen to present-day levels at 2.0 Gyr ago, 0.8 Gyr ago, and modern Earth. In addition to calculating the UV flux on the surface of the planet, we model the biologically effective irradiance, using DNA damage as a proxy for biological damage. We find that a pre-biotic Earth (3.9 Gyr ago) orbiting an F0V star receives 6 times the biologically effective radiation as around the early Sun and 3520 times the modern Earth–Sun levels. A pre-biotic Earth orbiting GJ 581 (M3.5 V) receives 300 times less biologically effective radiation, about 2 times modern Earth–Sun levels. The UV fluxes calculated here provide a grid of model UV environments during the evolution of an Earth-like planet orbiting a range of stars. These models can be used as inputs into photo-biological experiments and for pre-biotic chemistry and early life evolution experiments

  2. Tile Surface Thermocouple Measurement Challenges from the Orbiter Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Charles H.; Berger, Karen; Anderson, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Hypersonic entry flight testing motivated by efforts seeking to characterize boundary layer transition on the Space Shuttle Orbiters have identified challenges in our ability to acquire high quality quantitative surface temperature measurements versus time. Five missions near the end of the Space Shuttle Program implemented a tile surface protuberance as a boundary layer trip together with tile surface thermocouples to capture temperature measurements during entry. Similar engineering implementations of these measurements on Discovery and Endeavor demonstrated unexpected measurement voltage response during the high heating portion of the entry trajectory. An assessment has been performed to characterize possible causes of the issues experienced during STS-119, STS-128, STS-131, STS-133 and STS-134 as well as similar issues encountered during other orbiter entries.

  3. Dirac spin-orbit torques and charge pumping at the surface of topological insulators

    KAUST Repository

    Ndiaye, Papa Birame

    2017-07-07

    We address the nature of spin-orbit torques at the magnetic surfaces of topological insulators using the linear-response theory. We find that the so-called Dirac torques in such systems possess a different symmetry compared to their Rashba counterpart, as well as a high anisotropy as a function of the magnetization direction. In particular, the damping torque vanishes when the magnetization lies in the plane of the topological-insulator surface. We also show that the Onsager reciprocal of the spin-orbit torque, the charge pumping, induces an enhanced anisotropic damping. Via a macrospin model, we numerically demonstrate that these features have important consequences in terms of magnetization switching.

  4. Dirac spin-orbit torques and charge pumping at the surface of topological insulators

    KAUST Repository

    Ndiaye, Papa Birame; Akosa, Collins Ashu; Fischer, M. H.; Vaezi, A.; Kim, E.-A.; Manchon, Aurelien

    2017-01-01

    We address the nature of spin-orbit torques at the magnetic surfaces of topological insulators using the linear-response theory. We find that the so-called Dirac torques in such systems possess a different symmetry compared to their Rashba counterpart, as well as a high anisotropy as a function of the magnetization direction. In particular, the damping torque vanishes when the magnetization lies in the plane of the topological-insulator surface. We also show that the Onsager reciprocal of the spin-orbit torque, the charge pumping, induces an enhanced anisotropic damping. Via a macrospin model, we numerically demonstrate that these features have important consequences in terms of magnetization switching.

  5. Dirac spin-orbit torques and charge pumping at the surface of topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndiaye, Papa B.; Akosa, C. A.; Fischer, M. H.; Vaezi, A.; Kim, E.-A.; Manchon, A.

    2017-07-01

    We address the nature of spin-orbit torques at the magnetic surfaces of topological insulators using the linear-response theory. We find that the so-called Dirac torques in such systems possess a different symmetry compared to their Rashba counterpart, as well as a high anisotropy as a function of the magnetization direction. In particular, the damping torque vanishes when the magnetization lies in the plane of the topological-insulator surface. We also show that the Onsager reciprocal of the spin-orbit torque, the charge pumping, induces an enhanced anisotropic damping. Via a macrospin model, we numerically demonstrate that these features have important consequences in terms of magnetization switching.

  6. Theory of Covalent Adsorbate Frontier Orbital Energies on Functionalized Light-Absorbing Semiconductor Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Min; Doak, Peter; Tamblyn, Isaac; Neaton, Jeffrey B

    2013-05-16

    Functional hybrid interfaces between organic molecules and semiconductors are central to many emerging information and solar energy conversion technologies. Here we demonstrate a general, empirical parameter-free approach for computing and understanding frontier orbital energies - or redox levels - of a broad class of covalently bonded organic-semiconductor surfaces. We develop this framework in the context of specific density functional theory (DFT) and many-body perturbation theory calculations, within the GW approximation, of an exemplar interface, thiophene-functionalized silicon (111). Through detailed calculations taking into account structural and binding energetics of mixed-monolayers consisting of both covalently attached thiophene and hydrogen, chlorine, methyl, and other passivating groups, we quantify the impact of coverage, nonlocal polarization, and interface dipole effects on the alignment of the thiophene frontier orbital energies with the silicon band edges. For thiophene adsorbate frontier orbital energies, we observe significant corrections to standard DFT (∼1 eV), including large nonlocal electrostatic polarization effects (∼1.6 eV). Importantly, both results can be rationalized from knowledge of the electronic structure of the isolated thiophene molecule and silicon substrate systems. Silicon band edge energies are predicted to vary by more than 2.5 eV, while molecular orbital energies stay similar, with the different functional groups studied, suggesting the prospect of tuning energy alignment over a wide range for photoelectrochemistry and other applications.

  7. A new NH 3 orbital of the NH 3/Ni(110) surface observed by metastable quenching spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lihwa; Arias, Jose; Hanrahan, Ciaran; Martin, Richard M.; Metiu, Horia

    1986-01-01

    By using metastable quenching spectroscopy we have found a new NH 3 filled orbital (in the language of one electron theory) for NH 3/Ni(110), located at the Fermi level of the surface. The orbital is not observed when NH 3 is adsorbed on Ni(110), but it is detected for NH 3 adsorbed on polycrystalline Al.

  8. Examination of returned solar-max surfaces for impacting orbital debris and meteoroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, D. J.; Zook, H. A.; Potter, A. E.; Mckay, D. S.; Clanton, U. S.; Warren, J. L.; Watts, L. A.; Schultz, R. A.; Schramm, L. S.; Wentworth, S. J.

    1985-01-01

    Previous theoretical studies predicted that in certain regions of earth orbit, the man-made earth orbiting debris environment will soon exceed the interplanetary meteoroid environment for sizes smaller than 1 cm. The surfaces returned from the repaired Solar Max Mission (SMM) by STS 41-C on April 12, 1984, offered an excellent opportunity to examine both the debris and meteoroid environments. To date, approximately 0.7 sq. met. of the thermal insulation and 0.05 sq. met of the aluminum louvers have been mapped by optical microscope for crater diameters larger than 40 microns. Craters larger in diameter than about 100 microns found on the initial 75 micron thick Kapton first sheet on the MEB (Main Electronics Box) blanket are actually holes and constitute perforations through that blanket. The following populations have been found to date in impact sites on these blankets: (1) meteoritic material; (2) thermal paint particles; (3) aluminum droplets; and (4) waste particles.

  9. Influence of radiant energy exchange on the determination of convective heat transfer rates to Orbiter leeside surfaces during entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Throckmorton, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    Temperatures measured at the aerodynamic surface of the Orbiter's thermal protection system (TPS), and calorimeter measurements, are used to determine heating rates to the TPS surface during atmospheric entry. On the Orbiter leeside, where convective heating rates are low, it is possible that a significant portion of the total energy input may result from solar radiation, and for the wing, cross radiation from the hot (relatively) Orbiter fuselage. In order to account for the potential impact of these sources, values of solar- and cross-radiation heat transfer are computed, based upon vehicle trajectory and attitude information and measured surface temperatures. Leeside heat-transfer data from the STS-2 mission are presented, and the significance of solar radiation and fuselage-to-wing cross-radiation contributions to total energy input to Orbiter leeside surfaces is assessed.

  10. An orbital-overlap model for minimal work functions of cesiated metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, Sharon H; Bargatin, Igor; Howe, Roger T; Voss, Johannes; Vojvodic, Aleksandra; Abild-Pedersen, Frank

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a model for the effect of cesium adsorbates on the work function of transition metal surfaces. The model builds on the classical point-dipole equation by adding exponential terms that characterize the degree of orbital overlap between the 6s states of neighboring cesium adsorbates and its effect on the strength and orientation of electric dipoles along the adsorbate-substrate interface. The new model improves upon earlier models in terms of agreement with the work function-coverage curves obtained via first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. All the cesiated metal surfaces have optimal coverages between 0.6 and 0.8 monolayers, in accordance with experimental data. Of all the cesiated metal surfaces that we have considered, tungsten has the lowest minimum work function, also in accordance with experiments.

  11. Automated 3D Damaged Cavity Model Builder for Lower Surface Acreage Tile on Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belknap, Shannon; Zhang, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The 3D Automated Thermal Tool for Damaged Acreage Tile Math Model builder was developed to perform quickly and accurately 3D thermal analyses on damaged lower surface acreage tiles and structures beneath the damaged locations on a Space Shuttle Orbiter. The 3D model builder created both TRASYS geometric math models (GMMs) and SINDA thermal math models (TMMs) to simulate an idealized damaged cavity in the damaged tile(s). The GMMs are processed in TRASYS to generate radiation conductors between the surfaces in the cavity. The radiation conductors are inserted into the TMMs, which are processed in SINDA to generate temperature histories for all of the nodes on each layer of the TMM. The invention allows a thermal analyst to create quickly and accurately a 3D model of a damaged lower surface tile on the orbiter. The 3D model builder can generate a GMM and the correspond ing TMM in one or two minutes, with the damaged cavity included in the tile material. A separate program creates a configuration file, which would take a couple of minutes to edit. This configuration file is read by the model builder program to determine the location of the damage, the correct tile type, tile thickness, structure thickness, and SIP thickness of the damage, so that the model builder program can build an accurate model at the specified location. Once the models are built, they are processed by the TRASYS and SINDA.

  12. The Topography of Mars: Understanding the Surface of Mars Through the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derby, C. A.; Neumann, G. A.; Sakimoto, S. E.

    2001-12-01

    The Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter has been orbiting Mars since 1997 and has measured the topography of Mars with a meter of vertical accuracy. This new information has improved our understanding of both the surface and the interior of Mars. The topographic globe and the labeled topographic map of Mars illustrate these new data in a format that can be used in a classroom setting. The map is color shaded to show differences in elevation on Mars, presenting Mars with a different perspective than traditional geological and geographic maps. Through the differences in color, students can see Mars as a three-dimensional surface and will be able to recognize features that are invisible in imagery. The accompanying lesson plans are designed for middle school science students and can be used both to teach information about Mars as a planet and Mars in comparison to Earth, fitting both the solar system unit and the Earth science unit in a middle school curriculum. The lessons are referenced to the National Benchmark standards for students in grades 6-8 and cover topics such as Mars exploration, the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter, resolution and powers of 10, gravity, craters, seismic waves and the interior structure of a planet, isostasy, and volcanoes. Each lesson is written in the 5 E format and includes a student content activity and an extension showing current applications of Mars and MOLA data. These activities can be found at http://ltpwww.gsfc.nasa.gov/education/resources.html. Funding for this project was provided by the Maryland Space Grant Consortium and the MOLA Science Team, Goddard Space Flight Center.

  13. Automatic Detection of Changes on Mars Surface from High-Resolution Orbital Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidiropoulos, Panagiotis; Muller, Jan-Peter

    2017-04-01

    Over the last 40 years Mars has been extensively mapped by several NASA and ESA orbital missions, generating a large image dataset comprised of approximately 500,000 high-resolution images (of citizen science can be employed for training and verification it is unsuitable for planetwide systematic change detection. In this work, we introduce a novel approach in planetary image change detection, which involves a batch-mode automatic change detection pipeline that identifies regions that have changed. This is tested in anger, on tens of thousands of high-resolution images over the MC11 quadrangle [5], acquired by CTX, HRSC, THEMIS-VIS and MOC-NA instruments [1]. We will present results which indicate a substantial level of activity in this region of Mars, including instances of dynamic natural phenomena that haven't been cataloged in the planetary science literature before. We will demonstrate the potential and usefulness of such an automatic approach in planetary science change detection. Acknowledgments: The research leading to these results has received funding from the STFC "MSSL Consolidated Grant" ST/K000977/1 and partial support from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under iMars grant agreement n° 607379. References: [1] P. Sidiropoulos and J. - P. Muller (2015) On the status of orbital high-resolution repeat imaging of Mars for the observation of dynamic surface processes. Planetary and Space Science, 117: 207-222. [2] O. Aharonson, et al. (2003) Slope streak formation and dust deposition rates on Mars. Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets, 108(E12):5138 [3] A. McEwen, et al. (2011) Seasonal flows on warm martian slopes. Science, 333 (6043): 740-743. [4] S. Byrne, et al. (2009) Distribution of mid-latitude ground ice on mars from new impact craters. Science, 325(5948):1674-1676. [5] K. Gwinner, et al (2016) The High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) of Mars Express and its approach to science analysis and mapping for Mars and

  14. Fermi Surface of Sr_{2}RuO_{4}: Spin-Orbit and Anisotropic Coulomb Interaction Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guoren; Gorelov, Evgeny; Sarvestani, Esmaeel; Pavarini, Eva

    2016-03-11

    The topology of the Fermi surface of Sr_{2}RuO_{4} is well described by local-density approximation calculations with spin-orbit interaction, but the relative size of its different sheets is not. By accounting for many-body effects via dynamical mean-field theory, we show that the standard isotropic Coulomb interaction alone worsens or does not correct this discrepancy. In order to reproduce experiments, it is essential to account for the Coulomb anisotropy. The latter is small but has strong effects; it competes with the Coulomb-enhanced spin-orbit coupling and the isotropic Coulomb term in determining the Fermi surface shape. Its effects are likely sizable in other correlated multiorbital systems. In addition, we find that the low-energy self-energy matrix-responsible for the reshaping of the Fermi surface-sizably differs from the static Hartree-Fock limit. Finally, we find a strong spin-orbital entanglement; this supports the view that the conventional description of Cooper pairs via factorized spin and orbital part might not apply to Sr_{2}RuO_{4}.

  15. Orbit Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoliy Klimyk

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, properties of orbit functions are reviewed and further developed. Orbit functions on the Euclidean space E_n are symmetrized exponential functions. The symmetrization is fulfilled by a Weyl group corresponding to a Coxeter-Dynkin diagram. Properties of such functions will be described. An orbit function is the contribution to an irreducible character of a compact semisimple Lie group G of rank n from one of its Weyl group orbits. It is shown that values of orbit functions are repeated on copies of the fundamental domain F of the affine Weyl group (determined by the initial Weyl group in the entire Euclidean space E_n. Orbit functions are solutions of the corresponding Laplace equation in E_n, satisfying the Neumann condition on the boundary of F. Orbit functions determine a symmetrized Fourier transform and a transform on a finite set of points.

  16. Land Surface Temperature- Comparing Data from Polar Orbiting and Geostationary Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comyn-Platt, E.; Remedios, J. J.; Good, E. J.; Ghent, D.; Saunders, R.

    2012-04-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) is a vital parameter in Earth climate science, driving long-wave radiation exchanges that control the surface energy budget and carbon fluxes, which are important factors in Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) and the monitoring of climate change. Satellites offer a convenient way to observe LST consistently and regularly over large areas. A comparison between LST retrieved from a Geostationary Instrument, the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI), and a Polar Orbiting Instrument, the Advanced Along Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR) is presented. Both sensors offer differing benefits. AATSR offers superior precision and spatial resolution with global coverage but given its sun-synchronous platform only observes at two local times, ~10am and ~10pm. SEVIRI provides the high-temporal resolution (every 15 minutes) required for observing diurnal variability of surface temperatures but given its geostationary platform has a poorer resolution, 3km at nadir, which declines at higher latitudes. A number of retrieval methods are applied to the raw satellite data: First order coefficient based algorithms provided on an operational basis by the LandSAF (for SEVIRI) and the University of Leicester (for AATSR); Second order coefficient based algorithms put forward by the University of Valencia; and an optimal estimation method using the 1DVar software provided by the NWP SAF. Optimal estimation is an iterative technique based upon inverse theory, thus is very useful for expanding into data assimilation systems. The retrievals are assessed and compared on both a fine scale using in-situ data from recognised validation sites and on a broad scale using two 100x100 regions such that biases can be better understood. Overall, the importance of LST lies in monitoring daily temperature extremes, e.g. for estimating permafrost thawing depth or risk of crop damage due to frost, hence the ideal dataset would use a combination of observations

  17. Estimation and Validation of Land Surface Temperatures from Chinese Second-Generation Polar-Orbit FY-3A VIRR Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Hui Tang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This work estimated and validated the land surface temperature (LST from thermal-infrared Channels 4 (10.8 µm and 5 (12.0 µm of the Visible and Infrared Radiometer (VIRR onboard the second-generation Chinese polar-orbiting FengYun-3A (FY-3A meteorological satellite. The LST, mean emissivity and atmospheric water vapor content (WVC were divided into several tractable sub-ranges with little overlap to improve the fitting accuracy. The experimental results showed that the root mean square errors (RMSEs were proportional to the viewing zenith angles (VZAs and WVC. The RMSEs were below 1.0 K for VZA sub-ranges less than 30° or for VZA sub-ranges less than 60° and WVC less than 3.5 g/cm2, provided that the land surface emissivities were known. A preliminary validation using independently simulated data showed that the estimated LSTs were quite consistent with the actual inputs, with a maximum RMSE below 1 K for all VZAs. An inter-comparison using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS-derived LST product MOD11_L2 showed that the minimum RMSE was 1.68 K for grass, and the maximum RMSE was 3.59 K for barren or sparsely vegetated surfaces. In situ measurements at the Hailar field site in northeastern China from October, 2013, to September, 2014, were used to validate the proposed method. The result showed that the RMSE between the LSTs calculated from the ground measurements and derived from the VIRR data was 1.82 K.

  18. Ocean Surface Topography Mission (OSTM) /Jason-2: Orbital Information (NODC Accession 0044985)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains the descriptions for the OSTM/Jason-2 orbital information, which is served through the NOAA/NESDIS Comprehensive Large Array-data Stewardship...

  19. On-Orbit Planetary Science Laboratories for Simulating Surface Conditions of Planets and Small Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangavelautham, J.; Asphaug, E.; Schwartz, S.

    2017-02-01

    Our work has identified the use of on-orbit centrifuge science laboratories as a key enabler towards low-cost, fast-track physical simulation of off-world environments for future planetary science missions.

  20. Lessons learned from the development and manufacture of ceramic reusable surface insulation materials for the space shuttle orbiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banas, R. P.; Elgin, D. R.; Cordia, E. R.; Nickel, K. N.; Gzowski, E. R.; Aguiler, L.

    1983-01-01

    Three ceramic, reusable surface insulation materials and two borosilicate glass coatings were used in the fabrication of tiles for the Space Shuttle orbiters. Approximately 77,000 tiles were made from these materials for the first three orbiters, Columbia, Challenger, and Discovery. Lessons learned in the development, scale up to production and manufacturing phases of these materials will benefit future production of ceramic reusable surface insulation materials. Processing of raw materials into tile blanks and coating slurries; programming and machining of tiles using numerical controlled milling machines; preparing and spraying tiles with the two coatings; and controlling material shrinkage during the high temperature (2100-2275 F) coating glazing cycles are among the topics discussed.

  1. Reactivity of etoricoxib based on computational study of molecular orbitals, molecular electrostatic potential surface and Mulliken charge analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Ritika; Soni, Abhinav; Singh, V. P.; Saini, G. S. S.

    2018-05-01

    Etoricoxib is one of the selective cyclooxygenase inhibitor drug which plays a significant role in the pharmacological management of arthritis and pain. The theoretical investigation of its reactivity is done using Density Functional Theory calculations. Molecular Electrostatic Potential Surface of etoricoxib and its Mulliken atomic charge distribution are used for the prediction of its electrophilic and nucleophilic sites. The detailed analysis of its frontier molecular orbitals is also done.

  2. A Lookup-Table-Based Approach to Estimating Surface Solar Irradiance from Geostationary and Polar-Orbiting Satellite Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailong Zhang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Incoming surface solar irradiance (SSI is essential for calculating Earth’s surface radiation budget and is a key parameter for terrestrial ecological modeling and climate change research. Remote sensing images from geostationary and polar-orbiting satellites provide an opportunity for SSI estimation through directly retrieving atmospheric and land-surface parameters. This paper presents a new scheme for estimating SSI from the visible and infrared channels of geostationary meteorological and polar-orbiting satellite data. Aerosol optical thickness and cloud microphysical parameters were retrieved from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES system images by interpolating lookup tables of clear and cloudy skies, respectively. SSI was estimated using pre-calculated offline lookup tables with different atmospheric input data of clear and cloudy skies. The lookup tables were created via the comprehensive radiative transfer model, Santa Barbara Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer (SBDART, to balance computational efficiency and accuracy. The atmospheric attenuation effects considered in our approach were water vapor absorption and aerosol extinction for clear skies, while cloud parameters were the only atmospheric input for cloudy-sky SSI estimation. The approach was validated using one-year pyranometer measurements from seven stations in the SURFRAD (SURFace RADiation budget network. The results of the comparison for 2012 showed that the estimated SSI agreed with ground measurements with correlation coefficients of 0.94, 0.69, and 0.89 with a bias of 26.4 W/m2, −5.9 W/m2, and 14.9 W/m2 for clear-sky, cloudy-sky, and all-sky conditions, respectively. The overall root mean square error (RMSE of instantaneous SSI was 80.0 W/m2 (16.8%, 127.6 W/m2 (55.1%, and 99.5 W/m2 (25.5% for clear-sky, cloudy-sky (overcast sky and partly cloudy sky, and all-sky (clear-sky and cloudy-sky conditions, respectively. A comparison with other state

  3. Spin-orbit torque in 3D topological insulator-ferromagnet heterostructure: crossover between bulk and surface transport

    KAUST Repository

    Ghosh, Sumit; Manchon, Aurelien

    2017-01-01

    Current-driven spin-orbit torques are investigated in a heterostructure composed of a ferromagnet deposited on top of a three dimensional topological insulator using the linear response formalism. We develop a tight-binding model of the heterostructure adopting a minimal interfacial hybridization scheme that promotes induced magnetic exchange on the topological surface states, as well as induced Rashba-like spin-orbit coupling in the ferromagnet. Therefore, our model accounts for spin Hall effect from bulk states together with inverse spin galvanic and magnetoelectric effects at the interface on equal footing. By varying the transport energy across the band structure, we uncover a crossover from surface-dominated to bulk-dominated transport regimes. We show that the spin density profile and the nature of the spin-orbit torques differ substantially in both regimes. Our results, which compare favorably with experimental observations, demonstrate that the large damping torque reported recently is more likely attributed to interfacial magnetoelectric effect, while spin Hall torque remains small even in the bulk-dominated regime.

  4. Spin-orbit torque in a three-dimensional topological insulator–ferromagnet heterostructure: Crossover between bulk and surface transport

    KAUST Repository

    Ghosh, Sumit; Manchon, Aurelien

    2018-01-01

    Current-driven spin-orbit torques are investigated in a heterostructure composed of a ferromagnet deposited on top of a three-dimensional topological insulator using the linear response formalism. We develop a tight-binding model of the heterostructure adopting a minimal interfacial hybridization scheme that promotes induced magnetic exchange on the topological surface states, as well as induced Rashba-like spin-orbit coupling in the ferromagnet. Therefore our model accounts for the spin Hall effect from bulk states together with inverse spin galvanic and magnetoelectric effects at the interface on equal footing. By varying the transport energy across the band structure, we uncover a crossover from surface-dominated to bulk-dominated transport regimes. We show that the spin density profile and the nature of the spin-orbit torques differ substantially in both regimes. Our results, which compare favorably with experimental observations, demonstrate that the large dampinglike torque reported recently is more likely attributed to the Berry curvature of interfacial states, while spin Hall torque remains small even in the bulk-dominated regime.

  5. Spin-orbit torque in 3D topological insulator-ferromagnet heterostructure: crossover between bulk and surface transport

    KAUST Repository

    Ghosh, Sumit

    2017-11-29

    Current-driven spin-orbit torques are investigated in a heterostructure composed of a ferromagnet deposited on top of a three dimensional topological insulator using the linear response formalism. We develop a tight-binding model of the heterostructure adopting a minimal interfacial hybridization scheme that promotes induced magnetic exchange on the topological surface states, as well as induced Rashba-like spin-orbit coupling in the ferromagnet. Therefore, our model accounts for spin Hall effect from bulk states together with inverse spin galvanic and magnetoelectric effects at the interface on equal footing. By varying the transport energy across the band structure, we uncover a crossover from surface-dominated to bulk-dominated transport regimes. We show that the spin density profile and the nature of the spin-orbit torques differ substantially in both regimes. Our results, which compare favorably with experimental observations, demonstrate that the large damping torque reported recently is more likely attributed to interfacial magnetoelectric effect, while spin Hall torque remains small even in the bulk-dominated regime.

  6. Spin-orbit torque in a three-dimensional topological insulator–ferromagnet heterostructure: Crossover between bulk and surface transport

    KAUST Repository

    Ghosh, Sumit

    2018-04-02

    Current-driven spin-orbit torques are investigated in a heterostructure composed of a ferromagnet deposited on top of a three-dimensional topological insulator using the linear response formalism. We develop a tight-binding model of the heterostructure adopting a minimal interfacial hybridization scheme that promotes induced magnetic exchange on the topological surface states, as well as induced Rashba-like spin-orbit coupling in the ferromagnet. Therefore our model accounts for the spin Hall effect from bulk states together with inverse spin galvanic and magnetoelectric effects at the interface on equal footing. By varying the transport energy across the band structure, we uncover a crossover from surface-dominated to bulk-dominated transport regimes. We show that the spin density profile and the nature of the spin-orbit torques differ substantially in both regimes. Our results, which compare favorably with experimental observations, demonstrate that the large dampinglike torque reported recently is more likely attributed to the Berry curvature of interfacial states, while spin Hall torque remains small even in the bulk-dominated regime.

  7. ORBITAL INJURIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Kansky

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Orbit is involved in 40% of all facial fractures. There is considerable variety in severity, ranging from simple nondisplaced to complex comminuted fractures. Complex comminuted fractures (up to 20% are responsible for the majority of complications and unfavorable results. Orbital fractures are classified as internal orbital fractures, zygomatico-orbital fractures, naso-orbito-ethmoidal fractures and combined fractures. The ophtalmic sequelae of midfacial fractures are usually edema and ecchymosis of the soft tissues, subconjuctival hemorrhage, diplopia, iritis, retinal edema, ptosis, enophthalmos, ocular muscle paresis, mechanical restriction of ocular movement and nasolacrimal disturbances. More severe injuries such as optic nerve trauma and retinal detachments have also been reported. Within the wide range of orbital fractures small group of complex fractures causes most of the sequelae. Therefore identification of severe injuries and adequate treatment is of major importance. The introduction of craniofacial techniques made possible a wide exposure even of large orbital wall defects and their reconstruction by bone grafts. In spite of significant progress, repair of complex orbital wall defects remains a problem even for the experienced surgeons.Results. In 1999 121 facial injuries were treated at our department (Clinical Centre Ljubljana Dept. Of Maxillofacial and Oral Surgery. Orbit was involved in 65% of cases. Isolated inner orbital fractures presented 4% of all fractures. 17 (14% complex cases were treated, 5 of them being NOE, 5 orbital (frame and inner walls, 3 zygomatico-orbital, 2 FNO and 2 maxillo-orbital fractures.Conclusions. Final result of the surgical treatment depends on severity of maxillofacial trauma. Complex comminuted fractures are responsable for most of the unfavorable results and ocular function is often permanently damaged (up to 75% in these fractures.

  8. The Colour and Stereo Surface Imaging System (CaSSIS) for the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, N.; Cremonese, G.; Ziethe, R.; Gerber, M.; Brändli, M.; Bruno, G.; Erismann, M.; Gambicorti, L.; Gerber, T.; Ghose, K.; Gruber, M.; Gubler, P.; Mischler, H.; Jost, J.; Piazza, D.; Pommerol, A.; Rieder, M.; Roloff, V.; Servonet, A.; Trottmann, W.; Uthaicharoenpong, T.; Zimmermann, C.; Vernani, D.; Johnson, M.; Pelò, E.; Weigel, T.; Viertl, J.; De Roux, N.; Lochmatter, P.; Sutter, G.; Casciello, A.; Hausner, T.; Ficai Veltroni, I.; Da Deppo, V.; Orleanski, P.; Nowosielski, W.; Zawistowski, T.; Szalai, S.; Sodor, B.; Tulyakov, S.; Troznai, G.; Banaskiewicz, M.; Bridges, J.C.; Byrne, S.; Debei, S.; El-Maarry, M. R.; Hauber, E.; Hansen, C.J.; Ivanov, A.; Keszthelyil, L.; Kirk, Randolph L.; Kuzmin, R.; Mangold, N.; Marinangeli, L.; Markiewicz, W. J.; Massironi, M.; McEwen, A.S.; Okubo, Chris H.; Tornabene, L.L.; Wajer, P.; Wray, J.J.

    2017-01-01

    The Colour and Stereo Surface Imaging System (CaSSIS) is the main imaging system onboard the European Space Agency’s ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO) which was launched on 14 March 2016. CaSSIS is intended to acquire moderately high resolution (4.6 m/pixel) targeted images of Mars at a rate of 10–20 images per day from a roughly circular orbit 400 km above the surface. Each image can be acquired in up to four colours and stereo capability is foreseen by the use of a novel rotation mechanism. A typical product from one image acquisition will be a 9.5 km×∼45 km">9.5 km×∼45 km9.5 km×∼45 km swath in full colour and stereo in one over-flight of the target thereby reducing atmospheric influences inherent in stereo and colour products from previous high resolution imagers. This paper describes the instrument including several novel technical solutions required to achieve the scientific requirements.

  9. Ocean Surface Topography Mission (OSTM) /Jason-3: Orbital Information, 2015- (NODC Accession 0122598)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Jason-3 is the fourth mission in U.S.-European series of satellite missions that measure the height of the ocean surface. Scheduled to launch in 2015, the mission...

  10. The Fermi surface of Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4}: spin-orbit and anisotropic Coulomb interaction effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guoren; Gorelov, Evgeny; Sarvestani, Esmaeel; Pavarini, Eva [Institute for Advanced Simulation, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The topology of the Fermi surface of Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} is well described by local density approximation calculations with spin-orbit interaction, but the relative size of its different sheets is not. By accounting for many-body effects via dynamical mean-field theory, we show that the standard isotropic Coulomb interaction worsen or does not correct this discrepancy. In order to reproduce experiments, it is essential to include the Coulomb anisotropy. The latter is small but has strong effects; it competes with the Coulomb-enhanced spin-orbit coupling and with the isotropic Coulomb term. This mechanism is likely to be at work in other multi-orbital systems. Finally, we find a strong spin-orbital entanglement. This supports the view that the conventional description of Cooper pairs via factorized spin and orbital part might not apply to Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4}.

  11. Biofilm formation in geometries with different surface curvature and oxygen availability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Ya-Wen; Fragkopoulos, Alexandros A; Kim, Harold D; Fernández-Nieves, Alberto; Marquez, Samantha M; Angelini, Thomas E

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria in the natural environment exist as interface-associated colonies known as biofilms . Complex mechanisms are often involved in biofilm formation and development. Despite the understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in biofilm formation, it remains unclear how physical effects in standing cultures influence biofilm development. The topology of the solid interface has been suggested as one of the physical cues influencing bacteria-surface interactions and biofilm development. Using the model organism Bacillus subtilis, we study the transformation of swimming bacteria in liquid culture into robust biofilms in a range of confinement geometries (planar, spherical and toroidal) and interfaces (air/water, silicone/water, and silicone elastomer/water). We find that B. subtilis form submerged biofilms at both solid and liquid interfaces in addition to air-water pellicles. When confined, bacteria grow on curved surfaces of both positive and negative Gaussian curvature. However, the confinement geometry does affect the resulting biofilm roughness and relative coverage. We also find that the biofilm location is governed by oxygen availability as well as by gravitational effects; these compete with each other in some situations. Overall, our results demonstrate that confinement geometry is an effective way to control oxygen availability and subsequently biofilm growth. (paper)

  12. MESSENGER, MErcury: Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging; A Mission to Orbit and Explore the Planet Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    MESSENGER is a scientific mission to Mercury. Understanding this extraordinary planet and the forces that have shaped it is fundamental to understanding the processes that have governed the formation, evolution, and dynamics of the terrestrial planets. MESSENGER is a MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging mission to orbit Mercury for one Earth year after completing two flybys of that planet following two flybys of Venus. The necessary flybys return significant new data early in the mission, while the orbital phase, guided by the flyby data, enables a focused scientific investigation of this least-studied terrestrial planet. Answers to key questions about Mercury's high density, crustal composition and structure, volcanic history, core structure, magnetic field generation, polar deposits, exosphere, overall volatile inventory, and magnetosphere are provided by an optimized set of miniaturized space instruments. Our goal is to gain new insight into the formation and evolution of the solar system, including Earth. By traveling to the inner edge of the solar system and exploring a poorly known world, MESSENGER fulfills this quest.

  13. Magnetic surfaces, particle orbits and neutral injection in conventional and ultimate torsatrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.T.; Derr, J.A.; Kruckewitt, T.; Shohet, J.L.; Rehker, S.; Tataronis, J.A.

    1979-01-01

    Capabilities in fully non-axisymmetric numerical methods have resulted in a parametric study of various conventional and ultimate torsatron configurations. No superbananas are found in torsatrons without local magnetic wells. Neutral injection calculations show that, if the vacuum magnetic surfaces are well defined, tangential injection is very efficient

  14. The stochastic distribution of available coefficient of friction for human locomotion of five different floor surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wen-Ruey; Matz, Simon; Chang, Chien-Chi

    2014-05-01

    The maximum coefficient of friction that can be supported at the shoe and floor interface without a slip is usually called the available coefficient of friction (ACOF) for human locomotion. The probability of a slip could be estimated using a statistical model by comparing the ACOF with the required coefficient of friction (RCOF), assuming that both coefficients have stochastic distributions. An investigation of the stochastic distributions of the ACOF of five different floor surfaces under dry, water and glycerol conditions is presented in this paper. One hundred friction measurements were performed on each floor surface under each surface condition. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov goodness-of-fit test was used to determine if the distribution of the ACOF was a good fit with the normal, log-normal and Weibull distributions. The results indicated that the ACOF distributions had a slightly better match with the normal and log-normal distributions than with the Weibull in only three out of 15 cases with a statistical significance. The results are far more complex than what had heretofore been published and different scenarios could emerge. Since the ACOF is compared with the RCOF for the estimate of slip probability, the distribution of the ACOF in seven cases could be considered a constant for this purpose when the ACOF is much lower or higher than the RCOF. A few cases could be represented by a normal distribution for practical reasons based on their skewness and kurtosis values without a statistical significance. No representation could be found in three cases out of 15. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  15. FOB-SH: Fragment orbital-based surface hopping for charge carrier transport in organic and biological molecules and materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, J.; Gajdos, F.; Blumberger, J.

    2016-08-01

    We introduce a fragment orbital-based fewest switches surface hopping method, FOB-SH, designed to efficiently simulate charge carrier transport in strongly fluctuating condensed phase systems such as organic semiconductors and biomolecules. The charge carrier wavefunction is expanded and the electronic Hamiltonian constructed in a set of singly occupied molecular orbitals of the molecular sites that mediate the charge transfer. Diagonal elements of the electronic Hamiltonian (site energies) are obtained from a force field, whereas the off-diagonal or electronic coupling matrix elements are obtained using our recently developed analytic overlap method. We derive a general expression for the exact forces on the adiabatic ground and excited electronic state surfaces from the nuclear gradients of the charge localized electronic states. Applications to electron hole transfer in a model ethylene dimer and through a chain of ten model ethylenes validate our implementation and demonstrate its computational efficiency. On the larger system, we calculate the qualitative behaviour of charge mobility with change in temperature T for different regimes of the intermolecular electronic coupling. For small couplings, FOB-SH predicts a crossover from a thermally activated regime at low temperatures to a band-like transport regime at higher temperatures. For higher electronic couplings, the thermally activated regime disappears and the mobility decreases according to a power law. This is interpreted by a gradual loss in probability for resonance between the sites as the temperature increases. The polaron hopping model solved for the same system gives a qualitatively different result and underestimates the mobility decay at higher temperatures. Taken together, the FOB-SH methodology introduced here shows promise for a realistic investigation of charge carrier transport in complex organic, aqueous, and biological systems.

  16. FOB-SH: Fragment orbital-based surface hopping for charge carrier transport in organic and biological molecules and materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, J.; Gajdos, F.; Blumberger, J., E-mail: j.blumberger@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-14

    We introduce a fragment orbital-based fewest switches surface hopping method, FOB-SH, designed to efficiently simulate charge carrier transport in strongly fluctuating condensed phase systems such as organic semiconductors and biomolecules. The charge carrier wavefunction is expanded and the electronic Hamiltonian constructed in a set of singly occupied molecular orbitals of the molecular sites that mediate the charge transfer. Diagonal elements of the electronic Hamiltonian (site energies) are obtained from a force field, whereas the off-diagonal or electronic coupling matrix elements are obtained using our recently developed analytic overlap method. We derive a general expression for the exact forces on the adiabatic ground and excited electronic state surfaces from the nuclear gradients of the charge localized electronic states. Applications to electron hole transfer in a model ethylene dimer and through a chain of ten model ethylenes validate our implementation and demonstrate its computational efficiency. On the larger system, we calculate the qualitative behaviour of charge mobility with change in temperature T for different regimes of the intermolecular electronic coupling. For small couplings, FOB-SH predicts a crossover from a thermally activated regime at low temperatures to a band-like transport regime at higher temperatures. For higher electronic couplings, the thermally activated regime disappears and the mobility decreases according to a power law. This is interpreted by a gradual loss in probability for resonance between the sites as the temperature increases. The polaron hopping model solved for the same system gives a qualitatively different result and underestimates the mobility decay at higher temperatures. Taken together, the FOB-SH methodology introduced here shows promise for a realistic investigation of charge carrier transport in complex organic, aqueous, and biological systems.

  17. Martian aeolian activity at the Bagnold Dunes, Gale Crater: The view from the surface and orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, N. T.; Sullivan, R.; Newman, C. E.; Navarro, S.; van Beek, J.; Ewing, R. C.; Ayoub, F.; Silvestro, S.; Gasnault, O.; Le Mouélic, S.; Lapotre, M. G. A.; Rapin, W.

    2017-10-01

    The first in situ investigation of an active dune field on another planetary surface occurred in 2015-2016 when the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover investigated the Bagnold Dunes on Mars. High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment images show clear seasonal variations that are in good agreement with atmospheric model predictions of intra-annual sand flux and migration directions that together indicate that the campaign occurred during a period of low wind activity. Curiosity surface images show that limited changes nevertheless occurred, with movement of large grains, particularly on freshly exposed surfaces, two occurrences of secondary grain flow on the slip face of Namib Dune, and a slump on a freshly exposed surface of a large ripple. These changes are seen at Martian solar day (sol)-to-sol time scales. Grains on a rippled sand deposit and unconsolidated dump piles show limited movement of large grains over a few hours during which mean friction speeds are estimated at 0.3-0.4 m s-1. Overall, the correlation between changes and peak Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) winds is moderate, with high wind events associated with changes in some cases, but not in others, suggesting that other factors are also at work. The distribution of REMS 1 Hz wind speeds shows a significant tail up to the current 20 m s-1 calibration limit, indicating that even higher speed winds occur. Nonaeolian triggering mechanisms are also possible. The low activity period at the dunes documented by Curiosity provides clues to processes that dominated in the Martian past under conditions of lower obliquity.

  18. High-resolution projections of surface water availability for Tasmania, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Bennett

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Changes to streamflows caused by climate change may have major impacts on the management of water for hydro-electricity generation and agriculture in Tasmania, Australia. We describe changes to Tasmanian surface water availability from 1961–1990 to 2070–2099 using high-resolution simulations. Six fine-scale (∼10 km2 simulations of daily rainfall and potential evapotranspiration are generated with the CSIRO Conformal Cubic Atmospheric Model (CCAM, a variable-resolution regional climate model (RCM. These variables are bias-corrected with quantile mapping and used as direct inputs to the hydrological models AWBM, IHACRES, Sacramento, SIMHYD and SMAR-G to project streamflows.

    The performance of the hydrological models is assessed against 86 streamflow gauges across Tasmania. The SIMHYD model is the least biased (median bias = −3% while IHACRES has the largest bias (median bias = −22%. We find the hydrological models that best simulate observed streamflows produce similar streamflow projections.

    There is much greater variation in projections between RCM simulations than between hydrological models. Marked decreases of up to 30% are projected for annual runoff in central Tasmania, while runoff is generally projected to increase in the east. Daily streamflow variability is projected to increase for most of Tasmania, consistent with increases in rainfall intensity. Inter-annual variability of streamflows is projected to increase across most of Tasmania.

    This is the first major Australian study to use high-resolution bias-corrected rainfall and potential evapotranspiration projections as direct inputs to hydrological models. Our study shows that these simulations are capable of producing realistic streamflows, allowing for increased confidence in assessing future changes to surface water variability.

  19. Sand Dune Dynamics on Mars: Integration of Surface Imaging, Wind Measurements, and Orbital Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, N.; Sullivan, R. J., Jr.; Ewing, R. C.; Newman, C. E.; Ayoub, F.; Lapotre, M. G. A.; van Beek, J.

    2016-12-01

    In early 2016, the Mars Science Laboratory rover completed the first in situ investigation of an active dune field on another planetary body, the "Bagnold Dunes" in Gale Crater. During the campaign, a series of Mastcam and RMI time-series images of local sand patches, dump piles, ripples, and the lee face and margin of Namib Dune (a barchan in the Bagnold field) were acquired. These were at cadences of a sol or more that were generally at nearly the same local time, and intra-sol imaging bridged by continuous wind measurements from REMS. The dune field has also been imaged 16 times by HiRISE since 2008. By combining the two datasets, long term dune dynamics over the whole field can be compared to small-scale and short-term observations on the surface. From HiRISE, Namib Dune and other barchans and longitudinal dunes to the south and west migrate generally toward the south to southeast. The most active sand deposits are the longitudinal and barchans dunes, with the highest ripple migration rates found on the highest elevations. Rippled sand patches exhibit little of no motion. From MSL, the scrambling of grains on the surfaces of local rippled sand patches and Namib Dune is obvious over periods as short as a single sol, with light-toned grains showing the greatest tendency. On the lee face of Namib, images show grain scrambling, one case of modification to a secondary grainflow, and possibly ripple motion over 3-16 sols. At the dune margin, grain scrambling and one major slump on the lee face of a dune ripple are seen. The daytime REMS record shows wind speeds up to 20 m/s with confidence. As yet, we do not have a demonstrable correlation between measured wind speeds and changes, suggesting that short term gusts or non-aeolian processes acting as triggers may precede significant activity. The changes, occurring in a low flux season based on HiRISE analysis and global circulation models, indicate an active surface at all times of the year to some degree.

  20. Visibility of lunar surface features - Apollo 14 orbital observations and lunar landing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziedman, K.

    1972-01-01

    Description of an in-flight visibility test conducted during the Apollo 14 mission for the purpose of validating and extending the mathematical visibility models used previously in the course of the Apollo program to examine the constraints on descent operations imposed by lunar visibility limitations. Following a background review of the effects on mission planning of the visibility limitations due to downsun lunar surface detail 'washout' and a discussion of the visibility prediction techniques previously used for studying lunar visibility problems, the visibility test rationale and procedures are defined and the test results presented. The results appear to confirm the validity of the visibility prediction techniques employed in lunar visibility problem studies. These results provide also a basis for improving the accuracy of the prediction techniques by appropriate modifications.

  1. Multi-spacecraft observations of ICMEs propagating beyond Earth orbit during MSL/RAD flight and surface phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Forstner, J.; Guo, J.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Hassler, D.; Temmer, M.; Vrsnak, B.; Čalogović, J.; Dumbovic, M.; Lohf, H.; Appel, J. K.; Heber, B.; Steigies, C. T.; Zeitlin, C.; Ehresmann, B.; Jian, L. K.; Boehm, E.; Boettcher, S. I.; Burmeister, S.; Martin-Garcia, C.; Brinza, D. E.; Posner, A.; Reitz, G.; Matthiae, D.; Rafkin, S. C.; weigle, G., II; Cucinotta, F.

    2017-12-01

    The propagation of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) between Earth's orbit (1 AU) and Mars ( 1.5 AU) has been studied with their propagation speed estimated from both measurements and simulations. The enhancement of the magnetic fields related to ICMEs and their shock fronts cause so-called Forbush decreases, which can be detected as a reduction of galactic cosmic rays measured on-ground or on a spacecraft. We have used galactic cosmic ray (GCR) data from in-situ measurements at Earth, from both STEREO A and B as well as the GCR measurement by the Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) instrument onboard Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) on the surface of Mars as well as during its flight to Mars in 2011-2012. A set of ICME events has been selected during the periods when Earth (or STEREO A or B) and MSL locations were nearly aligned on the same side of the Sun in the ecliptic plane (so-called opposition phase). Such lineups allow us to estimate the ICMEs' transit times between 1 AU and the MSL location by estimating the delay time of the corresponding Forbush decreases measured at each location. We investigate the evolution of their propagation speeds after passing Earth's orbit and find that the deceleration of ICMEs due to their interaction with the ambient solar wind continues beyond 1 AU. The results are compared to simulation data obtained from two CME propagation models, namely the Drag-Based Model (DBM) and the WSA-ENLIL plus cone model.

  2. Projections of Declining Surface-Water Availability for the Southwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seager, Richard; Ting, Mingfang; Li, Cuihua; Naik, Naomi; Cook, Benjamin; Nakamura, Jennifer; Liu, Haibo

    2012-01-01

    bias for the Colorado headwaters as also shown in Figure S1. Here the observed runoff values are taken from simulations of the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) land surface-hydrology model (3) forced by observed meteorology (5) that were conducted as part of the North American Land Data Assimilation System project phase 2 ( (NLDAS-2), http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/mmb/nldas/. Runoff for California-Nevada is better simulated but there is a positive bias over Texas despite no strong precipitation bias. To check whether regional climate models better simulate P and runoff in these regions we analyzed the historical simulation with the Regional Climate Model version 3 driven by the National Centers for Environmental Prediction-Department of Energy Reanalysis 2 available from the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (http://www.narccap.ucar.edu). This model configuration retained these biases in P and runoff although they were reduced in amplitude. Given these varying biases we plot P and P - E changes in actual values but apply the simplest bias correction possible to the runoff and soil moisture values and show the modeled changes in terms of percentages of the 20th Century model climatologies. A thorough assessment of the simulation of North American climate in CMIP5 models is conducted in Sheffield at al. (North American Climate in CMIP5 Experiments. Part I: Evaluation of 20th Century Continental and Regional Climatology, manuscript submit ted to J. Climate, available at http://www.climate.noaa.gov/index.jsp?pg=./cpo pa/ mapp/cmip5 publications.html). Sheffield et al. analyze the climatology of precipitation, surface air temperature, low level winds, moisture fluxes, runoff etc. and conclude that the main features of the hydrological cycle, including characteristics of the atmospheric moisture balance and its seasonality, are captured in the CMP5 models subject to biases in total precipitation amounts. We chose to use all available models instead

  3. High-resolution MRI using orbit surface coils for the evaluation of metastatic risk factors in 143 children with retinoblastoma. Part 2: new vs. old imaging concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirin, Selma; Schlamann, Marc; Schweiger, Bernd; Goericke, Sophia L. [University Hospital Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Metz, Klaus A. [University Hospital Essen, Department of Pathology and Neuropathology, Essen (Germany); Bornfeld, Norbert; Holdt, Markus [University Hospital Essen, Department of Ophthalmology, Essen (Germany); Temming, Petra; Schuendeln, Michael M. [University Hospital Essen, Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Essen (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is recommended for the evaluation of metastatic risk factors in children with retinoblastoma according to recent guidelines. The aim of this study was to compare diagnostic accuracy of a new imaging concept with two orbit surface coils to that of an old imaging concept with one orbit surface coil. One hundred forty-three patients (148 eyes, 64 girls, 79 boys) underwent high-resolution MRI on 1.5 T scanners using orbit surface coils. The old imaging concept (one orbit surface coil focusing on the (most) effected eye additionally to the standard head coil) was used in 100 patients/103 eye; the new imaging concept (two orbit surface coils (each focusing on one eye) additionally to the standard head coil) in 43 patients/45 eyes. Image analysis was performed by two neuroradiologists in consensus. Histopathology served as gold standard. Detection rate for choroidal invasion was higher for the new compared to that for the old imaging concept (sensitivity/specificity 87.5/94.6 % vs. 57.1/96.1 % for choroidal invasion and 100/97.5 % vs. 58.3/97.7 % for massive choroidal invasion, respectively). Sensitivity and specificity for the detection of postlaminar optic nerve infiltration, peribulbar fat, and scleral invasion were comparable in both imaging concepts; however positive predictive value was higher in the new imaging concept (new vs. old imaging concept: 60 vs. 31.6 % for postlaminar and deep postlaminar optic nerve infiltration, respectively, and 100 vs. 66.7 % for scleral invasion). The new imaging concept shows a trend towards improving the accuracy of detecting metastatic risk factors in children with retinoblastoma and is therefore recommended for pretherapeutic imaging and follow-up. (orig.)

  4. High-resolution MRI using orbit surface coils for the evaluation of metastatic risk factors in 143 children with retinoblastoma. Part 2: new vs. old imaging concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirin, Selma; Schlamann, Marc; Schweiger, Bernd; Goericke, Sophia L.; Metz, Klaus A.; Bornfeld, Norbert; Holdt, Markus; Temming, Petra; Schuendeln, Michael M.

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is recommended for the evaluation of metastatic risk factors in children with retinoblastoma according to recent guidelines. The aim of this study was to compare diagnostic accuracy of a new imaging concept with two orbit surface coils to that of an old imaging concept with one orbit surface coil. One hundred forty-three patients (148 eyes, 64 girls, 79 boys) underwent high-resolution MRI on 1.5 T scanners using orbit surface coils. The old imaging concept (one orbit surface coil focusing on the (most) effected eye additionally to the standard head coil) was used in 100 patients/103 eye; the new imaging concept (two orbit surface coils (each focusing on one eye) additionally to the standard head coil) in 43 patients/45 eyes. Image analysis was performed by two neuroradiologists in consensus. Histopathology served as gold standard. Detection rate for choroidal invasion was higher for the new compared to that for the old imaging concept (sensitivity/specificity 87.5/94.6 % vs. 57.1/96.1 % for choroidal invasion and 100/97.5 % vs. 58.3/97.7 % for massive choroidal invasion, respectively). Sensitivity and specificity for the detection of postlaminar optic nerve infiltration, peribulbar fat, and scleral invasion were comparable in both imaging concepts; however positive predictive value was higher in the new imaging concept (new vs. old imaging concept: 60 vs. 31.6 % for postlaminar and deep postlaminar optic nerve infiltration, respectively, and 100 vs. 66.7 % for scleral invasion). The new imaging concept shows a trend towards improving the accuracy of detecting metastatic risk factors in children with retinoblastoma and is therefore recommended for pretherapeutic imaging and follow-up. (orig.)

  5. Effect of simulated chairside grinding procedures using commercially available abrasive agents on the surface properties of zirconia

    OpenAIRE

    Sandhu, Ramandeep; Kheur, Mohit; Kheur, Supriya

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to assess the change in physical properties (surface roughness, surface hardness and phase transformation) after surface grinding of zirconia by using three commercially available abrasives. Materials and Methods: Thirty sintered zirconia specimens were prepared and divided into three groups namely Group M (grinded using Mani Dia diamond bur standard grit), Group T (grinded using Tri Hawk diamond bur coarse grit) and Group P (grinded using Predator car...

  6. Effect of simulated chairside grinding procedures using commercially available abrasive agents on the surface properties of zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Ramandeep; Kheur, Mohit; Kheur, Supriya

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the change in physical properties (surface roughness, surface hardness and phase transformation) after surface grinding of zirconia by using three commercially available abrasives. Thirty sintered zirconia specimens were prepared and divided into three groups namely Group M (grinded using Mani Dia diamond bur standard grit), Group T (grinded using Tri Hawk diamond bur coarse grit) and Group P (grinded using Predator carbide bur). A customised assembly was used to follow a standardised protocol for surface grinding. The surface roughness, surface hardness and phase transformation was recorded before and after the grinding procedure. ANOVA and Bonferroni post hoc test were used to assess the values obtained after the testing the surface roughness and surface hardness. The results of the present study revealed the average values of change in surface roughness as Group M (0.44 μ m) and Group T (1.235 μ m) and Group P (-0.88 μ m). The average values of change in surface hardness were Group T (19.578 HV), Group M (46.722 HV) and Group P (36.429 HV). The change in surface hardness was not statistically significant. There was no phase transformation seen after the grinding procedure. Carbide burs along with copious water irrigation when used to grind zirconia intra-orally produces has a polishing effect, minimal change in hardness & no phase transformation. The present study advocates the use of carbides for chair-side grinding of zirconia.

  7. The role of reservoir storage in large-scale surface water availability analysis for Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrote, L. M.; Granados, A.; Martin-Carrasco, F.; Iglesias, A.

    2017-12-01

    A regional assessment of current and future water availability in Europe is presented in this study. The assessment was made using the Water Availability and Adaptation Policy Analysis (WAAPA) model. The model was built on the river network derived from the Hydro1K digital elevation maps, including all major river basins of Europe. Reservoir storage volume was taken from the World Register of Dams of ICOLD, including all dams with storage capacity over 5 hm3. Potential Water Availability is defined as the maximum amount of water that could be supplied at a certain point of the river network to satisfy a regular demand under pre-specified reliability requirements. Water availability is the combined result of hydrological processes, which determine streamflow in natural conditions, and human intervention, which determines the available hydraulic infrastructure to manage water and establishes water supply conditions through operating rules. The WAAPA algorithm estimates the maximum demand that can be supplied at every node of the river network accounting for the regulation capacity of reservoirs under different management scenarios. The model was run for a set of hydrologic scenarios taken from the Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project (ISIMIP), where the PCRGLOBWB hydrological model was forced with results from five global climate models. Model results allow the estimation of potential water stress by comparing water availability to projections of water abstractions along the river network under different management alternatives. The set of sensitivity analyses performed showed the effect of policy alternatives on water availability and highlighted the large uncertainties linked to hydrological and anthropological processes.

  8. A review of construction techniques available for surface and underground radioactive waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godfrey, D.G.; Davies, I.L.; MacKenzie, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    In terms of engineering requirements the construction of surface or indeed underground radioactive waste repositories is not unduly difficult. The civil engineering techniques likely to be required have generally been carried out previously, albeit not in the context of radioactive waste repositories in this country. The emphasis will have to be very much on the quality of construction. This paper emphasises the need for quality construction and describes the techniques likely to be used in the construction of repositories. Reference is made to the materials likely to be used in the construction of repositories and also to the need for being able to convince the designers, regulating authorities and the general public that the materials used will indeed last for the required time. Brief reference is made at the end of the paper to the civil engineering parameters requiring consideration in the location of repository siting. (author)

  9. Implications of Upstream Flow Availability for Watershed Surface Water Supply Across the Conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai Duan; Ge Sun; Peter V. Caldwell; Steven G. McNulty; Yang Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Although it is well established that the availability of upstream flow (AUF) affects downstream water supply, its significance has not been rigorously categorized and quantified at fine resolutions. This study aims to fill this gap by providing a nationwide inventory of AUF and local water resource, and assessing their roles in securing water supply across the 2,099 8-...

  10. High-resolution MRI using orbit surface coils for the evaluation of metastatic risk factors in 143 children with retinoblastoma. Part 1: MRI vs. histopathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirin, Selma; Schlamann, Marc; Schweiger, Bernd; Goericke, Sophia L. [University Hospital Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Metz, Klaus A. [University Hospital Essen, Department of Pathology and Neuropathology, Essen (Germany); Bornfeld, Norbert; Holdt, Markus [University Hospital Essen, Department of Ophthalmology, Essen (Germany); Temming, Petra; Schuendeln, Michael M. [University Hospital Essen, Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Essen (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    A reliable detection of metastatic risk factors is important for children with retinoblastoma to choose the right therapeutic regimen. First studies using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with orbit surface coils were promising. The aim of this study was therefore to evaluate the ability of high-resolution MRI to detect metastatic and especially advanced metastatic risk factors in a large group of children with retinoblastoma. One hundred forty-three consecutive children with retinoblastoma (148 enucleated eyes, 64 girls, 79 boys, mean age 19.7 ± 15.3) who received pretherapeutical high-resolution MRI with orbit surface coils on 1.5 T MR scanner systems between 2007 and 2012 and subsequent primary enucleation within 14 days were included in this retrospective study. Image analysis was performed by two neuroradiologists experienced in ocular imaging in consensus. Histopathology served as gold standard. Sensitivity/specificity for the detection of metastatic risk factors using high-resolution MRI with orbit surface coils were 60 %/88.7 % for postlaminar optic nerve infiltration, 65.5 %/95.6 % for choroidal invasion, 100 %/99.3 % for scleral invasion, and 100 %/100 % for peribulbar fat invasion, respectively. The results increased for the detection of advanced metastatic risk factors, 81.8 %/89.1 % for deep postlaminar optic nerve infiltration, 70.6 %/97.6 % for massive choroidal invasion. High-resolution MRI is clinically valuable for the detection of metastatic, especially of advanced metastatic risk factors in children with retinoblastoma. (orig.)

  11. [Influence of surface water availability on mammal distributions in Nonggang National Nature Reserve, Guangxi, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tian-Bo; Sung, Yik-Hei; Bosco Chan, Pui-Lok; Meng, Yuan-Jun; Wan, Pak-Ho

    2013-06-01

    Surface water is a major limiting factor affecting animal activities in karst ecosystems. From March, 2006 to June, 2007 and from October, 2010 to May, 2011, infra-red camera traps were installed along animal trails and temporary rain pools in Nonggang National Nature Reserve, Guangxi, China, to monitor mammal diversity and relative abundance. In total, 19 species from 17 genera, 12 families, and 5 orders were recorded, including two State Key Protection Class I species, the François' langur (Trachypithecus francoisi) and Assam macaque (Macaca assamensis). Although 42% of species only occurred in one of the microhabitats, differences in species assemblages between trails and pools were not significant. The results of our observation indicated that camera trapping was effective in monitoring medium to large sized mammals, and for recording illegal hunting. In addition, our results suggest that authorities should reinforce patrolling, especially at water pools during the dry season, and eradicate unsustainable extraction of underground water. Moreover, based on the advantages of large inhibited environments to animal species, especially to large predators, we also recommend connecting the three isolated sections of the reserve to promote species recovery and dispersal.

