WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface mixed layers

  1. Tests of Parameterized Langmuir Circulation Mixing in the Oceans Surface Mixed Layer II

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-11

    zero in deep mixed layers below the influence of the surface waves. When the SDC is zero, the GV and GS functions ((29) and (30)) will be zero, and...current and do not include the SDC. With the inclusion of the SDC in the Coriolis term in the momentum equations, the net transport of u is not zero, but...balances the net transport of the SDC us, so that the combined net downwind transport of the Eulerian current plus the SDC is zero. Hence, since the

  2. Shear rheology of mixed protein adsorption layers vs their structure studied by surface force measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danov, Krassimir D; Kralchevsky, Peter A; Radulova, Gergana M; Basheva, Elka S; Stoyanov, Simeon D; Pelan, Eddie G

    2015-08-01

    The hydrophobins are proteins that form the most rigid adsorption layers at liquid interfaces in comparison with all other investigated proteins. The mixing of hydrophobin HFBII with other conventional proteins is expected to reduce the surface shear elasticity and viscosity, E(sh) and η(sh), proportional to the fraction of the conventional protein. However, the experiments show that the effect of mixing can be rather different depending on the nature of the additive. If the additive is a globular protein, like β-lactoglobulin and ovalbumin, the surface rigidity is preserved, and even enhanced. The experiments with separate foam films indicate that this is due to the formation of a bilayer structure at the air/water interface. The more hydrophobic HFBII forms the upper layer adjacent to the air phase, whereas the conventional globular protein forms the lower layer that faces the water phase. Thus, the elastic network formed by the adsorbed hydrophobin remains intact, and even reinforced by the adjacent layer of globular protein. In contrast, the addition of the disordered protein β-casein leads to softening of the HFBII adsorption layer. Similar (an even stronger) effect is produced by the nonionic surfactant Tween 20. This can be explained with the penetration of the hydrophobic tails of β-casein and Tween 20 between the HFBII molecules at the interface, which breaks the integrity of the hydrophobin interfacial elastic network. The analyzed experimental data for the surface shear rheology of various protein adsorption layers comply with a viscoelastic thixotropic model, which allows one to determine E(sh) and η(sh) from the measured storage and loss moduli, G' and G″. The results could contribute for quantitative characterization and deeper understanding of the factors that control the surface rigidity of protein adsorption layers with potential application for the creation of stable foams and emulsions with fine bubbles or droplets. Copyright © 2014

  3. Chlorophyll modulation of sea surface temperature in the Arabian Sea in a mixed-layer isopycnal general circulation model

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nakamoto, S.; PrasannaKumar, S.; Muneyama, K.; Frouin, R.

    Remotely sensed chlorophyll pigment concentrations from the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) are used to estimate biological heating rate and investigate the biological modulation of the sea surface temperature (SST) in a bulk mixed layer model...

  4. Variable but persistent coexistence of Prochlorococcus ecotypes along temperature gradients in the ocean's surface mixed layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Jeremy W; Lin, Yajuan; Gainer, P Jackson; Post, Anton F; Johnson, Zackary I; Zinser, Erik R

    2016-04-01

    The vast majority of the phytoplankton communities in surface mixed layer of the oligotrophic ocean are numerically dominated by one of two ecotypes of Prochlorococcus, eMIT9312 or eMED4. In this study, we surveyed large latitudinal transects in the Atlantic and Pacific Ocean to determine if these ecotypes discretely partition the surface mixed layer niche, or if populations exist as a continuum along key environmental gradients, particularly temperature. Transitions of dominance occurred at approximately 19-21°C, with the eMED4 ecotype dominating the colder, and eMIT9312 ecotype dominating the warmer regions. Within these zones of regional dominance, however, the minority ecotype was not competed to extinction. Rather, a robust log-linear relationship between ecotype ratio and temperature characterized this stabilized coexistence: for every 2.5°C increase in temperature, the eMIT9312:eMED4 ratio increased by an order of magnitude. This relationship was observed in both quantitative polymerase chain reaction and in pyrosequencing assays. Water column stratification also contributed to the ecotype ratio along the basin-scale transects, but to a lesser extent. Finally, instances where the ratio of the eMED4 and eMIT9312 abundances did not correlate well with temperature were identified. Such occurrences are likely due to changes in water temperatures outpacing changes in community structure. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The warmer the ocean surface, the shallower the mixed layer. How much of this is true?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somavilla, R; González-Pola, C; Fernández-Diaz, J

    2017-09-01

    Ocean surface warming is commonly associated with a more stratified, less productive, and less oxygenated ocean. Such an assertion is mainly based on consistent projections of increased near-surface stratification and shallower mixed layers under global warming scenarios. However, while the observed sea surface temperature (SST) is rising at midlatitudes, the concurrent ocean record shows that stratification is not unequivocally increasing nor is MLD shoaling. We find that while SST increases at three study areas at midlatitudes, stratification both increases and decreases, and MLD deepens with enhanced deepening of winter MLDs at rates over 10 m  decade-1. These results rely on the estimation of several MLD and stratification indexes of different complexity on hydrographic profiles from long-term hydrographic time-series, ocean reanalysis, and Argo floats. Combining this information with estimated MLDs from buoyancy fluxes and the enhanced deepening/attenuation of the winter MLD trends due to changes in the Ekman pumping, MLD variability involves a subtle interplay between circulation and atmospheric forcing at midlatitudes. Besides, it is highlighted that the density difference between the surface and 200 m, the most widely used stratification index, should not be expected to reliably inform about changes in the vertical extent of mixing.

  6. The warmer the ocean surface, the shallower the mixed layer. How much of this is true?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somavilla, R.; González-Pola, C.; Fernández-Diaz, J.

    2017-09-01

    Ocean surface warming is commonly associated with a more stratified, less productive, and less oxygenated ocean. Such an assertion is mainly based on consistent projections of increased near-surface stratification and shallower mixed layers under global warming scenarios. However, while the observed sea surface temperature (SST) is rising at midlatitudes, the concurrent ocean record shows that stratification is not unequivocally increasing nor is MLD shoaling. We find that while SST increases at three study areas at midlatitudes, stratification both increases and decreases, and MLD deepens with enhanced deepening of winter MLDs at rates over 10 m decade-1. These results rely on the estimation of several MLD and stratification indexes of different complexity on hydrographic profiles from long-term hydrographic time-series, ocean reanalysis, and Argo floats. Combining this information with estimated MLDs from buoyancy fluxes and the enhanced deepening/attenuation of the winter MLD trends due to changes in the Ekman pumping, MLD variability involves a subtle interplay between circulation and atmospheric forcing at midlatitudes. Besides, it is highlighted that the density difference between the surface and 200 m, the most widely used stratification index, should not be expected to reliably inform about changes in the vertical extent of mixing.

  7. Chalk-Ex: Transport of Optically Active Particles from the Surface Mixed Layer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Plueddemann, Albert J

    2005-01-01

    ... (from Cretaceous chalk) were injected into the mixed layer to create a "chalk patch". Experiments were performed at two stations, one mesotrophic and one eutrophic, during two times of the year, June and November...

  8. Stability of mixing layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Christopher; Krothapalli, A

    1993-01-01

    The research program for the first year of this project (see the original research proposal) consists of developing an explicit marching scheme for solving the parabolized stability equations (PSE). Performing mathematical analysis of the computational algorithm including numerical stability analysis and the determination of the proper boundary conditions needed at the boundary of the computation domain are implicit in the task. Before one can solve the parabolized stability equations for high-speed mixing layers, the mean flow must first be found. In the past, instability analysis of high-speed mixing layer has mostly been performed on mean flow profiles calculated by the boundary layer equations. In carrying out this project, it is believed that the boundary layer equations might not give an accurate enough nonparallel, nonlinear mean flow needed for parabolized stability analysis. A more accurate mean flow can, however, be found by solving the parabolized Navier-Stokes equations. The advantage of the parabolized Navier-Stokes equations is that its accuracy is consistent with the PSE method. Furthermore, the method of solution is similar. Hence, the major part of the effort of the work of this year has been devoted to the development of an explicit numerical marching scheme for the solution of the Parabolized Navier-Stokes equation as applied to the high-seed mixing layer problem.

  9. Mixing height over water and its role on the correlation between temperature and humidity fluctuations in the unstable surface layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sempreviva, A.M.; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    2000-01-01

    Results from an experimental investigation of the mixing height over inner Danish waters carried out from September 1990 to October 1992, are discussed. The statistical analysis of the mixed-layer height (z(i)) over the sea does not exhibit the daily variation that is characteristic of the mixed ...

  10. Turbulent Mixing and Vertical Heat Transfer in the Surface Mixed Layer of the Arctic Ocean: Implication of a Cross-Pycnocline High-Temperature Anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Yusuke; Takeda, Hiroki

    2017-04-01

    This study focuses on the mixing processes in the vicinity of surface mixed layer (SML) of the Arctic Ocean. Turbulence activity and vertical heat transfer are quantitatively characterized in the Northwind Abyssal Plain, based on the RV Mirai Arctic cruise, during the transition from late summer to early winter 2014. During the cruise, noticeable storm events were observed, which came over the ship's location and contributed to the deepening of the SML. According to the ship-based microstructure observation, within the SML, the strong wind events produced enhanced dissipation rates of turbulent kinetic energy in the order of magnitude of ɛ = 10-6-10-4W kg-1. On thermal variance dissipation rate, χ increases toward the base of SML, reaching O(10-7) K2 s-1, resulting in vertical heat flux of O(10) W m-2. During the occasional energetic mixing events, the near-surface warm water was transferred downward and penetrated through the SML base, creating a cross-pycnocline high-temperature anomaly (CPHTA) at approximately 20-30 m depth. Near CPHTA, the vertical heat flux was anomalously magnified to O(10-100) W m-2. Following the fixed-point observation, in the regions of marginal and thick ice zones, the SML heat content was monitored using an autonomous drifting buoy, UpTempO. During most of the ice-covered period, the ocean-to-ice turbulent heat flux was dominant, rather than the diapycnal heat transfer across the SML bottom interface.

