WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface mount components

  1. Surface mount component jig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronberg, James W.

    1990-08-07

    A device for bending and trimming the pins of a dual-inline-package component and the like for surface mounting rather than through mounting to a circuit board comprises, in a first part, in pin cutter astride a holder having a recess for holding the component, a first spring therebetween, and, in a second part, two flat members pivotally interconnected by a hinge and urged to an upward peaked position from a downward peaked position by a second spring. As a downward force is applied to the pin cutter it urges the holder downward, assisted by the first spring and a pair of ridges riding on shoulders of the holder, to carry the component against the upward peaked flat members which guide the pins outwardly. As the holder continues downwardly, the flat members pivot to the downward peaked position bending the pins upwardly against the sides of the holder. When the downward movement is met with sufficient resistance, the ridges of the pin cutter ride over the holder's shoulders to continue downward to cut any excess length of pin.

  2. Assembling surface mounted components on ink-jet printed double sided paper circuit board

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Henrik A; Manuilskiy, Anatoliy; Haller, Stefan; Sidén, Johan; Nilsson, Hans-Erik; Hummelgård, Magnus; Olin, Håkan; Hummelgård, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Printed electronics is a rapidly developing field where many components can already be manufactured on flexible substrates by printing or by other high speed manufacturing methods. However, the functionality of even the most inexpensive microcontroller or other integrated circuit is, at the present time and for the foreseeable future, out of reach by means of fully printed components. Therefore, it is of interest to investigate hybrid printed electronics, where regular electrical components are mounted on flexible substrates to achieve high functionality at a low cost. Moreover, the use of paper as a substrate for printed electronics is of growing interest because it is an environmentally friendly and renewable material and is, additionally, the main material used for many packages in which electronics functionalities could be integrated. One of the challenges for such hybrid printed electronics is the mounting of the components and the interconnection between layers on flexible substrates with printed conductive tracks that should provide as low a resistance as possible while still being able to be used in a high speed manufacturing process. In this article, several conductive adhesives are evaluated as well as soldering for mounting surface mounted components on a paper circuit board with ink-jet printed tracks and, in addition, a double sided Arduino compatible circuit board is manufactured and programmed. (paper)

  3. Quantitative measurement of in-plane acoustic field components using surface-mounted fiber sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, Richard O.; Dhawan, Rajat R.; Gunther, Michael F.; Murphy, Kent A.

    1993-01-01

    Extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric sensors have been used to obtain calibrated, quantitative measurements of the in-plane displacement components associated with the propagation of ultrasonic elastic stress waves on the surfaces of solids. The frequency response of the sensor is determined by the internal spacing between the two reflecting fiber endface surfaces which form the Fabry-Perot cavity, a distance which is easily controlled during fabrication. With knowledge of the material properties of the solid, the out-of-plane displacement component of the wave may also be determined, giving full field data.

  4. Reliability Study of Solder Paste Alloy for the Improvement of Solder Joint at Surface Mount Fine-Pitch Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Nizam Ab. Rahman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The significant increase in metal costs has forced the electronics industry to provide new materials and methods to reduce costs, while maintaining customers’ high-quality expectations. This paper considers the problem of most electronic industries in reducing costly materials, by introducing a solder paste with alloy composition tin 98.3%, silver 0.3%, and copper 0.7%, used for the construction of the surface mount fine-pitch component on a Printing Wiring Board (PWB. The reliability of the solder joint between electronic components and PWB is evaluated through the dynamic characteristic test, thermal shock test, and Taguchi method after the printing process. After experimenting with the dynamic characteristic test and thermal shock test with 20 boards, the solder paste was still able to provide a high-quality solder joint. In particular, the Taguchi method is used to determine the optimal control parameters and noise factors of the Solder Printer (SP machine, that affects solder volume and solder height. The control parameters include table separation distance, squeegee speed, squeegee pressure, and table speed of the SP machine. The result shows that the most significant parameter for the solder volume is squeegee pressure (2.0 mm, and the solder height is the table speed of the SP machine (2.5 mm/s.

  5. Influence of sodium chloride and weak organic acids (flux residues) on electrochemical migration of tin on surface mount chip components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdingovas, Vadimas; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2013-01-01

    The electrolytic properties of sodium chloride and no-clean solder flux residue, and their effects on electrochemical migration and dendrite growth on surface mount chip capacitors were investigated. The leakage current dependency on concentration of contaminants was measured by a solution...

  6. Development and Evaluation of a Surface-Mount, High-G Accelerometer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peregino, Philip

    2004-01-01

    .... In the area of die level and surface mount components, the 7270A is relatively large. The sensing element is packaged inside a metal case with screw holes for mounting to a rigid surface. In addition...

  7. Robotized Surface Mounting of Permanent Magnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Hultman

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Using permanent magnets on a rotor can both simplify the design and increase the efficiency of electric machines compared to using electromagnets. A drawback, however, is the lack of existing automated assembly methods for large machines. This paper presents and motivates a method for robotized surface mounting of permanent magnets on electric machine rotors. The translator of the Uppsala University Wave Energy Converter generator is used as an example of a rotor. The robot cell layout, equipment design and assembly process are presented and validated through computer simulations and experiments with prototype equipment. A comparison with manual assembly indicates substantial cost savings and an improved work environment. By using the flexibility of industrial robots and a scalable equipment design, it is possible for this assembly method to be adjusted for other rotor geometries and sizes. Finally, there is a discussion on the work that remains to be done on improving and integrating the robot cell into a production line.

  8. Qualification of engine-mounted components due to operational vibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B.J.; Bayat, A.

    1994-01-01

    The Emergency Diesel Generator (EDG) in a Nuclear Power Plant is considered to be an essential component of the plant for its safe operation. Failures of auxiliary components directly mounted on the EDG creates costly repairs, and compromises the engine's availability and reliability. Although IEEE-323 and Section III of the ASME code require addressing of safety-related components due to mechanically induced vibration, very few guidelines exist in the nuclear industry to show how this may be accounted for. Most engine vendors rely on the empirical experience data as the basis of their evaluation for vibration. Upgrade of engine controls, addition of monitoring components and other engine modifications require design and installation of new mechanical and electrical components to be mounted directly on the engine. This necessitates the evaluation of such components for engine-induced vibration which is considered to be one of the most severe design parameters. This paper presents a methodology to evaluate three categories of components; structural, mechanical, and electrical under engine vibration. The discussion for the characteristics and manipulation of engine vibration profile to be used for each component evaluation is also given. In addition, the suitability of analytical verses testing approaches is discussed for each category. An example application of the methodology is presented for a typical EDG which is currently undergoing major controls upgrade and monitoring modification

  9. Surface-Mount Rotor Motion Sensing System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A surface-mounted instrumentation system for measuring rotor blade motions on rotorcraft, for use both in flight and in wind tunnel testing, is proposed for...

  10. A Surface-Mounted Rotor State Sensing System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A surface-mounted instrumentation system for measuring rotor blade motions on rotorcraft, for use both in flight and in wind tunnel testing, is proposed for...

  11. Quality investigation of surface mount technology using phase-shifting digital holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonsri, Chantira; Buranasiri, Prathan

    2016-09-01

    Applying of a phase-shifting digital holography combined with compressive sensing to inspect the soldering quality of surface mount technology (SMT) which is a method for producing electronic circuits. In SMT, the components are mounted and connected with each other directly onto the surface of printed circuit boards (PCBs). By reconstructing the multidimensional images from a few samples of SMT, the results are solved by an optimization problem. In this paper, two problems have been concerned. The first one is to examine the devices and the soldering quality of connections between them, which are in micro-scaled. The second is to observe the effect of heat treatment of soldering material and devices on the surface mount board.

  12. PECULIARITIES OF ASSIGNMENT OF ROLLING BEARING MOUNTING AND PARAMETERS OF GEOMETRIC ACCURACY OF MOUNTING SURFACES OF SHAFTS AND FRAMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamenko Yu. І.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The standards and methods concerning assignment of rolling bearing fit with shafts and frames via example of bearing 6-208 are analyzed. We set certain differences of recommendations according to GOST 3325-85, "Rolling bearings. Tolerance zones and technical requirements to mounting surfaces of shafts and frames. Attachment" and by reference of rolling bearing manufacturers. The following factors should be taken into consideration when assigning the mounting with the tension the internal ring of the bearing with shaft and mounting with a gap in the outer ring with a housing bore. The methods of achieving accuracy of mounting surfaces of shafts and frames via form tolerance assignment: roundness tolerance, profile of longitudinal cut, cross section, cylindricity and others. It is possible to limit the bearing rings in different ways, for example appointing the cylindrical mounting surfaces and bead end surfaces the appropriate tolerances, namely: coaxiality tolerance or full radial beat of mounting surfaces, and also perpendicularity tolerance, butt beats and full butt beats of mounting end surfaces. We suggest to expand methods of achieving the accuracy of shafts and frames depending on seriation of production and production operations metrology support.

  13. Models of printed boards for solderless mounting of electronic components by foil perforation method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yefimenko A. A.

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents models of printed circuit boards for an improved foil perforation method. The density of electrical connections of such printed circuit boards is estimated in comparison with circuit boards obtained using the methods of mounting in holes and surface mounting. The technological differences in the manufacture of printed circuit boards for the foil perforation method and the traditional method are considered.

  14. Body surface mounted biomedical monitoring system using Bluetooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambu, Masayuki

    2007-01-01

    Continuous monitoring in daily life is important for the health condition control of the elderly. However, portable or wearable devices need to carry by user on their own will. On the other hand, implantation sensors are not adoptable, because of generic users dislike to insert the any object in the body for monitoring. Therefore, another monitoring system of the health condition to carry it easily is necessary. In addition, ID system is necessary even if the subject live with few families. Furthermore, every measurement system should be wireless system, because not to obstruct the daily life of the user. In this paper, we propose the monitoring system, which is mounted on the body surface. This system will not obstruct the action or behavior of user in daily life, because this system attached the body surface on the back of the user. In addition, this system has wireless communication system, using Bluetooth, and acquired data transfer to the outside of the house via the Internet.

  15. Vortex shedding from two surface-mounted cubes in tandem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinuzzi, Robert J.; Havel, Brian

    2004-01-01

    Periodic vortex shedding from two surface-mounted cubes, of height H, in tandem arrangement placed in a thin boundary layer is investigated for a spacing 2H using phase-averaged Laser Doppler Velocimetry. Tests were conducted for a Reynolds number of 22,000, based on H and the freestream velocity, and an approximately 0.07H thick laminar boundary layer. For obstacle separations between 1.5H and 2.5H, the shedding frequency scales inversely with the obstacle spacing, S, such that the Strouhal number based on S is constant or geometrically locked. In this locked regime, periodic shedding is triggered by the interference between a vertical flow stream along the front face of the downstream obstacle and the vortex in the inter-obstacle cavity. This three-dimensional mechanism is not observed for two-dimensional geometries and helps explain why a locked regime cannot be observed for square cylinders in tandem arrangement. Furthermore, it is shown that the structure of the turbulent field in the cavity region differs significantly from that in the base region of a two-dimensional obstacle

  16. Structural response of near surface mounted CFRP strengthened reinforced concrete bridge deck overhang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    This report presents the results from an experimental investigation which explores the change in structural response due to the addition of near-surface-mounted (NSM) carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) reinforcement for increasing the capacity of...

  17. Test-Anchored Vibration Response Predictions for an Acoustically Energized Curved Orthogrid Panel with Mounted Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frady, Gregory P.; Duvall, Lowery D.; Fulcher, Clay W. G.; Laverde, Bruce T.; Hunt, Ronald A.

    2011-01-01

    rich body of vibroacoustic test data was recently generated at Marshall Space Flight Center for component-loaded curved orthogrid panels typical of launch vehicle skin structures. The test data were used to anchor computational predictions of a variety of spatially distributed responses including acceleration, strain and component interface force. Transfer functions relating the responses to the input pressure field were generated from finite element based modal solutions and test-derived damping estimates. A diffuse acoustic field model was applied to correlate the measured input sound pressures across the energized panel. This application quantifies the ability to quickly and accurately predict a variety of responses to acoustically energized skin panels with mounted components. Favorable comparisons between the measured and predicted responses were established. The validated models were used to examine vibration response sensitivities to relevant modeling parameters such as pressure patch density, mesh density, weight of the mounted component and model form. Convergence metrics include spectral densities and cumulative root-mean squared (RMS) functions for acceleration, velocity, displacement, strain and interface force. Minimum frequencies for response convergence were established as well as recommendations for modeling techniques, particularly in the early stages of a component design when accurate structural vibration requirements are needed relatively quickly. The results were compared with long-established guidelines for modeling accuracy of component-loaded panels. A theoretical basis for the Response/Pressure Transfer Function (RPTF) approach provides insight into trends observed in the response predictions and confirmed in the test data. The software developed for the RPTF method allows easy replacement of the diffuse acoustic field with other pressure fields such as a turbulent boundary layer (TBL) model suitable for vehicle ascent. Structural responses

  18. Wakes behind surface-mounted obstacles: Impact of aspect ratio, incident angle, and surface roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Nicolas; Chamorro, Leonardo P.

    2018-03-01

    The so-called wake-moment coefficient C˜h and lateral wake deflection of three-dimensional windbreaks are explored in the near and far wake. Wind-tunnel experiments were performed to study the functional dependence of C˜h with windbreak aspect ratio, incidence angle, and the ratio of the windbreak height and surface roughness (h /z0 ). Supported with the data, we also propose basic models for the wake deflection of the windbreak in the near and far fields. The near-wake model is based on momentum conservation considering the drag on the windbreak, whereas the far-wake counterpart is based on existing models for wakes behind surface-mounted obstacles. Results show that C˜h does not change with windbreak aspect ratios of 10 or greater; however, it may be lower for an aspect ratio of 5. C˜h is found to change roughly with the cosine of the incidence angle, and to depend strongly on h /z0 . The data broadly support the proposed wake-deflection models, though better predictions could be made with improved knowledge of the windbreak drag coefficient.

  19. Fundamentally excited flow past a surface-mounted rib. Part II ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    However, the selection of proper excitation parameters requires the complete understanding of turbulent transport quantities and their evolution in the reattaching shear layer. Hence, the detailed turbulent statistics and energy budget of the reattaching shear layer behind a surface-mounted rib is the focus of this paper.

  20. Multiple-Objective Particle Swarm Optimization for Multi-Head Beam-Type Surface Mounting Machines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torabi, S.A.; Hamedi, M.; Ashayeri, J.

    2010-01-01

    The growing demand for electronic devices has made the manufacturing of printed circuit boards (PCBs) a promising industry over the last decades. As the demand for printed circuit boards increases, the industry becomes more dependent on highly automated assembly processes using Surface Mounting

  1. The impact of accelerometer mounting methods on the level of vibrations recorded at ground surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Czech

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of field research based on the measurements of accelerations recorded at ground surface. The source of the vibration characterized by high repetition rate of pulse parameters was light falling weight deflectometer ZFG-01. Measurements of vibrations have been carried out using top quality high-precision measuring system produced by Brüel&Kiær. Accelerometers were mounted on a sandy soil surface at the measuring points located radially at 5-m and 10-m distances from the source of vibration. The paper analyses the impact that the method of mounting accelerometers on the ground has on the level of the recorded values of accelerations of vibrations. It has been shown that the method of attaching the sensor to the surface of the ground is crucial for the credibility of the performed measurements.[b]Keywords[/b]: geotechnics, surface vibrations, ground, vibration measurement

  2. Near Surface Mounted Composites for Flexural Strengthening of Reinforced Concrete Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Akter Hosen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Existing structural components require strengthening after a certain period of time due to increases in service loads, errors in design, mechanical damage, and the need to extend the service period. Externally-bonded reinforcement (EBR and near-surface mounted (NSM reinforcement are two preferred strengthening approach. This paper presents a NSM technique incorporating NSM composites, namely steel and carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP bars, as reinforcement. Experimental and analytical studies carried out to explore the performance of reinforced concrete (RC members strengthened with the NSM composites. Analytical models were developed in predicting the maximum crack spacing and width, concrete cover separation failure loads, and deflection. A four-point bending test was applied on beams strengthened with different types and ratios of NSM reinforcement. The failure characteristics, yield, and ultimate capacities, deflection, strain, and cracking behavior of the beams were evaluated based on the experimental output. The test results indicate an increase in the cracking load of 69% and an increase in the ultimate load of 92% compared with the control beam. The predicted result from the analytical model shows good agreement with the experimental result, which ensures the competent implementation of the present NSM-steel and CFRP technique.

  3. First observations of surface ozone concentration from the summit region of Mount Everest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semple, John L.; Moore, G. W. K.

    2008-10-01

    The extreme height of Mount Everest is such that its summit region may periodically be in the lower stratosphere. In this regard it provides a unique location for observing the exchange of ozone between the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. Here we report the first surface ozone measurements from the summit region of Mount Everest. Simultaneous measurements were recorded at different elevations on the north side from base camp (5676 m) to the summit (8848 m) during May 2005. The concentrations measured were as high as 70 ppb. Meteorological diagnostics suggest that the stratosphere as well as the long range transport of polluted tropospheric air masses from South East Asia are sources of the observed ozone. There is evidence that the source region for ozone in the vicinity of Mount Everest may vary with the onset of the summer monsoon.

  4. Parallel optical interconnect between surface-mounted devices on FR4 printed wiring board using embedded waveguides and passive optical alignments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karppinen, Mikko; Alajoki, Teemu; Tanskanen, Antti; Kataja, Kari; Mäkinen, Jukka-Tapani; Karioja, Pentti; Immonen, Marika; Kivilahti, Jorma

    2006-04-01

    Technologies to design and fabricate high-bit-rate chip-to-chip optical interconnects on printed wiring boards (PWB) are studied. The aim is to interconnect surface-mounted component packages or modules using board-embedded optical waveguides. In order to demonstrate the developed technologies, a parallel optical interconnect was integrated on a standard FR4-based PWB. It consists of 4-channel BGA-mounted transmitter and receiver modules as well as of four polymer multimode waveguides fabricated on top of the PWB using lithographic patterning. The transmitters and receivers built on low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) substrates include flip-chip mounted VCSEL or photodiode array and 4x10 Gb/s driver or receiver IC. Two microlens arrays and a surface-mounted micro-mirror enable optical coupling between the optoelectronic device and the waveguide array. The optical alignment is based on the marks and structures fabricated in both the LTCC and optical waveguide processes. The structures were optimized and studied by the use of optical tolerance analyses based on ray tracing. The characterized optical alignment tolerances are in the limits of the accuracy of the surface-mount technology.

  5. Surface modification of tribological components in transportation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenske, G.R.

    1992-11-01

    This paper reviews a number of programs funded through the Engineered Tribological Interfaces (ETI) Task area of the Tribology Program that utilize energetic beams of atoms to enhance the mechanical and microstructural properties of near-surface regions to improve the tribological performance of critical components. The processes used in these programs include techniques based on chemical vapor deposition, physical vapor deposition, and ion implantation. A common feature of these techniques is their ability to produce dense and adherent modified surfaces without need for subsequent grinding/polishing treatments. Another feature of these techniques is their ability to introduce a wide range of elements into near-surface regions.

  6. Analytical Calculation of Magnetic Field Distribution and Stator Iron Losses for Surface-Mounted Permanent Magnet Synchronous Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Tian

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Permanent-magnet synchronous machines (PMSMs are widely used in electric vehicles owing to many advantages, such as high power density, high efficiency, etc. Iron losses can account for a significant component of the total loss in permanent-magnet (PM machines. Consequently, these losses should be carefully considered during the PMSM design. In this paper, an analytical calculation method has been proposed to predict the magnetic field distribution and stator iron losses in the surface-mounted permanent magnet (SPM synchronous machines. The method introduces the notion of complex relative air-gap permeance to take into account the effect of slotting. The imaginary part of the relative air-gap permeance is neglected to simplify the calculation of the magnetic field distribution in the slotted air gap for the surface-mounted permanent-magnet (SPM machine. Based on the armature reaction magnetic field analysis, the stator iron losses can be estimated by the modified Steinmetz equation. The stator iron losses under load conditions are calculated according to the varying d-q-axis currents of different control methods. In order to verify the analysis method, finite element simulation results are compared with analytical calculations. The comparisons show good performance of the proposed analytical method.

  7. Surface topography characterization using an atomic force microscope mounted on a coordinate measuring machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo; Hansen, H.N; Kofod, N

    1999-01-01

    The paper describes the construction, testing and use of an integrated system for topographic characterization of fine surfaces on parts having relatively big dimensions. An atomic force microscope (AFM) was mounted on a manual three-coordinate measuring machine (CMM) achieving free positioning...... of the AFM probe in space. This means that the limited measuring range of the AFM (40 mu m x 40 mu m x 2.7 um) can be extended by positioning the AFM probe using the movements of the CMM axes (400 mm x 100 mm x 75 mm). Evaluation of the background noise by determining the Sa value of an optical fiat gave...

  8. Probing the switching state of a surface-mounted azobenzene derivative using femtosecond XUV photoemission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunau, Jan; Heinemann, Nils; Rohwer, Timm; Zargarani, Dordaneh; Kuhn, Sonja; Jung, Ullrich; Kipp, Lutz; Magnussen, Olaf; Herges, Rainer; Bauer, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Photoemission spectroscopy using femtosecond XUV light pulses is applied to probe the isomerization state of the molecular switch 3-(4-(4-hexyl-phenylazo)-phenoxy)-propane-1-thiol deposited by liquid phase self-assembly on Au(111). Spectral shifts of valence-electronic signatures that we associate with the carbon C2s orbital enable us to distinguish the trans and the cis isomerization state of the adsorbed molecules. These preliminary results envision the potential to probe reversible switching processes of surface-mounted molecules in real time by tracking the temporal evolution of the electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom in a femtosecond XUV photoemission experiment.

  9. Choice and optimization of ratio of components to develop fast-mounted thermostable heat-insulating constructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loginova, N. A.; Grigor'ev, S. V.; Lapin, E. E.; Pogorelov, S. I.; Ryzhenkov, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    Fast-mounted heat-insulating constructions based on foamed synthetic rubbers, polyethylene, and polyurethane are characterized by a thermostability up to 150°C and emit toxic substances when burnt. However, there is a need for heat insulation of surfaces with higher coolant temperatures, such as pipelines, equipment of nuclear and thermal power plants, and heating systems with remote heat sources. One of the most promising types of heat insulation materials for creation of fast-mounted heat insulation constructions is the syntactic foams or thin-film multilayer heat-insulating coatings (TFMHIC), which are created using hollow microspheres and various types of binders. The formation of TFMHIC on the heat-insulating surface is carried out mostly by means of spraying methods that have well proven themselves at coating on flat and cylindrical surfaces of large area, but they turned out ineffective for cylindrical surfaces with a diameter of 300 mm and less, since they are characterized by a large degree of carryover of composite material. This article analyzed the binders and microspheres promising to create the fast-mounted heat-insulating constructions based on TFMHIC with high thermostability. Based on the analysis, a conclusion is drawn that organicsilicon binding and glass microspheres are promising for use in the heat-insulating constructions with thermostability up to 300°C. The results of experimental research are given that point to the possibility of predicting the optimal composition of heat-insulating material characterized by a high degree of filling with microspheres with maintaining the mechanical strength, by means of performing the analysis of rheological characteristics of nonpolymerized liquid compositions of heat-insulation material. The index of tensile strength in bending was the criterion for evaluating the mechanical strength of heat-insulating material. The critical volume concentrations of filling the heat-insulating material with glass

  10. Vibration attenuation and shape control of surface mounted, embedded smart beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Rathi

    Full Text Available Active Vibration Control (AVC using smart structure is used to reduce the vibration of a system by automatic modification of the system structural response. AVC is widely used, because of its wide and broad frequency response range, low additional mass, high adaptability and good efficiency. A lot of research has been done on Finite Element (FE models for AVC based on Euler Bernoulli Beam Theory (EBT. In the present work Timoshenko Beam Theory (TBT is used to model a smart cantilever beam with surface mounted sensors / actuators. A Periodic Output Feedback (POF Controller has been designed and applied to control the first three modes of vibration of a flexible smart cantilever beam. The difficulties encountered in the usage of surface mounted piezoelectric patches in practical situations can be overcome by the use of embedded shear sensors / actuators. A mathematical model of a smart cantilever beam with embedded shear sensors and actuators is developed. A POF Controller has been designed and applied to control of vibration of a flexible smart cantilever beam and effect of actuator location on the performance of the controller is investigated. The mathematical modeling and control of a Multiple Input multiple Output (MIMO systems with two sensors and two actuators have also been considered.

  11. Fourier decomposition of segmented magnets with radial magnetization in surface-mounted PM machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiang, Tow Leong; Ishak, Dahaman; Lim, Chee Peng

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents a generic field model of radial magnetization (RM) pattern produced by multiple segmented magnets per rotor pole in surface-mounted permanent magnet (PM) machines. The magnetization vectors from either odd- or even-number of magnet blocks per pole are described. Fourier decomposition is first employed to derive the field model, and later integrated with the exact 2D analytical subdomain method to predict the magnetic field distributions and other motor global quantities. For the assessment purpose, a 12-slot/8-pole surface-mounted PM motor with two segmented magnets per pole is investigated by using the proposed field model. The electromagnetic performances of the PM machines are intensively predicted by the proposed magnet field model which include the magnetic field distributions, airgap flux density, phase back-EMF, cogging torque, and output torque during either open-circuit or on-load operating conditions. The analytical results are evaluated and compared with those obtained from both 2D and 3D finite element analyses (FEA) where an excellent agreement has been achieved.

  12. Standard Test Method for Measuring Heat Flux Using Surface-Mounted One-Dimensional Flat Gages

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This test method describes the measurement of the net heat flux normal to a surface using flat gages mounted onto the surface. Conduction heat flux is not the focus of this standard. Conduction applications related to insulation materials are covered by Test Method C 518 and Practices C 1041 and C 1046. The sensors covered by this test method all use a measurement of the temperature difference between two parallel planes normal to the surface to determine the heat that is exchanged to or from the surface in keeping with Fourier’s Law. The gages operate by the same principles for heat transfer in either direction. 1.2 This test method is quite broad in its field of application, size and construction. Different sensor types are described in detail in later sections as examples of the general method for measuring heat flux from the temperature gradient normal to a surface (1). Applications include both radiation and convection heat transfer. The gages have broad application from aerospace to biomedical en...

  13. Spatiotemporal characterization of land surface temperature in Mount Kilimanjaro using satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Eduardo Eiji; Hurskainen, Pekka

    2014-11-01

    Mount Kilimanjaro is considered the highest free-standing mountain in the world and a symbol of the African continent. Steep slopes and high altitudes are on the backdrop of unique biophysical characteristics, in which changes between savannas, tropical cloud forests, and subalpine vegetation can be observed in relatively small distances. In the context of this complex and heterogeneous landscape, describing the interactions between climatic variables and ecosystem functions is crucial for understanding the drivers of biodiversity. However, the characterization of climatic variables, especially surface temperature, still remains a critical bottleneck for a comprehensive understanding of habitats in Kilimanjaro. This study applies satellite-based estimates of land surface temperature (LST), from 2001 to 2011, to delineate a thorough characterization of the spatiotemporal patterns of surface temperature in Mount Kilimanjaro. The ample spatial coverage and continuous observations provided by the satellite measurements allowed the detailed description of characteristics so far poorly understood or not yet described in the literature. We demonstrate that the spatial patterns of LST in this region are rather complex, in the sense that it is characterized by non-linear behaviors and strong interactions with land cover and topography. Daytime observations (measured at 10:30 am) were shown to be strongly influenced by land cover characteristics, which is responsible for defining not only the spatial patterns (e.g., lapse rate) but also the seasonal signature of LST. At nighttime measurements (10:30 pm), the influence of land cover virtually disappears and the spatial patterns are mostly driven by altitude. Moreover, this study provides a brief assessment of LST trends observed within the analyzed period.

  14. Classification of surface types using SIR-C/X-SAR, Mount Everest area, Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, Thomas P.; Painter, Thomas H.; Roberts, Dar A.; Shi, Jiancheng; Dozier, Jeff; Fielding, Eric

    1998-11-01

    Imaging radar is a promising tool for mapping snow and ice cover in alpine regions. It combines a high-resolution, day or night, all-weather imaging capability with sensitivity to hydrologic and climatic snow and ice parameters. We use the spaceborne imaging radar-C/X-band synthetic aperture radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) to map snow and glacial ice on the rugged north slope of Mount Everest. From interferometrically derived digital elevation data, we compute the terrain calibration factor and cosine of the local illumination angle. We then process and terrain-correct radar data sets acquired on April 16, 1994. In addition to the spectral data, we include surface slope to improve discrimination among several surface types. These data sets are then used in a decision tree to generate an image classification. This method is successful in identifying and mapping scree/talus, dry snow, dry snow-covered glacier, wet snow-covered glacier, and rock-covered glacier, as corroborated by comparison with existing surface cover maps and other ancillary information. Application of the classification scheme to data acquired on October 7 of the same year yields accurate results for most surface types but underreports the extent of dry snow cover.

  15. The cooling of printed circuit board mounted components using copper ladder heat conduction to a cold wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, I. C.

    1982-09-01

    A series of experimental tests, designed to investigate the cooling of printed circuit board (PCB) mounted dual-in-line (DIL) components within an avionic box using the copper ladder/cold wall technique is described. Areas of investigation include avionic box orientation, side wall conduction, top plate finning, mixed air-wash, avionic power reduction, cooling air temperature reduction, cooling air mass flow rate reduction, cold wall heat pick-up and avionic box insulation. Results were obtained from thermocouple temperature measurements. The use of an aluminum alloy interplate to cool two adjacent PCBs is discussed. Results in graphic form are included together with a list of conclusions on the effects of all the major parameters considered.

  16. Thermocouple Errors when Mounted on Cylindrical Surfaces in Abnormal Thermal Environments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakos, James T. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Suo-Anttila, Jill M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Zepper, Ethan T. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Koenig, Jerry J [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Valdez, Vincent A. [ECI Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Mineral-insulated, metal-sheathed, Type-K thermocouples are used to measure the temperature of various items in high-temperature environments, often exceeding 1000degC (1273 K). The thermocouple wires (chromel and alumel) are protected from the harsh environments by an Inconel sheath and magnesium oxide (MgO) insulation. The sheath and insulation are required for reliable measurements. Due to the sheath and MgO insulation, the temperature registered by the thermocouple is not the temperature of the surface of interest. In some cases, the error incurred is large enough to be of concern because these data are used for model validation, and thus the uncertainties of the data need to be well documented. This report documents the error using 0.062" and 0.040" diameter Inconel sheathed, Type-K thermocouples mounted on cylindrical surfaces (inside of a shroud, outside and inside of a mock test unit). After an initial transient, the thermocouple bias errors typically range only about +-1-2% of the reading in K. After all of the uncertainty sources have been included, the total uncertainty to 95% confidence, for shroud or test unit TCs in abnormal thermal environments, is about +-2% of the reading in K, lower than the +-3% typically used for flat shrouds. Recommendations are provided in Section 6 to facilitate interpretation and use of the results. .

  17. Fractional-Slot Surface Mounted PM Motors with Concentrated Windings for HEV Traction Drives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, J.M.

    2005-10-24

    High-power density and efficiency resulting from elimination of rotor windings and reduced magnetic-flux losses have made the rare earth permanent magnet (PM) motor a leading candidate for the Department of Energy's Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (FCVTs) traction drive motor. These traction drives are generally powered by radial-gap motors, having the magnets on or embedded in a rotating cylinder separated from the inside surface of a slotted cylindrical stator by an annular gap. The two main types of radial-gap PM rotors are those with magnets mounted on the surface of a supporting back iron, called PM surface mounted (PMSM) motors, and those with magnets mounted in slots in the rotor, called interior PM (IPM) motors. Most early PM motor research was on the PMSM motor, which was thought to have an inherently low stator inductance. A low stator inductance can lead to currents dangerously exceeding rated current as the back-emf across the inductance increases with speed; consequently, part of the attempted solution has been to increase the stator inductance to reduce the rate of current rise. Although analysis suggested that there should be no problem designing sufficiently high stator inductance into PMSMs, attempts to do so were often not successful and a motor design was sought that would have a higher intrinsic inductance. Commercial research at Toyota has focused on IPM motors because they can achieve a high-saliency ratio, which helps them operate over a high constant power speed ratio (CPSR), but they are more difficult to fabricate. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) position has been to continue research on brushless direct current (dc) motors (BDCMs) because of ease of fabrication and increased power output. Recently there has been a revival of interest in a fractional-slot PMSMs [15] made with concentrated windings because they possess three important features. First, they can increase the motor's inductance

  18. Modifing the Surface Layers of Mechanical Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Slanec

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the creation of thin surface layers prepared by the Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition Method (PACVD. Polished sample surfaces made of tool steel were used. An investigation of the dependence of layer thickness on process duration was carried out. The structure of the original surface and the structure of the coated surface were evaluated and compared. The microhardness of the surface areas was also measured.

  19. Determination of High-Frequency d- and q-axis Inductances for Surface-Mounted Permanent-Magnet Synchronous Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Kaiyuan; Vetuschi, M.; Rasmussen, Peter Omand

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a reliable method for the experimental determination of high-frequency d- and q -axis inductances for surface-mounted permanent-magnet synchronous machines (SMPMSMs). Knowledge of the high-frequency d- and q-axis inductances plays an important role in the efficient design...

  20. MM99.50 - Surface Topography Characterization Using an Atomic Force Microscope Mounted on a Coordinate Measuring Machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiffre, Leonardo De; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Kofod, Niels

    1999-01-01

    The paper describes the construction, testing and use of an integrated system for topographic characterization of fine surfaces on parts having relatively big dimensions. An atomic force microscope (AFM) was mounted on a manual three-coordinate measuring machine (CMM) achieving free positioning...

  1. Fiber Reinforced Polymer Strengthening of Structures by Near-Surface Mounting Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh Parvin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a critical review of recent studies on strengthening of reinforced concrete and unreinforced masonry (URM structures by fiber reinforced polymers (FRP through near-surface mounting (NSM method. The use of NSM-FRP has been on the rise, mainly due to composite materials’ high strength and stiffness, non-corrosive nature and ease of installation. Experimental investigations presented in this review have confirmed the benefits associated with NSM-FRP for flexural and shear strengthening of RC and URM structures. The use of prestressing and anchorage systems to further improve NSM-FRP strain utilization and changes in failure modes has also been presented. Bond behavior of NSM-FRP-concrete or masonry interface, which is a key factor in increasing the load capacity of RC and URM structures has been briefly explored. Presented studies related to the effect of temperature on the bond performance of NSM-FRP strengthened systems with various insulations and adhesive types, show better performance than externally bonded reinforcement (EBR FRP retrofitting. In summary, the presented literature review provides an insight into the ongoing research on the use of NSM-FRP for strengthening of structural members and the trends for future research in this area.

  2. Recent Developments of Reflectarray Antennas for Reconfigurable Beams Using Surface-Mounted RF-MEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Carrasco

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Some of the most recent developments in reconfigurable reflectarrays using surface-mounted RF-MEMS, which have been developed at the Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, are summarized in this paper. The results include reconfigurable elements based on patches aperture-coupled to delay lines in two configurations: single elements and gathered elements which form subarrays with common phase control. The former include traditional aperture-coupled elements and a novel wideband reflectarray element which has been designed using two stacked patches. The latter are proposed as a low cost solution for reducing the number of electronic control devices as well as the manufacturing complexity of large reflectarrays. The main advantages and drawbacks of the grouping are evaluated in both pencil and shaped-beam antennas. In all the cases, the effects of the MEMS switches and their assembly circuitry are evaluated when they are used in a 2-bit phase shifter which can be extended to more bits, demonstrating that the proposed elements can be used efficiently in reconfigurable-beam reflectarrays.

  3. Structure Crack Identification Based on Surface-mounted Active Sensor Network with Time-Domain Feature Extraction and Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunling DU

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work the condition of metallic structures are classified based on the acquired sensor data from a surface-mounted piezoelectric sensor/actuator network. The structures are aluminum plates with riveted holes and possible crack damage at these holes. A 400 kHz sine wave burst is used as diagnostic signals. The combination of time-domain S0 waves from received sensor signals is directly used as features and preprocessing is not needed for the dam age detection. Since the time sequence of the extracted S0 has a high dimension, principal component estimation is applied to reduce its dimension before entering NN (neural network training for classification. An LVQ (learning vector quantization NN is used to classify the conditions as healthy or damaged. A number of FEM (finite element modeling results are taken as inputs to the NN for training, since the simulated S0 waves agree well with the experimental results on real plates. The performance of the classification is then validated by using these testing results.

  4. Milk-run kanban system for raw printed circuit board withdrawal to surface-mounted equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swee Li Chee

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose:  The paper aims to present a case study and later simulation analysis on a kanban system that incorporating milk-run operation to draw in raw material to the process. Design/methodology/approach:  Data collection at the case study company for ten weeks followed by a process study called value stream mapping. The proposed kanban model is simulated to test its various performances including total output, average flow time, average work-in-process, SME utilization, and average waiting time. Response surface methodology is adopted to generate suitable representative regression models.  Findings: For all performance measures, simulation results showed that the proposed system consistently outperforms the push system currently practiced. Second, the system indicates the advantages of leveling, particularly in the event of machine failure and blockage. Third, operator in the proposed kanban system has a lower utilization, even with the additional material handling task.   Research limitations/implications: This study only begins to reveal the implication of leveling for production control on multi-machine scenario. The simulation of the system is solely based only the case study. The control parameters critical to the case study, were naturally used. The furtherance of the research should include generalizing the system and devising the respective methodology to facilitate wider applications. Practical implications: Originality/value:  The kanban system is proposed in the light of conflicting interests in handling the surface mounting and the related upstream processes. Such aspect is common to electronics assembly industry.

  5. Photovoltaic mounting/demounting unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a photovoltaic arrangement comprising a photovoltaic assembly comprising a support structure defining a mounting surface onto which a photovoltaic module is detachably mounted; and a mounting/demounting unit comprising at least one mounting/demounting apparatus...... which when the mounting/demounting unit is moved along the mounting surface, causes the photovoltaic module to be mounted or demounted to the support structure; wherein the photovoltaic module comprises a carrier foil and wherein a total thickness of the photo voltaic module is below 500 muiotaeta....... The present invention further relates to an associated method for mounting/demounting photovoltaic modules....

  6. Photovoltaic module mounting system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miros, Robert H. J. [Fairfax, CA; Mittan, Margaret Birmingham [Oakland, CA; Seery, Martin N [San Rafael, CA; Holland, Rodney H [Novato, CA

    2012-04-17

    A solar array mounting system having unique installation, load distribution, and grounding features, and which is adaptable for mounting solar panels having no external frame. The solar array mounting system includes flexible, pedestal-style feet and structural links connected in a grid formation on the mounting surface. The photovoltaic modules are secured in place via the use of attachment clamps that grip the edge of the typically glass substrate. The panel mounting clamps are then held in place by tilt brackets and/or mid-link brackets that provide fixation for the clamps and align the solar panels at a tilt to the horizontal mounting surface. The tilt brackets are held in place atop the flexible feet and connected link members thus creating a complete mounting structure.

  7. Characterization of dissolved organic materials in surface waters within the blast zone of Mount St Helens, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, Diane M.; Pereira, W.E.; Ceazan, M.L.; Wissmar, Robert C.

    1982-01-01

    After the May 18, 1980, eruption of Mount St Helens, the concentration of dissolved organic material in surface waters near the volcano increased significantly as a result of the destruction of the surrounding conifer forest. Low molecular weight organic compounds identified in the blast zone surface waters were derived from pyrolysis of plant and soil organic materials incorporated into pyroclastic flow, mud flow and debris avalanche deposits. A major fraction of the dissolved organic material consisted of high molecular weight, colored, organic acids that are similar in their general properties to aquatic fulvic acids found in more typical surface waters except for greater sulfur contents. The other major fraction of the dissolved organic material consisted of hydrophilic acids, which may include compounds capable of supporting heterotrophic microorganisms, and precursors in the formation of aquatic fulvic acids. The organic chemistry of blast zone surface waters will probably be greatly influenced by the May 18, 1980, eruption for many years. ?? 1982.

  8. PV module mounting method and mounting assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenox, Carl J.S.; Johnson, Kurt M.

    2013-04-23

    A method for mounting PV modules to a deck includes selecting PV module layout pattern so that adjacent PV module edges are spaced apart. PV mounting and support assemblies are secured to the deck according to the layout pattern using fasteners extending into the deck. The PV modules are placed on the PV mounting and support assemblies. Retaining elements are located over and secured against the upper peripheral edge surfaces of the PV modules so to secure them to the deck with the peripheral edges of the PV modules spaced apart from the deck. In some examples a PV module mounting assembly, for use on a shingled deck, comprises flashing, a base mountable on the flashing, a deck-penetrating fastener engageable with the base and securable to the deck so to secure the flashing and the base to the shingled deck, and PV module mounting hardware securable to the base.

  9. Flexible hybrid circuit fully inkjet-printed: Surface mount devices assembled by silver nanoparticles-based inkjet ink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrese, J.; Vescio, G.; Xuriguera, E.; Medina-Rodriguez, B.; Cornet, A.; Cirera, A.

    2017-03-01

    Nowadays, inkjet-printed devices such as transistors are still unstable in air and have poor performances. Moreover, the present electronics applications require a high degree of reliability and quality of their properties. In order to accomplish these application requirements, hybrid electronics is fulfilled by combining the advantages of the printing technologies with the surface-mount technology. In this work, silver nanoparticle-based inkjet ink (AgNP ink) is used as a novel approach to connect surface-mount devices (SMDs) onto inkjet-printed pads, conducted by inkjet printing technology. Excellent quality AgNP ink-junctions are ensured with high resolution picoliter drop jetting at low temperature (˜150 °C). Electrical, mechanical, and morphological characterizations are carried out to assess the performance of the AgNP ink junction. Moreover, AgNP ink is compared with common benchmark materials (i.e., silver epoxy and solder). Electrical contact resistance characterization shows a similar performance between the AgNP ink and the usual ones. Mechanical characterization shows comparable shear strength for AgNP ink and silver epoxy, and both present higher adhesion than solder. Morphological inspections by field-emission scanning electron microscopy confirm a high quality interface of the silver nanoparticle interconnection. Finally, a flexible hybrid circuit on paper controlled by an Arduino board is manufactured, demonstrating the viability and scalability of the AgNP ink assembling technique.

  10. Mathematical and computer modeling of component surface shaping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyashkov, A.

    2016-04-01

    The process of shaping technical surfaces is an interaction of a tool (a shape element) and a component (a formable element or a workpiece) in their relative movements. It was established that the main objects of formation are: 1) a discriminant of a surfaces family, formed by the movement of the shape element relatively the workpiece; 2) an enveloping model of the real component surface obtained after machining, including transition curves and undercut lines; 3) The model of cut-off layers obtained in the process of shaping. When modeling shaping objects there are a lot of insufficiently solved or unsolved issues that make up a single scientific problem - a problem of qualitative shaping of the surface of the tool and then the component surface produced by this tool. The improvement of known metal-cutting tools, intensive development of systems of their computer-aided design requires further improvement of the methods of shaping the mating surfaces. In this regard, an important role is played by the study of the processes of shaping of technical surfaces with the use of the positive aspects of analytical and numerical mathematical methods and techniques associated with the use of mathematical and computer modeling. The author of the paper has posed and has solved the problem of development of mathematical, geometric and algorithmic support of computer-aided design of cutting tools based on computer simulation of the shaping process of surfaces.

  11. Surfaces: processing, coating, decontamination, pollution, etc. Surface mastering to prevent component corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foucault, M.

    2012-01-01

    In the primary and secondary circuits of nuclear Pressurized Water Reactors, AREVA uses several nickel-based alloys or austenitic stainless steels for the manufacture of safety components. The experience feedback of the last twenty years allows us to point out the major role hold by the component surface state in their life duration. In this paper, we present four examples of problem encountered and solved by a surface study and the definition and implementation of processes for the surface control of the repaired components. Then, we propose some ideas about the present needs in term of analysis means to improve the surface knowledge and control of the manufactured components. (author)

  12. A Torque Error Compensation Algorithm for Surface Mounted Permanent Magnet Synchronous Machines with Respect to Magnet Temperature Variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Seok Park

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a torque error compensation algorithm for a surface mounted permanent magnet synchronous machine (SPMSM through real time permanent magnet (PM flux linkage estimation at various temperature conditions from medium to rated speed. As known, the PM flux linkage in SPMSMs varies with the thermal conditions. Since a maximum torque per ampere look up table, a control method used for copper loss minimization, is developed based on estimated PM flux linkage, variation of PM flux linkage results in undesired torque development of SPMSM drives. In this paper, PM flux linkage is estimated through a stator flux linkage observer and the torque error is compensated in real time using the estimated PM flux linkage. In this paper, the proposed torque error compensation algorithm is verified in simulation and experiment.

  13. Prestressing Effects on the Performance of Concrete Beams with Near-surface-mounted Carbon-fiber-reinforced Polymer Bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sungnam; Park, Sun-Kyu

    2016-07-01

    The effects of various prestressing levels on the flexural behavior of concrete beams strengthened with prestressed near-surface-mounted (NSM) carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) bars were investigated in this study. Four-point flexural tests up to failure were performed using a total of six strengthened prestressed and nonprestressed concrete beams. The nonprestressed strengthened beam failed by premature debonding at the interface of concrete and the epoxy adhesive, but the prestressed one failed owing due to rupture of the CFRP bar. As the prestressing level of the CFRP bar increased, the cracking and yield loads of the prestressed beams increased, but its effect on their deflections was insignificant. The ultimate load was constant regardless of prestressing level, but the ultimate deflection was almost inversely proportional to the level.

  14. Skin suturing and cortical surface viral infusion improves imaging of neuronal ensemble activity with head-mounted miniature microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinjian; Cao, Vania Y; Zhang, Wenyu; Mastwal, Surjeet S; Liu, Qing; Otte, Stephani; Wang, Kuan Hong

    2017-11-01

    In vivo optical imaging of neural activity provides important insights into brain functions at the single-cell level. Cranial windows and virally delivered calcium indicators are commonly used for imaging cortical activity through two-photon microscopes in head-fixed animals. Recently, head-mounted one-photon microscopes have been developed for freely behaving animals. However, minimizing tissue damage from the virus injection procedure and maintaining window clarity for imaging can be technically challenging. We used a wide-diameter glass pipette at the cortical surface for infusing the viral calcium reporter AAV-GCaMP6 into the cortex. After infusion, the scalp skin over the implanted optical window was sutured to facilitate postoperative recovery. The sutured scalp was removed approximately two weeks later and a miniature microscope was attached above the window to image neuronal activity in freely moving mice. We found that cortical surface virus infusion efficiently labeled neurons in superficial layers, and scalp skin suturing helped to maintain the long-term clarity of optical windows. As a result, several hundred neurons could be recorded in freely moving animals. Compared to intracortical virus injection and open-scalp postoperative recovery, our methods minimized tissue damage and dura overgrowth underneath the optical window, and significantly increased the experimental success rate and the yield of identified neurons. Our improved cranial surgery technique allows for high-yield calcium imaging of cortical neurons with head-mounted microscopes in freely behaving animals. This technique may be beneficial for other optical applications such as two-photon microscopy, multi-site imaging, and optogenetic modulation. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Principal Component Surface (2011) for Fish Bay, St. John

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 0.3x0.3 meter principal component analysis (PCA) surface for areas inside Fish Bay, St. John in the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI). It was...

  16. Early micromovement of the Articular Surface Replacement (ASR) femoral component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penny, J O; Ding, M; Varmarken, J E

    2012-01-01

    Radiostereometric analysis (RSA) can detect early micromovement in unstable implant designs which are likely subsequently to have a high failure rate. In 2010, the Articular Surface Replacement (ASR) was withdrawn because of a high failure rate. In 19 ASR femoral components, the mean micromovement...

  17. Principal Component Surface (2011) for Coral Bay, St. John

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 0.3x0.3 meter principal component analysis (PCA) surface for areas inside Coral Bay, St. John in the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI). It was...

  18. GumPack: A Personal Health Assistant with Reconfigurable Surface Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kejia Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Wearable and everyday-carry medical devices can improve quality of life for individuals that need frequent health monitoring. Such tools can supplement ubiquitous home care environments populated with medical sensors, extending the reach of these environments and increasing the freedom of their occupants. This paper presents the concept design for an everyday-carry medical device called a ‘GumPack’: a small cuboid-shaped device that offers wireless connectivity and plug-and-play surface components, where a component can be a biomedical sensor or a wireless network coordinator that manages a body area network. This geometrical layout optimizes access to surface-based medical hardware mounted on a small form factor. The device offers substantive computing power, supports local component reconfigurability, and promotes interoperability with medical device coordination environments. The GumPack is envisioned to be a personal health assistant carried in a pocket or handbag that can operate alone or interface to, e.g., a cell phone.

  19. Non-conventional laser surface hardening for axisymmetric components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liverani, Erica; Battiato, Nadine; Ascari, Alessandro; Fortunato, Alessandro

    2014-02-01

    A new process, based on ring spot geometry, is presented for laser surface hardening of large cylindrical com-ponents. The proposed technique leads to a very hard, deep and uniform treated area along the entire work piece surface without introducing a tempered zone, making the process very attractive compared to conventional induction hardening that exhibits both low energy efficiency and poor flexibility. A complete physical model is presented for the process, together with a study of the influence of process parameters on the final outcome. The results of an extensive validation campaign, carried out following the AISI1040 standard, are also reported.

  20. Peri-Elastodynamic Simulations of Guided Ultrasonic Waves in Plate-Like Structure with Surface Mounted PZT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subir Patra

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Peridynamic based elastodynamic computation tool named Peri-elastodynamics is proposed herein to simulate the three-dimensional (3D Lamb wave modes in materials for the first time. Peri-elastodynamics is a nonlocal meshless approach which is a scale-independent generalized technique to visualize the acoustic and ultrasonic waves in plate-like structure, micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS and nanodevices for their respective characterization. In this article, the characteristics of the fundamental Lamb wave modes are simulated in a sample plate-like structure. Lamb wave modes are generated using a surface mounted piezoelectric (PZT transducer which is actuated from the top surface. The proposed generalized Peri-elastodynamics method is not only capable of simulating two dimensional (2D in plane wave under plane strain condition formulated previously but also capable of accurately simulating the out of plane Symmetric and Antisymmetric Lamb wave modes in plate like structures in 3D. For structural health monitoring (SHM of plate-like structures and nondestructive evaluation (NDE of MEMS devices, it is necessary to simulate the 3D wave-damage interaction scenarios and visualize the different wave features due to damages. Hence, in addition, to simulating the guided ultrasonic wave modes in pristine material, Lamb waves were also simulated in a damaged plate. The accuracy of the proposed technique is verified by comparing the modes generated in the plate and the mode shapes across the thickness of the plate with theoretical wave analysis.

  1. Pathway from subducting slab to surface for melt and fluids beneath Mount Rainier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGary, R Shane; Evans, Rob L; Wannamaker, Philip E; Elsenbeck, Jimmy; Rondenay, Stéphane

    2014-07-17

    Convergent margin volcanism originates with partial melting, primarily of the upper mantle, into which the subducting slab descends. Melting of this material can occur in one of two ways. The flow induced in the mantle by the slab can result in upwelling and melting through adiabatic decompression. Alternatively, fluids released from the descending slab through dehydration reactions can migrate into the hot mantle wedge, inducing melting by lowering the solidus temperature. The two mechanisms are not mutually exclusive. In either case, the buoyant melts make their way towards the surface to reside in the crust or to be extruded as lava. Here we use magnetotelluric data collected across the central state of Washington, USA, to image the complete pathway for the fluid-melt phase. By incorporating constraints from a collocated seismic study into the magnetotelluric inversion process, we obtain superior constraints on the fluids and melt in a subduction setting. Specifically, we are able to identify and connect fluid release at or near the top of the slab, migration of fluids into the overlying mantle wedge, melting in the wedge, and transport of the melt/fluid phase to a reservoir in the crust beneath Mt Rainier.

  2. Modeling guided wave excitation in plates with surface mounted piezoelectric elements: coupled physics and normal mode expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Baiyang; Lissenden, Cliff J.

    2018-04-01

    Guided waves have been extensively studied and widely used for structural health monitoring because of their large volumetric coverage and good sensitivity to defects. Effectively and preferentially exciting a desired wave mode having good sensitivity to a certain defect is of great practical importance. Piezoelectric discs and plates are the most common types of surface-mounted transducers for guided wave excitation and reception. Their geometry strongly influences the proportioning between excited modes as well as the total power of the excited modes. It is highly desirable to predominantly excite the selected mode while the total transduction power is maximized. In this work, a fully coupled multi-physics finite element analysis, which incorporates the driving circuit, the piezoelectric element and the wave guide, is combined with the normal mode expansion method to study both the mode tuning and total wave power. The excitation of circular crested waves in an aluminum plate with circular piezoelectric discs is numerically studied for different disc and adhesive thicknesses. Additionally, the excitation of plane waves in an aluminum plate, using a stripe piezoelectric element is studied both numerically and experimentally. It is difficult to achieve predominant single mode excitation as well as maximum power transmission simultaneously, especially for higher order modes. However, guidelines for designing the geometry of piezoelectric elements for optimal mode excitation are recommended.

  3. Flexural Behavior of Concrete Beam Strengthened by Near-Surface Mounted CFRP Reinforcement Using Equivalent Section Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo-tai Jung

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available FRP (fiber reinforced polymer has found wide applications as an alternative to steel rebar not only for the repair and strengthening of existing structures but also for the erection of new structures. Near-surface mounted (NSM strengthening was introduced as an alternative of externally bonded reinforcement (EBR but this method also experiences early bond failure, which stresses the importance of predicting accurately the bond failure behavior in order to evaluate precisely the performance of NSM reinforcement. This study proposes the equivalent section model assuming monolithic behavior of the filler and CFRP reinforcement. This equivalent section model enables establishing a bond failure model applicable independently of the sectional shape of the CFRP reinforcement. This so-derived bond failure model is then validated experimentally by means of beams flexure-strengthened by NSM CFRP reinforcements with various cross-sections. Finally, analytical analysis applying the bond failure model considering the equivalent section and defined failure criteria is performed. The results show the accuracy of the prediction of the failure mode as well as the accurate prediction of the experimental results regardless of the sectional shape of the CFRP reinforcement.

  4. Finite element modelling to assess the effect of surface mounted piezoelectric patch size on vibration response of a hybrid beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, N.; Alam, M. N.

    2018-02-01

    Vibration response analysis of a hybrid beam with surface mounted patch piezoelectric layer is presented in this work. A one dimensional finite element (1D-FE) model based on efficient layerwise (zigzag) theory is used for the analysis. The beam element has eight mechanical and a variable number of electrical degrees of freedom. The beams are also modelled in 2D-FE (ABAQUS) using a plane stress piezoelectric quadrilateral element for piezo layers and a plane stress quadrilateral element for the elastic layers of hybrid beams. Results are presented to assess the effect of size of piezoelectric patch layer on the free and forced vibration responses of thin and moderately thick beams under clamped-free and clamped-clamped configurations. The beams are subjected to unit step loading and harmonic loading to obtain the forced vibration responses. The vibration control using in phase actuation potential on piezoelectric patches is also studied. The 1D-FE results are compared with the 2D-FE results.

  5. Surface composition of biomedical components by ion beam analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenny, M.J.; Wielunski, L.S.; Baxter, G.R.

    1991-01-01

    Materials used for replacement body parts must satisfy a number of requirements such as biocompatibility and mechanical ability to handle the task with regard to strength, wear and durability. When using a CVD coated carbon fibre reinforced carbon ball, the surface must be ion implanted with uniform dose of nitrogen ions in order to make it wear resistant. The mechanism by which the wear resistance is improved is one of radiation damage and the required dose of about 10 16 cm -2 can have a tolerance of about 20%. To implant a spherical surface requires manipulation of the sample within the beam and control system (either computer or manually operated) to enable uniform dose all the way from polar to equatorial regions on the surface. A manipulator has been designed and built for this purpose. In order to establish whether the dose is uniform, nuclear reaction analysis using the reaction 14 N(d,α) 12 C is an ideal method of profiling. By taking measurements at a number of points on the surface, the uniformity of nitrogen dose can be ascertained. It is concluded that both Rutherford Backscattering and Nuclear Reaction Analysis can be used for rapid analysis of surface composition of carbon based materials used for replacement body components. 2 refs., 2 figs

  6. Surface temperature measurement of plasma facing components in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiel, Stephane

    2014-01-01

    During this PhD, the challenges on the non-intrusive surface temperature measurements of metallic plasma facing components in tokamaks are reported. Indeed, a precise material emissivity value is needed for classical infrared methods and the environment contribution has to be known particularly for low emissivities materials. Although methods have been developed to overcome these issues, they have been implemented solely for dedicated experiments. In any case, none of these methods are suitable for surface temperature measurement in tokamaks.The active pyrometry introduced in this study allows surface temperature measurements independently of reflected flux and emissivities using pulsed and modulated photothermal effect. This method has been validated in laboratory on metallic materials with reflected fluxes for pulsed and modulated modes. This experimental validation is coupled with a surface temperature variation induced by photothermal effect and temporal signal evolvement modelling in order to optimize both the heating source characteristics and the data acquisition and treatment. The experimental results have been used to determine the application range in temperature and detection wavelengths. In this context, the design of an active pyrometry system on tokamak has been completed, based on a bicolor camera for a thermography application in metallic (or low emissivity) environment.The active pyrometry method introduced in this study is a complementary technique of classical infrared methods used for thermography in tokamak environment which allows performing local and 2D surface temperature measurements independently of reflected fluxes and emissivities. (author) [fr

  7. Fine and coarse components in surface sediments from Bikini Lagoon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noshkin, V. E., LLNL

    1997-01-01

    In 1979, 21 years after the moratorium on nuclear testing in the Marshall Islands, surface sediment samples (to depths of 2 and 4 cm) were collected from 87 locations in the lagoon of Bikini Atoll, one of the two sites in the Marshall Islands used by the United States to test nuclear devices from 1946 through 1958. The main purpose for the collections was to map the distribution of long-lived man-made radionuclides associated with the bottom material. In addition the samples were processed to estimate the fraction of fine and coarse components to show, by comparison, what modifications occurred in the composition since the sediments were first described in samples collected before testing in 1946. Nuclear testing produced more finely divided material that is now found in the surface sediment layer over large areas of the lagoon and especially in regions of the lagoon and reef adjacent to test sites. The 5 cratering events alone at Bikini Atoll redistributed sufficient material to account for the higher inventory of fine material found over the surface 4 cm of the sediment of the lagoon. Although the fraction of fine material in the bottom sediments was altered by the nuclear events, the combined processes of formation, transport and deposition were not sufficiently dynamic to greatly change the general geographical features of the major sedimentary components over most of the lagoon floor.