  12. Aerial and surface rivers: downwind impacts on water availability from land use changes in Amazonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Wei; Luedeke, Matthias K. B.; Zemp, Delphine C.; Lakes, Tobia; Kropp, Juergen P.

    2018-02-01

    The abundant evapotranspiration provided by the Amazon forests is an important component of the hydrological cycle, both regionally and globally. Since the last century, deforestation and expanding agricultural activities have been changing the ecosystem and its provision of moisture to the atmosphere. However, it remains uncertain how the ongoing land use change will influence rainfall, runoff, and water availability as findings from previous studies differ. Using moisture tracking experiments based on observational data, we provide a spatially detailed analysis recognizing potential teleconnection between source and sink regions of atmospheric moisture. We apply land use scenarios in upwind moisture sources and quantify the corresponding rainfall and runoff changes in downwind moisture sinks. We find spatially varying responses of water regimes to land use changes, which may explain the diverse results from previous studies. Parts of the Peruvian Amazon and western Bolivia are identified as the sink areas most sensitive to land use change in the Amazon and we highlight the current water stress by Amazonian land use change on these areas in terms of the water availability. Furthermore, we also identify the influential source areas where land use change may considerably reduce a given target sink's water reception (from our example of the Ucayali River basin outlet, rainfall by 5-12 % and runoff by 19-50 % according to scenarios). Sensitive sinks and influential sources are therefore suggested as hotspots for achieving sustainable land-water management.

  13. Neonatal orbital abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil M Al-Salem

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Orbital complications due to ethmoiditis are rare in neonates. A case of orbital abscess due to acute ethmoiditis in a 28-day-old girl is presented. A Successful outcome was achieved following antimicrobial therapy alone; spontaneous drainage of the abscess occurred from the lower lid without the need for surgery. From this case report, we intend to emphasize on eyelid retraction as a sign of neonatal orbital abscess, and to review all the available literature of similar cases.

  14. Appropriate use of locally available materials in concrete, bituminous surfacings and layerworks for roads in rural areas

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Paige-Green, P

    2009-06-17

    Full Text Available and aggregate hardness. It is anticipated that the use of modified bitumens with marginal aggregates will result in lower life-cycle costs for surfacing. Detailed analysis of the structural behaviour of pavement layers has shown that current design techniques...

  15. Orbital glass in HTSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusmartsev, F.V.

    1992-10-01

    The physical reasons why the orbital glass may exist in granular high-temperature superconductors and the existing experimental data appeared recently are discussed. The orbital glass is characterized by the coexistence of the orbital paramagnetic state with the superconducting state and occurs at small magnetic fields H c0 c1 . The transition in orbital glass arises at the critical field H c0 which is inversely proportional to the surface cross-area S of an average grain. In connection with theoretical predictions the possible experiments are proposed. (author). 10 refs

  16. Evaluation of sea-surface photosynthetically available radiation algorithms under various sky conditions and solar elevations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somayajula, Srikanth Ayyala; Devred, Emmanuel; Bélanger, Simon; Antoine, David; Vellucci, V; Babin, Marcel

    2018-04-20

    In this study, we report on the performance of satellite-based photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) algorithms used in published oceanic primary production models. The performance of these algorithms was evaluated using buoy observations under clear and cloudy skies, and for the particular case of low sun angles typically encountered at high latitudes or at moderate latitudes in winter. The PAR models consisted of (i) the standard one from the NASA-Ocean Biology Processing Group (OBPG), (ii) the Gregg and Carder (GC) semi-analytical clear-sky model, and (iii) look-up-tables based on the Santa Barbara DISORT atmospheric radiative transfer (SBDART) model. Various combinations of atmospheric inputs, empirical cloud corrections, and semi-analytical irradiance models yielded a total of 13 (11 + 2 developed in this study) different PAR products, which were compared with in situ measurements collected at high frequency (15 min) at a buoy site in the Mediterranean Sea (the "BOUée pour l'acquiSition d'une Série Optique à Long termE," or, "BOUSSOLE" site). An objective ranking method applied to the algorithm results indicated that seven PAR products out of 13 were well in agreement with the in situ measurements. Specifically, the OBPG method showed the best overall performance with a root mean square difference (RMSD) (bias) of 19.7% (6.6%) and 10% (6.3%) followed by the look-up-table method with a RMSD (bias) of 25.5% (6.8%) and 9.6% (2.6%) at daily and monthly scales, respectively. Among the four methods based on clear-sky PAR empirically corrected for cloud cover, the Dobson and Smith method consistently underestimated daily PAR while the Budyko formulation overestimated daily PAR. Empirically cloud-corrected methods using cloud fraction (CF) performed better under quasi-clear skies (CF0.7), however, all methods showed larger RMSD differences (biases) ranging between 32% and 80.6% (-54.5%-8.7%). Finally, three methods tested for low sun elevations revealed

  17. Orbital fractures: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Jeffrey M Joseph, Ioannis P GlavasDivision of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, New York University, New York, NY, USA; Manhattan Eye, Ear, and Throat Hospital, New York, NY, USAAbstract: This review of orbital fractures has three goals: 1 to understand the clinically relevant orbital anatomy with regard to periorbital trauma and orbital fractures, 2 to explain how to assess and examine a patient after periorbital trauma, and 3 to understand the medical and surgical management of orbital fractures. The article aims to summarize the evaluation and management of commonly encountered orbital fractures from the ophthalmologic perspective and to provide an overview for all practicing ophthalmologists and ophthalmologists in training.Keywords: orbit, trauma, fracture, orbital floor, medial wall, zygomatic, zygomatic complex, zmc fracture, zygomaticomaxillary complex fractures 

  18. Mean Orbital Elements for Geosynchronous Orbit - II - Orbital inclination, longitude of ascending node, mean longitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyu-Hong Choi

    1990-06-01

    Full Text Available The osculating orbital elements include the mean, secular, long period, and short period terms. The iterative algorithm used for conversion of osculating orbital elements to mean orbital elements is described. The mean orbital elements of Wc, Ws, and L are obtained.

  19. Understanding surface-water availability in the Central Valley as a means to projecting future groundwater storage with climate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, J. P.; Cayan, D. R.

    2017-12-01

    California's Central Valley (CV) relies heavily on diverted surface water and groundwater pumping to supply irrigated agriculture. However, understanding the spatiotemporal character of water availability in the CV is difficult because of the number of individual farms and local, state, and federal agencies involved in using and managing water. Here we use the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM), developed by the USGS, to understand the relationships between climatic variability, surface water inputs, and resulting groundwater use over the historical period 1970-2013. We analyzed monthly surface water diversion data from >500 CV locations. Principle components analyses were applied to drivers constructed from meteorological data, surface reservoir storage, ET, land use cover, and upstream inflows, to feed multiple regressions and identify factors most important in predicting surface water diversions. Two thirds of the diversion locations ( 80% of total diverted water) can be predicted to within 15%. Along with monthly inputs, representations of cumulative precipitation over the previous 3 to 36 months can explain an additional 10% of variance, depending on location, compared to results that excluded this information. Diversions in the southern CV are highly sensitive to inter-annual variability in precipitation (R2 = 0.8), whereby more surface water is used during wet years. Until recently, this was not the case in the northern and mid-CV, where diversions were relatively constant annually, suggesting relative insensitivity to drought. In contrast, this has important implications for drought response in southern regions (eg. Tulare Basin) where extended dry conditions can severely limit surface water supplies and lead to excess groundwater pumping, storage loss, and subsidence. In addition to fueling our understanding of spatiotemporal variability in diversions, our ability to predict these water balance components allows us to update CVHM predictions before

  20. Titan Orbiter Aerorover Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittler Jr., E. C.; Acuna, M.; Burchell, M. J.; Coates, A.; Farrell, W.; Flasar, M.; Goldstein, B. E.; Gorevan, S.; Hartle, R. E.; Johnson, W. T. K.

    2001-01-01

    We propose a combined Titan orbiter and Titan Aerorover mission with an emphasis on both in situ and remote sensing measurements of Titan's surface, atmosphere, ionosphere, and magnetospheric interaction. The biological aspect of the Titan environment will be emphasized by the mission (i.e., search for organic materials which may include simple organics to 'amono' analogues of amino acids and possibly more complex, lightening detection and infrared, ultraviolet, and charged particle interactions with Titan's surface and atmosphere). An international mission is assumed to control costs. NASA will provide the orbiter, launch vehicle, DSN coverage and operations, while international partners will provide the Aerorover and up to 30% of the cost for the scientific instruments through collaborative efforts. To further reduce costs we propose a single PI for orbiter science instruments and a single PI for Aerorover science instruments. This approach will provide single command/data and power interface between spacecraft and orbiter instruments that will have redundant central DPU and power converter for their instruments. A similar approach could be used for the Aerorover. The mission profile will be constructed to minimize conflicts between Aerorover science, orbiter radar science, orbiter radio science, orbiter imaging science, and orbiter fields and particles (FP) science. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  1. Shape polarisation induced by g9/2 orbitals in A∼70-80 region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.; Xu, F.R.; Zheng, S.J.; Shi, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear shape coexistence and shape change induced by 1g 9/2 orbitals have been investigated using configuration-constrained potential-energy-surface and Total-Routhian-Surface calculations. Oblate isomeric states and shape-coexisting rotational bands are found and compared with available experimental data. The effects of the 1g 9/2 orbitals on nuclear structure are discussed.

  2. On the capability of Swarm for surface mass variation monitoring: Quantitative assessment based on orbit information from CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, Oliver; Weigelt, Matthias; Zehentner, Norbert; Mayer-Gürr, Torsten; Jäggi, Adrian

    2014-05-01

    In the last decade, temporal variations of the gravity field from GRACE observations have become one of the most ubiquitous and valuable sources of information for geophysical and environmental studies. In the context of global climate change, mass balance of the Arctic and Antarctic ice sheets gained particular attention. Because GRACE has outlived its predicted lifetime by several years already, it is very likely that a gap between GRACE and its successor GRACE follow-on (supposed to be launched in 2017, at the earliest) occurs. The Swarm mission - launched on November 22, 2013 - is the most promising candidate to bridge this potential gap, i.e., to directly acquire large-scale mass variation information on the Earth's surface in case of a gap between the present GRACE and the upcoming GRACE follow-on projects. Although the magnetometry mission Swarm has not been designed for gravity field purposes, its three satellites have the characteristics for such an endeavor: (i) low, near-circular and near-polar orbits, (ii) precise positioning with high-quality GNSS receivers, (iii) on-board accelerometers to measure the influence of non-gravitational forces. Hence, from an orbit analysis point of view the Swarm satellites are comparable to the CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE spacecraft. Indeed and as data analysis from CHAMP has been shown, the detection of annual signals and trends from orbit analysis is possible for long-wavelength features of the gravity field, although the accuracy associated with the inter-satellite GRACE measurements cannot be reached. We assess the capability of the (non-dedicated) mission Swarm for mass variation detection in a real-case environment (opposed to simulation studies). For this purpose, we "approximate" the Swarm scenario by the GRACE+CHAMP and GRACE+GOCE constellations. In a first step, kinematic orbits of the individual satellites are derived from GNSS observations. From these orbits, we compute monthly combined GRACE+CHAMP and GRACE

  3. Comparison of surface modified zirconia implants with commercially available zirconium and titanium implants: a histological study in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gredes, Tomasz; Kubasiewicz-Ross, Pawel; Gedrange, Tomasz; Dominiak, Marzena; Kunert-Keil, Christiane

    2014-08-01

    New biomaterials and their various surface modifications should undergo in vitro and in vivo evaluation before clinical trials. The objective of our in vivo study was to evaluate the biocompatibility of newly created zirconium implant surfaces after implantation in the lower jaw of pigs and compare the osseointegration of these dental implants with commercially available zirconium and titanium implants. After a healing period of 12 weeks, a histological analysis of the soft and hard tissues and a histomorphometric analysis of the bone-implant contact (BIC) were performed. The implant surfaces showed an intimate connection to the adjacent bone for all tested implants. The 3 newly created zirconium implant surfaces achieved a BIC of 45% on average in comparison with a BIC of 56% from the reference zirconium implants and 35% from titanium implants. Furthermore, the new zirconium implants had a better attachment to gingival and bone tissues in the range of implant necks as compared with the reference implants. The results suggest that the new implants comparably osseointegrate within the healing period, and they have a good in vivo biocompatibility.

  4. Methane oxidation in pig and cattle slurry storages, and effects of surface crust moisture and methane availability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, S.O.; Ambus, P.

    2006-01-01

    Storages with liquid manure (slurry) may develop a surface crust of particulate organic matter, or an artificial crust can be established. Slurry storages are net sources of atmospheric methane (CH4), but a potential for bacterial oxidation of CH4 in surface crusts was recently suggested in a study......2 during incubation, while intact subsamples were used to characterize CH4 oxidation as a function of CH4 availability and moisture content. Methane oxidation was observed in all materials except for an expanded clay product (Leca) sampled from a pig slurry storage. Despite significant variation...... crusts indicates that there is a potential for stimulating the process by manipulation of gas phase composition above the stored slurry....

  5. Monte Carlo simulations of the secondary neutron ambient and effective dose equivalent rates from surface to suborbital altitudes and low Earth orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Jaby, Samy; Richardson, Richard B

    2015-07-01

    Occupational exposures from ionizing radiation are currently regulated for airline travel (Earth orbit (∼300-400 km). Aircrew typically receive between 1 and 6 mSv of occupational dose annually, while aboard the International Space Station, the area radiation dose equivalent measured over just 168 days was 106 mSv at solar minimum conditions. It is anticipated that space tourism vehicles will reach suborbital altitudes of approximately 100 km and, therefore, the annual occupational dose to flight crew during repeated transits is expected to fall somewhere between those observed for aircrew and astronauts. Unfortunately, measurements of the radiation environment at the high altitudes reached by suborbital vehicles are sparse, and modelling efforts have been similarly limited. In this paper, preliminary MCNPX radiation transport code simulations are developed of the secondary neutron flux profile in air from surface altitudes up to low Earth orbit at solar minimum conditions and excluding the effects of spacecraft shielding. These secondary neutrons are produced by galactic cosmic radiation interacting with Earth's atmosphere and are among the sources of radiation that can pose a health risk. Associated estimates of the operational neutron ambient dose equivalent, used for radiation protection purposes, and the neutron effective dose equivalent that is typically used for estimates of stochastic health risks, are provided in air. Simulations show that the neutron radiation dose rates received at suborbital altitudes are comparable to those experienced by aircrew flying at 7 to 14 km. We also show that the total neutron dose rate tails off beyond the Pfotzer maximum on ascension from surface up to low Earth orbit. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Split Fermi Surfaces of the Spin-Orbit-Coupled Metal Cd2Re2O7 Probed by de Haas-van Alphen Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubayashi, Yasuhito; Sugii, Kaori; Hirose, Hishiro T.; Hirai, Daigorou; Sugiura, Shiori; Terashima, Taichi; Uji, Shinya; Hiroi, Zenji

    2018-05-01

    The superconducting pyrochlore oxide Cd2Re2O7 shows a structural transition with inversion symmetry breaking (ISB) at Ts1 = 200 K. A recent theory [https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.026401" xlink:type="simple">L. Fu, Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 026401 (2015)] suggests that the origin is an electronic instability that leads to a multipolar order in the spin-orbit-coupled metal. To observe the Fermi surface of the low-temperature phase of Cd2Re2O7, we perform de Haas-van Alphen effect measurements by means of magnetic torque. In reference to a calculated band structure, the spin-split Fermi surfaces with large cyclotron masses of 5-9m0 are revealed. The splitting is suggested to be due to an antisymmetric spin-orbit coupling induced by ISB, the strength of which is estimated to be approximately 67 K, which is rather smaller than those of typical non-centrosymmetric metals.

  7. Generation of high-order Bessel vortex beam carrying orbital angular momentum using multilayer amplitude-phase-modulated surfaces in radiofrequency domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Na; Yu, Shixing; Li, Long

    2017-01-01

    A high-order Bessel vortex beam carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) is generated by using multilayer amplitude-phase-modulated surfaces (APMSs) at 10 GHz. The APMS transmitarray is composed of four-layer conformal square-loop (FCSL) surfaces with both amplitude and phase modulation. The APMS can transform a quasi-spherical wave emitted from the feeding source into a pseudo non-diffractive high-order Bessel vortex beam with OAM. The APMS for a second-order Bessel beam carrying OAM in the n = 2 mode is designed, fabricated, and measured. Full-wave simulation and measurement results confirm that Bessel vortex beams with OAM can be effectively generated using the proposed APMS transmitarray.

  8. [Orbital inflammation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouriaux, F; Coffin-Pichonnet, S; Robert, P-Y; Abad, S; Martin-Silva, N

    2014-12-01

    Orbital inflammation is a generic term encompassing inflammatory pathologies affecting all structures within the orbit : anterior (involvement up to the posterior aspect of the globe), diffuse (involvement of intra- and/or extraconal fat), apical (involvement of the posterior orbit), myositis (involvement of only the extraocular muscles), dacryoadenitis (involvement of the lacrimal gland). We distinguish between specific inflammation and non-specific inflammation, commonly referred to as idiopathic inflammation. Specific orbital inflammation corresponds to a secondary localization of a "generalized" disease (systemic or auto-immune). Idiopathic orbital inflammation corresponds to uniquely orbital inflammation without generalized disease, and thus an unknown etiology. At the top of the differential diagnosis for specific or idiopathic orbital inflammation are malignant tumors, represented most commonly in the adult by lympho-proliferative syndromes and metastases. Treatment of specific orbital inflammation begins with treatment of the underlying disease. For idiopathic orbital inflammation, treatment (most often corticosteroids) is indicated above all in cases of visual loss due to optic neuropathy, in the presence of pain or oculomotor palsy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Revisiting magnetism of capped Au and ZnO nanoparticles: Surface band structure and atomic orbital with giant magnetic moment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernando, Antonio; Crespo, Patricia [Instituto de Magnetismo Aplicado, UCM-CSIC-ADIF, Las Rozas. P.O. Box 155, 28230 Madrid (Spain); Dept. Fisica de Materiales, Universidad Complutense, Madrid (Spain); Garcia, Miguel Angel [Instituto de Ceramica y Vidrio, CSIC, C/ Kelsen, 5, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Coey, Michael [Trinity College Dublin, Dublin (Ireland); Ayuela, Andres; Echenique, Pedro Miguel [Centro de Fisica de Materiales, CFM-MPC CSIC-UPV/EHU, Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Fac. de Quimicas, Universidad del Pais Vasco UPV-EHU, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    In this article we review the exotic magnetism of nanoparticles (NPs) formed by substances that are not magnetic in bulk as described with generality in Section 1. In particular, the intrinsic character of the magnetism observed on capped Au and ZnO NPs is analysed. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) analysis has shown that the magnetic moments are intrinsic and lie in the Au and Zn atoms, respectively, as analysed in Section 2, where the general theoretical ideas are also revisited. Since impurity atoms bonded to the surface act as donor or acceptor of electrons that occupy the surface states, the anomalous magnetic response is analysed in terms of the surface band in Section 3. Finally, Section 4 summarizes our last theoretical proposal. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Peripheral orbit model

    CERN Document Server

    Hara, Yasuo

    1975-01-01

    Peripheral orbit model, in which an incoming hadron is assumed to revolve in a peripheral orbit around a target hadron, is discussed. The non-diffractive parts of two-body reaction amplitudes of hadrons are expressed in terms of the radius, width an absorptivity of the orbit. The radius of the orbit is about 1 fm and the width of the orbit is determined by the range of the interaction between the hadrons. The model reproduces all available experimental data on differential cross-sections and polarizations of $K^{-}p\\to K^{-}p$ and $\\bar K^{\\circ}n$ reactions for all angles successfully. This contribution is not included in the proceedings since it will appear in Progress of Theoretical Physics Vol. 51 (1974) No 2. Any person interested in the subject may apply for reprints to the author.

  11. Thermal math model analysis of FRSI test article subjected to cold soak and entry environments. [Flexible Reuseable Surface Insulation in Space Shuttle Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    A multi-objective test program was conducted at the NASA/JSC Radiant Heat Test Facility in which an aluminum skin/stringer test panel insulated with FRSI (Flexible Reusable Surface Insulation) was subjected to 24 simulated Space Shuttle Orbiter ascent/entry heating cycles with a cold soak in between in the 10th and 20th cycles. A two-dimensional thermal math model was developed and utilized to predict the thermal performance of the FRSI. Results are presented which indicate that the modeling techniques and property values have been proven adequate in predicting peak structure temperatures and entry thermal responses from both an ambient and cold soak condition of an FRSI covered aluminum structure.

  12. Topology of tokamak orbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rome, J.A.; Peng, Y.K.M.

    1978-09-01

    Guiding center orbits in noncircular axisymmetric tokamak plasmas are studied in the constants of motion (COM) space of (v, zeta, psi/sub m/). Here, v is the particle speed, zeta is the pitch angle with respect to the parallel equilibrium current, J/sub parallels/, and psi/sub m/ is the maximum value of the poloidal flux function (increasing from the magnetic axis) along the guiding center orbit. Two D-shaped equilibria in a flux-conserving tokamak having β's of 1.3% and 7.7% are used as examples. In this space, each confined orbit corresponds to one and only one point and different types of orbits (e.g., circulating, trapped, stagnation and pinch orbits) are represented by separate regions or surfaces in the space. It is also shown that the existence of an absolute minimum B in the higher β (7.7%) equilibrium results in a dramatically different orbit topology from that of the lower β case. The differences indicate the confinement of additional high energy (v → c, within the guiding center approximation) trapped, co- and countercirculating particles whose orbit psi/sub m/ falls within the absolute B well

  13. Hypersonic Navier Stokes Comparisons to Orbiter Flight Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Charles H.; Nompelis, Ioannis; Candler, Graham; Barnhart, Michael; Yoon, Seokkwan

    2009-01-01

    Hypersonic chemical nonequilibrium simulations of low earth orbit entry flow fields are becoming increasingly commonplace as software and computational capabilities become more capable. However, development of robust and accurate software to model these environments will always encounter a significant barrier in developing a suite of high quality calibration cases. The US3D hypersonic nonequilibrium Navier Stokes analysis capability has been favorably compared to a number of wind tunnel test cases. Extension of the calibration basis for this software to Orbiter flight conditions will provide an incremental increase in confidence. As part of the Orbiter Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment and the Hypersonic Thermodynamic Infrared Measurements project, NASA is performing entry flight testing on the Orbiter to provide valuable aerothermodynamic heating data. An increase in interest related to orbiter entry environments is resulting from this activity. With the advent of this new data, comparisons of the US3D software to the new flight testing data is warranted. This paper will provide information regarding the framework of analyses that will be applied with the US3D analysis tool. In addition, comparisons will be made to entry flight testing data provided by the Orbiter BLT Flight Experiment and HYTHIRM projects. If data from digital scans of the Orbiter windward surface become available, simulations will also be performed to characterize the difference in surface heating between the CAD reference OML and the digitized surface provided by the surface scans.

  14. Quark Orbital Angular Momentum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkardt Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Definitions of orbital angular momentum based on Wigner distributions are used as a framework to discuss the connection between the Ji definition of the quark orbital angular momentum and that of Jaffe and Manohar. We find that the difference between these two definitions can be interpreted as the change in the quark orbital angular momentum as it leaves the target in a DIS experiment. The mechanism responsible for that change is similar to the mechanism that causes transverse single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering.

  15. Electron content near the lunar surface using dual-frequency VLBI tracking data in a single lunar orbiter mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhen; Wang, Na; Ping, Jin-Song

    2015-01-01

    In VLBI observations of Vstar, a subsatellite of the Japanese lunar mission SELENE, there were opportunities for lunar grazing occultation when Vstar was very close to the limb of the Moon. This kind of chance made it possible to probe the thin plasma layer above the Moon's surface as a meaningful by-product of VLBI, by using the radio occultation method with coherent radio waves from the S/X bands. The dual-frequency measurements were carried out at Earth-based VLBI stations. In the line-of-sight direction between the satellite and the ground-based tracking station where VLBI measurements were made, the effects of the terrestrial ionosphere, interplanetary plasma and the thin lunar ionosphere mixed together in the combined observables of dual-frequency Doppler shift and phase shift. To separate the variation of the ionospheric total electron content (TEC) near the surface of the Moon from the mixed signal, the influences of the terrestrial ionosphere and interplanetary plasma have been removed by using an extrapolation method based on a short-term trend. The lunar TEC is estimated from the dual-frequency observation for Vstar from UT 22:18 to UT 22:20 on 2008 June 28 at several tracking stations. The TEC results obtained from VLBI sites are identical, however, they are not as remarkable as the result obtained at the Usuda deep space tracking station. (paper)

  16. Late Neogene Orbitally-Forced Sea Surface Temperature Variability in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific as Measured by Uk'37 and TEX86

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, K. T.; Pearson, A.; Castañeda, I. S.; Peterson, L.

    2017-12-01

    Key features of late Neogene climate remain uncertain due to conflicting records derived from different sea surface temperature (SST) proxies. To resolve these disputes, it is necessary to explore both the consistencies and differences between paleotemperature estimates from critical oceanographic regimes. Here, we report orbital-scale climate variability at ODP Site 846 in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific (EEP) in the interval from 5-6 Ma using alkenone and TEX86 temperature estimates. Results from both proxies are very similar in their secular trends and magnitude of long-term temperature change; and spectral analysis demonstrates that the records are coherent and in-phase or nearly in-phase in both the obliquity and precession bands. However, we find that the temperatures reconstructed by TEX86 are consistently offset towards colder values by 2ºC with orbital-scale variations approximately twice the amplitude of the Uk'37 derived estimates. Both temperature records are antiphased - i.e. "colder" - at higher sediment alkenone concentrations, a qualitative indicator of increased glacial productivity. Temperature differences between the proxies are accentuated during glacial intervals in contrasts to modern observations of EEP surface and subsurface temperatures, which show that thermocline temperatures are fairly stable, and thus by analogy, glacial cooling and/or enhanced upwelling should have reduced rather than accentuated temperature gradients in the upper water column. Therefore, arguments that Uk'37 corresponds to temperature variability in the surface, while TEX86 responds to the subsurface, may be too simplistic. Instead, it appears generally true that high-productivity environments, including the EEP, tend to have negative TEX86 anomalies. This may reflect a dual dependence of TEX86 records on both water column temperature and local productivity. Overall, our data suggest that in the EEP and likely in other upwelling zones, paleotemperature data derived

  17. Orbital transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oertel, H. Jr.; Koerner, H.

    1993-01-01

    The Third Aerospace Symposium in Braunschweig presented, for the first time, the possibility of bringing together the classical disciplines of aerospace engineering and the natural science disciplines of meteorology and air chemistry in a european setting. In this way, aspects of environmental impact on the atmosphere could be examined quantitatively. An essential finding of the european conference, is the unrestricted agreement of the experts that the given launch frequencies of the present orbital transport result in a negligible amount of pollutants being released in the atmosphere. The symposium does, however, call attention to the increasing need to consider the effect of orbital and atmospheric environmental impact of a future increase in launch frequencies of orbital transport in connection with future space stations. The Third Aerospace Symposium, 'Orbital Transport, Technical, Meteorological and Chemical Aspects', constituted a first forum of discussion for engineers and scientists. Questions of new orbital transport technologies and their environmental impact were to be discussed towards a first consensus. Through the 34 reports and articles, the general problems of space transportation and environmental protection were addressed, as well as particular aspects of high temperatures during reentry in the atmosphere of the earth, precision navigation of flight vehicles or flow behavior and air chemistry in the stratosphere. (orig./CT). 342 figs

  18. Estimating Surface Area of Sponges and Marine Gorgonians as Indicators of Habitat Availability on Caribbean Coral Reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surface area and topographical complexity are fundamental attributes of shallow tropical coral reefs and can be used to estimate habitat for fish and invertebrates. This study presents empirical methods for estimating surface area provided by sponges and gorgonians in the Central...

  19. Predicting Potential Fire Severity Using Vegetation, Topography and Surface Moisture Availability in a Eurasian Boreal Forest Landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Fang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Severity of wildfires is a critical component of the fire regime and plays an important role in determining forest ecosystem response to fire disturbance. Predicting spatial distribution of potential fire severity can be valuable in guiding fire and fuel management planning. Spatial controls on fire severity patterns have attracted growing interest, but few studies have attempted to predict potential fire severity in fire-prone Eurasian boreal forests. Furthermore, the influences of fire weather variation on spatial heterogeneity of fire severity remain poorly understood at fine scales. We assessed the relative importance and influence of pre-fire vegetation, topography, and surface moisture availability (SMA on fire severity in 21 lightning-ignited fires occurring in two different fire years (3 fires in 2000, 18 fires in 2010 of the Great Xing’an Mountains with an ensemble modeling approach of boosted regression tree (BRT. SMA was derived from 8-day moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS evapotranspiration products. We predicted the potential distribution of fire severity in two fire years and evaluated the prediction accuracies. BRT modeling revealed that vegetation, topography, and SMA explained more than 70% of variations in fire severity (mean 83.0% for 2000, mean 73.8% for 2010. Our analysis showed that evergreen coniferous forests were more likely to experience higher severity fires than the dominant deciduous larch forests of this region, and deciduous broadleaf forests and shrublands usually burned at a significantly lower fire severity. High-severity fires tended to occur in gentle and well-drained slopes at high altitudes, especially those with north-facing aspects. SMA exhibited notable and consistent negative association with severity. Predicted fire severity from our model exhibited strong agreement with the observed fire severity (mean r2 = 0.795 for 2000, 0.618 for 2010. Our results verified that spatial variation

  20. Use of high resolution images of orbital surface of waterproofing with different levels of urban land: case Irati-PR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Costa de Oliveira Filho

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to present a detailed diagnosis for use and occupation of urban land aimed at different levels of sealing, in a downtownIrati area of 14 blocks, totaling 0.23 km2, from the Quickbird satellite images with spatial resolution of 0.60 m, by the method of interpretation and vectorization on the screen followed by classification. The area occupied by the classes that represent the highest level of waterproof is 33,218% of the total study area, since the area occupied by classes representing less impermeable level is 22,488% of the same area. The results show that the study area is well sealed.

  1. Congenital orbital teratoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shereen Aiyub

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of mature congenital orbital teratoma managed with lid-sparing exenteration and dermis fat graft. This is a case report on the management of congenital orbital teratoma. A full-term baby was born in Fiji with prolapsed right globe which was surrounded by a nonpulsatile, cystic mass. Clinical and imaging features were consistent with congenital orbital teratoma. Due to limited surgical expertise, the patient was transferred to Adelaide, Australia for further management. The patient underwent a lid-sparing exenteration with frozen section control of the apical margin. A dermis fat graft from the groin was placed beneath the lid skin to provide volume. Histopathology revealed mature tissues from each of the three germ cell layers which confirmed the diagnosis of mature teratoma. We describe the successful use of demis fat graft in socket reconstruction following lid-sparing exenteration for congenital orbital teratoma.

  2. Discovery of highly spin-polarized conducting surface states in the strong spin-orbit coupling semiconductor Sb2Se3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Shekhar; Sirohi, Anshu; Kumar Gupta, Gaurav; Kamboj, Suman; Vasdev, Aastha; Gayen, Sirshendu; Guptasarma, Prasenjit; Das, Tanmoy; Sheet, Goutam

    2018-06-01

    Majority of the A2B3 -type chalcogenide systems with strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC), such as Bi2Se3,Bi2Te3 , and Sb2Te3 , etc., are topological insulators. One important exception is Sb2Se3 where a topological nontrivial phase was argued to be possible under ambient conditions, but such a phase could be detected to exist only under pressure. In this paper, we show that Sb2Se3 like Bi2Se3 displays a generation of highly spin-polarized current under mesoscopic superconducting point contacts as measured by point-contact Andreev reflection spectroscopy. In addition, we observe a large negative and anisotropic magnetoresistance of the mesoscopic metallic point contacts formed on Sb2Se3 . Our band-structure calculations confirm the trivial nature of Sb2Se3 crystals and reveal two trivial surface states one of which shows large spin splitting due to Rashba-type SOC. The observed high spin polarization and related phenomena in Sb2Se3 can be attributed to this spin splitting.

  3. Antisymmetric Orbit Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoliy Klimyk

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, properties of antisymmetric orbit functions are reviewed and further developed. Antisymmetric orbit functions on the Euclidean space $E_n$ are antisymmetrized exponential functions. Antisymmetrization is fulfilled by a Weyl group, corresponding to a Coxeter-Dynkin diagram. Properties of such functions are described. These functions are closely related to irreducible characters of a compact semisimple Lie group $G$ of rank $n$. Up to a sign, values of antisymmetric orbit functions are repeated on copies of the fundamental domain $F$ of the affine Weyl group (determined by the initial Weyl group in the entire Euclidean space $E_n$. Antisymmetric orbit functions are solutions of the corresponding Laplace equation in $E_n$, vanishing on the boundary of the fundamental domain $F$. Antisymmetric orbit functions determine a so-called antisymmetrized Fourier transform which is closely related to expansions of central functions in characters of irreducible representations of the group $G$. They also determine a transform on a finite set of points of $F$ (the discrete antisymmetric orbit function transform. Symmetric and antisymmetric multivariate exponential, sine and cosine discrete transforms are given.

  4. Orbit Propagation and Determination of Low Earth Orbit Satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Nien Shou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents orbit propagation and determination of low Earth orbit (LEO satellites. Satellite global positioning system (GPS configured receiver provides position and velocity measures by navigating filter to get the coordinates of the orbit propagation (OP. The main contradictions in real-time orbit which is determined by the problem are orbit positioning accuracy and the amount of calculating two indicators. This paper is dedicated to solving the problem of tradeoffs. To plan to use a nonlinear filtering method for immediate orbit tasks requires more precise satellite orbit state parameters in a short time. Although the traditional extended Kalman filter (EKF method is widely used, its linear approximation of the drawbacks in dealing with nonlinear problems was especially evident, without compromising Kalman filter (unscented Kalman Filter, UKF. As a new nonlinear estimation method, it is measured at the estimated measurements on more and more applications. This paper will be the first study on UKF microsatellites in LEO orbit in real time, trying to explore the real-time precision orbit determination techniques. Through the preliminary simulation results, they show that, based on orbit mission requirements and conditions using UKF, they can satisfy the positioning accuracy and compute two indicators.

  5. "PROCESS and UVolution: photochemistry experiments in Low Earth Orbit": investigation of the photostability of organic and mineral material exposed to Mars surface UV radiation conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalport, Fabien; Guan, Yuan Yong; Noblet, Audrey; Coll, Patrice; Szopa, Cyril; Macari, Frederique; Person, Alain; Chaput, Didier; Raulin, Francois; Cottin, Hervé

    The harsh martian environment could explain the lack of organics and minerals such as car-bonates by destroying them: i) no organic molecule has been found at the two different landing sites of the Viking landers within the detection limits of the instruments onboard, ii) to date, no large deposits of carbonates have been detected and their detection is specific of local ar-eas and in very low amounts. In this context several experimental and numerical modelling studies were led to evaluate the possibility for the destruction or evolution of the organics and carbonates under the martian surface environmental conditions. The presence of UV radiation has been proposed to explain the photodecomposition of such material. This is the reason why, to investigate the nature, abundance, and stability of organic and mineral material that could survive under such environmental conditions, we exposed in low Earth orbit organic molecules and carbonates (also biominerals) with martian relevance to solar UV radiation ¿ 200 nm, in the frame of the experiment UVolution, onboard the BIOPAN ESA module which was set outside a Russian Foton automated capsule and exposed to space condition during 12 days in September 2007, and the experiment PROCESS (hervé peux tu rajouter quelques infos sur le temps exact d'exposition stp) which was set outside the International Space Station (ISS). Here, we present results with regard to the impact of solar UV radiation on the targeted molecules. Preliminary results indicate that that no organic sample seems to resist to the solar UV radiation if directly exposed to it. Conversely our results show that the exposed carbonates seem to be stable to the solar UV radiation if directly exposed to it. Moreover, the stability of the biominerals strengthens the interest to explore deeper their potential as life records at Mars. Hence they should be considered as primary targets for in situ analyses during future missions.

  6. Orbit analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michelotti, L.

    1995-01-01

    The past fifteen years have witnessed a remarkable development of methods for analyzing single particle orbit dynamics in accelerators. Unlike their more classic counterparts, which act upon differential equations, these methods proceed by manipulating Poincare maps directly. This attribute makes them well matched for studying accelerators whose physics is most naturally modelled in terms of maps, an observation that has been championed most vigorously by Forest. In the following sections the author sketchs a little background, explains some of the physics underlying these techniques, and discusses the best computing strategy for implementing them in conjunction with modeling accelerators

  7. Brane orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Bergshoeff, Eric A; Riccioni, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    We complete the classification of half-supersymmetric branes in toroidally compactified IIA/IIB string theory in terms of representations of the T-duality group. As a by-product we derive a last wrapping rule for the space-filling branes. We find examples of T-duality representations of branes in lower dimensions, suggested by supergravity, of which none of the component branes follow from the reduction of any brane in ten-dimensional IIA/IIB string theory. We discuss the constraints on the charges of half-supersymmetric branes, determining the corresponding T-duality and U-duality orbits.

  8. Orbit analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelotti, L.

    1995-01-01

    The past fifteen years have witnessed a remarkable development of methods for analyzing single particle orbit dynamics in accelerators. Unlike their more classic counterparts, which act upon differential equations, these methods proceed by manipulating Poincare maps directly. This attribute makes them well matched for studying accelerators whose physics is most naturally modelled in terms of maps, an observation that has been championed most vigorously by Forest. In the following sections the author sketchs a little background, explains some of the physics underlying these techniques, and discusses the best computing strategy for implementing them in conjunction with modeling accelerators.

  9. E-Orbit Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiri Patera

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We review and further develop the theory of $E$-orbit functions. They are functions on the Euclidean space $E_n$ obtained from the multivariate exponential function by symmetrization by means of an even part $W_{e}$ of a Weyl group $W$, corresponding to a Coxeter-Dynkin diagram. Properties of such functions are described. They are closely related to symmetric and antisymmetric orbit functions which are received from exponential functions by symmetrization and antisymmetrization procedure by means of a Weyl group $W$. The $E$-orbit functions, determined by integral parameters, are invariant withrespect to even part $W^{aff}_{e}$ of the affine Weyl group corresponding to $W$. The $E$-orbit functions determine a symmetrized Fourier transform, where these functions serve as a kernel of the transform. They also determine a transform on a finite set of points of the fundamental domain $F^{e}$ of the group $W^{aff}_{e}$ (the discrete $E$-orbit function transform.

  10. Development of a New Data Tool for Computing Launch and Landing Availability with Respect to Surface Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, K. Lee; Altino, Karen

    2008-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center Natural Environments Branch has a long history of expertise in the modeling and computation of statistical launch availabilities with respect to weather conditions. Their existing data analysis product, the Atmospheric Parametric Risk Assessment (APRA) tool, computes launch availability given an input set of vehicle hardware and/or operational weather constraints by calculating the climatological probability of exceeding the specified constraint limits, APRA has been used extensively to provide the Space Shuttle program the ability to estimate impacts that various proposed design modifications would have to overall launch availability. The model accounts for both seasonal and diurnal variability at a single geographic location and provides output probabilities for a single arbitrary launch attempt. Recently, the Shuttle program has shown interest in having additional capabilities added to the APRA model, including analysis of humidity parameters, inclusion of landing site weather to produce landing availability, and concurrent analysis of multiple sites, to assist in operational landing site selection. In addition, the Constellation program has also expressed interest in the APRA tool, and has requested several additional capabilities to address some Constellation-specific issues, both in the specification and verification of design requirements and in the development of operations concepts. The combined scope of the requested capability enhancements suggests an evolution of the model beyond a simple revision process. Development has begun for a new data analysis tool that will satisfy the requests of both programs. This new tool, Probabilities of Atmospheric Conditions and Environmental Risk (PACER), will provide greater flexibility and significantly enhanced functionality compared to the currently existing tool.

  11. Signal information available for plume source tracking with and without surface waves and learning by undergraduates assisting with the research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Megan Beth

    Autonomous vehicles have had limited success in locating point sources of pollutants, chemicals, and other passive scalars. However, animals such as stomatopods, a mantis shrimp, track odor plumes easily for food, mates, and habitat. Laboratory experiments using Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence measured odor concentration downstream of a diffusive source with and without live stomatopods to investigate their source-tracking strategies in unidirectional and "wave-affected" (surface waves with a mean current) flows. Despite the dearth of signal, extreme temporal variation, and meandering plume centerline, the stomatopods were able to locate the source, especially in the wave-affected flow. Differences in the two plumes far from the source (>160 cm) appeared to help the animals in the wave-affected flow position themselves closer to the source (fluid mechanics, and there was little evidence of learning by participation in the RAship. One RA's conceptions of turbulence did change, but a group workshop seemed to support this learning more than the RAship. The documented conceptions could aid in curriculum design, since situating new information within current knowledge seems to deepen learning outcomes. The RAs' conceptions varied widely with some overlap of ideas. The interviews also showed that most RAs did not discuss molecular diffusion as part of the mixing process and some remembered information from course demonstrations, but applied them inappropriately to the interview questions.

  12. A Typical Presentation of Orbital Pseudotumor Mimicking Orbital Cellulitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ayatollahi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Orbital pseudotumor, also known as idiopathic orbital inflammatory syndrome (IOIS, is a benign, non- infective inflammatory condition of the orbit without identifiable local or systemic causes. The disease may mimics a variety of pathologic conditions. We pre-sent a case of pseudotumor observed in a patient admitted under the name of orbital celluli-ties. Case Report: A 26-year-old woman reffered to our hospital with the history of left ocular pain and headache 2 days before her visit.. Ophthalmological examination of the patient was normal except for the redness and lid edema, mild chemosis and conjunctival injection. Gen-eral assessment was normal but a low grade fever was observed. She was hospitalized as an orbital cellulitis patient. She was treated with intravenous antibiotics. On the third day , sud-denly diplopia, proptosis in her left eye and ocular pain in her right side appeared. MRI re-vealed bilateral enlargement of extraocular muscles. Diagnosis of orbital pseudotumor was made and the patient was treated with oral steroid.She responded promptly to the treatment. Antibiotics were discontinued and steroid was tapered in one month period under close fol-low up. Conclusion: The clinical features of orbital pseudotumor vary widely . Orbital pseudotumor and orbital cellulitis can occasionally demonstrate overlapping features.. Despite complete physical examination and appropriate imaging, sometimes correct diagnosis of the disease would be difficult (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2013; 20 (3:256-259

  13. Nanoscale Topographical Characterization of Orbital Implant Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Salerno

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The search for an ideal orbital implant is still ongoing in the field of ocular biomaterials. Major limitations of currently-available porous implants include the high cost along with a non-negligible risk of exposure and postoperative infection due to conjunctival abrasion. In the effort to develop better alternatives to the existing devices, two types of new glass-ceramic porous implants were fabricated by sponge replication, which is a relatively inexpensive method. Then, they were characterized by direct three-dimensional (3D contact probe mapping in real space by means of atomic force microscopy in order to assess their surface micro- and nano-features, which were quantitatively compared to those of the most commonly-used orbital implants. These silicate glass-ceramic materials exhibit a surface roughness in the range of a few hundred nanometers (Sq within 500–700 nm and topographical features comparable to those of clinically-used “gold-standard” alumina and polyethylene porous orbital implants. However, it was noted that both experimental and commercial non-porous implants were significantly smoother than all the porous ones. The results achieved in this work reveal that these porous glass-ceramic materials show promise for the intended application and encourage further investigation of their clinical suitability.

  14. Comparative availability of cesium and strontium for plant absorption from amended Rupert surface soil and associated subsoil: influence of growth conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cataldo, D.A.

    1979-03-01

    Studies were undertaken to determine the plant availability of 134 Cs and 85 Sr amended to Rupert surface soil and an associated subsoil. Concentration ratios for cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) and tumbleweed (Salsola kali) grown on 134 Cs amended Rupert soil were 0.15 and 0.28, respectively; values for amended subsoils were 0.074 and 0.13, respectively. Rupert surface soil and subsoil amended with 85 Sr gave concentration ratios of 15 and 7, respectively, for both tumbleweed and cheatgrass. While pot size (1 vs 4 kg) had a market effect on concentration ratios, values for greenhouses and growth chamber grown plants were generally similar. Aging of both Rupert surface soil and subsoils for 1 to 30 days prior to planting had a pronounced effect on the availability of 134 Cs for uptake by plants, but no effect on 85 Sr uptake

  15. Orbital Chondroma: A rare mesenchymal tumor of orbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi S Kabra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available While relatively common in the skeletal system, cartilaginous tumors are rarely seen originating from the orbit. Here, we report a rare case of an orbital chondroma. A 27-year-old male patient presented with a painless hard mass in the superonasal quadrant (SNQ of left orbit since 3 months. On examination, best-corrected visual acuity of both eyes was 20/20, with normal anterior and posterior segment with full movements of eyeballs and normal intraocular pressure. Computerized tomography scan revealed well defined soft tissue density lesion in SNQ of left orbit. Patient was operated for anteromedial orbitotomy under general anesthesia. Mass was excised intact and sent for histopathological examination (HPE. HPE report showed lobular aggregates of benign cartilaginous cells with mild atypia suggesting of benign cartilaginous tumor - chondroma. Very few cases of orbital chondroma have been reported in literature so far.

  16. A new kinematical definition of orbital eccentricity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ninković S.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A new concept of orbital eccentricity is given. The dimensionless quantities proposed in the present paper to serve as orbital eccentricities have a kinematical nature. The purpose is to use them in describing the motion for the case of three-dimensional orbits. A comparison done for nearly planar orbits shows that the values of the eccentricities proposed here do not differ significantly from those corresponding to the eccentricities of geometric nature usually applied.

  17. Rehabilitation of orbital cavity after orbital exenteration using polymethyl methacrylate orbital prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumeet Jain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma of the eyelid is the second most common malignant neoplasm of the eye with the incidence of 0.09 and 2.42 cases/100 000 people. Orbital invasion is a rare complication but, if recognized early, can be treated effectively with exenteration. Although with advancements in technology such as computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing, material science, and retentive methods like implants, orbital prosthesis with stock ocular prosthesis made of methyl methacrylate retained by anatomic undercuts is quiet effective and should not be overlooked and forgotten. This clinical report describes prosthetic rehabilitation of two male patients with polymethyl methacrylate resin orbital prosthesis after orbital exenteration, for squamous cell carcinoma of the upper eyelid. The orbital prosthesis was sufficiently retained by hard and soft tissue undercuts without any complications. The patients using the prosthesis are quite satisfied with the cosmetic results and felt comfortable attending the social events.

  18. HCMM/soil moisture experiment. [relationship between surface minus air temperature differential and available water according to crop type in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cihlar, J. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    Progress in the compilation and analysis of airborne and ground data to determine the relationship between the maximum surface minus maximum air temperature differential (delta Tsa) and available water (PAW) is reported. Also, results of an analysis of HCMM images to determine the effect of cloud cover on the availability of HCMM-type data are presented. An inverse relationship between delta Tsa and PAW is indicated along with stable delta Tsa vs. PAW distributions for fully developed canopies. Large variations, both geographical and diurnal, in the cloud cover images are reported. The average monthly daytime cloud cover fluctuated between 40 and 60 percent.

  19. Towards Biochar and Hydrochar Engineering—Influence of Process Conditions on Surface Physical and Chemical Properties, Thermal Stability, Nutrient Availability, Toxicity and Wettability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Dieguez-Alonso

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The impact of conversion process parameters in pyrolysis (maximum temperature, inert gas flow rate and hydrothermal carbonization (maximum temperature, residence time and post-washing on biochar and hydrochar properties is investigated. Pine wood (PW and corn digestate (CD, with low and high inorganic species content respectively, are used as feedstock. CD biochars show lower H/C ratios, thermal recalcitrance and total specific surface area than PW biochars, but higher mesoporosity. CD and PW biochars present higher naphthalene and phenanthrene contents, respectively, which may indicate different reaction pathways. High temperatures (>500 °C lead to lower PAH (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons content (<12 mg/kg and higher specific surface area. With increasing process severity the biochars carbon content is also enhanced, as well as the thermal stability. High inert gas flow rates increase the microporosity and wettability of biochars. In hydrochars the high inorganic content favor decarboxylation over dehydration reactions. Hydrochars show mainly mesoporosity, with a higher pore volume but generally lower specific surface area than biochars. Biochars present negligible availability of NO 3 − and NH 4 + , irrespective of the nitrogen content of the feedstock. For hydrochars, a potential increase in availability of NO 3 − , NH 4 + , PO 4 3 − , and K + with respect to the feedstock is possible. The results from this work can be applied to “engineer” appropriate biochars with respect to soil demands and certification requirements.

  20. ERS orbit control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosengren, Mats

    1991-12-01

    The European remote sensing mission orbit control is addressed. For the commissioning phase, the orbit is defined by the following requirements: Sun synchronous, local time of descending node 10:30; three days repeat cycle with 43 orbital revolutions; overhead Venice tower (12.508206 deg east, 45.314222 deg north). The launch, maneuvers for the initial acquisition of the operational orbit, orbit maintenance maneuvers, evaluation of the orbit control, and the drift of the inclination are summarized.

  1. GOC: General Orbit Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maddox, L.B.; McNeilly, G.S.

    1979-08-01

    GOC (General Orbit Code) is a versatile program which will perform a variety of calculations relevant to isochronous cyclotron design studies. In addition to the usual calculations of interest (e.g., equilibrium and accelerated orbits, focusing frequencies, field isochronization, etc.), GOC has a number of options to calculate injections with a charge change. GOC provides both printed and plotted output, and will follow groups of particles to allow determination of finite-beam properties. An interactive PDP-10 program called GIP, which prepares input data for GOC, is available. GIP is a very easy and convenient way to prepare complicated input data for GOC. Enclosed with this report are several microfiche containing source listings of GOC and other related routines and the printed output from a multiple-option GOC run

  2. JSC Orbital Debris Website Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The website provides information about the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office at JSC, which is the lead NASA center for orbital debris research. It is recognized world-wide for its leadership in addressing orbital debris issues. The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office has taken the international lead in conducting measurements of the environment and in developing the technical consensus for adopting mitigation measures to protect users of the orbital environment. Work at the center continues with developing an improved understanding of the orbital debris environment and measures that can be taken to control its growth. Major Contents: Orbital Debris research is divided into the following five broad efforts. Each area of research contains specific information as follows: 1) Modeling - NASA scientists continue to develop and upgrade orbital debris models to describe and characterize the current and future debris environment. Evolutionary and engineering models are described in detail. Downloadable items include a document in PDF format and executable software. 2) Measurements - Measurements of near-Earth orbital debris are accomplished by conducting ground-based and space-based observations of the orbital debris environment. The data from these sources provide validation of the environment models and identify the presence of new sources. Radar, optical and surface examinations are described. External links to related topics are provided. 3) Protection - Orbital debris protection involves conducting hypervelocity impact measurements to assess the risk presented by orbital debris to operating spacecraft and developing new materials and new designs to provide better protection from the environment with less weight penalty. The data from this work provides the link between the environment defined by the models and the risk presented by that environment to operating spacecraft and provides recommendations on design and operations procedures to reduce the risk as

  3. Seasonal amounts of nutrients in Western cherry fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae) and their relation to nutrient availability on cherry plant surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Wee L; Chapman, Peter S

    2008-10-01

    Relatively little is known about the nutritional ecology of fruit flies in the genus Rhagoletis. In this study, nutrient amounts in male and female western cherry fruit fly, Rhagoletis indifferens Curran, and availability of nitrogen and sugar on surfaces of leaves, fruit, and extrafloral nectaries (EFNs) of sweet cherry trees, were determined from late May to late June 2005 and of sugar from EFNs from mid-May to late June 2007 in Washington state. Protein amounts in male and female flies did not differ over the season. Nitrogen was present on leaves, fruit, and EFNs during the sampling period, but amounts on leaves and fruit were lower in late May than the rest of the season. Sugar amounts in flies did not differ over the season. Sugar was present on leaf, fruit, and EFN surfaces all season, but amounts on all three were lower in late May than later in the season. Fructose and glucose were the predominant sugars on all plant surfaces, but sucrose was also present in nectar from EFNs. In outdoor and field cage experiments in 2004 and 2006, more flies survived when cherry branches with leaves and fruit were present than absent. Results suggest that R. indifferens maintains stable protein and sugar levels throughout the season because sufficient amounts of nutrients are found in cherry trees during this time and that increases in nutrient availability caused by ripening and damaged cherries later in the season do not result in increased amounts of nutrients in flies.

  4. The Surface UV Environment on Planets Orbiting M Dwarfs: Implications for Prebiotic Chemistry and the Need for Experimental Follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Sukrit; Wordsworth, Robin; Sasselov, Dimitar D.

    2017-07-01

    Potentially habitable planets orbiting M dwarfs are of intense astrobiological interest because they are the only rocky worlds accessible to biosignature search over the next 10+ years because of a confluence of observational effects. Simultaneously, recent experimental and theoretical work suggests that UV light may have played a key role in the origin of life on Earth, especially the origin of RNA. Characterizing the UV environment on M-dwarf planets is important for understanding whether life as we know it could emerge on such worlds. In this work, we couple radiative transfer models to observed M-dwarf spectra to determine the UV environment on prebiotic Earth-analog planets orbiting M dwarfs. We calculate dose rates to quantify the impact of different host stars on prebiotically important photoprocesses. We find that M-dwarf planets have access to 100–1000 times less bioactive UV fluence than the young Earth. It is unclear whether UV-sensitive prebiotic chemistry that may have been important to abiogenesis, such as the only known prebiotically plausible pathways for pyrimidine ribonucleotide synthesis, could function on M-dwarf planets. This uncertainty affects objects like the recently discovered habitable-zone planets orbiting Proxima Centauri, TRAPPIST-1, and LHS 1140. Laboratory studies of the sensitivity of putative prebiotic pathways to irradiation level are required to resolve this uncertainty. If steady-state M-dwarf UV output is insufficient to power these pathways, transient elevated UV irradiation due to flares may suffice; laboratory studies can constrain this possibility as well.

  5. The Surface UV Environment on Planets Orbiting M Dwarfs: Implications for Prebiotic Chemistry and the Need for Experimental Follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranjan, Sukrit; Sasselov, Dimitar D. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Wordsworth, Robin, E-mail: sranjan@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02140 (United States)

    2017-07-10

    Potentially habitable planets orbiting M dwarfs are of intense astrobiological interest because they are the only rocky worlds accessible to biosignature search over the next 10+ years because of a confluence of observational effects. Simultaneously, recent experimental and theoretical work suggests that UV light may have played a key role in the origin of life on Earth, especially the origin of RNA. Characterizing the UV environment on M-dwarf planets is important for understanding whether life as we know it could emerge on such worlds. In this work, we couple radiative transfer models to observed M-dwarf spectra to determine the UV environment on prebiotic Earth-analog planets orbiting M dwarfs. We calculate dose rates to quantify the impact of different host stars on prebiotically important photoprocesses. We find that M-dwarf planets have access to 100–1000 times less bioactive UV fluence than the young Earth. It is unclear whether UV-sensitive prebiotic chemistry that may have been important to abiogenesis, such as the only known prebiotically plausible pathways for pyrimidine ribonucleotide synthesis, could function on M-dwarf planets. This uncertainty affects objects like the recently discovered habitable-zone planets orbiting Proxima Centauri, TRAPPIST-1, and LHS 1140. Laboratory studies of the sensitivity of putative prebiotic pathways to irradiation level are required to resolve this uncertainty. If steady-state M-dwarf UV output is insufficient to power these pathways, transient elevated UV irradiation due to flares may suffice; laboratory studies can constrain this possibility as well.

  6. The Surface UV Environment on Planets Orbiting M Dwarfs: Implications for Prebiotic Chemistry and the Need for Experimental Follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranjan, Sukrit; Sasselov, Dimitar D.; Wordsworth, Robin

    2017-01-01

    Potentially habitable planets orbiting M dwarfs are of intense astrobiological interest because they are the only rocky worlds accessible to biosignature search over the next 10+ years because of a confluence of observational effects. Simultaneously, recent experimental and theoretical work suggests that UV light may have played a key role in the origin of life on Earth, especially the origin of RNA. Characterizing the UV environment on M-dwarf planets is important for understanding whether life as we know it could emerge on such worlds. In this work, we couple radiative transfer models to observed M-dwarf spectra to determine the UV environment on prebiotic Earth-analog planets orbiting M dwarfs. We calculate dose rates to quantify the impact of different host stars on prebiotically important photoprocesses. We find that M-dwarf planets have access to 100–1000 times less bioactive UV fluence than the young Earth. It is unclear whether UV-sensitive prebiotic chemistry that may have been important to abiogenesis, such as the only known prebiotically plausible pathways for pyrimidine ribonucleotide synthesis, could function on M-dwarf planets. This uncertainty affects objects like the recently discovered habitable-zone planets orbiting Proxima Centauri, TRAPPIST-1, and LHS 1140. Laboratory studies of the sensitivity of putative prebiotic pathways to irradiation level are required to resolve this uncertainty. If steady-state M-dwarf UV output is insufficient to power these pathways, transient elevated UV irradiation due to flares may suffice; laboratory studies can constrain this possibility as well.

  7. Orbital Infarction due to Sickle Cell Disease without Orbital Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron L. McBride

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell disease is a hemoglobinopathy that results in paroxysmal arteriolar occlusion and tissue infarction that can manifest in a plurality of tissues. Rarely, these infarcted crises manifest in the bony orbit. Orbital infarction usually presents with acute onset of periorbital tenderness, swelling, erythema, and pain. Soft tissue swelling can result in proptosis and attenuation of extraocular movements. Expedient diagnosis of sickle cell orbital infarction is crucial because this is a potentially sight-threatening entity. Diagnosis can be delayed since the presentation has physical and radiographic findings mimicking various infectious and traumatic processes. We describe a patient who presented with sickle cell orbital crisis without pain. This case highlights the importance of maintaining a high index of suspicion in patients with known sickle cell disease or of African descent born outside the United States in a region where screening for hemoglobinopathy is not routine, even when the presentation is not classic.

  8. CONGENITAL ORBITAL TERATOMA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    was done without contrast and 3mm/5mm/10mm slices were obtained to cover the orbit, skull base and brain. The findings included a soft tissue mass arising from the orbit. The left eye ball was extra orbital. There was no defect .... love's Short Practice of Surgery. 7 Edition,. Levis London, 1997; 45-64. 2. Orbital tumor Part 1, ...