  11. The role of snow-surface coupling, radiation, and turbulent mixing in modeling a stable boundary layer over Arctic sea ice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, H.A.M.; Steeneveld, G.J.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    To enhance the understanding of the impact of small-scale processes in the polar climate, this study focuses on the relative role of snow-surface coupling, radiation and turbulent mixing in an Arctic stable boundary layer. We extend the GABLS1 (GEWEX Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Study 1) model

  12. On the annual cycle of the sea surface temperature and the mixed layer depth in the Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza, V.M.; Villanueva, E.E.; Adem, J. [Centro de Ciencias de la Atmosfera, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, UNAM, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-04-01

    Using an integrated mixed layer model, we carry out a simulation of the annual cycle of the sea surface temperature (SST) and of the mixed layer depth (MLD) in the Gulf of Mexico. We also compute the annual cycle of the entrainment velocity in the deepest region of the Gulf of Mexico. The model is based on the thermal energy equation and on an equation of mechanical and thermal energy balance based on the Kraus-Turner theory; both equation are coupled and are vertically integrated in the mixed layer. The model equations are solved in a uniform grid of 25 km in the Gulf of Mexico, the northwestern region of the Caribbean Sea and the eastern coast of Florida. The surface ocean current velocity and the atmospheric variables are prescribed in the model using observed values. We show the importance of the Ekman pumping in the entrainment velocity. We found that the upwelling plays an important role in increasing the entrainment velocity, producing an important reduction in the SST and diminishing the depth of the mixed layer in the Campeche Bay. In the rest of the Gulf of Mexico the downwelling tends to reduce the entrainment velocity, increasing the SST and the MLD. Comparison of the computed annual cycle of the SST and the MLD with the corresponding observations reported by Robinson (1973) shows a good agreement. In the deepest region of the Gulf of Mexico, the photosynthetic pigment concentration data obtained from the Mexican Pacific Cd-Rom of environmental analysis shows significant correlation with the computed annual cycle of the computed entrainment velocity only in January, April, May, June and September. [Spanish] Usando un modelo integrado en la capa de mezcla hemos obtenido una simulacion del ciclo anual de la temperatura de la superficie del mar (SST), de la profundidad de la capa de mezcla (MLD) en el Golfo de Mexico, asi como el ciclo anual de la velocidad de penetracion vertical turbulenta a traves de la termoclina en la region mas profunda del golfo de

  13. Martian Mixed Layer during Pathfinder Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, G. M.; Valero, F.; Vazquez, L.

    2008-09-01

    In situ measurements of the Martian Planetary Boundary Layer (MPBL) encompass only the sur- face layer. Therefore, in order to fully address the MPBL, it becomes necessary to simulate somehow the behaviour of the martian mixed layer. The small-scale processes that happen in the MPBL cause GCM's ([1], [2]) to describe only partially the turbulent statistics, height, convective scales, etc, of the surface layer and the mixed layer. For this reason, 2D and 3D martian mesoscale models ([4], [5]), and large eddy simulations ([4], [6], [7], [8]) have been designed in the last years. Although they are expected to simulate more accurately the MPBL, they take an extremely expensive compu- tational time. Alternatively, we have derived the main turbu- lent characteristics of the martian mixed layer by using surface layer and mixed layer similarity ([9], [10]). From in situ temperature and wind speed measurements, together with quality-tested simu- lated ground temperature [11], we have character- ized the martian mixed layer during the convective hours of Pathfinder mission Sol 25. Mean mixed layer turbulent statistics like tem- perature variance , horizontal wind speed variance , vertical wind speed variance , viscous dissipation rate , and turbu- lent kinetic energy have been calculated, as well as the mixed layer height zi, and the convective scales of wind w? and temperature θ?. Our values, obtained with negligible time cost, match quite well with some previously obtained results via LES's ([4] and [8]). A comparisson between the above obtained mar- tian values and the typical Earth values are shown in Table 1. Convective velocity scale w doubles its counterpart terrestrial typical value, as it does the mean wind speed variances and . On the other hand, the temperature scale θ? and the mean temperature variance are virtually around one order higher on Mars. The limitations of these results concern the va- lidity of the convective mixed layer similarity. This theory

  14. Marine isoprene production and consumption in the mixed layer of the surface ocean - a field study over two oceanic regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booge, Dennis; Schlundt, Cathleen; Bracher, Astrid; Endres, Sonja; Zäncker, Birthe; Marandino, Christa A.

    2018-02-01

    Parameterizations of surface ocean isoprene concentrations are numerous, despite the lack of source/sink process understanding. Here we present isoprene and related field measurements in the mixed layer from the Indian Ocean and the eastern Pacific Ocean to investigate the production and consumption rates in two contrasting regions, namely oligotrophic open ocean and the coastal upwelling region. Our data show that the ability of different phytoplankton functional types (PFTs) to produce isoprene seems to be mainly influenced by light, ocean temperature, and salinity. Our field measurements also demonstrate that nutrient availability seems to have a direct influence on the isoprene production. With the help of pigment data, we calculate in-field isoprene production rates for different PFTs under varying biogeochemical and physical conditions. Using these new calculated production rates, we demonstrate that an additional significant and variable loss, besides a known chemical loss and a loss due to air-sea gas exchange, is needed to explain the measured isoprene concentration. We hypothesize that this loss, with a lifetime for isoprene between 10 and 100 days depending on the ocean region, is potentially due to degradation or consumption by bacteria.

  15. Mixed convection boundary-layer flow from a horizontal circular cylinder with a constant surface heat flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazar, R.; Amin, N. [Department of Mathematics, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Pop, I. [Faculty of Mathematics, University of Cluj, R-3400 Cluj, CP 253 (Romania)

    2004-02-01

    The laminar mixed convection boundary-layer flow of a viscous and incompressible fluid past a horizontal circular cylinder, which is maintained at a constant heat flux and is placed in a stream flowing vertically upward has been theoretically studied in this paper. The solutions for the flow and heat transfer characteristics are evaluated numerically for different values of the mixed convection parameter {lambda} with the Prandtl number Pr = 1 and 7, respectively. It is found, as for the case of a heated or cooled cylinder, considered by Merkin [5], that assisting flow delays separation of the boundary-layer and can, if the assisting flow is strong enough, suppress it completely. The opposing flow, on the other side, brings the separation point nearer to the lower stagnation point and for sufficiently strong opposing flows there will not be a boundary-layer on the cylinder. (orig.)

  16. Mixing in straight shear layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasso, P. S.; Mungal, M. G.

    1992-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence measurements were performed in a liquid plane mixing layer to extract the probability density function (pdf) of the mixture fraction of a passive scalar across the layer. Three Reynolds number (Re) cases were studied, 10,000, 33,000 and 90,000, with Re based on velocity difference and visual thickness. The results show that a non-marching pdf (central hump invariant from edge to edge of the layer) exists for Re = 10,000 but that a marching type pdf characterizes the Re = 33,000 and Re = 90,000 cases. For all cases, a broad range of mixture fraction values is found at each location across the layer. Streamwise and spanwise ramps across the layer, and structure-to-structure variation were observed and are believed to be responsible for the above behavior of the composition field. Tripping the boundary layer on the high-speed side of the splitter plate for each of the above three cases resulted in increased three-dimensionality and a change in the composition field. Average and average mixed fluid compositions are reported for all cases.

  17. Music Mixing Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gelineck, Steven; Büchert, Morten; Andersen, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a multi-touch based interface for mixing music. The goal of the interface is to provide users with a more intuitive control of the music mix by implementing the so-called stage metaphor control scheme, which is especially suitable for multi-touch surfaces. Specifically, we...... discuss functionality important for the professional music technician (main target user) - functionality, which is especially challenging to integrate when implementing the stage metaphor. Finally we propose and evaluate solutions to these challenges....

  18. Numerical modelling of the atmospheric mixing-layer diurnal evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molnary, L. de.

    1990-03-01

    This paper introduce a numeric procedure to determine the temporal evolution of the height, potential temperature and mixing ratio in the atmospheric mixing layer. The time and spatial derivatives were evaluated via forward in time scheme to predict the local evolution of the mixing-layer parameters, and a forward in time, upstream in space scheme to predict the evolution of the mixing-layer over a flat region with a one-dimensional advection component. The surface turbulent fluxes of sensible and latent heat were expressed using a simple sine wave that is function of the hour day and kind of the surface (water or country). (author) [pt

  19. Nomogram for the height of the daytime mixed layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyren, K.; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    1999-01-01

    A method to construct a nomogram of the daytime mixed-layer-height evolution is presented. The nomogram will be specific for a given location and land surface type and is intended to be an easy tool to achieve a general understanding of mixed-layer behaviour. Also it is a pedagogical graphical on...

  20. Effect of Variable Viscosity on Vortex Instability of Non-Darcy Mixed Convection Boundary Layer Flow Adjacent to a Nonisothermal Horizontal Surface in a Porous Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Elaiw

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the effect of variable viscosity on the flow and vortex instability for non-Darcy mixed convection boundary layer flow on a nonisothermal horizontal plat surface in a saturated porous medium. The variation of viscosity is expressed as an exponential function of temperature. The analysis of the disturbance flow is based on linear stability theory. The base flow equations and the resulting eigenvalue problem are solved using finite difference schemes. It is found that the variable viscosity effect enhances the heat transfer rate and destabilizes the flow for liquid heating, while the opposite trend is true for gas heating.