  8. Analysis of shape correctness of surfaces of diamond burnished components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varga Gyula

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In these days, diamond burnishing is frequently used for final finishing manufacturing operations of components. Diamond burnishing belongs to cold plastic manufacturing procedures. When using this technique, the following advantages can be obtained: micro-hardness of near surface layer is increasing; surface roughness is improving and the shape correctness is also improving. This paper deals with how the different technological parameters of burnishing, such as the feed rate, the burnishing speed and the burnishing force effect on the cylindricity of the burnished workpiece. The experiment was done on some specimen having outer cylindrical surfaces. The experiments were executed by the Taguchi type Full Factorial Experiment Design method with which empirical formulas can be efficiently created. The measurements of the cylindricity of specimens were done with a circular and position error measuring. From the measured data, special improvement ratios were calculated in order to define the appropriate range of technological parameters which results high improvements. Further aim was to compare the measured values of different cylindricity parameters.

  9. Two-dimensional motifs in organic materials: Nanodisks, nanodisk-based nanocomposites and nanothin surface-mounted films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekobo, Samuel

    Various new technologies are benefiting from the incorporation of new nanophase materials into existing materials and devices. This dissertation explores two-dimensional motifs in creation of organic nanomaterials with new and superior properties. The major part of this thesis focuses on organic nanodisks prepared by controlled polymerization in the interior of bicelles, discoidal lipid aggregates. Another shape studied here is nanothin film mounted on a gold surface. Synthesis of nanodisks is carried out by UV-initiated polymerization of a mixture of styrene and divinylbenzene loaded into self-assembled bicelles. Bicelles act as temporary self-assembled scaffolds, and after the synthesis lipids can be separated and recycled to template a new batch of nanodisks. This method yields new two-dimensional nanoparticles with 15--30 nm diameter and 2 nm thickness. Aggregation behavior of nanodisks was studied in water, organic solvents, and solid phase. Aggregation of nanoparticles has been a major problem in developing various applications. Nanodisks formed a stable (>1 week) suspension of single particles in toluene and carbon tetrachloride, but required a surfactant for uniform dispersion in water. Using sodium docecylsulfate (SDS) as the surfactant, zeta potential studies revealed that particles have a good electrostatic stability at SDS concentrations below the critical micelle concentration. Further, varying the surface density of surfactants can control the size of aggregates of nanodisks in water. Upon drying, nanodisks aggregate into sub-micron platelets. Cross-linked polystyrene nanodisks were then incorporated into bulk polystyreme to determine whether they reinforced its thermal and mechanical properties. Small-angle neutron scattering data suggest that material containing small amounts of nanodisks, as little as 0.001%, form true nanocomposites as evidenced by the presence of individual nanodisks in polystyrene matrix. Thermogravimetric analysis and flexure

  10. Thin concentrator photovoltaic module with micro-solar cells which are mounted by self-align method using surface tension of melted solder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Nobuhiko; Terauchi, Masaharu; Aya, Youichirou; Kanayama, Shutetsu; Nishitani, Hikaru; Nakagawa, Tohru; Takase, Michihiko

    2017-09-01

    We are developing a thin and lightweight CPV module using small size lens system made from poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA) with a short focal length and micro-solar cells to decrease the transporting and the installing costs of CPV systems. In order to achieve high conversion efficiency in CPV modules using micro-solar cells, the micro-solar cells need to be mounted accurately to the irradiated region of the concentrated sunlight. In this study, we have successfully developed self-align method thanks to the surface tension of the melted solder even utilizing commercially available surface-mounting technology (SMT). Solar cells were self-aligned to the specified positions of the circuit board by this self-align method with accuracy within ±10 µm. We actually fabricated CPV modules using this self-align method and demonstrated high conversion efficiency of our CPV module.

  11. Surfaces: processing, coating, decontamination, pollution, etc. Surface mastering to prevent component corrosion; Surfaces: traitement, revetements, decontamination, pollution, etc. Maitrise de la surface pour prevenir la corrosion des composants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foucault, M. [Departement Corrosion Chimie, AREVA Centre Technique, BP 181, 71205 Le Creusot (France)

    2012-07-01

    In the primary and secondary circuits of nuclear Pressurized Water Reactors, AREVA uses several nickel-based alloys or austenitic stainless steels for the manufacture of safety components. The experience feedback of the last twenty years allows us to point out the major role hold by the component surface state in their life duration. In this paper, we present four examples of problem encountered and solved by a surface study and the definition and implementation of processes for the surface control of the repaired components. Then, we propose some ideas about the present needs in term of analysis means to improve the surface knowledge and control of the manufactured components. (author)

  12. Testing of Liquid Metal Components for Nuclear Surface Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, K. A.; Pearson, J. B.; Godfroy, T. J.; Schoenfeld, M.; Webster, K.; Briggs, M. H.; Geng, S. M.; Adkins, H. E.; Werner, J. E.

    2010-01-01

    The capability to perform testing at both the module/component level and in near prototypic reactor configurations using a non-nuclear test methodology allowed for evaluation of two components critical to the development of a potential nuclear fission power system for the lunar surface. A pair of 1 kW Stirling power convertors, similar to the type that would be used in a reactor system to convert heat to electricity, were integrated into a reactor simulator system to determine their performance using pumped NaK as the hot side working fluid. The performance in the pumped-NaK system met or exceed the baseline performance measurements where the converters were electrically heated. At the maximum hot-side temperature of 550 C the maximum output power was 2375 watts. A specially-designed test apparatus was fabricated and used to quantify the performance of an annular linear induction pump that is similar to the type that could be used to circulate liquid metal through the core of a space reactor system. The errors on the measurements were generally much smaller than the magnitude of the measurements, permitting accurate performance evaluation over a wide range of operating conditions. The pump produced flow rates spanning roughly 0.16 to 5.7 l/s (2.5 to 90 GPM), and delta p levels from less than 1 kPa to 90 kPa (greater than 0.145 psi to roughly 13 psi). At the nominal FSP system operating temperature of 525 C the maximum efficiency was just over 4%.

  13. Corrugated metal surface with pillars for terahertz surface plasmon polariton waveguide components

    KAUST Repository

    Yuehong, Xu

    2018-01-12

    In the terahertz regime, due to perfect conductivity of most metals, it is hard to realize a strong confinement of Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) although a propagation loss could be sufficiently low. We experimentally demonstrated a structure with periodic pillars arranged on a thin metal surface that supports bound modes of spoof SPPs at terahertz (THz) frequencies. By using scanning near-field THz microscopy, the electric field distribution above the metal surface within a distance of 130 μm was mapped. The results proved that this structure could guide spoof SPPs propagating along subwavelength waveguides, and at the same time reduce field expansion into free space. Further, for the development of integrated optical circuits, several components including straight waveguide, S-bend, Y-splitter and directional couplers were designed and characterized by the same method. We believe that the waveguide components proposed here will pave a new way for the development of flexible, wideband and compact photonic circuits operating at THz frequencies.

  14. An Instrument for Inspecting Aspheric Optical Surfaces and Components Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is a Phase I proposal to develop an extremely versatile optical inspection tool for determining the optical figure of aspheric optical components, such as test...

  15. Multi-component joint analysis of surface waves

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dal Moro, Giancarlo; Moura, R.M.M.; Moustafa, S.S.R.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 119, AUG (2015), s. 128-138 ISSN 0926-9851 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : surface waves * surface wave dispersion * seismic data acquisition * seismic data inversion * velocity spectrum Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 1.355, year: 2015

  16. The Martian Dust Cycle: Investigation of the Surface Lifting Component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, James R.; Bridger, Alison F. C.; Haberle, Robert M.

    1996-01-01

    We have investigated the nature of the annual cycle of suspended dust in the martian atmosphere. This has been undertaken to understand the dynamical processes responsible for lifting dust from the surface, locations where dust is preferentially lifted, and preferred sites for dust deposition upon the surface. Our efforts have involved carrying out a number of numerical simulations with the Ames Mars General Circulation Model (GCM) interactively coupled with an aerosol transport/ micro-physical model. The model generates an annual dust cycle similar to that observed. Various feedbacks are present in the atmosphere/ surface system which enter into the generation of the cycle. Several locations are primary surface sources of dust, while much of the remaining planet's surface acts a sink for suspended dust.

  17. A discrete surface growth model for two components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Nashar, H.F.; Cerdeira, H.A.

    2000-04-01

    We present a ballistic deposition model for the surface growth of a binary species A and C. Numerical simulations of the growth kinetics show a deviation from the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang universality class, model valid for only one kind of deposited particles. The study also shows that when the deposition of particles with less active bonds occurs more frequently the voids under the surface become relevant. However, the increase in overhang/voids processes under the moving interface does not strengthen greatly the local surface gradient. (author)

  18. Study of Huizhou architecture component point cloud in surface reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Runmei; Wang, Guangyin; Ma, Jixiang; Wu, Yulu; Zhang, Guangbin

    2017-06-01

    Surface reconfiguration softwares have many problems such as complicated operation on point cloud data, too many interaction definitions, and too stringent requirements for inputing data. Thus, it has not been widely popularized so far. This paper selects the unique Huizhou Architecture chuandou wooden beam framework as the research object, and presents a complete set of implementation in data acquisition from point, point cloud preprocessing and finally implemented surface reconstruction. Firstly, preprocessing the acquired point cloud data, including segmentation and filtering. Secondly, the surface’s normals are deduced directly from the point cloud dataset. Finally, the surface reconstruction is studied by using Greedy Projection Triangulation Algorithm. Comparing the reconstructed model with the three-dimensional surface reconstruction softwares, the results show that the proposed scheme is more smooth, time efficient and portable.

  19. Stress corrosion cracking of Ni-based alloys in PWR primary water. Component surface control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foucault, M.

    2004-01-01

    In the PWR plant primary circuit, FRAMATOME-ANP uses several nickel-base alloys or austenitic stainless steels for the manufacture of safety components. The experience feedback of the last twenty years allows us to point out the major role played by the surface state of the components in their life duration. In this paper, we present two examples of problems encountered and solved by a surface study and the definition and implementation of a process for the surface control of the repair components. Then, we propose some ideas about the present needs in terms of analysis methods to improve the surface knowledge and the control of the manufactured components. (author)

  20. Integrated Optical Components Utilizing Long-Range Surface Plasmon Polaritons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boltasseva, Alexandra; Nikolajsen, Thomas; Leosson, Kristjan

    2005-01-01

    New optical waveguide technology for integrated optics, based on propagation of long-range surface plasmon polaritons (LR-SPPs) along metal stripes embedded in dielectric, is presented. Guiding and routing of electromagnetic radiation along nanometer-thin and micrometer-wide gold stripes embedded...

  1. Laser-assisted surface cleaning of metallic components

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-09

    Feb 9, 2014 ... Keywords. YAG laser, oxide layer, contamination, cleaning. Abstract. Removal of a thin oxide layer from a tungsten ribbon and ThO2 particulates from zircaloy surface was achieved using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. The removal mechanism of the oxide layer from the tungsten ribbon was identified as spallation ...

  2. Laser-assisted surface cleaning of metallic components

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-09

    Feb 9, 2014 ... 1Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Tarapur 401 504, India ... taining to nuclear industry in the field of nuclear fuel fabrication and radioactive waste management. As we know .... ThO2 powder taken along with a small quantity of isopropyl alcohol on the surface of. 240.

  3. Laser-assisted surface cleaning of metallic components

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-09

    Feb 9, 2014 ... for effective utilization of uranium and thorium reserves to fulfill the ever growing need of energy [3]. ... nism of laser-assisted removal of ThO2 particulates off the metal surface and present here results of some ... samples (tungsten ribbon, thoria-contaminated zircaloy metal) were irradiated inside a chamber ...

  4. Soil Structure - A Neglected Component of Land-Surface Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatichi, S.; Or, D.; Walko, R. L.; Vereecken, H.; Kollet, S. J.; Young, M.; Ghezzehei, T. A.; Hengl, T.; Agam, N.; Avissar, R.

    2017-12-01

    Soil structure is largely absent in most standard sampling and measurements and in the subsequent parameterization of soil hydraulic properties deduced from soil maps and used in Earth System Models. The apparent omission propagates into the pedotransfer functions that deduce parameters of soil hydraulic properties primarily from soil textural information. Such simple parameterization is an essential ingredient in the practical application of any land surface model. Despite the critical role of soil structure (biopores formed by decaying roots, aggregates, etc.) in defining soil hydraulic functions, only a few studies have attempted to incorporate soil structure into models. They mostly looked at the effects on preferential flow and solute transport pathways at the soil profile scale; yet, the role of soil structure in mediating large-scale fluxes remains understudied. Here, we focus on rectifying this gap and demonstrating potential impacts on surface and subsurface fluxes and system wide eco-hydrologic responses. The study proposes a systematic way for correcting the soil water retention and hydraulic conductivity functions—accounting for soil-structure—with major implications for near saturated hydraulic conductivity. Modification to the basic soil hydraulic parameterization is assumed as a function of biological activity summarized by Gross Primary Production. A land-surface model with dynamic vegetation is used to carry out numerical simulations with and without the role of soil-structure for 20 locations characterized by different climates and biomes across the globe. Including soil structure affects considerably the partition between infiltration and runoff and consequently leakage at the base of the soil profile (recharge). In several locations characterized by wet climates, a few hundreds of mm per year of surface runoff become deep-recharge accounting for soil-structure. Changes in energy fluxes, total evapotranspiration and vegetation productivity

  5. Layer-by-Layer Method for the Synthesis and Growth of Surface Mounted Metal-Organic Frameworks (SURMOFs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama Shekhah

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A layer-by-layer method has been developed for the synthesis of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs and their deposition on functionalized organic surfaces. The approach is based on the sequential immersion of functionalized organic surfaces into solutions of the building blocks of the MOF, i.e., the organic ligand and the inorganic unit. The synthesis and growth of different types of MOFs on substrates with different functionalization, like COOH, OH and pyridine terminated surfaces, were studied and characterized with different surface characterization techniques. A controlled and highly oriented growth of very homogenous films was obtained using this method. The layer-by-layer method offered also the possibility to study the kinetics of film formation in more detail using surface plasmon resonance and quartz crystal microbalance. In addition, this method demonstrates the potential to synthesize new classes of MOFs not accessible by conventional methods. Finally, the controlled growth of MOF thin films is important for many applications like chemical sensors, membranes and related electrodes.

  6. Low-speed wind-tunnel investigation of a large scale advanced arrow-wing supersonic transport configuration with engines mounted above wing for upper-surface blowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivers, J. P.; Mclemore, H. C.; Coe, P. L., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Tests have been conducted in a full scale tunnel to determine the low speed aerodynamic characteristics of a large scale advanced arrow wing supersonic transport configuration with engines mounted above the wing for upper surface blowing. Tests were made over an angle of attack range of -10 deg to 32 deg, sideslip angles of + or - 5 deg, and a Reynolds number range of 3,530,000 to 7,330,000. Configuration variables included trailing edge flap deflection, engine jet nozzle angle, engine thrust coefficient, engine out operation, and asymmetrical trailing edge boundary layer control for providing roll trim. Downwash measurements at the tail were obtained for different thrust coefficients, tail heights, and at two fuselage stations.

  7. Loss Prediction and Thermal Analysis of Surface-Mounted Brushless AC PM Machines for Electric Vehicle Application Considering Driving Duty Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianxun Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a computationally efficient loss prediction procedure and thermal analysis of surface-mounted brushless AC permanent magnet (PM machine considering the UDDS driving duty cycle by using a lumped parameters’ thermal model. The accurate prediction of loss and its variation with load are essential for thermal analysis. Employing finite element analysis (FEA to determine loss at every load point would be computationally intensive. Here, the finite element analysis and/or experiment based computationally efficient winding copper and iron loss and permanent magnet (PM power loss models are employed to calculate the electromagnetic loss at every operation point, respectively. Then, the lumped parameter thermal method is used to analyse the thermal behaviour of the driving PM machine. Experiments have been carried out to measure the temperature distribution in a motor prototype. The calculation and experiment results are compared and discussed.

  8. Measurements on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces using a porous gamma alumina nanoparticle aggregate mounted on Atomic Force Microscopy cantilevers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, Theerthankar; Becker, Thomas; Nair, Balagopal N.

    2010-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) measurements are extensively used for a detailed understanding of molecular and surface forces. In this study, we present a technique for measuring such forces, using an AFM cantilever attached with a porous gamma alumina nanoparticle aggregate. The modified cantilever

  9. Two-component injection moulding simulation of ABS-POM micro structured surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosello, Guido; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Islam, Aminul

    2013-01-01

    Multi-component micro injection moulding (μIM) processes such as two-component (2k) μIM are the key technologies for the mass fabrication of multi-material micro products. 2k-μIM experiments involving a miniaturized test component with micro features in the sub-mm dimensional range and moulding a...... process. Flow front predictions are compared with experimental results using the short shots technique over the whole miniaturized component and within the surface micro structures....

  10. Dynamics of seismogenic volcanic extrusion resisted by a solid surface plug, Mount St. Helens, 2004-2005: Chapter 21 in A volcano rekindled: the renewed eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Richard M.; Sherrod, David R.; Scott, William E.; Stauffer, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    The 2004-5 eruption of Mount St. Helens exhibited sustained, near-equilibrium behavior characterized by nearly steady extrusion of a solid dacite plug and nearly periodic occurrence of shallow earthquakes. Diverse data support the hypothesis that these earthquakes resulted from stick-slip motion along the margins of the plug as it was forced incrementally upward by ascending, solidifying, gas-poor magma. I formalize this hypothesis with a mathematical model derived by assuming that magma enters the base of the eruption conduit at a steady rate, invoking conservation of mass and momentum of the magma and plug, and postulating simple constitutive equations that describe magma and conduit compressibilities and friction along the plug margins. Reduction of the model equations reveals a strong mathematical analogy between the dynamics of the magma-plug system and those of a variably damped oscillator. Oscillations in extrusion velocity result from the interaction of plug inertia, a variable upward force due to magma pressure, and a downward force due to the plug weight. Damping of oscillations depends mostly on plug-boundary friction, and oscillations grow unstably if friction exhibits rate weakening similar to that observed in experiments. When growth of oscillations causes the extrusion rate to reach zero, however, gravity causes friction to reverse direction, and this reversal instigates a transition from unstable oscillations to self-regulating stick-slip cycles. The transition occurs irrespective of the details of rate-weakening behavior, and repetitive stick-slip cycles are, therefore, robust features of the system’s dynamics. The presence of a highly compressible elastic driving element (that is, magma containing bubbles) appears crucial for enabling seismogenic slip events to occur repeatedly at the shallow earthquake focal depths (8 N. These results imply that the system’s self-regulating behavior is not susceptible to dramatic change--provided that the

  11. Detector Mount Design for IGRINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Sok Oh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Immersion Grating Infrared Spectrometer (IGRINS is a near-infrared wide-band high-resolution spectrograph jointly developed by the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute and the University of Texas at Austin. IGRINS employs three HAWAII-2RG Focal Plane Array (H2RG FPA detectors. We present the design and fabrication of the detector mount for the H2RG detector. The detector mount consists of a detector housing, an ASIC housing, a Field Flattener Lens (FFL mount, and a support base frame. The detector and the ASIC housing should be kept at 65 K and the support base frame at 130 K. Therefore they are thermally isolated by the support made of GFRP material. The detector mount is designed so that it has features of fine adjusting the position of the detector surface in the optical axis and of fine adjusting yaw and pitch angles in order to utilize as an optical system alignment compensator. We optimized the structural stability and thermal characteristics of the mount design using computer-aided 3D modeling and finite element analysis. Based on the structural and thermal analysis, the designed detector mount meets an optical stability tolerance and system thermal requirements. Actual detector mount fabricated based on the design has been installed into the IGRINS cryostat and successfully passed a vacuum test and a cold test.

  12. Turbine component having surface cooling channels and method of forming same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Carlos Miguel; Trimmer, Andrew Lee; Kottilingam, Srikanth Chandrudu

    2017-09-05

    A component for a turbine engine includes a substrate that includes a first surface, and an insert coupled to the substrate proximate the substrate first surface. The component also includes a channel. The channel is defined by a first channel wall formed in the substrate and a second channel wall formed by at least one coating disposed on the substrate first surface. The component further includes an inlet opening defined in flow communication with the channel. The inlet opening is defined by a first inlet wall formed in the substrate and a second inlet wall defined by the insert.

  13. An atlas of monthly mean distributions of GEOSAT sea surface height, SSMI surface wind speed, AVHRR/2 sea surface temperature, and ECMWF surface wind components during 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, D.; Zlotnicki, V.; Newman, J.; Brown, O.; Wentz, F.

    1991-01-01

    Monthly mean global distributions for 1988 are presented with a common color scale and geographical map. Distributions are included for sea surface height variation estimated from GEOSAT; surface wind speed estimated from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager on the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program spacecraft; sea surface temperature estimated from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer on NOAA spacecrafts; and the Cartesian components of the 10m height wind vector computed by the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasting. Charts of monthly mean value, sampling distribution, and standard deviation value are displayed. Annual mean distributions are displayed.

  14. Mount St. Helens Rebirth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The catastrophic eruption of Mt. St. Helens 20 years ago today (on May 18, 1980), ranks among the most important natural events of the twentieth century in the United States. Because Mt. St. Helens is in a remote area of the Cascades Mountains, only a few people were killed by the eruption, but property damage and destruction totaled in the billions of dollars. Mount St. Helens is an example of a composite or stratovolcano. These are explosive volcanoes that are generally steep-sided, symmetrical cones built up by the accumulation of debris from previous eruptions and consist of alternating layers of lava flows, volcanic ash and cinder. Some of the most photographed mountains in the world are stratovolcanoes, including Mount Fuji in Japan, Mount Cotopaxi in Ecuador, Mount Hood in Oregon, and Mount Rainier in Washington. The recently erupting Mount Usu on the island of Hokkaido in Japan is also a stratovolcano. Stratovolcanoes are characterized by having plumbing systems that move magma from a chamber deep within the Earth's crust to vents at the surface. The height of Mt. St. Helens was reduced from about 2950 m (9677 ft) to about 2550 m (8364 ft) as a result of the explosive eruption on the morning of May 18. The eruption sent a column of dust and ash upwards more than 25 km into the atmosphere, and shock waves from the blast knocked down almost every tree within 10 km of the central crater. Massive avalanches and mudflows, generated by the near-instantaneous melting of deep snowpacks on the flanks of the mountain, devastated an area more than 20 km to the north and east of the former summit, and rivers choked with all sorts of debris were flooded more than 100 km away. The area of almost total destruction was about 600 sq. km. Ash from the eruption cloud was rapidly blown to the northeast and east producing lightning which started many small forest fires. An erie darkness caused by the cloud enveloped the landscape more than 200 km from the blast area, and ash

  15. Time Series Surface Deformation using Multi-Temporal InSAR Technique at Mount Sinabung Eruption in North Sumatra, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Eui-Hong; Lee, ChangWook; Jo, Eunyoung; Lee, SeulKi; Kim, KiYeon

    2014-05-01

    Sinabung volcano in Indonesia is a part of the Pacific Ring of Fire, formed due to the subduction between the Eurasian and the Indo-Australian plate. After about 400-year dormancy, Sinabung volcano erupted on August 29, 2010 and January 4, 2014, recently. We study the surface deformation of Sinabung volcano using ALOS/PALSAR and RADARSAT-2 interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) images acquired from February 2007 to September 2013. Based on multi-temporal InSAR processing, we can generate the ground surface deformation map due to the 2010 eruption. During the 3 years before the 2010 eruption, the volcano inflated at an average rate ~1.7 cm/yr with marked higher rate of 6.6 cm/year during the 6 months prior to the 2010 eruption. The inflation is constrained to the top of the volcano. Since the 2010 eruption to January 2011, the volcano has subsided for about 3 cm (or about 6 cm/yr). The observed inflation and deflation are modeled with a Mogi and Prolate spheroid source. The source of inflation is located about 0.3 - 1.3 km below sea level directly underneath the crater. On the other hand, deflation source is modeled about 0.6-1.0 km with coeruption period. The average volumetric change was about from 1.9x10-6 to -2.7x10-5 km3/yr during the eruption event using ALOS/PALSAR images. Recently, RADARSAT-2 SAR data were applied to new eruption event from September 2013 to January 2014 for frequently eruption during short time period. We interpret the inflation was due to magma accumulation at a shallow reservoir beneath the Sinabung volcano. The deflation was due to the magma withdrawal from the shallow reservoir during the eruption as well as thermo-elastic compaction of erupted material.

  16. Principal component analysis for surface reflection components and structure in facial images and synthesis of facial images for various ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Misa; Toyota, Saori; Ojima, Nobutoshi; Ogawa-Ochiai, Keiko; Tsumura, Norimichi

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, principal component analysis is applied to the distribution of pigmentation, surface reflectance, and landmarks in whole facial images to obtain feature values. The relationship between the obtained feature vectors and the age of the face is then estimated by multiple regression analysis so that facial images can be modulated for woman aged 10-70. In a previous study, we analyzed only the distribution of pigmentation, and the reproduced images appeared to be younger than the apparent age of the initial images. We believe that this happened because we did not modulate the facial structures and detailed surfaces, such as wrinkles. By considering landmarks and surface reflectance over the entire face, we were able to analyze the variation in the distributions of facial structures and fine asperity, and pigmentation. As a result, our method is able to appropriately modulate the appearance of a face so that it appears to be the correct age.

  17. Genetic Diversity of Plasmodium falciparum Merozoite Surface Protein-1 Block 2 in Sites of Contrasting Altitudes and Malaria Endemicities in the Mount Cameroon Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanji, Samuel; Kengne-Ouafo, Arnaud J.; Joan Eyong, Ebanga E.; Kimbi, Helen K.; Tendongfor, Nicholas; Ndamukong-Nyanga, Judith L.; Nana-Djeunga, Hugues C.; Bourguinat, Catherine; Sofeu-Feugaing, David D.; Charvet, Claude L.

    2012-01-01

    The present study analyzed the relationship between the genetic diversity of Plasmodium falciparum and parasitologic/entomologic indices in the Mount Cameroon region by using merozoite surface protein 1 as a genetic marker. Blood samples were collected from asymptomatic children from three altitude zones (high, intermediate, and low). Parasitologic and entomologic indices were determined by microscopy and landing catch mosquito collection/circumsporozoite protein–enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. A total of 142 randomly selected P. falciparum-positive blood samples were genotyped by using a nested polymerase chain reaction–based technique. K-1 polymerase chain reaction products were also sequenced. As opposed to high altitude, the highest malaria prevalence (70.65%) and entomologic inoculation rate (2.43 infective/bites/night) were recorded at a low altitude site. Seven (18.91%), 22 (36.66%), and 19 (42.22%) samples from high, intermediate, and low altitudes, respectively, contained multiclonal infections. A new K-1 polymorphism was identified. This study shows a positive non-linear association between low/intermediate altitude (high malaria transmission) and an increase in P. falciparum merozoite surface protein 1 block 2 polymorphisms. PMID:22556072

  18. Monthly version of HadISST sea surface temperature state-space components

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — State-Space Decomposition of Monthly version of HadISST sea surface temperature component (1-degree). See Rayner, N. A., Parker, D. E., Horton, E. B., Folland, C....

  19. An inertia-type hybrid mount combining a rubber mount and a piezostack actuator for naval shipboard equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seok-Jun Moon

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper has been focused on developing a new hybrid mount for shipboard equipment used in naval surface ships and submarines. While the hybrid mount studied in our previous research was 100 kg-class series-type mount, the new hybrid mount has been designed as an inertia-type mount capable of supporting a static of 500 kg. The proposed mount consists of a commercial rubber resilient mount, a piezostack actuator and an inertial mass. The piezostack actuator connected with the inertial mass generates actively the control force. The performances of the proposed mount with a newly designed specific controller have been evaluated in accordance with US military specifications and compared with the passive mount. An isolation system consisting of four proposed mounts and auxiliary devices has been also tested. Through a series of experimental tests, it has been confirmed that the proposed mount provides better performance than the US Navy's standard passive mounts.

  20. Printing transferable components using microstructured elastomeric surfaces with pressure modulated reversible adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menard, Etienne; Rogers, John A.; Kim, Seok; Carlson, Andrew

    2016-08-09

    In a method of printing a transferable component, a stamp including an elastomeric post having three-dimensional relief features protruding from a surface thereof is pressed against a component on a donor substrate with a first pressure that is sufficient to mechanically deform the relief features and a region of the post between the relief features to contact the component over a first contact area. The stamp is retracted from the donor substrate such that the component is adhered to the stamp. The stamp including the component adhered thereto is pressed against a receiving substrate with a second pressure that is less than the first pressure to contact the component over a second contact area that is smaller than the first contact area. The stamp is then retracted from the receiving substrate to delaminate the component from the stamp and print the component onto the receiving substrate. Related apparatus and stamps are also discussed.

  1. Identifying apple surface defects using principal components analysis and artifical neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artificial neural networks and principal components were used to detect surface defects on apples in near-infrared images. Neural networks were trained and tested on sets of principal components derived from columns of pixels from images of apples acquired at two wavelengths (740 nm and 950 nm). I...

  2. Control of Surface Mounted Permanent Magnet Motors with Special Application to Fractional-Slot Motors with Concentrated Windings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKeever, John W [ORNL; Patil, Niranjan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Lawler, Jack [ORNL

    2007-07-01

    at high speed depends solely on machine parameters and is virtually independent of the load level and the direct current (dc) supply voltage. Thus, the motor current is virtually the same at no load as at full load resulting in poor efficiency at less than full load conditions. While an inductance higher than the value cited above is warranted, it still does not ensure that the motor current is proportional to load; consequently, the problem of low efficiency at high speed and partial load is not resolved but is only mitigated. A common definition of 'base speed' is the speed at which the voltage applied to the motor armature is equal to the magnitude of the back-emf. The results in this study indicate that the dc supply voltage should be adequate to drive rated current into the motor winding at the specified base speed. At a minimum this requires sufficient voltage to overcome not only the back-emf but also the voltage drop across the internal impedance of the machine. For a high inductance PMSM, the internal impedance at base speed can be considerable and substantial additional voltage is required to overcome the internal voltage drop. It is further shown that even more voltage than the minimum required for injecting rated current at base speed can be beneficial by allowing the required power to be developed at lower current, which reduces losses in the motor and inverter components. Further, it is shown that the current is minimized at a unique speed; consequently, there may be room for optimization if the drive spends a substantial amount of its operating life at a certain speed (for example 60 mph). In this study, fundamental frequency phasor models are developed for a synchronous PMSM and the control systems that drive them is CPA. The models were compared with detailed simulations to show their validity. The result was used to design a traction drive control system with optimized efficiency to drive the fractional-slot motor with concentrated

  3. An experimental study of flow patterns and endwall heat transfer upstream of a surface-mounted rectangular obstruction in a turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Quan

    1991-02-01

    A seven-phase experimental investigation documented the three-dimensional separation region in front of a surface-mounted rectangular obstruction. The obstruction was centered between sidewalls of a wind tunnel in a turbulent approaching boundary layer. The major feature of this flow was a horseshoe vortex system near the junction. Real-time vortex structures were visualized with a laser sheet. Interior velocity, turbulence intensity and velocity power spectrum measurements were obtained with a Laser Doppler Anemometer (LDA) and a hot-wire anemometer. Ink dot surface flow visualizations and pressure measurements were acquired on the endwall under the vortex system. Endwall heat transfer coefficients were nonintrusively measured by an infrared imaging system. Laser sheet flow visualizations indicated a vortex system with randon oscillations. In the time-averaged sense, ink-dot flow visualizations, LDA measurements and endwall pressure measurements indicated a well defined primary vortex. The separation region was 70 percent larger, in the streamwise direction, than that in front of a cylinder with a diameter the same as the obstruction width. The time-averaged primary vortex center, where maximum values of turbulence intensity were measured, was located farther away from the obstruction leading edge at higher freestream velocities. Endwall heat transfer coefficient distribution measurements on the endwall surface revealed that the obstruction established a complex heat transfer pattern. Local heat transfer rates as much as 80 percent greater than the undisturbed two-dimensional level were recorded upstream of the obstruction along the test section centerline. A local heat transfer coefficient peak was associated with the local maximum turbulence intensity measured near the endwall by LDA.

  4. User's guide to designing and mounting lenses and mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalskie, B.J.

    1978-01-01

    The guidebook is a practitioner-oriented supplement to standard texts in optics and mechanical engineering. It reflects practical experience with the oftentimes troublesome aspects of effectively integrating optical components with mechanical hardware. Accordingly, its focus is on the techniques, assumptions, and levels of design sophistication needed for a wide variety of sizes and optical surface quality levels. It is intended to be a primer for engineers, designers, and draftsmen already familiar with some of the problems encountered in mounting optical components and who are responsible for developing components for high-energy laser systems

  5. The study on surface characteristics of high transmission components by 3D printing technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Hui-Jean; Huang, Chien-Yao; Wang, Wan-Hsuan; Lin, Ping-Hung; Tsay, Ho-Lin; Hsu, Wei-Yao

    2017-06-01

    3D printing is a high freedom fabrication technique. Any components, which designed by 3D design software or scanned from real parts, can be printed. The printing materials include metals, plastics and biocompatible materials etc. Especially for those high transmission components used in optical system or biomedical field can be printed, too. High transmission lens increases the performances of optical system. And high transmission cover or shell using in biomedical field helps observers to see the structures inside, such as brain, bone, and vessels. But the surface of printed components is not transparent, even the inside layer is transparent. If we increase the transmittance of surface, the components which fabricated by 3D printing process could have high transmission. In this paper, we using illuminating and polishing methods to improve the transmittance of printing surface. The illuminating time is the experiment parameters in illuminating method. The roughness and transmission of printing components are the evaluating targets. A 3D printing machine, Stratasys Connex 500, has been used to print high transmittance components in this paper. The surface transmittance of printing components is increasing above 80 % by polishing method.

  6. Multi-scale roughness spectra of Mount St. Helens debris flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Richard T.; England, Anthony W.

    1993-01-01

    A roughness spectrum allows surface structure to be interpreted as a sum of sinusoidal components with differing wavelengths. Knowledge of the roughness spectrum gives insight into the mechanisms responsible for electromagnetic scattering at a given wavelength. Measured spectra from 10-year-old primary debris flow surfaces at Mount St. Helens conform to a power-law spectral model, suggesting that these surfaces are scaling over the measured range of spatial frequencies. Measured spectra from water-deposited surfaces deviate from this model.

  7. A Novel Method to Magnetic Flux Linkage Optimization of Direct-Driven Surface-Mounted Permanent Magnet Synchronous Generator Based on Nonlinear Dynamic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Xie

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper pays attention to magnetic flux linkage optimization of a direct-driven surface-mounted permanent magnet synchronous generator (D-SPMSG. A new compact representation of the D-SPMSG nonlinear dynamic differential equations to reduce system parameters is established. Furthermore, the nonlinear dynamic characteristics of new D-SPMSG equations in the process of varying magnetic flux linkage are considered, which are illustrated by Lyapunov exponent spectrums, phase orbits, Poincaré maps, time waveforms and bifurcation diagrams, and the magnetic flux linkage stable region of D-SPMSG is acquired concurrently. Based on the above modeling and analyses, a novel method of magnetic flux linkage optimization is presented. In addition, a 2 MW D-SPMSG 2D/3D model is designed by ANSYS software according to the practical design requirements. Finally, five cases of D-SPMSG models with different magnetic flux linkages are simulated by using the finite element analysis (FEA method. The nephograms of magnetic flux density are agreement with theoretical analysis, which both confirm the correctness and effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  8. Adsorption-Driven Surface Segregation of the Less Reactive Alloy Component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Klas Jerker; Calle Vallejo, Federico; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Counterintuitive to expectations and all prior observations of adsorbate-induced surface segregation of the more reactive alloy component (the one forming the stronger bond with the adsorbate), we show that CO adsorption at elevated pressures and temperatures pulls the less reactive Cu to the sur......Counterintuitive to expectations and all prior observations of adsorbate-induced surface segregation of the more reactive alloy component (the one forming the stronger bond with the adsorbate), we show that CO adsorption at elevated pressures and temperatures pulls the less reactive Cu...... to the surface of a CuPt near-surface alloy. The Cu surface segregation is driven by the formation of a stable self-organized CO/CuPt surface alloy structure and is rationalized in terms of the radically stronger Pt−CO bond when Cu is present in the first surface layer of Pt. The results, which are expected...... to apply to a range of coinage (Cu, Ag)/Pt-group bimetallic surface alloys, open up new possibilities in selective and dynamical engineering of alloy surfaces for catalysis....

  9. Surface layer scintillometry for estimating the sensible heat flux component of the surface energy balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Savage

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The relatively recently developed scintillometry method, with a focus on the dual-beam surface layer scintillometer (SLS, allows boundary layer atmospheric turbulence, surface sensible heat and momentum flux to be estimated in real-time. Much of the previous research using the scintillometer method has involved the large aperture scintillometer method, with only a few studies using the SLS method. The SLS method has been mainly used by agrometeorologists, hydrologists and micrometeorologists for atmospheric stability and surface energy balance studies to obtain estimates of sensible heat from which evaporation estimates representing areas of one hectare or larger are possible. Other applications include the use of the SLS method in obtaining crucial input parameters for atmospheric dispersion and turbulence models. The SLS method relies upon optical scintillation of a horizontal laser beam between transmitter and receiver for a separation distance typically between 50 and 250 m caused by refractive index inhomogeneities in the atmosphere that arise from turbulence fluctuations in air temperature and to a much lesser extent the fluctuations in water vapour pressure. Measurements of SLS beam transmission allow turbulence of the atmosphere to be determined, from which sub-hourly, real-time and in situ path-weighted fluxes of sensible heat and momentum may be calculated by application of the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. Unlike the eddy covariance (EC method for which corrections for flow distortion and coordinate rotation are applied, no corrections to the SLS measurements, apart from a correction for water vapour pressure, are applied. Also, path-weighted SLS estimates over the propagation path are obtained. The SLS method also offers high temporal measurement resolution and usually greater spatial coverage compared to EC, Bowen ratio energy balance, surface renewal and other sensible heat measurement methods. Applying the shortened surface

  10. Friction surfacing for enhanced surface protection of marine engineering components: erosion-corrosion study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajakumar, S.; Balasubramanian, V.; Balakrishnan, M.

    2016-08-01

    Good mechanical properties combined with outstanding corrosion-resistance properties of cast nickel-aluminum bronze (NAB) alloy lead to be a specific material for many marine applications, including ship propellers. However, the erosion-corrosion resistance of cast-NAB alloy is not as good as wrought NAB alloy. Hence, in this investigation, an attempt has been made to improve the erosion-corrosion resistance of cast NAB alloy by depositing wrought (extruded) NAB alloy applying the friction surfacing (FS) technique. Erosion-corrosion tests were carried out in slurries composed of sand particles of 3.5% NaCl solution. Silica sand having a nominal size range of 250-355 μm is used as an erodent. Specimens were tested at 30° and 90° impingement angles. It is observed that the erosion and erosion-corrosion resistance of friction surfaced NAB alloy exhibited an improvement as compared to cast NAB alloy. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis showed that the erosion tracks developed on the cast NAB alloy were wider and deeper than those formed on the friction surfaced extruded NAB alloy.

  11. Microclimatic models. Estimation of components of the energy balance over land surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heikinheimo, M.; Venaelaeinen, A.; Tourula, T. [Finnish Meteorological Inst., Helsinki (Finland). Air Quality Dept.

    1996-12-31

    Climates at regional scale are strongly dependent on the interaction between atmosphere and its lower boundary, the oceans and the land surface mosaic. Land surfaces influence climate through their albedo, and the aerodynamic roughness, the processes of the biosphere and many soil hydrological properties; all these factors vary considerably geographically. Land surfaces receive a certain portion of the solar irradiance depending on the cloudiness, atmospheric transparency and surface albedo. Short-wave solar irradiance is the source of the heat energy exchange at the earth`s surface and also regulates many biological processes, e.g. photosynthesis. Methods for estimating solar irradiance, atmospheric transparency and surface albedo were reviewed during the course of this project. The solar energy at earth`s surface is consumed for heating the soil and the lower atmosphere. Where moisture is available, evaporation is one of the key components of the surface energy balance, because the conversion of liquid water into water vapour consumes heat. The evaporation process was studied by carrying out field experiments and testing parameterisation for a cultivated agricultural surface and for lakes. The micrometeorological study over lakes was carried out as part of the international `Northern Hemisphere Climatic Processes Experiment` (NOPEX/BAHC) in Sweden. These studies have been aimed at a better understanding of the energy exchange processes of the earth`s surface-atmosphere boundary for a more accurate and realistic parameterisation of the land surface in atmospheric models

  12. Principal Component Surface (2011) for St. Thomas East End Reserve, St. Thomas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 0.3x0.3 meter principal component analysis (PCA) surface for areas the St. Thomas East End Reserve (STEER) in the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI)....

  13. [Studies on the interaction of blood components with ultra-smooth polymer surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, T.H. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). School of Medicine

    1989-04-17

    This report is in three parts, though each is briefly described data is provided. The three parts address (1) radioiodination of human thrombin and fibrinogen; (2) interaction of blood components with ultra- smooth polymer surfaces; and (3) initial studies of Tecoflex and treated Tecoflex cups with normal serum samples.

  14. Two-component injection moulding simulation of ABS-POM micro structured surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosello, Guido; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Islam, Aminul

    2013-01-01

    a pair of thermoplastic materials (ABS and POM) were conducted. Three dimensional process simulations based on the finite element method have been performed to explore the capability of predicting filling pattern shape at component-level and surface micro feature-level in a polymer/polymer overmoulding...

  15. Ultrasonic detection technology based on joint robot on composite component with complex surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Juan; Xu, Chunguang; Zhang, Lan [School of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing (China)

    2014-02-18

    Some components have complex surface, such as the airplane wing and the shell of a pressure vessel etc. The quality of these components determines the reliability and safety of related equipment. Ultrasonic nondestructive detection is one of the main methods used for testing material defects at present. In order to improve the testing precision, the acoustic axis of the ultrasonic transducer should be consistent with the normal direction of the measured points. When we use joint robots, automatic ultrasonic scan along the component surface normal direction can be realized by motion trajectory planning and coordinate transformation etc. In order to express the defects accurately and truly, the robot position and the signal of the ultrasonic transducer should be synchronized.

  16. NEXAFS characterization of DNA components and molecular-orientation of surface-bound DNA oligomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuel, Newton T.; Lee, C.-Y.; Gamble, Lara J.; Fischer, Daniel A.; Castner, David G.

    2006-01-01

    Single stranded DNA oligomers (ssDNA) immobilized onto solid surfaces forms the basis for several biotechnological applications such as DNA microarrays, affinity separations, and biosensors. Surface structure of Surface-bound oligomers is expected to significantly influence their biological activity and interactions with the environment. In this study near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) is used to characterize the components of DNA (nucleobases, nucleotides and nucleosides) and the orientation information of surface-bound ssDNA. The K-edges of carbon, nitrogen and oxygen have spectra with features that are characteristic of the different chemical species present in the nucleobases of DNA. The effect of addition of the DNA sugar and phosphate components on the NEXAFS K-edge spectra was also investigated. The polarization-dependent nitrogen K-edge NEXAFS data show significant changes for different orientations of surface bound ssDNA. These results establish NEXAFS as a powerful technique for chemical and structural characterization of surface-bound DNA oligomers

  17. An Integrated Surface Engineering Technology Development for Improving Energy Efficiency of Engine Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen Hsu; Liming Chang; Huan Zhan

    2009-05-31

    Frictional losses are inherent in most practical mechanical systems. The ability to control friction offers many opportunities to achieve energy conservation. Over the years, materials, lubricants, and surface modifications have been used to reduce friction in automotive and diesel engines. However, in recent years, progress in friction reduction technology has slowed because many of the inefficiencies have been eliminated. A new avenue for friction reduction is needed. Designing surfaces specifically for friction reduction with concomitant enhanced durability for various engine components has emerged recently as a viable opportunity due to advances in fabrication and surface finishing techniques. Recently, laser ablated dimples on surfaces have shown friction reduction properties and have been demonstrated successfully in conformal contacts such as seals where the speed is high and the load is low. The friction reduction mechanism in this regime appears to depend on the size, patterns, and density of dimples in the contact. This report describes modeling efforts in characterizing surface textures and understanding their mechanisms for enhanced lubrication under high contact pressure conditions. A literature survey is first presented on the development of descriptors for irregular surface features. This is followed by a study of the hydrodynamic effects of individual micro-wedge dimples using the analytical solution of the 1-D Reynolds equation and the determination of individual components of the total friction resistance. The results obtained provide a better understanding of the dimple orientation effects and the approach which may be used to further compare the friction reduction provided by different texture patterns.

  18. Characterizing Mediterranean Land Surfaces as Component of the Regional Climate System by Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolle, H.-J.; Koslowsky, D.; Menenti, M.; Nerry, F.; Otterman, Joseph; Starr, D.

    1998-01-01

    Extensive areas in the Mediterranean region are subject to land degradation and desertification. The high variability of the coupling between the surface and the atmosphere affects the regional climate. Relevant surface characteristics, such as spectral reflectance, surface emissivity in the thermal-infrared region, and vegetation indices, serve as "primary" level indicators for the state of the surface. Their spatial, seasonal and interannual variability can be monitored from satellites. Using relationships between these primary data and combining them with prior information about the land surfaces (such as topography, dominant soil type, land use, collateral ground measurements and models), a second layer of information is built up which specifies the land surfaces as a component of the regional climate system. To this category of parameters which are directly involved in the exchange of energy, momentum and mass between the surface and the atmosphere, belong broadband albedo, thermodynamic surface temperature, vegetation types, vegetation cover density, soil top moisture, and soil heat flux. Information about these parameters finally leads to the computation of sensible and latent heat fluxes. The methodology was tested with pilot data sets. Full resolution, properly calibrated and normalized NOAA-AVHRR multi-annual primary data sets are presently compiled for the whole Mediterranean area, to study interannual variability and longer term trends.

  19. The correct lens mount lightweighting design of thermal cycle stress in Cassegrain telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, M. Y.; Chang, S. T.; Huang, T. M.; Hsu, Ming-Ying

    2011-10-01

    The Cassegrain telescope system was design for space environment. The correct lens mount assembly is included as correct lens, lens mount, spacer, mount barrel and retainer. The system mass budget allocated to correct lens assembly was 5 Kg. Meanwhile, according to optical design the correct lens is made from fused silica, the lens diameter is 130 mm, and the mass is 2.3 Kg. Therefore, remain mass budget is 2.7 Kg; including the lens mount, spacer, mount barrel and retainer. The telescope system deformation is mainly caused by thermal deformation on space orbit. The correct lens mount was made from invar material in initial design. The CTE (Coefficient of Thermal Expansion) of invar is only 1* 10-6/°C, low CTE would be resistant to thermal deformation, but invar density is 8* 10-6 kg/mm3. If all components were made from invar, the total mass was over 2.7 kg. Thus, the components material would consider titanium alloy (CTE is 8.6* 10-6/°C, density is 4.43* 10-6 kg/mm3) or aluminum alloy (CTE is 23.6* 10-6/°C, density is 2.81* 10-6 kg/mm3). The titanium alloy density is 1.83 times lighter than invar, but CTE is 8.6 times higher. The aluminum alloy density is 2.84 times lighter then invar, but CTE is 23.6 times higher. The lens mount thermal deformation would effect correct lens surface wavefront error and introduce optical aberration. This article analyzes the correct lens assembly thermal deformation and optical performance in different lens mount material. From above conditions, using FEM (Finite Element Method) and optical software, simulation and optimization on the lens mount design have been performed to achieve system mass requirement.

  20. Non-equilibrium Thermodynamic Dissolution Theory for Multi-Component Solid/Liquid Surfaces Involving Surface Adsorption and Radiolysis Kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stout, R B

    2001-01-01

    A theoretical expression is developed for the dissolution rate response for multi-component radioactive materials that have surface adsorption kinetics and radiolysis kinetics when wetted by a multi-component aqueous solution. An application for this type of dissolution response is the performance evaluation of multi-component spent nuclear fuels (SNFs) for long term interim storage and for geological disposition. Typically, SNF compositions depend on initial composition, uranium oxide and metal alloys being most common, and on reactor burnup which results in a wide range of fission product and actinide concentrations that decay by alpha, beta, and gamma radiation. These compositional/burnup ranges of SNFs, whether placed in interim storage or emplaced in a geologic repository, will potentially be wetted by multi-component aqueous solutions, and these solutions may be further altered by radiolytic aqueous species due to three radiation fields. The solid states of the SNFs are not thermodynamically stable when wetted and will dissolve, with or without radiolysis. The following development of a dissolution theory is based on a non-equilibrium thermodynamic analysis of energy reactions and energy transport across a solid-liquid phase change discontinuity that propagates at a quasi-steady, dissolution velocity. The integral form of the energy balance equation is used for this spatial surface discontinuity analysis. The integral formulation contains internal energy functional of classical thermodynamics for both the SNFs' solid state and surface adsorption species, and the adjacent liquid state, which includes radiolytic chemical species. The steady-state concentrations of radiolytic chemical species are expressed by an approximate analysis of the decay radiation transport equation. For purposes of illustration a modified Temkin adsorption isotherm was assumed for the surface adsorption kinetics on an arbitrary, finite area of the solid-liquid dissolution interface. For

  1. Simulated plasma facing component measurements for an in situ surface diagnostic on Alcator C-Moda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Z. S.; Whyte, D. G.

    2010-10-01

    The ideal in situ plasma facing component (PFC) diagnostic for magnetic fusion devices would perform surface element and isotope composition measurements on a shot-to-shot (˜10 min) time scale with ˜1 μm depth and ˜1 cm spatial resolution over large areas of PFCs. To this end, the experimental adaptation of the customary laboratory surface diagnostic—nuclear scattering of MeV ions—to the Alcator C-Mod tokamak is being guided by ACRONYM, a Geant4 synthetic diagnostic. The diagnostic technique and ACRONYM are described, and synthetic measurements of film thickness for boron-coated PFCs are presented.

  2. Improvement in the surface quality of structural components produced by the RTM-process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaeli, W.; Dyckhoff, J. [Institute of Plastics Processing, Aachen (Germany)

    1993-12-31

    During the production of long or continuous fiber reinforced structural components in Resin Transfer Moulding (RTM), surface defects like voids, pinholes or unevenness frequently occur. These have to be repaired by manual labor before final painting. The conditions for the formation of voids in the laminate as well as surface defects are investigated by model experiments, making use of a window mould. Generally the resin is assumed to flow through the fiber reinforcement in a plug flow. The investigations indicate that advance either in the nonwovens of the surface or in the center of the laminate depends on the flow front velocity. This can be attributed to a superposition of capillary and flow effects. In order to obtain a high surface quality, the flow front velocity has to be kept within a material-related band width. Otherwise, areas of air enclosure in the laminate or surface defects like pinholes will result. With the aid of a steel mould with a large area, procedural variants are investigated to reduce surface faults and to decrease the air content in the laminate. The analysis indicates that the air content can be significantly reduced by injecting the resin into a cavity filled with gaseous acetone and increasing the cavity pressure during the time of curing. Furthermore the long and short-term waviness of the surface is improved by these process modifications.

  3. [Determination of film thickness, component and content based on glass surface by using XRF spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Yan; Ma, Mi-Xia; Nie, Zuo-Ren

    2013-12-01

    Film thickness, component and content based on glass surface were determined by using XRF technic, measure condition and instrument work condition in every layer were set and adjusted for the best measure effect for every element. Background fundamental parameter (BG-FP) method was built up. Measure results with this method were consistent with the actual preparation course and the method could fit to production application.

  4. Quantitative determination of the intensities of known components in spectra obtained from surface analytical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, G.C.

    1984-01-01

    Linear least-squares methods have been used to quantitatively decompose experimental data obtained from surface analytical techniques into its separate components. The mathematical procedure for accomplishing this is described and examples are given of the use of this method with data obtained from Auger electron spectroscopy [both N(E) and derivative], x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and low energy ion scattering spectroscopy. The requirements on the quality of the data are discussed

  5. Integrated-Optics Components Utilizing Long-Range Surface Plasmon Polaritons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2004-01-01

    This thesis describes a new class of components for integrated optics, based on the propagation of long-range surface plasmon polaritons (LR-SPPs) along metal stripes embedded in a dielectric. These novel components can provide guiding of light as well as coupling and splitting from/into a number...... fabricated and optically characterized. At 1570 nm, coupling lengths of 1.9 and 0.8 mm are found for directional couplers with waveguides separated 4 and 0 µm, respectively. LR-SPP-based waveguides and waveguide components are modeled using the effective-refractive-index method and a good agreement...... with experimental results is obtained. The interaction of LR-SPPs with photonic crystals (PCs) is also studied. The PC structures are formed by periodic arrays of gold bumps that are arranged in a triangular lattice and placed symmetrically on both sides of a thin gold film. The LR-SPP transmission through...

  6. Mount Protects Thin-Walled Glass or Ceramic Tubes from Large Thermal and Vibration Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Michael; Schmidt, Stephen; Marsh. James; Dahya, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    The design allows for the low-stress mounting of fragile objects, like thin walled glass, by using particular ways of compensating, isolating, or releasing the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) differences between the mounted object and the mount itself. This mount profile is lower than true full kinematic mounting. Also, this approach enables accurate positioning of the component for electrical and optical interfaces. It avoids the higher and unpredictable stress issues that often result from potting the object. The mount has been built and tested to space-flight specifications, and has been used for fiber-optic, optical, and electrical interfaces for a spaceflight mission. This mount design is often metal and is slightly larger than the object to be mounted. The objects are optical or optical/electrical, and optical and/or electrical interfaces are required from the top and bottom. This requires the mount to be open at both ends, and for the object s position to be controlled. Thin inside inserts at the top and bottom contact the housing at defined lips, or edges, and hold the fragile object in the mount. The inserts can be customized to mimic the outer surface of the object, which further reduces stress. The inserts have the opposite CTE of the housing material, partially compensating for the CTE difference that causes thermal stress. A spring washer is inserted at one end to compensate for more CTE difference and to hold the object against the location edge of the mount for any optical position requirements. The spring also ensures that any fiber-optic or optic interface, which often requires some pressure to ensure a good interface, does not overstress the fragile object. The insert thickness, material, and spring washer size can be traded against each other to optimize the mount and stresses for various thermal and vibration load ranges and other mounting requirements. The alternate design uses two separate, unique features to reduce stress and hold the

  7. 2D surface temperature measurement of plasma facing components with modulated active pyrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiel, S.; Loarer, T.; Pocheau, C.; Roche, H.; Gauthier, E.; Aumeunier, M.-H.; Courtois, X.; Jouve, M.; Balorin, C.; Moncada, V.; Le Niliot, C.; Rigollet, F.

    2014-01-01

    In nuclear fusion devices, such as Tore Supra, the plasma facing components (PFC) are in carbon. Such components are exposed to very high heat flux and the surface temperature measurement is mandatory for the safety of the device and also for efficient plasma scenario development. Besides this measurement is essential to evaluate these heat fluxes for a better knowledge of the physics of plasma-wall interaction, it is also required to monitor the fatigue of PFCs. Infrared system (IR) is used to manage to measure surface temperature in real time. For carbon PFCs, the emissivity is high and known (ε ∼ 0.8), therefore the contribution of the reflected flux from environment and collected by the IR cameras can be neglected. However, the future tokamaks such as WEST and ITER will be equipped with PFCs in metal (W and Be/W, respectively) with low and variable emissivities (ε ∼ 0.1–0.4). Consequently, the reflected flux will contribute significantly in the collected flux by IR camera. The modulated active pyrometry, using a bicolor camera, proposed in this paper allows a 2D surface temperature measurement independently of the reflected fluxes and the emissivity. Experimental results with Tungsten sample are reported and compared with simultaneous measurement performed with classical pyrometry (monochromatic and bichromatic) with and without reflective flux demonstrating the efficiency of this method for surface temperature measurement independently of the reflected flux and the emissivity

  8. Surface engineering glass-metal coatings designed for induction heating of ceramic components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Amir Azam; Labbe, Jean Claude

    2014-01-01

    The term Surface Engineering is of relatively recent origin and use, however, the use of coatings and treatments to render surfaces of materials more suitable for certain application or environment is not new. With the advent of Vacuum Technology, Surface Engineering has gained a whole new impetus, whereby expensive materials with adequate mechanical, chemical and thermal properties are being coated or treated on their surfaces in order to achieve what is called as Surface Engineered materials. The present paper presents an overview of recent achievements in Surface Engineering and gives a detailed view of a specific application where glass-metal composite coatings were deposited on ceramic components in order to render them sensitive to induction heating. Sintered glaze coatings containing silver particles in appropriate concentration can be used for the induction heating of porcelain. Mixtures of glass ceramic powders with silver are used to prepare self-transfer patterns, which are deposited over porcelain. Several configurations of these coatings, which are aesthetic to start with, are employed and heating patterns are recorded. The microstructure of these coatings is discussed in relation to the heating ability by a classical household induction system. The results show that this technique is practical and commercially viable

  9. Surface engineering glass-metal coatings designed for induction heating of ceramic components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A. A.; Labbe, J. C.

    2013-01-01

    The term Surface Engineering is of relatively recent origin and use, however, the use of coatings and treatments to render surfaces of materials more suitable for certain application or environment is not new. With the advent of Vacuum Technology, Surface Engineering has gained a whole new impetus, whereby expensive materials with adequate mechanical, chemical and thermal properties are being coated or treated on their surfaces in order to achieve what is called as Surface Engineered materials. The present paper presents an overview of recent achievements in Surface Engineering and gives a detailed view of a specific application where glass-metal composite coatings were deposited on ceramic components in order to render them sensitive to induction heating. Sintered glaze coatings containing silver particles in appropriate concentration can be used for the induction heating of porcelain. Mixtures of glass ceramic powders with silver are used to prepare self-transfer patterns, which are deposited over porcelain. Several configurations of these coatings, which are aesthetic to start with, are employed and heating patterns are recorded. The microstructure of these coatings is discussed in relation to the heating ability by a classical household induction system. The results show that this technique is practical and commercially viable. (author)

  10. Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David H [Redondo Beach, CA

    2012-04-10

    Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies are provided. In an embodiment, by way of example only, a sensor mount assembly includes a busbar, a main body, a backing surface, and a first finger. The busbar has a first end and a second end. The main body is overmolded onto the busbar. The backing surface extends radially outwardly relative to the main body. The first finger extends axially from the backing surface, and the first finger has a first end, a second end, and a tooth. The first end of the first finger is disposed on the backing surface, and the tooth is formed on the second end of the first finger.