  9. Radiovolumetry of the orbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abujamra, S.

    1983-01-01

    The authors present a method called ''Radiovolumetry of the orbit'' that permits the evaluation of the orbital volume from anteroposterior skull X-Rays (CALDWELL 30 0 position). The research was based in the determination of the orbital volume with lead spheres, in 1010 orbits of 505 dry skulls of Anatomy Museums. After the dry skulls was X-rayed six frontal orbital diameters were made, with care to correct the radiographic amplification. PEARSON correlation coeficient test was applied between the mean orbital diameter and the orbital volume. The result was r = 0,8 with P [pt

  10. Use of activated carbon as a support medium for H2S biofiltration and effect of bacterial immobilization on available pore surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Y L; Yan, R; Chen, X G; Geng, A L; Gould, W D; Liang, D T; Koe, L C C

    2004-12-01

    The use of support media for the immobilization of microorganisms is widely known to provide a surface for microbial growth and a shelter that protects the microorganisms from inhibitory compounds. In this study, activated carbon is used as a support medium for the immobilization of microorganisms enriched from municipal sewage activated sludge to remove gas-phase hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a major odorous component of waste gas from sewage treatment plants. A series of designed experiments is used to examine the effect on bacteria-immobilized activated carbon (termed "biocarbon") due to physical adsorption, chemical reaction, and microbial degradation in the overall removal of H2S. H2S breakthrough tests are conducted with various samples, including microbe-immobilized carbon and Teflon discs, salts-medium-washed carbon, and ultra-pure water-washed carbon. The results show a higher removal capacity for the microbe-immobilized activated carbon compared with the activated carbon control in a batch biofilter column. The increase in removal capacity is attributed to the role played by the immobilized microorganisms in metabolizing adsorbed sulfur and sulfur compounds on the biocarbon, hence releasing the adsorption sites for further H2S uptake. The advantage for activated carbon serving as the support medium is to adsorb a high initial concentration of substrate and progressively release this for microbial degradation, hence acting as a buffer for the microorganisms. Results obtained from surface area and pore size distribution analyses of the biocarbon show a correlation between the available surface area and pore volume with the extent of microbial immobilization and H2S uptake. The depletion of surface area and pore volume is seen as one of the factors which cause the onset of column breakthrough. Microbial growth retardation is due to the accumulation of metabolic products (i.e., sulfuric acid); and a lack of water and nutrient salts in the batch biofilter are other

  11. Remotely sensed soil temperatures beneath snow-free skin-surface using thermal observations from tandem polar-orbiting satellites: An analytical three-time-scale model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhan, Wenfeng; Zhou, Ji; Ju, Weimin

    2014-01-01

    Subsurface soil temperature is a key variable of land surface processes and not only responds to but also modulates the interactions of energy fluxes at the Earth's surface. Thermal remote sensing has traditionally been regarded as incapable of detecting the soil temperature beneath the skin-surf...

  12. Building and calibrating a large-extent and high resolution coupled groundwater-land surface model using globally available data-sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutanudjaja, E. H.; Van Beek, L. P.; de Jong, S. M.; van Geer, F.; Bierkens, M. F.

    2012-12-01

    The current generation of large-scale hydrological models generally lacks a groundwater model component simulating lateral groundwater flow. Large-scale groundwater models are rare due to a lack of hydro-geological data required for their parameterization and a lack of groundwater head data required for their calibration. In this study, we propose an approach to develop a large-extent fully-coupled land surface-groundwater model by using globally available datasets and calibrate it using a combination of discharge observations and remotely-sensed soil moisture data. The underlying objective is to devise a collection of methods that enables one to build and parameterize large-scale groundwater models in data-poor regions. The model used, PCR-GLOBWB-MOD, has a spatial resolution of 1 km x 1 km and operates on a daily basis. It consists of a single-layer MODFLOW groundwater model that is dynamically coupled to the PCR-GLOBWB land surface model. This fully-coupled model accommodates two-way interactions between surface water levels and groundwater head dynamics, as well as between upper soil moisture states and groundwater levels, including a capillary rise mechanism to sustain upper soil storage and thus to fulfill high evaporation demands (during dry conditions). As a test bed, we used the Rhine-Meuse basin, where more than 4000 groundwater head time series have been collected for validation purposes. The model was parameterized using globally available data-sets on surface elevation, drainage direction, land-cover, soil and lithology. Next, the model was calibrated using a brute force approach and massive parallel computing, i.e. by running the coupled groundwater-land surface model for more than 3000 different parameter sets. Here, we varied minimal soil moisture storage and saturated conductivities of the soil layers as well as aquifer transmissivities. Using different regularization strategies and calibration criteria we compared three calibration scenarios

  13. Four Years on Orbit at the Moon with LOLA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.; Neumann, G. A.; Mazarico, E.; Torrence, M. H.; Lemoine, F. G.

    2013-12-01

    After four years of near-continuous operation at the Moon, the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) continues to collect altimetry, surface roughness, slope and normal reflectance data. Although the instrument is beginning to show the effects of tens of thousands of thermal cycles and the natural process of the aging of the laser transmitters, LOLA continues to acquire data on the sunlit portion of every orbit on all 5 laser beams when below 100-km altitude. LOLA has acquired over 6x10^9 altimeter measurements, all geodetically controlled to the center-of-mass of the Moon with a radial precision of around 10 cm and an accuracy of about 1 meter. The position of the measurements on the lunar surface is primarily limited by the knowledge of the position of the spacecraft in orbit; in the last year the LRO orbit accuracy has improved significantly as a result of the availability of an accurate gravity model of the Moon from the GRAIL Discovery mission. Our present estimate of positional accuracy is less than 10 m rms but is only achievable with a GRAIL gravity model to at least degree and order 600 because of the perturbing gravitational effect of the Moon's surface features. Significant improvements in the global shape and topography have assisted the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) stereo mapping program, and the identification of potential lunar landing sites for ESA and Russia, particularly in the high-latitude polar regions where 5- and 10-meter average horizontal resolution has been obtained. LOLA's detailed mapping of the polar regions has improved the delineation of permanently-shadowed areas and assisted in the understanding of the LEND neutron data and its relationship to surface slopes. Recently, a global, calibrated LOLA normal albedo dataset at 1064 nm has been developed and is being combined with analysis and modeling by the Diviner team for the identification of the coldest locations in the polar regions.

  14. Evidence for Surface Water Ice in the Lunar Polar Regions Using Reflectance Measurements from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter and Temperature Measurements from the Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Elizabeth A.; Lucey, Paul G.; Lemelin, Myriam; Greenhagen, Benjamin T.; Siegler, Matthew A.; Mazarico, Erwan; Aharonson, Oded; Williams, Jean-Pierre; Hayne, Paul O.; Neumann, Gregory A.; hide

    2017-01-01

    We find that the reflectance of the lunar surface within 5 deg of latitude of theSouth Pole increases rapidly with decreasing temperature, near approximately 110K, behavior consistent with the presence of surface water ice. The North polar region does not show this behavior, nor do South polar surfaces at latitudes more than 5 deg from the pole. This South pole reflectance anomaly persists when analysis is limited to surfaces with slopes less than 10 deg to eliminate false detection due to the brightening effect of mass wasting, and also when the very bright south polar crater Shackleton is excluded from the analysis. We also find that south polar regions of permanent shadow that have been reported to be generally brighter at 1064 nm do not show anomalous reflectance when their annual maximum surface temperatures are too high to preserve water ice. This distinction is not observed at the North Pole. The reflectance excursion on surfaces with maximum temperatures below 110K is superimposed on a general trend of increasing reflectance with decreasing maximum temperature that is present throughout the polar regions in the north and south; we attribute this trend to a temperature or illumination-dependent space weathering effect (e.g. Hemingway et al. 2015). We also find a sudden increase in reflectance with decreasing temperature superimposed on the general trend at 200K and possibly at 300K. This may indicate the presence of other volatiles such as sulfur or organics. We identified and mapped surfaces with reflectances so high as to be unlikely to be part of an ice-free population. In this south we find a similar distribution found by Hayne et al. 2015 based on UV properties. In the north a cluster of pixels near that pole may represent a limited frost exposure.

  15. Evidence for surface water ice in the lunar polar regions using reflectance measurements from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter and temperature measurements from the Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Elizabeth A.; Lucey, Paul G.; Lemelin, Myriam; Greenhagen, Benjamin T.; Siegler, Matthew A.; Mazarico, Erwan; Aharonson, Oded; Williams, Jean-Pierre; Hayne, Paul O.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Paige, David A.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2017-08-01

    We find that the reflectance of the lunar surface within 5° of latitude of the South Pole increases rapidly with decreasing temperature, near ∼110 K, behavior consistent with the presence of surface water ice. The North polar region does not show this behavior, nor do South polar surfaces at latitudes more than 5° from the pole. This South pole reflectance anomaly persists when analysis is limited to surfaces with slopes less than 10° to eliminate false detection due to the brightening effect of mass wasting, and also when the very bright south polar crater Shackleton is excluded from the analysis. We also find that south polar regions of permanent shadow that have been reported to be generally brighter at 1064 nm do not show anomalous reflectance when their annual maximum surface temperatures are too high to preserve water ice. This distinction is not observed at the North Pole. The reflectance excursion on surfaces with maximum temperatures below 110 K is superimposed on a general trend of increasing reflectance with decreasing maximum temperature that is present throughout the polar regions in the north and south; we attribute this trend to a temperature or illumination-dependent space weathering effect (e.g. Hemingway et al., 2015). We also find a sudden increase in reflectance with decreasing temperature superimposed on the general trend at 200 K and possibly at 300 K. This may indicate the presence of other volatiles such as sulfur or organics. We identified and mapped surfaces with reflectances so high as to be unlikely to be part of an ice-free population. In this south we find a similar distribution found by Hayne et al. (2015) based on UV properties. In the north a cluster of pixels near that pole may represent a limited frost exposure.

  16. Global optimum spacecraft orbit control subject to bounded thrust in presence of nonlinear and random disturbances in a low earth orbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer Mekky Ahmed Habib

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of this work is to develop an effective spacecraft orbit control algorithm suitable for spacecraft orbital maneuver and/or rendezvous. The actual governing equation of a spacecraft orbiting the earth is merely nonlinear. Disturbance forces resulting from aerodynamic drag, oblateness of the earth till the fourth order (i.e. J4, and random disturbances are modeled for the initial and target orbits. These disturbances increase the complexity of nonlinear governing equations. Global optimum solutions of the control algorithm parameters are determined throughout real coded genetic algorithms such that the steady state difference between the actual and desired trajectories is minimized. The resulting solutions are constrained to avoid spacecraft collision with the surface of the earth taking into account limited thrust budget.

  17. Use of activated carbon as a support medium for H{sub 2}S biofiltration and effect of bacterial immobilization on available pore surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Y.L.; Yan, R.; Chen, X.G.; Geng, A.L.; Liang, D.T.; Koe, L.C.C. [Institute of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological Univ., Singapore (Singapore); Gould, W.D. [Environmental Lab., CANMET, Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2004-12-01

    The use of support media for the immobilization of micro-organisms widely known to provide a surface for microbial growth and a shelter that protects the microorganisms from inhibitory compounds. In this study, activated carbon is used as a support medium for the immobilization of microorganisms enriched from municipal sewage activated sludge to remove gas-phase hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), a major odorous component of waste gas from sewage treatment plants. A series of designed experiments is used to examine the effect on bacteria-immobilized activated carbon (termed ''biocarbon'') due to physical adsorption, chemical reaction and microbial degradation in the overall removal of H{sub 2}S. H{sub 2}S breakthrough tests are conducted with various samples, including micro-immobilized carbon and Teflon discs, salts-medium-washed carbon, and ultra-pure water-washed carbon. The results show a higher removal capacity for the microbe-immobilized activated carbon compared with the activated carbon control in a batch biofilter column. The increase in removal capacity is attributed to the role played by the immobilized micro-organisms in metabolizing adsorbed sulfur and sulfur compounds on the biocarbon, hence releasing the adsorption sites for further H{sub 2}S uptake. The advantage for activated carbon serving as the support medium is to adsorb a high initial concentration of substrate and progressively release this for microbial degradation, hence acting as a buffer for the microorganisms. Results obtained from surface area and pore size distribution analyses of the biocarbon show a correlation between the available surface area and pore volume with the extent of microbial immobilization and H{sub 2}S uptake. The depletion of surface area and pore volume is seen as one of the factors which cause the onset of column breakthrough. Microbial growth retardation is due to the accumulation of metabolic products (i.e., sulfuric acid); and a lack of water and

  18. Space Tourism: Orbital Debris Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudian, N.; Shajiee, S.; Moghani, T.; Bahrami, M.

    2002-01-01

    Space activities after a phase of research and development, political competition and national prestige have entered an era of real commercialization. Remote sensing, earth observation, and communication are among the areas in which this growing industry is facing competition and declining government money. A project like International Space Station, which draws from public money, has not only opened a window of real multinational cooperation, but also changed space travel from a mere fantasy into a real world activity. Besides research activities for sending man to moon and Mars and other outer planets, space travel has attracted a considerable attention in recent years in the form of space tourism. Four countries from space fairing nations are actively involved in the development of space tourism. Even, nations which are either in early stages of space technology development or just beginning their space activities, have high ambitions in this area. This is worth noting considering their limited resources. At present, trips to space are available, but limited and expensive. To move beyond this point to generally available trips to orbit and week long stays in LEO, in orbital hotels, some of the required basic transportations, living requirements, and technological developments required for long stay in orbit are already underway. For tourism to develop to a real everyday business, not only the price has to come down to meaningful levels, but also safety considerations should be fully developed to attract travelers' trust. A serious hazard to space activities in general and space tourism in particular is space debris in earth orbit. Orbiting debris are man-made objects left over by space operations, hazardous to space missions. Since the higher density of debris population occurs in low earth orbit, which is also the same orbit of interest to space tourism, a careful attention should be paid to the effect of debris on tourism activities. In this study, after a

  19. Orbit determination for ISRO satellite missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Ch. Sreehari; Sinha, S. K.

    Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) has been successful in using the in-house developed orbit determination and prediction software for satellite missions of Bhaskara, Rohini and APPLE. Considering the requirements of satellite missions, software packages are developed, tested and their accuracies are assessed. Orbit determination packages developed are SOIP, for low earth orbits of Bhaskara and Rohini missions, ORIGIN and ODPM, for orbits related to all phases of geo-stationary missions and SEGNIP, for drift and geo-stationary orbits. Software is tested and qualified using tracking data of SIGNE-3, D5-B, OTS, SYMPHONIE satellites with the help of software available with CNES, ESA and DFVLR. The results match well with those available from these agencies. These packages have supported orbit determination successfully throughout the mission life for all ISRO satellite missions. Member-Secretary

  20. Traumatic orbital CSF leak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borumandi, Farzad

    2013-01-01

    Compared to the cerebrospinalfluid (CSF) leak through the nose and ear, the orbital CSF leak is a rare and underreported condition following head trauma. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman with oedematous eyelid swelling and ecchymosis after a seemingly trivial fall onto the right orbit. Apart from the above, she was clinically unremarkable. The CT scan revealed a minimally displaced fracture of the orbital roof with no emphysema or intracranial bleeding. The fractured orbital roof in combination with the oedematous eyelid swelling raised the suspicion for orbital CSF leak. The MRI of the neurocranium demonstrated a small-sized CSF fistula extending from the anterior cranial fossa to the right orbit. The patient was treated conservatively and the lid swelling resolved completely after 5 days. Although rare, orbital CSF leak needs to be included in the differential diagnosis of periorbital swelling following orbital trauma. PMID:24323381

  1. The Effects of Different Tillage Methods on Available Soil Potassium Measured by Various Extractors in a Soil with High Specific Surface Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hosseini

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The effects of any tillage method on soil properties, depends on location (soil, water and air and the number of (years their implementation. Soil compaction reduces yield through increased soil mechanical resistance against root growth and lower water and nutrient use efficiency (Gamda et al. 18 & Ishagh et al 23. Soil surface and sub surface compaction both reduce yield due to limited root growth and plant potassium uptake (Doulan et al. 14. Sabt et al. (50 reported that in the study area, which the lands are mostly illite clay (high specific surface area with sufficient nitrogen, soil potassium is the most important limiting factor for the growth of wheat.Considering the point that loess soils in Golestan Province have a high specific surface area,they can provide potassium for plants to produce crop, but for a higher production, potassium fertilizers should be used. Previous studies indicated that production of wheat is limited due to potassium deficiency (4, 49, 54 and 57. In these soils with a high specific surface area, the speed of movement of potassium from the soil solution is low, and doing solimits wheat yield.In loess soils containing high illite and high specific surface area (eg, soilsin the series of Rahmat Abad of Gorgan, ammonium acetate measured potassium on exchange and solution surfaces, which is highly correlated with grain yield (54 . There is a high correlation between grain yield with overload of potassium and Na TPB extraction (57. The aim of this study was to absorb potassium (limiting factor for plant growth with different tillage systemsat different depths. International recommendations towards reducing the depth and intensity of tillage (from minimum tillage to no-tillage in order to reduce erosion and oxidation of organic substances plays an important role in determining the amount of greenhouse gases. If potassium absorption does not reduceafter reducing tillage intensity,low or no-tillage methods

  2. Eye and orbital cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panfilova, G.V.; Koval', G.Yu.

    1984-01-01

    Radioanatomy of eyes and orbit is described. Diseases of the orbit (developmental anomalies, inflammatory diseases, lacrimal apparatus deseases, toxoplasmosis, tumors and cysts et al.), methods of foreign body localization in the eye are considered. Roentgenograms of the orbit and calculation table for foreign body localization in spherical eyes of dissimilar diameter are presented

  3. Introducing Earth's Orbital Eccentricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oostra, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Most students know that planetary orbits, including Earth's, are elliptical; that is Kepler's first law, and it is found in many science textbooks. But quite a few are mistaken about the details, thinking that the orbit is very eccentric, or that this effect is somehow responsible for the seasons. In fact, the Earth's orbital eccentricity is…

  4. Surface enhancement Raman scattering of tautomeric thiobarbituric acid. Natural bond orbitals and B3LYP/6-311+G (d, p) assignments of the Fourier Infrared and Fourier Raman Spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, C A Téllez; Ramos, J M; Costa Junior, A C; Vieira, Laís S; Rangel, João L; Raniero, L; Fávero, Priscila P; Lemma, Tibebe; Ondar, Grisset F; Versiane, Otavio; Martin, A A

    2013-10-01

    Surface enhancement Raman scattering (SERS) of two tautomer of thiobarbituric acid was obtained using silver and gold nanoparticles. Large band enhancement in the region of the ν(C=S), ν(C=C), δ(CH2), and δ(CNH) vibrational modes was found. Natural bond analysis of the tautomer species revealed expressive values of charge transfer, principally from lone pair electron orbitals of the S, N, and O atoms. Complete vibrational assignment was done for the two tautomers using the B3LYP/6-311+G (d, p) procedure, band deconvolution analysis, and from a rigorous interpretation of the normal modes matrix. The calculated spectra agree well with the experimental ones. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Electron microscope observations of impact crater debris amongst contaminating particulates on materials surfaces exposed in space in low-Earth orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murr, L. E.; Rivas, J. M.; Quinones, S.; Niou, C.-S.; Advani, A. H.; Marquez, B.

    1993-01-01

    Debris particles extracted from a small sampling region on the leading edge of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) spacecraft have been examined by analytical transmission electron microscopy and the elemental frequency observed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry and compared with upper atmosphere (Earth) particle elemental frequency and the average elemental compositions of interplanetary dust particles. A much broader elemental distribution was observed for the exposed spacecraft surface debris milieu. Numerous metal microfragment analyses, particularly aluminum and stainless steel, were compared with scanning electron microscope observations-of impact crater features, and the corresponding elemental spectra on selected LDEF aluminium tray clamps and stainless steel bolts. The compositions and melt features for these impact craters and ejecta have been shown to be consistent with microcrystalline debris fragments in the case of aluminum, and these observations suggest an ever changing debris milieu on exposed surfaces for space craft and space system materials.

  6. An Orbit Propagation Software for Mars Orbiting Spacecraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Joo Song

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available An orbit propagation software for the Mars orbiting spacecraft has been developed and verified in preparations for the future Korean Mars missions. Dynamic model for Mars orbiting spacecraft has been studied, and Mars centered coordinate systems are utilized to express spacecraft state vectors. Coordinate corrections to the Mars centered coordinate system have been made to adjust the effects caused by Mars precession and nutation. After spacecraft enters Sphere of Influence (SOI of the Mars, the spacecraft experiences various perturbation effects as it approaches to Mars. Every possible perturbation effect is considered during integrations of spacecraft state vectors. The Mars50c gravity field model and the Mars-GRAM 2001 model are used to compute perturbation effects due to Mars gravity field and Mars atmospheric drag, respectively. To compute exact locations of other planets, JPL's DE405 ephemerides are used. Phobos and Deimos's ephemeris are computed using analytical method because their informations are not released with DE405. Mars Global Surveyor's mapping orbital data are used to verify the developed propagator performances. After one Martian day propagation (12 orbital periods, the results show about maximum ±5 meter errors, in every position state components(radial, cross-track and along-track, when compared to these from the Astrogator propagation in the Satellite Tool Kit. This result shows high reliability of the developed software which can be used to design near Mars missions for Korea, in future.

  7. Space station orbit maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, D. I.; Jones, R. M.

    1983-01-01

    The orbit maintenance problem is examined for two low-earth-orbiting space station concepts - the large, manned Space Operations Center (SOC) and the smaller, unmanned Science and Applications Space Platform (SASP). Atmospheric drag forces are calculated, and circular orbit altitudes are selected to assure a 90 day decay period in the event of catastrophic propulsion system failure. Several thrusting strategies for orbit maintenance are discussed. Various chemical and electric propulsion systems for orbit maintenance are compared on the basis of propellant resupply requirements, power requirements, Shuttle launch costs, and technology readiness.

  8. Nontraumatic orbital roof encephalocele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Amber; Maugans, Todd; Ngo, Thang; Ikeda, Jamie

    2017-02-01

    Intraorbital meningoencephaloceles occur most commonly as a complication of traumatic orbital roof fractures. Nontraumatic congenital orbital meningoncephaloceles are very rare, with most secondary to destructive processes affecting the orbit and primary skull defects. Treatment for intraorbital meningoencephaloceles is surgical repair, involving the excision of herniated brain parenchyma and meninges and reconstruction of the osseous defect. Most congenital lesions present in infancy with obvious globe and orbital deformities; we report an orbital meningoencephalocele in a 3-year-old girl who presented with ptosis. Copyright © 2017 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Deadly Sunflower Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Douglas P.

    2018-04-01

    Solar radiation pressure is usually very effective at removing hazardous millimeter-sized debris from distant orbits around asteroidsand other small solar system bodies (Hamilton and Burns 1992). Theprimary loss mechanism, driven by the azimuthal component of radiationpressure, is eccentricity growth followed by a forced collision withthe central body. One large class of orbits, however, neatly sidestepsthis fate. Orbits oriented nearly perpendicular to the solar directioncan maintain their face-on geometry, oscillating slowly around a stableequilibrium orbit. These orbits, designated sunflower orbits, arerelated to terminator orbits studied by spacecraft mission designers(Broschart etal. 2014).Destabilization of sunflower orbits occurs only for particles smallenough that radiation pressure is some tens of percent the strength ofthe central body's direct gravity. This greatly enhanced stability,which follows from the inability of radiation incident normal to theorbit to efficiently drive eccentricities, presents a threat tospacecraft missions, as numerous dangerous projectiles are potentiallyretained in orbit. We have investigated sunflower orbits insupport of the New Horizons, Aida, and Lucy missions and find thatthese orbits are stable for hazardous particle sizes at asteroids,comets, and Kuiper belt objects of differing dimensions. Weinvestigate the sources and sinks for debris that might populate suchorbits, estimate timescales and equilibrium populations, and willreport on our findings.

  10. Primary orbital squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana L. Campos Arbulú

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Primary orbital squamous cell carcinoma is a rare entity. There is little published literature. We report a case of primary squamous cell carcinoma of the orbital soft tissues. Surgical resection offered the best treatment for the patient. Complete resection of the lesion was achieved. The patient received adjuvant radiotherapy due to the proximity of the lesion to the surgical margins. Surgical treatment is feasible and should be considered as part of the surgeon's arsenal. However, therapeutic decisions must be made on a case-by-case basis

  11. Durability test of geomembrane liners presumed to avail near surface disposal facilities for low-level waste generated from research, industrial and medical facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, Hisakazu; Amazawa, Hiroya; Sakai, Akihiro; Kurosawa, Ryohei; Sakamoto, Yoshiaki; Kanno, Naohiro; Kashima, Takahiro

    2014-02-01

    The Low-level Radioactive Waste Disposal Project Center will construct near surface disposal facilities for radioactive wastes from research, industrial and medical facilities. The disposal facilities consist of “concrete pit type” for low-level radioactive wastes and “trench type” for very low level radioactive wastes. As for the trench type disposal facility, two kinds of facility designs are on projects – one for a normal trench type disposal facility without any of engineered barriers and the other for a trench type disposal facility with geomembrane liners that could prevent from causing environmental effects of non radioactive toxic materials contained in the waste packages. The disposal facility should be designed taking basic properties of durability on geomembrane liners into account, for it is exposed to natural environment on a long-term basis. This study examined mechanical strength and permeability properties to assess the durability on the basis of an indoor accelerated exposure experiment targeting the liner materials presumed to avail the conceptual design so far. Its results will be used for the basic and detailed design henceforth by confirming the empirical degradation characteristic with the progress of the exposure time. (author)

  12. Determination of the external contamination and cross-contamination by cytotoxic drugs on the surfaces of vials available on the Swiss market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury-Souverain, Sandrine; Nussbaumer, Susanne; Mattiuzzo, Marc; Bonnabry, Pascal

    2014-04-01

    The external contamination and cross-contamination by cytotoxic drugs on the surface (outside and septum) of 133 vials from various manufacturers and available on the Swiss market were evaluated. All of the tested vials contained one of the following active ingredients: cyclophosphamide, cytarabine, doxorubicin, epirubicin, etoposide phosphate, gemcitabine, ifosfamide, irinotecan, methotrexate or vincristine. The validated wiping liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method used in this study allowed for the simultaneous determination of these 10 cytotoxic drugs in less than 30 min. External contamination by cytotoxic drugs was detected on 63% of tested vials (outside and septum). The highest contamination level was observed on etoposide phosphate vials with 1896.66 ng of active ingredient on the outside of the vial. Approximately 20% of the contaminated vials had greater than 10 ng of cytotoxic drugs. Chemical contamination on the septum was detected on 38% of the vials. No contamination or very low levels of cytotoxic drugs, less than 1 ng per vial, were detected on the vials protected by plastic shrink-wrap. Traces of cytotoxic drugs different from the active ingredient were detected on 35% of the tested vials. Handling cytotoxic vials with gloves and having a procedure for the decontamination of vials are of the utmost importance for reducing exposure to cytotoxic drugs. Moreover, manufacturers must improve their procedures to provide products free from any contamination.

  13. Titan Orbiter with Aerorover Mission (TOAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittler, Edward C.; Cooper, J. F.; Mahaffey, P.; Esper, J.; Fairbrother, D.; Farley, R.; Pitman, J.; Kojiro, D. R.; TOAM Team

    2006-12-01

    We propose to develop a new mission to Titan called Titan Orbiter with Aerorover Mission (TOAM). This mission is motivated by the recent discoveries of Titan, its atmosphere and its surface by the Huygens Probe, and a combination of in situ, remote sensing and radar mapping measurements of Titan by the Cassini orbiter. Titan is a body for which Astrobiology (i.e., prebiotic chemistry) will be the primary science goal of any future missions to it. TOAM is planned to use an orbiter and balloon technology (i.e., aerorover). Aerobraking will be used to put payload into orbit around Titan. The Aerorover will probably use a hot air balloon concept using the waste heat from the MMRTG 500 watts. Orbiter support for the Aerorover is unique to our approach for Titan. Our strategy to use an orbiter is contrary to some studies using just a single probe with balloon. Autonomous operation and navigation of the Aerorover around Titan will be required, which will include descent near to the surface to collect surface samples for analysis (i.e., touch and go technique). The orbiter can provide both relay station and GPS roles for the Aerorover. The Aerorover will have all the instruments needed to sample Titan’s atmosphere, surface, possible methane lakes-rivers, use multi-spectral imagers for surface reconnaissance; to take close up surface images; take core samples and deploy seismometers during landing phase. Both active and passive broadband remote sensing techniques will be used for surface topography, winds and composition measurements.

  14. Exploratory orbit analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michelotti, L.

    1989-03-01

    Unlike the other documents in these proceedings, this paper is neither a scientific nor a technical report. It is, rather, a short personal essay which attempts to describe an Exploratory Orbit Analysis (EOA) environment. Analyzing the behavior of a four or six dimensional nonlinear dynamical system is at least as difficult as analyzing events in high-energy collisions; the consequences of doing it badly, or slowly, would be at least as devastating; and yet the level of effort and expenditure invested in the latter, the very attention paid to it by physicists at large, must be two orders of magnitude greater than that given to the former. It is difficult to choose the model which best explains the behavior of a physical device if one does not first understand the behavior of the available models. The time is ripe for the development of a functioning EOA environment, which I will try to describe in this paper to help us achieve this goal

  15. Exploratory orbit analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelotti, L.

    1989-03-01

    Unlike the other documents in these proceedings, this paper is neither a scientific nor a technical report. It is, rather, a short personal essay which attempts to describe an Exploratory Orbit Analysis (EOA) environment. Analyzing the behavior of a four or six dimensional nonlinear dynamical system is at least as difficult as analyzing events in high-energy collisions; the consequences of doing it badly, or slowly, would be at least as devastating; and yet the level of effort and expenditure invested in the latter, the very attention paid to it by physicists at large, must be two orders of magnitude greater than that given to the former. It is difficult to choose the model which best explains the behavior of a physical device if one does not first understand the behavior of the available models. The time is ripe for the development of a functioning EOA environment, which I will try to describe in this paper to help us achieve this goal.

  16. Orbital Eccrine Hidrocystoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Marangoz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A 29-year-old female patient presented with a painless mass on her upper eyelid medially. She noticed the mass 4 years earlier and it had increased in size over time. She had no diplopia, eyelid swelling, skin lesion overlying the mass, or visual disturbances. On ocular examination, eye movements and funduscopy were normal. The mass was movable and painless with palpation. Magnetic resonance imaging with contrast showed a 12x8x7 mm well-circumscribed cystic lesion with no contrast dye appearance. Surgical removal was performed delicately and no capsular rupture occured. Pathological examination revealed an eccrine hidrocystoma. Our aim is to underline that eccrine hidrocystoma should be included in differential diagnosis of orbital masses.

  17. Generating Animated Displays of Spacecraft Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candey, Robert M.; Chimiak, Reine A.; Harris, Bernard T.

    2005-01-01

    Tool for Interactive Plotting, Sonification, and 3D Orbit Display (TIPSOD) is a computer program for generating interactive, animated, four-dimensional (space and time) displays of spacecraft orbits. TIPSOD utilizes the programming interface of the Satellite Situation Center Web (SSCWeb) services to communicate with the SSC logic and database by use of the open protocols of the Internet. TIPSOD is implemented in Java 3D and effects an extension of the preexisting SSCWeb two-dimensional static graphical displays of orbits. Orbits can be displayed in any or all of the following seven reference systems: true-of-date (an inertial system), J2000 (another inertial system), geographic, geomagnetic, geocentric solar ecliptic, geocentric solar magnetospheric, and solar magnetic. In addition to orbits, TIPSOD computes and displays Sibeck's magnetopause and Fairfield's bow-shock surfaces. TIPSOD can be used by the scientific community as a means of projection or interpretation. It also has potential as an educational tool.

  18. GPM GROUND VALIDATION SATELLITE SIMULATED ORBITS LPVEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Satellite Simulated Orbits LPVEx dataset is available in the Orbital database, which takes account for the atmospheric profiles, the...

  19. On periodic orbits in discrete-time cascade systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huimin Li

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We present some results on existence, minimum period, number of periodic orbits, and stability of periodic orbits in discrete-time cascade systems. Some examples are presented to illustrate these results.

  20. Sorting and quantifying orbital angular momentum of laser beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schulze, C

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel tool for sorting the orbital angular momentum and to determine the orbital angular momentum density of laser beams, which is based on the use of correlation filters....

  1. Prospective Ukrainian lunar orbiter mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkuratov, Y.; Litvinenko, L.; Shulga, V.; Yatskiv, Y.; Kislyuk, V.

    Ukraine has launch vehicles that are able to deliver about 300 kg to the lunar orbit. Future Ukrainian lunar program may propose a polar orbiter. This orbiter should fill principal information gaps in our knowledge about the Moon after Clementine and Lunar Prospector missions and the future missions, like Smart-1, Lunar-A, and Selene. We consider that this can be provided by radar studies of the Moon with supporting optical polarimetric observations from lunar polar orbit. These experiments allow one to better understand global structure of the lunar surface in a wide range of scales, from microns to kilometers. We propose three instruments for the prospective lunar orbiter. They are: a synthetic aperture imaging radar (SAR), ground-penetrating radar (GPR), and imaging polarimeter (IP). The main purpose of SAR is to study with high resolution (50 m) the permanently shadowed sites in the lunar polar regions. These sites are cold traps for volatiles, and have a potential of resource utilization. Possible presence of water ice in the regolith in the sites makes them interesting for permanent manned bases on the Moon. Radar imaging and mapping of other interesting regions could be also planned. Multi-frequencies multi-polarization soun d ing of the lunar surface with GPR can provide information about internal structure of the lunar surface from meters to several hundred meters deep. GPR can be used for measuring the megaregolith layer properties, detection of cryptomaria, and studies of internal structure of the largest craters. IP will be a CCD camera with an additional suite of polarizers. Modest spatial resolution (100 m) should provide a total coverage or a large portion of the lunar surface in oblique viewing basically at large phase angles. Polarization degree at large (>90°) phase angles bears information about characteristic size of the regolith particles. Additional radiophysical experiments are considered with the use of the SAR system, e.g., bistatic radar

  2. Congenital orbital teratoma

    OpenAIRE

    Aiyub, Shereen; Chan, Weng Onn; Szetu, John; Sullivan, Laurence J; Pater, John; Cooper, Peter; Selva, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of mature congenital orbital teratoma managed with lid-sparing exenteration and dermis fat graft. This is a case report on the management of congenital orbital teratoma. A full-term baby was born in Fiji with prolapsed right globe which was surrounded by a nonpulsatile, cystic mass. Clinical and imaging features were consistent with congenital orbital teratoma. Due to limited surgical expertise, the patient was transferred to Adelaide, Australia for further management. The p...

  3. Pictorial essay: Orbital tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narula, Mahender K; Chaudhary, Vikas; Baruah, Dhiraj; Kathuria, Manoj; Anand, Rama

    2010-01-01

    Tuberculosis of the orbit is rare, even in places where tuberculosis is endemic. The disease may involve soft tissue, the lacrimal gland, or the periosteum or bones of the orbital wall. Intracranial extension, in the form of extradural abscess, and infratemporal fossa extension has been described. This pictorial essay illustrates the imaging findings of nine histopathologically confirmed cases of orbital tuberculosis. All these patients responded to antituberculous treatment

  4. Radiology of orbital trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.K.; Lazo, A.; Metes, J.J.

    1988-01-01

    Computed tomography has become the gold standard against which to measure orbital imaging modalities. The simultaneous display of bone, soft tissues, paranasal sinuses, and intracranial structures is a unique advantage. Radiation dose and cost have been cited as disadvantages. These would suggest that CT be reserved for the patient with significant orbital injury or difficult diagnostic problems. Magnetic resonance is limited in the investigation of orbital trauma

  5. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: ACCESS 2000 - niveau 1 : 13 & 14.11.03 (2 jours) C++ for Particle Physicists : 17 – 21.11.03 (6 X 3-hour lectures) Programmation automate Schneider TSX Premium – niveau 2 : 18 – 21.11.03 (4 jours) JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition – Part 1 : WEB Applications : 20 & ...

  6. Bony orbital distances among the Filipino population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Constance M; Jimenez, David F; Laskey, Antoinette; Alcantara, Briccio G; Braddock, Stephen R

    2002-03-01

    Six hundred and seventy seven radiographs were selected from the logs of films taken in a major hospital in Metro Manila, Philippines over the course of the previous year. Two hundred and eighty-eight female and 389 male, healthy Filipinos between the ages of birth and twenty years were selected based on the availability of a modified Waters' projection and lateral skull film taken at the same time. Measurements for the lateral orbital wall were made at the site of the suture on the medial surface of the zygomatic bone. The medial orbital wall measurement was the distance between the dacrya using a correction factor formula of CF = D-d/D where D is the target film distance and d is the object film distance (1). The actual bony measurements were calculated. The data was gathered and plotted according to sex and in age in years. Graphs were generated using SAS over a graph software. Lines were smooth using cubic spline technique developed by Reinsch with the smoothest value of 75 (2). The mean plus two, four, and six standard deviations were included in each of the curves.

  7. Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. Places available The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses : Introduction à Outlook : 19.8.2004 (1 journée) Outlook (short course I) : E-mail : 31.8.2004 (2 hours, morning) Outlook (short course II) : Calendar, Tasks and Notes : 31.8.2004 (2 hours, afternoon) Instructor-led WBTechT Study or Follow-up for Microsoft Applications : 7.9.2004 (morning) Outlook (short course III) : Meetings and Delegation : 7.9.2004 (2 hours, afternoon) Introduction ...

  8. Dependence of Excited State Potential Energy Surfaces on the Spatial Overlap of the Kohn-Sham Orbitals and the Amount of Nonlocal Hartree-Fock Exchange in Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plötner, Jürgen; Tozer, David J; Dreuw, Andreas

    2010-08-10

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) with standard GGA or hybrid exchange-correlation functionals is not capable of describing the potential energy surface of the S1 state of Pigment Yellow 101 correctly; an additional local minimum is observed at a twisted geometry with substantial charge transfer (CT) character. To investigate the influence of nonlocal exact orbital (Hartree-Fock) exchange on the shape of the potential energy surface of the S1 state in detail, it has been computed along the twisting coordinate employing the standard BP86, B3LYP, and BHLYP xc-functionals as well as the long-range separated (LRS) exchange-correlation (xc)-functionals LC-BOP, ωB97X, ωPBE, and CAM-B3LYP and compared to RI-CC2 benchmark results. Additionally, a recently suggested Λ-parameter has been employed that measures the amount of CT in an excited state by calculating the spatial overlap of the occupied and virtual molecular orbitals involved in the transition. Here, the error in the calculated S1 potential energy curves at BP86, B3LYP, and BHLYP can be clearly related to the Λ-parameter, i.e., to the extent of charge transfer. Additionally, it is demonstrated that the CT problem is largely alleviated when the BHLYP xc-functional is employed, although it still exhibits a weak tendency to underestimate the energy of CT states. The situation improves drastically when LRS-functionals are employed within TDDFT excited state calculations. All tested LRS-functionals give qualitatively the correct potential energy curves of the energetically lowest excited states of P. Y. 101 along the twisting coordinate. While LC-BOP and ωB97X overcorrect the CT problem and now tend to give too large excitation energies compared to other non-CT states, ωPBE and CAM-B3LYP are in excellent agreement with the RI-CC2 results, with respect to both the correct shape of the potential energy curve as well as the absolute values of the calculated excitation energies.

  9. Congenital orbital encephalocele, orbital dystopia, and exophthalmos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kun; Kim, Han Joon

    2012-07-01

    We present here an exceedingly rare variant of a nonmidline basal encephalocele of the spheno-orbital type, and this was accompanied with orbital dystopia in a 56-year-old man. On examination, his left eye was located more inferolaterally than his right eye, and the patient said this had been this way since his birth. The protrusion of his left eye was aggravated when he is tired. His naked visual acuity was 0.7/0.3, and the ocular pressure was 14/12 mm Hg. The exophthalmometry was 10/14 to 16 mm. His eyeball motion was not restricted, yet diplopia was present in all directions. The distance from the midline to the medial canthus was 20/15 mm. The distance from the midline to the midpupillary line was 35/22 mm. The vertical dimension of the palpebral fissure was 12/9 mm. The height difference of the upper eyelid margin was 11 mm, and the height difference of the lower eyelid margin was 8 mm. Facial computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed left sphenoid wing hypoplasia and herniation of the left anterior temporal pole and dura mater into the orbit, and this resulted into left exophthalmos and encephalomalacia in the left anterior temporal pole. To the best of our knowledge, our case is the second case of basal encephalocele and orbital dystopia.

  10. Progress in reconstruction of orbital wall after fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu-Lu Xu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available At present, the orbital wall fracture is a very common facial trauma. The orbital contents are often incarcerated in the fracture cracks resulting in changes in the orbital eye position, then can bring a lifetime of diplopia and enophthalmos, which greatly affects the visual acuity and facial appearance. The purpose of repairing of orbital fracture is reconstructing orbital wall, repairing defect to correct eye position, avoiding enophthalmos and recovering visual function. The review will provide a comprehensive overview of orbital fracture reconstruction.

  11. Amplitude damping channel for orbital angular momentum

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dudley, Angela L

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the pioneering work on the entanglement of the orbital angular momentum (OAM) states of light, much attention has been devoted to the subject, with particular attention into the quantum aspects of information processing using OAM. Furthermore...

  12. Orbital-angular-momentum entanglement in turbulence

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hamadou Ibrahim, A

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The turbulence-induced decay of orbital-angular-momentum (OAM) entanglement between two photons is investigated numerically and experimentally. To compare our resultswith previouswork,we simulate the turbulent atmosphere with a single phase screen...

  13. Orbital and adnexal sarcoidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prabhakaran, Venkatesh C.; Saeed, Perooz; Esmaeli, Bita; Sullivan, Timothy J.; Mcnab, Alan; Davis, Garry; Valenzuela, Alejandra; Leibovitch, Igal; Kesler, Anat; Sivak-Callcott, Jennifer; Hoyama, Erika; Selva, Dinesh

    2007-01-01

    To present the clinical features and management in a series of patients with orbital and adnexal sarcoidosis. This multicenter retrospective study included patients with biopsy-proven noncaseating granuloma involving the orbit or adnexa and evidence of systemic sarcoidosis. Clinical records were

  14. Update on orbital reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Tzung; Chen, Yu-Ray

    2010-08-01

    Orbital trauma is common and frequently complicated by ocular injuries. The recent literature on orbital fracture is analyzed with emphasis on epidemiological data assessment, surgical timing, method of approach and reconstruction materials. Computed tomographic (CT) scan has become a routine evaluation tool for orbital trauma, and mobile CT can be applied intraoperatively if necessary. Concomitant serious ocular injury should be carefully evaluated preoperatively. Patients presenting with nonresolving oculocardiac reflex, 'white-eyed' blowout fracture, or diplopia with a positive forced duction test and CT evidence of orbital tissue entrapment require early surgical repair. Otherwise, enophthalmos can be corrected by late surgery with a similar outcome to early surgery. The use of an endoscope-assisted approach for orbital reconstruction continues to grow, offering an alternative method. Advances in alloplastic materials have improved surgical outcome and shortened operating time. In this review of modern orbital reconstruction, several controversial issues such as surgical indication, surgical timing, method of approach and choice of reconstruction material are discussed. Preoperative fine-cut CT image and thorough ophthalmologic examination are key elements to determine surgical indications. The choice of surgical approach and reconstruction materials much depends on the surgeon's experience and the reconstruction area. Prefabricated alloplastic implants together with image software and stereolithographic models are significant advances that help to more accurately reconstruct the traumatized orbit. The recent evolution of orbit reconstruction improves functional and aesthetic results and minimizes surgical complications.

  15. Orbital wall fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iinuma, Toshitaka; Ishio, Ken-ichirou; Yoshinami, Hiroyoshi; Kuriyama, Jun-ichi; Hirota, Yoshiharu.

    1993-01-01

    A total of 59 cases of mild facial fractures (simple orbital wall fractures, 34 cases, other facial fractures, 25 cases) with the clinical suspects of orbital wall fractures were evaluated both by conventional views (Waters' and Caldwell views) and coronal CT scans. Conventional views were obtained, as an average, after 4 days and CT after 7 days of injuries. Both the medial wall and the floor were evaluated at two sites, i.e., anterior and posterior. The ethmoid-maxillary plate was also included in the study. The degree of fractures was classified as, no fractures, fractures of discontinuity, dislocation and fragmentation. The coronal CT images in bone window condition was used as reference and the findings were compared between conventional views and CT. The correct diagnosis was obtained as follows: orbital floor (anterior, 78%, posterior, 73%), medial orbital wall (anterior, 72%, posterior, 72%) and ethmoid-maxillary plate (64%). The false positive diagnosis was as follows: orbital floor (anterior only, 13%), medial orbital wall (anterior only, 7%) and ethmoid-maxillary plate (11%). The false negative diagnosis was as follows: orbital floor (anterior, 9%, posterior, 10%), medial orbital wall (anterior, 21%, posterior, 28%) and ethmoid-maxillary plate (21%). The results were compared with those of others in the past. (author)

  16. Places available**

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    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval Tel. 74924technical.training@cern.ch ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: MATLAB Fundamentals and Programming Techniques (ML01) : 2 & 3.12.03 (2 days) Oracle 8i : SQL : 3 - 5.12.03 (3 days) The EDMS MTF in practice : 5.12.03 (afternoon, free of charge) Modeling Dynamic Systems with Simulink (SL01) : 8 & 9.12.03 (2 days) Signal Processing with MATLAB (SG01) : 11 & 12.12.03 (2 days) The JAVA Programming Language - l...

  17. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

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    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: MATLAB Fundamentals and Programming Techniques (ML01) :2 & 3.12.03 (2 days) Oracle 8i : SQL : 3 - 5.12.03 (3 days) The EDMS MTF in practice : 5.12.03 (afternoon, free of charge) Modeling Dynamic Systems with Simulink (SL01) : 8 & 9.12.03 (2 days) Signal Processing with MATLAB (SG01) : 11 & ...

  18. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt.TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: The JAVA Programming Language Level 1 : 9 & 10.1.2004 (2 days) The JAVA Programming Language Level 2 : 11 to 13.1.2004 (3 days) LabVIEW base 1 : 25 - 27.2.2004 (3 jours) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom : 10.3.2004 (afternoon - free of charge) C++ for Particle Physicists : 8 - 12.3.2004 ( 6 X 4-hour sessions) LabVIEW Basics 1 : 22 - 24.3.20...

  19. Places available**

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: The JAVA Programming Language Level 1 :9 & 10.1.2004 (2 days) The JAVA Programming Language Level 2 : 11 to 13.1.2004 (3 days) Hands-on Introduction to Python Programming : 16 - 18.2.2004 (3 days - free of charge) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom : 10.3.2004 (afternoon - free of charge) C++ for Particle Physicists : 8 - 12.3.2004...

  20. Places available**

    CERN Document Server

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    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval Tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 1 : WEB Applications : 20 & 21.11.03(2 days) FrontPage 2000 - niveau 1 : 20 & 21.11.03 (2 jours) Oracle 8i : SQL : 3 - 5.12.03 (3 days) Oracle 8i : Programming with PL/SQL : 8 - 10.12.03 (3 days) The JAVA Programming Language - leve...

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    2003-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Project Planning with MS-Project : 15 & 22.1.2004 (2 days) Joint PVSS JCOP Framework Course : 2 sessions : 2 - 6.2.2004 and 16 - 20-2-2004 (5 days) Hands-on Introduction to Python Programming : 16 - 18.2.2004 (3 days - free of charge) C++ for Particle Physicists : 8 - 12.3.2004 ( 6 X 4-hour sessions)

  2. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses : EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 20 & 22.10.03 (2 jours) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom (free of charge) : 23.10.03 (half day) The EDMS-MTF in practice (free of charge) :  28 -  30.10.03 (6 half-day sessions) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1 : 3, 4, 12, 13.11.03 (4 days) LabVIEW TestStand ver. 3 : 4 & 5.11.03 (2 days) Introduction to Pspice : 4.11.03 p.m. (half-day) Hands-on Introduction to Python Programm...

  3. Influence of surface melting effects and availability of reagent ions on LDI-MS efficiency after UV laser irradiation of Pd nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silina, Yuliya E; Koch, Marcus; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2015-03-01

    In this study, the influence of surface morphology, reagent ions and surface restructuring effects on atmospheric pressure laser desorption/ionization (LDI) for small molecules after laser irradiation of palladium self-assembled nanoparticular (Pd-NP) structures has been systematically studied. The dominant role of surface morphology during the LDI process, which was previously shown for silicon-based substrates, has not been investigated for metal-based substrates before. In our experiments, we demonstrated that both the presence of reagent ions and surface reorganization effects--in particular, melting--during laser irradiation was required for LDI activity of the substrate. The synthesized Pd nanostructures with diameters ranging from 60 to 180 nm started to melt at similar temperatures, viz. 890-898 K. These materials exhibited different LDI efficiencies, however, with Pd-NP materials being the most effective surface in our experiments. Pd nanostructures of diameters >400-800 nm started to melt at higher temperatures, >1000 K, making such targets more resistant to laser irradiation, with subsequent loss of LDI activity. Our data demonstrated that both melting of the surface structures and the presence of reagent ions were essential for efficient LDI of the investigated low molecular weight compounds. This dependence of LDI on melting points was exploited further to improve the performance of Pd-NP-based sampling targets. For example, adding sodium hypophosphite as reducing agent to Pd electrolyte solutions during synthesis lowered the melting points of the Pd-NP materials and subsequently gave reduced laser fluence requirements for LDI. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Pursuit/evasion in orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, H. J.; Cliff, E. M.; Lutze, F. H.

    1981-01-01

    Maneuvers available to a spacecraft having sufficient propellant to escape an antisatellite satellite (ASAT) attack are examined. The ASAT and the evading spacecraft are regarded as being in circular orbits, and equations of motion are developed for the ASAT to commence a two-impulse maneuver sequence. The ASAT employs thrust impulses which yield a minimum-time-to-rendezvous, considering available fuel. Optimal evasion is shown to involve only in-plane maneuvers, and begins as soon as the ASAT launch information is gathered and thrust activation can be initiated. A closest approach, along with a maximum evasion by the target spacecraft, is calculated to be 14,400 ft. Further research to account for ASATs in parking orbit and for generalization of a continuous control-modeled differential game is indicated.

  5. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Introduction to Databases :  3 - 4.7.01 (2 days) The JAVA programming language Level 2 : 4 - 6.7.01 (3 days) Enterprise JavaBeans :  9 - 11.7.01 (3 days) Design Patterns :  10 - 12.7.01 (3 days) C++ for Particle Physicists :  23 - 27.7.01 (6 3-hour lectures) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt.

  6. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Introduction to Perl 5 : 2 - 3.7.01 (2 days) Introduction to Databases :  3 - 4.7.01 (2 days) JAVA programming language Level 2 : 4 - 6.7.01 (3 days) Enterprise JavaBeans :  9 - 11.7.01 (3 days) Design Patterns :  10 - 12.7.01 (3 days) C++ for Particle Physicists :  23 - 27.7.01 (6 3-hour lectures) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt.

  7. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: CLEAN-2002 : Travailler en salle blanche (cours gratuit) : 13.08.2002 (matin) Introduction to the CERN Enginnering Data Management System :  27.8.02  (1 day) The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Advanced Users :  28.8.02  (1 day) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : Technical Training or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. Technical Training Monique Duval Tel.74924 monique.duval@cern.ch    

  8. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: C++ Programming Level 2 - Traps & Pitfalls:  16 - 19.7.02 (4 days) Frontpage 2000 - level 1 :  22 - 23.7.02  (2 days) Introduction à Windows 2000 au CERN : 24.7.02 (après-midi) CLEAN-2002 : Travailler en salle blanche (cours gratuit) : 13.08.2002 (matin) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : Technical Training or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. Technical Training Monique Duval Tel.74924 monique.duval@cern.ch

  9. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: December 2002   PCAD Schémas - Débutants :  5 & 6.12.02  (2 jours) PCAD PCB - Débutants :  9 - 11.12.02  (3 jours) FrontPage 2000 - level 1:  9 & 10.12.02  (2 days) Introduction à la CAO Cadence (cours gratuit) :  10 & 11.12.02  (2 jours) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : Technical Training or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. Technical Training Monique Duval Tel.74924 monique.duval@cern.ch

  10. Places available**

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    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Conception de PCB rapides dans le flot Cadence : 11.6.03 (matin) EXCEL 2000 - level 1 : 12 & 13.6.03 (2 days) Introduction to PVSS : 16.6.03 (p.m.) Basic PVSS : 17 - 19.6.03 (3 days) Réalisation de PCB rapides dans le flot Cadence : 17.6.03 (matin) PVSS - JCOP Framework Tutorial : 20.6.03 (1 day) Programmation automate Schneider : Programmation automate Schneider TSX Premium - 2ème niveau : 24 - 27.6.03 (4 jours) - audience : toute personne qui veux maitriser la mise en uvre et la programmation des fonctions spécialisées d'un automate TSX Premium - objectifs : maitriser la mise en uvre et la programmation des fonctions spécialisées d'un automate TSX Premium Cours de sécurité : Etre TSO au CERN : Prochaines sessions : 24, 25 & 27.6.03 - 4, 5 & 7.11.03 (session de 3 jours) ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. If you wish to participate in one of these courses, pl...

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    Enseignement Technique; Tél. 74924; Technical Training; Monique Duval; Tel. 74924

    2000-01-01

    Places available Places are available in the following courses:   LabView hands-on 13.11.00 4 hours LabView Basics 1 14 - 16.11.00 3 days Nouveautés de WORD 19 et 20.10.00 2 jours ACCESS 1er niveau 30 - 31.10.00 2 jours Advanced aspects of the C language 2 - 3.11.00 2 days Introduction to Oracle SQL and PL/SQL 13 - 17.11.00 5 days C++ for Particle Physicists 20 - 24.11.00 6 lectures Develop PL/SQL Program Units 20 - 22.11.00 3 days Oracle Application Server Develop Web-Based Applications with PL/SQL 27 - 28.11.00 2 days Programmation TSX Premium 1 28.11 - 1.12.00 4 jours Programmation TSX Premium 2 12 - 15.12.00 4 jours If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an “application for training” form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Offi...

  12. Hemangiopericitoma de órbita Orbital hemangiopericytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Ximenes Alves

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Descrever um raro caso de hemangiopericitoma orbital. Métodos: Relato de caso de associação entre hemangipericitoma orbital e blefaroptose. Resultados: A exérese da neoplasia normalizou o posicionamento palpebral. Conclusões: Lesões orbitais anteriores são causas de blefaroptose por compressão do músculo elevador palpebral.Purpose: To describe a rare case of orbital hemangiope- ricytoma. Methods: Case report of an association of blepha-roptosis with orbital hemangiopericytoma. Results: When the lesion was surgically removed the position of the upper eyelid returned to normal. Conclusions: Anterior orbital lesions can lead to blepharoptosis by compression of the levator palpebrae muscle.

  13. Orbital selective spin-texture in a topological insulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Bahadur, E-mail: bahadursingh24@gmail.com; Prasad, R. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India)

    2015-05-15

    Three-dimensional topological insulators support a metallic non-trivial surface state with unique spin texture, where spin and momentum are locked perpendicular to each other. In this work, we investigate the orbital selective spin-texture associated with the topological surface states in Sb2Te{sub 3}, using the first principles calculations. Sb2Te{sub 3} is a strong topological insulator with a p-p type bulk band inversion at the Γ-point and supports a single topological metallic surface state with upper (lower) Dirac-cone has left (right) handed spin-texture. Here, we show that the topological surface state has an additional locking between the spin and orbitals, leading to an orbital selective spin-texture. The out-of-plane orbitals (p{sub z} orbitals) have an isotropic orbital texture for both the Dirac cones with an associated left and right handed spin-texture for the upper and lower Dirac cones, respectively. In contrast, the in-planar orbital texture (p{sub x} and p{sub y} projections) is tangential for the upper Dirac-cone and is radial for the lower Dirac-cone surface state. The dominant in-planar orbital texture in both the Dirac cones lead to a right handed orbital-selective spin-texture.

  14. Existence and multiplicity results for homoclinic orbits of Hamiltonian systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Nien Chen

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available Homoclinic orbits play an important role in the study of qualitative behavior of dynamical systems. Such kinds of orbits have been studied since the time of Poincare. In this paper, we discuss how to use variational methods to study the existence of homoclinic orbits of Hamiltonian systems.

  15. Reconstruction of Midface and Orbital Wall Defects After Maxillectomy and Orbital Content Preservation With Titanium Mesh and Fascia Lata: 3-Year Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motiee-Langroudi, Maziar; Harirchi, Iraj; Amali, Amin; Jafari, Mehrdad

    2015-12-01

    To describe the authors' experience in the reconstruction of patients after total maxillectomy with preservation of orbital contents for maxillary tumors using titanium mesh and autogenous fascia lata, where no setting for free flap reconstruction is available. Twelve consecutive patients with paranasal sinus tumors underwent total maxillectomy without orbital exenterations and primary reconstruction. The defects were reconstructed by titanium mesh in combination with autogenous fascia lata in the orbital floor performed by 1 surgical team. Titanium mesh (0.2 mm thick) was contoured and fixed to reconstruct the orbital floor and obtain midface projection. Fascia lata was used to cover the titanium mesh along the orbital floor to prevent fat entrapment in the mesh holes. The most common pathology was squamous cell carcinoma (50%). Patients' mean age was 45.66 years (33 to 74 yr). The mean follow-up period was 35.2 months (30 to 49 months). During follow-up, no infection or foreign body reaction was encountered. Extrusion of titanium mesh occurred in 4 patients who underwent postoperative radiotherapy. Two cases of mild diplopia at extreme gaze occurred early during the postoperative period that resolved after a few months. Placing fascia lata between the titanium mesh surface of the orbital implant and the orbital contents was successful in preventing long-term diplopia or dystopia. Nevertheless, exposure of the titanium implant through the skin surface represented a complication of this technique in 25% of patients. Further studies are required with head-to-head comparisons of artificial materials and free flaps for reconstruction of maxillectomy defects. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Posttraumatic Orbital Emphysema: A Numerical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Skorek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Orbital emphysema is a common symptom accompanying orbital fracture. The pathomechanism is still not recognized and the usually assumed cause, elevated pressure in the upper airways connected with sneezing or coughing, does not always contribute to the occurrence of this type of fracture. Observations based on the finite model (simulating blowout type fracture of the deformations of the inferior orbital wall after a strike in its lower rim. Authors created a computer numeric model of the orbit with specified features—thickness and resilience modulus. During simulation an evenly spread 14400 N force was applied to the nodular points in the inferior rim (the maximal value not causing cracking of the outer rim, but only ruptures in the inferior wall. The observation was made from 1·10-3 to 1·10-2 second after a strike. Right after a strike dislocations of the inferior orbital wall toward the maxillary sinus were observed. Afterwards a retrograde wave of the dislocation of the inferior wall toward the orbit was noticed. Overall dislocation amplitude reached about 6 mm. Based on a numeric model of the orbit submitted to a strike in the inferior wall an existence of a retrograde shock wave causing orbital emphysema has been found.

