WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface moisture measurement

  1. Surface Moisture Measurement System Operation and Maintenance Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, G.A.; Pearce, K.L.; Stokes, T.L.

    1995-12-01

    This operations and maintenance manual addresses deployment, equipment and field hazards, operating instructions, calibration verification, removal, maintenance, and other pertinent information necessary to safely operate and store the Surface Moisture Measurement System (SMMS) and Liquid Observation Well Moisture Measurement System (LOWMMS). These systems were developed primarily in support of Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Safety Programs for moisture measurement in organic and ferrocyanide watch list tanks

  2. Mapping surface soil moisture with L-band radiometric measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, James R.; Shiue, James C.; Schmugge, Thomas J.; Engman, Edwin T.

    1989-01-01

    A NASA C-130 airborne remote sensing aircraft was used to obtain four-beam pushbroom microwave radiometric measurements over two small Kansas tall-grass prairie region watersheds, during a dry-down period after heavy rainfall in May and June, 1987. While one of the watersheds had been burned 2 months before these measurements, the other had not been burned for over a year. Surface soil-moisture data were collected at the time of the aircraft measurements and correlated with the corresponding radiometric measurements, establishing a relationship for surface soil-moisture mapping. Radiometric sensitivity to soil moisture variation is higher in the burned than in the unburned watershed; surface soil moisture loss is also faster in the burned watershed.

  3. Surface moisture measurement system hardware acceptance test report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, G.A., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-28

    This document summarizes the results of the hardware acceptance test for the Surface Moisture Measurement System (SMMS). This test verified that the mechanical and electrical features of the SMMS functioned as designed and that the unit is ready for field service. The bulk of hardware testing was performed at the 306E Facility in the 300 Area and the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility in the 400 Area. The SMMS was developed primarily in support of Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Safety Programs for moisture measurement in organic and ferrocyanide watch list tanks.

  4. System design description for surface moisture measurement system (SMMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargo, G.F.

    1996-09-23

    The SMMS has been developed to measure moisture in the top few centimeters of tank waste. The SMMS development was initiated by the preliminary findings of SAR-033, and does not necessarily fulfill any established DQO. After the SAR-033 is released, if no significant changes are made, moisture measurements in the organic waste tanks will rapidly become a DQO. The SMMS was designed to be installed in any 4 inch or larger riser, and to allow maximum adjustability for riser lengths, and is used to deploy a sensor package on the waste surface within a 6 foot radius about the azimuth. The first sensor package will be a neutron probe.

  5. Surface moisture measurement system hardware acceptance test procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, G.A.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this acceptance test procedure is to verify that the mechanical and electrical features of the Surface Moisture Measurement System are operating as designed and that the unit is ready for field service. This procedure will be used in conjunction with a software acceptance test procedure, which addresses testing of software and electrical features not addressed in this document. Hardware testing will be performed at the 306E Facility in the 300 Area and the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility in the 400 Area. These systems were developed primarily in support of Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Safety Programs for moisture measurement in organic and ferrocyanide watch list tanks

  6. Measuring and modeling the effect of surface moisture on the spectral reflectance of coastal beach sand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nolet, Corjan; Poortinga, Ate; Roosjen, Peter; Bartholomeus, Harm; Ruessink, Gerben|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/169093360

    2014-01-01

    Surface moisture is an important supply limiting factor for aeolian sand transport, which is the primary driver of coastal dune development. As such, it is critical to account for the control of surface moisture on available sand for dune building. Optical remote sensing has the potential to measure

  7. The Utility of Using a Near-Infrared (NIR) Camera to Measure Beach Surface Moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, S.; Schmutz, P. P.

    2017-12-01

    Surface moisture content is an important factor that must be considered when studying aeolian sediment transport in a beach environment. A few different instruments and procedures are available for measuring surface moisture content (i.e. moisture probes, LiDAR, and gravimetric moisture data from surface scrapings); however, these methods can be inaccurate, costly, and inapplicable, particularly in the field. Near-infrared (NIR) spectral band imagery is another technique used to obtain moisture data. NIR imagery has been predominately used through remote sensing and has yet to be used for ground-based measurements. Dry sand reflects infrared radiation given off by the sun and wet sand absorbs IR radiation. All things considered, this study assesses the utility of measuring surface moisture content of beach sand with a modified NIR camera. A traditional point and shoot digital camera was internally modified with the placement of a visible light-blocking filter. Images were taken of three different types of beach sand at controlled moisture content values, with sunlight as the source of infrared radiation. A technique was established through trial and error by comparing resultant histogram values using Adobe Photoshop with the various moisture conditions. The resultant IR absorption histogram values were calibrated to actual gravimetric moisture content from surface scrapings of the samples. Overall, the results illustrate that the NIR spectrum modified camera does not provide the ability to adequately measure beach surface moisture content. However, there were noted differences in IR absorption histogram values among the different sediment types. Sediment with darker quartz mineralogy provided larger variations in histogram values, but the technique is not sensitive enough to accurately represent low moisture percentages, which are of most importance when studying aeolian sediment transport.

  8. Using a terrestrial laser scanner to measure spatiotemporal surface moisture dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Y.; Donker, J.; Ruessink, G.

    2017-12-01

    A terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) is an active remote sensing technique that utilizes the round trip time of an emitted laser beam to provide the range between the laser scanner and the backscattering object. It is routinely used for topographic mapping, forest measurements or 3D city models since it derives useful object representations by means of a dense three-dimensional (3D) point cloud. Here, we present a novel application using the returned intensity of the emitted beam to detect surface moisture with the RIEGL VZ-400. Because this TLS operates at a wavelength near a water absorption band (1550 nm), reflectance is an accurate parameter to measure surface moisture over its full range. Five days of intensive laser scanning were performed on a Dutch beach to illustrate the applicability of the TLS. Concurrent gravimetric surface moisture samples were collected to calibrate the relation between reflectance and surface moisture. Results reveal the reflectance output is a robust parameter to measure surface moisture from the thin upper layer over its full range from 0% to 25%. The obtained calibration curve of the presented TLS, describing the relationship between reflectance and surface moisture, has a root-mean-square error of 2.7% and a correlation coefficient squared of 0.85. This relation holds to about 60 m from the TLS. Within this distance the TLS typically produces O(10^6-10^7) data points, which we averaged into surface moisture maps with a 1 x 1 m resolution. This grid size largely removes small moisture disturbances induced by, for example, footprints or tire tracks, while retaining larger scale trends. Concluding, TLS (RIEGL-VZ 400) is a highly suited technique to accurately and robustly measure spatiotemporal surface moisture variations on a coastal beach with high spatial ( 1 x 1 m) and temporal ( 15-30min.) resolution.

  9. Regional-scale estimates of surface moisture availability and thermal inertia using remote thermal measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, T. N.

    1986-01-01

    A review is presented of numerical models which were developed to interpret thermal IR data and to identify the governing parameters and surface energy fluxes recorded in the images. Analytic, predictive, diagnostic and empirical models are described. The limitations of each type of modeling approach are explored in terms of the error sources and inherent constraints due to theoretical or measurement limitations. Sample results of regional-scale soil moisture or evaporation patterns derived from the Heat Capacity Mapping Mission and GOES satellite data through application of the predictive model devised by Carlson (1981) are discussed. The analysis indicates that pattern recognition will probably be highest when data are collected over flat, arid, sparsely vegetated terrain. The soil moisture data then obtained may be accurate to within 10-20 percent.

  10. Downscaling of Surface Soil Moisture Retrieval by Combining MODIS/Landsat and In Situ Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenyang Xu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Soil moisture, especially surface soil moisture (SSM, plays an important role in the development of various natural hazards that result from extreme weather events such as drought, flooding, and landslides. There have been many remote sensing methods for soil moisture retrieval based on microwave or optical thermal infrared (TIR measurements. TIR remote sensing has been popular for SSM retrieval due to its fine spatial and temporal resolutions. However, because of limitations in the penetration of optical TIR radiation and cloud cover, TIR methods can only be used under clear sky conditions. Microwave SSM retrieval is based on solid physical principles, and has advantages in cases of cloud cover, but it has low spatial resolution. For applications at the local scale, SSM data at high spatial and temporal resolutions are important, especially for agricultural management and decision support systems. Current remote sensing measurements usually have either a high spatial resolution or a high temporal resolution, but not both. This study aims to retrieve SSM at both high spatial and temporal resolutions through the fusion of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS and Land Remote Sensing Satellite (Landsat data. Based on the universal triangle trapezoid, this study investigated the relationship between land surface temperature (LST and the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI under different soil moisture conditions to construct an improved nonlinear model for SSM retrieval with LST and NDVI. A case study was conducted in Iowa, in the United States (USA (Lat: 42.2°~42.7°, Lon: −93.6°~−93.2°, from 1 May 2016 to 31 August 2016. Daily SSM in an agricultural area during the crop-growing season was downscaled to 120-m spatial resolution by fusing Landsat 8 with MODIS, with an R2 of 0.5766, and RMSE from 0.0302 to 0.1124 m3/m3.

  11. Microwave emission measurements of sea surface roughness, soil moisture, and sea ice structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloersen, P.; Wilheit, T. T.; Schmugge, T. J.

    1972-01-01

    In order to demonstrate the feasibility of the microwave radiometers to be carried aboard the Nimbus 5 and 6 satellites and proposed for one of the earth observatory satellites, remote measurements of microwave radiation at wavelengths ranging from 0.8 to 21 cm have been made of a variety of the earth's surfaces from the NASA CV-990 A/C. Brightness temperatures of sea water surfaces of varying roughness, of terrain with varying soil moisture, and of sea ice of varying structure were observed. In each case, around truth information was available for correlation with the microwave brightness temperature. The utility of passive microwave radiometry in determining ocean surface wind speeds, at least for values higher than 7 meters/second has been demonstrated. In addition, it was shown that radiometric signatures can be used to determine soil moisture in unvegetated terrain to within five percentage points by weight. Finally, it was demonstrated that first year thick, multi-year, and first year thin sea ice can be distinguished by observing their differing microwave emissivities at various wavelengths.

  12. In-situ soil composition and moisture measurement by surface neutron activation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, C.; Smith, C.; Marks, A.

    2009-04-01

    Neutron activation analysis is widely known as a laboratory technique dependent upon a nuclear reactor to provide the neutron flux and capable of precise elemental analysis. Less well known in-situ geochemical analysis is possible with isotopic (252Cf & 241Am) or compact accelerator (D-T, D-D fusion reaction) neutron sources. Prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) geophysical borehole logging has been applied to mining issues for >15 years (CSIRO) using isotopic neutron sources and more recently to environmental and hydro-geological applications by ANSTO. Similarly, sophisticated geophysical borehole logging equipment based on inelastic neutron scattering (INS) has been applied in the oil and gas industry by large oilfield services companies to measure oil saturation indices (carbon/oxygen) using accelerator neutron sources. Recent advances in scintillation detector spectral performance has enabled improved precision and detection limits for elements likely to be present in soil profiles (H, Si, Al, Fe, Cl) and possible detection of many minor to trace elements if sufficiently abundant (Na, K, Mg, Ca, S, N, + ). To measure carbon an accelerator neutron source is required to provide fast neutrons above 4.8 MeV. CSIRO and ANSTO propose building a soil geochemical analysis system based on experience gained from building and applying PGNA borehole logging equipment. A soil geochemical analysis system could effectively map the 2D geochemical composition of the top 50cm of soil by dragging the 1D logging equipment across the ground surface. Substituting an isotopic neutron source for a D-T accelerator neutron source would enable the additional measurement of elemental carbon. Many potential ambiguities with other geophysical proxies for soil moisture may be resolved by direct geochemical measurement of H. Many other applications may be possible including time series in-situ measurements of soil moisture for differential drainage, hydrology, land surface

  13. Land surface model performance using cosmic-ray and point-scale soil moisture measurements for calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Iwema

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available At very high resolution scale (i.e. grid cells of 1 km2, land surface model parameters can be calibrated with eddy-covariance flux data and point-scale soil moisture data. However, measurement scales of eddy-covariance and point-scale data differ substantially. In our study, we investigated the impact of reducing the scale mismatch between surface energy flux and soil moisture observations by replacing point-scale soil moisture data with observations derived from Cosmic-Ray Neutron Sensors (CRNSs made at larger spatial scales. Five soil and evapotranspiration parameters of the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES were calibrated against point-scale and Cosmic-Ray Neutron Sensor soil moisture data separately. We calibrated the model for 12 sites in the USA representing a range of climatic, soil, and vegetation conditions. The improvement in latent heat flux estimation for the two calibration solutions was assessed by comparison to eddy-covariance flux data and to JULES simulations with default parameter values. Calibrations against the two soil moisture products alone did show an advantage for the cosmic-ray technique. However, further analyses of two-objective calibrations with soil moisture and latent heat flux showed no substantial differences between both calibration strategies. This was mainly caused by the limited effect of calibrating soil parameters on soil moisture dynamics and surface energy fluxes. Other factors that played a role were limited spatial variability in surface fluxes implied by soil moisture spatio-temporal stability, and data quality issues.

  14. Determination of land surface temperature and soil moisture from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission/Microwave Imager remote sensing data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wen, J.; Su, Z.; Ma, Y.

    2003-01-01

    An analytical algorithm for the determination of land surface temperature and soil moisture from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission/Microwave Imager (TRMM/TMI) remote sensing data has been developed in this study. The error analyses indicate that the uncertainties of the enrolled parameters

  15. Monitoring hillslope moisture dynamics with surface ERT for enhancing spatial significance of hydrometric point measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübner, R.; Heller, K.; Günther, T.; Kleber, A.

    2015-01-01

    Besides floodplains, hillslopes are basic units that mainly control water movement and flow pathways within catchments of subdued mountain ranges. The structure of their shallow subsurface affects water balance, e.g. infiltration, retention, and runoff. Nevertheless, there is still a gap in the knowledge of the hydrological dynamics on hillslopes, notably due to the lack of generalization and transferability. This study presents a robust multi-method framework of electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) in addition to hydrometric point measurements, transferring hydrometric data into higher spatial scales to obtain additional patterns of distribution and dynamics of soil moisture on a hillslope. A geoelectrical monitoring in a small catchment in the eastern Ore Mountains was carried out at weekly intervals from May to December 2008 to image seasonal moisture dynamics on the hillslope scale. To link water content and electrical resistivity, the parameters of Archie's law were determined using different core samples. To optimize inversion parameters and methods, the derived spatial and temporal water content distribution was compared to tensiometer data. The results from ERT measurements show a strong correlation with the hydrometric data. The response is congruent to the soil tension data. Water content calculated from the ERT profile shows similar variations as that of water content from soil moisture sensors. Consequently, soil moisture dynamics on the hillslope scale may be determined not only by expensive invasive punctual hydrometric measurements, but also by minimally invasive time-lapse ERT, provided that pedo-/petrophysical relationships are known. Since ERT integrates larger spatial scales, a combination with hydrometric point measurements improves the understanding of the ongoing hydrological processes and better suits identification of heterogeneities.

  16. EDITORIAL: Microwave Moisture Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaatze, Udo; Kupfer, Klaus; Hübner, Christof

    2007-04-01

    Microwave moisture measurements refer to a methodology by which the water content of materials is non-invasively determined using electromagnetic fields of radio and microwave frequencies. Being the omnipresent liquid on our planet, water occurs as a component in most materials and often exercises a significant influence on their properties. Precise measurements of the water content are thus extremely useful in pure sciences, particularly in biochemistry and biophysics. They are likewise important in many agricultural, technical and industrial fields. Applications are broad and diverse, and include the quality assessment of foodstuffs, the determination of water content in paper, cardboard and textile production, the monitoring of moisture in sands, gravels, soils and constructions, as well as the measurement of water admixtures to coal and crude oil in reservoirs and in pipelines. Microwave moisture measurements and evaluations require insights in various disciplines, such as materials science, dielectrics, the physical chemistry of water, electrodynamics and microwave techniques. The cooperation of experts from the different fields of science is thus necessary for the efficient development of this complex discipline. In order to advance cooperation the Workshop on Electromagnetic Wave Interaction with Water and Moist Substances was held in 1993 in Atlanta. It initiated a series of international conferences, of which the last one was held in 2005 in Weimar. The meeting brought together 130 scientists and engineers from all over the world. This special issue presents a collection of some selected papers that were given at the event. The papers cover most topics of the conference, featuring dielectric properties of aqueous materials, electromagnetic wave interactions, measurement methods and sensors, and various applications. The special issue is dedicated to Dr Andrzej W Kraszewski, who died in July 2006 after a distinguished career of 48 years in the research of

  17. Assessment of the SMAP Level-4 Surface and Root-Zone Soil Moisture Product Using In Situ Measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reichle, Rolf H.; De Lannoy, Gabrielle J. M.; Liu, Qing; Ardizzone, Joseph V.; Colliander, Andreas; Conaty, Austin; Crow, Wade; Jackson, Thomas J.; Jones, Lucas A.; Kimball, John S.; Koster, Randal D.; Mahanama, Sarith P.; Smith, Edmond B.; Berg, Aaron; Bircher, Simone; Bosch, David; Caldwell, Todd G.; Cosh, Michael; Holifield Collins, Chandra D.; Jensen, Karsten H.; Livingston, Stan; Lopez-baeza, Ernesto; Martínez-fernández, José; Mcnairn, Heather; Moghaddam, Mahta; Pacheco, Anna; Pellarin, Thierry; Prueger, John; Rowlandson, Tracy; Seyfried, Mark; Starks, Patrick; Su, Bob; Thibeault, Marc; Van Der Velde, Rogier; Walker, Jeffrey; Wu, Xiaoling; Zeng, Yijian

    2017-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission Level-4 Surface and Root-Zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) data product is generated by assimilating SMAP L-band brightness temperature observations into the NASA Catchment land surface model. The L4_SM product is available from 31 March 2015 to present

  18. Moisture content measurement in paddy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klomklao, P.; Kuntinugunetanon, S.; Wongkokua, W.

    2017-09-01

    Moisture content is an important quantity for agriculture product, especially in paddy. In principle, the moisture content can be measured by a gravimetric method which is a direct method. However, the gravimetric method is time-consuming. There are indirect methods such as resistance and capacitance methods. In this work, we developed an indirect method based on a 555 integrated circuit timer. The moisture content sensor was capacitive parallel plates using the dielectric constant property of the moisture. The instrument generated the output frequency that depended on the capacitance of the sensor. We fitted a linear relation between periods and moisture contents. The measurement results have a standard uncertainty of 1.23 % of the moisture content in the range of 14 % to 20 %.

  19. A COUPLED LAND-SURFACE AND DRY DEPOSITION MODEL AND COMPARISON TO FIELD MEASUREMENTS OF SURFACE HEAT, MOISTURE, AND OZONE FLUXES

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have developed a coupled land-surface and dry deposition model for realistic treatment of surface fluxes of heat, moisture, and chemical dry deposition within a comprehensive air quality modeling system. A new land-surface model (LSM) with explicit treatment of soil moisture...

  20. Neutron moisture measurement in materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thony, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    This method is generally used for soil moisture determination but also for moisture in building materials. After a review of neutron interaction with matter (elastic and inelastic scattering, radiative capture and absorption with emission of charged particles) and of the equipment (source, detector and counting), gravimetric and chemical calibration are described and accuracy of measurement is discussed. 5 refs [fr

  1. Moisture monitoring in waste disposal surface barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandelik, Alex; Huebner, Christof

    2003-05-01

    Surface barriers for waste disposal sites should prevent waste water and gas emission into the environment. It is necessary to assess their proper operation by monitoring the water regime of the containment. A set of three new water content measuring devices has been developed that provide an economical solution for monitoring the moisture distribution and water dynamic. They will give an early warning service if the barrier system is at risk of being damaged. The cryo soil moisture sensor 'LUMBRICUS' is an in situ self-calibrating absolute water content measuring device. It measures moisture profiles at spot locations down to 2.5 m depth with an accuracy of better than 1.5% and a depth resolution of 0.03 m. The sensor inherently measures density changes and initial cracks of shrinking materials like clay minerals. The large area soil moisture sensor 'TAUPE' is a moisture sensitive electric cable network to be buried in the mineral barrier material of the cover. A report will be given with results and experiences on an exemplary installation at the Waste Disposal Facility Karlsruhe-West. 800 m2 of the barrier construction have been continuously monitored since December 1997. Volumetric water content differences of 1.5% have been detected and localised within 4 m. This device is already installed in two other waste disposal sites. A modified 'TAUPE' was constructed for the control of tunnels and river dams as well. Thin sheet moisture sensor 'FORMI' is specifically designed for moisture measurements in liners like bentonite, textile and plastic. Due to its flexibility it follows the curvature of the liner. The sensor measures independently from neighbouring materials and can be matched to a wide range of different thickness of the material. The sensors are patented in several countries.

  2. The international soil moisture network: A data hosting facility for global in situ soil moisture measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    In situ measurements of soil moisture are invaluable for calibrating and validating land surface models and satellite-based soil moisture retrievals. In addition, long-term time series of in situ soil moisture measurements themselves can reveal trends in the water cycle related to climate or land co...

  3. Implementing a physical soil water flow model with minimal soil characteristics and added value offered by surface soil moisture measurements assimilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanzy, André

    2010-05-01

    climatic data. The strategy takes profit of all work made on soil texture as a proxi of soil hydraulic through pedotransfer functions. It also takes into account the constraints in soil moisture variations after important precipitation events. Performances on soil moisture are assessed by considering both the soil moisture accuracy and the ability of detecting a soil moisture threshold. o The added value of soil moisture measurements. The aim is to evaluate to which extent we can improve soil moisture simulations by assimilating a few soil moisture measurements made in the surface layer (ploughed layers). We focus on such a layer since moisture can be derived from remote sensing observations or by using in situ sensors (capacitance sensor, TDR) with minimal effort. The validity of such measurements to represent the soil moisture at the field scale is analysed. It is shown that relative variations in soil moisture are much easier to obtain than an absolute characterisation of the soil moisture measurements. We evaluate the value of assimilating surface measurement in the TEC model and how we can deal with a measurement of relative soil moisture variations (in order to prevent a tedious calibration process). Again the performances of the approach are evaluated with the soil moisture accuracy and the ability of detecting a soil moisture threshold.

  4. Assimilating the Cosmic-Ray Soil Moisture Observing System Measurements for Land Surface Hydrologic Model Parameter Estimation Using the Ensemble Kalman Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, D.; Shi, Y.; Li, L.

    2015-12-01

    Parameter estimation is generally required for land surface models (LSMs) and hydrologic models to reproduce observed water and energy fluxes in different watersheds. Using soil moisture observations for parameter estimation in addition to discharge and land surface temperature observations can improve the prediction of land surface and subsurface processes. Due to their representativity, point measurements cannot capture the watershed-scale soil moisture conditions and may lead to notable bias in watershed soil moisture predictions if used for model calibration. The intermediate-scale cosmic-ray soil moisture observing system (COSMOS) provides average soil water content measurement over a footprint of 0.34 m2 and depths up to 50 cm, and may provide better calibration data for low-order watersheds. In this study, we will test using COSMOS observations for Flux-PIHM parameter and state estimation via the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF). Flux-PIHM is a physically-based land surface hydrologic model that couples the Penn State Integrated Hydrologic Model (PIHM) with the Noah land surface model. Synthetic data experiments will be performed at the Shale Hills watershed (area: 0.08 km2, smaller than COSMOS footprint) and the Garner Run watershed (1.34 km2, larger than COSMOS footprint) in the Shale Hills Susquehanna Critical Zone Observatory in central Pennsylvania. COSMOS observations will be assimilated into Flux-PIHM using the EnKF, in addition to discharge and land surface temperature (LST) observations. The accuracy of EnKF estimated parameters and water and energy flux predictions will be evaluated. In addition, the results will be compared with assimilating point soil moisture measurement (in addition to discharge and LST), to assess the effects of using different scales of soil moisture observations for parameter estimation. The results at Shale Hills and Garner Run will be compared to test whether performance of COSMOS data assimilation is affected by the size of

  5. Surface moisture estimation in urban areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yitong

    Surface moisture is an important parameter because it modifies urban microclimate and surface layer meteorology. The primary objectives of this paper are: 1) to analyze the impact of surface roughness from buildings on surface moisture in urban areas; and 2) to quantify the impact of surface roughness resulting from urban trees on surface moisture. To achieve the objectives, two hypotheses were tested: 1) the distribution of surface moisture is associated with the structural complexity of buildings in urban areas; and 2) The distribution and change of surface moisture is associated with the distribution and vigor of urban trees. The study area is Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. In the part of the morphology of urban trees, Warren Township was selected due to the limitation of tree inventory data. To test the hypotheses, the research design was made to extract the aerodynamic parameters, such as frontal areas, roughness length and displacement height of buildings and trees from Terrestrial and Airborne LiDAR data, then to input the aerodynamic parameters into the urban surface energy balance model. The methodology was developed for comparing the impact of aerodynamic parameters from LiDAR data with the parameters that were derived empirically from land use and land cover data. The analytical procedures are discussed below: 1) to capture the spatial and temporal variation of surface moisture, daily and hourly Land Surface Temperature (LST) were downscaled from 4 km to 1 km, and 960 m to 30 m, respectively, by regression between LST and various components that impact LST; 2) to estimate surface moisture, namely soil moisture and evapotranspiration (ET), land surfaces were classified into soil, vegetation, and impervious surfaces, using Linear Spectral Mixture Analysis (LSMA); 3) aerodynamic parameters of buildings and trees were extracted from Airborne and Terrestrial LiDAR data; 4) the Temperature-Vegetation-Index (TVX) method, and the Two-Source-Energy-Balance (TSEB

  6. Development of the neutron technology for measuring the moisture content in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jingwu; Liu Shengkang; Zhang Zhiping

    2011-01-01

    According to measuring mode (in-hopper, surface, sampling neutron moisture gauge), the development and application of neutron moisture gauge in china were introduced, which include the following course from only measuring moisture content of soil to monitoring moisture content of farmland and saving water for irrigating farmland, from measuring moisture content of pellet to coke and coal material, from only measuring moisture content to computerized neutron moisture gauges with density compensation and o f high precision. (authors)

  7. Measurement of soil moisture using gypsum blocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis Dela, B.

    For the past 50 years, gypsum blocks have been used to determine soil moisture content. This report describes a method for calibrating gypsum blocks for soil moisture measurements. Moisture conditions inside a building are strongly influenced by the moisture conditions in the soil surrounding...... the building. Consequently, measuring the moisture of the surrounding soil is of great importance for detecting the source of moisture in a building. Up till now, information has been needed to carry out individual calibrations for the different types of gypsum blocks available on the market and to account...

  8. Predicting root zone soil moisture with satellite near-surface moisture data in semiarid environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfreda, S.; Baldwin, D. C.; Keller, K.; Smithwick, E. A. H.; Caylor, K. K.

    2015-12-01

    One of the most critical variables in semiarid environment is the soil water content that represents a controlling factor for both ecological and hydrological processes. Soil moisture monitoring over large scales may be extremely useful, but it is limited by the fact that most of the available tools provides only surface measurements not representative of the effective amount of water stored in the subsurface. Therefore, a methodology able to infer root-zone soil moisture starting from surface measurements is highly desirable. Recently a new simplified formulation has been introduced to provide a formal description of the mathematical relationship between surface measurements and root-zone soil moisture (Manfreda et al., HESS 2014). This is a physically based approach derived from the soil water balance equation, where different soil water loss functions have been explored in order to take into account for the non-linear processes governing soil water fluxes. The study highlighted that the soil loss function is the key for such relationship that is therefore strongly influenced by soil type and physiological plant types. The new formulation has been tested on soil moisture based on measurements taken from the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) and the Soil Climate Analysis Network (SCAN) databases. The method sheds lights on the physical controls for soil moisture dynamics and on the possibility to use such a simplified method for the description of root-zone soil moisture. Furthermore, the method has been also couple with an Enasamble Kalman Filter (EnKF) in order to optimize its performances for the large scale monitoring based the new satellite near-surface moisture data (SMAP). The optimized SMAR-EnKF model does well in both wet and dry climates and across many different soil types (51 SCAN locations) providing a strategy for real-time soil moisture monitoring.

  9. Multiscale soil moisture measurement for mapping surface runoff generation on torrential headwater catchments (Draix-Bléone field observatory, South Alps, France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florian, Mallet; Vincent, Marc; Johnny, Douvinet; Philippe, Rossello; Bouteiller Caroline, Le; Jean-Philippe, Malet; Julien, Gance

    2015-04-01

    soilwater flow of from the surface to - 30 cm. Another distributed approach will be carried out from a measurement of cosmic neutrons mitigation (Cosmic ray sensor) to estimate a soil moisture averaged value over 40 ha (Zreda et al., 2012). Finally, the smallest scale (slope and catchment) will be approached using remote sensing with a drone and/or satellite imagery (IR, passive and active microwave). This concatenation of scales with different combinations of time steps should enable us to better understand the hydrological dynamics in torrential environments. It aims at mapping the stormflow generation on a catchment at the flood scale and defining the main determinants of surface runoff. These results may contribute to the improvement of runoff simulation and flood prediction. References : Uhlenbrook S., J.J. McDonnell and C. Leibundgut, 2003. Preface: Runoff generation implications for river basin modelling. Hydrological Processes, Special Issue, 17: 197-198. Andrew W. Western, Sen-Lin Zhou, Rodger B. Grayson, Thomas A. MacMahon, Günter Blöshl, David J. Wilson, 2004. Spatial correlation of soil moisture in small catchments and its relationship to dominant spatial hydrological processes. Journal of Hydrology 286. Zreda, M., Shuttleworth WJ., Zeng X., Zweck C., Desilets D., Franz TE. et al., 2012. COSMOS: the COsmic-ray Soil Moisture Observing System. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 16(11): 4079-4099.

  10. Atmospheric moisture's influence on fire behavior: surface moisture and plume dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian E. Potter; Joseph J. Charney; Lesley A. Fusina

    2006-01-01

    Nine measures of atmospheric surface moisture are tested for statistical relationships with fire size and number of fires using data from the Great Lakes region of the United States. The measures include relative humidity, water vapor mixing ratio, mixing ratio deficit, vapor pressure, vapor pressure deficit, dew point temperature, dew point depression, wet bulb...

  11. CLPX-Ground: ISA Soil Moisture Measurements

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set consists of in-situ point measurements of soil moisture within three 25-km by 25-km Meso-cell Study Areas (MSAs) in northern Colorado (Fraser, North...

  12. Challenges in measuring moisture content of feeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiex, N; Richardson, C R

    2003-12-01

    Accurate determination of the moisture (water) content in individual feed ingredients and mixed feeds is critical throughout the feed industry. Most analytical methods used to determine apparent water content of feedstuffs are empirical, estimating water by evaporation and loss of weight on drying (oven drying methods). These methods differ greatly in effectiveness, resulting in bias. Bias associated with measuring the water content of feedstuffs is a concern not only because of the lack of confidence in the moisture value itself, but also because moisture determinations affect accurate quantification and expression of other nutrient values. Methods for determining moisture in feeds have frequently been borrowed from the cereal, forage, or other applications without validating the extension of the method. Methods such as Karl Fischer titration measure water by direct comparison to a calibration standard for water and can be used as reference methods for the evaluation of empirical methods. The objective of this paper is to review methods for determining moisture, review comparisons among moisture methods for various feedstuffs, make recommendations for a reference method, and make general recommendations toward improving the results of moisture testing. The need to evaluate and improve moisture methods and standardize practices in laboratories is evident from this study. It also is evident that the methods appropriate for a specific feed ingredient or feed should not be extended to all feeds without proper validation to the new matrices. Part of the validation for empirical methods should be comparison to Karl Fischer or other the direct methods. It also is recommended that the results obtained using oven methods not be termed "moisture;" rather, they should be termed "loss on drying," and the drying conditions should become part of the term.

  13. Measurement of heat and moisture exchanger efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, M

    2013-09-01

    Deciding between a passive heat and moisture exchanger or active humidification depends upon the level of humidification that either will deliver. Published international standards dictate that active humidifiers should deliver a minimum humidity of 33 mg.l(-1); however, no such requirement exists, for heat and moisture exchangers. Anaesthetists instead have to rely on information provided by manufacturers, which may not allow comparison of different devices and their clinical effectiveness. I suggest that measurement of humidification efficiency, being the percentage moisture returned and determined by measuring the temperature of the respired gases, should be mandated, and report a modification of the standard method that will allow this to be easily measured. In this study, different types of heat and moisture exchangers for adults, children and patients with a tracheostomy were tested. Adult and paediatric models lost between 6.5 mg.l(-1) and 8.5 mg.l(-1) moisture (corresponding to an efficiency of around 80%); however, the models designed for patients with a tracheostomy lost between 16 mg.l(-1) and 18 mg.l(-1) (60% efficiency). I propose that all heat and moisture exchangers should be tested in this manner and percentage efficiency reported to allow an informed choice between different types and models. © 2013 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  14. Opto-thermal moisture content and moisture depth profile measurements in organic materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xiao, P.; Guo, X.; Cui, Y.Y.; Imhof, R.; Bicanic, D.D.

    2004-01-01

    Opto-thermal transient emission radiometry(OTTER) is a infrared remote sensing technique, which has been successfully used in in vivo skin moisture content and skin moisture depth profiling measurements.In present paper, we extend this moisture content measurement capability to analyze the moisture

  15. Overview of soil moisture measurements with neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Aagje; Steele-Dunne, Susan; van de Giesen, Nick

    2014-05-01

    Soil moisture measurements are useful for hydrological and agricultural applications. Soil moisture can be measured with a range of in-situ sensors in the soil, such as probes based on the difference in dielectric permittivity of wet and dry soil. At a large scale of tenths of kilometres, soil moisture can be measured with microwave remote sensing from satellites. At the intermediate scale, detection methods such as GPS reflectometry and the use of cosmic rays have been developed recently. One of the principles that can be used to measure soil moisture, is the difference in behaviour of neutrons in wet and dry soil. Neutrons are massive, electrically neutral particles that transfer their energy easily to light atoms, such as hydrogen. Therefore, in wet soil, neutrons lose their energy quickly. In dry soil, they scatter elastically from the heavy atoms and can be detected. The amount of detected neutrons is therefore inversely correlated with the amount of hydrogen in the soil. In this research we look for an overview of the possibilities to measure soil moisture with neutrons and how neutrons can be detected. Neutrons can be used to measure at the point scale and at a larger scale of approximately 1 km. We discuss in-situ measurements, in which a neutron source is put into the soil. Immediately next to the source is a detector, that counts the amount of neutrons that scatters back if the soil is dry. At a larger scale or measurement volume, we discuss the measurement of soil moisture with neutrons from cosmic rays. Cosmic rays are charged particles, accelerated by astrophysical sources (such as a Supernova). When the particles enter the atmosphere, they interact with the atmospheric atoms and form a shower. At sea level, we find several types of particles, such as muons and neutrons. We discuss why neutrons would be more useful for soil moisture measurements than other particles and how the use of cosmic-ray neutrons influences the measurement volume. Here we

  16. Soil Moisture Measurement System For An Improved Flood Warning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaedel, W.; Becker, R.

    Precipitation-runoff processes are correlated with the catchment's hydrological pre- conditions that are taken into account in some hydrological models, e.g. by pre- precipitation index. This statistically generated variable is unsuitable in case of ex- treme flood events. Thus a non-statistical estimation of the catchment's preconditions is of tremendous importance for an improvement in reliability of flood warning. This can be achieved by persistent operational observation of the catchment's soil mois- ture condition. The soil moisture acts as a state variable controlling the risk of surface runoff, which is assumed to provoke critical floods. Critical soil moisture conditions can be identified by measurements in certain areas representative for the catchment. Therefore a measurement arrangement that does not effect the structure of soils is realised with twin rod probes. Spatial resolution algorithms result in soil moisture profiles along the probe rods. In this set up a quasi three dimensional soil moisture distribution can be interpolated with point measurements of up to 47 twin rod probes per cluster, connected via multiplexer. The large number of probes per cluster is of use for detailed observation of small-scaled moisture variability. As regionalized grid cell moisture the cluster information calibrates the default, state depending soil moisture distribution of the catchment. This distribution is explained by diverse soil moisture influencing properties, which are found by Landsat satellite image. Therefore the im- age is processed with principal component analysis to extract the soil moisture distri- bution. The distribution is calibrated by the detailed measurements, acting as ground based truth. Linear multiple regression operated on the calibrated distribution identi- fies the mentioned properties. In this fashion the catchment status can be determined and combined with precipitation forecasts, thus allowing for the comprehensive risk calculation of

  17. Variability of soil moisture and its relationship with surface albedo ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    30 N latitude) are used to study the diurnal, monthly and seasonal soil moisture variations. The effect of rainfall on diurnal and seasonal soil moisture is discussed. We have investigated relationships of soil moisture with sur- face albedo and soil thermal diffusivity. The diurnal variation of surface albedo appears as a.

  18. Divergent surface and total soil moisture projections under global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Alexis; Sheffield, Justin; Milly, Paul C.D.

    2017-01-01

    Land aridity has been projected to increase with global warming. Such projections are mostly based on off-line aridity and drought metrics applied to climate model outputs but also are supported by climate-model projections of decreased surface soil moisture. Here we comprehensively analyze soil moisture projections from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5, including surface, total, and layer-by-layer soil moisture. We identify a robust vertical gradient of projected mean soil moisture changes, with more negative changes near the surface. Some regions of the northern middle to high latitudes exhibit negative annual surface changes but positive total changes. We interpret this behavior in the context of seasonal changes in the surface water budget. This vertical pattern implies that the extensive drying predicted by off-line drought metrics, while consistent with the projected decline in surface soil moisture, will tend to overestimate (negatively) changes in total soil water availability.

  19. Hazards and operability study for the surface moisture monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Board, B.D.

    1996-01-01

    The Hanford Nuclear Reservation Tank Farms' underground waste tanks have been used to store liquid radioactive waste from defense materials production since the 1940's. Waste in certain of the tanks may contain material in the form of ferrocyanide or various organic compounds which could potentially be susceptible to condensed phase chemical reactions. Because of the presence of oxidizing materials (nitrate compounds) and heat sources (radioactive decay and chemical reactions), the ferrocyanide or organic material could potentially fuel a propagating exothermic reaction with undesirable consequences. Analysis and experiments indicate that the reaction propagation and/or initiation may be prevented by the presence of sufficient moisture in the waste. Because the reaction would probably be initiated at the surface of the waste, evidence of sufficient moisture concentration would help provide evidence that the tank waste can continue to be safely stored. The Surface Moisture Measurement System (SMMS) was developed to collect data on the surface moisture in the waste by inserting two types of probes (singly) into a waste tank-a neutron probe and an electromagnetic inductance (EMI) probe. The sensor probes will be placed on the surface of the waste utilizing a moveable deployment arm to lower them through an available riser. The movement of the SMMS within the tank will be monitored by a camera lowered through an adjacent riser. The SMMS equipment is the subject of this study. Hazards and Operability Analysis (HAZOP) is a systematic technique for assessing potential hazards and/or operability problems for a new activity. It utilizes a multidiscipline team of knowledgeable individuals in a systematic brainstorming effort. The results of this study will be used as input to an Unreviewed Safety Question determination

  20. Calibration of Soil Moisture Measurement Using Pr2 Moisture Meter and Gravimetric-Based Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olotu Yahaya

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The research study strongly focused on creating strong mechanism for measuring and evaluating soil moisture content comparing PR2 capacitance moisture meter and gravimetric approach. PR2 moisture meter shows a better performance accuracy of ± 6%; 0.06 m 3 /m 3 and intercept a0 =1.8; indicating the field is heavy clay. It measures to 1000 mm depth with high precision; while realistic result could not be obtained from gravimetric method at this measuring depth. Therefore, effective soil moisture measuring, monitoring and evaluation can be achieved with PR2 moisture meter.

  1. Quality Assurance of Rice and Paddy Moisture Measurements in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinhaneti, T.; Keawprasert, T.; Puuntharo, P.; Triarun, W.

    2017-10-01

    A bilateral comparison in moisture measurement between the National Institute of Metrology Thailand (NIMT) and the Central Bureau of Weights and Measures (CBWM) was organized for quality assuring of rice and paddy moisture measurement in Thailand. The bilateral comparison was conducted by using the same batch of sample and moisture meter as transfer device. It consisted of two parts: moisture measurement in rice and in paddy. A rice moisture meter belonging to CBWM and rice standards prepared at the nominal moisture content of 10 %, 12 %, 14 % and 16 % at NIMT, were used for rice moisture comparison, while a paddy moisture meter belonging to NIMT and paddy standards prepared at the nominal moisture content of 12 %, 14 %, 16 % and 18 % at CBWM, were used for paddy moisture comparison. Both laboratories measured the moisture content of a sample by using the standard method in ISO 712 and used that sample to calibrate a moisture meter by means of the method based on ISO 7700-1. Since the moisture content of the sample can change during the comparison, correction values in moisture content between the standard value and the reading value from the moisture meter are used as calibration results for the comparison evaluation. For the rice moisture comparison, differences in the correction value measured by the two laboratories vary from 0.18 % to 0.46 %, with their combined comparison uncertainty of 0.37 % (k= 2). The main contribution to the difference comes from the standard values from both laboratories differing from 0.27 % to 0.53 %, as the rice standard was found to drift in moisture content less than 0.05 %. Similarly to the rice moisture comparison, differences in the correction value for the paddy moisture measurement range from 0.08 % to 0.56 % with the combined comparison uncertainty of 0.38 % (k = 2), whereas the stability in moisture content of the paddy sample at NIMT was found to be within 0.12 %.

  2. Mapping Surface Heat Fluxes by Assimilating SMAP Soil Moisture and GOES Land Surface Temperature Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yang; Steele-Dunne, Susan C.; Farhadi, Leila; van de Giesen, Nick

    2017-12-01

    Surface heat fluxes play a crucial role in the surface energy and water balance. In situ measurements are costly and difficult, and large-scale flux mapping is hindered by surface heterogeneity. Previous studies have demonstrated that surface heat fluxes can be estimated by assimilating land surface temperature (LST) and soil moisture to determine two key parameters: a neutral bulk heat transfer coefficient (CHN) and an evaporative fraction (EF). Here a methodology is proposed to estimate surface heat fluxes by assimilating Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) soil moisture data and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) LST data into a dual-source (DS) model using a hybrid particle assimilation strategy. SMAP soil moisture data are assimilated using a particle filter (PF), and GOES LST data are assimilated using an adaptive particle batch smoother (APBS) to account for the large gap in the spatial and temporal resolution. The methodology is implemented in an area in the U.S. Southern Great Plains. Assessment against in situ observations suggests that soil moisture and LST estimates are in better agreement with observations after assimilation. The RMSD for 30 min (daytime) flux estimates is reduced by 6.3% (8.7%) and 31.6% (37%) for H and LE on average. Comparison against a LST-only and a soil moisture-only assimilation case suggests that despite the coarse resolution, assimilating SMAP soil moisture data is not only beneficial but also crucial for successful and robust flux estimation, particularly when the uncertainties in the model estimates are large.

  3. Measuring Soil Moisture in Skeletal Soils Using a COSMOS Rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, C.; Neely, H.; Desilets, D.; Mohanty, B.; Moore, G. W.

    2017-12-01

    The presence of coarse fragments directly influences the volumetric water content of the soil. Current surface soil moisture sensors often do not account for the presence of coarse fragments, and little research has been done to calibrate these sensors under such conditions. The cosmic-ray soil moisture observation system (COSMOS) rover is a passive, non-invasive surface soil moisture sensor with a footprint greater than 100 m. Despite its potential, the COSMOS rover has yet to be validated in skeletal soils. The goal of this study was to validate measurements of surface soil moisture as taken by a COSMOS rover on a Texas skeletal soil. Data was collected for two soils, a Marfla clay loam and Chinati-Boracho-Berrend association, in West Texas. Three levels of data were collected: 1) COSMOS surveys at three different soil moistures, 2) electrical conductivity surveys within those COSMOS surveys, and 3) ground-truth measurements. Surveys with the COSMOS rover covered an 8000-h area and were taken both after large rain events (>2") and a long dry period. Within the COSMOS surveys, the EM38-MK2 was used to estimate the spatial distribution of coarse fragments in the soil around two COSMOS points. Ground truth measurements included coarse fragment mass and volume, bulk density, and water content at 3 locations within each EM38 survey. Ground-truth measurements were weighted using EM38 data, and COSMOS measurements were validated by their distance from the samples. There was a decrease in water content as the percent volume of coarse fragment increased. COSMOS estimations responded to both changes in coarse fragment percent volume and the ground-truth volumetric water content. Further research will focus on creating digital soil maps using landform data and water content estimations from the COSMOS rover.

  4. Instrument for measuring moisture in wood chips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werme, L.

    1980-06-01

    A method to determine the moisture content in wood chips, in batch and on-line, has been investigated. The method can be used for frozen and non frozen chips. Samples of wood chips are thawn and dryed with microwaves. During the drying the sample is weighed continously and the rate of drying is measured. The sample is dried t 10 percent moisture content. The result is extrapolated to the drying rate zero. The acccuracy at the method is 1.6 to 1.7 percent for both frozen and non frozen chips. The accuracy of the method is considered acceptable, but sofisticated sampling equipment is necessary. This makes the method too complex to make the instrument marketable.

  5. Microwave radiometric measurements of soil moisture in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Macelloni

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of the MAP and RAPHAEL projects, airborne experimental campaigns were carried out by the IFAC group in 1999 and 2000, using a multifrequency microwave radiometer at L, C and X bands (1.4, 6.8 and 10 GHz. The aim of the experiments was to collect soil moisture and vegetation biomass information on agricultural areas to give reliable inputs to the hydrological models. It is well known that microwave emission from soil, mainly at L-band (1.4 GHz, is very well correlated to its moisture content. Two experimental areas in Italy were selected for this project: one was the Toce Valley, Domodossola, in 1999, and the other, the agricultural area of Cerbaia, close to Florence, where flights were performed in 2000. Measurements were carried out on bare soils, corn and wheat fields in different growth stages and on meadows. Ground data of soil moisture (SMC were collected by other research teams involved in the experiments. From the analysis of the data sets, it has been confirmed that L-band is well related to the SMC of a rather deep soil layer, whereas C-band is sensitive to the surface SMC and is more affected by the presence of surface roughness and vegetation, especially at high incidence angles. An algorithm for the retrieval of soil moisture, based on the sensitivity to moisture of the brightness temperature at C-band, has been tested using the collected data set. The results of the algorithm, which is able to correct for the effect of vegetation by means of the polarisation index at X-band, have been compared with soil moisture data measured on the ground. Finally, the sensitivity of emission at different frequencies to the soil moisture profile was investigated. Experimental data sets were interpreted by using the Integral Equation Model (IEM and the outputs of the model were used to train an artificial neural network to reproduce the soil moisture content at different depths. Keywords: microwave radiometry, soil moisture

  6. Radar Mapping of Surface Soil Moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Dubois, P. C.; van Zyl, J.

    1997-01-01

    Intended as an overview aimed at potential users of remotely sensed spatial distributions and temporal variations of soil moisture, this paper begins with an introductory section on the fundamentals of radar imaging and associated attributes.

  7. Testing of a conceptualisation of catchment scale surface soil moisture in a hydrologic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komma, J.; Parajka, J.; Naeimi, V.; Blöschl, G.; Wagner, W.

    2009-04-01

    In this study the simulated surface soil moisture of a dual layer conceptual hydrologic model is tested against ERS scatterometer top soil moisture observations. The study catchment at the Kamp river with a size of 1550 km² is located in north-eastern Austria. The hydrologic simulations in this study are based on a well calibrated hydrologic model. The model consists of a spatially distributed soil moisture accounting scheme and a flood routing component. The spatial and temporal resolutions of the model are 1 x 1 km² and 15 minutes. The soil moisture accounting scheme simulates the mean moisture state over the entire vertical soil column. To get additional information about moisture states in a thin surface soil layer from the continuous rainfall-runoff model, the soil moisture accounting scheme is extended by a thin skin soil storage sitting at the top of the main soil reservoir. The skin soil storage is filled by rain and snow melt. The skin soil reservoir and the main soil reservoir are connected by a bidirectional moisture flux which is assumed to be a linear function of the vertical soil moisture gradient. The calibration of the additional dual layer component is based on hydrologic reasoning and the incorporation of measured soil water contents close to the study catchment. The comparison of the simulated surface soil moisture with the ERS scatterometer top soil moisture observations is performed in the period 1993-2005. On average, about 3 scatterometer images per month with a mean spatial coverage of about 82% are available at the Kamp catchment. The correlation between the catchment mean values of the two top soil moisture estimates changes with the season. The differences tend to be smaller due the summer month from July to October. The results indicate a good agreement between the modelled and remote sensed spatial moisture patterns in the study area.

  8. Combined NMR moisture, temperature and pressure measurements during heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pel L.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available For model validation, quantitative measurements of the evolution of moisture, temperature, and pressure distributions in time are needed. For this purpose, we have developed an NMR setup to measure the moisture transport in heated building materials. The measured combined moisture content and temperature profiles give a unique insight in the moisture transport and dehydration kinetics inside concrete during fire. These measurements give the first quantitative proof for the build-up of a moisture peak due to the vapor pressure build-up. In this study we have also combined for the first time the measurement of the moisture and temperature profiles with the measurement of the pressure at one position, which show that the pressure build up is directly related to the moisture profiles.

  9. The neutronic method for measuring soil moisture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couchat, Ph.

    1967-01-01

    The three group diffusion theory being chosen as the most adequate method for determining the response of the neutron soil moisture probe, a mathematical model is worked out using a numerical calculation programme with Fortran IV coding. This model is fitted to the experimental conditions by determining the effect of different parameters of measuring device: channel, fast neutron source, detector, as also the soil behaviour under neutron irradiation: absorbers, chemical binding of elements. The adequacy of the model is tested by fitting a line through the image points corresponding to the couples of experimental and theoretical values, for seven media having different chemical composition: sand, alumina, line stone, dolomite, kaolin, sandy loam, calcareous clay. The model chosen gives a good expression of the dry density influence and allows α, β, γ and δ constants to be calculated for a definite soil according to the following relation which gives the count rate of the soil moisture probe: N = (α ρ s +β) H v +γ ρ s + δ. (author) [fr

  10. New method measures moisture and true dry mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, H.

    The moisture content of wood can be determined by measuring the nuclear magnetic resonance of free water hydrogen atoms in wood. Nanassy studied NMR curves for six types of wood and obtained the calibration curve by reducing the moisture content in steps by 4% moisture down to ca. 1% moisture and then by gradually wetting the wood. The initial material was fresh wood. For each step he measured the intensity of the free water hydrogen signal. If the sample weight is known the dry matter content (dry weight) and moisture content of the sample can be derived from the measured NMR signal. (J.P.)

  11. Moisture dependence of radon transport in concrete : Measurements and modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cozmuta, [No Value; van der Graaf, ER; de Meijer, RJ

    2003-01-01

    The moisture dependence of the radon-release rate of concrete was measured under well controlled conditions. It was found that the radon-release rate almost linearly increases up to moisture contents of 50 to 60%. At 70 to 80% a maximum was found and for higher moisture contents the radon-release

  12. Microwave moisture measurement of cotton fiber moisture content in the laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    The moisture content of cotton fiber is an important fiber property, but it is often measured by a laborious, time-consuming laboratory oven drying method. A program was implemented to establish the capabilities of a laboratory microwave moisture measurement instrument to perform rapid, precise and...

  13. Variability of soil moisture and its relationship with surface albedo ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 119; Issue 4. Variability of soil moisture and its relationship with surface albedo and soil thermal ... The diurnal variation of surface albedo appears as a U-shaped curve on sunny days. Surface albedo decreases with the increase of solar elevation angle, and it tends ...

  14. Simple grain moisture content determination from microwave measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraszewski, A.W.; Trabelsi, S.; Nelson, S.O.

    1998-01-01

    Moisture content of wheat, Triticum aestivum L., is expressed as a function of the ratio of microwave attenuation and phase shift, measured at 16.8 GHz, and grain temperature. Validation of the calibration equation indicated that moisture content was obtained with an uncertainty less than +/- 0.45% moisture at the 95% confidence level, independent of density variation, at temperatures from -1 degree C to 42 degrees C, and moisture contents from 10% to 19%. Moisture determination does not depend on the layer thickness of the wheat norits bulk density. No differences between two wheat cultivars were observed in the measurement data

  15. Using lagged dependence to identify (de)coupled surface and subsurface soil moisture values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Coleen D. U.; van der Ploeg, Martine J.; Torfs, Paul J. J. F.

    2018-04-01

    Recent advances in radar remote sensing popularized the mapping of surface soil moisture at different spatial scales. Surface soil moisture measurements are used in combination with hydrological models to determine subsurface soil moisture values. However, variability of soil moisture across the soil column is important for estimating depth-integrated values, as decoupling between surface and subsurface can occur. In this study, we employ new methods to investigate the occurrence of (de)coupling between surface and subsurface soil moisture. Using time series datasets, lagged dependence was incorporated in assessing (de)coupling with the idea that surface soil moisture conditions will be reflected at the subsurface after a certain delay. The main approach involves the application of a distributed-lag nonlinear model (DLNM) to simultaneously represent both the functional relation and the lag structure in the time series. The results of an exploratory analysis using residuals from a fitted loess function serve as a posteriori information to determine (de)coupled values. Both methods allow for a range of (de)coupled soil moisture values to be quantified. Results provide new insights into the decoupled range as its occurrence among the sites investigated is not limited to dry conditions.

  16. Trace moisture emissions from heated metal surfaces in hydrogen service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funke, Hans H.; Yao Jianlong; Raynor, Mark W.

    2004-01-01

    The formation of trace moisture by exposure of dry heated surfaces of 316 L stainless-steel, Restek Silcosteel registered , and nickel 1/8 in. outer diameter line segments to purified Ar and H 2 was studied using atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry at flow rates of 2 slpm. Prior to H 2 exposure, adsorbed moisture was removed by heating incrementally to 500 deg. C in an argon matrix, where the Restek Silcosteel registered material released a maximum of 50 ppb moisture at 300 deg. C and moisture spikes from the Ni and stainless-steel surfaces reached several 100 ppb. Upon exposure to H 2 , persistent low ppb moisture emissions due to the reduction of surface oxide species were observed at temperatures as low as 100 deg. C. Spikes at 300-500 deg. C ranged from ∼100 ppb for the stainless-steel lines to 400 ppb for the Restek Silcosteel registered material. The observed moisture emissions have to be considered as a potential contamination source for high-purity processes utilizing H 2 purge at elevated temperatures

  17. Measuring seasonal variations of moisture in a landfill with the partitioning gas tracer test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Byunghyun; Jafarpour, Behnam; Gallagher, Victoria N.; Imhoff, Paul T.; Chiu, Pei C.; Fluman, Daniel A.

    2006-01-01

    Seven pilot-scale partitioning gas tracer tests (PGTTs) were conducted to assess the accuracy and reproducibility of this method for measuring water in municipal solid waste landfills. Tests were conducted in the same location over a 12-month period, and measured moisture conditions ranged from possible dry waste to refuse with a moisture content of 24.7%. The final moisture content of 24.7% was in reasonable agreement with gravimetric measurements of excavated refuse, where the moisture content was 26.5 ± 6.0CI%. Laboratory tests were used to assess the utility of the PGTT for measuring water in small pores, water sorbed to solid surfaces, and the influence of dry waste on PGTTs. These experiments indicated that when refuse surfaces are not completely solvated with water, PGTTs may produce misleading results (negative estimates) of water saturation and moisture content

  18. Temporal observations of surface soil moisture using a passive microwave sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, T.J.; O'Neill, P.

    1987-01-01

    A series of 10 aircraft flights was conducted over agricultural fields to evaluate relationships between observed surface soil moisture and soil moisture predicted using passive microwave sensor observations. An a priori approach was used to predict values of surface soil moisture for three types of fields: tilled corn, no-till corn with soybean stubble, and idle fields with corn stubble. Acceptable predictions were obtained for the tilled corn fields, while poor results were obtained for the others. The source of error is suspected to be the density and orientation of the surface stubble layer; however, further research is needed to verify this explanation. Temporal comparisons between observed, microwave predicted, and soil water-simulated moisture values showed similar patterns for tilled well-drained fields. Divergences between the observed and simulated measurements were apparent on poorly drained fields. This result may be of value in locating and mapping hydrologic contributing areas

  19. Measured moisture in buildings and adverse health effects: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendell, Mark J; Macher, Janet M; Kumagai, Kazukiyo

    2018-04-23

    It has not yet been possible to quantify dose-related health risks attributable to indoor dampness or mold (D/M), to support the setting of health-related limits for D/M. An overlooked target for assessing D/M is moisture in building materials, the critical factor allowing microbial growth. A search for studies of quantified building moisture and occupant health effects identified three eligible studies. Two studies assessed associations between measured wall moisture content and respiratory health in the UK. Both reported dose-related increases in asthma exacerbation with higher measured moisture, with one study reporting an adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 7.0 for night-time asthma symptoms with higher bedroom moisture. The third study assessed relationships between infrared camera-determined wall moisture and atopic dermatitis in South Korea, reporting an adjusted OR of 14.5 for water-damaged homes and moderate or severe atopic dermatitis. Measuring building moisture has, despite extremely limited available findings, potential promise for detecting unhealthy D/M in homes and merits more research attention. Further research to validate these findings should include measured "water activity," which directly assesses moisture availability for microbial growth. Ultimately, evidence-based, health-related thresholds for building moisture, across specific materials and measurement devices, could better guide assessment and remediation of D/M in buildings. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Study of Material Moisture Measurement Method and Instrument by the Combination of Fast Neutron Absorption and γ Absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Chaoqin; Gong Yalin; Zhang Wei; Shang Qingmin; Li Yanfeng; Gou Qiangyuan; Yin Deyou

    2010-01-01

    To solve the problem of on-line sinter moisture measurement in the iron making plant, we developed material moisture measurement method and instrument by the combination of fast neutron absorption and y-absorption. It overcomes the present existed problems of other moisture meters for the sinter. Compare with microwave moisture meter, the measurement dose not affected by conductance and magnetism of material; to infrared moisture meter, the measurement result dose not influenced by colour and light-reflect performance of material surface, dose not influenced by changes of material kind; to slow neutron scatter moisture meter, the measurement dose not affected by density of material and thickness of hopper wall; to the moisture measurement meter which combined by slow neutron penetrate through and y-absorption, there are definite math model and good linear relation between the measurement values, and the measurement dose not affected by material thickness, changes of material form and component. (authors)

  1. Physically plausible prescription of land surface model soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Mathias; Orth, René; Thiery, Wim; Seneviratne, Sonia

    2016-04-01

    Land surface hydrology is an important control of surface weather and climate, especially under extreme dry or wet conditions where it can amplify heat waves or floods, respectively. Prescribing soil moisture in land surface models is a valuable technique to investigate this link between hydrology and climate. It has been used for example to assess the influence of soil moisture on temperature variability, mean and extremes (Seneviratne et al. 2006, 2013, Lorenz et al., 2015). However, perturbing the soil moisture content artificially can lead to a violation of the energy and water balances. Here we present a new method for prescribing soil moisture which ensures water and energy balance closure by using only water from runoff and a reservoir term. If water is available, the method prevents soil moisture decrease below climatological values. Results from simulations with the Community Land Model (CLM) indicate that our new method allows to avoid soil moisture deficits in many regions of the world. We show the influence of the irrigation-supported soil moisture content on mean and extreme temperatures and contrast our findings with that of earlier studies. Additionally, we will assess how long into the 21st century the new method will be able to maintain present-day climatological soil moisture levels for different regions. Lorenz, R., Argüeso, D., Donat, M.G., Pitman, A.J., den Hurk, B.V., Berg, A., Lawrence, D.M., Chéruy, F., Ducharne, A., Hagemann, S. and Meier, A., 2015. Influence of land-atmosphere feedbacks on temperature and precipitation extremes in the GLACE-CMIP5 ensemble. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres. Seneviratne, S.I., Lüthi, D., Litschi, M. and Schär, C., 2006. Land-atmosphere coupling and climate change in Europe. Nature, 443(7108), pp.205-209. Seneviratne, S.I., Wilhelm, M., Stanelle, T., Hurk, B., Hagemann, S., Berg, A., Cheruy, F., Higgins, M.E., Meier, A., Brovkin, V. and Claussen, M., 2013. Impact of soil moisture

  2. Remote Sensing of Surface Soil Moisture using Semi-Concurrent Radar and Radiometer Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L.; Ouellette, J. D.; Colliander, A.; Cosh, M. H.; Caldwell, T. G.; Walker, J. P.

    2017-12-01

    Radar backscatter and radiometer brightness temperature both have well-documented sensitivity to surface soil moisture, particularly in the microwave regime. While radiometer-derived soil moisture retrievals have been shown to be stable and accurate, they are only available at coarse spatial resolutions on the order of tens of kilometers. Backscatter from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is similarly sensitive to soil moisture but can yield higher spatial resolutions, with pixel sizes about an order of magnitude smaller. Soil moisture retrieval from radar backscatter is more difficult, however, due to the combined sensitivity of radar scattering to surface roughness, vegetation structure, and soil moisture. The algorithm uses a time-series of SAR data to retrieval soil moisture information, constraining the SAR-derived soil moisture estimates with radiometer observations. This effectively combines the high spatial resolution offered by SAR with the precision offered by passive radiometry. The algorithm is a change detection approach which maps changes in the radar backscatter to changes in surface soil moisture. This new algorithm differs from existing retrieval techniques in that it does not require ancillary vegetation information, but assumes vegetation and surface roughness are stable between pairs of consecutive radar overpasses. Furthermore, this method does not require a radar scattering model for the vegetation canopy, nor the use of a training data set. The algorithm works over a long time series, and is constrained by hard bounds which are defined using a coarse-resolution radiometer soil moisture product. The presentation will include soil moisture retrievals from Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) SAR data. Two sets of optimization bounds will constrain the radar change detection algorithm: one defined by SMAP radiometer retrievals and one defined by WindSat radiometer retrievals. Retrieved soil moisture values will be presented on a world map and will

  3. Effects of neutron source type on soil moisture measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving Goldberg; Norman A. MacGillivray; Robert R. Ziemer

    1967-01-01

    A number of radioisotopes have recently become commercially available as alternatives to radium-225 in moisture gauging devices using alpha-neutron sources for determining soil moisture, for well logging, and for other industrial applications in which hydrogenous materials are measured.