  1. The salinity effect in a mixed layer ocean model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    A model of the thermally mixed layer in the upper ocean as developed by Kraus and Turner and extended by Denman is further extended to investigate the effects of salinity. In the tropical and subtropical Atlantic Ocean rapid increases in salinity occur at the bottom of a uniformly mixed surface layer. The most significant effects produced by the inclusion of salinity are the reduction of the deepening rate and the corresponding change in the heating characteristics of the mixed layer. If the net surface heating is positive, but small, salinity effects must be included to determine whether the mixed layer temperature will increase or decrease. Precipitation over tropical oceans leads to the development of a shallow stable layer accompanied by a decrease in the temperature and salinity at the sea surface.

  2. Variability of the Mixed-Layer Height Over Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Franco, J. L.; Stremme, W.; Bezanilla, A.; Ruiz-Angulo, A.; Grutter, M.

    2018-02-01

    The diurnal and seasonal variability of the mixed-layer height in urban areas has implications for ground-level air pollution and the meteorological conditions. Measurements of the backscatter of light pulses with a commercial lidar system were performed for a continuous period of almost six years between 2011 and 2016 in the southern part of Mexico City. The profiles were temporally and vertically smoothed, clouds were filtered out, and the mixed-layer height was determined with an ad hoc treatment of both the filtered and unfiltered profiles. The results are in agreement when compared with values of mixed-layer height reconstructed from, (i) radiosonde data, and (ii) surface and vertical column densities of a trace gas. The daily maxima of the mean mixed-layer height reach values > 3 km above ground level in the months of March-April, and are clearly lower (pollution episodes and the height of the mixed layer. The growth rate of the convective mixed-layer height has a seasonal behaviour, which is characterized together with the mixed-layer-height anomalies. A clear residual layer is evident from the backscattered signals recorded in days with specific atmospheric conditions, but also from the cloud-filtered mean diurnal profiles. The occasional presence of a residual layer results in an overestimation of the reported mixed-layer height during the night and early morning hours.

  3. Chlorophyll modulation of mixed layer thermodynamics in a mixed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 111; Issue 3. Chlorophyll modulation of mixed layer thermodynamics in a mixed-layer isopycnal General Circulation Model - An example from Arabian Sea and equatorial Pacific. S Nakamoto S Prasanna Kumar J M Oberhuber H Saito K Muneyama R Frouin.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulations of the electrical double layer on smectite surfaces contacting concentrated mixed electrolyte (NaCl-CaCl2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

    2011-04-01

    We report new molecular dynamics results elucidating the structure of the electrical double layer (EDL) on smectite surfaces contacting mixed NaCl-CaCl{sup 2} electrolyte solutions in the range of concentrations relevant to pore waters in geologic repositories for CO{sub 2} or high-level radioactive waste (0.34-1.83 mol{sub c} dm{sup -3}). Our results confirm the existence of three distinct ion adsorption planes (0-, {beta}-, and d-planes), often assumed in EDL models, but with two important qualifications: (1) the location of the {beta}- and d-planes are independent of ionic strength or ion type and (2) 'indifferent electrolyte' ions can occupy all three planes. Charge inversion occurred in the diffuse ion swarm because of the affinity of the clay surface for CaCl{sup +} ion pairs. Therefore, at concentrations 0.34 mol{sub c} dm{sup -3}, properties arising from long-range electrostatics at interfaces (electrophoresis, electro-osmosis, co-ion exclusion, colloidal aggregation) will not be correctly predicted by most EDL models. Co-ion exclusion, typically neglected by surface speciation models, balanced a large part of the clay mineral structural charge in the more concentrated solutions. Water molecules and ions diffused relatively rapidly even in the first statistical water monolayer, contradicting reports of rigid 'ice-like' structures for water on clay mineral surfaces.

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of the electrical double layer on smectite surfaces contacting concentrated mixed electrolyte (NaCl-CaCl₂) solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourg, Ian C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sposito, Garrison [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    We report new molecular dynamics results elucidating the structure of the electrical double layer (EDL) on smectite surfaces contacting mixed NaCl–CaCl2 electrolyte solutions in the range of concentrations relevant to pore waters in geologic repositories for CO2 or high-level radioactive waste (0.34–1.83 molc dm-3). Our results confirm the existence of three distinct ion adsorption planes (0-, β-, and d-planes), often assumed in EDL models, but with two important qualifications: (1) the location of the β- and d-planes are independent of ionic strength or ion type and (2) “indifferent electrolyte” ions can occupy all three planes. Charge inversion occurred in the diffuse ion swarm because of the affinity of the clay surface for CaCl+ ion pairs. Therefore, at concentrations {>=0.34 molc dm-3}, properties arising from long-range electrostatics at interfaces (electrophoresis, electro-osmosis, co-ion exclusion, colloidal aggregation) will not be correctly predicted by most EDL models. Co-ion exclusion, typically neglected by surface speciation models, balanced a large part of the clay mineral structural charge in the more concentrated solutions. Water molecules and ions diffused relatively rapidly even in the first statistical water monolayer, contradicting reports of rigid “ice-like” structures for water on clay mineral surfaces.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations of the electrical double layer on smectite surfaces contacting concentrated mixed electrolyte (NaCl-CaCl2) solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourg, Ian C; Sposito, Garrison

    2011-08-15

    We report new molecular dynamics results elucidating the structure of the electrical double layer (EDL) on smectite surfaces contacting mixed NaCl-CaCl(2) electrolyte solutions in the range of concentrations relevant to pore waters in geologic repositories for CO(2) or high-level radioactive waste (0.34-1.83 mol(c) dm(-3)). Our results confirm the existence of three distinct ion adsorption planes (0-, β-, and d-planes), often assumed in EDL models, but with two important qualifications: (1) the location of the β- and d-planes are independent of ionic strength or ion type and (2) "indifferent electrolyte" ions can occupy all three planes. Charge inversion occurred in the diffuse ion swarm because of the affinity of the clay surface for CaCl(+) ion pairs. Therefore, at concentrations ≥0.34 mol(c) dm(-3), properties arising from long-range electrostatics at interfaces (electrophoresis, electro-osmosis, co-ion exclusion, colloidal aggregation) will not be correctly predicted by most EDL models. Co-ion exclusion, typically neglected by surface speciation models, balanced a large part of the clay mineral structural charge in the more concentrated solutions. Water molecules and ions diffused relatively rapidly even in the first statistical water monolayer, contradicting reports of rigid "ice-like" structures for water on clay mineral surfaces. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations of the electrical double layer on smectite surfaces contacting concentrated mixed electrolyte (NaCl-CaCl2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

    2011-01-01

    We report new molecular dynamics results elucidating the structure of the electrical double layer (EDL) on smectite surfaces contacting mixed NaCl-CaCl 2 electrolyte solutions in the range of concentrations relevant to pore waters in geologic repositories for CO 2 or high-level radioactive waste (0.34-1.83 mol c dm -3 ). Our results confirm the existence of three distinct ion adsorption planes (0-, β-, and d-planes), often assumed in EDL models, but with two important qualifications: (1) the location of the β- and d-planes are independent of ionic strength or ion type and (2) 'indifferent electrolyte' ions can occupy all three planes. Charge inversion occurred in the diffuse ion swarm because of the affinity of the clay surface for CaCl + ion pairs. Therefore, at concentrations 0.34 mol c dm -3 , properties arising from long-range electrostatics at interfaces (electrophoresis, electro-osmosis, co-ion exclusion, colloidal aggregation) will not be correctly predicted by most EDL models. Co-ion exclusion, typically neglected by surface speciation models, balanced a large part of the clay mineral structural charge in the more concentrated solutions. Water molecules and ions diffused relatively rapidly even in the first statistical water monolayer, contradicting reports of rigid 'ice-like' structures for water on clay mineral surfaces.

  8. Sediment mixed layer as a proxy for benthic ecosystem process and function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teal, L.R.; Parker, E.R.; Solan, M.

    2010-01-01

    Faunal mediated particle and porewater mixing (bioturbation) alters the structure of the surface sediment layer, forming a distinct mixed layer, where the majority of organic matter degradation takes place. Current methods of assessing benthic habitat quality often reference this mixed layer as an

  9. Chlorophyll modulation of mixed layer thermodynamics in a mixed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Senthilkumar (Newgen Imaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    ing solar radiation is trapped due to phytoplankton at upper layers (from surface to 35m), while the lower layers (from 65m to 80m) does not receive the same solar energy as before the chlorophyll blooming in the previous month. In the equatorial Pacific where horizontal advec- tion effect is important, the effect of chlorophyll.

  10. Cumulus cloud venting of mixed layer ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, J. K. S.; Shipley, S. T.; Browell, E. V.; Brewer, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Observations are presented which substantiate the hypothesis that significant vertical exchange of ozone and aerosols occurs between the mixed layer and the free troposphere during cumulus cloud convective activity. The experiments utilized the airborne Ultra-Violet Differential Absorption Lidar (UV-DIAL) system. This system provides simultaneous range resolved ozone concentration and aerosol backscatter profiles with high spatial resolution. Evening transects were obtained in the downwind area where the air mass had been advected. Space-height analyses for the evening flight show the cloud debris as patterns of ozone typically in excess of the ambient free tropospheric background. This ozone excess was approximately the value of the concentration difference between the mixed layer and free troposphere determined from independent vertical soundings made by another aircraft in the afternoon.

  11. Mixed convection in fluid superposed porous layers

    CERN Document Server

    Dixon, John M

    2017-01-01

    This Brief describes and analyzes flow and heat transport over a liquid-saturated porous bed. The porous bed is saturated by a liquid layer and heating takes place from a section of the bottom. The effect on flow patterns of heating from the bottom is shown by calculation, and when the heating is sufficiently strong, the flow is affected through the porous and upper liquid layers. Measurements of the heat transfer rate from the heated section confirm calculations. General heat transfer laws are developed for varying porous bed depths for applications to process industry needs, environmental sciences, and materials processing. Addressing a topic of considerable interest to the research community, the brief features an up-to-date literature review of mixed convection energy transport in fluid superposed porous layers.