  17. Harmonically excited orbital variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, T.

    1985-01-01

    Rephrasing the equations of motion for orbital maneuvers in terms of Lagrangian generalized coordinates instead of Newtonian rectangular cartesian coordinates can make certain harmonic terms in the orbital angular momentum vector more readily apparent. In this formulation the equations of motion adopt the form of a damped harmonic oscillator when torques are applied to the orbit in a variationally prescribed manner. The frequencies of the oscillator equation are in some ways unexpected but can nonetheless be exploited through resonant forcing functions to achieve large secular variations in the orbital elements. Two cases are discussed using a circular orbit as the control case: (1) large changes in orbital inclination achieved by harmonic excitation rather than one impulsive velocity change, and (2) periodic and secular changes to the longitude of the ascending node using both stable and unstable excitation strategies. The implications of these equations are also discussed for both artificial satellites and natural satellites. For the former, two utilitarian orbits are suggested, each exploiting a form of harmonic excitation. 5 refs

  18. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    Places are available in the following courses: Hands-on Introduction to Python Programming: 11-13.08.2003 (3 days) Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System (EDMS): 26.08.2003 (1 day) The CERN Engineering Data Management System (EDMS) for Engineers: 27.08.2003 (1 day) CLEAN-2002 : Travailler en salle blanche : 4.09.2003 (une demi-journée) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1: 4, 5, 15, 16.09.2003 (2 x 2 days) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack : 17, 18, 25, 26.09.2003 et 2, 3.10.2003 (3 x 2 journées, français) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 23, 24, 30.09.2003 et 1.10.2003 (2 x 2 journées) Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System (EDMS): 23.09.2003 (1 day) The CERN Engineering Data Management System (EDMS) for Local Administrators: 24-25.09.2003 (2 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 8 et 10.10.2003 (2 journées) CLEAN-2002: Working in a Cleanroom: 23.10.2003 (half day, p.m.) ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availabili...

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    Places are available in the following courses: Hands-on Introduction to Python Programming: 11-13.08.2003(3 days) Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System (EDMS): 26.08.2003 (1 day) The CERN Engineering Data Management System (EDMS) for Engineers: 27.08.2003 (1 day) CLEAN-2002 : Travailler en salle blanche : 4.09.2003 (une demi-journée) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1: 4, 5, 15, 16.09.2003 (2 x 2 days) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack : 17, 18, 25, 26.09.2003 et 2, 3.10.2003 (3 x 2 journées, français) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 23, 24, 30.09.2003 et 1.10.2003 (2 x 2 journées) Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System (EDMS): 23.09.2003 (1 day) The CERN Engineering Data Management System (EDMS) for Local Administrators: 24-25.09.2003 (2 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 8 et 10.10.2003 (2 journées) CLEAN-2002: Working in a Cleanroom: 23.10.2003 (half day, p.m.) ** The number of places available may vary. Please ch...

  20. PLACES AVAILABLE

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    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: LabView Hands-on (bilingue/bilingual - gratuit/free of charge) : 13.9.02 (a.m.) LabView DAQ Hands-on (bilingue/bilingual - gratuit/free of charge) : 13.9.02 (p.m.) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 19, 20, 26, 27.9.02 (4 jours) LabView Base 1 : 23 - 25.9.02 (3 jours) LabView DAQ (E) : 26 - 27.9.02 (2 days) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 30.9, 1, 2, 9, 10, 11.10.02 (6 jours) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom (free of charge) : 10.10.02 (half-day, p.m.) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 14 - 15.10.02 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1 : 17, 18, 24, 25.10.02 (4 days) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : Technical Training or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Of...

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    Technical Training; Tel 74924

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: LabView hands-on : 21.01.02 (1/2 journée) LabView DAQ hands-on : 21.01.02 (1/2 journée) FileMaker Pro : 22 - 25.1.02 (4 jours) MS-Project 2000 : 24 & 25.01.02 (2 jours) Introduction au PC et à Windows 2000 au CERN : 29 - 30.1.02 (2 jours) LabView Base 1 : 4 - 6.2.02 (3 jours) LabView DAQ (E) : 7 & 8.02.02 (2 days) Hands-on Object-Oriented Design & Programming with Java : 11 - 13.02.02 (3 days) C++ for Particle Physicists : 11 - 15.3.2002 (6 * 3 hour lectures) Cours sur la migration AutoCAD : AutoCAD : Mise à jour AutoCAD r-14 vers 2002 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical PowerPack 6 basé sur AutoCAD 2002 (5 jours) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : Technical Training or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO ...

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    TECHNICAL TRAINING; Tel. 74460

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: MS-Project 1er niveau : 20 - 23.2.01 (4 matins) Architecture d'automatisme : 20 - 21.2.01 (2 jours) Introduction à PowerPoint : 26.2.01 (1 journée) Programmation TSX Premium 1 (Schneider) : 26.2 - 2.3.01 (5 jours) Premiers pas avec votre PC : 27.2 - 2.3.01 (4 matins) C++ for Particle Physicists : 5 - 9.3.01 (6*3 hour lectures) EXCEL : 6, 7 et 13, 14.3.01 (4 jours) The JAVA programming language level 2 :  12 - 14.3.01 (3 days) Nouveautés de FileMaker :  20 - 23.03.01 (4 matins) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt.

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    Places are available in the following courses: Habilitation électrique : recyclage HT/BT : 11 - 15.3.2002  (2 * 2 heures) PVSS Basics :  8 - 12.4.02  (5 days) ELEC-2002 : Spring Term :  9, 11, 16, 18, 23, 25, 30.4.02 (7 * 2.5 hours) LabVIEW base 1 : 22 - 24.4.02 (3 jours) LabVIEW DSC (F) 25 & 26.4.02 (2 jours) LabVIEW Basics 2 : 13 & 14.5.02 (2 days) LabVIEW DAQ (F) : 15 & 16.5.02 (2 jours) Cours sur la migration AutoCAD :   AutoCAD : Mise à jour AutoCAD r-14 vers 2002 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical PowerPack 6 basé sur AutoCAD 2002 (5 jours) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : Technical Training or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applica...

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    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: November 2002   Hands-on Object-Oriented Design and Programming with C++:  19 - 21.11.02  (3 days)  December 2002   LabVIEW - DSC (English) :  2 - 3.12.02  (2 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 :  2 & 3.12.02  (2 jours) FileMaker (Français) :  2 - 5.12.02  (4 jours) PCAD Schémas - Débutants :  5 & 6.12.02  (2 jours) PCAD PCB - Débutants :  9 - 11.12.02  (3 jours) FrontPage 2000 - level 1:  9 & 10.12.02  (2 days) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : Technical Training or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisiona...

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    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: November 2002   Java Programming Language level 1 :  28 & 29.11.02  (2 days) December 2002   LabVIEW - DSC (English) :  2 - 3.12.02  (2 days) FileMaker (Français) :  2 - 5.12.02  (4 jours) PCAD Schémas - Débutants :  5 & 6.12.02  (2 jours) PCAD PCB - Débutants :  9 - 11.12.02  (3 jours) FrontPage 2000 - level 1:  9 & 10.12.02  (2 days) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : Technical Training or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. Technical Training M...

  6. Malignant orbital teratoma in a neonate: A clinicopathological case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M VS Prakash

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Teratoma of the orbit is rare; very few cases have been published in literature. A case of orbital teratoma in a neonate is presented where the proptosis was massive enough to obscure the eyeball. Clinically, the diagnosis of teratoma was considered. As there was no possibility of salvaging the eye, exenteration of the orbit was done. Orbital teratomas are generally benign. Histopathological examination revealed the features of malignant teratoma.

  7. QUIKVIS- CELESTIAL TARGET AVAILABILITY INFORMATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruzzo, C.

    1994-01-01

    QUIKVIS computes the times during an Earth orbit when geometric requirements are satisfied for observing celestial objects. The observed objects may be fixed (stars, etc.) or moving (sun, moon, planets). QUIKVIS is useful for preflight analysis by those needing information on the availability of celestial objects to be observed. Two types of analyses are performed by QUIKVIS. One is used when specific objects are known, the other when targets are unknown and potentially useful regions of the sky must be identified. The results are useful in selecting candidate targets, examining the effects of observation requirements, and doing gross assessments of the effects of the orbit's right ascension of the ascending node (RAAN). The results are not appropriate when high accuracy is needed (e.g. for scheduling actual mission operations). The observation duration is calculated as a function of date, orbit node, and geometric requirements. The orbit right ascension of the ascending node can be varied to account for the effects of an uncertain launch time of day. The orbit semimajor axis and inclination are constant throughout the run. A circular orbit is assumed, but a simple program modification will allow eccentric orbits. The geometric requirements that can be processed are: 1) minimum separation angle between the line of sight to the object and the earth's horizon; 2) minimum separation angle between the line of sight to the object and the spacecraft velocity vector; 3) maximum separation angle between the line of sight to the object and the zenith direction; and 4) presence of the spacecraft in the earth's shadow. The user must supply a date or date range, the spacecraft orbit and inclination, up to 700 observation targets, and any geometric requirements to be met. The primary output is the time per orbit that conditions are satisfied, with options for sky survey maps, time since a user-specified orbit event, and bar graphs illustrating overlapping requirements. The

  8. Mixed nano/micro-sized calcium phosphate composite and EDTA root surface etching improve availability of graft material in intrabony defects: an in vivo scanning electron microscopy evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamal, Ahmed Y; Iacono, Vincent J

    2013-12-01

    The use of nanoparticles of graft materials may lead to breakthrough applications for periodontal regeneration. However, due to their small particle size, nanoparticles may be eliminated from periodontal defects by phagocytosis. In an attempt to improve nanoparticle retention in periodontal defects, the present in vivo study uses scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to evaluate the potential of micrograft particles of β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) to enhance the binding and retention of nanoparticles of hydroxyapatite (nHA) on EDTA-treated and non-treated root surfaces in periodontal defects after 14 days of healing. Sixty patients having at least two hopeless periodontally affected teeth designated for extraction were randomly divided into four treatment groups (15 patients per group). Patients in group 1 had selected periodontal intrabony defects grafted with nHA of particle size 10 to 100 nm. Patients in group 2 were treated in a similar manner but had the affected roots etched for 2 minutes with a neutral 24% EDTA gel before grafting of the associated vertical defects with nHA. Patients in group 3 had the selected intrabony defects grafted with a composite graft consisting of equal volumes of nHA and β-TCP (particle size 63 to 150 nm). Patients in group 4 were treated as in group 3 but the affected roots were etched with neutral 24% EDTA as in group 2. For each of the four groups, one tooth was extracted immediately, and the second tooth was extracted after 14 days of healing for SEM evaluation. Fourteen days after surgery, all group 1 samples were devoid of any nanoparticles adherent to the root surfaces. Group 2 showed root surface areas 44.7% covered by a single layer of clot-blended grafted particles 14 days following graft application. After 14 days, group 3 samples appeared to retain fibrin strands devoid of grafted particles. Immediately extracted root samples of group 4 had adherent graft particles that covered a considerable area of the root surfaces

  9. Thrombosis of orbital varices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boschi Oyhenart, J.; Tenyi, A.; Boschi Pau, J.

    2002-01-01

    Orbital varices are venous malformations produced by an abnormal dilatation of one or more orbital veins, probably associated with congenital weakness of the vascular wall. They are rare lesions, usually occurring in young patients, that produce intermittent proptosis related to the increase in the systemic venous pressure. The presence of hemorrhage or thrombosis is associated with rapid development of proptosis, pain and decreased ocular motility. We report the cases of two adult patients with orbital varices complicated by thrombosis in whom the diagnosis was based on computed tomography. The ultrasound and magnetic resonance findings are also discussed. (Author) 16 refs

  10. Man-Made Debris In and From Lunar Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.; McKay, Gordon A. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    During 1966-1976, as part of the first phase of lunar exploration, 29 manned and robotic missions placed more than 40 objects into lunar orbit. Whereas several vehicles later successfully landed on the Moon and/or returned to Earth, others were either abandoned in orbit or intentionally sent to their destruction on the lunar surface. The former now constitute a small population of lunar orbital debris; the latter, including four Lunar Orbiters and four Lunar Module ascent stages, have contributed to nearly 50 lunar sites of man's refuse. Other lunar satellites are known or suspected of having fallen from orbit. Unlike Earth satellite orbital decays and deorbits, lunar satellites impact the lunar surface unscathed by atmospheric burning or melting. Fragmentations of lunar satellites, which would produce clouds of numerous orbital debris, have not yet been detected. The return to lunar orbit in the 1990's by the Hagoromo, Hiten, Clementine, and Lunar Prospector spacecraft and plans for increased lunar exploration early in the 21st century, raise questions of how best to minimize and to dispose of lunar orbital debris. Some of the lessons learned from more than 40 years of Earth orbit exploitation can be applied to the lunar orbital environment. For the near-term, perhaps the most important of these is postmission passivation. Unique solutions, e.g., lunar equatorial dumps, may also prove attractive. However, as with Earth satellites, debris mitigation measures are most effectively adopted early in the concept and design phase, and prevention is less costly than remediation.

  11. Image simulation and assessment of the colour and spatial capabilities of the Colour and Stereo Surface Imaging System (CaSSIS) on the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornabene, Livio L.; Seelos, Frank P.; Pommerol, Antoine; Thomas, Nicolas; Caudill, Christy M.; Becerra, Patricio; Bridges, John C.; Byrne, Shane; Cardinale, Marco; Chojnacki, Matthew; Conway, Susan J.; Cremonese, Gabriele; Dundas, Colin M.; El-Maarry, M. R.; Fernando, Jennifer; Hansen, Candice J.; Hansen, Kayle; Harrison, Tanya N.; Henson, Rachel; Marinangeli, Lucia; McEwen, Alfred S.; Pajola, Maurizio; Sutton, Sarah S.; Wray, James J.

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to assess the spatial and visible/near-infrared (VNIR) colour/spectral capabilities of the 4-band Colour and Stereo Surface Imaging System (CaSSIS) aboard the ExoMars 2016 Trace Grace Orbiter (TGO). The instrument response functions for the CaSSIS imager was used to resample spectral libraries, modelled spectra and to construct spectrally (i.e., in I/F space) and spatially consistent simulated CaSSIS image cubes of various key sites of interest and for ongoing scientific investigations on Mars. Coordinated datasets from Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) are ideal, and specifically used for simulating CaSSIS. The Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) provides colour information, while the Context Imager (CTX), and in a few cases the High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE), provides the complementary spatial information at the resampled CaSSIS unbinned/unsummed pixel resolution (4.6 m/pixel from a 400-km altitude). The methodology used herein employs a Gram-Schmidt spectral sharpening algorithm to combine the ∼18–36 m/pixel CRISM-derived CaSSIS colours with I/F images primarily derived from oversampled CTX images. One hundred and eighty-one simulated CaSSIS 4-colour image cubes (at 18–36 m/pixel) were generated (including one of Phobos) based on CRISM data. From these, thirty-three “fully”-simulated image cubes of thirty unique locations on Mars (i.e., with 4 colour bands at 4.6 m/pixel) were made. All simulated image cubes were used to test both the colour capabilities of CaSSIS by producing standard colour RGB images, colour band ratio composites (CBRCs) and spectral parameters. Simulated CaSSIS CBRCs demonstrated that CaSSIS will be able to readily isolate signatures related to ferrous (Fe2+) iron- and ferric (Fe3+) iron-bearing deposits on the surface of Mars, ices and atmospheric phenomena. Despite the lower spatial resolution of CaSSIS when compared to HiRISE, the results of this work demonstrate that

  12. Image Simulation and Assessment of the Colour and Spatial Capabilities of the Colour and Stereo Surface Imaging System (CaSSIS) on the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornabene, Livio L.; Seelos, Frank P.; Pommerol, Antoine; Thomas, Nicholas; Caudill, C. M.; Becerra, Patricio; Bridges, John C.; Byrne, Shane; Cardinale, Marco; Chojnacki, Matthew; Conway, Susan J.; Cremonese, Gabriele; Dundas, Colin M.; El-Maarry, M. R.; Fernando, Jennifer; Hansen, Candice J.; Hansen, Kayle; Harrison, Tanya N.; Henson, Rachel; Marinangeli, Lucia; McEwen, Alfred S.; Pajola, Maurizio; Sutton, Sarah S.; Wray, James J.

    2018-02-01

    This study aims to assess the spatial and visible/near-infrared (VNIR) colour/spectral capabilities of the 4-band Colour and Stereo Surface Imaging System (CaSSIS) aboard the ExoMars 2016 Trace Grace Orbiter (TGO). The instrument response functions for the CaSSIS imager was used to resample spectral libraries, modelled spectra and to construct spectrally ( i.e., in I/F space) and spatially consistent simulated CaSSIS image cubes of various key sites of interest and for ongoing scientific investigations on Mars. Coordinated datasets from Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) are ideal, and specifically used for simulating CaSSIS. The Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) provides colour information, while the Context Imager (CTX), and in a few cases the High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE), provides the complementary spatial information at the resampled CaSSIS unbinned/unsummed pixel resolution (4.6 m/pixel from a 400-km altitude). The methodology used herein employs a Gram-Schmidt spectral sharpening algorithm to combine the ˜18-36 m/pixel CRISM-derived CaSSIS colours with I/F images primarily derived from oversampled CTX images. One hundred and eighty-one simulated CaSSIS 4-colour image cubes (at 18-36 m/pixel) were generated (including one of Phobos) based on CRISM data. From these, thirty-three "fully"-simulated image cubes of thirty unique locations on Mars ( i.e., with 4 colour bands at 4.6 m/pixel) were made. All simulated image cubes were used to test both the colour capabilities of CaSSIS by producing standard colour RGB images, colour band ratio composites (CBRCs) and spectral parameters. Simulated CaSSIS CBRCs demonstrated that CaSSIS will be able to readily isolate signatures related to ferrous (Fe2+) iron- and ferric (Fe3+) iron-bearing deposits on the surface of Mars, ices and atmospheric phenomena. Despite the lower spatial resolution of CaSSIS when compared to HiRISE, the results of this work demonstrate that Ca

  13. Places available **

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    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: PIPES-2003 - Pratique du Sertissage de tubes métalliques et multicouches : 26.8.03 (stage pratique) The CERN Engineering Data Management System (EDMS) for Engineers : 27.8.03 (1 day, free of charge) CLEAN-2002 : Travailler en salle blanche : 4.9.03 (une demi-journée, séminaire gratuit) The CERN Engineering Data Management System (EDMS) for Local Administrators : 24 & 25.9.03 (2 days, free of charge) Siemens SIMATIC Training : Programmation STEP7 - niveau 1 : 29 - 2.10.03 (4 jours) - ouverture des inscriptions fin août Programmation STEP7 - niveau 2 : 13 - 17.10.03 (5 jours) - ouverture des inscriptions fin août Réseau Simatic Net : 22 & 23.10.03 (2 jours) - ouverture des inscriptions fin août CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom : 23.20.03 (half day, free of charge) These courses will be given in French or Englis...

  14. Places available**

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses : FrontPage 2000 - niveau 1: 20 & 21.5.03 (2 jours) PIPES-2003 : Pratique du sertissage de tubes métalliques et multicouches: 21.5.03 (1 jour) Introduction à la CAO Cadence: de la saisie de schéma Concept-HDL au PCB : 20 & 22.5.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (E): 5, 6, 12, 13, 26, 27.6.03 (6 days) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1: 10 & 11.6.03 (2 jours) Conception de PCB rapides dans le flot Cadence: 11.6.03 (matin) EXCEL 2000 - level 1: 12 & 13.6.03 (2 days) Introduction to PVSS: 16.6.03 (half-day, pm) Basic PVSS: 17 - 19.6.03 (3 days) Réalisation de PCB rapides dans le flot Cadence: 17.6.03 (matin) LabView DSC (language to be defined): 19 & 20.6.03 PVSS - JCOP Framework Tutorial: 20.6.03 (1 day) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 2: 24 & 25.6.03 (2 jours) Siemens SIMATIC Training: Introduction to STEP7: 3 & 4.6.03 (2 days) STEP7 Programming: 16 - 20.6.03 (5 days) Simatic Net Network: 26 & 27.6.03 (2 days) These courses will be given...

  15. PLACES AVAILABLE

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    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Introduction to Oracle 8i : SQL and PL/SQL:  7 - 11.10.02  (5 days) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom (free of charge):  10.10.02  (half-day, p.m.) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 :  14 - 15.10.02  (2 jours) Introduction à DesignSpace :  16.10.02  (1 journée) Introduction to DesignSpace:  17.10.02  (1 day) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1:  17, 18, 24, 25.10.02  (4 days) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) :  21, 22, 23.10 et 4, 5, 6.11.02  (6 jours) Introduction à ANSYS/Introduction to ANSYS (langue à définir suivant demande/ Language to be chosen according to demand):  21 - 25.10.02  (5 jours/days) HREF-2002: Helium Refrigeration Techniques (English-French, bilingual) :  21 - 25.10.2002  (7 half days) HREF-2002: Techniques de la Réfri...

  16. Places available**

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    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses : The CERN EDMS for Local Administrators : 24 & 25.9.03 (2 days, free of charge) HeREF-2003 : Techniques de la réfrigération Hélium (cours en français avec support en anglais) : 6 - 10.10.2003 (7 demi-journées) The Java Programming Language Level 1 : 6 - 7.10.2003 (2 days) Java 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 2 : Enterprise JavaBeans : 8 - 10.10.2003 (3 days) FileMaker - niveau 1 : 9 & 10.10.03 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 20 & 22.10.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 20, 21, 27, 28.10.03 (4 jours) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom : 23.10.03 (half day, free of charge) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1 : 3, 4, 12, 13.11.03 (4 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 10 & 11.11.03 (2 jours) ACCESS 2000 - niveau 1 : 13 & 14.11.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (E) : 17, 18, 24, 25.11 & 1, 2.12.03 (6...

  17. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Introduction à DesignSpace :  16.10.02  (1 journée) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) :  21, 22, 23.10 et 4, 5, 6.11.02  (6 jours) Introduction à ANSYS 21 - 25.10.02  (5 jours/days) HREF-2002: Helium Refrigeration Techniques (English-French, bilingual) :  21 - 25.10.2002  (7 half days) LabVIEW Basics 1 (English):  21 - 23.10.02  (3 days) LabVIEW Basics 2 (English):  24 & 25.10.02  (2 days) Oracle 8i : Access the Database with Java:  7 & 8.11.02  (2 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 :  7 & 8.11.02  (2 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1:  14, 15, 21, 22.11.02  (4 days) LabVIEW - Advanced (English) :  18 - 20.11.2002  (3 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 :  19, 20, 25, 26.11.02 (4 jours) Oracle iDS Designer: First Class:&...

  18. Places available**

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: CLEAN-2002 : Travailler en salle blanche (séminaire gratuit) : 4.9.03 (une demi-journée) The CERN EDMS for Local Administrators (free of charge) : 24 & 25.9.03 (2 days) HeREF-2003 : Techniques de la réfrigération Hélium (cours en français avec support en anglais) : 6 - 10.10.2003 (7 demi-journées) The Java Programming Language Level 1 : 6 - 7.10.2003 (2 days) Java 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 2 : Enterprise JavaBeans : 8 - 10.10.2003 (3 days) FileMaker - niveau 1 : 9 & 10.10.03 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 20 & 22.10.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 20, 21, 27, 28.10.03 (4 jours) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom (free of charge) : 23.10.03 (half day) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (E) : 23, 24, 30, 31.10 & 12, 13.11.03 (6 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 10 & 11.11.03 (2 jours)...

  19. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: The CERN EDMS for Local Administrators : 24 & 25.9.03 (2 days, free of charge) HeREF-2003 : Techniques de la réfrigération Hélium cours en français avec support en anglais) : 6 - 10.10.2003 (7 demi-journées) The Java Programming Language Level 1 : 6 - 7.10.2003 (2 days) Java 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 2 : Enterprise JavaBeans : 8 - 10.10.2003 (3 days) FileMaker - niveau 1 : 9 & 10.10.03 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 20 & 22.10.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 20, 21, 27, 28.10.03 (4 jours) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom : 23.10.03 (half day, free of charge) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1 : 3, 4, 12, 13.11.03 (4 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 10 & 11.11.03 (2 jours) ACCESS 2000 - niveau 1 : 13 & 14.11.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (E) : 17, 18, 24, 25.11 & 1, 2.12.03 (6 days) FrontPage 2000 - niveau 1 : 20 & 21.11.03 (2 jours) MAGNE-03 : Magnétisme pour l'électrotechnique : 25 - 27.11.03 (3 jours) ...

  20. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: LabView hands-on (bilingue/bilingual): 5.11.02 (matin/morning) LabView DAQ hands-on (bilingue/bilingual):  5.11.02  (après-midi afternoon) Introduction au PC et Windows 2000 au CERN:  6 & 7.11.02  (2 jours) Oracle 8i : Access the Database with Java:  7 & 8.11.02  (2 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2:  7 & 8.11.02  (2 jours) Introduction to PVSS (free of charge):  11.11.2002 pm  (1/2 day) Basic PVSS:  12 - 14.11.02  (3 days) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1:  12 & 13.11.02  (2 jours) CLEAN-2002: Working in a Cleanroom (English, free of charge):  13.11.2002  (afternoon) LabView Base 1 :  13 - 15.11.02  (3 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1:  14, 15, 21, 22.11.2002  (4 days) LabVIEW - Advanced:  18 - 20.11.02  (3 days) Auto...

  1. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: PIPES-2003 - Pratique du sertissage de tubes métalliques et multicouches :26.8.03(stage pratique) The CERN EDMS for Engineers (free of charge) : 27.8.03 (1 day) CLEAN-2002 : Travailler en salle blanche (séminaire gratuit) : 4.9.03(une demi-journée) The CERN EDMS for Local Administrators (free of charge) : 24 & 25.9.03 (2 days) HeREF-2003 : Techniques de la réfrigération Hélium (cours en français avec support en anglais) : 6 - 10.10.2003 (7 demi-journées) The Java Programming Language Level 1 : 6 - 7.10.2003 (2 days) Java 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 2 : Enterprise JavaBeans : 8 - 10.10.2003 (3 days) FileMaker - niveau 1 : 9 & 10.10.03 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 20 & 22.10.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 20, 21, 27, 28.10.03 (4 jours) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom (free of charge) : 23.10.03 (half day) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (E) : 23, 24, 30, 31.10 & 12, 13.11.03 (6 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2...

  2. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: The CERN EDMS for Local Administrators (free of charge) : 24 & 25.9.03 (2 days) HeREF-2003 : Techniques de la réfrigération Hélium (cours en français avec support en anglais) : 6 - 10.10.2003 (7 demi-journées) The Java Programming Language Level 1 : 6 - 7.10.2003 (2 days) Java 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 2 : Enterprise JavaBeans : 8 - 10.10.2003 (3 days) FileMaker - niveau 1 : 9 & 10.10.03 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 20 & 22.10.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 20, 21, 27, 28.10.03 (4 jours) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom (free of charge) : 23.10.03 (half day) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (E) : 23, 24, 30, 31.10 & 12, 13.11.03 (6 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 10 & 11.11.03 (2 jours) ACCESS 2000 - niveau 1 : 13 & 14.11.03 (2 jours) FrontPage 2000 - niveau 1 : 20...

  3. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: October 2002   Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System (free of charge):  29.10.2002  (1 day) The CERN EDMS for Advanced users (free of charge):  30.10.2002  (1 day) November 2002   LabView hands-on (bilingue/bilingual): 5.11.02 (matin/morning) LabView DAQ hands-on (bilingue/bilingual):  5.11.02  (après-midi afternoon) Introduction au PC et Windows 2000 au CERN :  6 & 7.11.02  (2 jours) Oracle 8i : Access the Database with Java:  7 & 8.11.02  (2 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 :  7 & 8.11.02  (2 jours) Introduction to PVSS (free of charge):  11.11.2002 pm  (1/2 day) Basic PVSS:  12 - 14.11.02  (3 days) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 :  12 & 13.11.02  (2 jours) CLEAN-2002: Working in a Cleanroom (English, free ...

  4. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Introduction to Oracle 8i : SQL and PL/SQL:  7 - 11.10.02  (5 days) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom (free of charge):  10.10.02  (half-day, p.m.) LabView Hands-on (bilingue/bilingual) : 10.10.02 (matin/morning) LabView DAQ Hands-on (bilingue/bilingual)  10.10.02 (après-midi /afternoon) Introduction à DesignSpace :  16.10.02  (1 journée) Introduction to DesignSpace:  17.10.02  (1 day) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) :  21, 22, 23.10 et 4, 5, 6.11.02  (6 jours) Introduction à ANSYS/Introduction to ANSYS (langue à définir suivant demande/ Language to be chosen according to demand):  21 - 25.10.02  (5 jours/days) HREF-2002: Helium Refrigeration Techniques (English-French, bilingual) :  21 - 25.10.2002  (7 half days) HREF-2002: Techniques de la...

  5. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Enseignement Technique; Tél. 74924; Technical Training; Monique Duval; Tel. 74924

    2000-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses : Premiers pas avec votre PC 12 - 15.9.00 (4 demi-journées) WORD 20, 21 et 26, 27.9.2000 (4 jours) JAVA programming level 1 25 - 26.9.2000 (2 days) Gaz inflammables 1 26.9.2000 (1 journée) Advanced aspects of PERL 5 6.10.2000 (1 day) Initiation au WWW 10 - 12.10.00 (3 demi-journées) WORD : importer et manipuler des images 16.10.2000 (1 journée) FileMaker 17, 18 et 24, 25.10.00 (4 jours) Nouveautés de WORD 19 et 20.10.2000 (2 jours) ACCESS 1er niveau 30 - 31.10.00 (2 jours)Introduction à PowerPoint 6.11.00 (1 journée)Nouveautés d’EXCEL 7.11.2000(4 demi-journées)Excel 13, 14 et 20, 21.11.00 (4 jours) LabView hands-on 13.11.2000(4 hours)LabView Basics 1 14 - 16.11.2000 (3 days) MS-Project 1er niveau 14-17.11.00 (4 demi-journées) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply elec...

  6. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: LabView hands-on : 21.01.02 (1/2 journée) LabView DAQ hands-on : 21.01.02 (1/2 journée) FileMaker Pro : 22 - 25.1.02 (4 jours) MS-Project 2000 : 22, 24 & 25.01.02 (3 jours) Introduction au PC et à Windows 2000 au CERN : 29 - 30.1.02 (2 jours) LabView Base 1 : 4 - 6.2.02 (3 jours) LabView DAQ  (E) :  7 & 8.02.02 (2 days) Hands-on Object-Oriented Design & Programming with Java :  11 - 13.02.02 (3 days) PVSS basics :  11 - 15.2.02 (5 days) Introduction à Windows 2000 : 18.2.02 (1 demi-journée) Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System :  20.2.02 (1 day) The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Advanced users :  21.2.02  (1 day) C++ for Particle Physicists :  11 - 15.3.2002  (6 * 3 hour lectures) Cours sur la migration AutoCAD : AutoCAD : Mise à...

  7. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: LabVIEW - Basics 1 :  10 - 12.12.01 (3 days) Introduction to XML :  12 & 13.12.01 (2 days) Introduction au PC et Windows 2000 : 12 & 14.12.01 (2 jours) LabVIEW - Basics 2 :  13 - 14.12.01 (2 days) Habilitation électrique : superviseurs : 17.12.2001 (1/2 journée) MS-Project 2000 : 10 & 11.01.02 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 2 : 15 - 16.1.02 (2 jours) Sécurité dans les installations cryogéniques: 15-17.1.2002 (2 demi-journées) C++ Programming Level 2 - Traps and Pitfalls :  15 - 18.1.2002  (4 days) ELEC-2002 Winter Term: Readout and system electronics for Physics  15.1.2002 - 7.2.2002 (8 half- days) Nouveautés de WORD 2000 : 18.1.02 (1/2 journée) LabView hands-on : 21.01.02 (1/2 journée) LabView DAQ hands-on : 21.01.02 (1/2 journée) FileMaker Pro : 22 -...

  8. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Enseignement Technique; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: MS-Project 2000 : 10 & 11.01.02 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 2 : 15 - 16.1.02 (2 jours) Sécurité dans les installations cryogéniques: 15-17.1.2002 (2 demi-journées) C++ Programming Level 2 - Traps and Pitfalls :  15 - 18.1.2002  (4 days) ELEC-2002 Winter Term: Readout and system electronics for Physics  15.1.2002 - 7.2.2002 (8 half- days) Nouveautés de WORD 2000 : 18.1.02 (1/2 journée) LabView hands-on : 21.01.02 (1/2 journée) LabView DAQ hands-on : 21.01.02 (1/2 journée) FileMaker Pro : 22 - 25.1.02 (4 jours) MS-Project 2000 : 24 & 25.01.02 (2 jours) Introduction au PC et à Windows 2000 au CERN : 29 - 30.1.02 (2 jours) LabView Base 1 : 4 - 6.2.02 (3 jours) LabView DAQ  (E) :  7 & 8.02.02 (2 days) Hands-on Object-Oriented Design & Programming with Java :&nbs...

  9. Places available **

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Des places sont disponibles dans les cours suivants : Places are available in the following courses : WorldFIP 2003 pour utilisateurs : 11-14.2.03 (4 jours) DISP-2003 ? Spring I Term : Introduction to Digital Signal Processing : 20, 27.2, 6, 13, 20, 27.3, 3.4.03 (7 X 2-hour lectures) AXEL-2003 - Introduction to Accelerators : 24-28.2.03 (10 X 1-hour lectures) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 24, 25.2 & 3, 4.3.03 (4 jours) Introduction à Windows 2000 au CERN : 25.2.03 (1/2 journée) LabView base 2/LabView Basics 2 : 10 & 11.3.03 (2 jours/2 days) langue à définir/Language to be decided C++ for Particle Physicists : 10 ? 14.3.03 (6 X 3-hour lectures) Introduction to PVSS : 10.3.03 (half day, afternoon) Basic PVSS : 11 - 13.3.03 (3 days) LabView avancé /LabView Advanced : 12 - 14.3.03 (3 jours/3days) Langue à définir/language to be decided AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 12, 13, 17, 18, 24 & 25.3.03 (6 jours) PVSS - JCOP Framework Tutorial : 14.3.03 (1 day) MAGNE-03 - Magnetism for Technical Ele...

  10. Places available **

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Des places sont disponibles dans les cours suivants : Places are available in the following courses : Introduction à Windows 2000 au CERN : 25.2.03 (1/2 journée) LabView base 2/LabView Basics 2 : 10 & 11.3.03 (2 jours/2 days) langue à définir/Language to be decided C++ for Particle Physicists : 10 - 14.3.03 (6 X 3-hour lectures) Introduction to PVSS : 10.3.03 (half day, afternoon) Basic PVSS : 11 - 13.3.03 (3 days) LabView avancé /LabView Advanced : 12 - 14.3.03 (3 jours/3days) Langue à définir/Language to be decided AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 12, 13, 17, 18, 24 & 25.3.03 (6 jours) PVSS - JCOP Framework Tutorial : 14.3.03 (1 day) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a cleanroom : 2.4.03 (half-day, afternoon, free course, registration required) LabView base 1/LabView Basics 1 : 9 - 11.4.03 (3 jours/3 days) Langue à définir/Language to be decided DISP-2003 - Spring II Term : Advanced Digital Signal Processing : 30.4, 7, 14, 21.5.03 (4 X 2-hour lectures) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 5 & 6.5.03 (...

  11. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses : CLEAN-2002 : Working in a cleanroom (free course, registration required) : 2.4.03 (half-day, afternoon) LabView base 1/LabView Basics 1 (Langue à définir/ language to be decided) : 9 - 11.4.03 (3 jours/3 days) DISP-2003 - Spring II Term : Advanced Digital Signal Processing : 30.4, 7, 14, 21.5.03 (4 X 2-hour lectures) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 29, 30.4 et 7, 8.5.03 (4 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 5 & 6.5.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 12, 13, 20, 21, 27 & 28.5.03(6 jours) Formation Siemens SIMATIC /Siemens SIMATIC Training : Introduction à STEP7 /Introduction to STEP7 : 3 & 4.6.03 (2 jours/2 days) Programmation STEP7/STEP7 Programming : 31.3 - 4.4.03 / 16 - 20.6.03 (5 jours/5 days) Réseau Simatic Net /Simatic Net Network : 15 & 16.4.03 / 26 & 27.6.03 These courses will be given in French or English following the requests. Cours de sécurité : Etre TSO au CERN : 3 sessions sont programmées pour 2003 : 25...

  12. Places available **

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses : CLEAN-2002 : Working in a cleanroom (free course, registration required): 11.4.03 (half-day, afternoon, ) LabView Basics 2 : 10 - 11.4.03 (3 days) DISP-2003 - Spring II Term : Advanced Digital Signal Processing : 30.4, 7, 14, 21.5.03 (4 X 2-hour lectures) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 29, 30.4 et 7, 8.5.03 (4 jours) Oracle iDS Reports : Build Internet Reports : 5 - 9.5.03 (5 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 5 & 6.5.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 12, 13, 20, 21, 27 & 28.5.03 (6 jours) Formation Siemens SIMATIC /Siemens SIMATIC Training : Introduction à STEP7 /Introduction to STEP7 : 3 & 4.6.03 (2 jours/2 days) Programmation STEP7/STEP7 Programming : 31.3 - 4.4.03 / 16 - 20.6.03 (5 jours/5 days) Réseau Simatic Net /Simatic Net Network : 15 & 16.4.03 / 26 & 27.6.03 These courses will be given in French or English following the requests. Cours de sécurité : Etre TSO au CERN : Prochaines sessions : 24, 25 & 27.6....

  13. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses : DISP-2003 - Spring II Term : Advanced Digital Signal Processing : 30.4, 7, 14, 21.5.03 (4 X 2-hour lectures) Oracle iDS Reports : Build Internet Reports : 5 - 9.5.03 (5 days) LabView DAQ (language to be defined) : 8 & 9.5.03 AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 12, 13, 20, 21, 27 & 28.5.03 (6 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 3 & 4.6.03 (2 jours) LabView DSC (language to be defined) : 19 & 20.6.03 Siemens SIMATIC Training : Introduction to STEP7 : 3 & 4.6.03 (2 days) STEP7 Programming : 16 - 20.6.03 (5 days) Simatic Net Network : 15 & 16.4.03 / 26 & 27.6.03 (sessions of 2 days) These courses will be given in French or English following the requests. Cours de sécurité : Etre TSO au CERN : Prochaines sessions : 24, 25 & 27.6.03 - 4, 5 & 7.11.03 (session de 3 jours) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description ...

  14. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses : CLEAN-2002 : Working in a cleanroom (free course, registration required): 11.4.03 (half-day, afternoon, ) LabView Basics 2 : 10 - 11.4.03 (3 days) DISP-2003 - Spring II Term : Advanced Digital Signal Processing : 30.4, 7, 14, 21.5.03 (4 X 2-hour lectures) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 29, 30.4 et 7, 8.5.03 (4 jours) Oracle iDS Reports : Build Internet Reports : 5 - 9.5.03 (5 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 5 & 6.5.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 12, 13, 20, 21, 27 & 28.5.03(6 jours) Formation Siemens SIMATIC /Siemens SIMATIC Training : Introduction à STEP7 /Introduction to STEP7 : 3 & 4.6.03 (2 jours/2 days) Programmation STEP7/STEP7 Programming : 31.3 - 4.4.03 / 16 - 20.6.03 (5 jours/5 days) Réseau Simatic Net /Simatic Net Network : 15 & 16.4.03 / 26 & 27.6.03 These courses will be given in French or English following the requests. Cours de sécurité : Etre TSO au CERN : Prochaines sessions : 24, 25 & 27.6...

  15. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses : DISP-2003 - Spring II Term : Advanced Digital Signal Processing : 30.4, 7, 14, 21.5.03 (4 X 2-hour lectures) Programmation de pilotes périphériques : 5 - 8.5.03 (4 jours) Oracle iDS Reports : Build Internet Reports : 5 - 9.5.03 (5 days) LabView DAQ (language to be defined) : 8 & 9.5.03 AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 12, 13, 20, 21, 27 & 28.5.0 (6 jours) FrontPage 2000 - niveau 1 : 20 & 21.5.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 3 & 4.6.03 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 10 & 11.6.03 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - level 1 : 12 & 13.6.03 (2 days) PowerPoint 2000 (F) : 17 & 18.6.03 (2 jours) FrontPage 2000 - niveau 2 : 19 & 20.6.03 (2 jours) LabView DSC (langue à décider/language to be defined) : 19 & 20.6.03 EXCEL 2000 - niveau 2 : 24 & 25.6.03 (2 jours) Siemens SIMATIC Training : Introduction to STEP7 : 3 & 4.6.03 (2 days) STEP7 Programming : 16 - 20.6.03 (5 days) Simatic Net Network : 26 & 27.6.03 ...

  16. Places available **

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Des places sont disponibles dans les cours suivants : Places are available in the following courses : DISP-2003 - Spring I Term : Introduction to Digital Signal Processing : 20, 27.2, 6, 13, 20, 27.3, 3.4.03 (7 X 2-hour lectures) AXEL-2003 - Introduction to Accelerators : 24 - 28.2.03 (10 X 1-hour lectures) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 24, 25.2 & 3, 4.3.03 (4 jours) Introduction à Windows 2000 au CERN : 25.2.03 (1/2 journée) LabView base 2/LabView Basics 2 : 10 & 11.3.03 (2 jours/2 days) langue à définir/Language to be decided C++ for Particle Physicists : 10 - 14.3.03 (6 X 3-hour lectures) Introduction to PVSS : 10.3.03 (half day, afternoon) Basic PVSS : 11 - 13.3.03 (3 days) LabView avancé /LabView Advanced : 12 - 14.3.03 (3 jours/3days) Langue à définir/language to be decided AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 12, 13, 17, 18, 24 & 25.3.03 (6 jours) PVSS - JCOP Framework Tutorial : 14.3.03 (1 day) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a cleanroom : 2.4.03 (half-day, afternoon, free course, regis...

  17. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses : CLEAN-2002 : Working in a cleanroom (free course, registration required): 11.4.03 (half-day, afternoon) LabView Basics 2 : 10 - 11.4.03 (3 days) DISP-2003 - Spring II Term : Advanced Digital Signal Processing : 30.4, 7, 14, 21.5.03 (4 X 2-hour lectures) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 29, 30.4 et 7, 8.5.03 (4 jours) Oracle iDS Reports : Build Internet Reports : 5 - 9.5.03 (5 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 5 & 6.5.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 12, 13, 20, 21, 27 & 28.5.03(6 jours) Formation Siemens SIMATIC /Siemens SIMATIC Training : Introduction à STEP7 /Introduction to STEP7 : 3 & 4.6.03 (2 jours/2 days) Programmation STEP7/STEP7 Programming : 16 - 20.6.03 (5 jours/5 days) Réseau Simatic Net /Simatic Net Network : 15 & 16.4.03 / 26 & 27.6.03 These courses will be given in French or English following the requests. Cours de sécurité : Etre TSO au CERN : Prochaines sessions : 24, 25 & 27.6.03 - 4, 5 & 7....

  18. Places available **

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Des places sont disponibles dans les cours suivants : Places are available in the following courses : C++ for Particle Physicists : 10 - 14.3.03 (6 X 3-hour lectures) Introduction to PVSS : 10.3.03 (half day, afternoon) Basic PVSS : 11 - 13.3.03 (3 days) PVSS - JCOP Framework Tutorial : 14.3.03 (1 day) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a cleanroom : 2.4.03 (half-day, afternoon, free course, registration required) LabView base 1/LabView Basics 1 : 9 - 11.4.03 (3 jours/3 days) Langue à définir/language to be decided DISP-2003 - Spring II Term : Advanced Digital Signal Processing : 30.4, 7, 14, 21.5.03 (4 X 2-hour lectures) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 29, 30.4 et 7, 8.5.03 (4 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 5 & 6.5.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 12, 13, 20, 21, 27 & 28.5.03 (6 jours) Formation Siemens SIMATIC /Siemens SIMATIC Training : Introduction à STEP7 /Introduction to STEP7 : 11 & 12.3.03 / 3 & 4.6.03 (2 jours/2 days) Programmation STEP7/STEP7 Programming : 31.3 - 4.4.03 / 16...

  19. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses : Introduction to PVSS : 10.3.03 (half-day, afternoon) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a cleanroom : 2.4.03 (half-day, afternoon, free course, registration required) LabView Basics 1 : 9 - 11.4.03 (3 days) Language to be decided. DISP-2003 - Spring II Term : Advanced Digital Signal Processing : 30.4, 7, 14, 21.5.03 (4 X 2-hour lectures). AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 29, 30.4 et 7, 8.5.03 (4 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 5 & 6.5.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 12, 13, 20, 21, 27 & 28.5.03 (6 jours) Siemens SIMATIC Training: Introduction to STEP7 : 3 & 4.6.03 (2 days) STEP7 Programming : 31.3 - 4.4.03 / 16 - 20.6.03 (5 days) Simatic Net Network : 15 & 16.4.03 / 26 & 27.6.03 These courses will be given in French or English following the requests. Cours de sécurité: Etre TSO au CERN : 3 sessions sont programmées pour 2003 : 25, 26 & 28.3.03 - 24, 25 & 27.6.03 - 4, 5 & 7.11.03 (sessions de 3 jours) ** The number o...

  20. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: November 2002   Introduction to PVSS (free of charge): 11.11.02  (afternoon) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 :  12 & 13.11.02  (2 jours) CLEAN-2002: Working in a Cleanroom (English, free of charge):  13.11.2002  (afternoon) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 :  14, 15, 21, 22.11.02  (4 jours) Hands-on Object-Oriented Design and Programming with C++:  19 - 21.11.02  (3 days)  EXCEL 2000 - niveau 2 :  25 & 26.11.02  (2 jours) FrontPage 2000 - niveau 1 :  27 & 28.11.02  (2 jours) December 2002   LabVIEW - DSC (English) :  2 - 3.12.02  (2 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 :  2 & 3.12.02  (2 jours) FileMaker (Français) :  2 - 5.12.02  (4 jours) PCAD Schémas - Débutants :  5 & 6.12.02 ...

  1. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: PROFIBUS : 25 - 26.9.01 (2 jours) PROFIBUS : 27 - 28.9.01 (2 days) Automates et réseaux de terrain : 3 - 4.10.2001 (2 jours) PCAD Schémas - débutants : 4 - 5.10.01 (2 jours) PCAD PCB - débutants : 8 - 10.10.01 (3 jours) Programmation TSX Premium 1 : 15 - 19.10.01 (5 jours) Programmation TSX Premium 1 : 22 - 26.10.01 (5 jours) Programming TSX Premium 2: 19 - 23.11.01 (5 days) Programmation TSX Premium 2 : 26 - 30.11.01 (5 jours) Autocad Migration support courses: a detailed calendar will be published shortly for this series of sessions which will start on 15.10.2001. Registration is already open AutoCAD : Mise à jour AutoCAD r-14 vers 2002 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical PowerPack 6 basé sur AutoCAD 2002 (5 jours) The following LabView courses will be given in either English or French according to demand LabVIEW - Base 1 / LabVIEW - Basics 1 : 10 - 12.9.01 (3 jours / 3 days)...

  2. PLACES AVAILABLES

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: PVSS Basics : 20 - 24.8.01 (5 days) PROFIBUS : 25 - 26.9.01 (2 jours) PROFIBUS : 27 - 28.9.01 (2 days) PCAD Schémas - débutants : 4 - 5.10.01 (2 jours) PCAD PCB - débutants : 8 - 10.10.01 (3 jours) Programming TSX Premium 1: 15 - 19.10.01 (5 days) Programmation TSX Premium 1 : 22 - 26.10.01 (5 jours) Programming TSX Premium 2: 19 - 23.11.01 (5 days) Programmation TSX Premium 2 : 26 - 30.11.01 (5 jours) The following LabView courses will be given in either English or French according to demand LabVIEW - Base 1 / LabVIEW - Basics 1 : 10 - 12.9.01 (3 jours / 3 days) LabVIEW - DAQ / LabVIEW - DAQ : 13 - 14.9.01 (2 jours / 2 days) LabVIEW - Base 1 / LabVIEW - Basics 1 : 15 - 17.10.01 (3 jours / 3 days) LabVIEW - Base 2 / LabVIEW - Basics 2 : 18 - 19.10.01 (2 jours / 2 days) LabVIEW - Base 1 / LabVIEW - Basics 1 : 12 - 14.11.01 (3 jours / 3 days) LabVIEW - DAQ / LabVIEW - DAQ : 15 - 16.11.01 (2 jours / 2...

  3. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: November 2002   LabView hands-on (bilingue/bilingual): 5.11.02 (matin/morning) LabView DAQ hands-on (bilingue/bilingual):  5.11.02  (après-midi afternoon) PCAD Schémas - Débutants :  5 & 6.11.02  (2 jours) PCAD PCB - Débutants :  9 - 11.11.02  (3 jours) Introduction au PC et Windows 2000 au CERN :  6 & 7.11.02  (2 jours) Oracle 8i : Access the Database with Java :  7 & 8.11.02  (2 days) Introduction to PVSS (free of charge):  11.11.2002 pm  (1/2 day) Basic PVSS:  12 - 14.11.02  (3 days) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 :  12 & 13.11.02  (2 jours) CLEAN-2002: Working in a Cleanroom (English, free of charge):  13.11.2002  (afternoon) LabView Base 1 :  13 - 15.11.02  (3 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 :  14, 15, 21, 22.11.02  (4 jours) LabVIEW - Advanced:  18 - 20.11.02  (3 days) Hands-on Object-Oriented Design and Programming with C++ :  19 - 21.11.02  (3 days)  LabVIEW - Basics 2:  21 - 22.11.02 ...

  4. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses : EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 10 & 11.6.03 (2 jours) Conception de PCB rapides dans le flot Cadence : 11.6.03 (matin) EXCEL 2000 - level 1 : 12 & 13.6.03 (2 days) Introduction to PVSS : 16.6.03 (p.m.) Basic PVSS : 17 - 19.6.03 (3 days) Réalisation de PCB rapides dans le flot Cadence : 17.6.03 (matin) PVSS - JCOP Framework Tutorial : 20.6.03 (1 day) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 2 : 24 & 25.6.03 (2 jours) Siemens SIMATIC Training : Introduction to STEP7 : 3 & 4.6.03 (2 jours/2 days) STEP7 Programming : 16 - 20.6.03 (5 jours/5 days) Simatic Net Network : 26 & 27.6.03 (2 jours/2 days) These courses will be given in French or English following the requests. Programmation automate Schneider : Programmation automate Schneider TSX Premium - 1er niveau : 10 - 13.6.03 (4 jours) - audience : toute personne qui veux maitriser la msie en uvre et la programmation d'un automate TSX Premium - objectifs : maitriser la mise en uvre et la programmation d'un autom...

  5. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses : FrontPage 2000 - niveau 1 : 20 & 21.5.03 (2 jours) PIPES-2003 : Pratique du sertissage de tubes métalliques et multicouches : 21.5.03 (1 jour) Introduction à la CAO Cadence : de la saisie de schéma Concept-HDL au PCB : 20 & 22.5.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 3 & 4.6.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 5, 6, 12, 13, 26, 27.6.03 (6 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 10 & 11.6.03 (2 jours) Conception de PCB rapides dans le flot Cadence : 11.6.03 (matin) EXCEL 2000 - level 1 : 12 & 13.6.03 (2 days) PowerPoint 2000 (F) : 17 & 18.6.03 (2 jours) Réalisation de PCB rapides dans le flot Cadence : 17.6.03 (matin) FrontPage 2000 - niveau 2 : 19 & 20.6.03 (2 jours) LabView DSC (langue à décider/language to be defined) : 19 & 20.6.03 EXCEL 2000 - niveau 2 : 24 & 25.6.03 (2 jours) Siemens SIMATIC Training: Introduction to STEP7 : 3 & 4.6.03 (2 days) STEP7 Programming : 16 - 20.6.03 (5 days) Simatic...

  6. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: PVSS Basics : 20 - 24.8.01 (5 days) PROFIBUS : 25 - 26.9.01 (2 jours) PROFIBUS : 27 - 28.9.01 (2 days) PCAD Schémas - débutants : 4 - 5.10.01 (2 jours) PCAD PCB - débutants : 8 - 10.10.01 (3 jours) Programming TSX Premium 1: 15 - 19.10.01 (5 days) Programmation TSX Premium 1 : 22 - 26.10.01 (5 jours) Programming TSX Premium 2: 19 - 23.11.01 (5 days) Programmation TSX Premium 2 : 26 - 30.11.01 (5 jours) The following LabView courses will be given in either English or French according to demand LabVIEW - Base 1 / LabVIEW - Basics 1 : 10 - 12.9.01 (3 jours / 3 days) LabVIEW - DAQ / LabVIEW - DAQ : 13 - 14.9.01 (2 jours / 2 days) LabVIEW - Base 1 / LabVIEW - Basics 1 : 15 - 17.10.01 (3 jours / 3 days) LabVIEW - Base 2 / LabVIEW - Basics 2 : 18 - 19.10.01 (2 jours / 2 days) LabVIEW - Base 1 / LabVIEW - Basics 1 : 12 - 14.11.01 (3 jours / 3 days) LabVIEW - DAQ / LabVIEW - DAQ : 15 - 16.11.01 (2 jours / 2...

  7. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Introduction à Windows 2000 au CERN : 2 sessions de _ journée les 24 et 25.9.01 PROFIBUS : 25 - 26.9.01 (2 jours) PROFIBUS : 27 - 28.9.01 (2 days) PowerPoint 2000 : 1 et 2.10.01 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 3 et 4.10.01 (2 jours) Automates et réseaux de terrain : 3 - 4.10.2001 (2 jours) PCAD Schémas - débutants : 4 - 5.10.01 (2 jours) Introduction à Outlook : 5.10.01 (1 journée) Frontpage 2000 - niveau 1 : 8 et 9.10.01 (2 jours) PCAD PCB - débutants : 8 - 10.10.01 (3 jours) C++ for Particle Physicists : 8 - 12.10.01 (6 3-hour lectures) MS-Project 2000 - niveau 1 : 15 - 18.10.01 (4 demi-journées) LabView Basics 1 :  15 - 17.10.01  (3 days) Programmation TSX Premium 1 : 15 - 19.10.01 (5 jours) WORD 2000 : importer et manipuler des images : 19.10.01 (1 journée) Programmation TSX Premium 1 : 22 - 26.10.01...

  8. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Cadence Board Design tools : Upgrading to release 14 :  3 1-day sessions on 9, 10 & 11.10.01 MS-Project 2000 - niveau 1 : 15 - 18.10.01 (4 demi-journées) LabView Base 2 : 18 & 19.10.01 (2 jours) WORD 2000 : importer et manipuler des images : 19.10.01 (1 journée) Contract Follow-up (F) :  30.10.01 (1/2 journée) The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Electronics Design :  30.10.01 (1 day) UNIX pour non-programmeurs : 5 - 7.11.01 (3 jours) The Java programming language Level 1: 8 - 9.11.01 (2 days) LabView Base 1 : 12 - 14.11.01 (3 jours) Introduction to PERL 5 :  15 - 16.11.01  (2 days) Introduction to XML :  19 - 20.11.01 (2 days) Programming TSX Premium 1 :  19 - 23.11.01  (5 days) Introduction to C Programming :  21- 23.11.01 (3 days) The Java programming language Level 2:  26 - 28.11.01 (...

  9. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Introduction à Windows 2000 au CERN : 2 sessions de _ journée les 24 et 25.9.01 PROFIBUS : 25 - 26.9.01 (2 jours) PROFIBUS : 27 - 28.9.01 (2 days) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 3 et 4.10.01 (2 jours) Automates et réseaux de terrain : 3 - 4.10.2001 (2 jours) Introduction à Outlook : 5.10.01 (1 journée) Frontpage 2000 - niveau 1 : 8 et 9.10.01 (2 jours) C++ for Particle Physicists : 8 - 12.10.01 (6 lectures) MS-Project 2000 - niveau 1 : 15 - 18.10.01 (4 demi-journées) Programmation TSX Premium 1 : 15 - 19.10.01 (5 jours) WORD 2000 : importer et manipuler des images : 19.10.01 (1 journée) Programmation TSX Premium 1 : 22 - 26.10.01 (5 jours) UNIX pour non-programmeurs : 5 - 7.11.01 (3 jours) The Java programming language Level 1: 8 - 9.11.01 (2 days) Introduction to PERL 5 :  15 - 16.11.01  (2 days) Introduction to XML :  19 - 20.11.01 (2...

  10. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 3 et 4.10.01 (2 jours) Automates et réseaux de terrain : 3 - 4.10.2001 (2 jours) Introduction à Outlook : 5.10.01 (1 journée) C++ for Particle Physicists : 8 - 12.10.01 (6 lectures) Cadence Board Design tools : Upgrading to release 14 : 3 1-day sessions on 9, 10 & 11.10.01 MS-Project 2000 - niveau 1 : 15 - 18.10.01 (4 demi-journées) LabView Base 2 : 18 & 19.10.01 (2 jours) WORD 2000 : importer et manipuler des images : 19.10.01 (1 journée) The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Electronics Design :  30.10.01 (1 day) UNIX pour non-programmeurs : 5 - 7.11.01 (3 jours) The Java programming language Level 1: 8 - 9.11.01 (2 days) Introduction to PERL 5 :  15 - 16.11.01  (2 days) Introduction to XML :  19 - 20.11.01 (2 days) Programming TSX Premium 1 :  19 - 23.11.01  (5 days) Introd...

  11. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: MS-Project 2000 - niveau 1 : 15 - 18.10.01 (4 demi-journées) LabView Base 2 : 18 & 19.10.01 (2 jours) WORD 2000 : importer et manipuler des images : 19.10.01 (1 journée) Contract Follow-up (F) : 30.10.01 (1/2 journée) The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Electronics Design :  30.10.01 (1 day) UNIX pour non-programmeurs : 5 - 7.11.01 (3 jours) The Java programming language Level 1: 8 - 9.11.01 (2 days) LabView Base 1 : 12 - 14.11.01 (3 jours) Automates et réseaux de terrain : 13 & 14.11.01 (2 jours) Introduction to PERL 5 :  15 - 16.11.01  (2 days) Introduction to XML :  19 - 20.11.01 (2 days) Programming TSX Premium 1 :  19 - 23.11.01  (5 days) Introduction to C Programming :  21- 23.11.01 (3 days) The Java programming language Level 2:  26 - 28.11.01 (3 days) Programmation TSX Premium 2 : 26 ...

  12. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: LabView Base 1 :  23 - 25.9.02  (3 jours) Object-Oriented Analysis & Design using UML:  25 - 27.9.02  (3 days) LabView DAQ (E):  26 - 27.9.02  (2 days) Introduction to Oracle 8i : SQL and PL/SQL:  7 - 11.10.02  (5 days) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom (free of charge):  10.10.02  (half-day, p.m.) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 :  14 - 15.10.02  (2 jours) Introduction à DesignSpace :  16.10.02  (1 journée) Introduction to DesignSpace:  17.10.02  (1 day) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1:  17, 18, 24, 25.10.02  (4 days) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) :  21, 22, 23.10 et 4, 5, 6.11.02  (6 jours) Introduction à ANSYS/Introduction to ANSYS (langue à définir suivant demande/ Language to be chosen according to demand):...