  4. Inline real-time near-infrared granule moisture measurements of a continuous granulation-drying-milling process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chablani, Lipika; Taylor, Michael K; Mehrotra, Amit; Rameas, Patrick; Stagner, William C

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this research was to use inline real-time near-infrared (NIR) to measure the moisture content of granules manufactured using a commercial production scale continuous twin-screw granulator fluid-bed dryer milling process. A central composite response surface statistical design was used to study the effect of inlet air temperature and dew point on granule moisture content. The NIR moisture content was compared to Karl Fischer (KF) and loss on drying (LOD) moisture determinations. Using multivariate analysis, the data showed a statistically significant correlation between the conventional methods and NIR. The R(2) values for predicted moisture content by NIR versus KF and predicted moisture values by NIR versus LOD were 0.94 (p moisture content as measured by predicted NIR (adjusted R(2) = 0.84, p moisture measurements.

  5. Drought monitoring with soil moisture active passive (SMAP) measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Ashok; Vu, Tue; Veettil, Anoop Valiya; Entekhabi, Dara

    2017-09-01

    Recent launch of space-borne systems to estimate surface soil moisture may expand the capability to map soil moisture deficit and drought with global coverage. In this study, we use Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) soil moisture geophysical retrieval products from passive L-band radiometer to evaluate its applicability to forming agricultural drought indices. Agricultural drought is quantified using the Soil Water Deficit Index (SWDI) based on SMAP and soil properties (field capacity and available water content) information. The soil properties are computed using pedo-transfer function with soil characteristics derived from Harmonized World Soil Database. The SMAP soil moisture product needs to be rescaled to be compatible with the soil parameters derived from the in situ stations. In most locations, the rescaled SMAP information captured the dynamics of in situ soil moisture well and shows the expected lag between accumulations of precipitation and delayed increased in surface soil moisture. However, the SMAP soil moisture itself does not reveal the drought information. Therefore, the SMAP based SWDI (SMAP_SWDI) was computed to improve agriculture drought monitoring by using the latest soil moisture retrieval satellite technology. The formulation of SWDI does not depend on longer data and it will overcome the limited (short) length of SMAP data for agricultural drought studies. The SMAP_SWDI is further compared with in situ Atmospheric Water Deficit (AWD) Index. The comparison shows close agreement between SMAP_SWDI and AWD in drought monitoring over Contiguous United States (CONUS), especially in terms of drought characteristics. The SMAP_SWDI was used to construct drought maps for CONUS and compared with well-known drought indices, such as, AWD, Palmer Z-Index, sc-PDSI and SPEI. Overall the SMAP_SWDI is an effective agricultural drought indicator and it provides continuity and introduces new spatial mapping capability for drought monitoring. As an

  6. Measured moisture properties for alternative insulation products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan De Place; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Padfield, Tim

    1999-01-01

    During the past few years there has been a growing interest in using alternative insulation products in buildings. Among these products are the organic materials cellulose fibre, flax and sheep's wool as well as the inorganic perlite. The organic materials are regarded with some suspicion, becaus...... of their hygroscopicity. This paper describes two of the moisture-related properties of these materials: the water sorption and the water vapour transmission. For reference, some mineral fibre products are studied as well....

  7. Assimilating the cosmic-ray soil moisture observing system measurements for understanding watershed hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, D.; Cai, Z.; Shi, Y.; Li, L.

    2016-12-01

    Soil moisture is an essential variable in hydrologic, land-surface and reactive transport processes. The intermediate-scale cosmic-ray soil moisture observing system (COSMOS) provides average soil water content measurement over a footprint of 0.34 km2 with depths up to 70 cm and an innovative means to understand watershed water dynamics. Compared with point measurements at the scale of centimeters, the COSMOS data represent averaged soil moisture at the scale of hundreds of meters. In this study, we test the use of COSMOS observations in constraining parameters in a physics-based hydrology model Flux-PIHM via the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF). We aim to investigate 1) how COSMOS data can be used to predict soil moisture in a low-order watershed by Flux-PIHM, 2) which parameters are critical in predicting areal averaged soil moisture, and 3) how changes in data availability of the COSMOS influence prediction of watershed hydrodynamics. Synthetic data experiments are performed at the Shale Hills Susquehanna Critical Zone Observatory in central Pennsylvania. The COSMOS data is assimilated into Flux-PIHM using the EnKF, in addition to discharge and land surface temperature observations. The assimilation of COSMOS measurements can improve the model prediction of top layer soil moisture, and the soil parameters like van Genuchten β and porosity are critical in reproducing areal averaged soil moisture. The accuracy of EnKF estimated parameters and water and energy flux predictions is evaluated, reflecting the sensitivity of the observation to the corresponding parameter related hydrologic processes. In addition, the results are compared with assimilating point soil moisture measurement to assess the effects of soil moisture measurements at different scales in calibrating Flux-PIHM. The data retrieval frequency experiments evaluate the consequence of data availability on the hydrodynamics of simulated soil moisture profiles. We found that there exists an optimal data

  8. Drive by Soil Moisture Measurement: A Citizen Science Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senanayake, I. P.; Willgoose, G. R.; Yeo, I. Y.; Hancock, G. R.

    2017-12-01

    Two of the common attributes of soil moisture are that at any given time it varies quite markedly from point to point, and that there is a significant deterministic pattern that underlies this spatial variation and which is typically 50% of the spatial variability. The spatial variation makes it difficult to determine the time varying catchment average soil moisture using field measurements because any individual measurement is unlikely to be equal to the average for the catchment. The traditional solution to this is to make many measurements (e.g. with soil moisture probes) spread over the catchment, which is very costly and manpower intensive, particularly if we need a time series of soil moisture variation across a catchment. An alternative approach, explored in this poster is to use the deterministic spatial pattern of soil moisture to calibrate one site (e.g. a permanent soil moisture probe at a weather station) to the spatial pattern of soil moisture over the study area. The challenge is then to determine the spatial pattern of soil moisture. This poster will present results from a proof of concept project, where data was collected by a number of undergraduate engineering students, to estimate the spatial pattern. The approach was to drive along a series of roads in a catchment and collect soil moisture measurements at the roadside using field portable soil moisture probes. This drive was repeated a number of times over the semester, and the time variation and spatial persistence of the soil moisture pattern were examined. Provided that the students could return to exactly the same location on each collection day there was a strong persistent pattern in the soil moisture, even while the average soil moisture varied temporally as a result of preceding rainfall. The poster will present results and analysis of the student data, and compare these results with several field sites where we have spatially distributed permanently installed soil moisture probes. The

  9. Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) Product Specification Document

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichle, Rolf H.; Ardizzone, Joseph V.; Kim, Gi-Kong; Lucchesi, Robert A.; Smith, Edmond B.; Weiss, Barry H.

    2015-01-01

    This is the Product Specification Document (PSD) for Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) data for the Science Data System (SDS) of the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) project. The L4_SM data product provides estimates of land surface conditions based on the assimilation of SMAP observations into a customized version of the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System, Version 5 (GEOS-5) land data assimilation system (LDAS). This document applies to any standard L4_SM data product generated by the SMAP Project. The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission will enhance the accuracy and the resolution of space-based measurements of terrestrial soil moisture and freeze-thaw state. SMAP data products will have a noteworthy impact on multiple relevant and current Earth Science endeavors. These include: Understanding of the processes that link the terrestrial water, the energy and the carbon cycles, Estimations of global water and energy fluxes over the land surfaces, Quantification of the net carbon flux in boreal landscapes Forecast skill of both weather and climate, Predictions and monitoring of natural disasters including floods, landslides and droughts, and Predictions of agricultural productivity. To provide these data, the SMAP mission will deploy a satellite observatory in a near polar, sun synchronous orbit. The observatory will house an L-band radiometer that operates at 1.40 GHz and an L-band radar that operates at 1.26 GHz. The instruments will share a rotating reflector antenna with a 6 meter aperture that scans over a 1000 km swath.

  10. Spatial distribution of potential near surface moisture flux at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flint, A.L.; Flint, L.E.

    1994-01-01

    An estimate of the areal distribution of present-day surface liquid moisture flux at Yucca Mountain was made using field measured water contents and laboratory measured rock properties. Using available data for physical and hydrologic properties (porosity, saturated hydraulic conductivity, moisture retention functions) of the volcanic rocks, surface lithologic units that are hydrologically similar were delineated. Moisture retention and relative permeability functions were assigned to each surface unit based on the similarity of the mean porosity and saturated hydraulic conductivity of the surface unit to laboratory samples of the same lithology. The potential flux into the mountain was estimated for each surface hydrologic unit using the mean saturated hydraulic conductivity for each unit and assuming all matrix flow. Using measured moisture profiles for each of the surface units, estimates were made of the depth at which seasonal fluctuations diminish and steady state downward flux conditions are likely to exist. The hydrologic properties at that depth were used with the current relative saturation of the tuff, to estimate flux as the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. This method assumes a unit gradient. The range in estimated flux was 0.02 mm/yr for the welded Tiva Canyon to 13.4 mm/yr for the nonwelded Paintbrush Tuff. The areally averaged flux was 1.4 mm/yr. The major zones of high flux occur to the north of the potential repository boundary where the nonwelded tuffs are exposed in the major drainages

  11. Spatial distribution of potential near surface moisture flux at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flint, A.L.; Flint, L.E.

    1994-01-01

    An estimate of the areal distribution of present-day surface liquid moisture flux at Yucca Mountain was made using field measured water contents and laboratory measured rock properties. Using available data for physical and hydrologic properties (porosity, saturated hydraulic conductivity moisture retention functions) of the volcanic rocks, surface lithologic units that are hydrologically similar were delineated. Moisture retention and relative permeability functions were assigned to each surface unit based on the similarity of the mean porosity and saturated hydraulic conductivity of the surface unit to laboratory samples of the same lithology. The potential flux into the mountain was estimated for each surface hydrologic unit using the mean saturated hydraulic conductivity for each unit and assuming all matrix flow. Using measured moisture profiles for each of the surface units, estimates were made of the depth at which seasonal fluctuations diminish and steady state downward flux conditions are likely to exist. The hydrologic properties at that depth were used with the current relative saturation of the tuff, to estimate flux as the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. This method assumes a unit gradient. The range in estimated flux was 0.02 mm/yr for the welded Tiva Canyon to 13.4 mm/yr for the nonwelded Paintbrush Tuff. The areally averaged flux was 1.4 mm/yr. The major zones of high flux occur to the north of the potential repository boundary where the nonwelded tuffs are exposed in the major drainages

  12. CLPX-Ground: ISA Soil Moisture Measurements, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set consists of in-situ point measurements of soil moisture within three 25-km by 25-km Meso-cell Study Areas (MSAs) in northern Colorado (Fraser, North...

  13. Measuring Moisture Levels in Graphite Epoxy Composite Sandwich Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurge, Mark; Youngquist, Robert; Starr, Stanley

    2011-01-01

    Graphite epoxy composite (GEC) materials are used in the construction of rocket fairings, nose cones, interstage adapters, and heat shields due to their high strength and light weight. However, they absorb moisture depending on the environmental conditions they are exposed to prior to launch. Too much moisture absorption can become a problem when temperature and pressure changes experienced during launch cause the water to vaporize. The rapid state change of the water can result in structural failure of the material. In addition, heat and moisture combine to weaken GEC structures. Diffusion models that predict the total accumulated moisture content based on the environmental conditions are one accepted method of determining if the material strength has been reduced to an unacceptable level. However, there currently doesn t exist any field measurement technique to estimate the actual moisture content of a composite structure. A multi-layer diffusion model was constructed with Mathematica to predict moisture absorption and desorption from the GEC sandwich structure. This model is used in conjunction with relative humidity/temperature sensors both on the inside and outside of the material to determine the moisture levels in the structure. Because the core materials have much higher diffusivity than the face sheets, a single relative humidity measurement will accurately reflect the moisture levels in the core. When combined with an external relative humidity measurement, the model can be used to determine the moisture levels in the face sheets. Since diffusion is temperaturedependent, the temperature measurements are used to determine the diffusivity of the face sheets for the model computations.

  14. Effect of airflow velocity on moisture exchange at surfaces of building materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Lone Hedegaard; Rode, Carsten; Peuhkuri, Ruut Hannele

    2006-01-01

    The moisture transfer between air and construction are affected of the boundary layer conditions close to the surface, which is influenced by the airflow patterns in the room. Therefore an investigation of the relation be-tween the surface resistance and the airflow velocity above a material samp...... resistances decrease for increasing airflow velocity above the boundary layer of the material surface. The measured resistances are somewhat smaller than the ones esti-mated by use of the Lewis relation....

  15. Effectiveness of Protective Action of Coatings from Moisture Sorption into Surface Layer of Sand Moulds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaźnica N.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of investigations of the sorption process of surface layers of sand moulds covered by zirconium and zirconium - graphite alcohol coatings are presented in the paper. Investigations comprised two kinds of sand grains (silica sand and reclaimed sand of moulding sand with furan resin. Tests were performed under conditions of a high relative air humidity 75 - 85% and a constant temperature within the range 28 – 33°C. To evaluate the effectiveness of coatings protective action from moisture penetration into surface layers of sand moulds gravimetric method of quantitavie moisture sorption and ultrasonic method were applied in measurements.

  16. Land surface model evaluation using a new soil moisture dataset from Kamennaya Steppe, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, T.; Robock, A.; Speranskaya, N.

    2004-12-01

    The land surface affects the atmosphere through the transfer of energy and moisture and serves as the lower boundary in numerical weather prediction and climate models. To obtain good forecasts, these models must therefore accurately portray the land surface. Actual in situ measurements are vital for testing and developing these models. It is with this in mind that we have obtained a dataset of soil moisture, soil temperature and meteorological measurements from Kamennaya Steppe, Russia. The meteorological dataset spans the time period 1965-1991, while the soil moisture dataset runs from 1956-1991. The soil moisture dataset contains gravimetric volumetric total soil moisture measurements for 10 layers taken from forest, agricultural and grassland soils. The meteorological dataset contains 3-hourly measurements of precipitation, temperature, wind speed, pressure and relative humidity. We obtained longwave and shortwave radiation data from standard formulae. The data will be made available to the public via the Rutgers University Center for Environmental Prediction Global Soil Moisture Data Bank. Soil temperature is important in determining the timing, duration and intensity of runoff and snowmelt, particularly at the beginning and end of the winter when the ground is only partially frozen. Soil temperature can in turn be affected by the vertical distribution of roots. The soil temperature data are for 1969-1991. The data are daily averaged for every 20 cm to 1.2 meters in depth. These data are used to investigate the natural sensitivity of soil temperature to vegetation type and root distribution. We also use the temperature data, as well as water balance and snowfall data to test the sensitivity of the Noah land surface model (LSM) soil temperature to vertical root distribution, and what effect that has on the hydrology of the site. In addition to soil temperature data, we also have soil moisture data for several vegetation types. We compare the soil moisture time

  17. Numerical and experimental determination of surface temperature and moisture evolution in a field soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinyemi, Olukayode D.; Mendes, Nathan

    2007-03-01

    Knowledge about the dynamics of soil moisture and heat, especially at the surface, provides important insights into the physical processes governing their interactions with the atmosphere, thereby improving the understanding of patterns of climate dynamics. In this context the paper presents the numerical and field experimental results of temperature and moisture evolution, which were measured on the surface of a sandy soil at Abeokuta, south-western Nigeria. An unconditionally stable numerical method was used, which linearizes the vapour concentration driving-potential term giving the moisture exchanged at the boundaries in terms of temperature and moisture content, and simultaneously solves the governing equations for each time step. The model avoids stability problems and limitations to low moisture contents and the usual assumption of constant thermal conductivity. Instantaneous temperature measurements were made at the surface using a thermocouple, while the gravimetric method was employed to determine the volumetric water contents at some specific hours of the experimental period. The observed experimental data compared fairly well with the predicted values, with both having correlation coefficients greater than 0.9 and consequently following a common diurnal trend. The sensitivity of the model was very high to the choice of simulation parameters, especially grid size refinement and time step. While the model underestimated the soil moisture content at 6 a.m. and 10 p.m., the measured temperatures were however overestimated. When compared to moisture content, average errors for temperature were low resulting in a minimal absolute difference in amplitude of 0.81 °C.

  18. Influence of absorbed moisture on surface hydrophobization of ethanol pretreated and plasma treated ramie fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Zhou; Wang Jilong; Huang Xiao; Zhang Liwen; Moyo, Senelisile; Sun Shiyuan; Qiu Yiping

    2012-01-01

    The existence of moisture in the substrate material may influence the effect of atmospheric pressure plasma treatment. Our previous study has found that the employment of ethanol pretreatment and plasma treatment can effectively induce hydrophobic surface modification of cellulose fiber to enhance the compatibility to polypropylene (PP) matrix, and this study aims to investigate the influence of fiber moisture regain on the treatment effect of this technique. Ramie fibers with three different moisture regains (MR) (2.5, 6.1 and 23.5%) are pretreated with ethanol followed by atmospheric pressure plasma treatment. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) shows that the 2.5% MR group has the most significant plasma etching effect. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis indicates an increase of C-C and a decrease of C-O bond in the plasma treated groups, and the largest raise of C-C bond for the 2.5% MR group. The water contact angles of the 2.5 and 6.1% MR groups increase, whereas no significant change is showed in the 23.5% MR group. The interfacial shear strengths (IFSS) measured by microbond pull-out test are raised by 44 and 25% when moisture regains are 2.5 and 6.1%, while presented no apparent improvement at high moisture regain of 23.5%. Therefore, it can be concluded that moisture regain has negative influence on the surface hydrophobization of ramie fibers in the improvement of adhesion property to PP matrix.

  19. Moisture measurements in building materials with microwaves; Rakennusmateriaalien kosteusmittauksia mikroaalloilla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaeaeriaeinen, H.; Rudolph, M.; Schaurich, D.; Wiggenhauser, H. [VTT Building Technology, Espoo (Finland). Construction and Facility Management

    1998-12-01

    In order to assess the condition and evaluate the reliability of buildings and structures, it is essential to establish the moisture condition of the floor and other structural elements of the building. NDT-methods are increasingly being used for such moisture measurements because they do not cause any damage to the building under investigation. Microwave transmission is one of the NDT-methods and has been in use for several years. In this report, the applicability of the microwave method for measuring moisture in different building materials was investigated. This method has been successfully used at BAM for repeated moisture measurements in brick and sandstone material. This project also included other materials, such as concrete, sand, gravel, insulation and wood. At the same time, information was gathered about in situ moisture determination of building materials with a microwave moisture measuring system. The equipment used in this research has been developed at BAM over the last few years. The method requires two parallel boreholes in the specimen in which two microwave antennae can be moved. The moisture content in the material can be calculated from the microwave intensity transmitted between the two boreholes. Moisture profiles along the boreholes can be obtained by moving the antennae in steps along the length of the boreholes and taking measurements at each step. Special care must be taken while drilling the holes for the antennae, as this process must not affect the moisture condition in the specimen, and the boreholes must be made as parallel to each other as possible. The microwave frequencies used in the laboratory measurements ranged from 8 to 16,5 GHz in steps of 0,5 GHz. The diameters of the antennae were between 7 and 9 mm, and of the boreholes between 8 and 12 mm. Except for the concrete specimen, all the specimens were measured using plastic tubes in the boreholes. The moisture content measured by the microwave technique was verified by the

  20. Greenhouse gas emissions from beef feedlot surface materials as affected by diet, moisture, temperature, and time

    Science.gov (United States)

    A laboratory study was conducted to measure the effects of diet, moisture, temperature, and time on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from feedlot surface materials (FSM). The FSM were collected from open lot, pens where beef cattle were fed either a dry-rolled corn (DRC) diet containing no wet distil...

  1. Contributions of Soil Moisture and Vegetation Components to Polarized Emission Based on the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, T.; Talebi, S.; Li, S.; Entekhabi, D.; Lu, H.; Shi, J.; Akbar, R.; Wang, Z.; Weng, H.; Mccoll, K. A.

    2016-12-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) is an Earth satellite mission providing polarized L-band brightness temperature measurements with 6AM and 6PM equatorial crossing times. The brightness temperature measurements over land respond to land and water mixing across the landscape. Over land the soil dielectric constant and the vegetation structure and biomass cause variations in brightness temperature. The physical temperature of the landscape components and their emissivity determine the polarized brightness temperature. During the morning crossing when the physical temperature of the components are nearly equal, the difference of the polarizations normalized by the sum is independent of physical temperature. In this study, we use the Polarization Ratio (PR) as a measurement of surface emission because it does not depend on physical temperature and potentially is also a signature of soil moisture and vegetation. To decompose the PR signal into vegetation and soil components, SMAP Level 2 radiometer-only soil moisture products at 36-km are directly used. Radar observations are used as a measurement of vegetation, including cross-polarized backscattering coefficients and the Radar Vegetation Index (RVI). Regressions between these satellite observations are conducted. The regression coefficients are used to estimate percentage variance explained. Results show there is a positive correlation between PR and soil moisture and an inverse correlation exists between PR and the cross polarization of radar signal or RVI that corresponds to vegetation. In light to moderate vegetation regions, there is a substantial explained-variance between PR and soil moisture. But in dense vegetation the correlation is weak because the vegetation causes depolarization and reduces the dynamic range of the PR.

  2. Calibration of quantitative neutron radiography method for moisture measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemec, T.; Jeraj, R.

    1999-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of moisture and hydrogenous matter in building materials by neutron radiography (NR) are regularly performed at TRIGA Mark II research of 'Jozef Stefan' Institute in Ljubljana. Calibration of quantitative method is performed using standard brick samples with known moisture content and also with a secondary standard, plexiglas step wedge. In general, the contribution of scattered neutrons to the neutron image is not determined explicitly what introduces an error to the measured signal. Influence of scattered neutrons is significant in regions with high gradients of moisture concentrations, where the build up of scattered neutrons causes distortion of the moisture concentration profile. In this paper detailed analysis of validity of our calibration method for different geometrical parameters is presented. The error in the measured hydrogen concentration is evaluated by an experiment and compared with results obtained by Monte Carlo calculation with computer code MCNP 4B. Optimal conditions are determined for quantitative moisture measurements in order to minimize the error due to scattered neutrons. The method is tested on concrete samples with high moisture content.(author)

  3. Near Surface Soil Moisture Controls Beyond the Darcy Support Scale: A Remote Sensing Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, B.; Gaur, N.

    2014-12-01

    Variability observed in near-surface soil moisture is a function of spatial and temporal scale and an understanding of the same is required in numerous environmental and hydrological applications. Past literature has focused largely on the Darcy support scale of measurement for generating knowledge about soil moisture variability and the factors causing it. With the advent of a remote sensing era, it is essential to develop a comprehensive understanding of soil moisture variability and the factors creating it at the remote sensing footprint scale. This understanding will facilitate knowledge transfer between scales which remains an area of active research. In this study, we have presented the hierarchy of controls that physical factors namely, soil, vegetation and topography exert on soil moisture distributions from airborne remote sensor footprint scale (~800 m) to a satellite footprint scale (12800 m) across 3 hydro-climates- humid (Iowa), sub-humid (Oklahoma) and semi-arid (Arizona). We evaluated the effect of physical factors on soil moisture variability at coarse spatial support scales but fine (daily) temporal spacing scales which are typical of remotely sensed soil moisture data. The hierarchy or ranking scheme defined in the study is a function of the areal extent of controls of the different physical factors and the magnitude of their effect in creating spatial variability of soil moisture. We found that even though the areal influence of soil on soil moisture variability remained significant at all scales, it decreased as we went from airborne scale to coarser scales whereas the influence of topography and vegetation increased for all three hydro-climates. The magnitude of the effect of these factors, however, was dependent on antecedent soil moisture conditions and hydro-climate.

  4. Circumpolar freeze/thaw surface status and surface soil moisture from Metop ASCAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Annett; Paulik, Christoph; Melzer, Thomas; Hahn, Sebastian; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2013-04-01

    Circumpolar surface soil moisture and freeze/thaw surface status has been derived from Metop ASCAT within the framework of the ESA DUE Permafrost and STSE ALANIS-Methane projects. The dataset is available via Pangaea (doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.775959) and can be vizualized with the WebGIS of the DUE Permafrost data portal (www.ipf.tuwien.ac.at/permafrost). MetOp ASCAT data have been used for both the near surface soil moisture (SSM) product and determination of freeze/thaw status at panboreal/ arctic scale. Metop-A, launched in October 2006 by the European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT), is the first of three satellites within EUMETSAT's Polar System (EPS). The ASCAT SSM DUE Permafrost product is the result of an improved SSM retrieval algorithm developed at the Institute for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (IPF) of the Vienna University of Technology. The SSM Product is delivered with a weekly temporal resolution and 25 km spatial resolution. The soil moisture product also includes a quality flag which contains the number of used measurements. Data are masked for frozen ground conditions also based on MetOp ASCAT. The daily SSF is available as separate flag. The SSM product is provided as weekly averaged images north of 50°N in GeoTIFF/NetCDF format and EASE Grid projection Further, complementary regional scale (1km) freeze/thaw information is available at selected sites based on ENVISAT ASAR GM (PANGAEA http://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.779658).

  5. The effects of surface wettability on the fog and dew moisture harvesting performance on tubular surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Seo, Donghyun; Lee, Junghun; Lee, Choongyeop; Nam, Youngsuk

    2016-01-01

    The efficient water harvesting from air-laden moisture has been a subject of great interest to address world-wide water shortage issues. Recently, it has been shown that tailoring surface wettability can enhance the moisture harvesting performance. However, depending on the harvesting condition, a different conclusion has often been reported and it remains unclear what type of surface wettability would be desirable for the efficient water harvesting under the given condition. Here we compare ...

  6. Measuring Soil Moisture using the Signal Strength of Buried Bluetooth Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hut, R.; Campbell, C. S.

    2015-12-01

    A low power bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) device is burried 20cm into the soil and a smartphone is placed on top of the soil to test if bluetooth signal strength can be related to soil moisture. The smartphone continuesly records and stores bluetooth signal strength of the device. The soil is artifcially wetted and drained. Results show a relation between BLE signal strength and soil moisture that could be used to measure soil moisture using these off-the-shelf consumer electronics. This opens the possibily to develop sensors that can be buried into the soil, possibly below the plow-line. These sensors can measure local parameters such as electric conductivity, ph, pressure, etc. Readings would be uploaded to a device on the surface using BLE. The signal strength of this BLE would be an (additional) measurement of soil moisture.

  7. Surface-Atmosphere Moisture Coupling in Eurasian Frozen Ground Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frauenfeld, O. W.; Ford, T.

    2014-12-01

    Permafrost represents an impermeable barrier to moisture, resulting in a saturated or near-saturated surface layer during the warm season in many continuous and discontinuous permafrost zones. These surface conditions could lead to enhanced convection and precipitation during the warm season, and significant local recycling of moisture. In areas underlain by sporadic or isolated permafrost, or in seasonally frozen areas, the moisture can drain away more readily, resulting in much drier soil conditions. As climate change causes frozen ground degradation, this will thus also alter the patterns of atmospheric convection, moisture recycling, and the hydrologic cycle in high-latitude land areas. In this study, we analyze evaporative fraction (EF) as a proxy for evapotranspiration, and precipitation from the Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA-land) reanalysis dataset. We focus on 1979-2012 and document patterns and changes in EF over the Eurasian high latitudes. We find strong, positive April EF trends over the study period, particularly in the Lena River Basin, 80% of which is underlain by continuous permafrost. In fact, these significant positive trends in spring EF are strongest over continuous permafrost across the Eurasian high latitudes, but negative for sporadic and isolated permafrost. In addition, we find a strong, statistically significant relationship between EF anomalies and the probability of subsequent precipitation over the Lena Basin during April. This association therefore suggests a potential land-atmosphere coupling between frozen ground and precipitation. As the permafrost and seasonally frozen ground distribution changes in the future, this will likely have repercussions for the Arctic hydrologic cycle.

  8. Atmospheric moisture supersaturatons in the near-surface atmosphere of Dome C, Antarctic Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genthon, Christophe; Piard, Luc; Vignon, Etienne; Madeleine, Jean-Baptiste; Casado, Mathieu; Gallée, Hubert

    2017-04-01

    Moisture supersaturations occur at the top of the troposphere where cirrus clouds form, but is comparatively unusual near the surface where the air is generally warmer and laden with liquid and/or ice condensation nuclei. One exception is the surface of the high antarctic plateau. This study presents one year of atmospheric moisture measurement at the surface of Dome C on the East Antarctic plateau. The measurements are obtained using commercial hygrometry sensors adapted to allow air sampling without affecting the moisture content even in case of supersaturation. Supersaturation is found to be very frequent. Common unadapted hygrometry sensors generally fail to report supersaturation, and most reports of atmospheric moisture on the antarctic plateau are thus likely biased low. The measurements are compared with results from 2 models with cold microphysics parametrizations: the European Center for Medium-range Weather Forecasts through its operational analyses, and the Model Atmosphérique Régional. As in the observations, supersaturation is frequent in the models but the statistical distribution differs both between models and observations and between the 2 models, leaving much room for model improvement. The representation of supersaturations is not critical for the estimations of surface sublimation since they are more frequent as temperature is lower i.e. as moisture quantities and water fluxes are small. However, ignoring near-surface supersaturation may be a more serious issue for the modeling of fog and when considering water isotopes, a tracer of phase change and temperature, largely used to reconstruct past climates and environments from ice cores. Because observations are easier in the surface atmosphere, longer and more continuous in situ observation series of atmospheric supersaturation can be obtained than higher in the atmosphere to test parameterizations of cold microphysics, such as those used in the formation of high altitude cirrus clouds in

  9. A simple interpretation of the surface tenperature/vegetation index space for assessment of soil moisture status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandholt, Inge; Andersen, J.; Rasmussen, Kjeld

    2002-01-01

    Remote Sensing, soil moisture, surface temperature, vegetation index, hydrology, Africa, Senegal, semiarid......Remote Sensing, soil moisture, surface temperature, vegetation index, hydrology, Africa, Senegal, semiarid...

  10. A 3-step framework for understanding the added value of surface soil moisture measurements for large-scale runoff prediction via data assimilation - a synthetic study in the Arkansas-Red River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Y.; Crow, W. T.; Nijssen, B.

    2017-12-01

    Soil moisture (SM) plays an important role in runoff generation both by partitioning infiltration and surface runoff during rainfall events and by controlling the rate of subsurface flow during inter-storm periods. Therefore, more accurate SM state estimation in hydrologic models is potentially beneficial for streamflow prediction. Various previous studies have explored the potential of assimilating SM data into hydrologic models for streamflow improvement. These studies have drawn inconsistent conclusions, ranging from significantly improved runoff via SM data assimilation (DA) to limited or degraded runoff. These studies commonly treat the whole assimilation procedure as a black box without separating the contribution of each step in the procedure, making it difficult to attribute the underlying causes of runoff improvement (or the lack thereof). In this study, we decompose the overall DA process into three steps by answering the following questions (3-step framework): 1) how much can assimilation of surface SM measurements improve surface SM state in a hydrologic model? 2) how much does surface SM improvement propagate to deeper layers? 3) How much does (surface and deeper-layer) SM improvement propagate into runoff improvement? A synthetic twin experiment is carried out in the Arkansas-Red River basin ( 600,000 km2) where a synthetic "truth" run, an open-loop run (without DA) and a DA run (where synthetic surface SM measurements are assimilated) are generated. All model runs are performed at 1/8 degree resolution and over a 10-year period using the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrologic model at a 3-hourly time step. For the DA run, the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) method is applied. The updated surface and deeper-layer SM states with DA are compared to the open-loop SM to quantitatively evaluate the first two steps in the framework. To quantify the third step, a set of perfect-state runs are generated where the "true" SM states are directly inserted

  11. Assessing the Impacts of Urbanization-Associated Land Use/Cover Change on Land Surface Temperature and Surface Moisture: A Case Study in the Midwestern United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yitong Jiang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Urbanization-associated land use and land cover (LULC changes lead to modifications of surface microclimatic and hydrological conditions, including the formation of urban heat islands and changes in surface runoff pattern. The goal of the paper is to investigate the changes of biophysical variables due to urbanization induced LULC changes in Indianapolis, USA, from 2001 to 2006. The biophysical parameters analyzed included Land Surface Temperature (LST, fractional vegetation cover, Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI, impervious fractions evaporative fraction, and soil moisture. Land cover classification and changes and impervious fractions were obtained from the National Land Cover Database of 2001 and 2006. The Temperature-Vegetation Index (TVX space was created to analyze how these satellite-derived biophysical parameters change during urbanization. The results showed that the general trend of pixel migration in response to the LULC changes was from the areas of low temperature, dense vegetation cover, and high surface moisture conditions to the areas of high temperature, sparse vegetation cover, and low surface moisture condition in the TVX space. Analyses of the T-soil moisture and T-NDWI spaces revealed similar changed patterns. The rate of change in LST, vegetation cover, and moisture varied with LULC type and percent imperviousness. Compared to conversion from cultivated to residential land, the change from forest to commercial land altered LST and moisture more intensively. Compared to the area changed from cultivated to residential, the area changed from forest to commercial altered 48% more in fractional vegetation cover, 71% more in LST, and 15% more in soil moisture Soil moisture and NDWI were both tested as measures of surface moisture in the urban areas. NDWI was proven to be a useful measure of vegetation liquid water and was more sensitive to the land cover changes comparing to soil moisture. From a change forest to

  12. Estimating surface soil moisture from SMAP observations using a Neural Network technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolassa, J; Reichle, R H; Liu, Q; Alemohammad, S H; Gentine, P; Aida, K; Asanuma, J; Bircher, S; Caldwell, T; Colliander, A; Cosh, M; Collins, C Holifield; Jackson, T J; Martínez-Fernández, J; McNairn, H; Pacheco, A; Thibeault, M; Walker, J P

    2018-01-01

    A Neural Network (NN) algorithm was developed to estimate global surface soil moisture for April 2015 to March 2017 with a 2-3 day repeat frequency using passive microwave observations from the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite, surface soil temperatures from the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System Model version 5 (GEOS-5) land modeling system, and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer-based vegetation water content. The NN was trained on GEOS-5 soil moisture target data, making the NN estimates consistent with the GEOS-5 climatology, such that they may ultimately be assimilated into this model without further bias correction. Evaluated against in situ soil moisture measurements, the average unbiased root mean square error (ubRMSE), correlation and anomaly correlation of the NN retrievals were 0.037 m 3 m -3 , 0.70 and 0.66, respectively, against SMAP core validation site measurements and 0.026 m 3 m -3 , 0.58 and 0.48, respectively, against International Soil Moisture Network (ISMN) measurements. At the core validation sites, the NN retrievals have a significantly higher skill than the GEOS-5 model estimates and a slightly lower correlation skill than the SMAP Level-2 Passive (L2P) product. The feasibility of the NN method was reflected by a lower ubRMSE compared to the L2P retrievals as well as a higher skill when ancillary parameters in physically-based retrievals were uncertain. Against ISMN measurements, the skill of the two retrieval products was more comparable. A triple collocation analysis against Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2) and Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) soil moisture retrievals showed that the NN and L2P retrieval errors have a similar spatial distribution, but the NN retrieval errors are generally lower in densely vegetated regions and transition zones.

  13. Measuring of moisture content in biofuel; Fukthaltsmaetning av biobraensle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, Lars; Njurell, Rolf; Ehleskog, Rickard [AaF Energikonsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2002-04-01

    Direct determination of the moisture content, i.e. analysis of the fuel, is the most dominating moisture measuring method of today, and is usually done manually by weighing and drying a sample. By measuring on the exhaust gases the moisture content is determined indirect. This method is based upon the fact that there is a relation between the moisture content in the fuel and in the exhaust gases. This is an alternative that is only considered briefly in this report. Acceptance test of the fuel today takes place in several ways. The methods vary from advanced automatic mechanical devices to manually taken tests made by the driver him self. In the simplest case when the plant only has one fuel supplier, deduction is maid against the amount of produced energy. There are no systems today that can automatically take tests for continuous measuring. This project aims to find methods that are practical for direct, automatic and continuous measurement of the moisture content for the following applications: Moisture determination of fuel supplies, acceptance test. Moisture determination for combustion control in furnaces and boilers. The possibilities to automate the sampling are discussed in detail, at which important background information concerning the handling problems associated with the point of measuring is illustrated. The measurement techniques that are described more in detail are NIR (Near Infra Red), radar technique, microwave technique, radio frequency scan, radioactive technique, double energy X-ray and some combinations of these techniques. In the report, suppliers of interesting instruments are presented. The fundamental technical demands and the basis that should be included in a specification of a measuring device are gathered. Our appraisal is that a sequel to this project should be concentrated on the following main issues: Automatic acceptance test: The measuring is suggested to be done with a test probe direct in the incoming batch. The most suited

  14. The SMAP Level 4 Surface and Root-zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichle, Rolf; Crow, Wade; Koster, Randal; Kimball, John

    2010-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) mission is being developed by NASA for launch in 2013 as one of four first-tier missions recommended by the U.S. National Research Council Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space in 2007. The primary science objectives of SMAP are to enhance understanding of land surface controls on the water, energy and carbon cycles, and to determine their linkages. Moreover, the high resolution soil moisture mapping provided by SMAP has practical applications in weather and seasonal climate prediction, agriculture, human health, drought and flood decision support. In this paper we describe the assimilation of SMAP observations for the generation of the planned SMAP Level 4 Surface and Root-zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) product. The SMAP mission makes simultaneous active (radar) and passive (radiometer) measurements in the 1.26-1.43 GHz range (L-band) from a sun-synchronous low-earth orbit. Measurements will be obtained across a 1000 km wide swath using conical scanning at a constant incidence angle (40 deg). The radar resolution varies from 1-3 km over the outer 70% of the swath to about 30 km near the center of the swath. The radiometer resolution is 40 km across the entire swath. The radiometer measurements will allow high-accuracy but coarse resolution (40 km) measurements. The radar measurements will add significantly higher resolution information. The radar is however very sensitive to surface roughness and vegetation structure. The combination of the two measurements allows optimal blending of the advantages of each instrument. SMAP directly observes only surface soil moisture (in the top 5 cm of the soil column). Several of the key applications targeted by SMAP, however, require knowledge of root zone soil moisture (approximately top 1 m of the soil column), which is not directly measured by SMAP. The foremost objective of the SMAP L4_SM product is to fill this gap and provide estimates of root zone soil moisture

  15. Hysteresis and Temperature Dependency of Moisture Sorption – New Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2011-01-01

    for combined heat and moisture transport in materials. There is a need for further elaboration of the importance of these issues, and it is the intent of this paper to contribute to such elaboration. The paper seeks to contribute to the knowledge base about such sorption characteristic by presenting some new...... measurements of hysteresis and temperature dependency of the moisture sorption characteristics of three different porous building materials: aerated concrete, cement paste and spruce. Scanning curves are measured for all three materials where periods with adsorption and desorption interrupt each other...

  16. Unsaturated soil moisture drying and wetting diffusion coefficient measurements in the laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    ABSTRACTTransient moisture flow in an unsaturated soil in response to suction changes is controlled by the unsaturated moisture diffusion coefficient. The moisture diffusion coefficient can be determined by measuring suction profiles over time. The l...

  17. Multivariate assimilation of coarse scale soil moisture, cosmic-ray soil moisture, land surface temperature and leaf area index in CLM4.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xujun; Hendricks Franssen, Harrie-Jan; Schalge, Bernd; Baroni, Gabriele; Rihani, Jehan; Kollet, Stefan; Vereecken, Harry; Simmer, Clemens

    2017-04-01

    The land surface plays a central role in the atmosphere - land surface - subsurface continuum. Surface soil moisture for instance impacts the partitioning of absorbed radiation in heating ground and atmosphere and thus impacts resulting evapotranspiration. The land surface also drives partitioning of rainfall between infiltration which ends up as groundwater recharge and surface runoff contributing to stream discharge. It is therefore expected that the use of observations for characterizing and predicting the land surface state also leads to improved state estimations and predictions in all the other sub-compartments of the system we consider: groundwater, stream discharge and atmosphere. To test this hypothesis requires efficient data assimilation schemes that are capable to take up specific requirements of different compartments, such as different time windows of observations. In this study we will derive such data assimilation methods and quantify the improvement of predictions in the different compartments due to assimilation of multiple observations, and evaluate to what extent assimilation of land surface observations will also improve predictions of land surface states and fluxes for atmosphere and groundwater. We argue that improvements can be achieved by implementing a data assimilation methodology that is capable of simultaneous assimilation of many data sources (remote sensing soil moisture, cosmic-ray measurement for soil moisture, land surface temperature and leaf area index) at different spatial scales ranging from 102 m to 104 m. The multivariate data assimilation system for the land-surface component will be developed and extended to assimilate the coarse scale remote sensing soil moisture, cosmic-ray soil moisture, land surface temperature and leaf area index, and their different combinations using the local ensemble transform Kalman filter. The multivariate data assimilation will be evaluated using a synthetic study which mimics the Neckar

  18. A Unilateral Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Sensor for Nondestructive Wood Moisture Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YU Deng-jie

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available An unilateral nuclear magnetic resonance (UMR sensor was designed to measure wood moisture nondestructively. The sensor consisted of a unilateral magnet, an anti-eddy current module, a radiofrequency (RF coil and an impedance matching and tuning circuit. The sensor produced a static magnetic field of 71.1 mT (resonant frequency:3.027 MHz in a 50 mm×50 mm plane locating 75 mm above the sensor's surface. Preliminary nondestructive measurement of wood moisture was carried out with the sensor. The moisture distribution in the radical direction of a cylindrical wood sample was scanned. Variations in transverse relaxation time (T2 from the bark to core were obtained. Evaporation of moisture during wood drying was also measured with the UMR sensor. Experimental results showed that:the peak of long T2 component in the T2 spectrum moved to left and the peak integral area decreased gradually during drying. The integral area was proportional to the moisture content of the sample. The work presents a portable UMR device for wood research which may potentially be used for nondestructive moisture measurement on living trees in situ.

  19. An evaluation of ASCAT surface soil moisture products with in-situ observations in Southwestern France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Albergel

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available A long term data acquisition effort of profile soil moisture is currently underway at 13 automatic weather stations located in Southwestern France. In this study, the soil moisture measured in-situ at 5 cm is used to evaluate the normalised surface soil moisture (SSM estimates derived from coarse-resolution (25 km active microwave data of the ASCAT scatterometer instrument (onboard METOP, issued by EUMETSAT for a period of 6 months (April–September in 2007. The seasonal trend is removed from the satellite and in-situ time series by considering scaled anomalies. One station (Mouthoumet of the ground network, located in a mountainous area, is removed from the analysis as very few ASCAT SSM estimates are available. No correlation is found for the station of Narbonne, which is close to the Mediterranean sea. On the other hand, nine stations present significant correlation levels. For two stations, a significant correlation is obtained when considering only part of the ASCAT data. The soil moisture measured in-situ at those stations, at 30 cm, is used to estimate the characteristic time length (T of an exponential filter applied to the ASCAT product. The best correlation between a soil water index derived from ASCAT and the in-situ soil moisture observations at 30 cm is obtained with a T-value of 14 days.

  20. An evaluation of ASCAT surface soil moisture products with in-situ observations in Southwestern France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albergel, C.; Rüdiger, C.; Carrer, D.; Calvet, J.-C.; Fritz, N.; Naeimi, V.; Bartalis, Z.; Hasenauer, S.

    2009-02-01

    A long term data acquisition effort of profile soil moisture is currently underway at 13 automatic weather stations located in Southwestern France. In this study, the soil moisture measured in-situ at 5 cm is used to evaluate the normalised surface soil moisture (SSM) estimates derived from coarse-resolution (25 km) active microwave data of the ASCAT scatterometer instrument (onboard METOP), issued by EUMETSAT for a period of 6 months (April-September) in 2007. The seasonal trend is removed from the satellite and in-situ time series by considering scaled anomalies. One station (Mouthoumet) of the ground network, located in a mountainous area, is removed from the analysis as very few ASCAT SSM estimates are available. No correlation is found for the station of Narbonne, which is close to the Mediterranean sea. On the other hand, nine stations present significant correlation levels. For two stations, a significant correlation is obtained when considering only part of the ASCAT data. The soil moisture measured in-situ at those stations, at 30 cm, is used to estimate the characteristic time length (T) of an exponential filter applied to the ASCAT product. The best correlation between a soil water index derived from ASCAT and the in-situ soil moisture observations at 30 cm is obtained with a T-value of 14 days.

  1. Ultrasonic measurement of elastic constants in fiber-reinforced polymer composites under influence of absorbed moisture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S.A.; Toftegaard, H.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents an attempt to quantify hygral aging in fiber-reinforced polymer composites by the elastic constants C-11 and C-33. Quantitative ultrasonic measurements of the elastic constants for three different unidirectional as well as three different cross-ply specimens were compared. The......, and typically moisture expansion coefficients are reported. Moreover, as the ultrasonic pulse form changed in the anisotropic materials, different broadband methods were used to calculate the elastic constants. (C) 2000 Published by Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved........ The specimens were manufactured with different moisture resistant surfaces and immersed in water for 24 h. By calculating the elastic constants, it was taken into account that hygral aging was accompanied by absorption of moisture in the polymer matrix. Moisture changed the laminate dimensions significantly...

  2. Soil surface moisture estimation over a semi-arid region using ENVISAT ASAR radar data for soil evaporation evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zribi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper proposes a method for the evaluation of soil evaporation, using soil moisture estimations based on radar satellite measurements. We present firstly an approach for the estimation and monitoring of soil moisture in a semi-arid region in North Africa, using ENVISAT ASAR images, over two types of vegetation covers. The first mapping process is dedicated solely to the monitoring of moisture variability related to rainfall events, over areas in the "non-irrigated olive tree" class of land use. The developed approach is based on a simple linear relationship between soil moisture and the backscattered radar signal normalised at a reference incidence angle. The second process is proposed over wheat fields, using an analysis of moisture variability due to both rainfall and irrigation. A semi-empirical model, based on the water-cloud model for vegetation correction, is used to retrieve soil moisture from the radar signal. Moisture mapping is carried out over wheat fields, showing high variability between irrigated and non-irrigated wheat covers. This analysis is based on a large database, including both ENVISAT ASAR and simultaneously acquired ground-truth measurements (moisture, vegetation, roughness, during the 2008–2009 vegetation cycle. Finally, a semi-empirical approach is proposed in order to relate surface moisture to the difference between soil evaporation and the climate demand, as defined by the potential evaporation. Mapping of the soil evaporation is proposed.

  3. Moisture measurements in single-family houses with attics containing radiant barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levins, W.P.; Karnitz, M.A.; Hall, J.A.

    1989-02-01

    Tests were conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers at three unoccupied research houses in Karns, Tennessee, to determine the effects of moisture condensation on the underside of perforated horizontal radiant barriers during the winter of 1987-88. An experimental plan called for the houses to be operated at high indoor relative humidities (45 and 55% at 70/degree/F), with data concerning the attic moisture conditions collected by both visual and instrument measurements. The testing showed that moisture went through a diurnal cycle at the Karns research houses. Moisture could condense on the bottom surface of a horizontal barrier in cold (below 35/degree/F) weather, but it could also dissipate to the attic air during a normal Tennessee winter afternoon, leaving the barrier dry. In long periods of subfreezing weather, all the condensation did not vaporize, as some remained on the surface through the day. However, the testing did show that the moisture cycle occurring on a perforated horizontal radiant barrier during a typical Tennessee winter did not appear to pose any structural, wet insulation, or strained ceiling problems to the Karns research houses, even though they were operated at higher than normal indoor relative humidities. Care should be taken in extrapolating the observations of this experimental work to areas with prolonged periods of subfreezing weather. The diurnal moisture cycle under a barrier may be different in colder climates. Further testing of horizontal barriers in colder climates is recommended. 21 refs., 45 figs., 11 tabs.

  4. Subcellular Electrical Measurements as a Function of Wood Moisture Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; José L. Colon Quintana; Samuel V. Glass; Joseph E. Jakes; Alex C. Wiedenhoeft

    2015-01-01

    The percolation model developed by Zelinka et al. was based upon macroscale measurements of the electrical conductivity and implicitly treats the wood material as homogenous. The transport mechanism proposed by Jakes et al. depends upon a moisture induced glass transition occurring in the hemicelluloses. This theory suggests that there are likely differences in the...

  5. Measurement of moisture in smoldering smoke and implications for fog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary L. Achtemeier

    2006-01-01

    Smoke from wildland burning in association with fog has been implicated as a visibility hazard over roadways in the southern United States. A project began in 2002 to determine whether moisture released during the smoldering phases of southern prescribed burns could contribute to fog formation. Temperature and relative humidity measurements were taken from 27...

  6. Spatiotemporal Interaction of Near-Surface Soil Moisture Content and Frost Table Depth in a Discontinuous Permafrost Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, X.; Spence, C.; Westbrook, C. J.

    2009-05-01

    The ubiquitous presence of frozen ground in cold regions creates a unique dynamic boundary issue for subsurface water movement and storage. We examined the relationship between ground thaw and spatiotemporal soil moisture patterns at three sites (peatland, wetland and valley) near Yellowknife NT. Thaw depth and near-surface soil moisture were measured along a systematic grid at each site. Energy and water budgets were computed for each site to explain the soil moisture patterns. At the peatland, overall soil moisture decreased through the summer and became more spatially homogeneous with deepened thaw, increased subsurface storage capacity, and drying from evapotranspiration. In the peatland and wetland, accumulated water in depressions maintained soils at higher soil moistures for a longer duration than the hummock tops. The depressions had deeper frost tables than the drier hummock tops because the organic mats covering the hummocks insulated the ground and retarded ground thaw. The wettest soils were often locations of deepest thaw depth due to surface ponding and the transfer of latent heat accompanying surface runoff from upslopes. For example, the 3.3 ha wetland received 3.08x105 m3 of surface inflow from a lake with 2.32 kJm-2 of convective heat available to be transferred into the frozen ground over the study period. Soil moisture patterns also revealed preferential surface and subsurface flow routes. The findings indicate that the presence of frozen ground and differential thawing have a diverse and dynamic relationship with near-surface soil moisture content. When the impermeable boundary is dynamic, and controlled by water and energy fluxes, thicker soil layers are associated with higher moisture. This contrasts findings from temperate regions with a fixed impermeable boundary which show that surface soil moisture content can be lower in areas with thick soil.

  7. [The relationship between the variation rate of MODIS land surface temperature and AMSR-E soil moisture and its application to downscaling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, An-Qi; Xie, Chao; Shi, Jian-Cheng; Gong, Hui-Li

    2013-03-01

    Using AMSR-E soil moisture, MODIS land surface temperature (Ts) and vegetation index product, the authors discuss the relationship between the variation rate of land surface temperature and surface soil moisture. Selecting the plains region of central United States as the study area, the authors propose the distribution triangle of the variation rate of land surface temperature and soil moisture. In the present paper, temperature variation and vegetation index (TVVI), a new index containing the information of temperature variation and vegetation, is introduced. The authors prove that TVVI and soil moisture show a steady relationship of exponential function; and build a quantitative model of soil moisture(SM) and instantaneous surface temperature variation (VTs). The authors later achieve downscaling of AMSR-E soil moisture data, through the above stated functional relationships and high-resolution MODIS data. Comparison with measured data on ground surface indicates that this method of downscaling is of high precision

  8. Development of resistance type moisture measuring device for grains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadiq Sius LAWAL

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a study aimed at developing an indigenous moisture measuring device from locally available materials for grains based on the principle of resistance change of the material with corresponding change in moisture during drying. The developed device has four copper electrode cups positions in which both gauging and dummy copper electrode cups were placed to form Wheatstone bridge circuits of full, half and quarter for four, two and one gauging copper electrode cups respectively, while the remaining positions were used as dummies. These circuits were used to measure the resistances and hence obtaining the moisture content of the grains used. Grains of paddy rice, guinea corn and millet were used to test the device and it was observed that for full bridge circuits of each of the grains, paddy rice have a negative coefficient of correlation of -0.95, -0.99 for guinea corn and -0.99 for millet. The results obtained from predictive empirical equations when compared with the direct oven method, showed that the device can be used to predict or measure moisture content once calibrated.

  9. Comparisons of Satellite Soil Moisture, an Energy Balance Model Driven by LST Data and Point Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laiolo, Paola; Gabellani, Simone; Rudari, Roberto; Boni, Giorgio; Puca, Silvia

    2013-04-01

    Soil moisture plays a fundamental role in the partitioning of mass and energy fluxes between land surface and atmosphere, thereby influencing climate and weather, and it is important in determining the rainfall-runoff response of catchments; moreover, in hydrological modelling and flood forecasting, a correct definition of moisture conditions is a key factor for accurate predictions. Different sources of information for the estimation of the soil moisture state are currently available: satellite data, point measurements and model predictions. All are affected by intrinsic uncertainty. Among different satellite sensors that can be used for soil moisture estimation three major groups can be distinguished: passive microwave sensors (e.g., SSMI), active sensors (e.g. SAR, Scatterometers), and optical sensors (e.g. Spectroradiometers). The last two families, mainly because of their temporal and spatial resolution seem the most suitable for hydrological applications In this work soil moisture point measurements from 10 sensors in the Italian territory are compared of with the satellite products both from the HSAF project SM-OBS-2, derived from the ASCAT scatterometer, and from ACHAB, an operative energy balance model that assimilate LST data derived from MSG and furnishes daily an evaporative fraction index related to soil moisture content for all the Italian region. Distributed comparison of the ACHAB and SM-OBS-2 on the whole Italian territory are performed too.

  10. Atmospheric moisture supersaturation in the near-surface atmosphere at Dome C, Antarctic Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genthon, Christophe; Piard, Luc; Vignon, Etienne; Madeleine, Jean-Baptiste; Casado, Mathieu; Gallée, Hubert

    2017-01-01

    Supersaturation often occurs at the top of the troposphere where cirrus clouds form, but is comparatively unusual near the surface where the air is generally warmer and laden with liquid and/or ice condensation nuclei. One exception is the surface of the high Antarctic Plateau. One year of atmospheric moisture measurement at the surface of Dome C on the East Antarctic Plateau is presented. The measurements are obtained using commercial hygrometry sensors modified to allow air sampling without affecting the moisture content, even in the case of supersaturation. Supersaturation is found to be very frequent. Common unadapted hygrometry sensors generally fail to report supersaturation, and most reports of atmospheric moisture on the Antarctic Plateau are thus likely biased low. The measurements are compared with results from two models implementing cold microphysics parameterizations: the European Center for Medium-range Weather Forecasts through its operational analyses, and the Model Atmosphérique Régional. As in the observations, supersaturation is frequent in the models but the statistical distribution differs both between models and observations and between the two models, leaving much room for model improvement. This is unlikely to strongly affect estimations of surface sublimation because supersaturation is more frequent as temperature is lower, and moisture quantities and thus water fluxes are small anyway. Ignoring supersaturation may be a more serious issue when considering water isotopes, a tracer of phase change and temperature, largely used to reconstruct past climates and environments from ice cores. Because observations are easier in the surface atmosphere, longer and more continuous in situ observation series of atmospheric supersaturation can be obtained than higher in the atmosphere to test parameterizations of cold microphysics, such as those used in the formation of high-altitude cirrus clouds in meteorological and climate models.

  11. WindSat/Coriolis surface soil moisture (LPRM) L2 V001 (LPRM_WINDSAT_SOILM2) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — WindSat/Coriolis surface soil moisture (LPRM) L2 V001 is a Level 2 (swath) data set. Its land surface parameters, surface soil moisture, land surface (skin)...

  12. TAKING VARIOUS AGRO-TECHNICAL MEASURES FOR THE PRESERVATION AND ACCUMULATION OF MOISTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. Khalilov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ARTICLE RETRACTEDAim. The aim is to conduct a theoretical study of the conditions of occurrence of surface runoff and take technical measures for its prevention.Discussion. The occurrence of surface runoff is possible on condition that the intensity of moisture entry per time unit is greater than the intensity of its absorption and passage through the topsoil. Conditions of surface runoff occur at high intensity of moisture entering the soil surface which can be in the case of heavy rainfall, low water permeability of topsoil as a result of the increased density. The upper topsoil not affected by loosening passes moisture worse than loosened. Low water conductivity of the arable layer may be due to the fact that it is saturated with moisture up to the limit, and the underlying subsoil layers do not absorb or absorb not enough water, pass water less than enters through the upper topsoil. This phenomenon leads to oversaturation of the top plowed layer by water, which can lead to water erosion and landslide.Conclusion. We obtained analytical expressions describing the process of accumulation of moisture in the soil and the formation of surface runoff, which also allow to theoretically justify the need for different agronomic techniques impact on soil. We should select tools and soil impact techniques in order to preserve and accumulate moisture with account of the certain agrolandscape conditions specific to these fields.

  13. Effects of hedgerow systems on soil moisture and unsaturated hydraulics conductivity measured by the Libardi method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S . Prijono

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The hedgerow systems are the agroforestry practices suggesting any positive impacts and negative impacts on soil characteristics. This study evaluated the effects of hedgerows on the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of soil with the Libardi method approach. This study was conducted in North Lampung for 3 months on the hedgerow plots of Peltophorum dassyrachis (P, Gliricidia sepium (G, and without hedgerow plot (K, with four replications. Each plot was watered as much as 150 liters of water until saturated, then the soil surface were covered with the plastic film. Observation of soil moisture content was done to a depth of 70 cm by the 10 cm intervals. Soil moisture content was measured using the Neutron probe that was calibrated to get the value of volumetric water content. Unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of soil was calculated by using the Libardi Equation. Data were tested using the analysis of variance, the least significant different test (LSD, Duncan Multiple Range Test (DMRT, correlation and regression analysis. The results showed that the hedgerow significantly affected the soil moisture content and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. Soil moisture content on the hedgerow plots was lower than the control plots. The value of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity in the hedgerow plots was higher than the control plots. Different types of hedgerows affected the soil moisture content and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. The positive correlation was found between the volumetric soil moisture content and the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of soil.

  14. LPRM/WindSat/Coriolis L2 Surface Soil Moisture, Ancillary Params, and QC V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Level 2 (swath) data set¿s land surface parameters, surface soil moisture, land surface (skin) temperature, and vegetation water content, are derived from...

  15. LPRM/TMI/TRMM L2 Surface Soil Moisture, Ancillary Params, and QC V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Level 2 (swath) data set’s land surface parameters, surface soil moisture, land surface (skin) temperature, and vegetation water content, are derived from...

  16. The effects of surface wettability on the fog and dew moisture harvesting performance on tubular surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Donghyun; Lee, Junghun; Lee, Choongyeop; Nam, Youngsuk

    2016-04-01

    The efficient water harvesting from air-laden moisture has been a subject of great interest to address world-wide water shortage issues. Recently, it has been shown that tailoring surface wettability can enhance the moisture harvesting performance. However, depending on the harvesting condition, a different conclusion has often been reported and it remains unclear what type of surface wettability would be desirable for the efficient water harvesting under the given condition. Here we compare the water harvesting performance of the surfaces with various wettability under two different harvesting conditions-dewing and fogging, and show that the different harvesting efficiency of each surface under these two conditions can be understood by considering the relative importance of the water capturing and removal efficiency of the surface. At fogging, the moisture harvesting performance is determined by the water removal efficiency of the surface with the oil-infused surfaces exhibiting the best performance. Meanwhile, at dewing, both the water capturing and removal efficiency are crucial to the harvesting performance. And well-wetting surfaces with a lower barrier to nucleation of condensates exhibit a better harvesting performance due to the increasing importance of the water capture efficiency over the water removal efficiency at dewing.

  17. Measurement of water content in semi-humid sandy land by using IAE-II neutron moisture gauge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Qi

    1994-01-01

    The feasibility of using a neutron moisture gauge to study moisture change in semi-humid sandy land was affirmed. The gauge is compact and can rapidly take measurements with small errors. It is found that both the inter-substance boundary surface and the space formed in fixing the neutron tube affect obviously the precision of measurements in the survey process. The calibration variance is the most important part of total uncertainty in measurements

  18. Assessment of Surface Soil Moisture Using High-Resolution Multi-Spectral Imagery and Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Hassan-Esfahani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Many crop production management decisions can be informed using data from high-resolution aerial images that provide information about crop health as influenced by soil fertility and moisture. Surface soil moisture is a key component of soil water balance, which addresses water and energy exchanges at the surface/atmosphere interface; however, high-resolution remotely sensed data is rarely used to acquire soil moisture values. In this study, an artificial neural network (ANN model was developed to quantify the effectiveness of using spectral images to estimate surface soil moisture. The model produces acceptable estimations of surface soil moisture (root mean square error (RMSE = 2.0, mean absolute error (MAE = 1.8, coefficient of correlation (r = 0.88, coefficient of performance (e = 0.75 and coefficient of determination (R2 = 0.77 by combining field measurements with inexpensive and readily available remotely sensed inputs. The spatial data (visual spectrum, near infrared, infrared/thermal are produced by the AggieAir™ platform, which includes an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV that enables users to gather aerial imagery at a low price and high spatial and temporal resolutions. This study reports the development of an ANN model that translates AggieAir™ imagery into estimates of surface soil moisture for a large field irrigated by a center pivot sprinkler system.

  19. Initial Validation of ASCAT Soil Moisture Data with In-Situ Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, W.; Naeimi, V.

    2009-04-01

    The Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) is part of the payload of three METOP satellites which constitute the EUMETSAT Polar System (EPS) - Europe's first polar orbiting operational meteorological satellite system. It was designed solely for operational wind monitoring over the oceans, but research with its successor instrument, the scatterometer on board of ERS-1 and ERS-2, has shown that it can also be used for monitoring soil moisture over land surfaces. Therefore, in a cooperation between EUMETSAT and the Vienna University of Technology (TU Wien) a near-real-time (NRT) processing system has been set at EUMETSAT which was declared operational 11 December 2008. The ASCAT soil moisture product is produced in near real-time by EUMETSAT, using the so-called WARP-NRT software originally developed by TU Wien and prototyped for EUMETSAT. ASCAT soil moisture is a Level 2 product delivered in orbit geometry at two different grid spacing: 25 km and 12.5 km. The two products are derived directly and on the same grid as the equivalent ASCAT Level 1b backscatter products, hence the resolution of the soil moisture values is approximately 50/35 km respectively. The ASCAT Level 2 Soil Moisture product is disseminated via EUMETCast-Europe, channel "EPS-3" within 2h from sensing in BUFR format. This poster shows initial validation results of ASCAT soil moisture using in-situ soil moisture observations from different networks in Europe and North America. The initial results show that ASCAT soil moisture data compare slightly more favorably to the in-situ measurements as published results with the ERS scatterometer. It is believed that this is due to some algorithmic improvements, a higher temporal sampling rate and, possibly, the higher radiometric accuracy of ASCAT.