  11. Sample mounts for microcrystal crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, Robert E. (Inventor); Stum, Zachary (Inventor); O'Neill, Kevin (Inventor); Kmetko, Jan (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Sample mounts (10) for mounting microcrystals of biological macromolecules for X-ray crystallography are prepared by using patterned thin polyimide films (12) that have curvature imparted thereto, for example, by being attached to a curved outer surface of a small metal rod (16). The patterned film (12) preferably includes a tip end (24) for holding a crystal. Preferably, a small sample aperture is disposed in the film for reception of the crystal. A second, larger aperture can also be provided that is connected to the sample aperture by a drainage channel, allowing removal of excess liquid and easier manipulation in viscous solutions. The curvature imparted to the film (12) increases the film's rigidity and allows a convenient scoop-like action for retrieving crystals. The polyimide contributes minimally to background and absorption, and can be treated to obtain desired hydrophobicity or hydrophilicity.

  12. Mounting with compliant cylinders for deformable mirrors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinlein, Claudia; Goy, Matthias; Lange, Nicolas; Appelfelder, Michael

    2015-04-01

    A method is presented to mount large aperture unimorph deformable mirrors by compliant cylinders (CC). The CCs are manufactured from a soft silicone, and shear testing is performed in order to evaluate the Young's modulus. A scale mirror model is assembled to evaluate mount-induced change of piezoelectric deformation, and its applicability for tightly focusing mirrors. Experiments do not show any decrease of piezoelectric stroke. Further it is shown that the changes of surface fidelity by the attachment of the deformable mirror to its mount are neglectable.

  13. Lactic acid bacteria in dairy food: surface characterization and interactions with food matrix components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgain, J; Scher, J; Francius, G; Borges, F; Corgneau, M; Revol-Junelles, A M; Cailliez-Grimal, C; Gaiani, C

    2014-11-01

    This review gives an overview of the importance of interactions occurring in dairy matrices between Lactic Acid Bacteria and milk components. Dairy products are important sources of biological active compounds of particular relevance to human health. These compounds include immunoglobulins, whey proteins and peptides, polar lipids, and lactic acid bacteria including probiotics. A better understanding of interactions between bioactive components and their delivery matrix may successfully improve their transport to their target site of action. Pioneering research on probiotic lactic acid bacteria has mainly focused on their host effects. However, very little is known about their interaction with dairy ingredients. Such knowledge could contribute to designing new and more efficient dairy food, and to better understand relationships between milk constituents. The purpose of this review is first to provide an overview of the current knowledge about the biomolecules produced on bacterial surface and the composition of the dairy matter. In order to understand how bacteria interact with dairy molecules, adhesion mechanisms are subsequently reviewed with a special focus on the environmental conditions affecting bacterial adhesion. Methods dedicated to investigate the bacterial surface and to decipher interactions between bacteria and abiotic dairy components are also detailed. Finally, relevant industrial implications of these interactions are presented and discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Thermographic analysis of plasma facing components covered by carbon surface layer in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardarein, Jean-Laurent

    2007-01-01

    Tokamaks are reactors based on the thermonuclear fusion energy with magnetic confinement of the plasma. In theses machines, several MW are coupled to the plasma for about 10 s. A large part of this power is directed towards plasma facing components (PFC). For better understanding and control the heat flux transfer from the plasma to the surrounding wall, it is very important to measure the surface temperature of the PFC and to estimate the imposed heat flux. In most of tokamaks using carbon PFC, the eroded carbon is circulating in the plasma and redeposited elsewhere. During the plasma operations, this leads at some locations to the formation of thin or thick carbon layers usually poorly attached to the PFC. These surface layers with unknown thermal properties complicate the calculation of the heat flux from IR surface temperature measurements. To solve this problem, we develop first, inverse method to estimate the heat flux using thermocouple (not sensitive to the carbon surface layers) temperature measurements. Then, we propose a front face pulsed photothermal method allowing an estimation of layers thermal diffusivity, conductivity, effusivity and the thermal contact resistance between the layer and the tile. The principle is to study with an infrared sensor, the cooling of the layer surface after heating by a short laser pulse, this cooling depending on the thermal properties of the successive layers. (author) [fr

  15. Components of the regular surface array of Aquaspirillum serpens MW5 and their assembly in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kist, M L; Murray, R G

    1984-02-01

    The two-layered regular surface array of Aquaspirillum serpens MW5 was removed from cell envelopes and dissociated into subunits by treatment with 6 M urea. The surface components reassembled onto an outer membrane surface and self-assembled into planar sheets in vitro in the presence of Ca2+ or Sr2+. The two layers were removed sequentially from cell envelopes by a two-step extraction procedure involving initial treatment with a high-pH buffer to remove the outermost surface layer and subsequent treatment with 6 M urea to remove the innermost layer. Analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that the outer and inner layers of the array were composed of two proteins with molecular weights of 125,000 and 150,000, respectively. The two layers assembled sequentially; the 150,000-molecular-weight protein formed an array on an outer membrane surface, and the 125,000-molecular-weight protein required that array as a template for its in vitro assembly.

  16. The contribution of inflammasome components on macrophage response to surface nanotopography and chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christo, Susan; Bachhuka, Akash; Diener, Kerrilyn R.; Vasilev, Krasimir; Hayball, John D.

    2016-05-01

    Implantable devices have become an established part of medical practice. However, often a negative inflammatory host response can impede the integration and functionality of the device. In this paper, we interrogate the role of surface nanotopography and chemistry on the potential molecular role of the inflammasome in controlling macrophage responses. To achieve this goal we engineered model substrata having precisely controlled nanotopography of predetermined height and tailored outermost surface chemistry. Bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDM) were harvested from genetically engineered mice deficient in the inflammasome components ASC, NLRP3 and AIM2. These cells were then cultured on these nanoengineered substrata and assessed for their capacity to attach and express pro-inflammatory cytokines. Our data provide evidence that the inflammasome components ASC, NLRP3 and AIM2 play a role in regulating macrophage adhesion and activation in response to surface nanotopography and chemistry. The findings of this paper are important for understanding the inflammatory consequences caused by biomaterials and pave the way to the rational design of future implantable devices having controlled and predictable inflammatory outcomes.

  17. Surface inspection system for industrial components based on shape from shading minimization approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotan, Muhammed; Öz, Cemil

    2017-12-01

    An inspection system using estimated three-dimensional (3-D) surface characteristics information to detect and classify the faults to increase the quality control on the frequently used industrial components is proposed. Shape from shading (SFS) is one of the basic and classic 3-D shape recovery problems in computer vision. In our application, we developed a system using Frankot and Chellappa SFS method based on the minimization of the selected basis function. First, the specialized image acquisition system captured the images of the component. To eliminate noise, wavelet transform is applied to the taken images. Then, estimated gradients were used to obtain depth and surface profiles. Depth information was used to determine and classify the surface defects. Also, a comparison made with some linearization-based SFS algorithms was discussed. The developed system was applied to real products and the results indicated that using SFS approaches is useful and various types of defects can easily be detected in a short period of time.

  18. Sticky pin mounting

    OpenAIRE

    Lilja, David

    2016-01-01

    The study was conducted at Volvo Arvika were pins sometimes are sticky to mount during assembly of wheel loaders. This causes problems regarding ergonomic, quality, cost and productivity. Due to deviations in tolerances, defects and errors, assemblers are forced to use equipment such as sledgehammers to mount the pins. The purpose of this study is to achieve and assembly process which meets Volvo´s criteria’s. By investigation the flows for frames at Volvo Arvika, defects and errors were disc...

  19. The timing and cause of glacial activity during the last glacial in central Tibet based on 10Be surface exposure dating east of Mount Jaggang, the Xainza range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Guocheng; Zhou, Weijian; Yi, Chaolu; Fu, Yunchong; Zhang, Li; Li, Ming

    2018-04-01

    Mountain glaciers are sensitive to climate change, and can provide valuable information for inferring former climates on the Tibetan Plateau (TP). The increasing glacial chronologies indicate that the timing of the local Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) recorded across the TP is asynchronous, implying different local influences of the mid-latitude westerlies and Asian Summer Monsoon in triggering glacier advances. However, the well-dated sites are still too few, especially in the transition zone between regions controlled by the two climate systems. Here we present detailed last glacial chronologies for the Mount Jaggang area, in the Xainza range, central Tibet, with forty-three apparent 10Be exposure-ages ranging from 12.4 ± 0.8 ka to 61.9 ± 3.8 ka. These exposure-ages indicate that at least seven glacial episodes occurred during the last glacial cycle east of Mount Jaggang. These include: a local LGM that occurred at ∼61.9 ± 3.8 ka, possibly corresponding to Marine Isotope Stage 4 (MIS 4); subsequent glacial advances at ∼43.2 ± 2.6 ka and ∼35.1 ± 2.1 ka during MIS 3; one glacial re-advance/standstill at MIS3/2 transition (∼29.8 ± 1.8 ka); and three glacial re-advances/standstills that occurred following MIS 3 at ∼27.9 ± 1.7 ka, ∼21.8 ± 1.3 ka, and ∼15.1 ± 0.9 ka. The timing of these glacial activities is roughly in agreement with North Atlantic millennial-scale climate oscillations (Heinrich events), suggesting the potential correlations between these abrupt climate changes and glacial fluctuations in the Mount Jaggang area. The successively reduced glacial extent might have resulted from an overall decrease in Asian Summer Monsoon intensity over this timeframe.

  20. Preliminary Assessment of Seals for Dust Mitigation of Mechanical Components for Lunar Surface Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Irebert R.; Handschuh, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Component tests were conducted on spring-loaded Teflon seals to determine their performance in keeping lunar simulant out of mechanical component gearbox, motor, and bearing housings. Baseline tests were run in a dry-room without simulant for 10,000 cycles to determine wear effects of the seal against either anodized aluminum or stainless steel shafts. Repeat tests were conducted using lunar simulants JSC-1A and LHT-2M. Finally, tests were conducted with and without simulant in vacuum at ambient temperature. Preliminary results indicate minimal seal and shaft wear through 10,000 cycles, and more importantly, no simulant was observed to pass through the seal-shaft interface. Future endurance tests are planned at relevant NASA Lunar Surface System architecture shaft sizes and operating conditions.

  1. Response Surface Modeling of Combined-Cycle Propulsion Components using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, C. J., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Three examples of response surface modeling with CFD are presented for combined cycle propulsion components. The examples include a mixed-compression-inlet during hypersonic flight, a hydrogen-fueled scramjet combustor during hypersonic flight, and a ducted-rocket nozzle during all-rocket flight. Three different experimental strategies were examined, including full factorial, fractionated central-composite, and D-optimal with embedded Plackett-Burman designs. The response variables have been confined to integral data extracted from multidimensional CFD results. Careful attention to uncertainty assessment and modeling bias has been addressed. The importance of automating experimental setup and effectively communicating statistical results are emphasized.

  2. Proceedings of the joint meeting on Plasma Surface Interaction (PSI) and Plasma Facing Components (PFC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    The joint meeting on Plasma Surface Interaction (PSI) and Plasma Facing Components (PFC) was held in Naka Fusion Establishment on December 1, 2000. This meeting has been held to enhance information exchange between PSI and PFC researchers. In the present meeting, there were 11 presentations which covered current status of PSI and PFC studies for large fusion devices such as ITER, JT-60 and LHD, and basic studies on Hydrogen isotope behavior in the fusion material. This report includes abstracts and view graphs of these presentations. (author)

  3. Principal component analysis of bacteria using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guicheteau, Jason; Christesen, Steven D.

    2006-05-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) provides rapid fingerprinting of biomaterial in a non-destructive manner. The problem of tissue fluorescence, which can overwhelm a normal Raman signal from biological samples, is largely overcome by treatment of biomaterials with colloidal silver. This work presents a study into the applicability of qualitative SER spectroscopy with principal component analysis (PCA) for the discrimination of four biological threat simulants; Bacillus globigii, Pantoea agglomerans, Brucella noetomae, and Yersinia rohdei. We also demonstrate differentiation of gram-negative and gram-positive species and as well as spores and vegetative cells of Bacillus globigii.

  4. Principal component analysis for surface reflection components and structure in the facial image and synthesis of the facial image in various ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Misa; Toyota, Saori; Ojima, Nobutoshi; Ogawa-Ochiai, Keiko; Tsumura, Norimichi

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, principal component analysis is applied to pigmentation distributions, surface reflectance components and facial landmarks in the whole facial images to obtain feature values. Furthermore, the relationship between the obtained feature vectors and age is estimated by multiple regression analysis to modulate facial images in woman of ages 10 to 70. In our previous work, we analyzed only pigmentation distributions and the reproduced images looked younger than the reproduced age by the subjective evaluation. We considered that this happened because we did not modulate the facial structures and detailed surfaces such as wrinkles. By analyzing landmarks represented facial structures and surface reflectance components, we analyzed the variation of facial structures and fine asperity distributions as well as pigmentation distributions in the whole face. As a result, our method modulate the appearance of a face by changing age more appropriately.

  5. Modification of the cellulosic component of hemp fibers using sulfonic acid derivatives: Surface and thermal characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Michael; Mussone, Paolo G; Bressler, David C

    2015-12-10

    The aim of this study was to characterize the surface, morphological, and thermal properties of hemp fibers treated with two commercially available, inexpensive, and water soluble sulfonic acid derivatives. Specifically, the cellulosic component of the fibers were targeted, because cellulose is not easily removed during chemical treatment. These acids have the potential to selectively transform the surfaces of natural fibers for composite applications. The proposed method proceeds in the absence of conventional organic solvents and high reaction temperatures. Surface chemical composition and signature were measured using gravimetric analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR). XPS data from the treated hemp fibers were characterized by measuring the reduction in O/C ratio and an increase in abundance of the C-C-O signature. FTIR confirmed the reaction with the emergence of peaks characteristic of disubstituted benzene and amino groups. Grafting of the sulfonic derivatives resulted in lower surface polarity. Thermogravimetric analysis revealed that treated fibers were characterized by lower percent degradation between 200 and 300 °C, and a higher initial degradation temperature. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Protection of surface assets on Mars from wind blown jettisoned spacecraft components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paton, Mark

    2017-07-01

    Jettisoned Entry, Descent and Landing System (EDLS) hardware from landing spacecraft have been observed by orbiting spacecraft, strewn over the Martian surface. Future Mars missions that land spacecraft close to prelanded assets will have to use a landing architecture that somehow minimises the possibility of impacts from these jettisoned EDLS components. Computer modelling is used here to investigate the influence of wind speed and direction on the distribution of EDLS components on the surface. Typical wind speeds encountered in the Martian Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) were found to be of sufficient strength to blow items having a low ballistic coefficient, i.e. Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators (HIADs) or parachutes, onto prelanded assets even when the lander itself touches down several kilometres away. Employing meteorological measurements and careful characterisation of the Martian PBL, e.g. appropriate wind speed probability density functions, may then benefit future spacecraft landings, increase safety and possibly help reduce the delta v budget for Mars landers that rely on aerodynamic decelerators.

  7. Mechanism study of initial filamentary damage in optical components owing to surface contamination particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoyan; Lei, Zemin; Lu, Xingqiang; Fan, Dianyuan

    2015-07-01

    Contaminations existing inevitably in high-power laser facilities modulate laser beams and decrease beam quality. This study set up a detection system to study the mechanism of initial filamentary damage in optical components induced by surface contaminations. The effect of ordinary solid particles, liquid particles, and solid-liquid mixed particles on the near-field intensity distribution of laser beam was studied and analyzed statistically. The experiment results show that pure solid particles make the beam generate diffraction rings with dark center usually in the shadow of the particles which is a weak intensity modulation; pure liquid particles focus the localized beam into a bright spot rapidly, but it is diffracted away soon; solid-liquid mixed particles cause diffraction rings with strongly bright center, but the high local intensity can be diffracted away only after a longer distance, which is one of the reason that induces the initial filamentary damage to optical components. The research results can predict the likelihood of component damage, and the corresponding preventive measures help to keep the safe operation of high-power laser facilities.

  8. Neural Network and Response Surface Methodology for Rocket Engine Component Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, Rajkumar; Papita, Nilay; Shyy, Wei; Tucker, P. Kevin; Griffin, Lisa W.; Haftka, Raphael; Fitz-Coy, Norman; McConnaughey, Helen (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The goal of this work is to compare the performance of response surface methodology (RSM) and two types of neural networks (NN) to aid preliminary design of two rocket engine components. A data set of 45 training points and 20 test points obtained from a semi-empirical model based on three design variables is used for a shear coaxial injector element. Data for supersonic turbine design is based on six design variables, 76 training, data and 18 test data obtained from simplified aerodynamic analysis. Several RS and NN are first constructed using the training data. The test data are then employed to select the best RS or NN. Quadratic and cubic response surfaces. radial basis neural network (RBNN) and back-propagation neural network (BPNN) are compared. Two-layered RBNN are generated using two different training algorithms, namely solverbe and solverb. A two layered BPNN is generated with Tan-Sigmoid transfer function. Various issues related to the training of the neural networks are addressed including number of neurons, error goals, spread constants and the accuracy of different models in representing the design space. A search for the optimum design is carried out using a standard gradient-based optimization algorithm over the response surfaces represented by the polynomials and trained neural networks. Usually a cubic polynominal performs better than the quadratic polynomial but exceptions have been noticed. Among the NN choices, the RBNN designed using solverb yields more consistent performance for both engine components considered. The training of RBNN is easier as it requires linear regression. This coupled with the consistency in performance promise the possibility of it being used as an optimization strategy for engineering design problems.

  9. Mathematical modelling of ultrasonic testing of components with defects close to a non-planar surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westlund, Jonathan; Bostroem, Anders

    2011-05-01

    Nondestructive testing with ultrasound is a standard procedure in the nuclear power industry. To develop and qualify the methods extensive experimental work with test blocks is usually required. This can be very time-consuming and costly and it also requires a good physical intuition of the situation. A reliable mathematical model of the testing situation can, therefore, be very valuable and cost-effective as it can reduce experimental work significantly. A good mathematical model enhances the physical intuition and is very useful for parametric studies, as a pedagogical tool, and for the qualification of procedures and personnel. The aim of the present report is to describe work that has been performed to model ultrasonic testing of components that contain a defect close to a nonplanar surface. For nuclear power applications this may be a crack or other defect on the inside of a pipe with a diameter change or connection. This is an extension of the computer program UTDefect, which previously only admits a planar back surface (which is often applicable also to pipes if the pipe diameter is large enough). The problems are investigated in both 2D and 3D, and in 2D both the simpler anti-plane (SH) and the in-plane (P-SV) problem are studied. The 2D investigations are primarily solved to get a 'feeling' for the solution procedure, the discretizations, etc. In all cases an integral equation approach with a Green's function in the kernel is taken. The nonplanar surface is treated by the boundary element method (BEM) where a division of the surface is made in small elements. The defects are mainly cracks, strip-like (in 2D) or rectangular (in 3D), and these are treated with more analytical methods. In 2D also more general defects are treated with the help of their transition (T) matrix. As in other parts of UTDefect the ultrasonic probes in transmission and reception are included in the model. In 3D normalization by a side drilled hole is possible. Some numerical results

  10. An atlas of monthly mean distributions of SSMI surface wind speed, ARGOS buoy drift, AVHRR/2 sea surface temperature, and ECMWF surface wind components during 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, D.; Knauss, W.; Brown, O.; Wentz, F.

    1993-01-01

    The following monthly mean global distributions for 1991 are presented with a common color scale and geographical map: 10-m height wind speed estimated from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSMI) on a United States Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft; sea surface temperature estimated from the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR/2) on a U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) spacecraft; Cartesian components of free-drifting buoys which are tracked by the ARGOS navigation system on NOAA satellites; and Cartesian components of the 10-m height wind vector computed by the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF). Charts of monthly mean value, sampling distribution, and standard deviation value are displayed. Annual mean distributions are displayed.

  11. An atlas of monthly mean distributions of SSMI surface wind speed, ARGOS buoy drift, AVHRR/2 sea surface temperature, and ECMWF surface wind components during 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, D.; Knauss, W.; Brown, O.; Wentz, F.

    1993-01-01

    The following monthly mean global distributions for 1990 are proposed with a common color scale and geographical map: 10-m height wind speed estimated from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSMI) on a United States (US) Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft; sea surface temperature estimated from the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR/2) on a U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) spacecraft; Cartesian components of free drifting buoys which are tracked by the ARGOS navigation system on NOAA satellites; and Cartesian components on the 10-m height wind vector computed by the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF). Charts of monthly mean value, sampling distribution, and standard deviation values are displayed. Annual mean distributions are displayed.

  12. The Separation of Blood Components Using Standing Surface Acoustic Waves (SSAWs Microfluidic Devices: Analysis and Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. Soliman

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The separation of blood components (WBCs, RBCs, and platelets is important for medical applications. Recently, standing surface acoustic wave (SSAW microfluidic devices are used for the separation of particles. In this paper, the design analysis of SSAW microfluidics is presented. Also, the analysis of SSAW force with Rayleigh angle effect and its attenuation in liquid-loaded substrate, viscous drag force, hydrodynamic force, and diffusion force are explained and analyzed. The analyses are provided for selecting the piezoelectric material, width of the main microchannel, working area of SAW, wavelength, minimum input power required for the separation process, and widths of outlet collecting microchannels. The design analysis of SSAW microfluidics is provided for determining the minimum input power required for the separation process with appropriated the displacement contrast of the particles.The analyses are applied for simulation the separation of blood components. The piezoelectric material, width of the main microchannel, working area of SAW, wavelength, and minimum input power required for the separation process are selected as LiNbO3, 120 μm, 1.08 mm2, 300 μm, 371 mW. The results are compared to other published results. The results of these simulations achieve minimum power consumption, less complicated setup, and high collecting efficiency. All simulation programs are built by MATLAB.

  13. Antibacterial performance of polypropylene nonwoven fabric wound dressing surfaces containing passive and active components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xin, Zhirong, E-mail: xinzhirong2012@126.com [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Yantai University, Yantai 264005 (China); Du, Shanshan; Zhao, Chunyu; Chen, Hao; Sun, Miao [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Yantai University, Yantai 264005 (China); Yan, Shunjie [State Key Laboratory of Polymer Physics and Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Luan, Shifang, E-mail: sfluan@ciac.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Polymer Physics and Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); Yin, Jinghua [State Key Laboratory of Polymer Physics and Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China)

    2016-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • PNVP and PHMG components were covalently immobilized on PP{sub NWF} surface. • PP{sub NWF}-g-PNVP-PHMG possessed bacterial adhesion-resistant and bactericidal capabilities. • PP{sub NWF}-g-PNVP-PHMG obviously suppressed platelet and red blood cell adhesion. - Abstract: A growing number of wound dressing-related nosocomial infections necessitate the development of novel antibacterial strategies. Herein, polypropylene non-woven fabric (PP{sub NWF}) was facilely modified with passive and active antibacterial components, namely photografting polymerization both N-Vinyl-2-pyrrolidone (NVP) and glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) monomers, and the introduction of guanidine polymer through the reaction between active amino groups and epoxy groups. The modified samples were confirmed by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. Water contact angle measurement, antibacterial test, platelet and red blood cell adhesion were used to evaluate the hydrophilicity, antibacterial properties and hemocompatibility of the samples. It was found that the antibacterial properties were obviously enhanced, meanwhile significantly suppressing platelet and red blood cell adhesion after the above modification. This PP{sub NWF} samples that possess antifouling and antimicrobial properties, have great potential in wound dressing applications.

  14. Antibacterial performance of polypropylene nonwoven fabric wound dressing surfaces containing passive and active components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xin, Zhirong; Du, Shanshan; Zhao, Chunyu; Chen, Hao; Sun, Miao; Yan, Shunjie; Luan, Shifang; Yin, Jinghua

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • PNVP and PHMG components were covalently immobilized on PP NWF surface. • PP NWF -g-PNVP-PHMG possessed bacterial adhesion-resistant and bactericidal capabilities. • PP NWF -g-PNVP-PHMG obviously suppressed platelet and red blood cell adhesion. - Abstract: A growing number of wound dressing-related nosocomial infections necessitate the development of novel antibacterial strategies. Herein, polypropylene non-woven fabric (PP NWF ) was facilely modified with passive and active antibacterial components, namely photografting polymerization both N-Vinyl-2-pyrrolidone (NVP) and glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) monomers, and the introduction of guanidine polymer through the reaction between active amino groups and epoxy groups. The modified samples were confirmed by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. Water contact angle measurement, antibacterial test, platelet and red blood cell adhesion were used to evaluate the hydrophilicity, antibacterial properties and hemocompatibility of the samples. It was found that the antibacterial properties were obviously enhanced, meanwhile significantly suppressing platelet and red blood cell adhesion after the above modification. This PP NWF samples that possess antifouling and antimicrobial properties, have great potential in wound dressing applications.

  15. A Krebs Cycle Component Limits Caspase Activation Rate through Mitochondrial Surface Restriction of CRL Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aram, Lior; Braun, Tslil; Braverman, Carmel; Kaplan, Yosef; Ravid, Liat; Levin-Zaidman, Smadar; Arama, Eli

    2016-04-04

    How cells avoid excessive caspase activity and unwanted cell death during apoptotic caspase-mediated removal of large cellular structures is poorly understood. We investigate caspase-mediated extrusion of spermatid cytoplasmic contents in Drosophila during spermatid individualization. We show that a Krebs cycle component, the ATP-specific form of the succinyl-CoA synthetase β subunit (A-Sβ), binds to and activates the Cullin-3-based ubiquitin ligase (CRL3) complex required for caspase activation in spermatids. In vitro and in vivo evidence suggests that this interaction occurs on the mitochondrial surface, thereby limiting the source of CRL3 complex activation to the vicinity of this organelle and reducing the potential rate of caspase activation by at least 60%. Domain swapping between A-Sβ and the GTP-specific SCSβ (G-Sβ), which functions redundantly in the Krebs cycle, show that the metabolic and structural roles of A-Sβ in spermatids can be uncoupled, highlighting a moonlighting function of this Krebs cycle component in CRL activation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Detection of explosives on the surface of banknotes by Raman hyperspectral imaging and independent component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Mariana R; Correa, Deleon N; Zacca, Jorge J; Logrado, Lucio Paulo Lima; Poppi, Ronei J

    2015-02-20

    The aim of this study was to develop a methodology using Raman hyperspectral imaging and chemometric methods for identification of pre- and post-blast explosive residues on banknote surfaces. The explosives studied were of military, commercial and propellant uses. After the acquisition of the hyperspectral imaging, independent component analysis (ICA) was applied to extract the pure spectra and the distribution of the corresponding image constituents. The performance of the methodology was evaluated by the explained variance and the lack of fit of the models, by comparing the ICA recovered spectra with the reference spectra using correlation coefficients and by the presence of rotational ambiguity in the ICA solutions. The methodology was applied to forensic samples to solve an automated teller machine explosion case. Independent component analysis proved to be a suitable method of resolving curves, achieving equivalent performance with the multivariate curve resolution with alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) method. At low concentrations, MCR-ALS presents some limitations, as it did not provide the correct solution. The detection limit of the methodology presented in this study was 50 μg cm(-2). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Eddy current technique for detecting and sizing surface cracks in steel components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecco, V.S.; Carter, J.R.; Sullivan, S.P.

    1995-01-01

    Cracking has occurred in pressure vessel nozzles and girth welds due to thermal fatigue. Pipe welds, welds in support structures, and welds in reactor vault liner panels in nuclear facilities have failed because of cracks. Cracking can also occur in turbine rotor bore surfaces due to high cycle fatigue. Dye penetrant, magnetic particle and other surface NDT methods are used to detect cracks but cannot be used for depth sizing. Crack depth can be measured with various NDT methods such as ultrasonic time-of-flight diffraction (TOFD), potential drop, and eddy current. The TOFD technique can be difficult to implement on nozzle welds and is best suited for sizing deep cracks (>5 mm). The conventional eddy current method is easy to implement, but crack sizing is normally limited to shallow cracks ( 2 mm) cracks. Eddy current testing (ET) techniques are readily amenable to remote/automatic inspections. These new probes could augment present magnetic particle (MT) and dye penetrant (PT) testing through provision of reliable defect depth information. Reliable crack sizing permits identification of critical cracks for plant life extension and licensing purposes. In addition, performing PT and MT generates low level radioactive waste in some inspection applications in nuclear facilities. Replacing these techniques with ET for some components will eliminate some of this radioactive waste. (author)

  18. Detecting geothermal anomalies and evaluating LST geothermal component by combining thermal remote sensing time series and land surface model data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romaguera, M.; Vaughan, R. G.; Ettema, J.; Izquierdo-Verdiguier, E.; Hecker, C. A.; van der Meer, F. D.

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores for the first time the possibilities to use two land surface temperature (LST) time series of different origins (geostationary Meteosat Second Generation satellite data and Noah land surface modelling, LSM), to detect geothermal anomalies and extract the geothermal component of

  19. Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein 1 block 2 gene polymorphism in field isolates along the slope of mount Cameroon: a cross - sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apinjoh, Tobias O; Tata, Rolland B; Anchang-Kimbi, Judith K; Chi, Hanesh F; Fon, Eleanor M; Mugri, Regina N; Tangoh, Delphine A; Nyingchu, Robert V; Ghogomu, Stephen M; Nkuo-Akenji, Theresa; Achidi, Eric A

    2015-08-05

    Malaria remains a major global health burden despite the intensification of control efforts, due partly to the lack of an effective vaccine. Information on genetic diversity in natural parasite populations constitutes a major impediment to vaccine development efforts and is limited in some endemic settings. The present study characterized diversity by investigating msp1 block 2 polymorphisms and the relationship between the allele families with ethnodemographic indices and clinical phenotype. Individuals with asymptomatic parasitaemia (AP) or uncomplicated malaria (UM) were enrolled from rural, semi-rural and semi-urban localities at varying altitudes along the slope of mount Cameroon. P. falciparum malaria parasitaemic blood screened by light microscopy was depleted of leucocytes using CF11 cellulose columns and the parasite DNA genotyped by nested PCR. Length polymorphism was assessed in 151 field isolates revealing 64 (5) and 274 (22) distinct recombinant and major msp1 allelic fragments (genotypes) respectively. All family specific allelic types (K1, MAD20 and RO33) as well as MR were observed in the different locations, with K1 being most abundant. Eighty seven (60 %) of individuals harbored more than one parasite clone, with a significant proportion (p = 0.009) in rural compared to other settings. AP individuals had higher (p = 0.007) K1 allele frequencies but lower (p = 0.003) mean multiplicity of genotypes per infection (2.00 ± 0.98 vs. 2.56 ± 1.17) compared to UM patients. These results indicate enormous diversity of P. falciparum in the area and suggests that allele specificity and complexity may be relevant for the progression to symptomatic disease.

  20. Inkjet printed paper based frequency selective surfaces and skin mounted RFID tags: The interrelation between silver nanoparticle ink, paper substrate and low temperature sintering technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez-Romaguera, V.; Wünscher, S.; Turki, B.M.; Abbel, R.; Barbosa, S.; Tate, D.J.; Oyeka, D.; Batchelor, J.C.; Parker, E.A.; Schubert, U.S.; Yeates, S.G.

    2015-01-01

    Inkjet printing of functional frequency selective surfaces (FSS) and radio frequency identification (RFID) tags on commercial paper substrates using silver nanoparticle inks sintered using low temperature thermal, plasma and photonic techniques is reported. Printed and sintered FSS devices

  1. 3D-additive manufactured optical mount

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammini, Paul V.; Ciscel, David; Wooten, John

    2015-09-01

    The Area Defense Anti-Munitions (ADAM) is a low cost and effective high power laser weapon system. It's designed to address and negate important threats such as short-range rockets, UAVs, and small boats. Many critical optical components operate in the system. The optics and mounts must accommodate thermal and mechanical stresses, plus maintain an exceptional wave front during operation. Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) developed, designed, and currently operates ADAM. This paper covers the design and development of a key monolithic, flexured, titanium mirror mount that was manufactured by CalRAM using additive processes.

  2. Adherence of Helicobacter pylori cells and their surface components to HeLa cell membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauchère, J L; Blaser, M J

    1990-12-01

    Four Helicobacter pylori strains were used to develop in vitro methods to assess adherence to HeLa cells. Using direct detection by microscopy, adhesion scores increased with the initial bacteria-to-cell ratio. The urease method assessed H. pylori bound to HeLa cells by their urease activity. The percentage of the original inoculum adhering to HeLa cells remained constant for initial ratios from 10(2) to 10(5) bacteria per cell. An ELISA using anti-H. pylori serum assessed whole bacteria or components bound to HeLa cell fractions. By all three methods, the four H. pylori strains were adherent to HeLa cells or membranes whereas Campylobacter fetus and Providencia control strains were not. The adherence of H. pylori whole cells decreased following extraction with saline, water, or glycine buffer and most of the superficial adhering material (SAM) was present in the saline or water extracts. SAM bound better to HeLa membranes than to calf fetuin or bovine serum albumin (BSA); binding was inhibited by preincubation of SAM with HeLa membranes but not with fetuin or BSA or by pretreatment of HeLa membranes with neuraminidase. These data indicate that SAM has a specific receptor on the HeLa cell membranes. By gel exclusion chromatography of bacterial extracts, the most adherent components were found in the fractions which also contained the highest urease activity; these fractions included urease subunit antigens. We conclude that adherence of H. pylori can be assessed by microtiter assays and involves bacterial surface material which co-purifies with urease and is different from the N-acetyl-neuraminyl-lactose binding hemagglutinin.

  3. Retention Forces between Titanium and Zirconia Components of Two-Part Implant Abutments with Different Techniques of Surface Modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Maltzahn, Nadine Freifrau; Holstermann, Jan; Kohorst, Philipp

    2016-08-01

    The adhesive connection between titanium base and zirconia coping of two-part abutments may be responsible for the failure rate. A high mechanical stability between both components is essential for the long-term success. The aim of the present in-vitro study was to evaluate the influence of different surface modification techniques and resin-based luting agents on the retention forces between titanium and zirconia components in two-part implant abutments. A total of 120 abutments with a titanium base bonded to a zirconia coping were investigated. Two different resin-based luting agents (Panavia F 2.0 and RelyX Unicem) and six different surface modifications were used to fix these components, resulting in 12 test groups (n = 10). The surface of the test specimens was mechanically pretreated with aluminium oxide blasting in combination with application of two surface activating primers (Alloy Primer, Clearfil Ceramic Primer) or a tribological conditioning (Rocatec), respectively. All specimens underwent 10,000 thermal cycles between 5°C and 55°C in a moist environment. A pull-off test was then conducted to determine retention forces between the titanium and zirconia components, and statistical analysis was performed (two-way anova). Finally, fracture surfaces were analyzed by light and scanning electron microscopy. No significant differences were found between Panavia F 2.0 and RelyX Unicem. However, the retention forces were significantly influenced by the surface modification technique used (p zirconia copings were pretreated with aluminium oxide blasting, and with the application of Clearfil Ceramic Primer. Surface modification techniques crucially influence the retention forces between titanium and zirconia components in two-part implant abutments. All adhesion surfaces should be pretreated by sandblasting. Moreover, a phosphate-based primer serves to enhance long-term retention of the components. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Photovoltaic module mounting clip with integral grounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenox, Carl J.

    2010-08-24

    An electrically conductive mounting/grounding clip, usable with a photovoltaic (PV) assembly of the type having an electrically conductive frame, comprises an electrically conductive body. The body has a central portion and first and second spaced-apart arms extending from the central portion. Each arm has first and second outer portions with frame surface-disrupting element at the outer portions.

  5. Low-speed wind-tunnel investigation of a large-scale advanced arrow wing supersonic transport configuration with engines mounted above the wing for upper-surface blowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivers, J. P.; Mclemore, H. C.; Coe, P. L., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The Langley full scale tunnel was used to investigate the low speed stability and control of an advanced arrow wing supersonic transport with engines mounted above the wing for upper-surface blowing. Tests were made over an angle of attack range of -10 to 32 deg, slideslip angles of + or -5 deg and a Reynolds number ranging from 3.53 million to 7.33 million (referenced to mean aerodynamic chord of the wing). Configuration variables included trailing-edge flap deflection, engine jet nozzle angle, engine thrust coefficient, engine out operation, and asymmetrical trailing-edge BLC for providing roll trim. Downwash measurements at the tail were obtained for different thrust coefficients, tail heights, and at two fuselage stations.

  6. Ceramic Surface Treatment with a Single-component Primer: Resin Adhesion to Glass Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Mayara; Prochnow, Catina; Marchionatti, Ana Maria Estivalete; Baldissara, Paolo; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Wandscher, Vinicius Felipe

    2018-04-19

    To evaluate the microshear bond strength (μSBS) of composite cement bonded to two machined glass ceramics and its durability, comparing conventional surface conditioning (hydrofluoric acid + silane) to a one-step primer (Monobond Etch & Prime). Machined slices of lithium disilicate ceramic (LDC) (IPS e.max CAD) and feldspathic ceramic (FC) (VITA Mark II) glass ceramics were divided into two groups (n = 10) according to two factors: 1. surface treatment: HF+S (ca 5% hydrofluoric acid [IPS Ceramic Etching GEL] + silane coupling agent [SIL; Monobond Plus]) or MEP (single-component ceramic conditioner; Monobond Etch & Prime); 2. storage condition: baseline (without aging; tested 24 h after cementing) or aged (70 days of water storage + 12,000 thermal cycles). Composite cement (Multilink Automix, Ivoclar Vivadent) was applied to starch matrices on the treated ceramic surfaces and photoactivated. A μSBS test was performed (0.5 mm/min) and the failure pattern was determined. Contact angle and micromorphological analyses were also performed. Data were analyzed with Student's t-test (α = 5%). For both ceramic materials, HF+S resulted in higher mean μSBS (MPa) at baseline (LDC: HF+S 21.2 ± 2.2 > MEP 10.4 ± 2.4; FC: HF+S 19.6 ± 4.3 > MEP 13.5 ± 5.4) and after aging (LDC: HF+S 14.64 ± 2.31 > MEP 9 ± 3.4; FC HF+S: 14.73 ± 3.33 > MEP 11.1 ± 3.3). HF+S resulted in a statistically significant decrease in mean μSBS after aging (p = 0.0001), while MEP yielded no significant reduction. The main failure type was adhesive between composite cement and ceramic. HF+S resuted in the lowest contact angle. Hydrofluoric acid + silane resulted in higher mean μSBS than Monobond Etch & Prime for both ceramics; however, Monobond Etch & Prime had stable bonding after aging.

  7. Two component silicone modified epoxy foul release coatings: Effect of modulus, surface energy and surface restructuring on pseudobarnacle and macrofouling behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rath, S.K.; Chavan, J.G.; Sasane, Savita; Jagannath; Patri, M.; Samui, A.B.; Chakraborty, B.C.

    2010-01-01

    Two component silicone modified epoxy resin based low surface energy and non-toxic foul release coatings were developed. Silicone modified epoxy resin with 15 and 30% silicone content was used as component A and a polyether diamine (Jeffamine-500) was used as the component B. Free standing films were prepared by casting a mixture of components A and B in stoichiometric proportions. The surface composition, surface topography and wetting properties of the coatings were studied by angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and contact angle goniometry respectively. The mechanical properties of the cured films were evaluated by tensile measurements as well as dynamic mechanical analysis. Pseudobarnacles made of aluminium studs were attached to the coated panels and adhesion tests were carried out by a pseudobarnacle tester. Coated panels were exposed in Mumbai harbor for fouling studies for a period of 90 days. Surface restructuring studies of the coatings upon immersion in seawater were carried out by measuring the changes in advancing and receding contact angles by contact angle goniometry. The effect of surface energy, modulus and surface restructuring of the coatings on the macrofouling and pseudobarnacle adhesion properties has been discussed in detail.

  8. Modal analysis of gear housing and mounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Teik C.; Singh, RAJ.; Zakrajsek, James J.

    1989-01-01

    Dynamic finite element analysis of a real gear housing is presented. The analysis was conducted for the housing without the rotating components (gears, shafts, and bearings). Both rigid and flexible mounting conditions for the gear housing are considered in this analysis. The flexible support simulates the realistic mounting condition on a rotorcraft, and the rigid one is analyzed for comparison purposes. The effect of gear housing stiffeners is also evaluated. The results indicate that the first six natural modes of the flexibly mounted gear housing in the 0 to 200 Hz range correspond to the translational and rotational rigid body vibration modes of the housing. Above this range, the housing plate elastic modes begin to occur. In the case of the rigid mount, only the housing plate elastic modes are observed which are verified by modal analysis experiments. Parametric studies show that the housing plate stiffeners and rigid mounts tend to increase most of the natural frequencies, the lower ones being affected the most.

  9. The Influence of the Tool Surface Texture on Friction and the Surface Layers Properties of Formed Component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Šugárová

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The morphological texturing of forming tool surfaces has high potential to reduce friction and tool wear and also has impact on the surface layers properties of formed material. In order to understand the effect of different types of tool textures, produced by nanosecond fibre laser, on the tribological conditions at the interface tool-formed material and on the integrity of formed part surface layers, the series of experimental investigations have been carried out. The coefficient of friction for different texture parameters (individual feature shape, including the depth profile of the cavities and orientation of the features relative to the material flow was evaluated via a Ring Test and the surface layers integrity of formed material (surface roughness and subsurface micro hardness was also experimentally analysed. The results showed a positive effect of surface texturing on the friction coefficients and the strain hardening of test samples material. Application of surface texture consisting of dimple-like depressions arranged in radial layout contributed to the most significant friction reduction of about 40%. On the other hand, this surface texture contributed to the increase of surface roughness parameters, Ra parameter increased from 0.49 μm to 2.19 μm and the Rz parameter increased from 0.99 μm to 16.79 μm.

  10. Hole-thru-laminate mounting supports for photovoltaic modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wexler, Jason; Botkin, Jonathan; Culligan, Matthew; Detrick, Adam

    2015-02-17

    A mounting support for a photovoltaic module is described. The mounting support includes a pedestal having a surface adaptable to receive a flat side of a photovoltaic module laminate. A hole is disposed in the pedestal, the hole adaptable to receive a bolt or a pin used to couple the pedestal to the flat side of the photovoltaic module laminate.

  11. The effect of laser pulse width on laser-induced damage at K9 and UBK7 components surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xinda; Ba, Rongsheng; Zheng, Yinbo; Yuan, Jing; Li, Wenhong; Chen, Bo

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we investigated the effects of laser pulse width on laser-induced damage. We measured the damage threshold of K9 glass and UBK7 glass optical components at different pulse width, then analysis pulse-width dependence of damage threshold. It is shown that damage threshold at different pulse width conforms to thermal restriction mechanism, Because of cm size laser beam, defect on the optical component surface leads to laser-induced threshold decreased.

  12. Application of Response Surface Methodology in Extraction of Bioactive Component from Palm Leaves (Elaeis guineensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Afiqah Arham

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 The hydroxyl groups of the polyphenols are capable to act as reducing agent for reduction reaction. The effect of drying temperature, extraction temperature and extraction duration were evaluated using central composite design which consists of 20 experimental runs. Response surface methodology (RSM was used to estimate the optimum parameters in extracting polyphenols from the palm leaves. The correspondence analysis of the results yielded a quadratic model which can be used to find optimum conditions of extraction process. The optimum extraction condition of drying temperature, extraction temperature and extraction duration are 70°C, at 70°C of 10 minutes, respectively. Total polyphenols were determined by application of the Folin-Ciocalteu micro method and the extract was found contain of 8 mg GAE/g dry palm leaves at optimum conditions. Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Doi: 10.12777/ijse.5.2.95-100 [How to cite this article: Arham, N.A., Mohamad, N.A.N., Jai, J., Krishnan, J., Noorsuhana Mohd Yusof, N.M. (2013. Application of Response Surface Methodology in Extraction of Bioactive Component from Palm Leaves (Elaeis guineensis. International Journal of Science and

  13. Evaluation of the Cutting Force Components and the Surface Roughness in the Milling Process of Micro- and Nanocrystalline Titanium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habrat W.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Nanocristalline pure titanium in comparison to microcrystalline titanium is characterized by better mechanical properties which influence its wider usability. The aim of the research was to evaluate whether the grain size of pure titanium (micro- and nanocrystalline has influence on the cutting force components and the surface roughness in the milling process. Models of cutting force components for both materials were prepared and differences between the results were examined. The feed rate effect on selected parameters of surface roughness after milling of micro- and nanocrystalline pure titanium was determined.

  14. Surface-Active Agents for Isolation of the Core Component of Avian Myeloblastosis Virus 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stromberg, Kurt

    1972-01-01

    Sixty-one surface-active agents were evaluated in a procedure designed to assess their ability to remove the envelope from the core component of avian myeloblastosis virus (AMV). The procedure consisted of centrifugation of intact AMV through a series of sucrose gradients each containing an upper layer of agent at one of eight concentrations between 0.01 and 10%. The effectiveness of an agent in producing AMV cores was indicated by (i) the appearance of light-scattering bands in the region of core buoyant density in gradient tubes; (ii) the range of surfactant concentration over which these bands appeared; and (iii) an electron microscopy assessment by the negative-staining technique of the relative proportion of core to non-core material in each of these bands. Six nonionic surfactants were selected by this screening method for comparison in regard to recovery of core protein and endogenous ribonucleic acid (RNA)-dependent deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) polymerase activity, as well as further morphologic evaluation by electron microscopy. The nonionic surfactants of the polyoxyethylene alcohol class (particularly, Sterox SL) were most effective. Nonionic surfactants of the polyoxyethylene alkylphenol class (particularly, Nonidet P-40) were also effective. Sterox SL and Nonidet P-40 each gave a more than fivefold increase in specific activity of endogenous RNA-dependent DNA polymerase, and each gave a low recovery of core protein. Sterox SL did not interfere to the extent that Nonidet P-40 did in procedures which involved spectrophotometric assay at 260 nm. The use of Sterox SL resulted in the least envelope contamination of core preparations by electron microscopy examination, the most recovery of protein and endogenous RNA-dependent DNA polymerase activity, and a core buoyant density in sucrose of 1.27 g/ml. Images PMID:4112071

  15. Clamp-mount device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, K. H. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A clamp-mount device is disclosed for mounting equipment to an associated I-beam and the like structural member of the type having oppositely extending flanges wherein the device comprises a base and a pair of oppositely facing clamping members carried diagonally on the base clamping flanges therebetween and having flange receiving openings facing one another. Lock means are carried diagonally by the base opposite the clamping members locking the flanges in the clamping members. A resilient hub is carried centrally of the base engaging and biasing a back side of the flanges maintaining tightly clamped and facilitating use on vertical as well as horizontal members. The base turns about the hub to receive the flanges within the clamping members. Equipment may be secured to the base by any suitable means such as bolts in openings. Slidable gate latches secure the hinged locks in an upright locking position. The resilient hub includes a recess opening formed in the base and a rubber-like pad carried in this opening being depressably and rotatably carried therein.

  16. Influence of surface-energy components of Ni-P-TiO2-PTFE nanocomposite coatings on bacterial adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chen; Zhao, Qi

    2011-08-02

    The influence of total surface energy on bacterial adhesion has been investigated intensively with the frequent conclusion that bacterial adhesion is less on low-energy surfaces. However, there are also a number of contrary findings that high-energy surfaces have a smaller biofouling tendency. Recently, it was found that the CQ ratio, which is defined as the ratio of Lifshitz-van der Waals (LW) apolar to electron donor surface-energy components of substrates, has a strong correlation to bacterial adhesion. However, the electron donor surface-energy components of substrates varied over only a very limited range. In this article, a series of Ni-P-TiO(2)-PTFE nanocomposite coatings with wide range of surface-energy components were prepared using an electroless plating technique. The bacterial adhesion and removal on the coatings were evaluated with different bacteria under both static and flow conditions. The experimental results demonstrated that there was a strong correlation between bacterial attachment (or removal) and the CQ ratio. The coatings with the lowest CQ ratio had the lowest bacterial adhesion or the highest bacterial removal, which was explained using the extented DLVO theory.

  17. Process chain for fabrication of anisotropic optical functional surfaces on polymer components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Dongya; Zhang, Yang; Regi, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to introduce a process chain for fabrication of anisotropic optical functional surfaces on polymer products. Thesurface features under investigation are composed of micro serrated ridges. The scope was to maximize the visible contrast betweenhorizontally orthogonal textured surfaces...

  18. Radio/Antenna Mounting System for Wireless Networking under Row-Crop Agriculture Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel K. Fisher

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Interest in and deployment of wireless monitoring systems is increasing in many diverse environments, including row-crop agricultural fields. While many studies have been undertaken to evaluate various aspects of wireless monitoring and networking, such as electronic hardware components, data-collection procedures, power management, and communication protocols, little information related to physical deployment issues has been reported. To achieve acceptable wireless transmission capability, the radio/antenna must be positioned properly relative to the ground surface or crop canopy to minimize degradation of the radio signal, usually requiring the mounting of the radio/antenna above the canopy. This results in the presence of obstacles to normal agricultural equipment traffic and production operations and potential damage to the wireless monitoring system. A simple and rugged radio/antenna mounting system was designed which could be subjected to encounters with agricultural equipment without suffering physical damage. The mounting system was deployed and tested, and operated successfully following repeated encounters with various agricultural machines and implements. The radio/antenna mount is simple and inexpensive to fabricate using locally available components.

  19. Surface roughness characterization of cast components using 3D optical methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nwaogu, Ugochukwu Chibuzoh; Tiedje, Niels Skat; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    made in green sand moulds and the surface roughness parameter (Sa) values were compared with those of the standards. Sa parameter suffices for the evaluation of casting surface texture. The S series comparators showed a better description of the surface of castings after shot blasting than the A series...

  20. Synergistic use of Lagrangian dispersion and radiative transfer modelling with satellite and surface remote sensing measurements for the investigation of volcanic plumes: the Mount Etna eruption of 25–27 October 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sellitto

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we combine SO2 and ash plume dispersion modelling with satellite and surface remote sensing observations to study the regional influence of a relatively weak volcanic eruption from Mount Etna on the optical and micro-physical properties of Mediterranean aerosols. We analyse the Mount Etna eruption episode of 25–27 October 2013. The evolution of the plume along the trajectory is investigated by means of the FLEXible PARTicle Lagrangian dispersion (FLEXPART model. The satellite data set includes true colour images, retrieved values of volcanic SO2 and ash, estimates of SO2 and ash emission rates derived from MODIS (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer observations and estimates of cloud top pressure from SEVIRI (Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager. Surface remote sensing measurements of aerosol and SO2 made at the ENEA Station for Climate Observations (35.52° N, 12.63° E; 50 m a.s.l. on the island of Lampedusa are used in the analysis. The combination of these different data sets suggests that SO2 and ash, despite the initial injection at about 7.0 km altitude, reached altitudes around 10–12 km and influenced the column average aerosol particle size distribution at a distance of more than 350 km downwind. This study indicates that even a relatively weak volcanic eruption may produce an observable effect on the aerosol properties at the regional scale. The impact of secondary sulfate particles on the aerosol size distribution at Lampedusa is discussed and estimates of the clear-sky direct aerosol radiative forcing are derived. Daily shortwave radiative forcing efficiencies, i.e. radiative forcing per unit AOD (aerosol optical depth, are calculated with the LibRadtran model. They are estimated between −39 and −48 W m−2 AOD−1 at the top of the atmosphere and between −66 and −49 W m−2 AOD−1 at the surface, with the variability in the estimates mainly depending on the

  1. Measurement of the surface morphology of plasma facing components on the EAST tokamak by a laser speckle interferometry approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongbei, WANG; Xiaoqian, CUI; Yuanbo, LI; Mengge, ZHAO; Shuhua, LI; Guangnan, LUO; Hongbin, DING

    2018-03-01

    The laser speckle interferometry approach provides the possibility of an in situ optical non-contacted measurement for the surface morphology of plasma facing components (PFCs), and the reconstruction image of the PFC surface morphology is computed by a numerical model based on a phase unwrapping algorithm. A remote speckle interferometry measurement at a distance of three meters for real divertor tiles retired from EAST was carried out in the laboratory to simulate a real detection condition on EAST. The preliminary surface morphology of the divertor tiles was well reproduced by the reconstructed geometric image. The feasibility and reliability of this approach for the real-time measurement of PFCs have been demonstrated.

  2. Assessment of total equivalent strain at the surface of strain controlled axisymmetric components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, D.; Smith, P.S.

    1987-01-01

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Case N 47 (ASME) specifies rules for assessing fatigue and creep damage to components operating at elevated temperatures. Two routes are specified, namely an elastic route and an inelastic route. This paper considers the possibility of using this approach to thermally shocked components where primary loads are negligible. (orig./GL)

  3. Application of Box-Behnken Design and Response Surface Methodology for Surface Roughness Prediction Model of CP-Ti Powder Metallurgy Components Through WEDM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Arunangsu; Sarkar, Susenjit; Karanjai, Malobika; Sutradhar, Goutam

    2018-04-01

    The present work was undertaken to investigate and characterize the machining parameters (such as surface roughness, etc.) of uni-axially pressed commercially pure titanium sintered powder metallurgy components. Powder was uni-axially pressed at designated pressure of 840 MPa to form cylindrical samples and the green compacts were sintered at 0.001 mbar for about 4 h with sintering temperature varying from 1350 to 1450 °C. The influence of the sintering temperature, pulse-on and pulse-off time at wire-EDM on the surface roughness of the preforms has been investigated thoroughly. Experiments were conducted under different machining parameters in a CNC operated wire-cut EDM. The surface roughness of the machined surface was measured and critically analysed. The optimum surface roughness was achieved under the conditions of 6 μs pulse-on time, 9 μs pulse-off time and at sintering temperature of 1450 °C.

  4. Application of Box-Behnken Design and Response Surface Methodology for Surface Roughness Prediction Model of CP-Ti Powder Metallurgy Components Through WEDM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Arunangsu; Sarkar, Susenjit; Karanjai, Malobika; Sutradhar, Goutam

    2017-06-01

    The present work was undertaken to investigate and characterize the machining parameters (such as surface roughness, etc.) of uni-axially pressed commercially pure titanium sintered powder metallurgy components. Powder was uni-axially pressed at designated pressure of 840 MPa to form cylindrical samples and the green compacts were sintered at 0.001 mbar for about 4 h with sintering temperature varying from 1350 to 1450 °C. The influence of the sintering temperature, pulse-on and pulse-off time at wire-EDM on the surface roughness of the preforms has been investigated thoroughly. Experiments were conducted under different machining parameters in a CNC operated wire-cut EDM. The surface roughness of the machined surface was measured and critically analysed. The optimum surface roughness was achieved under the conditions of 6 μs pulse-on time, 9 μs pulse-off time and at sintering temperature of 1450 °C.

  5. Assessing the Contribution of the CFRP Strip of Bearing the Applied Load Using Near-Surface Mounted Strengthening Technique with Innovative High-Strength Self-Compacting Cementitious Adhesive (IHSSC-CA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyaa Mohammed

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficient transfer of load between concrete substrate and fibre reinforced polymer (FRP by the bonding agent is the key factor in any FRP strengthening system. An innovative high-strength self-compacting non-polymer cementitious adhesive (IHSSC-CA was recently developed by the authors and has been used in a number of studies. Graphene oxide and cementitious materials are used to synthesise the new adhesive. The successful implementation of IHSSC-CA significantly increases carbon FRP (CFRP strip utilization and the load-bearing capacity of the near-surface mounted (NSM CFRP strengthening system. A number of tests were used to inspect the interfacial zone in the bonding area of NSM CFRP strips, including physical examination, pore structure analysis, and three-dimensional laser profilometery analysis. It was deduced from the physical inspection of NSM CFRP specimens made with IHSSC-CA that a smooth surface for load transfer was found in the CFRP strip without stress concentrations in some local regions. A smooth surface of the adhesive layer is very important for preventing localized brittle failure in the concrete. The pore structure analysis also confirmed that IHSSC-CA has better composite action between NSM CFRP strips and concrete substrate than other adhesives, resulting in the NSM CFRP specimens made with IHSSC-CA sustaining a greater load. Finally, the results of three-dimensional laser profilometery revealed a greater degree of roughness and less deformation on the surface of the CFRP strip when IHSSC-CA was used compared to other adhesives.

  6. Micro-inverter solar panel mounting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, John; Gilchrist, Phillip Charles

    2016-02-02

    Processes, systems, devices, and articles of manufacture are provided. Each may include adapting micro-inverters initially configured for frame-mounting to mounting on a frameless solar panel. This securement may include using an adaptive clamp or several adaptive clamps secured to a micro-inverter or its components, and using compressive forces applied directly to the solar panel to secure the adaptive clamp and the components to the solar panel. The clamps can also include compressive spacers and safeties for managing the compressive forces exerted on the solar panels. Friction zones may also be used for managing slipping between the clamp and the solar panel during or after installation. Adjustments to the clamps may be carried out through various means and by changing the physical size of the clamps themselves.

  7. Changes in contact angle providing evidence for surface alteration in multi-component solid foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinke, Svenja K.; Hauf, Katharina; Vieira, Josélio; Heinrich, Stefan; Palzer, Stefan

    2015-11-01

    Chocolate blooming, one of the major problems in the confectionery industry, is the formation of visible white spots or a greyish haze on the surface of chocolate products due to large sugar or fat crystals on the surface. This leads to aesthetic changes and deterioration of taste and thus large sales losses for the confectionery industry due to consumer complaints. Chocolate blooming is often related to migration of lipids or sugar molecules to the chocolate surface, where they recrystallize with an associated polymorphic change of crystal structure on the surface. The wetting behaviour from contact angle measurements gives further insight into surface properties and is needed to determine surface energies and to evaluate possible migration mechanisms and preferred pathways. Therefore, an equilibrium contact angle is needed which is not directly accessible and is influenced by surface texture and interaction between solid and test liquid. In this study, the surface of cocoa butter and conventional chocolates was characterized by measuring the contact angle with the sessile drop protocol. The influence of roughness, test liquid and pre-crystallization of the samples as well as the storage temperature were investigated. In case of no pre-crystallization, a change in surface properties due to storage at 20 °C was detected, whereas samples stored at 30 °C showed the same wetting behaviour as fresh samples. This is associated with polymorphic transformation from thermodynamically less stable crystals to more stable configurations.