  13. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Java 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 2: Enterprise JavaBeans:  18 - 20.9.02  (3 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 :  19, 20, 26, 27.9.02  (4 jours) LabView Base 1 :  23 - 25.9.02  (3 jours) Object-Oriented Analysis & Design using UML:  25 - 27.9.02  (3 days) LabView DAQ (E):  26 - 27.9.02  (2 days) Introduction to Oracle 8i : SQL and PL/SQL:  7 - 11.10.02  (5 days) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom (free of charge):  10.10.02  (half-day, p.m.) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 :  14 - 15.10.02  (2 jours) Introduction à DesignSpace :  16.10.02  (1 journée) Introduction to DesignSpace:  17.10.02  (1 day) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1:  17, 18, 24, 25.10.02  (4 days) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) :  21, 22, 23.10 et 4, 5, 6.11....

  14. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Automates et réseaux de terrain : 13 & 14.11.01 (3 jours) Introduction à Windows 2000 au CERN : 12 - 14.11.01 (1/2 journée) Introduction to Windows 2000 at CERN :  14.11.01  (half-day) Introduction to PERL 5 :  15 - 16.11.01  (2 days) Sécurité dans les installations cryogéniques : 21 - 22.11.2001 (2 demi-journées) Introduction to C Programming :  21- 23.11.01 (3 days) Programmation TSX Premium 2 : 26 - 30.11.01 (5 jours) Contract Follow-up (F) : 26.11.01 (1/2 journée) Object-Oriented Analysis and Design :  27 - 30.11.2001  (4 days) Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System :  30.11.2001 (1 day) Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC): Introduction (bilingual) :  3.12.01 (half-day) Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System : 07.12.2001...

  15. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Contract Follow-up (F) : 30.10.01 (1/2 journée) The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Electronics Design :  30.10.01 (1 day) UNIX pour non-programmeurs : 5 - 7.11.01 (3 jours) Nouveautés d'EXCEL : 5.11.01 (1/2 journée) Introduction a Windows 2000 au CERN : 6.11.01 (1/2 journée) The Java programming language Level 1: 8 - 9.11.01 (2 days) LabView Base 1 : 12 - 14.11.01 (3 jours) Automates et réseaux de terrain : 13 & 14.11.01 (2 jours) Introduction to PERL 5 :  15 - 16.11.01  (2 days) Introduction to XML :  19 - 20.11.01 (2 days) Programming TSX Premium 1 :  19 - 23.11.01  (5 days) Introduction to C Programming :  21- 23.11.01 (3 days) The Java programming language Level 2:  26 - 28.11.01 (3 days) Programmation TSX Premium 2 : 26 - 30.11.01 (5 jours) Autocad Migration support courses: a detail...

  16. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Contract Follow-up (F) : 30.10.01 (1/2 journée) The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Electronics Design :  30.10.01 (1 day) Nouveautés d'Excel 2000 : 5.11.01 (1/2 journée) UNIX pour non-programmeurs : 5 - 7.11.01 (3 jours) Introduction à Windows 2000 au CERN : 6.11.01 (1/2 journée) The Java programming language Level 1: 8 - 9.11.01 (2 days) LabView Base 1 : 12 - 14.11.01 (3 jours) LabVIEW DAQ (F) : 15 & 16.11.01 (2 jours) Automates et réseaux de terrain : 13 & 14.11.01 (2 jours) Introduction to PERL 5 :  15 - 16.11.01  (2 days) LabVIEW - DAQ : 15 - 16.11.01 (2 jours) Introduction to XML :  19 - 20.11.01 (2 days) Introduction to C Programming :  21- 23.11.01 (3 days) Programmation TSX Premium 2 : 26 - 30.11.01 (5 jours) Object-Oriented Analysis and Design :  27 - 30.11.2001 (4 days) Hands...

  17. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Nouveautés d'EXCEL : 5.11.01 (1/2 journée) Introduction a Windows 2000 au CERN : 6.11.01 (1/2 journée) UNIX pour non-programmeurs : 5 - 7.11.01 (3 jours) Design Patterns :  7 - 8.11.01 (2 days) The Java programming language Level 1: 8 - 9.11.01 (2 days) Automates et réseaux de terrain : 13 & 14.11.01 (3 jours) Introduction à Windows 2000 au CERN : 12 - 14.11.01 (1/2 journée) Introduction to Windows 2000 at CERN :  14.11.01  (half-day) Introduction to PERL 5 :  15 - 16.11.01  (2 days) Introduction to C Programming :  21- 23.11.01 (3 days) Programmation TSX Premium 2 : 26 - 30.11.01 (5 jours) Contract Follow-up (F) : 26.11.01 (1/2 journée) Object-Oriented Analysis and Design :  27 - 30.11.2001  (4 days) Hands-on Object-Oriented Design and Programming with C++ :  11 - 13.12.2...

  18. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: ELEC-2002 : Spring Term :  9, 11, 16, 18, 23, 25, 30.4.02 (7 * 2.5 hours) Object-Oriented Analysis & Design: 16 - 19.4.02  (4 days) The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Advanced users:  16.4.02  (1 day) Migration from AutoCAD 14 towards AutoCAD Mechanical6 PowerPack:  17 - 19.4 and 2 &3.5.02  (5 days) AutoCAD - niveau 1 : 22, 23, 29, 30.4 et 6, 7.5.02 (6 jours) LabVIEW base 1 : 22 - 24.4.02 (3 jours) CLEAN 2002 : working in a cleanroom:  24.4.02  (half-day, pm) LabVIEW DSC (F) 25 & 26.4.02 (2 jours) AutoCAD : Mise à jour AutoCAD r-14 vers 2002 : 25 & 26.4.02 (2 jours) Cotations selon les normes GPS de l'ISO : 29 - 30.4.02 (2 jours) Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System:  7.5.02  (1 day) LabVIEW Basics 2 : 13 & 14.5.02 (2 days) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 13-...

  19. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System:  7.5.02  (1 day) LabVIEW Basics 2: 13 & 14.5.02 (2 days) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 13-14, 17, 21, 27-28.5.02 (6 jours) WorldFIP - Généralités : 14.5.2002 (1/2 journée) WorldFIP - Développer avec MicroFIP HANDLER : 14.5 - après-midi, 15.5.02 - matin (1 jour) WorldFIP - FullFIP FDM : FIP Device Manager (F) : 15.5 - après-midi, 16.5.02 - matin (1 jour) LabVIEW DAQ (F) : 15 & 16.5.02 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 2 : 22 & 23.5.02 (2 jours) The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Advanced users:  30.5.02  (1 day) LabVIEW Basics 1:  3 - 5.6.02  (3 days) AutoCAD 2002 - condensé : 4 - 6.6.02 (3 jours) LabVIEW DAQ (E):  6 & 7.6.02  (2 days) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1:  10 - ...

  20. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Advanced users : 16.4.02  (1 day) Migration from AutoCAD 14 towards AutoCAD Mechanical6 PowerPack:  17 - 19.4 and 2 &3.5.02  (5 days) AutoCAD - niveau 1 : 22, 23, 29, 30.4 et 6, 7.5.02 (6 jours) LabVIEW base 1 : 22 - 24.4.02 (3 jours) CLEAN 2002 : working in a cleanroom:  24.4.02  (half-day, pm) LabVIEW DSC (F) 25 & 26.4.02 (2 jours) AutoCAD : Mise à jour AutoCAD r-14 vers 2002 : 25 & 26.4.02 (2 jours) Cotations selon les normes GPS de l'ISO : 29 - 30.4.02 (2 jours) Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System:  7.5.02  (1 day) LabVIEW Basics 2: 13 & 14.5.02 (2 days) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 13-14, 17, 21, 27-28.5.02 (6 jours) WorldFIP - Généralités : 14.5.2002 (1/2 journée) WorldFIP - Développer avec Micr...

  1. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: LabVIEW Basics 2: 13 & 14.5.02 (2 days) WorldFIP - Généralités : 14.5.2002 (1/2 journée) WorldFIP - Développer avec MicroFIP HANDLER : 14.5 - après-midi, 15.5.02 - matin (1 jour) WorldFIP - FullFIP FDM : FIP Device Manager (F) : 15.5 - après-midi, 16.5.02 - matin (1 jour) LabVIEW DAQ (F) : 15 & 16.5.02 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 2 : 22 & 23.5.02 (2 jours) The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Advanced users:  30.5.02  (1 day) LabVIEW Basics 1:  3 - 5.6.02  (3 days) AutoCAD 2002 - condensé : 4 - 6.6.02 (3 jours) LabVIEW DAQ (E):  6 & 7.6.02  (2 days) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1:  10 - 12 and 24 - 26.6.02  (6 days) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the c...

  2. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: LabVIEW base 1 : 22 - 24.4.02 (3 jours) CLEAN 2002 : working in a cleanroom:  24.4.02  (half-day, pm) LabVIEW DSC (F) 25 & 26.4.02 (2 jours) AutoCAD : Mise à jour AutoCAD r-14 vers 2002 : 25 & 26.4.02 (2 jours) Cotations selon les normes GPS de l'ISO : 29 - 30.4.02 (2 jours) Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System:  7.5.02  (1 day) LabVIEW Basics 2: 13 & 14.5.02 (2 days) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 13-14, 17, 21, 27-28.5.02 (6 jours) WorldFIP - Généralités : 14.5.2002 (1/2 journée) WorldFIP - Développer avec MicroFIP HANDLER : 14.5 - après-midi, 15.5.02 - matin (1 jour) WorldFIP - FullFIP FDM : FIP Device Manager (F) : 15.5 - après-midi, 16.5.02 - matin (1 jour) LabVIEW DAQ (F) : 15 & 16.5.02 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 2 : 22 & 23.5.02 (2 jours)...

  3. Congenital orbital teratoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiyub, Shereen; Chan, Wengonn; Szetu, John; Sullivan, Laurence J; Pater, John; Cooper, Peter; Selva, Dinesh

    2013-12-01

    We present a case of mature congenital orbital teratoma managed with lid-sparing exenteration and dermis fat graft. This is a case report on the management of congenital orbital teratoma. A full-term baby was born in Fiji with prolapsed right globe which was surrounded by a nonpulsatile, cystic mass. Clinical and imaging features were consistent with congenital orbital teratoma. Due to limited surgical expertise, the patient was transferred to Adelaide, Australia for further management. The patient underwent a lid-sparing exenteration with frozen section control of the apical margin. A dermis fat graft from the groin was placed beneath the lid skin to provide volume. Histopathology revealed mature tissues from each of the three germ cell layers which confirmed the diagnosis of mature teratoma. We describe the successful use of demis fat graft in socket reconstruction following lid-sparing exenteration for congenital orbital teratoma.

  4. PS Booster Orbit Correction

    CERN Document Server

    Chanel, M; Rumolo, G; Tomás, R; CERN. Geneva. AB Department

    2008-01-01

    At the end of the 2007 run, orbit measurements were carried out in the 4 rings of the PS Booster (PSB) for different working points and beam energies. The aim of these measurements was to provide the necessary input data for a PSB realignment campaign during the 2007/2008 shutdown. Currently, only very few corrector magnets can be operated reliably in the PSB; therefore the orbit correction has to be achieved by displacing (horizontally and vertically) and/or tilting some of the defocusing quadrupoles (QDs). In this report we first describe the orbit measurements, followed by a detailed explanation of the orbit correction strategy. Results and conclusions are presented in the last section.

  5. CMTM3 (CKLF-Like Marvel Transmembrane Domain 3) Mediates Angiogenesis by Regulating Cell Surface Availability of VE-Cadherin in Endothelial Adherens Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrifi, Ihsan; Louzao-Martinez, Laura; Brandt, Maarten; van Dijk, Christian G M; Burgisser, Petra; Zhu, Changbin; Kros, Johan M; Duncker, Dirk J; Cheng, Caroline

    2017-06-01

    Decrease in VE-cadherin adherens junctions reduces vascular stability, whereas disruption of adherens junctions is a requirement for neovessel sprouting during angiogenesis. Endocytosis plays a key role in regulating junctional strength by altering bioavailability of cell surface proteins, including VE-cadherin. Identification of new mediators of endothelial endocytosis could enhance our understanding of angiogenesis. Here, we assessed the function of CMTM3 (CKLF-like MARVEL transmembrane domain 3), which we have previously identified as highly expressed in Flk1 + endothelial progenitor cells during embryonic development. Using a 3-dimensional coculture of human umbilical vein endothelial cells-GFP (green fluorescent protein) and pericytes-RFP (red fluorescent protein), we demonstrated that siRNA-mediated CMTM3 silencing in human umbilical vein endothelial cells impairs angiogenesis. In vivo CMTM3 inhibition by morpholino injection in developing zebrafish larvae confirmed that CMTM3 expression is required for vascular sprouting. CMTM3 knockdown in human umbilical vein endothelial cells does not affect proliferation or migration. Intracellular staining demonstrated that CMTM3 colocalizes with early endosome markers EEA1 (early endosome marker 1) and Clathrin + vesicles and with cytosolic VE-cadherin in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Adenovirus-mediated CMTM3 overexpression enhances endothelial endocytosis, shown by an increase in Clathrin + , EEA1 + , Rab11 + , Rab5 + , and Rab7 + vesicles. CMTM3 overexpression enhances, whereas CMTM3 knockdown decreases internalization of cell surface VE-cadherin in vitro. CMTM3 promotes loss of endothelial barrier function in thrombin-induced responses, shown by transendothelial electric resistance measurements in vitro. In this study, we have identified a new regulatory function for CMTM3 in angiogenesis. CMTM3 is involved in VE-cadherin turnover and is a regulator of the cell surface pool of VE-cadherin. Therefore, CMTM

  6. Local orbit feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    Critically aligned experiments are sensitive to small changes in the electron beam orbit. At the NSLS storage rings, the electron beam and photon beam motions have been monitored over the past several years. In the survey conducted in 1986 by the NSLS Users Executive Committee, experimenters requested the vertical beam position variation and the vertical angle variation, within a given fill, remain within 10 μm and 10 μr, respectively. This requires improvement in the beam stability by about one order of magnitude. At the NSLS and SSRL storage rings, the beam that is originally centered on the position monitor by a dc orbit correction is observed to have two kinds of motion: a dc drift over a storage period of several hours and a beam bounce about its nominal position. These motions are a result of the equilibrium orbit not being held perfectly stable due to time-varying errors introduced into the magnetic guide field by power supplies, mechanical vibration of the magnets, cooling water temperature variations, etc. The approach to orbit stabilization includes (1) identifying and suppressing as many noise sources on the machine as possible, (2) correcting the beam position globally (see Section 6) by controlling a number of correctors around the circumference of the machine, and (3) correcting the beam position and angle at a given source location by position feedback using local detectors and local orbit bumps. The third approach, called Local Orbit Feedback will be discussed in this section

  7. Dealing with Uncertainties in Initial Orbit Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armellin, Roberto; Di Lizia, Pierluigi; Zanetti, Renato

    2015-01-01

    A method to deal with uncertainties in initial orbit determination (IOD) is presented. This is based on the use of Taylor differential algebra (DA) to nonlinearly map the observation uncertainties from the observation space to the state space. When a minimum set of observations is available DA is used to expand the solution of the IOD problem in Taylor series with respect to measurement errors. When more observations are available high order inversion tools are exploited to obtain full state pseudo-observations at a common epoch. The mean and covariance of these pseudo-observations are nonlinearly computed by evaluating the expectation of high order Taylor polynomials. Finally, a linear scheme is employed to update the current knowledge of the orbit. Angles-only observations are considered and simplified Keplerian dynamics adopted to ease the explanation. Three test cases of orbit determination of artificial satellites in different orbital regimes are presented to discuss the feature and performances of the proposed methodology.

  8. Lightning measurements from the Pioneer Venus Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarf, F. L.; Russell, C. T.

    1983-01-01

    The plasma wave instrument on the Pioneer Venus Orbiter frequently detects strong and impulsive low-frequency signals when the spacecraft traverses the nightside ionosphere near periapsis. These particular noise bursts appear only when the local magnetic field is strong and steady and when the field is oriented to point down to the ionosphere thus; the signals have all characteristics of lightning whistlers. We have tried to identify lightning sources between the cloud layers and the planet itself by tracing rays along the B-field from the Orbiter down toward the surface. An extensive data set, consisting of measurements through Orbit 1185, strongly indicates a clustering of lightning sources near the Beta and Phoebe Regios, with an additional significant cluster near the Atla Regio at the eastern edge of Aphrodite Terra. These results suggest that there are localized lightning sources at or near the planetary surface.

  9. TerraSAR-X precise orbit determination with real-time GPS ephemerides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wermuth, Martin; Hauschild, Andre; Montenbruck, Oliver; Kahle, Ralph

    TerraSAR-X is a German Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) satellite, which was launched in June 2007 from Baikonour. Its task is to acquire radar images of the Earth's surface. In order to locate the radar data takes precisely, the satellite is equipped with a high-quality dual-frequency GPS receiver -the Integrated Geodetic and Occultation Receiver (IGOR) provided by the GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam (GFZ). Using GPS observations from the IGOR instrument in a reduced dynamic precise orbit determination (POD), the German Space Operations Center (DLR/GSOC) is computing rapid and science orbit products on a routine basis. The rapid orbit products arrive with a latency of about one hour after data reception with an accuracy of 10-20 cm. Science orbit products are computed with a latency of five days achieving an accuracy of about 5cm (3D-RMS). For active and future Earth observation missions, the availability of near real-time precise orbit information is becoming more and more important. Other applications of near real-time orbit products include the processing of GNSS radio occulation measurements for atmospheric sounding as well as altimeter measurements of ocean surface heights, which are nowadays employed in global weather and ocean circulation models with short latencies. For example after natural disasters it is necessary to evaluate the damage by satellite images as soon as possible. The latency and quality of POD results is mainly driven by the availability of precise GPS ephemerides. In order to have high-quality GPS ephemerides available at real-time, GSOC has developed the real-time clock estimation system RETICLE. The system receives NTRIP-data streams with GNSS observations from the global tracking network of IGS in real-time. Using the known station position, RETICLE estimates precise GPS satellite clock offsets and drifts based on the most recent available IGU predicted orbits. The clock offset estimates have an accuracy of better than 0.3 ns and are

  10. Reconstruction of Orbital Floor With Auricular Concha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seven, Ergin; Tellioglu, Ali Teoman; Inozu, Emre; Ozakpinar, Hulda Rifat; Horoz, Ugur; Eryilmaz, Avni Tolga; Karamursel, Sebat

    2017-10-01

    Orbital floor fractures of varying sizes commonly occur after orbital injuries and remain a serious challenge. Serious complications of such fractures include enopthalmos, restriction of extraocular movement, and diplopia. There is a dearth of literature that can be applied widely, easily, and successfully in all such situations, and therefore there is no consensus on the treatment protocol of this pathology yet. Autogenous grafts and alloplastic and allogenic materials with a wide variety of advantages and disadvantages have been discussed. The value of preoperative and postoperative ophthalmological examination should be standard of care in all orbital fracture patients. An ideal reconstructed orbital floor fracture should accelerate the restoration of orbital function with acceptable cosmetic results. Management parameters of orbital fractures such as timing of surgery, incision type, and implant materials, though widely discussed, remain controversial. In this study, 55 patients with orbital floor fractures surgically reconstructed with conchal cartilage grafts between 2008 and 2014 were retrospectively evaluated. Complications and long-time follow-up visit results have been reported with clinical and radiographic findings. The aim of this study was to present the authors' clinical experiences of reconstruction of blow-out fractures with auricular conchal graft and to evaluate the other materials available for use.

  11. SU-F-T-640: Feasibility of Using a Commercially Available Surface Guided Radiotherapy System with An Open-Face SRS Immobilization System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chinsky, B; Patel, R; Roeske, J; Surucu, M [Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, IL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the inherent accuracy of using a surface guided radiotherapy system (SGRT) in the setup and monitoring of patients receiving stereotactic radiosurgery with an open-face SRS immobilization system. Methods: An anthropomorphic head phantom was set up using the Qfix Encompass SRS Immobilization System on a Varian Edge with OSMS and Varian TrueBeam with AlignRT. The phantom was positioned at 0° gantry and couch. A reference image was acquired using the SGRT system and an ROI was created over the mask opening. The couch and gantry were rotated to different combinations focusing on clinically used SRS gantry/couch combinations and those blocking the SGRT cameras. Perceived surface deviation by the SGRT system from the reference image was recorded. A Winston-Lutz test was performed on couch angles tested and used to exclude couch walkout. The deviation magnitude was calculated using translational values and rotational raw values were recorded. Results: The maximum couch walkouts were: 0.4mm (Edge) and 0.5mm (TB). Solely rotating the gantry resulted in a median couch deviation of 0.2mm and range of 0.1–0.3mm for both linacs. Only rotating the couch (0° gantry) resulted in median deviations of 0.6mm and 0.5mm with ranges of 0.3–1.0mm and 0.3–0.7mm for the Edge and TB, respectively. Combining gantry and couch rotations, the median deviations were 0.7mm and 0.9mm with ranges of 0.3–1.1mm and 0.2–1.9mm for the Edge and TB, respectively. Including all combinations, rotation, roll, and pitch median deviations ranged from 0.1–0.3° with pitch demonstrating consistently higher values and a maximum deviation of 1.0° (both linacs). Conclusion: SGRT is a reliable monitoring tool, though taking into account system fluctuations, 1mm is too restrictive a site tolerance to use with the Qfix Encompass mask. Gantry rotation has little effect on system fluctuation even with camera blockage, whereas couch rotation has a larger effect.

  12. SU-F-T-640: Feasibility of Using a Commercially Available Surface Guided Radiotherapy System with An Open-Face SRS Immobilization System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinsky, B; Patel, R; Roeske, J; Surucu, M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the inherent accuracy of using a surface guided radiotherapy system (SGRT) in the setup and monitoring of patients receiving stereotactic radiosurgery with an open-face SRS immobilization system. Methods: An anthropomorphic head phantom was set up using the Qfix Encompass SRS Immobilization System on a Varian Edge with OSMS and Varian TrueBeam with AlignRT. The phantom was positioned at 0° gantry and couch. A reference image was acquired using the SGRT system and an ROI was created over the mask opening. The couch and gantry were rotated to different combinations focusing on clinically used SRS gantry/couch combinations and those blocking the SGRT cameras. Perceived surface deviation by the SGRT system from the reference image was recorded. A Winston-Lutz test was performed on couch angles tested and used to exclude couch walkout. The deviation magnitude was calculated using translational values and rotational raw values were recorded. Results: The maximum couch walkouts were: 0.4mm (Edge) and 0.5mm (TB). Solely rotating the gantry resulted in a median couch deviation of 0.2mm and range of 0.1–0.3mm for both linacs. Only rotating the couch (0° gantry) resulted in median deviations of 0.6mm and 0.5mm with ranges of 0.3–1.0mm and 0.3–0.7mm for the Edge and TB, respectively. Combining gantry and couch rotations, the median deviations were 0.7mm and 0.9mm with ranges of 0.3–1.1mm and 0.2–1.9mm for the Edge and TB, respectively. Including all combinations, rotation, roll, and pitch median deviations ranged from 0.1–0.3° with pitch demonstrating consistently higher values and a maximum deviation of 1.0° (both linacs). Conclusion: SGRT is a reliable monitoring tool, though taking into account system fluctuations, 1mm is too restrictive a site tolerance to use with the Qfix Encompass mask. Gantry rotation has little effect on system fluctuation even with camera blockage, whereas couch rotation has a larger effect.

  13. PRIMARY ENDOPROSTHETIC REPLACEMENT OF THE ANOPHTHALMIC ORBIT IN PATIENTS WITH UVEAL MELANOMA: SIX-YEAR FOLLOW-UP RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Yarovoy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A locomotor stump was formed in 36 patients (28 women and 8 men, by implanting an endoprosthesis for enucleation of the eyeball with uveal melanoma (UM. The indication for endoprosthesis implantation was no signs of extrabulbar growth. A modified 17–19 mm silicone implant covered with strips from a dura mater graft and medical mesh fabric was used as an orbital implant. The follow-up was 3 to 72 months (mean 32.5 months. All the patients achieved a satisfactory cosmetic effect. None patient was found to have a recurrent orbital tumor. Out of the complications, anterior implant surface denudation was noted in 4 patients. Two patients developed metastases. The absence of recurrent orbital UM at a 6-year follow-up enables primary endoprosthetic replacement of the orbit for UM to be regarded as a safe and reasonable method for patient cosmetic rehabilitation. 

  14. Anterior eye protection with orbital neoplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancock, S.L.

    1986-01-01

    The administration of adequate doses of radiation to tumors involving the orbit and surrounding facial structures and sinuses is often complicated by the need to protect the sensitive ocular components, the lens and cornea. A technique has been devised that uses four photon beam fields and an optional electron field to treat the contents of both orbits and adjacent sinuses with effective, reproducible protection of cornea and lens. Essential features include: alignment of the corneal surfaces with the central plane of rotation of the treatment machine, use of a narrow eye block across the entire beam to shield a strip equal to the width of the cornea, positioned symmetrically across the central plane of rotation, fine alignment of the eye block with both corneal surfaces by altering pedestal angle, treatment with paired, wedged, anterior oblique fields to encompass desired orbital and sinus volumes with additional blocking placed as needed, and complementary, lateral strip fields using collimators set to eye block thickness to equalize dose in the posterior orbit shielded by the strip eye block. A similar anterior electron beam strip field may be added to boost the medial orbit and ethmoid regions covered by the eye block. Bite block head immobilization and easy, direct daily visualization of block position assures eye protection for each treatment and provides substantial reduction in dose to the cornea, lens and iris. Additional blocking may be incorporated to provide partial lacrimal and parotid sparing

  15. [Secondary orbital lymphoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basanta, I; Sevillano, C; Álvarez, M D

    2015-09-01

    A case is presented of an 85 year-old Caucasian female with lymphoma that recurred in the orbit (secondary ocular adnexal lymphoma). The orbital tumour was a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma according to the REAL classification (Revised European-American Lymphoma Classification). Orbital lymphomas are predominantly B-cell proliferations of a variety of histological types, and most are low-grade tumours. Patients are usually middle-aged or elderly, and it is slightly more common in women. A palpable mass, proptosis and blepharoptosis are the most common signs of presentation. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Large orbit neoclassical transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Z.; Tang, W.M.; Lee, W.W.

    1997-01-01

    Neoclassical transport in the presence of large ion orbits is investigated. The study is motivated by the recent experimental results that ion thermal transport levels in enhanced confinement tokamak plasmas fall below the open-quotes irreducible minimum levelclose quotes predicted by standard neoclassical theory. This apparent contradiction is resolved in the present analysis by relaxing the basic neoclassical assumption that the ions orbital excursions are much smaller than the local toroidal minor radius and the equilibrium scale lengths of the system. Analytical and simulation results are in agreement with trends from experiments. The development of a general formalism for neoclassical transport theory with finite orbit width is also discussed. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  17. Projectile Motion in the "Language" of Orbital Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurcher, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    We consider the orbit of projectiles launched with arbitrary speeds from the Earth's surface. This is a generalization of Newton's discussion about the transition from parabolic to circular orbits, when the launch speed approaches the value [image omitted]. We find the range for arbitrary launch speeds and angles, and calculate the eccentricity of…

  18. Baseline Design and Performance Analysis of Laser Altimeter for Korean Lunar Orbiter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung-Chul Lim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Korea’s lunar exploration project includes the launching of an orbiter, a lander (including a rover, and an experimental orbiter (referred to as a lunar pathfinder. Laser altimeters have played an important scientific role in lunar, planetary, and asteroid exploration missions since their first use in 1971 onboard the Apollo 15 mission to the Moon. In this study, a laser altimeter was proposed as a scientific instrument for the Korean lunar orbiter, which will be launched by 2020, to study the global topography of the surface of the Moon and its gravitational field and to support other payloads such as a terrain mapping camera or spectral imager. This study presents the baseline design and performance model for the proposed laser altimeter. Additionally, the study discusses the expected performance based on numerical simulation results. The simulation results indicate that the design of system parameters satisfies performance requirements with respect to detection probability and range error even under unfavorable conditions.

  19. METRIC: A Dedicated Earth-Orbiting Spacecraft for Investigating Gravitational Physics and the Space Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Peron

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A dedicated mission in low Earth orbit is proposed to test predictions of gravitational interaction theories and to directly measure the atmospheric density in a relevant altitude range, as well as to provide a metrological platform able to tie different space geodesy techniques. The concept foresees a small spacecraft to be placed in a dawn-dusk eccentric orbit between 450 and 1200 km of altitude. The spacecraft will be tracked from the ground with high precision, and a three-axis accelerometer package on-board will measure the non-gravitational accelerations acting on its surface. Estimates of parameters related to fundamental physics and geophysics should be obtained by a precise orbit determination, while the accelerometer data will be instrumental in constraining the atmospheric density. Along with the mission scientific objectives, a conceptual configuration is described together with an analysis of the dynamical environment experienced by the spacecraft and the accelerometer.

  20. Cephalic Tetanus from Penetrating Orbital Wound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloïse Guyennet

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Tetanus is a neurologic disorder caused by tetanospasmin, a protein toxin elaborated by Clostridium tetani. Cephalic tetanus is a localized form of the disease causing trismus and dysfunction of cranial nerves. We report the case of a man who presented with facial trauma, complete ophthalmoplegia, exophthalmos, areactive mydriasis, and periorbital hematoma. An orbital CT revealed air bubbles in the right orbital apex. The patient was given a tetanus toxoid booster and antibiotherapy. After extraction of a wooden foreign body, the patient developed right facial nerve palsy, disorders of swallowing, contralateral III cranial nerve palsy, and trismus. Only one case of cephalic tetanus from penetrating orbital wound has been reported in literature 20 years ago. When a patient presents with an orbital wound with ophthalmoplegia and signs of anaerobic infection, cephalic tetanus should be ruled out.

  1. Influence of orbital forcing and solar activity on water isotopes in precipitation during the mid- and late Holocene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Dietrich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we investigate the impact of mid- and late Holocene orbital forcing and solar activity on variations of the oxygen isotopic composition in precipitation. The investigation is motivated by a recently published speleothem δ18O record from the well-monitored Bunker Cave in Germany. The record reveals some high variability on multi-centennial to millennial scales that does not linearly correspond to orbital forcing. Our model study is based on a set of novel climate simulations performed with the atmosphere general circulation model ECHAM5-wiso enhanced by explicit water isotope diagnostics. From the performed model experiments, we derive the following major results: (1 the response of both orbital and solar forcing lead to changes in surface temperatures and δ18O in precipitation with similar magnitudes during the mid- and late Holocene. (2 Past δ18O anomalies correspond to changing temperatures in the orbital driven simulations. This does not hold true if an additional solar forcing is added. (3 Two orbital driven mid-Holocene experiments, simulating the mean climate state approximately 5000 and 6000 yr ago, yield very similar results. However, if an identical additional solar activity-induced forcing is added, the simulated changes of surface temperatures as well as δ18O between both periods differ. We conclude from our simulation results that non-linear effects and feedbacks of the orbital and solar activity forcing substantially alter the δ18O in precipitation pattern and its relation to temperature change.

  2. Orbital welding technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeschen, W.

    2003-01-01

    The TIG (Tungsten-inert gas) orbital welding technique is applied in all areas of pipe welding. The process is mainly used for austenitic and ferritic materials but also for materials like aluminium, nickel, and titanium alloys are commonly welded according to this technique. Thin-walled as well as thick-walled pipes are welded economically. The application of orbital welding is of particular interest in the area of maintenance of thick-walled pipes that is described in this article. (orig.) [de

  3. GLONASS Orbits in Teqc: Methodology and Future Extension for Using SP3 Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estey, L.; Wier, S.

    2011-12-01

    UNAVCO's teqc software package provides translation of a wide variety of GNSS receiver formats, metadata editing (either during translation to RINEX or on existing RINEX files), time-windowing and epoch decimation editing, and quality check (qc) analysis. Teqc is used extensively in GNSS pre-processing, and is designed to handle mixed satellite constellations, such as GPS, GLONASS, Galileo, and SBAS. The latest release of teqc adds GLONASS orbit calculations using GLONASS broadcast navigation messages, read from RINEX file format, during qc. The ephemerides for each GLONASS SV have time and orbit position in Earth-centered, Earth-fixed x, y, and z coordinates. Following Schenewerk [2003], we use trigonometric interpolation, essentially a fit of a partial sum of the Fourier series for each time-varying cartesian orbital component, allowing estimates of orbit positions at most GLONASS observation times. Tests show the interpolated GLONASS orbits made from the broadcast messages diverge from final orbits little more than the same differences using GPS orbits computed from their broadcast messages. Since GLONASS ephemerides do not use Keplerian orbital elements, GLONASS SV orbits can only be interpolated using this method for time intervals when an adequate sequence of ephemerides are available. For typical daily navigation messages collected at a single sit, when a GLONASS SV is in view less than three hours, that SV's signals are generally not used by teqc due to less precise orbit positions. Teqc quality control including SV position can now use GPS alone, GLONASS alone, or the joint solution. Future work will extend teqc to use SP3 format files, such as the IGS final orbit files, and SBAS data, which have broadcast ephemerides with elements similar to GLONASS.

  4. Quantitative evaluation of orbital hybridization in carbon nanotubes under radial deformation using π-orbital axis vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masato Ohnishi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available When a radial strain is applied to a carbon nanotube (CNT, the increase in local curvature induces orbital hybridization. The effect of the curvature-induced orbital hybridization on the electronic properties of CNTs, however, has not been evaluated quantitatively. In this study, the strength of orbital hybridization in CNTs under homogeneous radial strain was evaluated quantitatively. Our analyses revealed the detailed procedure of the change in electronic structure of CNTs. In addition, the dihedral angle, the angle between π-orbital axis vectors of adjacent atoms, was found to effectively predict the strength of local orbital hybridization in deformed CNTs.

  5. Viking orbiter and its Mariner inheritance

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Improvements to the design of the Mariner spacecraft resulted in the Viking spacecraft. The Viking spacecraft would consist of two major systems - an orbiter and a lander, while the lander would provide the means for safely delivering the scientific instruments to the surface, house, and provide the necessary power source and communication links for those experiments, the orbiter would transport the lander to Mars, rovide a platform for the Viking imaging system so that proposed landing sites could be surveyed and certified, relay lander science information back to Earth, and conduct scientific observations in its own right.

  6. The habitable zone and extreme planetary orbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Stephen R; Gelino, Dawn M

    2012-10-01

    The habitable zone for a given star describes the range of circumstellar distances from the star within which a planet could have liquid water on its surface, which depends upon the stellar properties. Here we describe the development of the habitable zone concept, its application to our own solar system, and its subsequent application to exoplanetary systems. We further apply this to planets in extreme eccentric orbits and show how they may still retain life-bearing properties depending upon the percentage of the total orbit which is spent within the habitable zone. Key Words: Extrasolar planets-Habitable zone-Astrobiology.

  7. Computerized tomography of orbital lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroiwa, Mayumi

    1981-01-01

    Two different types of computerized tomography scanners (CT scanner), i.e. a whole-body CT scanner (GE-CT/T8800) and a cerebral CT scanner (EMI-1010), were compared in the assessment and diagnosis of various orbital lesions. The whole-body CT scanner was found to be advantageous over the cerebral CT scanner for the following reasons: (1) CT images were more informative due to thinner slices associated with smaller-sized and larger-numbered matrices; (2) less artifacts derived from motion of the head or eyeball were produced because of the shorter scanning time; (3) with a devised gantry, coronal dissections were available whenever demanded. (author)

  8. Correlation between the 2-Dimensional Extent of Orbital Defects and the 3-Dimensional Volume of Herniated Orbital Content in Patients with Isolated Orbital Wall Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Hyun Cha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe purpose of this study was to assess the correlation between the 2-dimensional (2D extent of orbital defects and the 3-dimensional (3D volume of herniated orbital content in patients with an orbital wall fracture.MethodsThis retrospective study was based on the medical records and radiologic data of 60 patients from January 2014 to June 2016 for a unilateral isolated orbital wall fracture. They were classified into 2 groups depending on whether the fracture involved the inferior wall (group I, n=30 or the medial wall (group M, n=30. The 2D area of the orbital defect was calculated using the conventional formula. The 2D extent of the orbital defect and the 3D volume of herniated orbital content were measured with 3D image processing software. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the correlations between the 2D and 3D parameters.ResultsVarying degrees of positive correlation were found between the 2D extent of the orbital defects and the 3D herniated orbital volume in both groups (Pearson correlation coefficient, 0.568−0.788; R2=32.2%−62.1%.ConclusionsBoth the calculated and measured 2D extent of the orbital defects showed a positive correlation with the 3D herniated orbital volume in orbital wall fractures. However, a relatively large volume of herniation (>0.9 cm3 occurred not infrequently despite the presence of a small orbital defect (<1.9 cm2. Therefore, estimating the 3D volume of the herniated content in addition to the 2D orbital defect would be helpful for determining whether surgery is indicated and ensuring adequate surgical outcomes.

  9. Tailoring spin-orbit torque in diluted magnetic semiconductors

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Hang; Wang, Xuhui; Doǧan, Fatih; Manchon, Aurelien

    2013-01-01

    We study the spin orbit torque arising from an intrinsic linear Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling in a single layer III-V diluted magnetic semiconductor. We investigate the transport properties and spin torque using the linear response theory, and we report here: (1) a strong correlation exists between the angular dependence of the torque and the anisotropy of the Fermi surface; (2) the spin orbit torque depends nonlinearly on the exchange coupling. Our findings suggest the possibility to tailor the spin orbit torque magnitude and angular dependence by structural design.

  10. Tailoring spin-orbit torque in diluted magnetic semiconductors

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Hang

    2013-05-16

    We study the spin orbit torque arising from an intrinsic linear Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling in a single layer III-V diluted magnetic semiconductor. We investigate the transport properties and spin torque using the linear response theory, and we report here: (1) a strong correlation exists between the angular dependence of the torque and the anisotropy of the Fermi surface; (2) the spin orbit torque depends nonlinearly on the exchange coupling. Our findings suggest the possibility to tailor the spin orbit torque magnitude and angular dependence by structural design.

  11. Bohr orbit theory revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harcourt, R.D.

    1987-01-01

    Bohr orbit theory is used to calculate energies for the 1S, 2P, 3D, 4F and 5G states of the helium muonic atom, when the muon is excited. These energies are close to those which have been calculated variationally by Huang (1977, Phys. Rev. A 15 1832-8). (author)

  12. The orbital record in stratigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Alfred G.

    1992-01-01

    Orbital signals are being discovered in pre-Pleistocene sediments. Due to their hierarchical nature these cycle patterns are complex, and the imprecision of geochronology generally makes the assignment of stratigraphic cycles to specific orbital cycles uncertain, but in sequences such as the limnic Newark Group under study by Olsen and pelagic Cretaceous sequence worked on by our Italo-American group the relative frequencies yield a definitive match to the Milankovitch hierarchy. Due to the multiple ways in which climate impinges on depositional systems, the orbital signals are recorded in a multiplicity of parameters, and affect different sedimentary facies in different ways. In platform carbonates, for example, the chief effect is via sea-level variations (possibly tied to fluctuating ice volume), resulting in cycles of emergence and submergence. In limnic systems it finds its most dramatic expression in alternations of lake and playa conditions. Biogenic pelagic oozes such as chalks and the limestones derived from them display variations in the carbonate supplied by planktonic organisms such as coccolithophores and foraminifera, and also record variations in the aeration of bottom waters. Whereas early studies of stratigraphic cyclicity relied mainly on bedding variations visible in the field, present studies are supplementing these with instrumental scans of geochemical, paleontological, and geophysical parameters which yield quantitative curves amenable to time-series analysis; such analysis is, however, limited by problems of distorted time-scales. My own work has been largely concentrated on pelagic systems. In these, the sensitivity of pelagic organisms to climatic-oceanic changes, combined with the sensitivity of botton life to changes in oxygen availability (commonly much more restricted in the Past than now) has left cyclic patterns related to orbital forcing. These systems are further attractive because (1) they tend to offer depositional continuity

  13. Meteoroid Orbits from Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell-Brown, Margaret

    2018-04-01

    Millions of orbits of meteoroids have been measured over the last few decades, and they comprise the largest sample of orbits of solar system bodies which exists. The orbits of these objects can shed light on the distribution and evolution of comets and asteroids in near-Earth space (e.g. Neslusan et al. 2016). If orbits can be measured at sufficiently high resolution, individual meteoroids can be traced back to their parent bodies and, in principle, even to their ejection time (Rudawska et al. 2012). Orbits can be measured with multi-station optical observations or with radar observations.The most fundamental measured quantities are the speed of the meteor and the two angles of the radiant, or point in the sky from which the meteor appears to come. There are many methods used to determine these from observations, but not all produce the most accurate results (Egal et al. 2017). These three measured quantities, along with the time and location of the observation, are sufficient to obtain an orbit (see, e.g., Clark & Wiegert 2011), but the measurements must be corrected for the deceleration of the meteoroid in the atmosphere before it was detected, the rotation of the Earth, and the gravitational attraction of the Earth (including higher order moments if great precision is necessary).Once meteor orbits have been determined, studies of the age and origin of meteor showers (Bruzzone et al., 2015), the parent bodies of sporadic sources (Pokorny et al. 2014), and the dynamics of the meteoroid complex as a whole can be constrained.Bruzzone, J. S., Brown, P., Weryk, R., Campbell-Brown, M., 2015. MNRAS 446, 1625.Clark, D., Wiegert, P., 2011. M&PS 46, 1217.Egal, A., Gural, P., Vaubaillon, J., Colas, F., Thuillot, W., 2017. Icarus 294, 43.Neslusan, L., Vaubaillon, J., Hajdukova, M., 2016. A&A 589, id.A100.Pokorny, P., Vokrouhlicky, D., Nesvorny, D., Campbell-Brown, M., Brown, P., 2014. ApJ 789, id.25.Rudawska, R., Vaubaillon, J., Atreya, P., 2012. A&A 541, id.A2

  14. Displaced Electric Sail Orbits Design and Transition Trajectory Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naiming Qi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Displaced orbits for spacecraft propelled by electric sails are investigated as an alternative to the use of solar sails. The orbital dynamics of electric sails based spacecraft are studied within a spherical coordinate system, which permits finding the solutions of displaced electric sail orbits and optimize transfer trajectory. Transfer trajectories from Earth's orbit to displaced orbit are also studied in an optimal framework, by using genetic algorithm and Gauss pseudospectral method. The initial guesses for the state and control histories used in the Gauss pseudospectral method are interpolated from the best solution of a genetic algorithm. Numerical simulations show that the electric sail is able to perform the transfer from Earth’s orbit to displaced orbit in acceptable time, and the hybrid optimization method has the capability to search the feasible and optimal solution without any initial value guess.

  15. Cholesterol granuloma of the orbit: An atypical presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed A R Rizvi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol granuloma is a rare, well-defined lesion of the orbit. In the orbit, diploe of the frontal bone is involved almost exclusively. We report an atypical case of cholesterol granuloma involving superomedial quadrant of orbit. A 42-year-old male presented with progressive, painless, proptosis with infero-temporal displacement of left eye. A large mass was felt beneath the bony orbital margin in the superomedial quadrant of the left orbit. Computerized tomography (CT scan revealed an extraconal superomedial, heterogeneous enhancing mass which was isodense with brain and pushing the globe inferolaterally and anteriorly. Excision biopsy of the tumor revealed the typical features of a cholesterol granuloma without any epithelial elements. Cholesterol granuloma of the orbit is a rare entity, but it can be diagnosed and differentiated from other lesions of the superior orbit by its characteristic clinical, radiological and histopathological features. An appropriate intervention in time carries a good prognosis with almost no recurrence.

  16. Mars Molniya Orbit Atmospheric Resource Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Robert P.; Braun, Robert D.; Sibille, Laurent; Sforzo, Brandon; Gonyea, Keir; Ali, Hisham

    2016-01-01

    This NIAC (NASA Advanced Innovative Concepts) work will focus on Mars and will build on previous efforts at analyzing atmospheric mining at Earth and the outer solar system. Spacecraft systems concepts will be evaluated and traded, to assess feasibility. However the study will primarily examine the architecture and associated missions to explore the closure, constraints and critical parameters through sensitivity studies. The Mars atmosphere consists of 95.5 percent CO2 gas which can be converted to methane fuel (CH4) and Oxidizer (O2) for chemical rocket propulsion, if hydrogen is transported from electrolyzed water on the Mars surface or from Earth. By using a highly elliptical Mars Molniya style orbit, the CO2 atmosphere can be scooped, ram-compressed and stored while the spacecraft dips into the Mars atmosphere at periapsis. Successive orbits result in additional scooping of CO2 gas, which also serves to aerobrake the spacecraft, resulting in a decaying Molniya orbit.

  17. Evaluation of the global orbit correction algorithm for the APS real-time orbit feedback system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carwardine, J.; Evans, K. Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The APS real-time orbit feedback system uses 38 correctors per plane and has available up to 320 rf beam position monitors. Orbit correction is implemented using multiple digital signal processors. Singular value decomposition is used to generate a correction matrix from a linear response matrix model of the storage ring lattice. This paper evaluates the performance of the APS system in terms of its ability to correct localized and distributed sources of orbit motion. The impact of regulator gain and bandwidth, choice of beam position monitors, and corrector dynamics are discussed. The weighted least-squares algorithm is reviewed in the context of local feedback

  18. Local orbitals by minimizing powers of the orbital variance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansik, Branislav; Høst, Stinne; Kristensen, Kasper

    2011-01-01

    's correlation consistent basis sets, it is seen that for larger penalties, the virtual orbitals become more local than the occupied ones. We also show that the local virtual HF orbitals are significantly more local than the redundant projected atomic orbitals, which often have been used to span the virtual...

  19. Orbital debris: a technical assessment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Committee on Space Debris, National Research Council

    ..., and other debris created as a byproduct of space operations. Orbital Debris examines the methods we can use to characterize orbital debris, estimates the magnitude of the debris population, and assesses the hazard that this population poses to spacecraft...

  20. Evolution of the Orbital Elements for Geosynchronous Orbit of Communications Satellite, II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyu-Hong Choi

    1987-06-01

    Full Text Available For a geostationary satellite north-south station keeping maneuver must control the inclination elements. The effects on the orbit plane of maneuvers and natural perturbations may be represented by a plane plot of Wc versus Ws, since these inclination elements represent the projection of the unit orbit normal onto the equatorial plane. The evolution of the semi-major axis and the inclination elements are obtained.

  1. Orbiting objective lens telescope system and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crooks, J.W. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    A large objective lens is placed in a highly eccentric orbit about the earth. The orbit and orientation of the lens are carefully chosen so that it focuses light or other radiation from a preselected astronomical object into an image which slowly moves across the surface of the earth. A row of optical sensing units is located on the surface of the earth so that the image focused by the orbiting objective lens will travel substantially perpendicularly across the row during an observation. Output data generated from the sensing units may be multiplexed and fed to a real time processor which produces display signals. Each of the sensing units provides one scan line of the image being observed. The display signals are fed to a suitable display device which produces a picture of the preselected astronomical object. The objective lens may comprise a large flexible Fresnel zone plate or a flexible convex lens carried by a bicycle wheel-type supporting structure. The lens and supporting structure may be unfolded from compact cargo configurations and rotated after being placed into orbit

  2. Kalman Orbit Optimized Loop Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Lawrence E.; Meehan, Thomas K.

    2011-01-01

    Under certain conditions of low signal power and/or high noise, there is insufficient signal to noise ratio (SNR) to close tracking loops with individual signals on orbiting Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receivers. In addition, the processing power available from flight computers is not great enough to implement a conventional ultra-tight coupling tracking loop. This work provides a method to track GNSS signals at very low SNR without the penalty of requiring very high processor throughput to calculate the loop parameters. The Kalman Orbit-Optimized Loop (KOOL) tracking approach constitutes a filter with a dynamic model and using the aggregate of information from all tracked GNSS signals to close the tracking loop for each signal. For applications where there is not a good dynamic model, such as very low orbits where atmospheric drag models may not be adequate to achieve the required accuracy, aiding from an IMU (inertial measurement unit) or other sensor will be added. The KOOL approach is based on research JPL has done to allow signal recovery from weak and scintillating signals observed during the use of GPS signals for limb sounding of the Earth s atmosphere. That approach uses the onboard PVT (position, velocity, time) solution to generate predictions for the range, range rate, and acceleration of the low-SNR signal. The low- SNR signal data are captured by a directed open loop. KOOL builds on the previous open loop tracking by including feedback and observable generation from the weak-signal channels so that the MSR receiver will continue to track and provide PVT, range, and Doppler data, even when all channels have low SNR.

  3. Small Aerostationary Telecommunications Orbiter Concept for Mars in the 2020s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, Robert E.; Edwards, Charles D., Jr.; Nicholas, Austin; Woolley, Ryan; Bell, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Current Mars science orbiters carry UHF proximity payloads to provide limited access and data services to landers and rovers on Mars surface. In the era of human spaceflight to Mars, very high rate and reliable relay services will be needed to serve a large number of supporting vehicles, habitats, and orbiters, as well as astronaut EVAs. These will likely be provided by a robust network of orbiting assets in very high orbits, such as areostationary orbits. In the decade leading to that era, telecommunications orbits can be operated at areostationary orbit that can support a significant population of robotic precursor missions and build the network capabilities needed for the human spaceflight era. Telecommunications orbiters of modest size and cost, delivered by Solar Electric Propulsion to areostationary orbit, can provide continuous access at very high data rates to users on the surface and in Mars orbit.In the era of human spaceflight to Mars very high rate andreliable relay services will be needed to serve a largenumber of supporting vehicles, habitats, and orbiters, aswell as astronaut EVAs. These could be provided by arobust network of orbiting assets in very high orbits. In thedecade leading to that era, telecommunications orbiterscould be operated at areostationary orbit that could support asignificant population of robotic precursor missions andbuild the network capabilities needed for the humanspaceflight era. These orbiters could demonstrate thecapabilities and services needed for the future but withoutthe high bandwidth and high reliability requirements neededfor human spaceflight.Telecommunications orbiters of modest size and cost,delivered by Solar Electric Propulsion to areostationaryorbit, could provide continuous access at very high datarates to users on the surface and in Mars orbit. Twoexamples highlighting the wide variety of orbiter deliveryand configuration options were shown that could providehigh-performance service to users.

  4. Orbiter OMS and RCS technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreaux, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    Orbiter Orbital Maneuver Subsystem (OMS) and Reaction Control Subsystem (RCS) tankage has proved to be highly successful in shuttle flights on-orbit propellant transfer tests were done. Tank qualification tests along with flight demonstrations were carried out future uses of storable propellants are cited.

  5. The Coupled Orbit-Attitude Dynamics and Control of Electric Sail in Displaced Solar Orbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingying Huo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Displaced solar orbits for spacecraft propelled by electric sails are investigated. Since the propulsive thrust is induced by the sail attitude, the orbital and attitude dynamics of electric-sail-based spacecraft are coupled and required to be investigated together. However, the coupled dynamics and control of electric sails have not been discussed in most published literatures. In this paper, the equilibrium point of the coupled dynamical system in displaced orbit is obtained, and its stability is analyzed through a linearization. The results of stability analysis show that only some of the orbits are marginally stable. For unstable displaced orbits, linear quadratic regulator is employed to control the coupled attitude-orbit system. Numerical simulations show that the proposed strategy can control the coupled system and a small torque can stabilize both the attitude and orbit. In order to generate the control force and torque, the voltage distribution problem is studied in an optimal framework. The numerical results show that the control force and torque of electric sail can be realized by adjusting the voltage distribution of charged tethers.

  6. Application of orbital strong magnet in the extraction of deep orbital magnetic foreign bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Chen Jia

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the surgical method and efficacy of extraction of deep orbital magnetic foreign bodies by mean of an orbital strong magnet. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of clinical data of patients with deep orbital magnetic foreign bodies(OMFBin Hebei Eye Hospital from June 2014 to May 2017 was processed. A total of 23 eyes were enrolled, among them, 14 eyes of extraorbital OMFB, 9 eyes of intraorbital OMFB. The rate of extraction of foreign bodies and the postoperative complications were observed. RESULTS: All eyes of intraorbital foreign bodies were successfully extracted with 100% success rate. Twelve of 14 eyes of extraorbital foreign bodies were extracted with 86% success rate. Mild orbital hemorrhage were found in 2 eyes. There was no other obvious complication such as visual loss, orbital massive hemorrhage or limited ocular movement. CONCLUSION: It's an ideal surgical method to extract the deep orbital magnetic foreign bodies by mean of an orbital strong magnet, with mini-injury, high success rate, short duration and few complications.

  7. Feasibility analysis of cislunar flight using the Shuttle Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Davy A.

    1991-01-01

    A first order orbital mechanics analysis was conducted to examine the possibility of utilizing the Space Shuttle Orbiter to perform payload delivery missions to lunar orbit. In the analysis, the earth orbit of departure was constrained to be that of Space Station Freedom. Furthermore, no enhancements of the Orbiter's thermal protection system were assumed. Therefore, earth orbit insertion maneuvers were constrained to be all propulsive. Only minimal constraints were placed on the lunar orbits and no consideration was given to possible landing sites for lunar surface payloads. The various phases and maneuvers of the mission are discussed for both a conventional (Apollo type) and an unconventional mission profile. The velocity impulses needed, and the propellant masses required are presented for all of the mission maneuvers. Maximum payload capabilities were determined for both of the mission profiles examined. In addition, other issues relating to the feasibility of such lunar shuttle missions are discussed. The results of the analysis indicate that the Shuttle Orbiter would be a poor vehicle for payload delivery missions to lunar orbit.

  8. Low-Cost 3D Printing Orbital Implant Templates in Secondary Orbital Reconstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Alison B; Campbell, Ashley A; Petris, Carisa; Kazim, Michael

    Despite its increasing use in craniofacial reconstructions, three-dimensional (3D) printing of customized orbital implants has not been widely adopted. Limitations include the cost of 3D printers able to print in a biocompatible material suitable for implantation in the orbit and the breadth of available implant materials. The authors report the technique of low-cost 3D printing of orbital implant templates used in complex, often secondary, orbital reconstructions. A retrospective case series of 5 orbital reconstructions utilizing a technique of 3D printed orbital implant templates is presented. Each patient's Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine data were uploaded and processed to create 3D renderings upon which a customized implant was designed and sent electronically to printers open for student use at our affiliated institutions. The mock implants were sterilized and used intraoperatively as a stencil and mold. The final implant material was chosen by the surgeons based on the requirements of the case. Five orbital reconstructions were performed with this technique: 3 tumor reconstructions and 2 orbital fractures. Four of the 5 cases were secondary reconstructions. Molded Medpor Titan (Stryker, Kalamazoo, MI) implants were used in 4 cases and titanium mesh in 1 case. The stenciled and molded implants were adjusted no more than 2 times before anchored in place (mean 1). No case underwent further revision. The technique and cases presented demonstrate 1) the feasibility and accessibility of low-cost, independent use of 3D printing technology to fashion patient-specific implants in orbital reconstructions, 2) the ability to apply this technology to the surgeon's preference of any routinely implantable material, and 3) the utility of this technique in complex, secondary reconstructions.

  9. Management of Orbital and Periorbital Venous Malformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara A. Benoiton

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundTo review our management of common venous malformation (VM affecting the orbit and/or periorbital area.MethodsConsecutive patients with orbital and/or periorbital VM were identified from our vascular anomalies database. Demographic details of the patients, anatomic site(s affected, symptoms and signs, presence of a family history of VM, and types of treatment(s were collected, supplemented by chart review.ResultsA total of 24 patients’ age 1–68 (mean, 30 years with orbital and/or periorbital VM presented with cosmetic concerns (n = 17, 71%, distensibility (n = 15, 63%, pain (n = 9, 38%, diplopia (n = 4, 17%, and spontaneous thrombosis (n = 1, 8%. The VM caused globe dystopia (n = 13, 54%, enophthalmos (n = 6, 25%, proptosis (n = 3, 12%, exotropia (n = 3, 12%, and pseudoptosis with visual obstruction (n = 3, 13%. A total of 11 (46% patients were managed conservatively. 13 (54% patients underwent active treatment. Ethanol sclerotherapy (ES was performed in six patients with extensive facial VM associated with orbital/periorbital involvement, resulting in symptomatic improvement in five patients, one of whom developed skin necrosis and another patient developed reduced infraorbital nerve sensation. Surgery was performed for localized lesion (n = 3, 23%, for extensive lesions (n = 4, 31% and as an adjunct to ES (n = 6, 46% resulting in symptomatic improvement in all patients. One patient required correction of lower lid ectropion.ConclusionOrbital and/or periorbital VMs are heterogeneous, and management needs to be individualized. Surgery is used for localized lesions aiming for complete excision, as a debulking procedure for extensive orbital/periorbital VM when ES was not possible, or following ES for extensive facial VM with orbital and/or periorbital involvement.

  10. Wigner Functions and Quark Orbital Angular Momentum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukherjee Asmita

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Wigner distributions contain combined position and momentum space information of the quark distributions and are related to both generalized parton distributions (GPDs and transverse momentum dependent parton distributions (TMDs. We report on a recent model calculation of the Wigner distributions for the quark and their relation to the orbital angular momentum.

  11. Orbital MALT Lymphoma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shobha G Pai

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available A case of orbital MALT (mucous associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma is reported for its rarity. It presented as a large tumor obscuring the whole eye with loss of vision, without any signs of dissemination and remained free of recurrence or metastasis 12 months after undergoing simple surgical excision.

  12. The Habitable Zone and Extreme Planetary Orbits

    OpenAIRE

    Kane, Stephen R.; Gelino, Dawn M.

    2012-01-01

    The habitable zone for a given star describes the range of circumstellar distances from the star within which a planet could have liquid water on its surface, which depends upon the stellar properties. Here we describe the development of the habitable zone concept, its application to our own solar system, and its subsequent application to exoplanetary systems. We further apply this to planets in extreme eccentric orbits and show how they may still retain life-bearing properties depending upon...

  13. Orbit Representations from Linear mod 1 Transformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Correia Ramos

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We show that every point $x_0in [0,1]$ carries a representationof a $C^*$-algebra that encodes the orbit structure of thelinear mod 1 interval map $f_{eta,alpha}(x=eta x +alpha$. Such $C^*$-algebra is generated by partial isometries arising from the subintervals of monotonicity of the underlying map $f_{eta,alpha}$. Then we prove that such representation is irreducible. Moreover two such of representations are unitarily equivalent if and only if the points belong to the same generalized orbit, for every $alphain [0,1[$ and $etageq 1$.