  20. Spectral detection of near-surface moisture content and water-table position in northern peatland ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl M. Meingast; Michael J. Falkowski; Evan S. Kane; Lynette R. Potvin; Brian W. Benscoter; Alistair M.S. Smith; Laura L. Bourgeau-Chavez; Mary Ellen. Miller

    2014-01-01

    Wildland fire occurrence has been increasing in peatland ecosystems during recent decades. As such, there is a need for broadly applicable tools to detect and monitor controls on combustion such as surface peat moisture and water-table position. A field portable spectroradiometer was used to measure surface reflectance of two Sphagnum moss-dominated...

  1. Spatial Variability of Soil Properties and its Impact on Simulated Surface Soil Moisture Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korres, W.; Bothe, T.; Reichenau, T. G.; Schneider, K.

    2015-12-01

    The spatial variability of soil properties (particle size distribution, PSD, and bulk density, BD) has large effects on the spatial variability of soil moisture and therefore on plant growth and surface exchange processes. In model studies, soil properties from soil maps are considered homogeneous over mapping units, which neglects the small scale variability of soil properties and leads to underestimated small scale variability of simulated soil moisture. This study focuses on the validation of spatial variability of simulated surface soil moisture (SSM) in a winter wheat field in Western Germany using the eco-hydrological simulation system DANUBIA. SSM measurements were conducted at 20 different sampling points and nine different dates in 2008. Frequency distributions of BD and PSD were derived from an independent dataset (n = 486) of soil physical properties from Germany and the USA. In the simulations, BD and PSD were parameterized according to these frequency distributions. Mean values, coefficients of variation and frequency distributions of simulated SSM were compared to the field measurements. Using the heterogeneous model parameterization, up to 76 % of the frequency distribution of the measured SSM can be explained. Furthermore, the results show that BD has a larger impact on the variability of SSM than PSD. The introduced approach can be used for simulating mean SSM and SSM variability more accurately and can form the basis for a spatially heterogeneous parameterization of soil properties in mesoscale models.

  2. Downscaling near-surface soil moisture from field to plot scale: A comparative analysis under different environmental conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasta, Paolo; Penna, Daniele; Brocca, Luca; Zuecco, Giulia; Romano, Nunzio

    2018-02-01

    Indirect measurements of field-scale (hectometer grid-size) spatial-average near-surface soil moisture are becoming increasingly available by exploiting new-generation ground-based and satellite sensors. Nonetheless, modeling applications for water resources management require knowledge of plot-scale (1-5 m grid-size) soil moisture by using measurements through spatially-distributed sensor network systems. Since efforts to fulfill such requirements are not always possible due to time and budget constraints, alternative approaches are desirable. In this study, we explore the feasibility of determining spatial-average soil moisture and soil moisture patterns given the knowledge of long-term records of climate forcing data and topographic attributes. A downscaling approach is proposed that couples two different models: the Eco-Hydrological Bucket and Equilibrium Moisture from Topography. This approach helps identify the relative importance of two compound topographic indexes in explaining the spatial variation of soil moisture patterns, indicating valley- and hillslope-dependence controlled by lateral flow and radiative processes, respectively. The integrated model also detects temporal instability if the dominant type of topographic dependence changes with spatial-average soil moisture. Model application was carried out at three sites in different parts of Italy, each characterized by different environmental conditions. Prior calibration was performed by using sparse and sporadic soil moisture values measured by portable time domain reflectometry devices. Cross-site comparisons offer different interpretations in the explained spatial variation of soil moisture patterns, with time-invariant valley-dependence (site in northern Italy) and hillslope-dependence (site in southern Italy). The sources of soil moisture spatial variation at the site in central Italy are time-variant within the year and the seasonal change of topographic dependence can be conveniently

  3. Variability of soil moisture and its relationship with surface albedo

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Continuous observation data collected over the year 2008 at Astronomical Observatory, Thiruvananthapuram in south Kerala (76° 59′E longitude and 8° 30′N latitude) are used to study the diurnal, monthly and seasonal soil moisture variations. The effect of rainfall on diurnal and seasonal soil moisture is discussed.

  4. Variability of soil moisture and its relationship with surface albedo ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    system, soil moisture has a long memory (Pielke et al 1999; Wu et al 2002). The climatic anom- alies persist because the memory of soil moisture .... The colour of the soil at the experimental site varies from dark brown to dark reddish brown as we go to the deeper layers. Correspondingly the soil texture varies from grav-.

  5. Retrieving near surface soil moisture from microwave radiometric observations: current status and future plans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wigneron, J.P.; Calvet, J.C.; Pellarin, T.; vd Griend, A.A.; Berger, M.; Ferrazzoli, P.

    2003-01-01

    Surface soil moisture is a key variable used to describe water and energy exchanges at the land surface/atmosphere interface. Passive microwave remotely sensed data have great potential for providing estimates of soil moisture with good temporal repetition on a daily basis and on a regional scale (∼

  6. Monitoring Multidecadal satellite earth observation of soil moisture products through land surface reanalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albergel, C.; Dorigo, W.; Balsamo, G.; Sabatar, J; de Rosnay, P.; Isaksen, I; Brocca, L; de Jeu, R.A.M.; Wagner, W.

    2013-01-01

    Soil moisture from ERA-Land, a revised version of the land surface components of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Interim reanalysis (ERA-Interim), is used to monitor at a global scale the consistency of a new microwave based multi-satellite surface soil moisture date set

  7. Sensitivity experiments on the response of Vb cyclones to sea surface temperature and soil moisture changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Messmer

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Extratropical cyclones of type Vb, which develop over the western Mediterranean and move northeastward, are major natural hazards that are responsible for heavy precipitation over central Europe. To gain further understanding in the governing processes of these Vb cyclones, the study explores the role of soil moisture and sea surface temperature (SST and their contribution to the atmospheric moisture content. Thereby, recent Vb events identified in the ERA-Interim reanalysis are dynamically downscaled with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model. Results indicate that a mean high-impact summer Vb event is mostly sensitive to an increase in the Mediterranean SSTs and rather insensitive to Atlantic SSTs and soil moisture changes. Hence, an increase of +5 K in Mediterranean SSTs leads to an average increase of 24 % in precipitation over central Europe. This increase in precipitation is mainly induced by larger mean upward moisture flux over the Mediterranean with increasing Mediterranean SSTs. This further invokes an increase in latent energy release, which leads to an increase in atmospheric instability, i.e. in convective available potential energy. Both the increased availability of atmospheric moisture and the increased instability of the atmosphere, which is able to remove extra moisture from the atmosphere due to convective processes, are responsible for the strong increase in precipitation over the entire region influenced by Vb events. Precipitation patterns further indicate that a strong increase in precipitation is found at the eastern coast of the Adriatic Sea for increased Mediterranean SSTs. This premature loss in atmospheric moisture leads to a significant decrease in atmospheric moisture transport to central Europe and the northeastern flanks of the Alpine mountain chain. This leads to a reduction in precipitation in this high-impact region of the Vb event for an increase in Mediterranean SSTs of +5 K. Furthermore, the

  8. The influence of soil moisture on magnetic susceptibility measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, G.; Scholger, R.; Schön, J.

    2006-06-01

    An important methodological question for magnetic susceptibility measurements is if a variation of the soil conductivity, as a result of a change in soil moisture, influences the measured susceptibility values. An answer to this question is essential because an accurate magnetic susceptibility mapping requires a grid of comparable magnetic susceptibility values, which indicate the magnetic iron-mineral contents of the soils. Therefore, in the framework of the MAGPROX project (EU-Project EVK2-CT-1999-00019), the study aims at investigating the influence of soil moisture and the possible correlation between magnetic susceptibility and electric conductivity. This approach was realised by model experiments in the laboratory and a field monitoring experiment, which was performed in an analogical manner as the model. For the laboratory experiment, a plastic tub with a water in- and outflow system and installed lines of electrodes was used. The measurements were carried out with layers of different magnetic material within the experimental sand formation under varying water saturation conditions. For the field experiment, which was carried out from July to December 2003, two test sites were selected. The magnetic susceptibility was measured by means of the recently developed vertical soil profile kappa meter SM400 and a commonly used Bartington MS2D probe. The electric resistivity was recorded using a 4-point light system (laboratory) and a ground conductivity meter EM38 (field). The knowledge of the resistivity of the sand formation enabled an estimation of porosity and water saturation in consideration of the Archie equations. The laboratory experiment results showed a very slight variation of measured magnetic susceptibility under different degrees of moisture, indicating mainly the influence from the diamagnetic contribution of the water volume. A measurement error in connection with the measurement method, for example caused by an interfering effect of soil

  9. The effect of surface sealing on soil moisture dynamics in a semiarid hillslope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sela, S.; Svoray, T.; Assouline, S.

    2010-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms underlying hillslope soil moisture dynamics and vegetation patchiness remains a current challenge in hydrology, especially in ungauged watersheds. In dry areas, these mechanisms include the formation of surface seals, that although directly affects infiltration and evaporation fluxes, researchers usually disregard its development when predicting soil moisture patterns. The role of these seals in shaping spatial and temporal patterns of soil moisture, considered as the primary limiting factor for dry area plant distribution, is still an open research gap. At the LTER Lehavim site, in the center of Israel (31020' N, 34045' E), a typical hillslope (0.115 Km2) was chosen offering different aspects and a classic geomorphologic banding. Annual rainfall is 290 mm, the soils are brown lithosols and arid brown loess and the dominant rock formations are Eocenean limestone and chalk with patches of calcrete. The vegetation is characterised by scattered dwarf shrubs (dominant species Sarcopoterium spinosum) and patches of herbaceous vegetation, mostly annuals, are spread between rocks and dwarf shrubs. An extensive spatial database of soil hydraulic and environmental parameters (e.g. slope, radiation, bulk density) was measured in the field and was interpolated to continuous maps using geostatistical techniques and physically-based models. To explore the effect of soil surface sealing, the Mualem and Assouline (1989) equations, describing the change in hydraulic parameters resulting from soil seal formation, were applied explicitly in space to the entire hillslope. Two simple indices were developed to describe local evaporation rates and the contribution of water from rock outcrops to the downslope soil patches. This spatio-temporal database was used to characterise 1187 cells serving as an input to a numeric model (Hydrus 1D) solving the flow equations to predict soil water content at the single storm and the seasonal scales. Predictions were

  10. Soil Moisture and Temperature Measuring Networks in the Tibetan Plateau and Their Hydrological Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kun; Chen, Yingying; Qin, Jun; Lu, Hui

    2017-04-01

    Assimilation System (GLDAS). 2. Development of New Products. We developed a dual-pass land data assimilation system. The essential idea of the system is to calibrate a land data assimilation system before a normal data assimilation. The calibration is based on satellite data rather than in situ data. Through this way, we may alleviate the impact of uncertainties in determining the error covariance of both observation operator and model operation, as it is always tough to determine the covariance. The performance of the data assimilation system is presented through comparison against the Tibetan Plateau soil moisture measuring networks. And the results are encouraging. 3. Estimation of Soil Parameter Values in a Land Surface Model. We explored the possibility to estimate soil parameter values by assimilating AMSR-E brightness temperature (TB) data. In the assimilation system, the TB is simulated by the coupled system of a land surface model (LSM) and a radiative transfer model (RTM), and the simulation errors highly depend on parameters in both the LSM and the RTM. Thus, sensitive soil parameters may be inversely estimated through minimizing the TB errors. The effectiveness of the estimated parameter values is evaluated against intensive measurements of soil parameters and soil moisture in three grasslands of the Tibetan Plateau and the Mongolian Plateau. The results indicate that this satellite data-based approach can improve the data quality of soil porosity, a key parameter for soil moisture modeling, and LSM simulations with the estimated parameter values reasonably reproduce the measured soil moisture. This demonstrates it is feasible to calibrate LSMs for soil moisture simulations at grid scale by assimilating microwave satellite data, although more efforts are expected to improve the robustness of the model calibration.

  11. Data for moisture measurements during vertical absorption in building porous materials such as brick and limestone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelides, Chris; Arampatzis, George

    2018-04-01

    This article contains the datasets obtained from experiments in laboratory related to moisture propagation in building porous materials. The datasets contain moisture measurements and corresponding time measurements during vertical infiltration experiment in brick and limestone samples. Moisture measurements were carried out using a γ-ray device and water volume absorption was recorded by a computer controlled digital scale.

  12. Spatial Scaling Assessment of Surface Soil Moisture Estimations Using Remotely Sensed Data for Precision Agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan Esfahani, L.; Torres-Rua, A. F.; Jensen, A.; McKee, M.

    2014-12-01

    Airborne and Landsat remote sensing are promising technologies for measuring the response of agricultural crops to variations in several agricultural inputs and environmental conditions. Of particular significance to precision agriculture is surface soil moisture, a key component of the soil water balance, which addresses water and energy exchanges at the surface/atmosphere interface and affects vegetation health. Its estimation using the spectral reflectance of agricultural fields could be of value to agricultural management decisions. While top soil moisture can be estimated using radiometric information from aircraft or satellites and data mining techniques, comparison of results from two different aerial platforms might be complicated because of the differences in spatial scales (high resolution of approximately 0.15m versus coarser resolutions of 30m). This paper presents a combined modeling and scale-based approach to evaluate the impact of spatial scaling in the estimation of surface soil moisture content derived from remote sensing data. Data from Landsat 7 ETM+, Landsat 8 OLI and AggieAirTM aerial imagery are utilized. AggieAirTM is an airborne remote sensing platform developed by Utah State University that includes an autonomous Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) which captures radiometric information at visual, near-infrared, and thermal wavebands at spatial resolutions of 0.15 m or smaller for the optical cameras and about 0.6 m or smaller for the thermal infrared camera. Top soil moisture maps for AggieAir and Landsat are developed and statistically compared at different scales to determine the impact in terms of quantitative predictive capability and feasibility of applicability of results in improving in field management.

  13. Development of an instrument for measuring moisture deep into solid materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westin, R.; Walletun, H.

    1993-01-01

    It is of value in some applications to be able to detect humidity rather deep into a solid material, for example when determining the moisture content in the frame of buildings, in insulation or in biofuels. Common to these measurement problems is that it is difficult to measure moisture in the bulk of a solid, in contrast to the surface layers. In this report is described the principle and the functioning of an instrument to measure moisture at larger depths than other instruments that are available today. It is intended for use primarily on solid materials, not on gases or liquids. Field experience is also reported here. The principle of the measuring technique is nuclear: we have utilized the ability of hydrogen atoms to moderate (or brake) high energy neutrons. If there is hydrogen in the sample, fast neutrons will interact with the hydrogen atoms and one may detect and count low energy, so called thermal neutrons. The intensity of the slow neutron flux is proportional to the water content, if one assumes that hydrogen atoms are water, i.e. moisture

  14. Global observation-based diagnosis of soil moisture control on land surface flux partition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego-Elvira, Belen; Taylor, Christopher M.; Harris, Phil P.; Ghent, Darren; Veal, Karen L.; Folwell, Sonja S.

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture plays a central role in the partition of available energy at the land surface between sensible and latent heat flux to the atmosphere. As soils dry out, evapotranspiration becomes water-limited ("stressed"), and both land surface temperature (LST) and sensible heat flux rise as a result. This change in surface behaviour during dry spells directly affects critical processes in both the land and the atmosphere. Soil water deficits are often a precursor in heat waves, and they control where feedbacks on precipitation become significant. State-of-the-art global climate model (GCM) simulations for the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) disagree on where and how strongly the surface energy budget is limited by soil moisture. Evaluation of GCM simulations at global scale is still a major challenge owing to the scarcity and uncertainty of observational datasets of land surface fluxes and soil moisture at the appropriate scale. Earth observation offers the potential to test how well GCM land schemes simulate hydrological controls on surface fluxes. In particular, satellite observations of LST provide indirect information about the surface energy partition at 1km resolution globally. Here, we present a potentially powerful methodology to evaluate soil moisture stress on surface fluxes within GCMs. Our diagnostic, Relative Warming Rate (RWR), is a measure of how rapidly the land warms relative to the overlying atmosphere during dry spells lasting at least 10 days. Under clear skies, this is a proxy for the change in sensible heat flux as soil dries out. We derived RWR from MODIS Terra and Aqua LST observations, meteorological re-analyses and satellite rainfall datasets. Globally we found that on average, the land warmed up during dry spells for 97% of the observed surface between 60S and 60N. For 73% of the area, the land warmed faster than the atmosphere (positive RWR), indicating water stressed conditions and increases in sensible heat flux

  15. Moisture assessment by fast and non-destructive in situ measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Møller, Eva B.; Hansen, Ernst Jan de Place

    2014-01-01

    moisture content, which is not revealed by this inspection. The moisture content may become a problem for the buyers. This problem might have been avoided if the moisture content of the Building materials was measured on inspection. This is easily done in wood-based materials but for example in concrete...... and brick the moisture content is difficult to determine within a short period time. There is political pressure to include moisture measurements in the report if it does not increase the cost of the inspection significantly. Therefore, a moisture-measuring method is needed that is non-destructive, fast...... to use, easily applicable and suitable for most porous building materials. Furthermore, the measurements must be reliable at the high end of the hygroscopic area and describe absolute moisture content or corresponding relative humidity. The existing methods for moisture measuring cannot meet...

  16. A new probe for in situ TDR moisture measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokuda, E. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, R. [Sonsub Services, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    1993-05-01

    This paper explains the development of a new Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) probe which can be inserted through waste and soil to a depth of 14 feet with minimal labor and minimal soil disturbance. TDR has been used for 10 years as a method for measuring soil moisture contents. Conventional TDR probes are 30 centimeters long and therefore are difficult to insert at depths below a few feet. Recently, a probe has been developed which can be inserted to depths of 14 feet with the use of a vibratory drill. Quality objectives for the instrument, preliminary data, and suggestions for future developments are presented.

  17. A new probe for in situ TDR moisture measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokuda, E. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Smith, R. (Sonsub Services, Inc., Houston, TX (United States))

    1993-01-01

    This paper explains the development of a new Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) probe which can be inserted through waste and soil to a depth of 14 feet with minimal labor and minimal soil disturbance. TDR has been used for 10 years as a method for measuring soil moisture contents. Conventional TDR probes are 30 centimeters long and therefore are difficult to insert at depths below a few feet. Recently, a probe has been developed which can be inserted to depths of 14 feet with the use of a vibratory drill. Quality objectives for the instrument, preliminary data, and suggestions for future developments are presented.

  18. Error in Radar-Derived Soil Moisture due to Roughness Parameterization: An Analysis Based on Synthetical Surface Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard De Baets

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available In the past decades, many studies on soil moisture retrieval from SAR demonstrated a poor correlation between the top layer soil moisture content and observed backscatter coefficients, which mainly has been attributed to difficulties involved in the parameterization of surface roughness. The present paper describes a theoretical study, performed on synthetical surface profiles, which investigates how errors on roughness parameters are introduced by standard measurement techniques, and how they will propagate through the commonly used Integral Equation Model (IEM into a corresponding soil moisture retrieval error for some of the currently most used SAR configurations. Key aspects influencing the error on the roughness parameterization and consequently on soil moisture retrieval are: the length of the surface profile, the number of profile measurements, the horizontal and vertical accuracy of profile measurements and the removal of trends along profiles. Moreover, it is found that soil moisture retrieval with C-band configuration generally is less sensitive to inaccuracies in roughness parameterization than retrieval with L-band configuration.

  19. The impact of land surface temperature on soil moisture anomaly detection from passive microwave observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Parinussa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available For several years passive microwave observations have been used to retrieve soil moisture from the Earth's surface. Low frequency observations have the most sensitivity to soil moisture, therefore the current Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS and future Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP satellite missions observe the Earth's surface in the L-band frequency. In the past, several satellite sensors such as the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-EOS (AMSR-E and WindSat have been used to retrieve surface soil moisture using multi-channel observations obtained at higher microwave frequencies. While AMSR-E and WindSat lack an L-band channel, they are able to leverage multi-channel microwave observations to estimate additional land surface parameters. In particular, the availability of Ka-band observations allows AMSR-E and WindSat to obtain coincident surface temperature estimates required for the retrieval of surface soil moisture. In contrast, SMOS and SMAP carry only a single frequency radiometer and therefore lack an instrument suited to estimate the physical temperature of the Earth. Instead, soil moisture algorithms from these new generation satellites rely on ancillary sources of surface temperature (e.g. re-analysis or near real time data from weather prediction centres. A consequence of relying on such ancillary data is the need for temporal and spatial interpolation, which may introduce uncertainties. Here, two newly-developed, large-scale soil moisture evaluation techniques, the triple collocation (TC approach and the Rvalue data assimilation approach, are applied to quantify the global-scale impact of replacing Ka-band based surface temperature retrievals with Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA surface temperature output on the accuracy of WindSat and AMSR-E based surface soil moisture retrievals. Results demonstrate that under sparsely vegetated conditions, the use of

  20. Estimation of Surface Soil Moisture in Irrigated Lands by Assimilation of Landsat Vegetation Indices, Surface Energy Balance Products, and Relevance Vector Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso F. Torres-Rua

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Spatial surface soil moisture can be an important indicator of crop conditions on farmland, but its continuous estimation remains challenging due to coarse spatial and temporal resolution of existing remotely-sensed products. Furthermore, while preceding research on soil moisture using remote sensing (surface energy balance, weather parameters, and vegetation indices has demonstrated a relationship between these factors and soil moisture, practical continuous spatial quantification of the latter is still unavailable for use in water and agricultural management. In this study, a methodology is presented to estimate volumetric surface soil moisture by statistical selection from potential predictors that include vegetation indices and energy balance products derived from satellite (Landsat imagery and weather data as identified in scientific literature. This methodology employs a statistical learning machine called a Relevance Vector Machine (RVM to identify and relate the potential predictors to soil moisture by means of stratified cross-validation and forward variable selection. Surface soil moisture measurements from irrigated agricultural fields in Central Utah in the 2012 irrigation season were used, along with weather data, Landsat vegetation indices, and energy balance products. The methodology, data collection, processing, and estimation accuracy are presented and discussed.

  1. Nuclear techniques for measuring moisture content in soil profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrada, Y.

    1983-01-01

    The prevailing severe shortage of animal feed in most of the developing countries could, to a considerable extent, be overcome through improved range management, which includes introduction of high yielding drought-resistant forage crops, development of adequate water conservation measures, and as far as possible growing annual forage crops on part of the vast areas of arable land currently left fallow each year. Year round measurements are essential for a good understanding of soil water and nutrients dynamics, which allow for adequate evaluation of pasture management alternatives. The methods most commonly used for moisture measurements in soil profiles are discussed because such measurements are likely to form an essential part of any investigation aimed at increasing animal feed production through the development of adequate pasture management practices. (author)

  2. Spatial and temporal structure within moisture measurements of a stormwater control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisture sensing is a mature soil research technology commonly applied to agriculture. Such sensors may be appropriated for use in novel stormwater research applications. Knowledge of moisture (with respect to space and time) in infiltration based stormwater control measures (SCM...

  3. Foundation products have a measureable impact on moisturization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley-Bowles, Tricia; Liguori, Jillian; Razuri, Farrah; Hubschmitt, Amber; Litchauer, Jill; Aucar, Betty; De Mul, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Multifunctional products are becoming more prevalent in the color cosmetics market. We evaluated four foundation products for in vivo moisturizing benefits using the mini-regression test method. We found that statistically significant long-lasting moisturization was provided by the foundations tested, but only if hygroscopic moisturizing ingredients were present.

  4. Spatial downscaling of SMAP soil moisture using MODIS land surface temperature and NDVI during SMAPVEX15

    Science.gov (United States)

    The SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) mission provides global surface soil moisture product at 36 km resolution from its L-band radiometer. While the coarse resolution is satisfactory to many applications there are also a lot of applications which would benefit from a higher resolution soil moistu...

  5. Role of subsurface physics in the assimilation of surface soil moisture observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil moisture controls the exchange of water and energy between the land surface and the atmosphere and exhibits memory that may be useful for climate prediction at monthly time scales. Though spatially distributed observations of soil moisture are increasingly becoming available from remotely sense...

  6. Parametric exponentially correlated surface emission model for L-band passive microwave soil moisture retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surface soil moisture is an important parameter in hydrology and climate investigations. Current and future satellite missions with L-band passive microwave radiometers can provide valuable information for monitoring the global soil moisture. A factor that can play a significant role in the modeling...

  7. Influence of soil moisture content on surface albedo and soil thermal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The large variability in the soil moisture content is attributed to the rainfall during all the seasons and also to the evaporation/movement of water to deeper layers. The relationship of surface albedo on soil moisture content on different time scales are studied and the influence of solar elevation angle and cloud cover are also ...

  8. The Impact of Microwave-Derived Surface Soil Moisture on Watershed Hydrological Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ONeill, P. E.; Hsu, A. Y.; Jackson, T. J.; Wood, E. F.; Zion, M.

    1997-01-01

    The usefulness of incorporating microwave-derived soil moisture information in a semi-distributed hydrological model was demonstrated for the Washita '92 experiment in the Little Washita River watershed in Oklahoma. Initializing the hydrological model with surface soil moisture fields from the ESTAR airborne L-band microwave radiometer on a single wet day at the start of the study period produced more accurate model predictions of soil moisture than a standard hydrological initialization with streamflow data over an eight-day soil moisture drydown.

  9. Satellite estimation of the surface energy balance, moisture availability and thermal inertia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, T. N.; Dodd, J. K.; Benjamin, S. G.; Cooper, J. N.

    1981-01-01

    A method for inferring the distribution of surface heat and evaporative fluxes and the ground moisture availability and thermal inertia (ground conductive capacity) is used to analyze two urbanized areas, Los Angeles and St. Louis. The technique employs infrared satellite temperature measurements in conjunction with a one-dimensional boundary-layer model. Results show that there is a marked reduction of evaporation and moisture availability and a corresponding elevation of sensible heat flux over urbanized areas and over cropped areas with low vegetative cover. Conversely, low heat flux and high evaporation characterize vegetated and, especially, forested areas. Warm urban centers appear directly related to a reduction in vegetation, which normally allows for a greater fraction of available radiant energy to be converted into latent heat flux. The distribution of thermal inertia was surprisingly ill-defined and its variation between urban and rural areas was quite small. Thus, the increased heat storage within the urban fabric, which has been proposed as the underlying cause of the nocturnal heat island, may be caused mainly by enhanced daytime surface heating which occurs because of surface dryness, rather than by large spatial variations in the conductivity of the surface.

  10. Calibration of rock-surface moisture content using an infrared optical moisture metre : the relationship between absorbance intensity and moisture content of several types of rock

    OpenAIRE

    Matsukura, Yukinori

    2001-01-01

    Matsukura and Takahashi(1999)have examined the possibility of in situ rapid, non-destrucive measuring of rock moisture content using an infrared optical moisture metre. A laboratory test was carried out using ...

  11. Historical development of grain moisture measurement and other food quality sensing through electrical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A review of the use of electrical properties of agricultural products for sensing moisture content and other qualities shows that their use for rapid measurements of the moisture content in grain and seed has been the most successful application. Discovery of useful correlations between the moistur...

  12. Surface cleanliness measurement procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroder, Mark Stewart; Woodmansee, Donald Ernest; Beadie, Douglas Frank

    2002-01-01

    A procedure and tools for quantifying surface cleanliness are described. Cleanliness of a target surface is quantified by wiping a prescribed area of the surface with a flexible, bright white cloth swatch, preferably mounted on a special tool. The cloth picks up a substantial amount of any particulate surface contamination. The amount of contamination is determined by measuring the reflectivity loss of the cloth before and after wiping on the contaminated system and comparing that loss to a previous calibration with similar contamination. In the alternative, a visual comparison of the contaminated cloth to a contamination key provides an indication of the surface cleanliness.

  13. Development of long-wave microwave satellite systems for measuring soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engman, Edwin T.

    1998-12-01

    The science need for remotely sensed soil moisture has been well established in the hydrologic, climate change and weather forecasting communities. There also have been a number of programs that have demonstrated the feasibility of using long wave microwave sensors for estimating soil moisture. These have ranged from truck mounted sensors, to intensive airborne campaigns with science objectives. Based on this history of truck and aircraft experiments, the science community has settled on a soil moisture product that meets the following criteria: a two day global repeat, a measured layer of 5 cm of soil, a footprint of 20 to 30 km, and an absolute accuracy of plus or minus 4% volumetric soil moisture. The principal sensor to accomplish this is an L-band passive microwave radiometer. A soil moisture mission is being proposed for the NASA Earth Systems Science Pathfinder (ESSP) mission which has very real constraints of a limited budget which includes the launch vehicle, and a three year award to launch time schedule. Within the past few years there have been a number of mission concepts proposed that meet the challenge of getting a very large antenna in space in order to realize a spatial resolution on the ground that meets the science and applications needs. This paper describes some of the alternative concepts considered to meet these unusual requirements and the ways to solve the very large antenna challenge, and the criteria used to choose the final design for an ESSP proposal. The paper also discusses the alternatives considered to obtain the necessary ancillary data for characterizing the surface roughness, the surface temperature and the attenuation affects of vegetation.

  14. Upscaling of Surface Soil Moisture Using a Deep Learning Model with VIIRS RDR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongying Zhang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In current upscaling of in situ surface soil moisture practices, commonly used novel statistical or machine learning-based regression models combined with remote sensing data show some advantages in accurately capturing the satellite footprint scale of specific local or regional surface soil moisture. However, the performance of most models is largely determined by the size of the training data and the limited generalization ability to accomplish correlation extraction in regression models, which are unsuitable for larger scale practices. In this paper, a deep learning model was proposed to estimate soil moisture on a national scale. The deep learning model has the advantage of representing nonlinearities and modeling complex relationships from large-scale data. To illustrate the deep learning model for soil moisture estimation, the croplands of China were selected as the study area, and four years of Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS raw data records (RDR were used as input parameters, then the models were trained and soil moisture estimates were obtained. Results demonstrate that the estimated models captured the complex relationship between the remote sensing variables and in situ surface soil moisture with an adjusted coefficient of determination of R ¯ 2 = 0.9875 and a root mean square error (RMSE of 0.0084 in China. These results were more accurate than the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP active radar soil moisture products and the Global Land data assimilation system (GLDAS 0–10 cm depth soil moisture data. Our study suggests that deep learning model have potential for operational applications of upscaling in situ surface soil moisture data at the national scale.

  15. Influence of the convective surface transfer coefficients on the Heat, Air, and Moisture (HAM) building performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steskens, Paul Wilhelmus Maria Hermanus; Janssen, Hans; Rode, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    Current models to predict heat, air and moisture (HAM) conditions in buildings assume constant boundary conditions for the temperature and relative humidity of the neighbouring air and for the surface heat and moisture transfer coefficients. These assumptions may introduce errors in the predicted...... influence on the predicted hygrothermal conditions at the surface of a building component and on the heat and vapour exchange with the indoor environment....

  16. Estimating surface turbulent heat fluxes from land surface temperature and soil moisture using the particle batch smoother

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yang; Dong, Jianzhi; Steele-Dunne, Susan; van de Giesen, Nick

    2016-04-01

    This study is focused on estimating surface sensible and latent heat fluxes from land surface temperature (LST) time series and soil moisture observations. Surface turbulent heat fluxes interact with the overlying atmosphere and play a crucial role in meteorology, hydrology and other climate-related fields, but in-situ measurements are costly and difficult. It has been demonstrated that the time series of LST contains information of energy partitioning and that surface turbulent heat fluxes can be determined from assimilation of LST. These studies are mainly based on two assumptions: (1) a monthly value of bulk heat transfer coefficient under neutral conditions (CHN) which scales the sum of the fluxes, and (2) an evaporation fraction (EF) which stays constant during the near-peak hours of the day. Previous studies have applied variational and ensemble approaches to this problem. Here the newly developed particle batch smoother (PBS) algorithm is adopted to test its capability in this application. The PBS can be seen as an extension of the standard particle filter (PF) in which the states and parameters within a fix window are updated in a batch using all observations in the window. The aim of this study is two-fold. First, the PBS is used to assimilate only LST time series into the force-restore model to estimate fluxes. Second, a simple soil water transfer scheme is introduced to evaluate the benefit of assimilating soil moisture observations simultaneously. The experiments are implemented using the First ISLSCP (International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project) (FIFE) data. It is shown that the restored LST time series using PBS agrees very well with observations, and that assimilating LST significantly improved the flux estimation at both daily and half-hourly time scales. When soil moisture is introduced to further constrain EF, the accuracy of estimated EF is greatly improved. Furthermore, the RMSEs of retrieved fluxes are effectively reduced at both

  17. Assimilation of ASCAT near-surface soil moisture into the SIM hydrological model over France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Draper

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examines whether the assimilation of remotely sensed near-surface soil moisture observations might benefit an operational hydrological model, specifically Météo-France's SAFRAN-ISBA-MODCOU (SIM model. Soil moisture data derived from ASCAT backscatter observations are assimilated into SIM using a Simplified Extended Kalman Filter (SEKF over 3.5 years. The benefit of the assimilation is tested by comparison to a delayed cut-off version of SIM, in which the land surface is forced with more accurate atmospheric analyses, due to the availability of additional atmospheric observations after the near-real time data cut-off. However, comparing the near-real time and delayed cut-off SIM models revealed that the main difference between them is a dry bias in the near-real time precipitation forcing, which resulted in a dry bias in the root-zone soil moisture and associated surface moisture flux forecasts. While assimilating the ASCAT data did reduce the root-zone soil moisture dry bias (by nearly 50%, this was more likely due to a bias within the SEKF, than due to the assimilation having accurately responded to the precipitation errors. Several improvements to the assimilation are identified to address this, and a bias-aware strategy is suggested for explicitly correcting the model bias. However, in this experiment the moisture added by the SEKF was quickly lost from the model surface due to the enhanced surface fluxes (particularly drainage induced by the wetter soil moisture states. Consequently, by the end of each winter, during which frozen conditions prevent the ASCAT data from being assimilated, the model land surface had returned to its original (dry-biased climate. This highlights that it would be more effective to address the precipitation bias directly, than to correct it by constraining the model soil moisture through data assimilation.

  18. Assimilation of ASCAT near-surface soil moisture into the SIM hydrological model over France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, C.; Mahfouf, J.-F.; Calvet, J.-C.; Martin, E.; Wagner, W.

    2011-12-01

    This study examines whether the assimilation of remotely sensed near-surface soil moisture observations might benefit an operational hydrological model, specifically Météo-France's SAFRAN-ISBA-MODCOU (SIM) model. Soil moisture data derived from ASCAT backscatter observations are assimilated into SIM using a Simplified Extended Kalman Filter (SEKF) over 3.5 years. The benefit of the assimilation is tested by comparison to a delayed cut-off version of SIM, in which the land surface is forced with more accurate atmospheric analyses, due to the availability of additional atmospheric observations after the near-real time data cut-off. However, comparing the near-real time and delayed cut-off SIM models revealed that the main difference between them is a dry bias in the near-real time precipitation forcing, which resulted in a dry bias in the root-zone soil moisture and associated surface moisture flux forecasts. While assimilating the ASCAT data did reduce the root-zone soil moisture dry bias (by nearly 50%), this was more likely due to a bias within the SEKF, than due to the assimilation having accurately responded to the precipitation errors. Several improvements to the assimilation are identified to address this, and a bias-aware strategy is suggested for explicitly correcting the model bias. However, in this experiment the moisture added by the SEKF was quickly lost from the model surface due to the enhanced surface fluxes (particularly drainage) induced by the wetter soil moisture states. Consequently, by the end of each winter, during which frozen conditions prevent the ASCAT data from being assimilated, the model land surface had returned to its original (dry-biased) climate. This highlights that it would be more effective to address the precipitation bias directly, than to correct it by constraining the model soil moisture through data assimilation.

  19. Fog-drip contributions to soil moisture as determined through passive fog collector measurements, leaf wetness data, and soil moisture at Pepperwood Preserve, Sonoma County, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheli, L.; Dodge, C.; Fernandez, D.; Weiss, P. L.; Flint, L. E.; Flint, A. L.; Torregrosa, A.

    2016-12-01

    Summertime coastal fog advects from the ocean and transports water inland in the form of fog droplets to forests and grasslands. The amount of fog water delivered to the soil through fog drip from foliage and other surfaces that have captured and accumulated the droplets is often difficult to quantify due to many challenges including the difficulty of measuring the relatively small variations in soil moisture that accompany fog events. This study details summer season records collected from 4 sites at the Pepperwood Preserve in Santa Rosa, CA. Fog drip volumes were measured using 1 m2 standard fog collectors located at a grassland site for the past three summers. Soil moisture measurements were collected for portions of the three summer seasons from three sites: two oak woodland understory sites and a grassland site on the edge of a forest. One oak woodland site was within 400 m of the standard fog collector grassland site. Leaf wetness sensors (LWS) were co-located at all soil moisture sites. We observe a much higher frequency of wet periods at the grassland site than at the nearby oak woodland site during the summer fog season. One hypothesis is that the oak canopy acts to protect the LWS at the oak woodland site from nocturnal radiative cooling, thereby reducing condensation and dew formation. Another hypothesis is that the oak woodland canopy tends sheltered the understory during light fog events, resulting in edge effects that may tend to reduce fog deposition within the canopy. Leaf and soil moisture measurements both during fog events and during periods without fog but when dew point is reached may provide a more complete picture of non-rain mechanisms of moisture delivery to the foliage and the soil. Investigations are on-going to include corresponding meteorological data (wind speed and direction, relative humidity and temperature) to understand relative contributions to the soil associated with both fog and dew and to better distinguish between fog and

  20. A Technical Design Approach to Soil Moisture Content Measurement

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soil moisture is an important type of data in many fields; ranging from agriculture to environmental monitoring. Three soil samples were collected at definite proportions to represent the three basic soil types (sandy, loamy and clay soils). The moisture contents of these soil samples were analyzed using the thermogravimetric ...

  1. Comparison of Soil Moisture in Switzerland Using In-Situ Measurements and Model Output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelbach, H.; Orth, R.; Seneviratne, S. I.

    2011-01-01

    Soil moisture is an essential contributor to land surface- atmosphere interactions. In this study we evaluate the two Land surface models CLM3.5 and SIB3 regarding their performance in simulating soil moisture and its anomalies for the one year period 01.09.2009 to 31.08.2010. Four grassland sites from the SwissSMEX/- Veg project were used as reference soil moisture data. In general, both models represent the soil moisture anomalies and their distribution better than the absolute soil moisture. Furthermore, both models show a seasonal dependence of the correlation and root mean square error. In contrast to the SIB3 model, the CLM3.5 model shows stronger seasonal variation of the root mean square error and a larger interquantile range for soil moisture anomalies.

  2. Multifractal and Singularity Maps of soil surface moisture distribution derived from 2D image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumbrera, Ramiro; Millán, Humberto; Martín-Sotoca, Juan Jose; Pérez Soto, Luis; Sanchez, Maria Elena; Tarquis, Ana Maria

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture distribution usually presents extreme variation at multiple spatial scales. Image analysis could be a useful tool for investigating these spatial patterns of apparent soil moisture at multiple resolutions. The objectives of the present work were (i) to describe the local scaling of apparent soil moisture distribution and (ii) to define apparent soil moisture patterns from vertical planes of Vertisol pit images. Two soil pits (0.70 m long × 0.60 m width × 0.30 m depth) were excavated on a bare Mazic Pellic Vertisol. One was excavated in April/2011 and the other pit was established in May/2011 after 3 days of a moderate rainfall event. Digital photographs were taken from each Vertisol pit using a Kodak™ digital camera. The mean image size was 1600 × 945 pixels with one physical pixel ≈373 μm of the photographed soil pit. For more details see Cumbrera et al. (2012). Geochemical exploration have found with increasingly interests and benefits of using fractal (power-law) models to characterize geochemical distribution, using the concentration-area (C-A) model (Cheng et al., 1994; Cheng, 2012). This method is based on the singularity maps of a measure that at each point define areas with self-similar properties that are shown in power-law relationships in Concentration-Area plots (C-A method). The C-A method together with the singularity map ("Singularity-CA" method) define thresholds that can be applied to segment the map. We have applied it to each soil image. The results show that, in spite of some computational and practical limitations, image analysis of apparent soil moisture patterns could be used to study the dynamical change of soil moisture sampling in agreement with previous results (Millán et al., 2016). REFERENCES Cheng, Q., Agterberg, F. P. and Ballantyne, S. B. (1994). The separation of geochemical anomalies from background by fractal methods. Journal of Geochemical Exploration, 51, 109-130. Cheng, Q. (2012). Singularity theory and

  3. Moisture assessment by fast and non-destructive in-situ measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Eva B.; Hansen, Ernst Jan de Place; Brandt, Erik

    2014-01-01

    to use, easily applicable and suitable for most porous building materials. Furthermore, the measurements must be reliable at the high end of the hygroscopic area and describe absolute moisture content or corresponding relative humidity. The existing methods for moisture measuring cannot meet...... and brick the moisture content is difficult to determine within a short period time. There is political pressure to include moisture measurements in the report if it does not increase the cost of the inspection significantly. Therefore, a moisture-measuring method is needed that is non-destructive, fast...... these requirements, and those who come close are very expensive. This paper describes a method under development; with simple means and within a few hours, the method can measure the absolute moisture content or the corresponding relative humidity in constructions in a non-destructive way. The method is based...

  4. Use of microwave remote sensing data to monitor spatio temporal characteristics of surface soil moisture at local and regional scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Löw

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrologic processes, such as runoff production or evapotranspiration, largely depend on the variation of soil moisture and its spatial pattern. The interaction of electromagnetic waves with the land surface can be dependant on the water content of the uppermost soil layer. Especially in the microwave domain of the electromagnetic spectrum, this is the case. New sensors as e.g. ENVISAT ASAR, allow for frequent, synoptically and homogeneous image acquisitions over larger areas. Parameter inversion models are therefore developed to derive bio- and geophysical parameters from the image products. The paper presents a soil moisture inversion model for ENVISAT ASAR data for local and regional scale applications. The model is validated against in situ soil moisture measurements. The various sources of uncertainties, being related to the inversion process are assessed and quantified.

  5. Laboratory microwave measurement of the moisture content in seed cotton and ginned cotton fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    The timely and accurate measurement of cotton fiber moisture content is important, but the measurement is often performed by laborious, time-consuming laboratory oven drying methods. Microwave technology for measuring fiber moisture content directly (not for drying only) offers potential advantages...

  6. Cross-evaluation of modelled and remotely sensed surface soil moisture with in situ data in southwestern France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albergel, C.; Calvet, J.-C.; de Rosnay, P.; Balsamo, G.; Wagner, W.; Hasenauer, S.; Naeimi, V.; Martin, E.; Bazile, E.; Bouyssel, F.; Mahfouf, J.-F.

    2010-11-01

    The SMOSMANIA soil moisture network in Southwestern France is used to evaluate modelled and remotely sensed soil moisture products. The surface soil moisture (SSM) measured in situ at 5 cm permits to evaluate SSM from the SIM operational hydrometeorological model of Météo-France and to perform a cross-evaluation of the normalised SSM estimates derived from coarse-resolution (25 km) active microwave observations from the ASCAT scatterometer instrument (C-band, onboard METOP), issued by EUMETSAT and resampled to the Discrete Global Grid (DGG, 12.5 km gridspacing) by TU-Wien (Vienna University of Technology) over a two year period (2007-2008). A downscaled ASCAT product at one kilometre scale is evaluated as well, together with operational soil moisture products of two meteorological services, namely the ALADIN numerical weather prediction model (NWP) and the Integrated Forecasting System (IFS) analysis of Météo-France and ECMWF, respectively. In addition to the operational SSM analysis of ECMWF, a second analysis using a simplified extended Kalman filter and assimilating the ASCAT SSM estimates is tested. The ECMWF SSM estimates correlate better with the in situ observations than the Météo-France products. This may be due to the higher ability of the multi-layer land surface model used at ECMWF to represent the soil moisture profile. However, the SSM derived from SIM corresponds to a thin soil surface layer and presents good correlations with ASCAT SSM estimates for the very first centimetres of soil. At ECMWF, the use of a new data assimilation technique, which is able to use the ASCAT SSM, improves the SSM and the root-zone soil moisture analyses.

  7. Cross-evaluation of modelled and remotely sensed surface soil moisture with in situ data in southwestern France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Albergel

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The SMOSMANIA soil moisture network in Southwestern France is used to evaluate modelled and remotely sensed soil moisture products. The surface soil moisture (SSM measured in situ at 5 cm permits to evaluate SSM from the SIM operational hydrometeorological model of Météo-France and to perform a cross-evaluation of the normalised SSM estimates derived from coarse-resolution (25 km active microwave observations from the ASCAT scatterometer instrument (C-band, onboard METOP, issued by EUMETSAT and resampled to the Discrete Global Grid (DGG, 12.5 km gridspacing by TU-Wien (Vienna University of Technology over a two year period (2007–2008. A downscaled ASCAT product at one kilometre scale is evaluated as well, together with operational soil moisture products of two meteorological services, namely the ALADIN numerical weather prediction model (NWP and the Integrated Forecasting System (IFS analysis of Météo-France and ECMWF, respectively. In addition to the operational SSM analysis of ECMWF, a second analysis using a simplified extended Kalman filter and assimilating the ASCAT SSM estimates is tested. The ECMWF SSM estimates correlate better with the in situ observations than the Météo-France products. This may be due to the higher ability of the multi-layer land surface model used at ECMWF to represent the soil moisture profile. However, the SSM derived from SIM corresponds to a thin soil surface layer and presents good correlations with ASCAT SSM estimates for the very first centimetres of soil. At ECMWF, the use of a new data assimilation technique, which is able to use the ASCAT SSM, improves the SSM and the root-zone soil moisture analyses.

  8. Moisture disturbance when measuring boron content in wet glass fibre materials with thermal neutron transmission method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhiping; Liu Shengkang; Zhang Yongjie

    2001-01-01

    The theoretical calculation and experimental study on the moisture disturbance in the boron content measurement of wet glass fibre materials using the thermal neutron transmission method were reported. The relevant formula of the moisture disturbance was derived. For samples with a mass of 16 g, it was found that a moisture variation of 1% (mass percent) would result in a deviation of 0.28% (mass percent) in the measurement of boron contents

  9. Modelling the passive microwave signature from land surfaces: a review of recent results and application to the SMOS & SMAP soil moisture retrieval algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two passive microwave missions are currently operating at L-band to monitor surface soil moisture (SM) over continental surfaces. The SMOS sensor, based on an innovative interferometric technology enabling multi-angular signatures of surfaces to be measured, was launched in November 2009....

  10. Apparatus for measuring moisture in moving bulk material using a lithium-7 radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashe, J.B.

    1976-01-01

    A nucleonic device is described for measuring the moisture content of bulk materials using a radioisotopic fast-neutron source such as lithium-7 admixed with an alpha-particle emitter such as americium-241 as a means of minimizing the thickness of the layer of bulk material required proximate to the moisture sensor for a neutron-reflection moisture gauge for proper operation of said gauge. Minimization of the required thickness of the bulk material permits use of a neutron-reflection moisture gauge for measurements of bulk materials on lightly-loaded belts and other types of conveyors where measurements have previously been impracticable

  11. Using Sentinel-1 and Landsat 8 satellite images to estimate surface soil moisture content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mexis, Philippos-Dimitrios; Alexakis, Dimitrios D.; Daliakopoulos, Ioannis N.; Tsanis, Ioannis K.

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays, the potential for more accurate assessment of Soil Moisture (SM) content exploiting Earth Observation (EO) technology, by exploring the use of synergistic approaches among a variety of EO instruments has emerged. This study is the first to investigate the potential of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) (Sentinel-1) and optical (Landsat 8) images in combination with ground measurements to estimate volumetric SM content in support of water management and agricultural practices. SAR and optical data are downloaded and corrected in terms of atmospheric, geometric and radiometric corrections. SAR images are also corrected in terms of roughness and vegetation with the synergistic use of Oh and Topp models using a dataset consisting of backscattering coefficients and corresponding direct measurements of ground parameters (moisture, roughness). Following, various vegetation indices (NDVI, SAVI, MSAVI, EVI, etc.) are estimated to record diachronically the vegetation regime within the study area and as auxiliary data in the final modeling. Furthermore, thermal images from optical data are corrected and incorporated to the overall approach. The basic principle of Thermal InfraRed (TIR) method is that Land Surface Temperature (LST) is sensitive to surface SM content due to its impact on surface heating process (heat capacity and thermal conductivity) under bare soil or sparse vegetation cover conditions. Ground truth data are collected from a Time-domain reflectometer (TRD) gauge network established in western Crete, Greece, during 2015. Sophisticated algorithms based on Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) and Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) approaches are used to explore the statistical relationship between backscattering measurements and SM content. Results highlight the potential of SAR and optical satellite images to contribute to effective SM content detection in support of water resources management and precision agriculture. Keywords: Sentinel-1, Landsat 8, Soil

  12. Assimilation of SMOS Brightness Temperatures or Soil Moisture Retrievals into a Land Surface Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lannoy, Gabrielle J. M.; Reichle, Rolf H.

    2016-01-01

    Three different data products from the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission are assimilated separately into the Goddard Earth Observing System Model, version 5 (GEOS-5) to improve estimates of surface and root-zone soil moisture. The first product consists of multi-angle, dual-polarization brightness temperature (Tb) observations at the bottom of the atmosphere extracted from Level 1 data. The second product is a derived SMOS Tb product that mimics the data at a 40 degree incidence angle from the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission. The third product is the operational SMOS Level 2 surface soil moisture (SM) retrieval product. The assimilation system uses a spatially distributed ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) with seasonally varying climatological bias mitigation for Tb assimilation, whereas a time-invariant cumulative density function matching is used for SM retrieval assimilation. All assimilation experiments improve the soil moisture estimates compared to model-only simulations in terms of unbiased root-mean-square differences and anomaly correlations during the period from 1 July 2010 to 1 May 2015 and for 187 sites across the US. Especially in areas where the satellite data are most sensitive to surface soil moisture, large skill improvements (e.g., an increase in the anomaly correlation by 0.1) are found in the surface soil moisture. The domain-average surface and root-zone skill metrics are similar among the various assimilation experiments, but large differences in skill are found locally. The observation-minus-forecast residuals and analysis increments reveal large differences in how the observations add value in the Tb and SM retrieval assimilation systems. The distinct patterns of these diagnostics in the two systems reflect observation and model errors patterns that are not well captured in the assigned EnKF error parameters. Consequently, a localized optimization of the EnKF error parameters is needed to further improve Tb or SM retrieval

  13. Correlation between near infrared spectroscopy and electrical techniques in measuring skin moisture content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad, M; Sabbri, A R M; Jafri, M Z Mat; Omar, A F

    2014-01-01

    Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy technique serves as an important tool for the measurement of moisture content of skin owing to the advantages it has over the other techniques. The purpose of the study is to develop a correlation between NIR spectrometer with electrical conventional techniques for skin moisture measurement. A non-invasive measurement of moisture content of skin was performed on different part of human face and hand under control environment (temperature 21 ± 1 °C, relative humidity 45 ± 5 %). Ten healthy volunteers age between 21-25 (male and female) participated in this study. The moisture content of skin was measured using DermaLab ® USB Moisture Module, Scalar Moisture Checker and NIR spectroscopy (NIRQuest). Higher correlation was observed between NIRQuest and Dermalab moisture probe with a coefficient of determination (R 2 ) above 70 % for all the subjects. However, the value of R 2 between NIRQuest and Moisture Checker was observed to be lower with the R 2 values ranges from 51.6 to 94.4 %. The correlation of NIR spectroscopy technique successfully developed for measuring moisture content of the skin. The analysis of this correlation can help to establish novel instruments based on an optical system in clinical used especially in the dermatology field

  14. Spatio-temporal variation of surface soil moisture over the Yellow River basin during 1961–2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Tong

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Soil moisture plays a significant role in agricultural and ecosystem development. However, in the real world soil moisture data are very limited due to many factors. VIC-3L model, as a semi-distribution hydrological model, can potentially provide valuable information regarding soil moisture. In this study, daily soil moisture contents in the surface soil layer (0–10 cm of 1500 grids at 0.25 × 0.25 degree were simulated by the VIC-3L model. The Mann-Kendall trend test and Morlet wavelet analysis methods were used for the analysis of annual and monthly average surface soil moisture series. Results showed that the trend of surface soil moisture was not obvious on the basin scale, but it varied with spatial and temporal conditions. Different fluctuation amplitudes and periods of surface soil moisture were also discovered on the Yellow River basin during 1961 to 2012.

  15. Where did my wifi go? Measuring soil moisture using wifi signal strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hut, Rolf; de Jeu, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Soil moisture is tricky to measure. Currently soil moisture is measured at small footprints using probes and other field devices, or at large footprints using satellites. Promising developments in measuring soil moisture are using fiber optic cables for measurements along a line, or using cosmos rays for field scale measurements. In this demonstration we present a low cost alternative to measure soil moisture at footprints of a few square meters. We use a wifi hotspot and a wifi dongle, both mounted in a cantenna for beam forming. We aim the hotspot on a piece of soil and put the dongle in the path of the reflection. By logging the signal strength of the wifi netwerk, we have a proxy for soil moisture. A first proof of concept is presented.

  16. Observational constraints on Arctic boundary-layer clouds, surface moisture and sensible heat fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, D. L.; Boisvert, L.; Klaus, D.; Dethloff, K.; Ganeshan, M.

    2016-12-01

    The dry, cold environment and dynamic surface variations make the Arctic a unique but difficult region for observations, especially in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). Spaceborne platforms have been the key vantage point to capture basin-scale changes during the recent Arctic warming. Using the AIRS temperature, moisture and surface data, we found that the Arctic surface moisture flux (SMF) had increased by 7% during 2003-2013 (18 W/m2 equivalent in latent heat), mostly in spring and fall near the Arctic coastal seas where large sea ice reduction and sea surface temperature (SST) increase were observed. The increase in Arctic SMF correlated well with the increases in total atmospheric column water vapor and low-level clouds, when compared to CALIPSO cloud observations. It has been challenging for climate models to reliably determine Arctic cloud radiative forcing (CRF). Using the regional climate model HIRHAM5 and assuming a more efficient Bergeron-Findeisen process with generalized subgrid-scale variability for total water content, we were able to produce a cloud distribution that is more consistent with the CloudSat/CALIPSO observations. More importantly, the modified schemes decrease (increase) the cloud water (ice) content in mixed-phase clouds, which help to improve the modeled CRF and energy budget at the surface, because of the dominant role of the liquid water in CRF. Yet, the coupling between Arctic low clouds and the surface is complex and has strong impacts on ABL. Studying GPS/COSMIC radio occultation (RO) refractivity profiles in the Arctic coldest and driest months, we successfully derived ABL inversion height and surface-based inversion (SBI) frequency, and they were anti-correlated over the Arctic Ocean. For the late summer and early fall season, we further analyzed Japanese R/V Mirai ship measurements and found that the open-ocean surface sensible heat flux (SSHF) can explain 10 % of the ABL height variability, whereas mechanisms such as cloud

  17. Study of heat-moisture treatment of potato starch granules by chemical surface gelatinization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartz, Josiane; da Rosa Zavareze, Elessandra; Dias, Alvaro Renato Guerra

    2017-08-01

    Native potato starch was subjected to heat-moisture treatment (HMT) at 12%, 15%, 18%, 21%, and 24% of moisture content at 110 °C for 1 h, and the effects on morphology, structure, and thermal and physicochemical properties were investigated. To reveal the internal structure, 30% and 50% of the granular surface were removed by chemical surface gelatinization in concentrated LiCl solution. At moisture contents of 12% and 15%, HTM reduced the gelatinization temperatures and relative crystallinity of the starches, while at moisture contents of 21% and 24 % both increased. The alterations on morphology, X-ray pattern, physicochemical properties, and increase of amylose content were more intense with the increase of moisture content of HMT. The removal of granular layers showed that the changes promoted by HMT occur throughout the whole granule and were pronounced at the core or peripheral region, depending of the moisture content applied during HMT. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Botswana water and surface energy balance research program. Part 2: Large scale moisture and passive microwaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandegriend, A. A.; Owe, M.; Chang, A. T. C.

    1992-01-01

    The Botswana water and surface energy balance research program was developed to study and evaluate the integrated use of multispectral satellite remote sensing for monitoring the hydrological status of the Earth's surface. The research program consisted of two major, mutually related components: a surface energy balance modeling component, built around an extensive field campaign; and a passive microwave research component which consisted of a retrospective study of large scale moisture conditions and Nimbus scanning multichannel microwave radiometer microwave signatures. The integrated approach of both components are explained in general and activities performed within the passive microwave research component are summarized. The microwave theory is discussed taking into account: soil dielectric constant, emissivity, soil roughness effects, vegetation effects, optical depth, single scattering albedo, and wavelength effects. The study site is described. The soil moisture data and its processing are considered. The relation between observed large scale soil moisture and normalized brightness temperatures is discussed. Vegetation characteristics and inverse modeling of soil emissivity is considered.

  19. Ensemble based Assimilation of SMOS Surface Soil Moisture into the Surfex 11-layer Diffusion Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blyverket, Jostein; Hamer, Paul; Svendby, Tove; Lahoz, William

    2017-04-01

    The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite samples soil moisture at a spatial scale of ˜40 km and in the top ˜5 cm of the soil, depending on land cover and soil type. Remote sensing products have a limited spatial and temporal cover, with a re-visit time of 3 days close to the Equator for SMOS. These factors make it difficult to monitor the hydrological cycle over e.g., Northern Areas where there is a strong topography, fractal coastline and long periods of snow cover, all of which affect the SMOS soil moisture retrieval. Until now simple 3-layer force and restore models have been used to close the spatial (vertical/horizontal) and temporal gaps of soil moisture from remote sensing platforms. In this study we have implemented the Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter (ETKF) into the Surfex land surface model, and used the ISBA diffusion scheme with 11-vertical layers. In contrast to the rapid changing surface layer, the slower changing root zone soil moisture is important for long term evapotranspiration and water supply. By combining a land surface model with satellite observations using data assimilation we can provide a better estimate of the root zone soil moisture at regional scales. The Surfex model runs are done for a European domain, from 1 July 2012 to 1 August 2013. For validation of our model setup, we compare with in situ stations from the International Soil Moisture Network (ISMN) and the Norwegian Water and Energy Authorities (NVE); we also compare against the ESA CCI soil moisture product v02.2, which does not include SMOS soil moisture data. SMOS observations and open loop model runs are shown to exhibit large biases, these are removed before assimilation by a linear rescaling technique. Information from the satellite is transferred into deeper layers of the model using data assimilation, improving the root zone product when validated against in situ stations. The improved correlation between the assimilated product and the in situ values

  20. A Conceptual Approach to Assimilating Remote Sensing Data to Improve Soil Moisture Profile Estimates in a Surface Flux/Hydrology Model. Part 1; Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosson, William L.; Laymon, Charles A.; Inguva, Ramarao; Schamschula, Marius; Caulfield, John

    1998-01-01

    Knowledge of the amount of water in the soil is of great importance to many earth science disciplines. Soil moisture is a key variable in controlling the exchange of water and energy between the land surface and the atmosphere. Thus, soil moisture information is valuable in a wide range of applications including weather and climate, runoff potential and flood control, early warning of droughts, irrigation, crop yield forecasting, soil erosion, reservoir management, geotechnical engineering, and water quality. Despite the importance of soil moisture information, widespread and continuous measurements of soil moisture are not possible today. Although many earth surface conditions can be measured from satellites, we still cannot adequately measure soil moisture from space. Research in soil moisture remote sensing began in the mid 1970s shortly after the surge in satellite development. Recent advances in remote sensing have shown that soil moisture can be measured, at least qualitatively, by several methods. Quantitative measurements of moisture in the soil surface layer have been most successful using both passive and active microwave remote sensing, although complications arise from surface roughness and vegetation type and density. Early attempts to measure soil moisture from space-borne microwave instruments were hindered by what is now considered sub-optimal wavelengths (shorter than 5 cm) and the coarse spatial resolution of the measurements. L-band frequencies between 1 and 3 GHz (10-30 cm) have been deemed optimal for detection of soil moisture in the upper few centimeters of soil. The Electronically Steered Thinned Array Radiometer (ESTAR), an aircraft-based instrument operating a 1,4 GHz, has shown great promise for soil moisture determination. Initiatives are underway to develop a similar instrument for space. Existing space-borne synthetic aperture radars (SARS) operating at C- and L-band have also shown some potential to detect surface wetness. The

  1. Estimation of soil moisture and its effect on soil thermal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Soil moisture is an important parameter of the earth's climate system. Regression model for estimation of soil moisture at various depths has been developed using the amount of moisture near the surface layer. The estimated values of soil moisture are tested with the measured moisture values and it is found that the ...

  2. LPRM/AMSR2/GCOM-W1 L2 Downscaled Surface Soil Moisture, Ancillary Params, and QC V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Level 2 (swath) data set¿s land surface parameters, surface soil moisture, land surface (skin) temperature, and vegetation water content, are derived from...

  3. LPRM/AMSR2/GCOM-W1 L3 Descending Surface Soil Moisture, Ancillary Params, and QC V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Level 3 (gridded) data set¿s land surface parameters, surface soil moisture, land surface (skin) temperature, and vegetation water content, are derived from...

  4. LPRM/AMSR2/GCOM-W1 L3 Ascending Surface Soil Moisture, Ancillary Params, and QC V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Level 3 (gridded) data set¿s land surface parameters, surface soil moisture, land surface (skin) temperature, and vegetation water content, are derived from...

  5. LPRM/AMSR2/GCOM-W1 L2 Surface Soil Moisture, Ancillary Params, and QC V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Level 2 (swath) data set¿s land surface parameters, surface soil moisture, land surface (skin) temperature, and vegetation water content, are derived from...

  6. LPRM/WindSat/Coriolis L3 Night Surface Soil Moisture, Ancillary Params, and QC V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Level 3 (gridded) data set¿s land surface parameters, surface soil moisture, land surface (skin) temperature, and vegetation water content, are derived from...

  7. LPRM/WindSat/Coriolis L3 Day Surface Soil Moisture, Ancillary Params, and QC V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Level 3 (gridded) data set¿s land surface parameters, surface soil moisture, land surface (skin) temperature, and vegetation water content, are derived from...

  8. LPRM/AMSR-E/Aqua Daily L3 Ascending Surface Soil Moisture, Ancillary Params, and QC V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Level 3 (gridded) data set’s land surface parameters, surface soil moisture, land surface (skin) temperature, and vegetation water content, are derived from...

  9. LPRM/AMSR-E/Aqua Daily L3 Descending Surface Soil Moisture, Ancillary Params, and QC V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Level 3 (gridded) data set’s land surface parameters, surface soil moisture, land surface (skin) temperature, and vegetation water content, are derived from...