  12. Eddy dynamics in the Southern Ocean: How does the interaction of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current with sea-bed topography influence the surface mixed layer and hence the carbon-climate feedback processes?

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kobo, N

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Ocean: How does the interaction of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current with sea-bed topography infl uence the surface mixed layer and hence the carbon-climate feedback processes N KOBO, S HERBETTE, PMS MONTEIRO AND C REASON CSIR Natural Resources... encounters topography the generation of mesoscale features (such as eddies) can result. These mesoscale features influence water mass formation, meridional heat transport and carbon dioxide uptake[2]. This project investigates the how. METHODS...

  13. Mixed-layer carbon cycling at the Kuroshio Extension Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassbender, Andrea J.; Sabine, Christopher L.; Cronin, Meghan F.; Sutton, Adrienne J.

    2017-02-01

    Seven years of data from the NOAA Kuroshio Extension Observatory (KEO) surface mooring, located in the North Pacific Ocean carbon sink region, were used to evaluate drivers of mixed-layer carbon cycling. A time-dependent mass balance approach relying on two carbon tracers was used to diagnostically evaluate how surface ocean processes influence mixed-layer carbon concentrations over the annual cycle. Results indicate that the annual physical carbon input is predominantly balanced by biological carbon uptake during the intense spring bloom. Net annual gas exchange that adds carbon to the mixed layer and the opposing influence of net precipitation that dilutes carbon concentrations make up smaller contributions to the annual mixed-layer carbon budget. Decomposing the biological term into annual net community production (aNCP) and calcium carbonate production (aCaCO3) yields 7 ± 3 mol C m-2 yr-1 aNCP and 0.5 ± 0.3 mol C m-2 yr-1 aCaCO3, giving an annually integrated particulate inorganic carbon to particulate organic carbon production ratio of 0.07 ± 0.05, as a lower limit. Although we find that vertical physical processes dominate carbon input to the mixed layer at KEO, it remains unclear how horizontal features, such as eddies, influence carbon production and export by altering nutrient supply as well as the depth of winter ventilation. Further research evaluating linkages between Kuroshio Extension jet instabilities, eddy activity, and nutrient supply mechanisms is needed to adequately characterize the drivers and sensitivities of carbon cycling near KEO.

  14. Linear stability analysis of interactions between mixing layer and boundary layer flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengjun LIU

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The linear instabilities of incompressible confluent mixing layer and boundary layer were analyzed. The mixing layers include wake, shear layer and their combination. The mean velocity profile of confluent flow is taken as a superposition of a hyperbolic and exponential function to model a mixing layer and the Blasius similarity solution for a flat plate boundary layer. The stability equation of confluent flow was solved by using the global numerical method. The unstable modes associated with both the mixing and boundary layers were identified. They are the boundary layer mode, mixing layer mode 1 (nearly symmetrical mode and mode 2 (nearly anti-symmetrical mode. The interactions between the mixing layer stability and the boundary layer stability were examined. As the mixing layer approaches the boundary layer, the neutral curves of the boundary layer mode move to the upper left, the resulting critical Reynolds number decreases, and the growth rate of the most unstable mode increases. The wall tends to stabilize the mixing layer modes at low frequency. In addition, the mode switching behavior of the relative level of the spatial growth rate between the mixing layer mode 1 and mode 2 with the velocity ratio is found to occur at low frequency.

  15. Dynamic air layer on textured superhydrophobic surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2013-09-03

    We provide an experimental demonstration that a novel macroscopic, dynamic continuous air layer or plastron can be sustained indefinitely on textured superhydrophobic surfaces in air-supersaturated water by a natural gas influx mechanism. This type of plastron is an intermediate state between Leidenfrost vapor layers on superheated surfaces and the equilibrium Cassie-Baxter wetting state on textured superhydrophobic surfaces. We show that such a plastron can be sustained on the surface of a centimeter-sized superhydrophobic sphere immersed in heated water and variations of its dynamic behavior with air saturation of the water can be regulated by rapid changes of the water temperature. The simple experimental setup allows for quantification of the air flux into the plastron and identification of the air transport model of the plastron growth. Both the observed growth dynamics of such plastrons and millimeter-sized air bubbles seeded on the hydrophilic surface under identical air-supersaturated solution conditions are consistent with the predictions of a well-mixed gas transport model. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  16. Effects of Thermobaricity on Coupled Ice-Mixed Layer Thermodynamics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roth, Mathias

    2003-01-01

    .... This density structure often leads to entrainment and affects both the mixed layer depth and the ice thickness, Thermobaricity, the combined dependence of seawater thermal expansion on temperature...

  17. Single-layer model for surface roughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carniglia, C K; Jensen, D G

    2002-06-01

    Random roughness of an optical surface reduces its specular reflectance and transmittance by the scattering of light. The reduction in reflectance can be modeled by a homogeneous layer on the surface if the refractive index of the layer is intermediate to the indices of the media on either side of the surface. Such a layer predicts an increase in the transmittance of the surface and therefore does not provide a valid model for the effects of scatter on the transmittance. Adding a small amount of absorption to the layer provides a model that predicts a reduction in both reflectance and transmittance. The absorbing layer model agrees with the predictions of a scalar scattering theory for a layer with a thickness that is twice the rms roughness of the surface. The extinction coefficient k for the layer is proportional to the thickness of the layer.

  18. Applied model for the growth of the daytime mixed layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batchvarova, E.; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    1991-01-01

    A slab model is proposed for developing the height of the mixed layer capped by stable air aloft. The model equations are closed by relating the consumption of energy (potential and kinetic) at the top of the mixed layer to the production of convective and mechanical turbulent kinetic energy with...

  19. Temperature Versus Salinity Gradients Below the Ocean Mixed Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-03

    13] The effects of density compensated gradients below the mixed layer are not limited to ocean circulation and cli- mate. Since sound speed and...The Impact of Spice on Ocean circulation . The second is the 6.2 program element 62435N Full Column Mixing for Numerical Ocean Models. The authors would...and F. Paparella (2003), Compensation and alignment of thermohaline gradients in the ocean mixed layer, J. Phys. Oceanogr., 33, 2214–2223, doi

  20. Sound generation in coflow and counterflow mixing layers

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Ge; Gloerfelt, Xavier; Robinet, Jean-Christophe

    2010-01-01

    National audience; In this study, nonlinear disturbance equations are solved in two and three dimensions to investigate the sound generated by compressible plane mixing layers. Two flow regimes are distinguished : coflow and counterflow mixing layers. The simulations of coflow shear layers has been carried out in two- and threedimensions. In both cases, the main radiation is attributed to the pairing events leading to a quadrupolar signature. The convective nature of the flow is conform with ...

  1. Structure of binary mixed polymer Langmuir layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernardini, C.

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of preparing 2D stable emulsions through mixing of homopolymers in a Langmuir monolayer is the core topic of this thesis. While colloid science has achieved well established results in the study of bulk dispersed systems, accounts on properties of mixed monomolecular films are fewer,

  2. Structure of binary mixed polymer Langmuir layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernardini, C.

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of preparing 2D stable emulsions through mixing of homopolymers in a Langmuir monolayer is the core topic of this thesis. While colloid science has achieved well established results in the study of bulk dispersed systems, accounts on properties of mixed monomolecular films are

  3. Modifing the Surface Layers of Mechanical Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Slanec

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the creation of thin surface layers prepared by the Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition Method (PACVD. Polished sample surfaces made of tool steel were used. An investigation of the dependence of layer thickness on process duration was carried out. The structure of the original surface and the structure of the coated surface were evaluated and compared. The microhardness of the surface areas was also measured.

  4. PIV measurement of turbulent mixing layer flow with polymer additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning, T; Guo, F; Chen, B; Zhang, X

    2009-01-01

    Turbulent mixing layer flow with polymer additives was experimentally investigated by PIV in present paper. The velocity ratio between high and low speed is 4:1 and the Reynolds number for pure water case based on the velocity differences of two steams and hydraulic diameter of the channel ranges from 14667∼73333. Flow field and turbulent quantities of turbulent mixing layer with 200ppm polymer additives were measured and compared with pure water mixing layer flow. It is shown that the dynamic development of mixing layer is greatly influenced by polymer addictives. The smaller vortices are eliminated and the coherent structure is much clearer. Similar with pure water case, Reynolds stress and vorticity still concentrate in a coniform area of central part of mixing layer and the width will increase with the Reynolds number increasing. However, compared with pure water case, the coniform width of polymer additives case is larger, which means the polymer additives will lead to the diffusion of coherent structure. The peak value of vorticity in different cross section will decrease with the development of mixing layer. Compared with pure water case, the vorticity is larger at the beginning of the mixing layer but decreases faster in the case with polymer additives.

  5. Structure of binary mixed polymer Langmuir layers

    OpenAIRE

    Bernardini, C.

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of preparing 2D stable emulsions through mixing of homopolymers in a Langmuir monolayer is the core topic of this thesis. While colloid science has achieved well established results in the study of bulk dispersed systems, accounts on properties of mixed monomolecular films are fewer, and seldom systematic. The aim of this investigation is to contribute to a deeper understanding of the subject, in order to explore opportunities to apply the acquired knowledge to the fabrication...