  8. Changes in contact angle providing evidence for surface alteration in multi-component solid foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinke, Svenja K; Hauf, Katharina; Heinrich, Stefan; Vieira, Josélio; Palzer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Chocolate blooming, one of the major problems in the confectionery industry, is the formation of visible white spots or a greyish haze on the surface of chocolate products due to large sugar or fat crystals on the surface. This leads to aesthetic changes and deterioration of taste and thus large sales losses for the confectionery industry due to consumer complaints. Chocolate blooming is often related to migration of lipids or sugar molecules to the chocolate surface, where they recrystallize with an associated polymorphic change of crystal structure on the surface. The wetting behaviour from contact angle measurements gives further insight into surface properties and is needed to determine surface energies and to evaluate possible migration mechanisms and preferred pathways. Therefore, an equilibrium contact angle is needed which is not directly accessible and is influenced by surface texture and interaction between solid and test liquid. In this study, the surface of cocoa butter and conventional chocolates was characterized by measuring the contact angle with the sessile drop protocol. The influence of roughness, test liquid and pre-crystallization of the samples as well as the storage temperature were investigated. In case of no pre-crystallization, a change in surface properties due to storage at 20 °C was detected, whereas samples stored at 30 °C showed the same wetting behaviour as fresh samples. This is associated with polymorphic transformation from thermodynamically less stable crystals to more stable configurations. (paper)

  9. Adding a Performance-Based Component to Surface Warfare Officer Bonuses: Will it Affect Retention?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carman, Aron S; Mudd, Ryan M

    2008-01-01

    ... Authorization and the current officer inventory beginning at 9 years of commissioned service. The objective of this study was to analyze the 13-year retention effect of adding a performance-based component to the SWO Critical Skills Bonus (CSB...

  10. An Instrument for Inspecting Aspheric Optical Surfaces and Components, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is a Phase II SBIR proposal to develop an extremely versatile optical inspection tool for aspheric optical components and optics that are not easily inspected...

  11. An Instrument for Inspecting Aspheric Optical Surfaces and Components, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is a Phase I proposal to develop an extremely versatile optical inspection tool for determining the optical figure of aspheric optical components, such as test...

  12. The surface tension of pure liquids. Thermodynamic components and corresponding states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lyklema, J.

    1999-01-01

    From the temperature dependency of surface and interfacial tensions the surface excess energy and entropy per unit area can be obtained. The excess energy is a liquid-specific property; it varies over about three decades between liquid helium and molten metals. On the other hand, the excess entropy

  13. Influence of the hydrostatic stress component on critical surface expansion in forging compound products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorm, T; Bay, Niels; Wanheim, Tarras

    1974-01-01

    of a superimposed hydrostatic pressure on the critical surface expansion during a forging process. The critical surface expansion appears to decrease with increasing hydrostatic pressure. This may be due to the fact that the close contact between the materials necessary to obtain bonding is created by a micro...

  14. Photonic flash soldering of thin chips and SMD components on foils for flexible electronics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ende, D.A. van den; Hendriks, R.; Cauchois, R.; Kusters, R.H.L.; Cauwe, M.; Groen, W.A.; Brand, J. van den

    2014-01-01

    Ultrathin bare die chips and small-size surface mount device components were successfully soldered using a novel roll-to-roll compatible soldering technology. A high-power xenon light flash was used to successfully solder the components to copper tracks on polyimide (PI) and polyethylene

  15. Laser structuring and modification of surfaces for chemical and medical micro components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremus-Koebberling, Elke A.; Gillner, Arnold

    2003-11-01

    In the production of micro devices for applications in chemistry, biotechnology and medical technologies surface properties become more and more important. The microscale topography and surface chemistry have influence on wetting properties and cell behavior. Therefore the design of material surface determines the success of artificial devices in contact with biological systems. For applications in the field of medical implants laser technologies have been developed for micro structuring of polymers to modify the surface properties with respect to wettability and controlled cell growth. The technology is based on excimer laser treatment of polymer surfaces using laser wavelength 193 nm (ArF) with different fluences and cumulated energies. Depending on the processing parameters and examined polymers either hydrophobic or hydrophilic surfaces can be increased. The water contact angle of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) for example can be increased from 113° to approx. 150° so that the surface exhibits the so called lotus effect. The laser generated micro patterns reveal influence on cell density and cell distribution which can be used for cell guidance. Results for cell growing experiments are shown for different polymers.

  16. Advancement of the arc-waterjet cutting to a gouging process for contaminated surface activity of steel components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bach, F.W.; Bruening, D.

    1990-01-01

    The technique of arc-waterjet cutting had to be progressed so that it is possible to gouge the surface of metallic components of nuclear power plants. With applicable cutting parameters depending on the thickness of the contamination the surface had to be gouged and converted to a granulation that is to remove. A continously pulled out wire electrode strikes an arc to the workpeace by short circuit and melts both. A concentric around the wire placed waterjet is able to wash the liquid metal away. With a computer numeric control it is possible to remove the surface of metal up to a deep penetration of 4 to 5 mm. With arc waterjet gouging a remote-controlled removal of contaminated surface activity in shutdowned nuclear power plants under water is possible. (orig./HP) With 15 refs., 1 tab., 14 figs [de

  17. Double Lap Shear Testing of Coating-Modified Ice Adhesion to Specific Shuttle Component Surfaces

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ferrick, M. G; Mulherin, Nathan D; Coutermarsh, Barry A; Durell, Glenn D; Curtis, Leslie A; St. Clair, Terry L; Weiser, Erik S; Cano, Roberto J; Smith, Trent M; Stevenson, Charles G; Martinez, Eloy C

    2006-01-01

    The goals of this experimental program were to optimize the effectiveness of an icephobic coating for use on several Space Shuttle surfaces, to evaluate the effects of adding an ultraviolet light absorber (UVA...

  18. Mount St. Helens Flyover

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    This Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) image of Mt. St. Helens volcano in Washington State was acquired on August 8, 2000 and covers an area of 37 by 51 km. Mount Saint Helens, a volcano in the Cascade Range of southwestern Washington that had been dormant since 1857, began to show signs of renewed activity in early 1980. On 18 May 1980, it erupted with such violence that the top of the mountain was blown off, spewing a cloud of ash and gases that rose to an altitude of 19 kilometers. The blast killed about 60 people and destroyed all life in an area of some 180 square kilometers (some 70 square miles), while a much larger area was covered with ash and debris. It continues to spit forth ash and steam intermittently. As a result of the eruption, the mountain's elevation decreased from 2,950 meters to 2,549 meters. The simulated fly-over was produced by draping ASTER visible and near infrared image data over a digital topography model, created from ASTER's 3-D stereo bands. The color was computer enhanced to create a 'natural' color image, where the vegetation appears green. The topography has been exaggerated 2 times to enhance the appearance of the relief. Landsat7 aquired an image of Mt. St. Helens on August 22, 1999. Image and animation courtesy NASA/GSFC/MITI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team.

  19. Effect of metal surface composition on deposition behavior of stainless steel component dissolved in liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokota, Norikatsu; Shimoyashiki, Shigehiro

    1988-01-01

    Deposition behavior of corrosion products has been investigated to clarify the effect of metal surface composition on the deposition process in liquid sodium. For the study a sodium loop made of Type 304 stainless steel was employed. Deposition test pieces, which were Type 304 stainless steel, iron, nickel or Inconel 718, were immersed in the sodium pool of the test pot. Corrosion test pieces, which were Type 304 stainless steel, 50 at% Fe-50 at%Mn and Inconel 718, were set in a heater pin assembly along the axial direction of the heater pin surface. Sodium temperatures at the outlet and inlet of the heater pin assembly were controlled at 943 and 833 K, respectively. Sodium was purified at a cold trap temperature of 393 K and the deposition test was carried out for 4.3 x 10 2 - 2.9 x 10 4 ks. Several crystallized particles were observed on the surface of the deposition test pieces. The particles had compositions and crystal structures which depended on both the composition of deposition test pieces and the concentration of iron and manganese in sodium. Only iron-rich particles having a polyhedral shape deposited on the iron surface. Two types of particles, iron-rich α-phase and γ-phase with nearly the same composition as stainless steel, were deposited on Type 304 stainless steel. A Ni-Mn alloy was deposited on the nickel surface in the case of a higher concentration of manganese in sodium. On the other hand, for a lower manganese concentration, a Fe-Ni alloy was precipitated on the nickel surface. Particles deposited on nickel had a γ-phase crystal structure similar to the deposition test piece of nickel. Hence, the deposition process can be explained as follows: Corrosion products in liquid sodium were deposited on the metal surface by forming a metal alloy selectively with elements of the metal surface. (author)

  20. Characterizing Surface Energy Budget Components in Urban Regions Using Combination of Flux Tower Observations and Satellite Remote Sensing Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norouzi, H.; Vant-hull, B.; Ramamurthy, P.; Blake, R.; Prakash, D. S.

    2016-12-01

    Urban and built regions because of their lack of surface moisture and their surface impermeability significantly perform differently in surface energy budget than natural and non-urban regions. Characterizing the effect and the response of each surface type in the cities can help to increase our understanding of climate, anthropogenic heat, and urban heat islands. Both ground observations and remote sensing observations are important when the extent of the heat energy balance components in big cities is targeted. This is study aims to provide a novel approach to use ground observations and map the maxima and minima air temperature in New York City using satellite measurements. Complete energy balance stations are installed over distinct materials such as concrete, asphalt, and rooftops. The footprint of these stations is restricted to the individual materials. The energy balance stations monitor the sensible and latent heat fluxes through eddy covariance method. To account for the incoming and outgoing radiation, a 4-component radiometer is used that can observe both incoming and outgoing longwave and shortwave radiation. Moreover, satellite observations from Landsat 8 are utilized to classify the city surfaces to distinct defined surfaces where ground observations were performed. The mapped temperatures will be linked to MODIS surface temperatures to develop a model that can downscale MODIS skin temperatures to fine resolution air temperature over urban regions. The results are compared with ground observations, which they reveal a great potential of using synergetic use of flux tower observations and satellite measurement to study urban surface energy budget. The results of this study can enhance our understanding about urban heat islands as well as climate studies and their effects on the environment.

  1. Influences of surface and solvent on retention of HEMA/mixture components after evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Fernanda C P; Wang, Linda; Pereira, Lúcia C G; de Andrade e Silva, Safira M; Júnior, Luiz M; Carrilho, Marcela Rocha de Oliveira

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the retention of solvents within experimental HEMA/solvent primers after two conditions for solvent evaporation: from a free surface or from dentine surface. Experimental primers were prepared by mixing 35% HEMA with 65% water, methanol, ethanol or acetone (v/v). Aliquots of each primer (50 microl) were placed on glass wells or they were applied to the surface of acid-etched dentine cubes (2mm x 2mm x 2mm) (n=5). For both conditions (i.e. from free surface or dentine cubes), change in primers mass due to solvent evaporation was gravimetrically measured for 10min at 51% RH and 21 degrees C. The rate of solvent evaporation was calculated as a function of loss of primers mass (%) over time. Data were analysed by two-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls (pevaporation rate (%/min) depending on the solvent present in the primer and the condition for evaporation (from free surface or dentine cubes) (pevaporation for HEMA/acetone primer was almost 2- to 10-times higher than for HEMA/water primer depending whether evaporation occurred, respectively, from a free surface or dentine cubes. The rate of solvent evaporation varied with time, being in general highest at the earliest periods. The rate of solvent evaporation and its retention into HEMA/solvent primers was influenced by the type of the solvent and condition allowed for their evaporation.

  2. Design and Analysis of a Micromechanical Three-Component Force Sensor for Characterizing and Quantifying Surface Roughness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Q.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Roughness, which can represent the trade-off between manufacturing cost and performance of mechanical components, is a critical predictor of cracks, corrosion and fatigue damage. In order to measure polished or super-finished surfaces, a novel touch probe based on three-component force sensor for characterizing and quantifying surface roughness is proposed by using silicon micromachining technology. The sensor design is based on a cross-beam structure, which ensures that the system possesses high sensitivity and low coupling. The results show that the proposed sensor possesses high sensitivity, low coupling error, and temperature compensation function. The proposed system can be used to investigate micromechanical structures with nanometer accuracy.

  3. A probability index for surface zonda wind occurrence at Mendoza city through vertical sounding principal components analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, Federico; Norte, Federico; Araneo, Diego

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this work is to obtain an index for predicting the probability of occurrence of zonda event at surface level from sounding data at Mendoza city, Argentine. To accomplish this goal, surface zonda wind events were previously found with an objective classification method (OCM) only considering the surface station values. Once obtained the dates and the onset time of each event, the prior closest sounding for each event was taken to realize a principal component analysis (PCA) that is used to identify the leading patterns of the vertical structure of the atmosphere previously to a zonda wind event. These components were used to construct the index model. For the PCA an entry matrix of temperature ( T) and dew point temperature (Td) anomalies for the standard levels between 850 and 300 hPa was build. The analysis yielded six significant components with a 94 % of the variance explained and the leading patterns of favorable weather conditions for the development of the phenomenon were obtained. A zonda/non-zonda indicator c can be estimated by a logistic multiple regressions depending on the PCA component loadings, determining a zonda probability index \\widehat{c} calculable from T and Td profiles and it depends on the climatological features of the region. The index showed 74.7 % efficiency. The same analysis was performed by adding surface values of T and Td from Mendoza Aero station increasing the index efficiency to 87.8 %. The results revealed four significantly correlated PCs with a major improvement in differentiating zonda cases and a reducing of the uncertainty interval.

  4. Silicon Carbide Mounts for Fabry-Perot Interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindemann, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Etalon mounts for tunable Fabry- Perot interferometers can now be fabricated from reaction-bonded silicon carbide structural components. These mounts are rigid, lightweight, and thermally stable. The fabrication of these mounts involves the exploitation of post-casting capabilities that (1) enable creation of monolithic structures having reduced (in comparison with prior such structures) degrees of material inhomogeneity and (2) reduce the need for fastening hardware and accommodations. Such silicon carbide mounts could be used to make lightweight Fabry-Perot interferometers or could be modified for use as general lightweight optical mounts. Heretofore, tunable Fabry-Perot interferometer structures, including mounting hardware, have been made from the low-thermal-expansion material Invar (a nickel/iron alloy) in order to obtain the thermal stability required for spectroscopic applications for which such interferometers are typically designed. However, the high mass density of Invar structures is disadvantageous in applications in which there are requirements to minimize mass. Silicon carbide etalon mounts have been incorporated into a tunable Fabry-Perot interferometer of a prior design that originally called for Invar structural components. The strength, thermal stability, and survivability of the interferometer as thus modified are similar to those of the interferometer as originally designed, but the mass of the modified interferometer is significantly less than the mass of the original version.

  5. Mass transfer in fuel cells. [electron microscopy of components, thermal decomposition of Teflon, water transport, and surface tension of KOH solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, R. D., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Results of experiments on electron microscopy of fuel cell components, thermal decomposition of Teflon by thermogravimetry, surface area and pore size distribution measurements, water transport in fuel cells, and surface tension of KOH solutions are described.

  6. Modelling Earth's surface topography: decomposition of the static and dynamic components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerri, Mattia; Cammarano, Fabio; Tackley, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    topography maps and perform instantaneous mantle flow modelling to calculate the dynamic topography. We explore the effects of proposed mantle 1-D viscosities and also test a 3D pressure- and temperature-dependent viscosity model. We find that the patterns of residual and dynamic topography are robust.......19). The correlation slightly improves when considering only the very long-wavelength components of the maps (average = ∼0.23). We therefore conclude that a robust determination of dynamic topography is not feasible since current uncertainties affecting crustal density, mantle density and mantle viscosity are still......Contrasting results on the magnitude of the dynamic component of topography motivate us to analyse the sources of uncertainties affecting long wavelength topography modelling. We obtain a range of mantle density structures from thermo-chemical interpretation of available seismic tomography models...

  7. Response surface optimization of the medium components for the production of biosurfactants by probiotic bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodrigues, L; Teixeira, J; Oliveira, R; van der Mei, HC

    Optimization of the medium for biosurfactants production by probiotic bacteria (Lactococcus lactis 53 and Streptococcus thermophilus A) was carried out using response surface methodology. Both biosurfactants were proved to be growth-associated, thus the desired response selected for the optimization

  8. Atmospheric components of the surface energy budget over young sea ice: Results from the N-ICE2015 campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walden, Von P.; Hudson, Stephen R.; Cohen, Lana; Murphy, Sarah Y.; Granskog, Mats A.

    2017-08-01

    The Norwegian young sea ice campaign obtained the first measurements of the surface energy budget over young, thin Arctic sea ice through the seasonal transition from winter to summer. This campaign was the first of its kind in the North Atlantic sector of the Arctic. This study describes the atmospheric and surface conditions and the radiative and turbulent heat fluxes over young, thin sea ice. The shortwave albedo of the snow surface ranged from about 0.85 in winter to 0.72-0.80 in early summer. The near-surface atmosphere was typically stable in winter, unstable in spring, and near neutral in summer once the surface skin temperature reached 0°C. The daily average radiative and turbulent heat fluxes typically sum to negative values (-40 to 0 W m-2) in winter but then transition toward positive values of up to nearly +60 W m-2 as solar radiation contributes significantly to the surface energy budget. The sensible heat flux typically ranges from +20-30 W m-2 in winter (into the surface) to negative values between 0 and -20 W m-2 in spring and summer. A winter case study highlights the significant effect of synoptic storms and demonstrates the complex interplay of wind, clouds, and heat and moisture advection on the surface energy components over sea ice in winter. A spring case study contrasts a rare period of 24 h of clear-sky conditions with typical overcast conditions and highlights the impact of clouds on the surface radiation and energy budgets over young, thin sea ice.

  9. Determining the impact of urban components on land surface temperature of Istanbul by using remote sensing indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bektaş Balçik, Filiz

    2014-02-01

    For the past 60 years, Istanbul has been experiencing an accelerated urban expansion. This urban expansion is leading to the replacement of natural surfaces by various artificial materials. This situation has a critical impact on the environment due to the alteration of heat energy balance. In this study, the effect upon the urban heat island (UHI) of Istanbul was analyzed using 2009 dated Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM) data. An Index Based Built-up Index (IBI) was used to derive artificial surfaces in the study area. To produce the IBI index, Soil-Adjusted Vegetation Index, Normalized Difference Built-up Index, and Modified Normalized Difference Water Index were calculated. Land surface temperature (LST) distribution was derived from Landsat 5 TM images using a mono-window algorithm. In addition, 24 transects were selected, and different regression models were applied to explore the correlation between LST and IBI index. The results show that artificial surfaces have a positive exponential relationship with LST rather than a simple linear one. An ecological evaluation index of the region was calculated to explore the impact of both the vegetated land and the artificial surfaces on the UHI. Therefore, the quantitative relationship of urban components (artificial surfaces, vegetation, and water) and LST was examined using multivariate statistical analysis, and the correlation coefficient was obtained as 0.829. This suggested that the areas with a high rate of urbanization will accelerate the rise of LST and UHI in Istanbul.

  10. Experimental investigation of surface determination process on multi-material components for dimensional computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borges de Oliveira, Fabrício; Stolfi, Alessandro; Bartscher, Markus

    2016-01-01

    and suitable surface determination settings, limits a better acceptance of CT as a CMS. Moreover, standard CT users are subject to the algorithms and boundary conditions implied by the use of commercial analysis software. In this context, this paper is concerned with the experimental evaluation...... of the influence of surface determination process on multi-material measurements, using functions available in the commercial CT data analysis software Volume Graphics VGStudio Max 2.2.6. Calibrated step gauges made of different materials, i.e. PEEK, PPS, and Al were used as reference standards. The step gauges...... were assembled in such a way as to have different multi-material X-ray absorption ratios. Comparative measurements of mono-material assemblies were performed as well. Different segmentation processes were considered (e.g. ISO-50%, local threshold, region growing, etc.), patch-based bidirectional length...

  11. SURFACE FILMS TO SUPPRESS FIELD EMISSION IN HIGH-POWER MICROWAVE COMPONENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirshfield, Jay l

    2014-02-07

    Results are reported on attempts to reduce the RF breakdown probability on copper accelerator structures by applying thin surface films that could suppress field emission of electrons. Techniques for application and testing of copper samples with films of metals with work functions higher than copper are described, principally for application of platinum films, since platinum has the second highest work function of any metal. Techniques for application of insulating films are also described, since these can suppress field emission and damage on account of dielectric shielding of fields at the copper surface, and on account of the greater hardness of insulating films, as compared with copper. In particular, application of zirconium oxide films on high-field portions of a 11.424 GHz SLAC cavity structure for breakdown tests are described.

  12. The complex dynamics of the seasonal component of USA's surface temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vecchio

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of the climate system has been investigated by analyzing the complex seasonal oscillation of monthly averaged temperatures recorded at 1167 stations covering the whole USA. We found the presence of an orbit-climate relationship on time scales remarkably shorter than the Milankovitch period {related to the nutational forcing}. The relationship manifests itself through occasional destabilization of the phase of the seasonal component due to the local changing of balance between direct insolation and the net energy received by the Earth. Quite surprisingly, we found that the local intermittent dynamics is modulated by a periodic component of about 18.6 yr due to the nutation of the Earth, which represents the main modulation of the Earth's precession. The global effect in the last century results in a cumulative phase-shift of about 1.74 days towards earlier seasons, in agreement with the phase shift expected from the Earth's precession. The climate dynamics of the seasonal cycle can be described through a nonlinear circle-map, indicating that the destabilization process can be associated to intermittent transitions from quasi-periodicity to chaos.

  13. Plasma surface reflectance spectroscopy for non-invasive and continuous monitoring of extracellular component of blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakota, Daisuke; Takatani, Setsuo

    2012-04-01

    To achieve the quantitative optical non-invasive diagnosis of blood during extracorporeal circulation therapies, the instrumental technique to extract extracellular spectra from whole blood was developed. In the circuit, the continuous blood flow was generated by a centrifugal blood pump. The oxygen saturation was maintained 100% by an oxygenator. The developed glass optical flow cell was attached to the outlet tubing of the oxygenator. The halogen lamp including the light from 400 to 900 nm wavelength was used for the light source. The light was guided into an optical fiber. The light emitted by the fiber was collimated and emitted to the flow cell flat surface at the incident angle of 45 degrees. The light just reflected on the boundary between inner surface of the flow cell and plasma at 45 degrees was detected by the detection fiber. The detected light was analyzed by a spectral photometer. The obtained spectrum from 400 to 600nm wavelength was not changed with respect to the hematocrit. In contrast, the signal in the spectral range was changed when the plasma free hemoglobin increased. By using two spectral range, 505+/-5 nm and 542.5+/-2.5 nm, the differential spectrum was correlated with the free hemoglobin at R2=0.99. On the other hand, as for the hematocrit, the differential spectrum was not correlated at R2=0.01. Finally, the plasma free hemoglobin was quantified with the accuracy of 22+/-19mg/dL. The result shows that the developed plasma surface reflectance spectroscopy (PSRS) can extract the plasma spectrum from flowing whole blood.

  14. Solar panel parallel mounting configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutschler, Jr., Edward Charles (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A spacecraft includes a plurality of solar panels interconnected with a power coupler and an electrically operated device to provide power to the device when the solar cells are insolated. The solar panels are subject to bending distortion when entering or leaving eclipse. Spacecraft attitude disturbances are reduced by mounting each of the solar panels to an elongated boom made from a material with a low coefficient of thermal expansion, so that the bending of one panel is not communicated to the next. The boom may be insulated to reduce its bending during changes in insolation. A particularly advantageous embodiment mounts each panel to the boom with a single mounting, which may be a hinge. The single mounting prevents transfer of bending moments from the panel to the boom.

  15. Stress corrosion cracking of Ni-based alloys in PWR primary water. Component surface control; Corrosion sous contrainte des alliages a base nickel en milieu primaire des reacteurs a eaux pressurisee. Maitrise de la surface des composants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foucault, M. [AREVA, Centre Technique Framatome ANP, Dept. Corrosion Chimie, 71 - Le Creusot (France)

    2004-06-01

    In the PWR plant primary circuit, FRAMATOME-ANP uses several nickel-base alloys or austenitic stainless steels for the manufacture of safety components. The experience feedback of the last twenty years allows us to point out the major role played by the surface state of the components in their life duration. In this paper, we present two examples of problems encountered and solved by a surface study and the definition and implementation of a process for the surface control of the repair components. Then, we propose some ideas about the present needs in terms of analysis methods to improve the surface knowledge and the control of the manufactured components. (author)

  16. Antibacterial performance of polypropylene nonwoven fabric wound dressing surfaces containing passive and active components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Zhirong; Du, Shanshan; Zhao, Chunyu; Chen, Hao; Sun, Miao; Yan, Shunjie; Luan, Shifang; Yin, Jinghua

    2016-03-01

    A growing number of wound dressing-related nosocomial infections necessitate the development of novel antibacterial strategies. Herein, polypropylene non-woven fabric (PPNWF) was facilely modified with passive and active antibacterial components, namely photografting polymerization both N-Vinyl-2-pyrrolidone (NVP) and glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) monomers, and the introduction of guanidine polymer through the reaction between active amino groups and epoxy groups. The modified samples were confirmed by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. Water contact angle measurement, antibacterial test, platelet and red blood cell adhesion were used to evaluate the hydrophilicity, antibacterial properties and hemocompatibility of the samples. It was found that the antibacterial properties were obviously enhanced, meanwhile significantly suppressing platelet and red blood cell adhesion after the above modification. This PPNWF samples that possess antifouling and antimicrobial properties, have great potential in wound dressing applications.

  17. Wear surface damage of a Stainless Steel EN 3358 aeronautical component subjected to sliding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdinando Felli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper describes the failure analysis of an aircraft component subjected to several episodes of in service failure, resulted in loss of the aircraft safety. Modern aircrafts are provided with mechanical systems which have the task to open not pressurized hatches during landing. The components of such systems are subject to considerable mechanical stresses in harsh environment (presence of moisture and pollutants, significant and sudden temperature variations. The system is constituted by a sliding piston, a related nipple and by a locking system consisting of 4 steel spheres which are forced into a countersink machined on the piston when the hatches is open. The whole system is activated by a preloaded spring. The machined parts, nipple and piston, are made of EN3358 steel (X3CrNiMo13-8-2, a precipitation hardening stainless steel with very low content of carbon often used in the aerospace. The samples provided by the manufacturer present different types of damage all referable to phenomena relative to the sliding of the piston inside the nipple. The present paper describes the different damage observed and the microstructure of the material, then are reported the results obtained from the characterization of the material of the samples by means of optical and electronic microscopy, carried out to define the mechanisms involved in the system seizure. In order to define the primary cause of failure and to propose solutions to be adopted, also analyzing the criticality of using this PH stainless steel for this application, the results of different tests were compared with system design and working data.

  18. Mounting clips for panel installation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavieres, Andres; Al-Haddad, Tristan; Goodman, Joseph

    2017-07-11

    A photovoltaic panel mounting clip comprising a base, central indexing tabs, flanges, lateral indexing tabs, and vertical indexing tabs. The mounting clip removably attaches one or more panels to a beam or the like structure, both mechanically and electrically. It provides secure locking of the panels in all directions, while providing guidance in all directions for accurate installation of the panels to the beam or the like structure.

  19. GEOEPIDERM – AN ECOLOGICAL CONCEPT THAT INTEGRATES SOIL COVER WITH ASSOCIATED LAND SURFACE COMPONENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Munteanu

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Based on the new concept of the “Epiderm of the Earth” introduced by the 2006 edition of the WRB-SR, the idea of “geoepiderm” has been developed. Besides its holistic meaning, by including both soil and non-soil materials found in the first 2 meters of the land surface, the term “geoepiderm” has a strong ecological sense, by suggesting similarity with the skin of the living organisms, as such, this concept is fully concordant with that of “Gaia” (Living Earth developed by James Lovelock. According to the main pedo-ecological characteristics of the soil and not soil coverings from the earth surface, ten kinds (classes of ‘geoepiderms” have been identified:1 – Protoderma (Entiderma– the primitive (emerging geoepiderm (mainly non-soil materials; five main subtypes: a Regoderma, b Leptoderma, c Areniderma, d Fluviderma and e Gleyoderma, were identified;2 – Cryoderma (Geliderma – geoepiderm of cold, mainly artic and subartic, regions with mean annual soil temperature <00C (often with perennial frozen subsoil - permafrost:3 – Arididerma – geoepiderm of arid regions and salt affected lands with limited or scarce available moisture; two subtypes: a Desertiderma, b Saliderma4 – Inceptiderma (or Juvenilederma – with 2 subtypes: a Cambiderma – a young (incipiently developed geoepiderm and b Andiderma, geoepiderm developed in volcanic materials;5 – Euderma – nutrient rich geoepiderm with two main subtypes: a Cherniderma (or Molliderma and b Luviderma (or Alfiderma;6 – Oligoderma – geoepiderm with low macro-nutrient and weatherable minerals content with 2 subtypes: a Podziderma (or Spodiderma and b Acriderma (or Ultiderma;7 – Ferriderma (Oxiderma or Senilederma – geoepiderm strongly weathered and with iron and aluminium hydroxides enrichment and low weatherable minerals reserve;8 – Vertiderma (Contractilederma – Contractile geoepiderm, developed from swelling clays;9 – Histoderma (Organiderma

  20. Effects of size reduction on deformation, microstructure, and surface roughness of micro components for micro metal injection molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Wang, Xin-da; Li, Xiang; Qi, Xiao-tong; Qu, Xuan-hui

    2017-09-01

    The fabrication of 17-4PH micro spool mandrils by micro metal injection molding was described here. The effects of size reduction on deformation, microstructure and surface roughness were studied by comparing a ϕ500 μm micro post and a ϕ1.7 mm cylinder after debinding and sintering. Experimental results show that slumping of the micro posts occurred due to a dramatic increase in outlet vapor pressure initiated at the thermal degradation onset temperature and the moment of gravity. Asymmetrical stress distribution within the micro component formed during the cooling stage may cause warping. Prior solvent debinding and adjustment in a thermal debinding scheme were useful for preventing the deformation of the micro components. Smaller grain size and higher micro hardness due to impeded grain growth were observed for the micro posts compared with the ϕ1.7 mm cylinder. Surface roughness increased with distance from the gate of the micro spool mandril due to melt front advancement during mold filling and the ensuing pressure distribution. At each position, surface roughness was dictated by injection molding and increased slightly after sintering.

  1. The head-mounted microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting; Dailey, Seth H; Naze, Sawyer A; Jiang, Jack J

    2012-04-01

    Microsurgical equipment has greatly advanced since the inception of the microscope into the operating room. These advancements have allowed for superior surgical precision and better post-operative results. This study focuses on the use of the Leica HM500 head-mounted microscope for the operating phonosurgeon. The head-mounted microscope has an optical zoom from 2× to 9× and provides a working distance from 300 mm to 700 mm. The headpiece, with its articulated eyepieces, adjusts easily to head shape and circumference, and offers a focus function, which is either automatic or manually controlled. We performed five microlaryngoscopic operations utilizing the head-mounted microscope with successful results. By creating a more ergonomically favorable operating posture, a surgeon may be able to obtain greater precision and success in phonomicrosurgery. Phonomicrosurgery requires the precise manipulation of long-handled cantilevered instruments through the narrow bore of a laryngoscope. The head-mounted microscope shortens the working distance compared with a stand microscope, thereby increasing arm stability, which may improve surgical precision. Also, the head-mounted design permits flexibility in head position, enabling operator comfort, and delaying musculoskeletal fatigue. A head-mounted microscope decreases the working distance and provides better ergonomics in laryngoscopic microsurgery. These advances provide the potential to promote precision in phonomicrosurgery. Copyright © 2011 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  2. First accelerator test of vacuum components with laser-engineered surfaces for electron-cloud mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calatroni, Sergio; Garcia-Tabares Valdivieso, Elisa; Neupert, Holger; Nistor, Valentin; Perez Fontenla, Ana Teresa; Taborelli, Mauro; Chiggiato, Paolo; Malyshev, Oleg; Valizadeh, Reza; Wackerow, Stefan; Zolotovskaya, Svetlana A.; Gillespie, W. Allan; Abdolvand, Amin

    2017-11-01

    Electron cloud mitigation is an essential requirement for high-intensity proton circular accelerators. Among other solutions, laser engineered surface structures (LESS) present the advantages of having potentially a very low secondary electron yield (SEY) and allowing simple scalability for mass production. Two copper liners with LESS have been manufactured and successfully tested by monitoring the electron cloud current in a dipole magnet in the SPS accelerator at CERN during the 2016 run. In this paper we report on these results as well as the detailed experiments carried out on samples—such as the SEY and topography studies—which led to an optimized treatment in view of the SPS test and future possible use in the HL-LHC.

  3. Modeling Earth's surface topography: decomposition of the static and dynamic components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerri, M.; Cammarano, F.; Tackley, P. J.

    2017-12-01

    Isolating the portion of topography supported by mantle convection, the so-called dynamic topography, would give us precious information on vigor and style of the convection itself. Contrasting results on the estimate of dynamic topography motivate us to analyse the sources of uncertainties affecting its modeling. We obtain models of mantle and crust density, leveraging on seismic and mineral physics constraints. We use the models to compute isostatic topography and residual topography maps. Estimates of dynamic topography and associated synthetic geoid are obtained by instantaneous mantle flow modeling. We test various viscosity profiles and 3D viscosity distributions accounting for inferred lateral variations in temperature. We find that the patterns of residual and dynamic topography are robust, with an average correlation coefficient of 0.74 and 0.71, respectively. The amplitudes are however poorly constrained. For the static component, the considered lithospheric mantle density models result in topographies that differ, on average, 720 m, with peaks reaching 1.7 km. The crustal density models produce variations in isostatic topography averaging 350 m, with peaks of 1 km. For the dynamic component, we obtain peak-to-peak topography amplitude exceeding 3 km for all the tested mantle density and viscosity models. Such values of dynamic topography produce geoid undulations that are not in agreement with observations. Assuming chemical heterogeneities in the lower mantle, in correspondence with the LLSVPs (Large Low Shear wave Velocity Provinces), helps to decrease the amplitudes of dynamic topography and geoid, but reduces the correlation between synthetic and observed geoid. The correlation coefficients between the residual and dynamic topography maps is always less than 0.55. In general, our results indicate that, i) current knowledge of crust density, mantle density and mantle viscosity is still limited, ii) it is important to account for all the various

  4. Surface Composition of the Non-Ice Component on Icy Satellites and Ring Particles in the Saturn System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, R. N.; Pearson, N.; Perlman, Z. S.; Bradley, E. T.; Hendrix, A.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Filacchione, G.; Nicholson, P. D.; Hedman, M. M.; Brown, R. H.; Buratti, B. J.; Baines, K. H.; Sotin, C.; Nelson, R.

    2013-12-01

    Saturn's icy satellites and ring particle surfaces have long been known to be composed mostly of frozen water. However, all surfaces show an absorption due to a non-water-ice component whose identity has not been well understood. In the near infrared, water ice has strong absorptions which limit detectability of other trace components. Similarly, at wavelengths less than about 0.18 microns, water is very absorbing. However, in the ~0.2 to ~1 micron range, water ice has low absorption and trace components are readily detected. Classical interpretations of the UV absorber and dark material on outer Solar System satellites have been varying amounts of tholins and carbon. However, tholins have spectral structure not seen in the icy spectra in the Saturn System. Many silicates also have UV spectral structure that reject them from contributing significantly to the observed spectral signatures. We have constructed a new UV spectrometer and a new environment chamber for studying the spectral properties of materials from 0.1 to 15 microns. In our survey of the spectral properties of materials so far, we find that small amounts of metallic iron and iron oxides in the icy surfaces are compatible with and can explain the UV, visible and near-infrared spectra of icy surfaces in the Saturn system (0.12 to 5.1 microns) using data from the Cassini UltraViolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) and the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS). The wide range of observed UV-NIR (0.1-5 micron) spectral signatures provide strong constraints on composition and grain size distribution, including grain sizes of the ice. Spectra of the Saturnian rings and icy satellites indicate they have a large range of ice grain sizes, from tens of microns to sub-micron. Sub-micron ice grains create unusual spectral properties, which are seen in the spectra of the rings and satellites of Saturn and on satellites further out in the Solar System. Clark et al. (2012, Icarus v218, p831) showed that VIMS

  5. Physicochemical characterization of engineered nanoparticles under physiological conditions: effect of culture media components and particle surface coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatisson, Julien; Quevedo, Ivan R; Wilkinson, Kevin J; Tufenkji, Nathalie

    2012-03-01

    The use of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) in commercial products has increased substantially over the last few years. Some research has been conducted in order to determine whether or not such materials are cytotoxic, but questions remain regarding the role that physiological media and sera constituents play in ENP aggregation or stabilization. In this study, several characterization methods were used to evaluate the particle size and surface potential of 6 ENPs suspended in a number of culture media and in the presence of different culture media constituents. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) were employed for size determinations. Results were interpreted on the basis of ENP surface potentials evaluated from particle electrophoretic mobilities (EPM). Measurements made after 24h of incubation at 37°C showed that the cell culture medium constituents had only moderate impact on the physicochemical properties of the ENP, although incubation in bovine serum albumin destabilized the colloidal system. In contrast, most of the serum proteins increased colloidal stabilization. Moreover, the type of ENP surface modification played a significant role in ENP behavior whereby the complexity of interactions between the ENPs and the medium components generally decreased with increasing complexity of the particle surface. This investigation emphasizes the importance of ENP characterization under conditions that are representative of cell culture media or physiological conditions for improved assessments of nanoparticle cytotoxicity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Functionalization of PDMS modified and plasma activated two-component polyurethane coatings by surface attachment of enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreider, Alexej; Richter, Katharina; Sell, Stephan; Fenske, Mandus; Tornow, Christian; Stenzel, Volkmar; Grunwald, Ingo

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a new strategy for coupling the enzyme horseradish peroxidase to a two-component polyurethane (2C-PUR) coating. A stable polymer conjugate was achieved by combining the enzyme and the 2C-PUR coating which was modified with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), located at the surface. An atmospheric pressure plasma jet system was used to convert alkyl groups from the PDMS into polar silanol functionalities. This conversion was proven by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and dynamic contact angle measurements. In addition, the stability of the activated 2C-PUR surface containing silanol groups was determined by measuring the contact angle as a function of time. Compared to the non-modified 2C-PUR systems the one with PDMS displayed a higher stability over a time period over 28 h. In a silanization process the coating was treated with (3-aminopropyl) trimethoxysilane and the enzyme was subsequently immobilized to the coating via the cross linker glutaraldehyde to receive new biomimetic catalytic/enzymatic functions. The chemical immobilization (chemisorption) of the enzyme to the surface showed statistically significant higher biological activity as compared to references samples without using a cross linker (physisorption). The presented technique offers the opportunity to design new and smart multifunctional surface coatings which employ biomimetic capabilities.

  7. Laser Surface Treatment of Hydro and Thermal Power Plant Components and Their Coatings: A Review and Recent Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, B. S.

    2015-11-01

    High-power diode laser (HPDL) surface modification of hydro and thermal power plant components is of the utmost importance to minimize their damages occurring due to cavitation erosion, water droplet erosion, and particle erosion (CE, WDE, and PE). Special emphasis is given on the HPDL surface treatment of martensitic and precipitate-hardened stainless steels, Ti6Al4V alloy, plasma ion nitro-carburized layers, high pressure high velocity oxy-fuel and twin-wire arc sprayed coatings. WDE test results of all these materials and coatings in `untreated' and `HPDL- treated at 1550 °C' conditions, up to 8.55 million cycles, are already available. Their WDE testing was further continued up to 10.43 million cycles. The X20Cr13 and X10CrNiMoV1222, the most common martensitic stainless steels used in hydro and thermal power plants, were HPDL surface treated at higher temperature (1650 °C) and their WDE test results were also obtained up to 10.43 million cycles. It is observed that the increased HPDL surface temperature from 1550 to 1650 °C has resulted in significant improvement in their WDE resistances because of increased martensitic (ά) phase at higher temperature. After conducting long-range WDE tests, the correlation of CE, WDE, and PE resistances of these materials and protective coatings with their mechanical properties such as fracture toughness and microhardness product, ultimate resilience, modified resilience, and ultimate modified resilience has been reviewed and discussed. One of the edges of a 500 MW low pressure steam turbine moving blade (X10CrNiMoV1222 stainless steel) was HPDL surface treated at 1550 °C and its radii of curvatures and deflections were measured. These were compared with the data available earlier from a flat rectangular sample of similar composition and identical HPDL surface temperature.

  8. Solar panel truss mounting systems and methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Haddad, Tristan Farris; Cavieres, Andres; Gentry, Russell; Goodman, Joseph; Nolan, Wade; Pitelka, Taylor; Rahimzadeh, Keyan; Brooks, Bradley; Lohr, Joshua; Crooks, Ryan; Porges, Jamie; Rubin, Daniel

    2018-01-30

    An exemplary embodiment of the present invention provides a solar panel truss mounting system comprising a base and a truss assembly coupled to the base. The truss assembly comprises a first panel rail mount, second panel rail mount parallel to the first panel rail mount, base rail mount parallel to the first and second panel rail mounts, and a plurality of support members. A first portion of the plurality of support members extends between the first and second panel rail mounts. A second portion of the plurality of support members extends between the first panel rail mount and the base rail mount. A third portion of the plurality of support members extends between the second panel rail mount and the base rail mount. The system can further comprise a plurality of connectors for coupling a plurality of photovoltaic solar panels to the truss assembly.

  9. Solar panel truss mounting systems and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Haddad, Tristan Farris; Cavieres, Andres; Gentry, Russell; Goodman, Joseph; Nolan, Wade; Pitelka, Taylor; Rahimzadeh, Keyan; Brooks, Bradley; Lohr, Joshua; Crooks, Ryan; Porges, Jamie; Rubin, Daniel

    2015-10-20

    An exemplary embodiment of the present invention provides a solar panel truss mounting system comprising a base and a truss assembly coupled to the base. The truss assembly comprises a first panel rail mount, second panel rail mount parallel to the first panel rail mount, base rail mount parallel to the first and second panel rail mounts, and a plurality of support members. A first portion of the plurality of support members extends between the first and second panel rail mounts. A second portion of the plurality of support members extends between the first panel rail mount and the base rail mount. A third portion of the plurality of support members extends between the second panel rail mount and the base rail mount. The system can further comprise a plurality of connectors for coupling a plurality of photovoltaic solar panels to the truss assembly.

  10. A rapid method of ferromanganese nodule mounting

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mukhopadhyay, S.; Banerjee, R.

    surfaces, standard diamond polishing method is recommended. It is important to note that all there~gentsarc 10 be stored i.n deep freeze to retain their chemical and physical propertJes unchanged. In parucular, the pol\\". ester resin, jf kept in deep freeze... adopted in mounting loose beach sands for mineral identification under arc-microscope. References MARGOLIS, S. V. and GLASIIY, G. P. (1973) Report on Inter-Univcrsity program of rcsearch co ferromanganese deposits of the ocean floor (unpub.), phase-I, pp...

  11. A dynamic monitoring approach for the surface morphology evolution measurement of plasma facing components by means of speckle interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongbei; Cui, Xiaoqian; Feng, Chunlei; Li, Yuanbo; Zhao, Mengge; Luo, Guangnan; Ding, Hongbin

    2017-11-01

    Plasma Facing Components (PFCs) in a magnetically confined fusion plasma device will be exposed to high heat load and particle fluxes, and it would cause PFCs' surface morphology to change due to material erosion and redeposition from plasma wall interactions. The state of PFCs' surface condition will seriously affect the performance of long-pulse or steady state plasma discharge in a tokamak; it will even constitute an enormous threat to the operation and the safety of fusion plasma devices. The PFCs' surface morphology evolution measurement could provide important information about PFCs' real-time status or damage situation and it would help to a better understanding of the plasma wall interaction process and mechanism. Meanwhile through monitoring the distribution of dust deposition in a tokamak and providing an upper limit on the amount of loose dust, the PFCs' surface morphology measurement could indirectly contribute to keep fusion operational limits and fusion device safety. Aiming at in situ dynamic monitoring PFCs' surface morphology evolution, a laboratory experimental platform DUT-SIEP (Dalian University of Technology-speckle interferometry experimental platform) based on the speckle interferometry technique has been constructed at Dalian University of Technology (DUT) in China. With directional specific designing and focusing on the real detection condition of EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak), the DUT-SIEP could realize a variable measurement range, widely increased from 0.1 μm to 300 μm, with high spatial resolution (adopted from EAST has been measured, and the feasibility and reliability of this new experimental platform have been demonstrated.

  12. Efficient numerical methods for simulating surface tension of multi-component mixtures with the gradient theory of fluid interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Kou, Jisheng

    2015-08-01

    Surface tension significantly impacts subsurface flow and transport, and it is the main cause of capillary effect, a major immiscible two-phase flow mechanism for systems with a strong wettability preference. In this paper, we consider the numerical simulation of the surface tension of multi-component mixtures with the gradient theory of fluid interfaces. Major numerical challenges include that the system of the Euler-Lagrange equations is solved on the infinite interval and the coefficient matrix is not positive definite. We construct a linear transformation to reduce the Euler-Lagrange equations, and naturally introduce a path function, which is proven to be a monotonic function of the spatial coordinate variable. By using the linear transformation and the path function, we overcome the above difficulties and develop the efficient methods for calculating the interface and its interior compositions. Moreover, the computation of the surface tension is also simplified. The proposed methods do not need to solve the differential equation system, and they are easy to be implemented in practical applications. Numerical examples are tested to verify the efficiency of the proposed methods. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  13. Facile Synthesis of Smart Nanocontainers as Key Components for Construction of Self-Healing Coating with Superhydrophobic Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yi; Wang, MingDong; Wang, Cheng; Feng, Jing; Li, JianSheng; Wang, LianJun; Fu, JiaJun

    2016-12-01

    SiO2-imidazoline nanocomposites (SiO2-IMI) owning high loading capacity of corrosion inhibitor, 1-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide (HMID), and a special acid/alkali dual-stimuli-accelerated release property have been synthesized via a one-step modified Stöber method. SiO2-IMI were uniformly distributed into the hydrophobic SiO2 sol to construct "host"-"guest" feedback active coating with a superhydrophobic surface (SiO2-IMI@SHSC) on aluminium alloy, AA2024, by dip-coating technique. SiO2-IMI as "guest" components have good compatibility with "host" sol-gel coating, and more importantly, once localized corrosion occurs on the surface of AA2024, SiO2-IMI can simultaneously respond to the increase in environmental pH around corrosive micro-cathodic regions and decrease in pH near micro-anodic regions, promptly releasing HMID to form a compact molecular film on the damaged surface, inhibiting corrosion spread and executing a self-healing function. The scanning vibrating electrode technique (SVET) was applied to illustrate the suppression process of cathodic/anodic corrosion activities. Furthermore, benefiting from the superhydrophobic surface, SiO2-IMI@SHSC remained its protective ability after immersion in 0.5 M NaCl solution for 35 days, which is far superior to the conventional sol-gel coating with the same coating thickness. The facile fabrication method of SiO2-IMI simplifies the construction procedure of SiO2-IMI@SHSC, which have great potential to replace non-environmental chromate conversion coatings for practical use.

  14. Facile Synthesis of Smart Nanocontainers as Key Components for Construction of Self-Healing Coating with Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yi; Wang, MingDong; Wang, Cheng; Feng, Jing; Li, JianSheng; Wang, LianJun; Fu, JiaJun

    2016-04-01

    SiO2-imidazoline nanocomposites (SiO2-IMI) owning high loading capacity of corrosion inhibitor, 1-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide (HMID), and a special acid/alkali dual-stimuli-accelerated release property have been synthesized via a one-step modified Stöber method. SiO2-IMI were uniformly distributed into the hydrophobic SiO2 sol to construct "host"-"guest" feedback active coating with a superhydrophobic surface (SiO2-IMI@SHSC) on aluminium alloy, AA2024, by dip-coating technique. SiO2-IMI as "guest" components have good compatibility with "host" sol-gel coating, and more importantly, once localized corrosion occurs on the surface of AA2024, SiO2-IMI can simultaneously respond to the increase in environmental pH around corrosive micro-cathodic regions and decrease in pH near micro-anodic regions, promptly releasing HMID to form a compact molecular film on the damaged surface, inhibiting corrosion spread and executing a self-healing function. The scanning vibrating electrode technique (SVET) was applied to illustrate the suppression process of cathodic/anodic corrosion activities. Furthermore, benefiting from the superhydrophobic surface, SiO2-IMI@SHSC remained its protective ability after immersion in 0.5 M NaCl solution for 35 days, which is far superior to the conventional sol-gel coating with the same coating thickness. The facile fabrication method of SiO2-IMI simplifies the construction procedure of SiO2-IMI@SHSC, which have great potential to replace non-environmental chromate conversion coatings for practical use.

  15. X-37 C-Sic CMC Control Surface Components Development [Status of the NASA/Boeing/USAF Orbital Vehicle and Related Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Peter G; Rivers, H. Kevin; Chen, Victor L.

    2004-01-01

    Carbon/Silicon-Carbide (C-Sic) ceramic matrix composite (CMC) flaperon and ruddervator control surface components are being developed for the X-37 Orbital Vehicle (OV). The results of the prior NASA LaRC led work, aimed at developing C-Sic flaperon and ruddervator components for the X-37, will be reviewed. The status of several on-going and/or planned NASA, USAF, and Boeing programs that will support the development of control surface components for the X-37 OV will also be reviewed. The overall design and development philosophy being employed to assemble a team(s) to develop both: (a) C-Sic hot structure control surface components for the X-37 OV, and (b) carbon-carbon (C-C) hot structure components (a risk-reduction backup option for the OV), will be presented.

  16. Control of Wall Mounting Robot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sloth, Christoffer; Pedersen, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a method for designing controllers for trajectory tracking with actuator constraints. In particular, we consider a joystick-controlled wall mounting robot called WallMo. In contrast to previous works, a model-free approach is taken to the control problem, where the path...

  17. Mounting power cables on SOLEIL

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    The power couplers are mounted on the SOLEIL cryomodule in a clean room. The cryomodule will allow superconducting technology to be used at SOLEIL, the French national synchrotron facility. This work is carried out as part of a collaboration between CERN and CEA Saclay, the French National Atomic Energy Commission.

  18. Engine mounts and structural joints

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    While finite element (FEM) solutions are useful if. SaÅdhanaÅ, Vol. 25, Part 3, June 2000, pp. ... A more general set of analysis tools and design dynamics is required to understand existing ... and highly damped to control the idle shake and engine mounting resonance over 5±30 Hz. Also, it must be able to control, like a ...

  19. Protective structures on the surface of zirconium components of light water reactor cores: Formation, testing, and prototype equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begrambekov, L. B.; Gordeev, A. A.; Evsin, A. E., E-mail: evsin@plasma.mephi.ru; Ivanova, S. V.; Kaplevsky, A. S.; Sadovskiy, Ya. A. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute) (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    The results of tests of plasma treatment of zirconium and deposition of protective yttrium coatings used as the methods of protection of zirconium components of light water reactor cores against hydrogenation are detailed. The amount of hydrogen in the treated sample exposed to superheated steam for 2500 h at temperature T = 400°C and pressure p = 1 atm was five times lower than the corresponding value for the untreated one. The amount of hydrogen in the sample coated with yttrium remained almost unchanged in 4000 h of exposure. A plasma method for rapid testing for hydrogen resistance is proposed. The hydrogenation rate provided by this method is 700 times higher than that in tests with superheated steam. The results of preliminary experiments confirm the possibility of constructing a unit for batch processing of the surfaces of fuel rod claddings.

  20. Protective structures on the surface of zirconium components of light water reactor cores: Formation, testing, and prototype equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begrambekov, L. B.; Gordeev, A. A.; Evsin, A. E.; Ivanova, S. V.; Kaplevsky, A. S.; Sadovskiy, Ya. A.

    2015-12-01

    The results of tests of plasma treatment of zirconium and deposition of protective yttrium coatings used as the methods of protection of zirconium components of light water reactor cores against hydrogenation are detailed. The amount of hydrogen in the treated sample exposed to superheated steam for 2500 h at temperature T = 400°C and pressure p = 1 atm was five times lower than the corresponding value for the untreated one. The amount of hydrogen in the sample coated with yttrium remained almost unchanged in 4000 h of exposure. A plasma method for rapid testing for hydrogen resistance is proposed. The hydrogenation rate provided by this method is 700 times higher than that in tests with superheated steam. The results of preliminary experiments confirm the possibility of constructing a unit for batch processing of the surfaces of fuel rod claddings.

  1. Theoretical insight of physical adsorption for a single-component adsorbent+adsorbate system: I. Thermodynamic property surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Anutosh; Saha, Bidyut Baran; Ng, Kim Choon; Koyama, Shigeru; Srinivasan, Kandadai

    2009-02-17

    Thermodynamic property surfaces for a single-component adsorbent+adsorbate system are derived and developed from the viewpoint of classical thermodynamics, thermodynamic requirements of chemical equilibrium, Gibbs law, and Maxwell relations. They enable us to compute the entropy and enthalpy of the adsorbed phase, the isosteric heat of adsorption, specific heat capacity, and the adsorbed phase volume thoroughly. These equations are very simple and easy to handle for calculating the energetic performances of any adsorption system. We have shown here that the derived thermodynamic formulations fill up the information gap with respect to the state of adsorbed phase to dispel the confusion as to what is the actual state of the adsorbed phase. We have also discussed and established the temperature-entropy diagrams of (i) CaCl2-in-silica gel+water system for cooling applications, and (ii) activated carbon (Maxsorb III)+methane system for gas storage.

  2. Effects and Interactions of Medium Components on Laccase from a Marine-Derived Fungus Using Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandralata Raghukumar

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The effects of various synthetic medium components and their interactions with each other ultimately impact laccase production in fungi. This was studied using a laccasehyper-producing marine-derived basidiomycete, Cerrena unicolor MTCC 5159. Inducible laccases were produced in the idiophase only after addition of an inducer such as CuSO4. Concentration of carbon and nitrogen acted antagonistically with respect to laccase production. A combination of low nitrogen and high carbon concentration favored both biomass and laccase production. The most favorable combination resulted in 917 U L-1 of laccase. After sufficient growth had occurred, addition of a surfactant such as Tween 80 positively impacted biomass and increased the laccase activity to around 1,300 U L-1. Increasing the surface to volume ratio of the culture vessel further increased its activity to almost 2,000 U L-1.

  3. A countermeasure for external stress corrosion cracking in piping components by means of residual stress improvement on the outer surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Umemoto, Tadahiro

    1988-01-01

    Many techniques have been proposed as countermeasures for the External Stress Corrosion Cracking (ESCC) on austenitic stainless steel piping caused by sea salt particles. However, not one seems perfect. The method proposed here is an expansion of IHSI (Induction Heating Stress Improvement) which has been successfully implemented in many nuclear power plants as a remedy for Intergranular Stress Corrossion Cracking. The proposed method named EIHSI (External IHSI) can make the residual stress compressive on the outer surface of the piping components. In order to confirm the effectiveness of EIHSI, one series of tests were conducted on a weld joint between the pipe flange and the straight pipe. The measured residual stresses and also the results of the cracking test revealed that EIHSI is a superior method to suppress the ESCC. The outline of EIHSI and the verification tests are presented in this paper. (author)

  4. Theoretical Insight of Physical Adsorption for a Single-Component Adsorbent + Adsorbate System: I. Thermodynamic Property Surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Chakraborty, Anutosh

    2009-02-17

    Thermodynamic property surfaces for a single-component adsorbent + adsorbate system are derived and developed from the viewpoint of classical thermodynamics, thermodynamic requirements of chemical equilibrium, Gibbs law, and Maxwell relations. They enable us to compute the entropy and enthalpy of the adsorbed phase, the isosteric heat of adsorption, specific heat capacity, and the adsorbed phase volume thoroughly. These equations are very simple and easy to handle for calculating the energetic performances of any adsorption system. We have shown here that the derived thermodynamic formulations fill up the information gap with respect to the state of adsorbed phase to dispel the confusion as to what is the actual state of the adsorbed phase. We have also discussed and established the temperature-entropy diagrams of (i) CaCl 2-in-silica gel + water system for cooling applications, and (ii) activated carbon (Maxsorb III) + methane system for gas storage. © Copyright 2009 American Chemical Society.

  5. [Water cults on Soratte Mount].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falchetti, Mario; Ottini, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Mount Soratte is a limestone ridge that rises on a lonely plateau of Pliocene tuff on the right of the Tiber, about forty kilometers North of Rome. Studies related to human settlements during prehistory in this territory have been sporadic and occasional. The first evidence of prehistoric cults on mount Soratte has been found in the early Fifties when ajar, dating back to Neolithic times, was discovered in the cave of the Meri. The jar was placed in a position to be always filled of water and indicates the existence of ancient practices of worship linked to groundwater. In the Middle Ages, although caves became a step towards the Hell, dripping caves were often associated with the magical-religious and therapeutic aspects of water linked to fertility in the popular imagination. In the cave church of the Saint Romana, on the eastern slope of Mount Soratte close to Meri, there is a small marble basin near the altar and the water drips from the rock above it. This water is taken out for devotion and drunk by mothers who did not get milk from their breasts. Recently, the water of the Saint Romana would have drained as a result of an act of sacrilege, albeit unintentionally, as reported in a oral testimony. Overall, the territory of Mount Soratte is characterized by a sharp and clear karst. This causes the water, that collects on the inside, coming out in many springs all around the valley. This water is collected to supply fountains used years ago by farmers and livestock and nowadays may represent a cultural space of social life with the aim to build a strong link with the territory and a new awareness of the past and history of the countryside around Mount Soratte.

  6. Optimization of medium components for production of chitin deacetylase byBacillus amyloliquefaciensZ7, using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuanhao; Xu, Jianping; Wang, Shengjie; Zhou, Guoying; Liu, Junang

    2014-03-04

    Plackett-Burman design and Box-Behnken response surface methodology (RSM) was employed to optimize the medium components for the chitin deacetylase (CDA) activity from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens Z7. Plackett-Burman design was applied to determine the specific medium components affecting CDA activity and found that starch, chitin and MgSO 4 were critical in augmenting CDA activity. These significant parameters were further optimized using Box-Behnken RSM and the optimum concentrations of starch, chitin and MgSO 4 were found to be 24.4, 8.8 and 0.19 g/L, respectively. The optimum medium composition was chitin 8.8 g/L, starch 24.4 g/L, yeast extract 10g/L, MgSO 4 0.19 g/L, K 2 HPO 4 0.3 g/L and NaCl 5 g/L. Under these optimal conditions, the CDA activity of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens Z7 increased distinctly from 18.75 to 27.48 U/mL (46.6% increase in total yield).