  10. Measurement of the moisture content of the granulated sugar by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJB SERVER

    2007-01-18

    Jan 18, 2007 ... The moisture content of granulated sugar is a critical parameter for its transformation into cubes. To the best of our ... resolve this, a new method using infrared transphotometry technique based on the attenuation of an infrared ... contribution of other interactions to the attenuation of the incident wave, i.e. ...

  11. Measurement of the moisture content of the granulated sugar by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The moisture content of granulated sugar is a critical parameter for its transformation into cubes. To the best of our knowledge there is no easy-to-use method for the determination of this parameter. To resolve this, a new method using infrared transphotometry technique based on the attenuation of an infrared radiation ...

  12. Surface forces between hydrophilic silica surfaces in a moisture-sensitive oleophilic diacrylate monomer liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Shunya; Kasuya, Motohiro; Kurihara, Kazue; Nakagawa, Masaru

    2018-02-01

    We measured the surface forces generated between fused silica surfaces in a low-viscosity oleophilic diacrylate monomer for reliably repeated ultraviolet (UV) nanoimprinting, and studied the influence of water in monomer liquids on the forces. Fused silica surfaces, with a static contact angle of 52.6 ± 1.7° for water, owing to the low degree of hydroxylation, hardly showed reproducible surface forces with repeated scan cycles, comprising approach and separation, even in an identical liquid monomer medium with both of low and high water content. The monomer liquid with a high water content of approximately 420 ppm showed a greater tendency to increase the surface forces at longer surface-surface distances compared with the monomer liquid with a low water content of approximately 60 ppm. On the other hand, silica surfaces with a water contact angle of < 5° after exposure to vacuum UV (VUV) light under a reduced air pressure showed reproducible profiles of surfaces forces using the monomer with a low water concentration of approximately 60 ppm for repeated surface forces scan cycles even in separately prepared silica surfaces, whilst they showed less reproducible profiles in the liquids with high water content of 430 ppm. These results suggested that water possibly adsorbed on the hydrophilic and hydrophobic silica surfaces in the monomer liquid of the high water concentration influenced the repeatability of the surface forces profiles.

  13. Measurement of moisture depth distribution in composite materials using positron lifetime technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, J.J.; Holt, W.H.; Mock, W. Jr.; Mall, G.H.

    1980-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced resin matrix composites reportedly suffer significant degradation in their mechanical properties when exposed to hot, moist, environments for extended periods. Moisture weakens the fiber matrix bond as well as the matrix shear strength. An important factor in determining the extent of degradation is the depth distribution of moisture in the resin matrix. Despite the importance of measuring moisture distribution and its effects on composite material properties, not enough data are available on suitable nondestructive techniques for detecting and measuring moisture diffusion in organic composite materials. This paper addresses itself to the problem of measuring the moisture content of such materials, with special emphasis on its depth distribution, using positron lifetime technique

  14. Assimilation of ASCAT near-surface soil moisture into the French SIM hydrological model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, C.; Mahfouf, J.-F.; Calvet, J.-C.; Martin, E.; Wagner, W.

    2011-06-01

    The impact of assimilating near-surface soil moisture into the SAFRAN-ISBA-MODCOU (SIM) hydrological model over France is examined. Specifically, the root-zone soil moisture in the ISBA land surface model is constrained over three and a half years, by assimilating the ASCAT-derived surface degree of saturation product, using a Simplified Extended Kalman Filter. In this experiment ISBA is forced with the near-real time SAFRAN analysis, which analyses the variables required to force ISBA from relevant observations available before the real time data cut-off. The assimilation results are tested against ISBA forecasts generated with a higher quality delayed cut-off SAFRAN analysis. Ideally, assimilating the ASCAT data will constrain the ISBA surface state to correct for errors in the near-real time SAFRAN forcing, the most significant of which was a substantial dry bias caused by a dry precipitation bias. The assimilation successfully reduced the mean root-zone soil moisture bias, relative to the delayed cut-off forecasts, by close to 50 % of the open-loop value. The improved soil moisture in the model then led to significant improvements in the forecast hydrological cycle, reducing the drainage, runoff, and evapotranspiration biases (by 17 %, 11 %, and 70 %, respectively). When coupled to the MODCOU hydrogeological model, the ASCAT assimilation also led to improved streamflow forecasts, increasing the mean discharge ratio, relative to the delayed cut off forecasts, from 0.68 to 0.76. These results demonstrate that assimilating near-surface soil moisture observations can effectively constrain the SIM model hydrology, while also confirming the accuracy of the ASCAT surface degree of saturation product. This latter point highlights how assimilation experiments can contribute towards the difficult issue of validating remotely sensed land surface observations over large spatial scales.

  15. Using machine learning to produce near surface soil moisture estimates from deeper in situ records at U.S. Climate Reference Network (USCRN) locations: Analysis and applications to AMSR-E satellite validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surface soil moisture is critical parameter for understanding the energy flux at the land atmosphere boundary. Weather modeling, climate prediction, and remote sensing validation are some of the applications for surface soil moisture information. The most common in situ measurement for these purpo...

  16. Device for radiometric measurement, e.g. of surface density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregor, J.; Kopl, F.

    1973-01-01

    A design is described of a device for radiometric measurements, such as of material surface density, thickness of coating layers, surface moisture, and for the analysis of chemical composition. The device uses backscattered radiation indicated by two ionization chambers with gas filling; the radiation source is placed in between the chambers. (J.K.)

  17. The practical application of scintillometers in determining the surface fluxes of heat, moisture and momentum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Green, A.E.

    2001-01-01

    This thesis has collated one review chapter and five experiments concerned with addressing the question, 'how successful is the scintillometer method in determining the surface fluxes of heat, moisture and momentum and under what circumstances does it appear to fail?'

  18. Seasonal variation in surface fuel moisture between unthinned and thinned mixed conifer forest, northern California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becky L. Estes; Eric E. Knapp; Carl N. Skinner; Fabian C. C. Uzoh

    2012-01-01

    Reducing stand density is often used as a tool for mitigating the risk of high-intensity crown fires. However, concern has been expressed that opening stands might lead to greater drying of surface fuels, contributing to increased fire risk. The objective of this study was to determine whether woody fuel moisture differed between unthinned and thinned mixed-conifer...

  19. Influence of soil moisture content on surface albedo and soil thermal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    atively longer memory of soil moisture in com- parison with the variation of controlling parame- ters often leads to climatic ... and vegetation cover changes the soil colour and thus varies the surface albedo (Todd and Hoffer. 1998). .... The colour of the soil at the experimental site varied from dark brown to dark reddish brown.

  20. TMI/TRMM surface soil moisture (LPRM) L3 1 day 25 km x 25 km daytime V001 (LPRM_TMI_DY_SOILM3) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — TMI/TRMM surface soil moisture (LPRM) L3 1 day 25 km x 25 km daytime V001 is a Level 3 (gridded) data set. Its land surface parameters, surface soil moisture, land...

  1. Medical CT-scanners for non-destructive wood density and moisture content measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Lindgren, Owe

    1992-01-01

    Most methods to measure wood density and moisture content are destructive. One non-destructive technique is X-ray computed tomography (CT). The actual physical variable measured is the X-ray linear attenuation coefficient which is highly density dependent. The primary purpose of this thesis is to establish the accuracy of medical CT-scanners for wood density measurements in small volume elements. As wood moisture content has an effect on wet wood density, the secondary purpose of the thesis i...

  2. Analysis of surface and root-zone soil moisture dynamics with ERS scatterometer and the hydrometeorological model SAFRAN-ISBA-MODCOU at Grand Morin watershed (France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Paris Anguela

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Spatial and temporal variations of soil moisture strongly affect flooding, erosion, solute transport and vegetation productivity. Its characterization, offers an avenue to improve our understanding of complex land surface-atmosphere interactions. In this paper, soil moisture dynamics at soil surface (first centimeters and root-zone (up to 1.5 m depth are investigated at three spatial scales: local scale (field measurements, 8×8 km2 (hydrological model and 25×25 km2 scale (ERS scatterometer in a French watershed. This study points out the quality of surface and root-zone soil moisture data for SIM model and ERS scatterometer for a three year period. Surface soil moisture is highly variable because is more influenced by atmospheric conditions (rain, wind and solar radiation, and presents RMSE up to 0.08 m3 m−3. On the other hand, root-zone moisture presents lower variability with small RMSE (between 0.02 and 0.06 m3 m−3. These results will contribute to satellite and model verification of moisture, but also to better application of radar data for data assimilation in future.

  3. Sampling depth of soil moisture content by radiometric measurement at 21 cm wavelength: some experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pampaloni, P.; Paloscia, S.; Chiarantini, L.; Coppo, P.; Gagliani, S.; Luzi, G.

    1990-01-01

    The thickness of soil layer, through which moisture can be directly estimated by means of a microwave radiometer, has been investigated experimentally on a test area in Central Italy by means of airborne sensors. Aircraft remote sensing data, collected on agricultural bare and vegetated fields during the growth stage of vegetation (May-July 1988), have shown that L band microwave emission is correlated to the average moisture of the first 20 cm of soil under the surface. However, correlation between moisture at difference depths makes the identification of the actual sampling depth difficult

  4. Effects of vegetation types on soil moisture estimation from the normalized land surface temperature versus vegetation index space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dianjun; Zhou, Guoqing

    2015-12-01

    Soil moisture (SM) is a key variable that has been widely used in many environmental studies. Land surface temperature versus vegetation index (LST-VI) space becomes a common way to estimate SM in optical remote sensing applications. Normalized LST-VI space is established by the normalized LST and VI to obtain the comparable SM in Zhang et al. (Validation of a practical normalized soil moisture model with in situ measurements in humid and semiarid regions [J]. International Journal of Remote Sensing, DOI: 10.1080/01431161.2015.1055610). The boundary conditions in the study were set to limit the point A (the driest bare soil) and B (the wettest bare soil) for surface energy closure. However, no limitation was installed for point D (the full vegetation cover). In this paper, many vegetation types are simulated by the land surface model - Noah LSM 3.2 to analyze the effects on soil moisture estimation, such as crop, grass and mixed forest. The locations of point D are changed with vegetation types. The normalized LST of point D for forest is much lower than crop and grass. The location of point D is basically unchanged for crop and grass.

  5. A dynamic tester to evaluate the thermal and moisture behaviour of the surface of textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenbin; Xu, Weilin; Wang, Hao; Wang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The thermal and moisture behaviour of the microclimate of textiles is crucial in determining the physiological comfort of apparel, but it has not been investigated sufficiently due to the lack of particular evaluation techniques. Based on sensing, temperature controlling and wireless communicating technology, a specially designed tester has been developed in this study to evaluate the thermal and moisture behaviour of the surface of textiles in moving status. A temperature acquisition system and a temperature controllable hotplate have been established to test temperature and simulate the heat of human body, respectively. Relative humidity of the surface of fabric in the dynamic process has been successfully tested through sensing. Meanwhile, wireless communication technology was applied to transport the acquired data of temperature and humidity to computer for further processing. Continuous power supply was achieved by intensive contact between an elastic copper plate and copper ring on the rotating shaft. This tester provides the platform to evaluate the thermal and moisture behaviour of textiles. It enables users to conduct a dynamic analysis on the temperature and humidity together with the thermal and moisture transport behaviour of the surface of fabric in moving condition. Development of this tester opens the door of investigation on the micro-climate of textiles in real time service, and eventually benefits the understanding of the sensation comfort and wellbeing of apparel wearers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Biological soil crust succession impact on soil moisture and temperature in the sub-surface along a rainfall gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaady, E.; Yizhaq, H.; Ashkenazy, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Biological soil crusts produce mucilage sheets of polysaccharides that cover the soil surface. This hydrophobic coating can seal the soil micro-pores and thus cause reduction of water permeability and may influence soil temperature. This study evaluates the impact of crust composition on sub-surface water and temperature over time. We hypothesized that the successional stages of biological soil crusts, affect soil moisture and temperature differently along a rainfall gradient throughout the year. Four experimental sites were established along a rainfall gradient in the western Negev Desert. At each site three treatments; crust removal, pure sand (moving dune) and natural crusted were monitored. Crust successional stage was measured by biophysiological and physical measurements, soil water permeability by field mini-Infiltrometer, soil moisture by neutron scattering probe and temperature by sensors, at different depths. Our main interim conclusions from the ongoing study along the rainfall gradient are: 1. the biogenic crust controls water infiltration into the soil in sand dunes, 2. infiltration was dependent on the composition of the biogenic crust. It was low for higher successional stage crusts composed of lichens and mosses and high with cyanobacterial crust. Thus, infiltration rate controlled by the crust is inverse to the rainfall gradient. Continuous disturbances to the crust increase infiltration rates, 3. despite the different rainfall amounts at the sites, soil moisture content below 50 cm is almost the same. We therefore predict that climate change in areas that are becoming dryer (desertification) will have a positive effect on soil water content and vice versa.

  7. Superhydrophobicity of biological and technical surfaces under moisture condensation: stability in relation to surface structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mockenhaupt, Bernd; Ensikat, Hans-Jürgen; Spaeth, Manuel; Barthlott, Wilhelm

    2008-12-02

    The stability of superhydrophobic properties of eight plants and four technical surfaces in respect to water condensation has been compared. Contact and sliding angles were measured after application of water drops of ambient temperature (20 degrees C) onto cooled surfaces. Water evaporating from the drops condensed, due to the temperature difference between the drops and the surface, on the cooled samples, forming "satellite droplets" in the vicinity of the drops. Surface cooling to 15, 10, and 5 degrees C showed a gradual decrease of superhydrophobicity. The decrease was dependent on the specific surface architecture of the sample. The least decrease was found on hierarchically structured surfaces with a combination of a coarse microstructure and submicrometer-sized structures, similar to that of the Lotus leaf. Control experiments with glycerol droplets, which show no evaporation, and thus no condensation, were carried out to verify that the effects with water were caused by condensation from the drop (secondary condensation). Furthermore, the superhydrophobic properties after condensation on cooled surfaces from a humid environment for 10 min were examined. After this period, the surfaces were covered with spherical water droplets, but most samples retained their superhydrophobicity. Again, the best stability of the water-repellent properties was found on hierarchically structured surfaces similar to that of the Lotus leaf.

  8. A simple interpretation of the surface temperature/vegetation index space for assessment of surface moisture status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandholt, Inge; Rasmussen, Kjeld; Andersen, Jens Asger

    2002-01-01

    A simplified land surface dryness index (Temperature-Vegetation Dryness Index, TVDI) based on an empirical parameterisation of the relationship between surface temperature (T-s) and vegetation index (NDVI) is suggested. The index is related to soil moisture and, in comparison to existing interpre......A simplified land surface dryness index (Temperature-Vegetation Dryness Index, TVDI) based on an empirical parameterisation of the relationship between surface temperature (T-s) and vegetation index (NDVI) is suggested. The index is related to soil moisture and, in comparison to existing...... interpretations of the T-s/NDVI space, the index is conceptually and computationally straightforward. It is based on satellite derived information only, and the potential for operational application of the index is therefore large. The spatial pattern and temporal evolution in TVDI has been analysed using 37 NOAA...

  9. Azobenzene-Based Gel Coated Fibre Bragg Grating Sensor for Moisture Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Moniruzzaman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A fibre Bragg grating sensor is coated with a novel polymer gel in order to investigate its suitability for nondestructive measurement of moisture in materials that can potentially lose their integrity due to moisture ingress. Absorption and desorption of moisture lead to swelling/shrinkage of an azobenzene-based gel, which induces a strain in the Bragg grating resulting in wavelength shifts. The results demonstrated that the amount of wavelength shift is linearly dependent on the amount of water ingress by the gel. The performance of the proposed optical fibre moisture sensor was found to be repeatable with no detectable hysteresis and has the potential to offer a low-cost route for monitoring moisture content.

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF NEW HYPERSPECTRAL ANGLE INDEX FOR ESTIMATION OF SOIL MOISTURE USING IN SITU SPECTRAL MEASURMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Mobasheri

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Near-surface soil moisture is one of the crucial variables in hydrological processes, which influences the exchange of water and energy fluxes at the land surface/atmosphere interface. Accurate estimate of the spatial and temporal variations of soil moisture is critical for numerous environmental studies. On the other hand, information of distributed soil moisture at large scale with reasonable spatial and temporal resolution is required for improving climatic and hydrologic modeling and prediction. The advent of hyperspectral imagery has allowed examination of continuous spectra not possible with isolated bands in multispectral imagery. In addition to high spectral resolution for individual band analyses, the contiguous narrow bands show characteristics of related absorption features, such as effects of strong absorptions on the band depths of adjacent absorptions. Our objective in this study was to develop a new spectral angle index to estimate soil moisture based on spectral region (350 and 2500 nm. In this paper, using spectral observations made by ASD Spectroradiometer for predicting soil moisture content, two soil indices were also investigated involving the Perpendicular Drought Index (PDI, NMDI (Normalized Multi-band Drought Index indices. Correlation and regression analysis showed a high relationship between PDI and the soil moisture percent (R2 = 0.9537 and NMDI (R2 = 0.9335. Furthermore, we also simulated these data according to the spectral range of some sensors such as MODIS, ASTER, ALI and ETM+. Indices relevant these sensors have high correlation with soil moisture data. Finally, we proposed a new angle index which shows significant relationship between new angle index and the soil moisture percentages (R2 = 0.9432.angle index relevant bands 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 MODIS also showing high accuracy in estimation of soil moisture (R2 = 0.719.

  11. [Effects of scale-like pit and mulching measures on soil moisture of dryland jujube orchard in North Shaanxi Province, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong-Chen; Zhao, Xi-Ning; Gao, Xiao-Ding; Wang, Jia-Wen; Shi, Yin-Guang

    2014-08-01

    Soil moisture is a key factor affecting jujube growth in the semiarid Northern Shaanxi Province. The impacts of different engineering and mulching measures on soil moisture were investigated via in situ measurements in a typical dryland jujube orchard. The results showed that the mean soil moistures (0-180 cm) of scale-like pit + branch mulching, scale-like scale + straw mulching, and soil moisture of scale-like pit with no mulching were increased by 14.2%, 9.4%, and 4.8% than control, respectively. Different measures, especially for the scale-like pit + branch mulching, significantly increased the soil moisture in the soil surface (0-20 cm) and the main root zone layer (20-100 cm) during the jujube growth stage. Individual precipitation events had great impacts on soil moisture in the 0-100 cm, while its effect on soil moisture in deep layers was not apparent. There was no significant difference among the soil moistures in different soil depths of scale-like pit with no mulching when compared with the control under high, medium, and low soil humidity conditions. This study indicated that using the clipped jujube branches as mulching could both save materials cost and achieve the goal of reserving more water in dryland jujube orchard in north Shaanxi Province.

  12. AMSR-E/Aqua L2B Surface Soil Moisture, Ancillary Parms, & QC EASE-Grids V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The AMSR-E/Aqua Level-2B land surface product includes surface soil moisture and vegetation/roughness water content interpretive information on a global 25 km...

  13. Model-based surface soil moisture (SSM) retrieval algorithm using multi-temporal RISAT-1 C-band SAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Dharmendra K.; Maity, Saroj; Bhattacharya, Bimal; Misra, Arundhati

    2016-05-01

    Accurate measurement of surface soil moisture of bare and vegetation covered soil over agricultural field and monitoring the changes in surface soil moisture is vital for estimation for managing and mitigating risk to agricultural crop, which requires information and knowledge to assess risk potential and implement risk reduction strategies and deliver essential responses. The empirical and semi-empirical model-based soil moisture inversion approach developed in the past are either sensor or region specific, vegetation type specific or have limited validity range, and have limited scope to explain physical scattering processes. Hence, there is need for more robust, physical polarimetric radar backscatter model-based retrieval methods, which are sensor and location independent and have wide range of validity over soil properties. In the present study, Integral Equation Model (IEM) and Vector Radiative Transfer (VRT) model were used to simulate averaged backscatter coefficients in various soil moisture (dry, moist and wet soil), soil roughness (smooth to very rough) and crop conditions (low to high vegetation water contents) over selected regions of Gujarat state of India and the results were compared with multi-temporal Radar Imaging Satellite-1 (RISAT-1) C-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data in σ°HH and σ°HV polarizations, in sync with on field measured soil and crop conditions. High correlations were observed between RISAT-1 HH and HV with model simulated σ°HH & σ°HV based on field measured soil with the coefficient of determination R2 varying from 0.84 to 0.77 and RMSE varying from 0.94 dB to 2.1 dB for bare soil. Whereas in case of winter wheat crop, coefficient of determination R2 varying from 0.84 to 0.79 and RMSE varying from 0.87 dB to 1.34 dB, corresponding to with vegetation water content values up to 3.4 kg/m2. Artificial Neural Network (ANN) methods were adopted for model-based soil moisture inversion. The training datasets for the NNs were

  14. Calibration approaches of cosmic-ray neutron sensing for soil moisture measurement in cropped fields

    OpenAIRE

    Rivera Villarreyes, C. A.; Baroni, G.; Oswald, S. E.

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of soil moisture at the plot or hill-slope scale is an important link between local vadose-zone hydrology and catchment hydrology. This study evaluates the applicability of the cosmic-ray neutron sensing for soil moisture in cropped fields. Measurements of cosmic-ray neutrons (fast neutrons) were performed at a lowland farmland in Bornim (Brandenburg, Germany) cropped with sunflower and winter rye. Three field calibration approaches and four ...

  15. Estimating Surface Soil Moisture in a Mixed-Landscape using SMAP and MODIS/VIIRS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, J.; Di, L.; Xiao, J.

    2017-12-01

    Soil moisture, a critical parameter of earth ecosystem linking land surface and atmosphere, has been widely applied in many application (Di, 1991; Njoku et al. 2003; Western 2002; Zhao et al. 2014; McColl et al. 2017) from regional to continental or even global scale. The advent of satellite-based remote sensing, particular in the last two decades, has proven successful for mapping the surface soil moisture (SSM) from space (Petropoulos et al. 2015; Kim et al. 2015; Molero et al. 2016). The current soil moisture products, however, is not able to fully characterize the spatial and temporal variability of soil moisture at mixed landscape types (Albergel et al. 2013; Zeng et al. 2015). In this research, we derived the SSM at 1-km spatial resolution by using sensor observation and high-level products from SMAP and MODIS/VIIRS as well as metrorological, landcover, and soil data. Specifically, we proposed a practicable method to produce the originally planned SMAP L3_SM_A with comparable quality by downscaling the SMAP L3_SM_P product through a proved method, the geographically weighted regression method at mixed landscape in southern New Hampshire. This estimated SSM was validated using the Soil Climate Analysis Network (SCAN) from Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) of United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).

  16. On-line moisture analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Cutmore, N G

    2002-01-01

    Measurement of the moisture content of iron ore has become a key issue for controlling moisture additions for dust suppression. In most cases moisture content is still determined by manual or automatic sampling of the ore stream, followed by conventional laboratory analysis by oven drying. Although this procedure enables the moisture content to be routinely monitored, it is too slow for control purposes. This has generated renewed interest in on-line techniques for the accurate and rapid measurement of moisture in iron ore on conveyors. Microwave transmission techniques have emerged over the past 40 years as the dominant technology for on-line measurement of moisture in bulk materials, including iron ores. Alternative technologies have their limitations. Infra-red analysers are used in a variety of process industries, but rely on the measurement of absorption by moisture in a very thin surface layer. Consequently such probes may be compromised by particle size effects and biased presentation of the bulk mater...

  17. The significance of vertical moisture diffusion on drifting snow sublimation near snow surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ning; Shi, Guanglei

    2017-12-01

    Sublimation of blowing snow is an important parameter not only for the study of polar ice sheets and glaciers, but also for maintaining the ecology of arid and semi-arid lands. However, sublimation of near-surface blowing snow has often been ignored in previous studies. To study sublimation of near-surface blowing snow, we established a sublimation of blowing snow model containing both a vertical moisture diffusion equation and a heat balance equation. The results showed that although sublimation of near-surface blowing snow was strongly reduced by a negative feedback effect, due to vertical moisture diffusion, the relative humidity near the surface does not reach 100 %. Therefore, the sublimation of near-surface blowing snow does not stop. In addition, the sublimation rate near the surface is 3-4 orders of magnitude higher than that at 10 m above the surface and the mass of snow sublimation near the surface accounts for more than half of the total snow sublimation when the friction wind velocity is less than about 0.55 m s-1. Therefore, the sublimation of near-surface blowing snow should not be neglected.

  18. Improving Long-term Global Precipitation Dataset Using Multi-sensor Surface Soil Moisture Retrievals and the Soil Moisture Analysis Rainfall Tool (SMART)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, F.; Crow, W. T.; Holmes, T. R.

    2012-12-01

    Using multiple historical satellite surface soil moisture products, the Kalman Filtering-based Soil Moisture Analysis Rainfall Tool (SMART) is applied to improve the accuracy of a multi-decadal global daily rainfall product that has been bias-corrected to match the monthly totals of available rain gauge observations. In order to adapt to the irregular retrieval frequency of heritage soil moisture products, a new variable correction window method is developed which allows for better efficiency in leveraging temporally sparse satellite soil moisture retrievals. Results confirm the advantage of using this variable window method relative to an existing fixed-window version of SMART over a range of accumulation periods. Using this modified version of SMART, and heritage satellite surface soil moisture products, a 1.0-degree, 1979-1998 global rainfall dataset over land is corrected and validated. Relative to the original precipitation product, the updated correction scheme demonstrates improved root-mean-square-error and correlation accuracy and provides a higher probability of detection and lower false alarm rates for 3-day rainfall accumulation estimates, except for the heaviest (99th percentile) cases. This corrected rainfall dataset is expected to provide improved rainfall forcing data for the land surface modeling community.

  19. Improving long-term, retrospective precipitation datasets using satellite-based surface soil moisture retrievals and the Soil Moisture Analysis Rainfall Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fan; Crow, Wade T.; Holmes, Thomas R. H.

    2012-01-01

    Using historical satellite surface soil moisture products, the Soil Moisture Analysis Rainfall Tool (SMART) is applied to improve the submonthly scale accuracy of a multi-decadal global daily rainfall product that has been bias-corrected to match the monthly totals of available rain gauge observations. In order to adapt to the irregular retrieval frequency of heritage soil moisture products, a new variable correction window method is developed that allows for better efficiency in leveraging temporally sparse satellite soil moisture retrievals. Results confirm the advantage of using this variable window method relative to an existing fixed-window version of SMART over a range of one- to 30-day accumulation periods. Using this modified version of SMART and heritage satellite surface soil moisture products, a 1.0-deg, 20-year (1979 to 1998) global rainfall dataset over land is corrected and validated. Relative to the original precipitation product, the corrected dataset demonstrates improved correlation with a global gauge-based daily rainfall product, lower root-mean-square-error (-13%) on a 10-day scale and provides a higher probability of detection (+5%) and lower false alarm rates (-3.4%) for five-day rainfall accumulation estimates. This corrected rainfall dataset is expected to provide improved rainfall forcing data for the land surface modeling community.

  20. Effects of soil moisture on the diurnal pattern of pesticide emission: Comparison of simulations with field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichman, Rivka; Yates, Scott R.; Skaggs, Todd H.; Rolston, Dennis E.

    2013-02-01

    Pesticide volatilization from agricultural soils is one of the main pathways in which pesticides are dispersed in the environment and affects ecosystems including human welfare. Thus, it is necessary to have accurate knowledge of the various physical and chemical mechanisms that affect volatilization rates from field soils. A verification of the influence of soil moisture modeling on the simulated volatilization rate, soil temperature and soil-water content is presented. Model simulations are compared with data collected in a field study that measured the effect of soil moisture on diazinon volatilization. These data included diurnal changes in volatilization rate, soil-water content, and soil temperature measured at two depths. The simulations were performed using a comprehensive non-isothermal model, two water retention functions, and two soil surface resistance functions, resulting in four tested models. Results show that the degree of similarity between volatilization curves simulated using the four models depended on the initial water content. Under fairly wet conditions, the simulated curves mainly differ in the magnitude of their deviation from the measured values. However, under intermediate and low moisture conditions, the simulated curves also differed in their pattern (shape). The model prediction accuracy depended on soil moisture. Under normal practices, where initial soil moisture is about field capacity or higher, a combination of Brooks and Corey water retention and the van de Grind and Owe soil surface resistance functions led to the most accurate predictions. However, under extremely dry conditions, when soil-water content in the top 1 cm is below the volumetric threshold value, the use of a full-range water retention function increased prediction accuracy. The different models did not affect the soil temperature predictions, and had a minor effect on the predicted soil-water content of Yolo silty clay soil.

  1. A simple algorithm to retrieve soil moisture and vegetation biomass using passive microwave measurements over crop fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wigneron, J.P.; Chanzy, A.; Calvet, J.C.; Bruguier, N.

    1995-01-01

    A simple algorithm to retrieve sail moisture and vegetation water content from passive microwave measurements is analyzed in this study. The approach is based on a zeroth-order solution of the radiative transfer equations in a vegetation layer. In this study, the single scattering albedo accounts for scattering effects and two parameters account for the dependence of the optical thickness on polarization, incidence angle, and frequency. The algorithm requires only ancillary information about crop type and surface temperature. Retrievals of the surface parameters from two radiometric data sets acquired over a soybean and a wheat crop have been attempted. The model parameters have been fitted in order to achieve best match between measured and retrieved surface data. The results of the inversion are analyzed for different configurations of the radiometric observations: one or several look angles, L-band, C-band or (L-band and C-band). Sensitivity of the retrievals to the best fit values of the model parameters has also been investigated. The best configurations, requiring simultaneous measurements at L- and C-band, produce retrievals of soil moisture and biomass with a 15% estimated precision (about 0.06 m 3 /m 3 for soil moisture and 0.3 kg/m 2 for biomass) and exhibit a limited sensitivity to the best fit parameters. (author)

  2. Advanced Soil Moisture Network Technologies; Developments in Collecting in situ Measurements for Remote Sensing Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, M.; Silva, A. R. D.; Akbar, R.; Clewley, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Soil moisture Sensing Controller And oPtimal Estimator (SoilSCAPE) wireless sensor network has been developed to support Calibration and Validation activities (Cal/Val) for large scale soil moisture remote sensing missions (SMAP and AirMOSS). The technology developed here also readily supports small scale hydrological studies by providing sub-kilometer widespread soil moisture observations. An extensive collection of semi-sparse sensor clusters deployed throughout north-central California and southern Arizona provide near real time soil moisture measurements. Such a wireless network architecture, compared to conventional single points measurement profiles, allows for significant and expanded soil moisture sampling. The work presented here aims at discussing and highlighting novel and new technology developments which increase in situ soil moisture measurements' accuracy, reliability, and robustness with reduced data delivery latency. High efficiency and low maintenance custom hardware have been developed and in-field performance has been demonstrated for a period of three years. The SoilSCAPE technology incorporates (a) intelligent sensing to prevent erroneous measurement reporting, (b) on-board short term memory for data redundancy, (c) adaptive scheduling and sampling capabilities to enhance energy efficiency. A rapid streamlined data delivery architecture openly provides distribution of in situ measurements to SMAP and AirMOSS cal/val activities and other interested parties.

  3. An algorithm for temperature correcting substrate moisture measurements: aligning substrate moisture responses with environmental drivers in polytunnel-grown strawberry plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodchild, Martin; Janes, Stuart; Jenkins, Malcolm; Nicholl, Chris; Kühn, Karl

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this work is to assess the use of temperature corrected substrate moisture data to improve the relationship between environmental drivers and the measurement of substrate moisture content in high porosity soil-free growing environments such as coir. Substrate moisture sensor data collected from strawberry plants grown in coir bags installed in a table-top system under a polytunnel illustrates the impact of temperature on capacitance-based moisture measurements. Substrate moisture measurements made in our coir arrangement possess the negative temperature coefficient of the permittivity of water where diurnal changes in moisture content oppose those of substrate temperature. The diurnal substrate temperature variation was seen to range from 7° C to 25° C resulting in a clearly observable temperature effect in substrate moisture content measurements during the 23 day test period. In the laboratory we measured the ML3 soil moisture sensor (ThetaProbe) response to temperature in Air, dry glass beads and water saturated glass beads and used a three-phase alpha (α) mixing model, also known as the Complex Refractive Index Model (CRIM), to derive the permittivity temperature coefficients for glass and water. We derived the α value and estimated the temperature coefficient for water - for sensors operating at 100MHz. Both results are good agreement with published data. By applying the CRIM equation with the temperature coefficients of glass and water the moisture temperature coefficient of saturated glass beads has been reduced by more than an order of magnitude to a moisture temperature coefficient of

  4. Investigation of (de)coupling between surface and subsurface soil moisture using a Distributed Lag Non-linear Model (DNLM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Coleen; van der Ploeg, Martine

    2017-04-01

    Accurate estimates of water content in the soil profile are essential for environmental and climate modeling studies. Current trends for estimating profile soil moisture incorporate remote sensing methods for mapping soil moisture at greater spatial coverage but is limited to the upper soil layers (e.g. 5cm for radar satellites). Data assimilation methods offer promising computational techniques to translate mapped surface soil moisture to estimates of profile soil moisture, in conjunction with physical models. However, a variety of factors, such as differences in the drying rates, can lead to "decoupling" (Capehart and Carlson, 1997) of surface and subsurface soil moisture. In other words, surface soil moisture conditions no longer reflect or represent subsurface conditions. In this study, we investigated the relation and observed decoupling between surface and subsurface soil moisture from 15-minute interval time series datasets in four selected Dutch agricultural fields (SM_05, SM_09, SM_13, SM_20) from the soil moisture network in Twente region. The idea is that surface soil moisture conditions will be reflected in the subsurface after a certain time lag because of its movement or flow from the surface. These lagged associations were analysed using distributed lag non-linear model (DLNM). This statistical technique provides a framework to simultaneously represent non-linear exposure-response dependencies and delayed effects. DNLM was applied to elucidate which surface soil moisture conditions resulted in a high association to subsurface values, indicating good correlation between the two zones. For example, initial results for this ongoing study from SM_13 show an overall low but increasing association from dry to intermediate soil moisture values (0 to 25%). At this range of values, we say that the two zones are decoupled. Above these values towards near saturated conditions ( 40%), associations between the two zones remain high. For predictor

  5. The radiobrightness thermal inertia measure of soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Anthony W.; Galantowicz, John F.; Schretter, Mindy S.

    1992-01-01

    Radiobrightness thermal inertia (RTI) is proposed as a method for using day-night differences in satellite-sensed radiobrightness to monitor the moisture of Great Plains soils. Diurnal thermal and radiobrightness models are used to examine the sensitivity of the RTI method. Model predictions favor use of the 37.0 and 85.5 GHz, H-polarized channels of the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I). The model further predicts that overflight times near 2:00 AM/PM would be nearly optimal for RTI, that midnight/noon and 4:00 AM/PM are nearly as good, but that the 6:00 AM/PM overflight times of the current SSM/I are particularly poor. Data from the 37.0 GHz channel of the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) are used to demonstrate that the method is plausible.

  6. Evaluating near-surface soil moisture using Heat Capacity Mapping Mission data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilman, J. L.; Moore, D. G.

    1982-01-01

    Four dates of Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) data were analyzed in order to evaluate HCMM thermal data use in estimating near-surface soil moisture in a complex agricultural landscape. Because of large spatial and temporal ground cover variations, HCMM radiometric temperatures alone did not correlate with soil water content. The radiometric temperatures consisted of radiance contributions from different canopies and their respective soil backgrounds. However, when surface soil temperatures were empirically estimated from HCMM temperatures and percent cover of each pixel, a highly significant correlation was obtained between the estimated soil temperatures and near-surface soil water content.

  7. Near-surface turbulence as a missing link in modeling evapotranspiration-soil moisture relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighi, Erfan; Kirchner, James W.

    2017-07-01

    Despite many efforts to develop evapotranspiration (ET) models with improved parametrizations of resistance terms for water vapor transfer into the atmosphere, estimates of ET and its partitioning remain prone to bias. Much of this bias could arise from inadequate representations of physical interactions near nonuniform surfaces from which localized heat and water vapor fluxes emanate. This study aims to provide a mechanistic bridge from land-surface characteristics to vertical transport predictions, and proposes a new physically based ET model that builds on a recently developed bluff-rough bare soil evaporation model incorporating coupled soil moisture-atmospheric controls. The newly developed ET model explicitly accounts for (1) near-surface turbulent interactions affecting soil drying and (2) soil-moisture-dependent stomatal responses to atmospheric evaporative demand that influence leaf (and canopy) transpiration. Model estimates of ET and its partitioning were in good agreement with available field-scale data, and highlight hidden processes not accounted for by commonly used ET schemes. One such process, nonlinear vegetation-induced turbulence (as a function of vegetation stature and cover fraction) significantly influences ET-soil moisture relationships. Our results are particularly important for water resources and land use planning of semiarid sparsely vegetated ecosystems where soil surface interactions are known to play a critical role in land-climate interactions. This study potentially facilitates a mathematically tractable description of the strength (i.e., the slope) of the ET-soil moisture relationship, which is a core component of models that seek to predict land-atmosphere coupling and its feedback to the climate system in a changing climate.

  8. Apparatus and process for continuous measurement of moisture in moving coal by neutron thermalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, R.F.

    1967-01-01

    The invention relates to an apparatus and process for the measurement of moisture contents in solid materials. More particularly, the invention makes available a continuous moisture analysis of a moving mass of material, such as coal, by penetrating such material with neutrons emitted from a source of fast neutrons and detecting, counting, and recording slowed or thermalized neutrons reflected from the internal structure of the material. (U.S.)

  9. Automated low energy photon absorption equipment for measuring internal moisture and density distributions of wood samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiitta, M.; Olkkonen, H.; Lappalainen, T.; Kanko, T.

    1993-01-01

    Automated equipment for measuring the moisture and density distributions of wood samples was developed. Using a narrow beam of gamma rays, the equipment scans the wood samples, which are placed on the moving belt. The moisture measurement is based on the 241 Am photon absorption technique (59.5 keV), where the difference of the linear absorption coefficients of the moist and dry wood is measured. The method requires no knowledge of the thickness of the specimen. The density estimation method is based on the measurement of the linear attenuation coefficient of wood. Comprehensive software including image processing was developed for treatment of the numerical values of the measurements. (author)

  10. Improved characterization of root zone soil moisture in land surface models by assimilation of groundwater level data. An example with TerrSysMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks Franssen, Harrie-Jan; Zhang, Hongjuan; Kurtz, Wolfgang; Kollet, Stefan; Vereecken, Harry

    2017-04-01

    Land surface model predictions are affected by uncertainty with respect to parameters, atmospheric forcings and process representation. Therefore, constraining land surface model predictions by assimilation of soil moisture data is of great interest, using techniques like the Ensemble Kalman Filter. Soil moisture is a key variable in land surface models linking the water and energy cycles. However, various studies found that assimilation of remotely sensed soil moisture content improved root zone soil moisture characterization only marginally. In addition, below densely vegetated areas measured remotely sensed soil moisture content is unreliable. In this study, we explored groundwater level data as an additional information source to be used in data assimilation to constrain root zone soil moisture characterization and land surface model predictions. In order to extract as much information as possible from groundwater level data we used the model TerrSysMP, which represents groundwater better than classical land surface models considering lateral subsurface flow, and fully coupled interactions between the vadose zone and groundwater. The assimilation of groundwater level data in integrated hydrological models like TerrSysMP is challenging. If groundwater level data are assimilated in terms of pressure information and used to update pressure in the vadose zone and aquifer, unrealistic updates may be generated in the upper vadose zone during (very) dry conditions as probability density functions of pressure are highly skewed. On the other hand, if groundwater level data are assimilated in terms of soil moisture values (equal to porosity in the aquifer) and used to update soil moisture in the vadose zone, under specific conditions which we will detail in the presentation updating also does not work well. We tested different data assimilation strategies in synthetic experiments and found that assimilating groundwater level data in terms of pressure, but updating model

  11. A Smart Irrigation Approach Aided by Monitoring Surface Soil Moisture using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wienhold, K. J.; Li, D.; Fang, N. Z.

    2017-12-01

    Soil moisture is a critical component in the optimization of irrigation scheduling in water resources management. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) equipped with multispectral sensors represent an emerging technology capable of detecting and estimating soil moisture for irrigation and crop management. This study demonstrates a method of using a UAV as an optical and thermal remote sensing platform combined with genetic programming to derive high-resolution, surface soil moisture (SSM) estimates. The objective is to evaluate the feasibility of spatially-variable irrigation management for a golf course (about 50 acres) in North Central Texas. Multispectral data is collected over the course of one month in the visible, near infrared and longwave infrared spectrums using a UAV capable of rapid and safe deployment for daily estimates. The accuracy of the model predictions is quantified using a time domain reflectometry (TDR) soil moisture sensor and a holdout validation test set. The model produces reasonable estimates for SSM with an average coefficient of correlation (r) = 0.87 and coefficient of determination of (R2) = 0.76. The study suggests that the derived SSM estimates be used to better inform irrigation scheduling decisions for lightly vegetated areas such as the turf or native roughs found on golf courses.

  12. Deriving surface soil moisture from reflected GNSS signal observations from a grassland site in southwestern France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Zhang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This work assesses the estimation of surface volumetric soil moisture (VSM using the global navigation satellite system interferometric reflectometry (GNSS-IR technique. Year-round observations were acquired from a grassland site in southwestern France using an antenna consecutively placed at two contrasting heights above the ground surface (3.3 and 29.4 m. The VSM retrievals are compared with two independent reference datasets: in situ observations of soil moisture, and numerical simulations of soil moisture and vegetation biomass from the ISBA (Interactions between Soil, Biosphere and Atmosphere land surface model. Scaled VSM estimates can be retrieved throughout the year removing vegetation effects by the separation of growth and senescence periods and by the filtering of the GNSS-IR observations that are most affected by vegetation. Antenna height has no significant impact on the quality of VSM estimates. Comparisons between the VSM GNSS-IR retrievals and the in situ VSM observations at a depth of 5 cm show good agreement (R2 =  0.86 and RMSE  =  0.04 m3 m−3. It is shown that the signal is sensitive to the grass litter water content and that this effect triggers differences between VSM retrievals and in situ VSM observations at depths of 1 and 5 cm, especially during light rainfall events.

  13. Deriving surface soil moisture from reflected GNSS signal observations from a grassland site in southwestern France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sibo; Calvet, Jean-Christophe; Darrozes, José; Roussel, Nicolas; Frappart, Frédéric; Bouhours, Gilles

    2018-03-01

    This work assesses the estimation of surface volumetric soil moisture (VSM) using the global navigation satellite system interferometric reflectometry (GNSS-IR) technique. Year-round observations were acquired from a grassland site in southwestern France using an antenna consecutively placed at two contrasting heights above the ground surface (3.3 and 29.4 m). The VSM retrievals are compared with two independent reference datasets: in situ observations of soil moisture, and numerical simulations of soil moisture and vegetation biomass from the ISBA (Interactions between Soil, Biosphere and Atmosphere) land surface model. Scaled VSM estimates can be retrieved throughout the year removing vegetation effects by the separation of growth and senescence periods and by the filtering of the GNSS-IR observations that are most affected by vegetation. Antenna height has no significant impact on the quality of VSM estimates. Comparisons between the VSM GNSS-IR retrievals and the in situ VSM observations at a depth of 5 cm show good agreement (R2 = 0.86 and RMSE = 0.04 m3 m-3). It is shown that the signal is sensitive to the grass litter water content and that this effect triggers differences between VSM retrievals and in situ VSM observations at depths of 1 and 5 cm, especially during light rainfall events.

  14. The impact of temporal auto-correlation mismatch on the assimilation of satellite-derived surface soil moisture retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satellite-based surface soil moisture retrievals are commonly assimilated into eco-hydrological models in order to obtain improved profile soil moisture estimates. However, differences in temporal auto-correlation structure between these retrievals and comparable model-based predictions can potentia...

  15. Comparison of time domain reflectometry, capacitance methods and neutron scattering in soil moisture measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khorasani, A.; Mousavi Shalmani, M. A.; Piervali Bieranvand, N.

    2011-01-01

    An accurate, precise, fast and ease as well as the ability for measurements in depth are the characteristics that are desirable in measuring soil moisture methods. To compare methods (time domain reflectometry and capacitance) with neutron scattering for soil water monitoring, an experiment was carried out in a randomized complete block design (Split Split plot) on tomato with three replications on the experimental field of International Atomic Energy Agency (Seibersdorf-Austria). The treatment instruments for the soil moisture monitoring (main factor) consist of neutron gauge, Diviner 2000, time domain reflectometer and an EnviroScan and different irrigation systems (first sub factor) consist of trickle and furrow irrigations and different depths of soil (second sub factor) consist of 0-20, 20-40 and 40-60 cm. The results showed that for the neutron gauge and time domain reflectometer the amount of soil moisture in both of trickle and furrow irrigations were the same, but the significant differences were recorded in Diviner 2000 and EnviroScan measurements. The results of this study showed that the neutron gauge is an acceptable and reliable means with the modern technology, with a precision of ±2 mm in 450 mm soil water to a depth of 1.5 meter and can be considered as the most practical method for measuring soil moisture profiles and irrigation planning program. The time domain reflectometer method in most mineral soils, without the need for calibration, with an accuracy ±0.01m 3 m -3 has a good performance in soil moisture and electrical conductivity measurements. The Diviner 2000 and EnviroScan are not well suitable for the above conditions for several reasons such as much higher soil moisture and a large error measurement and also its sensitivity to the soil gap and to the small change in the soil moisture in comparison with the neutron gauge and the time domain reflectometer methods.

  16. Measuring of the moisture content in brick walls of historical buildings - the overview of methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hola, A.

    2017-10-01

    The paper deals with the issue of measuring the moisture content of brick walls in buildings of high historical value. It includes a classification of known methods used to measure the moisture content and their valorisation with regards to the legitimacy of using them in historical buildings. Moreover, the most important considerations for conducting such measurements are also described, which include the choice of an appropriate method for a specific situation, the determination of a correlative or hypothetical dependency for equipment used in tests and also the method of distributing measurement points.

  17. Importance of moisture determination in studies of infiltration and surface runoff for long periods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Fulginiti

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The determination of the natural soil moisture is essential to solve problems related to irrigation water requirements, environmental considerations, and determination of surplus water. For the determination of runoff one can adopt models that consider exclusively the infiltration as a loss or one could use computational models of infiltration to model the infiltrated water. Models based on the infiltration calculation consider well the interaction between infiltration - runoff processes and provide additional information on the phenomenon of infiltration which establishes the existing conditions of moisture in the soil before the occurrence of a new event (simulation for long periods. These models require solving Richards’s equation and for this purpose it is necessary to determine the relation between the soil moisture - suction and hydraulic conductivity - suction which require the determination of the hydraulic properties that can be obtained by measuring the water content by moisture profiles. The aim of this study was the verification of these moisture curves in loessic soils in the south of the city of Cordoba, Argentina. To do this, measurements were done and compared with results of infiltration models based on the determined hydraulic functions. The measurements were done using three probes installed at different depths. The results showed that the values obtained with NETRAIN adequately represent the behavior of wetting and drying conditions of the studied soil.The determination of these curves provided a basis for future studies that include the advancement of agricultural chemicals in the soil and its potential capacity to pollute groundwater, fundamental issue to define environmental management policies.

  18. Equilibrium moisture content of radiata pine at elevated temperature and pressure reveals measurement challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pearson, Hamish; Gabbitas, Brian; Ormarsson, Sigurdur

    2012-01-01

    moisture contents were attributed to condensation of liquid water on the specimen with subsequent evaporation at a rate that was too slow for the moisture content to reach equilibrium before it was measured. Reliable EMC data at elevated temperatures require (1) tight process control of experimental......Relatively few studies have been performed on the equilibrium moisture content (EMC) of wood under conditions of elevated temperature and pressure. Eight studies indicated that EMC near saturation decreased between 100 and 150 °C, whilst five studies indicated that EMC increased. The aim...... of this study was to identify the likely source of the disagreement using radiata pine (Pinus radiata D. Don) sapwood which was conditioned to a moisture content of around 3 % and then exposed for 1 h at 150 °C and relative humidities of either 50, 70 or 90 %. Mean values of EMC, obtained through in situ...

  19. Inferring Land Surface Model Parameters for the Assimilation of Satellite-Based L-Band Brightness Temperature Observations into a Soil Moisture Analysis System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichle, Rolf H.; De Lannoy, Gabrielle J. M.

    2012-01-01

    The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite mission provides global measurements of L-band brightness temperatures at horizontal and vertical polarization and a variety of incidence angles that are sensitive to moisture and temperature conditions in the top few centimeters of the soil. These L-band observations can therefore be assimilated into a land surface model to obtain surface and root zone soil moisture estimates. As part of the observation operator, such an assimilation system requires a radiative transfer model (RTM) that converts geophysical fields (including soil moisture and soil temperature) into modeled L-band brightness temperatures. At the global scale, the RTM parameters and the climatological soil moisture conditions are still poorly known. Using look-up tables from the literature to estimate the RTM parameters usually results in modeled L-band brightness temperatures that are strongly biased against the SMOS observations, with biases varying regionally and seasonally. Such biases must be addressed within the land data assimilation system. In this presentation, the estimation of the RTM parameters is discussed for the NASA GEOS-5 land data assimilation system, which is based on the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) and the Catchment land surface model. In the GEOS-5 land data assimilation system, soil moisture and brightness temperature biases are addressed in three stages. First, the global soil properties and soil hydraulic parameters that are used in the Catchment model were revised to minimize the bias in the modeled soil moisture, as verified against available in situ soil moisture measurements. Second, key parameters of the "tau-omega" RTM were calibrated prior to data assimilation using an objective function that minimizes the climatological differences between the modeled L-band brightness temperatures and the corresponding SMOS observations. Calibrated parameters include soil roughness parameters, vegetation structure parameters

  20. Modeling spatial and seasonal soil moisture in a semi arid hillslope: The impact of integrating soil surface seal parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sela, Shai; Svoray, Tal; Assouline, Shmuel

    2010-05-01

    Modeling hillslope hydrology and the complex and coupled reaction of runoff processes to rainfall, lies in the focus of a growing number of research studies. The ability to characterize and understand the mechanisms underlying the complex hillslope soil moisture patterns, which trigger spatially variable non linear runoff initiation, still remains a current hydrological challenge especially in ungauged catchments. In humid climates, connectivity of transient moisture patches was suggested as a unifying concept for studying thresholds for subsurface flow and redistribution of soil moisture at the hillslope scale. In semiarid areas, however, transient moisture patches control also the differentiation between evaporation and surface runoff and the ability to identify a unifying concept controlling the large variability of soil moisture at the hillslope scale remains an open research gap. At the LTER Lehavim site in the center of Israel (31020' N, 34045' E) a typical hillslope (0.115 km2) was chosen offering different aspects and a classic geomorphologic banding. The annual rainfall is 290 mm, the soils are brown lithosols and arid brown loess and the dominant rock formations are Eocenean limestone and chalk with patches of calcrete. The vegetation is characterised by scattered dwarf shrubs (dominant species Sarcopoterium spinosum) and patches of herbaceous vegetation, mostly annuals, are spread between rocks and dwarf shrubs. An extensive spatial database of soil hydraulic and environmental parameters (e.g. slope, radiation, bulk density) was measured in the field and interpolated to continuous maps using geostatistical techniques and physically based modelling. To explore the effect of soil surface sealing, Mualem and Assouline (1989) equations describing the change in hydraulic parameters resulting from soil seal formation were applied. Two simple indices were developed to describe local evaporation values and contribution of water from rock outcrops to the soil

  1. Soil moisture, dielectric permittivity and emissivity of soil: effective depth of emission measured by the L-band radiometer ELBARA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usowicz, Boguslaw; Lukowski, Mateusz; Marczewski, Wojciech; Usowicz, Jerzy; Lipiec, Jerzy; Rojek, Edyta; Slominska, Ewa; Slominski, Jan

    2014-05-01

    Due to the large variation of soil moisture in space and in time, obtaining soil water balance with an aid of data acquired from the surface is still a challenge. Microwave remote sensing is widely used to determine the water content in soil. It is based on the fact that the dielectric constant of the soil is strongly dependent on its water content. This method provides the data in both local and global scales. Very important issue that is still not solved, is the soil depth at which radiometer "sees" the incoming radiation and how this "depth of view" depends on water content and physical properties of soil. The microwave emission comes from its entire profile, but much of this energy is absorbed by the upper layers of soil. As a result, the contribution of each layer to radiation visible for radiometer decreases with depth. The thickness of the surface layer, which significantly contributes to the energy measured by the radiometer is defined as the "penetration depth". In order to improve the physical base of the methodology of soil moisture measurements using microwave remote sensing and to determine the effective emission depth seen by the radiometer, a new algorithm was developed. This algorithm determines the reflectance coefficient from Fresnel equations, and, what is new, the complex dielectric constant of the soil, calculated from the Usowicz's statistical-physical model (S-PM) of dielectric permittivity and conductivity of soil. The model is expressed in terms of electrical resistance and capacity. The unit volume of soil in the model consists of solid, water and air, and is treated as a system made up of spheres, filling volume by overlapping layers. It was assumed that connections between layers and spheres in the layer are represented by serial and parallel connections of "resistors" and "capacitors". The emissivity of the soil surface is calculated from the ratio between the brightness temperature measured by the ELBARA radiometer (GAMMA Remote

  2. Impact of urban cover fraction on SMOS and SMAP surface soil moisture retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, N.; Walker, J. P.; Rudiger, C.; Ryu, D.; Gurney, R.

    2011-12-01

    L-band (~1.4 GHz) microwave radiometry has been widely acknowledged as the most promising technique for surface (top ~5cm) soil moisture observation at regional and global scales, due to its all weather capability, direct relationship to soil moisture, and reduced sensitivity to surface roughness and vegetation. Radiometer observations of microwave emission from the soil surface are used to estimate soil moisture through a radiative transfer model using ancillary information including land cover and soil properties etc. This technique has been applied to the ESA's (European Space Agency) Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite, the first soil moisture dedicated space mission, launched on 2nd Nov. 2009. Similarly, radiometer techniques will be employed by NASA's (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) mission, in both the passive and active-passive products. However, passive microwave soil moisture retrieval suffers from land surface heterogeneity at coarse scales; with the radiometer footprints of both missions being ~40 km, which is the best spatial resolution currently achievable using current satellite antenna technology. In order to achieve the ~0.04 m3/m3 target volumetric soil moisture accuracies at such scales, microwave contributions of non-soil targets (such as urban areas) within the sensors' field-of-view needs to be considered in the retrieval algorithm error budget and implementation, since the impact could potentially be significant if ignored. Currently there is a lack of knowledge on the microwave behaviour of non-soil targets, with little assessment of their microwave emissions and impact on satellite scale footprints. Therefore, the objectives of this study are to 1) investigate the relationship between urban induced brightness temperature uncertainties and urban fraction, 2) extract urban fraction thresholds for negligible brightness temperature impact by urban areas based on the SMOS and

  3. Comparative analysis of surface soil moisture retrieval using VSWI and TVDI in karst areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hongbo; Zhou, Guoqing; Lu, Xianjian

    2015-12-01

    Vegetation Supply Water Index (VSWI) and Temperature Vegetation dryness Index (TVDI) are two most commonly used methods for surface soil moisture (SSM) retrieval using electromagnetic spectrum of visible, near infrared and thermal infrared band. Both of them take into account the effect of vegetation index (VI) and surface temperature (Ts) on SSM. A comparative analysis of the ability and effect of the two methods for SSM retrieval in karst areas was carried out, using the remote sensing data of Landsat 8 OLI_TIRS. The study area is located in Guilin, which is a typical karst area. The experimental results show that TVDI is more suitable for SSM retrieval in karst areas.

  4. ESTAR: The Electronically Scanned Thinned Array Radiometer for remote sensing measurement of soil moisture and ocean salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, C. T.

    1993-01-01

    The product of a working group assembled to help define the science objectives and measurement requirements of a spaceborne L-band microwave radiometer devoted to remote sensing of surface soil moisture and sea surface salinity is presented. Remote sensing in this long-wavelength portion of the microwave spectrum requires large antennas in low-Earth orbit to achieve acceptable spatial resolution. The proposed radiometer, ESTAR, is unique in that it employs aperture synthesis to reduce the antenna area requirements for a space system.

  5. Validation of SMAP Surface Soil Moisture Products with Core Validation Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colliander, A.; Jackson, T. J.; Bindlish, R.; Chan, S.; Das, N.; Kim, S. B.; Cosh, M. H.; Dunbar, R. S.; Dang, L.; Pashaian, L.; hide

    2017-01-01

    The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission has utilized a set of core validation sites as the primary methodology in assessing the soil moisture retrieval algorithm performance. Those sites provide well calibrated in situ soil moisture measurements within SMAP product grid pixels for diverse conditions and locations.The estimation of the average soil moisture within the SMAP product grid pixels based on in situ measurements is more reliable when location specific calibration of the sensors has been performed and there is adequate replication over the spatial domain, with an up-scaling function based on analysis using independent estimates of the soil moisture distribution. SMAP fulfilled these requirements through a collaborative CalVal Partner program.This paper presents the results from 34 candidate core validation sites for the first eleven months of the SMAP mission. As a result of the screening of the sites prior to the availability of SMAP data, out of the 34 candidate sites 18 sites fulfilled all the requirements at one of the resolution scales (at least). The rest of the sites are used as secondary information in algorithm evaluation. The results indicate that the SMAP radiometer-based soil moisture data product meets its expected performance of 0.04 cu m/cu m volumetric soil moisture (unbiased root mean square error); the combined radar-radiometer product is close to its expected performance of 0.04 cu m/cu m, and the radar-based product meets its target accuracy of 0.06 cu m/cu m (the lengths of the combined and radar-based products are truncated to about 10 weeks because of the SMAP radar failure). Upon completing the intensive CalVal phase of the mission the SMAP project will continue to enhance the products in the primary and extended geographic domains, in co-operation with the CalVal Partners, by continuing the comparisons over the existing core validation sites and inclusion of candidate sites that can address shortcomings.

  6. Density and moisture measurements by nuclear method and its application to compaction control in road construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Azmi Ismail

    1994-01-01

    The application of nuclear technique in civil engineering sector which emphasises on the in-situ density and moisture measurements of soil in road construction is discussed. The nuclear density-moisture gauge utilises both gamma-rays and neutrons for the determination of the density and moisture content, respectively. The knowledge on the density and moisture content will be used to evaluate the degree of compaction of the compacted layers. The technique offers not only a fast and non-destructive measurement but it is also accurate, economical and repeatable. A calibration equation which is stored in the built-in microprocessor is applicable for any type of soil. Corrections for the interferences from needless gamma-rays produced as a result of thermal neutrons interaction with certain nuclei for the density measurement and effects of hydrogen other than absorbed water for the moisture measurement are considered in the equation. This paper describes briefly the theory and the characteristics of the nuclear gauge and its application in road construction work

  7. AMSR-E/Aqua Daily L3 Surface Soil Moisture, Interpretive Parms, & QC EASE-Grids V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The AMSR-E/Aqua Level-3 daily land product includes surface soil moisture, vegetation/roughness water content interpretive information, and TBs on global 25 km...

  8. Development of a method for the noncontact moisture measurement of different materials at a belt conveyor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frevert, E.

    1991-01-01

    In laboratory tests a method was developed for a contactless moisture measurement at belt conveyors of different materials like coal, clay, industrial slay and stones of inflating clay. The moisture was measured with an 241 Am-Be-neutron source, the absolute necessary determination of the changing flow of material was made with the gamma rays of 137 Cs or 241 Am. The analysis of the records shows, that to all measuring values mathematical defined curves could be found, so that methods of calculation for the moisture content could be deduced. The maximal obtainable accuracy is about ± 0.5 percentage by weight. With the industrial slay and the stones of inflating clay supplementary tests were made direct on the belt conveyor. They show, that also in the practice good results can be obtained. (orig.) [de

  9. In-house development of neutron moisture gauge for field measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Channuie, J.; Sinkaew, P.; Lekchaum, S.; Kanjana, K.

    2017-09-01

    The measurement of moisture content in soil is based on the principle of neutron back scattering. In this principle, when fast neutrons emitted from a radioactive source collide with hydrogen atoms their energies are much greater reduced than colliding with other elements. The number of slowed down neutrons, hence, represents the number of hydrogen atoms present in the vicinity of the source. As water is the main contributor of hydrogen atoms in a soil medium, the moisture content in soil, therefore, can be measured based on this principle. An in-house developed probe containing a source of fast neutrons and a slow neutron detector was inserted into soil at different depths under the ground level. The probe was made of high density polyethylene and connected to a suitably calibrated detection system by a single cable. The moisture content was determined from the slow neutron count rate. The results of field measurement tests were reported and discussed.

  10. Service Life Prediction of Wood Claddings by in-situ Measurement of Wood Moisture Content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelund, Emil Tang; Lindegaard, Berit; Morsing, Niels

    2009-01-01

    of wood moisture are done by in-situ resistance moisture meters (Lindegaard and Morsing 2006). The aim is that the test should form the basis of evaluation of the maintenance requirements and the prediction of service life of the surface treatment and the wood/construction. At the moment 60 test racks...... to predict the service life of the construction in terms of maintenance period and the risk of biological degradation of the construction.......The Danish Technological Institute is in co-operation with industry partners running a project aiming at predicting the service life of different wood protecting systems. The project focuses on examining the moisture reducing effect of different protecting systems for timber claddings...

  11. Design, development and method validation of a novel multi-resonance microwave sensor for moisture measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Johanna; Taute, Wolfgang; Bartscher, Kathrin; Döscher, Claas; Höft, Michael; Knöchel, Reinhard; Breitkreutz, Jörg

    2017-04-08

    Microwave sensor systems using resonance technology at a single resonance in the range of 2-3 GHz have been shown to be a rapid and reliable tool for moisture determination in solid materials including pharmaceutical granules. So far, their application is limited to lower moisture ranges or limitations above certain moisture contents had to be accepted. Aim of the present study was to develop a novel multi-resonance sensor system in order to expand the measurement range. Therefore, a novel sensor using additional resonances over a wide frequency band was designed and used to investigate inherent limitations of first generation sensor systems and material-related limits. Using granule samples with different moisture contents, an experimental protocol for calibration and validation of the method was established. Pursuant to this protocol, a multiple linear regression (MLR) prediction model built by correlating microwave moisture values to the moisture determined by Karl Fischer titration was chosen and rated using conventional criteria such as coefficient of determination (R 2 ) and root mean square error of calibration (RMSEC). Using different operators, different analysis dates and different ambient conditions the method was fully validated following the guidance of ICH Q2(R1). The study clearly showed explanations for measurement uncertainties of first generation sensor systems which confirmed the approach to overcome these by using additional resonances. The established prediction model could be validated in the range of 7.6-19.6%, demonstrating its fit for its future purpose, the moisture content determination during wet granulations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A multi-frequency approach to soil moisture measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiglione, Paolo; Campbell, Colin S.; Cobos, Doug R.; Campbell, Gaylon S.