  6. Mixing layer height as an indicator for urban air quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiß, Alexander; Wiegner, Matthias; Bonn, Boris; Schäfer, Klaus; Forkel, Renate; von Schneidemesser, Erika; Münkel, Christoph; Chan, Ka Lok; Nothard, Rainer

    2017-08-01

    The mixing layer height (MLH) is a measure for the vertical turbulent exchange within the boundary layer, which is one of the controlling factors for the dilution of pollutants emitted near the ground. Based on continuous MLH measurements with a Vaisala CL51 ceilometer and measurements from an air quality network, the relationship between MLH and near-surface pollutant concentrations has been investigated. In this context the uncertainty of the MLH retrievals and the representativeness of ground-based in situ measurements are crucial. We have investigated this topic by using data from the BAERLIN2014 campaign in Berlin, Germany, conducted from June to August 2014. To derive the MLH, three versions of the proprietary software BL-VIEW and a novel approach COBOLT were compared. It was found that the overall agreement is reasonable if mean diurnal cycles are considered. The main advantage of COBOLT is the continuous detection of the MLH with a temporal resolution of 10 min and a lower number of cases when the residual layer is misinterpreted as mixing layer. We have calculated correlations between MLH as derived from the different retrievals and concentrations of pollutants (PM10, O3 and NOx) for different locations in the metropolitan area of Berlin. It was found that the correlations with PM10 are quite different for different sites without showing a clear pattern, whereas the correlation with NOx seems to depend on the vicinity of emission sources in main roads. In the case of ozone as a secondary pollutant, a clear correlation was found. We conclude that the effects of the heterogeneity of the emission sources, chemical processing and mixing during transport exceed the differences due to different MLH retrievals. Moreover, it seems to be unrealistic to find correlations between MLH and near-surface pollutant concentrations representative for a city like Berlin (flat terrain), in particular when traffic emissions are dominant. Nevertheless it is worthwhile to use

  7. Mixing layer height as an indicator for urban air quality?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Geiß

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The mixing layer height (MLH is a measure for the vertical turbulent exchange within the boundary layer, which is one of the controlling factors for the dilution of pollutants emitted near the ground. Based on continuous MLH measurements with a Vaisala CL51 ceilometer and measurements from an air quality network, the relationship between MLH and near-surface pollutant concentrations has been investigated. In this context the uncertainty of the MLH retrievals and the representativeness of ground-based in situ measurements are crucial. We have investigated this topic by using data from the BAERLIN2014 campaign in Berlin, Germany, conducted from June to August 2014. To derive the MLH, three versions of the proprietary software BL-VIEW and a novel approach COBOLT were compared. It was found that the overall agreement is reasonable if mean diurnal cycles are considered. The main advantage of COBOLT is the continuous detection of the MLH with a temporal resolution of 10 min and a lower number of cases when the residual layer is misinterpreted as mixing layer. We have calculated correlations between MLH as derived from the different retrievals and concentrations of pollutants (PM10, O3 and NOx for different locations in the metropolitan area of Berlin. It was found that the correlations with PM10 are quite different for different sites without showing a clear pattern, whereas the correlation with NOx seems to depend on the vicinity of emission sources in main roads. In the case of ozone as a secondary pollutant, a clear correlation was found. We conclude that the effects of the heterogeneity of the emission sources, chemical processing and mixing during transport exceed the differences due to different MLH retrievals. Moreover, it seems to be unrealistic to find correlations between MLH and near-surface pollutant concentrations representative for a city like Berlin (flat terrain, in particular when traffic emissions are dominant. Nevertheless it is

  8. Surface wind mixing in the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Robin; Hartlipp, Paul

    2017-12-01

    Mixing at the ocean surface is key for atmosphere-ocean interactions and the distribution of heat, energy, and gases in the upper ocean. Winds are the primary force for surface mixing. To properly simulate upper ocean dynamics and the flux of these quantities within the upper ocean, models must reproduce mixing in the upper ocean. To evaluate the performance of the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) in replicating the surface mixing, the results of four different vertical mixing parameterizations were compared against observations, using the surface mixed layer depth, the temperature fields, and observed diffusivities for comparisons. The vertical mixing parameterizations investigated were Mellor- Yamada 2.5 level turbulent closure (MY), Large- McWilliams- Doney Kpp (LMD), Nakanishi- Niino (NN), and the generic length scale (GLS) schemes. This was done for one temperate site in deep water in the Eastern Pacific and three shallow water sites in the Baltic Sea. The model reproduced the surface mixed layer depth reasonably well for all sites; however, the temperature fields were reproduced well for the deep site, but not for the shallow Baltic Sea sites. In the Baltic Sea, the models overmixed the water column after a few days. Vertical temperature diffusivities were higher than those observed and did not show the temporal fluctuations present in the observations. The best performance was by NN and MY; however, MY became unstable in two of the shallow simulations with high winds. The performance of GLS nearly as good as NN and MY. LMD had the poorest performance as it generated temperature diffusivities that were too high and induced too much mixing. Further observational comparisons are needed to evaluate the effects of different stratification and wind conditions and the limitations on the vertical mixing parameterizations.

  9. Southern Ocean Mixed-Layer Seasonal and Interannual Variations From Combined Satellite and In Situ Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buongiorno Nardelli, B.; Guinehut, S.; Verbrugge, N.; Cotroneo, Y.; Zambianchi, E.; Iudicone, D.

    2017-12-01

    The depth of the upper ocean mixed layer provides fundamental information on the amount of seawater that directly interacts with the atmosphere. Its space-time variability modulates water mass formation and carbon sequestration processes related to both the physical and biological pumps. These processes are particularly relevant in the Southern Ocean, where surface mixed-layer depth estimates are generally obtained either as climatological fields derived from in situ observations or through numerical simulations. Here we demonstrate that weekly observation-based reconstructions can be used to describe the variations of the mixed-layer depth in the upper ocean over a range of space and time scales. We compare and validate four different products obtained by combining satellite measurements of the sea surface temperature, salinity, and dynamic topography and in situ Argo profiles. We also compute an ensemble mean and use the corresponding spread to estimate mixed-layer depth uncertainties and to identify the more reliable products. The analysis points out the advantage of synergistic approaches that include in input the sea surface salinity observations obtained through a multivariate optimal interpolation. Corresponding data allow to assess mixed-layer depth seasonal and interannual variability. Specifically, the maximum correlations between mixed-layer anomalies and the Southern Annular Mode are found at different time lags, related to distinct summer/winter responses in the Antarctic Intermediate Water and Sub-Antarctic Mode Waters main formation areas.

  10. Nomogram for the height of the daytime mixed layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyren, K. [Ericsson EriSoft AB, Umeaa (Sweden); Gryning, S.E. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1997-10-01

    We present a nomogram that provide information about the general behaviour of the mixed layer at a given location. The nomogram is meant to be a practical and easy to use tool to determine the height of the mixed layer for i.e. weather forecaster, air pollution studies and planning of meteorological experiments. Use of the nomogram is restricted to flat, relatively homogeneous terrain. Inhomogeneous terrain with patch scales of 10 km or more might create organised circulation like i.e. lake breezes. The data represented in the nomogram is computed using a meteorological preprocessor and climatological temperature data for the location. The nomogram is simplified but retain main physical processes that control the evolution of the mixed layer and can be easily constructed for any chosen location on land. Nomogram of the mixed layer behavior at the location of Cabauw, the Netherlands is shown and discussed. (au)

  11. Laboratory simulations of the atmospheric mixed-layer in flow ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    A laboratory study of the influence of complex terrain on the interface between a well-mixed boundary layer and an elevated stratified layer was conducted in the towing-tank facility of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The height of the mixed layer in the daytime boundary layer can have a strong influence on the concentration of pollutants within this layer. Deflections of streamlines at the height of the interface are primarily a function of hill Froude number (Fr), the ratio of mixed-layer height (zi) to terrain height (h), and the crosswind dimension of the terrain. The magnitude of the deflections increases as Fr increases and zi / h decreases. For mixing-height streamlines that are initially below the terrain top, the response is linear with Fr; for those initially above the terrain feature the response to Fr is more complex. Once Fr exceeds about 2, the terrain related response of the mixed layer interface decreases somewhat with increasing Fr (toward more neutral flow). Deflections are also shown to increase as the crosswind dimensions of the terrain increases. Comparisons with numerical modeling, limited field data and other laboratory measurements reported in the literature are favorable. Additionally, visual observations of dye streamers suggests that the flow structure exhibited for our elevated inversions passing over three dimensional hills is similar to that reported in the literature for continuously stratified flow over two-dimensional h

  12. The physical structure of the oceanic surface-layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorov, K.N.

    1981-01-01

    A study is presented of the structure of the near-surface layer of the ocean under various hydrometeorological conditions. Such a study allows the isolation of border measures for a four characteristic regime for the top ocean layer: 1) intensive wind-wave mixing; 2) Langmuir circulation; 3) intense solar heating during still and calm weather (with and without internal wave modulations); 4) a pressing-out of surface sediment. It is demonstrated that the spatial temperature change in the ocean surface, the thermal structure, and the heat attainment in the top layer have various characteristics during different regimes and this must be considered during the measuring of the ocean surface temperature with the contact method as well as during the comparison of contact and satallite data on the ocean surface temperature. The necessity for more research in this area is underscored.

  13. Chlorophyll modulation of mixed layer thermodynamics in a mixed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Senthilkumar (Newgen Imaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Marine phytoplanktons influence the air-sea exchanges of carbon dioxide, sulfur compounds, and ocean radiation transfer as well as albedo of ocean surface water, which affect earth climate system through thermodynamical processes within the closed system of the planet earth. It has long been recognized that absorption.

  14. Constitutive behaviour of mixed mode loaded adhesive layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Högberg, J.L.; Sørensen, Bent F.; Stigh, U.

    2007-01-01

    Mixed mode testing of adhesive layer is performed with the Mixed mode double Cantilever Bean? specimen. During the experiments, the specimens are loaded by transversal and/or shear forces; seven different mode mixities are tested. The J-integral is used to evaluate the energy dissipation...... in the failure process zone. The constitutive behaviour of the adhesive layer is obtained by a so called inverse method and fitting an existing mixed mode cohesive model, which uses a coupled formulation to describe a mode dependent constitutive behaviour. The cohesive parameters are determined by optimizing...