  7. Proceedings of US/Japan workshop, Q219 on high heat flux components and plasma surface interactions for next fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulrickson, M.A.; Stevens, P.L.; Hino, T.; Hirohata, Y.

    1996-12-01

    This report contains the viewgraphs from the proceedings of US/Japan Workshop on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices. Some of the general topics covered by this report are: PFC/PSI in tokamak and helical devices; development of high heat flux components; PSIS and plasma facing materials;tritium; and material damage

  8. Proceedings of US/Japan workshop, Q219 on high heat flux components and plasma surface interactions for next fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulrickson, M.A.; Stevens, P.L.; Hino, T.; Hirohata, Y. [eds.

    1996-12-01

    This report contains the viewgraphs from the proceedings of US/Japan Workshop on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices. Some of the general topics covered by this report are: PFC/PSI in tokamak and helical devices; development of high heat flux components; PSIS and plasma facing materials;tritium; and material damage.

  9. Quality assurance in ceramic materials and components. High-resolution non-destructive testing especially of ceramic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiter, H.; Hoffmann, B.; Morsch, A.; Arnold, W.; Schneider, E.

    1988-01-01

    This report discusses the influence of defects on the failure behavior of ceramic materials under four-point bending stress. In this connection various Si 3 N 4 and SiC materials with and without artificially introduced defect particles (Fe, WC, Si, pores) were examined by the following non-destructive test methods: photoacoustic microscopy, scanning laser acoustic microscopy, microfocus roentgenoscopy and ultrasound transit-time measurements. Finally, a four-point bending test and a fracture-mechanical evaluation of the fracture-incuding defects were carried out at the Institute for reliability and failure studies in mechanical engineering of the University of Karlsruhe. According to the type of stress the samples predominantly failed in the case of defects in the surface zone of the side in tension. Among the ndt methods applied the photoacoustic microscopy as a typical surface testing method could predict most of the fracture-inducing defects (30-50 %) without causing destruction. In this connection a different detection sensitivity which corresponds to the thermal reflection factors became apparent according to the type of defect. Furthermore the reports describes the results of some preliminary tests on ndt of green ceramics. In these investigations both the microfocus roentgenoscopy test and the roentgen computed tomography showed a high potential of detecting inhomogeneities and defects in green Si 3 N 4 and SiC components. (orig.) [de

  10. Assessing regional crop water demand using a satellite-based combination equation with a land surface temperature component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyano, Maria Carmen; Garcia, Monica; Tornos, Lucia; Recuero, Laura; Palacios-Orueta, Alicia; Juana, Luis

    2015-04-01

    Quantification of daily evapotranspiration at regional levels is fundamental for improving agricultural and hydrological management, especially in water-scarce and climatic change vulnerable regions, like the Mediterranean basin. Regional estimates of daily crop evapotranspiration (ET) have been historically based on combination equations, such as Penman-Monteith or Priestley-Taylor, forced with weather-data inputs. However, the requirements for long term in-situ data, limit the application of such traditional approaches and algorithms using satellite-data without field calibrations bridge this gap by estimating long-term ET at the pixel level from local to global scales. Land surface temperature is a key variable tracking land surface moisture status. However, it has not been included in satellite ET approaches based on combination equations. In this study, a land surface temperature component was used to estimate soil surface conductance based on an apparent thermal inertia index. A process-based model was applied to estimate surface energy fluxes including daily ET based on a modified version of the Priestley-Taylor Jet Propulsion Laboratory (PT-JPL) model at 1km pixel resolution during a chrono-sequence spanning for more than a decade (2002-2013). The thermal-PT-JPL model was forced with vegetation, albedo, reflectance and temperature products from the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) from both Aqua and Terra satellites. The study region, B-XII Irrigation District of the Lower Guadalquivir, is one of the largest irrigated areas in Spain but it has scarce in-situ micrometeorological or eddy covariance data. The final aim of this study is to evaluate the thermal version of PT-JPL model versus a lumped hydrological model to assess crop evapotranspiration deficits and long-term water consumption trends in the area. The results showed that the thermal-PT-JPL model is a suitable and simple tool requiring only air temperature and incoming solar

  11. Detecting geothermal anomalies and evaluating LST geothermal component by combining thermal remote sensing time series and land surface model data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaguera, Mireia; Vaughan, R. Greg; Ettema, J.; Izquierdo-Verdiguier, E.; Hecker, C. A.; van der Meer, F.D.

    2018-01-01

    This paper explores for the first time the possibilities to use two land surface temperature (LST) time series of different origins (geostationary Meteosat Second Generation satellite data and Noah land surface modelling, LSM), to detect geothermal anomalies and extract the geothermal component of LST, the LSTgt. We hypothesize that in geothermal areas the LSM time series will underestimate the LST as compared to the remote sensing data, since the former does not account for the geothermal component in its model.In order to extract LSTgt, two approaches of different nature (physical based and data mining) were developed and tested in an area of about 560 × 560 km2 centered at the Kenyan Rift. Pre-dawn data in the study area during the first 45 days of 2012 were analyzed.The results show consistent spatial and temporal LSTgt patterns between the two approaches, and systematic differences of about 2 K. A geothermal area map from surface studies was used to assess LSTgt inside and outside the geothermal boundaries. Spatial means were found to be higher inside the geothermal limits, as well as the relative frequency of occurrence of high LSTgt. Results further show that areas with strong topography can result in anomalously high LSTgt values (false positives), which suggests the need for a slope and aspect correction in the inputs to achieve realistic results in those areas. The uncertainty analysis indicates that large uncertainties of the input parameters may limit detection of LSTgt anomalies. To validate the approaches, higher spatial resolution images from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) data over the Olkaria geothermal field were used. An established method to estimate radiant geothermal flux was applied providing values between 9 and 24 W/m2 in the geothermal area, which coincides with the LSTgt flux rates obtained with the proposed approaches.The proposed approaches are a first step in estimating LSTgt

  12. Immersive virtual walk-through development for tokamak using active head mounted display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, Pramit

    2015-01-01

    A fully immersive virtual walk-through of the SST-1 tokamak has been developed. The virtual walkthrough renders the virtual model of SST-1 tokamak through a active stereoscopic head mounted display to visualize the virtual environment. All locations inside and outside of the reactor can be accessed and reviewed. Such a virtual walkthrough provides a 1:1 scale visualization of all components of the tokamak. To achieve such a virtual model, the graphical details of the tokamak CAD model are enhanced. Such enhancements are provided to improve lighting conditions at various locations, texturing of components to have a realistic visual effect and 360° rendering for ease of access. The graphical enhancements also include the redefinition of the facets to optimize the surface triangles to remove lags in display during visual rendering. Two separate algorithms are developed to interact with the virtual model. A fly-by algorithm, developed using C#, uses inputs from a commercial joystick to navigate within the virtual environment. The second algorithm uses the IR and gyroscopic tracking system of the head mounted display to render view as per the current pose of the user within the virtual environment and the direction of view. Such a virtual walk-thorough can be used extensively for design review and integration, review of new components, operator training for remote handling, operations, upgrades of tokamak, etc. (author)

  13. On Possible Similarity Solutions for Three-Dimensional Incompressible Laminar Boundary-Layer Flows Over Developable Surfaces and with Proportional Mainstream Velocity Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Arthur G.

    1958-01-01

    Analysis is presented on the possible similarity solutions of the three-dimensional, laminar, incompressible, boundary-layer equations referred to orthogonal, curvilinear coordinate systems. Requirements of the existence of similarity solutions are obtained for the following: flow over developable surface and flow over non-developable surfaces with proportional mainstream velocity components.

  14. ATST telescope mount: telescope of machine tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffers, Paul; Stolz, Günter; Bonomi, Giovanni; Dreyer, Oliver; Kärcher, Hans

    2012-09-01

    The Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) will be the largest solar telescope in the world, and will be able to provide the sharpest views ever taken of the solar surface. The telescope has a 4m aperture primary mirror, however due to the off axis nature of the optical layout, the telescope mount has proportions similar to an 8 meter class telescope. The technology normally used in this class of telescope is well understood in the telescope community and has been successfully implemented in numerous projects. The world of large machine tools has developed in a separate realm with similar levels of performance requirement but different boundary conditions. In addition the competitive nature of private industry has encouraged development and usage of more cost effective solutions both in initial capital cost and thru-life operating cost. Telescope mounts move relatively slowly with requirements for high stability under external environmental influences such as wind buffeting. Large machine tools operate under high speed requirements coupled with high application of force through the machine but with little or no external environmental influences. The benefits of these parallel development paths and the ATST system requirements are being combined in the ATST Telescope Mount Assembly (TMA). The process of balancing the system requirements with new technologies is based on the experience of the ATST project team, Ingersoll Machine Tools who are the main contractor for the TMA and MT Mechatronics who are their design subcontractors. This paper highlights a number of these proven technologies from the commercially driven machine tool world that are being introduced to the TMA design. Also the challenges of integrating and ensuring that the differences in application requirements are accounted for in the design are discussed.

  15. A critical assessment of direct radiative effects of different aerosol types on surface global radiation and its components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Xiangao

    2014-01-01

    A critical assessment of direct radiative effects of different aerosol types on surface global, direct and diffuse radiation is presented. The analysis is based on measurements of aerosol optical properties and surface solar radiation (SSR) of cloud-free days at the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) and Aerosol Robotic Network station (AERONET) of Xianghe over the North China Plain between October 2004 and May 2012. Six aerosol types are classified based on aerosol size and absorption from the AERONET retrieval products, including two coarse-mode dominated aerosol types: dust (DU: fine mode fraction (FMF)<0.4) and polluted dust (PD: FMF within 0.4–0.7) and four fine-mode dominated aerosol types (FMF>0.7) but with different single scattering albedo (SSA): highly absorbing (HA: SSA<0.85), moderately absorbing (MA: SSA within 0.85–0.90), slightly absorbing (SA: SSA within 0.90–0.95) and very weakly absorbing (WA: SSA>0.95). Dramatic differences in aerosol direct radiative effect (ADRE) on global SSR and its components between the six aerosol types have been revealed. ADRE efficiency on global SSR for solar zenight angle (SZA) between 55° and 65° ranges from −106 W m −2 for WA to −181 W m −2 for HA. The minimum ADRE efficiency on diffuse SSR is derived for HA aerosols, being 113 W m −2 that is about half of that by DU, the maximum value of six aerosol types. ADRE efficiency on global SSR by DU and PD (−141 to −150 W m −2 for SZA between 55° and 65°) is comparable to that by MA, although 100 W m −2 more direct SSR is extincted by DU and PD than by MA. DU and PD induce more diffuse SSR than MA that offsets larger reduction of direct SSR by DU and PD. Implications of the results to related researches are detailed discussed. The results are derived from aerosol and radiation data in the North China Plain, however the method can be used to any other stations with similar measurements. - Highlights: • A statistical method is developed to

  16. Quaternary glaciation of Mount Everest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Lewis A.; Robinson, Ruth; Benn, Douglas I.; Finkel, Robert C.; Davis, Nicole K.; Yi, Chaolu; Putkonen, Jaakko; Li, Dewen; Murray, Andrew S.

    2009-07-01

    The Quaternary glacial history of the Rongbuk valley on the northern slopes of Mount Everest is examined using field mapping, geomorphic and sedimentological methods, and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and 10Be terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide (TCN) dating. Six major sets of moraines are present representing significant glacier advances or still-stands. These date to >330 ka (Tingri moraine), >41 ka (Dzakar moraine), 24-27 ka (Jilong moraine), 14-17 ka (Rongbuk moraine), 8-2 ka (Samdupo moraines) and ˜1.6 ka (Xarlungnama moraine), and each is assigned to a distinct glacial stage named after the moraine. The Samdupo glacial stage is subdivided into Samdupo I (6.8-7.7 ka) and Samdupo II (˜2.4 ka). Comparison with OSL and TCN defined ages on moraines on the southern slopes of Mount Everest in the Khumbu Himal show that glaciations across the Everest massif were broadly synchronous. However, unlike the Khumbu Himal, no early Holocene glacier advance is recognized in the Rongbuk valley. This suggests that the Khumbu Himal may have received increased monsoon precipitation in the early Holocene to help increase positive glacier mass balances, while the Rongbuk valley was too sheltered to receive monsoon moisture during this time and glaciers could not advance. Comparison of equilibrium-line altitude depressions for glacial stages across Mount Everest reveals asymmetric patterns of glacier retreat that likely reflects greater glacier sensitivity to climate change on the northern slopes, possibly due to precipitation starvation.

  17. Parsimonious classification of binary lacunarity data computed from food surface images using kernel principal component analysis and artificial neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Abdullah; Valous, Nektarios A; Sun, Da-Wen; Allen, Paul

    2011-02-01

    Lacunarity is about quantifying the degree of spatial heterogeneity in the visual texture of imagery through the identification of the relationships between patterns and their spatial configurations in a two-dimensional setting. The computed lacunarity data can designate a mathematical index of spatial heterogeneity, therefore the corresponding feature vectors should possess the necessary inter-class statistical properties that would enable them to be used for pattern recognition purposes. The objectives of this study is to construct a supervised parsimonious classification model of binary lacunarity data-computed by Valous et al. (2009)-from pork ham slice surface images, with the aid of kernel principal component analysis (KPCA) and artificial neural networks (ANNs), using a portion of informative salient features. At first, the dimension of the initial space (510 features) was reduced by 90% in order to avoid any noise effects in the subsequent classification. Then, using KPCA, the first nineteen kernel principal components (99.04% of total variance) were extracted from the reduced feature space, and were used as input in the ANN. An adaptive feedforward multilayer perceptron (MLP) classifier was employed to obtain a suitable mapping from the input dataset. The correct classification percentages for the training, test and validation sets were 86.7%, 86.7%, and 85.0%, respectively. The results confirm that the classification performance was satisfactory. The binary lacunarity spatial metric captured relevant information that provided a good level of differentiation among pork ham slice images. Copyright © 2010 The American Meat Science Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Tracing the stellar component of low surface brightness Milky Way dwarf galaxies to their outskirts. I. Sextans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicuéndez, L.; Battaglia, G.; Irwin, M.; Bermejo-Climent, J. R.; McMonigal, B.; Bate, N. F.; Lewis, G. F.; Conn, A. R.; de Boer, T. J. L.; Gallart, C.; Guglielmo, M.; Ibata, R.; McConnachie, A.; Tolstoy, E.; Fernando, N.

    2018-01-01

    Aims: We present results from deep and very spatially extended CTIO/DECam g and r photometry (reaching out to 2 mag below the oldest main-sequence turn-off and covering 20 deg2) around the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy. We aim to use this dataset to study the structural properties of Sextans overall stellar population and its member stars in different evolutionary phases, as well as to search for possible signs of tidal disturbance from the Milky Way, which would indicate departure from dynamical equilibrium. Methods: We performed the most accurate and quantitative structural analysis to-date of Sextans' stellar components by applying Bayesian Monte Carlo Markov chain methods to the individual stars' positions. Surface density maps are built by statistically decontaminating the sample through a matched filter analysis of the colour-magnitude diagram, and then analysed for departures from axisymmetry. Results: Sextans is found to be significantly less spatially extended and more centrally concentrated than early studies suggested. No statistically significant distortions or signs of tidal disturbances were found down to a surface brightness limit of 31.8 mag/arcsec2 in V-band. We identify an overdensity in the central regions that may correspond to previously reported kinematic substructure(s). In agreement with previous findings, old and metal-poor stars such as Blue Horizontal Branch stars cover a much larger area than stars in other evolutionary phases, and bright Blue Stragglers (BSs) are less spatially extended than faint ones. However, the different spatial distribution of bright and faint BSs appears consistent with the general age and metallicity gradients found in Sextans' stellar component. This is compatible with Sextans BSs having formed by evolution of binaries and not necessarily due to the presence of a central disrupted globular cluster, as suggested in the literature. We provide structural parameters for the various populations analysed and make

  19. Mounting support for a photovoltaic module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Gregory Michael; Barsun, Stephan K.; Coleman, Nathaniel T.; Zhou, Yin

    2013-03-26

    A mounting support for a photovoltaic module is described. The mounting support includes a foundation having an integrated wire-way ledge portion. A photovoltaic module support mechanism is coupled with the foundation.

  20. Fire and forest history at Mount Rushmore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Peter M; Wienk, Cody L; Symstad, Amy J

    2008-12-01

    Mount Rushmore National Memorial in the Black Hills of South Dakota is known worldwide for its massive sculpture of four of the United States' most respected presidents. The Memorial landscape also is covered by extensive ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forest that has not burned in over a century. We compiled dendroecological and forest structural data from 29 plots across the 517-ha Memorial and used fire behavior modeling to reconstruct the historical fire regime and forest structure and compare them to current conditions. The historical fire regime is best characterized as one of low-severity surface fires with occasional (> 100 years) patches (fire. We estimate that only approximately 3.3% of the landscape burned as crown fire during 22 landscape fire years (recorded at > or = 25% of plots) between 1529 and 1893. The last landscape fire was in 1893. Mean fire intervals before 1893 varied depending on spatial scale, from 34 years based on scar-to-scar intervals on individual trees to 16 years between landscape fire years. Modal fire intervals were 11-15 years and did not vary with scale. Fire rotation (the time to burn an area the size of the study area) was estimated to be 30 years for surface fire and 800+ years for crown fire. The current forest is denser and contains more small trees, fewer large trees, lower canopy base heights, and greater canopy bulk density than a reconstructed historical (1870) forest. Fire behavior modeling using the NEXUS program suggests that surface fires would have dominated fire behavior in the 1870 forest during both moderate and severe weather conditions, while crown fire would dominate in the current forest especially under severe weather. Changes in the fire regime and forest structure at Mount Rushmore parallel those seen in ponderosa pine forests from the southwestern United States. Shifts from historical to current forest structure and the increased likelihood of crown fire justify the need for forest restoration before a

  1. Electrochemical treatment of simulated textile wastewater with industrial components and Levafix Blue CA reactive dye: Optimization through response surface methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koerbahti, Bahadir K.; Tanyolac, Abdurrahman

    2008-01-01

    The electrochemical oxidation of simulated textile wastewater was studied on iron electrodes in the presence of NaCl electrolyte in a batch electrochemical reactor. The simulated textile wastewater was prepared from industrial components based on the real mercerized and non-mercerized cotton and viscon process, being first in literature. The highest COD, color and turbidity removals were achieved as 93.9%, 99.5%, and 82.9%, respectively, at 40% pollution load, 8 V applied potential, 37.5 g/L electrolyte concentration and 30 deg. C reaction temperature. The electrochemical treatment of industrial textile wastewater was optimized using response surface methodology (RSM), where applied potential and electrolyte concentration were to be minimized while COD, color and turbidity removal percents were maximized at 100% pollution load. In a specific batch run under the optimum conditions of 30 deg. C reaction temperature, 25 g/L electrolyte concentration and 8 V applied potential applied with 35.5 mA/cm 2 current density at 100% pollution load, COD, color and turbidity removals were realized as 61.6%, 99.6% and 66.4%, respectively

  2. Borrelia burgdorferi outer surface protein C (OspC) binds complement component C4b and confers bloodstream survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caine, Jennifer A; Lin, Yi-Pin; Kessler, Julie R; Sato, Hiromi; Leong, John M; Coburn, Jenifer

    2017-12-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb) is the causative agent of Lyme disease in the United States, a disease that can result in carditis, and chronic and debilitating arthritis and/or neurologic symptoms if left untreated. Bb survives in the midgut of the Ixodes scapularis tick, or within tissues of immunocompetent hosts. In the early stages of infection, the bacteria are present in the bloodstream where they must resist clearance by the innate immune system of the host. We have found a novel role for outer surface protein C (OspC) from B. burgdorferi and B. garinii in interactions with the complement component C4b and bloodstream survival in vivo. Our data show that OspC inhibits the classical and lectin complement pathways and competes with complement protein C2 for C4b binding. Resistance to complement is important for maintenance of the lifecycle of Bb, enabling survival of the pathogen within the host as well as in the midgut of a feeding tick when ospC expression is induced. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. [Optimization for supercritical CO2 extraction with response surface methodology and component analysis of Sapindus mukorossi oil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan; Xiao, Xin-yu; Ge, Fa-huan

    2012-02-01

    To study the extraction conditions of Sapindus mukorossi oil by Supercritical CO2 Extraction and identify its components. Optimized SFE-CO2 Extraction by response surface methodology and used GC-MS to analysie Sapindus mukorossi oil compounds. Established the model of an equation for the extraction rate of Sapindus mukorossi oil by Supercritical CO2 Extraction, and the optimal parameters for the Supercritical CO2 Extraction determined by the equation were: the extraction pressure was 30 MPa, temperature was 40 degrees C; The separation I pressure was 14 MPa, temperature was 45 degrees C; The separation II pressure was 6 MPa, temperature was 40 degrees C; The extraction time was 60 min and the extraction rate of Sapindus mukorossi oil of 17.58%. 22 main compounds of Sapindus mukorossi oil extracted by supercritical CO2 were identified by GC-MS, unsaturated fatty acids were 86.59%. This process is reliable, safe and with simple operation, and can be used for the extraction of Sapindus mukorossi oil.

  4. Simulation of Time-Varying Spatially Uniform Pressure and Near-Surface Wind Flows on Building Components and Cladding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seraphy Y. Shen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a new full-scale (FS testing apparatus for conducting performance evaluations of FS building envelope systems. The simulator can generate spatially uniform, time-varying pressure conditions associated with Saffir–Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale Category 5 winds while compensating for large air leakage through the specimen and also operate a high-speed wind tunnel, both with dynamic control. This paper presents system details, operating characteristics, and an early case study on the performance of large sectional door systems under wind pressure loading. Failure mechanisms are discussed, and finite element modeling is validated for two specimens. It demonstrates successful dynamic load control for large component and cladding systems, as well as simulation of flows near the building surface. These capabilities serve to complement other FS wind tunnel facilities by offering tools to generate ultimate load conditions on portions of the building. Further, the paper successfully demonstrates the utility of combining physical testing and computational analysis as a matter of routine, which underscores the potential of evolving FS testing to encompass cyber–physical approaches.

  5. Anaglyph with Landsat Overlay, Mount Meru, Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Mount Meru is an active volcano located just 70 kilometers (44 miles) west of Mount Kilimanjaro. It reaches 4,566 meters (14,978 feet) in height but has lost much of its bulk due to an eastward volcanic blast sometime in its distant past, perhaps similar to the eruption of Mount Saint Helens in Washington State in 1980. Mount Meru most recently had a minor eruption about a century ago. The several small cones and craters seen in the vicinity probably reflect numerous episodes of volcanic activity. Mount Meru is the topographic centerpiece of Arusha National Park, but Ngurdoto Crater to the east (image top) is also prominent. The fertile slopes of both volcanoes rise above the surrounding savanna and support a forest that hosts diverse wildlife, including nearly 400 species of birds, and also monkeys and leopards, while the floor of Ngurdoto Crater hosts herds of elephants and buffaloes.The stereoscopic effect of this anaglyph was created by first draping a Landsat satellite image over a digital elevation data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), and then generating two differing perspectives, one for each eye. When viewed through special glasses, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and cover the right eye with a blue filter.Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30-meter (98-foot) resolution of most Landsat images and will substantially help in analyzing the large and growing Landsat image archive, managed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour

  6. 78 FR 59954 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Michigan State Police, Mount Pleasant Post, Mount Pleasant, MI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ....R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Michigan State Police, Mount Pleasant Post, Mount Pleasant, MI... Pleasant Post, has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian...: Detective Sergeant Gary Green; Michigan State Police, Mount Pleasant Post, 3580 S. Isabella Road, Mount...

  7. US-Japan workshop Q-181 on high heat flux components and plasma-surface interactions for next devices: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrath, R.T. [ed.] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Yamashina, T. [ed.] [Hokkadio Univ. (Japan)

    1994-04-01

    This report contain viewgraphs of papers from the following sessions: plasma facing components issues for future machines; recent PMI results from several tokamaks; high heat flux technology; plasma facing components design and applications; plasma facing component materials and irradiation damage; boundary layer plasma; plasma disruptions; conditioning and tritium; and erosion/redeposition.

  8. US-Japan workshop Q-181 on high heat flux components and plasma-surface interactions for next devices: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGrath, R.T.; Yamashina, T.

    1994-04-01

    This report contain viewgraphs of papers from the following sessions: plasma facing components issues for future machines; recent PMI results from several tokamaks; high heat flux technology; plasma facing components design and applications; plasma facing component materials and irradiation damage; boundary layer plasma; plasma disruptions; conditioning and tritium; and erosion/redeposition

  9. Measurement & Minimization of Mount Induced Strain on Double Crystal Monochromator Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, J.; Alcock, S. G.

    2013-03-01

    Opto-mechanical mounts can cause significant distortions to monochromator crystals and mirrors if not designed or implemented carefully. A slope measuring profiler, the Diamond-NOM [1], was used to measure the change in tangential slope as a function of crystal clamping configuration and load. A three point mount was found to exhibit the lowest surface distortion (Diamond Light Source.

  10. Surface chemistry of Ti6Al4V components fabricated using selective laser melting for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaithilingam, Jayasheelan, E-mail: Jayasheelan.Vaithilingam@nottingham.ac.uk [Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing Research Group, EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Additive Manufacturing, School of Engineering, The University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Prina, Elisabetta [School of Pharmacy, Centre for Biomolecular Sciences, The University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Goodridge, Ruth D.; Hague, Richard J.M. [Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing Research Group, EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Additive Manufacturing, School of Engineering, The University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Edmondson, Steve [School of Materials, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Rose, Felicity R.A.J. [School of Pharmacy, Centre for Biomolecular Sciences, The University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Christie, Steven D.R. [Department of Chemistry, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom)

    2016-10-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) has previously been shown to be a viable method for fabricating biomedical implants; however, the surface chemistry of SLM fabricated parts is poorly understood. In this study, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to determine the surface chemistries of (a) SLM as-fabricated (SLM-AF) Ti6Al4V and (b) SLM fabricated and mechanically polished (SLM-MP) Ti6Al4V samples and compared with (c) traditionally manufactured (forged) and mechanically polished Ti6Al4V samples. The SLM–AF surface was observed to be porous with an average surface roughness (Ra) of 17.6 ± 3.7 μm. The surface chemistry of the SLM-AF was significantly different to the FGD-MP surface with respect to elemental distribution and their existence on the outermost surface. Sintered particles on the SLM-AF surface were observed to affect depth profiling of the sample due to a shadowing effect during argon ion sputtering. Surface heterogeneity was observed for all three surfaces; however, vanadium was witnessed only on the mechanically polished (SLM-MP and FGD-MP) surfaces. The direct and indirect 3T3 cell cytotoxicity studies revealed that the cells were viable on the SLM fabricated Ti6Al4V parts. The varied surface chemistry of the SLM-AF and SLM-MP did not influence the cell behaviour. - Highlights: • Surface chemistry of selective laser melted (SLM) Ti6Al4V parts was compared with conventionally forged Ti6Al4V parts. • The surface elemental compositions of the SLM as-fabricated surfaces were significantly different to the forged surface. • Surface oxide-layer of the SLM as-fabricated was thicker than the polished SLM surfaces and the forged Ti6Al4V surfaces.

  11. Biosorption of diethyl phthalate ester by living and nonliving Burkholderia cepacia and the role of its cell surface components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Si; Li, Langlang; Chen, Anwei; Zeng, Qingru; Xia, Hao; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2017-07-01

    In this study, the dibutyl phthalate (DBP) binding properties of a DBP-tolerant bacterium (B. cepacia) were characterized in terms of adsorption kinetics and isotherm. Living and nonliving cells both exhibited rapid removal of DBP, achieving more than 80% of maximum sorption within 30 min of contact and reached the equilibrium after 3 h. The adsorption isotherms were well fitted with the Sips model and the nonliving cells have greater biosorption capacity and affinity for DBP than the living cells. Furthermore, the absence of an active mechanism dependent on metabolism implied that the DBP bioaccumulation by living cells was mainly attribute to passive surface binding. The optimum pH for DBP adsorption by living and nonliving cells were both observed to be 6.0. The biosorptive mechanism of DBP binding by B. cepacia was further confirmed by FTIR analysis and various chemical treatments. FTIR results indicated that the phosphate and CH 2 groups on B. cepacia were the main bounding sites for DBP. Furthermore, 2.28, 2.15, 1.93 and 0.87 g of pretreated cells were obtained from 2.40 g of native cells via extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), superficial layer-capsule, lipids components and cell membrane removal treatments, respectively. Total binding amount of DBP on the native cells, EPS-removed cells, capsule-removed cells, lipids-extracted cells and membrane-removed cells were 26.69, 24.84, 24.93, 16.11 and 10.80 mg, respectively, suggesting that the cell wall lipids, proteins or peptidoglycan might play important roles in the sorption of DBP by B. cepacia. The information could be applied in understanding on the mobility, transport and ultimate fate of PAEs in soil and related environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Surface tension of different sized single-component droplets, according to macroscopic data obtained using the lattice gas model and the critical droplet size during phase formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovbin, Yu. K.; Zaitseva, E. S.; Rabinovich, A. B.

    2017-10-01

    Size dependences of the surface tension of spherical single-component droplets are calculated using equations of the lattice gas model for 19 compounds. Parameters of the model are found from experimental data on the surface tension of these compounds for a macroscopic planar surface. The chosen low-molecular compounds satisfy the law of corresponding states. To improve agreement with the experimental data, Lennard-Jones potential parameters are varied within 10% deviations. The surface tensions of different sized equilibrium droplets are calculated at elevated and lowered temperatures. It is found that the surface tension of droplets grows monotonically as the droplet size increases from zero to its bulk value. The droplet size R 0 corresponding to zero surface tension corresponds to the critical size of the emergence of a new phase. The critical droplet sizes in the new phase of the considered compounds are estimated for the first time.

  13. Surface chemistry of Ti6Al4V components fabricated using selective laser melting for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaithilingam, Jayasheelan; Prina, Elisabetta; Goodridge, Ruth D; Hague, Richard J M; Edmondson, Steve; Rose, Felicity R A J; Christie, Steven D R

    2016-10-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) has previously been shown to be a viable method for fabricating biomedical implants; however, the surface chemistry of SLM fabricated parts is poorly understood. In this study, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to determine the surface chemistries of (a) SLM as-fabricated (SLM-AF) Ti6Al4V and (b) SLM fabricated and mechanically polished (SLM-MP) Ti6Al4V samples and compared with (c) traditionally manufactured (forged) and mechanically polished Ti6Al4V samples. The SLM-AF surface was observed to be porous with an average surface roughness (Ra) of 17.6±3.7μm. The surface chemistry of the SLM-AF was significantly different to the FGD-MP surface with respect to elemental distribution and their existence on the outermost surface. Sintered particles on the SLM-AF surface were observed to affect depth profiling of the sample due to a shadowing effect during argon ion sputtering. Surface heterogeneity was observed for all three surfaces; however, vanadium was witnessed only on the mechanically polished (SLM-MP and FGD-MP) surfaces. The direct and indirect 3T3 cell cytotoxicity studies revealed that the cells were viable on the SLM fabricated Ti6Al4V parts. The varied surface chemistry of the SLM-AF and SLM-MP did not influence the cell behaviour. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Space radar image of Mount Everest

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    These are two comparison images of Mount Everest and its surroundings, along the border of Nepal and Tibet. The peak of Mount Everest, the highest elevation on Earth at 8,848 meters (29,028 feet), can be seen near the center of each image. The image at the top was acquired through thick cloud cover by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on April 16, 1994. The image on the bottom is an optical photograph taken by the Endeavour crew under clear conditions during the second flight of SIR-C/X-SAR on October 10, 1994. Both images show an area approximately 70 kilometers by 38 kilometers (43 miles by 24 miles) that is centered at 28.0 degrees north latitude and 86.9 degrees east longitude. North is toward the upper left. The colors in the radar image were obtained using the following radar channels: red represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received); green represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received); blue represents the C-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received). Radar illumination is from the top of the frame. The optical photograph has been geometrically adjusted to better match the area shown in the radar image. Many features of the Himalayan terrain are visible in both images. Snow covered areas appear white in the optical photograph while the same areas appear bright blue in the radar image. The radar image was taken in early spring and shows deep snow cover, while the optical photograph was taken in late summer and shows minimum snow cover. The curving and branching features seen in both images are glaciers. The two wavelengths and multiple polarizations of the SIR-C radar are sensitive to characteristics of the glacier surfaces that are not detected by conventional photography, such as the ice roughness, water content and stratification. For this reason, the glaciers show a variety of colors in the radar image (blue, purple, red

  15. A new magnetorheological mount featured by changeable damping gaps using a moved-plate valve structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phu, Do Xuan; Shah, Kruti; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a new type of a magnetorheological (MR) fluid mount is proposed and its performances are experimentally investigated. The design of this MR mount is based on two operating modes of MR fluid: flow mode and shear mode. These modes are applied to the mechanism design consisting of two components: a fixed plate for applying the flow mode, and a moved plate for applying the shear mode of MR fluid motion. These plates belong to the valve-type structure of MR mount. The primary objective using the moved plate is to overcome the block-up phenomenon which frequently occurs in the conventional-type MR mount, in which there is no flow of MR fluid through the damping gap. In this research, a laboratorial fluid (MRF140) is used in the design and optimization of MR mount. This fluid features plate-like particles unlike the sphere particles. The yield stress of the fluid is measured as a function of the magnetic field and the theoretical analysis for the mount design is undertaken using the properties of the MR fluid, followed by design optimization. The objective function is concentrated on maximal damping force of the MR mount subjected to parameter constraints. Based on the results of optimization, the proposed MR mount is manufactured and tested for the performance evaluation. Vibration control capability and block-up phenomenon are investigated and compared between the proposed and conventional MR mounts. (paper)

  16. Proceedings of 1999 U.S./Japan Workshop (99FT-05) On High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NYGREN,RICHARD E.; STAVROS,DIANA T.

    2000-06-01

    The 1999 US-Japan Workshop on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions in Next Step Fusion Devices was held at the St. Francis Hotel in Santa Fe, New Mexico, on November 1-4, 1999. There were 42 presentations as well as discussion on technical issues and planning for future collaborations. The participants included 22 researchers from Japan and the United States as well as seven researchers from Europe and Russia. There have been important changes in the programs in both the US and Japan in the areas of plasma surface interactions and plasma facing components. The US has moved away from a strong focus on the ITER Project and has introduced new programs on use of liquid surfaces for plasma facing components, and operation of NSTX has begun. In Japan, the Large Helical Device began operation. This is the first large world-class confinement device operating in a magnetic configuration different than a tokamak. In selecting the presentations for this workshop, the organizers sought a balance between research in laboratory facilities or confinement devices related to plasma surface interactions and experimental research in the development of plasma facing components. In discussions about the workshop itself, the participants affirmed their preference for a setting where ''work-in-progress'' could be informally presented and discussed.

  17. Radiation reflection from star surface reveals the mystery of interpulse shift and appearance of high frequency components in the Crab pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontorovich, V. M.; Trofymenko, S. V.

    2017-12-01

    A new mechanism of radiation emission in the polar gap of a pulsar is discussed. It is based on the curvature radiation which is emitted by positrons moving towards the surface of neutron star along field lines of the inclined magnetic field and reflects from the surface. This mechanism explains the mystery of the interpulse shift and appearance of additional components in the emission of Crab pulsar at high frequencies discovered by Moffett and Hankins twenty years ago. We discuss coherence, energy flux and spectrum of the reflected radiation, appearance and disappearance of the interpulse position shift with the frequency increase. It is also possible that a nonlinear reflection (stimulated scattering) from the star surface is observed in the form of HF components. The frequency drift of these components, discovered by Hankins, Jones and Eilek, is discussed. The nonlinear reflection is associated with “Wood’s anomaly” at the diffracted waves grazing along the star surface. Two components can arise due to slow and fast waves which are present in the magnetospheric plasma. The possible scheme of their appearance due to birefringence at the reflection is also proposed.

  18. Ocean floor mounting of wave energy converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Stefan G

    2015-01-20

    A system for mounting a set of wave energy converters in the ocean includes a pole attached to a floor of an ocean and a slider mounted on the pole in a manner that permits the slider to move vertically along the pole and rotate about the pole. The wave energy converters can then be mounted on the slider to allow adjustment of the depth and orientation of the wave energy converters.

  19. Components of near-surface energy balance derived from satellite soundings – Part 1: Net available energy

    OpenAIRE

    K. Mallick; A. Jarvis; G. Wohlfahrt; G. Kiely; T. Hirano; A. Miyata; S. Yamamoto; L. Hoffmann

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces a relatively simple method for recovering global fields of near-surface net available energy (the sum of the sensible and latent heat flux or the difference between the net radiation and surface heat accumulation) using satellite visible and infra-red products derived from the AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder) and MODIS (MOderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) platforms. The method focuses on first specifying net surface radiation by con...

  20. Simulated studies of wear and friction in total hip prosthesis components with various ball sizes and surface finishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swikert, M. A.; Johnson, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on a newly designed total hip joint simulator. The apparatus closely simulates the complex motions and loads of the human hip in normal walking. The wear and friction of presently used appliance configurations and materials were determined. A surface treatment of the metal femoral ball specimens was applied to influence wear. The results of the investigation indicate that wear can be reduced by mechanical treatment of metal femoral ball surfaces. A metallographic examination and surface roughness measurements were made.

  1. System architecture and operational analysis of medium displacement unmanned surface vehicle sea hunter as a surface warfare component of distributed lethality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release. Distribution is unlimited. SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE ...TITLE AND SUBTITLE SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE AND OPERATIONAL ANALYSIS OF MEDIUM DISPLACEMENT UNMANNED SURFACE VEHICLE SEA HUNTER AS A SURFACE WARFARE...traceability, requirements and capabilities while determining the architecture framework in accordance with the Department of Defense Architectural

  2. Effects and interactions of medium components on laccase from a marine-derived fungus using response surface methodology

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DeSouza-Ticlo, D.; Garg, S.; Raghukumar, C.

    The effects of various synthetic medium components and their interactions with each other ultimately impact laccase production in fungi. This was studied using a laccase-hyper-producing marine-derived basidiomycete, Cerrena unicolor MTCC 5159...

  3. Surface layer properties of dough liquor components: Are they key parameters in gas retention in bread dough?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Primo-Martín, C.; Hamer, R.J.; Jongh, H.H.J.de

    2006-01-01

    Gas cell stability during bread making is controlled by both surface and bulk properties. This paper is focused on studying the surface properties of the water-soluble phase of the dough, the dough liquor (with and without lipids), as well as the composition of the air/water interface. Using

  4. Cell surface hydrophobicity: a key component in the degradation of polyethylene succinate by Pseudomonas sp. AKS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribedi, P; Sil, A K

    2014-02-01

    Polyethylene succinate (PES) contains hydrolysable ester bonds that make it a potential substitute for polyethylene (PE) and polypropylene (PP). Towards bioremediation of PES, we have already reported that a new strain of Pseudomonas, Pseudomonas sp. AKS2, can efficiently degrade PES and hypothesized that cell surface hydrophobicity plays an important role in this degradation process. In this study, our efforts were targeted towards establishing a correlation between cell surface hydrophobicity and PES degradation. We have manipulated cell surface hydrophobicity of AKS2 by varying concentrations of glucose and ammonium sulphate in the growth medium and subsequently examined the extent of PES degradation. We observed an increase in PES degradation by AKS2 with an increase in cell surface hydrophobicity. The increased surface hydrophobicity caused an enhanced biofilm formation on PES surface that resulted in better polymer degradation. The current study establishes a direct correlation between cell surface hydrophobicity of an organism and its potential to degrade a nonpolar polymer like PES. Cell surface hydrophobicity manipulation can be used as an important strategy to increase bioremediation of nonpolar polymer like PES. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. Surface Layer Properties of Dough Liquor Components: Are They Key Parameters in Gas Retention in Bread Dough?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Primo Martin, C.; Hamer, R.J.; Jongh, de H.H.J.

    2006-01-01

    Gas cell stability during bread making is controlled by both surface and bulk properties. This paper is focused on studying the surface properties of the water-soluble phase of the dough, the dough liquor (with and without lipids), as well as the composition of the air/water interface. Using

  6. Isogloss: language and legacy on Mount St. Helens

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Dodd

    2012-01-01

    Nothing standing aboveground today was here thirty years ago. The ground itself wasn't here. Oh, there was ground, but much of it lay below the surface where my boot soles slip a little in the loose pebbles of pumice. Rolling on loose rock and big ideas, for a moment I lose my sense of balance, glancing first at the sky above, then at the nearby peak of Mount St...

  7. Surface tensions of multi-component mixed inorganic/organic aqueous systems of atmospheric significance: measurements, model predictions and importance for cloud activation predictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. O. Topping

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to predict the physical properties of aerosol particles, it is necessary to adequately capture the behaviour of the ubiquitous complex organic components. One of the key properties which may affect this behaviour is the contribution of the organic components to the surface tension of aqueous particles in the moist atmosphere. Whilst the qualitative effect of organic compounds on solution surface tensions has been widely reported, our quantitative understanding on mixed organic and mixed inorganic/organic systems is limited. Furthermore, it is unclear whether models that exist in the literature can reproduce the surface tension variability for binary and higher order multi-component organic and mixed inorganic/organic systems of atmospheric significance. The current study aims to resolve both issues to some extent. Surface tensions of single and multiple solute aqueous solutions were measured and compared with predictions from a number of model treatments. On comparison with binary organic systems, two predictive models found in the literature provided a range of values resulting from sensitivity to calculations of pure component surface tensions. Results indicate that a fitted model can capture the variability of the measured data very well, producing the lowest average percentage deviation for all compounds studied. The performance of the other models varies with compound and choice of model parameters. The behaviour of ternary mixed inorganic/organic systems was unreliably captured by using a predictive scheme and this was dependent on the composition of the solutes present. For more atmospherically representative higher order systems, entirely predictive schemes performed poorly. It was found that use of the binary data in a relatively simple mixing rule, or modification of an existing thermodynamic model with parameters derived from binary data, was able to accurately capture the surface tension variation with concentration. Thus

  8. The effect of cultureware surfaces on functional and structural components of differentiated 3T3-L1 preadipocytes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavlíková, N.; Weiszenstein, M.; Pala, J.; Halada, Petr; Šeda, O.; Elkalaf, M.; Trnka, J.; Kovář, J.; Polak, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 5 (2015), s. 919-936 ISSN 1425-8153 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Cell culture * Proteomics * Cultureware surface Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.753, year: 2015

  9. Topology-optimization-based design method of flexures for mounting the primary mirror of a large-aperture space telescope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Rui; Liu, Shutian; Li, Quhao

    2017-05-20

    For the development of a large-aperture space telescope, one of the key techniques is the method for designing the flexures for mounting the primary mirror, as the flexures are the key components. In this paper, a topology-optimization-based method for designing flexures is presented. The structural performances of the mirror system under multiple load conditions, including static gravity and thermal loads, as well as the dynamic vibration, are considered. The mirror surface shape error caused by gravity and the thermal effect is treated as the objective function, and the first-order natural frequency of the mirror structural system is taken as the constraint. The pattern repetition constraint is added, which can ensure symmetrical material distribution. The topology optimization model for flexure design is established. The substructuring method is also used to condense the degrees of freedom (DOF) of all the nodes of the mirror system, except for the nodes that are linked to the mounting flexures, to reduce the computation effort during the optimization iteration process. A potential optimized configuration is achieved by solving the optimization model and post-processing. A detailed shape optimization is subsequently conducted to optimize its dimension parameters. Our optimization method deduces new mounting structures that significantly enhance the optical performance of the mirror system compared to the traditional methods, which only focus on the parameters of existing structures. Design results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed optimization method.

  10. Mount Athos: Between autonomy and statehood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avramović Dragutin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Legal status of the Mount Athos is characterized by many special features that make it internationally unique legal regime. The author analyzes peculiarities of Mount Athos territorial status, legal position of residents and visitors, as well as organization of Mount Athos authorities. The author concludes that the Mount Athos is characterized by a kind of para-sovereignty. Its autonomy involves not only the internal organization, autonomous governance and religious autonomy, but it also includes many elements of secular life of their visitors. Mount Athos has its own, separate legislative, administrative and judicial powers, while the Statute of the Mount Athos has greater legal force than all the other laws of the Greek state, because the state can not unilaterally change its provisions. Having in mind that the wide self-government is vested in church authorities and that the monks have very specific way of living, the author takes a position that the Mount Athos represent 'monastic state', but without statehood. The author also states that the Mount Athos will be faced with many challenges in the context of spreading of an assimilating, universal conception of human rights.

  11. Alaska research natural areas: 1. Mount Prindle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    G.P. Juday

    1988-01-01

    The 2412-hectare Mount Prindle Research Natural Area is located in central Alaska on the border of the Steese National Conservation Area and White Mountains National Recreation Area. It is managed by the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, Steese-White Mountains District. Mount Prindle was selected as a Research Natural Area (RNA) because it...

  12. Surface texturing of Si3N4–SiC ceramic tool components by pulsed laser machining

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tshabalala, LC

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Article Type: Full Length Article Keywords: silicon nitride; pulsed laser machining; surface texturing; material removal; roughness Corresponding Author: Mrs. Lerato Criscelda Tshabalala, MTech Corresponding Author's Institution: Tshwane... show the material response to various laser parameters (pulse energy and pulse overlap). For this article, we only focused on profiling the material removal depth, scan width, material removal rates and the surface roughness after using two...

  13. Calculation of the surface water pollution index in the evaluation of environmental component of product life cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Олег Аскольдович Проскурнин

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The assessment feasibility of the combined effect of the product life cycle on the environment is grounded. As an example, the pollution of surface waters at the production stage is considered in the article. A mechanism of ranking indicators of surface water pollution according to their importance is proposed. An algorithm for checking the consistency of the statistical expert judgment in determining weight coefficient for the indicators of pollution, based on the use of the concordance coefficient, is given

  14. Polysiloxane layers created by sol-gel and photochemistry: ideal surfaces for rapid, low-cost and high-strength bonding of epoxy components to polydimethylsiloxane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Elisabeth; Deshpande, Kaustubh; Kotz, Frederik; Schild, Dieter; Keller, Nico; Heissler, Stefan; Sachsenheimer, Kai; Länge, Kerstin; Neumann, Christiane; Rapp, Bastian E

    2015-04-07

    In this article we introduce and compare three techniques for low-cost and rapid bonding of stereolithographically structured epoxy components to polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). In short, we first create a polysiloxane layer on the epoxy surface via silane surface coupling and polymerization. Afterwards, the modified epoxy surface can be bonded to a PDMS component at room temperature using a handheld corona discharger, which is a commonly used low-cost technique for bonding two PDMS components. Using these methods bonds of desirable strength can be generated within half an hour. Depending on the epoxy resin, we found it necessary to modify the silanization procedure. Therefore, we provide a total of three different silanization techniques that allow bonding of a wide variety of stereolithographically structurable epoxy resins. The first technique is a UV-light induced silanization process which couples a silane that contains an epoxy-ring ((3-glycidoxypropyl)trimethoxysilane (GPTMS)). For surfaces that cannot be modified with this silane we use dimethoxydimethylsilane (DMDMS). This silane can either be coupled to the surface by a sol-gel process or UV-light induced polymerisation. The sol-gel process which is a heat induced surface modification technique results in high bond strengths. Because of the heat which triggers the sol-gel process, this technique is limited to epoxy polymers with high glass transition temperatures. For the majority of stereolithographically structured epoxy resins which typically have glass transition temperatures of around 60 °C the light-induced bonding technique is preferable. For all three techniques we performed DIN EN-conform tensile testing demonstrating maximum bond strengths of up to 350 kPa which is comparable with bond strengths reported for PDMS-to-PDMS bonds. For all bond methods, long-term stability as well as hydrolytic stability was assessed.

  15. Comparative acid-base properties of the surface of components of the CdTe-ZnS system in series of substitutional solid solutions and their analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirovskaya, I. A.; Kasatova, I. Yu.

    2011-07-01

    The acid-base properties of the surface of solid solutions and binary components of the CdTe-ZnS system are studied by hydrolytic adsorption, nonaqueous conductometric titration, mechanochemistry, IR spectroscopy, and Raman scattering spectroscopy. The strength, nature, and concentration of acid centers on the original surface and that exposed to CO are determined. The changes in acid-base properties in dependence on the composition of the system under investigation in the series of CdB6, ZnB6 analogs are studied.

  16. Exploring Virtual Worlds With Head-Mounted Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, James C.; Harris, Mark R.; Brooks, Frederick P.; Fuchs, Henry; Kelley, Michael T.; Hughes, John W.; Ouh-Young, Ming; Cheung, Clement; Holloway, Richard L.; Pique, Michael

    1989-09-01

    For nearly a decade the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has been conducting research in the use of simple head-mounted displays in "real-world" applications. Such units provide the user with non-holographic true three-dimensional information, since the kinetic depth effect, stereoscopy, and other visual cues combine to immerse the user in a "virtual world" which behaves like the real world in some respects. UNC's head-mounted display was built inexpensively from commercially available off-the-shelf components. Tracking of the the user's head position and orientation is performed by a Polhemus Navigation Sciences' 3SPACE* tracker. The host computer uses the tracking information to generate updated images corresponding to the user's new left eye and right eye views. The images are broadcast to two liquid crystal television screens (220x320 pixels) mounted on a horizontal shelf at the user's forehead. The user views these color screens through half-silvered mirrors, enabling the computer-generated image to be superimposed upon the user's real physical environment. The head-mounted display has been incorporated into existing molecular modeling and architectural applications being developed at UNC. In molecular structure studies, chemists are presented with a room-sized molecule with which they can interact in a manner more intuitive than that provided by conventional two-dimensional displays and dial boxes. Walking around and through the large molecule may provide quicker understanding of its structure, and such problems as drug-enzyme docking may be approached with greater insight. In architecture, the head-mounted display enables clients to better appreciate three-dimensional designs, which may be misinterpreted in their conventional two-dimensional form by untrained eyes. The addition of a treadmill to the system provides additional kinesthetic input into the understanding of building size and scale.

  17. Proceedings of US/Japan Workshop (97FT5-06) on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nygren, Richard; Kureczko, Diana

    1998-10-01

    The 1997 US-Japan Workshop on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices was held at the Warwick Regis Hotel in San Francisco, California, on December 8-11, 1997. There were 53 presentations as well as discussions on technical issues and on planning for future collaborations, and 35 researchers from japan and the US participated in the workshop. Over the last few years, with the strong emphasis in the US on technology for ITER, there has been less work done in the US fusion program on basic plasma materials interaction and this change in emphasis workshops. The program this year emphasized activities that were not carried out under the ITER program and a new element this year in the US program was planning and some analysis on liquid surface concepts for advanced plasma facing components. The program included a ceremony to honor Professor Yamashina, who was retiring this year and a special presentation on his career

  18. An algorithm for hyperspectral remote sensing of aerosols: 2. Information content analysis for aerosol parameters and principal components of surface spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Weizhen; Wang, Jun; Xu, Xiaoguang; Reid, Jeffrey S.

    2017-05-01

    This paper describes the second part of a series of investigation to develop algorithms for simultaneous retrieval of aerosol parameters and surface reflectance from the future hyperspectral and geostationary satellite sensors such as Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of POllution (TEMPO). The information content in these hyperspectral measurements is analyzed for 6 principal components (PCs) of surface spectra and a total of 14 aerosol parameters that describe the columnar aerosol volume Vtotal, fine-mode aerosol volume fraction, and the size distribution and wavelength-dependent index of refraction in both coarse and fine mode aerosols. Forward simulations of atmospheric radiative transfer are conducted for 5 surface types (green vegetation, bare soil, rangeland, concrete and mixed surface case) and a wide range of aerosol mixtures. It is shown that the PCs of surface spectra in the atmospheric window channel could be derived from the top-of-the-atmosphere reflectance in the conditions of low aerosol optical depth (AOD ≤ 0.2 at 550 nm), with a relative error of 1%. With degree freedom for signal analysis and the sequential forward selection method, the common bands for different aerosol mixture types and surface types can be selected for aerosol retrieval. The first 20% of our selected bands accounts for more than 90% of information content for aerosols, and only 4 PCs are needed to reconstruct surface reflectance. However, the information content in these common bands from each TEMPO individual observation is insufficient for the simultaneous retrieval of surface's PC weight coefficients and multiple aerosol parameters (other than Vtotal). In contrast, with multiple observations for the same location from TEMPO in multiple consecutive days, 1-3 additional aerosol parameters could be retrieved. Consequently, a self-adjustable aerosol retrieval algorithm to account for surface types, AOD conditions, and multiple-consecutive observations is recommended to derive

  19. Effect of geometry on the surface characteristics of steel components AISI 4140 nitrited by DC-pulsed plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calahonra, C; De Las Heras, E; De La Serena, F; Corengia, P; Ybarra, G; Svoboda, H

    2004-01-01

    Steel AISI 4140 pieces containing cylindrical pinholes with different diameters and depths were nitrited by plasma, in an atmosphere of 25% N 2 + 75% H 2 under a DC-pulsed glow discharge for 15 h. The samples were nitrited to study the influence of the sizes of the pinholes on the uniformity of the compound layer, on the depth of the zone of diffusion and on the surface and subsurface micro-hardness. The results showed that nitriding pieces with pinholes introduces variations in the electric parameters and modifies the uniformity of the coat of compounds formed, altering the mechanical properties of the surface and subsurface (CW)

  20. Ground mounted photovoltaic installations. Guide for an impact study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Legally, an impact study must be performed for ground mounted photovoltaic installations with a power greater than 250 kW. This guide is aimed at helping the actors of the photovoltaic sector to perform impact studies. After the description of the characteristics of a photovoltaic installation (principles, technical characteristics of a ground mounted installation, impact of photovoltaic systems on climate) and a presentation of the legal framework (European commitments, Grenelle de l'Environnement, applicable procedures), this report present the objectives and approach of an impact study, describes how the environment is taken into account from the early stages of a project, how the impact study is to be prepared. The last part describes the different components of the impact study: legal content, project description, analysis of the site initial status and environment, analysis of the project effects, rationale for the choice of the project

  1. Surface texturing of Si3N4–SiC ceramic tool components by pulsed laser machining

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tshabalala, LC

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Traditional abrasive techniques such as grinding and lapping have long been used in the surface conditioning of engineering materials. However, in the processing of hard and brittle materials like silicon nitride (Si(sub3)N(sub4)), machining...

  2. Investigation of Surface Treatments to Improve the Friction and Wear of Titanium Alloys for Diesel Engine Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blau, Peter J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Cooley, Kevin M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kirkham, Melanie J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bansal, Dinesh G. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN (United States)

    2012-09-20

    This final report summarizes experimental and analytical work performed under an agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, and UT-Battelle LLC. The project was directed by Jerry Gibbs, of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Propulsion Materials Program, with management by D. P. Stinton and J. A. Haynes of ORNL. Participants included Peter J. Blau (Principal Investigator), Kevin M. Cooley (senior technician), Melanie J. Kirkham (materials scientist) of the Materials Science and Technology Division or ORNL, and Dinesh G. Bansal, a post doctoral fellow employed by Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) and who, at the time of this writing, is an engineer with Cummins, Inc. This report covers a three-year effort that involved two stages. In the first stage, and after a review of the literature and discussions with surface treatment experts, a series of candidate alloys and surface treatments for titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) was selected for initial screening. After pre-screening using an ASTM standard test method, the more promising surface treatments were tested in Phase 2 using a variable loading apparatus that was designed and built to simulate the changing load patterns in a typical connecting rod bearing. Information on load profiles from the literature was supplemented with the help of T.C. Chen and Howard Savage of Cummins, Inc. Considering the dynamic and evolving nature of materials technology, this report presents a snapshot of commercial and experimental bearing surface technologies for titanium alloys that were available during the period of this work. Undoubtedly, further improvements in surface engineering methods for titanium will evolve.

  3. Development of a segmented grating mount system for FIREX-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezaki, Y; Tabata, M; Kihara, M; Horiuchi, Y; Endo, M; Jitsuno, T

    2008-01-01

    A mount system for segmented meter-sized gratings has been developed, which has a high precision grating support mechanism and drive mechanism to minimize both deformation of the optical surfaces and misalignments in setting a segmented grating for obtaining sufficient performance of the pulse compressor. From analytical calculations, deformation of the grating surface is less than 1/20 lambda RMS and the estimated drive resolution for piston and tilt drive of the segmented grating is 1/20 lambda, which are both compliant with the requirements for the rear-end subsystem of FIREX-1

  4. Estimating the maritime component of aerosol optical depth and its dependency on surface wind speed using satellite data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Lehahn

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Six years (2003–2008 of satellite measurements of aerosol parameters from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS and surface wind speeds from Quick Scatterometer (QuikSCAT, the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E, and the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I, are used to provide a comprehensive perspective on the link between surface wind speed and marine aerosol optical depth over tropical and subtropical oceanic regions. A systematic comparison between the satellite derived fields in these regions allows to: (i separate the relative contribution of wind-induced marine aerosol to the aerosol optical depth; (ii extract an empirical linear equation linking coarse marine aerosol optical depth and wind intensity; and (iii identify a time scale for correlating marine aerosol optical depth and surface wind speed. The contribution of wind induced marine aerosol to aerosol optical depth is found to be dominated by the coarse mode elements. When wind intensity exceeds 4 m/s, coarse marine aerosol optical depth is linearly correlated with the surface wind speed, with a remarkably consistent slope of 0.009±0.002 s/m. A detailed time scale analysis shows that the linear correlation between the fields is well kept within a 12 h time frame, while sharply decreasing when the time lag between measurements is longer. The background aerosol optical depth, associated with aerosols that are not produced in-situ through wind driven processes, can be used for estimating the contributions of terrestrial and biogenic marine aerosol to over-ocean satellite retrievals of aerosol optical depth.

  5. Biodiversity of the flora of Mount Papa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin-Yin-Kyi

    1995-07-01

    Even though Mount Papa is in the dry zone area, it is almost evergreen, due to its elevation of 4981 feet above the sea level and its fertile soil conditions. A has a rich biodiversity with vegetation of many types

  6. Fast Picometer Mirror Mount, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is a 6DOF controllable mirror mount with high dynamic range and fast tip/tilt capability for space based applications. It will enable the...

  7. May 1980 Mount Saint Helens, USA Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — An earthquake occurred at 15 32 UT, only seconds before the explosion that began the eruption of Mount St. Helens volcano. This eruption and blast blew off the top...