    2014-05-01

    The greatest challenge in estimating soil water content from dielectric measurements derives from the dependence of soil permittivity on, a number of additional environmental (such as salinity, temperature) and structural (bulk density, texture etc.) parameters besides water content. The ideal relationship between soil dielectric permittivity and water content (sometimes referred to as universal relationship) is one that performs satisfactorily under all possible instances of the additional variables. We show that when permittivity is measured at a single frequency, an ideal relationship does not exist. This is true in spite of conventional wisdom suggesting that those effects can be mitigated by increasing the measurement frequency. As a consequence, high frequency techniques, such as TDR, are often believed to provide the greatest accuracy. However, this is only partially true. While soil permittivity is indeed only slightly affected by salinity in the frequency range characteristic of TDR, the effects from texture are much more pronounced there compared to lower frequency techniques. This is due to the dielectric properties displayed by bound water (abundant in fine textured soils), which differ substantially from those of free water (predominant in coarse soils). Multivariate statistical analysis suggests that a much more robust predictor for soil water content can be obtained from permittivity measurements at multiple frequencies. As an alternative to classical broadband spectroscopy, which appears too sophisticated and expensive for most practical applications, we provide an example of dielectric measurements at three different frequencies, combined with soil electrical conductivity and temperature, as an alternative predictor for water content. Such measurements are conveniently obtained with a traditional capacitance sensor through a slight modification of circuitry. The proposed method was tested for four different soils (sand, sandy loam, silt loam and

  13. A synthetic aperture microwave radiometer to measure soil moisture and ocean salinity from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Vine, D. M.; Hilliard, L. M.; Swift, C. T.; Ruf, C. S.; Garrett, L. B.

    1991-01-01

    A concept is presented for a microwave radiometer in space to measure soil moisture and ocean salinity as part of an 'Earth Probe' mission. The measurements could be made using an array of stick antennas. The L-band channel (1.4 GHz) would be the primary channel for determining soil moisture, with the S-band (2.65-GHz) and C-band (5.0-GHz) channels providing ancillary information to help correct for the effects of the vegetation canopy and possibly to estimate a moisture profile. A preliminary study indicates that an orbit at 450 km would provide coverage of better than 95 percent of the earth every 3 days. A 10-km resolution cell (at nadir) requires stick antennas about 9.5-m long at L-band. The S-band and C-band sticks would be substantially shorter (5 m and 2.7 m, respectively).

  14. Electronmagnetic induction probe calibration for electrical conductivity measurements and moisture content determination of Hanford high level waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittekind, W.D., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-23

    Logic of converting EMI measured electrical conductivity to moisture with expected uncertainty. Estimates from present knowledge, assumptions, and measured data. Archie`s Law has been used since the 1940`s to relate electrical conductivity in porous media to liquid volume fraction. Measured electrical conductivity to moisture content uses: Porosity, Interstitial liquid electrical conductivity, Solid particle density,Interstitial liquid density, and interstitial liquid water content. The uncertainty of assumed values is calculated to determine the final moisture wt.% result uncertainty.

  15. Assessing the relative influence of surface soil moisture and ENSO SST on precipitation predictability over the contiguous United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jin-Ho; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2015-06-28

    This study assesses the relative influence of soil moisture memory and tropical sea surface temperature (SST) in seasonal rainfall over the contiguous United States. Using observed precipitation, the NINO3.4 index and soil moisture and evapotranspiration simulated by a land surface model for 61 years, analysis was performed using partial correlations to evaluate to what extent land surface and SST anomaly of El Niño and Southern Oscillation (ENSO) can affect seasonal precipitation over different regions and seasons. Results show that antecedent soil moisture is as important as concurrent ENSO condition in controlling rainfall anomalies over the U.S., but they generally dominate in different seasons with SST providing more predictability during winter while soil moisture, through its linkages to evapotranspiration and snow water, has larger influence in spring and early summer. The proposed methodology is applicable to climate model outputs to evaluate the intensity of land-atmosphere coupling and its relative importance.

  16. Assessing the relative influence of surface soil moisture and ENSO SST on precipitation predictability over the contiguous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jin-Ho; Leung, L. Ruby

    2015-06-01

    This study assesses the relative influence of soil moisture memory and tropical sea surface temperature (SST) in seasonal rainfall over the contiguous United States. Using observed precipitation, the NINO3.4 index, and soil moisture and evapotranspiration simulated by a land surface model for 61 years, analysis was performed using partial correlations to evaluate to what extent land surface and SST anomaly of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) can affect seasonal precipitation over different regions and seasons. Results show that antecedent soil moisture is as important as concurrent ENSO condition in controlling rainfall anomalies over the U.S., but they generally dominate in different seasons with SST providing more predictability during winter while soil moisture, through its linkages to evapotranspiration and snow water, has larger influence in spring and early summer. The proposed methodology is applicable to climate model outputs to evaluate the intensity of land-atmosphere coupling and its relative importance.

  17. Measurement of Moisture in Wood for Application in the Restoration of Old Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moron, Carlos; Garcia-Fuentevilla, Luisa; Garcia, Alfonso; Moron, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    There are many historic buildings whose construction is based on timber frame walls. Most buildings built during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries were based on timber frame walls with vertical support elements. These timber frame elements are affected by their moisture content and by the passage of time. If the interaction of the timber frame walls with hygrothermal fluctuations were known, the maintenance of these buildings could be improved significantly. To determine the moisture content of wood there are two types of meters on the market: on the one hand, capacitance meters which consist of two side ends and where the moisture content is measured locally between two peaks. On the other hand, there are meters based on the variation of electromagnetic transmittance of timber, which depends on the moisture of timber. The second ones are very expensive and difficult to handle. This work presents a new non-intrusive capacitive sensor that measures the global moisture content in a section of the timber frame walls and therefore its accuracy is similar to the accuracy that can be obtained with electromagnetic transmittance meters. Additionally, as it is a capacitive sensor, it is low cost and easy to operate. PMID:27187410

  18. A Compound Sensor for Simultaneous Measurement of Packing Density and Moisture Content of Silage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Delun; Meng, Fanjia; Sun, Wei; Deng, Shuang

    2017-12-28

    Packing density and moisture content are important factors in investigating the ensiling quality. Low packing density is a major cause of loss of sugar content. The moisture content also plays a determinant role in biomass degradation. To comprehensively evaluate the ensiling quality, this study focused on developing a compound sensor. In it, moisture electrodes and strain gauges were embedded into an ASABE Standard small cone for the simultaneous measurements of the penetration resistance (PR) and moisture content (MC) of silage. In order to evaluate the performance of the designed sensor and the theoretical analysis being used, relevant calibration and validation tests were conducted. The determination coefficients are 0.996 and 0.992 for PR calibration and 0.934 for MC calibration. The validation indicated that this measurement technique could determine the packing density and moisture content of the silage simultaneously and eliminate the influence of the friction between the penetration shaft and silage. In this study, we not only design a compound sensor but also provide an alternative way to investigate the ensiling quality which would be useful for further silage research.

  19. Surface Functionalization of Metal-Organic Framework Crystals with Catechol Coatings for Enhanced Moisture Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castells-Gil, Javier; Novio, Fernando; Padial, Natalia M; Tatay, Sergio; Ruíz-Molina, Daniel; Martí-Gastaldo, Carlos

    2017-12-27

    Robust catechol coatings for enhanced moisture tolerance were produced in one step by direct reaction of Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) with synthetic catechols. We ascribe the rapid formation of homogeneous coatings around the metal-organic framework particles to the biomimetic catalytic activity of Cu(II) dimers in the external surface of the crystals. Use of fluorinated catechols results in hydrophobic, permeable coatings that protect HKUST from water degradation while retaining close to 100% of its original sorption capacity.

  20. Potential feedbacks between snow cover, soil moisture and surface energy fluxes in Southern Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brox Nilsen, Irene; Tallaksen, Lena M.; Stordal, Frode

    2017-04-01

    At high latitudes, the snow season has become shorter during the past decades because snowmelt is highly sensitive to a warmer climate. Snowmelt influences the energy balance by changing the albedo and the partitioning between latent and sensible heat fluxes. It further influences the water balance by changing the runoff and soil moisture. In a previous study, we identified southern Norway as a region where significant temperature changes in summer could potentially be explained by land-atmosphere interactions. In this study we hypothesise that changes in snow cover would influence the summer surface fluxes in the succeeding weeks or months. The exceptionally warm summer of 2014 was chosen as a test bed. In Norway, evapotranspiration is not soil moisture limited, but energy limited, under normal conditions. During warm summers, however, such as in 2014, evapotranspiration can be restricted by the available soil moisture. Using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model we replace the initial ground conditions for 2014 with conditions representative of a snow-poor spring and a snow-rich spring. WRF was coupled to Noah-MP at 3 km horizontal resolution in the inner domain, and the simulations covered mid-May through September 2014. Boundary conditions used to force WRF were taken from the Era-Interim reanalysis. Snow, runoff, soil moisture and soil temperature observational data were provided by the Norwegian Water Resources and Energy Directorate for validation. The validation shows generally good agreement with observations. Preliminary results show that the reduced snowpack, hereafter "sim1" increased the air temperature by up to 5 K and the surface temperature by up to 10 K in areas affected by snow changes. The increased snowpack, hereafter "sim2", decreased the air and surface temperature by the same amount. These are weekly mean values for the first eight simulation weeks from mid May. Because of the higher net energy available ( 100 Wm-2) in sim 1, both

  1. New approaches to predicting surface fuel moisture in south east Australian forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Gary; Nyman, Petter; Hawthorne, Sandra; Bovill, William; Walsh, Sean; Baillie, Craig; Duff, Thomas; Tolhurst, Kevin; Lane, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    The capacity to predict of the moisture content (FMC) of fine surface fuels in mountainous south east Australian forests has improved dramatically in recent years due to the convergence of several new technologies, including i) improved process-based account-keeping type FMC models, ii) improved understanding and representation of topographic effects (aspect, drainage position, elevation) on surface fuel and soil moisture, iii) improved methods for downscaling weather variables (eg. rainfall/throughfall, short-wave radiation) using digital elevation models and airborne LIDaR, and, iv) new in-situ sensor technologies (fuelsticks, capacitance sensors, Ibuttons) for continuously monitoring surface fuels and within-litter micro-climate conditions, generating datasets of unprecedented temporal resolution and continuity for model development and testing under real field conditions across a broad range of forests, landscapes and climates. In this study the combined improvements in predictive capacity were quantified by comparing the field FMC observations with predictions from traditional, widely used operational FMC models, and with two new process-based models, including improved spatial parameterisation provided by the new technologies outlined above. The results are interpreted in the context of planned-burning decision making and outcomes, and bushfire modelling and management. The initial results showed that the new approaches to FMC prediction offered substantial improvements over the traditional methods and could be reasonably implemented at operational scales.

  2. Use of the near-infrared reflectance method for measurement of moisture content during granulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantanen, J; Antikainen, O; Mannermaa, J P; Yliruusi, J

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the use of a near-infrared (NIR) method for in-process control of a placebo formulation. An NIR setup with a multichannel detector was applied in the measurement of water during fluidized bed granulation. The effects of two critical granulation parameters were studied using the central composite design. The present NIR setup with three wavelengths proved applicable for in-line moisture measurement. The 1990 nm signal was used for measurement of water and the 1745 and 2145 nm signals were used to correct the change in spectra baseline during granulation. Variations in inlet air conditions proved to be critical factors, explaining differences in the granule size distributions. Differences in granule moistening and drying rates resulting from varying inlet air conditions could be measured with the NIR setup. The moisture content of granules at the end of the spraying phase explained part of the differences in granule size distributions. The moisture content of granules at the end of the drying phase affected the tableting behavior of granules. The results suggested that direct measurement of granule moisture content facilitates the in-process control of the granulation.

  3. Tools for measuring surface cleanliness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroder, Mark Stewart (Hendersonville, NC); Woodmansee, Donald Ernest (Simpsonville, SC); Beadie, Douglas Frank (Greenville, SC)

    2002-01-01

    A procedure and tools for quantifying surface cleanliness are described. Cleanliness of a target surface is quantified by wiping a prescribed area of the surface with a flexible, bright white cloth swatch, preferably mounted on a special tool. The cloth picks up a substantial amount of any particulate surface contamination. The amount of contamination is determined by measuring the reflectivity loss of the cloth before and after wiping on the contaminated system and comparing that loss to a previous calibration with similar contamination. In the alternative, a visual comparison of the contaminated cloth to a contamination key provides an indication of the surface cleanliness.

  4. Neural Network-Based Retrieval of Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture using Multi-Frequency Remotely-Sensed Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed Alemohammad, Seyed; Kolassa, Jana; Prigent, Catherine; Aires, Filipe; Gentine, Pierre

    2017-04-01

    Knowledge of root zone soil moisture is essential in studying plant's response to different stress conditions since plant photosynthetic activity and transpiration rate are constrained by the water available through their roots. Current global root zone soil moisture estimates are based on either outputs from physical models constrained by observations, or assimilation of remotely-sensed microwave-based surface soil moisture estimates with physical model outputs. However, quality of these estimates are limited by the accuracy of the model representations of physical processes (such as radiative transfer, infiltration, percolation, and evapotranspiration) as well as errors in the estimates of the surface parameters. Additionally, statistical approaches provide an alternative efficient platform to develop root zone soil moisture retrieval algorithms from remotely-sensed observations. In this study, we present a new neural network based retrieval algorithm to estimate surface and root zone soil moisture from passive microwave observations of SMAP satellite (L-band) and AMSR2 instrument (X-band). SMAP early morning observations are ideal for surface soil moisture retrieval. AMSR2 mid-night observations are used here as an indicator of plant hydraulic properties that are related to root zone soil moisture. The combined observations from SMAP and AMSR2 together with other ancillary observations including the Solar-Induced Fluorescence (SIF) estimates from GOME-2 instrument provide necessary information to estimate surface and root zone soil moisture. The algorithm is applied to observations from the first 18 months of SMAP mission and retrievals are validated against in-situ observations and other global datasets.

  5. A microwave method for measuring moisture content, density, and grain angle of wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. L. James; Y.-H. Yen; R. J. King

    1985-01-01

    The attenuation, phase shift and depolarization of a polarized 4.81-gigahertz wave as it is transmitted through a wood specimen can provide estimates of the moisture content (MC), density, and grain angle of the specimen. Calibrations are empirical, and computations are complicated, with considerable interaction between parameters. Measured dielectric parameters,...

  6. Intercomparison of the JULES and CABLE land surface models through assimilation of remotely sensed soil moisture in southeast Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumedah, Gift; Walker, Jeffrey P.

    2014-12-01

    Numerous land surface models exist for predicting water and energy fluxes in the terrestrial environment. These land surface models have different conceptualizations (i.e., process or physics based), together with structural differences in representing spatial variability, alternate empirical methods, mathematical formulations and computational approach. These inherent differences in modeling approach, and associated variations in outputs make it difficult to compare and contrast land surface models in a straight-forward manner. While model intercomparison studies have been undertaken in the past, leading to significant progress on the improvement of land surface models, additional framework towards identification of model weakness is needed. Given that land surface models are increasingly being integrated with satellite based estimates to improve their prediction skill, it is practical to undertake model intercomparison on the basis of soil moisture data assimilation. Consequently, this study compares two land surface models: the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) and the Community Atmosphere Biosphere Land Exchange (CABLE) for soil moisture estimation and associated assessment of model uncertainty. A retrieved soil moisture data set from the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission was assimilated into both models, with their updated estimates validated against in-situ soil moisture in the Yanco area, Australia. The findings show that the updated estimates from both models generally provided a more accurate estimate of soil moisture than the open loop estimate based on calibration alone. Moreover, the JULES output was found to provide a slightly better estimate of soil moisture than the CABLE output at both near-surface and deeper soil layers. An assessment of the updated membership in decision space also showed that the JULES model had a relatively stable, less sensitive, and more highly convergent internal dynamics than the CABLE model.

  7. Soil hydraulic parameters and surface soil moisture of a tilled bare soil plot inversely derived from l-band brightness temperatures

    KAUST Repository

    Dimitrov, Marin

    2014-01-01

    We coupled a radiative transfer model and a soil hydrologic model (HYDRUS 1D) with an optimization routine to derive soil hydraulic parameters, surface roughness, and soil moisture of a tilled bare soil plot using measured brightness temperatures at 1.4 GHz (L-band), rainfall, and potential soil evaporation. The robustness of the approach was evaluated using five 28-d data sets representing different meteorological conditions. We considered two soil hydraulic property models: the unimodal Mualem-van Genuchten and the bimodal model of Durner. Microwave radiative transfer was modeled by three different approaches: the Fresnel equation with depth-averaged dielectric permittivity of either 2-or 5-cm-thick surface layers and a coherent radiative transfer model (CRTM) that accounts for vertical gradients in dielectric permittivity. Brightness temperatures simulated by the CRTM and the 2-cm-layer Fresnel model fitted well to the measured ones. L-band brightness temperatures are therefore related to the dielectric permittivity and soil moisture in a 2-cm-thick surface layer. The surface roughness parameter that was derived from brightness temperatures using inverse modeling was similar to direct estimates from laser profiler measurements. The laboratory-derived water retention curve was bimodal and could be retrieved consistently for the different periods from brightness temperatures using inverse modeling. A unimodal soil hydraulic property function underestimated the hydraulic conductivity near saturation. Surface soil moisture contents simulated using retrieved soil hydraulic parameters were compared with in situ measurements. Depth-specific calibration relations were essential to derive soil moisture from near-surface installed sensors. © Soil Science Society of America 5585 Guilford Rd., Madison, WI 53711 USA.

  8. Comparison of different methods for the in situ measurement of forest litter moisture content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schunk, C.; Ruth, B.; Leuchner, M.; Wastl, C.; Menzel, A.

    2016-02-01

    Dead fine fuel (e.g., litter) moisture content is an important parameter for both forest fire and ecological applications as it is related to ignitability, fire behavior and soil respiration. Real-time availability of this value would thus be a great benefit to fire risk management and prevention. However, the comprehensive literature review in this paper shows that there is no easy-to-use method for automated measurements available. This study investigates the applicability of four different sensor types (permittivity and electrical resistance measuring principles) for this measurement. Comparisons were made to manual gravimetric reference measurements carried out almost daily for one fire season and overall agreement was good (highly significant correlations with 0.792 fuel moisture measurements are made anyway. Additionally, a number of potential methodological improvements are suggested.

  9. Comparing Evapotranspiration Rates Estimated from Atmospheric Flux and TDR Soil Moisture Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schelde, Kirsten; Ringgaard, Rasmus; Herbst, Mathias

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of water vapor fluxes using eddy covariance (EC) and measurements of root zone soil moisture depletion using time domain reflectometry (TDR) represent two independent approaches to estimating evapotranspiration. This study investigated the possibility of using TDR to provide a lower...... limit estimate (disregarding dew evaporation) of evapotranspiration on dry days. During a period of 7 wk, the two independent measuring techniques were applied in a barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) field, and six dry periods were identified. Measurements of daily root zone soil moisture depletion were...... compared with daily estimates of water vapor loss. During the first dry periods, agreement between the two approaches was good, with average daily deviation between estimates below 1.0 mm d-1 Toward the end of the measurement period, the estimates of the two techniques tended to deviate due to different...

  10. Feasibility study of prompt gamma neutron activation for NDT measurement of moisture in stone and brick

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livingston, R. A.; Al-Sheikhly, M. [Materials Science and Engineering Dept., U. of Maryland, College Park MD 20742 (United States); Grissom, C.; Aloiz, E. [Museum Conservation Institute, Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC 20746 (United States); Paul, R. [Chemical Sciences Division, NIST, Gaithersburg MD 20899 (United States)

    2014-02-18

    The conservation of stone and brick architecture or sculpture often involves damage caused by moisture. The feasibility of a NDT method based on prompt gamma neutron activation (PGNA) for measuring the element hydrogen as an indication of water is being evaluated. This includes systematic characterization of the lithology and physical properties of seven building stones and one brick type used in the buildings of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. To determine the required dynamic range of the NDT method, moisture-related properties were measured by standard methods. Cold neutron PGNA was also used to determine chemically bound water (CBW) content. The CBW does not damage porous masonry, but creates an H background that defines the minimum level of detection of damaging moisture. The CBW was on the order of 0.5% for all the stones. This rules out the measurement of hygric processes in all of the stones and hydric processed for the stones with fine scale pore-size distributions The upper bound of moisture content, set by porosity through water immersion, was on the order of 5%. The dynamic range is about 10–20. The H count rates were roughly 1–3 cps. Taking into account differences in neutron energies and fluxes and sample volume between cold PGNA and a portable PGNA instrument, it appears that it is feasible to apply PGNA in the field.

  11. On-line moisture analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cutmore, N.G.; Mijak, D.G

    2002-01-01

    Measurement of the moisture content of iron ore has become a key issue for controlling moisture additions for dust suppression. In most cases moisture content is still determined by manual or automatic sampling of the ore stream, followed by conventional laboratory analysis by oven drying. Although this procedure enables the moisture content to be routinely monitored, it is too slow for control purposes. This has generated renewed interest in on-line techniques for the accurate and rapid measurement of moisture in iron ore on conveyors. Microwave transmission techniques have emerged over the past 40 years as the dominant technology for on-line measurement of moisture in bulk materials, including iron ores. Alternative technologies have their limitations. Infra-red analysers are used in a variety of process industries, but rely on the measurement of absorption by moisture in a very thin surface layer. Consequently such probes may be compromised by particle size effects and biased presentation of the bulk material. Nuclear-based analysers measure the total hydrogen content in the sample and do not differentiate between free and combined moisture. Such analysers may also be sensitive to material presentation and elemental composition. Very low frequency electromagnetic probes, such as capacitance or conductance probes, operate in the frequency region where the DC conductivity dominates much of the response, which is a function not only of moisture content but also of ionic composition and chemistry. These problems are overcome using microwave transmission techniques, which also have the following advantages, as a true bulk moisture analysis is obtained, because a high percentage of the bulk material is analysed; the moisture estimate is mostly insensitive to any biased presentation of moisture, for example due to stratification of bulk material with different moisture content and because no physical contact is made between the sensor and the bulk material. This is

  12. Armor Plate Surface Roughness Measurements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stanton, Brian; Coburn, William; Pizzillo, Thomas J

    2005-01-01

    ...., surface texture and coatings) that could become important at high frequency. We measure waviness and roughness of various plates to know the parameter range for smooth aluminum and rolled homogenous armor (RHA...

  13. On the control of irrigation through soil moisture measurement using a neutron depth probe in horizontal subsurface measuring circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaecke, B.; Schaecke, E.

    1977-01-01

    An outline is given of the advantages inherent in soil moisture measurement by means of a neutron probe in horizontal subsurface measuring circuits for irrigation control. Preliminary experience for the setting up of a field calibration curve and for practical measurement are submitted. This technique includes the following advantages: almost complete covering of the upper soil range which is of interest to irrigation control; good measuring density; suitable distribution of measuring points per unit area; possibility of continuous probe passage; optimal repeatability of measurements; exploration of a unit area with but few measuring circuits; no obstacles to tillage, drilling, intercultivation and harvest operations; and complete conservation of crop and plot which is not reached with any other soil moisture measurement technique so far available. Making use of the above advantages, the new technique allows automatic irrigation control with only one neutron depth probe. (author)

  14. Comparison of different methods for the in situ measurement of forest litter moisture content

    OpenAIRE

    C. Schunk; B. Ruth; M. Leuchner; C. Wastl; A. Menzel

    2015-01-01

    Dead fine fuel (e.g. litter) moisture content is an important parameter for both forest fire and ecological applications as it is related to ignitability, fire behavior as well as soil respiration. However, the comprehensive literature review in this paper shows that there is no easy-to-use method for automated measurements available. This study investigates the applicability of four different sensor types (permittivity and electrical resistance measuring pr...

  15. Representativeness of the ground observational sites and up-scaling of the point soil moisture measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinlei; Wen, Jun; Tian, Hui

    2016-02-01

    Soil moisture plays an increasingly important role in the cycle of energy-water exchange, climate change, and hydrologic processes. It is usually measured at a point site, but regional soil moisture is essential for validating remote sensing products and numerical modeling results. In the study reported in this paper, the minimal number of required sites (NRS) for establishing a research observational network and the representative single sites for regional soil moisture estimation are discussed using the soil moisture data derived from the ;Maqu soil moisture observational network; (101°40‧-102°40‧E, 33°30‧-35°45‧N), which is supported by Chinese Academy of Science. Furthermore, the best up-scaling method suitable for this network has been studied by evaluating four commonly used up-scaling methods. The results showed that (1) Under a given accuracy requirement R ⩾ 0.99, RMSD ⩽ 0.02 m3/m3, NRS at both 5 and 10 cm depth is 10. (2) Representativeness of the sites has been validated by time stability analysis (TSA), time sliding correlation analysis (TSCA) and optimal combination of sites (OCS). NST01 is the most representative site at 5 cm depth for the first two methods; NST07 and NST02 are the most representative sites at 10 cm depth. The optimum combination sites at 5 cm depth are NST01, NST02, and NST07. NST05, NST08, and NST13 are the best group at 10 cm depth. (3) Linear fitting, compared with other three methods, is the best up-scaling method for all types of representative sites obtained above, and linear regression equations between a single site and regional soil moisture are established hereafter. ;Single site; obtained by OCS has the greatest up-scaling effect, and TSCA takes the second place. (4) Linear fitting equations show good practicability in estimating the variation of regional soil moisture from July 3, 2013 to July 3, 2014, when a large number of observed soil moisture data are lost.

  16. A comparison between remotely-sensed and modelled surface soil moisture (and frozen status) at high latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouttevin, I.; Bartsch, A.; Krinner, G.; Naeimi, V.

    2013-08-01

    In this study, the combined surface status and surface soil moisture products retrieved by the ASCAT sensor within the ESA-DUE Permafrost project are compared to the hydrological outputs of the land surface model ORCHIDEE over Northern Eurasia. The objective is to derive broad conclusions as to the strengths and weaknesses of hydrological modelling and, to a minor extent, remote sensing of soil moisture over an area where data is rare and hydrological modelling is though crucial for climate and ecological applications. The spatial and temporal resolutions of the ASCAT products make them suitable for comparison with model outputs. Modelled and remotely-sensed surface frozen and unfrozen statuses agree reasonably well, which allows for a seasonal comparison between modelled and observed (liquid) surface soil moisture. The atmospheric forcing and the snow scheme of the land surface model are identified as causes of moderate model-to-data divergence in terms of surface status. For unfrozen soils, the modelled and remotely-sensed surface soil moisture signals are positively correlated over most of the study area. The correlation deteriorates in the North-Eastern Siberian regions, which is consistent with the lack of accurate model parameters and the scarcity of meteorological data. The model shows a reduced ability to capture the main seasonal dynamics and spatial patterns of observed surface soil moisture in Northern Eurasia, namely a characteristic spring surface moistening resulting from snow melt and flooding. We hypothesize that these weak performances mainly originate from the non-representation of flooding and surface ponding in the model. Further identified limitations proceed from the coarse treatment of the hydrological specificities of mountainous areas and spatial inaccuracies in the meteorological forcing in remote, North-Eastern Siberian areas. Investigations are currently underway to determine to which extent plausible inaccuracies in the satellite data

  17. Soil Moisture Characterization of the Valencia Anchor Station. Ground, Aircraft Measurements and Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Baeza, E.; Antolin, M. C.; Balling, J.; Belda, F.; Bouzinac, C.; Camacho, F.; Cano, A.; Carbo, E.; Delwart, S.; Domenech, C.; Ferreira, A. G.; Fidalgo, A.; Juglea, S.; Kerr, Y.; Marco, J.; Millan-Scheiding, C.; Narbon, C.; Rodriguez, D.; Saleh, K.; Sanchis, J.; Skou, N.; Sobjaerg, S.; Soriano, P.; Tamayo, J.; Tauriainen, S.; Torre, E.; Velazquez-Blazquez, A.; Wigneron, J.-P.; Wursteisen, P.

    In the framework of ESA SMOS Mission, the Valencia Anchor Station (VAS) has been selected as a core validation site. Its reasonable homogeneous characteristics make it appropriate to undertake the validation of SMOS Level 2 land products before attempting other more complex areas. Close to SMOS launch (2nd Nov. 2009), ESA defined the SMOS Validation Rehearsal Campaign Plan with the aim of testing the readiness, ensemble coordination and speed of operations, to be able to avoid as far as possible any unexpected deficiencies of the plan and procedure during the real Commissioning Phase campaigns.For the rehearsal activity which successfully took place in April - May 2008, a control area of 10 x 10 km2 was chosen at the VAS study area where a network of ground soil moisture (SM) measuring stations is being set up based on an original definition of homogeneous physio-hydrological units attending to climatic, soil type, lithology, geology, elevation, slope and vegetation cover conditions. Complementary to the ground measurements, flight operations were performed over this control area using the Helsinki University of Technology TKK Short Skyvan research aircraft which contained onboard a payload constituted of the following instruments: (i) L-band EMIRAD radiometer (Technical University of Denmark, TUD), (ii) L-band HUT-2D imaging interferometric radiometer (TKK), (iii) PARIS GPS reflectrometry system (Institute for Space Studies of Catalonia, IEEC), (iv) IR sensor (Finnish Institute of Maritime Research, FIMR).Together with the ground SM measurements, other ground and meteorological measurements from the VAS area, kindly provided by other institutions, are currently been used to simulate passive microwave brightness temperature to obtain satellite "match ups" for validation purposes and to test the retrieval algorithms. The spatialization of the ground measurements up to a SMOS pixel is carried out by using the SURFace EXternalisée (SURFEX) model from Météo France

  18. Impact of soil moisture and winter wheat height from the Loess Plateau in Northwest China on surface spectral albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenchao; Yang, Jiaxi; Gao, Xiaoqing; Zheng, Zhiyuan; Yu, Ye; Hou, Xuhong; Wei, Zhigang

    2018-02-01

    The understanding of surface spectral radiation and reflected radiation characteristics of different surfaces in different climate zones aids in the interpretation of regional surface energy transfers and the development of land surface models. This study analysed surface spectral radiation variations and corresponding surface albedo characteristics at different wavelengths as well as the relationship between 5-cm soil moisture and surface albedo on typical sunny days during the winter wheat growth period. The analysis was conducted using observational Loess Plateau winter wheat data from 2015. The results show that the ratio of atmospheric downward radiation to global radiation on typical sunny days is highest for near-infrared wavelengths, followed by visible wavelengths and ultraviolet wavelengths, with values of 57.3, 38.7 and 4.0%, respectively. The ratio of reflected spectral radiation to global radiation varies based on land surface type. The visible radiation reflected by vegetated surfaces is far less than that reflected by bare ground, with surface albedos of 0.045 and 0.27, respectively. Thus, vegetated surfaces absorb more visible radiation than bare ground. The atmospheric downward spectral radiation to global radiation diurnal variation ratios vary for near-infrared wavelengths versus visible and ultraviolet wavelengths on typical sunny days. The near-infrared wavelengths ratio is higher in the morning and evening and lower at noon. The visible and ultraviolet wavelengths ratios are lower in the morning and evening and higher at noon. Visible and ultraviolet wavelength surface albedo is affected by 5-cm soil moisture, demonstrating a significant negative correlation. Excluding near-infrared wavelengths, correlations between surface albedo and 5-cm soil moisture pass the 99% confidence test at each wavelength. The correlation with 5-cm soil moisture is more significant at shorter wavelengths. However, this study obtained surface spectral radiation

  19. Long-term Soil Moisture Time Series Analyses based on Active Microwave Backscatter Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, W.; Reimer, C.; Bauer-Marschallinger, B.; Enenkel, M.; Hahn, S.; Melzer, T.; Naeimi, V.; Paulik, C.; Dorigo, W.

    2015-04-01

    Active microwave sensors operating at lower microwave frequencies in the range from 1 to 10 GHz provide backscatter measurements that are sensitive to the moisture content of the soil. Thanks to a series of European C-band (5.3 GHz) scatterometers, which were first flown on board of the European Remote Sensing satellites ERS-1 and ERS-2, and later on board of MetOp-A and MetOp -B, we are now in the possession of a long-term soil moisture time series starting in 1991. The creation of globally consistent long-term soil moisture time series is a challenging task. The TU-Wien soil moisture algorithm is adopted to tackle these challenges. In this paper we present two methodologies that were developed to ensure radiometric stability of the European C-band scatterometers. The objective of sensor intra-calibration is to monitor and correct for radiometric instabilities within one scatterometer mission, while sensor inter-calibration aims to remove radiometric differences across several missions. In addition, a novel vegetation modelling approach is presented that enables the estimation of vegetation parameters for each day across several years to account for yearly to longer-term changes in vegetation phenology and land cover.

  20. Estimates of Soil Moisture Using the Land Information System for Land Surface Water Storage: Case Study for the Western States Water Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, P. W.; Famiglietti, J. S.; Levoe, S.; Reager, J. T., II; David, C. H.; Kumar, S.; Li, B.; Peters-Lidard, C. D.

    2017-12-01

    Soil moisture is one of the critical factors in terrestrial hydrology. Accurate soil moisture information improves estimation of terrestrial water storage and fluxes, that is essential for water resource management including sustainable groundwater pumping and agricultural irrigation practices. It is particularly important during dry periods when water stress is high. The Western States Water Mission (WSWM), a multiyear mission project of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, is operated to understand and estimate quantities of the water availability in the western United States by integrating observations and measurements from in-situ and remote sensing sensors, and hydrological models. WSWM data products have been used to assess and explore the adverse impacts of the California drought (2011-2016) and provide decision-makers information for water use planning. Although the observations are often more accurate, simulations using land surface models can provide water availability estimates at desired spatio-temporal scales. The Land Information System (LIS), developed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, integrates developed land surface models and data processing and management tools, that enables to utilize the measurements and observations from various platforms as forcings in the high performance computing environment to forecast the hydrologic conditions. The goal of this study is to implement the LIS in the western United States for estimates of soil moisture. We will implement the NOAH-MP model at the 12km North America Land Data Assimilation System grid and compare to other land surface models included in the LIS. Findings will provide insight into the differences between model estimates and model physics. Outputs from a multi-model ensemble from LIS can also be used to enhance estimated reliability and provide quantification of uncertainty. We will compare the LIS-based soil moisture estimates to the SMAP enhanced 9 km soil moisture product to understand the

  1. Rapid and accurate biofuel moisture content gauging using magnetic resonance measurement technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaervinen, T.

    2013-04-15

    Biomass is extensively utilised in energy production and as a raw material, such as for the production of liquid biofuels. All those processes will benefit if the moisture content of bio material is known in advance as accurately as possible under transient circumstances. Biofuel trade is increasingly based on the calorific value of fuels. In the first step, this also increases the need for rapid and accurate moisture content determination. During the last few years, large biofuel standardisation has been implemented, emphasising biofuel quality control at all stages of the utilisation chain. In principle, the moisture instrumental measurement can be utilised by many technologies and procedures. Typical techniques are infrared, radiofrequency, microwave, radiometric, electrical conductivity, capacitance, and impedance. Nuclear magnetic resonance (MR) and thermal neutron absorption are also applied. The MR measurement principle has been known and utilised already since the early 1950s. It has become the basic instrumental analysis tool in chemistry. It is also well-known as a very accurate method for analysing most compounds, especially substances containing hydrogen. The utilisation of MR metering is expanded extensively to medical diagnostics as a form of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Because of the precision of the MR principle, there have for a long time been efforts to apply it in new and different areas, and to make more user-friendly, smaller, and even portable devices. Such a device was designed by Vaisala a few years ago. VTT has utilised Vaisala's MR prototype for approximately one year for moisture content measurement of different biofuels. The first step in the use of an MR device for moisture determination was the definition of its measurement accuracy compared to the standard method (EN 14774). Those tests proved that the absolute precision seems to be comparable to the standard moisture content measurement method. It was also found out that

  2. Wood chip moisture on-line measurement system based on the combination of the different methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaervinen, T. (VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)); Teppola, P.; Siikanen, S. (VTT Technical Research Centreof Finland, Kuopio (Finland)); Malinen, J.; Hietala, E. (VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Oulu (Finland)); Tiitta, M.; Tomppo, L. (Univ. of Kuopio, Dept. of Physics (Finland)), email: markku.tiitta@uku.fi

    2009-07-01

    The aim of the project is to develop wood chip moisture on-line measurement system based on the combination of different methods based on use of nir-, impedance- and radiometric devices. All the measurements were installed in PDU-scale conveyor facility, which can be used for development and testing fuel and bulk material quality and property measurement technology and devices. The system enables to achieve accurate reference moisture content data within sufficient wide range of moisture content variation in full-scale. The usability and accuracy of the separate measurement methods were studied by testing in variable conditions. As a result, the best combination of different methods for each purpose is proposed. The actual system will be implemented in a separate new project under preparation. Good usability and wide range of applicability is prerequisite for the combination system to be used in variable ambient conditions for different types of wood chip like chips for pulping and logging residue chips and even to other biomass materials. (orig.)

  3. Fuel moisture content estimation: a land-surface modelling approach applied to African savannas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghent, D.; Spessa, A.; Kaduk, J.; Balzter, H.

    2009-04-01

    Despite the importance of fire to the global climate system, in terms of emissions from biomass burning, ecosystem structure and function, and changes to surface albedo, current land-surface models do not adequately estimate key variables affecting fire ignition and propagation. Fuel moisture content (FMC) is considered one of the most important of these variables (Chuvieco et al., 2004). Biophysical models, with appropriate plant functional type parameterisations, are the most viable option to adequately predict FMC over continental scales at high temporal resolution. However, the complexity of plant-water interactions, and the variability associated with short-term climate changes, means it is one of the most difficult fire variables to quantify and predict. Our work attempts to resolve this issue using a combination of satellite data and biophysical modelling applied to Africa. The approach we take is to represent live FMC as a surface dryness index; expressed as the ratio between the Normalised Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and land-surface temperature (LST). It has been argued in previous studies (Sandholt et al., 2002; Snyder et al., 2006), that this ratio displays a statistically stronger correlation to FMC than either of the variables, considered separately. In this study, simulated FMC is constrained through the assimilation of remotely sensed LST and NDVI data into the land-surface model JULES (Joint-UK Land Environment Simulator). Previous modelling studies of fire activity in Africa savannas, such as Lehsten et al. (2008), have reported significant levels of uncertainty associated with the simulations. This uncertainty is important because African savannas are among some of the most frequently burnt ecosystems and are a major source of greenhouse trace gases and aerosol emissions (Scholes et al., 1996). Furthermore, regional climate model studies indicate that many parts of the African savannas will experience drier and warmer conditions in future

  4. Soil salinity and moisture measurement system for grapes field by wireless sensor network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.K. Bhanarkar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Soil moisture and salinity measurement are the essential factors for crop irrigation as well as to increase the yield. Grapes eminence depends on the water volume contents in soil and soil nutrients. Based on these conditions, we determined water demand for best quality of grapes by wireless sensor network (WSN. Using lot of chemical fertilizers increases soil salinity but reduces soil fertility, soil salinity defines electrical conductivity or salty soil. Precise agriculture systems are integrated with multiple sensors to monitor and control the incident. Integrated WSN is designed and developed to measure soil moisture and salinity. ATmega328 microcontroller, XBee and Soil sensors are integrated across the system. This system is more competent, it can be helpful to automatic irrigation system and soil salinity monitoring.

  5. Dryness Indices Based on Remotely Sensed Vegetation and Land Surface Temperature for Evaluating the Soil Moisture Status in Cropland-Forest-Dominant Watersheds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heewon Moon and Minha Choi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Temperature Vegetation Dryness Index (TVDI was derived from the relationship between remotely sensed vegetation indices and land surface temperature (TS in this study for assessing the soil moisture status at regional scale in South Korea. The Leaf Area Index (LAI is newly applied in this method to overcome the increasing uncertainty of using the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI at high vegetation conditions. Both dryness indices were found to be well correlated with in situ soil moisture and 8-day average precipitation at most of the in situ measurement sites. The dryness indices accuracy was found to be influenced by rainfall events. An average correlation coefficient was improved from -0.253 to -0.329 when LAI was used instead of NDVI in calculating the TVDI. In the spatial analysis between the dryness indices and Advanced SCATterometer (ASCAT surface soil moisture (SSM using geographically weighted regression (GWR, the results showed the average negative correlation (R between the variables, while LAI-induced TVDI was more strongly correlated with SSM on average with the R value improved from -0.59 to -0.62. Both dryness indices and ASCAT SSM mappings generally showed coherent patterns under low vegetation and dry conditions. Based on these results, the LAI-induced TVDI accuracy as an index for soil moisture status was validated and found appropriate for use as an alternative and complementary method for NDVI-induced TVDI.

  6. The groundwater-land-surface-atmosphere connection: soil moisture effects on the atmospheric boundary layer in fully-coupled simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, R M; Chow, F K; Kollet, S J

    2007-02-02

    This study combines a variably-saturated groundwater flow model and a mesoscale atmospheric model to examine the effects of soil moisture heterogeneity on atmospheric boundary layer processes. This parallel, integrated model can represent spatial variations in land-surface forcing driven by three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric and subsurface components. The development of atmospheric flow is studied in a series of idealized test cases with different initial soil moisture distributions generated by an offline spin-up procedure or interpolated from a coarse-resolution dataset. These test cases are performed with both the fully-coupled model (which includes 3D groundwater flow and surface water routing) and the uncoupled atmospheric model. The effects of the different soil moisture initializations and lateral subsurface and surface water flow are seen in the differences in atmospheric evolution over a 36-hour period. The fully-coupled model maintains a realistic topographically-driven soil moisture distribution, while the uncoupled atmospheric model does not. Furthermore, the coupled model shows spatial and temporal correlations between surface and lower atmospheric variables and water table depth. These correlations are particularly strong during times when the land surface temperatures trigger shifts in wind behavior, such as during early morning surface heating.

  7. Measurements of volatile compound contents in resins using a moisture analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Masanori; Nagano, Futami; Endo, Kazuhiko; Ohno, Hiroki

    2010-02-01

    The contents of volatile adhesive compounds, such as water, solvents, and residual unpolymerized monomers, affect the integrity and durability of adhesive bonding. However, there is no method available that can be used to rapidly assess the residual solvent or water contents of adhesive resins. This study examined the effectiveness of a digital moisture analyzer to measure the volatile compound contents of resins. Five self-etching adhesives and seven experimental light-cured resins prepared with different contents (0, 10, and 20% by weight) of water or solvents (acetone and ethanol) were examined in this study. The resins were prepared using different methods (with and without air blast or light-curing) to simulate the clinical conditions of adhesive application. Resin weight changes (% of weight loss) were determined as the residual volatile compound contents, using the moisture analyzer. After the measurements, the resin films were examined using a scanning electron microscope. The weight changes of the resins were found to depend on the amount of water or solvents evaporating from the resin. Water and solvents were evaporated by air blast or light-curing, but some of the water and solvents remained in the cured resin. The moisture analyzer is easy to operate and is a useful instrument for using to measure the residual volatile compound contents of adhesive resin.

  8. LPRM/AMSR2/GCOM-W1 L3 Descending Downscaled Surface Soil Moisture, Ancillary Params, and QC V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Level 3 (gridded) data set¿s land surface parameters, surface soil moisture, land surface (skin) temperature, and vegetation water content, are derived from...

  9. LPRM/AMSR2/GCOM-W1 L3 Ascending Downscaled Surface Soil Moisture, Ancillary Params, and QC V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Level 3 (gridded) data set¿s land surface parameters, surface soil moisture, land surface (skin) temperature, and vegetation water content, are derived from...

  10. Surface modification of basalt with silane coupling agent on asphalt mixture moisture damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Yahong; Fang, Ying; Huang, Xiaojun; Zhu, Yinhui; Li, Wensheng [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha, 410082 (China); Yuan, Jianmin [College of Materials Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha, 410082 (China); Tan, Ligang [College of Mechanical and Vehicle Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha, 410082 (China); Wang, Shuangyin [State Key Laboratory of Chem/Bio-Sensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha, 410082 (China); Wu, Zhenjun, E-mail: wooawt@163.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha, 410082 (China)

    2015-08-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A new silane coupling agent was synthesized based on KH570. • Basalt surface was modified using the new silane coupling agent. • Chemical bond between basalt and the new silane coupling agent was formed. • Asphalt mixture which used modified basalt show superior water stability. - Abstract: A new silane coupling agent was synthesized based on γ-(methacryloyloxy) propyltrimethoxysilane (KH570). The surface of basalt rocks was modified by KH570 and the new silane coupling agent (NSCA), and the interfacial interaction between silane coupling agent and basalt was also studied. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis showed that the silane coupling agent molecule bound strongly with basalt rocks. Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) observation showed that a thin layer of coupling agent was formed on the surface of modified basalt. The boiling test and immersion Marshall test confirmed that the moisture sensitivity of basalt modified with the new silane coupling agent increased more significantly than that untreated and treated with KH570. The Retained Marshall Strength of basalt modified with the new coupling agent increased from 71.74% to 87.79% compared with untreated basalt. The results indicated that the new silane coupling agent played an important role in improving the interfacial performance between basalt and asphalt.

  11. Finally It Is Possible To Measure Area-Average Soil Moisture!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuttleworth, W. J.; Zreda, M. G.; Zeng, X.; Zweck, C.; Franz, T. E.; Rosolem, R.

    2011-12-01

    When a hitherto impossible measurement becomes possible, there are transformational changes in understanding. Measuring soil moisture using cosmic rays sounds like 1950s science fiction. But the non-invasive measurement of soil moisture at a horizontal scale of ~700m and depths of 15-70 cm is now feasible, by counting cosmic-ray neutrons that are generated within soil, moderated mainly by the hydrogen atoms, and emitted back to the atmosphere. The number of neutrons counted is sensitive to water content changes, only weakly sensitive to soil chemistry, and their intensity is inversely correlated with the hydrogen (i.e., water) content of the soil. Neither the basis of this measurement method nor the sensor technology used is new, they have been around for decades. However, the systematic understanding of cosmic-ray interactions at the ground-atmosphere interface and resulting knowledge of the source "footprint" of above ground neutron detectors and recognition of their limited of sensitivity to soil type in selected neutron energy bands is new, as is the low power electronics used for remote signal conditioning, counting and data capture. The measurement with a portable neutron detector placed above the ground takes minutes to hours, permitting high-resolution, long-term monitoring of undisturbed soil moisture. The large footprint makes the method suitable for weather and short-term climate forecast initialization and satellite validation, while the measurement depth makes the probe ideal for studying plant/soil/atmosphere interactions. Inclusion of a second detector that is sensitive to neutrons with lower energy shows promise as a means for detecting snow cover. This talk briefly overviews evidence that soil moisture status can potentially influence weather and seasonal climate and describe the COsmic-ray Soil Moisture Observing System (COSMOS), which observing program will install initially a network of 50 probes (to provide a proof of concept) and subsequently

  12. Photon and neutron doses of the personnel using moisture and density measurement devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carinou, E.; Papadomarkaki, E.; Tritakis, P.; Hourdakis, C.I.; Kamenopoulou, V.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study is to present the evolution of the photon doses received by the workers who use mobile devices for measuring the moisture and the density in various materials and to estimate the neutron doses. The workers employed in more than 30 construction companies in Greece were 76 in 2004. The devices used for that purpose incorporate a 137 Cs source for density measurements and an 241 Am-Be source for moisture measurements of soil, asphalt or concrete. Photon and neutron measurements were performed occasionally during the on site inspections. The results of the measurements showed that the photon and neutron dose rates were not negligible. The workers were monitored for photon radiation using film badges (Kodak Type 2, Holder NRPB type) till the year 2000 and then TLD badges issued by the Greek Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC), on a monthly basis. Since the neutron dose rates measured by a rem-meter were not so high, no neutron dosemeters were issued for them. Their personal dose equivalent data for photons are kept in the National Dose Registry Information System (N.D.R.I.S.) in G.A.E.C. and were used for statistical analysis for the period from 1997 till 2004. As far as the neutrons are concerned, a Monte Carlo code was used to simulate the measuring devices and the working positions in order to calculate the neutron individual doses. (authors)

  13. Response surface methodology (RSM) to evaluate moisture effects on corn stover in recovering xylose by DEO hydrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rita C.L.B. Rodrigues; William R. Kenealy; Diane Dietrich; Thomas W. Jeffries

    2012-01-01

    Response surface methodology (RSM), based on a 22 full factorial design, evaluated the moisture effects in recovering xylose by diethyloxalate (DEO) hydrolysis. Experiments were carried out in laboratory reactors (10 mL glass ampoules) containing corn stover (0.5 g) properly ground. The ampoules were kept at 160 °C for 90 min. Both DEO...

  14. The effect of salvage logging on surface fuel loads and fuel moisture in beetle-infested lodgepole pine forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul R. Hood; Kellen N. Nelson; Charles C. Rhoades; Daniel B. Tinker

    2017-01-01

    Widespread tree mortality from mountain pine beetle (MPB; Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) outbreaks has prompted forest management activities to reduce crown fire hazard in the Rocky Mountain region. However, little is known about how beetle-related salvage logging and biomass utilization options affect woody surface fuel loads and fuel moisture dynamics. We compared...

  15. Evaluating controls of soil properties and climatic conditions on the use of an exponential filter for converting near surface to root zone soil moisture contents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tiejun; Franz, Trenton E.; You, Jinsheng; Shulski, Martha D.; Ray, Chittaranjan

    2017-05-01

    Root zone soil moisture (RZSM) is an important state variable for understanding various land surface and ecohydrological processes. Due to the lack of field measurements, different methods have been proposed to estimate RZSM, including the use of exponential filters to predict RZSM from remotely sensed near surface soil moisture data. However, inconsistent findings about the controls on the optimal characteristic time length Topt, which is used in the exponential filter method, have been reported in the literature. To reconcile these inconsistent findings and further improve the use of the method, the impacts of soil properties and climatic conditions on Topt were assessed in this study using observed and modelled soil moisture datasets. Daily soil moisture data, daily meteorological records, and soil properties were retrieved from the Automated Weather Data Network (AWDN) and the Soil Climate Analysis Network (SCAN) within the continental United States. Data from the AWDN stations showed that Topt was mostly controlled by soil texture (e.g., a negative correlation with the sand fraction and a positive one with the clay fraction) as compared to climatic conditions. However, at SCAN stations, Topt was mostly affected by precipitation (P), and no significant correlation was found between Topt and soil texture. The difference in controlling factors between ADWN and SCAN stations can be largely attributed to the higher spatial variability in P across the SCAN stations, which overrode the impacts of soil properties on Topt. A 1-D vadose zone model was also utilized to simulate soil moisture at selected SCAN sites using a generated soil hydraulic parameter dataset. The simulation results further demonstrated the negative relationship between Topt and P observed for the SCAN stations. Moreover, the simulation results revealed that Topt was larger under vegetated conditions than under bare surface conditions. Under the same climatic conditions at each simulated site, which

  16. Parameter estimation of a two-horizon soil profile by combining crop canopy and surface soil moisture observations using GLUE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreelash, K.; Sekhar, M.; Ruiz, L.; Tomer, S. K.; Guérif, M.; Buis, S.; Durand, P.; Gascuel-Odoux, C.

    2012-08-01

    SummaryEstimation of soil parameters by inverse modeling using observations on either surface soil moisture or crop variables has been successfully attempted in many studies, but difficulties to estimate root zone properties arise when heterogeneous layered soils are considered. The objective of this study was to explore the potential of combining observations on surface soil moisture and crop variables - leaf area index (LAI) and above-ground biomass for estimating soil parameters (water holding capacity and soil depth) in a two-layered soil system using inversion of the crop model STICS. This was performed using GLUE method on a synthetic data set on varying soil types and on a data set from a field experiment carried out in two maize plots in South India. The main results were (i) combination of surface soil moisture and above-ground biomass provided consistently good estimates with small uncertainity of soil properties for the two soil layers, for a wide range of soil paramater values, both in the synthetic and the field experiment, (ii) above-ground biomass was found to give relatively better estimates and lower uncertainty than LAI when combined with surface soil moisture, especially for estimation of soil depth, (iii) surface soil moisture data, either alone or combined with crop variables, provided a very good estimate of the water holding capacity of the upper soil layer with very small uncertainty whereas using the surface soil moisture alone gave very poor estimates of the soil properties of the deeper layer, and (iv) using crop variables alone (else above-ground biomass or LAI) provided reasonable estimates of the deeper layer properties depending on the soil type but provided poor estimates of the first layer properties. The robustness of combining observations of the surface soil moisture and the above-ground biomass for estimating two layer soil properties, which was demonstrated using both synthetic and field experiments in this study, needs now to

  17. Using microcantilever sensors to measure poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) plasticization by moisture uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alves, Gustavo Marcati A.; Bose-Goswami, Sanjukta; Mansano, Ronaldo D.

    2018-01-01

    Polymeric materials absorb water when exposed to humidity or in contact with aqueous solutions. The polymer and water molecules interact, changing the physicochemical parameters of the material; the most noticeable effect is a decreased glass transition temperature (Tg), known as plasticization. We...... used microcantilever sensors to measure the Tg versus moisture content in poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), a biodegradable polymer used in implants and as a drug carrier. We demonstrate a concomitant measurement of the mass absorption and Tg using nanograms of material and an inexpensive setup...

  18. Remote measurement of sunflower seed moisture content by the use of microwaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvischenko, Vitali L; Nikiforov, Igor Ya; Ershov, Igor V

    2017-11-01

    Modern agriculture demands new methods and equipment that allow operators to conduct the instant control of moisture content over a wide area of agricultural fields with the purpose of providing farmers with the optimal moment of harvesting mature seeds and crops. Here the authors propose a new method and experimentally investigate the possibility to accomplish remote sensing of the moisture content of sunflower seeds using microwave radiation in the millimeter range. An experimental device for measuring the coefficient of reflection of electromagnetic waves from sunflower inflorescences in the frequency range 25.9-37.5 GHz was created. The obtained results showed that the moisture content of mature sunflower seeds affected the reflected signal. A difference in the reflected signal from the front and back sides of unripe sunflower inflorescences was also found. The results show that microwave radiation can be used to determine the degree of readiness of seeds for harvesting. The proposed new method opens up the possibility of remote instant diagnosis of sunflower seed ripeness in the field. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Impact of Surface Soil Moisture Variations on Radar Altimetry Echoes at Ku and Ka Bands in Semi-Arid Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Fatras

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Radar altimetry provides information on the topography of the Earth surface. It is commonly used for the monitoring not only sea surface height but also ice sheets topography and inland water levels. The radar altimetry backscattering coefficient, which depends on surface roughness and water content, can be related to surface properties such as surface soil moisture content. In this study, the influence of surface soil moisture on the radar altimetry echo and backscattering coefficient is analyzed over semi-arid areas. A semi-empirical model of the soil’s complex dielectric permittivity that takes into account that small-scale roughness and large-scale topography was developed to simulate the radar echoes. It was validated using waveforms acquired at Ku and Ka-bands by ENVISAT RA-2 and SARAL AltiKa respectively over several sites in Mali. Correlation coefficients ranging from 0.66 to 0.94 at Ku-band and from 0.27 to 0.96 at Ka-band were found. The increase in surface soil moisture from 0.02 to 0.4 (i.e., the typical range of variations in semi-arid areas increase the backscattering from 10 to 15 dB between the core of the dry and the maximum of the rainy seasons.

  20. AMSR-E/Aqua surface soil moisture (LPRM) L3 1 day 25 km x 25 km ascending V002 (LPRM_AMSRE_A_SOILM3) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — AMSR-E/Aqua surface soil moisture (LPRM) L3 1 day 25 km x 25 km ascending V002 is a Level 3 (gridded) data set. Its land surface parameters, surface soil moisture,...

  1. Retrieving moisture profiles from precipitable water measurements using a variational data assimilation approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Y.R.; Zou, X.; Kuo, Y.H. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Atmospheric moisture distribution is directly related to the formation of clouds and precipitation and affects the atmospheric radiation and climate. Currently, several remote sensing systems can measure precipitable water (PW) with fairly high accuracy. As part of the development of an Integrated Data Assimilation and Sounding System in support of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program, retrieving the 3-D water vapor fields from PW measurements is an important problem. A new four dimensional variational (4DVAR) data assimilation system based on the Penn State/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) mesoscale model (MM5) has been developed by Zou et al. (1995) with the adjoint technique. In this study, we used this 4DVAR system to retrieve the moisture profiles. Because we do not have a set of real observed PW measurements now, the special soundings collected during the Severe Environmental Storm and Mesoscale Experiment (SESAME) in 1979 were used to simulate a set of PW measurements, which were then assimilated into the 4DVAR system. The accuracy of the derived water vapor fields was assessed by direct comparison with the detailed specific humidity soundings. The impact of PW assimilation on precipitation forecast was examined by conducting a series of model forecast experiments started from the different initial conditions with or without data assimilation.

  2. Heat and moisture flux profiles in a region with inhomogeneous surface evaporation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michels, B.I.; Jochum, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    Results from a case study of heat and moisture transport in the atmospheric boundary layer during the European Field Experiment in a Desertification-threatened Area (EFEDA) are presented. The experimental area is heterogeneous in respect of soil moisture and vegetation on scales of several tens of

  3. Results from Assimilating AMSR-E Soil Moisture Estimates into a Land Surface Model Using an Ensemble Kalman Filter in the Land Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenship, Clay B.; Crosson, William L.; Case, Jonathan L.; Hale, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Improve simulations of soil moisture/temperature, and consequently boundary layer states and processes, by assimilating AMSR-E soil moisture estimates into a coupled land surface-mesoscale model Provide a new land surface model as an option in the Land Information System (LIS)

  4. Estimating surface soil moisture with the scanning low frequency microwave radiometer (SLFMR) during the Southern Great Plains 1997 (SGP97) hydrology experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uitdewilligen, D.C.A.; Kustas, W.P.; Oevelen, van P.J.

    2003-01-01

    The scanning low frequency microwave radiometer (SLFMR) was used to map surface soil moisture (0-5 cm depth) during the Southern Great Plains 1997 (SGP97) hydrology experiment. On June 29, July 2, and July 3. surface soil moisture maps with a pixel resolution of 200 m were obtained using a soil

  5. On-line measurement of moisture content of powdered food using microwave free-space transmission technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ki Bok; Park, Seong Un; Kim, Ji Yeon; Kim, Jong Heon; Lee, ChanJoo

    2006-01-01

    The moisture content of food is not only the most important quality factor but also one of the essential parameters affecting their physical and chemical properties related to storage, capability of processing and quality control. The moisture measurement technique using microwave is very attractive because that method has merits of rapid and accurate measurement in the wider range of moisture content, simple implementation and inexpensive compared with other methods. In this study, microwave free-space transmission technique was applied to measure the moisture content of powdered food. The on-line measurement system consisting of microwave system with 2.5 GHz, 7.0 GHz and 10.5 GHz, conveying device to move the food samples, inlet and outlet of the food samples, guide plate to control the thickness of the food samples, temperature sensing nit, taco-meter and central processing unit having analog to digital convert and microprocessor was constructed and its performance was evaluated.

  6. Impact of Soil Moisture Assimilation on Land Surface Model Spin-Up and Coupled LandAtmosphere Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santanello, Joseph A., Jr.; Kumar, Sujay V.; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Lawston, P.

    2016-01-01

    Advances in satellite monitoring of the terrestrial water cycle have led to a concerted effort to assimilate soil moisture observations from various platforms into offline land surface models (LSMs). One principal but still open question is that of the ability of land data assimilation (LDA) to improve LSM initial conditions for coupled short-term weather prediction. In this study, the impact of assimilating Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E) soil moisture retrievals on coupled WRF Model forecasts is examined during the summers of dry (2006) and wet (2007) surface conditions in the southern Great Plains. LDA is carried out using NASAs Land Information System (LIS) and the Noah LSM through an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) approach. The impacts of LDA on the 1) soil moisture and soil temperature initial conditions for WRF, 2) land-atmosphere coupling characteristics, and 3) ambient weather of the coupled LIS-WRF simulations are then assessed. Results show that impacts of soil moisture LDA during the spin-up can significantly modify LSM states and fluxes, depending on regime and season. Results also indicate that the use of seasonal cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) is more advantageous compared to the traditional annual CDF bias correction strategies. LDA performs consistently regardless of atmospheric forcing applied, with greater improvements seen when using coarser, global forcing products. Downstream impacts on coupled simulations vary according to the strength of the LDA impact at the initialization, where significant modifications to the soil moisture flux- PBL-ambient weather process chain are observed. Overall, this study demonstrates potential for future, higher-resolution soil moisture assimilation applications in weather and climate research.

  7. In vivo skin moisturizing measurement by high-resolution 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesrar, J; Ognard, J; Garetier, M; Chechin, D; Misery, L; Ben Salem, D

    2017-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is rarely used for the exploration of skin, even if studies have validated both feasibility of skin MRI and its interest for anatomical, physiological, and biochemical study of the skin. The purpose of this study is to explore moisturizing of the different skin layers using 3-T scan. An MRI of the heel's skin was performed using a 23 mm coil diameter on a 3T scan with a FFE (Fast Field Echo) 3D T1-weighted sequence and a TSE (Turbo Spin Echo) calculation T2-weighted sequence (pixels size of respectively 60 and 70 μm). This study was conducted on 35 healthy volunteers, who were scanned before applying moisturizer topic and 1 h after applying it. Region of interest in the stratum corneum, the epidermis and the dermis were generated on the T2 mapping. The thickness of each layer was measured. The T1 sequence allowed accurate cross-examination repositioning to ensure the comparability of the measurements. Among the 35 cases, two were excluded from the analysis because of movement artifacts. Measurements before and after moisturizer topic application displayed a T2 increase of 48.94% (P < 0.0001) in the stratum corneum and of 5.45% (P < 0.0001) in the epidermis yet without significant difference in the dermis. There was no significant link between the thickness of the stratum corneum and the T2 increase. However, there was a strong correlation between the thickness of the stratum corneum and the thickness of the epidermis (P < 0.001; rhô=0.72). High-resolution MRI allows fine exploration of anatomical and physiological properties of the skin and can further be used to extend the studies of skin hydration. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Micropatterned surfaces through moisture-induced phase-separation of polystyrene-clay nanocomposite particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Bindu P; Pavithran, Chorappan

    2010-08-03

    We report micropatterned polystyrene-clay nanocomposite (PCN) surfaces with concavities by moisture-induced phase separation of PCN particles. Micropatterned film with concavity size of 800 nm to 1.3 microm and a high number density of 2 x 10(8) features/cm(2) was obtained by drop-casting PCN solution (20 mg/mL PCN/THF) under ambient relative humidity of 70-80%. It is proposed that water droplets were channeled through the hydrophilic interfaces between the PCN particles, and the two-dimensional array of concavities was formed by spontaneous phase separation due to the presence of rigid clay platelets. The concavity size and number density can be tuned by varying the solvent for PCN. Micropatterned film with concavity size in the range of 650 nm to 1.1 microm with a number density of 5 x 10(7) features/cm(2) was obtained using chloroform as solvent, whereas a concavity size of 150-740 nm and number density of 10(8) features/cm(2) were obtained using carbon disulfide.