  15. Model castings with composite surface layer - application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szajnar

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a method of usable properties of surface layers improvement of cast carbon steel 200–450, by put directly in foundingprocess a composite surface layer on the basis of Fe-Cr-C alloy. Technology of composite surface layer guarantee mainly increase inhardness and aberasive wear resistance of cast steel castings on machine elements. This technology can be competition for generallyapplied welding technology (surfacing by welding and thermal spraying. In range of studies was made cast steel test castings withcomposite surface layer, which usability for industrial applications was estimated by criterion of hardness and aberasive wear resistance of type metal-mineral and quality of joint cast steel – (Fe-Cr-C. Based on conducted studies a thesis, that composite surface layer arise from liquid state, was formulated. Moreover, possible is control of composite layer thickness and its hardness by suitable selection of parameters i.e. thickness of insert, pouring temperature and solidification modulus of casting. Possibility of technology application of composite surface layer in manufacture of cast steel slide bush for combined cutter loader is presented.

  16. Producing of multicomponent and composite surface layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wierzchon, T.; Bielinski, P.; Michalski, A.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents a new method of producing multicomponent and composite layers on steel substrate. The combination of nickel plating with glow-discharge bordering or impulse-plasma deposition method gives an opportunity to obtain good properties of surface layers. The results of examinations of carbon 45 (0.45%C) steel, nickel plated and then borided under glow discharge conditions or covered with TiN layers are presented. The corrosion and friction wear resistance of such layers are markedly higher than for layer produced on non nickel plated substrates. (author). 19 refs, 5 figs

  17. Estimation of Atmospheric Mixing Layer Height from radiosonde data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Wang, K.

    2013-12-01

    Mixing layer is the lowest layer of the troposphere where surface turbulence can reach during the daytime. Mixing layer height (MLH) is an important parameter for understanding the transport process, air pollution, weather and climate change. MLH can be determined from the radiosonde profiles of relative humidity (RH), specific humidity (q), potential temperature (θ) and atmospheric refractivity (N) by searching for the strongest gradients of these parameters within a specific height above the surface. However, substantially different MLHs have been found from different parameters. The occurrence of cloud impacts on MLHs derived in two ways: (1) clouds impact the measurements of θ and RH, resulting in spurious MLHs derived by θ and RH, (2) clouds may amplify or depress turbulence, that is MLH can be at cloud top or cloud base when it occurs. However, MLHs determined by existing methods can generally be at cloud top. To solve these problems, we propose a method to estimate MLH by integrating the information of θ, RH, q, N and discriminating different cloud impacts on MLH. We apply this method to high vertical resolution (~30 m) radiosonde data collected at the 79 stations over North America during the period of 1998 to 2008 released by the Stratospheric Processes and their Role in Climate Data Center. The results show good agreement with those from N as the information of temperature and humidity contained in N, however the impact of clouds including in the new method has increased the reliability of MLH. The new results show good agreement with independent MLH determined from Lidar observations. MLH over the North America is 1647×323 meter with a strong east-west gradient, higher MLH (generally greater than 1800 m) over the Midwest America and lower MLH (less than 1300 m) over Alaska and west coast of America. The scatter plot of climatological MLHnew with MLHθ, MLHRH, MLHq, MLHN and MLHint for the period of 1998 to 2008. Pattern of climatological MLH of our

  18. Layered mixing on the New England Shelf in summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianing; Greenan, Blair J. W.; Lu, Youyu; Oakey, Neil S.; Shaw, William J.

    2014-09-01

    The layered structure of stratification and mixing on the New England Shelf (NES) in summer is examined by analyzing a comprehensive set of observations of hydrography, currents and turbulence. A clear distinction in mixing characteristics between the midcolumn water (consisting of subsurface stratification, middepth weak stratification and lower-layer stratification) and a well-mixed bottom boundary layer (BBL) is revealed. The combination of subtidal Ekman onshore bottom transport and cross-shore density gradient created a lower-layer stratification that inhibited the upward extension of the BBL turbulence. The BBL mixing was related to strong shear generated by bottom stress, and the magnitude and periodic variation of BBL mixing was determined by both the tidal and subtidal flows. Mixing in the midcolumn water occurred under stably stratified conditions and showed correspondence with the occurrence of near-inertial and semidiurnal internal waves. Positive correlations between buoyancy frequency squared (N2) and shear variance (S2), S2 and dissipation rate (ɛ), N2 and ɛ are established in the midcolumn, but not in the BBL. The midcolumn ɛ was reasonably described by a slightly modified MacKinnon-Gregg (MG) model.

  19. Nonlinear Stability and Structure of Compressible Reacting Mixing Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, M. J.; Mansour, N. N.; Reynolds, W. C.

    2000-01-01

    The parabolized stability equations (PSE) are used to investigate issues of nonlinear flow development and mixing in compressible reacting shear layers. Particular interest is placed on investigating the change in flow structure that occurs when compressibility and heat release are added to the flow. These conditions allow the 'outer' instability modes- one associated with each of the fast and slow streams-to dominate over the 'central', Kelvin-Helmholtz mode that unaccompanied in incompressible nonreacting mixing layers. Analysis of scalar probability density functions in flows with dominant outer modes demonstrates the ineffective, one-sided nature of mixing that accompany these flow structures. Colayer conditions, where two modes have equal growth rate and the mixing layer is formed by two sets of vortices, offer some opportunity for mixing enhancement. Their extent, however, is found to be limited in the mixing layer's parameter space. Extensive validation of the PSE technique also provides a unique perspective on central- mode vortex pairing, further supporting the view that pairing is primarily governed perspective sheds insight on how linear stability theory is able to provide such an accurate prediction of experimentally-observed, fully nonlinear flow phenomenon.

  20. Instability and mixing in interacting stratified shear layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joe, W. T.; Caulfield, C. P.

    2003-11-01

    Often in geophysical fluid flows, a stratified shear flow undergoes a transition to turbulence, leading to markedly enhanced mixing of the fluid parcels, and deceleration of the forcing shear flow. Such mixing events generically lead to the development of a layered density distribution, with deep layers of relatively well-mixed fluid separated by relatively thin interfaces of strong density gradient. There are certain circumstances in which re-intensification of the shear by the external forcing is initially localized in the vicinity of the strong density gradient interfaces. We consider numerically the behaviour of a simple example of such flows, where a relatively deep well-mixed layer is bordered by two thin interfaces of stronger density gradient, each of which is subject to a localized velocity shear. We find that the stability and subsequent behaviour of such flows are qualitatively and quantitatively dependent on the overall stratification. Sufficiently strongly stratified flows lead to Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities and associated mixing events which remain localized in the vicinity of the interfaces, while weaker stratification allows for intense interaction across the interior well-mixed layer.

  1. Velocity fields in mixing-enhanced compressible shear layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shigeya; Mungal, M. G.

    2005-01-01

    Planar velocity fields of mixing-enhanced compressible planar shear layers are measured via particle image velocimetry (PIV) in order to investigate the mechanism of mixing enhancement by sub-boundary-layer triangular disturbances. The measurements are conducted at convective Mach numbers, M_{{c}}, of 0.62 and 0.24 to examine compressibility effects on effectiveness of the mixing enhancement technique. Instantaneous side- and plan-view vector maps of the shear layers are obtained, and turbulence statistical quantities are derived from the instantaneous velocity data. Schlieren and planar laser Mie scattering (PLMS) techniques are also used to measure the shear-layer thickness and growth rate as well as surveying the qualitative flow fields. The velocity fields for several disturbance configurations with different shape, size, or thickness are compared in terms of the shear-layer thickness and growth rate in order to investigate the effects of the configuration variation on the mixing enhancement strategy. Configuration parameters include thickness, the semi-vertex angle of the triangular disturbance, and the streamwise offset of the disturbance from the splitter tip. The measured transverse profile of the mean streamwise velocity shows a characteristic shape with triple inflection points for the effective mixing-enhanced cases at the two different compressibility conditions, while periodic inflection points are observed in the spanwise direction. A pair of stationary counter-rotating streamwise vortices introduced by the subboundary-layer disturbances are also observed, even in the fully developed region of the shear layers. At M_{{c}} {=} 0.62, it is found that in successfully enhanced cases, regardless of the disturbance configurations, the present mixing-enhancement strategy has the effect of increasing the turbulence intensity and Reynolds stress, and suppressing the turbulence anisotropy increase with increasing compressibility, i.e. alleviating the

  2. Transition and mixing in layered stratified shear flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Victoria; Caulfield, C. P.

    2001-11-01

    Flows with step-wise density distributions, i.e. well-mixed layers of fluid separated by narrow regions of high density gradient, are common in geophysics. We investigate numerically and theoretically the nonlinear evolution of a parallel shear flow at a moderate Reynolds number which has embedded within it a mixed layer of intermediate fluid. Linear stability theory predicts that the flow may be unstable to stationary vortical disturbances which are a generalization of an inviscid instability first considered by G. I. Taylor. We investigate the behaviour of these "Taylor waves" at finite amplitude through 3D nonlinear numerical simulations. We follow the development of primary and secondary instabilities which contribute to the eventual breakdown of the layered flow. In particular, we are interested in the mixing properties of the flow as it undergoes transition to small-scale disorder.

  3. Infrared active thermography for surface layer characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semerok, A.; Fomichev, S.; Farcage, D.; Sortais, C.; Courtois, X.