  8. Long-term changes in net radiation and its components above a pine forest and a grass surface in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long-term measurements (1974–1993 and 1996, respectively) of the net radiation (Q), global radiation (G), reflected global radiation (R), long-wave atmospheric radiation (A) and thermal radiation (E) of a pine forest in Southern Germany (index p) and of a grass surface in Northern Germany (index g) are compared. The influence of changes in surface properties is discussed. There are, in the case of the pine stand, forest growth and forest management and in the case of the grass surface, the shifting of the site from a climatic garden to a horizontal roof. Both series of radiant fluxes are analyzed with respect to the influences of the weather (cloudiness, heat advection). To eliminate the different influence of the solar radiation of the two sites, it is necessary to normalize by means of the global radiation G, yielding the radiation efficiency Q/G, the albedo R/G=α and the normalized long-wave net radiation (A+E)/G. Furthermore, the long-term mean values and the long-term trend of yearly mean values are discussed and, moreover, a comparison is made of individual monthly values. Q p is twice as large as Q g . The reason for this is the higher values of G and A above the pine forest and half values of α p compared to α g . E p is only a little greater than E g . The time series of the radiation fluxes show the following trends: Q p declines continuously despite a slight increase of G p . This is mainly due to the long-wave radiation fluxes. The net radiation of the grass surface Q g shows noticeably lower values after the merging of the site. This phenomenon is also dominated by the long-wave radiation processes. Although the properties of both site surfaces alter, E p and E g remain relatively stable. A p and A g show a remarkable decrease however. The reason for this is to be found in a modification of the heat advection, showing a more pronounced impact on the more continentally exposed site (pine forest). Compared to α g , α p shows only a small

  9. Mount Everest region as seen from the STS-66 orbiter Atlantis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    View of the Mount Everst region, Nepal and China. Low morning sun highlights Mount Everest (the highest mountain in the world at 8,848 meters), Cho Oyu (8,153 meters) to the northwest, and other peaks of 'The Roof of the World'. New snow seems to be confined to the highest peaks. Abundant details of glacier surfaces, including moraines, crevasse fields, and ice falls are displayed for study.

  10. Human platelet glycoprotein Ia. One component is only expressed on the surface of activated platelets and may be a granule constituent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bienz, D.; Clemetson, K.J.

    1989-01-01

    Glycoprotein Ia (GP Ia) is a relatively minor component of human blood platelets thought to be a receptor involved in collagen-induced platelet activation. However, some difficulties exist with the definition of this glycoprotein. The expression of GP Ia on resting (prostacyclin analogue-treated) and thrombin-activated platelets was compared by surface labeling with 125 I-lactoperoxidase. Intact platelets or platelets solubilized in sodium dodecyl sulfate were labeled with periodate/[ 3 H]NaBH 4 . Analysis on two-dimensional isoelectric focusing/sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gels showed that GP Ia is very poorly labeled in resting platelets. After activation a new spot (GP Ia*) appears with the same relative molecular mass as GP Ia under reducing conditions. GP Ia and Ia* can be clearly separated by two-dimensional nonreduced/reduced gel electrophoresis. Therefore, two glycoproteins which have been termed GP Ia exist in platelets with similar molecular weight and pI under reducing conditions. One of these (GP Ia*) is only surface-labeled when platelets are activated, indicating that it is only exposed on the surface of activated platelets. Supernatant from activated platelets contains this glycoprotein as well as other granule components. This glycoprotein is missing in platelets from two patients with collagen-response defects

  11. 76 FR 27173 - Carolina Coastal Railway, Inc.-Acquisition and Operation Exemption-Rocky Mount & Western Railroad...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-10

    ... Surface Transportation Board Carolina Coastal Railway, Inc.--Acquisition and Operation Exemption--Rocky Mount & Western Railroad Co., Inc. d/b/a Nash County Railroad Carolina Coastal Railway, Inc. (CLNA), a... Rocky Mount & Western Railroad Co., Inc. d/b/a Nash County Railroad (NCR), and to operate, approximately...

  12. High Temperature Ultrasonic Probe and Pulse-Echo Probe Mounting Fixture for Testing and Blind Alignment on Steam Pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph (Inventor); Badescu, Mircea (Inventor); Lih, Shyh-Shiuh (Inventor); Sherrit, Stewart (Inventor); Takano, Nobuyuki (Inventor); Ostlund, Patrick N. (Inventor); Lee, Hyeong Jae (Inventor); Bao, Xiaoqi (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A high temperature ultrasonic probe and a mounting fixture for attaching and aligning the probe to a steam pipe using blind alignment. The high temperature ultrasonic probe includes a piezoelectric transducer having a high temperature. The probe provides both transmitting and receiving functionality. The mounting fixture allows the high temperature ultrasonic probe to be accurately aligned to the bottom external surface of the steam pipe so that the presence of liquid water in the steam pipe can be monitored. The mounting fixture with a mounted high temperature ultrasonic probe are used to conduct health monitoring of steam pipes and to track the height of condensed water through the wall in real-time.

  13. Perspective with Landsat Overlay, Mount Kilimanjaro, Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Mount Kilimanjaro (Kilima Njaro or 'shining mountain' in Swahili), the highest point in Africa, reaches 5,895 meters (19,340 feet) above sea level, tall enough to maintain a permanent snow cap despite being just 330 kilometers (210 miles) south of the equator. It is the tallest free-standing mountain on the Earth's land surface world, rising about 4,600 meters (15,000 feet) above the surrounding plain. Kilimanjaro is a triple volcano (has three peaks) that last erupted perhaps more than 100,000 years ago but still exudes volcanic gases. It is accompanied by about 20 other nearby volcanoes, some of which are seen to the west (left) in this view, prominently including Mount Meru, which last erupted only about a century ago. The volcanic mountain slopes are commonly fertile and support thick forests, while the much drier grasslands of the plains are home to elephants, lions, and other savanna wildlife.This 3-D perspective view was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), a Landsat 7 satellite image, and a false sky. Topographic expression is vertically exaggerated two times.Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30-meter (98-foot) resolution of most Landsat images and will substantially help in analyzing the large and growing Landsat image archive, managed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect 3-D measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter (approximately 200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and

  14. Kinematic mounting systems for NSLS beamlines and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oversluizen, T.; Stoeber, W.; Johnson, E.D.

    1991-01-01

    Methods for kinematically mounting equipment are well established, but applications at synchrotron radiation facilities are subject to constraints not always encountered in more traditional laboratory settings. Independent position adjustment of beamline components can have significant benefits in terms of minimizing time spent aligning, and maximizing time spent acquiring data. In this paper, we use examples taken from beamlines at the NSLS to demonstrate approaches for optimization of the reproducibility, stability, excursion, and set-up time for various situations. From our experience, we extract general principles which we hope will be useful for workers at other synchrotron radiation facilities. 7 refs., 4 figs

  15. A study of plasma facing tungsten components with electrical discharge machined surface exposed to cyclic thermal loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Yohji; Ezato, Koichiro; Suzuki, Satoshi; Yokoyama, Kenji; Yamada, Hirokazu; Hirayama, Tomoyuki

    2016-01-01

    Through R&D for a plasma facing units (PFUs) in an outer vertical target of an ITER full-tungsten (W) divertor, Japan Atomic Energy Agency succeeded in demonstrating the durability of the W divertor shaped by an electrical discharge machining (EDM). To prevent melting of W armors in the PFUs, an adequate technology to meet requirements of a geometrical shape and a tolerance is one of the most important key issues in a manufacturing process. From the necessity, the EDM has been evaluated to control the final shape of the W armor. Though the EDM was known to be advantages such as an easy workability, a potential disadvantage of presence of micro-cracks on the W surface appeared. In order to examine a potential effect of the micro-crack on a heat removal durability, a high heat flux testing was carried out for the W divertor mock-up with the polish and the EDM. As the result, all of the W armors endured the repetitive heat load of 1000 cycles at an absorbed heat flux of more than 20 MW/m 2 , which strongly encourages the realization of the PFUs of the ITER full-W divertor with the various geometrical shape and the high accuracy tolerance.

  16. In Vitro Propagation of Pink Lapacho: Response Surface Methodology and Factorial Analysis for Optimisation of Medium Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezequiel Enrique Larraburu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Handroanthus impetiginosus, pink lapacho, is a timber, ornamental, and medicinal tree. Experiments on the in vitro propagation of H. impetiginosus were conducted using nodal segments cultivated in both Murashige and Skoog salts with Gamborg vitamins (MSG and Woody Plant Medium (WPM with different concentrations of 6-benzylaminopurine (BA and indole butyric acid (IBA. Morphogenic responses were differentially affected by salt compositions and their interactions with plant growth regulators in each micropropagation stage. According to response surface analysis, the optimum multiplication rate with 1 μM IBA ranged from 16.7 to 21.3 μM BA in WPM, and the inhibitors of endogenous auxins could increase multiplication rates. A pulse with 50 μM IBA in 1/2 MSG produced 83% rooting with 3.2 roots per shoots and higher fresh and dry weights of shoots and roots. In the acclimatisation stage, 50% of plants survived after 1 year. This methodology optimised the culture media for the in vitro propagation of the H. impetiginosus clonal pool and could be applied to related species, several of which are categorised as vulnerable on the International Union for the Conservation of Nature Red List.

  17. First results and surface analysis strategy for plasma-facing components after JET operation with the ITER-like wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likonen, J.; Alves, E.; Baron-Wiechec, A.; Brezinsek, S.; Coad, J. P.; Hakola, A.; Heinola, K.; Koivuranta, S.; Matthews, G. F.; Petersson, P.; Rubel, M.; Stan-Sion, C.; Widdowson, A.; Contributors, JET-EFDA

    2014-04-01

    During the carbon wall operations of JET since 2001, an extensive post-mortem analysis programme has been carried out under the JET Task Force Fusion Technology and a similar analysis programme is underway for the JET-ILW tiles removed during the 2012 shutdown. The first post-mortem results from the JET ITER-like wall tiles have shown that the overall amount of deposition on the divertor tiles and on remote divertor areas has been reduced by more than an order of magnitude with respect to JET-C. In addition, the obtained data indicate a possible interaction between Be and W such as the formation of mixed Be-W layers. This could be due to the surface roughness of the tiles, or could be caused by diffusion or even alloying. Ion-beam analyses and secondary ion mass spectrometry techniques give only elemental information, so other techniques such as x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, secondary electron microscopy/energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and nuclear microprobing are required. Since the nature of deposition and erosion has changed during the JET-ILW operations, a change in the post-mortem analysis programme is needed. For example, no cross-sectional samples from the sloping parts of tiles 4 and 6 are required. A strategy for post-mortem analyses of the marker-coated tiles will be presented in this paper.

  18. Degradation of the starch components amylopectin and amylose by barley α-amylase 1: Role of surface binding site 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jonas Willum; Kramhøft, Birte; Bozonnet, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    Barley α-amylase isozyme 1 (AMY1, EC 3.2.1.1) contains two surface binding sites, SBS1 and SBS2, involved in the degradation of starch granules. The distinct role of SBS1 and SBS2 remains to be fully understood. Mutational analysis of Tyr-380 situated at SBS2 previously revealed that Tyr-380...... is required for binding of the amylose helix mimic, β-cyclodextrin. Also, mutant enzymes altered at position 380 displayed reduced binding to starch granules. Similarly, binding of wild type AMY1 to starch granules was suppressed in the presence of β-cyclodextrin. We investigated the role of SBS2 by comparing...... kinetic properties of the wild type AMY1 and the Y380A mutant enzyme in hydrolysis of amylopectin, amylose and β-limit dextrin, and the inhibition by β-cyclodextrin. Progress curves of the release of reducing ends revealed a bi-exponential hydrolysis of amylopectin and β-limit dextrin, whereas hydrolysis...

  19. Parameterization of the Satellite-Based Model (METRIC for the Estimation of Instantaneous Surface Energy Balance Components over a Drip-Irrigated Vineyard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Carrasco-Benavides

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A study was carried out to parameterize the METRIC (Mapping EvapoTranspiration at high Resolution with Internalized Calibration model for estimating instantaneous values of albedo (shortwave albedo (αi, net radiation (Rni and soil heat flux (Gi, sensible (Hi and latent heat (LEi over a drip-irrigated Merlot vineyard (location: 35°25′ LS; 71°32′ LW; 125 m.a.s. (l. The experiment was carried out in a plot of 4.25 ha, processing 15 Landsat images, which were acquired from 2006 to 2009. An automatic weather station was placed inside the experimental plot to measure αi, Rni and Gi. In the same tower an Eddy Covariance (EC system was mounted to measure Hi and LEi. Specific sub-models to estimate Gi, leaf area index (LAI and aerodynamic roughness length for momentum transfer (zom were calibrated for the Merlot vineyard as an improvement to the original METRIC model. Results indicated that LAI, zom and Gi were estimated using the calibrated functions with errors of 4%, 2% and 17%, while those were computed using the original functions with errors of 58%, 81%, and 5%, respectively. At the time of satellite overpass, comparisons between measured and estimated values indicated that METRIC overestimated αi in 21% and Rni in 11%. Also, METRIC using the calibrated functions overestimated Hi and LEi with errors of 16% and 17%, respectively while it using the original functions overestimated Hi and LEi with errors of 13% and 15%, respectively. Finally, LEi was estimated with root mean square error (RMSE between 43 and 60 W∙m−2 and mean absolute error (MAE between 35 and 48 W∙m−2 for both calibrated and original functions, respectively. These results suggested that biases observed for instantaneous pixel-by-pixel values of Rni, Gi and other intermediate components of the algorithm were presumably absorbed into the computation of sensible heat flux as a result of the internal self-calibration of METRIC.

  20. Principal Component Analysis in Grey Based Taguchi Method for Optimization of Multiple Surface Quality Characteristics of 6061-T4 Aluminum in CNC End Milling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Saurav; Routara, Bharat Chandra; Bandyopadhyay, Asish; Mahapatra, Siba Sankar

    2011-01-01

    The present study highlights a multi-objective optimization problem by applying Principal Component Analysis (PCA) coupled with grey based Taguchi method through a case study in CNC end milling of 6061-T4 Aluminum. The study aimed at evaluating the best process environment which could simultaneously satisfy multiple requirements of surface quality. In view of the fact, that traditional Taguchi method cannot solve a multi-objective optimization problem; to overcome this limitation, grey relation theory has been coupled with Taguchi method. Furthermore, to follow the basic assumption of Taguchi method i.e. quality attributes should be uncorrelated or independent; which is not always satisfied in practical situation. To overcome this shortcoming the study applied Principal Component analysis to eliminate response correlation and to evaluate independent or uncorrelated quality indices called Principal Components which were aggregated to compute an overall quality index denoted as overall grey relational grade which was optimized (minimized) finally. The study combined PCA and grey based Taguchi method for predicting optimal setting. Optimal result was verified through confirmatory test.

  1. Residues essential for Panton-Valentine leukocidin S component binding to its cell receptor suggest both plasticity and adaptability in its interaction surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit-Joseph Laventie

    Full Text Available Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL, a bicomponent staphylococcal leukotoxin, is involved in the poor prognosis of necrotizing pneumonia. The present study aimed to elucidate the binding mechanism of PVL and in particular its cell-binding domain. The class S component of PVL, LukS-PV, is known to ensure cell targeting and exhibits the highest affinity for the neutrophil membrane (Kd∼10(-10 M compared to the class F component of PVL, LukF-PV (Kd∼10(-9 M. Alanine scanning mutagenesis was used to identify the residues involved in LukS-PV binding to the neutrophil surface. Nineteen single alanine mutations were performed in the rim domain previously described as implicated in cell membrane interactions. Positions were chosen in order to replace polar or exposed charged residues and according to conservation between leukotoxin class S components. Characterization studies enabled to identify a cluster of residues essential for LukS-PV binding, localized on two loops of the rim domain. The mutations R73A, Y184A, T244A, H245A and Y250A led to dramatically reduced binding affinities for both human leukocytes and undifferentiated U937 cells expressing the C5a receptor. The three-dimensional structure of five of the mutants was determined using X-ray crystallography. Structure analysis identified residues Y184 and Y250 as crucial in providing structural flexibility in the receptor-binding domain of LukS-PV.

  2. Ball mounting fixture for a roundness gage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauler, A.L.; Pasieka, D.F.

    1983-11-15

    A ball mounting fixture for a roundness gage is disclosed. The fixture includes a pair of chuck assemblies oriented substantially transversely with respect to one another and mounted on a common base. Each chuck assembly preferably includes a rotary stage and a wobble plate affixed thereto. A ball chuck affixed to each wobble plate is operable to selectively support a ball to be measured for roundness, with the wobble plate permitting the ball chuck to be tilted to center the ball on the axis of rotation of the rotary stage. In a preferred embodiment, each chuck assembly includes a vacuum chuck operable to selectively support the ball to be measured for roundness. The mounting fixture enables a series of roundness measurements to be taken with a conventional rotating gagehead roundness instrument, which measurements can be utilized to determine the sphericity of the ball. 6 figs.

  3. Flow distortion on boom mounted cup anemometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindelöw, Per Jonas Petter; Friis Pedersen, Troels; Gottschall, Julia

    In this report we investigate on wind direction dependent errors in the measurement of the horizontal wind speed by boom mounted cup anemometers. The boom mounting on the studied lattice tower is performed according to IEC standard design rules, yet, larger deviations than predicted by flow models...... are observed. The errors on the measurements are likely caused by an underestimation of the flow distortions around the tower. In this paper an experimental method for deriving a correction formula and an in-field calibration is suggested. The method is based on measurements with two cup anemometers mounted...... in the measurement of wind turbine power performance, wind resource assessment and for providing purposeful in-field comparisons between different sensors, e.g. lidar anemometers. With the proposed method, direction dependent errors can be extracted and the mast flow distortion effect on the wind measurements...

  4. Mirror deformation versus contact area in mounted flat mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, James H., III; Penado, F. Ernesto; Cornelius, Frank

    2009-08-01

    Surface flatness of 6-inch diameter mirrors at the Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer is specified to be within 32 nanometers over a 5.4-inch diameter circle centered on the mirror. The current mounting technique is to use three spring plungers applied to the back surface of the mirror, near the perimeter edge, thereby pressing the front surface against three small diameter Teflon pads directly opposite the plungers. The pads have the effect of dissipating the deformation effects within the 5.4-inch diameter region. This paper describes the effects of varying the size of the pads, from a 7/32 inch diameter pad to a point-type contact such as a ball bearing. Experimental results using a phase shifting interferometer are presented, as well as finite element analysis results.

  5. Direct mounted photovoltaic device with improved adhesion and method thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boven, Michelle L; Keenihan, James R; Lickly, Stan; Brown, Jr., Claude; Cleereman, Robert J; Plum, Timothy C

    2014-12-23

    The present invention is premised upon a photovoltaic device suitable for directly mounting on a structure. The device includes an active portion including a photovoltaic cell assembly having a top surface portion that allows transmission of light energy to a photoactive portion of the photovoltaic device for conversion into electrical energy and a bottom surface having a bottom bonding zone; and an inactive portion immediately adjacent to and connected to the active portion, the inactive portion having a region for receiving a fastener to connect the device to the structure and having on a top surface, a top bonding zone; wherein one of the top and bottom bonding zones comprises a first bonding element and the other comprises a second bonding element, the second bonding element designed to interact with the first bonding element on a vertically overlapped adjacent photovoltaic device to bond the device to such adjacent device or to the structure.

  6. Robotic mounting of ATLAS barrel SCT modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickerson, R.B.; Viehhauser, G.; Wastie, R.; Terada, S.; Unno, Y.; Kohriki, T.; Ikegami, Y.; Hara, K.; Kobayashi, H.; Barbier, G.; Clark, A.G.; Perrin, E.; Carter, A.A.; Mistry, J.; Morris, J.

    2006-01-01

    The 2112 silicon detector modules of the barrel part of the ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker (SCT) have been mounted on their carbon fibre support structure. Module insertion, placement and fixing were performed by robotic assembly tooling. We report on our experience with this assembly method. Part of the mounting sequence involves a partial survey of elements of the support structure which is needed to align the modules properly during insertion. An analysis of these data is used to estimate the positional accuracy of the robots

  7. Shaded Relief with Height as Color, Mount Meru, Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Mount Meru is an active volcano located just 70 kilometers (44 miles) west of Mount Kilimanjaro. It reaches 4,566 meters (14,978 feet) in height but has lost much of its bulk due to an eastward volcanic blast sometime in its distant past, perhaps similar to the eruption of Mount Saint Helens in Washington State in 1980. Mount Meru most recently had a minor eruption about a century ago. The several small cones and craters seen in the vicinity probably reflect numerous episodes of volcanic activity. Mount Meru is the topographic centerpiece of Arusha National Park. Its fertile slopes rise above the surrounding savanna and support a forest that hosts diverse wildlife, including nearly 400 species of birds, and also monkeys and leopards.Two visualization methods were combined to produce this image: shading and color coding of topographic height. The shade image was derived by computing topographic slope in the north-south direction. Northern slopes appear bright and southern slopes appear dark, as would be the case at noon at this latitude in June. Color coding is directly related to topographic height, with green at the lower elevations, rising through yellow, red, and magenta, to blue and white at the highest elevations.Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect 3-D measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter (approximately 200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between NASA, the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense and the German and Italian space

  8. Motion planning for gantry mounted manipulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Anders Lau; Petersen, Henrik Gordon

    2007-01-01

    We present a roadmap based planner for finding robot motions for gantry mounted manipulators for a line welding application at Odense Steel Shipyard (OSS). The robot motions are planned subject to constraints on when the gantry may be moved. We show that random sampling of gantry configurations...

  9. Mounting LHCb hadron calorimeter scintillating tiles

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    Scintillating tiles are carefully mounted in the hadronic calorimeter for the LHCb detector. These calorimeters measure the energy of particles that interact via the strong force, called hadrons. The detectors are made in a sandwich-like structure where these scintillator tiles are placed between metal sheets.

  10. June 1992 Mount Spurr, USA Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Following 39 years of inactivity, Crater Peak vent on the south flank of Mount Spurr volcano burst into eruption at 7:04 a.m. Alaska daylight time (ADT) on June 27,...

  11. Artificial surface-mounted molecular rotors: Molecular dynamics simulations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vacek, Jaroslav; Michl, Josef

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 5 (2007), s. 730-739 ISSN 1616-301X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400550616; GA MŠk ME 857 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : molecular dynamics * molecular machines * nanomaterials Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 7.496, year: 2007

  12. The cell surface membrane proteins Cdo and Boc are components and targets of the Hedgehog signaling pathway and feedback network in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenzen, Toyoaki; Allen, Benjamin L; Cole, Francesca; Kang, Jong-Sun; Krauss, Robert S; McMahon, Andrew P

    2006-05-01

    Cdo and Boc encode cell surface Ig/fibronectin superfamily members linked to muscle differentiation. Data here indicate they are also targets and signaling components of the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway. Although Cdo and Boc are generally negatively regulated by Hedgehog (HH) signaling, in the neural tube Cdo is expressed within the Shh-dependent floor plate while Boc expression lies within the dorsal limit of Shh signaling. Loss of Cdo results in a Shh dosage-dependent reduction of the floor plate. In contrast, ectopic expression of Boc or Cdo results in a Shh-dependent, cell autonomous promotion of ventral cell fates and a non-cell-autonomous ventral expansion of dorsal cell identities consistent with Shh sequestration. Cdo and Boc bind Shh through a high-affinity interaction with a specific fibronectin repeat that is essential for activity. We propose a model where Cdo and Boc enhance Shh signaling within its target field.

  13. Hyperstereopsis in helmet-mounted NVDs: slope perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Geoffrey W.; Flanagan, Patrick; Gibbs, Peter

    2007-04-01

    Modern helmet-mounted night vision devices, such as the Thales TopOwl helmet, project imagery from intensifiers mounted on the sides of the helmet onto the helmet faceplate. This produces a situation of hyperstereopsis in which binocular disparities are magnified. This has the potential to distort the perception of slope in depth (an important cue to landing), because the slope cue provided by binocular disparity conflicts with veridical cues to slope, such as texture gradients and motion parallax. In the experiments, eight observers viewed sparse and dense textured surfaces tilted in depth under three viewing conditions: normal stereo hyper-stereo (4 times magnification), and hypostereo (1/4 magnification). The surfaces were either stationary, or rotated slowly around a central vertical axis. Stimuli were projected at 6 metres to minimise conflict between accommodation and convergence, and stereo viewing was provided by a Z-screen and passive polarised glasses. Observers matched perceived visual slope using a small tilt table set by hand. We found that slope estimates were distorted by hyperstereopsis, but to a much lesser degree than predicted by disparity magnification. The distortion was almost completely eliminated when motion parallax was present.

  14. Surface mu heavy chain signals down-regulation of the V(D)J-recombinase machinery in the absence of surrogate light chain components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galler, Gunther R; Mundt, Cornelia; Parker, Mathew; Pelanda, Roberta; Mårtensson, Inga-Lill; Winkler, Thomas H

    2004-06-07

    Early B cell development is characterized by stepwise, ordered rearrangement of the immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy (HC) and light (LC) chain genes. Only one of the two alleles of these genes is used to produce a receptor, a phenomenon referred to as allelic exclusion. It has been suggested that pre-B cell receptor (pre-BCR) signals are responsible for down-regulation of the VDJH-recombinase machinery (Rag1, Rag2, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase [TdT]), thereby preventing further rearrangement on the second HC allele. Using a mouse model, we show that expression of an inducible muHC transgene in Rag2-/- pro-B cells induces down-regulation of the following: (a) TdT protein, (b) a transgenic green fluorescent protein reporter reflecting endogenous Rag2 expression, and (c) Rag1 primary transcripts. Similar effects were also observed in the absence of surrogate LC (SLC) components, but not in the absence of the signaling subunit Ig-alpha. Furthermore, in wild-type mice and in mice lacking either lambda5, VpreB1/2, or the entire SLC, the TdT protein is down-regulated in muHC+LC- pre-B cells. Surprisingly, muHC without LC is expressed on the surface of pro-/pre-B cells from lambda5-/-, VpreB1-/-VpreB2-/-, and SLC-/- mice. Thus, SLC or LC is not required for muHC cell surface expression and signaling in these cells. Therefore, these findings offer an explanation for the occurrence of HC allelic exclusion in mice lacking SLC components.

  15. High-temperature, high-pressure bonding of nested tubular metallic components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinby, T.C.

    1980-01-01

    This invention is a tool for effecting high-temperature, high compression bonding between the confronting faces of nested, tubular, metallic components. In a typical application, the tool is used to produce tubular target assemblies for irradiation in nuclear reactors or particle accelerators, the target assembly comprising a uranium foil and an aluminum-alloy substrate. The tool preferably is composed throughout of graphite. It comprises a tubular restraining member in which a mechanically expandable tubular core is mounted to form an annulus with the member. The components to be bonded are mounted in nested relation in the annulus. The expandable core is formed of individually movable, axially elongated segments whose outer faces cooperatively define a cylindrical pressing surface and whose inner faces cooperatively define two opposed, inwardly tapered, axial bores. Tapered rams extend respectively into the bores. The loaded tool is mounted in a conventional hot-press provided with evacuation means, heaters for maintaining its interior at bonding temperature, and hydraulic cylinders for maintaining a selected inwardly directed pressure on the tapered rams. With the hotpress evacuated and the loaded tool at the desired temperature, the cylinders are actuated to apply the selected pressure to the rams. The rams in turn expand the segmented core to maintain the nested components in compression against the restraining member. These conditions are maintained until the confronting faces of the nested components are joined in a continuous, uniform bond characterized by high thermal conductivity

  16. High-temperature, high-pressure bonding of nested tubular metallic components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinby, T.C.

    A tool is described for effecting high-temperature, high-compression bonding between the confronting faces of nested, tubular, metallic components. In a typical application, the tool is used to produce tubular target assemblies for irradiation in nuclear reactors or particle accelerators. The target assembly comprising a uranum foil and an aluninum-alloy substrate. The tool is composed of graphite. It comprises a tubular restraining member in which a mechanically expandable tubular core is mounted to form an annulus. The components to be bonded are mounted in nested relation in the annulus. The expandable core is formed of individually movable, axially elongated segments whose outer faces cooperatively define a cylindrical pressing surface and whose inner faces cooperatively define two opposed, inwardly tapered, axial bores. Tapered rams extend into the bores. The loaded tool is mounted in a conventional hot-press provided with evacuation means, heaters for maintaining its interior at bonding temperature, and hydraulic cylinders for maintaining a selected inwardly directed pressure on the tapered rams. With the hot-press evacuated and the loaded tool at the desired temperature, the cylinders are actuated to apply the selected pressure to the rams. The rams in turn expand the segmented core to maintain the nested components in compression against the restraining member. These conditions are maintained until the confronting faces of the nested components are joined in a continuous, uniform bond characterized by high thermal conductivity.

  17. Study of laser-induced damage on the exit surface of silica components in the nanosecond regime in a multiple wavelengths configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambonneau, Maxime

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis, laser-induced damage phenomenon on the surface of fused silica components is investigated in the nanosecond regime. This phenomenon consists in an irreversible modification of the material. In the nanosecond regime, laser damage is tightly correlated to the presence of non-detectable precursor defects which are a consequence of the synthesis and the polishing of the components. In this thesis, we investigate laser damage in a multiple wavelengths configuration. In order to better understand this phenomenon in these conditions of irradiation, three studies are conducted. The first one focuses on damage initiation. The results obtained in the single wavelength configurations highlight a coupling in the multiple wavelengths one. A comparison between the experiments and a model developed during this thesis enables us to improve the knowledge of the fundamental processes involved during this damage phase. Then, we show that post mortem characterizations of damage morphology coupled to an accurate metrology allow us to understand both the nature and also the chronology of the physical mechanisms involved during damage formation. The proposed theoretical scenario is confirmed through various experiments. Finally, we study damage growth in both the single and the multiple wavelengths cases. Once again, this last configuration highlights a coupling between the wavelengths. We show the necessity to account for the spatial characteristics of the laser beams during a growth session. (author) [fr

  18. Solid state lighting component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Thomas; Keller, Bernd; Tarsa, Eric; Ibbetson, James; Morgan, Frederick; Dowling, Kevin; Lys, Ihor

    2017-10-17

    An LED component according to the present invention comprising an array of LED chips mounted on a submount with the LED chips capable of emitting light in response to an electrical signal. The array can comprise LED chips emitting at two colors of light wherein the LED component emits light comprising the combination of the two colors of light. A single lens is included over the array of LED chips. The LED chip array can emit light of greater than 800 lumens with a drive current of less than 150 milli-Amps. The LED chip component can also operate at temperatures less than 3000 degrees K. In one embodiment, the LED array is in a substantially circular pattern on the submount.

  19. Discrimination of hot versus cold avalanche deposits: Implications for hazard assessment at Mount Meager, B.C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Stewart

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The surficial deposits surrounding the Mount Meager volcanic complex include numerous avalanche deposits. These deposits share many attributes: (a they are nearly monolithologic and comprise mainly intermediate volcanic rock clasts, (b they lack internal structure, and (c they are very poorly sorted. Despite these similarities, the avalanche deposits represent two distinct processes. Mass wasting of the Mount Meager volcanic edifice has produced cold rock avalanche deposits, whereas gravitational collapse of active lava domes and flows has produced hot block and ash avalanche deposits. The ability to discriminate between these "hot" and "cold" avalanche deposits is a critical component in the assessment of hazards in volcanic terranes. Hot block and ash avalanche deposits can be distinguished by the presence of radially-oriented joints, breadcrust textures, and incipient welding, which are features indicative of high emplacement temperatures. Conversely, rock avalanche deposits resulting from mass wasting events may be distinguished by the presence of clasts that preserve pre-depositional weathering and jointing surfaces. Volcanic avalanches are mechanically similar to rock avalanches but pose a greater hazard due to high temperatures, increased fluidization from degassing and the potential to decouple highly mobile elutriated ash clouds. The increasing use of hazardous regions such as the Lillooet River valley requires more reliable risk assessment in order to minimize losses from future hazardous events.

  20. Optimal design of a Φ760 mm lightweight SiC mirror and the flexural mount for a space telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zongxuan; Chen, Xue; Wang, Shaoju; Jin, Guang

    2017-12-01

    A flexural support technique for lightweighted Primary Mirror Assembly (PMA) of a space telescope is presented in this article. The proposed three-point flexural mount based on a cartwheel flexure can maintain the surface figure of the PMA in a horizontal optical testing layout. The on-orbit surface error of the PMA causes significant degradation in image quality. On-ground optical testing cannot determine the zero-gravity figure of the PMA due to surface distortion by gravity. We unveiled the crucial fact that through a delicate mounting structure design, the surface figure can remain constant precisely without inducing distinguishable astigmatism when PMA rotates with respect to the optical axis, and the figure can be considered as the zero-gravity surface figure on the orbit. A design case is described to show the lightweight design of a SiC mirror and the optimal flexural mounting. Topology optimization and integrated opto-mechanical analysis using the finite element method are utilized in the design process. The Primary Mirror and mounting structures were fabricated and assembled. After the PMA mirror surface was polished to λ/50 RMS, optical testing in different clocking configurations was performed, respectively, through rotating the PMA by multiple angles. Test results show that the surface figure remained invariant, indicating that gravity release on the orbit will not cause an additional surface error. Vibration tests including sweep sine and random vibration were also performed to validate the mechanical design. The requirements for the mounting technique in space were qualified.

  1. Adjustable link for kinematic mounting systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, L.C.

    1997-07-01

    An adjustable link for kinematic mounting systems is disclosed. The adjustable link is a low-cost, passive device that provides backlash-free adjustment along its single constraint direction and flexural freedom in all other directions. The adjustable link comprises two spheres, two sockets in which the spheres are adjustable retain, and a connection link threadly connected at each end to the spheres, to provide a single direction of restraint and to adjust the length or distance between the sockets. Six such adjustable links provide for six degrees of freedom for mounting an instrument on a support. The adjustable link has applications in any machine or instrument requiring precision adjustment in six degrees of freedom, isolation from deformations of the supporting platform, and/or additional structural damping. The damping is accomplished by using a hollow connection link that contains an inner rod and a viscoelastic separation layer between the two. 3 figs.

  2. Mount Everest snow plume: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, G. W. K.

    2004-11-01

    A plume of snow blowing from the summit of Mount Everest is one of the most iconic images of the world's highest mountain. Its presence provides evidence of the strong jet stream winds that can buffet the mountain. In January 2004, astronauts onboard the International Space Station (ISS) observed a 15 to 20 km long snow plume emanating from the summit of Mount Everest. Remarkably little is known about these plumes and the role that they play in the redistribution of snow in the high Himalaya. In this paper we use a variety of meteorological datasets to show that the observed plume was the combination of high winds associated with the East Asian Jet Stream (EAJS) and a heavy snowfall that had occurred over the Himalaya during the preceding week. A simple model of a blown snow plume is shown to be consistent with the observations made from the ISS.

  3. The Geologic Story of Mount Rainier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandell, Dwight Raymond

    1969-01-01

    Ice-clad Mount Rainier, towering over the landscape of western Washington, ranks with Fuji-yama in Japan, Popocatepeti in Mexico, and Vesuvius in Italy among the great volcanoes of the world. At Mount Rainier, as at other inactive volcanoes, the ever-present possibility of renewed eruptions gives viewers a sense of anticipation, excitement, and apprehension not equaled by most other mountains. Even so, many of us cannot imagine the cataclysmic scale of the eruptions that were responsible for building the giant cone which now stands in silence. We accept the volcano as if it had always been there, and we appreciate only the beauty of its stark expanses of rock and ice, its flower-strewn alpine meadows, and its bordering evergreen forests.Mount Rainier owes its scenic beauty to many features. The broad cone spreads out on top of a major mountain range - the Cascades. The volcano rises about 7,000 feet above its 7,000-foot foundation, and stands in solitary splendor - the highest peak in the entire Cascade Range. Its rocky ice-mantled slopes above timberline contrast with the dense green forests and give Mount Rainier the appearance of an arctic island in a temperate sea, an island so large that you can see its full size and shape only from the air. The mountain is highly photogenic because of the contrasts it offers among bare rock, snowfields, blue sky, and the incomparable flower fields that color its lower slopes, shadows cast by the multitude of cliffs, ridges, canyons, and pinnacles change constantly from sunrise to sunset, endlessly varying the texture and mood of the mountain. The face of the mountain also varies from day to day as its broad snowfields melt during the summer. The melting of these frozen reservoirs makes Mount Rainier a natural resource in a practical as well as in an esthetic sense, for it ensures steady flows of water for hydroelectric power in the region, regardless of season.Seen from the Puget Sound country to the west, Mount Rainier has

  4. Mounting the cutting mark on the microfiche

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koike, Kunio; Habara, Tadashi; Narui, Shigeko

    1979-01-01

    The Japanese National Center of INIS has been submitting MF to the INIS Headquarters since 1971. In 1977, the center was requested to mount a cutting mark on the master MF on the basis of the NMA-MS-5 Standard which had never been adopted in Japan. Its new method was investigated in the collaboration with the microfilming companies. Consequently the best way was found by exposing the light on a spot of the film at photographing. But it took much time to make them in use, therefore, its tentative way was taken by painting the black ink manually on the master fiche. While the microfilming companies made an effort to adapt the camera to put marks other than former one. After bringing to completion, the cutting marks satisfied with the standard came to be automatically mounted on the master fiches. (author)

  5. Conceptual design for PSP mounting bracket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ransom, G.; Stein, R. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Protective structural packages (PSP`s or overpacks) used to ship 2 1/2-ton UF{sub 6} product cylinders are bolted to truck trailers. All bolts penetrate two longitudinal rows of wooden planks. Removal and replacement is required at various intervals for maintenance and routine testing. A conceptual design is presented for mounting brackets which would securely attach PSP`s to trailer frames, reduce removal and replacement time, and minimize risk of personnel injury.

  6. Customer Satisfaction Level in Mount Sherpa Restaurant

    OpenAIRE

    Shrestha, Sameer

    2015-01-01

    Customer satisfaction is the key to every successful business in the sense of profit motive, as well as in the long run. It is the desire of every business to be able to understand their customers’ need. Many businesses, especially related with the service industry, carry out different surveys and conduct research in order to know what their customers really want. This research was carried out to measure the customer satisfaction level in Mount Sherpa restaurant. The results and findings ...

  7. Eddy current testing system for bottom mounted instrumentation welds - 15206

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, N.; Ueno, S.; Suganuma, N.; Oodake, T.; Maehara, T.; Kasuya, T.; Ichikawa, H.

    2015-01-01

    We have demonstrated the scanning of eddy current testing (ECT) probe on the welds area including the nozzle, the J-welds and the buildup welds of the Bottom Mounted Instrumentation (BMI) mock-up using the developed ECT system and procedure. It is difficult to scan the probe on the BMI welds area because the area has a complex curved surface shape and narrow spaces. We made the space coordinates and the normal vectors on the scanning points as the scanning trajectory of probe on the welds area based on the measured results of welds surface shape on the mock-up. The multi-axis robot was used to scan the probe on the welds surface. Each motion axis position of the robot corresponding to each scanning point was calculated by the inverse kinematic algorithm. The BMI mock-up test was performed using the cross coil probe in the differential mode. The artificial stress corrosion cracking and the electrical discharge machining slits given on the mock-up surface were detected. The results show that the ECT can detect a defect of approximately 2.3 mm in length, 0.5 mm in depth and 0.2 mm in width for the BMI welds. From the output voltage of single coil, we estimated that the average and the maximum probe tilt angles on the mock-up surface under scanning were 2.6 degrees and 8.5 degrees, respectively

  8. Character of intermolecular interaction in pyridine-argon complex: Ab initio potential energy surface, internal dynamics, and interrelations between SAPT energy components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarewicz, Jan, E-mail: jama@amu.edu.pl; Shirkov, Leonid [Faculty of Chemistry, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 89b, 61-614 Poznań (Poland)

    2016-05-28

    The pyridine-Ar (PAr) van der Waals (vdW) complex is studied using a high level ab initio method. Its structure, binding energy, and intermolecular vibrational states are determined from the analytical potential energy surface constructed from interaction energy (IE) values computed at the coupled cluster level of theory with single, double, and perturbatively included triple excitations with the augmented correlation consistent polarized valence double-ζ (aug-cc-pVDZ) basis set complemented by midbond functions. The structure of the complex at its global minimum with Ar at a distance of 3.509 Å from the pyridine plane and shifted by 0.218 Å from the center of mass towards nitrogen agrees well with the corresponding equilibrium structure derived previously from the rotational spectrum of PAr. The PAr binding energy D{sub e} of 392 cm{sup −1} is close to that of 387 cm{sup −1} calculated earlier at the same ab initio level for the prototypical benzene-Ar (BAr) complex. However, under an extension of the basis set, D{sub e} for PAr becomes slightly lower than D{sub e} for BAr. The ab initio vdW vibrational energy levels allow us to estimate the reliability of the methods for the determination of the vdW fundamentals from the rotational spectra. To disclose the character of the intermolecular interaction in PAr, the symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) is employed for the analysis of different physical contributions to IE. It is found that SAPT components of IE can be approximately expressed in the binding region by only two of them: the exchange repulsion and dispersion energy. The total induction effect is negligible. The interrelations between various SAPT components found for PAr are fulfilled for a few other complexes involving aromatic molecules and Ar or Ne, which indicates that they are valid for all rare gas (Rg) atoms and aromatics.

  9. Character of intermolecular interaction in pyridine-argon complex: Ab initio potential energy surface, internal dynamics, and interrelations between SAPT energy components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarewicz, Jan; Shirkov, Leonid

    2016-05-28

    The pyridine-Ar (PAr) van der Waals (vdW) complex is studied using a high level ab initio method. Its structure, binding energy, and intermolecular vibrational states are determined from the analytical potential energy surface constructed from interaction energy (IE) values computed at the coupled cluster level of theory with single, double, and perturbatively included triple excitations with the augmented correlation consistent polarized valence double-ζ (aug-cc-pVDZ) basis set complemented by midbond functions. The structure of the complex at its global minimum with Ar at a distance of 3.509 Å from the pyridine plane and shifted by 0.218 Å from the center of mass towards nitrogen agrees well with the corresponding equilibrium structure derived previously from the rotational spectrum of PAr. The PAr binding energy De of 392 cm(-1) is close to that of 387 cm(-1) calculated earlier at the same ab initio level for the prototypical benzene-Ar (BAr) complex. However, under an extension of the basis set, De for PAr becomes slightly lower than De for BAr. The ab initio vdW vibrational energy levels allow us to estimate the reliability of the methods for the determination of the vdW fundamentals from the rotational spectra. To disclose the character of the intermolecular interaction in PAr, the symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) is employed for the analysis of different physical contributions to IE. It is found that SAPT components of IE can be approximately expressed in the binding region by only two of them: the exchange repulsion and dispersion energy. The total induction effect is negligible. The interrelations between various SAPT components found for PAr are fulfilled for a few other complexes involving aromatic molecules and Ar or Ne, which indicates that they are valid for all rare gas (Rg) atoms and aromatics.

  10. Embedded-LES and experiment of turbulent boundary layer flow around a floor-mounted cube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Nina Gall; Koss, Holger; Bennetsen, Jens Chr.

    An Embedded LES approach is used to numerically simulate fluctuating surface pressures on a floor-mounted cube in a turbulent boundary layer flow and compared to wind tunnel experiments. The computation were performed with the CFD software ANSYS FLUENT at a Reynolds number at cube height of Reh = 1...

  11. Primitive Extracellular Lipid Components on the Surface of the Charophytic Alga Klebsormidium flaccidum and Their Possible Biosynthetic Pathways as Deduced from the Genome Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Satoshi; Hori, Koichi; Sasaki-Sekimoto, Yuko; Kobayashi, Atsuko; Kato, Tsubasa; Yuno-Ohta, Naoko; Nobusawa, Takashi; Ohtaka, Kinuka; Shimojima, Mie; Ohta, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Klebsormidium flaccidum is a charophytic alga living in terrestrial and semiaquatic environments. K. flaccidum grows in various habitats, such as low-temperature areas and under desiccated conditions, because of its ability to tolerate harsh environments. Wax and cuticle polymers that contribute to the cuticle layer of plants are important for the survival of land plants, as they protect against those harsh environmental conditions and were probably critical for the transition from aquatic microorganism to land plants. Bryophytes, non-vascular land plants, have similar, but simpler, extracellular waxes and polyester backbones than those of vascular plants. The presence of waxes in terrestrial algae, especially in charophytes, which are the closest algae to land plants, could provide clues in elucidating the mechanism of land colonization by plants. Here, we compared genes involved in the lipid biosynthetic pathways of Arabidopsis thaliana to the K. flaccidum and the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii genomes, and identified wax-related genes in both algae. A simple and easy extraction method was developed for the recovery of the surface lipids from K. flaccidum and C. reinhardtii. Although these algae have wax components, their surface lipids were largely different from those of land plants. We also investigated aliphatic substances in the cell wall fraction of K. flaccidum and C. reinhardtii. Many of the fatty acids were determined to be lipophilic monomers in K. flaccidum, and a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis revealed that their possible binding mode was distinct from that of A. thaliana. Thus, we propose that K. flaccidum has a cuticle-like hydrophobic layer composed of lipids and glycoproteins, with a different composition from the cutin polymer typically found in land plant cuticles.

  12. Simulation of erosion and deposition processes of many-component surface layers in fusion devices; Simulation von Erosion- und Depositionsprozessen mehrkomponentiger Oberflaechenschichten in Fusionsanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Droste, S.

    2007-02-15

    The present choice of first wall materials in ITER will unavoidably lead to the formation of mixed carbon, tungsten and beryllium layers. Predictive modelling of erosion processes, impurity transport and deposition processes is important. For this the 3D Monte-Carlo code ERO can be used. In this thesis ERO has been coupled to the existing Monte-Carlo code SDTrimSP to describe material mixing processes in wall components correctly. SDTrimSP describes the surface by calculating the transport of ions in solids. It keeps track of the depth dependent material concentration caused by the implantation of projectiles in the solid. The calculation of movements of the recoil atoms within the solid gives reflection coefficients and sputtering yields. Since SDTrimSP does not consider chemical processes a new method has been developed to implement chemical erosion of carbon by the impact of hydrogen projectiles. The new code ERO-SDTrimSP was compared to TEXTOR experiments which were carried out to study the formation of mixed surface layers. In these experiments methane CH4 was injected through drillings in graphite and tungsten spherical limiters into the plasma. A pronounced substrate dependence was observed. The deposition efficiency, i.e. the ratio of the locally deposited to the injected amount of carbon, was 4% for graphite and 0.3% for tungsten. The deposition-dominated area on the graphite limiter covers a five times larger area than on the tungsten limiter. Modelling of this experiment with ERO-SDTrimSP also showed a clear substrate dependence with 2% deposition efficiency for graphite and less than 0.5% for tungsten. An important result of the comparison between experiment and simulation was that the effective sticking of hydrocarbon radicals hitting the surface must be negligible. Furthermore, it was shown that local re-deposited carbon layers are 10 times more effectively eroded than ordinary graphite. Simulation of the impurity transport in the plasma was checked

  13. Enhanced mycelial biomass production of the hairy bracket mushroom, Trametes hirsuta (Higher Basidiomycetes), by optimizing medium component with Plackett-Burman design and response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rongling; Liu, Xueming; Zhao, Xiangjie; Xu, Yujuan; Ma, Rongxia

    2013-01-01

    Statistical analyses based on experimental designs were applied to optimize the medium components for mycelial biomass production by Trametes hirsuta in shake flask cultivation. First, the effects of different carbon resources (glucose, sucrose, lactose, maltose, fructose, soluble starch and potato), nitrogen resources (yeast extract, peptone, (NH4)2SO4, NH4NO3, NH4Cl, peanut powder, soybean powder) and mineral elements (CaCl2, ZnSO4·7H2O, FeSO4·7H2O, MnSO4·H2O, CuSO4·7H2O) on mycelial biomass production were investigated using a univariate design. Second, a Plackett-Burman design was applied to identify the significant variables that principally influenced the mycelial biomass production, and the path of steepest ascent was pursued to approach the regions of optimal value of the significant variables. Subsequently, these significant variables were optimized using the Box-Behnken design of response surface methodology. Ultimately, the optimized medium conditions were composed of sucrose 25.65 g·L-1, MgSO4·7H2O 1.24 g·L-1, and FeSO4·7H2O 3.36 g·L-1, and the yield of mycelial biomass reached 15.45 g·L-1, which represents an approximately 1.6-fold increase above the initial yield.

  14. A study on the impact of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose on the viscosity of PEG melt suspensions using surface plots and principal component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Ching Mien; Heng, Paul Wan Sia; Chan, Lai Wah

    2015-04-01

    An understanding of the rheological behaviour of polymer melt suspensions is crucial in pharmaceutical manufacturing, especially when processed by spray congealing or melt extruding. However, a detailed comparison of the viscosities at each and every temperature and concentration between the various grades of adjuvants in the formulation will be tedious and time-consuming. Therefore, the statistical method, principal component analysis (PCA), was explored in this study. The composite formulations comprising polyethylene glycol (PEG) 3350 and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) of ten different grades (K100 LV, K4M, K15M, K100M, E15 LV, E50 LV, E4M, F50 LV, F4M and Methocel VLV) at various concentrations were prepared and their viscosities at different temperatures determined. Surface plots showed that concentration of HPMC had a greater effect on the viscosity compared to temperature. Particle size and size distribution of HPMC played an important role in the viscosity of melt suspensions. Smaller particles led to a greater viscosity than larger particles. PCA was used to evaluate formulations of different viscosities. The complex viscosity profiles of the various formulations containing HPMC were successfully classified into three clusters of low, moderate and high viscosity. Formulations within each group showed similar viscosities despite differences in grade or concentration of HPMC. Formulations in the low viscosity cluster were found to be sprayable. PCA was able to differentiate the complex viscosity profiles of different formulations containing HPMC in an efficient and time-saving manner and provided an excellent visualisation of the data.

  15. Utilization of satellite remote sensing data on land surface characteristics in water and heat balance component modeling for vegetation covered territories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzylev, Eugene; Uspensky, Alexander; Startseva, Zoya; Volkova, Elena; Kukharsky, Alexander; Uspensky, Sergey

    2010-05-01

    The model of vertical water and heat transfer in the "soil-vegetation-atmosphere" system (SVAT) for vegetation covered territory has been developed, allowing assimilating satellite remote sensing data on land surface condition as well as accounting for heterogeneities of vegetation and meteorological characteristics. The model provides the calculation of water and heat balance components (such as evapotranspiration Ev, soil water content W, sensible and latent heat fluxes and others ) as well as vertical soil moisture and temperature distributions, temperatures of soil surface and foliage, land surface brightness temperature for any time interval within vegetation season. To describe the landscape diversity soil constants and leaf area index LAI, vegetation cover fraction B, and other vegetation characteristics are used. All these values are considered to be the model parameters. Territory of Kursk region with square about 15 thousands km2 situated in the Black Earth zone of Central Russia was chosen for investigation. Satellite-derived estimates of land surface characteristics have been constructed under cloud-free condition basing AVHRR/NOAA, MODIS/EOS Terra and EOS Aqua, SEVIRI/Meteosat-8, -9 data. The developed technologies of AVHRR data thematic processing have been refined providing the retrieval of surface skin brightness temperature Tsg, air foliage temperature Ta, efficient surface temperature Ts.eff and emissivity E, as well as derivation of vegetation index NDVI, B, and LAI. The linear regression estimators for Tsg, Ta and LAI have been built using representative training samples for 2003-2009 vegetation seasons. The updated software package has been applied for AVHRR data thematic processing to generate named remote sensing products for various dates of the above vegetation seasons. The error statistics of Ta, Ts.eff and Тsg derivation has been investigated for various samples using comparison with in-situ measurements that has given RMS errors in the

  16. Stereo Pair with Landsat Overlay, Mount Meru, Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Mount Meru is an active volcano located just 70 kilometers (44 miles)west of Mount Kilimanjaro. It reaches 4,566 meters (14,978 feet) in height but has lost much of its bulk due to an eastward volcanic blast sometime in its distant past, perhaps similar to the eruption of Mount Saint Helens in Washington State in 1980. Mount Meru most recently had a minor eruption about a century ago. The several small cones and craters seen in the vicinity probably reflect numerous episodes of volcanic activity. Mount Meru is the topographic centerpiece of Arusha National Park, but Ngurdoto Crater to the east (image top) is also prominent. The fertile slopes of both volcanoes rise above the surrounding savanna and support a forest that hosts diverse wildlife, including nearly 400 species of birds, and also monkeys and leopards, while the floor of Ngurdoto Crater hosts herds of elephants and buffaloes.This stereoscopic image was generated by draping a Landsat satellite image over a Shuttle Radar Topography Mission digital elevation model. Two differing perspectives were then calculated, one for each eye. They can be seen in 3-D by viewing the left image with the right eye and the right image with the left eye (cross-eyed viewing or by downloading and printing the image pair and viewing them with a stereoscope. When stereoscopically merged, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of Earth's surface in its full three dimensions.Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30-meter (98-foot)resolution of most Landsat images and will substantially help in analyzing the large and growing Landsat image archive, managed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture

  17. MRTouch: Adding Touch Input to Head-Mounted Mixed Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Robert; Schwarz, Julia; Throm, Nick; Wilson, Andrew D; Benko, Hrvoje

    2018-04-01

    We present MRTouch, a novel multitouch input solution for head-mounted mixed reality systems. Our system enables users to reach out and directly manipulate virtual interfaces affixed to surfaces in their environment, as though they were touchscreens. Touch input offers precise, tactile and comfortable user input, and naturally complements existing popular modalities, such as voice and hand gesture. Our research prototype combines both depth and infrared camera streams together with real-time detection and tracking of surface planes to enable robust finger-tracking even when both the hand and head are in motion. Our technique is implemented on a commercial Microsoft HoloLens without requiring any additional hardware nor any user or environmental calibration. Through our performance evaluation, we demonstrate high input accuracy with an average positional error of 5.4 mm and 95% button size of 16 mm, across 17 participants, 2 surface orientations and 4 surface materials. Finally, we demonstrate the potential of our technique to enable on-world touch interactions through 5 example applications.

  18. Field-trip guide to Mount Hood, Oregon, highlighting eruptive history and hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, William E.; Gardner, Cynthia A.

    2017-06-22

    This guidebook describes stops of interest for a geological field trip around Mount Hood volcano. It was developed for the 2017 International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth’s Interior (IAVCEI) Scientific Assembly in Portland, Oregon. The intent of this guidebook and accompanying contributions is to provide an overview of Mount Hood, including its chief geologic processes, magmatic system, eruptive history, local tectonics, and hazards, by visiting a variety of readily accessible localities. We also describe coeval, largely monogenetic, volcanoes in the region. Accompanying the field-trip guidebook are separately authored contributions that discuss in detail the Mount Hood magmatic system and its products and behavior (Kent and Koleszar, this volume); Mount Hood earthquakes and their relation to regional tectonics and the volcanic system (Thelen and Moran, this volume); and young surface faults cutting the broader Mount Hood area whose extent has come to light after acquisition of regional light detection and ranging coverage (Madin and others, this volume).The trip makes an approximately 175-mile (280-kilometer) clockwise loop around Mount Hood, starting and ending in Portland. The route heads east on Interstate 84 through the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area. The guidebook points out only a few conspicuous features of note in the gorge, but many other guides to the gorge are available. The route continues south on the Mount Hood National Scenic Byway on Oregon Route 35 following Hood River, and returns to Portland on U.S. Highway 26 following Sandy River. The route traverses rocks as old as the early Miocene Eagle Creek Formation and overlying Columbia River Basalt Group of middle Miocene age, but chiefly lava flows and clastic products of arc volcanism of late Miocene to Holocene age.

  19. Reducing the Effect of Transducer Mount Induced Noise (XMIN) on Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel Testing Data with a New Transducer Mount Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herron, Andrew J.; Reed, Darren K.; Nance, Donald K.

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of flight vehicle unsteady aerodynamics is often studied via large scale wind tunnel testing. Boundary layer noise is measured by miniature pressure transducers installed in a model. Noise levels (2-5 dB ref. 20 µPa) can be induced when transducer is mounted out of flush with model outer surface. This effect must be minimized to accurately determine aerodynamically induced acoustic environments.

  20. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 and its correlation with basal membrane components laminin-5 and collagen type IV in paediatric burn patients measured with Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging (SPRI) biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weremijewicz, Artur; Matuszczak, Ewa; Sankiewicz, Anna; Tylicka, Marzena; Komarowska, Marta; Tokarzewicz, Anna; Debek, Wojciech; Gorodkiewicz, Ewa; Hermanowicz, Adam

    2018-01-30

    The purpose of this study was the determination of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and its correlation with basal membrane components laminin-5 and collagen type IV in the blood plasma of burn patients measured with Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging (SPRI) biosensors. 31 children scalded by hot water who were managed at the Department of Paediatric Surgery between 2014-2015, after primarily presenting with burns in 4-20% TBSA were included into the study (age 9 months up to 14 years, mean age 2,5+1 years). There were 10 girls and 21 boys. Venous blood samples were drawn 2-6h, and 12-16h after the thermal injury, and on the subsequent days 3, 5 and 7. The matrix metalloproteinase-2, collagen type IV and laminin-5 concentrations were assessed using Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging by the investigators blinded to the other data. The MMP-2, laminin-5 and collagen type IV concentrations in the blood plasma of patients with burns, were highest 12-16h after thermal injury, the difference was statistically significant. The MMP-2, laminin-5 and collagen type IV concentrations measured 3 days, 5 days and 7 days after the thermal injury, slowly decreased over time, and on the 7th day reached the normal range, when compared with the concentration measured in controls. Current work is the first follow-up study regarding MMP-2 in burns. MMP-2, laminin-5 and collagen type IV levels were elevated early after burn injury in the plasma of studied patients, and were highest 12-16h after the injury. MMP-2, laminin-5 and collagen type IV levels were not proportional to the severity of the burn. We believe in the possibility that the gradual decrease of MMP-2, collagen type IV and laminin-5 concentrations could be connected with the process of healing, but to prove it, more investigation is needed in this area. The SPR imaging biosensor is a good diagnostic tool for determination of MMP-2, laminin-5 and collagen type IV in blood plasma of patients with burns. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd

  1. Project of integrity assessment of flawed components with structural discontinuity (IAF). Data book for estimation stress intensity factor. Surface crack on ICM housing for penetration in reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-12-01

    The project of Integrity Assessment of Flawed Components with Structural Discontinuity (IAF) was entrusted to Japan Power Engineering and Inspection Corporation (JAPEIC) from Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA) and started from FY 2001. And then, it was taken over to Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES) which was established in October 2003 and carried out until FY 2007. In the IAF project, weld joints between nickel based alloys and low alloy steels around penetrations in reactor vessel, safe-end of nozzles and shroud supports were selected from among components and pipe arrangements in nuclear power plants, where high residual stresses were generated due to welding and complex structure. Residual stresses around of the weld joints were estimated by finite element analysis method (FEM) with a general modeling method, then the reasonability and the conservativeness was evaluated. In addition, for postulated surface crack of stress corrosion cracking (SCC), a simple calculation method of stress intensity factor (K) required to estimate the crack growth was proposed and the effectiveness was confirmed. JNES compiled results of the IAF project into Data Books of Residual Stress Analysis of Weld Joint, and Data Book of Simplified Stress Intensity Factor Calculation for Penetration of Reactor as typical Structure Discontinuity, respectively. Data Books of Residual Stress Analysis in Weld Joint. 1. Butt Weld Joint of Small Diameter Cylinder (4B Sch40) (JNES-RE-2012-0005), 2. Dissimilar Metal Weld Joint in Safe End (One-Side Groove Joint (JNES-RE-2012-0006), 3. Dissimilar Metal Weld Joint in Safe End (Large Diameter Both-Side Groove Joint) (JNES-RE-2012-0007), 4. Weld Joint around Penetrations in Reactor Vessel (Insert Joint) (JNES-RE-2012-0008), 5. Weld Joint in Shroud Support (H8, H9, H10 and H11 Welds) (JNES-RE-2012-0009), 6. Analysis Model of Dissimilar Metal Weld Joint Applied Post Weld Heat Treatment (PWHT) (JNES-RE-2012-0010). Data Book of

  2. The laboratory station for tyres grip testing on different surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinowski, K.; Grabowik, C.; Janik, W.; Ćwikła, G.; Skowera, M.