  9. Combining satellite radar altimetry, SAR surface soil moisture and GRACE total storage changes for hydrological model calibration in a large poorly gauged catchment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milzow, Christian; Krogh, Pernille Engelbredt; Bauer-Gottwein, Peter

    2011-01-01

    gauged Okavango catchment in Southern Africa: (i) surface soil moisture (SSM) estimates derived from radar measurements onboard the Envisat satellite; (ii) radar altimetry measurements by Envisat providing river stages in the tributaries of the Okavango catchment, down to a minimum river width of about...... one hundred meters; and (iii) temporal changes of the Earth's gravity field recorded by the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) caused by total water storage changes in the catchment. The SSM data are shown to be helpful in identifying periods with over-respectively underestimation...

  10. Soil Moisture and Sea Surface Temperatures equally important for Land Climate in the Warm Season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, R.; Seneviratne, S. I.

    2015-12-01

    Both sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and soil moisture (SM) are important drivers of climate variability over land. In this study we present a comprehensive comparison of SM versus SST impacts on land climate in the warm season. We perform ensemble experiments with the Community Earth System Model (CESM) where we set SM or SSTs to median conditions, respectively, to remove their inter-annual variability, whereby the other component - SST or SM - is still interactively computed. In contrast to earlier experiments performed with prescribed SSTs, our experiments suggest that SM is overall as important as SSTs for land climate, not only in the midlatitudes but also in the tropics and subtropics. Mean temperature and precipitation are reduced by 0.1-0.5 K and 0-0.2 mm, respectively, whereas their variability at different time scales decreases by 10-40% (temperature) and 0-10% (precipitation) when either SM or SSTs are prescribed. Also drought occurrence is affected, with mean changes in the maximum number of cumulative dry days of 0-0.75 days. Both SM and SST-induced changes are strongest for hot temperatures (up to 0.7 K, and 50%), extreme precipitation (up to 0.4 mm, and 20%), and strong droughts (up to 2 days). Local climate changes in response to removed SM variability are controlled - to first order - by the land-atmosphere coupling and the natural SM variability. SST-related changes are partly controlled by the relation of local temperature or precipitation with the El Niño-Southern Oscillation. Moreover removed SM or SST variabilities both induce remote effects by impacting the atmospheric circulation. Our results are similar for the present day and the end of the century. We investigate the inter-dependency between SM and SST and find a sufficient degree of independence for the purpose of this study. The robustness of our findings is shown by comparing the response of CESM to removed SM variability with four other global climate models. In summary, SM and SSTs

  11. The Impact of Model and Rainfall Forcing Errors on Characterizing Soil Moisture Uncertainty in Land Surface Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggioni, V.; Anagnostou, E. N.; Reichle, R. H.

    2013-01-01

    The contribution of rainfall forcing errors relative to model (structural and parameter) uncertainty in the prediction of soil moisture is investigated by integrating the NASA Catchment Land Surface Model (CLSM), forced with hydro-meteorological data, in the Oklahoma region. Rainfall-forcing uncertainty is introduced using a stochastic error model that generates ensemble rainfall fields from satellite rainfall products. The ensemble satellite rain fields are propagated through CLSM to produce soil moisture ensembles. Errors in CLSM are modeled with two different approaches: either by perturbing model parameters (representing model parameter uncertainty) or by adding randomly generated noise (representing model structure and parameter uncertainty) to the model prognostic variables. Our findings highlight that the method currently used in the NASA GEOS-5 Land Data Assimilation System to perturb CLSM variables poorly describes the uncertainty in the predicted soil moisture, even when combined with rainfall model perturbations. On the other hand, by adding model parameter perturbations to rainfall forcing perturbations, a better characterization of uncertainty in soil moisture simulations is observed. Specifically, an analysis of the rank histograms shows that the most consistent ensemble of soil moisture is obtained by combining rainfall and model parameter perturbations. When rainfall forcing and model prognostic perturbations are added, the rank histogram shows a U-shape at the domain average scale, which corresponds to a lack of variability in the forecast ensemble. The more accurate estimation of the soil moisture prediction uncertainty obtained by combining rainfall and parameter perturbations is encouraging for the application of this approach in ensemble data assimilation systems.

  12. Humidity measurements in passive heat and moisture exchangers applications: a critical issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubini, G; Fumero, R

    2000-01-01

    A reliable, quantitative assessment of humidification performances of passive heat and moisture exchangers in mechanically-ventilated patients is still to be achieved, although relevant efforts have been made to date. One of the major problems to tackle consists in the difficulty of humidity measurements, both in vivo (during either anaesthesia or intensive care unit treatments) and in vitro set-ups. In this paper a review of the basic operation principles of humidity sensors as well as an analysis of their usage within in vivo and in vitro tests are presented. Particular attention is devoted to the limitations arising from the specific measurement set-up, as they may affect the results notably.

  13. New Primary Standards for Establishing SI Traceability for Moisture Measurements in Solid Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinonen, M.; Bell, S.; Choi, B. Il; Cortellessa, G.; Fernicola, V.; Georgin, E.; Hudoklin, D.; Ionescu, G. V.; Ismail, N.; Keawprasert, T.; Krasheninina, M.; Aro, R.; Nielsen, J.; Oğuz Aytekin, S.; Österberg, P.; Skabar, J.; Strnad, R.

    2018-01-01

    A European research project METefnet addresses a fundamental obstacle to improving energy-intensive drying process control: due to ambiguous reference analysis methods and insufficient methods for estimating uncertainty in moisture measurements, the achievable accuracy in the past was limited and measurement uncertainties were largely unknown. This paper reports the developments in METefnet that provide a sound basis for the SI traceability: four new primary standards for realizing the water mass fraction were set up, analyzed and compared to each other. The operation of these standards is based on combining sample weighing with different water vapor detection techniques: cold trap, chilled mirror, electrolytic and coulometric Karl Fischer titration. The results show that an equivalence of 0.2 % has been achieved between the water mass fraction realizations and that the developed methods are applicable to a wide range of materials.

  14. New Dielectric Sensors and Sensing Techniques for Soil and Snow Moisture Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Schuhmann

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of material moisture are essential in fields such as agriculture or civil engineering. Electromagnetic techniques, more precisely dielectric methods, have gained wide acceptance in the last decades. Frequency or Time Domain methods take advantage of the high dielectric permittivity of water compared to dry materials. This paper presents four new dielectric sensors for the determination of soil or snow water content. After a short introduction into the principles, both the hardware and operating mode of each sensor are described. Field test results show the advantages and potentials such as automatic measurement and profiling, state-of-ground detection or large-scale determination. From the results it follows that the presented sensors offer promising new tools for modern environmental research.

  15. New dielectric sensors and sensing techniques for soil and snow moisture measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacheder, Markus; Koeniger, Franz; Schuhmann, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    Measurements of material moisture are essential in fields such as agriculture or civil engineering. Electromagnetic techniques, more precisely dielectric methods, have gained wide acceptance in the last decades. Frequency or Time Domain methods take advantage of the high dielectric permittivity of water compared to dry materials. This paper presents four new dielectric sensors for the determination of soil or snow water content. After a short introduction into the principles, both the hardware and operating mode of each sensor are described. Field test results show the advantages and potentials such as automatic measurement and profiling, state-of-ground detection or large-scale determination. From the results it follows that the presented sensors offer promising new tools for modern environmental research.

  16. Soil moisture characterization of the Valencia anchor station. Ground, aircraft measurements and simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez-Baeza, E; Antolin, M C; Balling, Jan E.

    2009-01-01

    . For the rehearsal activity which successfully took place in April - May 2008, a control area of 10 × 10 km2 was chosen at the VAS study area where a network of ground soil moisture (SM) measuring stations is being set up based on an original definition of homogeneous physio-hydrological units attending to climatic......, soil type, lithology, geology, elevation, slope and vegetation cover conditions. Complementary to the ground measurements, flight operations were performed over this control area using the Helsinki University of Technology TKK Short Skyvan research aircraft which contained onboard a payload constituted...... of the following instruments: (i) L-band EMIRAD radiometer (Technical University of Denmark, TUD), (ii) L-band HUT-2D imaging interferometric radiometer (TKK), (iii) PARIS GPS reflectrometry system (Institute for Space Studies of Catalonia, IEEC), (iv) IR sensor (Finnish Institute of Maritime Research, FIMR...

  17. Measurement of final container residual moisture in freeze-dried biological products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, J C; Wheeler, R M; Etz, N; Del Grosso, A

    1992-01-01

    The Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research has changed its regulations pertaining to residual moisture in freeze-dried biological products as published in Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations for Food and Drugs. The new regulation requires that each lot of dried product be tested for residual moisture and meet and not exceed established limits as specified by an approved method on file in the product license application. The gravimetric or loss-on-drying method is no longer listed as the required method; the 1.0% moisture limit is no longer specifically stated in the regulation. These revisions were made to bring the regulation into line with changes in residual moisture testing methods and the results obtained when new testing methods were applied to the determination of residual moisture. This is illustrated with data for Measles Virus Vaccine Live and Haemophilus b Polysaccharide Vaccine using final container residual moisture test results obtained by the gravimetric, coulometric Karl Fischer, thermogravimetric and thermogravimetric/mass spectrometric methods. Guidelines for the determination of residual moisture in dried biological products have been issued to describe residual moisture test methods and procedures used to set product residual moisture limits. For most products levels of residual moisture should be low, usually from less than 1.0% to 3.0%, so that the viability, immunologic potency and therefore the stability of the product is not compromised over time.

  18. A Study of Spatial Soil Moisture Estimation Using a Multiple Linear Regression Model and MODIS Land Surface Temperature Data Corrected by Conditional Merging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunggil Jung

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This study attempts to estimate spatial soil moisture in South Korea (99,000 km2 from January 2013 to December 2015 using a multiple linear regression (MLR model and the Terra moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS land surface temperature (LST and normalized distribution vegetation index (NDVI data. The MODIS NDVI was used to reflect vegetation variations. Observed precipitation was measured using the automatic weather stations (AWSs of the Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA, and soil moisture data were recorded at 58 stations operated by various institutions. Prior to MLR analysis, satellite LST data were corrected by applying the conditional merging (CM technique and observed LST data from 71 KMA stations. The coefficient of determination (R2 of the original LST and observed LST was 0.71, and the R2 of corrected LST and observed LST was 0.95 for 3 selected LST stations. The R2 values of all corrected LSTs were greater than 0.83 for total 71 LST stations. The regression coefficients of the MLR model were estimated seasonally considering the five-day antecedent precipitation. The p-values of all the regression coefficients were less than 0.05, and the R2 values were between 0.28 and 0.67. The reason for R2 values less than 0.5 is that the soil classification at each observation site was not completely accurate. Additionally, the observations at most of the soil moisture monitoring stations used in this study started in December 2014, and the soil moisture measurements did not stabilize. Notably, R2 and root mean square error (RMSE in winter were poor, as reflected by the many missing values, and uncertainty existed in observations due to freezing and mechanical errors in the soil. Thus, the prediction accuracy is low in winter due to the difficulty of establishing an appropriate regression model. Specifically, the estimated map of the soil moisture index (SMI can be used to better understand the severity of droughts with the

  19. How Much Surface Coating of Hydrophobic Azithromycin Is Sufficient to Prevent Moisture-Induced Decrease in Aerosolisation of Hygroscopic Amorphous Colistin Powder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qi Tony; Loh, Zhi Hui; Yu, Jiaqi; Sun, Si-Ping; Gengenbach, Thomas; Denman, John A; Li, Jian; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2016-09-01

    Aerosolisation performance of hygroscopic particles of colistin could be compromised at elevated humidity due to increased capillary forces. Co-spray drying colistin with a hydrophobic drug is known to provide a protective coating on the composite particle surfaces against moisture-induced reduction in aerosolisation performance; however, the effects of component ratio on surface coating quality and powder aerosolisation at elevated relative humidities are unknown. In this study, we have systematically examined the effects of mass ratio of hydrophobic azithromycin on surface coating quality and aerosolisation performance of the co-spray dried composite particles. Four combination formulations with varying drug ratios were prepared by co-spray drying drug solutions. Both of the drugs in each combination formulation had similar in vitro deposition profiles, suggesting that each composite particle comprises two drugs in the designed mass ratio, which is supported by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) data. XPS and ToF-SIMS measurements also revealed that 50% by weight (or 35% by molecular fraction) of azithromycin in the formulation provided a near complete coating of 96.5% (molar fraction) on the composite particle surface, which is sufficient to prevent moisture-induced reduction in fine particle fraction (FPF)recovered and FPFemitted. Higher azithromycin content did not increase coating coverage, while contents of azithromycin lower than 20% w/w did not totally prevent the negative effects of humidity on aerosolisation performance. This study has highlighted that a critical amount of azithromycin is required to sufficiently coat the colistin particles for short-term protection against moisture.

  20. How much surface coating of hydrophobic azithromycin is sufficient to prevent moisture-induced decrease in aerosolisation of hygroscopic colistin powder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qi (Tony); Loh, Zhi Hui; Yu, Jiaqi; Sun, Si-ping; Gengenbach, Thomas; Denman, John A.; Li, Jian; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2017-01-01

    Aerosolisation performance of hygroscopic particles of colistin could be compromised at elevated humidity due to increased capillary forces. Co-spray drying colistin with a hydrophobic drug is known to provide a protective coating on the composite particle surfaces against moisture-induced reduction in aerosolisation performance; however, the effects of component ratio on surface coating quality and powder aerosolisation at elevated relative humidities are unknown. In this study, we have systematically examined the effects of mass ratio of hydrophobic azithromycin on surface coating quality and aerosolisation performance of the co-spray dried composite particles. Four combination formulations with varying drug ratios were prepared by co-spray drying drug solutions. Both of the drugs in each combination formulation had similar in vitro deposition profiles, suggesting that each composite particle comprise two drugs in the designed mass ratio, which is supported by XPS and ToF-SIMS data. XPS and ToF-SIMS measurements also revealed that 50 % by weight (or 35 % by molecular fraction) of azithromycin in the formulation provided a near-complete coating of 96.5 % (molar fraction) on the composite particle surface, which is sufficient to prevent moisture-induced reduction in FPFrecovered and FPFemitted. Higher azithromycin content did not increase coating coverage, while contents of azithromycin lower than 20 %w/w did not totally prevent the negative effects of humidity on aerosolisation performance. This study has highlighted that a critical amount of azithromycin is required to sufficiently coat the colistin particles for short-term protection against moisture. PMID:27255350

  1. The evaporative fraction as a measure of surface energy partitioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, W.E. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Cuenca, R.H. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)

    1990-12-31

    The evaporative fraction is a ratio that expresses the proportion of turbulent flux energy over land surfaces devoted to evaporation and transpiration (evapotranspiration). It has been used to characterize the energy partition over land surfaces and has potential for inferring daily energy balance information based on mid-day remote sensing measurements. The HAPEX-MOBILHY program`s SAMER system provided surface energy balance data over a range of agricultural crops and soil types. The databases from this large-scale field experiment was analyzed for the purpose of studying the behavior and daylight stability of the evaporative fraction in both ideal and general meteorological conditions. Strong linear relations were found to exist between the mid-day evaporative fraction and the daylight mean evaporative fraction. Statistical tests however rejected the hypothesis that the two quantities were equal. The relations between the evaporative fraction and the surface soil moisture as well as soil moisture in the complete vegetation root zone were also explored.

  2. The evaporative fraction as a measure of surface energy partitioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, W.E. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Cuenca, R.H. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States))

    1990-01-01

    The evaporative fraction is a ratio that expresses the proportion of turbulent flux energy over land surfaces devoted to evaporation and transpiration (evapotranspiration). It has been used to characterize the energy partition over land surfaces and has potential for inferring daily energy balance information based on mid-day remote sensing measurements. The HAPEX-MOBILHY program's SAMER system provided surface energy balance data over a range of agricultural crops and soil types. The databases from this large-scale field experiment was analyzed for the purpose of studying the behavior and daylight stability of the evaporative fraction in both ideal and general meteorological conditions. Strong linear relations were found to exist between the mid-day evaporative fraction and the daylight mean evaporative fraction. Statistical tests however rejected the hypothesis that the two quantities were equal. The relations between the evaporative fraction and the surface soil moisture as well as soil moisture in the complete vegetation root zone were also explored.

  3. Long Term Global Surface Soil Moisture Fields Using an SMOS-Trained Neural Network Applied to AMSR-E Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemesio J. Rodríguez-Fernández

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A method to retrieve soil moisture (SM from Advanced Scanning Microwave Radiometer—Earth Observing System Sensor (AMSR-E observations using Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS Level 3 SM as a reference is discussed. The goal is to obtain longer time series of SM with no significant bias and with a similar dynamical range to that of the SMOS SM dataset. This method consists of training a neural network (NN to obtain a global non-linear relationship linking AMSR-E brightness temperatures ( T b to the SMOS L3 SM dataset on the concurrent mission period of 1.5 years. Then, the NN model is used to derive soil moisture from past AMSR-E observations. It is shown that in spite of the different frequencies and sensing depths of AMSR-E and SMOS, it is possible to find such a global relationship. The sensitivity of AMSR-E T b ’s to soil temperature ( T s o i l was also evaluated using European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast Interim/Land re-analysis (ERA-Land and Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications-Land (MERRA-Land model data. The best combination of AMSR-E T b ’s to retrieve T s o i l is H polarization at 23 and 36 GHz plus V polarization at 36 GHz. Regarding SM, several combinations of input data show a similar performance in retrieving SM. One NN that uses C and X bands and T s o i l information was chosen to obtain SM in the 2003–2011 period. The new dataset shows a low bias (<0.02 m3/m3 and low standard deviation of the difference (<0.04 m3/m3 with respect to SMOS L3 SM over most of the globe’s surface. The new dataset was evaluated together with other AMSR-E SM datasets and the Climate Change Initiative (CCI SM dataset against the MERRA-Land and ERA-Land models for the 2003–2011 period. All datasets show a significant bias with respect to models for boreal regions and high correlations over regions other than the tropical and boreal forest. All of the global SM datasets including AMSR-E NN were also

  4. In situ changes in the moisture content of heated, welded tuff based on thermal neutron measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, A.L.; Carlson, R.C.; Buscheck, T.A.

    1991-07-01

    Thermal neutron logs were collected to monitor changes in moisture content within a welded tuff rock mass heated from a borehole containing an electrical heater which remained energized for 195 days. Thermal neutron measurements were made in sampling boreholes before, during and after heating. The results generally corroborated our conceptual understanding of hydrothermal flow as well as most of the numerical modeling conducting for this study. Conceptual models have been developed in conjunction with the numerical model calculations to explain differences in the drying and re-wetting behavior above and below the heater. Numerical modeling indicated that the re-wetting of the dried-out zone was dominated by the binary diffusion of water vapor through fractures. Saturation gradients in the rock matrix resulted in relative humidity gradients which drove water vapor (primarily along fractures) back to the dried-out zone where it condensed along the fracture walls and was imbibed by the matrix. 4 refs., 28 figs

  5. Field measurements, simulation modeling and development of analysis for moisture stressed corn and soybeans, 1982 studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blad, B. L.; Norman, J. M.; Gardner, B. R.

    1983-01-01

    The experimental design, data acquisition and analysis procedures for agronomic and reflectance data acquired over corn and soybeans at the Sandhills Agricultural Laboratory of the University of Nebraska are described. The following conclusions were reached: (1) predictive leaf area estimation models can be defined which appear valid over a wide range of soils; (2) relative grain yield estimates over moisture stressed corn were improved by combining reflectance and thermal data; (3) corn phenology estimates using the model of Badhwar and Henderson (1981) exhibited systematic bias but were reasonably accurate; (4) canopy reflectance can be modelled to within approximately 10% of measured values; and (5) soybean pubescence significantly affects canopy reflectance, energy balance and water use relationships.

  6. Evaluation of Optimum Moisture Content for Composting of Beef Manure and Bedding Material Mixtures Using Oxygen Uptake Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunjong; Lee, Dong-Hyun; Won, Seunggun; Ahn, Heekwon

    2016-05-01

    Moisture content influences physiological characteristics of microbes and physical structure of solid matrices during composting of animal manure. If moisture content is maintained at a proper level, aerobic microorganisms show more active oxygen consumption during composting due to increased microbial activity. In this study, optimum moisture levels for composting of two bedding materials (sawdust, rice hull) and two different mixtures of bedding and beef manure (BS, Beef cattle manure+sawdust; BR, Beef cattle manure+rice hull) were determined based on oxygen uptake rate measured by a pressure sensor method. A broad range of oxygen uptake rates (0.3 to 33.3 mg O2/g VS d) were monitored as a function of moisture level and composting feedstock type. The maximum oxygen consumption of each material was observed near the saturated condition, which ranged from 75% to 98% of water holding capacity. The optimum moisture content of BS and BR were 70% and 57% on a wet basis, respectively. Although BS's optimum moisture content was near saturated state, its free air space kept a favorable level (above 30%) for aerobic composting due to the sawdust's coarse particle size and bulking effect.

  7. Evaluation of Optimum Moisture Content for Composting of Beef Manure and Bedding Material Mixtures Using Oxygen Uptake Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunjong Kim

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Moisture content influences physiological characteristics of microbes and physical structure of solid matrices during composting of animal manure. If moisture content is maintained at a proper level, aerobic microorganisms show more active oxygen consumption during composting due to increased microbial activity. In this study, optimum moisture levels for composting of two bedding materials (sawdust, rice hull and two different mixtures of bedding and beef manure (BS, Beef cattle manure+sawdust; BR, Beef cattle manure+rice hull were determined based on oxygen uptake rate measured by a pressure sensor method. A broad range of oxygen uptake rates (0.3 to 33.3 mg O2/g VS d were monitored as a function of moisture level and composting feedstock type. The maximum oxygen consumption of each material was observed near the saturated condition, which ranged from 75% to 98% of water holding capacity. The optimum moisture content of BS and BR were 70% and 57% on a wet basis, respectively. Although BS’s optimum moisture content was near saturated state, its free air space kept a favorable level (above 30% for aerobic composting due to the sawdust’s coarse particle size and bulking effect.

  8. Self-adaptive Green-Ampt infiltration parameters obtained from measured moisture processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Xiang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Green-Ampt (G-A infiltration model (i.e., the G-A model is often used to characterize the infiltration process in hydrology. The parameters of the G-A model are critical in applications for the prediction of infiltration and associated rainfall-runoff processes. Previous approaches to determining the G-A parameters have depended on pedotransfer functions (PTFs or estimates from experimental results, usually without providing optimum values. In this study, rainfall simulators with soil moisture measurements were used to generate rainfall in various experimental plots. Observed runoff data and soil moisture dynamic data were jointly used to yield the infiltration processes, and an improved self-adaptive method was used to optimize the G-A parameters for various types of soil under different rainfall conditions. The two G-A parameters, i.e., the effective hydraulic conductivity and the effective capillary drive at the wetting front, were determined simultaneously to describe the relationships between rainfall, runoff, and infiltration processes. Through a designed experiment, the method for determining the G-A parameters was proved to be reliable in reflecting the effects of pedologic background in G-A type infiltration cases and deriving the optimum G-A parameters. Unlike PTF methods, this approach estimates the G-A parameters directly from infiltration curves obtained from rainfall simulation experiments so that it can be used to determine site-specific parameters. This study provides a self-adaptive method of optimizing the G-A parameters through designed field experiments. The parameters derived from field-measured rainfall-infiltration processes are more reliable and applicable to hydrological models.

  9. Effect of soil moisture on seasonal variation in indoor radon concentration: modelling and measurements in 326 Finnish houses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvela, H.; Holmgren, O.; Haenninen, P.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of soil moisture on seasonal variation in soil air and indoor radon is studied. A brief review of the theory of the effect of soil moisture on soil air radon has been presented. The theoretical estimates, together with soil moisture measurements over a period of 10 y, indicate that variation in soil moisture evidently is an important factor affecting the seasonal variation in soil air radon concentration. Partitioning of radon gas between the water and air fractions of soil pores is the main factor increasing soil air radon concentration. On two example test sites, the relative standard deviation of the calculated monthly average soil air radon concentration was 17 and 26 %. Increased soil moisture in autumn and spring, after the snow melt, increases soil gas radon concentrations by 10-20 %. In February and March, the soil gas radon concentration is in its minimum. Soil temperature is also an important factor. High soil temperature in summer increased the calculated soil gas radon concentration by 14 %, compared with winter values. The monthly indoor radon measurements over period of 1 y in 326 Finnish houses are presented and compared with the modelling results. The model takes into account radon entry, climate and air exchange. The measured radon concentrations in autumn and spring were higher than expected and it can be explained by the seasonal variation in the soil moisture. The variation in soil moisture is a potential factor affecting markedly to the high year-to-year variation in the annual or seasonal average radon concentrations, observed in many radon studies. (authors)

  10. Spatial Variability of Near-surface Soil Moisture for Bioenergy Crops at the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dam, R. L.; Diker, K.; Bhardwaj, A. K.; Hamilton, S. K.

    2009-12-01

    We used time-lapse electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) to monitor spatial and temporal soil moisture variability below ten different potential bioenergy cropping systems at the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center’s sustainability research site in Michigan, U.S.A. These crops range from high-diversity, low-input grasses and poplars to low-diversity, high-input corn-soybean-canola rotations. We equipped the 28x40m vegetation plots with permanent 2D resistivity arrays, each consisting of 40 graphite electrodes at 30cm spacing. Other permanent equipment in each plot includes multi-depth temperature and time domain reflectometry (TDR) based moisture sensors, and two tension soil water samplers. The material at the site consists of coarse sandy glacial tills in which a soil with an approximately 50cm thick A-Bt horizon has developed. ERI data were collected using a dipole-dipole configuration every four weeks since early May 2009. After removal of bad points, the data were inverted and translated into 2D images of water content using lab-derived petrophysical relationships, including corrections for soil temperature and salinity. The results show significant seasonal variation within and between vegetation plots. We compare our results to high-temporal resolution point-based measurements of soil moisture from TDR probes and present statistical analysis of the variability of soil moisture within and between plots.

  11. Assimilating Remotely Sensed Surface Soil Moisture into SWAT using Ensemble Kalman Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, a 1-D Ensemble Kalman Filter has been used to update the soil moisture states of the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model. Experiments were conducted for the Cobb Creek Watershed in southeastern Oklahoma for 2006-2008. Assimilation of in situ data proved limited success in the ...

  12. Spatial and temporal monitoring of soil moisture using surface electrical resistivity tomography in Mediterranean soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alamry, Abdulmohsen S.; van der Meijde, Mark; Noomen, Marleen; Addink, Elisabeth A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/224281216; van Benthem, Rik; de Jong, Steven M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/120221306

    2017-01-01

    ERT techniques are especially promising in (semi-arid) areas with shallow and rocky soils where other methods fail to produce soil moisture maps and to obtain soil profile information. Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) was performed in the Peyne catchment in southern France at four sites

  13. [The temperature and temperature gradients distribution in the rabbit body thermophysical model with evaporation of moisture from its surface].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumiantsev, G V

    2004-04-01

    On created in laboratory heat-physical model of a rabbit body reflecting basic heat-physical parameters of the body such as: weight, size of a relative surface, heat absorption and heat conduction, heat capacity etc., a change of radial distribution of temperature and size was found across a superficial layer of evaporation of water from its surface, that simulates sweating, with various ratio of environmental temperature and capacity of electrical heater simulating heat production in animal. The experiments have shown that with evaporation of moisture from a surface of model in all investigated cases, there is an increase of superficial layer of body of a temperature gradient and simultaneous decrease of temperature of a model inside and on the surface. It seems that, with evaporation of a moisture from a surface of a body, the size of a temperature gradient in a thin superficial layer dependent in our experiments on capacity for heat production and environmental temperature, is increased and can be used in a live organism for definition of change in general heat content of the body with the purpose of maintenance of its thermal balance with environment.

  14. Measurements of Near Sea Surface Infrared Propagation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Frost, Shaun

    1999-01-01

    .... Measurements have been made of the atmospheric infrared transmission near the sea surface. Spectral transmission profiles were measured for a number of ranges using a fourier transform spectrometer...

  15. Moisture transfer through the membrane of a cross-flow energy recovery ventilator: Measurement and simple data-driven modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    CR Boardman; Samuel V. Glass

    2015-01-01

    The moisture transfer effectiveness (or latent effectiveness) of a cross-flow, membrane based energy recovery ventilator is measured and modeled. Analysis of in situ measurements for a full year shows that energy recovery ventilator latent effectiveness increases with increasing average relative humidity and surprisingly increases with decreasing average temperature. A...

  16. The measurement of surface gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crossley, David; Hinderer, Jacques; Riccardi, Umberto

    2013-01-01

    This review covers basic theory and techniques behind the use of ground-based gravimetry at the Earth's surface. The orientation is toward modern instrumentation, data processing and interpretation for observing surface, land-based, time-variable changes to the geopotential. The instrumentation side is covered in some detail, with specifications and performance of the most widely used models of the three main types: the absolute gravimeters (FG5, A10 from Micro-g LaCoste), superconducting gravimeters (OSG, iGrav from GWR instruments), and the new generation of spring instruments (Micro-g LaCoste gPhone, Scintrex CG5 and Burris ZLS). A wide range of applications is covered, with selected examples from tides and ocean loading, atmospheric effects on gravity, local and global hydrology, seismology and normal modes, long period and tectonics, volcanology, exploration gravimetry, and some examples of gravimetry connected to fundamental physics. We show that there are only a modest number of very large signals, i.e. hundreds of µGal (10 −8 m s −2 ), that are easy to see with all gravimeters (e.g. tides, volcanic eruptions, large earthquakes, seasonal hydrology). The majority of signals of interest are in the range 0.1–5.0 µGal and occur at a wide range of time scales (minutes to years) and spatial extent (a few meters to global). Here the competing effects require a careful combination of different gravimeter types and measurement strategies to efficiently characterize and distinguish the signals. Gravimeters are sophisticated instruments, with substantial up-front costs, and they place demands on the operators to maximize the results. Nevertheless their performance characteristics such as drift and precision have improved dramatically in recent years, and their data recording ability and ruggedness have seen similar advances. Many subtle signals are now routinely connected with known geophysical effects such as coseismic earthquake displacements, post

  17. The measurement of surface gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossley, David; Hinderer, Jacques; Riccardi, Umberto

    2013-04-01

    This review covers basic theory and techniques behind the use of ground-based gravimetry at the Earth's surface. The orientation is toward modern instrumentation, data processing and interpretation for observing surface, land-based, time-variable changes to the geopotential. The instrumentation side is covered in some detail, with specifications and performance of the most widely used models of the three main types: the absolute gravimeters (FG5, A10 from Micro-g LaCoste), superconducting gravimeters (OSG, iGrav from GWR instruments), and the new generation of spring instruments (Micro-g LaCoste gPhone, Scintrex CG5 and Burris ZLS). A wide range of applications is covered, with selected examples from tides and ocean loading, atmospheric effects on gravity, local and global hydrology, seismology and normal modes, long period and tectonics, volcanology, exploration gravimetry, and some examples of gravimetry connected to fundamental physics. We show that there are only a modest number of very large signals, i.e. hundreds of µGal (10-8 m s-2), that are easy to see with all gravimeters (e.g. tides, volcanic eruptions, large earthquakes, seasonal hydrology). The majority of signals of interest are in the range 0.1-5.0 µGal and occur at a wide range of time scales (minutes to years) and spatial extent (a few meters to global). Here the competing effects require a careful combination of different gravimeter types and measurement strategies to efficiently characterize and distinguish the signals. Gravimeters are sophisticated instruments, with substantial up-front costs, and they place demands on the operators to maximize the results. Nevertheless their performance characteristics such as drift and precision have improved dramatically in recent years, and their data recording ability and ruggedness have seen similar advances. Many subtle signals are now routinely connected with known geophysical effects such as coseismic earthquake displacements, post-glacial rebound

  18. Multiscale soil moisture estimates using static and roving cosmic-ray soil moisture sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McJannet, David; Hawdon, Aaron; Baker, Brett; Renzullo, Luigi; Searle, Ross

    2017-12-01

    Soil moisture plays a critical role in land surface processes and as such there has been a recent increase in the number and resolution of satellite soil moisture observations and the development of land surface process models with ever increasing resolution. Despite these developments, validation and calibration of these products has been limited because of a lack of observations on corresponding scales. A recently developed mobile soil moisture monitoring platform, known as the rover, offers opportunities to overcome this scale issue. This paper describes methods, results and testing of soil moisture estimates produced using rover surveys on a range of scales that are commensurate with model and satellite retrievals. Our investigation involved static cosmic-ray neutron sensors and rover surveys across both broad (36 × 36 km at 9 km resolution) and intensive (10 × 10 km at 1 km resolution) scales in a cropping district in the Mallee region of Victoria, Australia. We describe approaches for converting rover survey neutron counts to soil moisture and discuss the factors controlling soil moisture variability. We use independent gravimetric and modelled soil moisture estimates collected across both space and time to validate rover soil moisture products. Measurements revealed that temporal patterns in soil moisture were preserved through time and regression modelling approaches were utilised to produce time series of property-scale soil moisture which may also have applications in calibration and validation studies or local farm management. Intensive-scale rover surveys produced reliable soil moisture estimates at 1 km resolution while broad-scale surveys produced soil moisture estimates at 9 km resolution. We conclude that the multiscale soil moisture products produced in this study are well suited to future analysis of satellite soil moisture retrievals and finer-scale soil moisture models.

  19. A field evaluation of soil moisture modelling with the Soil, Vegetation, and Snow (SVS) land surface model using evapotranspiration observations as forcing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheu, Audrey; Anctil, François; Gaborit, Étienne; Fortin, Vincent; Nadeau, Daniel F.; Therrien, René

    2018-03-01

    To address certain limitations with their current operational model, Environment and Climate Change Canada recently developed the Soil, Vegetation, and Snow (SVS) land surface model and the representation of subsurface hydrological processes was targeted as an area for improvement. The objective of this study is to evaluate the ability of HydroSVS, the component of SVS responsible for the vertical redistribution of water, to simulate soil moisture under snow-free conditions when using flux-tower observations of evapotranspiration as forcing data. We assessed (1) model fidelity by comparing soil moisture modelled with HydroSVS to point-scale measurements of volumetric soil water content and (2) model complexity by comparing the performance of HydroSVS to that of HydroGeoSphere, a state-of-the-art integrated surface and subsurface hydrologic model. To do this, we performed one-dimensional soil column simulations at four sites of the AmeriFlux network. Results indicate that under Mediterranean and temperate climates, HydroSVS satisfactorily simulated soil moisture (Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency between 0.26 and 0.70; R2 ≥ 0.80), with a performance comparable to HydroGeoSphere (Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency ≥0.60; R2 ≥ 0.80). However, HydroSVS performed weakly under a semiarid climate while HydroGeoSphere performed relatively well. By decoupling the magnitude and sourcing of evapotranspiration, this study proposes a powerful diagnostic tool to evaluate the representation of subsurface hydrological processes in land surface models. Overall, this study highlights the potential of SVS for hydrological applications.

  20. In situ measurement of soil moisture and pore-water pressures in an 'incipient' landslide: Lake Tutira, New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawke, Richard; McConchie, Jack

    2011-02-01

    The immediate cost of shallow regolith landslides in New Zealand has been estimated to exceed US$33M annually. Since the majority of these landslides occur during prolonged wet conditions, or intense rainstorms, moisture conditions are a critical control. The nature, dynamics, and character of soil moisture conditions, and the piezometric response to rainfall, have been recorded within an 'incipient' landslide for more than 5 years. The study site, on pastoral hill country within the Lake Tutira catchment in northern Hawkes Bay, is typical of large areas of New Zealand episodically affected by extensive landsliding. Detailed continuous measurements show that both the soil moisture and piezometric response within the regolith are highly storm- and site-specific. The development of positive pore pressures is infrequent; they form only during intense rainstorms, and persist for a short time. The hydraulic response of the soil is primarily a function of storm characteristics, but this response can be modified by antecedent moisture conditions, topographic position, and heterogeneity of soil properties. Stability analysis shows that most slopes in the study area are significantly steeper than can be explained by the frictional strength of the regolith. Measured hydraulic conditions also show that positive pore-water pressures alone do not trigger slope instability. A recent slope failure followed a period of extremely high antecedent moisture conditions, and occurred when maximum soil moisture conditions, though not pore-water pressures, were recorded. Increased moisture content of the regolith reduces matric tension, and therefore effective cohesion of the soil. This cohesion is critical to maintaining stability of the regolith on these slopes. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. SMEX03 Surface and Soil Temperature Measurements: Alabama

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains land surface temperature and soil temperature data at depths of 1 cm, 5 cm, and 10 cm collected during the Soil Moisture Experiment 2003...

  2. New Physical Algorithms for Downscaling SMAP Soil Moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, M.; Ghafari, E.; Babaeian, E.; Davary, K.; Farid, A.; Jones, S. B.; Tuller, M.

    2017-12-01

    The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission provides new means for estimation of surface soil moisture at the global scale. However, for many hydrological and agricultural applications the spatial SMAP resolution is too low. To address this scale issue we fused SMAP data with MODIS observations to generate soil moisture maps at 1-km spatial resolution. In course of this study we have improved several existing empirical algorithms and introduced a new physical approach for downscaling SMAP data. The universal triangle/trapezoid model was applied to relate soil moisture to optical/thermal observations such as NDVI, land surface temperature and surface reflectance. These algorithms were evaluated with in situ data measured at 5-cm depth. Our results demonstrate that downscaling SMAP soil moisture data based on physical indicators of soil moisture derived from the MODIS satellite leads to higher accuracy than that achievable with empirical downscaling algorithms. Keywords: Soil moisture, microwave data, downscaling, MODIS, triangle/trapezoid model.

  3. Spatial and temporal variability of soil temperature, moisture and surface soil properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajek, B. F.; Dane, J. H.

    1993-01-01

    The overall objectives of this research were to: (l) Relate in-situ measured soil-water content and temperature profiles to remotely sensed surface soil-water and temperature conditions; to model simultaneous heat and water movement for spatially and temporally changing soil conditions; (2) Determine the spatial and temporal variability of surface soil properties affecting emissivity, reflectance, and material and energy flux across the soil surface. This will include physical, chemical, and mineralogical characteristics of primary soil components and aggregate systems; and (3) Develop surface soil classes of naturally occurring and distributed soil property assemblages and group classes to be tested with respect to water content, emissivity and reflectivity. This document is a report of studies conducted during the period funded by NASA grants. The project was designed to be conducted over a five year period. Since funding was discontinued after three years, some of the research started was not completed. Additional publications are planned whenever funding can be obtained to finalize data analysis for both the arid and humid locations.

  4. Comparison and Downscale of AMSR2 Soil Moisture Products with In Situ Measurements from the SCAN–NRCS Network over Puerto Rico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Nuñez-Olivieri

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A continuous spatio-temporal database of accurate soil moisture (SM measurements is an important asset for agricultural activities, hydrologic studies, and environmental monitoring. The Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2, which was launched in May 2012, has been providing SM data globally with a revisit period of two days. It is imperative to assess the quality of this data before performing any application. Since resources of accurate SM measurements are very limited in Puerto Rico, this research will assess the quality of the AMSR2 data by comparing it with ground-based measurements, as well as perform a downscaling technique to provide a better description of how the sensor perceives the surface soil moisture as it passes over the island. The comparison consisted of the evaluation of the mean error, root mean squared error, and the correlation coefficient. Two downscaling techniques were used, and their performances were studied. The results revealed that AMSR2 products tend to underestimate soil moisture. This is due to the extreme heterogeneous distributions of elevations, vegetation densities, soil types, and weather events on the island. This research provides a comprehensive study on the accuracy and potential of the AMSR2 products over Puerto Rico. Further studies are recommended to improve the AMSR2 products.

  5. Detecting the influence of ocean process on the moisture supply for India summer monsoon from Satellite Sea Surface Salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, W.; Yueh, S. H.; Liu, W. T.; Fore, A.; Hayashi, A.

    2016-02-01

    A strong contrast in the onset of Indian summer monsoon was observed by independent satellites: average rain rate over India subcontinent (IS) in June was more than doubled in 2013 than 2012 (TRMM); also observed are larger area of wet soil (Aquarius) and high water storage (GRACE). The difference in IS rainfall was contributed to the moisture inputs through west coast of India, estimated from ocean wind (OSCAT2) and water vapor (TMI). This is an interesting testbed for studying the role of ocean on terrestrial water cycle, in particular the Indian monsoon, which has tremendous social-economical impact. What is the source of extra moisture in 2013 or deficit in 2012 for the monsoon onset? Is it possible to quantify the contribution of ocean process that maybe responsible for redistributing the freshwater in favor of the summer monsoon moisture supply? This study aims to identify the influence of ocean processes on the freshwater exchange between air-sea interfaces, using Aquarius sea surface salinity (SSS). We found two areas in Indian Ocean with high correlation between IS rain rate and Aquarius SSS: one area is in the Arabian Sea adjacent to IS, another area is a horizontal patch from 60°E to 100°E centered around 10°S. On the other hand, E-P (OAflux, TRMM) shows no similar correlation patterns with IS rain. Based on the governing equation of the salt budget in the upper ocean, we define the freshwater flux, F, from the oceanic branch of the water cycle, including contributions from salinity tendency, advection, and subsurface process. The tendency and advection terms are estimated using Aquarius SSS and OSCAR ocean current. We will present results of analyzing the spatial and temporal variability of F and evidence of and hypothesis on how the oceanic processes may enhance the moisture supply for summer Indian monsoon onset in 2013 comparing with 2012. The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) has been producing the global soil moisture (SM) every 2-3 days

  6. Local Versus Remote Contributions of Soil Moisture to Near-Surface Temperature Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, R.; Schubert, S.; Wang, H.; Chang, Y.

    2018-01-01

    Soil moisture variations have a straightforward impact on overlying air temperatures, wetter soils can induce higher evaporative cooling of the soil and thus, locally, cooler temperatures overall. Not known, however, is the degree to which soil moisture variations can affect remote air temperatures through their impact on the atmospheric circulation. In this talk we describe a two-pronged analysis that addresses this question. In the first segment, an extensive ensemble of NASA/GSFC GEOS-5 atmospheric model simulations is analyzed statistically to isolate and quantify the contributions of various soil moisture states, both local and remote, to the variability of air temperature at a given local site. In the second segment, the relevance of the derived statistical relationships is evaluated by applying them to observations-based data. Results from the second segment suggest that the GEOS-5-based relationships do, at least to first order, hold in nature and thus may provide some skill to forecasts of air temperature at subseasonal time scales, at least in certain regions.

  7. Impact of stone content on soil moisture measurement with capacitive sensors 10HS (Decagon)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deraedt, Deborah; Bernard, Julien; Bietlot, Louise; Clerbois, Laura; Rosière, Clément; Starren, Amandine; Colinet, Gilles; Mercatoris, Benoit; Degré, Aurore

    2015-04-01

    Lot of soil survey focused on agricultural soils. For practical reasons, those soils have a low stone content. So, most of the soil water content sensors are placed on low stone content soils and the calibration equations are developed for them. Yet some researches take an interest in forest soils that are often much different from the previous ones. The differences lie in their stone content and their slope. Lots of studies have proved the importance of making soil specific calibration of the soil water content sensor. As our lab use regularly the 10HS sensors (Decagon Devices, United States) in forested soil, we decided to evaluate the importance of the stone content in the soil moisture measurement. The soil used for this experimentation comes from Gembloux (50°33'54.9''N, 4°42'11.3''E). It is silt that has been sieved at 2 mm to remove the gravel. The stones used to form the samples come from an experimental site located in the Belgian Ardennes (50°1'52.6''N, 4°53'22.5''E). They are mainly composed of schist with some quartz and sandstone elements. Initially, only five samples were constructed with three replications each. The size and the proportion of stones were the variables. Stones were classified in two groups, the first contains gravels whose size is less than 1,5 cm and a the second contains gravels whose size is comprised between 2 and 3 cm. The proportions of stone selected for the experiment are 0, 20 and 40%. In order to generate validation data, two more samples were constructed with intermediate proportion of stone content (30%). The samples were built in PVC container which dimensions are slightly bigger than the sensor volume of influence (1.1-1.3l). The soil samples were saturated and then dried on a thermal chamber set at about 32°C. During at least 14 days, the samples soil water content was determined by the sensor measurement with the Procheck read-out system (Decagon Devices, United State) and by weighting the samples thrice a day

  8. Redox Bias in Loss on Ignition Moisture Measurement for Relatively Pure Plutonium-Bearing Oxide Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eller, P. G.; Stakebake, J. L.; Cooper, T. D.

    2002-02-26

    This paper evaluates potential analytical bias in application of the Loss on Ignition (LOI) technique for moisture measurement to relatively pure (plutonium assay of 80 wt.% or higher) oxides containing uranium that have been stabilized according to stabilization and storage standard DOE-STD-3013-2000 (STD- 3013). An immediate application is to Rocky Flats (RF) materials derived from high-grade metal hydriding separations subsequently treated by multiple calcination cycles. Specifically evaluated are weight changes due to oxidation/reduction of multivalent impurity oxides that could mask true moisture equivalent content measurement. Process knowledge and characterization of materials representing complex-wide materials to be stabilized and packaged according to STD-3013, and particularly for the immediate RF target stream, indicate that oxides of uranium, iron and gallium are the only potential multivalent constituents expected to be present above 0.5 wt.%. The evaluation show s that of these constituents, with few exceptions, only uranium oxides can be present at a sufficient level to produce weight gain biases significant with respect to the LOI stability test. In general, these formerly high-value, high-actinide content materials are reliably identifiable by process knowledge and measurement. Significant bias also requires that UO2 components remain largely unoxidized after calcination and are largely converted to U3O8 during LOI testing at only slightly higher temperatures. Based on well-established literature, it is judged unlikely that this set of conditions will be realized in practice. We conclude that it is very likely that LOI weight gain bias will be small for the immediate target RF oxide materials containing greater than 80 wt.% plutonium plus a much smaller uranium content. Recommended tests are in progress to confirm these expectations and to provide a more authoritative basis for bounding LOI oxidation/reduction biases. LOI bias evaluation is more

  9. Magnetic susceptibility and magnetic resonance measurements of the moisture content and hydration condition of a magnetic mixture material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukada, K.; Kusaka, T.; Saari, M. M.; Takagi, R.; Sakai, K.; Kiwa, T.; Bito, Y.

    2014-01-01

    We developed a magnetic measurement method to measure the moisture content and hydration condition of mortar as a magnetic mixture material. Mortar is a mixture of Portland cement, sand, and water, and these materials exhibit different magnetic properties. The magnetization–magnetic field curves of these components and of mortars with different moisture contents were measured, using a specially developed high-temperature-superconductor superconducting quantum interference device. Using the differences in magnetic characteristics, the moisture content of mortar was measured at the ferromagnetic saturation region over 250 mT. A correlation between magnetic susceptibility and moisture content was successfully established. After Portland cement and water are mixed, hydration begins. At the early stage of the hydration/gel, magnetization strength increased over time. To investigate the magnetization change, we measured the distribution between bound and free water in the mortar in the early stage by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The MRI results suggest that the amount of free water in mortar correlates with the change in magnetic susceptibility

  10. Magnetic susceptibility and magnetic resonance measurements of the moisture content and hydration condition of a magnetic mixture material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukada, K., E-mail: tsukada@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp; Kusaka, T.; Saari, M. M.; Takagi, R.; Sakai, K.; Kiwa, T. [The Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University, 3-1-1 Tsushima-Naka, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Bito, Y. [Central Research Lab., Hitachi. Ltd., 1-280 Higashi-Koigakubo, Kokubunji, Tokyo 185-8601 (Japan)

    2014-05-07

    We developed a magnetic measurement method to measure the moisture content and hydration condition of mortar as a magnetic mixture material. Mortar is a mixture of Portland cement, sand, and water, and these materials exhibit different magnetic properties. The magnetization–magnetic field curves of these components and of mortars with different moisture contents were measured, using a specially developed high-temperature-superconductor superconducting quantum interference device. Using the differences in magnetic characteristics, the moisture content of mortar was measured at the ferromagnetic saturation region over 250 mT. A correlation between magnetic susceptibility and moisture content was successfully established. After Portland cement and water are mixed, hydration begins. At the early stage of the hydration/gel, magnetization strength increased over time. To investigate the magnetization change, we measured the distribution between bound and free water in the mortar in the early stage by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The MRI results suggest that the amount of free water in mortar correlates with the change in magnetic susceptibility.

  11. Evaluation of gravimetric ground truth soil moisture data collected for the agricultural soil moisture experiment, 1978 Colby, Kansas, aircraft mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, L. M.; Phinney, D. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    Soil moisture data acquired to support the development of algorithms for estimating surface soil moisture from remotely sensed backscattering of microwaves from ground surfaces are presented. Aspects of field uniformity and variability of gravimetric soil moisture measurements are discussed. Moisture distribution patterns are illustrated by frequency distributions and contour plots. Standard deviations and coefficients of variation relative to degree of wetness and agronomic features of the fields are examined. Influence of sampling depth on observed moisture content an variability are indicated. For the various sets of measurements, soil moisture values that appear as outliers are flagged. The distribution and legal descriptions of the test fields are included along with examinations of soil types, agronomic features, and sampling plan. Bulk density data for experimental fields are appended, should analyses involving volumetric moisture content be of interest to the users of data in this report.

  12. Impact of groundwater capillary rises as lower boundary conditions for soil moisture in a land surface model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergnes, Jean-Pierre; Decharme, Bertrand; Habets, Florence

    2014-05-01

    Groundwater is a key component of the global hydrological cycle. It sustains base flow in humid climate while it receives seepage in arid region. Moreover, groundwater influences soil moisture through water capillary rise into the soil and potentially affects the energy and water budget between the land surface and the atmosphere. Despite its importance, most global climate models do not account for groundwater and their possible interaction with both the surface hydrology and the overlying atmosphere. This study assesses the impact of capillary rise from shallow groundwater on the simulated water budget over France. The groundwater scheme implemented in the Total Runoff Integrated Pathways (TRIP) river routing model in a previous study is coupled with the Interaction between Soil Biosphere Atmosphere (ISBA) land surface model. In this coupling, the simulated water table depth acts as the lower boundary condition for the soil moisture diffusivity equation. An original parameterization accounting for the subgrid elevation inside each grid cell is proposed in order to compute this fully-coupled soil lower boundary condition. Simulations are performed at high (1/12°) and low (0.5°) resolutions and evaluated over the 1989-2009 period. Compared to a free-drain experiment, upward capillary fluxes at the bottom of soil increase the mean annual evapotranspiration simulated over the aquifer domain by 3.12 % and 1.54 % at fine and low resolutions respectively. This process logically induces a decrease of the simulated recharge from ISBA to the aquifers and contributes to enhance the soil moisture memory. The simulated water table depths are then lowered, which induces a slight decrease of the simulated mean annual river discharges. However, the fully-coupled simulations compare well with river discharge and water table depth observations which confirms the relevance of the coupling formalism.

  13. A non-linear and stochastic response surface method for Bayesian estimation of uncertainty in soil moisture simulation from a land surface model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Hossain

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a simple and efficient scheme for Bayesian estimation of uncertainty in soil moisture simulation by a Land Surface Model (LSM. The scheme is assessed within a Monte Carlo (MC simulation framework based on the Generalized Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation (GLUE methodology. A primary limitation of using the GLUE method is the prohibitive computational burden imposed by uniform random sampling of the model's parameter distributions. Sampling is improved in the proposed scheme by stochastic modeling of the parameters' response surface that recognizes the non-linear deterministic behavior between soil moisture and land surface parameters. Uncertainty in soil moisture simulation (model output is approximated through a Hermite polynomial chaos expansion of normal random variables that represent the model's parameter (model input uncertainty. The unknown coefficients of the polynomial are calculated using limited number of model simulation runs. The calibrated polynomial is then used as a fast-running proxy to the slower-running LSM to predict the degree of representativeness of a randomly sampled model parameter set. An evaluation of the scheme's efficiency in sampling is made through comparison with the fully random MC sampling (the norm for GLUE and the nearest-neighborhood sampling technique. The scheme was able to reduce computational burden of random MC sampling for GLUE in the ranges of 10%-70%. The scheme was also found to be about 10% more efficient than the nearest-neighborhood sampling method in predicting a sampled parameter set's degree of representativeness. The GLUE based on the proposed sampling scheme did not alter the essential features of the uncertainty structure in soil moisture simulation. The scheme can potentially make GLUE uncertainty estimation for any LSM more efficient as it does not impose any additional structural or distributional assumptions.

  14. Measuring Surface Combatant Fleet Effectiveness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Crary, Michael

    1999-01-01

    ...? While Measures of Effectiveness for an individual ship can include its number of missiles, speed, and endurance, it is difficult to find a Measure of Effectiveness credible to experienced warplanners...

  15. Extreme fire events are related to previous-year surface moisture conditions in permafrost-underlain larch forests of Siberia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forkel, Matthias; Beer, Christian; Thonicke, Kirsten; Cramer, Wolfgang; Bartalev, Sergey; Schmullius, Christiane

    2012-01-01

    Wildfires are a natural and important element in the functioning of boreal forests. However, in some years, fires with extreme spread and severity occur. Such severe fires can degrade the forest, affect human values, emit huge amounts of carbon and aerosols and alter the land surface albedo. Usually, wind, slope and dry air conditions have been recognized as factors determining fire spread. Here we identify surface moisture as an additional important driving factor for the evolution of extreme fire events in the Baikal region. An area of 127 000 km 2 burned in this region in 2003, a large part of it in regions underlain by permafrost. Analyses of satellite data for 2002–2009 indicate that previous-summer surface moisture is a better predictor for burned area than precipitation anomalies or fire weather indices for larch forests with continuous permafrost. Our analysis advances the understanding of complex interactions between the atmosphere, vegetation and soil, and how coupled mechanisms can lead to extreme events. These findings emphasize the importance of a mechanistic coupling of soil thermodynamics, hydrology, vegetation functioning, and fire activity in Earth system models for projecting climate change impacts over the next century. (letter)

  16. A Quasi-Global Approach to Improve Day-Time Satellite Surface Soil Moisture Anomalies through the Land Surface Temperature Input

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M. Parinussa

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Passive microwave observations from various spaceborne sensors have been linked to the soil moisture of the Earth’s surface layer. A new generation of passive microwave sensors are dedicated to retrieving this variable and make observations in the single theoretically optimal L-band frequency (1–2 GHz. Previous generations of passive microwave sensors made observations in a range of higher frequencies, allowing for simultaneous estimation of additional variables required for solving the radiative transfer equation. One of these additional variables is land surface temperature, which plays a unique role in the radiative transfer equation and has an influence on the final quality of retrieved soil moisture anomalies. This study presents an optimization procedure for soil moisture retrievals through a quasi-global precipitation-based verification technique, the so-called Rvalue metric. Various land surface temperature scenarios were evaluated in which biases were added to an existing linear regression, specifically focusing on improving the skills to capture the temporal variability of soil moisture. We focus on the relative quality of the day-time (01:30 pm observations from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for Earth Observing System (AMSR-E, as these are theoretically most challenging due to the thermal equilibrium theory, and existing studies indicate that larger improvements are possible for these observations compared to their night-time (01:30 am equivalent. Soil moisture data used in this study were retrieved through the Land Parameter Retrieval Model (LPRM, and in line with theory, both satellite paths show a unique and distinct degradation as a function of vegetation density. Both the ascending (01:30 pm and descending (01:30 am paths of the publicly available and widely used AMSR-E LPRM soil moisture products were used for benchmarking purposes. Several scenarios were employed in which the land surface temperature input for

  17. A Quasi-Global Approach to Improve Day-Time Satellite Surface Soil Moisture Anomalies through the Land Surface Temperature Input

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parinussa, Robert M.; de Jeu, Richard A. M.; van Der Schalie, Robin; Crow, Wade T.; Lei, Fangni; Holmes, Thomas R. H.

    2016-01-01

    Passive microwave observations from various spaceborne sensors have been linked to the soil moisture of the Earth's surface layer. A new generation of passive microwave sensors are dedicated to retrieving this variable and make observations in the single theoretically optimal L-band frequency (1-2 GHz). Previous generations of passive microwave sensors made observations in a range of higher frequencies, allowing for simultaneous estimation of additional variables required for solving the radiative transfer equation. One of these additional variables is land surface temperature, which plays a unique role in the radiative transfer equation and has an influence on the final quality of retrieved soil moisture anomalies. This study presents an optimization procedure for soil moisture retrievals through a quasi-global precipitation-based verification technique, the so-called Rvalue metric. Various land surface temperature scenarios were evaluated in which biases were added to an existing linear regression, specifically focusing on improving the skills to capture the temporal variability of soil moisture. We focus on the relative quality of the day-time (01:30 pm) observations from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for Earth Observing System (AMSR-E), as these are theoretically most challenging due to the thermal equilibrium theory, and existing studies indicate that larger improvements are possible for these observations compared to their night-time (01:30 am) equivalent. Soil moisture data used in this study were retrieved through the Land Parameter Retrieval Model (LPRM), and in line with theory, both satellite paths show a unique and distinct degradation as a function of vegetation density. Both the ascending (01:30 pm) and descending (01:30 am) paths of the publicly available and widely used AMSR-E LPRM soil moisture products were used for benchmarking purposes. Several scenarios were employed in which the land surface temperature input for the radiative

  18. Landscape-scale soil moisture heterogeneity and its influence on surface fluxes at the Jornada LTER site: Evaluating a new model parameterization for subgrid-scale soil moisture variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, I. T.; Prihodko, L.; Vivoni, E. R.; Denning, A. S.

    2017-12-01

    Arid and semiarid regions represent a large fraction of global land, with attendant importance of surface energy and trace gas flux to global totals. These regions are characterized by strong seasonality, especially in precipitation, that defines the level of ecosystem stress. Individual plants have been observed to respond non-linearly to increasing soil moisture stress, where plant function is generally maintained as soils dry down to a threshold at which rapid closure of stomates occurs. Incorporating this nonlinear mechanism into landscape-scale models can result in unrealistic binary "on-off" behavior that is especially problematic in arid landscapes. Subsequently, models have `relaxed' their simulation of soil moisture stress on evapotranspiration (ET). Unfortunately, these relaxations are not physically based, but are imposed upon model physics as a means to force a more realistic response. Previously, we have introduced a new method to represent soil moisture regulation of ET, whereby the landscape is partitioned into `BINS' of soil moisture wetness, each associated with a fractional area of the landscape or grid cell. A physically- and observationally-based nonlinear soil moisture stress function is applied, but when convolved with the relative area distribution represented by wetness BINS the system has the emergent property of `smoothing' the landscape-scale response without the need for non-physical impositions on model physics. In this research we confront BINS simulations of Bowen ratio, soil moisture variability and trace gas flux with soil moisture and eddy covariance observations taken at the Jornada LTER dryland site in southern New Mexico. We calculate the mean annual wetting cycle and associated variability about the mean state and evaluate model performance against this variability and time series of land surface fluxes from the highly instrumented Tromble Weir watershed. The BINS simulations capture the relatively rapid reaction to wetting

  19. Methane oxidation in pig and cattle slurry storages, and effects of surface crust moisture and methane availability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, S.O.; Ambus, P.

    2006-01-01

    2 during incubation, while intact subsamples were used to characterize CH4 oxidation as a function of CH4 availability and moisture content. Methane oxidation was observed in all materials except for an expanded clay product (Leca) sampled from a pig slurry storage. Despite significant variation......Storages with liquid manure (slurry) may develop a surface crust of particulate organic matter, or an artificial crust can be established. Slurry storages are net sources of atmospheric methane (CH4), but a potential for bacterial oxidation of CH4 in surface crusts was recently suggested in a study...... of experimental storages. The present study was conducted to investigate methanotrophic activity under practical storage conditions. Surface crusts from slurry storages at two pig farms and four dairy farms were sampled in late autumn. Mixed samples (0-4 cm depth) were used to determine changes in CH4, O-2 and CO...

  20. Methodical comparison of neutron depth probes and long-term soil moisture measurements on loess, sandy loess, and boulder clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neue, H.U.

    1980-01-01

    Three measuring instruments were tested: 0.05 mCi Cf-252, 100 mCi Am-241/Be, 500 mCi Am-241/Be. The advantages - measurement in undisturbed soil profiles, large depths of measurement, reproducibility of measurements in the same place over several years - and the disadvantages - radiation protection, resolution, variations of measured volume in dependence of moisture, background influences etc. - have been critically checked by experiment. In addition, annual soil moisture curves have been measured over two years by parallel use of the free probes on a loess, sandy loess, and boulder clay site. The results were compared and discussed with a view to the soil water dynamics of these sites. (orig./HP) [de

  1. Measurements of soil respiration and simple models dependent on moisture and temperature for an Amazonian southwest tropical forest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zanchi, F.B.; Rocha, Da H.R.; Freitas, De H.C.; Kruijt, B.; Waterloo, M.J.; Manzi, A.O.

    2009-01-01

    Soil respiration plays a significant role in the carbon cycle of Amazonian tropical forests, although in situ measurements have only been poorly reported and the dependence of soil moisture and soil temperature also weakly understood. This work investigates the temporal variability of soil

  2. Validation and downscaling of Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) soil moisture using ground measurements in the Western Cape, South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Moller, J

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available ) soil moisture product on METOP satellite (12.5 km and downscaled to 1 km resolution), against ground measurements of SWC taken with a Hydrosense II probe along transects of 360–820 m on agricultural and natural land at locations in the Western Cape...

  3. Calibration of a Neutron Hydroprobe for Moisture Measurements in Small-Diameter Steel-Cased Boreholes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, Anderson L.; Wittman, Richard S.