    2006-05-01

    Deposited layer characterization was stated as the main goal of our studies for 2006. The investigations by DRFC/SIPP/GCFP (CEA Cadarache) were performed with the procedure of surface temperature measurements based on infrared thermography with synchronous demodulation (Lock-in Thermography). It was applied to provide the temperature surface monitoring during the modulated heating by illumination. The obtained 2D-cartography revealed the zones with a weak heat transfer resulting from a low layer/surface adhesion or poor layer thermal conductivity. The obtained lock-in cartography data should be regarded only as qualitative. For deposited layers characterization (layer depth, adhesion with the substrate), the active laser pyrometer measurements with the developed experimental device were made in LILM laboratory (CEA Saclay). Active surface pyrometry with repetitive laser heating can provide both qualitative and quantitative data on the first layer and the interface with the substrate. A 3D-numerical model of graphite deposited layer heating by a pulsed high repetition rate laser beam was developed to determine the heated surface temperature with a high temporal and spatial resolution. The theoretical data obtained with 3D-numerical model for surface heating were compared with the experimental results. It was demonstrated that for the given optical and thermo-physical parameters of materials, the theoretical temperatures may be fitted with the experimental results to assess certain unknown parameters of the layer (thermal contact resistance, diffusivity, thickness, porosity, ). Based on the comparison of the obtained experimental and theoretical results, the deposited layer characterization was made. The results of the investigations on Active Laser Pyrometry and Lock-in Thermography demonstrated that the methods can provide qualitative and quantitative data on the deposited layer and on the layer/substrate interface. The correlation and cross-check of the results

  4. Thin TaC layer produced by ion mixing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barna, Árpád; Kotis, László; Pécz, Béla

    2012-01-01

    Ion-beam mixing in C/Ta layered systems was investigated. C 8nm/Ta 12nm and C 20nm/Ta 19nm/C 20nm layer systems were irradiated by Ga+ ions of energy in the range of 2–30keV. In case of the 8nm and 20nm thick C cover layers applying 5–8keV and 20–30keV Ga+ ion energy, respectively resulted...... in strongly asymmetric ion mixing; the carbon was readily transported to the Ta layer, while the reverse process was much weaker. Because of the asymmetrical transport the C/TaC interface remained sharp independently from the applied fluence. The carbon transported to the Ta layer formed Ta......Cx. The stoichiometry of the carbide produced varied along the depth. The TaCx layer contained implanted Ga, the concentration of which decreased with increasing depth. The thickness of the TaCx layer could be tailored by the ion fluence and energy making possible to produce coating layer of desired thickness....

  5. Surface-layer gusts for aircraft operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Young, G.S.; Kristensen, L.

    1992-01-01

    We use Monin-Obukhov similarity theory to extend the Kristensen et al. (1991) aviation gust estimation technique from the neutral to the diabatic surface layer. Example calculations demonstrate the importance of this correction. Simple stability class methods using only standard aviation surface ...

  6. Mixing layers and coherent structures in vegetated aquatic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghisalberti, Marco; Nepf, Heidi M.

    2002-02-01

    To date, flow through submerged aquatic vegetation has largely been viewed as perturbed boundary layer flow, with vegetative drag treated as an extension of bed drag. However, recent studies of terrestrial canopies demonstrate that the flow structure within and just above an unconfined canopy more strongly resembles a mixing layer than a boundary layer. This paper presents laboratory measurements, obtained from a scaled seagrass model, that demonstrate the applicability of the mixing layer analogy to aquatic systems. Specifically, all vertical profiles of mean velocity contained an inflection point, which makes the flow susceptible to Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. This instability leads to the generation of large, coherent vortices within the mixing layer (observed in the model at frequencies between 0.01 and 0.11 Hz), which dominate the vertical transport of momentum through the layer. The downstream advection of these vortices is shown to cause the progressive, coherent waving of aquatic vegetation, known as the monami. When the monami is present, the turbulent vertical transport of momentum is enhanced, with turbulent stresses penetrating an additional 30% of the plant height into the canopy.

  7. Determination of regional heat fluxes from the growth of the mixed layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gryning, S.E. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark); Batchvarova, E. [National Inst. of Meteorology and Hydrology, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1997-10-01

    The distribution of surface sensible heat flux is a critical factor in producing and modifying the mesoscale atmospheric flows, turbulence and evaporation. Parameterizations that assume homogeneous land characteristics are inappropriate to represent the spatial variability often found in nature. One possibility to overcome this problem is to increase the resolution of the model grid which demands unrealistic computing resources and data for model initialization. Area averaged fluxes can be obtained from aircraft measurements. It is essential that the flights are performed at a height where the individual surface features are not felt. A large number of flights and appropriate pattern to meet the task are needed in order to achieve a fair statistics. The mixed layer grows in response to the regional turbulent fluxes including the aggregation and small scale processes. The region of influence in upwind direction is typically 20 times the height of the mixed layer for convective and 100 times the height of the mixed layer for atmospheric near neutral conditions. In this study we determine the regional integrated sensible heat flux from information on the evolution of the mixed layer over the area. The required information to use the method can be derived from wind speed and temperature profiles obtained by radio-soundings when performed frequently enough to provide a reasonably detailed structure of the development of the mixed-layer. The method is applied to estimate the regional heat flux over the NOPEX experimental area for three days during the campaign in 1994. (au)

  8. Using dissolved oxygen concentrations to determine mixed layer depths in the Bellingshausen Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Castro-Morales

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Concentrations of oxygen (O2 and other dissolved gases in the oceanic mixed layer are often used to calculate air-sea gas exchange fluxes. The mixed layer depth (zmix may be defined using criteria based on temperature or density differences to a reference depth near the ocean surface. However, temperature criteria fail in regions with strong haloclines such as the Southern Ocean where heat, freshwater and momentum fluxes interact to establish mixed layers. Moreover, the time scales of air-sea exchange differ for gases and heat, so that zmix defined using oxygen may be different than zmix defined using temperature or density. Here, we propose to define an O2-based mixed layer depth, zmix(O2, as the depth where the relative difference between the O2 concentration and a reference value at a depth equivalent to 10 dbar equals 0.5 %. This definition was established by analysis of O2 profiles from the Bellingshausen Sea (west of the Antarctic Peninsula and corroborated by visual inspection. Comparisons of zmix(O2 with zmix based on potential temperature differences, i.e., zmix(0.2 °C and zmix(0.5 °C, and potential density differences, i.e., zmix(0.03 kg m−3 and zmix(0.125 kg m−3, showed that zmix(O2 closely follows zmix(0.03 kg m−3. Further comparisons with published zmix climatologies and zmix derived from World Ocean Atlas 2005 data were also performed. To establish zmix for use with biological production estimates in the absence of O2 profiles, we suggest using zmix(0.03 kg m−3, which is also the basis for the climatology by

  9. Surface layer effects on waste glass corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, X.

    1993-01-01

    Water contact subjects waste glass to chemical attack that results in the formation of surface alteration layers. Two principal hypotheses have been advanced concerning the effect of surface alteration layers on continued glass corrosion: (1) they act as a mass transport barrier and (2) they influence the chemical affinity of the glass reaction. In general, transport barrier effects have been found to be less important than affinity effects in the corrosion of most high-level nuclear waste glasses. However, they can be important under some circumstances, for example, in a very alkaline solution, in leachants containing Mg ions, or under conditions where the matrix dissolution rate is very low. The latter suggests that physical barrier effect may affect the long-term glass dissolution rate. Surface layers influence glass reaction affinity through the effects of the altered glass and secondary phases on the solution chemistry. The reaction affinity may be controlled by various precipitates and crystalline phases, amorphous silica phases, gel layer, or all the components of the glass. The surface alteration layers influence radionuclide release mainly through colloid formation, crystalline phase incorporation, and gel layer retention. This paper reviews current understanding and uncertainties

  10. Chlorophyll modulation of mixed layer thermodynamics in a mixed-layer isopycnal general circulation model - An example from Arabian Sea and Equatorial Pacific

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nakamoto, S.; PrasannaKumar, S.; Oberhuber, J.M.; Saito, H.; Muneyama, K.

    and supported by quasi-steady upwelling. Remotely sensed chlorophyll pigment concentrations from the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) are used to investigate the chlorophyll modulation of ocean mixed layer thermodynamics in a bulk mixed-layer model, embedded...

  11. Substantial energy input to the mesopelagic ecosystem from the seasonal mixed-layer pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Olmo, Giorgio; Dingle, James; Polimene, Luca; Brewin, Robert J. W.; Claustre, Hervé

    2016-11-01

    The ocean region known as the mesopelagic zone, which is at depths of about 100-1,000 m, harbours one of the largest ecosystems and fish stocks on the planet. Life in this region is believed to rely on particulate organic carbon supplied by the biological carbon pump. Yet this supply appears insufficient to meet mesopelagic metabolic demands. An additional organic carbon source to the mesopelagic zone could be provided by the seasonal entrainment of surface waters in deeper layers, a process known as the mixed-layer pump. Little is known about the magnitude and spatial distribution of this process globally or its potential to transport carbon to the mesopelagic zone. Here we combine mixed-layer depth data from Argo floats with satellite estimates of particulate organic carbon concentrations to show that the mixed-layer pump supplies an important seasonal flux of organic carbon to the mesopelagic zone. We estimate that this process is responsible for a global flux of 0.1-0.5 Pg C yr-1. In high-latitude regions where the mixed layer is usually deep, this flux amounts on average to 23% of the carbon supplied by fast sinking particles, but it can be greater than 100%. We conclude that the seasonal mixed-layer pump is an important source of organic carbon for the mesopelagic zone.

  12. The Total Energy Flux Leaving the Ocean's Mixed Layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rimac, Antonija; von Storch, Jin-Song; Eden, Carsten

    The total energy flux leaving the ocean’s spatially and seasonally varying mixed layer is estimated using a global ⅝1/10° ocean general circulation model. From the total wind-power input of 3.33 TW into near-inertial waves (0.35 TW), subinertial fluctuations (0.87 TW), and the time-mean circulation

  13. Structure of the oceanic mixed layer in western Bay of Bengal during MONEX

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anto, A.F.; Somayajulu, Y.K.