  14. Global orbit feedback utilizing analog and digital technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, O.; Tang, Y.; Ramamoorthy, S.; Krinsky, S.; Yu, L.H.

    1997-01-01

    At the NSLS, an analog global orbit feedback system is used in regular operations, and a digital global orbit feedback system is available in machine physics studies on the X-Ray Ring. Here, the authors discuss the relative merits of utilizing analog and digital technology in orbit feedback. Results of experiments are reported characterizing the performance of the analog and digital systems when operated individually or together. They give their thoughts on plans for future development of the orbit feedback systems at the NSLS

  15. Chronic Orbital Inflammation Associated to Hydroxyapatite Implants in Anophthalmic Sockets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Galindo-Ferreiro

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We report 6 patients who received a hydroxyapatite (HA orbital implant in the socket and developed chronic orbital inflammation unresponsive to conventional medical therapy. Case Reports: We assisted 6 cases (4 males, 2 females who received an HA orbital implant in the socket between 2015 and 2016 at King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, and developed chronic orbital inflammation with chronic discharge, redness, and pain (onset from weeks to over 2 decades after surgery. Computed tomography evaluation indicated inflammation in the orbital tissues, and histological examination showed a foreign body granulomatous reaction mainly localized around and blanching the HA implant. The condition was unresponsive to usual medical treatment and was resolved immediately after implant removal. Conclusions: Chronic inflammation can occur decades after placement of an HA implant in the orbit and can be successfully treated with implant removal.

  16. Orbital Epidermoid Cysts: A Diagnosis to Consider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rania A. Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Orbital epidermoids form a rare pathological entity that is separate from dermoid cysts. They have variable clinical and radiological presentations and they should be considered in the differential diagnosis of orbital cystic lesions. This work describes the various clinical and radiological presentations of 17 cases of epidermoid cysts and the surgical outcome. Method. A prospective interventional study was conducted on 17 patients diagnosed with epidermoid cysts. Patients’ symptoms and signs were recorded; CT scan was done for all patients. All lesions were removed through anterior orbitotomy and histopathological diagnosis confirmed. Results. Mean age of patients was 16.3 years ±  10.54. Main complaints were lid swelling, masses, ocular dissimilarity, chronic pain, and ocular protrusion. Clinical signs varied from lid swelling and masses in all cases to proptosis, globe displacement, limitation of ocular motility, and scars. Radiological findings ranged from homogenous hypodense masses (58.8% to homogenous radiolucent (17.6% and heterogenous masses (23.5%. No recurrences following surgeries were reported throughout the follow-up (mean 18.8 months ±  0.72. Conclusion. Deep orbital epidemoid cysts are a separate entity that can behave like deep orbital epidermoid; however, they usually present at a relatively older age. They can be associated with increased orbital volume but not necessarily related to bony sutures.

  17. Symmetry orbits and their data-analytic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlos A.G. Viana

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The concept of data indexed by finite symmetry orbits is reviewed within the data-analytic framework of symmetry studies. Data decompositions are discussed in terms of canonical projections and Plancherel’s formulas, and interpreted in terms of orbit invariants.

  18. Glial heterotopia in an adult: A rare orbital mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Dabir Sundaresh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Heterotopic glial tissue is very rare in the orbit. Our case was an adult, which is unique since most cases reported in literature involve children. We describe a case of a 60-year-old man who presented with an orbital mass, which histopathologically revealed heterotopic glial tissue.

  19. Prediction of Fermi-Surface Pressure Dependence in Rb and Cs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jan, J. P.; MacDonald, A. H.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1980-01-01

    The linear muffin-tin orbitals method of band-structure calculation, combined with a Gaussian integration technique using special directions in the Brillouin zone, has been used to calculate Fermi radii and extremal cross-sectional areas of the Fermi surface in rubidium and cesium. Band shifts we......-surface pressure dependence agree with the limited experimental data available....

  20. Mapping of Temporal Surface-water Resources Availability and Agricultural Adaptability due to Climate Change and Anthropogenic Activity in a Hot Semi-arid Region of Maharashtra State, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, A.; Inamdar, A. B.

    2016-12-01

    Major part of Godavari River Basin is intensely drought prone and climate vulnerable in the Western Maharashtra State, India. The economy of the state depends on the agronomic productivity of this region. So, it is necessary to regulate the effects of existing and upcoming hydro-meteorological advances in various strata. This study investigates and maps the surface water resources availability and vegetation, their decadal deviations with multi-temporal LANDSAT images; and finally quantifies the agricultural adaptations. This work involves the utilization of Remote Sensing and GIS with Hydrological modeling. First, climatic trend analysis is carried out with NCEP dataset. Then, multi-temporal LANDSAT images are classified to determine the decadal LULC changes and correlated to the community level hydrological demand. Finally, NDVI, NDWI and SWAT model analysis are accomplished to determine irrigated and non-irrigated cropping area for identifying the agricultural adaptations. The analysis shows that the mean value of annual and monsoon rainfall is significantly decreasing, whereas the mean value of annual and summer temperature is increasing significantly and the winter temperature is decreasing. The analysis of LANDSAT images shows that the surface water availability is highly dependent on climatic conditions. Barren-lands are most dynamic during the study period followed by, vegetation, and water bodies. The spatial extent of barren-lands is increased drastically during the climate vulnerable years replacing the vegetation and surface water bodies. Hence, the barren lands are constantly increasing and the vegetation cover is linearly decreasing, whereas the water extent is changing either way in a random fashion. There appears a positive correlation between surface water and vegetation occurrence; as they are fluctuating in a similar fashion in all the years. The vegetation cover is densely replenished around the dams and natural water bodies which serve as the

  1. The relationship of the globe to the orbital rim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstein, Lauren A; Shadpour, Joseph M; Menghani, Ravi; Goldberg, Robert A

    2011-01-01

    racial differences in the surface anatomy of the periorbital area. Anatomic analysis, based on 3-dimensional orbital imaging, may provide a rational approach to surgical planning for aesthetic and reconstructive orbitofacial surgery.

  2. GPM GROUND VALIDATION SATELLITE SIMULATED ORBITS C3VP V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Satellite Simulated Orbits C3VP dataset is available in the Orbital database, which takes account for the atmospheric profiles, the...

  3. GPM GROUND VALIDATION SATELLITE SIMULATED ORBITS MC3E V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Satellite Simulated Orbits MC3E dataset is available in the Orbital database , which takes account for the atmospheric profiles, the...

  4. GPM GROUND VALIDATION SATELLITE SIMULATED ORBITS TWP-ICE V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Satellite Simulated Orbits TWP-ICE dataset is available in the Orbital database, which takes account for the atmospheric profiles, the...

  5. Time-saving method of orbital thermal regime calculations of nanosatellites as exemplified by a 3U CubeSat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorev Vasily

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A time-saving approach to perform technical calculations of thermal conditions of orbital motion of 3U CubeSat nanosatellite was applied, which made it possible to make the thermal calculations of a satellite with simple structure geometry using MatLab and SolidWorks Simulation. Passive thermal regulation facilities are sufficient for a 3U CubeSat to provide thermal conductivity of the case’s structural elements and to remove heat from the lighted surface and internal components to the satellite’s shadowed surface. Application of spectrally selective coatings allows narrowing the range of surface temperatures of 3U CubeSat.

  6. Orbit Determination of Spacecraft in Earth-Moon L1 and L2 Libration Point Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, Mark; Cosgrove, Daniel; Morinelli, Patrick; Marchese, Jeff; Owens, Brandon; Folta, David

    2011-01-01

    measurements that would be needed to meet the required orbit determination accuracies. Analysts used the Orbit Determination Error Analysis System (ODEAS) to perform covariance analyses using various tracking data schedules. From this analysis, it was determined that 3.5 hours of DSN TRK-2-34 range and Doppler tracking data every other day would suffice to meet the predictive orbit knowledge accuracies in the Lissajous region. The results of this analysis are presented. Both GTDS and ODTK have high-fidelity environmental orbit force models that allow for very accurate orbit estimation in the lunar Lissajous regime. These models include solar radiation pressure, Earth and Moon gravity models, third body gravitational effects from the Sun, and to a lesser extent third body gravitational effects from Jupiter, Venus, Saturn, and Mars. Increased position and velocity uncertainties following each maneuver, due to small execution performance errors, requires that several days of post-maneuver tracking data be processed to converge on an accurate post-maneuver orbit solution. The effects of maneuvers on orbit determination accuracy will be presented, including a comparison of the batch least squares technique to the extended Kalman filter/smoother technique. We will present the maneuver calibration results derived from processing post-maneuver tracking data. A dominant error in the orbit estimation process is the uncertainty in solar radiation pressure and the resultant force on the spacecraft. An estimation of this value can include many related factors, such as the uncertainty in spacecraft reflectivity and surface area which is a function of spacecraft orientation (spin-axis attitude), uncertainty in spacecraft wet mass, and potential seasonal variability due to the changing direction of the Sun line relative to the Earth-Moon Lissajous reference frame. In addition, each spacecraft occasionally enters into Earth or Moon penumbra or umbra and these shadow crossings reduche solar

  7. Searching sequences of resonant orbits between a spacecraft and Jupiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formiga, J K S; Prado, A F B A

    2013-01-01

    This research shows a study of the dynamical behavior of a spacecraft that performs a series of close approaches with the planet Jupiter. The main idea is to find a sequence of resonant orbits that allows the spacecraft to stay in the region of the space near the orbit of Jupiter around the Sun gaining energy from each passage by the planet. The dynamical model considers the existence of only two massive bodies in the systems, which are the Sun and Jupiter. They are assumed to be in circular orbits around their center of mass. Analytical equations are used to obtain the values of the parameters required to get this sequence of close approaches. Those equations are useful, because they show which orbits are physically possible when taking into account that the periapsis distances have to be above the surface of the Sun and that the closest approach distances during the passage by Jupiter have to be above its surface

  8. Orbital apex syndrome associated with fractures of the inferomedial orbital wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugamata A

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Akira SugamataDepartment of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Tokyo Medical University Hachioji Medical Center, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: Although trauma is one of the main causes of orbital apex syndrome (OAS, reports of OAS associated with orbital fractures are relatively rare. We recently treated two patients who sustained severe visual impairment with damage to multiple cranial nerves (third to sixth associated with inferomedial orbital wall fractures. In these patients, posterior movement of the globe caused neuropathy of the cranial and optic nerves by posterior globe edema and hemorrhage, or direct impact between the globe and wall, which might then have induced OAS in the cases described in this report. Steroid therapy was unsuccessful for optic neuropathy due to the delay between injury and administration. When treating patients with inferomedial orbital blowout fractures due to globe-to-wall contact, it is necessary to routinely assess and monitor visual acuity since there may be a delay between the injury and OAS onset.Keywords: orbital apex syndrome, orbital fracture, blowout fracture, optic nerve, globe-to-wall contact mechanism

  9. Orbital preservation in a maxillectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Katsuhiko; Nishikawa, Hitomi; Kumagai, Masahiko; Dosaka, Yoshihiro; Kuroda, Toru; Atago, Yoshihiro; Nishio, Masamichi [Sapporo National Hospital (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    In the past 9 years, 38 patients of the maxillary cancer were treated by a combination of radiation and surgery. Sixteen patients showed the orbital involvement as confirmed by a CT scan and/or MRI. An orbital excenteration was necessary in 6 patients, due mainly to deep intraorbital invasion, while in 10, the orbital contents were preserved despite the involvement of the orbital capsule. The local rate of the orbital region in the latter patients evaluated at 48 months after the initial surgery was 44%. For the treatment of the recurrence at the orbital capsule. The application of gold grain (Au{sup 198}) thus appeared to be a useful tool for further preserving the eye. (author)

  10. Orbital preservation in a maxillectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Katsuhiko; Nishikawa, Hitomi; Kumagai, Masahiko; Dosaka, Yoshihiro; Kuroda, Toru; Atago, Yoshihiro; Nishio, Masamichi

    1999-01-01

    In the past 9 years, 38 patients of the maxillary cancer were treated by a combination of radiation and surgery. Sixteen patients showed the orbital involvement as confirmed by a CT scan and/or MRI. An orbital excenteration was necessary in 6 patients, due mainly to deep intraorbital invasion, while in 10, the orbital contents were preserved despite the involvement of the orbital capsule. The local rate of the orbital region in the latter patients evaluated at 48 months after the initial surgery was 44%. For the treatment of the recurrence at the orbital capsule. The application of gold grain (Au 198 ) thus appeared to be a useful tool for further preserving the eye. (author)

  11. ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter provides atmospheric data during Aerobraking into its final orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svedhem, Hakan; Vago, Jorge L.; Bruinsma, Sean; Müller-Wodarg, Ingo; ExoMars 2016 Team

    2017-10-01

    After the arrival of the Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO) at Mars on 19 October 2016 a number of initial orbit change manoeuvres were executed and the spacecraft was put in an orbit with a 24 hour period and 74 degrees inclination. The spacecraft and its four instruments were thoroughly checked out after arrival and a few measurements and images were taken in November 2016 and in Feb-March 2017. The solar occultation observations have however not yet been possible due to lack of the proper geometry.On 15 March a long period of aerobraking to reach the final 400km semi-circular frozen orbit (370x430km, with a fixed pericentre latitude). This orbit is optimised for the payload observations and for the communication relay with the ExoMars Rover, due to arrive in 2021.The aerobraking is proceeding well and the final orbit is expected to be reached in April 2018. A large data set is being acquired for the upper atmosphere of Mars, from the limit of the sensitivity of the accelerometer, down to lowest altitude of the aerobraking at about 105km. Initial analysis has shown a highly variable atmosphere with a slightly lower density then predicted by existing models. Until the time of the abstract writing no dust storms have been observed.The ExoMars programme is a joint activity by the European Space Agency(ESA) and ROSCOSMOS, Russia. ESA is providing the TGO spacecraft and Schiaparelli (EDM) and two of the TGO instruments and ROSCOSMOS is providing the Proton launcher and the other two TGO instruments. After the arrival of the ExoMars 2020 mission, consisting of a Rover and a Surface platform also launched by a Proton rocket, the TGO will handle the communication between the Earth and the Rover and Surface Platform through its (NASA provided) UHF communication system.

  12. Correlation Effects and Hidden Spin-Orbit Entangled Electronic Order in Parent and Electron-Doped Iridates Sr_{2}IrO_{4}

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Zhou

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Analogs of the high-T_{c} cuprates have been long sought after in transition metal oxides. Because of the strong spin-orbit coupling, the 5d perovskite iridates Sr_{2}IrO_{4} exhibit a low-energy electronic structure remarkably similar to the cuprates. Whether a superconducting state exists as in the cuprates requires understanding the correlated spin-orbit entangled electronic states. Recent experiments discovered hidden order in the parent and electron-doped iridates, some with striking analogies to the cuprates, including Fermi surface pockets, Fermi arcs, and pseudogap. Here, we study the correlation and disorder effects in a five-orbital model derived from the band theory. We find that the experimental observations are consistent with a d-wave spin-orbit density wave order that breaks the symmetry of a joint twofold spin-orbital rotation followed by a lattice translation. There is a Berry phase and a plaquette spin flux due to spin procession as electrons hop between Ir atoms, akin to the intersite spin-orbit coupling in quantum spin Hall insulators. The associated staggered circulating J_{eff}=1/2 spin current can be probed by advanced techniques of spin-current detection in spintronics. This electronic order can emerge spontaneously from the intersite Coulomb interactions between the spatially extended iridium 5d orbitals, turning the metallic state into an electron-doped quasi-2D Dirac semimetal with important implications on the possible superconducting state suggested by recent experiments.

  13. Giant deep orbital dermoid cyst presenting early in infancy in a Nigerian child: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fasina Oluyemi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Dermoid cysts are the most common orbital cystic lesions seen in children. While superficial orbital dermoid cysts present early in life, deep dermoid cysts remain clinically occult until adolescence or adulthood. We here present a case of a deep orbital dermoid cyst in a Nigerian child that became symptomatic early in infancy. Case presentation A female Nigerian infant of Yoruba ethnicity presented at three months of age with left non-axial proptosis and a hazy cornea. A superotemporal cystic orbital mass was seen on ultrasonography, and her parents were counseled for simple tumor excision. They however defaulted, only for their child to re-present two years later with gradually progressive proptosis, an enlarged orbit and keratinized ocular surface, necessitating orbital exenteration. Conclusion Deep orbital dermoid cysts may be symptomatic from birth. Late presentation may result in an irreversible loss of vision, as demonstrated in our case. The need for public enlightenment on early presentation and prompt management of such benign lesions is emphasized.

  14. Orbiting radiation stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, Dean P; Langford, John; Perez-Giz, Gabe

    2016-01-01

    We study a spherically symmetric solution to the Einstein equations in which the source, which we call an orbiting radiation star (OR-star), is a compact object consisting of freely falling null particles. The solution avoids quantum scale regimes and hence neither relies upon nor ignores the interaction of quantum mechanics and gravitation. The OR-star spacetime exhibits a deep gravitational well yet remains singularity free. In fact, it is geometrically flat in the vicinity of the origin, with the flat region being of any desirable scale. The solution is observationally distinct from a black hole because a photon from infinity aimed at an OR-star escapes to infinity with a time delay. (paper)

  15. Solitonic natural orbitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioslowski, Jerzy

    2018-04-01

    The dependence of the natural amplitudes of the harmonium atom in its ground state on the confinement strength ω is thoroughly investigated. A combination of rigorous analysis and extensive, highly accurate numerical calculations reveals the presence of only one positive-valued natural amplitude ("the normal sign pattern") for all ω ≥1/2 . More importantly, it is shown that unusual, weakly occupied natural orbitals (NOs) corresponding to additional positive-valued natural amplitudes emerge upon sufficient weakening of the confinement. These solitonic NOs, whose shapes remain almost invariant as their radial positions drift toward infinity upon the critical values of ω being approached from below, exhibit strong radial localization. Their asymptotic properties are extracted from the numerical data and their relevance to calculations on fully Coulombic systems is discussed.

  16. Use of extraocular muscle flaps in the correction of orbital implant exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsueh-Yen Chu

    Full Text Available PURPOSES: The study is to describe a new surgical technique for correcting large orbital implant exposure with extraocular muscle flaps and to propose a treatment algorithm for orbital implant exposure. METHODS: In a retrospective study, seven patients with orbital implant exposure were treated with extraocular muscle flaps. All data were collected from patients in Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan during 2007-2012. All surgeries were performed by one surgeon (Y.J.T. Patient demographics, the original etiology, details of surgical procedures, implant types, and follow-up interval were recorded. Small exposure, defined as exposure area smaller than 3 mm in diameter, was treated conservatively first with topical lubricant and prophylactic antibiotics. Larger defects were managed surgically. RESULTS: Seven patients consisting of two males and five females were successfully treated for orbital implant exposure with extraocular muscle flaps. The average age was 36.4 (range, 3-55 years old. Five patients were referred from other hospitals. One eye was enucleated for retinoblastoma. The other six eyes were eviscerated, including one for endophthalmitis and five for trauma. Mean follow-up time of all seven patients was 19.5 (range, 2-60 months. No patient developed recurrence of exposure during follow-up. All patients were fitted with an acceptable prosthesis and had satisfactory cosmetic and functional results. CONCLUSIONS: The most common complication of orbital implant is exposure, caused by breakdown of the covering layers, leading to extrusion. Several methods were reported to manage the exposed implants. We report our experience of treating implant exposure with extraocular muscle flaps to establish a well-vascularized environment that supplies both the wrapping material and the overlying ocular surface tissue. We believe it can work as a good strategy to manage or to prevent orbital implant exposure.

  17. A New Approach for Studying Bond Rupture/Closure of a Spiro Benzopyran Photochromic Material: Reactivity Descriptors Derived from Frontier Orbitals and DFT Computed Electrostatic Potential Energy Surface Maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. A. Abdel-Mottaleb

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on computations technique within the framework of the TD-DFT theory for studying the relationship between structure-properties of reversible conversion of photochromic materials. Specifically, we report on 1′,3′-dihydro-8-methoxy-1′,3′,3′-trimethyl-6-nitrospiro[2H-1-benzopyran-2,2′-(2H-indole] (SP and its isomers. TD-DFT calculated UV-Vis electronic spectra of the closed and open isomers of this photochromic material are in excellent agreement with the experimental results. Moreover, this paper reports on the results of theoretical investigations of reactivity indices that may govern the conversion between spiropyrans and its isomers. In addition, the solvent and rigidity of the medium significantly control the thermal bleaching of the photogenerated colored isomers and hence the switch ability pattern of the photochromic material. The effect of molecular structure computed by DFT in gas-phase and solvents on Cspiro-O bond length has been shown to correlate with photochromic properties. For this compound, DFT optimized geometry could be used to predict photochromism. Furthermore, in an attempt to predict the driving force for MC → SP, this work explores, for the first time, profitable exploitation of the calculated and visualized mapped electrostatic potential energy surfaces (ESP map. Interestingly, it seems that the electrostatic potential forces over the molecular fragments govern spirobond rupture/closure reactions. Thermodynamically, all-trans-colored isomer (CTT is the most stable merocyanine-like form.

  18. A methodology for selective removal of orbital debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, R. L.; Odonoghue, P. J.; Chambers, E. J.; Raney, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    Earth-orbiting objects, large enough to be tracked, were surveyed for possible systematic debris removal. Based upon the statistical collision studies of others, it was determined that objects in orbits approximately 1000 km above the Earth's surface are at greatest collisional risk. Russian C-1B boosters were identified as the most important target of opportunity for debris removal. Currently, more than 100 in tact boosters are orbiting the Earth with apogees between 950 km and 1050 km. Using data provided by Energia USA, specific information on the C-1B booster, in terms of rendezvous and capture strategies, was discussed.

  19. Tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance via molecular π orbitals of Pb dimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöneberg, Johannes; Ferriani, Paolo; Heinze, Stefan; Weismann, Alexander; Berndt, Richard

    2018-01-01

    Pb dimers on a ferromagnetic surface are shown to exhibit large tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR) due to molecular π orbitals. Dimers oriented differently with respect to the magnetization directions of a ferromagnetic Fe double layer on W(110) were made with a scanning tunneling microscope. Depending on the dimer orientations, TAMR is absent or as large as 20% at the Fermi level. General arguments and first-principles calculations show that mixing of molecular orbitals due to spin-orbit coupling, which leads to TAMR, is maximal when the magnetization is oriented parallel to the dimer axis.

  20. Technical-economic feasibility of orbiting sunlight reflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alferov, Z.; Minin, V.

    1986-02-01

    The use of deflectors in orbit as a means of providing artificial illumination is examined. Considerations of technical and economic feasibility are addressed. Three main areas of application are distinguished: reflecting sunlight onto the surface of the Earth; concentration of the flow of solar energy on an orbiting receiver; and retransmission of optical radiation. The advantages of the artificial Earth illumination application of the orbiting reflector scheme in terms of energy savings in lighting cities, and additional daylight time for critical periods of farming operations are discussed.

  1. Manipulating localized molecular orbitals by single-atom contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weihua; Shi, Xingqiang; Lin, Chensheng; Zhang, Rui Qin; Minot, Christian; Van Hove, Michel A; Hong, Yuning; Tang, Ben Zhong; Lin, Nian

    2010-09-17

    We have fabricated atom-molecule contacts by attachment of single Cu atoms to terpyridine side groups of bis-terpyridine tetra-phenyl ethylene molecules on a Cu(111) surface. By means of scanning tunneling microscopy, spectroscopy, and density functional calculations, we have found that, due to the localization characteristics of molecular orbitals, the Cu-atom contact modifies the state localized at the terpyridine side group which is in contact with the Cu atom but does not affect the states localized at other parts of the molecule. These results illustrate the contact effects at individual orbitals and offer possibilities to manipulate orbital alignments within molecules.

  2. Stellar orbits around Sgr A*

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trippe, S; Gillessen, S; Ott, T; Eisenhauer, F; Paumard, T; Martins, F; Genzel, R; Schoedel, R; Eckart, A; Alexander, T

    2006-01-01

    In this article we present and discuss the latest results from the observations of stars (''S-stars'') orbiting Sgr A* . With improving data quality the number of observed S-stars has increased substantially in the last years. The combination of radial velocity and proper motion information allows an ever more precise determination of orbital parameters and of the mass of and the distance to the supermassive black hole in the centre of the Milky Way. Additionally, the orbital solutions allow us to verify an agreement between the NIR source Sgr A* and the dynamical centre of the stellar orbits to within 2 mas

  3. Accelerated testing for synchronous orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdermott, P.

    1981-01-01

    Degradation of batteries during synchronous orbits is analyzed. Discharge and recharge rates are evaluated. The functional relationship between charge rate and degradation is mathematically determined.

  4. The conservation of orbital symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Woodward, R B

    2013-01-01

    The Conservation of Orbital Symmetry examines the principle of conservation of orbital symmetry and its use. The central content of the principle was that reactions occur readily when there is congruence between orbital symmetry characteristics of reactants and products, and only with difficulty when that congruence does not obtain-or to put it more succinctly, orbital symmetry is conserved in concerted reaction. This principle is expected to endure, whatever the language in which it may be couched, or whatever greater precision may be developed in its application and extension. The book ope

  5. Radiologic evaluation of orbital index among Ghanaians using CT scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botwe, Benard Ohene; Sule, Derick Seyram; Ismael, Abdul Mumin

    2017-07-11

    Orbital index (OI) expresses the proportion of the orbital height to the orbital width and varies with race, regions within the same race and periods in evolution. This index is useful in forensic medicine, anthropology and surgery. However, the average OI among Ghanaian adults was unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the orbital index of adult Ghanaians and classify them under one of the three predetermined groups. The study design was a retrospective cross-sectional. A systematic random sampling method was used for selecting 350 adult Ghanaian head computed tomography images available from 1 January to 31 December 2015 at KBTH Hospital. The orbital height and orbital width of each orbit were measured on a 3D CT skull. Data was analysed using Microsoft Excel and Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 20. The study had more females than men (167, 47.71%, vs 183, 52.29%). The observed orbital index of Ghanaians in the study was 81.22 ± 4.22. The mean orbital index was 80.52 ± 4.66 in males and 82.15 ± 3.83 in females with their difference being statistically significant (p value forensic medicine for skull classification and also for better surgical approach in neurosurgery as well as cosmetic surgery.

  6. Metal alkyls programmed to generate metal alkylidenes by α-H abstraction: prognosis from NMR chemical shift† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental and computational details, NMR spectra, results of NMR calculations and NCS analysis, graphical representation of shielding tensors, molecular orbital diagrams of selected compounds, optimized structures for all calculated species. See DOI: 10.1039/c7sc05039a

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Christopher P.; Yamamoto, Keishi; Searles, Keith; Shirase, Satoru

    2018-01-01

    Metal alkylidenes, which are key organometallic intermediates in reactions such as olefination or alkene and alkane metathesis, are typically generated from metal dialkyl compounds [M](CH2R)2 that show distinctively deshielded chemical shifts for their α-carbons. Experimental solid-state NMR measurements combined with DFT/ZORA calculations and a chemical shift tensor analysis reveal that this remarkable deshielding originates from an empty metal d-orbital oriented in the M–Cα–Cα′ plane, interacting with the Cα p-orbital lying in the same plane. This π-type interaction inscribes some alkylidene character into Cα that favors alkylidene generation via α-H abstraction. The extent of the deshielding and the anisotropy of the alkyl chemical shift tensors distinguishes [M](CH2R)2 compounds that form alkylidenes from those that do not, relating the reactivity to molecular orbitals of the respective molecules. The α-carbon chemical shifts and tensor orientations thus predict the reactivity of metal alkyl compounds towards alkylidene generation. PMID:29675237

  7. EUSO@TurLab: An experimental replica of ISS orbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertaina M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The EUSO@TurLab project is an on-going activity aimed to reproduce atmospheric and luminous conditions that JEM-EUSO will encounter on its orbits around the Earth. The use of the TurLab facility, part of the Department of Physics of the University of Torino, allows the simulation of different surface conditions in a very dark and rotating environment in order to test the response of JEM-EUSO's sensors and sensitivity. The experimental setup currently in operation has been used to check the potential of the TurLab facility for the above purposes, and the acquired data will be used to test the concept of JEM-EUSO's trigger system.

  8. Photometric Studies of GEO Orbital Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Rodriquez-Cowardin, Heather M.; Barker, Ed; Abercromby, Kira J.; Foreman, Gary; Horstman, Matt

    2009-01-01

    The photometric signature of a debris object can be useful in determining what the physical characteristics of a piece of debris are. We report on optical observations in multiple filters of debris at geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). Our sample is taken from GEO objects discovered in a survey with the University of Michigan's 0.6-m aperture Schmidt telescope MODEST (for Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope), and then followed up in real-time with the Cerro Tololo Inter- American Observatory (CTIO) 0.9-m for orbits and photometry. Our goal is to determine 6 parameter orbits and measure colors for all objects fainter than R=15th magnitude that are discovered in the MODEST survey. At this magnitude the distribution of observed angular rates changes significantly from that of brighter objects. There are two objectives: 1. Estimate the orbital distribution of objects selected on the basis of two observational criteria: brightness (magnitude) and angular rates. 2. Obtain magnitudes and colors in standard astronomical filters (BVRI) for comparison with reflectance spectra of likely spacecraft materials. What is the faint debris likely to be? More than 90 calibrated sequences of R-B-V-I-R magnitudes for a sample of 50 objects have been obtained with the CTIO 0.9-m. For objects that do not show large brightness variations, the colors are largely redder than solar in both B-R and R-I. The width of the color distribution may be intrinsic to the nature of the surfaces, but also could be that we are seeing irregularly shaped objects and measuring the colors at different times with just one telescope. For a smaller sample of objects we have observed with synchronized CCD cameras on the two telescopes. The CTIO 0.9-m observes in B, and MODEST in R. The CCD cameras are electronically linked together so that the start time and duration of observations are the same to better than 50 milliseconds. Thus the B-R color is a true measure of the surface of the debris piece facing the

  9. Parallel Study of HEND, RAD, and DAN Instrument Response to Martian Radiation and Surface Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martiniez Sierra, Luz Maria; Jun, Insoo; Litvak, Maxim; Sanin, Anton; Mitrofanov, Igor; Zeitlin, Cary

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear detection methods are being used to understand the radiation environment at Mars. JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) assets on Mars include: Orbiter -2001 Mars Odyssey [High Energy Neutron Detector (HEND)]; Mars Science Laboratory Rover -Curiosity [(Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD); Dynamic Albedo Neutron (DAN))]. Spacecraft have instruments able to detect ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. Instrument response on orbit and on the surface of Mars to space weather and local conditions [is discussed] - Data available at NASA-PDS (Planetary Data System).

  10. Orbital Reconstruction: Patient-Specific Orbital Floor Reconstruction Using a Mirroring Technique and a Customized Titanium Mesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarsitano, Achille; Badiali, Giovanni; Pizzigallo, Angelo; Marchetti, Claudio

    2016-10-01

    Enophthalmos is a severe complication of primary reconstruction of orbital floor fractures. The goal of secondary reconstruction procedures is to restore symmetrical globe positions to recover function and aesthetics. The authors propose a new method of orbital floor reconstruction using a mirroring technique and a customized titanium mesh, printed using a direct metal laser-sintering method. This reconstructive protocol involves 4 steps: mirroring of the healthy orbit at the affected site, virtual design of a patient-specific orbital floor mesh, CAM procedures for direct laser-sintering of the customized titanium mesh, and surgical insertion of the device. Using a computed tomography data set, the normal, uninjured side of the craniofacial skeleton was reflected onto the contralateral injured side, and a reconstructive orbital floor mesh was designed virtually on the mirrored orbital bone surface. The solid-to-layer files of the mesh were then manufactured using direct metal laser sintering, which resolves the shaping and bending biases inherent in the indirect method. An intraoperative navigation system ensured accuracy of the entire procedure. Clinical outcomes were assessed using 3dMD photogrammetry and computed tomography data in 7 treated patients. The technique described here appears to be a viable method to correct complex orbital floor defects needing delayed reconstruction. This study represents the first step in the development of a wider experimental protocol for orbital floor reconstruction using computer-assisted design-computer-assisted manufacturing technology.

  11. PyORBIT: A Python Shell For ORBIT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jean-Francois Ostiguy; Jeffrey Holmes

    2003-07-01

    ORBIT is code developed at SNS to simulate beam dynamics in accumulation rings and synchrotrons. The code is structured as a collection of external C++ modules for SuperCode, a high level interpreter shell developed at LLNL in the early 1990s. SuperCode is no longer actively supported and there has for some time been interest in replacing it by a modern scripting language, while preserving the feel of the original ORBIT program. In this paper, we describe a new version of ORBIT where the role of SuperCode is assumed by Python, a free, well-documented and widely supported object-oriented scripting language. We also compare PyORBIT to ORBIT from the standpoint of features, performance and future expandability.

  12. PyORBIT: A Python Shell For ORBIT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jean-Francois Ostiguy; Jeffrey Holmes

    2003-01-01

    ORBIT is code developed at SNS to simulate beam dynamics in accumulation rings and synchrotrons. The code is structured as a collection of external C++ modules for SuperCode, a high level interpreter shell developed at LLNL in the early 1990s. SuperCode is no longer actively supported and there has for some time been interest in replacing it by a modern scripting language, while preserving the feel of the original ORBIT program. In this paper, we describe a new version of ORBIT where the role of SuperCode is assumed by Python, a free, well-documented and widely supported object-oriented scripting language. We also compare PyORBIT to ORBIT from the standpoint of features, performance and future expandability

  13. Plasma balance equations based on orbit theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnert, B.

    1982-01-01

    A set of plasma balance equations is proposed which is based on orbit theory and the particle distribution function, to provide means for theoretical analysis of a number of finite Larmor radius (FLR) phenomena without use of the Vlasov equation. Several important FLR effects originate from the inhomogeneity of an electric field in the plasma. The exact solution of a simple case shows that this inhomogeneity introduces fundamental changes in the physics of the particle motion. Thus, the periodic Larmor motion (gyration) is shifted in frequency and becomes elliptically polarized. Further, the non-periodic guiding-centre drift obtains additional components, part of which are accelerated such as to make the drift orbits intersect the equipotential surfaces of a static electric field. An attempt is finally made to classify the FLR effects, also with the purpose of identifying phenomena which have so far not been investigated. (author)

  14. Mercury's Seasonal Sodium Exosphere: MESSENGER Orbital Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Timothy A.; Merkel, Aimee W.; Burger, Matthew H.; Killen, Rosemary M.; McClintock, William E.; Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.; Sarantos, Menelaos

    2014-01-01

    The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UVVS) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft now orbiting Mercury provides the first close-up look at the planet's sodium exosphere. UVVS has observed the exosphere from orbit almost daily for over 10 Mercury years. In this paper we describe and analyze a subset of these data: altitude profiles taken above the low-latitude dayside and south pole. The observations show spatial and temporal variations, but there are no obvious year-to-year variations in most of the observations. We do not see the episodic variability reported by some ground-based observers. We used these altitude profiles to make estimates of sodium density and temperature. The bulk of the exosphere, at about 1200 K, is much warmer than Mercury's surface. This value is consistent with some ground-based measurements and suggests that photon-stimulated desorption is the primary ejection process. We also observe a tenuous energetic component but do not see evidence of the predicted thermalized (or partially thermalized) sodium near Mercury's surface temperature. Overall we do not see the variable mixture of temperatures predicted by most Monte Carlo models of the exosphere.

  15. Phase-space distributions and orbital angular momentum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquini B.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We review the concept of Wigner distributions to describe the phase-space distributions of quarks in the nucleon, emphasizing the information encoded in these functions about the quark orbital angular momentum.

  16. Infected orbital cyst following exenteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, A; Hirsh, A; Rosner, M; Rosen, N

    1996-09-01

    An orbital cyst is a rare complication of orbital trauma and exenteration. Infections of such cysts have not been described, and are potentially dangerous unless treated immediately. The authors describe a case of delayed treatment of such an infected cyst, which resolved following surgical drainage. The potentially hazardous outcome makes knowledge of such cases important.

  17. GridOrbit public display

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramos, Juan David Hincapie; Tabard, Aurélien; Bardram, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    We introduce GridOrbit, a public awareness display that visualizes the activity of a community grid used in a biology laboratory. This community grid executes bioin-formatics algorithms and relies on users to donate CPU cycles to the grid. The goal of GridOrbit is to create a shared awareness about...

  18. Diplopia and Orbital Wall Fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boffano, P.; Roccia, F.; Gallesio, C.; Karagozoglu, K.H.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2014-01-01

    Diplopia is a symptom that is frequently associated with orbital wall fractures. The aim of this article was to present the incidence and patterns of diplopia after orbital wall blow-out fractures in 2 European centers, Turin and Amsterdam, and to identify any correlation between this symptom and

  19. Diplopia and orbital wall fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boffano, P.; Roccia, F.; Gallesio, C.; Karagozoglu, K.H.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2014-01-01

    Diplopia is a symptom that is frequently associated with orbital wall fractures. The aim of this article was to present the incidence and patterns of diplopia after orbital wall blow-out fractures in 2 European centers, Turin and Amsterdam, and to identify any correlation between this symptom and

  20. Understanding changes in water availability in the Rio Grande/Río Bravo del Norte basin under the influence of large-scale circulation indices using the Noah land surface model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khedun, C. Prakash; Mishra, Ashok K.; Bolten, John D.; Beaudoing, Hiroko K.; Kaiser, Ronald A.; Giardino, J. Richard; Singh, Vijay P.

    2012-03-01

    Water availability plays an important role in the socio-economic development of a region. It is however, subject to the influence of large-scale circulation indices, resulting in periodic excesses and deficits. An assessment of the degree of correlation between climate indices and water availability, and the quantification of changes with respect to major climate events is important for long-term water resources planning and management, especially in transboundary basins as it can help in conflict avoidance. In this study we first establish the correlation of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) with gauged precipitation in the Rio Grande basin, and then quantify the changes in water availability using runoff generated from the Noah land surface model. Both spatial and temporal variations are noted, with winter and spring being most influenced by conditions in the Pacific Ocean. Negative correlation is observed at the headwaters and positive correlation across the rest of the basin. The influence of individual ENSO events, classified using four different criteria, is also examined. El Niños (La Niñas) generally cause an increase (decrease) in runoff, but the pattern is not consistent; percentage change in water availability varies across events. Further, positive PDO enhances the effect of El Niño and dampens that of La Niña, but during neutral/transitioning PDO, La Niña dominates meteorological conditions. Long El Niños have more influence on water availability than short duration high intensity events. We also note that the percentage increase during El Niños significantly offsets the drought-causing effect of La Niñas.

  1. Understanding Changes in Water Availability in the Rio Grande/Rio Bravo del Norte Basin Under the Influence of Large-Scale Circulation Indices Using the Noah Land Surface Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khedun, C. Prakash; Mishra, Ashok K.; Bolten, John D.; Beaudoing, Hiroko K.; Kaiser, Ronald A.; Giardino, J. Richard; Singh, Vijay P.

    2012-01-01

    Water availability plays an important role in the socio-economic development of a region. It is however, subject to the influence of large-scale circulation indices, resulting in periodic excesses and deficits. An assessment of the degree of correlation between climate indices and water availability, and the quantification of changes with respect to major climate events is important for long-term water resources planning and management, especially in transboundary basins as it can help in conflict avoidance. In this study we first establish the correlation of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) with gauged precipitation in the Rio Grande basin, and quantify the changes in water availability using runoff generated from the Noah land surface model. Both spatial and temporal variations are noted, with winter and spring being most influenced by conditions in the Pacific Ocean. Negative correlation is observed at the headwaters and positive correlation across the rest of the basin. The influence of individual ENSO events, classified using four different criteria, is also examined. El Ninos (La Ninas) generally cause an increase (decrease) in runoff, but the pattern is not consistent; percentage change in water availability varies across events. Further, positive PDO enhances the effect of El Nino and dampens that of La Nina, but during neutral/transitioning PDO, La Nina dominates meteorological conditions. Long El Ninos have more influence on water availability than short duration high intensity events. We also note that the percentage increase during El Ninos significantly offsets the drought-causing effect of La Ninas.

  2. High Velocity Spectroscopic Binary Orbits from Photoelectric Radial Velocities: BD+20 5152, a Possible Triple System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sperauskas J.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The spectroscopic orbit of a high proper motion star, BD+20 5152, is calculated from 34 CORAVEL-type radial velocity measurements. The star has a slightly eccentric orbit with a period of 5.70613 d, half-amplitude of 47.7 km/s and eccentricity of 0.049. The center-of-mass velocity of the system is -24.3 km/s. BD+20 5152 seems to be a triple system consisting of a G8 dwarf as a primary component and of two K6-M0 dwarfs as secondary and tertiary components. This model is based on the analysis of its UBVRI and JHK magnitudes. According to the SuperWASP photometry, spots on the surface of the primary are suspected. The excessive brightness in the Galex FUV and NUV magnitudes and a non-zero eccentricity suggest the age of this system to be less than 1 Gyr.

  3. Precise Orbit Determination of GPS Satellites Using Phase Observables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myung-Kook Jee

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available The accuracy of user position by GPS is heavily dependent upon the accuracy of satellite position which is usually transmitted to GPS users in radio signals. The real-time satellite position information directly obtained from broadcast ephimerides has the accuracy of 3 x 10 meters which is very unsatisfactory to measure 100km baseline to the accuracy of less than a few mili-meters. There are globally at present seven orbit analysis centers capable of generating precise GPS ephimerides and their orbit quality is of the order of about 10cm. Therefore, precise orbit model and phase processing technique were reviewed and consequently precise GPS ephimerides were produced after processing the phase observables of 28 global GPS stations for 1 day. Initial 6 orbit parameters and 2 solar radiation coefficients were estimated using batch least square algorithm and the final results were compared with the orbit of IGS, the International GPS Service for Geodynamics.

  4. Current clinical research of immunoglobulin G4-related orbital disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Immunoglobulin G4-related disease(IgG4-related diseasehas received lots of attention in medical community as a recently recognized fibro-inflammatory condition. It is characterized by infiltration of IgG4-immunopositive plasmacytes and concentration of elevated serum IgG4. IgG4-related disease shows organ enlargement or nodular/hyperplastic lesions in various organs including the pancreas, hepatobiliary tract and orbit, which is called IgG4-related orbital disease. The diagnostic criteria for IgG4-related disease and IgG4-related orbital disease has recently been established, which is based on clinical, imaging and histopathologic features of the orbital lesions. Besides, attention should be drawn to the differentiation from other diseases. The treatment is empirical including corticosteroids, immunosuppressive drugs, radiotherapy, and rituximab. This article reviews clinical progression of IgG4-related orbital disease.

  5. Resonant Orbital Dynamics in LEO Region: Space Debris in Focus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Sampaio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing number of objects orbiting the earth justifies the great attention and interest in the observation, spacecraft protection, and collision avoidance. These studies involve different disturbances and resonances in the orbital motions of these objects distributed by the distinct altitudes. In this work, objects in resonant orbital motions are studied in low earth orbits. Using the two-line elements (TLE of the NORAD, resonant angles and resonant periods associated with real motions are described, providing more accurate information to develop an analytical model that describes a certain resonance. The time behaviors of the semimajor axis, eccentricity, and inclination of some space debris are studied. Possible irregular motions are observed by the frequency analysis and by the presence of different resonant angles describing the orbital dynamics of these objects.

  6. The value of color Doppler imaging and intralesional steroid injection in pediatric orbital capillary hemangioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifeng Ke

    2014-05-01

    Conclusion: The blood flow characteristics of CDI play a vital role in the differentiation of orbital capillary hemangiomas from other orbital lesions. The availability and lack of adverse effects of CDI enable its utilization in the early clinical diagnosis of pediatric orbital capillary hemangioma.

  7. Noncommutative Phase Spaces by Coadjoint Orbits Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ancille Ngendakumana

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We introduce noncommutative phase spaces by minimal couplings (usual one, dual one and their mixing. We then realize some of them as coadjoint orbits of the anisotropic Newton-Hooke groups in two- and three-dimensional spaces. Through these constructions the positions and the momenta of the phase spaces do not commute due to the presence of a magnetic field and a dual magnetic field.

  8. Two-Dimensional Metallicity with a Large Spin-Orbit Splitting: DFT Calculations of the Atomic, Electronic, and Spin Structures of the Au/Ge(111-(3×3R30° Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Fleszar

    2015-01-01

    of the many-body effects (self-interaction corrections beyond the LDA or GGA approximations. The most interesting property of this surface system is the large spin splitting of its metallic surface bands and the undulating spin texture along the hexagonal Fermi contours, which highly resembles the spin texture at the Dirac state of the topological insulator Bi2Te3. These properties make this system particularly interesting from both fundamental and technological points of view.

  9. Magnetically levitated space elevator to low-earth orbit.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, J. R.; Mulcahy, T. M.

    2001-07-02

    The properties of currently available NbTi superconductor and carbon-fiber structural materials enable the possibility of constructing a magnetically levitated space elevator from the earth's surface up to an altitude of {approx} 200 km. The magnetic part of the elevator consists of a long loop of current-carrying NbTi, composed of one length that is attached to the earth's surface in an east-west direction and a levitated-arch portion. The critical current density of NbTi is sufficiently high that these conductors will stably levitate in the earth's magnetic field. The magnetic self-field from the loop increases the levitational force and for some geometries assists levitational stability. The 200-km maximum height of the levitated arch is limited by the allowable stresses of the structural material. The loop is cryogenically cooled with helium, and the system utilizes intermediate pumping and cooling stations along both the ground and the levitated portion of the loop, similar to other large terrestrial cryogenic systems. Mechanically suspended from the basic loop is an elevator structure, upon which mass can be moved between the earth's surface and the top of the loop by a linear electric motor or other mechanical or electrical means. At the top of the loop, vehicles may be accelerated to orbital velocity or higher by rocket motors, electromagnetic propulsion, or hybrid methods.

  10. Magnetically levitated space elevator to low-earth orbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hull, J. R.; Mulcahy, T. M.

    2001-01-01

    The properties of currently available NbTi superconductor and carbon-fiber structural materials enable the possibility of constructing a magnetically levitated space elevator from the earth's surface up to an altitude of(approx) 200 km. The magnetic part of the elevator consists of a long loop of current-carrying NbTi, composed of one length that is attached to the earth's surface in an east-west direction and a levitated-arch portion. The critical current density of NbTi is sufficiently high that these conductors will stably levitate in the earth's magnetic field. The magnetic self-field from the loop increases the levitational force and for some geometries assists levitational stability. The 200-km maximum height of the levitated arch is limited by the allowable stresses of the structural material. The loop is cryogenically cooled with helium, and the system utilizes intermediate pumping and cooling stations along both the ground and the levitated portion of the loop, similar to other large terrestrial cryogenic systems. Mechanically suspended from the basic loop is an elevator structure, upon which mass can be moved between the earth's surface and the top of the loop by a linear electric motor or other mechanical or electrical means. At the top of the loop, vehicles may be accelerated to orbital velocity or higher by rocket motors, electromagnetic propulsion, or hybrid methods

  11. Summary of the results from the lunar orbiter laser altimeter after seven years in lunar orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Mazarico, Erwan; Lemoine, Frank G.; Head, James W., III; Lucey, Paul G.; Aharonson, Oded; Robinson, Mark S.; Sun, Xiaoli; Torrence, Mark H.; Barker, Michael K.; Oberst, Juergen; Duxbury, Thomas C.; Mao, Dandan; Barnouin, Olivier S.; Jha, Kopal; Rowlands, David D.; Goossens, Sander; Baker, David; Bauer, Sven; Gläser, Philipp; Lemelin, Myriam; Rosenburg, Margaret; Sori, Michael M.; Whitten, Jennifer; Mcclanahan, Timothy

    2017-02-01

    In June 2009 the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spacecraft was launched to the Moon. The payload consists of 7 science instruments selected to characterize sites for future robotic and human missions. Among them, the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) was designed to obtain altimetry, surface roughness, and reflectance measurements. The primary phase of lunar exploration lasted one year, following a 3-month commissioning phase. On completion of its exploration objectives, the LRO mission transitioned to a science mission. After 7 years in lunar orbit, the LOLA instrument continues to map the lunar surface. The LOLA dataset is one of the foundational datasets acquired by the various LRO instruments. LOLA provided a high-accuracy global geodetic reference frame to which past, present and future lunar observations can be referenced. It also obtained high-resolution and accurate global topography that were used to determine regions in permanent shadow at the lunar poles. LOLA further contributed to the study of polar volatiles through its unique measurement of surface brightness at zero phase, which revealed anomalies in several polar craters that may indicate the presence of water ice. In this paper, we describe the many LOLA accomplishments to date and its contribution to lunar and planetary science.

  12. Summary of the Results from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter after Seven Years in Lunar Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Mazarico, Erwan; Lemoine, Frank G.; Head, James W., III; Lucey, Paul G.; Aharonson, Oded; Robinson, Mark S.; Sun, Xiaoli; hide

    2016-01-01

    In June 2009 the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spacecraft was launched to the Moon. The payload consists of 7 science instruments selected to characterize sites for future robotic and human missions. Among them, the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) was designed to obtain altimetry, surface roughness, and reflectance measurements. The primary phase of lunar exploration lasted one year, following a 3-month commissioning phase. On completion of its exploration objectives, the LRO mission transitioned to a science mission. After 7 years in lunar orbit, the LOLA instrument continues to map the lunar surface. The LOLA dataset is one of the foundational datasets acquired by the various LRO instruments. LOLA provided a high-accuracy global geodetic reference frame to which past, present and future lunar observations can be referenced. It also obtained high-resolution and accurate global topography that were used to determine regions in permanent shadow at the lunar poles. LOLA further contributed to the study of polar volatiles through its unique measurement of surface brightness at zero phase, which revealed anomalies in several polar craters that may indicate the presence of water ice. In this paper, we describe the many LOLA accomplishments to date and its contribution to lunar and planetary science.

  13. The Results of Complex Research of GSS "SBIRS-Geo 2" Behavior in the Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhov, P. P.; Epishev, V. P.; Sukhov, K. P.; Karpenko, G. F.; Motrunich, I. I.

    2017-04-01

    The new generation of geosynchronous satellites SBIRS of US Air Force early warning system series (Satellite Early Warning System) replaced the previous DSP-satellite series (Defense Support Program). Currently from the territory of Ukraine, several GSS of DSP series and one "SBIRS-Geo 2" are available to observation. During two years of observations, we have received and analyzed for two satellites more than 30 light curves in B, V, R photometric system. As a result of complex research, we propose a model of "SBIRS-Geo" 2 orbital behavior compared with the same one of the DSP-satellite. To control the entire surface of the Earth with 15-16 sec interval, including the polar regions, 4 SBIRS satellites located every 90 deg. along the equator are enough in GEO orbit. Since DSP-satellites provide the coverage of the Earth's surface to 83 deg. latitudes with a period of 50 sec, DSP-satellites should be 8. All the conclusions were made based on an analysis of photometric and coordinate observations using the simulation of the dynamics of their orbital behavior.

  14. Angular dependence of spin-orbit spin-transfer torques

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Ki-Seung

    2015-04-06

    In ferromagnet/heavy-metal bilayers, an in-plane current gives rise to spin-orbit spin-transfer torque, which is usually decomposed into fieldlike and dampinglike torques. For two-dimensional free-electron and tight-binding models with Rashba spin-orbit coupling, the fieldlike torque acquires nontrivial dependence on the magnetization direction when the Rashba spin-orbit coupling becomes comparable to the exchange interaction. This nontrivial angular dependence of the fieldlike torque is related to the Fermi surface distortion, determined by the ratio of the Rashba spin-orbit coupling to the exchange interaction. On the other hand, the dampinglike torque acquires nontrivial angular dependence when the Rashba spin-orbit coupling is comparable to or stronger than the exchange interaction. It is related to the combined effects of the Fermi surface distortion and the Fermi sea contribution. The angular dependence is consistent with experimental observations and can be important to understand magnetization dynamics induced by spin-orbit spin-transfer torques.

  15. Angular dependence of spin-orbit spin-transfer torques

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Ki-Seung; Go, Dongwook; Manchon, Aurelien; Haney, Paul M.; Stiles, M. D.; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Lee, Kyung-Jin

    2015-01-01

    In ferromagnet/heavy-metal bilayers, an in-plane current gives rise to spin-orbit spin-transfer torque, which is usually decomposed into fieldlike and dampinglike torques. For two-dimensional free-electron and tight-binding models with Rashba spin-orbit coupling, the fieldlike torque acquires nontrivial dependence on the magnetization direction when the Rashba spin-orbit coupling becomes comparable to the exchange interaction. This nontrivial angular dependence of the fieldlike torque is related to the Fermi surface distortion, determined by the ratio of the Rashba spin-orbit coupling to the exchange interaction. On the other hand, the dampinglike torque acquires nontrivial angular dependence when the Rashba spin-orbit coupling is comparable to or stronger than the exchange interaction. It is related to the combined effects of the Fermi surface distortion and the Fermi sea contribution. The angular dependence is consistent with experimental observations and can be important to understand magnetization dynamics induced by spin-orbit spin-transfer torques.

  16. Influence of the Choice of Lunar Gravity Model on Orbit Determination for Lunar Orbiters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Rok Kim

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We examine the influence of the lunar gravity model on the orbit determination (OD of a lunar orbiter operating in a 100 km high, lunar polar orbit. Doppler and sequential range measurements by three Deep Space Network antennas and one Korea Deep Space Antenna were used. For measurement simulation and OD analysis, STK11 and ODTK6 were utilized. GLGM2, LP100K, LP150Q, GRAIL420A, and GRAIL660B were used for investigation of lunar gravity model selection effect. OD results were assessed by position and velocity uncertainties with error covariance and an external orbit comparison using simulated true orbit. The effect of the lunar gravity models on the long-term OD, degree and order level, measurement-acquisition condition, and lunar altitude was investigated. For efficiency verification, computational times for the five lunar gravity models were compared. Results showed that significant improvements to OD accuracy are observed by applying a GRAIL-based model; however, applying a full order and degree gravity modeling is not always the best strategy, owing to the computational burden. Consequently, we consider that OD using GRAIL660B with 70 × 70 degree and order is the most efficient strategy for mission preanalysis. This study provides useful guideline for KPLO OD analysis during nominal mission operation.

  17. GPS Based Reduced-Dynamic Orbit Determination for Low Earth Orbiters with Ambiguity Fixing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the ever-increasing number of satellites in Low Earth Orbit (LEO for scientific missions, the precise determination of the position and velocity of the satellite is a necessity. GPS (Global Positioning System based reduced-dynamic orbit determination (RPOD method is commonly used in the post processing with high precision. This paper presents a sequential RPOD strategy for LEO satellite in the framework of Extended Kalman Filter (EKF. Precise Point Positioning (PPP technique is used to process the GPS observations, with carrier phase ambiguity resolution using Integer Phase Clocks (IPCs products. A set of GRACE (Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment mission data is used to test and validate the RPOD performance. Results indicate that orbit determination accuracy could be improved by 15% in terms of 3D RMS error in comparison with traditional RPOD method with float ambiguity solutions.

  18. Orbital Evolution and Orbital Phase Resolved Spectroscopy of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    binary. We have carried out orbital phase resolved spectroscopy to mea- ... agreement with a simple model of a spherically symmetric stellar wind from the .... has a set of Narrow Field Instruments (NFI) comprising one Low Energy Concen-.

  19. EVALUATING COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE DERMAL ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    As the Human Exposure Program focuses on the exposure of children to pesticides, there are concerns about the effect, or perceived effect, of components of the sampling procedure on the health and well-being of the infant and the ability to collect pesticide residues. One concern involves the materials in wipes used to collect pesticide residues or other contact materials on the skin. In recent studies (e.g., National Human Exposure Assessment Survey; NHEXAS), isopropyl alcohol has been used as a solvent in conjunction with a cloth wipe to obtain samples from the hands of adults and children. Although isopropyl alcohol is generally considered innocuous, the use of commercially available products could eliminate concerns about exposure to alcohol. A few studies have evaluated the potential of commercially available baby wipes to collect personal exposure samples for metals research, but not for the area of pesticide research (Millson et al., 1994; Campbell et al., 1993; Lichtenwalner et al., 1993). Therefore, there is a need to evaluate the potential for using commercially available baby wipes for collecting pesticide samples from skin and other surfaces. Another concern involves establishing a convenient and safe method for assessing overall dermal exposure for children, especially for those in crawling stage. One route that the U .S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) would like to investigate is the use of cotton body suits (infant sleepers) as an indicator

  20. Computed tomography of orbital myositis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dresner, S.C.; Rothfus, W.E.; Slamovits, T.L.; Kennerdell, J.S.; Curtin, H.D.

    1984-01-01

    The computerized tomographic (CT) scans of 11 consecutive patients with orbital myositis were reviewed to better characterize the CT appearance of this condition. The findings in this series differed from those of previous reports in several ways. Multiple muscle involvement predominated. Bilateral involvement was more frequent than previously reported. Enlargement of the tendon as well as the muscle was a frequent finding, but a normal tendinous insertion did not preclude the diagnosis of orbital myositis. Although the CT appearance of orbital myositis is often helpful, the findings are not pathognomonic; correlation with history, clinical findings, and therapeutic response must be considered in making the diagnosis

  1. Analysis of orbit determination from Earth-based tracking for relay satellites in a perturbed areostationary orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, P.; Pablos, B.; Barderas, G.

    2017-07-01

    Areostationary satellites are considered a high interest group of satellites to satisfy the telecommunications needs of the foreseen missions to Mars. An areostationary satellite, in an areoequatorial circular orbit with a period of 1 Martian sidereal day, would orbit Mars remaining at a fixed location over the Martian surface, analogous to a geostationary satellite around the Earth. This work addresses an analysis of the perturbed orbital motion of an areostationary satellite as well as a preliminary analysis of the aerostationary orbit estimation accuracy based on Earth tracking observations. First, the models for the perturbations due to the Mars gravitational field, the gravitational attraction of the Sun and the Martian moons, Phobos and Deimos, and solar radiation pressure are described. Then, the observability from Earth including possible occultations by Mars of an areostationary satellite in a perturbed areosynchronous motion is analyzed. The results show that continuous Earth-based tracking is achievable using observations from the three NASA Deep Space Network Complexes in Madrid, Goldstone and Canberra in an occultation-free scenario. Finally, an analysis of the orbit determination accuracy is addressed considering several scenarios including discontinuous tracking schedules for different epochs and different areoestationary satellites. Simulations also allow to quantify the aerostationary orbit estimation accuracy for various tracking series durations and observed orbit arc-lengths.

  2. Uranium favorability of tertiary sedimentary rocks of the Pend Oreille River valley, Washington. [Measurement and sampling of surface sections, collection of samples from isolated outcrops, chemical and mineralogical analyses of samples, and examination of available water logs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marjaniemi, D.K.; Robins, J.W.