    2009-08-01

    Computation of soil moisture content from thermalized neutron counts for the T-Farm Interim cover requires a calibration relationship but none exists for 2-in tubes. A number of calibration options are available for the neutron probe, including vendor calibration, field calibration, but none of these methods were deemed appropriate for the configuration of interest. The objective of this work was to develop a calibration relation for converting neutron counts measured in 2-in access tubes to soil water content. The calibration method chosen for this study was a computational approach using the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP). Model calibration was performed using field measurements in the Hanford calibration models with 6-in access tubes, in air and in the probe shield. The bet-fit model relating known water content to measured neutron counts was an exponential model that was essentially equivalent to that currently being used for 6-in steel cased wells. The MCNP simulations successfully predicted the neutron count rate for the neutron shield and the three calibration models for which data were collected in the field. However, predictions for air were about 65% lower than the measured counts . This discrepancy can be attributed to uncertainties in the configuration used for the air measurements. MCNP-simulated counts for the physical models were essentially equal to the measured counts with values. Accurate prediction of the response in 6-in casings in the three calibration models was motivation to predict the response in 2-in access tubes. Simulations were performed for six of the seven calibration models as well as 4 virtual models with the entire set covering a moisture range of 0 to 40%. Predicted counts for the calibration models with 2-in access tubes were 40 to 50% higher than in the 6-inch tubes. Predicted counts for water were about 60% higher in the 2-in tube than in the 6-in tube. The discrepancy between the 2-in and 6-in tube can be

  4. Can we use Electrical Resistivity Tomography to measure root zone moisture dynamics in fields with multiple crops?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garre, S.; Coteur, I.; Wongleecharoen, C.; Diels, J.; Vanderborght, J.

    2012-12-01

    Agriculture on shallow or steep soils in the humid tropics often leads to low resource use efficiency. Contour hedgerow intercropping systems have been proposed to reduce run-off and control soil erosion. However, competition for water and nutrients between crops and associated hedgerows may reduce the overall performance of contour hedgerow systems. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is a valuable technique to assess the distribution and dynamics of soil moisture non-invasively. Root water uptake is a spatially variable and small-scale process, which requires at least decimeter resolution and a high sensitivity in order to be able to monitor changes in time and space. Careful experimental design is of uttermost importance in order to maximize the information content of the ERT survey and to gain insights in the possibilities and limitations of the survey. Virtual experiments in combination with absolute and spatial performance measures provide a way to optimize the information that can be retrieved from an ERT experiment. We used this approach to identify a suitable measurement methodology to monitor water fluxes in a contour hedgerow intercropping system in Ratchaburi province, Thailand. The virtual experiment showed that there are important differences between the tested measurement configurations. We saw that the optimal ERT array was capable of recognizing distinct water depletion zones under the different crops. However, sharp contrasts in the 1-D water depletion profile are smoothened. ERT measurements conducted in Thailand showed that the soils of our experimental plots were very heterogeneous both along the slope as with depth. This observation highlighted some constraints of the ERT method for soil moisture monitoring in the field, such as the difficulty to define a relationship between electrical conductivity and soil moisture in very heterogeneous soils. Nevertheless, the data indeed revealed contrasting water depletion patterns under monocropping

  5. Reconciling Land-Ocean Moisture Transport Variability in Reanalyses with P-ET in Observationally-Driven Land Surface Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Franklin R.; Bosilovich, Michael G.; Roberts, Jason B.

    2016-01-01

    Vertically integrated atmospheric moisture transport from ocean to land [vertically integrated atmospheric moisture flux convergence (VMFC)] is a dynamic component of the global climate system but remains problematic in atmospheric reanalyses, with current estimates having significant multidecadal global trends differing even in sign. Continual evolution of the global observing system, particularly stepwise improvements in satellite observations, has introduced discrete changes in the ability of data assimilation to correct systematic model biases, manifesting as nonphysical variability. Land surface models (LSMs) forced with observed precipitation P and near-surface meteorology and radiation provide estimates of evapotranspiration (ET). Since variability of atmospheric moisture storage is small on interannual and longer time scales, VMFC equals P minus ET is a good approximation and LSMs can provide an alternative estimate. However, heterogeneous density of rain gauge coverage, especially the sparse coverage over tropical continents, remains a serious concern. Rotated principal component analysis (RPCA) with prefiltering of VMFC to isolate the artificial variability is used to investigate artifacts in five reanalysis systems. This procedure, although ad hoc, enables useful VMFC corrections over global land. The P minus ET estimates from seven different LSMs are evaluated and subsequently used to confirm the efficacy of the RPCA-based adjustments. Global VMFC trends over the period 1979-2012 ranging from 0.07 to minus 0.03 millimeters per day per decade are reduced by the adjustments to 0.016 millimeters per day per decade, much closer to the LSM P minus ET estimate (0.007 millimeters per day per decade). Neither is significant at the 90 percent level. ENSO (El Nino-Southern Oscillation)-related modulation of VMFC and P minus ET remains the largest global interannual signal, with mean LSM and adjusted reanalysis time series correlating at 0.86.

  6. Surface charge measurement by the Pockels effect

    CERN Document Server

    Sam, Y L

    2001-01-01

    have been observed by applying both impulse and AC voltages to a needle electrode in direct contact with the BSO. AC surface discharge behaviour of polymeric materials bonded to the BSO has also been investigated. The effect of the surrounding environment has been experimentally examined by placing the cell inside a vacuum chamber. Surface charge measurements have been made at various atmospheric pressures. The effect of an electro-negative gas (Sulphur Hexafluoride) on the surface charge distribution has also been investigated. This thesis is concerned with the design and development of a surface charge measurement system using Pockels effect. The measurement of surface charge is important in determining the electrical performance of high voltage insulation materials. The method proposed allows on-line measurement of charge and can generate two-dimensional images that represent the charge behaviour on the surface of the material under test. The measurement system is optical and uses a Pockels crystal as the ...

  7. Soil moisture characterization of the Valencia anchor station. Ground, aircraft measurements and simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez-Baeza, E; Antolin, M C; Balling, Jan E.

    2009-01-01

    , soil type, lithology, geology, elevation, slope and vegetation cover conditions. Complementary to the ground measurements, flight operations were performed over this control area using the Helsinki University of Technology TKK Short Skyvan research aircraft which contained onboard a payload constituted......). Together with the ground SM measurements, other ground and meteorological measurements from the VAS area, kindly provided by other institutions, are currently been used to simulate passive microwave brightness temperature to obtain satellite "match ups" for validation purposes and to test the retrieval...... algorithms. The spatialization of the ground measurements up to a SMOS pixel is carried out by using the SURFace EXternalisee (SURFEX) model from Meteo France. Output data, particularly SM, are then used to simulate L-band surface emission through the use of the L-MEB (L-band Microwave Emission...

  8. LS3MIP (v1.0) Contribution to CMIP6: The Land Surface, Snow and Soil Moisture Model Intercomparison Project Aims, Setup and Expected Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Den Hurk, Bart; Kim, Hyungjun; Krinner, Gerhard; Seneviratne, Sonia I.; Derksen, Chris; Oki, Taikan; Douville, Herve; Colin, Jeanne; Ducharne, Agnes; Cheruy, Frederique; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Land Surface, Snow and Soil Moisture Model Intercomparison Project (LS3MIP) is designed to provide a comprehensive assessment of land surface, snow, and soil moisture feedbacks on climate variability and climate change, and to diagnose systematic biases in the land modules of current Earth System Models (ESMs). The solid and liquid water stored at the land surface has a large influence on the regional climate, its variability and predictability, including effects on the energy, water and carbon cycles. Notably, snow and soil moisture affect surface radiation and flux partitioning properties, moisture storage and land surface memory. They both strongly affect atmospheric conditions, in particular surface air temperature and precipitation, but also large-scale circulation patterns. However, models show divergent responses and representations of these feedbacks as well as systematic biases in the underlying processes. LS3MIP will provide the means to quantify the associated uncertainties and better constrain climate change projections, which is of particular interest for highly vulnerable regions (densely populated areas, agricultural regions, the Arctic, semi-arid and other sensitive terrestrial ecosystems).The experiments are subdivided in two components, the first addressing systematic land biases in offline mode (LMIP, building upon the 3rd phase of Global Soil Wetness Project; GSWP3) and the second addressing land feedbacks attributed to soil moisture and snow in an integrated framework (LFMIP, building upon the GLACE-CMIP blueprint).

  9. Field and laboratory calibration of neutron probes for soil moisture measurements on a deep loess chernozem soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaecke, B.; Schaecke, E.

    1979-01-01

    In the case of a varying profile structure it is necessary to use different calibration curves and adequate correction factors, respectively. The bulk density of the soil had the greatest influence on the calibration. An increase in bulk density by 0.2 g/cm 3 at a clay content of 18% resulted in an apparent increase in the values of moisture measurements by 1.5 to 2.0% of the volume of water. In naturally stratified soil the humus content of the chernozem horizon, being 3% higher than that of the underlying loess horizon, was found to influence the measuring results obtained by the probe. The calibration curves determined for chernozem and loess horizons in the laboratory agreed well with those obtained in the field. The measured values read from the probe and the gravimetrically determined values of the soil moisture were of great significance in all measured depths of the profile. (author)

  10. Further studies on tritium tracing of soil moisture for rainwater infiltration measurements in Gatton, Queensland, Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dharmasiri, J.K.

    1998-01-01

    Further to preliminary results presented at the last SPERA 96 conference in Darwin, final results based on two years of measurements are summarised here. The tritium tracer was injected in April 1995 at 10 sites scattered in Gatton experimental area (70 km 2 ) and first sampled in April 1996. The second soil sampling was carried out in May 1997, after a major flood event that took place in May 1996. The sites were named as G 1-10 and the site G-8 was located in Forest Hill to the south of the study area. The vertical tracer distribution was essentially Gaussian in shape indicating piston-type moisture movement. Within the study area the tracer peak movement during 1995-97 was 5-30 cm from the initial depth of injection at 70 cm. The total infiltration ranged from 21-177 mm within two years. The site G 8 located in Forest Hill showed 201 mm of infiltration, with a skewed tracer distribution. The errors of measurement are large due to limitation in depth resolution (10 cm and 5 cm in 1996 and 1997 respectively), rendering the lower infiltration value insignificant. Yet, very small tracer movement in two years clearly indicated the problem of poor recharge through top soil layers to the alluvial aquifer. There are however other sources of recharge from creeks and sandstone outcrops as identified using stable isotopes. The Crowley Vale irrigation area (7 km 2 ) has already exhausted its groundwater by the middle of 1997, having little or no impact after the major flood in May 1996

  11. Updated global soil map for the Weather Research and Forecasting model and soil moisture initialization for the Noah land surface model

    Science.gov (United States)

    DY, C. Y.; Fung, J. C. H.

    2016-08-01

    A meteorological model requires accurate initial conditions and boundary conditions to obtain realistic numerical weather predictions. The land surface controls the surface heat and moisture exchanges, which can be determined by the physical properties of the soil and soil state variables, subsequently exerting an effect on the boundary layer meteorology. The initial and boundary conditions of soil moisture are currently obtained via National Centers for Environmental Prediction FNL (Final) Operational Global Analysis data, which are collected operationally in 1° by 1° resolutions every 6 h. Another input to the model is the soil map generated by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations - United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (FAO-UNESCO) soil database, which combines several soil surveys from around the world. Both soil moisture from the FNL analysis data and the default soil map lack accuracy and feature coarse resolutions, particularly for certain areas of China. In this study, we update the global soil map with data from Beijing Normal University in 1 km by 1 km grids and propose an alternative method of soil moisture initialization. Simulations of the Weather Research and Forecasting model show that spinning-up the soil moisture improves near-surface temperature and relative humidity prediction using different types of soil moisture initialization. Explanations of that improvement and improvement of the planetary boundary layer height in performing process analysis are provided.

  12. Influence of heat and moisture exchanger use on measurements performed with manovacuometer and respirometer in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucato, Jeanette Janaina Jaber; Nogueira da Cunha, Thiago Marraccini; Rocha, Sara Solange Oliveira Costa; Palmieri de Carvalho, Fernanda Maria; Botega, Daniele Cristina; Torquato, Jamili Anbar; Gimenes, Ana Cristina; Righetti, Renato Fraga

    2015-01-01

    The use of evaluation tools such as the manovacuometer and respirometer is frequent and disinfection is usually limited to the external surfaces, which is insufficient and raises concerns because of the potential spread of infectious diseases. Hydrophobic heat and moisture exchangers (HME) are used in mechanical ventilation and have microbiological filters, which can possibly reduce contamination, increasing the safety of related procedures. It is unknown, however, if the addition of an exchanger affects the measurements obtained. Aim of this study was to verify if the use of an HME interferes in maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures assessed using the manovacuometer and vital capacity evaluated using the respirometer in healthy adults. A controlled transversal trial was carried out. Twenty healthy young adults were included in the study. Vital capacity by respirometer and, maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) and maximal expiratory pressure (MEP) were assessed with and without the use of HME. No significant difference was found between the values pre and post HME use in vital capacity measurements: (3878.8 ± 202.2 mL vs. 3925.5 ± 206.0 mL, p = 0.116) and the respiratory muscle strength measurements: MIP (-99.0 ± 8.9 vs -95.5 ± 9.0 cm H2O, p = 0.149) and MEP (92.5 ± 7.5 vs 92.5 ± 7.7 cm H2O, p = 1.0) respectively. We conclude that the use of HME does not modify the lung volumes or respiratory muscle strength, and can be used in order to reduce the occurrence of pulmonary infection.

  13. Development of a CPT deployed probe for in situ measurement of volumetric soil moisture content and electrical resistivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinn, J.D. II; Timian, D.A.; Morey, R.M. [Applied Research Associates, Inc., South Royalton, VT (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The authors have developed a Cone Penetration Testing (CPT) probe which measures both the resistivity and the dielectric constant of the soil. This method is innovative because the water relaxation effects due to interfacial polarization are greatly reduced. This effect has plagued previous researchers and resulted in inaccurate measurements of the soil dielectric constant. The design of our sensors consists of four concentric rings spaced along the penetration rod with insulators in between. The outer two rings determine the soil resistivity; the inner two rings measure the capacitance using a modified Clapp high-frequency transistor oscillator operating at 100 MHz. The CPT measured dielectric constant can be used to calculate the soil volumetric moisture content by directly calibrating to the soil of interest. A more general equation, such as Topp`s Universal Equation, can determine the volumetric moisture content. Details of the sensor design approach along with results from an extensive field evaluation at a DOE site follow. The field data presents soil moisture and resistivity measurements at three different sites on a DOE facility. These sites included measurements in the vadose and saturated zones. An extensive independent laboratory study was conducted to verify the accuracy and precision of the sensor.

  14. Contact area measurements on structured surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kücükyildiz, Ömer Can; Jensen, Sebastian Hoppe Nesgaard; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    In connection with the use of brass specimens featuring structured surfaces in a tribology test, an algorithm was developed for automatic measurement of the contact area by optical means.......In connection with the use of brass specimens featuring structured surfaces in a tribology test, an algorithm was developed for automatic measurement of the contact area by optical means....

  15. A non-equilibrium model for soil heating and moisture transport during extreme surface heating: The soil (heat-moisture-vapor) HMV-Model Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    William Massman

    2015-01-01

    Increased use of prescribed fire by land managers and the increasing likelihood of wildfires due to climate change require an improved modeling capability of extreme heating of soils during fires. This issue is addressed here by developing and testing the soil (heat-moisture-vapor) HMVmodel, a 1-D (one-dimensional) non-equilibrium (liquid- vapor phase change)...

  16. A HIGH SENSITIVE MICROWAVE MEASURING DEVICE OF THE MOISTURE CONTENT IN THE NON-POLAR DIELECTRIC LIQUIDS BASED ON AN INHOMOGENEOUS STEP COAXIAL RESONATOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Rudakov

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Objective is to create a moisture meter for non-polar liquid dielectrics with low volumetric moisture content of more than 10‑3 %. Methodology. Moisture measuring is based on dielcometric method. It is implemented as a resonant method of determining a capacitance measuring transducer. Measuring transducer capacitive type has a working and parasitic capacitance. It was suggested the definition of moisture on four of resonance frequencies: when the measuring transducer is turned off, one by one filled with air, «dry» and investigated liquid, to determine the parasitic capacitance of the measuring generator, and the parasitic capacitance of the measuring transducer and humidity. Measurement frequency was increased up to microwave range to increase the sensitivity. Measuring transducer with distributed parameters representing a step heterogeneous coaxial resonator is used by. This measuring transducer has a zero stray capacitance, because the potential electrode has a galvanic connection with an external coaxial electrode. Inductive ties loop is used to neglect parasitic capacitance of the measuring generator, and to increase the quality factor of the system. Measuring moisture is reduced to measuring the two frequencies of resonance frequency and «dry» and investigated liquid. Resonant characteristics transducer in a step inhomogeneous coaxial resonator have been investigated to determine the quality factor of filled with air and transformer oil, and experiments to measure the moisture content in transformer oil have been conducted. Results. Measuring transducer of distributed type is developed and researched – it is step inhomogeneous coaxial resonator. It has a smaller geometric length and larger scatter of the first and second resonant frequencies. Expression is obtained for determination of moisture on the basis of two resonant frequencies. The formula of the two frequencies to determine the moisture is correct. Resonant

  17. Assimilation of the ESA CCI Soil Moisture ACTIVE and PASSIVE Product into the SURFEX Land Surface Model using the Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blyverket, J.; Hamer, P.; Bertino, L.; Lahoz, W. A.

    2017-12-01

    The European Space Agency Climate Change Initiative for soil moisture (ESA CCI SM) was initiated in 2012 for a period of six years, the objective for this period was to produce the most complete and consistent global soil moisture data record based on both active and passive sensors. The ESA CCI SM products consist of three surface soil moisture datasets: The ACTIVE product and the PASSIVE product were created by fusing scatterometer and radiometer soil moisture data, respectively. The COMBINED product is a blended product based on the former two datasets. In this study we assimilate globally both the ACTIVE and PASSIVE product at a 25 km spatial resolution. The different satellite platforms have different overpass times, an observation is mapped to the hours 00.00, 06.00, 12.00 or 18.00 if it falls within a 3 hour window centred at these times. We use the SURFEX land surface model with the ISBA diffusion scheme for the soil hydrology. For the assimilation routine we apply the Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter (ETKF). The land surface model is driven by perturbed MERRA-2 atmospheric forcing data, which has a temporal resolution of one hour and is mapped to the SURFEX model grid. Bias between the land surface model and the ESA CCI product is removed by cumulative distribution function (CDF) matching. This work is a step towards creating a global root zone soil moisture product from the most comprehensive satellite surface soil moisture product available. As a first step we consider the period from 2010 - 2016. This allows for comparison against other global root zone soil moisture products (SMAP Level 4, which is independent of the ESA CCI SM product).

  18. Uncertainty of Deardorff’s soil moisture model based on continuous TDR measurements for sandy loam soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandyk Andrzej

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge on soil moisture is indispensable for a range of hydrological models, since it exerts a considerable influence on runoff conditions. Proper tools are nowadays applied in order to gain in-sight into soil moisture status, especially of uppermost soil layers, which are prone to weather changes and land use practices. In order to establish relationships between meteorological conditions and topsoil moisture, a simple model would be required, characterized by low computational effort, simple structure and low number of identified and calibrated parameters. We demonstrated, that existing model for shallow soils, considering mass exchange between two layers (the upper and the lower, as well as with the atmosphere and subsoil, worked well for sandy loam with deep ground water table in Warsaw conurbation. GLUE (Generalized Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation linked with GSA (Global Sensitivity Analysis provided for final determination of parameter values and model confidence ranges. Including the uncertainty in a model structure, caused that the median soil moisture solution of the GLUE was shifted from the one optimal in deterministic sense. From the point of view of practical model application, the main shortcoming were the underestimated water exchange rates between the lower soil layer (ranging from the depth of 0.1 to 0.2 m below ground level and subsoil. General model quality was found to be satisfactory and promising for its utilization for establishing measures to regain retention in urbanized conditions.

  19. Using multi-temporal Sentinal-2 imagery for mapping Andean meadows and surface soil moisture in central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, Rocio; Fassnacht, Fabian E.; Lopatin, Javier; Hernández, H. Jaime

    2017-04-01

    In the Rio Maipo watershed, situated in central Chile, mining activities are the main factor impacting Andean meadows, through the consumption and exploitation of water and land. As wetlands are vulnerable and particularly susceptible to changes of water supply, alterations and modifications in the hydrological regime have direct effects on vegetation cover. In order to better understand this ecosystem, as well as for conservation planning and resource management, there is a strong need for spatially explicit and update wetland ecosystem assessment. However, there is a lack of baseline dataset and state of knowledge on these habitats. During the last decades remote sensing as evolve as an efficient tool for mapping and monitoring wetland ecosystems at different temporal and spatial scales. Accurate and up-to-date mapping and assessment of wetlands allows monitoring the changes in wetlands' vegetation due to natural and/or anthropogenic disturbances. New freely available spaceborne imagery, like Sentinel-2, supports long term monitoring on a high spatial resolution (10 m). The main aim of this work was to evaluate the potential of multi-temporal Sentinel-2 images in the detection and monitoring of water status of Andean meadows with anthropic disturbances. For these tasks we used bias support vector machines (BSVM), a one-class classifier to map and monitor meadow areas, and the support vector machines regression (SVMR) to estimate surface soil moisture (i.e. top 30 cm). BSVM produces probability maps of the class of interest, were only data of this class is needed as input of the model. One-class classifiers are well suited for situations where the numbers of the training samples from the class of interest is small and/or cover a small fraction of the area to be classified. We found that BSVM was capable to classify the meadow areas with an overall accuracy between 65% and 96%. Meanwhile, surface soil moisture prediction using SVMR reached r2 values between 0.2 and

  20. Surface texture measurement for dental wear applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, R. S.; Mullen, F.; Bartlett, D. W.

    2015-06-01

    The application of surface topography measurement and characterization within dental materials science is highly active and rapidly developing, in line with many modern industries. Surface measurement and structuring is used extensively within oral and dental science to optimize the optical, tribological and biological performance of natural and biomimetic dental materials. Although there has historically been little standardization in the use and reporting of surface metrology instrumentation and software, the dental industry is beginning to adopt modern areal measurement and characterization techniques, especially as the dental industry is increasingly adopting digital impressioning techniques in order to leverage CAD/CAM technologies for the design and construction of dental restorations. As dental treatment becomes increasingly digitized and reliant on advanced technologies such as dental implants, wider adoption of standardized surface topography and characterization techniques will become evermore essential. The dental research community welcomes the advances that are being made in surface topography measurement science towards realizing this ultimate goal.

  1. Technique for measuring very high surface velocities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maron, Y.

    1977-01-01

    An interferometric technique for measuring displacements of surfaces moving at velocities in the range of a few millimeters per microsecond is presented. The Doppler shift of frequency of light scattered from such surfaces is too high to be detectable by known devices. The present technique is based upon monitoring the signal resulting from the interference between two beams reflected from the surface at different incidence angles. Measurement systems for specularly as well as diffusely reflecting surfaces are described. Light source with very modest temporal coherence delivering about 100 mw power is required. The accuracy of the technique is discussed. (author)

  2. Do we need soil moisture measurements in the vegetation - environment studies in wetlands?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hájek, Michal; Hájková, Petra; Kočí, M.; Jiroušek, M.; Mikulášková, E.; Kintrová, K.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 1 (2013), s. 127-137 ISSN 1100-9233 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/08/0389 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : wetlands * soil moisture * water level Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 3.372, year: 2013

  3. Measuring the Moisture Content of Green Wood Using Time Domain Reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurence Schimleck; Kim Love-Myers; Joe Sanders; Heath Raybon; Richard Daniels; Jerry Mahon; Edward Andrews; Erik Schilling

    2011-01-01

    The responsible usage of water by facilities that rely on wet log storage in the southern United States has become an issue of great importance as restrictions on water usage have grown in recent years. In order to learn about the dynamics of moisture content in wet-stored logs over time, it is necessary to conduct continuous monitoring of log piles. Time domain...

  4. An assessment of three measures of long-term moisture deficiency before critical fire periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald A. Haines; Von J. Johnson; William A. Main

    1976-01-01

    Values of the Palmer Drought Index, the Keetch-Byram Drought Index, and a Buildup Index are calculated for 26 critical fires situations in the north-central and north-eastern states. The paper examines the response characteristics of these indexes, representative of different moisture regimes, relative to fire danger.

  5. Measurement of Moisture Content in Seeds of Some North American Hardwoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    F. T. Bonner

    1972-01-01

    Current International rules (International Seed Testing Association, 1966) for determination of moisture content specify the air-oven method at 105 °C for all tree seeds except those of Ables, Cedrus. Fagus, Picea, and Tsuga, for which the toluene distillation method must be used. Calibration of air-oven methods against a good reference method, such as toluene...

  6. Effects of soil moisture content on reflectance anisotropy - Laboratory goniometer measurements and RPV model inversions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosjen, P.P.J.; Bartholomeus, H.M.; Clevers, J.G.P.W.

    2015-01-01

    Optical methods to study soil moisture content (SMC) are often based on empirically or physically based models that relate changes in reflectance intensity to SMC. The effects of SMC on the reflectance anisotropy, however, have not received much attention. In this paper the effects of SMC on the

  7. Surface texture measurement for additive manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triantaphyllou, Andrew; Tomita, Ben; Milne, Katherine A; Giusca, Claudiu L; Macaulay, Gavin D; Roerig, Felix; Hoebel, Matthias; Leach, Richard K

    2015-01-01

    The surface texture of additively manufactured metallic surfaces made by powder bed methods is affected by a number of factors, including the powder’s particle size distribution, the effect of the heat source, the thickness of the printed layers, the angle of the surface relative to the horizontal build bed and the effect of any post processing/finishing. The aim of the research reported here is to understand the way these surfaces should be measured in order to characterise them. In published research to date, the surface texture is generally reported as an Ra value, measured across the lay. The appropriateness of this method for such surfaces is investigated here. A preliminary investigation was carried out on two additive manufacturing processes—selective laser melting (SLM) and electron beam melting (EBM)—focusing on the effect of build angle and post processing. The surfaces were measured using both tactile and optical methods and a range of profile and areal parameters were reported. Test coupons were manufactured at four angles relative to the horizontal plane of the powder bed using both SLM and EBM. The effect of lay—caused by the layered nature of the manufacturing process—was investigated, as was the required sample area for optical measurements. The surfaces were also measured before and after grit blasting. (paper)

  8. Constructing invariant fairness measures for surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravesen, Jens; Ungstrup, Michael

    2002-01-01

    The paper proposes a rational method to derive fairness measures for surfaces. It works in cases where isophotes, reflection lines, planar intersection curves, or other curves are used to judge the fairness of the surface. The surface fairness measure is derived by demanding that all the given cu...... of curves. Six basic third order invariants by which the fairing measures can be expressed are defined. Furthermore, the geometry of a plane intersection curve is studied, and the variation of the total, the normal, and the geodesic curvature and the geodesic torsion is determined....

  9. Using machine learning to produce near surface soil moisture estimates from deeper in situ records at U.S. Climate Reference Network (USCRN) locations: Analysis and applications to AMSR-E satellite validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coopersmith, Evan J.; Cosh, Michael H.; Bell, Jesse E.; Boyles, Ryan

    2016-12-01

    Surface soil moisture is a critical parameter for understanding the energy flux at the land atmosphere boundary. Weather modeling, climate prediction, and remote sensing validation are some of the applications for surface soil moisture information. The most common in situ measurement for these purposes are sensors that are installed at depths of approximately 5 cm. There are however, sensor technologies and network designs that do not provide an estimate at this depth. If soil moisture estimates at deeper depths could be extrapolated to the near surface, in situ networks providing estimates at other depths would see their values enhanced. Soil moisture sensors from the U.S. Climate Reference Network (USCRN) were used to generate models of 5 cm soil moisture, with 10 cm soil moisture measurements and antecedent precipitation as inputs, via machine learning techniques. Validation was conducted with the available, in situ, 5 cm resources. It was shown that a 5 cm estimate, which was extrapolated from a 10 cm sensor and antecedent local precipitation, produced a root-mean-squared-error (RMSE) of 0.0215 m3/m3. Next, these machine-learning-generated 5 cm estimates were also compared to AMSR-E estimates at these locations. These results were then compared with the performance of the actual in situ readings against the AMSR-E data. The machine learning estimates at 5 cm produced an RMSE of approximately 0.03 m3/m3 when an optimized gain and offset were applied. This is necessary considering the performance of AMSR-E in locations characterized by high vegetation water contents, which are present across North Carolina. Lastly, the application of this extrapolation technique is applied to the ECONet in North Carolina, which provides a 10 cm depth measurement as its shallowest soil moisture estimate. A raw RMSE of 0.028 m3/m3 was achieved, and with a linear gain and offset applied at each ECONet site, an RMSE of 0.013 m3/m3 was possible.

  10. Proposal for a New Noncontact Method for Measuring Tongue Moisture to Assist in Tongue Diagnosis and Development of the Tongue Image Analyzing System, Which Can Separately Record the Gloss Components of the Tongue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiya Nakaguchi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tongue diagnosis is a noninvasive diagnosis and is traditionally one of the most important tools for physicians who practice Kampo (traditional Japanese medicine. However, it is a subjective process, and its results can depend on the experience of the physician performing it. Previous studies have reported how to measure and evaluate the shape and color of the tongue objectively. Therefore, this study focused on the glossy component in order to quantify tongue moisture in tongue diagnosis. We hypothesized that moisture appears as a gloss in captured images and measured the amount of water on the tongue surface in 13 subjects. The results showed a high correlation between the degree of gloss and the amount of water on the tongue surface and suggested that the moisture on the tongue can be estimated by the degree of gloss in a captured image. Because the moisture level on the tongue changes during the course of taking photos, it became clear that we had to wait at least 3 minutes between photos. Based on these results, we established the tongue image analyzing system (TIAS, which can consistently record the gloss and color of the tongue surface simultaneously.

  11. Proposal for a New Noncontact Method for Measuring Tongue Moisture to Assist in Tongue Diagnosis and Development of the Tongue Image Analyzing System, Which Can Separately Record the Gloss Components of the Tongue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Kanako; Ishikawa, Yuya; Tsumura, Norimichi; Ueda, Keigo; Nagamine, Koichi; Namiki, Takao; Miyake, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    Tongue diagnosis is a noninvasive diagnosis and is traditionally one of the most important tools for physicians who practice Kampo (traditional Japanese) medicine. However, it is a subjective process, and its results can depend on the experience of the physician performing it. Previous studies have reported how to measure and evaluate the shape and color of the tongue objectively. Therefore, this study focused on the glossy component in order to quantify tongue moisture in tongue diagnosis. We hypothesized that moisture appears as a gloss in captured images and measured the amount of water on the tongue surface in 13 subjects. The results showed a high correlation between the degree of gloss and the amount of water on the tongue surface and suggested that the moisture on the tongue can be estimated by the degree of gloss in a captured image. Because the moisture level on the tongue changes during the course of taking photos, it became clear that we had to wait at least 3 minutes between photos. Based on these results, we established the tongue image analyzing system (TIAS), which can consistently record the gloss and color of the tongue surface simultaneously. PMID:25699260

  12. Moisture buffering phenomenon and its impact on building energy consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Mingjie; Qin, Menghao; Rode, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    Moisture buffering is the ability of surface materials in the indoor environment to moderate the indoor humidity variations through adsorption or desorption. Materials with high moisture buffering capacity could be used to passively control the indoor moisture condition and consequently improve...... the indoor environmental quality and reduce the latent heat load of buildings. In order to characterize the moisture buffering ability of materials, the basic concept of moisture buffer value (MBV) is adopted. The paper first proposes a new mathematical expression of basic MBV, and then introduces...... a theoretical correction factor that could be used together with the MBV to calculate the moisture uptake/release by hygroscopic materials exposed to different types of humidity variations. Secondly, a simplified two-bottle test method is proposed to measure the MBV in the present study. The impact of moisture...

  13. Surface tension measurements with a smartphone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goy, Nicolas-Alexandre; Denis, Zakari; Lavaud, Maxime; Grolleau, Adrian; Dufour, Nicolas; Deblais, Antoine; Delabre, Ulysse

    2017-11-01

    Smartphones are increasingly used in higher education and at university in mechanics, acoustics, and even thermodynamics as they offer a unique way to do simple science experiments. In this article, we show how smartphones can be used in fluid mechanics to measure surface tension of various liquids, which could help students understand the concept of surface tension through simple experiments.

  14. Constructing Invariant Fairness Measures for Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravesen, Jens; Ungstrup, Michael

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a general method which from an invariant curve fairness measure constructs an invariant surface fairness measure. Besides the curve fairness measure one only needs a class of curves on the surface for which one wants to apply the curve measure. The surface measure at a point...... variation.The method is extended to the case where one considers, not the fairness of one curve, but the fairness of a one parameter family of curves. Such a family is generated by the flow of a vector field, orthogonal to the curves. The first, respectively the second order derivative along the curve...... of the size of this vector field is used as the fairness measure on the family.Six basic 3rd order invariants satisfying two quadratic equations are defined. They form a complete set in the sense that any invariant 3rd order function can be written as a function of the six basic invariants together...

  15. AMSR2/GCOM-W1 surface soil moisture (LPRM) L3 1 day 10 km x 10 km ascending V001 (LPRM_AMSR2_DS_A_SOILM3) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — AMSR2/GCOM-W1 surface soil moisture (LPRM) L3 1 day 10 km x 10 km ascending V001 is a Level 3 (gridded) data set. Its land surface parameters, surface soil moisture,...

  16. Preparation of stable silica surfaces for surface forces measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Huai-Yin; Mizukami, Masashi; Kurihara, Kazue

    2017-09-01

    A surface forces apparatus (SFA) measures the forces between two surfaces as a function of the surface separation distance. It is regarded as an essential tool for studying the interactions between two surfaces. However, sample surfaces used for the conventional SFA measurements have been mostly limited to thin (ca. 2-3 μm) micas, which are coated with silver layers (ca. 50 nm) on their back, due to the requirement of the distance determination by transmission mode optical interferometry called FECO (fringes of equal chromatic order). The FECO method has the advantage of determining the absolute distance, so it should be important to increase the availability of samples other than mica, which is chemically nonreactive and also requires significant efforts for cleaving. Recently, silica sheets have been occasionally used in place of mica, which increases the possibility of surface modification. However, in this case, the silver layer side of the sheet is glued on a cylindrical quartz disc using epoxy resin, which is not stable in organic solvents and can be easily swollen or dissolved. The preparation of substrates more stable under severe conditions, such as in organic solvents, is necessary for extending application of the measurement. In this study, we report an easy method for preparing stable silica layers of ca. 2 μm in thickness deposited on gold layers (41 nm)/silica discs by sputtering, then annealed to enhance the stability. The obtained silica layers were stable and showed no swelling in organic solvents such as ethanol and toluene.

  17. WindSat/Coriolis surface soil moisture (LPRM) L3 1 day 25 km x 25 km daytime V001 (LPRM_WINDSAT_DY_SOILM3) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — WindSat/Coriolis surface soil moisture (LPRM) L3 1 day 25 km x 25 km daytime V001 is a Level 3 (gridded) data set. Its land surface parameters, surface soil...

  18. WindSat/Coriolis surface soil moisture (LPRM) L3 1 day 25 km x 25 km nighttime V001 (LPRM_WINDSAT_NT_SOILM3) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — WindSat/Coriolis surface soil moisture (LPRM) L3 1 day 25 km x 25 km nighttime V001 is a Level 3 (gridded) data set. Its land surface parameters, surface soil...

  19. Integrating soil moisture measurements into pasture growth forecasting in New Zealand's hill country

    OpenAIRE

    Hajdu, I; Yule, I; Bretherton, M; Singh, R; Grafton, M; Hedley, C

    2017-01-01

    Forecasting pasture growth in hill country landscapes requires information about soil water retention characteristics, which will help to quantify both water uptake, and its percolation below the root zone. Despite the importance of soil moisture data in pasture productivity predictions, current models use low-resolution estimates of water input into their soil water balance equations and plant growth simulations. As a result, they frequently fail to capture the spatial and temporal variabili...

  20. Influence of soil moisture content on surface albedo and soil thermal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The interval of measurement can be varied from the order of minutes to hours and was kept as half an hour in this study. The sensors have been tested and calibrated at regular intervals and the linearity. Table 1. The measurement instruments (EMCON make) and quantities measured. Parameter/. Accuracy, variable. Range.

  1. Measurements of moisture content in wood fuels with dual energy x-ray; Maetning av fukt i biobraenslen med dubbelenergiroentgen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordell, Anders [Industriellt Utvecklingscentrum i Karlskoga, Karlskoga (Sweden); Vikterloef, K.J. [Oerebro Radiofysik AB, Oerebro (Sweden)

    2000-04-01

    Good methods enabling quick determination of moisture in wood fuels are lacking. A standardized method generally used by the biofuel industry means drying samples in furnaces during at least 16 hours. The idea of this work has been to investigate if x-ray technique can offer a superior alternative for fast moisture determination. Analysis with x-ray has many advantages. The x-rays go completely through the whole test specimen. Large samples or many sequential samples can rapidly be measured. The penetration is extraordinary good; all parts of the tested mass will be analyzed. The measurement relies on the absorption of gamma photons in the tested mass. The x-ray absorption is carried out deep down in the atoms and therefore is independent of the materials equation of state as temperature, grain size or molecule binding. The disadvantages of the method are the general anxiety which can be for gamma rays, the relative high cost for equipment and the fact that an x-ray tube will wear with time and needs replacement. The method used here for moisture measurement is known as dual energy x-ray. The test sample is simultaneously exposed to transmission of two separate x-ray energies. The two energies are absorbed differently by the sample. The ratio of the absorption in the two respective energies is calculated and from that conclusions on the composition of the material can be drawn. The equipment used in this test is a standard medical apparatus adapted for the study of human body composition. When instead used for measurements of moisture in wood material the discrimination signal is about half of that achieved in the normal medical case. Despite that, the signal has been good enough for giving satisfactory accuracy in the moisture estimation. A little more than sixty approved results are presented in the report comprehending ten different fuel types. The results are grouped into three main categories depending on fuel type, wood fuels, peat fuels and salix including

  2. Experimental Measurement of Diffusive Extinction Depth and Soil Moisture Gradients in Southwestern Saudi Arabian Dune Sand

    KAUST Repository

    Mughal, Iqra

    2013-05-01

    In arid lands, a major contribution to water loss is by soil water evaporation. Desert sand dunes in arid regions are devoid of runoff and have high rates of infiltration. Rainwater is commonly stored within them because of the low permeability soils in the underlying desert pavement. In such cases, moisture is confined in the sand dune below a depth, termed as the “extinction depth”, where it is protected from evaporation during long dry periods. Moreover, desert sand dunes have sparse vegetation, which results in low transpiration losses from the stored water. The water accumulated below the extinction depth of the sand dunes can be utilized for various purposes such as in irrigation to support desert agriculture. In this study, field experiments were conducted in Western Saudi Arabia to monitor the soil moisture gradients and determine the diffusive extinction depth of dune sand. The dune sand was saturated with water and was exposed to natural conditions (evaporation and precipitation). The decline of the water level in the sand column was continuously recorded using transducers and sensors installed at different depths monitored the temporal variation of temperature and moisture content within the sand. The hydrological simulator HYDRUS-1D was used to construct the vertical profiles of soil water content and temperature and the results obtained from HYDRUS-1D were compared to the gradients monitored by the sensors.

  3. Development of an Aquarius Soil Moisture Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindlish, R.; Jackson, T. J.; Zhao, T.; Cosh, M. H.

    2013-12-01

    Aquarius observations over land offer a new resource for measuring soil moisture from space. Our objective in this investigation is to exploit the large amount of land observations that Aquarius acquires and extend the mission scope to land applications through the retrieval of soil moisture. This research increases the value and impact of the Aquarius mission by including a broader scientific community, allowing the exploration of new algorithm approaches that exploit the active-passive observations, and will contribute to a better understanding of the Earth's climate and water cycle. The first stage of our Aquarius soil moisture research focused on the use of the radiometer data because of the extensive heritage that this type of observations has in soil moisture applications. The calibration of the Aquarius radiometer over the entire dynamic range is a key element for the successful implementation of the soil moisture algorithm. Results to date indicate that the Aquarius observations are well calibrated for ocean targets but have a warm bias over land. This bias needed to be addressed if the Aquarius observations are to be used in land applications. Our approach was to use the gain and offsets computed using the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) comparisons to adjust the Aquarius brightness temperatures. The Single Channel Algorithm (SCA) was implemented using the Aquarius observations. SCA is also the baseline algorithm for the SMAP radiometer-only soil moisture product. Aquarius radiometer observations from the three beams (after bias/gain modification) along with the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) surface temperature model forecast were then used to estimate soil moisture. Ancillary data inputs required for using the SCA are vegetation water content, land surface temperature, and several soil and vegetation parameters derived based on land cover. The spatial patterns of the soil moisture estimates are consistent with the climatology

  4. Estimating soil moisture using the Danish polarimetric SAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiankang, Ji; Thomsen, A.; Skriver, Henning

    1995-01-01

    The results of applying data from the Danish polarimetric SAR (EMISAR) to estimate soil moisture for bare fields are presented. Fully calibrated C-band SAR images for hh, vv and cross polarizations have been used in this study. The measured surface roughness data showed that classical roughness...... autocorrelation functions (Gaussian and Exponential) were not able to fit natural surfaces well. A Gauss-Exp hybrid model which agreed better with the measured data has been proposed. Theoretical surface scattering models (POM, IEM), as well as an empirical model for retrieval of soil moisture and surface rms...... height from coand cross-polarized ratio, have been examined, but the results are less satisfactory. As soil moisture response to backscattering coefficient σo is mainly coupled to surface roughness effect for bare fields, a bilinear model coupling volumetric soil moisture mv and surface rms height σ...

  5. Measuring Thermal Conductivity and Moisture Absorption of Cryo-Insulation Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Michael A.

    1998-01-01

    NASA is seeking to develop thermal insulation material systems suitable for withstanding both extremely high temperatures encountered during atmospheric re-entry heating and aero- braking maneuvers, as well as extremely low temperatures existing in liquid fuel storage tanks. Currently, materials used for the high temperature insulation or Thermal Protection System (TPS) are different from the low temperature, or cryogenic insulation. Dual purpose materials are necessary to the development of reusable launch vehicles (RLV). The present Space Shuttle (or Space Transportation System, STS) employs TPS materials on the orbiter and cryo-insulation materials on the large fuel tank slung under the orbiter. The expensive fuel tank is jettisoned just before orbit is achieved and it burns up while re-entering over the Indian Ocean. A truly completely reusable launch vehicle must store aR cryogenic fuel internally. The fuel tanks will be located close to the outer surface. In fact the outer skin of the craft will probably also serve as the fuel tank enclosure, as in jet airliners. During a normal launch the combined TPS/cryo-insulation system will serve only as a low temperature insulator, since aerodynamic heating is relatively minimal during ascent to orbit. During re-entry, the combined TPS/cryo-insulation system will serve only as a high temperature insulator, since all the cryogenic fuel will have been expended in orbit. However, in the event of an.aborted launch or a forced/emergency early re-entry, the tanks will still contain fuel, and the TPS/cryo-insulation will have to serve as both low and high temperature insulation. Also, on long duration missions, such as to Mars, very effective cryo-insulation materials are needed to reduce bod off of liquid propellants, thereby reducing necessary tankage volume, weight, and cost. The conventional approach to obtaining both low and high temperature insulation, such as is employed for the X-33 and X-34 spacecraft, is to use

  6. Ideal climatic conditions for condensation of atmospheric moisture on the plants’ surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prokhorov Alexey

    2015-12-01

    A study of the diversity of the plant adaptation mechanisms that contribute to lowering the surface temperature and the absorption of condensate will allow us in the future to carry out introduction, genetic modification or selection of plants with the most visible effect of lowering the temperature and the least dependence on insolation.

  7. Application of cold neutron radiography for freshness measurement of fruit and vegetables. Moisture content in chrysanthemum cut flower

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushima, U. [Ryukyu Univ., Faculty of Agriculture, Nishihara, Okinawa (Japan); Kawabata, Y. [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Institute; Horie, T. [Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2003-01-01

    Metabolism of crops is suppressed at a low temperature. Pre-cooling of the crops before a long term preservation is very valid for keeping their freshness. Vacuum pre-cooling is possible to decrease quickly the temperature of fruit and vegetables using the latent heat of moisture evaporation. Many cut flowers of chrysanthemum, however are pointed out to lose their freshness on long-haul transportation. The changes of moisture content in the chrysanthemum cut flowers before and after the vacuum pre-cooling are measured by cold neutron radiography. High contrast images of the cut flowers obtained by the cold neutron radiography are considered as the change of hydrogen contents in the cut flowers at before and after the vacuum pre-cooling. The degree of brightness in the images of cut flowers after the pre-cooling increases in comparison with the one before the pre-cooling. The water equivalent thickness of the leaves of chrysanthemum after the pre-cooling decreases in comparison with the one before the pre-cooling. The moisture contents evaporated from the injured leaves of chrysanthemum are shown clearly and quantitatively in the images of cold neutron radiography. (M. Suetake)

  8. Hydrologic model calibration using remotely sensed soil moisture and discharge measurements: The impact on predictions at gauged and ungauged locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Grimaldi, Stefania; Pauwels, Valentijn R. N.; Walker, Jeffrey P.

    2018-02-01

    The skill of hydrologic models, such as those used in operational flood prediction, is currently restricted by the availability of flow gauges and by the quality of the streamflow data used for calibration. The increased availability of remote sensing products provides the opportunity to further improve the model forecasting skill. A joint calibration scheme using streamflow measurements and remote sensing derived soil moisture values was examined and compared with a streamflow only calibration scheme. The efficacy of the two calibration schemes was tested in three modelling setups: 1) a lumped model; 2) a semi-distributed model with only the outlet gauge available for calibration; and 3) a semi-distributed model with multiple gauges available for calibration. The joint calibration scheme was found to slightly degrade the streamflow prediction at gauged sites during the calibration period compared with streamflow only calibration, but improvement was found at the same gauged sites during the independent validation period. A more consistent and statistically significant improvement was achieved at gauged sites not used in the calibration, due to the spatial information introduced by the remotely sensed soil moisture data. It was also found that the impact of using soil moisture for calibration tended to be stronger at the upstream and tributary sub-catchments than at the downstream sub-catchments.

  9. Temperature-moisture biases in ECMWF analyses based on clear sky longwave simulations constrained by SSMI and MSU measurements and comparisons to ERBE estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Byung-Ju

    1994-01-01

    Clear sky longwave radiation fluxes for the summer of 1988 and winter of 1989 have been simulated with a radiative transfer model that includes detailed treatment of atmospheric gas absorption. The input data to the model are humidity and temperature profiles from European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) analyses and surface temperature measurements from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project. To reduce the inherent uncertainties in humidity profiles, the ECMWF moisture fields have been adjusted, based on the climatological relationship between the moisture profile and total precipitable water (PW), so that the ECMWF PW is equal to that derived from Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSMI) data. SSMI and ECMWF PW patterns are generally similar, but significant differences in magnitude are found in the low latitudes, particularly over the subtropical oceans in the Southern Hemisphere. At the same time the tropospheric brightness temperature (T(sub B)) at 53.74 GHz has been computed using a microwave transfer model with ECMWF temperature and humidity fields as inputs. The comparison of computed T(sub B) with the Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) channel 2 T(sub B) revealed differences larger than 1.5 K over most of the oceans, suggesting that the ECMWF model atmosphere has a cold bias. Maximum biases greater than 3 K are found in low latitudes. After removing the bias from the ECMWF temperature field, a new set of temperature profiles yielding brightness temperature equal to MSU channel 2 T(sub B) has been obtained. Simulation results clearly demonstrate that inclusion of satellite estimates of PW and T(sub B) enhances the accuracy of the clear sky LW flux simulation, substantially reducing the differences from Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) estimates. Global averages indicate that the model-derived top-of-atmosphere (TOA) clear sky fluxes from the adjusted moisture and temperature profiles are in very good agreement with

  10. Correlative assessment of two predictive soil hydrology models with measured surface soil geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filley, T. R.; Li, M.; Le, P. V.; Kumar, P.; Yan, Q.; Papanicolaou, T.; Hou, T.; Wang, J.

    2017-12-01

    Spatial variability of surface soil organic matter on the hill slope scale is strongly influenced by topographic variation, especially in sloping terrains, where the coupled effects of soil moisture and texture are principle drivers for stabilization and decomposition. Topographic wetness index (TWI) calculations have shown reasonable correlations with soil organic carbon (SOC) content at broad spatial scales. However, due to inherent limitations of the "depression filling" approach, traditional TWI methods are generally ineffectual at capturing how small-scale micro-topographic ( 1m2) variation controls water dynamics and, subsequently, poorly correlate to surface soil biogeochmical measures. For TWI models to capture biogeochmical controls at the scales made possible by LiDAR data they need to incoportate the dynamic connection between soil moisture, local climate, edaphic properties, and micro-topographic variability. We present the results of a study correlating surface soil geochemical data across field sites in the Upper Sangamon River Basin (USRB) in Central Illinois, USA with a range of land use types to SAGA TWI and a newly developed Dynamic Topographic Wetness Index (DTWI). The DTWI for all field sites were obtained from the probability distribution of long-term stochastically modeled soil moisture in between wilting point (WP) and field capacity (FC) using Dhara modeling framework. Whereas the SAGA TWI showed no correlation with soil geochemistry measures across the site-specific data, the DTWI, within a site, was strongly, positively correlated with soil nitrogen, organic carbon, and δ15N at three of the six sites and revealed controls potentially related to connectivity to local drainage paths. Overall, this study indicates that soil moisture derived by DTWI may offer a significant improvement in generating estimates in long-term soil moisture, and subsequently, soil biogeochemistry dynamics at a crucial landscape scale.

  11. Measurement of Gas-Surface Accommodation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trott, W. M.; Rader, D. J.; Castañeda, J. N.; Torczynski, J. R.; Gallis, M. A.

    2008-12-01

    Thermal accommodation coefficients have been determined for a variety of gas-surface combinations using an experimental apparatus developed to measure both the pressure dependence of the conductive heat flux and the variation of gas density between parallel plates separated by a gas-filled gap. Effects of gas composition, surface roughness and surface contamination have been examined with this system, and the behavior of gas mixtures has also been explored. Results are discussed in comparison with previous parallel-plate experimental studies as well as numerical simulations.

  12. Local- and plot-scale measurements of soil moisture: time and spatially resolved field techniques in plain, hill and mountain sites

    OpenAIRE

    Raffelli, Giulia; Previati, Maurizio; Canone, Davide; Gisolo, Davide; Bevilacqua, Ivan; Capello, Giorgio; Biddoccu, Marcella; Cavallo, Eugenio; Deiana, Rita; Cassiani, Giorgio; Ferraris, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Soil moisture measurement is essential to validate hydrological models and satellite data. In this work we provide an overview of different local and plot scale soil moisture measurement techniques applied in three different conditions in terms of altitude, land use, and soil type, namely a plain, a mountain meadow and a hilly vineyard. The main goal is to provide a synoptic view of techniques supported by practical case studies to show that in such different conditions it is possible to esti...

  13. Interpreting the probe-surface interaction of surface measuring instruments, or what is a surface?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Richard; Weckenmann, Albert; Coupland, Jeremy; Hartmann, Wito

    2014-09-01

    When using dimensional measuring instruments it is assumed that there is a property of the object, which we call surface, that is present before during and after the measurement, i.e. the surface is a fundamental property of an object that can, by appropriate means, be used to measure geometry. This paper will attempt to show that the fundamental property ‘surface’ does not exist in any simple form and that all the information we can have about a surface is the measurement data, which will include measurement uncertainty. Measurement data, or what will be referred to as the measured surface, is all that really exists. In this paper the basic physical differences between mechanically, electromagnetically and electrically measured surfaces are highlighted and discussed and accompanied by measurement results on a roughness artefact.

  14. Interpreting the probe-surface interaction of surface measuring instruments, or what is a surface?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leach, Richard; Weckenmann, Albert; Hartmann, Wito; Coupland, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    When using dimensional measuring instruments it is assumed that there is a property of the object, which we call surface, that is present before during and after the measurement, i.e. the surface is a fundamental property of an object that can, by appropriate means, be used to measure geometry. This paper will attempt to show that the fundamental property ‘surface’ does not exist in any simple form and that all the information we can have about a surface is the measurement data, which will include measurement uncertainty. Measurement data, or what will be referred to as the measured surface, is all that really exists. In this paper the basic physical differences between mechanically, electromagnetically and electrically measured surfaces are highlighted and discussed and accompanied by measurement results on a roughness artefact. (paper)

  15. Mathematical modeling of the formation of sedimentary acid precipitation in the atmosphere in view of the evaporation of moisture from their surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gvozdyakov Dmitry

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of numeric simulation of the formation of sedimentary acid precipitation in the atmosphere taking into account the evaporation of moisture from their surfaces. It is established that the joint condensation of vapors of sulfuric anhydride and water vapor, given the flow of solar energy and the evaporation process significantly slows the growth of drops. The possibility of achieving the underlying surface by the formed sediments is analyzed.

  16. Microcomputerized neutron moisture gauge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shengkang; Mei Yu

    1987-01-01

    A microcomputerized neutron moisture gauge is introduced. This gauge consists of a neutron moisture sensor and instruments. It is developed from the neutron moisture gauge for concrete mixer. A TECH-81 single card microcomputer is used for count, computation and display. It has the function of computing compensated quantity of sand. It can acquire the data from several neutron sensors by the multichanneling sampling, therefore it can measure moisture values of sand in several hoppers simultaneously. The precision of the static state calibration curve is 0.24% wt. The error limits of the dynamic state check is < 0.50% wt

  17. The Impact of Moisture Intrusions from Lower Latitudes on Arctic Net Surface Radiative Fluxes and Sea Ice Growth in Fall and Winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegyi, B. M.; Taylor, P. C.

    2017-12-01

    The fall and winter seasons mark an important period in the evolution of Arctic sea ice, where energy is transferred away from the surface to facilitate the cooling of the surface and the growth of Arctic sea ice extent and thickness. Climatologically, these seasons are characterized by distinct periods of increased and reduced surface cooling and sea ice growth. Periods of reduced sea ice growth and surface cooling are associated with cloudy conditions and the transport of warm and moist air from lower latitudes, termed moisture intrusions. In the research presented, we explore the regional and Arctic-wide impact of moisture intrusions on the surface net radiative fluxes and sea ice growth for each fall and winter season from 2000/01-2015/16, utilizing MERRA2 reanalysis data, PIOMAS sea ice thickness data, and daily CERES radiative flux data. Consistent with previous studies, we find that positive anomalies in downwelling longwave surface flux are associated with increased temperature and water vapor content in the atmospheric column contained within the moisture intrusions. Interestingly, there are periods of increased downwelling LW flux anomalies that persist for one week or longer (i.e. longer than synoptic timescales) that are associated with persistent poleward flux of warm, moist air from lower latitudes. These persistent anomalies significantly reduce the regional growth of Arctic sea ice, and may in part explain the interannual variability of fall and winter Arctic sea ice growth.

  18. Surface resistivity measurement of plasma treated polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, D.; Pigram, P.J.; Liesegang, J.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Resistivity of insulators is an important property of materials used within the integrated circuit and packaging industries. The measurement of electrical resistivity of insulator materials in the surface region in this work is interpreted through observations of surface charge decay. A self-field driven and diffusion charge transport theory is used to model the process and resistivity values obtained computationally. Data for the charge decay of surface charged samples are collected by suspending them inside a coaxial cylinder connected to an electrometer. Samples used have been low density polyethylene LDPE sheet, both pristine and surface treated. Some samples have been treated by air plasma at low vacuum pressures for different periods of time; others have been washed in ethyl acetate and then plasma treated before the resistivity measurement. The sets of resistivity measurements form the various treatments are compared below. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has also been used to investigate and account for the observed variations in surface resistivity

  19. Effects of rain and soil moisture on background neutron measurements with the SuperMISTI neutron array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutcheson, Anthony L.; Grove, J. Eric; Mitchell, Lee J.; Phlips, Bernard F.; Woolf, Richard S.; Wulf, Eric A.

    2017-01-01

    Background neutron measurements were recorded for approximately two months at Camp Blanding, FL, with a large array of moderated gas proportional detectors and EJ-309 liquid scintillator detectors. The variations in the local neutron background rate were on the order of 10% and were observed to be primarily due to the changing level of moisture in the local soil due to precipitation and evaporation. Simple models were constructed based only on very basic climatological information and were able to reproduce the major variations in our measured neutron counts with time. These simple models compare favorably to the more-complex modified Penman equation developed for the California Irrigation Management Information System. An accurate model to describe local neutron background variations based on easily measured climatological data would be invaluable to provide corrections for stationary neutron monitors. - Highlights: • Variations in local neutron background due to soil moisture changes were observed. • Neutron rate variations were modeled using basic climatological data. • Statistical qualities of the models' predictions were compared.

  20. Surface Tension Measurements with a Smartphone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goy, Nicolas-Alexandre; Denis, Zakari; Lavaud, Maxime; Grolleau, Adrian; Dufour, Nicolas; Deblais, Antoine; Delabre, Ulysse

    2017-01-01

    Smartphones are increasingly used in higher education and at university in mechanics, acoustics, and even thermodynamics as they offer a unique way to do simple science experiments. In this article, we show how smartphones can be used in fluid mechanics to measure surface tension of various liquids, which could help students understand the concept…

  1. Surface charge measurement using an electrostatic probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crichton, George C; McAllister, Iain Wilson

    1998-01-01

    During the 1960s, the first measurements of charge on dielectric surfaces using simple electrostatic probes were reported. However it is only within the last 10 years that a proper understanding of the probe response has been developed. This situation arose as a consequence of the earlier studies...

  2. Optical measurement of surface roughness in manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodmann, R.

    1984-11-01

    The measuring system described here is based on the light-scattering method, and was developed by Optische Werke G. Rodenstock, Munich. It is especially useful for rapid non-contact monitoring of surface roughness in production-related areas. This paper outlines the differences between this system and the common stylus instrument, including descriptions of some applications in industry.

  3. NASA Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX 2002/03): Field measurements of snowpack properties and soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly Elder; Don Cline; Glen E. Liston; Richard Armstrong

    2009-01-01

    A field measurement program was undertaken as part NASA's Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX). Extensive snowpack and soil measurements were taken at field sites in Colorado over four study periods during the two study years (2002 and 2003). Measurements included snow depth, density, temperature, grain type and size, surface wetness, surface roughness, and...

  4. Surface dose extrapolation measurements with radiographic film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butson, Martin J; Cheung Tsang; Yu, Peter K N; Currie, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Assessment of surface dose delivered from radiotherapy x-ray beams for optimal results should be performed both inside and outside the prescribed treatment fields. An extrapolation technique can be used with radiographic film to perform surface dose assessment for open field high energy x-ray beams. This can produce an accurate two-dimensional map of surface dose if required. Results have shown that the surface percentage dose can be estimated within ±3% of parallel plate ionization chamber results with radiographic film using a series of film layers to produce an extrapolated result. Extrapolated percentage dose assessment for 10 cm, 20 cm and 30 cm square fields was estimated to be 15% ± 2%, 29% ± 3% and 38% ± 3% at the central axis and relatively uniform across the treatment field. The corresponding parallel plate ionization chamber measurements are 16%, 27% and 37%, respectively. Surface doses are also measured outside the treatment field which are mainly due to scattered electron contamination. To achieve this result, film calibration curves must be irradiated to similar x-ray field sizes as the experimental film to minimize quantitative variations in film optical density caused by varying x-ray spectrum with field size. (note)

  5. Novel surface measurement system reading cost savings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sword, M.

    1996-05-01

    A new state-of-the-art data acquisition system for the oil and natural gas industries is being marketed by OPSCO`92 Industries Ltd. The unit is portable, it measures surface data which is calibrated to bottom-hole conditions and designed to measure temperature and pressure information without the necessity of sending testing equipment downhole. The Surface Data System (SDS) uses silicon-crystal technology, is mounted in a suitcase size carrying case, and runs off a 12-volt battery enclosure which can be backed up by a small solar panel. The first generation system can handle 16 different channels of information input on a laptop computer. Pressure, pressure differential, temperature, frequency and pulse signals for flow meter measurements are handled by standard sensors. Areas of application include build-up and fall-off tests, pipeline evaluation, pre-frac tests, underbalanced drilling and gas well evaluation. 1 fig., 1 photo.

  6. Moisture parameters and fungal communities associated with gypsum drywall in buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedesko, Sandra; Siegel, Jeffrey A

    2015-12-08

    Uncontrolled excess moisture in buildings is a common problem that can lead to changes in fungal communities. In buildings, moisture parameters can be classified by location and include assessments of moisture in the air, at a surface, or within a material. These parameters are not equivalent in dynamic indoor environments, which makes moisture-induced fungal growth in buildings a complex occurrence. In order to determine the circumstances that lead to such growth, it is essential to have a thorough understanding of in situ moisture measurement, the influence of building factors on moisture parameters, and the levels of these moisture parameters that lead to indoor fungal growth. Currently, there are disagreements in the literature on this topic. A literature review was conducted specifically on moisture-induced fungal growth on gypsum drywall. This review revealed that there is no consistent measurement approach used to characterize moisture in laboratory and field studies, with relative humidity measurements being most common. Additionally, many studies identify a critical moisture value, below which fungal growth will not occur. The values defined by relative humidity encompassed the largest range, while those defined by moisture content exhibited the highest variation. Critical values defined by equilibrium relative humidity were most consistent, and this is likely due to equilibrium relative humidity being the most relevant moisture parameter to microbial growth, since it is a reasonable measure of moisture available at surfaces, where fungi often proliferate. Several sources concur that surface moisture, particularly liquid water, is the prominent factor influencing microbial changes and that moisture in the air and within a material are of lesser importance. However, even if surface moisture is assessed, a single critical moisture level to prevent fungal growth cannot be defined, due to a number of factors, including variations in fungal genera and

  7. Minimizing Uncertainty in Cryogenic Surface Figure Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Peter; Mink, Ronald G.; Chambers, John; Robinson, F. David; Content, David; Davila, Pamela

    2005-01-01

    A new facility at the Goddard Space Flight Center is designed to measure with unusual accuracy the surface figure of mirrors at cryogenic temperatures down to 12 K. The facility is currently configured for spherical mirrors with a radius of curvature (ROC) of 600 mm, and apertures of about 150 mm or less. The goals of the current experiment were to 1) Obtain the best possible estimate of test mirror surface figure, S(x,y) at 87 K and 20 K; 2) Obtain the best estimate of the cryo-change, Delta (x,y): the change in surface figure between room temperature and the two cryo-temperatures; and 3) Determine the uncertainty of these measurements, using the definitions and guidelines of the ISO Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement. A silicon mirror was tested, and the cry-change from room temperature to 20K was found to be 3.7 nm rms, with a standard uncertainty of 0.23 nm in the rms statistic. Both the cryo-change figure and the uncertainty are among the lowest such figures yet published. This report describes the facilities, experimental methods, and uncertainty analysis of the measurements.