    2015-11-01

    The paper presents the conception of the device for tyre grip testing in the laboratory conditions. The main purpose is to provide a device working in confined spaces, which enables rapid changes of the tested samples of the road surfaces. Among the key assumptions the minimization of the device dimensions and the relative ease of transportation and mobility - the ability to quick assemble and disassemble were also assumed. The main components of the projected workstation includes: the replaceable platform for mounting samples of a road surface, the roller conveyor, the drive of the platform, the wheel mounting assembly and the axial force measuring system. At the design the station a morphological structure method has been used, particular elements have been optimized individually.

  3. Evaluation of shear mounted elastomeric damper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzi, E.; Walton, J.

    1982-01-01

    Viton-70 elastomeric shear mounted damper was built and tested on a T-55 power turbine spool in the rotor's high speed balancing rig. This application of a shear mounted elastomeric damper demonstrated for the first time, the feasibility of using elastomers as the primary rotor damping source in production turbine engine hardware. The shear damper design was selected because it was compatible with actual gas turbine engine radial space constraints, could accommodate both the radial and axial thrust loads present in gas turbine engines, and was capable of controlled axial preload. The shear damper was interchangeable with the production T-55 power turbine roller bearing support so that a direct comparison between the shear damper and the production support structure could be made. Test results show that the Viton-70 elastomer damper operated successfully and provided excellent control of both synchronous and nonsynchronous vibrations through all phases of testing up to the maximum rotor speed of 16,000 rpm. Excellent correlation between the predicted and experienced critical speeds, mode shapes and log decrements for the power turbine rotor and elastomer damper assembly was also achieved.

  4. Experience with HEP analysis on mounted filesystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuhrmann, Patrick; Gasthuber, Martin; Kemp, Yves; Ozerov, Dmitry

    2012-01-01

    We present results on different approaches on mounted filesystems in use or under investigation at DESY. dCache, established since long as a storage system for physics data has implemented the NFS v4.1/pNFS protocol. New performance results will be shown with the most current version of the dCache server. In addition to the native usage of the mounted filesystem in a LAN environment, the results are given for the performance of the dCache NFS v4.1/pNFS in WAN case. Several commercial vendors are currently in alpha or beta phase of adding the NFS v4.1/pNFS protocol to their storage appliances. We will test some of these vendor solutions for their readiness for HEP analysis. DESY has recently purchased an IBM Sonas system. We will present the result of a thorough performance evaluation using the native protocols NFS (v3 or v4) and GPFS. As the emphasis is on the usability for end user analysis, we will use latest ROOT versions and current end user analysis code for benchmark scenarios.

  5. Electronically controllable spoof localized surface plasmons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong Jin; Zhang, Chao; Yang, Liu; Xun Xiao, Qian

    2017-10-01

    Electronically controllable multipolar spoof localized surface plasmons (LSPs) are experimentally demonstrated in the microwave frequencies. It has been shown that half integer order LSPs modes exist on the corrugated ring loaded with a slit, which actually arise from the Fabry-Perot-like resonances. By mounting active components across the slit in the corrugated rings, electronic switchability and tunability of spoof LSPs modes have been accomplished. Both simulated and measured results demonstrate efficient dynamic control of the spoof LSPs. These elements may form the basis of highly integrated programmable plasmonic circuits in microwave and terahertz regimes.

  6. Coupling non invasive and fast sampling of proteins from work of art surfaces to surface plasmon resonance biosensing: Differential and simultaneous detection of egg components for cultural heritage diagnosis and conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarano, S; Carretti, E; Dei, L; Baglioni, P; Minunni, M

    2016-11-15

    Despite the wide application of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to a broad area of interests, from environment to food analysis, from drug discovery to diagnostics, its exploitation in cultural heritage conservation is still unexplored. Water-based highly viscous polymeric dispersions (HVPD) composed by partially hydrolyzed polyvinyl acetate (PVA), borax, and water, were recently developed and successfully applied for the selective removal of surface degradation patinas (i.e. protein materials, natural resins etc.) from paintings of historical and artistic interest. This approach is here coupled for the first time to a SPR biosensor to simultaneously recognize albumen, yolk, or their mixtures in HVPD extracts. Ovalbumin and immunoglobulin Y are selected as analytes for egg white and yolk recognition, respectively. The biosensor was first characterized on standard analytes within the range 0-400mgL(-1) and then on fresh and dried egg albumen and yolk down to 2·10(^4) and 1·10(^5) dilution factors, respectively. Once optimized, the biosensor was combined to the HVPD application on simulated and real art samples for the evaluation of hen egg presence in the extract, i.e. albumen, yolk, or their co-presence in the matrix. For a contemporary 'sacred icon', realized by the traditional egg tempera procedure described by Cennino Cennini, the biosensor successfully distinguished different uses of egg components for the realization of painted and gilded areas, i.e. yolk and albumen, respectively. Finally, a XVIII century italian painting whose the realization technique is unknown, was tested confirming its egg tempera-based realization technique. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Glass, plastic, and semiconductors: packaging techniques for miniature optoelectronic components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocha, Michael D.; Garrett, Henry E.; Patel, Rajesh R.; Jones, Leslie M., III; Larson, Michael C.; Emanuel, Mark A.; Bond, Steven W.; Deri, Robert J.; Drayton, R. F.; Petersen, Holly E.; Lowry, Mark E.

    2000-03-01

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we have extensive experience with the design and development of miniature photonic systems which require novel packaging schemes. Over the years we have developed silicon micro-optical benches to serve as a stable platform for precision mounting of optical and electronic components. We have developed glass ball lenses that can be fabricated in-situ on the microbench substrate. We have modified commercially available molded plastic fiber ribbon connectors (MT) and added thin film multilayer semiconductor coatings to create potentially low-cost wavelength combiners and wavelength selective filters. We have fabricated both vertical-cavity and in-plane semiconductor lasers and amplifiers, and have packaged these and other components into several miniature photonics systems. For example, we have combined the silicon optical bench with standard electronic packaging techniques and our custom-made wavelength-selective filters to develop a four-wavelength wavelength-division-multiplexing transmitter module mounted in a standard 120-pin ceramic PGA package that couples light from several vertical-cavity-surface-emitting-laser arrays into one multimode fiber-ribbon array. The coupling loss can be as low as 2 dB, and the transmitters can be operated at over 1.25 GHz. While these systems were not designed for biomedical or environmental applications, the concepts and techniques are general and widely applicable.

  8. Eddy current testing system for bottom mounted instrumentation welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, N.; Ueno, S.; Suganuma, N.; Oodake, T.; Maehara, T.; Kasuya, T.; Ichikawa, H.

    2015-01-01

    Eddy current testing (ECT) techniques are used to detect a defect, especially stress corrosion cracking. An ECT system and procedures have been developed for testing the bottom mounted instrumentation (BMI) weld area of the reactor vessel in a pressurized water reactor. It is difficult to position and move the probe on the BMI weld area because the area has complicated curved surfaces. The surface shape of weld area on the BMI mock-up was measured for generating the scanning trajectory of ECT probe. The space coordinates and the normal vectors at the scanning points as the scanning trajectory were calculated based on the measured results of weld surface shape. Each motion-axis position of the multi-axis robot corresponding to each scanning point was calculated by the inverse kinematic algorithm. The BMI mock-up test was performed using the developed ECT probe with the cross coil in the differential mode. The artificial SCC and EDM slits given on the build-up weld area were detected in the mock-up test. From the result of detecting defects, it is shown that this ECT system can detect a defect of approximately 2.3 mm in length, 0.5 mm in depth and 0.2 mm in width as the defect detection capability for the BMI welds. It was estimated that the average and the maximum probe tilt angles were 2.6 and 8.5 degrees, respectively

  9. Device for irradiation of a target surface by a variable electron beam, especially electron beam generator, in order to produce semiconductor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfe, J.E.

    1978-01-01

    For the lithographic device there is used a field emission source for thermal ions with a tungsten cathode and a zirconium top as an electron gain. For production of IC chips the electron beam of 1000 A/cm 2 can be focused on a mask template, mounted on a x/Y table, by means of a system of lenses. The electromagnetic focusing device with a small aberration coefficient is designed in such a way that there is obtained a large focal length on the image side as compared to the focal length on the object side. Thereby a small angular deflection of the beam in the focusing device causes a large deflection at the target. The control is performed by a processor. (RW) [de

  10. Cotton phenotyping with lidar from a track-mounted platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Andrew N.; Gore, Michael A.; Thompson, Alison

    2016-05-01

    High-Throughput Phenotyping (HTP) is a discipline for rapidly identifying plant architectural and physiological responses to environmental factors such as heat and water stress. Experiments conducted since 2010 at Maricopa, Arizona with a three-fold sensor group, including thermal infrared radiometers, active visible/near infrared reflectance sensors, and acoustic plant height sensors, have shown the validity of HTP with a tractor-based system. However, results from these experiments also show that accuracy of plant phenotyping is limited by the system's inability to discriminate plant components and their local environmental conditions. This limitation may be overcome with plant imaging and laser scanning which can help map details in plant architecture and sunlit/shaded leaves. To test the capability for mapping cotton plants with a laser system, a track-mounted platform was deployed in 2015 over a full canopy and defoliated cotton crop consisting of a scanning LIDAR driven by Arduinocontrolled stepper motors. Using custom Python and Tkinter code, the platform moved autonomously along a pipe-track at 0.1 m/s while collecting LIDAR scans at 25 Hz (0.1667 deg. beam). These tests showed that an autonomous LIDAR platform can reduce HTP logistical problems and provide the capability to accurately map cotton plants and cotton bolls. A prototype track-mounted platform was developed to test the use of LIDAR scanning for High- Throughput Phenotyping (HTP). The platform was deployed in 2015 at Maricopa, Arizona over a senescent cotton crop. Using custom Python and Tkinter code, the platform moved autonomously along a pipe-track at cotton bolls.

  11. Mean surface fields of heat budget components over the warm pool in the Bay of Bengal during post-monsoon season

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sadhuram, Y.; Rao, D.P.; Rao, B.P.

    Surface meteorological data collected onboard research vessels ORV Sagarkanya and Gaveshani during 1983-85 have been used in these studies. The analysis revealed that the Mean Sea surface temperature (SST was greater than 28 degrees C (designated...

  12. A hydrogeophysical conceptual model of Mount Toondina impact crater, South Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressler, Andrew Kelly

    Mount Toondina, South Australia is an impact crater that currently has groundwater discharging through evapotranspiration, but formerly had eight springs or more flowing around the crater ring. Using field geophysical and geochemical data, a hydrogeophysical conceptual model was developed that suggests that advection of groundwater to the surface through a sandstone layer is the dominant flow mechanism for the system, creating a ring of vegetation at the surface, although faults provide controls over some spring locations. The data also suggest that sufficient fluid density contrast combined with a vertical permeability structure may allow free convection to occur in the impact crater. The conceptual model was tested by developing numerical models to evaluate the permeability structure and the potential for mixed convection in the Mount Toondina system. The FEFLOW models suggest that the Mount Toondina impact crater spring system is controlled by mixed convective flow from the subsurface to the ring of vegetation around the springs which maintains brackish conditions relative to adjacent saline conditions. The models indicated that convective processes result throughout the crater although the character of convection is controlled by the relative permeability of the formations. The results can be applied to better manage flora and fauna in the Mount Toondina area and help to interpret potential for groundwater flow in and around other impact craters.

  13. Other components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    This chapter includes descriptions of electronic and mechanical components which do not merit a chapter to themselves. Other hardware requires mention because of particularly high tolerance or intolerance of exposure to radiation. A more systematic analysis of radiation responses of structures which are definable by material was given in section 3.8. The components discussed here are field effect transistors, transducers, temperature sensors, magnetic components, superconductors, mechanical sensors, and miscellaneous electronic components

  14. Surficial Geology of Mount Rainier National Park, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandell, Dwight Raymond

    1969-01-01

    Much of the ground surface around Mount Rainier volcano is directly underlain by loose geologic deposits that veneer the hard rock formations. Examples of these deposits are sand and gravel bars along the rivers, ridges of loose rock debris beside the glaciers, and sloping aprons of rock fragments beneath almost every cliff. Even though they are generally thin and inconspicuous when compared with the rock formations, these surficial deposits are clues to geologic events that have profoundly influenced the shape of the park's landscape. Thus, from the character and extent of glacial deposits one can judge the age and size of former glaciers that carved the cirques and deep canyons of the park; from the mudflows which streamed down nearly every valley one can infer the age and size of huge landslides of the past that helped determine Mount Rainier's present shape; and from the pumice deposits some of the volcano's recent eruptive activity can be reconstructed. The map (plate 1, in pocket) that accompanies this description of the surficial deposits of Mount Rainier National Park shows the location of the various geologic formations, and the explanation shows the formations arranged in order of their relative age, with the oldest at the bottom. The text describes the surficial deposits in sequence from older to younger. A discussion of the pumice deposits of the park, which were not mapped, is followed by a description of the formations shown on the geologic map. Inspection of the geologic map may lead the viewer to question why the surficial deposits are shown in more detail in a zone several miles wide around the base of the volcano than elsewhere. This is partly because the zone is largely near or above timberline, relatively accessible, and the surficial deposits there can be readily recognized, differentiated, and mapped. In contrast, access is more difficult in the heavily timbered parts of the park, and surficial deposits there are generally blanketed by a dense

  15. Article mounting and position adjustment stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutburth, Ronald W.; Silva, Leonard L.

    1988-01-01

    An improved adjustment and mounting stage of the type used for the detection of laser beams is disclosed. A ring sensor holder has locating pins on a first side thereof which are positioned within a linear keyway in a surrounding housing for permitting reciprocal movement of the ring along the keyway. A rotatable ring gear is positioned within the housing on the other side of the ring from the linear keyway and includes an oval keyway which drives the ring along the linear keyway upon rotation of the gear. Motor-driven single-stage and dual (x, y) stage adjustment systems are disclosed which are of compact construction and include a large laser transmission hole.

  16. Insectivore Plants Nepenthes sp. at Mount Merbabu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AHMAD DWI SETYAWAN

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available The aims of the research were to know the existence of the Nepenthes at mount Merbabu, variations of its morphology, associated plants, and ecological conditions. Nepenthes are one of plants that were categorized as conserved plant by Indonesian government as indicated in PPRI No. 7/1999. Many researchers attracted to study this unique plant since it’s distinct feature and the way to get nutrient by trapping insects at its sac. Samples were taken randomly along the path for climbing from Selo, Boyolali to the top of the mountain between April to May 2000. The results show that the plants were found at the altitude of around 1500 to 2000 tsl. There were two forms of the sacs, long and short at the same individual plants. The plants grow coiling on Myristica trees and shrubs of Thunbergia fragrans Roxb., and also could grow at the stoned-soil.

  17. Creating Gaze Annotations in Head Mounted Displays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mardanbeigi, Diako; Qvarfordt, Pernilla

    2015-01-01

    To facilitate distributed communication in mobile settings, we developed GazeNote for creating and sharing gaze annotations in head mounted displays (HMDs). With gaze annotations it possible to point out objects of interest within an image and add a verbal description. To create an annota- tion......, the user simply captures an image using the HMD’s camera, looks at an object of interest in the image, and speaks out the information to be associated with the object. The gaze location is recorded and visualized with a marker. The voice is transcribed using speech recognition. Gaze annotations can...... be shared. Our study showed that users found that gaze annotations add precision and expressive- ness compared to annotations of the image as a whole...

  18. Mount St. Helens Future Expected Deposition Scenario (FEDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-14

    Mount Saint Helens Future Expected Deposition Scenario (FEDS) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 COMPLETION OF AGENCY TECHNICAL REVIEW The Agency Technical Review (A TR) has been completed for the Mount Saint Helens ... Mount St. Helens Future Expected Deposition Scenario (FEDS) Channels within the Cowlitz-Toutle Watershed April 14

  19. Spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy experiments on the rough surface of a polycrystalline NiFe film with a fine magnetic tip sensitive to a well-defined magnetization component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Matsuyama

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We developed a micrometer-sized magnetic tip integrated onto the write head of a hard disk drive for spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (SP-STM in the modulated tip magnetization mode. Using SP-STM, we measured a well-defined in-plane spin-component of the tunneling current of the rough surface of a polycrystalline NiFe film. The spin asymmetry of the NiFe film was about 1.3% within the bias voltage range of -3 to 1 V. We obtained the local spin component image of the sample surface, switching the magnetic field of the sample to reverse the sample magnetization during scanning. We also obtained a spin image of the rough surface of a polycrystalline NiFe film evaporated on the recording medium of a hard disk drive.

  20. Electronic components

    CERN Document Server

    Colwell, Morris A

    1976-01-01

    Electronic Components provides a basic grounding in the practical aspects of using and selecting electronics components. The book describes the basic requirements needed to start practical work on electronic equipment, resistors and potentiometers, capacitance, and inductors and transformers. The text discusses semiconductor devices such as diodes, thyristors and triacs, transistors and heat sinks, logic and linear integrated circuits (I.C.s) and electromechanical devices. Common abbreviations applied to components are provided. Constructors and electronics engineers will find the book useful

  1. Component testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchings, M.T.; Schofield, Peter; Seymour, W.A.J.

    1986-01-01

    A method for non-destructive testing of an industrial component to ascertain if it is a single crystal, and to find the crystal orientations of those parts of the component which are single crystals, involves irradiating the component with a monochromatic collimated neutron beam. Diffracted neutron beams are observed live by means of LiF/ZnS composite screen, an image intensifier and a television camera and screen. (author)

  2. Mount Ararat, Turkey, Perspective with Landsat Image Overlay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This perspective view shows Mount Ararat in easternmost Turkey, which has been the site of several searches for the remains of Noah's Ark. The main peak, known as Great Ararat, is the tallest peak in Turkey, rising to 5165 meters (16,945 feet). This southerly, near horizontal view additionally shows the distinctly conically shaped peak known as 'Little Ararat' on the left. Both peaks are volcanoes that are geologically young, but activity during historic times is uncertain.This image was generated from a Landsat satellite image draped over an elevation model produced by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). The view uses a 1.25-times vertical exaggeration to enhance topographic expression. Natural colors of the scene are enhanced by image processing, inclusion of some infrared reflectance (as green) to highlight the vegetation pattern, and inclusion of shading of the elevation model to further highlight the topographic features. Volcanoes pose hazards for people, the most obvious being the threat of eruption. But other hazards are associated with volcanoes too. In 1840 an earthquake shook the Mount Ararat region, causing an unstable part of mountain's north slope to tumble into and destroy a village. Visualizations of satellite imagery when combined with elevation models can be used to reveal such hazards leading to disaster prevention through improved land use planning.But the hazards of volcanoes are balanced in part by the benefits they provide. Over geologic time volcanic materials break down to form fertile soils. Cultivation of these soils has fostered and sustained civilizations, as has occurred in the Mount Ararat region. Likewise, tall volcanic peaks often catch precipitation, providing a water supply to those civilizations. Mount Ararat hosts an icefield and set of glaciers, as seen here in this late summer scene, that are part of this beneficial natural processElevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission

  3. Step-by-step rotation of a molecule-gear mounted on an atomic-scale axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzano, C; Soe, W-H; Wong, H S; Ample, F; Gourdon, A; Chandrasekhar, N; Joachim, C

    2009-07-01

    Gears are microfabricated down to diameters of a few micrometres. Natural macromolecular motors, of tens of nanometres in diameter, also show gear effects. At a smaller scale, the random rotation of a single-molecule rotor encaged in a molecular stator has been observed, demonstrating that a single molecule can be rotated with the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope (STM). A self-assembled rack-and-pinion molecular machine where the STM tip apex is the rotation axis of the pinion was also tested. Here, we present the mechanics of an intentionally constructed molecule-gear on a Au(111) surface, mounting and centring one hexa-t-butyl-pyrimidopentaphenylbenzene molecule on one atom axis. The combination of molecular design, molecular manipulation and surface atomic structure selection leads to the construction of a fundamental component of a planar single-molecule mechanical machine. The rotation of our molecule-gear is step-by-step and totally under control, demonstrating nine stable stations in both directions.

  4. Local Community Entrepreneurship in Mount Agung Trekking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudana, I. G.; Sutama, I. K.; Widhari, C. I. S.

    2018-01-01

    Since its last major eruption in 1963, Mount Agung in Selat District, Karangasem Regency, the highest mountain in Bali Province began to be visited by tourists climbers. Because of the informal obligation that every climbing/trekking should be guided by local guides, since the 1990s, there have been initiatives from a number of local community members to serve climbing tourists who were keen to climb the volcano/mountain. This study was conducted to understand and describe the entrepreneurial practices which appeared in the local surrounding community. Specifically, Selat Village, in guiding the climbing/trekking. This study used qualitative data analysis and its theories were adapted to data needed in the field. The results of study showed that Mount Agung was considered attractive by climbing tourists not only because of the exotic beauty and challenges of difficulty (as well as the level of danger) to conquer it, but also because it kept certain myths from its status as a holy/sacred mountain to Balinese Hindus. In fact, a number of tourists who did the climbing/trekking without being guided very often got lost, harmed in an accident, or fell to their death. As a direct result, all climbing activities require guidance. Especially guides from local community organizations who really understand the intricacies of climbing and the curvature of the mountain. The entrepreneurial practices of Selat Village community had arisen not only to serve usual climbing activities, but also to preserve the environment of the mountain and the safety of the climbing tourists with the many taboos related to the climb. These facts could be seen clearly from descriptions of local experts and local climbing guides who have been doing their work for years. As a form of entrepreneurship, they basically did their work for the main purpose of seeking livelihoods (or making money) but their responsibility as local people made them commit to guarding the sanctity of the mountain. This was

  5. Photovoltaic array mounting apparatus, systems, and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Jack Raymond; Atchley, Brian; Hudson, Tyrus Hawkes; Johansen, Emil

    2016-01-05

    A photovoltaic array, including: (a) supports laid out on a surface in rows and columns; (b) photovoltaic modules positioned on top of the supports; and (c) fasteners connecting the photovoltaic modules to the supports, wherein the supports have an upper pedestal surface and a lower pedestal surface such that the photovoltaic modules are positioned at a non-horizontal angle when edges of the photovoltaic modules are positioned on top of the upper and lower pedestal surfaces, and wherein a portion of the fasteners rotate to lock the photovoltaic modules onto the supports.

  6. Proposal of reference stress for a surface flaw on a cylindrical component from a review-with-comparison of the local metal loss assessment rule between API 579-1 and the p-M diagram method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyamada, Kenji; Konosu, Shinji; Ohno, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    The Remaining Strength Factor (RSF) approach in Part 5 of API 579-1/ASME FFS-1 is an assessment method for a cylindrical component with a local metal loss based on surface correction factors. Also, reference stress solutions that are applied in the Failure Assessment Diagram (FAD) method for a cylindrical component with a crack-like flaw are provided in Annex D using surface correction factors. In the recently-developed p-M diagram method, the reference stress solution for local metal loss evaluation in a cylindrical component is derived using bulging factors, which are similar but not identical to the surface correction factors used in API 579-1/ASME FFS-1. This paper describes the results of a comparative study among the RSF approach, reference stress solutions for the FAD method, and the p-M diagram method, in terms of plastic collapse evaluation of a cylindrical component. These results were compared with the FEA and experimental results to confirm how these estimated stresses could be validated. This study also involves recommended reference stress solutions for a cylindrical component with a crack-like flaw or a local metal loss, which should be adopted as fitness-for-service rules, and a discussion on the influence of the design margin of the construction code on allowable flaw depth. - Highlights: → We compared local metal loss assessment rule between API 579-1 and the p-M method. → Experiments and FEA verified the p-M estimate stress state around a flaw accurate. → API 579-1 for local metal loss may underestimate stress state for certain conditions. → Existing reference stresses for crack-like flaws may underestimate stress state too. → We propose the reference stress for a surface flaw subjected to pressure and moment.

  7. Geothermal Potential Analysis Using Landsat 8 and Sentinel 2 (Case Study: Mount Ijen)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukojo, B. M.; Mardiana, R.

    2017-12-01

    Geothermal energy is also a heat energy contained in the earth’s internal. Indonesia has a total geothermal potential of around 27 GWe. The government is eager for the development of geothermal in Indonesia can run well so that geothermal can act as one of the pillars of national energy. However, the geothermal potential has not been fully utilized. One of the geothermal potention is Mount Ijen. Mount Ijen is a strato volcano that has a crater lake with a depth of about 190 m and has a very high degree of acidity and the volume of lake water is very large. With the abundance of potential geothermal potential in Indonesia, it is necessary to have an activity in the form of integrated geoscience studies to be able to maximize the potential content that exists in a geothermal area. One of the studies conducted is to do potential mapping. This research performs image data processing of Landsat 8, Sentinel 2, RBI Map, and preliminary survey data. This research carried out the Vegetation Index, surface temperature and altitude. The equipment used in this research includes image processing software, number processing software, GPS Handheld and Laptop. Surface Temperatures in the Mount Ijen have anomalies with large temperatures ranging between 18° C to 38° C. The best correlation value of altitude and ground surface temperature is -0.89 ie the correlation of January surface temperature. While the correlation value of Landsat 8 and Sentinel 2 vegetation index was 0.81. The land cover confidence matrix scored 80%. Land cover in the research area is dominated by forests by 35% of the research area. There is a potential area of geothermal potential is very high on Mount Ijen with an area of 39.43 hectares located in Wongsorejo District and adjacent to District Sempol.

  8. Electric motors with elastically mounted rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    But, D. A.; Kulikov, N. I.

    1984-08-01

    Motors with a conical motion of the shaft suitable for applications in mixers, medical equipment and robotics are analyzed. The rotor is made in the form of a disk with a ferromagnetic active region and a shaft running through the center of the disk. The free end of the shaft is connected to the mechanical load. The rotor is held by a flexible support, which is a rubber bushing, bellows, coiled spring, etc. The magnetic cores with the windings are arranged around the stator periphery, adjacent to the end faces of the disk at axial working gaps. The upper and lower cores are mounted on a common steel frame. The windings are powered through controlled rectifiers, switched so as to drive the disk to oscillatory wave-like motions. Various configurations of such motors are discussed and analytical expressions are derived for disk acceleration, rpm and average magnetic force on the disk. The theory is illustrated with sample calculations for an approximately 30 W motor running at 600 rpm with an efficiency of 0.576 weighing about 8 kg.

  9. 36 CFR 7.5 - Mount Rainier National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mount Rainier National Park. 7.5 Section 7.5 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.5 Mount Rainier National Park. (a...

  10. Solar electricity potentials and optimal angles for mounting solar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The need for harnessing solar energy using solar panels mounted at optimal inclination angles in the six geopolitical zones of Nigeria is presented. The optimal angle for mounting solar panels as presented by Photovoltaic Geographic Information System (PVGIS) ranges from 11º to 14º in the Southern zone and 13º to 16º ...

  11. Reducing the Effect of Transducer Mount Induced Noise on Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel Testing Data with a New Transducer Mount Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herron, A. J.; Reed, D. K.; Nance, D. K.

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of launch vehicle unsteady aerodynamics is a field best studied through experimentation, which is often carried out in the form of large scale wind tunnel testing. Measurement of the fluctuating pressures induced by the boundary layer noise is customarily made with miniature pressure transducers installed into a model of the vehicle of interest. Literature shows that noise level increases between two to five decibels (dB referenced to 20 micropascal) can be induced when the transducer surface is not mounted perfectly flush with the model outer surface. To reduce this artificially induced noise, special transducer holders have been used for aeroacoustic wind tunnel testing by NASA. This holder is a sleeve into which the transducer fits, with a cap that allows it to be mounted in a recessed hole in the model. A single hole in the holder allows the transport of the tunnel medium so the transducer can discriminate the fluctuating pressure due to the turbulent boundary layer noise. The holder is first dry fitted into the model and any difference in height between the holder and the model surface can be sanded flush. The holder is then removed from the model, the transducer glued inside the holder, and the holder replaced in the model, secured also with glue, thus eliminating the problem of noise level increases due to lack of flushness. In order to work with this holder design, special transducers have been ordered with their standard screen removed and the diaphragm moved as close to the top of the casing as possible to minimize any cavity volume. Although this greatly reduces induced noise due to the transducers being out of flush, the holders can also induce a cavity resonance that is usually at a very high frequency. This noise is termed transducer mount induced noise (XMIN). The peak of the mode can vary with the cavity depth, boundary layer noise that can excite the mode, tunnel flow medium, and the build of the transducers. Because the boundary

  12. Placement accuracy gauge for electrical components and method of using same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, Peter M.; Dancer, Linda K.; Yerganian, Simon S.

    1988-10-11

    Surface mounted electrical components are typically assembled on printed wiring boards by automatic machines. It is important that the machines accurately move with respect to both X and Y rotational axes in order to insure that components are positioned precisely on connector pads of the printed wiring board being assembled. In accordance with the instant invention, a gauge is used to facilitate convenient accuracy checks. The gauge is a glass substrate on which grids of 0.005 inch lines are scribed to form location and orientation fields where components are to be placed. The grids are referenced from either fiducial marks or the edge of the substrate to establish known positions within the grids. The equipment to be evaluated is programmed to place components in known positions and the components are held in place by tacky adhesive that is sprayed on the substrate prior to placing the components. The accuracy of the component position is then compared to the programmed position by placing the substrate on a light table and observing the component location. If a significant inaccuracy with respect to any of the axes exists, the inaccuracy is apparent because the component is not aligned properly with the grid. If a precise measurement of an axis inaccuracy is desired, a measuring microscope may be utilized.

  13. Proceedings of Japan-U.S. workshop P-196 on high heat flux components and plasma surface interactions for next devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, K.N.; Yamashina, T.

    1993-03-01

    The Japan-US Workshop P-196 was successfully carried out in Kyushu University, Chikushi Campus, from November 17 to 19. The major concern was on the research and development required both for international Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and Large Helical Device (LHD). Most of the discussion items was similar to that of the last workshop, e.g. PFC and PSI in Large Device, High Heat Flux Component, Laboratory Studies and Neutron Damage. The presentation number concerning High Heat Flux Component was largest. (J.P.N.)

  14. Optimization of Classical Hydraulic Engine Mounts Based on RMS Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Christopherson

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on RMS averaging of the frequency response functions of the absolute acceleration and relative displacement transmissibility, optimal parameters describing the hydraulic engine mount are determined to explain the internal mount geometry. More specifically, it is shown that a line of minima exists to define a relationship between the absolute acceleration and relative displacement transmissibility of a sprung mass using a hydraulic mount as a means of suspension. This line of minima is used to determine several optimal systems developed on the basis of different clearance requirements, hence different relative displacement requirements, and compare them by means of their respective acceleration and displacement transmissibility functions. In addition, the transient response of the mount to a step input is also investigated to show the effects of the optimization upon the time domain response of the hydraulic mount.

  15. Simulation of groundwater flow and pumping scenarios for 1900–2050 near Mount Pleasant, South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Jason M.; Petkewich, Matthew D.; Campbell, Bruce G.

    2017-10-31

    Groundwater withdrawals from the Upper Cretaceous-age Middendorf aquifer in South Carolina have created a large, regional cone of depression in the potentiometric surface of the Middendorf aquifer in Charleston and Berkeley Counties, South Carolina. Groundwater-level declines of as much as 249 feet have been observed in wells over the past 125 years and are a result of groundwater use for public water supply, irrigation, and private industry. To address the concerns of users of the Middendorf aquifer, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Mount Pleasant Waterworks (MPW), recalibrated an existing groundwater-flow model to incorporate additional groundwater-use and water-level data since 2008. This recalibration process consisted of a technique of parameter estimation that uses regularized inversion and employs “pilot points” for spatial hydraulic property characterization. The groundwater-flow system of the Coastal Plain physiographic province of South Carolina and parts of Georgia and North Carolina was simulated using the U.S. Geological Survey finite-difference computer code MODFLOW-2000.After the model recalibration, the following six predictive water-management scenarios were created to simulate potential changes in groundwater flow and groundwater-level conditions in the Mount Pleasant, South Carolina, area: Scenario 1—maximize MPW reverse-osmosis plant capacity by increasing groundwater withdrawals from the Middendorf aquifer from 3.9 million gallons per day (Mgal/d), which was the amount withdrawn in 2015, to 8.58 Mgal/d; Scenario 2—same as Scenario 1, but with the addition of a 0.5 Mgal/d supply well in the Middendorf aquifer near Moncks Corner, South Carolina; Scenario 3—same as Scenario 1, but with the addition of a 1.5 Mgal/d supply well in the Middendorf aquifer near Moncks Corner, South Carolina; Scenario 4—maximize MPW well capacity by increasing withdrawals from the Middendorf aquifer from 3.9 Mgal/d (in 2015) to 10.16 Mgal

  16. Effect of enzymatic desialylation of human serum amyloid P component on surface exposure of laser photo CIDNP (chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization) - reactive histidine, tryptophan and tyrosine residues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Siebert, H.-C; André, S.; Reuter, G.; Gabius, H.-J.; Kaptein, R.

    1995-01-01

    The human pentraxin serum amyloid P component (SAP) exhibits no microheterogeneity in its complex di-antennary glycan. To elucidate whether the removal of sialic acids from this glycoprotein might affect the accessibility of certain amino acid residues of the protein we employed the laser photo

  17. Banner clouds observed at Mount Zugspitze

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Wirth

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Systematic observations of banner clouds at Mount Zugspitze in the Bavarian Alps are presented and discussed. One set of observations draws on daily time lapse movies, which were taken over several years at this mountain. Identifying banner clouds with the help of these movies and using simultaneous observations of standard variables at the summit of the mountain provides climatological information regarding the banner clouds. In addition, a week-long measurement campaign with an entire suite of instruments was carried through yielding a comprehensive set of data for two specific banner cloud events.

    The duration of banner cloud events has a long-tailed distribution with a mean of about 40 min. The probability of occurrence has both a distinct diurnal and a distinct seasonal cycle, with a maximum in the afternoon and in the warm season, respectively. These cycles appear to correspond closely to analogous cycles of relative humidity, which maximize in the late afternoon and during the warm season. In addition, the dependence of banner cloud occurrence on wind speed is weak. Both results suggest that moisture conditions are a key factor for banner cloud occurrence. The distribution of wind direction during banner cloud events slightly deviates from climatology, suggesting an influence from the specific Zugspitz orography.

    The two banner cloud events during the campaign have a number of common features: the windward and the leeward side are characterized by different wind regimes, however, with mean upward flow on both sides; the leeward air is both moister and warmer than the windward air; the background atmosphere has an inversion just above the summit of Mt. Zugspitze; the lifting condensation level increases with altitude. The results are discussed, and it is argued that they are consistent with previous Large Eddy Simulations using idealized orography.

  18. Installation of a Roof Mounted Photovoltaic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, M.

    2015-12-01

    In order to create a safe and comfortable environment for students to learn, a lot of electricity, which is generated from coal fired power plants, is used. Therefore, ISF Academy, a school in Hong Kong with approximately 1,500 students, will be installing a rooftop photovoltaic (PV) system with 302 solar panels. Not only will these panels be used to power a classroom, they will also serve as an educational opportunity for students to learn about the importance of renewable energy technology and its uses. There were four different options for the installation of the solar panels, and the final choice was made based on the loading capacity of the roof, considering the fact that overstressing the roof could prove to be a safety hazard. Moreover, due to consideration of the risk of typhoons in Hong Kong, the solar panel PV system will include concrete plinths as counterweights - but not so much that the roof would be severely overstressed. During and after the installation of the PV system, students involved would be able to do multiple calculations, such as determining the reduction of the school's carbon footprint. This can allow students to learn about the impact renewable energy can have on the environment. Another project students can participate in includes measuring the efficiency of the solar panels and how much power can be produced per year, which in turn can help with calculate the amount of money saved per year and when we will achieve economic parity. In short, the installation of the roof mounted PV system will not only be able to help save money for the school but also provide learning opportunities for students studying at the ISF Academy.

  19. BRYOPHYTES OF MOUNT PATUHA, WEST JAVA, INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROBBERT GRADSTEIN

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available GRADSTEIN, R.    et al. 2010. Bryophytes of Mount Patuha, West  Java,  Indonesia.  Reinwardtia  13(2:  107–123. This  paper  presents  the  results  of  a  two–day  survey  of  the  bryophyte  flora of Mt.  Patuha  and  its  surroundings  near Bandung, West Java, carried out in the framework of the 5th regional training course on bryophyte and lichen diversity and conservation organized by SEAMEO BIOTROP, Bogor, in July 2009. A total of 159 bryophyte species were identi-fied,  including 98 mosses, 60  liverworts, and 1 hornwort, representing almost 1/6 of the  total bryophyte flora of Java. Three moss species, Bryohumbertia subcomosa (Dix. J.–P. Frahm, Fissidens gymnogynus Besch. and F. polypodioidesHedw., and one liverwort, Lejeunea pectinella Mizut., are new additions to the Javanese flora. The bryophyte diversity of Mt. Patuha is well representative of the Malesian flora and is rich in uncommon species. However, the relatively poor representation of shade epiphytes and commonness of sun epiphytes and generalists reflect disturbance of the forest by anthropogenic activities. Careful attention should be given  to conservation of  the  remaining natural  forest  in order  to prevent further losses of the rich bryophyte diversity of the area.

  20. High Concentrations of Ozone Air Pollution on Mount Everest: Health Implications for Sherpa Communities and Mountaineers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semple, John L; Moore, G W Kent; Koutrakis, Petros; Wolfson, Jack M; Cristofanelli, Paolo; Bonasoni, Paolo

    2016-12-01

    Semple, John L., G.W. Kent Moore, Petros Koutrakis, Jack M. Wolfson, Paolo Cristofanelli, and Paolo Bonasoni. High concentrations of ozone air pollution on Mount Everest: health implications for Sherpa communities and mountaineers. High Alt Med Biol. 17:365-369, 2016.-Introduction: Populations in remote mountain regions are increasingly vulnerable to multiple climate mechanisms that influence levels of air pollution. Few studies have reported on climate-sensitive health outcomes unique to high altitude ecosystems. In this study, we report on the discovery of high-surface ozone concentrations and the potential impact on health outcomes on Mount Everest and the high Himalaya. Surface ozone measurements were collected during ascending transects in the Mount Everest region of Nepal with passive nitrite-coated Ogawa filter samplers to obtain 8-hour personal exposures (2860-5364 m asl). In addition, the Nepal Climate Observatory-Pyramid, a GAW-WMO Global Station sited in the Khumbu Valley (5079 m asl), collected ozone mixing ratios with photometric gas analyzer. Surface ozone measurements increased with altitude with concentrations that exceed 100 ppb (8-hour exposure). Highest values were during the spring season and the result of diverse contributions: hemispheric background values, the descent of ozone-rich stratospheric air, and the transport of tropospheric pollutants occurring at different spatial scales. Multiple climate factors, including descending stratospheric ozone and imported anthropogenic air masses from the Indo-Gangetic Plain, contribute to ambient ozone exposure levels in the vicinity of Mount Everest that are similar to if not higher than those reported in industrialized cities.

  1. Impact of Mount St. Helens eruption on hydrology and water quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonelli, J.E.; Taylor, Howard E.; Klein, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    The 1980 eruptions of Mount St. Helens in southeast Washington resulted in a pronounced effect on the surface and ground water resources of the state. In response to the volcanic activity, the U.S. Geological Survey intensified statewide surface and ground water sampling programs to determine the nature and magnitude of the volcanic-induced variations. Streams to the east of Mount St. Helens received the major ash fallout. Chemical effects were best noted in smaller streams sampled 60 to 70 miles northeast of Mount St. Helens. The chemical variations observed were pronounced but short lived. Sulfate and chloride increases in anionic composition were prevalent immediately following the eruption however, the original bicarbonate predominance was again attained within several days. Suspended iron and aluminum concentrations were similarly elevated during the period of greatest ash deposition (highest turbidity) however, the dissolved concentrations remained relatively constant. Depressions of pH were minor and short lived. Streams draining to the south, tributaries to the Columbia river, showed little observable changes in water chemistry. Streams draining to the west (Toutle river and its tributaries) were compositionally affected by the various volcanic activities. Chloride and sulfate anion percentage exceeded the bicarbonate percentage up to one month following the eruption period. Streams and lakes sampled in the immediate vicinity of Mount St. Helens, in addition to trace metals, contained organic compounds derived from decomposing wood buried in the debris deposits. This organic material may constitute a significant source of organic compounds to surface and ground water for some time to come.

  2. Bacterial Cell Wall Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, Cynthia; Brown, Stephanie; Walker, Suzanne

    Bacterial cell-surface polysaccharides cells are surrounded by a variety of cell-surface structures that allow them to thrive in extreme environments. Components of the cell envelope and extracellular matrix are responsible for providing the cells with structural support, mediating intercellular communication, allowing the cells to move or to adhere to surfaces, protecting the cells from attack by antibiotics or the immune system, and facilitating the uptake of nutrients. Some of the most important cell wall components are polysaccharide structures. This review discusses the occurrence, structure, function, and biosynthesis of the most prevalent bacterial cell surface polysaccharides: peptidoglycan, lipopolysaccharide, arabinogalactan, and lipoarabinomannan, and capsular and extracellular polysaccharides. The roles of these polysaccharides in medicine, both as drug targets and as therapeutic agents, are also described.

  3. Study of Flow Deformation around Wind-Vane Mounted Three-Dimensional Hot-Wire Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rømer Rasmussen, K.; Larsen, Søren Ejling; Jørgensen, F. E.

    1981-01-01

    Open wind tunnel tests on several different sensor systems consisting of triaxial hot-wire probes mounted on wind vanes (DISA and Riso vanes) have shown that flow deformation around the hot-wire sensor introduces errors in the measured velocity components. Though changes in the horizontal...... components proved to be negligible, flow deformation resulted in an overestimation of the vertical component from 1.1 to 1.5, depending on the direction of the vertical component. Turbulence and mean value data were adjusted by use of a linear correction derived from the wind tunnel tests. Wind vane...... construction must strike a compromise between minor flow disturbance and sufficient probe support. The final version of the DISA vane resulted in an acceptable vertical correction of about 10%....

  4. Intrasexual mounting in the beetle Diaprepes abbreviatus (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harari, A R; Brockmann, H J; Landolt, P J

    2000-10-22

    The weevil Diaprepes abbreviatus shows three kinds of same-sex mountings: males mount other unpaired males, males mount males already engaged in copulation and females mount other females. Four hypotheses were evaluated in order to explain same-sex matings by males: (i) female mimicry by inferior males, (ii) dominance of larger males which affects the behaviour of small males, (iii) sperm transfer in which smaller males gain some reproductive success by 'hitchhiking' their sperm with the sperm of larger males, and (iv) poor sex recognition. Data from mate choice and sperm competition experiments rejected the female mimicry, dominance and sperm transfer hypotheses and supported the poor sex recognition hypothesis. We tested three hypotheses in order to explain female mounting behaviour: (i) females mimic male behaviour in order to reduce sexual harassment by males, (ii) females mount other females in order to appear larger and thereby attract more and larger males for mating, and (iii) female mimicry of males. The results of our mate choice experiments suggested that the female mimicry of males hypothesis best explains the observed female mounting behaviour. This result is also consistent with the poor sex recognition hypothesis which is the most likely explanation for male and female intrasexual mating behaviour in many insect species.

  5. Snow observations in Mount Lebanon (2011–2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fayad

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a unique meteorological and snow observational dataset in Mount Lebanon, a mountainous region with a Mediterranean climate, where snowmelt is an essential water resource. The study region covers the recharge area of three karstic river basins (total area of 1092 km2 and an elevation up to 3088 m. The dataset consists of (1 continuous meteorological and snow height observations, (2 snowpack field measurements, and (3 medium-resolution satellite snow cover data. The continuous meteorological measurements at three automatic weather stations (MZA, 2296 m; LAQ, 1840 m; and CED, 2834 m a.s.l. include surface air temperature and humidity, precipitation, wind speed and direction, incoming and reflected shortwave irradiance, and snow height, at 30 min intervals for the snow seasons (November–June between 2011 and 2016 for MZA and between 2014 and 2016 for CED and LAQ. Precipitation data were filtered and corrected for Geonor undercatch. Observations of snow height (HS, snow water equivalent, and snow density were collected at 30 snow courses located at elevations between 1300 and 2900 m a.s.l. during the two snow seasons of 2014–2016 with an average revisit time of 11 days. Daily gap-free snow cover extent (SCA and snow cover duration (SCD maps derived from MODIS snow products are provided for the same period (2011–2016. We used the dataset to characterize mean snow height, snow water equivalent (SWE, and density for the first time in Mount Lebanon. Snow seasonal variability was characterized with high HS and SWE variance and a relatively high snow density mean equal to 467 kg m−3. We find that the relationship between snow depth and snow density is specific to the Mediterranean climate. The current model explained 34 % of the variability in the entire dataset (all regions between 1300 and 2900 m a.s.l. and 62 % for high mountain regions (elevation 2200–2900 m a.s.l.. The dataset is suitable for

  6. Simulation work of fatigue life prediction of rubber automotive components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samad, M S A; Ali, Aidy

    2010-01-01

    The usage of rubbers has always been so important, especially in automotive industries. Rubbers have a hyper elastic behaviour which is the ability to withstand very large strain without failure. The normal applications for rubbers are used for shock absorption, sound isolation and mounting. In this study, the predictions of fatigue life of an engine mount of rubber automotive components were presented. The finite element analysis was performed to predict the critical part and the strain output were incorporated into fatigue model for prediction. The predicted result shows agreement in term of failure location of rubber mount.

  7. Stable isotope paleoaltimetry of the Mount Everest region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebelin, A.; Mulch, A.; Teyssier, C.; Jessup, M. J.; Law, R. D.; Brunel, M.

    2012-12-01

    Long-term climatic evolution and atmospheric circulation patterns are influenced to a first order by the topography of the largest mountain ranges. Reconstructing the Neogene elevation history of the Mount Everest region is of particular interest for understanding the tectonic history of the Himalaya-Tibet orogen as well as global scale atmospheric circulation and biotic changes through time. Stable isotope paleoaltimetry uses the isotopic lapse rate of precipitations preserved in the near-surface record. In the absence of surface deposits such as paleosols, volcanic ashes, or lacustrine limestone that record the stable isotopic composition of early to mid-Miocene water preserved in the highly erosive Himalayan range, we conduct stable-isotope paleoaltimetry based on the hydrogen isotopic composition (δD) of hydrous minerals that crystallized in the South Tibetan detachment (STD) shear zone at ~17 Ma. For paleoaltimetry reconstruction we compare stable isotope records from the STD mylonitic footwall to age-equivalent oxygen isotope ratios (δ18O) measured within pedogenic carbonate from Siwalik foreland paleosols that developed near Miocene sea level. The relative differences between meteoric water compositions in the foreland basin and the δ18Owater calculated from the hydrogen isotope composition of syntectonic minerals suggest that by ~17 Ma the central Himalaya was at an elevation similar to what it is today, and that a rain shadow likely existed at that time. Our results demonstrate the power of shear-zone based paleoaltimetry in eroded mountain belts, call for caution in interpreting basin-based stable isotope paleoaltimetry in the rain shadow of the mid-Miocene Himalayan range and suggest that strengthening of the South Asian monsoon may have occurred in early to mid-Miocene, earlier than previously thought.

  8. Cinder cones of Mount Slamet, Central Java, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igan S. SutawIdjaja

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.17014/ijog.vol4no1.20096The Mount Slamet volcanic field in Central Java, Indonesia, contains thirty five cinder cones within an area of 90 sq. km in the east flank of the volcano. The cinder cones occur singly or in small groups, with diameter of the base ranges from 130 - 750 m and the height is around 250 m. Within the volcanic field, the cinder cones are spread over the volcanic area at the distance of 4 to 14 km from the eruption center of the Slamet Volcano. They are concentrated within latitudes 7°11’00” - 7°16’00” S,, and longitudes 109°15’00” - 109°18’00” E. The density of the cinder cones is about 1.5 cones/km2. Most of the cinder cones lie on the Tertiary sedimentary rocks along the NW-trending fault system and on radial fractures. The structural pattern may be related to the radial faults in this region. The cone surfaces are commonly blanketed by Slamet air-falls and lava flows. The deposits consist of poorly bedded, very coarse-grained, occasionally overlain by oxidized scoria, and large-sized of ballistic bombs and blocks. There are various kind of volcanic bombs originating from scoriae ballistic rock fragments. The other kind of volcanic bombs are breadcrust bomb, almond seed or contorted shape. All of the cinder cones have undergone degradation, which can be observed from the characters of gully density and surface morphology. By using Porter parameters, Hco is equal to 0.25 Wco, whilst Wcr is equal to 0.40 Wco. The Hco/Wco ratio is higher than Hco = 0.2 Wco reference line. A radiometric dating using K-Ar method carried out on a scoria bomb yields the age of 0.042 + 0.020 Ma.  

  9. The study of flow and heat transfer characteristics of impinging jet array mounting air-induced duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeranee, K.; Wae-hayee, M.; Piya, I.; Rao, Y.; Nuntadusit, C.

    2017-09-01

    Impinging jet is widely employed in thermal industrial applications due to having high heat transfer coefficient in impingement region. One method to increase heat transfer on an impingement surface is to increase turbulence intensity in jet flow. The mounting of an air-induced duct at nozzle outlet is a passive method to increase entrainment air resulting on increasing turbulence intensity. The aim of this research is to study flow and heat transfer characteristics of array of impinging jets mounting air-induced ducts. The investigation model was jets discharging from pipe nozzle having an inner diameter of d=17.2 mm and a length of 200 mm. Nozzle arrangement were inline configuration having 5 rows x 5 columns. A jet-to-jet distance (S) was S=6d, 8d and a jet-to-plate distance (H) was H=6d. The inner diameter (D) and the length (L) of the air-induced ducts were D=4d and L=4d, respectively. The Reynolds number was fixed at Re=20,000. In addition, the impinging jets without mounting the air-induced ducts were also investigated for benchmarking with the case of mounting the air-induced ducts. In the study, a thin foil technique was used to measure heat transfer on the impingement surface, and a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) using ANSYS, Fluent (V.15.0) was also adopted. The results showed that the effect of mounting air-induced duct can enhance entrainment air into the jet flow resulting on increasing of heat transfer of impinging jets on target surface, and the effects of mounting air-induced duct on increasing heat transfer in case of larger jet-to-jet distance (S/d=8) was more effective than that of smaller jet-to-jet distance (S/d=6).

  10. The Role of Social Work Leadership: Mount Sinai Care, the Accountable Care Organization, and Population Health Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xenakis, Nancy

    2015-10-01

    In July 2012, The Mount Sinai Medical Center was selected by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid to join the first cohort of Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) in this country under its Medicare Shared Savings Program. A critical component of an ACO is care coordination of patients, which is a complex concept, intertwined with other concepts related to quality, delivery and organization of health care. This article provides an overview of the development, structure and functionality of Mount Sinai Care, the ACO of The Mount Sinai Health System, and how it was the beginning of its work in population health management. It describes the important role of social work leadership in the development and operation of its care coordination model. The model's successes and challenges and recommendations for future development of care coordination and population health management are outlined.

  11. Mount Rainier National Park : acoustical monitoring Report 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    During the summer (July September 2009), baseline acoustical data were collected for approximately one month at two sites deployed by NPS personnel in Mount Rainier National Park (MORA). The purpose of the monitoring effort was to supplement prio...

  12. Fathead minnow whole-mount in situ hybridization (WISH)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This study demonstrates the potential of whole-mount in situ hybridization (WISH), in conjunction with quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (QPCR)...

  13. How Mount Stromlo Observatory shed its imperial beginnings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhathal, Ragbir

    2014-12-01

    In the 90 years since its foundation in 1924, Mount Stromlo Observatory in Australia has changed from an outpost of empire to an international research institution. Ragbir Bhathal examines how the British influence waxed and waned.

  14. Liquid Crystal Matrix Image Source for Helmet Mounted Displays (HMDs)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gunther, John

    1988-01-01

    .... This image source was desired for experiments with helmet mounted display configurations in which an off-helmet image source is coupled to the on-helmet optical system through a coherent fiber optic bundle...

  15. Low radioactivity material for use in mounting radiation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Marshall; Metzger, Albert E.; Fox, Richard L.

    1988-01-01

    Two materials, sapphire and synthetic quartz, have been found for use in Ge detector mounting assemblies. These materials combine desirable mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties with the radioactive cleanliness required to detect minimal amounts of K, Th, and U.

  16. Testing tail-mounted transmitters with Myocastor coypus (nutria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, S.; Carter, J.; Thibodeaux, G.

    2007-01-01

    We developed a tail-mounted radio-transmitter for Myocastor coypus (nutria) that offers a practical and efficient alternative to collar or implant methods. The mean retention time was 96 d (range 57-147 d, n = 7), making this a practical method for short-term studies. The tail-mounts were less injurious to animals than collars and easier for field researchers to implement than either collars or surgically implanted transmitters.

  17. Taking Charge: Walter Sydney Adams and the Mount Wilson Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brashear, R.

    2004-12-01

    The growing preeminence of American observational astronomy in the first half of the 20th century is a well-known story and much credit is given to George Ellery Hale and his skill as an observatory-building entrepreneur. But a key figure who has yet to be discussed in great detail is Walter Sydney Adams (1876-1956), Hale's Assistant Director at Mount Wilson Observatory. Due to Hale's illnesses, Adams was Acting Director for much of Hale's tenure, and he became the second Director of Mount Wilson from 1923 to 1946. Behind his New England reserve Adams was instrumental in the growth of Mount Wilson and thus American astronomy in general. Adams was hand-picked by Hale to take charge of stellar spectroscopy work at Yerkes and Mount Wilson and the younger astronomer showed tremendous loyalty to Hale and Hale's vision throughout his career. As Adams assumed the leadership role at Mount Wilson he concentrated on making the observatory a place where researchers worked with great freedom but maintain a high level of cooperation. This paper will concentrate on Adams's early years and look at his growing relationship with Hale and how he came to be the central figure in the early history of Mount Wilson as both a solar and stellar observatory. His education, his years at Dartmouth and Yerkes (including his unfortunate encounter with epsilon Leonis), and his formative years on Mount Wilson are all important in learning how he shaped the direction of Mount Wilson and the development of American astronomy in the first half of the 20th century. This latter history cannot be complete until we bring Adams into better focus.

  18. Surface Tension of Binary Mixtures Including Polar Components Modeled by the Density Gradient Theory Combined with the PC-SAFT Equation of State

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vinš, Václav; Planková, Barbora; Hrubý, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 5 (2013), s. 792-812 ISSN 0195-928X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA200760905; GA ČR(CZ) GPP101/11/P046; GA ČR GA101/09/1633 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : chemical polarity * gradient theory * surface tension Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 0.623, year: 2013 http://www.springerlink.com/openurl.asp?genre=article&id=doi:10.1007/s10765-012-1207-z

  19. Mount Everest 1924 di Jalu Kurek [Mount Everest 1924 by Jalu Kurek

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Gurgul

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the non-fiction novel by Jalu Kurek Mount Everest 1924 published in 1933. We argue against the point of view expressed by critics who claimed that this book has to be seen only as a kind of “intermezzo” in the writer’s career. The book’s various aspects are connected with contemporary market trends, formal experiments, specific topics (the passion for climbing and the position taken in the discussion about the future of Alpinism and ideological contexts (the fundamental aporias of modernism: faith in progress and in the post-Nietzschean new man versus existential anxiety of an attentive observer of the world. All this makes it an important element of the artistic journey of this Cracovian poet and prose writer.

  20. THE PAR (PEER ASSESSMENT RATING CALCULATION ON 2 DIMENSIONAL TEETH MODEL IMAGE FOR THE CENTERLINE COMPONENT AND TEETH SEGMENTATION ON THE OCCLUSAL SURFACE TEETH MODEL IMAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanif Arief Wisesa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The PAR (Peer Assessment Rating Index is used by orthodontists around the world to calculate the severeness of a malocclusion. A malocclusion is a dental disease where the teeth are not properly aligned. In Indonesia, the number of malocclusion is relatively high. The occurrence of orthodontics who can treat malocclusion is also low in Indonesia. In 2013, a research is done to create the telehealth monitoring system to provide better treatment of malocclusion in Indonesia. The research is further improved by using different Adaptive Multiple Thresholding methods to segmentate the image. The result will be used to calculate the Centerline component of the PAR Index. The result is a system that could calculate the PAR Index automatically and is compared to the results using manual method.

  1. New active machine tool drive mounting on the frame

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Švéda J.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the new active mounting of the machine tool drives. The commonly used machine tools are at this time mainly equipped with fix-mounting of the feed drives. This structure causes full transmission of the force shocks to the machine bed and thereby restricts the dynamic properties of the motion axis and the whole machine. The spring-mounting of the feed drives is one of the possibilities how to partially suppress the vibrations. The force that reacts to the machine tool bed is transformed thereby the vibrations are lightly reduced. Unfortunately the transformation is not fully controlled. The new active mounting of the machine tool drives allows to fully control the force behaviour that react to the machine body. Thereby the number of excited frequencies on the machine tool bed is significantly reduced. The active variant of the feed drive mounting is characterized by the synergistic cooperation between two series-connected actuators (“motor on motor”. The paper briefly describes design, control techniques and optimization of the feed drives with the new active mounting conception.