    1975-08-01

    Tertiary sedimentary rocks in the Pend Oreille River valley were investigated in a regional study to determine the favorability for potential uranium resources of northeastern Washington. This project involved measurement and sampling of surface sections, collection of samples from isolated outcrops, chemical and mineralogical analyses of samples, and examination of available water well logs. The Box Canyon Dam area north of Ione is judged to have very high favorability. Thick-bedded conglomerates interbedded with sandstones and silty sandstones compose the Tiger Formation in this area, and high radioactivity levels are found near the base of the formation. Uranophane is found along fracture surfaces or in veins. Carbonaceous material is present throughout the Tiger Formation in the area. Part of the broad Pend Oreille valley surrounding Cusick, Washington, is an area of high favorability. Potential host rocks in the Tiger Formation, consisting of arkosic sandstones interbedded with radioactive shales, probably extend throughout the subsurface part of this area. Carbonaceous material is present and some samples contain high concentrations of uranium. In addition, several other possible chemical indicators were found. The Tiger-Lost Creek area is rated as having medium favorability. The Tiger Formation contains very hard, poorly sorted granite conglomerate with some beds of arkosic sandstone and silty sandstone. The granite conglomerate was apparently derived from source rocks having relatively high uranium content. The lower part of the formation is more favorable than the upper part because of the presence of carbonaceous material, anomalously high concentrations of uranium, and other possible chemical indicators. The area west of Ione is judged to have low favorability, because of the very low permeability of the rocks and the very low uranium content. (auth)

  3. Atmospheric interaction with nanosatellites from observed orbital decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macario-Rojas, A.; Smith, K. L.; Crisp, N. H.; Roberts, P. C. E.

    2018-06-01

    Nanosatellites have gained considerable presence in low Earth orbits wherein the atmospheric interaction with exposed surfaces plays a fundamental role in the evolution of motion. These aspects become relevant with the increasing applicability of nanosatellites to a broader range of missions objectives. This investigation sets out to determine distinctive drag coefficient development and attributes of atmospheric gas-surface interactions in nanosatellites in the common form of standard 3U CubeSats from observed orbital decay. As orbital decay can be measured with relative accuracy, and its mechanism broken down into its constituent sources, the value of drag-related coefficients can be inferred by fitting modelled orbit predictions to observed data wherein the coefficient of interest is the adjusted parameter. The analysis uses the data of ten historical missions with documented passive attitude stabilisation strategies to reduce uncertainties. Findings indicate that it is possible to estimate fitted drag coefficients in CubeSats with physical representativeness. Assessment of atomic oxygen surface coverage derived from the fitted drag coefficients is broadly consistent with theoretical trends. The proposed methodology opens the possibility to assess atmospheric interaction characteristics by using the unprecedented opportunity arising from the numerous observed orbital decay of nanosatellites.

  4. The Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) on NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riris, H.; Cavanaugh, J.; Sun, X.; Liiva, P.; Rodriguez, M.; Neuman, G.

    2017-11-01

    The Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) instrument [1-3] on NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) mission, launched on June 18th, 2009, from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, will provide a precise global lunar topographic map using laser altimetry. LOLA will assist in the selection of landing sites on the Moon for future robotic and human exploration missions and will attempt to detect the presence of water ice on or near the surface, which is one of the objectives of NASA's Exploration Program. Our present knowledge of the topography of the Moon is inadequate for determining safe landing areas for NASA's future lunar exploration missions. Only those locations, surveyed by the Apollo missions, are known with enough detail. Knowledge of the position and characteristics of the topographic features on the scale of a lunar lander are crucial for selecting safe landing sites. Our present knowledge of the rest of the lunar surface is at approximately 1 km kilometer level and in many areas, such as the lunar far side, is on the order of many kilometers. LOLA aims to rectify that and provide a precise map of the lunar surface on both the far and near side of the moon. LOLA uses short (6 ns) pulses from a single laser through a Diffractive Optical Element (DOE) to produce a five-beam pattern that illuminates the lunar surface. For each beam, LOLA measures the time of flight (range), pulse spreading (surface roughness), and transmit/return energy (surface reflectance). LOLA will produce a high-resolution global topographic model and global geodetic framework that enables precise targeting, safe landing, and surface mobility to carry out exploratory activities. In addition, it will characterize the polar illumination environment, and image permanently shadowed regions of the lunar surface to identify possible locations of surface ice crystals in shadowed polar craters.

  5. Cost Per Pound From Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merriam, M. L.

    2002-01-01

    Traditional studies of Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) designs have focused on designs that are completely reusable except for the fuel. This may not be realistic with current technology . An alternate approach is to look at partially reusable launch vehicles. This raises the question of which parts should be reused and which parts should be expendable. One approach is to consider the cost/pound of returning these parts from orbit. With the shuttle, this cost is about three times the cost/pound of launching payload into orbit. A subtle corollary is that RLVs are much less practical for higher orbits, such as the one on which the International Space Station resides, than they are for low earth orbits.

  6. NASA Orbital Debris Baseline Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krisko, Paula H.; Vavrin, A. B.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office has created high fidelity populations of the debris environment. The populations include objects of 1 cm and larger in Low Earth Orbit through Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit. They were designed for the purpose of assisting debris researchers and sensor developers in planning and testing. This environment is derived directly from the newest ORDEM model populations which include a background derived from LEGEND, as well as specific events such as the Chinese ASAT test, the Iridium 33/Cosmos 2251 accidental collision, the RORSAT sodium-potassium droplet releases, and other miscellaneous events. It is the most realistic ODPO debris population to date. In this paper we present the populations in chart form. We describe derivations of the background population and the specific populations added on. We validate our 1 cm and larger Low Earth Orbit population against SSN, Haystack, and HAX radar measurements.

  7. Lidar Orbital Angular Momentum Sensor

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The recognition in recent decades that electromagnetic fields have angular momentum (AM) in the form of not only polarization (or spin AM) but also orbital (OAM) has...

  8. Real and Hybrid Atomic Orbitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, D. B.; Fowler, P. W.

    1981-01-01

    Demonstrates that the Schrodinger equation for the hydrogenlike atom separates in both spheroconal and prolate spheroidal coordinates and that these separations provide a sound theoretical basis for the real and hybrid atomic orbitals. (Author/SK)

  9. High Power Orbit Transfer Vehicle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gulczinski, Frank

    2003-01-01

    ... from Virginia Tech University and Aerophysics, Inc. to examine propulsion requirements for a high-power orbit transfer vehicle using thin-film voltaic solar array technologies under development by the Space Vehicles Directorate (dubbed PowerSail...

  10. Topological imprint for periodic orbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martín, Jesús San; Moscoso, Ma José; Gómez, A González

    2012-01-01

    The more self-crossing points an orbit has the more complex it is. We introduce the topological imprint to characterize crossing points and focus on the period-doubling cascade. The period-doubling cascade topological imprint determines the topological imprint for orbits in chaotic bands. In addition, there is a closer link between this concept and the braids studied by Lettelier et al (2000 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 33 1809–25). (paper)

  11. Metastatic neuroendocrine tumor with initial presentation of orbital apex syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Yu Huang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The possible etiologies of orbital apex syndrome range from inflammatory, infectious, neoplastic, iatrogenic/traumatic, to vascular processes. In patients without obvious infection or systemic cancer history, judicious use of corticosteroids is a reasonable strategy. We describe a 64-year-old man who presented with orbital apex syndrome and had progressed to total visual loss in three days after admission. Radiological imaging and pathological studies were consistent with a neuroendocrine tumor with multiple metastases. We recommend that a biopsy-proven specimen is warranted in patient with orbital apex syndrome even without a cancer history.

  12. Spin-Orbit Coupling for Photons and Polaritons in Microstructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Sala

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We use coupled micropillars etched out of a semiconductor microcavity to engineer a spin-orbit Hamiltonian for photons and polaritons in a microstructure. The coupling between the spin and orbital momentum arises from the polarization-dependent confinement and tunneling of photons between adjacent micropillars arranged in the form of a hexagonal photonic molecule. It results in polariton eigenstates with distinct polarization patterns, which are revealed in photoluminescence experiments in the regime of polariton condensation. Thanks to the strong polariton nonlinearities, our system provides a photonic workbench for the quantum simulation of the interplay between interactions and spin-orbit effects, particularly when extended to two-dimensional lattices.

  13. A modified technique for retention of orbital prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameera R Shaikh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An orbital defect (congenital or acquired causes severe facial asymmetry and disfigurement, which results in psychological and social disturbances to the patient. It becomes a challenging task for a maxillofacial prosthodontist to fabricate a prosthesis that replicates the healthy side of the face. Success of the prosthesis depends primarily on satisfactory retention of the same. This clinical report illustrates rehabilitation of a patient with an orbital defect by fabricating a hollow orbital prosthesis, utilizing anatomical undercuts for retention using an acrylic resin template relined by a resilient denture liner.

  14. On the atmospheric drag in orbit determination for low Earth orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jingshi; Liu, Lin; Miao, Manqian

    2012-07-01

    orbit is propagated to the end of the 11th day (including the first day for POD). It is found that this approach provides reasonable results that match the analytical accuracy. At the end of the 11th day, the along-track error increases to 20km following an approximate time-square law, while the radial error a few hundred meters, the normal error below 50 meters and both follow a mild linear law. The results show that with accurate observation, the mean atmospheric density processed with appropriate approach is sufficient to provide reasonably precise orbit in prediction and determination without having to acquire accurate atmosphere conditions. Once long arc becomes available, the parameter B^* can also be used to study its long-term variation (monthly or seasonal). This can be expected as an alternative way to improve orbit accuracy in prediction and determination for LEO.

  15. Solar Radiation Pressure Binning for the Geosynchronous Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejduk, M. D.; Ghrist, R. W.

    2011-01-01

    Orbital maintenance parameters for individual satellites or groups of satellites have traditionally been set by examining orbital parameters alone, such as through apogee and perigee height binning; this approach ignored the other factors that governed an individual satellite's susceptibility to non-conservative forces. In the atmospheric drag regime, this problem has been addressed by the introduction of the "energy dissipation rate," a quantity that represents the amount of energy being removed from the orbit; such an approach is able to consider both atmospheric density and satellite frontal area characteristics and thus serve as a mechanism for binning satellites of similar behavior. The geo-synchronous orbit (of broader definition than the geostationary orbit -- here taken to be from 1300 to 1800 minutes in orbital period) is not affected by drag; rather, its principal non-conservative force is that of solar radiation pressure -- the momentum imparted to the satellite by solar radiometric energy. While this perturbation is solved for as part of the orbit determination update, no binning or division scheme, analogous to the drag regime, has been developed for the geo-synchronous orbit. The present analysis has begun such an effort by examining the behavior of geosynchronous rocket bodies and non-stabilized payloads as a function of solar radiation pressure susceptibility. A preliminary examination of binning techniques used in the drag regime gives initial guidance regarding the criteria for useful bin divisions. Applying these criteria to the object type, solar radiation pressure, and resultant state vector accuracy for the analyzed dataset, a single division of "large" satellites into two bins for the purposes of setting related sensor tasking and orbit determination (OD) controls is suggested. When an accompanying analysis of high area-to-mass objects is complete, a full set of binning recommendations for the geosynchronous orbit will be available.

  16. Loops in the Sun’s orbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjanov Milutin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Besides translation, spin around its axis and rotation around center of the Milky Way, the Sun performs relative motion in the solar system Laplacian plane, also. This motion was anticipated by Newton himself, in his Principia. The form of the Sun’s orbit is substantially different from the other solar system bodies’ orbits. Namely, the Sun moves along the path composed of the chain of large and small loops [1, 2, 6, 9]. This chain is situated within the circular outline with the diameter approximately twice as large as the Sun’s is. Under supposition that the solar system is stable, the Sun is going to move along it, in the same region, for eternity, never reitereiting the same path. It was also shown in this work that velocity and acceleration of the Sun’s center of mass are completely defined by the relative velocities and accelerations of the planets with respect to the Sun.

  17. MESSENGER at Mercury: Early Orbital Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNutt, Ralph L., Jr; Solomon, Sean C.; Bedini, Peter D.; Anderson, Brian J.; Blewett, David T.; Evans, Larry G.; Gold, Robert E.; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; Murchie, Scott L.; Nittler, Larry R.; hide

    2013-01-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, launched in August 2004 under NASA's Discovery Program, was inserted into orbit about the planet Mercury in March 2011. MESSENGER's three flybys of Mercury in 2008-2009 marked the first spacecraft visits to the innermost planet since the Mariner 10 flybys in 1974-1975. The unprecedented orbital operations are yielding new insights into the nature and evolution of Mercury. The scientific questions that frame the MESSENGER mission led to the mission measurement objectives to be achieved by the seven payload instruments and the radio science experiment. Interweaving the full set of required orbital observations in a manner that maximizes the opportunity to satisfy all mission objectives and yet meet stringent spacecraft pointing and thermal constraints was a complex optimization problem that was solved with a software tool that simulates science observations and tracks progress toward meeting each objective. The final orbital observation plan, the outcome of that optimization process, meets all mission objectives. MESSENGER's Mercury Dual Imaging System is acquiring a global monochromatic image mosaic at better than 90% coverage and at least 250 m average resolution, a global color image mosaic at better than 90% coverage and at least 1 km average resolution, and global stereo imaging at better than 80% coverage and at least 250 m average resolution. Higher-resolution images are also being acquired of targeted areas. The elemental remote sensing instruments, including the Gamma-Ray and Neutron Spectrometer and the X-Ray Spectrometer, are being operated nearly continuously and will establish the average surface abundances of most major elements. The Visible and Infrared Spectrograph channel of MESSENGER's Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer is acquiring a global map of spectral reflectance from 300 to 1450 nm wavelength at a range of incidence and emission

  18. Effect of lunar gravity models on Chang'E-2 orbit determination using VLBI tracking data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhu Wei

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The precise orbit determination of Chang'E-2 is the most important issue for successful mission and scientific applications, while the lunar gravity field model with big uncertainties has large effect on Chang'E-2 orbit determination. Recently, several new gravity models have been produced using the latest lunar satellites tracking data, such as LP165P, SGM150J, GL0900D and GRGM900C. In this paper, the four gravity models mentioned above were evaluated through the power spectra analysis, admittance and coherence analysis. Effect of four lunar gravity models on Chang'E-2 orbit determination performance is investigated and assessed using Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI tracking data. The overlap orbit analysis, the posteriori data residual, and the orbit prediction are used to evaluate the orbit precision between successive arcs. The LP165P model has better orbit overlap performance than the SGM150J model for Chang'E-2100 km × 100 km orbit and the SGM150J model performs better for Chang'E-2100 km × 15 km orbit, while GL0900D and GRGM900C have the best orbit overlap results for the two types of Chang'E-2 orbit. For the orbit prediction, GRGM900C has the best orbit prediction performance in the four models.

  19. Rumble surfaces

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    National Institute for Transport and Road

    1977-01-01

    Full Text Available Rumble surfaces are intermittent short lengths of coarse-textured road surfacings on which vehicle tyres produce a rumbling sound. used in conjunction with appropriate roadsigns and markings, they can reduce accidents on rural roads by alerting...

  20. Orbit effects on impurity transport in a rotating tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, K.L.; Cheng, C.Z.

    1988-05-01

    Particle orbits in a rotating tokamak plasma are calculated from the equation of motion in the frame that rotates with the plasma. It is found that heavy particles in a rotating plasma can drift away from magnetic surfaces significantly faster with a higher bounce frequency, resulting in a diffusion coefficient much larger than that for a stationary plasma. Particle orbits near the surface of a rotating tokamak are also analyzed. Orbit effects indicate that more impurities can penetrate into a plasma rotating with counter-beam injection. Particle simulation is carried out with realistic experimental parameters and the results are in qualitative agreement with some experimental observations in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). 19 refs., 15 figs

  1. Multi-layered foil capture of micrometeoroids and orbital debris in low Earth orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearsley, A.; Graham, G.

    Much of our knowledge concerning the sub-millimetre orbital debris population that poses a threat to orbiting satellites has been gleaned from examination of surfaces retrieved and subsequently analysed as part of post-flight investigations. The preservation of the hypervelocity impact-derived remnants located on these surfaces is very variable, whether of space debris or micrometeoroid origin. Whilst glass and metallic materials show highly visible impact craters when examined using optical and electron microscopes, complex mixing between the target material and the impacting particle may make unambiguous interpretation of the impactor origin difficult or impossible. Our recent detailed examination of selected multi-layered insulation (MLI) foils from the ISAS Space Flyer Unit (SFU), and our preliminary study of NASA's Trek blanket, exposed on the Mir station, show that these constructions have the potential to preserve abundant residue material of a quality sufficient for detailed analysis. Although there are still limitations on the recognition of certain sources of orbital debris, the foils complement the metal and glass substrates. We suggest that a purpose-built multi-layered foil structure may prove to be extremely effective for rapid collection and unambiguous analysis of impact- derived residues. Such a collector could be used an environmental monitor for ISS, as it would have low mass, high durability, easy deployment, recovery and storage, making it an economically viable and attractive option.

  2. Water availability as a driver of spatial and temporal variability in vegetation in the La Mancha plain (Spain): Implications for the land-surface energy, water and carbon budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Los, Sietse

    2017-04-01

    Vegetation is water limited in large areas of Spain and therefore a close link exists between vegetation greenness observed from satellite and moisture availability. Here we exploit this link to infer spatial and temporal variability in moisture from MODIS NDVI data and thermal data. Discrepancies in the precipitation - vegetation relationship indicate areas with an alternative supply of water (i.e. not rainfall), this can be natural where moisture is supplied by upwelling groundwater, or can be artificial where crops are irrigated. As a result spatial and temporal variability in vegetation in the La Mancha Plain appears closely linked to topography, geology, rainfall and land use. Crop land shows large variability in year-to-year vegetation greenness; for some areas this variability is linked to variability in rainfall but in other cases this variability is linked to irrigation. The differences in irrigation treatment within one plant functional type, in this case crops, will lead to errors in land surface models when ignored. The magnitude of these effects on the energy, carbon and water balance are assessed at the scale of 250 m to 200 km. Estimating the water balance correctly is of particular important since in some areas in Spain more water is used for irrigation than is supplemented by rainfall.

  3. Accuracy in Orbital Propagation: A Comparison of Predictive Software Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    30] M. Lane and K. Cranford, "An improved analytical drag theory for the artificial satellite problem," American Institute of Aeronautics and...which have a foundation in similar theory . Since their first operational use, both propagators have incorporated updated theory and mathematical...propagators should therefore utilize the most current TLE data available to avoid accuracy errors. 14. SUBJECT TERMS orbital mechanics , orbital

  4. Searching for stable orbits in the HD 10180 planetary system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laskar J.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A planetary system with at least seven planets has been found around the star HD 10180. However, the traditional Keplerian and n-body fits to the data provide an orbital solution that becomes unstable very quickly, which may quest the reliability of the observations. Here we show that stable orbital configurations can be obtained if general relativity and long-term dissipation raised by tides on the innermost planet are taken into account.

  5. Angles-only relative orbit determination in low earth orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardaens, Jean-Sébastien; Gaias, Gabriella

    2018-06-01

    The paper provides an overview of the angles-only relative orbit determination activities conducted to support the Autonomous Vision Approach Navigation and Target Identification (AVANTI) experiment. This in-orbit endeavor was carried out by the German Space Operations Center (DLR/GSOC) in autumn 2016 to demonstrate the capability to perform spaceborne autonomous close-proximity operations using solely line-of-sight measurements. The images collected onboard have been reprocessed by an independent on-ground facility for precise relative orbit determination, which served as ultimate instance to monitor the formation safety and to characterize the onboard navigation and control performances. During two months, several rendezvous have been executed, generating a valuable collection of images taken at distances ranging from 50 km to only 50 m. Despite challenging experimental conditions characterized by a poor visibility and strong orbit perturbations, angles-only relative positioning products could be continuously derived throughout the whole experiment timeline, promising accuracy at the meter level during the close approaches. The results presented in the paper are complemented with former angles-only experience gained with the PRISMA satellites to better highlight the specificities induced by different orbits and satellite designs.

  6. Transport from non-classical orbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, J.P.

    2001-10-01

    From the guiding centre orbit invariants it is possible to construct a map of different orbit shapes in a phase space of three dimensionless variables: normalised toroidal radius y, particle pitch angle ξ, normalised orbit width ρ [1, 2, 3]. The map describes the link between two points in phase space: point 1 (y 1 , ξ 1 , ρ) and point 2 (y 2 , ξ 2 , ρ) where y 1 , y 2 denote the orbit intersection points 1 and 2 with the y(R) axis. An algorithm permits the rapid calculation of point 2 when point 1 is given. The orbit drift excursion Δy = y 2 - y 1 is calculated and converted to Δx = x 2 - x 1 where x denotes a dimensionless flux surface label for a given equilibrium. The mono-energetic distribution function f 0 (Δx) is calculated at fixed ρ 0 (energy) and with a uniform pitch distribution for three tokamaks PBX, JET, MAST. These have been selected because of their variation of inverse aspect ratio ε. A fourth and hypothetical tokamak labelled 'NEOC' (neoclassical) is introduced to compare the results obtained with those predicted by neoclassical theory. A strong dependence of f 0 upon ε is established. An appropriate thermal distribution f(Δx) is also calculated for the four tokamaks and this distribution depends on the profile shapes of normalised temperature and normalised density as well as on the topology of the equilibrium. The thermal distribution functions are shown to exceed the levels assumed in neoclassical transport theory: the mean values are two to four times larger. It is shown that one reason for this excess is due to orbits which traverse the central region of the tokamak. The implications of the results obtained for estimates of transport can then be studied. The magnitude of the drift excursion Δx from a given flux surface x yields by itself no transport. In the limit vertical bar δ vertical bar yξρ (Δx) and δ = (δy, δξ, δρ). The former vector can be calculated in the thermal case. The latter vector describes collisionless

  7. OTORHINOLARYNGOLOGICAL DISEASES MASQUERADING AS ORBITAL TUMOURS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharmistha Behera

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The close proximity of the orbit and the paranasal sinuses, both of which share more than two-thirds of common walls makes the orbit too susceptible to infections spreading from the paranasal sinuses. In any case of proptosis indicating an orbital tumour, extension from a PNS lesion should be ruled out. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study was a retrospective descriptive study. Data taken from the patient's medical record during the period of July 2014- June 2017. A total of 32 cases of proptosis were studied all of which were secondary to paranasal sinus pathology. These cases were subject to routine clinical examination and investigations including CT and MRI scan. Histopathological diagnosis was obtained by biopsy in appropriate cases. RESULTS Out of 32 patients, males were 68.75% (n=22 and females were 31.25% (n=10. The largest age group are in the age range 41-50 years (31.25%, n=10 and in age group 0-10 years (31.25%. Out of the whole, 13 (40.6% of them were due to sinusitis, 6 (18.75% due to sinonasal malignancy, all of which were histopathologically confirmed to be squamous cell carcinoma of maxillary sinus, 6 (18.75% cases were of mucoceles from frontoethmoidal origin, 4 (12.50% cases were of fibrous dysplasia of maxillary sinus, 2 (6.25% case was of schwannoma of frontal sinus origin and 1 (3.12% case of Langerhans cell histiocytosis of maxillary sinus. In our study, proptosis was commonest presenting complaint in all 32 patients followed by nasal obstruction (62.5%, reduced vision (25%, facial asymmetry (25%, redness of eye (18.75% and double vision (12.50%. Out of all investigative modalities, biopsy was found to be the most accurate followed by CT scan brain, PNS and orbit. CONCLUSION Due to close proximity, nasal and PNS diseases through bone erosion or preformed pathways can invade the orbit and cause proptosis. Longstanding optic nerve compression by orbital encroachment of PNS lesion can lead to blindness due to optic

  8. Orbit orientation and eye morphometrics in giraffes ( Giraffa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Giraffe are thought to have excellent vision.We measured eye size, orbit orientation and retina surface area in 27 giraffes of both sexes ranging in age from neonates to mature adults (>10 yrs), to assess how it changes with growth, whether their eye anatomy correlates with their apparently excellent vision and lifestyle, and ...

  9. Detecting a Subsurface Ocean From Periodic Orbits at Enceladus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casotto, S.; Padovan, S.; Russell, R. P.; Lara, M.

    2008-12-01

    Enceladus is a small icy satellite of Saturn which has been observed by the Cassini orbiter to eject plumes mainly consisting of water vapor from the "tiger stripes" located near its South pole. While tidal heating has been ruled out as an inadequate energy source to drive these eruptions, tidally induced shear stress both along and across the stripes appears to be sufficiently powerful. The internal constitution of Enceladus that fits this model is likely to entail a thin crust and a subcrustal water layer above an undifferentiated interior. Apart from the lack of a core/mantle boundary, the situation is similar to the current hypothetical models of Europa's interior. The determination of the existence of a subsurface fluid layer can therefore be pursued with similar methods, including the study of the gravitational perturbations of tidal origin on an Enceladus orbiter, and the use of altimeter measurements to the tidally deformed surface. The dynamical environment of an Enceladus orbiter is made very unstable by the overwhelming presence of nearby Saturn. The Enceladus sphere of influence is roughly twice its radius. This makes it considerably more difficult to orbit than Europa, whose sphere of influence is ~six times its radius. While low-altitude, near-polar Enceladus orbits suffer extreme instability, recent works have extended the inclination envelope for long-term stable orbits at Enceladus. Several independent methods suggest that ~65 degrees inclination is the maximum attainable for stable, perturbed Keplerian motion. These orbits are non-circular and exist with altitude variations from ~200 to ~300 km. We propose a nominal reference orbit that enjoys long term stability and is favorable for long-term mapping and other scientific experiments. A brief excursion to a lower altitude, slightly higher inclined, yet highly unstable orbit is proposed to improve gravity signatures and enable high resolution, nadir-pointing experiments on the geysers emanating

  10. Orbital dermoid and epidermoid cysts: Case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veselinović Dragan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Dermoid and epidermoid cysts of the orbit belong to choristomas, tumours that originate from the aberrant primordial tissue. Clinically, they manifest as cystic movable formations mostly localized in the upper temporal quadrant of the orbit. They are described as both superficial and deep formations with most frequently slow intermittent growth. Apart from aesthetic effects, during their growth, dermoid and epidermoid cysts can cause disturbances in the eye motility, and in rare cases, also an optical nerve compression syndrome. Case Outline. In this paper, we described a child with a congenital orbital dermoid cyst localized in the upper-nasal quadrant that was showing signs of a gradual enlargement and progression. The computerized tomography revealed a cyst of 1.5-2.0 cm in size. At the Maxillofacial Surgery Hospital in Niš, the dermoid cyst was extirpated in toto after orbitotomy performed by superciliary approach. Postoperative course was uneventful, without inflammation signs, and after two weeks excellent functional and aesthetic effects were achieved. Conclusion. Before the decision to treat the dermoid and epidermoid cysts operatively, a detailed diagnostic procedure was necessary to be done in order to locate the cyst precisely and determine its size and possible propagation into the surrounding periorbital structures. Apart from cosmetic indications, operative procedures are recommended in the case of cysts with constant progressions, which cause the pressure to the eye lobe, lead to motility disturbances and indirectly compress the optical nerve and branches of the cranial nerves III, IV and VI.

  11. Thermoluminescence of meteorites and their orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcher, C. L.

    1981-01-01

    The thermoluminescence levels of 45 ordinary chondrites are measured in order to provide information on the orbital characteristics of the meteorites before impact. Glow curves of the photon emission response of powdered samples of the meteorites to temperatures up to 550 C in the natural state and following irradiation by a laboratory test dose of 110,000 rad were obtained as functions of terrestrial age and compared to those of samples of the Pribram, Lost City and Innisfree meteorites, for which accurate orbital data is available. The thermoluminescence levels in 40 out of 42 meteorites are found to be similar to those of the three control samples, indicating that the vast majority of ordinary chondrites that survive atmospheric entry have perihelia in the range 0.8-1 AU. Of the remaining two, Farmville is observed to exhibit an unusually large gradient in thermoluminescence levels with sample depth, which may be a result of a temperature gradient arising in a slowly rotating meteorite. Finally, the thermoluminescence measured in the Malakal meteorite is found to be two orders of magnitude lower than control samples, which is best explained by thermal draining by solar heating in an orbit with a perihelion distance of 0.5 to 0.6 AU.

  12. Orbital maneuvering end effectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, W. Neill (Inventor); Forbes, John C. (Inventor); Barnes, Wayne L. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    This invention relates to an end effector device for grasping and maneuvering objects such as berthing handles of a space telescope. The device includes a V-shaped capture window defined as inclined surfaces in parallel face plates which converge toward a retainer recess in which the handle is retained. A pivotal finger (30) meshes with a pair of pivoted fingers which rotate in counterrotation. The fingers rotate to pull a handle within the capture window into recess where latches lock handle in the recess. To align the capture window, plates may be cocked plus or minus five degrees on base. Drive means is included in the form of a motor coupled with a harmonic drive speed reducer, which provides for slow movement of the fingers at a high torque so that large articles may be handled. Novelty of the invention is believed to reside in the combined intermeshing finger structure, drive means and the harmonic drive speed reducer, which features provide the required maneuverability and strength.

  13. Photometric Studies of Orbital Debris at GEO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Cowardin, Heather M.; Barker, Ed; Abercromby, Kira J.; Foreman, Gary; Hortsman, Matt

    2009-01-01

    Orbital debris represents a significant and increasing risk to operational spacecraft. Here we report on photometric observations made in standard BVRI filters at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in an effort to determine the physical characteristics of optically faint debris at geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). Our sample is taken from GEO objects discovered in a survey with the University of Michigan s 0.6-m Curtis-Schmidt telescope (known as MODEST, for Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope), and then followed up in real-time with the CTIO/SMARTS 0.9-m for orbits and photometry. For a sample of 50 objects, calibrated sequences in RB- V-I-R filters have been obtained with the CTIO/SMARTS 0.9-m. For objects that do not show large brightness variations, the colors are largely redder than solar in both B-R and R-I. The width of the color distribution may be intrinsic to the nature of the surfaces, but also could imply that we are seeing irregularly shaped objects and measuring the colors at different times with just one telescope. For irregularly shaped objects tumbling at unknown orientations and rates, such sequential filter measurements using one telescope are subject to large errors for interpretation. If all observations in all filters in a particular sequence are of the same surface at the same solar and viewing angles, then the colors are meaningful. Where this is not the case, interpretation of the observed colors is impossible. For a smaller sample of objects we have observed with synchronized CCD cameras on the two telescopes. The CTIO/SMARTS 0.9-m observes in B, and the Schmidt in R. The CCD cameras are electronically linked together so that the start time and duration of observations are both the same to better than 50 milliseconds. Now the observed B-R color is a true measure of the scattered illuminated area of the debris piece for that observation.

  14. Orbital motions as gradiometers for post-Newtonian tidal effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo eIorio

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The direct long-term changes occurring in the orbital dynamics of a local gravitationally bound binary system S due to the post-Newtonian tidal acceleration caused by an external massive source are investigated. A class of systems made of a test particle m rapidly orbiting with orbital frequency nb an astronomical body of mass M which, in turn, slowly revolves around a distantobject of mass M with orbital frequency nb'<< □ nb is considered. The characteristic frequenciesof the non-Keplerian orbital variations of m and of M itself are assumed to be negligible withrespect to both nb and nb'. General expressions for the resulting Newtonian and post-Newtoniantidal orbital shifts of m are obtained. The future missions BepiColombo and JUICE to Mercuryand Ganymede, respectively, are considered in view of a possible detection. The largest effects,of the order of □ 0:1 □□ 0:5 milliarcseconds per year (mas yr□□1, occur for the Ganymede orbiterof the JUICE mission. Although future improvements in spacecraft tracking and orbit determina14tion might, perhaps, reach the required sensitivity, the systematic bias represented by the otherknown orbital perturbations of both Newtonian and post-Newtonian origin would be overwhel16ming. The realization of a dedicated artificial mini-planetary system to be carried onboard andEarth-orbiting spacecraft is considered as well. Post-Newtonian tidal precessions as large as1 □□ 102 mas yr□□1 could be obtained, but the quite larger Newtonian tidal effects would be amajor source of systematic bias because of the present-day percent uncertainty in the product of the Earth’s mass times the Newtonian gravitational parameter.

  15. The Eccentric Behavior of Nearly Frozen Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweetser, Theodore H.; Vincent, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Frozen orbits are orbits which have only short-period changes in their mean eccentricity and argument of periapse, so that they basically keep a fixed orientation within their plane of motion. Nearly frozen orbits are those whose eccentricity and argument of periapse have values close to those of a frozen orbit. We call them "nearly" frozen because their eccentricity vector (a vector whose polar coordinates are eccentricity and argument of periapse) will stay within a bounded distance from the frozen orbit eccentricity vector, circulating around it over time. For highly inclined orbits around the Earth, this distance is effectively constant over time. Furthermore, frozen orbit eccentricity values are low enough that these orbits are essentially eccentric (i.e., off center) circles, so that nearly frozen orbits around Earth are bounded above and below by frozen orbits.

  16. Orbital and Collisional Evolution of the Irregular Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesvorný, David; Alvarellos, Jose L. A.; Dones, Luke; Levison, Harold F.

    2003-07-01

    instabilities operating on longer time spans. The average orbits calculated from this experiment were then used to probe the collisional evolution of the irregular satellite systems. We found that (1) the large irregular moons must have collisionally eliminated many small irregular moons, thus shaping their population to the currently observed structures; (2) some dynamical families of satellites could have been formed by catastrophic collisions among the irregular moons; and (3) Phoebe's surface must have been heavily cratered by impacts from an extinct population of Saturnian irregular moons, much larger than the present one. We therefore suggest that the Cassini imaging of Phoebe in 2004 can be used to determine the primordial population of small irregular moons of Saturn. In such a case, we will also better understand the overall efficiency of the formation process of the irregular satellites and the physical conditions that existed during planetary formation. We discovered two dynamical families of tightly clustered orbits within the Jovian retrograde group. We believe that these two clusters may be the remnants of two collisionally disrupted bodies. We found that the entire Jovian retrograde group and the Saturnian inclination groups were not produced by single breakups, because the ejection velocities derived from the orbital structures of these groups greatly exceed values calculated by modern numerical models of collisional breakups. Taken together, the evidence presented here suggests that many properties of the irregular moons previously assigned to their formation process may have resulted from their later dynamical and collisional evolution. Finally, we have found that several irregular moons, namely, Pasiphae, Sinope, S/2001 J10, S/2000 S5, S/2000 S6, and S/2000 S3, have orbits characterized by secular resonances. The orbits of some of these moons apparently evolved by some slow dissipative process in the past and became captured in tiny resonant volumes.

  17. The method of coadjoint orbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delius, G.W.; Van Nieuwenhuizen, P.; Rodgers, V.G.J.

    1990-01-01

    The method of coadjoint orbits produces for any infinite dimensional Lie (super) algebra A with nontrivial central charge an action for scalar (super) fields which has at least the symmetry A. In this article, the authors try to make this method accessible to a larger audience by analyzing several examples in more detail than in the literature. After working through the Kac-Moody and Virasoro cases, we apply the method to the super Virasoro algebra and reobtain the super-symmetric extension of Polyakov's local nonpolynomial action for two-dimensional quantum gravity. As in the Virasoro case this action corresponds to the coadjoint orbit of a pure central extension. The authors further consider the actions corresponding to the other orbits of the super Virasoro algebra. As a new result the authors construct the actions for the N = 2 super Virasoro algebra

  18. Gravity Probe B orbit determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shestople, P; Ndili, A; Parkinson, B W; Small, H; Hanuschak, G

    2015-01-01

    The Gravity Probe B (GP-B) satellite was equipped with a pair of redundant Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers used to provide navigation solutions for real-time and post-processed orbit determination (OD), as well as to establish the relation between vehicle time and coordinated universal time. The receivers performed better than the real-time position requirement of 100 m rms per axis. Post-processed solutions indicated an rms position error of 2.5 m and an rms velocity error of 2.2 mm s −1 . Satellite laser ranging measurements provided independent verification of the GPS-derived GP-B orbit. We discuss the modifications and performance of the Trimble Advance Navigation System Vector III GPS receivers. We describe the GP-B precision orbit and detail the OD methodology, including ephemeris errors and the laser ranging measurements. (paper)

  19. MRI of orbital hydroxyapatite implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flanders, A.E.; De Potter P.; Rao, V.M.; Tom, B.M.; Shields, C.L.; Shields, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    Our aim was to use MRI for the postsurgical assessment of a new form of integrated orbital implant composed of a porous calcium phosphate hydroxyapatite substrate. We studied ten patients 24-74 years of age who underwent enucleation and implantation of a hydroxyapatite ball; 5-13 months after surgery, each patient was examined by spin-echo MRI, with fat suppression and gadolinium enhancement. Fibrovascular ingrowth was demonstrated in all ten patients as areas of enhancement at the periphery of the hydroxyapatite sphere that extended to the center to a variable degree. The radiologist should aware of the MRI appearances of the coralline hydroxyapatite orbital implant since it is now widely used following enucleation. MRI is a useful means to determine successful incorporation of the substrate into the orbital tissues. The normal pattern of contrast enhancement should not be mistaken for recurrent tumor or infection. (orig.)

  20. Orbits on bodies of rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröer, H.

    Orbits of small balls on revolutions solid shells are examined. Which velocity is necessary to stay in balance? The angular velocity remains constant. General revolution solid, revolution cone, revolution ellipsoid, ball, paraboloid and hyperboloid are treated. Chapter 1 represents the frictionless case. Chapter 2 deals with the friction case. The transformation from velocity to the belonging orbit height is calculated in chapter 3. In chapter 4 and 5 the macro revolution solids follow (without and with friction)is treated. The assumption of a homogeneous field is not possible here. The radial gravitational field must be used. In the last chapter we have orbits with non constant angular velocity that can be derived with the Lagrange-equations of the second kind in the frictionless case. Here is also possible to view different revolution solids. The book is recommended to all experimental-, theoretical and mathematical physicists. There is an english and a german edition.

  1. Orbital periods of recurrent novae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, B.E.

    1990-01-01

    The class of recurrent novae (RN) with thermonuclear runaways contains only three systems (T Pyx, U Sco, and V394 CrA), for which no orbital periods are known. This paper presents a series of photometric observations where the orbital periods for all three systems are discovered. T Pyx is found to have sinusoidal modulation with an amplitude of 0.08 mag and a period of 2.3783 h (with a possible alias of 2.6403 h). U Sco is found to be an eclipsing system with an eclipse amplitude of roughly 1.5 mag and an orbital period of 1.2344 days. V394 CrA is found to have sinusoidal modulation with an amplitude of 0.5 mag and a period of 0.7577 days. Thus two out of three RN with thermonuclear runaways (or five out of six for all RN) have evolved companions. 16 refs

  2. MR imaging of orbital disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Sato, Ryuiti; Sakamoto, Yuji; Kojima, Ryutaro; Takahashi, Mutsumasa; Maruoka, Syouko; Okamura, Ryoichi; Oguni, Tatsuro.

    1989-05-01

    Sixty five cases with orbital and ocular lesions were evaluated by MRI in comparison with high resolution CT. MRI was performed with spin echo techniques (short TR/TE and long TR/TE) using a 0.22 tesla resistive unit (Toshiba MRT-22A) or a 1.5 tesla superconductive unit (Siemens Magnetom). MRI was superior to CT in (1) detecting ocular lesions and vitreous changes, (2) differentiating a tumor from the adjacent extraocular muscles and optic nerves, (3) identifying the lesion in the orbital apex and demonstrating the posterior extent of the tumor and (4) detecting the abnormal flow in the orbital vascular structures. Although some tumors had specific signal intensities including hemangioma, menigioma, and pseudotumor, majority of tumors revealed non-sepcific signal intensities. CT was superior to MRI in detection for small and calcified lesions as well as visualization of bone details. (author).

  3. Orbital computed tomography for exophthalmos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ok Keun; Lee, Hyun; Sol, Chang Hyo; Kim, Byung Soo

    1987-01-01

    Since exophthalmos is caused by any decrease in the size of bony orbit or occurrence of mass within the rigid orbit, the accurate diagnosis of its causes are essential in determining the therapeutic aims. Exophthalmos is one of the important signs being the indication for orbital computed tomography along with periorbital swelling, visual loss, orbital trauma and diplopia. CT as the diagnostic tool for the cause of exophthalmos not only displays a superb role with uncomparable quality in comparison to any conventional diagnostic methods but also has a decisive role in determining the therapeutic aims and the appropriate operative method when the operation is indicated. The orbital CT was performed from May in 1983 to May in 1985 whose with chief complaints were exophthalmos and 23 cases were confirmed by operation, biopsy, clinical progression or other diagnostic procedures. Here was report thoroughly analyzed 23 cases. The results were as follows : 1. The etiologic disease of exophthalmos were 6 cases of pseudotumor, 4 cases of thyroid ophthalmopathy, 4 cases of maxill ary sinus and nasal cavity Ca., 3 cases of mucocele and 1 case of alveolar soft part sarcoma, osteoma, dermoid cyst, pleomorphic adenoma, meningioma, and C.C.F. each. 2. The origin of the etiologic diseases of exophthalmos were 13 cases of primary within bony orbit and 10 cases of secondary from adjacent structure. 3. The site of lesions were 11 cases of intraconal and extraconal, 10 cases of extraconal, and 2 cases of intraconal origin. 4. The degree of exophthalmos in CT scan was in proportion to the volume of the mass except in the case of thyroid ophthalmopathy. The upper limit of normal range by CT scan using regression line equation was 16.2 mm in approximation. 5. CT was a very useful diagnostic tool in the accurate assessment of the kinds of lesion, its location, and its relationship to adjacent structures in the diagnosis of etiologic diseases of exophthalmos

  4. Theory of orbital magnetoelectric response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malashevich, Andrei; Souza, Ivo; Coh, Sinisa; Vanderbilt, David

    2010-01-01

    We extend the recently developed theory of bulk orbital magnetization to finite electric fields, and use it to calculate the orbital magnetoelectric (ME) response of periodic insulators. Working in the independent-particle framework, we find that the finite-field orbital magnetization can be written as a sum of three gauge-invariant contributions, one of which has no counterpart at zero field. The extra contribution is collinear with and explicitly dependent on the electric field. The expression for the orbital magnetization is suitable for first-principles implementations, allowing one to calculate the ME response coefficients by numerical differentiation. Alternatively, perturbation-theory techniques may be used, and for that purpose we derive an expression directly for the linear ME tensor by taking the first field-derivative analytically. Two types of terms are obtained. One, the 'Chern-Simons' term, depends only on the unperturbed occupied orbitals and is purely isotropic. The other, 'Kubo' terms, involve the first-order change in the orbitals and give isotropic as well as anisotropic contributions to the response. In ordinary ME insulators all terms are generally present, while in strong Z 2 topological insulators only the Chern-Simons term is allowed, and is quantized. In order to validate the theory, we have calculated under periodic boundary conditions the linear ME susceptibility for a 3D tight-binding model of an ordinary ME insulator, using both the finite-field and perturbation-theory expressions. The results are in excellent agreement with calculations on bounded samples.

  5. Orbital computed tomography for exophthalmos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ok Keun; Lee, Hyun; Sol, Chang Hyo; Kim, Byung Soo [College of Medicine, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-06-15

    Since exophthalmos is caused by any decrease in the size of bony orbit or occurrence of mass within the rigid orbit, the accurate diagnosis of its causes are essential in determining the therapeutic aims. Exophthalmos is one of the important signs being the indication for orbital computed tomography along with periorbital swelling, visual loss, orbital trauma and diplopia. CT as the diagnostic tool for the cause of exophthalmos not only displays a superb role with uncomparable quality in comparison to any conventional diagnostic methods but also has a decisive role in determining the therapeutic aims and the appropriate operative method when the operation is indicated. The orbital CT was performed from May in 1983 to May in 1985 whose with chief complaints were exophthalmos and 23 cases were confirmed by operation, biopsy, clinical progression or other diagnostic procedures. Here was report thoroughly analyzed 23 cases. The results were as follows : 1. The etiologic disease of exophthalmos were 6 cases of pseudotumor, 4 cases of thyroid ophthalmopathy, 4 cases of maxill ary sinus and nasal cavity Ca., 3 cases of mucocele and 1 case of alveolar soft part sarcoma, osteoma, dermoid cyst, pleomorphic adenoma, meningioma, and C.C.F. each. 2. The origin of the etiologic diseases of exophthalmos were 13 cases of primary within bony orbit and 10 cases of secondary from adjacent structure. 3. The site of lesions were 11 cases of intraconal and extraconal, 10 cases of extraconal, and 2 cases of intraconal origin. 4. The degree of exophthalmos in CT scan was in proportion to the volume of the mass except in the case of thyroid ophthalmopathy. The upper limit of normal range by CT scan using regression line equation was 16.2 mm in approximation. 5. CT was a very useful diagnostic tool in the accurate assessment of the kinds of lesion, its location, and its relationship to adjacent structures in the diagnosis of etiologic diseases of exophthalmos.

  6. Patient Selection and Procedural Considerations for Coronary Orbital Atherectomy System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotomi, Yohei; Shlofmitz, Richard A; Colombo, Antonio; Serruys, Patrick W

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in technology, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) of severely calcified coronary lesions remains challenging. Rotational atherectomy is one of the current therapeutic options to manage calcified lesions, but has a limited role in facilitating the dilation or stenting of lesions that cannot be crossed or expanded with other PCI techniques due to unfavourable clinical outcome in long-term follow-up. However the results of orbital atherectomy presented in the ORBIT I and ORBIT II trials were encouraging. In addition to these encouraging data, necessity for sufficient lesion preparation before implantation of bioresorbable scaffolds lead to resurgence in the use of atherectomy. This article summarises currently available publications on orbital atherectomy (Cardiovascular Systems Inc.) and compares them with rotational atherectomy. PMID:29588702

  7. Spin tune dependence on closed orbit in RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ptitsyn, V.; Bai, M.; Roser, T.

    2010-01-01

    Polarized proton beams are accelerated in RHIC to 250 GeV energy with the help of Siberian Snakes. The pair of Siberian Snakes in each RHIC ring holds the design spin tune at 1/2 to avoid polarization loss during acceleration. However, in the presence of closed orbit errors, the actual spin tune can be shifted away from the exact 1/2 value. It leads to a corresponding shift of locations of higher-order ('snake') resonances and limits the available betatron tune space. The largest closed orbit effect on the spin tune comes from the horizontal orbit angle between the two snakes. During RHIC Run in 2009 dedicated measurements with polarized proton beams were taken to verify the dependence of the spin tune on the local orbits at the Snakes. The experimental results are presented along with the comparison with analytical predictions.

  8. Unusual intraconal localization of orbital giant cell angiofibroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meryem Altin Ekin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell angiofibroma (GCA is a recently reported rare soft-tissue tumor that can develop in various sites including orbit. Orbital GCAs were mainly located in the eyelid or extraconal regions such as lacrimal gland and conjunctiva. We report an atypical case of a GCA arising in the intraconal area of the orbit in a 65-year-old male patient. The tumor was excised in total by lateral orbitotomy. Histological and immunohistochemical features were consistent with the diagnosis of GCA. No recurrence was observed during the follow-up of over 2 years. GCA is a rare tumor that should be considered in the differential diagnosis of intraconal orbital tumors. Complete surgical removal is the current optimal treatment option.

  9. Pumped double quantum dot with spin-orbit coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherman Eugene

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We study driven by an external electric field quantum orbital and spin dynamics of electron in a one-dimensional double quantum dot with spin-orbit coupling. Two types of external perturbation are considered: a periodic field at the Zeeman frequency and a single half-period pulse. Spin-orbit coupling leads to a nontrivial evolution in the spin and orbital channels and to a strongly spin- dependent probability density distribution. Both the interdot tunneling and the driven motion contribute into the spin evolution. These results can be important for the design of the spin manipulation schemes in semiconductor nanostructures. PACS numbers: 73.63.Kv,72.25.Dc,72.25.Pn

  10. French Meteor Network for High Precision Orbits of Meteoroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atreya, P.; Vaubaillon, J.; Colas, F.; Bouley, S.; Gaillard, B.; Sauli, I.; Kwon, M. K.

    2011-01-01

    There is a lack of precise meteoroids orbit from video observations as most of the meteor stations use off-the-shelf CCD cameras. Few meteoroids orbit with precise semi-major axis are available using film photographic method. Precise orbits are necessary to compute the dust flux in the Earth s vicinity, and to estimate the ejection time of the meteoroids accurately by comparing them with the theoretical evolution model. We investigate the use of large CCD sensors to observe multi-station meteors and to compute precise orbit of these meteoroids. An ideal spatial and temporal resolution to get an accuracy to those similar of photographic plates are discussed. Various problems faced due to the use of large CCD, such as increasing the spatial and the temporal resolution at the same time and computational problems in finding the meteor position are illustrated.

  11. Orbital metastasis: A rare manifestation of scapular bone osteosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Taher Rajabi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report a case of orbital metastasis from scapular bone osteosarcoma. Case Report: A 55-year-old man who was a known case of scapular bone osteosarcoma, was referred to our clinic with ocular symptoms including acute painful decreased vision, proptosis, conjunctival injection, and chemosis. He had undergone surgical excision of the original tumor and received systemic chemotherapy 4 months before. Imaging studies and incisional biopsy were performed for the orbital lesion, the histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of metastatic osteosarcoma. The patient was referred to the oncologist for palliative chemotherapy and further intervention; however, he deceased 2 months later due to sepsis in the context of immunosuppression. Conclusion: Metastatic involvement of the orbit due to osteosarcoma is a rare condition manifesting with orbital mass, pain, diplopia and ocular motility disturbance. Although there is no effective treatment, the combination of modalities such as chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and surgery may delay progression of the disease.

  12. GLONASS orbit/clock combination in VNIIFTRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezmenov, I.; Pasynok, S.

    2015-08-01

    An algorithm and a program for GLONASS satellites orbit/clock combination based on daily precise orbits submitted by several Analytic Centers were developed. Some theoretical estimates for combine orbit positions RMS were derived. It was shown that under condition that RMS of satellite orbits provided by the Analytic Centers during a long time interval are commensurable the RMS of combine orbit positions is no greater than RMS of other satellite positions estimated by any of the Analytic Centers.

  13. Precise GPS orbits for geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Oscar L.

    1994-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) has become, in recent years, the main space-based system for surveying and navigation in many military, commercial, cadastral, mapping, and scientific applications. Better receivers, interferometric techniques (DGPS), and advances in post-processing methods have made possible to position fixed or moving receivers with sub-decimeter accuracies in a global reference frame. Improved methods for obtaining the orbits of the GPS satellites have played a major role in these achievements; this paper gives a personal view of the main developments in GPS orbit determination.

  14. Orbital resonances around black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brink, Jeandrew; Geyer, Marisa; Hinderer, Tanja

    2015-02-27

    We compute the length and time scales associated with resonant orbits around Kerr black holes for all orbital and spin parameters. Resonance-induced effects are potentially observable when the Event Horizon Telescope resolves the inner structure of Sgr A*, when space-based gravitational wave detectors record phase shifts in the waveform during the resonant passage of a compact object spiraling into the black hole, or in the frequencies of quasiperiodic oscillations for accreting black holes. The onset of geodesic chaos for non-Kerr spacetimes should occur at the resonance locations quantified here.

  15. Orbital effects in actinide systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lander, G.H.

    1983-01-01

    Actinide magnetism presents a number of important challenges; in particular, the proximity of 5f band to the Fermi energy gives rise to strong interaction with both d and s like conduction electrons, and the extended nature of the 5f electrons means that they can interact with electron orbitals from neighboring atoms. Theory has recently addressed these problems. Often neglected, however, is the overwhelming evidence for large orbital contributions to the magnetic properties of actinides. Some experimental evidence for these effects are presented briefly in this paper. They point, clearly incorrectly, to a very localized picture for the 5f electrons. This dichotomy only enhances the nature of the challenge

  16. AA, closed orbit observation pickup

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    Electrostatic pickups around the circumference of the AA served for the measurement of the closed orbits across the wide momentum range of +- 3% to either side of central orbit. The pickups were of the "shoebox" type, with diagonal cuts, a horizontal and a vertical one mechanically coupled together. They were located where they would not require extra space. The small ones, like the one we see here, were inserted into the vacuum chamber of the BLG (long and narrow) bending magnets. See also 8001372, 8010042, 8010045

  17. AA, closed orbit observation pickup

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    Electrostatic pickups around the circumference of the AA served for the measurement of the closed orbits across the wide momentum range of +- 3% to either side of central orbit. The pickups were of the "shoebox" type, with diagonal cuts, a horizontal and a vertical one mechanically coupled together. They were located where they would not require extra space. The wide ones (very wide indeed: 70 cm), like the one we see here, were placed inside the vacuum chamber of the wide quadrupoles QFW, at maximum dispersion. See also 8001372, 8001383, 8010045

  18. AA, closed orbit observation pickup

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    Electrostatic pickups around the circumference of the AA served for the measurement of the closed orbits across the wide momentum range of +- 3% to either side of central orbit. The pickups were of the "shoebox" type, with diagonal cuts, a horizontal and a vertical one mechanically coupled together. They were located where they would not require extra space. The wide ones (very wide indeed: 70 cm), like the one we see here, were placed inside the vacuum chamber of the wide quadrupoles, QFW, at maximum dispersion. See also 8001372,8001383, 8010042

  19. AA, closed orbit observation pickup

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    Electrostatic pickups around the circumference of the AA served for the measurement of the closed orbits across the wide momentum range of +- 3% to either side of central orbit. The pickups were of the "shoebox" type, with diagonal cuts, a horizontal and a vertical one mechanically coupled together. They were located where they would not require extra space. The small ones, like the one we see here, were inserted into the vacuum chamber of the BLG (long and narrow) bending magnets. Werner Sax contemplates his achievement. See also 8001383, 8010042, 8010045.

  20. Energy and the Elliptical Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, Bill

    2009-03-01

    In the January 2007 issue of The Physics Teacher, Prentis, Fulton, Hesse, and Mazzino describe a laboratory exercise in which students use a geometrical analysis inspired by Newton to show that an elliptical orbit and an inverse-square law force go hand in hand. The historical, geometrical, and teamwork aspects of the exercise are useful and important. This paper presents an exercise which uses an energy/angular momentum conservation model for elliptical orbits. This exercise can be done easily by an individual student and on regular notebook-sized paper.

  1. Size Dependence of Dust Distribution around the Earth Orbit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, Takahiro; Takeuchi, Taku [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo, 152-8551 (Japan); Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Ishihara, Daisuke; Kondo, Toru; Kaneda, Hidehiro, E-mail: t.ueda@geo.titech.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi, 464-8602 (Japan)

    2017-05-01

    In the solar system, interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) originating mainly from asteroid collisions and cometary activities drift to Earth orbit due to Poynting–Robertson drag. We analyzed the thermal emission from IDPs that was observed by the first Japanese infrared astronomical satellite, AKARI . The observed surface brightness in the trailing direction of the Earth orbit is 3.7% greater than that in the leading direction in the 9 μ m band and 3.0% in the 18 μ m band. In order to reveal dust properties causing leading–trailing surface brightness asymmetry, we numerically integrated orbits of the Sun, the Earth, and a dust particle as a restricted three-body problem including radiation from the Sun. The initial orbits of particles are determined according to the orbits of main-belt asteroids or Jupiter-family comets. Orbital trapping in mean motion resonances results in a significant leading–trailing asymmetry so that intermediate sized dust (∼10–100 μ m) produces a greater asymmetry than zodiacal light. The leading–trailing surface brightness difference integrated over the size distribution of the asteroidal dust is obtained to be 27.7% and 25.3% in the 9 μ m and 18 μ m bands, respectively. In contrast, the brightness difference for cometary dust is calculated as 3.6% and 3.1% in the 9 μ m and 18 μ m bands, respectively, if the maximum dust radius is set to be s {sub max} = 3000 μ m. Taking into account these values and their errors, we conclude that the contribution of asteroidal dust to the zodiacal infrared emission is less than ∼10%, while cometary dust of the order of 1 mm mainly accounts for the zodiacal light in infrared.

  2. Size Dependence of Dust Distribution around the Earth Orbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Takahiro; Takeuchi, Taku; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Ishihara, Daisuke; Kondo, Toru; Kaneda, Hidehiro

    2017-01-01

    In the solar system, interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) originating mainly from asteroid collisions and cometary activities drift to Earth orbit due to Poynting–Robertson drag. We analyzed the thermal emission from IDPs that was observed by the first Japanese infrared astronomical satellite, AKARI . The observed surface brightness in the trailing direction of the Earth orbit is 3.7% greater than that in the leading direction in the 9 μ m band and 3.0% in the 18 μ m band. In order to reveal dust properties causing leading–trailing surface brightness asymmetry, we numerically integrated orbits of the Sun, the Earth, and a dust particle as a restricted three-body problem including radiation from the Sun. The initial orbits of particles are determined according to the orbits of main-belt asteroids or Jupiter-family comets. Orbital trapping in mean motion resonances results in a significant leading–trailing asymmetry so that intermediate sized dust (∼10–100 μ m) produces a greater asymmetry than zodiacal light. The leading–trailing surface brightness difference integrated over the size distribution of the asteroidal dust is obtained to be 27.7% and 25.3% in the 9 μ m and 18 μ m bands, respectively. In contrast, the brightness difference for cometary dust is calculated as 3.6% and 3.1% in the 9 μ m and 18 μ m bands, respectively, if the maximum dust radius is set to be s max  = 3000 μ m. Taking into account these values and their errors, we conclude that the contribution of asteroidal dust to the zodiacal infrared emission is less than ∼10%, while cometary dust of the order of 1 mm mainly accounts for the zodiacal light in infrared.

  3. Postenucleation orbits in retinoblastoma: treatment with 125I brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stannard, Clare; Sealy, Ross; Hering, Egbert; Hough, Jan; Knowles, Ruth; Lecuona, Karin; Reddi, V. Bala

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Children with retinoblastoma that extends into or through the choroid, sclera, or optic nerve are at risk of developing orbital disease, as well as metastases. Previously, these enucleated orbits were treated with external beam radiotherapy in addition to chemotherapy. 125 I brachytherapy for tumors in and around the eye was pioneered by Sealy in Cape Town, South Africa, in 1974. In 1983, he developed a technique to irradiate the contents of the orbit while limiting the dose to the bony orbit and eyelids. Methods and Materials: Six nylon tubes containing 125 I seeds were implanted through the eyelids around the periphery of the orbit. Each contained a metal gutter that screens the outer part of the seeds from the bony orbit. A seventh unscreened tube was placed in the center, and a metal disc with 125 I seeds on its posterior surface was secured beneath the eyelids. Between 1983 and 2000, 57 orbits were treated in 56 children with retinoblastoma. Thirty-six were treated prophylactically and 21, with tumor at the resection line of the nerve, extrascleral tumor, or metastases, were treated therapeutically. They received a median dose of 34 Gy in 70 h; 30 also received chemotherapy. Children with tumor at the resection line of the nerve also received treatment to the craniospinal axis. Results: The median follow-up of the 35 patients treated prophylactically was 35 months (range 0-187). Seven patients died, 6 of metastases, at a median of 10 months (range 4-29) after the implant. Eight of the 13 patients with microscopic extraocular tumor survived a median of 29 months (range 5-156). None of the 8 patients presenting with orbital tumor or metastases survived. No orbital recurrences developed in any of the patients. Cosmesis was considerably improved compared with previous forms of irradiation. Conclusion: Orbital brachytherapy is an effective method of irradiating the orbit to prevent recurrent tumor, the treatment time is short, and the cosmesis is much more

  4. Optical communication beyond orbital angular momentum

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Trichili, A

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available :27674 | DOI: 10.1038/srep27674 www.nature.com/scientificreports Optical communication beyond orbital angular momentum Abderrahmen Trichili1, Carmelo Rosales-Guzmán2, Angela Dudley2,3, Bienvenu Ndagano2, Amine Ben Salem1, Mourad Zghal1,4 & Andrew Forbes2 Mode....rosalesguzman@wits.ac.za) received: 29 March 2016 Accepted: 24 May 2016 Published: 10 June 2016 OPEN www.nature.com/scientificreports/ 2Scientific RepoRts | 6:27674 | DOI: 10.1038/srep27674 Results Consider a LG mode in cylindrical coordinates, at its waist plane (z = 0), described...