  8. Role of the Soil Thermal Inertia in the short term variability of the surface temperature and consequences for the soil-moisture temperature feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheruy, Frederique; Dufresne, Jean-Louis; Ait Mesbah, Sonia; Grandpeix, Jean-Yves; Wang, Fuxing

    2017-04-01

    A simple model based on the surface energy budget at equilibrium is developed to compute the sensitivity of the climatological mean daily temperature and diurnal amplitude to the soil thermal inertia. It gives a conceptual framework to quantity the role of the atmospheric and land surface processes in the surface temperature variability and relies on the diurnal amplitude of the net surface radiation, the sensitivity of the turbulent fluxes to the surface temperature and the thermal inertia. The performances of the model are first evaluated with 3D numerical simulations performed with the atmospheric (LMDZ) and land surface (ORCHIDEE) modules of the Institut Pierre Simon Laplace (IPSL) climate model. A nudging approach is adopted, it prevents from using time-consuming long-term simulations required to account for the natural variability of the climate and allow to draw conclusion based on short-term (several years) simulations. In the moist regions the diurnal amplitude and the mean surface temperature are controlled by the latent heat flux. In the dry areas, the relevant role of the stability of the boundary layer and of the soil thermal inertia is demonstrated. In these regions, the sensitivity of the surface temperature to the thermal inertia is high, due to the high contribution of the thermal flux to the energy budget. At high latitudes, when the sensitivity of turbulent fluxes is dominated by the day-time sensitivity of the sensible heat flux to the surface temperature and when this later is comparable to the thermal inertia term of the sensitivity equation, the surface temperature is also partially controlled by the thermal inertia which can rely on the snow properties; In the regions where the latent heat flux exhibits a high day-to-day variability, such as transition regions, the thermal inertia has also significant impact on the surface temperature variability . In these not too wet (energy limited) and not too dry (moisture-limited) soil moisture (SM

  9. Passive microwave remote sensing of soil moisture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, T.J.; Schmugge, T.J.

    1986-01-01

    Microwave remote sensing provides a unique capability for direct observation of soil moisture. Remote measurements from space afford the possibility of obtaining frequent, global sampling of soil moisture over a large fraction of the Earth's land surface. Microwave measurements have the benefit of being largely unaffected by cloud cover and variable surface solar illumination, but accurate soil moisture estimates are limited to regions that have either bare soil or low to moderate amounts of vegetation cover. A particular advantage of passive microwave sensors is that in the absence of significant vegetation cover soil moisture is the dominant effect on the received signal. The spatial resolutions of passive microwave soil moisture sensors currently considered for space operation are in the range 10–20 km. The most useful frequency range for soil moisture sensing is 1–5 GHz. System design considerations include optimum choice of frequencies, polarizations, and scanning configurations, based on trade-offs between requirements for high vegetation penetration capability, freedom from electromagnetic interference, manageable antenna size and complexity, and the requirement that a sufficient number of information channels be available to correct for perturbing geophysical effects. This paper outlines the basic principles of the passive microwave technique for soil moisture sensing, and reviews briefly the status of current retrieval methods. Particularly promising are methods for optimally assimilating passive microwave data into hydrologic models. Further studies are needed to investigate the effects on microwave observations of within-footprint spatial heterogeneity of vegetation cover and subsurface soil characteristics, and to assess the limitations imposed by heterogeneity on the retrievability of large-scale soil moisture information from remote observations

  10. Radioimmunoassay to quantitatively measure cell surface immunoglobulins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishman, E.C.; Jewell, W.R.

    1975-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay techniques developed to quantitatively measure the presence of immunoglobulins on the surface of cells, is described. The amount of immunoglobulins found on different tumor cells varied from 200 to 1140 ng/10 6 cells. Determination of immunoglobulins on the peripheral lymphocytes obtained from different cancer patients varied between 340 to 1040 ng/10 6 cells. Cultured tumor cells, on the other hand, were found to contain negligible quantities of human IgG [pt

  11. Description of measurement techniques for surface contaminations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourrez, E.

    2001-01-01

    The needs of evaluation of the surface contamination are numerous in the processes of production and management of radioactive waste. The market of radiation protection materials proposes a lot of devices answering to the almost all these needs. These device have however their conditions and particular limits for use. To realize correct measurements it is use the device, the technique and the methods adapted to the need, by taking into account the optimization of economical aspect. (N.C.)

  12. A Conceptual Approach to Assimilating Remote Sensing Data to Improve Soil Moisture Profile Estimates in a Surface Flux/Hydrology Model. 2; Aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schamschula, Marius; Crosson, William L.; Inguva, Ramarao; Yates, Thomas; Laymen, Charles A.; Caulfield, John

    1998-01-01

    This is a follow up on the preceding presentation by Crosson. The grid size for remote microwave measurements is much coarser than the hydrological model computational grids. To validate the hydrological models with measurements we propose mechanisms to aggregate the hydrological model outputs for soil moisture to allow comparison with measurements. Weighted neighborhood averaging methods are proposed to facilitate the comparison. We will also discuss such complications as misalignment, rotation and other distortions introduced by a generalized sensor image.

  13. Field-scale prediction of soil moisture patterns by means of a fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm, digital elevation data, and sparse TDR measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröter, Ingmar; Paasche, Hendik; Dietrich, Peter; Wollschläger, Ute

    2014-05-01

    Soil moisture is a key variable of the hydrological cycle. For example, it controls partitioning of rainfall into a runoff and an infiltration component and modulating physical, chemical and biological processes within the soil. For a better understanding of these processes, knowledge about the spatio-temporal distribution of soil moisture is indispensable. For the field to the small catchment scale with survey areas up to a few square kilometres, there are numerous new and innovative ground-based and remote sensing technologies available which have great potential to provide temporal information about soil moisture patterns. The aim of this work is to design an optimal soil moisture monitoring program for a low-mountain catchment in central Germany. In a first step, the fuzzy c-means clustering technique (Paasche et al., 2006) was used to identify structure-relevant patterns in a set of different terrain attributes derived from a DEM. Based on these patterns optimal measurement locations were identified to conduct in-situ soil moisture measurements. To consider different wetting and drying states in the catchment, several TDR measurement campaigns were conducted from April to October 2013. The TDR measurements have been integrated with the structure-relevant patterns obtained by the fuzzy cluster analysis to regionally predict soil moisture. In this study, we outline the conceptual framework of this integrative approach and present first results from field measurements. The results of the project are expected to improve the monitoring and understanding of small catchment-scale hydrological processes and to contribute to a better representation of soil moisture dynamics in physically-based, hydrological models operating at the field to the small catchment scale. Reference: Paasche, H., J. Tronicke, K. Holliger, A.G. Green, and H. Maurer (2006): Integration of diverse physical-property models: Subsurface zonation and petrophysical parameter estimation based on fuzzy

  14. Moisture movements in render on brick wall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Munch, Thomas Astrup; Thorsen, Peter Schjørmann

    2003-01-01

    A three-layer render on brick wall used for building facades is studied in the laboratory. The vertical render surface is held in contact with water for 24 hours simulating driving rain while it is measured with non-destructive X-ray equipment every hour in order to follow the moisture front...

  15. A missing piece of the puzzle in climate change hotspots: Near-surface turbulent interactions controlling ET-soil moisture coupling in semiarid areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighi, Erfan; Gianotti, Daniel J.; Rigden, Angela J.; Salvucci, Guido D.; Kirchner, James W.; Entekhabi, Dara

    2017-04-01

    Being located in the transitional zone between dry and wet climate areas, semiarid ecosystems (and their associated ecohydrological processes) play a critical role in controlling climate change and global warming. Land evapotranspiration (ET), which is a central process in the climate system and a nexus of the water, energy and carbon cycles, typically accounts for up to 95% of the water budget in semiarid areas. Thus, the manner in which ET is partitioned into soil evaporation and plant transpiration in these settings is of practical importance for water and carbon cycling and their feedbacks to the climate system. ET (and its partitioning) in these regions is primarily controlled by surface soil moisture which varies episodically under stochastic precipitation inputs. Important as the ET-soil moisture relationship is, it remains empirical, and physical mechanisms governing its nature and dynamics are underexplored. Thus, the objective of this study is twofold: (1) to provide observational evidence for the influence of surface cover conditions on ET-soil moisture coupling in semiarid regions using soil moisture data from NASA's SMAP satellite mission combined with independent observationally based ET estimates, and (2) to develop a relatively simple mechanistic modeling platform improving our physical understanding of interactions between micro and macroscale processes controlling ET and its partitioning in partially vegetated areas. To this end, we invoked concepts from recent progress in mechanistic modeling of turbulent energy flux exchange in bluff-rough regions, and developed a physically based ET model that explicitly accounts for how vegetation-induced turbulence in the near-surface region influences soil drying and thus ET rates and dynamics. Model predictions revealed nonlinearities in the strength of the ET-soil moisture relationship (i.e., ∂ET/∂θ) as vegetation cover fraction increases, accounted for by the nonlinearity of surface

  16. Acoustic Impedance Measurement for Underground Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockcroft, Paul William

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. This thesis investigates the measurement of acoustic impedance for surfaces likely to be found in underground coal mines. By introducing the concepts of industrial noise, the effects of noise on the ear and relevant legislation the need for the protection of workers can be appreciated. Representative acoustic impedance values are vital as input for existing computer models that predict sound levels in various underground environments. These enable the mining engineer to predict the noise level at any point within a mine in the vicinity of noisy machinery. The concepts of acoustic intensity and acoustic impedance are investigated and different acoustic impedance measurement techniques are detailed. The possible use of either an impedance tube or an intensity meter for these kinds of measurements are suggested. The problems with acoustic intensity and acoustic impedance measurements are discussed with reference to the restraints that an underground environment imposes on any measurement technique. The impedance tube method for work in an acoustics laboratory is shown and the theory explained, accompanied by a few representative results. The use of a Metravib intensity meter in a soundproof chamber to gain impedance values is explained in detail. The accompanying software for the analysis of the two measured pressure signals is shown as well as the actual results for a variety of test surfaces. The use of a Nagra IV-SJ tape recorder is investigated to determine the effect of recording on the measurement and subsequent analysis of the input signals, particularly with reference to the phase difference introduced between the two simultaneous pressure signals. The subsequent use of a Norwegian Electronic intensity meter, including a proposal for underground work, is shown along with results for tests completed with this piece of equipment. Finally, recommendations are made on how to link up

  17. Remote Monitoring of Near-Surface Soil Moisture Dynamics In Unstable Slopes Using a Low-Power Autonomous Resistivity Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, J. E.; Meldrum, P.; Gunn, D.; Wilkinson, P. B.; Uhlemann, S.; Swift, R. T.; Kuras, O.; Inauen, C.; Hutchinson, D.; Butler, S.

    2016-12-01

    ERT monitoring has been demonstrated in numerous studies as an effective means of imaging near surface processes for applications as diverse as permafrost studies and contaminated land assessment. A limiting factor in applying time-lapse ERT for long-term studies in remote locations has been the availability of cost-effective ERT measurement systems designed specifically for monitoring applications. Typically, monitoring is undertaken using repeated manual data collection, or by building conventional survey instruments into a monitoring setup. The latter often requires high power and is therefore difficult to operate remotely without access to mains electricity. We describe the development of a low-power resistivity imaging system designed specifically for remote monitoring, taking advantage of, e.g., solar power and data telemetry. Here, we present the results of two field deployments. The system has been installed on an active railway cutting to provide insights into the effect of vegetation on the moisture dynamics in unstable infrastructure slopes and to gather subsurface information for pro-active remediation measures. The system, comprising 255 electrodes, acquires 4596 reciprocal measurement pairs twice daily during standard operation. In case of severe weather events, the measurement schedule is reactively changed, to gather high temporal resolution data to image rainfall infiltration processes. The system has also been installed along a leaking and marginally stable canal embankment; a less favourable location for remote monitoring, with limited solar power and poor mobile reception. Nevertheless, the acquired data indicated the effectiveness of remedial actions on the canal. The ERT results showed that one leak was caused by the canal and fixed during remediation, while two other "leaks" were shown to be effects of groundwater dynamics. The availability of cost-effective, low-power ERT monitoring instrumentation, combined with an automated workflow of

  18. AMSR-E/Aqua surface soil moisture (LSMEM) L3 1 day 0.25 degree x 0.25 degree V001 (WC_LSMEM_SOILM_025) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — AMSR-E/Aqua surface soil moisture (LSMEM) L3 1 day 0.25 degree x 0.25 degree V001 is a global, 10-year (2002-2011) data set. It is created from soil moisture...

  19. Downscaling SMAP Soil Moisture Using Geoinformation Data and Geostatistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y.; Wang, L.

    2017-12-01

    Soil moisture is important for agricultural and hydrological studies. However, ground truth soil moisture data for wide area is difficult to achieve. Microwave remote sensing such as Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) can offer a solution for wide coverage. However, existing global soil moisture products only provide observations at coarse spatial resolutions, which often limit their applications in regional agricultural and hydrological studies. This paper therefore aims to generate fine scale soil moisture information and extend soil moisture spatial availability. A statistical downscaling scheme is presented that incorporates multiple fine scale geoinformation data into the downscaling of coarse scale SMAP data in the absence of ground measurement data. Geoinformation data related to soil moisture patterns including digital elevation model (DEM), land surface temperature (LST), land use and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) at a fine scale are used as auxiliary environmental variables for downscaling SMAP data. Generalized additive model (GAM) and regression tree are first conducted to derive statistical relationships between SMAP data and auxiliary geoinformation data at an original coarse scale, and residuals are then downscaled to a finer scale via area-to-point kriging (ATPK) by accounting for the spatial correlation information of the input residuals. The results from standard validation scores as well as the triple collocation (TC) method against soil moisture in-situ measurements show that the downscaling method can significantly improve the spatial details of SMAP soil moisture while maintain the accuracy.

  20. Measuring the Valence of Nanocrystal Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, Jonathan Scharle [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2016-11-30

    The goal of this project is to understand and control the interplay between nanocrystal stoichiometry, surface ligand binding and exchange, and the optoelectronic properties of semiconductor nanocrystals in solution and in thin solid films. We pursued three research directions with this goal in mind: 1) We characterized nanocrystal stoichiometry and its influence on the binding of L-type and X-type ligands, including the thermodynamics of binding and the kinetics of ligand exchange. 2) We developed a quantitative understanding of the relationship between surface ligand passivation and photoluminescence quantum yield. 3) We developed methods to replace the organic ligands on the nanocrystal with halide ligands and controllably deposit these nanocrystals into thin films, where electrical measurements were used to investigate the electrical transport and internanocrystal electronic coupling.

  1. Evaluation of Arctic broadband surface radiation measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Matsui

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The Arctic is a challenging environment for making in-situ surface radiation measurements. A standard suite of radiation sensors is typically designed to measure incoming and outgoing shortwave (SW and thermal infrared, or longwave (LW, radiation. Enhancements may include various sensors for measuring irradiance in narrower bandwidths. Many solar radiation/thermal infrared flux sensors utilize protective glass domes and some are mounted on complex mechanical platforms (solar trackers that keep sensors and shading devices trained on the sun along its diurnal path. High quality measurements require striking a balance between locating stations in a pristine undisturbed setting free of artificial blockage (such as from buildings and towers and providing accessibility to allow operators to clean and maintain the instruments. Three significant sources of erroneous data in the Arctic include solar tracker malfunctions, rime/frost/snow deposition on the protective glass domes of the radiometers and operational problems due to limited operator access in extreme weather conditions. In this study, comparisons are made between the global and component sum (direct [vertical component] + diffuse SW measurements. The difference between these two quantities (that theoretically should be zero is used to illustrate the magnitude and seasonality of arctic radiation flux measurement problems. The problem of rime/frost/snow deposition is investigated in more detail for one case study utilizing both SW and LW measurements. Solutions to these operational problems that utilize measurement redundancy, more sophisticated heating and ventilation strategies and a more systematic program of operational support and subsequent data quality protocols are proposed.

  2. Calibration of areal surface topography measuring instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seewig, J.; Eifler, M.

    2017-06-01

    The ISO standards which are related to the calibration of areal surface topography measuring instruments are the ISO 25178-6xx series which defines the relevant metrological characteristics for the calibration of different measuring principles and the ISO 25178-7xx series which defines the actual calibration procedures. As the field of areal measurement is however not yet fully standardized, there are still open questions to be addressed which are subject to current research. Based on this, selected research results of the authors in this area are presented. This includes the design and fabrication of areal material measures. For this topic, two examples are presented with the direct laser writing of a stepless material measure for the calibration of the height axis which is based on the Abbott- Curve and the manufacturing of a Siemens star for the determination of the lateral resolution limit. Based on these results, as well a new definition for the resolution criterion, the small scale fidelity, which is still under discussion, is presented. Additionally, a software solution for automated calibration procedures is outlined.

  3. Seasonal slope surface deformation measured with TLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, L; Smethurst, J; Powrie, W; Sellaiya, A

    2014-01-01

    In temperate European climates, soil water removal due to vegetation transpiration peaks in summer and soil rewetting from higher levels of precipitation occurs in winter. In clays of high plasticity, the seasonal cycles of drying and wetting cause the soil to experience a volumetric change, resulting in seasonal shrinking and swelling. For a clay slope exhibiting volume change, such behaviour can lead to excessive deformation and could contribute to strain-softening and progressive slope failure. This can in turn cause traffic disruption and loss of life if roads and railways are founded on or surrounded by such slopes. This paper discusses the driving forces of seasonal surface movement, in particular the role of vegetation, and presents the use of Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) to measure the surface movement of a lightly vegetated London Clay slope near Newbury, UK. Two TLS scans were carried out in early and late summer respectively, representing relative wet and dry conditions of the slope. Continuous field measurements of soil water content in upper layers of the slope were obtained from TDR ThetaProbes already installed at the site. The water content data are used to support the results obtained from TLS by indicating the likely volumetric change in the soil due to loss of water

  4. Predicting Potential Fire Severity Using Vegetation, Topography and Surface Moisture Availability in a Eurasian Boreal Forest Landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Fang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Severity of wildfires is a critical component of the fire regime and plays an important role in determining forest ecosystem response to fire disturbance. Predicting spatial distribution of potential fire severity can be valuable in guiding fire and fuel management planning. Spatial controls on fire severity patterns have attracted growing interest, but few studies have attempted to predict potential fire severity in fire-prone Eurasian boreal forests. Furthermore, the influences of fire weather variation on spatial heterogeneity of fire severity remain poorly understood at fine scales. We assessed the relative importance and influence of pre-fire vegetation, topography, and surface moisture availability (SMA on fire severity in 21 lightning-ignited fires occurring in two different fire years (3 fires in 2000, 18 fires in 2010 of the Great Xing’an Mountains with an ensemble modeling approach of boosted regression tree (BRT. SMA was derived from 8-day moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS evapotranspiration products. We predicted the potential distribution of fire severity in two fire years and evaluated the prediction accuracies. BRT modeling revealed that vegetation, topography, and SMA explained more than 70% of variations in fire severity (mean 83.0% for 2000, mean 73.8% for 2010. Our analysis showed that evergreen coniferous forests were more likely to experience higher severity fires than the dominant deciduous larch forests of this region, and deciduous broadleaf forests and shrublands usually burned at a significantly lower fire severity. High-severity fires tended to occur in gentle and well-drained slopes at high altitudes, especially those with north-facing aspects. SMA exhibited notable and consistent negative association with severity. Predicted fire severity from our model exhibited strong agreement with the observed fire severity (mean r2 = 0.795 for 2000, 0.618 for 2010. Our results verified that spatial variation

  5. Measuring Humidity in the Charters of Freedom Encasements Using a Moisture Condensation Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkett, Cecil G.; West, James W.; Levine, Joel S.

    2004-01-01

    The relative humidity of the atmosphere in the encasements containing the U.S. Constitution Pages 1 and 4, the Declaration of Independence, and the Bill of Rights was measured to be in the range of 55% to 61%. This value is significantly higher than the presumed relative humidity between 25 to 35 %, but is consistent with the measured samples extracted from Pages 2 and 3 of the U.S. Constitution. The cooling/condensation measurement technique used at NARA on July 23, 2001, and described in this paper to measure the water vapor content of the atmosphere in the hermetically sealed encasements containing the U. S. Constitution, the Declaration of Independence, and the Bill of Rights, proved to be a powerful new measurement technique. The cooling/condensation technique developed at NASA LaRC and utilized at NARA has important applications in the non-invasive measurement of relative humidity in the atmospheres of sealed encasements and could become a standard measurement technique in this type of analysis.

  6. A novel, simplified ex vivo method for measuring water exchange performance of heat and moisture exchangers for tracheostomy application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Boer, Cindy; Muller, Sara H; Vincent, Andrew D; Züchner, Klaus; van den Brekel, Michiel W M; Hilgers, Frans J M

    2013-09-01

    Breathing through a tracheostomy results in insufficient warming and humidification of inspired air. This loss of air-conditioning can be partially compensated for with the application of a heat and moisture exchanger (HME) over the tracheostomy. In vitro (International Organization for Standardization [ISO] standard 9360-2:2001) and in vivo measurements of the effects of an HME are complex and technically challenging. The aim of this study was to develop a simple method to measure the ex vivo HME performance comparable with previous in vitro and in vivo results. HMEs were weighed at the end of inspiration and at the end of expiration at different breathing volumes. Four HMEs (Atos Medical, Hörby, Sweden) with known in vivo humidity and in vitro water loss values were tested. The associations between weight change, volume, and absolute humidity were determined using both linear and non-linear mixed effects models. The rating between the 4 HMEs by weighing correlated with previous intra-tracheal measurements (R(2) = 0.98), and the ISO standard (R(2) = 0.77). Assessment of the weight change between end of inhalation and end of exhalation is a valid and simple method of measuring the water exchange performance of an HME.

  7. Assessment of Wildfire Risk in Southern California with Live Fuel Moisture Measurement and Remotely Sensed Vegetation Water Content Proxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, S.; Kim, S. H.; Nghiem, S. V.; Kafatos, M.

    2017-12-01

    Live fuel moisture (LFM) is the water content of live herbaceous plants expressed as a percentage of the oven-dry weight of plant. It is a critical parameter in fire ignition in Mediterranean climate and routinely measured in sites selected by fire agencies across the U.S. Vegetation growing cycle, meteorological metrics, soil type, and topography all contribute to the seasonal and inter-annual variation of LFM, and therefore, the risk of wildfire. The optical remote sensing-based vegetation indices (VIs) have been used to estimate the LFM. Comparing to the VIs, microwave remote sensing products have advantages like less saturation effect in greenness and representing the water content of the vegetation cover. In this study, we established three models to evaluate the predictability of LFM in Southern California using MODIS NDVI, vegetation temperature condition index (VTCI) from downscaled Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) products, and vegetation optical depth (VOD) derived by Land Parameter Retrieval Model. Other ancillary variables, such as topographic factors (aspects and slope) and meteorological metrics (air temperature, precipitation, and relative humidity), are also considered in the models. The model results revealed an improvement of LFM estimation from SMAP products and VOD, despite the uncertainties introduced in the downscaling and parameter retrieval. The estimation of LFM using remote sensing data can provide an assessment of wildfire danger better than current methods using NDVI-based growing seasonal index. Future study will test the VOD estimation from SMAP data using the multi-temporal dual channel algorithm (MT-DCA) and extend the LFM modeling to a regional scale.

  8. Integrating ASCAT surface soil moisture and GEOV1 leaf area index into the SURFEX modelling platform: a land data assimilation application over France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Barbu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The land monitoring service of the European Copernicus programme has developed a set of satellite-based biogeophysical products, including surface soil moisture (SSM and leaf area index (LAI. This study investigates the impact of joint assimilation of remotely sensed SSM derived from Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT backscatter data and the Copernicus Global Land GEOV1 satellite-based LAI product into the the vegetation growth version of the Interactions between Soil Biosphere Atmosphere (ISBA-A-gs land surface model within the the externalised surface model (SURFEX modelling platform of Météo-France. The ASCAT data were bias corrected with respect to the model climatology by using a seasonal-based CDF (Cumulative Distribution Function matching technique. A multivariate multi-scale land data assimilation system (LDAS based on the extended Kalman Filter (EKF is used for monitoring the soil moisture, terrestrial vegetation, surface carbon and energy fluxes across the domain of France at a spatial resolution of 8 km. Each model grid box is divided into a number of land covers, each having its own set of prognostic variables. The filter algorithm is designed to provide a distinct analysis for each land cover while using one observation per grid box. The updated values are aggregated by computing a weighted average. In this study, it is demonstrated that the assimilation scheme works effectively within the ISBA-A-gs model over a four-year period (2008–2011. The EKF is able to extract useful information from the data signal at the grid scale and distribute the root-zone soil moisture and LAI increments throughout the mosaic structure of the model. The impact of the assimilation on the vegetation phenology and on the water and carbon fluxes varies from one season to another. The spring drought of 2011 is an interesting case study of the potential of the assimilation to improve drought monitoring. A comparison between simulated and in situ soil

  9. Retrieving soil moisture for non-forested areas using PALS radiometer measurements in SMAPVEX12 field campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this paper we investigate retrieval of soil moisture based on L-band brightness temperature under diverse conditions and land cover types. We apply the PALS (Passive Active L-band System) radiometer data collected in the SMAPVEX12 (Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment 2012) field ex...

  10. Real-time measurements of temperature, pressure and moisture profiles in High-Performance Concrete exposed to high temperatures during neutron radiography imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toropovs, N., E-mail: nikolajs.toropovs@rtu.lv [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Dübendorf (Switzerland); Riga Technical University, Institute of Materials and Structures, Riga (Latvia); Lo Monte, F. [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Milan (Italy); Wyrzykowski, M. [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Dübendorf (Switzerland); Lodz University of Technology, Department of Building Physics and Building Materials, Lodz (Poland); Weber, B. [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Dübendorf (Switzerland); Sahmenko, G. [Riga Technical University, Institute of Materials and Structures, Riga (Latvia); Vontobel, P. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Laboratory for Neutron Scattering and Imaging, Villigen (Switzerland); Felicetti, R. [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Milan (Italy); Lura, P. [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Dübendorf (Switzerland); ETH Zürich, Institute for Building Materials (IfB), Zürich (Switzerland)

    2015-02-15

    High-Performance Concrete (HPC) is particularly prone to explosive spalling when exposed to high temperature. Although the exact causes that lead to spalling are still being debated, moisture transport during heating plays an important role in all proposed mechanisms. In this study, slabs made of high-performance, low water-to-binder ratio mortars with addition of superabsorbent polymers (SAP) and polypropylene fibers (PP) were heated from one side on a temperature-controlled plate up to 550 °C. A combination of measurements was performed simultaneously on the same sample: moisture profiles via neutron radiography, temperature profiles with embedded thermocouples and pore pressure evolution with embedded pressure sensors. Spalling occurred in the sample with SAP, where sharp profiles of moisture and temperature were observed. No spalling occurred when PP-fibers were introduced in addition to SAP. The experimental procedure described here is essential for developing and verifying numerical models and studying measures against fire spalling risk in HPC.

  11. Systematic approach for the calibration of humidity sensitive polyimide recoated fibre Bragg gratings for measuring humidity and temperature and their application for measuring moisture absorption in polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, T J; Lodeiro, M J; Gower, M R L; Sassi, M B

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a systematic method for calibrating polyimide recoated fibre Bragg grating (FBG) optical fibres and the associated models used to measure temperature and relative humidity (RH) from 20 to 70 °C and 20% RH to 80% RH. The method was validated by comparing known values of temperature and RH with calculated values from two FBG sensors with different thicknesses of polyimide recoat. Results show good agreement, with a standard deviation error of 0.5 °C and 4.8% RH for temperature and humidity respectively. Drift in the measured wavelength was observed for both thicknesses of polyimide coating under the combined effect of elevated temperature and high humidity. This drift was reversed after a reduction in the humidity. Additional results are provided on the use of embedded polyimide recoated FBG optical fibres for measuring moisture ingress within polymers and composites. (paper)

  12. Sea Surface Temperatures (SST): Significance and Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, S. F.

    2006-05-01

    Oceans cover 71 percent of Earth's surface and control the global climate. Quoted global mean temperature values and trends, largely based on land thermometers, differ substantially -" mainly because of uncertainties about SST. The ongoing controversy about the relative importance of natural climate changes and Anthropogenic Global Warming (AGW) revolves mainly around disparities between temperature trends of the atmosphere and surface (in the tropics and SH, i.e. mostly SST). Accurate measurement of SST is difficult. Geographic coverage is poor and there are many different techniques, each with its own problems and uncertainties: Water temperatures from buckets and ship-engine inlets; fixed and floating buoys; air temperatures from shipboard and island stations; and remote sensing from satellites using IR and microwaves. As is evident, each technique refers to a different level below the air-water interface. Drifter buoys (at around 50 cm) measure temperatures in the euphotic layers that are generally warmer than the bulk mixed layer sampled by ships (typically around 10 m). The IR emission arises from a 10-micron-thick skin that interacts dynamically with the underlying "mixed layer." The microwave data depend also on emissivity and therefore on surface roughness and sea state. SST data derived from corals provide some support for instrumental data but are not conclusive. The majority of corals show a warming trend since 1979; others show cooling or are ambiguous. There are different ways of interpreting this result. Physical optics dictates that the downwelling IR radiation from atmospheric greenhouse gases is absorbed in the first instance within the skin. Only direct measurements can establish how much of this energy is shared with the bulk mixed layer (to which the usual SST values refer.). SST controls evaporation and therefore global precipitation. SST influences tropical cyclones and sea-level rise; but there is lively debate on those issues. Changes in

  13. Confocal Raman microspectroscopy: measuring the effects of topical moisturizers on stratum corneum water gradient in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieg, Anke; Crowther, Jonathan; Blenkiron, Peter; Marcott, Curtis; Matts, Paul J.

    2006-02-01

    The stratum corneum (SC) water concentration gradient is fundamental to skin's role as a barrier, regulating its physical and biochemical properties. Standard instruments utilizing changes in SC electrical properties to estimate SC water concentration provide simple, rapid measurements but cannot provide true interval data as a function of depth. Confocal Raman spectroscopy (CRS) of human subjects provides non-invasive, real-time, in vivo measures of molecular concentration profiles. A state-of-the-art confocal Raman microspectrometer equipped with a fiber-coupled laser source operating at a wavelength of 671 nm was used to obtain measurements in the high wavenumber region (~2400-4000 cm -1). An aircooled, high-sensitivity back-illuminated, deep-depletion CCD camera captured radiation scattered inelastically from focal planes within the skin in vivo (a high-precision, computer-controlled piezo-electric stage and objective allowing depth resolutions of niacinamide on SC water concentration gradient, as measured by CRS, in vivo. The approach to compare SC water gradient effects will be discussed and the utility of this exciting new method will be compared and contrasted to existing methodology.

  14. Using dry spell dynamics of land surface temperature to evaluate large-scale model representation of soil moisture control on evapotranspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Christopher M.; Harris, Philip P.; Gallego-Elvira, Belen; Folwell, Sonja S.

    2017-04-01

    The soil moisture control on the partition of land surface fluxes between sensible and latent heat is a key aspect of land surface models used within numerical weather prediction and climate models. As soils dry out, evapotranspiration (ET) decreases, and the excess energy is used to warm the atmosphere. Poor simulations of this dynamic process can affect predictions of mean, and in particular, extreme air temperatures, and can introduce substantial biases into projections of climate change at regional scales. The lack of reliable observations of fluxes and root zone soil moisture at spatial scales that atmospheric models use (typically from 1 to several hundred kilometres), coupled with spatial variability in vegetation and soil properties, makes it difficult to evaluate the flux partitioning at the model grid box scale. To overcome this problem, we have developed techniques to use Land Surface Temperature (LST) to evaluate models. As soils dry out, LST rises, so it can be used under certain circumstances as a proxy for the partition between sensible and latent heat. Moreover, long time series of reliable LST observations under clear skies are available globally at resolutions of the order of 1km. Models can exhibit large biases in seasonal mean LST for various reasons, including poor description of aerodynamic coupling, uncertainties in vegetation mapping, and errors in down-welling radiation. Rather than compare long-term average LST values with models, we focus on the dynamics of LST during dry spells, when negligible rain falls, and the soil moisture store is drying out. The rate of warming of the land surface, or, more precisely, its warming rate relative to the atmosphere, emphasises the impact of changes in soil moisture control on the surface energy balance. Here we show the application of this approach to model evaluation, with examples at continental and global scales. We can compare the behaviour of both fully-coupled land-atmosphere models, and land

  15. Quadrotor helicopter for surface hydrological measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, C.; Tauro, F.; Porfiri, M.; Grimaldi, S.

    2013-12-01

    Surface hydrological measurements are typically performed through user-assisted and intrusive field methodologies which can be inadequate to monitor remote and extended areas. In this poster, we present the design and development of a quadrotor helicopter equipped with digital acquisition system and image calibration units for surface flow measurements. This custom-built aerial vehicle is engineered to be lightweight, low-cost, highly customizable, and stable to guarantee optimal image quality. Quadricopter stability guarantees minimal vibrations during image acquisition and, therefore, improved accuracy in flow velocity estimation through large scale particle image velocimetry algorithms or particle tracking procedures. Stability during the vehicle pitching and rolling is achieved by adopting large arm span and high-wing configurations. Further, the vehicle framework is composed of lightweight aluminum and durable carbon fiber for optimal resilience. The open source Ardupilot microcontroller is used for remote control of the quadricopter. The microcontroller includes an inertial measurement unit (IMU) equipped with accelerometers and gyroscopes for stable flight through feedback control. The vehicle is powered by a 3 cell (11.1V) 3000 mAh Lithium-polymer battery. Electronic equipment and wiring are hosted into the hollow arms and on several carbon fiber platforms in the waterproof fuselage. Four 35A high-torque motors are supported at the far end of each arm with 10 × 4.7 inch propellers. Energy dissipation during landing is accomplished by four pivoting legs that, through the use of shock absorbers, prevent the impact energy from affecting the frame thus causing significant damage. The data capturing system consists of a GoPro Hero3 camera and in-house built camera gimbal and shock absorber damping device. The camera gimbal, hosted below the vehicle fuselage, is engineered to maintain the orthogonality of the camera axis with respect to the water surface by

  16. SMEX03 Little Washita Micronet Soil Moisture Data: Oklahoma

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains volumetric soil moisture, soil temperature, soil conductivity, soil salinity, and surface temperature data collected during the Soil Moisture...

  17. Local- and Plot-Scale Measurements of Soil Moisture: Time and Spatially Resolved Field Techniques in Plain, Hill and Mountain Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Raffelli

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Soil moisture measurement is essential to validate hydrological models and satellite data. In this work we provide an overview of different local and plot scale soil moisture measurement techniques applied in three different conditions in terms of altitude, land use, and soil type, namely a plain, a mountain meadow and a hilly vineyard. The main goal is to provide a synoptic view of techniques supported by practical case studies to show that in such different conditions it is possible to estimate a time and spatially resolved soil moisture by the same combination of instruments: contact-based methods (i.e., Time Domain Reflectometry—TDR, and two low frequency probes for the time resolved, and hydro-geophysical minimally-invasive methods (i.e., Electromagnetic Induction—EMI, Ground Penetrating Radar—GPR, and the Electrical Resistivity Tomography—ERT for the spatially resolved. Both long-term soil moisture measurements and spatially resolved measurement campaigns are discussed. Technical and operational measures are detailed to allow critical factors to be identified.

  18. All-Weather Sounding of Moisture and Temperature From Microwave Sensors Using a Coupled Surface/Atmosphere Inversion Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukabara, S. A.; Garrett, K.

    2014-12-01

    A one-dimensional variational retrieval system has been developed, capable of producing temperature and water vapor profiles in clear, cloudy and precipitating conditions. The algorithm, known as the Microwave Integrated Retrieval System (MiRS), is currently running operationally at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Environmental Satellite Data and Information Service (NESDIS), and is applied to a variety of data from the AMSU-A/MHS sensors on board the NOAA-18, NOAA-19, and MetOp-A/B polar satellite platforms, as well as SSMI/S on board both DMSP F-16 and F18, and from the NPP ATMS sensor. MiRS inverts microwave brightness temperatures into atmospheric temperature and water vapor profiles, along with hydrometeors and surface parameters, simultaneously. This atmosphere/surface coupled inversion allows for more accurate retrievals in the lower tropospheric layers by accounting for the surface emissivity impact on the measurements. It also allows the inversion of the soundings in all-weather conditions thanks to the incorporation of the hydrometeors parameters in the inverted state vector as well as to the inclusion of the emissivity in the same state vector, which is accounted for dynamically for the highly variable surface conditions found under precipitating atmospheres. The inversion is constrained in precipitating conditions by the inclusion of covariances for hydrometeors, to take advantage of the natural correlations that exist between temperature and water vapor with liquid and ice cloud along with rain water. In this study, we present a full assessment of temperature and water vapor retrieval performances in all-weather conditions and over all surface types (ocean, sea-ice, land, and snow) using matchups with radiosonde as well as Numerical Weather Prediction and other satellite retrieval algorithms as references. An emphasis is placed on retrievals in cloudy and precipitating atmospheres, including extreme weather events

  19. Buffer moisture protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritola, J.; Peura, J.

    2013-11-01

    With the present knowledge, bentonite blocks have to be protected from the air relative humidity and from any moisture leakages in the environment that might cause swelling of the bentonite blocks during the 'open' installation phase before backfilling. The purpose of this work was to design the structural reference solution both for the bottom of the deposition hole and for the buffer moisture protection and dewatering system with their integrated equipment needed in the deposition hole. This report describes the Posiva's reference solution for the buffer moisture protection system and the bottom plate on basis of the demands and functional requirements set by long-term safety. The reference solution with structural details has been developed in research work made 2010-2011. The structural solution of the moisture protection system has not yet been tested in practice. On the bottom of the deposition hole a copper plate which protects the lowest bentonite block from the gathered water is installed straight to machined and even rock surface. The moisture protection sheet made of EPDM rubber is attached to the copper plate with an inflatable seal. The upper part of the moisture protection sheet is fixed to the collar structures of the lid which protects the deposition hole in the disposal tunnel. The main function of the moisture protection sheet is to protect bentonite blocks from the leaking water and from the influence of the air humidity at their installation stage. The leaking water is controlled by the dewatering and alarm system which has been integrated into the moisture protection liner. (orig.)

  20. [Bare Soil Moisture Inversion Model Based on Visible-Shortwave Infrared Reflectance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiao-po; Sun, Yue-jun; Qin, Qi-ming; Ren, Hua-zhong; Gao, Zhong-ling; Wu, Ling; Meng, Qing-ye; Wang, Jin-liang; Wang, Jian-hua

    2015-08-01

    Soil is the loose solum of land surface that can support plants. It consists of minerals, organics, atmosphere, moisture, microbes, et al. Among its complex compositions, soil moisture varies greatly. Therefore, the fast and accurate inversion of soil moisture by using remote sensing is very crucial. In order to reduce the influence of soil type on the retrieval of soil moisture, this paper proposed a normalized spectral slope and absorption index named NSSAI to estimate soil moisture. The modeling of the new index contains several key steps: Firstly, soil samples with different moisture level were artificially prepared, and soil reflectance spectra was consequently measured using spectroradiometer produced by ASD Company. Secondly, the moisture absorption spectral feature located at shortwave wavelengths and the spectral slope of visible wavelengths were calculated after analyzing the regular spectral feature change patterns of different soil at different moisture conditions. Then advantages of the two features at reducing soil types' effects was synthesized to build the NSSAI. Thirdly, a linear relationship between NSSAI and soil moisture was established. The result showed that NSSAI worked better (correlation coefficient is 0.93) than most of other traditional methods in soil moisture extraction. It can weaken the influences caused by soil types at different moisture levels and improve the bare soil moisture inversion accuracy.

  1. Airflow resistivity instrument for in situ measurement on the earth's ground surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    An airflow resistivity instrument features a novel specimen holder, especially designed for in situ measurement on the earth's ground surface. This capability eliminates the disadvantages of prior intrusive instruments, which necessitate the removal of a test specimen from the ground. A prototype instrument can measure airflow resistivities in the range 10-5000 cgs rayl/cm, at specimen depths up to 15.24 cm (6 in.), and at differential pressures up to 2490.8 dyn sq cm (1 in. H2O) across the specimen. Because of the close relationship between flow resistivity and acoustic impedance, this instrument should prove useful in acoustical studies of the earth's ground surface. Results of airflow resistivity measurements on an uncultivated grass field for varying values of moisture content are presented.

  2. Examination of Soil Moisture Retrieval Using SIR-C Radar Data and a Distributed Hydrological Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, A. Y.; ONeill, P. E.; Wood, E. F.; Zion, M.

    1997-01-01

    A major objective of soil moisture-related hydrological-research during NASA's SIR-C/X-SAR mission was to determine and compare soil moisture patterns within humid watersheds using SAR data, ground-based measurements, and hydrologic modeling. Currently available soil moisture-inversion methods using active microwave data are only accurate when applied to bare and slightly vegetated surfaces. Moreover, as the surface dries down, the number of pixels that can provide estimated soil moisture by these radar inversion methods decreases, leading to less accuracy and, confidence in the retrieved soil moisture fields at the watershed scale. The impact of these errors in microwave- derived soil moisture on hydrological modeling of vegetated watersheds has yet to be addressed. In this study a coupled water and energy balance model operating within a topographic framework is used to predict surface soil moisture for both bare and vegetated areas. In the first model run, the hydrological model is initialized using a standard baseflow approach, while in the second model run, soil moisture values derived from SIR-C radar data are used for initialization. The results, which compare favorably with ground measurements, demonstrate the utility of combining radar-derived surface soil moisture information with basin-scale hydrological modeling.

  3. The study of atmospheric moisture transfer by tritium and aerological measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotkova, L.; Kouznetsova, L.; Romanov, V.; Ferronsky, V.

    1988-01-01

    This study reveals the results of the preliminary interpretation of tritium concentration (C t ) in monthly samples of the precipitation, which was carried out at the Water Problems Institute of the USSR Academy of Sciences within the framework of CAPG Subproject 16.2 relating 'Investigation of the atmospheric water transfer over central and eastern Europe with the help of natural isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen' (1981 to 1985). It presents the coordinated isotope and meteorological data with the aim to develop some complex methods of the atmospheric water cycle research. There have been made the C t data maps for the European part of the USSR (EPUSSR) for 1980 to 1981 which included the C t data of 3 observation stations in Bulgaria and Czechoslovakia as well as the same of 4 stations in Finland. The daily aerological observation data on the atmospheric water contents and horizontal flow over EPUSSR for 1980 to 1982 have been also treated so as to receive the monthly rainy period maps on these characteristics. The algorithm and the corresponding computer program have been developed for computation and graphic representation of the atmospheric water movement trajectories which make it possible to trace the provenance of the atmospheric water in precipitation of the measured C t . This program has been applied to the trajectory computations for the rainy days at 4 stations of EPUSSR in January 1981. The mean decade and monthly pressure and isobaric maps as well as cyclon center trajectories data were used for the purpose to get the additional information. The complex analysis of the above information data resulted in revealing the qualitative relations between the C t distribution over EPUSSR and the atmospheric circulation and water flux field characteristics for different months. (author)

  4. Calibration of TDR Test Probe for Measuring Moisture in the Body of the Railway Substructure and its Subgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobeš Peter

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the introduction of the paper there is characterized a way of monitoring the moisture in the railway substructure in the experimental stand, which is a part of the experimental workplace of the Department of Railway Engineering and Track Management. A substantial part of the paper is devoted to the calibration of TDR test probe for selected rock materials as a basic prerequisite for the determination of the actual moisture in the body of the railway substructure and subgrade.

  5. Experimental Measurement of Diffusive Extinction Depth and Soil Moisture Gradients in a Dune Sand Aquifer in Western Saudi Arabia: Assessment of Evaporation Loss for Design of an MAR System

    KAUST Repository

    Mughal, Iqra

    2015-12-10

    A component of designing a managed aquifer recharge system in a dune aquifer is the control of diffusive evaporative loss of water which is governed by the physical properties of the sediments and the position of the water table. A critical water table position is the “extinction depth”, below which no further loss of water occurs via diffusion. Field experiments were conducted to measure the extinction depth of sediments taken from a typical dune field in the region. The soil grain size characteristics, laboratory porosity, and saturated hydraulic conductivity were measured. The sand is classified as well-sorted, very fine sand with a mean grain diameter of 0.15 mm. Soil moisture gradients and diffusion loss rates were measured using sensors in a non-weighing lysimeter that was placed below land surface. The sand was saturated carefully with water from the bottom to the top and was exposed to the natural climate for a period of about two months. The moisture gradient showed a gradual decline during measurement until extinction depth was reached at about 100 cm below surface after 56 days. Diurnal temperature changes were observed in the upper 75 cm of the column and were negligible at greater depth.

  6. The urban moisture climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas L. Sisterson

    1977-01-01

    Data collected on 26 July 1974 as a part of project METROMEX in St. Louis show the three-dimensional structure of the urban moisture field. Mesoscale dry regions at the urban surface, corresponding to large residential and light industrial land-use characterization, were responsible for a reduction in specific humidity in the urban mixing layer. Anthropogenic sources...

  7. A bare ground evaporation revision in the ECMWF land-surface scheme: evaluation of its impact using ground soil moisture and satellite microwave data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Albergel

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In situ soil moisture data from 122 stations across the United States are used to evaluate the impact of a new bare ground evaporation formulation at ECMWF. In November 2010, the bare ground evaporation used in ECMWF's operational Integrated Forecasting System (IFS was enhanced by adopting a lower stress threshold than for the vegetation, allowing a higher evaporation. It results in more realistic soil moisture values when compared to in situ data, particularly over dry areas. Use was made of the operational IFS and offline experiments for the evaluation. The latter are based on a fixed version of the IFS and make it possible to assess the impact of a single modification, while the operational analysis is based on a continuous effort to improve the analysis and modelling systems, resulting in frequent updates (a few times a year. Considering the field sites with a fraction of bare ground greater than 0.2, the root mean square difference (RMSD of soil moisture is shown to decrease from 0.118 m3 m−3 to 0.087 m3 m−3 when using the new formulation in offline experiments, and from 0.110 m3 m−3 to 0.088 m3 m−3 in operations. It also improves correlations. Additionally, the impact of the new formulation on the terrestrial microwave emission at a global scale is investigated. Realistic and dynamically consistent fields of brightness temperature as a function of the land surface conditions are required for the assimilation of the SMOS data. Brightness temperature simulated from surface fields from two offline experiments with the Community Microwave Emission Modelling (CMEM platform present monthly mean differences up to 7 K. Offline experiments with the new formulation present drier soil moisture, hence simulated brightness temperature with its surface fields are larger. They are also closer to SMOS remotely sensed brightness temperature.

  8. A comprehensive approach to analyze discrepancies between land surface models and in-situ measurements: a case study over the US and Illinois with SECHIBA forced by NLDAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Guimberteau

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to test the ability of the Land Surface Model SECHIBA to simulate water budget and particularly soil moisture at two different scales: regional and local. The model is forced by NLDAS data set at 1/8th degree resolution over the 1997–1999 period. SECHIBA gives satisfying results in terms of evapotranspiration and runoff over the US compared with four other land surface models, all forced by NLDAS data set for a common time period. The simulated soil moisture is compared to in-situ data from the Global Soil Moisture Database across Illinois by computing a soil wetness index. A comprehensive approach is performed to test the ability of SECHIBA to simulate soil moisture with a gradual change of the vegetation parameters closely related to the experimental conditions. With default values of vegetation parameters, the model overestimates soil moisture, particularly during summer. Sensitivity tests of the model to the change of vegetation parameters show that the roots extraction parameter has the largest impact on soil moisture, other parameters such as LAI, height or soil resistance having a minor impact. Moreover, a new evapotranspiration computation including bare soil evaporation under vegetation has been introduced into the model. The results point out an improvement of the soil moisture simulation when this effect is taken into account. Finally, soil moisture sensitivity to precipitation variation is addressed and it is shown that soil moisture observations can be rather different, depending on the method of measuring field capacity. When the observed field capacity is deducted from the observed volumetric water profiles, simulated soil wetness index is closer to the observations.

  9. Relation between seasonally detrended shortwave infrared reflectance data and land surface moisture in semi-arid Sahel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jørgen Lundegaard; Ceccato, Pietro; Proud, Simon Richard

    2013-01-01

    in vegetation moisture status, and is compared to detrended time series of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). It was found that when plant available water is low, the SIWSI anomalies increase over time, while the NDVI anomalies decrease over time, but less systematically. Therefore SIWSI may...... carry important complementary information to NDVI in terms of vegetation water status, and can provide this information with the unique combination of temporal and spatial resolution from optical geostationary observations over Sahel. However, the relation between SIWSI anomalies and periods of water...

  10. Modeling the contributions of global air temperature, synoptic-scale phenomena and soil moisture to near-surface static energy variability using artificial neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, Sara C.; Sullivan, Ryan C.; Schoof, Justin T.

    2017-12-01

    The static energy content of the atmosphere is increasing on a global scale, but exhibits important subglobal and subregional scales of variability and is a useful parameter for integrating the net effect of changes in the partitioning of energy at the surface and for improving understanding of the causes of so-called warming holes (i.e., locations with decreasing daily maximum air temperatures (T) or increasing trends of lower magnitude than the global mean). Further, measures of the static energy content (herein the equivalent potential temperature, θe) are more strongly linked to excess human mortality and morbidity than air temperature alone, and have great relevance in understanding causes of past heat-related excess mortality and making projections of possible future events that are likely to be associated with negative human health and economic consequences. New nonlinear statistical models for summertime daily maximum and minimum θe are developed and used to advance understanding of drivers of historical change and variability over the eastern USA. The predictor variables are an index of the daily global mean temperature, daily indices of the synoptic-scale meteorology derived from T and specific humidity (Q) at 850 and 500 hPa geopotential heights (Z), and spatiotemporally averaged soil moisture (SM). SM is particularly important in determining the magnitude of θe over regions that have previously been identified as exhibiting warming holes, confirming the key importance of SM in dictating the partitioning of net radiation into sensible and latent heat and dictating trends in near-surface T and θe. Consistent with our a priori expectations, models built using artificial neural networks (ANNs) out-perform linear models that do not permit interaction of the predictor variables (global T, synoptic-scale meteorological conditions and SM). This is particularly marked in regions with high variability in minimum and maximum θe, where more complex models

  11. MoistureMap: A soil moisture monitoring, prediction and reporting system for sustainable land and water management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudiger, C.; Walker, J. P.; Barrett, D. J.; Gurney, R. J.; Kerr, Y. H.; Kim, E. J.; Lemarshall, J.

    2009-12-01

    A prototype soil moisture monitoring, prediction and reporting system is being developed for Australia, with the Murrumbidgee catchment as the demonstration catchment. The system will provide current and future soil moisture information and its uncertainty at 1km resolution, by combining weather, climate and land surface model predictions with soil moisture data from ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite; the first-ever dedicated microwave soil moisture mission. A major aspect of this project is developing and testing the soil moisture retrieval algorithms to be used for SMOS and verifying SMOS data for Australian conditions, through a number of airborne campaigns. The key elements of this project will develop and test innovative techniques for monitoring, prediction and reporting of 1km resolution soil moisture content from ground-, air- and space-based measurements for Australian conditions. The ground based and air-borne data will be used for: (i) calibration/validation of the SMOS satellite; (ii) development and verification of surface soil moisture retrieval algorithm components of the SMOS Simulator; (iii) development and verification of soil hydraulic property estimation; and (iv) verification of 1km moisture from MoistureMap. The Murrumbidgee catchment is an 80,000km2 watershed located in south-eastern Australia, with a large diversity in climatic, topographic and land cover characteristics making it an excellent demonstration test-bed for SMOS Simulator and MoistureMap developments. The Murrumbidgee River Catchment has been instrumented and monitored for soil moisture and supporting data for more than 7 years. The existing network of monitoring sites, data management systems, data sets, and detailed knowledge of the catchment provide an ideal basis for the field work and data requirements of this study. The soil moisture prediction model to be used is CSIRO Atmosphere Biosphere Land Exchange (CABLE), a column model based on Richards

  12. Global Soil Moisture from the Aquarius/SAC-D Satellite: Description and Initial Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindlish, Rajat; Jackson, Thomas; Cosh, Michael; Zhao, Tianjie; O'Neil, Peggy

    2015-01-01

    Aquarius satellite observations over land offer a new resource for measuring soil moisture from space. Although Aquarius was designed for ocean salinity mapping, our objective in this investigation is to exploit the large amount of land observations that Aquarius acquires and extend the mission scope to include the retrieval of surface soil moisture. The soil moisture retrieval algorithm development focused on using only the radiometer data because of the extensive heritage of passive microwave retrieval of soil moisture. The single channel algorithm (SCA) was implemented using the Aquarius observations to estimate surface soil moisture. Aquarius radiometer observations from three beams (after bias/gain modification) along with the National Centers for Environmental Prediction model forecast surface temperatures were then used to retrieve soil moisture. Ancillary data inputs required for using the SCA are vegetation water content, land surface temperature, and several soil and vegetation parameters based on land cover classes. The resulting global spatial patterns of soil moisture were consistent with the precipitation climatology and with soil moisture from other satellite missions (Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for the Earth Observing System and Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity). Initial assessments were performed using in situ observations from the U.S. Department of Agriculture Little Washita and Little River watershed soil moisture networks. Results showed good performance by the algorithm for these land surface conditions for the period of August 2011-June 2013 (rmse = 0.031 m(exp 3)/m(exp 3), Bias = -0.007 m(exp 3)/m(exp 3), and R = 0.855). This radiometer-only soil moisture product will serve as a baseline for continuing research on both active and combined passive-active soil moisture algorithms. The products are routinely available through the National Aeronautics and Space Administration data archive at the National Snow and Ice Data Center.

  13. [Measuring microhardness of laser exposed tooth surface].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florin, R; Herrmann, C; Bernhardt, W

    1990-02-01

    In principle it is possible to homogenize the enamel surface by melting structural elements with the continuous wave CO2 laser. Using the precision instrument NEOPHOT 2 (Carl Zeiss JENA) the microhardness of extracted laserexposed premolares were tested so as to clarify the functional strain capasity and the mechanical characteristics of laserexposed regions of enamel surfaces. The proven higher hardness in the centre of the laserinduced fusing zones (in comparison with adjacent enamel) objectify an attainable refining of the enamel surface that probably causes an increase in the caries-preventive resistance.

  14. Evaluation of HCMM satellite data for estuarine tidal circulation patterns and thermal inertia soil moisture measurements. [Delaware Bay, Cooper River, and the Potomac River estuaries; Luverne, Minnesota, soil moisture, and water temperature of Lake Anna, Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesnet, D. R.; Mcginnis, D. F., Jr. (Principal Investigator); Matson, M.; Pritchard, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Digital thermal maps of the Cooper River (SC) and the Potomac River estuaries were prepared from heat capacity mapping radiometer (HCMR) tapes. Tidal phases were correctly interpreted and verified. Synoptic surface circulation patterns were charted by location thermal fronts and water mass boundaries within the estuaries. Thermal anomalies were detected adjacent of a conventional power plant on the Potomac. Under optimum conditions, estuaries as small as the Cooper River can be monitored for generalized thermal/tidal circulation patterns by the HCMM-type IR sensors. The HCMM thermal inertia approach to estimating soil moisture at the Luverne (MN) test site was found to be unsatisfactory as a NESS operational satellite technique because of cloud cover interference. Thermal-IR data show similar structure of the Baltimore and Washington heat islands when compared to NOAA AVHRR thermal-IR data. Thermal anomalies from the warm water discharge water of a nuclear power plant were mapped in Lake Anna, Virginia.

  15. The seating mechanics of head-neck modular tapers in vitro: Load-displacement measurements, moisture, and rate effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouellette, Eric S; Shenoy, Aarti A; Gilbert, Jeremy L

    2017-09-08

    The mechanically assisted crevice corrosion performance of head-neck modular tapers is a significant concern in orthopedic biomaterials. Fretting crevice corrosion processes in modular tapers are thought to be influenced by a wide array of factors including seating mechanics of the junction, hence there is a need for in vitro test methods that can assess their performance. This study presented a test method to directly measure the load-displacement seating mechanics of modular tapers and used this method to compare the seating mechanics for different tapers, moisture, seating loads and seating rates. Seating mechanics were explored whereby the instantaneous load-displacement behavior of the head seating onto the neck is captured and used to define the mechanics of seating. Two distinct taper design/material combinations were assembled wet or dry using axially applied loads (500, 1,000, 2,000, and 4,000 N) at two loading rates of 100 and 10 4  N/s (n = 5 for each condition) using a servohydraulic test frame. The results showed that pull-off strength scaled with seating load and ranged between 43% and 68% of seating load depending on sample and wetness. Tapers seated wet had higher pull-off strengths (2,200 ± 300 N) than those seated dry (1,800 ± 200 N, p mechanics (load-displacement plots) varied due to sample type and due to wetness with differences in seating energy, seating stiffness, and seating displacement. These results show the detailed mechanics of seating during assembly and provide significant insight into the complex interplay of factors associated with even "ideal" seating (axial, quasistatic) loading. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 9999:1-9, 2018. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Flexible Residential Test Facility: Impact of Infiltration and Ventilation on Measured Cooling Season Energy and Moisture Levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, D.; Kono, J.; Vieira, R.; Fairey, P.; Sherwin, J.; Withers, C.; Hoak, D.; Beal, D.

    2014-05-01

    Air infiltration and ventilation in residential buildings is a very large part of the heating loads, but empirical data regarding the impact on space cooling has been lacking. Moreover, there has been little data on how building tightness might relate to building interior moisture levels in homes in a hot and humid climate. To address this need, BA-PIRC has conducted research to assess the moisture and cooling load impacts of airtightness and mechanical ventilation in two identical laboratory homes in the hot-humid climate over the cooling season.

  17. Flexible Residential Test Facility: Impact of Infiltration and Ventilation on Measured Cooling Season Energy and Moisture Levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, Danny S. [BA-PIRC/Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States); Cummings, Jamie E. [BA-PIRC/Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States); Vieira, Robin K. [BA-PIRC/Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States); Fairey, III, Phillip W. [BA-PIRC/Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States); Sherwin, John S. [BA-PIRC/Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States); Withers, Jr., Charles [BA-PIRC/Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States); Hoak, David [BA-PIRC/Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States); Beal, David [BA-PIRC/Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Air infiltration and ventilation in residential buildings is a very large part of the heating loads, but empirical data regarding the impact on space cooling has been lacking. Moreover, there has been little data on how building tightness might relate to building interior moisture levels in homes in a hot and humid climate. To address this need, BA-PIRC has conducted research to assess the moisture and cooling load impacts of airtightness and mechanical ventilation in two identical laboratory homes in the hot-humid climate over the cooling season.

  18. Closing the scale gap between land surface parameterizations and GCMs with a new scheme, SiB3-Bins: SOIL MOISTURE SCALE GAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, I. T.; Sellers, P. J.; Denning, A. S.; Medina, I.; Kraus, P.

    2017-01-01

    The interaction of land with the atmosphere is sensitive to soil moisture (W). Evapotranspiration (ET) reacts to soil moisture in a nonlinear way, f(W), as soils dry from saturation to wilt point. This nonlinear behavior and the fact that soil moisture varies on scales as small as 1–10 m in nature, while numerical general circulation models (GCMs) have grid cell sizes on the order of 1 to 100s of kilometers, makes the calculation of grid cell-average ET problematic. It is impractical to simulate the land in GCMs on the small scales seen in nature, so techniques have been developed to represent subgrid scale heterogeneity, including: (1) statistical-dynamical representations of grid subelements of varying wetness, (2) relaxation of f(W), (3) moderating f(W) with approximations of catchment hydrology, (4) “tiling” the landscape into vegetation types, and (5) hyperresolution. Here we present an alternative method for representing subgrid variability in W, one proven in a conceptual framework where landscape-scale W is represented as a series of “Bins” of increasing wetness from dry to saturated. The grid cell-level f(W) is defined by the integral of the fractional area of the wetness bins and the value of f(W) associated with each. This approach accounts for the spatiotemporal dynamics of W. We implemented this approach in the SiB3 land surface parameterization and then evaluated its performance against a control, which assumes a horizontally uniform field of W. We demonstrate that the Bins method, with a physical basis, attenuates unrealistic jumps in model state and ET seen in the control runs.

  19. Effects of atmospheric moisture on rock resistivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, R.

    1973-01-01

    This study examines the changes in resistivity of rock samples as induced by atmospheric moisture. Experiments were performed on samples of hematitic sandstone, pyrite, and galena. The sandstone underwent a change in resistivity of four orders of magnitude when it was measured in a vacuum of 500 ntorr and in air of 37% relative humidity. Pyrite and galena showed no variations in resistivity when they were measured under the same conditions. These results, plus others obtained elsewhere, indicate that rocks of the resistive type are affected in their electrical properties by atmospheric moisture, whereas rocks of the conductive type are not. The experimental evidence obtained is difficult to reconcile with a model of aqueous electrolytic conduction on the sample surface. It is instead suggested that adsorbed water molecules alter the surface resistivity in a manner similar to that observed in semiconductors and insulators.

  20. Surface texturing of crystalline silicon and effective area measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tietun; Chen, Dong; Chui, Rongqiang

    2000-11-01

    In this paper, the surface area of solar cell is determined by the capacitance measurements of MOS structure. The texture etching technology can be controlled according to the change of silicon surface area, furthermore, the textured silicon surface and interface characteristic of solar cell can be studied by measuring the relationship of capacitance and voltage for MOS structure.

  1. A Modified Kriging Method to Interpolate the Soil Moisture Measured by Wireless Sensor Network with the Aid of Remote Sensing Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Liu, Q.; Li, X.; Niu, H.; Cai, E.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, wireless sensor network (WSN) emerges to collect Earth observation data at relatively low cost and light labor load, while its observations are still point-data. To learn the spatial distribution of a land surface parameter, interpolating the point data is necessary. Taking soil moisture (SM) for example, its spatial distribution is critical information for agriculture management, hydrological and ecological researches. This study developed a method to interpolate the WSN-measured SM to acquire the spatial distribution in a 5km*5km study area, located in the middle reaches of HEIHE River, western China. As SM is related to many factors such as topology, soil type, vegetation and etc., even the WSN observation