  2. Functional and structural changes in human erythrocyte surface after irradiation by UV waves of various wavelengths. Report 2. Adsorption of alcyan blue by external premembranous components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artsishevskaya, R.A.; Samoylova, K.A.

    1983-12-01

    A method developed previously by the authors for quantitative determination of external premembranous layers of cells was used to determine the extent to which shortwave ultraviolet (SUV) radiation influences the status of this structure in human erythrocytes. An erythrocyte suspension from freshly prepared donor blood stabilized by heparin or glugicir was prepared and irradiated as previously described. Manifestation of external premembranous layers in nonirradiated and irradiated erythrocytes was judged by the adsorption of a cationic phthalocyanine dye. Optimal staining conditions were found: concentration of cell suspension 10Y cells/ml, concentration of dye solution 0.005%, staining time 10 minutes. The influence of SUV on adsorption of erythrocytes results in a reliable decrease in dye sorption. Small and medium doses cause a reduction in sorption, while the highest dose used, 3720 J/m2, causes an increase of 19.5% in dye sorption, sometimes up to 40-50%. It is thought that structural perturbation of the erythrocyte surface may cause activation not only of ABO and Rh antigens, but also other antigens, as well as changes in a number of properties and functions of the cells which involve specialized cell surface systems such as receptors and enzyme groups. 24 references.

  3. Component Rhinoplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Mohmand, Muhammad Humayun; Ahmad, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND According to statistics of American Society of Plastic Surgeons, cosmetic rhinoplasty was the second most frequently performed cosmetic surgery. This study shares the experiences with component rhinoplasty. METHODS From 2004 to 2010, all patients underwent aesthetic nasal surgery were enrolled. The patients requiring only correction of septal deviation and those presenting with cleft lip nasal deformity were excluded. All procedures were performed under general anaesthesia with ope...

  4. Microbial community structure in moraine lakes and glacial meltwaters, Mount Everest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongqin; Yao, Tandong; Jiao, Nianzhi; Kang, Shichang; Zeng, Yonghui; Huang, Sijun

    2006-12-01

    The bacterial diversity and abundance in two moraine lakes and two glacial meltwaters (5140, 5152, 5800 and 6350 m above sea level, respectively) in the remote Mount Everest region were examined through 16S rRNA gene clone library and flow cytometry approaches. In total, 247 clones were screened by RFLP and 60 16S rRNA gene sequences were obtained, belonging to the following groups: Proteobacteria (8% alpha subdivision, 21% beta subdivision, and 1% gamma subdivision), Cytophaga-Flavobacteria-Bacteroides (CFB) (54%), Actinobacteria (4%), Planctomycetes (2%), Verrucomicrobia (2%), Fibrobacteres (1%) and Eukaryotic chroloplast (3%), respectively. The high dominance of CFB distinguished the Mount Everest waters from other mountain lakes. The highest bacterial abundance and diversity occurred in the open moraine lake at 5152 m, and the lowest in the glacial meltwater at 6350 m. Low temperature at high altitude is considered to be critical for component dominancy. At the same altitude, nutrient availability plays a role in regulating population structure. Our results also show that the bacteria in Mount Everest may be derived from different sources.

  5. Hyperfrequency components

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The document has a collection of 19 papers (11 on technologies, 8 on applications) by 26 authors and coauthors. Technological topics include: evolution from conventional HEMT's double heterojunction and planar types of pseudomorphic HEMT's; MMIC R&D and production aspects for very-low-noise, low-power, and very-low-noise, high-power applications; hyperfrequency CAD tools; parametric measurements of hyperfrequency components on plug-in cards for design and in-process testing uses; design of Class B power amplifiers and millimetric-wave, bigrid-transistor mixers, exemplifying combined use of three major types of physical simulation in electrical modeling of microwave components; FET's for power amplification at up to 110 GHz; production, characterization, and nonlinear applications of resonant tunnel diodes. Applications topics include: development of active modules for major European programs; tubes versus solid-state components in hyperfrequency applications; status and potentialities of national and international cooperative R&D on MMIC's and CAD of hyperfrequency circuitry; attainable performance levels in multifunction MMIC applications; state of the art relative of MESFET power amplifiers (Bands S, C, X, Ku); creating a hyperfrequency functions library, of parametrizable reference cells or macrocells; and design of a single-stage, low-noise, band-W amplifier toward development of a three-stage amplifier.

  6. Precision Cleaning and Protection of Coated Optical Components for NIF Small Optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phelps, Jim [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-19

    The purpose of this procedure shall be to define the precision cleaning of finished, coated, small optical components for NIF at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. The term “small optical components” includes coated optics that are set into simple mounts, as well as coated, un-mounted optics.

  7. Evaluation for activities of component of Cyclotron-Based Epithermal Neutron Source (C-BENS) and the surface of concrete wall in irradiation room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imoto, M; Tanaka, H; Fujita, K; Mitsumoto, T; Ono, K; Maruhashi, A; Sakurai, Y

    2011-12-01

    The workers employed in BNCT must enter the irradiation room just after an irradiation under the condition of remaining activities. To reduce the radiation exposure for the workers, it is important to identify the origins of the activities. In this research, the activities induced on the concrete wall surface were evaluated using MCNP-5 and the measurement results of thermal neutron distribution. Furthermore, the radioisotopes produced in the moderator were identified with a High Purity Germanium detector. It was found that the activities of the wall were mainly caused by (46)Sc, (60)Co and (152)Eu, and that (24)Na and (56)Mn were mainly produced in the moderator. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Screen printed passive components for flexible power electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostfeld, Aminy E; Deckman, Igal; Gaikwad, Abhinav M; Lochner, Claire M; Arias, Ana C

    2015-10-30

    Additive and low-temperature printing processes enable the integration of diverse electronic devices, both power-supplying and power-consuming, on flexible substrates at low cost. Production of a complete electronic system from these devices, however, often requires power electronics to convert between the various operating voltages of the devices. Passive components-inductors, capacitors, and resistors-perform functions such as filtering, short-term energy storage, and voltage measurement, which are vital in power electronics and many other applications. In this paper, we present screen-printed inductors, capacitors, resistors and an RLC circuit on flexible plastic substrates, and report on the design process for minimization of inductor series resistance that enables their use in power electronics. Printed inductors and resistors are then incorporated into a step-up voltage regulator circuit. Organic light-emitting diodes and a flexible lithium ion battery are fabricated and the voltage regulator is used to power the diodes from the battery, demonstrating the potential of printed passive components to replace conventional surface-mount components in a DC-DC converter application.

  9. Mock-up tests of rail-mounted vehicle type in-vessel transporter/manipulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, K.; Kakaudate, S.; Fukatsu, S.

    1995-01-01

    A rail-mounted vehicle system has been developed for remote maintenance of in-vessel components for fusion experimental reactor. In this system, a rail deploying/storing system is installed at outside of the reactor core and used to deploy a rail transporter and vehicle/manipulator for the in-vessel maintenance. A prototype of the rail deploying/storing system has been fabricated for mockup tests. This paper describes structural design of the prototypical rail deploying/storing system and results of the performance tests such as payload capacity, position control and rail deployment/storage performance

  10. Color Helmet-Mounted Display System for In-Flight Simulation on the RASCAL Research Helicopter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Tim; Barnhart, Warren; Sawyer, Kevin; Aiken, Edwin W. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    A high performance color helmet mounted display (HMD) system for in-flight simulation and research has been developed for the Rotorcraft Aircrew Systems Concepts Laboratory (RASCAL). The display system consists of a programmable display generator, a display electronics unit, a head tracker, and the helmet with display optics. The system provides a maximum of 1024 x 1280 resolution, a 4:1 contrast ratio, and a brightness of 1100fL utilizing currently available technologies. This paper describes the major features and components of the system. Also discussed are the measured performance of the system and the design techniques that allowed the development of a full color HMD.

  11. Street Lighting Infrastructure Assessment Using Discriminant and GIS Method on Mount Merapi Evacuation Road

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izdihar, R. P.; Maryono, M.; Widjonarko, W.; Rahayu, S.

    2018-02-01

    This research aims to assess street lighting infrastructure in rural-urban of Mount Merapi Evacuation road. Three evacuation road/corridor; Mriyan-Boyolali, Wonodoyo-Boyolali and Samiran-Boyolali are selected as case study. By using discriminant this study examine 6 variables namely type of lamp, physical component, height, time, power and cons consumption. In addition this study also using GIS method to assessing geographical feature as of previous result. According to the discriminant analysis, the characteristic of street lighting could be distinguished as two characteristic, while from the GIS assessment, the study found three characteristic of geographical street lighting feature.

  12. Local pressure components and interfacial tensions of a liquid film in the vicinity of a solid surface with a nanometer-scale slit pore obtained by the perturbative method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, K; Shibahara, M

    2015-03-07

    A classical molecular dynamics simulation was conducted for a liquid-solid interfacial system with a nanometer-scale slit pore in order to reveal local thermodynamic states: local pressure components and interfacial tensions of a liquid film in the vicinity of the slit. The simulation also examined the transition mechanism between the two states of the liquid film: (a) liquid film on the slit and (b) liquid film in the slit, based on the local thermodynamic quantities from a molecular point of view. An instantaneous expression of the local pressure components and interfacial tensions, which is based on a volume perturbation, was presented to investigate time-dependent phenomena in molecular dynamics simulations. The interactions between the particles were described by the 12-6 Lennard-Jones potential, and effects of the fluid-solid interaction intensity on the local pressure components and interfacial tensions of the fluid in the vicinity of the slit were examined in detail by the presented perturbative method. The results revealed that the local pressure components tangential to the solid surface in the vicinity of the 1st fluid layer from the solid surface are different in a two dimensional plane, and the difference became pronounced in the vicinity of the corner of the slit, for cases where the fluid-solid interaction intensities are relatively strong. The results for the local interfacial tensions of the fluid inside the slit suggested that the local interfacial tensions in the vicinity of the 2nd and 3rd layers of the solid atoms from the entrance of the slit act as a trigger for the transition between the two states under the influence of a varying fluid-solid interaction.

  13. Finding Mount Everest and handling voids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storch, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    Evolutionary algorithms (EAs) are randomized search heuristics that solve problems successfully in many cases. Their behavior is often described in terms of strategies to find a high location on Earth's surface. Unfortunately, many digital elevation models describing it contain void elements. These are elements not assigned an elevation. Therefore, we design and analyze simple EAs with different strategies to handle such partially defined functions. They are experimentally investigated on a dataset describing the elevation of Earth's surface. The largest value found by an EA within a certain runtime is measured, and the median over a few runs is computed and compared for the different EAs. For the dataset, the distribution of void elements seems to be neither random nor adversarial. They are so-called semirandomly distributed. To deepen our understanding of the behavior of the different EAs, they are theoretically considered on well-known pseudo-Boolean functions transferred to partially defined ones. These modifications are also performed in a semirandom way. The typical runtime until an optimum is found by an EA is analyzed, namely bounded from above and below, and compared for the different EAs. We figure out that for the random model it is a good strategy to assume that a void element has a worse function value than all previous elements. Whereas for the adversary model it is a good strategy to assume that a void element has the best function value of all previous elements.

  14. Variance Components

    CERN Document Server

    Searle, Shayle R; McCulloch, Charles E

    1992-01-01

    WILEY-INTERSCIENCE PAPERBACK SERIES. The Wiley-Interscience Paperback Series consists of selected books that have been made more accessible to consumers in an effort to increase global appeal and general circulation. With these new unabridged softcover volumes, Wiley hopes to extend the lives of these works by making them available to future generations of statisticians, mathematicians, and scientists. ". . .Variance Components is an excellent book. It is organized and well written, and provides many references to a variety of topics. I recommend it to anyone with interest in linear models.".

  15. Antenna with distributed strip and integrated electronic components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenbeck, Christopher T [Albuquerque, NM; Payne, Jason A [Albuquerque, NM; Ottesen, Cory W [Albuquerque, NM

    2008-08-05

    An antenna comprises electrical conductors arranged to form a radiating element including a folded line configuration and a distributed strip configuration, where the radiating element can be in proximity to a ground conductor and/or arranged as a dipole. Embodiments of the antenna include conductor patterns formed on a printed wiring board, having a ground plane, spacedly adjacent to and coplanar with the radiating element. An antenna can comprise a distributed strip patterned on a printed wiring board, integrated with electronic components mounted on top of or below the distributed strip, and substantially within the extents of the distributed strip. Mounting of electronic components on top of or below the distributed strip has little effect on the performance of the antenna, and allows for realizing the combination of the antenna and integrated components in a compact form. An embodiment of the invention comprises an antenna including a distributed strip, integrated with a battery mounted on the distributed strip.

  16. Development and evaluation of a boat-mounted RFID antenna for monitoring freshwater mussels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Jesse R.; Neebling, Travis E.; Quist, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    Development of radio frequency identification (RFID) technology and passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags has substantially increased the ability of researchers and managers to monitor populations of aquatic organisms. However, use of transportable RFID antenna systems (i.e., backpack-mounted) is currently limited to wadeable aquatic environments (RFID antenna to detect individually PIT-tagged benthic aquatic organisms (mussels). We evaluated the effects of tag orientation on detection distances in water with a 32-mm half-duplex PIT tag. Detection distances up to 50 cm from the antenna coils were obtained, but detection distance was dependent on tag orientation. We also evaluated detection distance of PIT tags beneath the sediment to simulate detection of burrowing mussels with 23- and 32-mm tags. In sand substrate, the maximum detection distance varied from 3.5 cm and 4.5 cm (vertical tag orientation) to 24.7 cm and 39.4 cm (45° tag orientation) for the 23- and 32-mm PIT tags, respectively. Our results suggest a 1.4-m total detection width for tagged mussels on the substrate surface by the boat-mounted antenna system regardless of tag orientation. However, burrowed mussels may require multiple passes to increase detection that would be influenced by depth, tag orientation, and tag size. Construction of the boat-mounted antenna was relatively low in cost (<500 USD) and had several advantages (less labor and time intensive, increased safety) over traditional mussel sampling techniques (diving, snorkeling) in nonwadeable habitats.

  17. DETERMINATION OF THE THICKNESS OF THE COMPONENTS OF A DOUBLE-LAYER NICKEL-CHROMIUM COATING BY MAGNETIC PONDEROMOTIVE METHOD WITH UNILATERAL ACCESS TO THE CONTROLLED SURFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. V. Gnutenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of thick-layer nickel (up to 700 μm and chromium (up to 200 μm coatings has been widely used to give the combustion chamber of a liquid-propellant rocket engine the required operational properties. The main parameter that determines the ability of a coating to fulfill its function is its thickness and uniformity of its distribution. The main problem of current nondestructive methods for determining the thickness of coatings under consideration is that they can be used only at the stage of production of rocket engineering products, when there is an access to the product from the side of the inner wall of the combustion chamber before and after applying a chromium coating to the nickel sublayer. However, when an already finished product arrives at subsequent stages of assembly to another enterprise, there is often a need of incoming control of the thicknesses of coatings from nickel and chromium. In this case, it is not possible to apply existing control techniques to a finished product, or the use of these techniques leads to unacceptable errors in the results of measurements. The goal of the research was to develop a technique for nondestructive determination of the thickness of each component of the two-layer nickel-chromium coating by the magnetic ponderomotive method under conditions of unilateral access to the finished product from the side of the chromium coating.A new technique for nondestructive determination of the thicknesses of nickel and chromium coatings of the double-layer structure on a finished product without a priori data on the properties or thicknesses of these coatings or a product in general is proposed using a magnetic ponderomotive method.This newly developed technique is implemented in the thickness gauge TEP-XN1 of double-layer nickel- chromium coatings, which is successfully used by enterprises of the rocket and space industry of the Russian Federation.

  18. Structural changes of humic acids from sinking organic matter and surface sediments investigated by advanced solid-state NMR: Insights into sources, preservation and molecularly uncharacterized components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jingdong; Tremblay, Luc; Gagné, Jean-Pierre

    2011-12-01

    carbohydrates and fused-ring aromatics detected in the present study likely represented an important part of molecularly uncharacterized components (MUC).

  19. Tracking polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) congener patterns in Newark Bay surface sediment using principal component analysis (PCA) and positive matrix factorization (PMF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saba, Tarek; Su, Steave

    2013-09-15

    PCB congener data for Newark Bay surface sediments were analyzed using PCA and PMF, and relationships between the outcomes from these two techniques were explored. The PCA scores plot separated the Lower Passaic River Mouth samples from North Newark Bay, thus indicating dissimilarity. Although PCA was able to identify subareas in the Bay system with specific PCB congener patterns (e.g., higher chlorinated congeners in Elizabeth River), further conclusions reading potential PCB source profiles or potential upland source areas were not clear for the PCA scores plot. PMF identified five source factors, and explained the Bay sample congener profiles as a mix of these Factors. This PMF solution was equivalent to (1) defining an envelope that encompasses all samples on the PCA scores plot, (2) defining source factors that plot on that envelope, and (3) explaining the congener profile for each Bay sediment sample (inside the scores plot envelope) as a mix of factors. PMF analysis allowed identifying characteristic features in the source factor congener distributions that allowed tracking of source factors to shoreline areas where PCB inputs to the Bay may have originated. The combined analysis from PCA and PMF showed that direct discharges to the Bay are likely the dominant sources of PCBs to the sediment. Review of historical upland activities and regulatory files will be needed, in addition to the PCA and PMF analysis, to fully reconstruct the history of operations and PCB releases around the Newark Bay area that impacted the Bay sediment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Surface cleanliness measurement procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroder, Mark Stewart; Woodmansee, Donald Ernest; Beadie, Douglas Frank

    2002-01-01

    A procedure and tools for quantifying surface cleanliness are described. Cleanliness of a target surface is quantified by wiping a prescribed area of the surface with a flexible, bright white cloth swatch, preferably mounted on a special tool. The cloth picks up a substantial amount of any particulate surface contamination. The amount of contamination is determined by measuring the reflectivity loss of the cloth before and after wiping on the contaminated system and comparing that loss to a previous calibration with similar contamination. In the alternative, a visual comparison of the contaminated cloth to a contamination key provides an indication of the surface cleanliness.

  1. Comparing Three-Dimensional Geophysical Models of Mount St. Helens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creager, K. C.; Ulberg, C. W.; Vidale, J. E.; Levander, A.; Kiser, E.; Abers, G. A.; Crosbie, K.; Mann, M. E.; Moran, S. C.; Denlinger, R. P.; Thelen, W. A.; Hansen, S. M.; Schmandt, B.; Schultz, A.; Bowles-martinez, E.; Bedrosian, P.; Peacock, J.; Hill, G.

    2017-12-01

    The iMUSH project integrates active- and passive-source seismic experiments with magnetotelluric (MT) observations and petrology to better understand the structure and dynamics of the Mount St. Helens (MSH) magmatic system from the subducted plate to the surface. The geophysical experiments included a two-year, 70-element broadband array with 10-km station spacing within 50 km of the MSH edifice, 23 shots recorded by geophones at 6000 sites including 900 Nodal stations, and 147 wideband MT stations with 6-km nominal station spacing. We have determined 3-D models of P-wave, S-wave and P/S-wave velocity as well as 3-D electrical resistivity. Our models from independent data sets and methodologies exhibit remarkable similarity. A narrow low-VP and VS anomaly as well as a high VP/VS and conductivity anomaly is well imaged by nearly all methods at about 6-15 km beneath MSH and coincides with a previously inferred magma storage volume. The St. Helens seismic zone (SHZ), which cuts through MSH with a NNW-SSE orientation, coincides with a narrow, vertical, planar zone of high electrical conductivity and low VP from the near surface to 15 km depth where we lose resolution. The continental Moho shows strong reflectivity east of the SHZ, but is weak to non-existent to the west, perhaps because this marks the eastern edge of hydrous mineral stability in the cold mantle wedge. Farther north, a similar high-conductivity feature is imaged along the west Rainer seismic zone. High Vp/Vs and high electrical conductivity extend under the Indian Heaven volcanic field at depths of 5-15 km, potentially associated with regions of partial melt and/or fluids. Mid- to lower-crustal velocities are generally fast to the west of MSH, consistent with the presence of the accreted Siletz terrane, and slow to the east suggesting both a change in composition and higher temperatures. Moderate lower-crustal resistivity is also present to the east, and is consistent with a small degree of partial melt

  2. Eruptions of Mount St. Helens : Past, present, and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilling, Robert I.; Topinka, Lyn J.; Swanson, Donald A.

    1990-01-01

    Mount St. Helens, located in southwestern Washington about 50 miles northeast of Portland, Oregon, is one of several lofty volcanic peaks that dominate the Cascade Range of the Pacific Northwest; the range extends from Mount Garibaldi in British Columbia, Canada, to Lassen Peak in northern California. Geologists call Mount St. Helens a composite volcano (or stratovolcano), a term for steepsided, often symmetrical cones constructed of alternating layers of lava flows, ash, and other volcanic debris. Composite volcanoes tend to erupt explosively and pose considerable danger to nearby life and property. In contrast, the gently sloping shield volcanoes, such as those in Hawaii, typically erupt nonexplosively, producing fluid lavas that can flow great distances from the active vents. Although Hawaiian-type eruptions may destroy property, they rarely cause death or injury. Before 1980, snow-capped, gracefully symmetrical Mount St. Helens was known as the "Fujiyama of America." Mount St. Helens, other active Cascade volcanoes, and those of Alaska form the North American segment of the circum-Pacific "Ring of Fire," a notorious zone that produces frequent, often destructive, earthquake and volcanic activity.

  3. Passive pavement-mounted acoustical linguistic drive alert system and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisner, Roger A.; Anderson, Richard L.; Carnal, Charles L.; Hylton, James O.; Stevens, Samuel S.

    2001-01-01

    Systems and methods are described for passive pavement-mounted acoustical alert of the occupants of a vehicle. A method of notifying a vehicle occupant includes providing a driving medium upon which a vehicle is to be driven; and texturing a portion of the driving medium such that the textured portion interacts with the vehicle to produce audible signals, the textured portion pattern such that a linguistic message is encoded into the audible signals. The systems and methods provide advantages because information can be conveyed to the occupants of the vehicle based on the location of the vehicle relative to the textured surface.

  4. Hybrid diffractive-refractive optical system design of head-mounted display for augmented reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huijuan

    2005-02-01

    An optical see-through head-mounted display for augmented reality is designed in this paper. Considering the factors, such as the optical performance, the utilization ratios of energy of real world and virtual world, the feelings of users when he wears it and etc., a structure of the optical see-through is adopted. With the characteristics of the particular negative dispersive and the power of realizing random-phase modulation, the diffractive surface is helpful for optical system of reducing weight, simplifying structure and etc., and a diffractive surface is introduced in our optical system. The optical system with 25 mm eye relief, 12 mm exit pupil and 20° (H)x15.4° (V) field-of-view is designed. The utilization ratios of energy of real world and virtual world are 1/4 and 1/2, respectively. The angular resolution of display is 0.27 mrad and it less than that of the minimum of human eyes. The diameter of this system is less than 46mm, and it applies the binocular. This diffractive-refractive optical system of see-through head-mounted display not only satisfies the demands of user"s factors in structure, but also with high resolution, very small chromatic aberration and distortion, and satisfies the need of augmented reality. In the end, the parameters of the diffractive surface are discussed.

  5. Linear and/or curvilinear rail mount system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jackie D. (Inventor); Harris, Lawanna L. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    One or more linear and/or curvilinear mounting rails are coupled to a structure. Each mounting rail defines a channel and at least one cartridge assembly is engaged in the channel. Each cartridge assembly includes a housing that slides within the channel. The housing defines a curvilinearly-shaped recess longitudinally aligned with the channel when the housing is in engagement therewith. The cartridge assembly also includes a cleat fitted in the recess for sliding engagement therealong. The cleat can be coupled to a fastener that passes through the mounting rail and the housing when the housing is so-engaged in the channel. The cleat is positioned in the recess by a position of the fastener.

  6. Geologic map of Mount Mazama, Crater Lake, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Charles

    1990-01-01

    Crater Lake caldera collapsed about 6,850 yr B.P. during the climactic eruption of Mount Mazama, a High Cascade basaltic andesitic to dacitic volcanic center that was constructed during a period of about 400,000 yr. The caldera and the products of the climactic eruption are clear evidence for the presence of a shallow magma body that must have supported a hydrothermal system in the recent past. The geology of Mount Mazama has been mapped at a scale of 1:24,000 based on detailed study of the walls of Crater Lake caldera and mapping of the flanks of the volcano. The map shows lavas and fragmental deposits of Mount Mazama, lavas of nearby monogenetic volcanoes, pre-Mazama silicic volcanic rocks, products of the climactic eruption, and glacial deposits. Related topical studies of the volcanology, geochronology, petrology, and geochemistry of the Crater Lake area depend on field relations established by geologic mapping.

  7. Volcano collapse promoted by progressive strength reduction: New data from Mount St. Helens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Mark E.; Keith, Terry E.C.; Kayen, Robert E.; Iverson, Neal R.; Iverson, Richard M.; Brien, Dianne

    2010-01-01

    Rock shear strength plays a fundamental role in volcano flank collapse, yet pertinent data from modern collapse surfaces are rare. Using samples collected from the inferred failure surface of the massive 1980 collapse of Mount St. Helens (MSH), we determined rock shear strength via laboratory tests designed to mimic conditions in the pre-collapse edifice. We observed that the 1980 failure shear surfaces formed primarily in pervasively shattered older dome rocks; failure was not localized in sloping volcanic strata or in weak, hydrothermally altered rocks. Our test results show that rock shear strength under large confining stresses is reduced ∼20% as a result of large quasi-static shear strain, as preceded the 1980 collapse of MSH. Using quasi-3D slope-stability modeling, we demonstrate that this mechanical weakening could have provoked edifice collapse, even in the absence of transiently elevated pore-fluid pressures or earthquake ground shaking. Progressive strength reduction could promote collapses at other volcanic edifices.

  8. Components of the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinda, J.; Lieskovska, Z.

    1998-01-01

    This report of the Ministry of the Environment of the Slovak Republic deals with the components of the environment. The results of monitoring of air (emission situation), ambient air quality, atmospheric precipitation, tropospheric ozone, water (surface water, groundwater resources, waste water and drinking water), geological factors (geothermal energy, fuel deposits, ore deposits, non-metallic ore deposits), soil (area statistics, soil contamination. soil reaction and active extractable aluminium, soil erosion), flora and fauna (national strategy of biodiversity protection) are presented

  9. Experimental study of some mounting brackets to support fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubert, M.; Poglia, S.; Roche, R.

    1958-09-01

    In an atomic pile with vertical channels, fuel elements are stacked on one another. According to a possible assembly, fuel element can be contained by a graphite sleeve and be supported by a mounting bracket in this sleeve. Sleeves are then stacked on one another. The authors report the investigation of different designs for these mounting brackets. They describe their mechanical role and their mechanical, aerodynamic, neutronic and test conditions. They report tests performed on brackets made in graphite and on brackets made in stainless steel and graphite, and discuss the obtained results

  10. Common eland Taurotragus oryx on Mount Kilimanjaro, Tanzania: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    More than 150 years after the first Europeans tackled Mount Kilimanjaro, the mammal fauna of Africa's highest mountain is still shrouded in mystery. This even applies to the common eland Taurotragus oryx, the world's second largest antelope, signs of which have been observed at altitudes between 3000 m and 5200 m, ...

  11. Volcanic Ash from the 1999 Eruption of Mount Cameroon Volcano ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-10-21

    Oct 21, 2008 ... fluorine (F) content of the ash was determined by the selective ion electrode method. The results show that the. Mount Cameroon ash particles have a variety of shapes .... populations in the Bakingili-Batoke health districts. These studies reported irritation of the eyes (Afane et al. 2001) and respiratory ...

  12. Volcanic Ash from the 1999 Eruption of Mount Cameroon Volcano ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Volcanic ash from the 1999 eruption of Mount Cameroon volcano has been characterized for its particle size and shape (by scanning electron microscopy, SEM), and mineralogy (by X-ray diffractometry, XRD). Also the total fluorine (F) content of the ash was determined by the selective ion electrode method. The results ...

  13. Climbing Mount Everest: on our way to the summit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamian, Judith

    2003-01-01

    The key to climbing Mount Everest is not one individual striving for the peak. Teamwork, leadership, and meticulous planning are what take climbers to the summit. They are key, as well, to solving the problems of human resources in the healthcare system.

  14. Direct effects of fire on endangered Mount Graham red squirrels

    Science.gov (United States)

    John L. Koprowski; Katherine M. Leonard; Claire A. Zugmeyer; Julia L. Jolley

    2006-01-01

    Direct mortality of forest wildlife due to fire is rarely documented. In June and July 2004, the Nuttall Complex Fire burned 11,898 ha in the Pinaleno Mountains, southeastern Arizona. Portions of these mountains serve as the only habitat of endangered Mount Graham red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus grahamensis). Survival of radio-collared red...

  15. Mount St. Helens 30 years later: a landscape reconfigured.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhonda Mazza

    2010-01-01

    On May 18, 1980, after two months of tremors, Mount St. Helens erupted spectacularly and profoundly changed a vast area surrounding the volcano. The north slope of the mountain catastrophically failed, forming the largest landslide witnessed in modern times. The largest lobe of this debris avalanche raced 14 miles down the Toutle River...

  16. Kuidas koostada meeskonda - Mount Everesti ainetel / Marii Karell

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Karell, Marii, 1980-

    2003-01-01

    Eesti meeskonna Mount Everesti tippu juhtinud Tõivo Sarmet selgitab toimunud ekspeditsiooni näitel, miks tema peab meeskonna komplekteerimisel oluliseimaks inimeste iseloomuomadusi. Ekstreemoludes hakkama saamiseks tuleb meeles pidada, et eesmärk on ühine ja kellegi ego ei tohi seda nurjata, rõhutab Sarmet. Kommenteerib Alar Sikk

  17. The South African Defence Force and Horse Mounted Infantry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The South African Defence Force (SADF) made effective use of the horse mounted soldier in the Namibian Independence War or 'Border War', 1966 to 1989, in Namibia (South West African) and Angola, in a conflict usually depicted as a series of high profile mechanised infantry operations. Nevertheless, the legacy of the ...

  18. Biogeographic patterns of forest diversity at mount Kasigau, Kenya ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study reports 140 species, 46 were measured in only one plot, and affinities for 75 species to the Somalia-Masai (43%), Afromontane (29%), and Zanzibar- Inhambane (Coastal, 28%) floristic regions. Cluster and Indicator Species Analyses identified eight community types. Mount Kasigau uniquely conserves much ...

  19. Evaluation of HOPG mounting possibilities for multiplexing spectrometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groitl, Felix; Bartkowiak, Marek; Bergmann, Ryan M.

    2017-01-01

    Four different methods for mounting HOPG analyzer crystals on Si holders have been evaluated in the design process of the new multiplexing spectrometer CAMEA. Contrary to neutron optics used in standard spectrometers, the new instrument concept employs a series of analyzer segments behind each ot...

  20. Dynamic design of automotive systems: Engine mounts and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Dynamic design and vibro-acoustic modelling issues for automotive structures are illustrated via two case studies. The first case examines the role performance of passive and adaptive hydraulic engine mounts. In the second, the importance of welded joints and adhesives in vehicle bodies and chassis structures is ...

  1. Cones and craters on Mount Pavagadh, Deccan Traps: Rootless ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    The mountain is surrounded by smaller hills, some of which apparently represent individ- ual satellite vents. Rhyolite outcrops, and volcanic breccia deposits with clear quaquaversal dips, are seen in these hills. Here we describe the shal- low cones with craters that are found on the uppermost mafic lava flow of Mount ...

  2. Astrophotography on the go using short exposures with light mounts

    CERN Document Server

    Ashley, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    No longer are heavy, sturdy, expensive mounts and tripods required to photograph deep space. With today's advances in technology, all that is required is an entry-DSLR and an entry level GoTo telescope. Here is all of the information needed to start photographing the night sky without buying expensive tracking mounts. By using multiple short exposures and combining them with mostly ‘freeware’ computer programs, the effect of image rotation can be minimized to a point where it is undetectable in normal astrophotography, even for a deep-sky object such as a galaxy or nebula. All the processes, techniques, and equipment needed to use inexpensive, lightweight altazimuth and equatorial mounts and very short exposures photography to image deep space objects are explained, step-by-step, in full detail, supported by clear, easy to understand graphics and photographs.   Currently available lightweight mounts and tripods are identified and examined from an economic versus capability perspective to help users deter...

  3. Assessing climate change impacts on water balance in the Mount ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A statistical downscaling known for producing station-scale climate information from GCM output was preferred to evaluate the impacts of climate change within the Mount Makiling forest watershed, Philippines. The lumped hydrologic BROOK90 model was utilized for the water balance assessment of climate change ...

  4. Rheocasting an engine mounting bracket in commercial 7075

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Curle, UA

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available -1 Light Metals Technology V, the 5th International Conference on Light Metals Technology, July 19- 22, 2011, Luneburg, Germany Rheocasting an engine mounting bracket in commercial 7075 CURLE Ulyate Andries1, a 1Materials Science and Manufacturing...

  5. [The Greek illustrations of the human diseases: Mount Athos].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlier, Philippe

    2003-01-01

    Philippe Charlier deals with the whole illustrations of human diseases either from religious texts or works of art. He tends to pass in review the skeletal and anatomic illustrations of the illness which has been a repetitive subject since the ancient Greeks. The author points out their common features and their amazing differences in the examples of Mount Athos.

  6. Dynamic design of automotive systems: Engine mounts and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The first case examines the role performance of passive and adaptive hydraulic engine mounts. In the second, the importance of welded joints and adhesives in vehicle bodies and chassis structures is highlighted via generic 'T' and 'L' beams assemblies. In each case, analytical and experimental results are presented.

  7. The South African Defence Force and Horse Mounted Infantry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jacques

    2003-03-26

    Mar 26, 2003 ... supplied standard issue civilian saddles that were not designed to take the strain exerted by excessive .... challenges, demand for horse mounted patrols along the border increased to combat ever greater ..... things, no armour, no Kevlar jackets or anything, and they would ride right up to a person and greet ...

  8. Rollin' in Style!: Students Design Bike Mounted Skateboard Racks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Rick

    2008-01-01

    Recognizing the increasing popularity of skateboarding, the author has found a project that teaches design and manufacturing concepts--and, of equal importance, really gets his students motivated. He challenges them to design and build a skateboard rack that mounts easily on a bicycle. The project benefits students by teaching creativity, the…

  9. Assessing climate change impacts on water balance in the Mount

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A statistical downscaling known for producing station-scale climate information from GCM output was preferred to evaluate the impacts of climate change within the Mount Makiling forest watershed, Philippines. The lumped hydrologic BROOK90 model was utilized for the water balance assessment of climate change ...

  10. The mount Cameroon height determined from ground gravity data ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract This paper deals with the accurate determination of mount Cameroon orthometric height, by combining ground gravity data, global navigation satellite system (GNSS) observations and global geopotential models. The elevation of the highest point (Fako) is computed above the WGS84 reference ellipsoid.

  11. Ethnobotanical survey of \\'wild\\' woody plant resources at Mount ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper focuses on the naming and use of plants by Taita who live at Mount Kasigau in Kenya's Eastern Arc Mountains. Plant vouchers and ethnobotanical data were compiled from transects and within 55 ecological plots, and during participant observations, home surveys, and semi-structured interviews with residents.

  12. Assessing climate change impacts on water balance in the Mount ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A statistical downscaling known for producing station-scale climate information from GCM out- put was preferred to evaluate the impacts of climate change within the Mount Makiling forest watershed, Philippines. The lumped hydrologic BROOK90 model was utilized for the water bal- ance assessment of climate change ...

  13. Volcano ecology: flourishing on the flanks of Mount St. Helens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhonda Mazza; Charlie Crisafulli

    2016-01-01

    Mount St. Helens’ explosive eruption on May 18, 1980, was a pivotal moment in the field of disturbance ecology. The subsequent sustained, integrated research effort has shaped the development of volcano ecology, an emerging field of focused research. Excessive heat, burial, and impact force are some of the disturbance mechanisms following an eruption. They are also...

  14. 75 FR 1285 - Vehicle-Mounted Earth Stations (VMES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-11

    ... transmission within 100 milliseconds if the angle between the orbital location of the target satellite and...-Mounted Earth Stations in Certain Frequency Bands Allocated to the Fixed-Satellite Service, IB Docket No... via the Internet at: [email protected] and [email protected] . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION...

  15. Forest Carbon Stocks in Woody Plants of Mount Zequalla Monastery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Carbon sequestration through forestry has the potential to play a significant role in ameliorating global environmental problems such as atmospheric accumulation of GHG's and climate change.The present study was undertaken to estimate forest carbon stock along altitudinal gradient in Mount Zequalla Monastery forest.

  16. Light Field Rendering for Head Mounted Displays using Pixel Reprojection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anne Juhler; Klein, Jákup; Kraus, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Light field displays have advantages over traditional stereoscopic head mounted displays, for example, because they can overcome the vergence-accommodation conflict. However, rendering light fields can be a heavy task for computers due to the number of images that have to be rendered. Since much ...

  17. 29 CFR 1926.553 - Base-mounted drum hoists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Cranes, Derricks, Hoists, Elevators, and Conveyors § 1926.553 Base-mounted drum hoists. (a) General requirements. (1) Exposed moving parts such as gears... design, construction, installation, testing, inspection, maintenance, and operations, as prescribed by...

  18. Geologic Map of Mount Mazama and Crater Lake Caldera, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Charles R.

    2008-01-01

    Crater Lake partly fills one of the most spectacular calderas of the world, an 8-by-10-km basin more than 1 km deep formed by collapse of the volcano known as Mount Mazama (fig. 1) during a rapid series of explosive eruptions about 7,700 years ago. Having a maximum depth of 594 m, Crater Lake is the deepest lake in the United States. Crater Lake National Park, dedicated in 1902, encompasses 645 km2 of pristine forested and alpine terrain, including the lake itself, virtually all of Mount Mazama, and most of the area of the geologic map. The geology of the area was first described in detail by Diller and Patton (1902) and later by Williams (1942), whose vivid account led to international recognition of Crater Lake as the classic collapse caldera. Because of excellent preservation and access, Mount Mazama, Crater Lake caldera, and the deposits formed by the climactic eruption constitute a natural laboratory for study of volcanic and magmatic processes. For example, the climactic ejecta are renowned among volcanologists as evidence for systematic compositional zonation within a subterranean magma chamber. Mount Mazama's climactic eruption also is important as the source of the widespread Mazama ash, a useful Holocene stratigraphic marker throughout the Pacific Northwest, adjacent Canada, and offshore. A detailed bathymetric survey of the floor of Crater Lake in 2000 (Bacon and others, 2002) provides a unique record of postcaldera eruptions, the interplay between volcanism and filling of the lake, and sediment transport within this closed basin. Knowledge of the geology and eruptive history of the Mount Mazama edifice, greatly enhanced by the caldera wall exposures, gives exceptional insight into how large volcanoes of magmatic arcs grow and evolve. Lastly, the many smaller volcanoes of the High Cascades beyond the limits of Mount Mazama are a source of information on the flux of mantle-derived magma through the region. General principles of magmatic and eruptive

  19. Rhizocarpon calibration curve for the Aoraki/Mount Cook area of New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, Thomas V.; Schoenenberger, Katherine; Deddens, James A.; Denton, George H.; Smith, Colby; Black, Jessica; Hendy, Chris H.

    2005-05-01

    Development of Rhizocarpon growth curve from the Aoraki/Mount Cook area of New Zealand provides a means to assess Little Ice Age glacier behaviour and suggests approaches that have wider application. Employing a sampling strategy based on large populations affords the opportunity to assess which of various metrics (e.g. single largest, average of five largest, mean of an entire population) best characterise Rhizocarpon growth patterns. The 98% quantile from each population fitted with a quadric curve forms a reliable representation of the growth pattern. Since this metric does not depend on the original sample size, comparisons are valid where sample strategy must be adapted to local situations or where the original sample size differs. For the Aoraki/Mount Cook area a surface 100 years old will have a 98% quantile lichen diameter of 34.3 mm, whereas a 200-year-old surface will have a lichen diameter of 73.7 mm. In the Southern Alps, constraints from the age range of calibration points, the flattening of the quadric calibration curve and ecological factors limit the useful age range to approximately 250 years. Copyright

  20. The Effects of Degradational Factors on the Ecosystem of Mount Madra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efe, R.; Soykan, A.; Sönmez, S.; Cürebal, I.

    2009-04-01

    environment of Kozak Plataeu, and in addition to this, quarrying activity has recently begun in the area around Burhaniye. All these activities have led to problems such as erosion, decreased biodiversity, and pollution of water sources on Mount Madra. The forest clearances which have been made, for various reasons, on the northern and southern slopes of Mount Madra, have caused the topsoil to be worn away by surface water. The most striking examples of this can be seen on Mount Şabla (1111m) and on the southern slopes of Maya peak (1344m). The trimming recently carried out by the Forestry Commission on sections of Mount Madra has badly damaged the forest's vegetation and in a short space of time caused irreversible harm to the ecosystem of the mountain. For thousands of years, parts of the top of Mount Madra and the Kozak plateau have been used as summer grounds and, as a result, the forest has been cleared from a wide section. On the north-facing slopes of Mount Madra, the number of chestnut trees (Castanea sativa) found within pine woods is increasing daily. The pine trees around the chestnuts are being chopped down in order to increase the number of chestnut trees, whose fruit are harvested for the economic benefit they bring. The pine forests are, for this reason, in constant decline. Forest roads, both planned and unplanned, have led to further destruction of forest vegetation. Apart from the forest vegetation of the Mountain, other natural resources are under threat; particularly water sources. Facilities for fish farming have been built with no pre-planning or research, leading to the clearance of forest and pollution of the environment. Mount Madra is an important water source for the rivers in the surrounding areas. It is the source of the Madra and Karınca Rivers which flow into the Aegean Sea, the Kocaçay River which feeds Manyas Lake and several tributaries of the Bakırçay River. The protection of Mount Madra and its freshwater sources and biodiversity is

  1. Interactions between titanium surfaces and biological components

    OpenAIRE

    Pegueroles Neyra, Marta

    2009-01-01

    El conocimiento de las interacciones entre célula/proteína/biomaterial es fundamental para la ingeniería de superficies debido a las numerosas aplicaciones biomédicas y biotecnológicas que se están desarrollando así como al éxito clínico que han alcanzado muchos implantes. La respuesta biológica final inducida por los implantes está fuertemente influenciada por las interacciones superficiales entre los componentes biológicos y el material sintético. Las propiedades físicas y químicas de la su...

  2. Use of total internal reflection Raman (TIR) and attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy to analyze component separation in thin offset ink films after setting on coated paper surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivioja, Antti; Hartus, Timo; Vuorinen, Tapani; Gane, Patrick; Jääskeläinen, Anna-Stiina

    2013-06-01

    The interactive behavior of ink constituents with porous substrates during and after the offset print process has an important effect on the quality of printed products. To help elucidate the distribution of ink components between the retained ink layer and the substrate, a variety of spectroscopic and microscopic analysis techniques have been developed. This paper describes for the first time the use of total internal reflection (TIR) Raman spectroscopy to analyze the penetration behavior of separated offset ink components (linseed oil, solid color pigment) in coated papers providing chemically intrinsic information rapidly, nondestructively, and with minimal sample preparation. In addition, the already widely applied technique of attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR) was evaluated in parallel and compared. The results of the ATR-IR Raman clearly revealed an improvement in uppermost depth resolution compared with values previously published from other nondestructive techniques, and the method is shown to be capable of providing new knowledge of the setting of thin (0.25-2 μm) offset ink films, allowing the spreading and the penetration behavior on physically different paper coating surfaces to be studied.

  3. Improved stress prediction in adhesive bonded optical components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreugd, J. de; Voert, M.J.A. te; Nijenhuis, J.R.; Pijnenburg, J.A.C.M.; Tabak, E.

    2012-01-01

    Adhesives are widely used in optomechanical structures for bonding optical components to their mounts. The main advantage of using adhesives is the excellent strength to weight ratio. Adhesive bonding is seen as a desirable joining technique as it allows for greater flexibility in design. A

  4. Habitat segregation of Ambystoma gracile and Ambystoma macrodactylum in mountain ponds, Mount Rainer National Park, Washington, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Robert L.; Larson, Gary L.; Brokes, Brendan J.

    2003-01-01

    Ambystoma gracile (Baird) and Ambystoma macrodactylum Baird are common salamander species occupying key trophic positions in mountain ponds and lakes of Mount Rainier National Park (MORA). Based on amphibian surveys conducted in ponds and lakes in the northeast quadrant of MORA during the summers of 1993a??1995, 20 sites were resampled in 1996 to document and evaluate distributions of the two species relative to site habitat characteristics. Distributions of larvae were assessed either by nearshore snorkel or visual encounter surveys of each study site. Twelve environmental variables representing pond and lake physical characteristics, water quality, and nutrient concentrations were measured. The occurrences at each site of three major habitat components (i.e., pond bottom firmness, coarse woody debris, and emergent/aquatic vegetation) were qualitatively estimated. Allotopic distributions of larval populations of both species were related to site elevation, maximum depth, organic content of bottom substrates, and surface area. Ambystoma gracile sites were larger, deeper, lower in elevation, had flocculent sediment higher in organic content, abundant coarse woody debris, and limited emergent/aquatic vegetation relative to A. macrodactylum sites. Ambystoma macrodactylum sites were smaller, shallower, higher in elevation, had firm sediments low in organic content, and had a greater occurrence of emergent/aquatic vegetation than did A. gracile sites. Two sites supported syntopic populations and exhibited many of the habitat characteristics observed at sites inhabited by each species. The distribution of each species in MORA was related to the interconnection between habitat characteristics of ponds and lakes and species life-history patterns and possibly interspecific interactions.

  5. Floating chip mounting system driven by repulsive force of permanent magnets for multiple on-site SPR immunoassay measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, Tsutomu; Tobita, Tatsuya; Miura, Toru; Iwasaki, Yuzuru; Seyama, Michiko; Inoue, Suzuyo; Takahashi, Jun-ichi; Haga, Tsuneyuki; Tamechika, Emi

    2012-10-17

    We have developed a measurement chip installation/removal mechanism for a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) immunoassay analysis instrument designed for frequent testing, which requires a rapid and easy technique for changing chips. The key components of the mechanism are refractive index matching gel coated on the rear of the SPR chip and a float that presses the chip down. The refractive index matching gel made it possible to optically couple the chip and the prism of the SPR instrument easily via elastic deformation with no air bubbles. The float has an autonomous attitude control function that keeps the chip parallel in relation to the SPR instrument by employing the repulsive force of permanent magnets between the float and a float guide located in the SPR instrument. This function is realized by balancing the upward elastic force of the gel and the downward force of the float, which experiences a leveling force from the float guide. This system makes it possible to start an SPR measurement immediately after chip installation and to remove the chip immediately after the measurement with a simple and easy method that does not require any fine adjustment. Our sensor chip, which we installed using this mounting system, successfully performed an immunoassay measurement on a model antigen (spiked human-IgG) in a model real sample (non-homogenized milk) that included many kinds of interfering foreign substances without any sample pre-treatment. The ease of the chip installation/removal operation and simple measurement procedure are suitable for frequent on-site agricultural, environmental and medical testing.

  6. Floating Chip Mounting System Driven by Repulsive Force of Permanent Magnets for Multiple On-Site SPR Immunoassay Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emi Tamechika

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a measurement chip installation/removal mechanism for a surface plasmon resonance (SPR immunoassay analysis instrument designed for frequent testing, which requires a rapid and easy technique for changing chips. The key components of the mechanism are refractive index matching gel coated on the rear of the SPR chip and a float that presses the chip down. The refractive index matching gel made it possible to optically couple the chip and the prism of the SPR instrument easily via elastic deformation with no air bubbles. The float has an autonomous attitude control function that keeps the chip parallel in relation to the SPR instrument by employing the repulsive force of permanent magnets between the float and a float guide located in the SPR instrument. This function is realized by balancing the upward elastic force of the gel and the downward force of the float, which experiences a leveling force from the float guide. This system makes it possible to start an SPR measurement immediately after chip installation and to remove the chip immediately after the measurement with a simple and easy method that does not require any fine adjustment. Our sensor chip, which we installed using this mounting system, successfully performed an immunoassay measurement on a model antigen (spiked human-IgG in a model real sample (non-homogenized milk that included many kinds of interfering foreign substances without any sample pre-treatment. The ease of the chip installation/removal operation and simple measurement procedure are suitable for frequent on-site agricultural, environmental and medical testing.

  7. Patch Clamp Recording of Starburst Amacrine Cells in a Flat-mount Preparation of Deafferentated Mouse Retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Hung-Ya; Hsu, Chih-Chun; Chen, Yu-Jiun; Chen, Ching-Kang

    2016-10-13

    The mammalian retina is a layered tissue composed of multiple neuronal types. To understand how visual signals are processed within its intricate synaptic network, electrophysiological recordings are frequently used to study connections among individual neurons. We have optimized a flat-mount preparation for patch clamp recording of genetically marked neurons in both GCL (ganglion cell layer) and INL (inner nuclear layer) of mouse retinas. Recording INL neurons in flat-mounts is favored over slices because both vertical and lateral connections are preserved in the former configuration, allowing retinal circuits with large lateral components to be studied. We have used this procedure to compare responses of mirror-partnered neurons in retinas such as the cholinergic starburst amacrine cells (SACs).

  8. [Chemical characteristics of fresh snow in Mount Everest Region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, D; Qin, D; Ren, J; Kang, S; Wang, X; Huang, C

    2001-03-01

    The chemistry of fresh snow samples collected in August and September, 1998 from Mount Everest was studied and compared with other fresh snow samples collected in different seasons in this region. The results indicated that major species in precipitation were very low in late summer in Mount Everest region and may be representative of the background of precipitation chemistry of remote regions in the wold. Chemical Characteristics of fresh snow in different seasons had distinct differences and they may reflect different moist source and climatic status. The precipitation in August and September was mainly come from Indian summer monsoon and in April and May it was influenced deeply by the dust of semi-arid and arid regions in central Asia. This indicates the precipitation in this region is climatic sensitively.

  9. Mortality on Mount Everest, 1921-2006: descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firth, Paul G; Zheng, Hui; Windsor, Jeremy S; Sutherland, Andrew I; Imray, Christopher H; Moore, G W K; Semple, John L; Roach, Robert C; Salisbury, Richard A

    2008-12-11

    To examine patterns of mortality among climbers on Mount Everest over an 86 year period. Descriptive study. Climbing expeditions to Mount Everest, 1921-2006. 14,138 mountaineers; 8030 climbers and 6108 sherpas. Circumstances of deaths. The mortality rate among mountaineers above base camp was 1.3%. Deaths could be classified as involving trauma (objective hazards or falls, n=113), as non-traumatic (high altitude illness, hypothermia, or sudden death, n=52), or as a disappearance (body never found, n=27). During the spring climbing seasons from 1982 to 2006, 82.3% of deaths of climbers occurred during an attempt at reaching the summit. The death rate during all descents via standard routes was higher for climbers than for sherpas (2.7% (43/1585) v 0.4% (5/1231), PMount Everest. Profound fatigue and late times in reaching the summit are early features associated with subsequent death.

  10. Preparation of source mounts for 4π counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E.P.

    1991-01-01

    The 4πβ/γ counter in the ANSTO radioisotope standards laboratory at Lucas Heights constitutes part of the Australian national standard for radioactivity. Sources to be measured in the counter must be mounted on a substrate which is strong enough to withstand careful handling and transport. The substrate must also be electrically conducting to minimise counting errors caused by charging of the source, and it must have very low superficial density so that little or none of the radiation is absorbed. The entire process of fabrication of VYNS films, coating them with gold/palladium and transferring them to source mount rings, as carried out in the radioisotope standards laboratory, is documented. 3 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs

  11. Siting study for small platform-mounted industrial energy reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-07-01

    Utilizing an existing 313 MW(t) ship propulsion reactor design, a concept has been formulated for a floating platform-mounted nuclear plant and an evaluation has been made to determine reductions in construction time and cost achievable by repetitive platform construction in a shipyard. Concepts and estimates are presented for siting platform-mounted nuclear plants at the location of industrial facilities where the nuclear plants would furnish industrial process heat and/or electrical power. The representative industrial site designated for this study is considered typical of sites that might be used along the extensive network of navigable canals adjacent to the ocean and is similar to potential sites along the inland waterways of the United States

  12. Payload isolation and stabilization by a Suspended Experiment Mount (SEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Wayne L.; Desanctis, Carmine E.; Nicaise, Placide D.; Schultz, David N.

    1992-01-01

    Many Space Shuttle and Space Station payloads can benefit from isolation from crew or attitude control system disturbances. Preliminary studies have been performed for a Suspended Experiment Mount (SEM) system that will provide isolation from accelerations and stabilize the viewing direction of a payload. The concept consists of a flexible suspension system and payload-mounted control moment gyros. The suspension system, which is rigidly locked for ascent and descent, isolates the payload from high frequency disturbances. The control moment gyros stabilize the payload orientation. The SEM will be useful for payloads that require a lower-g environment than a manned vehicle can provide, such as materials processing, and for payloads that require stabilization of pointing direction, but not large angle slewing, such as nadir-viewing earth observation or solar viewing payloads.

  13. Righteousness and identity formation in the Sermon on the Mount

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francois P. Viljoen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Righteousness is an important term in the first gospel and has a significant concentration in the Sermon on the Mount. The argument in this article is that the first gospel has a community building function. Matthew intentionally uses the word ‘righteousness’ in the Sermon on the Mount as an instrument to define the identity of his community. Though righteousness can be used in a soteriological sense, it is argued that Matthew mainly uses it in an ethical sense. By righteousness Matthew refers to the proper behavioural norms and attitudes for his community. Commitment to Jesus forms the central focus of the community’s identity. Their discipleship is demonstrated by doing the will of God as defined and interpreted by Jesus. Doing the will of God in such a manner is what Matthew regards as the distinguishing mark of this community. Thus they would surpass the righteousness of the scribes and Pharisees.

  14. Fluorescent visualization of macromolecules in Drosophila whole mounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Ricardo Guelerman Pinheiro; Machado, Luciana Claudia Herculano; Moda, Livia Maria Rosatto

    2010-01-01

    The ability to determine the expression dynamics of individual genes "in situ" by visualizing the precise spatial and temporal distribution of their products in whole mounts by histochemical and immunocytochemical reactions has revolutionized our understanding of cellular processes. Drosophila developmental genetics was one of the fields that benefited most from these technologies, and a variety of fluorescent methods were specifically designed for investigating the localization of developmentally important proteins and cell markers during embryonic and post embryonic stages of this model organism. In this chapter we present detailed protocols for fluorescence immunocytochemistry of whole mount embryos, imaginal discs, pupal retinas, and salivary glands of Drosophila melanogaster, as well as methods for fluorescent visualization of specific subcellular structures in these tissues.

  15. Apparatus for mounting photovoltaic power generating systems on buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Miles C [Lincoln, MA

    2009-08-18

    Rectangular photovoltaic (PV) modules are mounted on a building roof by mounting stands that are distributed in rows and columns. Each stand comprises a base plate and first and second different height brackets attached to opposite ends of the base plate. Each first and second bracket comprises two module-support members. One end of each module is pivotally attached to and supported by a first module-support member of a first bracket and a second module-support member of another first bracket. At its other end each module rests on but is connected by flexible tethers to module-support members of two different second brackets. The tethers are sized to allow the modules to pivot up away from the module-support members on which they rest to a substantially horizontal position in response to wind uplift forces.

  16. High thermal load component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuse, Toshiaki; Tachikawa, Nobuo.

    1996-01-01

    A cooling tube made of a pure copper is connected to the inner portion of an armour (heat resistant member) made of an anisotropic carbon/carbon composite (CFC) material. The CFC material has a high heat conductivity in longitudinal direction of fibers and has low conductivity in perpendicular thereto. Fibers extending in the armour from a heat receiving surface just above the cooling tube are directly connected to the cooling tube. A portion of the fibers extending from a heat receiving surface other than portions not just above the cooling tube is directly bonded to the cooling tube. Remaining fibers are disposed so as to surround the cooling tube. The armour and the cooling tube are soldered using an active metal flux. With such procedures, high thermal load components for use in a thermonuclear reactor are formed, which are excellent in a heat removing characteristic and hardly causes defects such as crackings and peeling. (I.N.)

  17. Astronaut Susan J. Helms Mounts a Videao Camera in Zarya

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Astronaut Susan J. Helms, Expedition Two flight engineer, mounts a video camera onto a bracket in the Russian Zarya or Functional Cargo Block (FGB) of the International Space Station (ISS). Launched by a Russian Proton rocket from the Baikonu Cosmodrome on November 20, 1998, the Unites States-funded and Russian-built Zarya was the first element of the ISS, followed by the U.S. Unity Node.

  18. Urban Combat: Is the Mounted Force Prepared to Contribute

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Asia with brigade and higher level commanders focusing on these operations.ś Future threats will operate from urban terrain in order to negate US...operations in urban terrain.103 "MOUT is expected to be the future battlefield in Europe and Asia with brigade and higher level commanders focusing...Approved for Public Release; Distribution is Unlimited Urban Combat: Is the Mounted Force Prepared to Contribute? A Monograph by Major Scott T

  19. The impact of global warming on Mount Everest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, G W K; Semple, John L

    2009-01-01

    Global warming impacts a wide range of human activities and ecosystems. One unanticipated consequence of the warming is an increase in barometric pressure throughout the troposphere. Mount Everest's extreme height and resulting low barometric pressure places humans near its summit in an extreme state of hypoxia. Here we quantify the degree with which this warming is increasing the barometric pressure near Everest's summit and argue that it is of such a magnitude as to make the mountain, over time, easier to climb.

  20. Method to mount defect fuel elements i transport casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgers, H.; Deleryd, R.

    1996-01-01

    Leaching or otherwise failed fuel elements are mounted in special containers that fit into specially designed chambers in a transportation cask for transport to reprocessing or long-time storage. The fuel elements are entered into the container under water in a pool. The interior of the container is dried before transfer to the cask. Before closing the cask, its interior, and the exterior of the container are dried. 2 figs