  5. Numerical Algorithms for Precise and Efficient Orbit Propagation and Positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Ben K.

    orbit propagation, yielding savings in computation time and memory. Orbit propagation and position transformation simulations are analyzed to generate a complete set of recommendations for performing the ITRS/GCRS transformation for a wide range of needs, encompassing real-time on-board satellite operations and precise post-processing applications. In addition, a complete derivation of the ITRS/GCRS frame transformation time-derivative is detailed for use in velocity transformations between the GCRS and ITRS and is applied to orbit propagation in the rotating ITRS. EOP interpolation methods and ocean tide corrections are shown to impact the ITRS/GCRS transformation accuracy at the level of 5 cm and 20 cm on the surface of the Earth and at the Global Positioning System (GPS) altitude, respectively. The precession-nutation and EOP simplifications yield maximum propagation errors of approximately 2 cm and 1 m after 15 minutes and 6 hours in low-Earth orbit (LEO), respectively, while reducing computation time and memory usage. Finally, for orbit propagation in the ITRS, a simplified scheme is demonstrated that yields propagation errors under 5 cm after 15 minutes in LEO. This approach is beneficial for orbit determination based on GPS measurements. We conclude with a summary of recommendations on EOP usage and bias-precession-nutation implementations for achieving a wide range of transformation and propagation accuracies at several altitudes. This comprehensive set of recommendations allows satellite operators, astrodynamicists, and scientists to make informed decisions when choosing the best implementation for their application, balancing accuracy and computational complexity.

  6. Molecular orbital calculations for the formation of GaN layers on ultra-thin AlN/6H-SiC surface using alternating pulsative supply of gaseous trimethyl gallium (TMG) and NH3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seong, See Yearl; Hwang, Jin Soo

    2001-01-01

    The steps for the generation of very thin GaN films on ultrathin AlN/6H-SiC surface by alternating a pulsative supply (APS) of trimethyl gallium and NH 3 gases have been examined by ASED-MO calculations. We postulate that the gallium clusters was formed with the evaporation of CH 4 gases via the decomposition of trimethyl gallium (TMG), dimethyl gallium (DMG), and monomethyl gallium (MMG). During the injection of NH 3 gas into the reactor, the atomic hydrogens were produced from the thermal decomposition of NH 3 molecule. These hydrogen gases activated the Ga-C bond cleavage. An energetically stable GaN nucleation site was formed via nitrogen incorporation into the layer of gallium cluster. The nitrogen atoms produced from the thermal degradation of NH 3 were expected to incorporate into the edge of the gallium cluster since the galliums bind weakly to each other (0.19 eV). The structure was stabilized by 2.08 eV, as an adsorbed N atom incorporated into a tetrahedral site of the Ga cluster. This suggests that the adhesion of the initial layer can be reinforced by the incorporation of nitrogen atom through the formation of large grain boundary GaN crystals at the early stage of GaN film growth

  7. Molecular orbital calculations for the formation of GaN layers on ultra-thin AlN/6H-SiC surface using alternating pulsative supply of gaseous trimethyl gallium (TMG) and NH sub 3

    CERN Document Server

    Seong, S Y

    2001-01-01

    The steps for the generation of very thin GaN films on ultrathin AlN/6H-SiC surface by alternating a pulsative supply (APS) of trimethyl gallium and NH sub 3 gases have been examined by ASED-MO calculations. We postulate that the gallium clusters was formed with the evaporation of CH sub 4 gases via the decomposition of trimethyl gallium (TMG), dimethyl gallium (DMG), and monomethyl gallium (MMG). During the injection of NH sub 3 gas into the reactor, the atomic hydrogens were produced from the thermal decomposition of NH sub 3 molecule. These hydrogen gases activated the Ga-C bond cleavage. An energetically stable GaN nucleation site was formed via nitrogen incorporation into the layer of gallium cluster. The nitrogen atoms produced from the thermal degradation of NH sub 3 were expected to incorporate into the edge of the gallium cluster since the galliums bind weakly to each other (0.19 eV). The structure was stabilized by 2.08 eV, as an adsorbed N atom incorporated into a tetrahedral site of the Ga cluster...

  8. Orbital computed tomography: technical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, T.J.; Rosenbaum, A.E.; Miller, N.R.

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomographic scanning has revolutionized the diagnosis and management of orbital disease. The best use of this methodology requires knowledge of the principles and appropriate attention to scanning protocols. Computed tomographic scanning of the orbit is a demanding technique requiring thin sections through planes precisely positioned from the topographical anatomy. Ideally, orbital CT should include both transverse axial and coronal sections: The pathological condition and its plane of growth will influence the selection of the optimal plane or section. Coronal sections may be obtained either directly or indirectly by computer reconstruction from contiguous transverse images. Sagittal or oblique sections or both also are useful and may be obtained directly or indirectly. Difficulty in patient positioning may preclude direct sagittal imaging, however. The use of intravenous contrast enhancement is not necessary as a routine technique unless a mass is identified or suspected. Where surgical resection or biopsy of a space-occupying lesion is contemplated, contrast enhancement can be valuable in assessing relative vascularity and aiding diagnostic specificity. It should be continually emphasized that CT is a powerful technology which, in orbital diagnosis, produces the highest yield when clinician and radiologist collaborate in the radiodiagnostic workup. The clinical information supplied by the referring ophthalmologist is used by the radiologist both in the selection of the appropriate techniques for investigation and in striving to achieve the most specific conclusion

  9. Getting a Crew into Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddle, Bob

    2011-01-01

    Despite the temporary setback in our country's crewed space exploration program, there will continue to be missions requiring crews to orbit Earth and beyond. Under the NASA Authorization Act of 2010, NASA should have its own heavy launch rocket and crew vehicle developed by 2016. Private companies will continue to explore space, as well. At the…

  10. Closed orbit analysis for RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milutinovic, J.; Ruggiero, A.G.

    1989-01-01

    We examine the effects of four types of errors in the RHIC dipoles and quadrupoles on the on-momentum closed orbit in the machine. We use PATRIS both to handle statistically the effects of kick-modeled errors and to check the performance of the Fermilab correcting scheme in a framework of a more realistic modeling. On the basis of the accepted rms values of the lattice errors, we conclude that in about 40% of all studied cases the lattice must be to some extent pre-corrected in the framework of the so-called ''first turn around strategy,'' in order to get a closed orbit within the aperture limitations at all and, furthermore, for approximately 2/3 of the remaining cases we find that a single pass algorithm of the Fermilab scheme is not sufficient to bring closed orbit distortions down to acceptable levels. We have modified the scheme and have allowed repeated applications of the otherwise unchanged three bump method and in doing so we have been able to correct the orbit in a satisfactory manner. 4 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  11. DOT strategies versus orbiter strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    The Dutch Open Telescope is a high-resolution solar imager coming on-line at La Palma. The definition of the DOT science niche, strategies, and requirements resemble Solar Orbiter considerations and deliberations. I discuss the latter in the light of the former, and claim that multi-line observation

  12. CONGENITAI, ORBITAL, TERATOMIA IN A

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Unit, National Orthopaedic Hospital, Enugu, Nigeria. ABSTRAC"H". Congenital orbital teratomas are rare. This is a case report of an otherwise .... aspirate showed fairly cloudy, blood-tinged straw- coloured fluid with no malignant cells or organisms. Two histopathology reports of 3cm/ ...

  13. THREE PLANETS ORBITING WOLF 1061

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, D. J.; Wittenmyer, R. A.; Tinney, C. G.; Bentley, J. S.; Zhao, Jinglin, E-mail: duncan.wright@unsw.edu.au [Department of Astronomy and Australian Centre for Astrobiology, School of Physics, University of New South Wales, NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2016-02-01

    We use archival HARPS spectra to detect three planets orbiting the M3 dwarf Wolf 1061 (GJ 628). We detect a 1.36 M{sub ⊕} minimum-mass planet with an orbital period P = 4.888 days (Wolf 1061b), a 4.25 M{sub ⊕} minimum-mass planet with orbital period P = 17.867 days (Wolf 1061c), and a likely 5.21 M{sub ⊕} minimum-mass planet with orbital period P = 67.274 days (Wolf 1061d). All of the planets are of sufficiently low mass that they may be rocky in nature. The 17.867 day planet falls within the habitable zone for Wolf 1061 and the 67.274 day planet falls just outside the outer boundary of the habitable zone. There are no signs of activity observed in the bisector spans, cross-correlation FWHMs, calcium H and K indices, NaD indices, or Hα indices near the planetary periods. We use custom methods to generate a cross-correlation template tailored to the star. The resulting velocities do not suffer the strong annual variation observed in the HARPS DRS velocities. This differential technique should deliver better exploitation of the archival HARPS data for the detection of planets at extremely low amplitudes.

  14. Orbital meningioma, the Utrecht experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourits, Maarten Ph.; Berkelbach van der Sprenkel, Jan Willem

    2001-01-01

    AIMS. 1) To evaluate epidemiological data (age, gender, initial complaints, and ophthalmic findings) of a patient cohort with a primary or secondary orbital meningioma. 2) To evaluate the clinical course of these patients. 3) To evaluate the outcome of treatment. PATIENTS AND METHODS. All

  15. Nuclear propulsion for orbital transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beale, G.A.; Lawrence, T.J.

    1989-01-01

    The state of the art in nuclear propulsion for orbital transfer is discussed. Cryogenic propulsion, electric propulsion, solar-thermal propulsion and direct nuclear propulsion are examined in this context. New technologies with exceptional promise are addressed, emphasizing the particle test bed nuclear engine

  16. The spectroscopic orbit of Capella revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, M.; Strassmeier, K. G.

    2011-07-01

    Context. Capella is among the few binary stars with two evolved giant components. The hotter component is a chromospherically active star within the Hertzsprung gap, while the cooler star is possibly helium-core burning. Aims: The known inclination of the orbital plane from astrometry in combination with precise radial velocities will allow very accurate masses to be determined for the individual Capella stars. This will constrain their evolutionary stage and possibly the role of the active star's magnetic field on the dynamical evolution of the binary system. Methods: We obtained a total of 438 high-resolution échelle spectra during the years 2007-2010 and used the measured velocities to recompute the orbital elements. Our double-lined orbital solution yields average residuals of 64 m s-1 for the cool component and 297 m s-1 for the more rapidly rotating hotter component. Results: The semi-amplitude of the cool component is smaller by 0.045 km s-1 than the orbit determination of Torres et al. from data taken during 1996-1999 but more precise by a factor of 5.5, while for the hotter component it is larger by 0.580 km s-1 and more precise by a factor of 3.6. This corresponds to masses of 2.573 ± 0.009 M⊙ and 2.488 ± 0.008 M⊙ for the cool and hot component, respectively. Their relative errors of 0.34% and 0.30% are about half of the values given in Torres et al. for a combined literature-data solution but with absolute values different by 4% and 2% for the two components, respectively. The mass ratio of the system is therefore q = MA/MB = 0.9673 ± 0.0020. Conclusions: Our orbit is the most precise and also likely to be the most accurate ever obtained for Capella. Based on data obtained with the STELLA robotic telescope in Tenerife, an AIP facility jointly operated by AIP and IAC.Full Table 1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/531/A89

  17. OW ASCAT Ocean Surface Winds

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) sensor onboard the EUMETSAT MetOp polar-orbiting satellite provides ocean surface wind observations by means of radar...

  18. A 3D Visualization and Analysis Model of the Earth Orbit, Milankovitch Cycles and Insolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostadinov, Tihomir; Gilb, Roy

    2013-04-01

    Milankovitch theory postulates that periodic variability of Earth's orbital elements is a major climate forcing mechanism. Although controversies remain, ample geologic evidence supports the major role of the Milankovitch cycles in climate, e.g. glacial-interglacial cycles. There are three Milankovitch orbital parameters: orbital eccentricity (main periodicities of ~100,000 and ~400,000 years), precession (quantified as the longitude of perihelion, main periodicities 19,000-24,000 years) and obliquity of the ecliptic (Earth's axial tilt, main periodicity 41,000 years). The combination of these parameters controls the spatio-temporal patterns of incoming solar radiation (insolation) and the timing of the seasons with respect to perihelion, as well as season duration. The complex interplay of the Milankovitch orbital parameters on various time scales makes assessment and visualization of Earth's orbit and insolation variability challenging. It is difficult to appreciate the pivotal importance of Kepler's laws of planetary motion in controlling the effects of Milankovitch cycles on insolation patterns. These factors also make Earth-Sun geometry and Milankovitch theory difficult to teach effectively. Here, an astronomically precise and accurate Earth orbit visualization model is presented. The model offers 3D visualizations of Earth's orbital geometry, Milankovitch parameters and the ensuing insolation forcings. Both research and educational uses are envisioned for the model, which is developed in Matlab® as a user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI). We present the user with a choice between the Berger et al. (1978) and Laskar et al. (2004) astronomical solutions for eccentricity, obliquity and precession. A "demo" mode is also available, which allows the three Milankovitch parameters to be varied independently of each other (and over much larger ranges than the naturally occurring ones), so the user can isolate the effects of each parameter on orbital geometry

  19. Orbital roof encephalocele mimicking a destructive neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsuhaibani, Adel H; Hitchon, Patrick W; Smoker, Wendy R K; Lee, Andrew G; Nerad, Jeffrey A

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this case report is to report an orbital roof encephalocele mimicking a destructive orbital neoplasm. Orbital roof encephalocele is uncommon but can mimic neoplasm. One potential mechanism for the orbital roof destruction is a post-traumatic "growing orbital roof fracture." The growing fracture has been reported mostly in children but can occur in adults. Alternative potential etiologies for the encephalocele are discussed, including Gorham syndrome. Orbital roof encephalocele is uncommon in adults, and the findings can superficially resemble an orbital neoplasm. Radiographic and clinical features that might suggest the correct diagnosis include a prior history of trauma, overlying frontal lobe encephalomalacia without significant mass effect or edema, and an orbital roof defect. The "growing fracture" mechanism may be a potential explanation for the orbital roof destruction in some cases.

  20. Lageos orbit decay due to infrared radiation from earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubincam, David Parry

    1987-01-01

    Infrared radiation from the earth may be the principal reason for the decay of Lageos' orbit. The radiation heats up the laser retroreflectors embedded in Lageos' aluminum surface. This creates a north-south temperature gradient on the satellite. The gradient in turn causes a force to be exerted on Lageos because of recoil from photons leaving its surface. The delayed heating of the retroreflectors due to their thermal inertia gives the force a net along-track component which always acts like drag. A simple thermal model for the retroreflectors indicates that this thermal drag accounts for about half the observed average along-track acceleration of -3.3 x 10 to the -10th power m/sec squared. The contribution from the aluminum surface to this effect is negligible. The infrared effect cannot explain the large observed fluctuations in drag which occur mainly when the orbit intersects the earth's shadow.

  1. Research on the Effectiveness of Different Estimation Algorithm on the Autonomous Orbit Determination of Lagrangian Navigation Constellation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youtao Gao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The accuracy of autonomous orbit determination of Lagrangian navigation constellation will affect the navigation accuracy for the deep space probes. Because of the special dynamical characteristics of Lagrangian navigation satellite, the error caused by different estimation algorithm will cause totally different autonomous orbit determination accuracy. We apply the extended Kalman filter and the fading–memory filter to determinate the orbits of Lagrangian navigation satellites. The autonomous orbit determination errors are compared. The accuracy of autonomous orbit determination using fading-memory filter can improve 50% compared to the autonomous orbit determination accuracy using extended Kalman filter. We proposed an integrated Kalman fading filter to smooth the process of autonomous orbit determination and improve the accuracy of autonomous orbit determination. The square root extended Kalman filter is introduced to deal with the case of inaccurate initial error variance matrix. The simulations proved that the estimation method can affect the accuracy of autonomous orbit determination greatly.

  2. The globe and orbit in Laron syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornreich, L; Konen, O; Lilos, P; Laron, Z

    2011-09-01

    Patients with LS have an inborn growth hormone resistance, resulting in failure to generate IGF-1. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the size of the eye and orbit in LS. We retrospectively reviewed the MR imaging of the brain in 9 patients with LS for the following parameters: axial diameter of the globe, interzygomatic distance, perpendicular distance from the interzygomatic line to margins of the globe, medial-to-lateral diameter of the orbit at the anterior orbital rim, distance from the anterior orbital rim to the anterior globe, maximal distance between the medial walls of the orbits, lateral orbital wall angle, lateral orbital wall length, and mediolateral thickness of the intraorbital fat in the most cranial image of the orbit. All measurements were made bilaterally. Twenty patients referred for MR imaging for unrelated reasons served as control subjects. Compared with the control group, the patients with LS had a significantly smaller maximal globe diameter and shallower but wider orbits due to a shorter lateral wall, a smaller medial distance between the orbits, and a larger angle of the orbit. The ratio between the most anterior orbital diameter and the globe was greater than that in controls. The position of the globe was more anterior in relation to the interzygomatic line. Shallow and wide orbits and small globes relative to orbital size are seen in LS and may be secondary to IGF-1 deficiency.

  3. Orbital melanocytoma: When a tumor becomes a relieving surprise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haytham E. Nasr

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Melanocytomas are rare pigmented tumors that arise form melanocytes and have been reported in the central nervous system. Orbital melanocytomas “also known as blue nevus” are rarely reported. The occurrence of choroidal melanoma and orbital melanocytomas has never been described. Observations: This is a case of orbital melanocytoma in a 34 year old female who presented with left proptosis and ecchymosis. She has the right eye enucleated to treat a large choroidal melanoma, 6 years earlier. Orbital metastasis was suspected. After orbital imaging and systemic evaluation, incisional biopsy was planned yet the mass could be totally excised and it turned out to be melanocytoma. The condition was not associated with nevus of Ota and the patient is not known to have any predisposing condition for melanocytic lesions. Conclusion and importance: Melanocytoma and malignant melanoma share the same cell of origin. The benign course, the well differentiated cells, absence of anaplasia and the positive reaction to Human Melanoma Black-45 (HMB-45 and S-100 proteins established the diagnosis of the former. Such diagnosis was a relief for this one eyed patient.(HMB-45:human melanoma black-45. Keywords: Orbit, Melanocytoma, Choroidal melanoma, HMB-45, S-100

  4. The Rotational Barrier in Ethane: A Molecular Orbital Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo J. Mena-Rejón

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The energy change on each Occupied Molecular Orbital as a function of rotation about the C-C bond in ethane was studied using the B3LYP, mPWB95 functional and MP2 methods with different basis sets. Also, the effect of the ZPE on rotational barrier was analyzed. We have found that σ and π energies contribution stabilize a staggered conformation. The σs molecular orbital stabilizes the staggered conformation while the  stabilizes the eclipsed conformation and destabilize the staggered conformation. The πz and  molecular orbitals stabilize both the eclipsed and staggered conformations, which are destabilized by the πv and  molecular orbitals. The results show that the method of calculation has the effect of changing the behavior of the energy change in each Occupied Molecular Orbital energy as a function of the angle of rotation about the C–C bond in ethane. Finally, we found that if the molecular orbital energy contribution is deleted from the rotational energy, an inversion in conformational preference occurs.

  5. Manipulation and application of orbital ordering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng Zhigao; Sun Yuping

    2014-01-01

    Under certain conditions, the orbits of the outmost shell electrons in strong correlated materials can be localized in order, which gives birth to so-called orbital ordering. During the construction or destruction of the orbital ordering, strongly correlated materials show fruitful quantum critical phenomena with great potential for future applications. We first present the mechanism for the construction of orbital ordering. Then, some physical properties associated with orbits are discussed. Finally, we emphasize the key points and progress in the research of orbital ordering controlling. (authors)

  6. Science Planning and Orbit Classification for Solar Probe Plus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusterer, M. B.; Fox, N. J.; Rodgers, D. J.; Turner, F. S.

    2016-12-01

    There are a number of challenges for the Science Planning Team (SPT) of the Solar Probe Plus (SPP) Mission. Since SPP is using a decoupled payload operations approach, tight coordination between the mission operations and payload teams will be required. The payload teams must manage the volume of data that they write to the spacecraft solid-state recorders (SSR) for their individual instruments for downlink to the ground. Making this process more difficult, the geometry of the celestial bodies and the spacecraft during some of the SPP mission orbits cause limited uplink and downlink opportunities. The payload teams will also be required to coordinate power on opportunities, command uplink opportunities, and data transfers from instrument memory to the spacecraft SSR with the operation team. The SPT also intend to coordinate observations with other spacecraft and ground based systems. To solve these challenges, detailed orbit activity planning is required in advance for each orbit. An orbit planning process is being created to facilitate the coordination of spacecraft and payload activities for each orbit. An interactive Science Planning Tool is being designed to integrate the payload data volume and priority allocations, spacecraft ephemeris, attitude, downlink and uplink schedules, spacecraft and payload activities, and other spacecraft ephemeris. It will be used during science planning to select the instrument data priorities and data volumes that satisfy the orbit data volume constraints and power on, command uplink and data transfer time periods. To aid in the initial stages of science planning we have created an orbit classification scheme based on downlink availability and significant science events. Different types of challenges arise in the management of science data driven by orbital geometry and operational constraints, and this scheme attempts to identify the patterns that emerge.

  7. Role of bumpy fields on single particle orbit in near quasihelically symmetric stellarators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seol, JaeChun; Hegna, C.C.

    2004-01-01

    The role of symmetry breaking on single particle orbits in near helically symmetric stellarators is investigated. In particular, the effect of a symmetry-breaking bumpy term is included in the analysis of trapped particle orbits. It is found that all trapped particle drift orbits are determined by surfaces on which vertical bar B vertical bar min is constant. Trapped particle orbits reside on these surfaces regardless of pitch angle and are determined solely by the initial position and the shape of the vertical bar B vertical bar min contour. Since vertical bar B vertical bar min contours do not depend on the direction of the banana center motion, superbanana orbits do not appear

  8. Options for Staging Orbits in Cis-Lunar Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Roland; Whitley, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    NASA has been studying options to conduct missions beyond Low Earth Orbit, but within the Earth-Moon system, in preparation for deep space exploration including human missions to Mars. Referred to as the Proving Ground, this arena of exploration activities will enable the development of human spaceflight systems and operations to satisfy future exploration objectives beyond the cis-lunar environment. One option being considered includes the deployment of a habitable element or elements, which could be used as a central location for aggregation of supplies and resources for human missions in cis-lunar space and beyond. Characterizing candidate orbit locations for this asset and the impacts on system design and mission operations is important in the overall assessment of the options being considered. The orbits described in this paper were initially selected by taking advantage of previous studies conducted by NASA and the work of other authors. In this paper orbits are assessed for their relative attractiveness based on various factors. A set of constraints related to the capability of the combined Orion and SLS system to deliver humans and cargo to and from the orbit are evaluated. Deployed assets intended to spend multiple years in the Proving Ground would ideally require minimal station keeping costs to reduce the mass budget allocated to this function. Additional mission design drivers include eclipse frequency, potential for uninterrupted communication with deployed assets, thermal, attitude control, communications, and other operational implications. Also the ability to support potential lunar surface activities and excursion missions beyond Earth-Moon space is considered. The results of the characterization and evaluation of the selected orbits indicate a Near Rectilinear Orbit (NRO) is an attractive candidate as an aggregation point or staging location for operations. In this paper, the NRO is further described in terms which balance a number of key

  9. Comparison of Ultra-Rapid Orbit Prediction Strategies for GPS, GLONASS, Galileo and BeiDou

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Geng

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Currently, ultra-rapid orbits play an important role in the high-speed development of global navigation satellite system (GNSS real-time applications. This contribution focuses on the impact of the fitting arc length of observed orbits and solar radiation pressure (SRP on the orbit prediction performance for GPS, GLONASS, Galileo and BeiDou. One full year’s precise ephemerides during 2015 were used as fitted observed orbits and then as references to be compared with predicted orbits, together with known earth rotation parameters. The full nine-parameter Empirical Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE Orbit Model (ECOM and its reduced version were chosen in our study. The arc lengths of observed fitted orbits that showed the smallest weighted root mean squares (WRMSs and medians of the orbit differences after a Helmert transformation fell between 40 and 45 h for GPS and GLONASS and between 42 and 48 h for Galileo, while the WRMS values and medians become flat after a 42 h arc length for BeiDou. The stability of the Helmert transformation and SRP parameters also confirmed the similar optimal arc lengths. The range around 42–45 h is suggested to be the optimal arc length interval of the fitted observed orbits for the multi-GNSS joint solution of ultra-rapid orbits.

  10. Simulation of Micron-Sized Debris Populations in Low Earth Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y.-L.; Matney, M.; Liou, J.-C.; Hyde, J. L.; Prior, T. G.

    2010-01-01

    The update of ORDEM2000, the NASA Orbital Debris Engineering Model, to its new version . ORDEM2010, is nearly complete. As a part of the ORDEM upgrade, this paper addresses the simulation of micro-debris (greater than 10 micron and smaller than 1 mm in size) populations in low Earth orbit. The principal data used in the modeling of the micron-sized debris populations are in-situ hypervelocity impact records, accumulated in post-flight damage surveys on the space-exposed surfaces of returned spacecrafts. The development of the micro-debris model populations follows the general approach to deriving other ORDEM2010-required input populations for various components and types of debris. This paper describes the key elements and major steps in the statistical inference of the ORDEM2010 micro-debris populations. A crucial step is the construction of a degradation/ejecta source model to provide prior information on the micron-sized objects (such as orbital and object-size distributions). Another critical step is to link model populations with data, which is rather involved. It demands detailed information on area-time/directionality for all the space-exposed elements of a shuttle orbiter and damage laws, which relate impact damage with the physical properties of a projectile and impact conditions such as impact angle and velocity. Also needed are model-predicted debris fluxes as a function of object size and impact velocity from all possible directions. In spite of the very limited quantity of the available shuttle impact data, the population-derivation process is satisfactorily stable. Final modeling results obtained from shuttle window and radiator impact data are reasonably convergent and consistent, especially for the debris populations with object-size thresholds at 10 and 100 micron.

  11. Lunar Topography: Results from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Gregory; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Mazarico, Erwan

    2012-01-01

    The Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) onboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) has been operating nearly continuously since July 2009, accumulating over 6 billion measurements from more than 2 billion in-orbit laser shots. LRO's near-polar orbit results in very high data density in the immediate vicinity of the lunar poles, with full coverage at the equator from more than 12000 orbital tracks averaging less than 1 km in spacing at the equator. LRO has obtained a global geodetic model of the lunar topography with 50-meter horizontal and 1-m radial accuracy in a lunar center-of-mass coordinate system, with profiles of topography at 20-m horizontal resolution, and 0.1-m vertical precision. LOLA also provides measurements of reflectivity and surface roughness down to its 5-m laser spot size. With these data LOLA has measured the shape of all lunar craters 20 km and larger. In the proposed extended mission commencing late in 2012, LOLA will concentrate observations in the Southern Hemisphere, improving the density of the polar coverage to nearly 10-m pixel resolution and accuracy to better than 20 m total position error. Uses for these data include mission planning and targeting, illumination studies, geodetic control of images, as well as lunar geology and geophysics. Further improvements in geodetic accuracy are anticipated from the use of re ned gravity fields after the successful completion of the Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission in 2012.

  12. Simplified technique for orbital prosthesis fabrication: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerareddy, Chandrika; Nair, K Chandrasekharan; Reddy, G Ramaswamy

    2012-10-01

    Loss of orbital content can cause functional impairment, disfigurement of the face, and psychological distress. Rehabilitation of an orbital defect is a complex task, and if reconstruction by plastic surgery is not possible or not desired by the patient, the defect can be rehabilitated by an orbital prosthesis. The prosthetic rehabilitation in such cases depends on the precisely retained, user-friendly removable maxillofacial prosthesis. Many times, making an impression of the orbital area with an accurate record of surface details can be a difficult procedure. The critical areas are making a facial moulage, mold preparation, and attaching the retention device, particularly when eyeglass frames are used. This case focuses on these hindrance factors. A simple basket was used for the impression tray to obtain the facial moulage. A putty mold was used, and attachment of the prosthesis to a retention device was accomplished with positional distance. This method proves to be an economical and simple way of making an orbital prosthesis. © 2012 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  13. Managment of orbital complications of sinusitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazil Emre Ozkurt

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We reported on the clinical approaches of ophthalmology and otorhinolaryngology departments in the treatment of the orbital complications of sinusitis. We also included an in-depth literature review. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical files of 51 patients from January 2008 to January 2014. The records were evaluated for age, gender, type of orbital complications, symptoms, predisposing factors, imaging studies, medical and surgical management, culture results, and follow-up information. SPSS version 15.0 software (Statistical Analysis, The Statistical Package for Social Sciences Inc, Chicago, IL was used for the statistical analysis. Results: Fifty-one patients met the criteria, with available medical records, for the study (29 male, 22 female. Thirty-two (62.7% were diagnosed with preseptal cellulitis and 19 (37.3% with postseptal cellulitis. After a detailed evaluation, 15 were diagnosed with a subperiosteal abscess (SPA, and 4 were diagnosed with orbital cellulitis. The age and gender was similar for the two groups. Five patients with medial SPA were treated with endoscopic sinus surgery, one patient with inferior SPA was treated with external surgery, and six patients with other localizations were treated with a combination of endoscopic sinus surgery and external surgery. All patients presented with periorbital erythema and edema. The length of hospitalization and duration of symptoms were similar in both groups. Visual acuity was between 1/10 to 10/10 (mean 7/10 and statistically significant for preseptal and postseptal cellulitis groups (p<0.001. All patients received intravenous antibiotics upon the first day of admission. Conclusion: Orbital complications of acute sinusitis required intensive follow-up and a multidisciplinary approach. A contrast-enhanced paranasal sinus computerized tomography (CT scan can detect the extent of the infection. An initial trial of intravenosus (IV antibiotics may be appropriate when

  14. Advantages of Using Microwave Satellite Soil Moisture over Gridded Precipitation Products and Land Surface Model Output in Assessing Regional Vegetation Water Availability and Growth Dynamics for a Lateral Inflow Receiving Landscape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, T.; McVicar, T.R.; Wang, G.J.; Chen, X.; de Jeu, R.A.M.; Liu, Y.; Shen, H.; Zhang, F.; Dolman, A.J.

    2016-01-01

    To improve the understanding of water-vegetation relationships, direct comparative studies assessing the utility of satellite remotely sensed soil moisture, gridded precipitation products, and land surface model output are needed. A case study was investigated for a water-limited, lateral inflow

  15. Uncertainty Requirement Analysis for the Orbit, Attitude, and Burn Performance of the 1st Lunar Orbit Insertion Maneuver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Joo Song

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the uncertainty requirements for orbit, attitude, and burn performance were estimated and analyzed for the execution of the 1st lunar orbit insertion (LOI maneuver of the Korea Pathfinder Lunar Orbiter (KPLO mission. During the early design phase of the system, associate analysis is an essential design factor as the 1st LOI maneuver is the largest burn that utilizes the onboard propulsion system; the success of the lunar capture is directly affected by the performance achieved. For the analysis, the spacecraft is assumed to have already approached the periselene with a hyperbolic arrival trajectory around the moon. In addition, diverse arrival conditions and mission constraints were considered, such as varying periselene approach velocity, altitude, and orbital period of the capture orbit after execution of the 1st LOI maneuver. The current analysis assumed an impulsive LOI maneuver, and two-body equations of motion were adapted to simplify the problem for a preliminary analysis. Monte Carlo simulations were performed for the statistical analysis to analyze diverse uncertainties that might arise at the moment when the maneuver is executed. As a result, three major requirements were analyzed and estimated for the early design phase. First, the minimum requirements were estimated for the burn performance to be captured around the moon. Second, the requirements for orbit, attitude, and maneuver burn performances were simultaneously estimated and analyzed to maintain the 1st elliptical orbit achieved around the moon within the specified orbital period. Finally, the dispersion requirements on the B-plane aiming at target points to meet the target insertion goal were analyzed and can be utilized as reference target guidelines for a mid-course correction (MCC maneuver during the transfer. More detailed system requirements for the KPLO mission, particularly for the spacecraft bus itself and for the flight dynamics subsystem at the ground

  16. Extrasolar Giant Planet in Earth-like Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-07-01

    the Earth's motion can be excluded. A second complication arises from the fact that for Earth-bound telescopes, the visibility of a particular star changes in the course of the year. This creates `windows of opportunity', i.e. certain times when a given star can best be observed. That leads to a tendency to observe and re-observe the star when the planet is in the same part of its orbit. The full variation in radial velocity will therefore only be revealed after a sufficiently long time span has elapsed, covering several revolutions of the planet around the central star. More planets in the iota Hor system? The comparatively high scatter of the data points from the best fitting radial velocity curve presents an additional puzzle. While the accuracy of these measurements was determined as ± 17 m/sec (for other, similar stars, with and without known planets, an even higher precision of ± 14 m/sec was found with the same instrument), the scatter of the measurements around the mean velocity curve is higher, about ± 27 m/sec. This indicates that the discovered planet cannot be the whole story. There are two possible explanations for this additional variability. Either there is a second planet with another period in the same system, or activity on the surface of the star causes slight changes in its spectrum, influencing the velocity measurements. There are in fact indications that iota Hor is more active than the Sun, hence making the second explanation quite plausible. If so, it appears that the new planet is orbiting around a relatively young star, since such stars are typically more active than older ones like the Sun. Follow-up observations One of the next steps during the investigation of iota Hor will therefore be to get clues to its age. In any case, it is important to learn more about the properties of planetary orbits around young stars, in order to improve the theory of star and planet formation. After an upgrade to a spectral resolution more than twice as

  17. Neutron stars with orbiting light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukacs, B.

    1987-11-01

    There is a wide-spread belief in the literature of relativistic astrophysics concerning nonsingular final states of the stellar evolution: the external gravitational field of a physically nonsingular central symmetric body (e.g. a neutron star) is asymptotically empty and simple, i.e. there are no closed or trapped light-like causal geodesics. Present paper shows that this belief is false: some examples are presented for nonsingular bodies with various equations of state, around which there are closed light-like trajectories: 'orbiting light'. The reality of the used equations of state is discussed in detail. Present state of particle physics does not establish the existence of matter with such equations of state, but the hypothetical subquark level of matter may have such equation of state, thus 'subquark-stars' may exist with orbiting light around them. So the criterion of 'nonsingularity' must be further analyzed and accurately defined. (D.Gy.) 24 refs.; 5 figs

  18. Orbit monitoring in the SLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez-Chopitea, L.; Emma, P.; Van Olst, D.

    1991-05-01

    Beam orbits in the SLC are monitored in real time and the data is stored for future trend and correlation analysis. A background process acquires Beam Position Monitor (BPM) and Toroid data on a periodic basis and saves the general quantities such as orbit RMS and beam intensity in addition to the individual readings. Some of this data is archived by the SLC History Buffer facility and the rest is saved in files for later analysis. This has permitted the tracing of interaction point instabilities to specific devices as far away as the damping rings. In addition, the data is displayed for the operators both in summary and in full form. The different displays can be configured from the control consoles. 2 refs., 5 figs

  19. [Orbital decompression in Grave's ophtalmopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longueville, E

    2010-01-01

    Graves disease orbitopathy is a complex progressive inflammatory disease. Medical treatment remains in all cases the proposed treatment of choice. Surgical treatment by bone decompression can be considered as an emergency mainly in cases of optic neuropathy or ocular hypertension not being controlled medically or in post-traumatic exophthalmos stage. Emergency bone decompression eliminates compression or stretching of the optic nerve allowing visual recovery. The uncontrolled ocular hypertension will benefit from decompression. The normalization of intraocular pressure may be obtained by this surgery or if needed by the use of postoperative antiglaucoma drops or even filtration surgery. In all operated cases, the IOP was normalized with an average decrease of 7.71 mmHg and a cessation of eye drops in 3/7 cases. Regarding sequelae, our therapeutic strategy involves consecutively surgery of the orbit, extraocular muscles and eyelids. The orbital expansion gives excellent results on the cosmetic level and facilitates the implementation of subsequent actions.

  20. Robustness analysis method for orbit control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingrui; Yang, Keying; Qi, Rui; Zhao, Shuge; Li, Yanyan

    2017-08-01

    Satellite orbits require periodical maintenance due to the presence of perturbations. However, random errors caused by inaccurate orbit determination and thrust implementation may lead to failure of the orbit control strategy. Therefore, it is necessary to analyze the robustness of the orbit control methods. Feasible strategies which are tolerant to errors of a certain magnitude can be developed to perform reliable orbit control for the satellite. In this paper, first, the orbital dynamic model is formulated by Gauss' form of the planetary equation using the mean orbit elements; the atmospheric drag and the Earth's non-spherical perturbations are taken into consideration in this model. Second, an impulsive control strategy employing the differential correction algorithm is developed to maintain the satellite trajectory parameters in given ranges. Finally, the robustness of the impulsive control method is analyzed through Monte Carlo simulations while taking orbit determination error and thrust error into account.

  1. Management of ocular, orbital, and adnexal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spoor, T.C.; Nesi, F.A.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 20 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The Ruptured Globe: Primary Care; Corneal Trauma, Endophthalmitis; Antibiotic Usage; Radiology of Orbital Trauma; Maxillofacial Fractures; Orbital Infections; and Basic Management of Soft Tissue Injury

  2. Dynamique des orbites fortement elliptiques

    OpenAIRE

    Lion , Guillaume

    2013-01-01

    Most of the orbits of artificial satellites around the Earth have relatively low eccentricities. The calculation of their trajectories is very well under control, either by means of numerical methods when it comes to focus on accuracy and comparing observations, or either through analytical or semi-analytical theories to optimize the speed of calculations. This second category is used, in particular, for computing many long-term trajectories that could help to ensure the security and safety o...

  3. Superbanana orbits in stellarator geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derr, J.A.; Shohet, J.L.

    1979-04-01

    The presence of superbanana orbit types localized to either the interior or the exterior of stellarators and torsatrons is numerically investigated for 3.5 MeV alpha particles. The absence of the interior superbanana in both geometries is found to be due to non-conservation of the action. Exterior superbananas are found in the stellarator only, as a consequence of the existence of closed helical magnetic wells. No superbananas of either type are found in the torsatron

  4. Orbital Volumetry in Graves' Orbitopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Bakri, Moug; Rasmussen, Åse Krogh; Thomsen, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    were retrospectively analyzed. Thirteen patients imaged for unilateral orbital fractures served as controls. Results. The retrobulbar muscle volume was 2.1 ± 0.5 cm(3) (mean ± SD) in controls, 4.3 ± 1.5 cm(3) in GO without DON, and 4.7 ± 1.7 cm(3) in GO with DON. The retrobulbar fat volume was 5.4 ± 1...

  5. Shells, orbit bifurcations, and symmetry restorations in Fermi systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magner, A. G., E-mail: magner@kinr.kiev.ua; Koliesnik, M. V. [NASU, Institute for Nuclear Research (Ukraine); Arita, K. [Nagoya Institute of Technology, Department of Physics (Japan)

    2016-11-15

    The periodic-orbit theory based on the improved stationary-phase method within the phase-space path integral approach is presented for the semiclassical description of the nuclear shell structure, concerning themain topics of the fruitful activity ofV.G. Soloviev. We apply this theory to study bifurcations and symmetry breaking phenomena in a radial power-law potential which is close to the realistic Woods–Saxon one up to about the Fermi energy. Using the realistic parametrization of nuclear shapes we explain the origin of the double-humped fission barrier and the asymmetry in the fission isomer shapes by the bifurcations of periodic orbits. The semiclassical origin of the oblate–prolate shape asymmetry and tetrahedral shapes is also suggested within the improved periodic-orbit approach. The enhancement of shell structures at some surface diffuseness and deformation parameters of such shapes are explained by existence of the simple local bifurcations and new non-local bridge-orbit bifurcations in integrable and partially integrable Fermi-systems. We obtained good agreement between the semiclassical and quantum shell-structure components of the level density and energy for several surface diffuseness and deformation parameters of the potentials, including their symmetry breaking and bifurcation values.

  6. Earth to Orbit Beamed Energy Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Les; Montgomery, Edward E.

    2017-01-01

    As a means of primary propulsion, beamed energy propulsion offers the benefit of offloading much of the propulsion system mass from the vehicle, increasing its potential performance and freeing it from the constraints of the rocket equation. For interstellar missions, beamed energy propulsion is arguably the most viable in the near- to mid-term. A near-term demonstration showing the feasibility of beamed energy propulsion is necessary and, fortunately, feasible using existing technologies. Key enabling technologies are large area, low mass spacecraft and efficient and safe high power laser systems capable of long distance propagation. NASA is currently developing the spacecraft technology through the Near Earth Asteroid Scout solar sail mission and has signed agreements with the Planetary Society to study the feasibility of precursor laser propulsion experiments using their LightSail-2 solar sail spacecraft. The capabilities of Space Situational Awareness assets and the advanced analytical tools available for fine resolution orbit determination now make it possible to investigate the practicalities of an Earth-to-orbit Beamed Energy eXperiment (EBEX) - a demonstration at delivered power levels that only illuminate a spacecraft without causing damage to it. The degree to which this can be expected to produce a measurable change in the orbit of a low ballistic coefficient spacecraft is investigated. Key system characteristics and estimated performance are derived for a near term mission opportunity involving the LightSail-2 spacecraft and laser power levels modest in comparison to those proposed previously. While the technology demonstrated by such an experiment is not sufficient to enable an interstellar precursor mission, if approved, then it would be the next step toward that goal.

  7. An Ontological Architecture for Orbital Debris Data

    OpenAIRE

    Rovetto, Robert J.

    2017-01-01

    The orbital debris problem presents an opportunity for inter-agency and international cooperation toward the mutually beneficial goals of debris prevention, mitigation, remediation, and improved space situational awareness (SSA). Achieving these goals requires sharing orbital debris and other SSA data. Toward this, I present an ontological architecture for the orbital debris domain, taking steps in the creation of an orbital debris ontology (ODO). The purpose of this ontological system is to ...

  8. Algorithms for orbit control on SPEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbett, J.; Keeley, D.; Hettel, R.; Linscott, I.; Sebek, J.

    1994-06-01

    A global orbit feedback system has been installed on SPEAR to help stabilize the position of the photon beams. The orbit control algorithms depend on either harmonic reconstruction of the orbit or eigenvector decomposition. The orbit motion is corrected by dipole corrector kicks determined from the inverse corrector-to-bpm response matrix. This paper outlines features of these control algorithms as applied to SPEAR

  9. A rare case of Enterococcus faecalis-induced orbital cellulitis and myositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyush Kohli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Orbital cellulitis is an infection of soft tissue behind the orbital septum. Common pathogens isolated include Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Streptococcus pneumoniae. It is a straightforward diagnosis and usually responds to empirical treatment without any sequela. We report a case of orbital cellulitis caused by Enterococcus faecalis, which was complicated by myositis of levator palpebrae superioris. To the best of our knowledge, only one case report exists dating way back to 1986.

  10. Traumatic orbital encephalocele: Presentation and imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Leslie A; Kennedy, Tabassum A; Paul, Sean; Wells, Timothy S; Griepentrog, Greg J; Lucarelli, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic orbital encephalocele is a rare but severe complication of orbital roof fractures. We describe 3 cases of orbital encephalocele due to trauma in children. Retrospective case series from the University of Wisconsin - Madison and Medical College of Wisconsin. Three cases of traumatic orbital encephalocele in pediatric patients were found. The mechanism of injury was motor vehicle accident in 2 patients and accidental self-inflicted gunshot wound in 1 patient. All 3 patients sustained orbital roof fractures (4 mm to 19 mm in width) and frontal lobe contusions with high intracranial pressure. A key finding in all 3 cases was progression of proptosis and globe displacement 4 to 11 days after initial injury. On initial CT, all were diagnosed with extraconal hemorrhage adjacent to the roof fractures, with subsequent enlargement of the mass and eventual diagnosis of encephalocele. Orbital encephalocele is a severe and sight-threatening complication of orbital roof fractures. Post-traumatic orbital encephalocele can be challenging to diagnose on CT as patients with this condition often have associated orbital and intracranial hematoma, which can be difficult to distinguish from herniated brain tissue. When there is a high index of suspicion for encephalocele, an MRI of the orbits and brain with contrast should be obtained for additional characterization. Imaging signs that should raise suspicion for traumatic orbital encephalocele include an enlarging heterogeneous orbital mass in conjunction with a roof fracture and/or widening fracture segments.

  11. [1012.5676] The Exoplanet Orbit Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    : The Exoplanet Orbit Database Authors: Jason T Wright, Onsi Fakhouri, Geoffrey W. Marcy, Eunkyu Han present a database of well determined orbital parameters of exoplanets. This database comprises parameters, and the method used for the planets discovery. This Exoplanet Orbit Database includes all planets

  12. MALT LYMPHOMA OF PALATE AND ORBIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VIVIANA ANDREA CIFUENTES NAVAS

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available TITLE: Malt palate and orbit lymphoma  Authors: CIFUENTES NAVAS-Viviana Andrea; MARTÍN PASCUAL- María Consolación; FERNÁNDEZ RODRÍGUEZ- Ana; ALONSO MESONERO- Marta; CHAVIANO GRAHJERA-Juan; MORAIS PÉREZ-Darío. INTRODUCTIONMALT-type lymphomas are lymphoid proliferations originated in the glandular epithelium of organs like the stomach, the salivary and lacrimal glands, and even, we can find lymphoid neoformations of non-epithelial localization, like in the orbital soft tissue. The lymphomas of the mucosal-associated lymphatic tissue (MALT represent only 0.2-0.3% and constitute a well-defined group of non-Hodgkin lymphomas of B origin. In the field of oral pathology, the salivary glands, tonsils and palate are mainly affected, it is more rare to find it in jugal mucosa.We present a rare case of MALT lymphoma with involvement of the palate and orbit. MATERIAL AND METHODS84-year-old patient with multiple pathologies. Derived from his primary care physician due to pharyngeal complaints of 4 to 5 days of evolution, associated with a painful palate lesion.He presented in right hemipaladar a tumoration of elastic consistency in submucosa, ulcerated in the center, with normal neck. Also left orbital tumor that limits the visual field. RESULTSCT and MRI of the neck report mass of 4x4 x2.5 cm in right hemipaladar, noninfiltrating concordant with possible lymphoma. The orbital MRI describes an intra and extra nasal left nasal lesion of 2.3x1.2x2 cm with characteristics consistent with lymphoma. CT of the neck: It demostrates a great mass of right hemipaladar, with lobulated contours and homogeneous enhancement of 40x32x25 mm, in intimate contact with medial pterygoid muscle, although there were no signs of infiltration, the rest of the edges being well delimited. Images characteristics look like a lymphoma, without being able to rule out other etiologies. MRI of the neck: It demostrates a diffuse thickening of right side of the soft palate that

  13. Parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma (including the orbit): results of orbital irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jereb, B.; Haik, B.G.; Ong, R.; Ghavimi, F.

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-three patients with parameningeal (including orbital rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS)) were treated at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) between July 1971 and January 1983. Twenty were children with a mean age of 6 and 3 were adults. In 6 patients, the primary tumor was from the orbit, whereas the remaining 17 had other parameningeal primary sites. The tumors were in a very progressive local stage, with extensive destruction of the facial bones in 19 patients. Eight patients were treated with T2 chemotherapy protocol and 15 received T6. Seven patients received 5,000 to 7,200 rad delivered to the primary tumor in 11-16 weeks, 15 patients received between 4,500 to 5,000 rad in 4-7 weeks, and 1 patient received 3,000 rad in 3 weeks for residual microscopic disease following surgery. Two patients were treated with radiation to the whole brain; no patients received radiation of the whole central nervous axis (CNA). Fifteen of the 23 patients (65%) are alive and well with a medical follow-up time of 5 years. Two patients died of therapeutic complications and six died of tumor spread. In five patients, involvement of the central nervous system (CNS) was the cause of death. The prognosis of orbital RMS with parameningeal involvement is no better than in other tumors of parameningeal sites. In those patients who had impaired vision because of optic nerve damage prior to treatment, the vision did not improve following treatment. There was no impaired vision seen due to radiation damage of eye structures except in the lens

  14. Managment of orbital complications of sinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkurt, Fazil Emre; Ozkurt, Zeynep Gursel; Gul, Aylin; Akdag, Mehmet; Sengul, Engin; Yilmaz, Beyhan; Yuksel, Harun; Meric, Faruk

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: We reported on the clinical approaches of ophthalmology and otorhinolaryngology departments in the treatment of the orbital complications of sinusitis. We also included an in-depth literature review. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical files of 51 patients from January 2008 to January 2014. The records were evaluated for age, gender, type of orbital complications, symptoms, predisposing factors, imaging studies, medical and surgical management, culture results, and follow-up information. SPSS version 15.0 software (Statistical Analysis, The Statistical Package for Social Sciences Inc, Chicago, IL) was used for the statistical analysis. Results: Fifty-one patients met the criteria, with available medical records, for the study (29 male, 22 female). Thirty-two (62.7%) were diagnosed with preseptal cellulitis and 19 (37.3%) with postseptal cellulitis. After a detailed evaluation, 15 were diagnosed with a subperiosteal abscess (SPA), and 4 were diagnosed with orbital cellulitis. The age and gender was similar for the two groups. Five patients with medial SPA were treated with endoscopic sinus surgery, one patient with inferior SPA was treated with external surgery, and six patients with other localizations were treated with a combination of endoscopic sinus surgery and external surgery. All patients presented with periorbital erythema and edema. The length of hospitalization and duration of symptoms were similar in both groups. Visual acuity was between 1/10 to 10/10 (mean 7/10) and statistically significant for preseptal and postseptal cellulitis groups (p<0.001). All patients received intravenous antibiotics upon the first day of admission. Conclusion: Orbital complications of acute sinusitis required intensive follow-up and a multidisciplinary approach. A contrast-enhanced paranasal sinus computerized tomography (CT) scan can detect the extent of the infection. An initial trial of intravenosus (IV) antibiotics may be appropriate when close

  15. Acute traumatic orbital encephalocele: A case report with review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Jaiswal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Orbital roof fractures after a blunt injury are an uncommon complication of trauma. Traumatic encephaloceles in the orbital cavity are even rarer, with only 15 cases published till date. Raised intraorbital pressure leading to irreversible damage to the optic nerve can be prevented by early diagnosis and management. Orbital computed tomography (CT with thin axial and coronal sections is helpful in trauma patients with a concurrent orbital trauma. Decompression of the orbital roof is the key step in surgical treatment and should be performed in every case. Repairing the orbital roof has to be performed to avoid transmission of variation in the intracranial pressure to the orbit. We present a case of traumatic orbital encephalocele who underwent surgical treatment via a frontobasal approach with evacuation of the contused herniated brain and reconstruction of the orbital roof using temporalis fascia which is readily available in contrast to costly materials like titanium mesh, screws, bone powder, fibrin glue, and so on, which are not easily available in every hospital. Rapid resolution of proptosis and visual symptoms along with excellent cosmetic outcome was seen at follow-ups after three and nine months. We emphasize the early diagnosis of this rare condition and also emergency treatment to prevent permanent visual loss as well as to achieve good cosmetic results.

  16. Similarity in Bilateral Isolated Internal Orbital Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hung-Chang; Cox, Jacob T; Sanyal, Abanti; Mahoney, Nicholas R

    2018-04-13

    In evaluating patients sustaining bilateral isolated internal orbital fractures, the authors have observed both similar fracture locations and also similar expansion of orbital volumes. In this study, we aim to investigate if there is a propensity for the 2 orbits to fracture in symmetrically similar patterns when sustaining similar trauma. A retrospective chart review was performed studying all cases at our institution of bilateral isolated internal orbital fractures involving the medial wall and/or the floor at the time of presentation. The similarity of the bilateral fracture locations was evaluated using the Fisher's exact test. The bilateral expanded orbital volumes were analyzed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test to assess for orbital volume similarity. Twenty-four patients with bilateral internal orbital fractures were analyzed for fracture location similarity. Seventeen patients (70.8%) had 100% concordance in the orbital subregion fractured, and the association between the right and the left orbital fracture subregion locations was statistically significant (P < 0.0001). Fifteen patients were analyzed for orbital volume similarity. The average orbital cavity volume was 31.2 ± 3.8 cm on the right and 32.0 ± 3.7 cm on the left. There was a statistically significant difference between right and left orbital cavity volumes (P = 0.0026). The data from this study suggest that an individual who suffers isolated bilateral internal orbital fractures has a statistically significant similarity in the location of their orbital fractures. However, there does not appear to be statistically significant similarity in the expansion of the orbital volumes in these patients.

  17. Fuel Optimization for Low Earth Orbit Maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Jae Park

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The resolution of Earth images taken from a satellite has close relation with satellite's altitude. If a satellite has lower altitude, it gets a picture having better resolution. However the satellite will be exposed to heavier air drag and will spend more fuel to maintain its altitude for a desired mission. Therefore, in this study, the required fuel to maintain very low earth orbit(LEO with severe air drag is analyzed using optimization method such as collocation method. The required fuel to maintain the low altitude has significantly increased as the mission altitude is lowered and the solar activity is maximized. This study also shows that the fuel reduced by increasing the period of the satellite maneuver is very small, and that slightly increasing the satellite's mission altitude is much effective in reducing the amount of fuel to maintain its altitude. The calculated fuel to maintain very low earth orbit in this study would give useful information in planning the budget of fuel and cost for LEO satellites.

  18. Earth Orbiting Support Systems for commercial low Earth orbit data relay: Assessing architectures through tradespace exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, Gianluca; Golkar, Alessandro; Gaudenzi, Paolo

    2015-06-01

    As small satellites and Sun Synchronous Earth Observation systems are assuming an increased role in nowadays space activities, including commercial investments, it is of interest to assess how infrastructures could be developed to support the development of such systems and other spacecraft that could benefit from having a data relay service in Low Earth Orbit (LEO), as opposed to traditional Geostationary relays. This paper presents a tradespace exploration study of the architecture of such LEO commercial satellite data relay systems, here defined as Earth Orbiting Support Systems (EOSS). The paper proposes a methodology to formulate architectural decisions for EOSS constellations, and enumerate the corresponding tradespace of feasible architectures. Evaluation metrics are proposed to measure benefits and costs of architectures; lastly, a multicriteria Pareto criterion is used to downselect optimal architectures for subsequent analysis. The methodology is applied to two case studies for a set of 30 and 100 customer-spacecraft respectively, representing potential markets for LEO services in Exploration, Earth Observation, Science, and CubeSats. Pareto analysis shows how increased performance of the constellation is always achieved by an increased node size, as measured by the gain of the communications antenna mounted on EOSS spacecraft. On the other hand, nonlinear trends in optimal orbital altitude, number of satellites per plane, and number of orbital planes, are found in both cases. An upward trend in individual node memory capacity is found, although never exceeding 256 Gbits of onboard memory for both cases that have been considered, assuming the availability of a polar ground station for EOSS data downlink. System architects can use the proposed methodology to identify optimal EOSS constellations for a given service pricing strategy and customer target, thus identifying alternatives for selection by decision makers.

  19. Technical training - places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    If you would like more information on a course, or for any other inquiry/suggestions, please contact Technical.Training@cern.ch Valeria Perez Reale, Learning Specialist, Technical Programme Coordinator (Tel.: 62424) Eva Stern and Elise Romero, Technical Training Administration (Tel.: 74924) HR Department »Electronics design Next Session Duration Language Availability Comprehensive VHDL for FPGA Design 08-Oct-12 to 12-Oct-12 5 days English 3 places available Foundations of Electromagnetism and Magnet Design (EMAG) 14-Nov-12 to 27-Nov-12 6 days English 20 places available Impacts de la suppression du plomb (RoHS) en électronique 26-Oct-12 to 26-Oct-12 8 hours French 15 places available Introduction to VHDL 10-Oct-12 to 11-Oct-12 2 days English 7 places available LabVIEW Real Time and FPGA 13-Nov-12 to 16-Nov-12 5 days French 5 places available »Mechanical design Next Se...

  20. Orbital apex syndrome associated with herpes zoster ophthalmicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurimoto T

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Takuji Kurimoto1, Masahiro Tonari1, Norihiko Ishizaki1, Mitsuhiro Monta2, Saori Hirata2, Hidehiro Oku1, Jun Sugasawa1, Tsunehiko Ikeda11Department of Ophthalmology, Osaka Medical College, 2Department of Ophthalmology, Shitennoji Hospital, Osaka, JapanAbstract: We report our findings for a patient with orbital apex syndrome associated with herpes zoster ophthalmicus. Our patient was initially admitted to a neighborhood hospital because of nausea and loss of appetite of 10 days' duration. The day after hospitalization, she developed skin vesicles along the first division of the trigeminal nerve, with severe lid swelling and conjunctival injection. On suspicion of meningoencephalitis caused by varicella zoster virus, antiviral therapy with vidarabine and betamethasone was started. Seventeen days later, complete ptosis and ophthalmoplegia developed in the right eye. The light reflex in the right eye was absent and anisocoria was present, with the right pupil larger than the left. Fat-suppressed enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance images showed high intensity areas in the muscle cone, cavernous sinus, and orbital optic nerve sheath. Our patient was diagnosed with orbital apex syndrome, and because of skin vesicles in the first division of the trigeminal nerve, the orbital apex syndrome was considered to be caused by herpes zoster ophthalmicus. After the patient was transferred to our hospital, prednisolone 60 mg and vidarabine antiviral therapy was started, and fever and headaches disappeared five days later. The ophthalmoplegia and optic neuritis, but not the anisocoria, gradually resolved during tapering of oral therapy. From the clinical findings and course, the cause of the orbital apex syndrome was most likely invasion of the orbital apex and cavernous sinus by the herpes virus through the trigeminal nerve ganglia.Keywords: varicella zoster virus, orbital apex syndrome, herpes zoster ophthalmicus, complete ophthalmoplegia