    Based on the hourly BT and six hourly CSTD data, collected from two stations in the western Bay of Bengal during July 1979, the diurnal variations of temperature in the oceanic mixed layer (OML) were analysed as a function of the prevailing surface...

  14. The surface roughness and planetary boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telford, James W.

    1980-03-01

    Applications of the entrainment process to layers at the boundary, which meet the self similarity requirements of the logarithmic profile, have been studied. By accepting that turbulence has dominating scales related in scale length to the height above the surface, a layer structure is postulated wherein exchange is rapid enough to keep the layers internally uniform. The diffusion rate is then controlled by entrainment between layers. It has been shown that theoretical relationships derived on the basis of using a single layer of this type give quantitatively correct factors relating the turbulence, wind and shear stress for very rough surface conditions. For less rough surfaces, the surface boundary layer can be divided into several layers interacting by entrainment across each interface. This analysis leads to the following quantitatively correct formula compared to published measurements. 1 24_2004_Article_BF00877766_TeX2GIFE1.gif {σ _w }/{u^* } = ( {2/{9Aa}} )^{{1/4}} ( {1 - 3^{{1/2}{ a/k{d_n }/z{σ _w }/{u^* }z/L} )^{{1/4}} = 1.28(1 - 0.945({{σ _w }/{u^* }}}) {{z/L}})^{{1/4 where u^* = ( {{tau/ρ}}^{{1/2}}, σ w is the standard deviation of the vertical velocity, z is the height and L is the Obukhov scale lenght. The constants a, A, k and d n are the entrainment constant, the turbulence decay constant, Von Karman's constant, and the layer depth derived from the theory. Of these, a and A, are universal constants and not empirically determined for the boundary layer. Thus the turbulence needed for the plume model of convection, which resides above these layers and reaches to the inversion, is determined by the shear stress and the heat flux in the surface layers. This model applies to convection in cool air over a warm sea. The whole field is now determined except for the temperature of the air relative to the water, and the wind, which need a further parameter describing sea surface roughness. As a first stop to describing a surface where roughness elements

  15. Surface shear rheology of saponin adsorption layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golemanov, Konstantin; Tcholakova, Slavka; Denkov, Nikolai; Pelan, Edward; Stoyanov, Simeon D

    2012-08-21

    Saponins are a wide class of natural surfactants, with molecules containing a rigid hydrophobic group (triterpenoid or steroid), connected via glycoside bonds to hydrophilic oligosaccharide chains. These surfactants are very good foam stabiliziers and emulsifiers, and show a range of nontrivial biological activities. The molecular mechanisms behind these unusual properties are unknown, and, therefore, the saponins have attracted significant research interest in recent years. In our previous study (Stanimirova et al. Langmuir 2011, 27, 12486-12498), we showed that the triterpenoid saponins extracted from Quillaja saponaria plant (Quillaja saponins) formed adsorption layers with unusually high surface dilatational elasticity, 280 ± 30 mN/m. In this Article, we study the shear rheological properties of the adsorption layers of Quillaja saponins. In addition, we study the surface shear rheological properties of Yucca saponins, which are of steroid type. The experimental results show that the adsorption layers of Yucca saponins exhibit purely viscous rheological response, even at the lowest shear stress applied, whereas the adsorption layers of Quillaja saponins behave like a viscoelastic two-dimensional body. For Quillaja saponins, a single master curve describes the data for the viscoelastic creep compliance versus deformation time, up to a certain critical value of the applied shear stress. Above this value, the layer compliance increases, and the adsorption layers eventually transform into viscous ones. The experimental creep-recovery curves for the viscoelastic layers are fitted very well by compound Voigt rheological model. The obtained results are discussed from the viewpoint of the layer structure and the possible molecular mechanisms, governing the rheological response of the saponin adsorption layers.

  16. Density Effects on Incompressible Shear-Driven Mixing Layer Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltzer, Jon; Livescu, Daniel

    2017-11-01

    Our preliminary simulations of shear-driven turbulent mixing layers involving two streams of fluids with different densities have revealed that the growth rates of mixing layer thickness are reduced when the density difference is increased, even in the absence of high-speed effects. To assess a wide range of densities, we have performed a suite of incompressible temporal Direct Numerical Simulations involving two miscible fluids, with Atwood numbers of up to 0.87. Large domains involving up to 6144 x 2048 x 1536 points provide accurate statistics of growth and budgets. For the variable density case, there is no unique definition of the layer thickness (e.g., momentum thickness may defined traditionally or on a per-mass basis). Yet, the thickness definition used can substantially affect the growth rate change due to density effects. We analyze the equations describing the growth rates and relate density effects to asymmetries that develop in the flow with increasing Atwood number. Most importantly, mixing layers are found to grow preferentially towards the lower-density stream, which has significant implications for the momentum balance.

  17. Comparison of mixed layer models predictions with experimental data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faggian, P.; Riva, G.M. [CISE Spa, Divisione Ambiente, Segrate (Italy); Brusasca, G. [ENEL Spa, CRAM, Milano (Italy)

    1997-10-01

    The temporal evolution of the PBL vertical structure for a North Italian rural site, situated within relatively large agricultural fields and almost flat terrain, has been investigated during the period 22-28 June 1993 by experimental and modellistic point of view. In particular, the results about a sunny day (June 22) and a cloudy day (June 25) are presented in this paper. Three schemes to estimate mixing layer depth have been compared, i.e. Holzworth (1967), Carson (1973) and Gryning-Batchvarova models (1990), which use standard meteorological observations. To estimate their degree of accuracy, model outputs were analyzed considering radio-sounding meteorological profiles and stability atmospheric classification criteria. Besides, the mixed layer depths prediction were compared with the estimated values obtained by a simple box model, whose input requires hourly measures of air concentrations and ground flux of {sup 222}Rn. (LN)

  18. Aspects of turbulent-shear-layer dynamics and mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slessor, Michael David

    Experiments have been conducted in the GALCIT Supersonic Shear Layer Facility to investigate some aspects of high-Reynolds-number, turbulent, shear-layer flows in both incompressible- and compressible-flow regimes. Experiments designed to address several issues were performed; effects of inflow boundary conditions, freestream conditions (supersonic/subsonic flow), and compressibility, on both large-scale dynamics and small-scale mixing, are described. Chemically-reacting and non-reacting flows were investigated, the former relying on the (Hsb2 + NO)/Fsb2 chemical system, in the fast-kinetic regime, to infer the structure and amount of molecular-scale mixing through use of "flip" experiments. A variety of experimental techniques, including a color-schlieren visualization system developed as part of this work, were used to study the flows. Both inflow conditions and compressibility are found to have significant effects on the flow. In particular, inflow conditions are "remembered" for long distances downstream, a sensitivity similar to that observed in low-dimensionality, non-linear (chaotic) systems. The global flowfields (freestreams coupled by the shear layer) of transonic flows exhibit a sensitivity to imposed boundary conditions, a.e., local area ratios. A previously-proposed mode-selection rule for turbulent-structure convection speeds, based on the presence of a lab-frame subsonic freestream, was experimentally demonstrated to be incorrect. Compressibility, when decoupled from ail other parameters, e.g., Reynolds number, velocity and density ratios, etc., reduces large-scale entrainment and turbulent growth, but slightly enhances small-scale mixing, with an associated change in the structure of the molecularly-mixed fluid. This reduction in shear-layer growth rate is examined and a new parameter that interprets compressibility as an energy-exchange mechanism is proposed. The parameter reconciles and collapses experimentally-observed growth rates.

  19. Microthermal Instrument for Measuring Surface Layer Seeing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue-Bao; Zheng, Yan-Fang; Deng, Lin Hua; Xu, Guang

    2012-02-01

    Microthermal fluctuations are introduced by atmospheric turbulence very near the ground. In order to detect microthermal fluctuations at Fuxian Solar Observatory (FSO), a microthermal instrument has been developed. The microthermal instrument consists of a microthermal sensor, which is based on a Wheatstone bridge circuit and uses fine tungsten filaments as resistance temperature detectors, an associated signal processing unit, and a data collection, & communication subsystem. In this paper, after a brief introduction to surface layer seeing, we discuss the instrumentation behind the microthermal detector we have developed and then present the results obtained. The results of the evaluation indicate that the effect of the turbulent surface boundary layer to astronomical seeing would become sufficiently small when installing a telescope at a height of 16m or higher from the ground at FSO.

  20. Mixing and Formation of Layers by Internal Wave Forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossmann, Yvan; Pollet, Florence; Odier, Philippe; Dauxois, Thierry

    2017-12-01

    The energy pathways from propagating internal waves to the scales of irreversible mixing in the ocean are not fully described. In the ocean interior, the triadic resonant instability is an intrinsic destabilization process that may enhance the energy cascade away from topographies. The present study focuses on the integrated impact of mixing processes induced by a propagative normal mode-1 over long-term experiments in an idealized setup. The internal wave dynamics and the evolution of the density profile are followed using the light attenuation technique. Diagnostics of the turbulent diffusivity KT and background potential energy BPE are provided. Mixing effects result in a partially mixed layer colocated with the region of maximum shear induced by the forcing normal mode. The maximum measured turbulent diffusivity is 250 times larger than the molecular value, showing that diapycnal mixing is largely enhanced by small-scale turbulent processes. Intermittency and reversible energy transfers are discussed to bridge the gap between the present diagnostic and the larger values measured in Dossmann et al. (). The mixing efficiency η is assessed by relating the BPE growth to the linearized KE input. One finds a value of Γ=12-19%, larger than the mixing efficiency in the case of breaking interfacial wave. After several hours of forcing, the development of staircases in the density profile is observed. This mechanism has been previously observed in experiments with weak homogeneous turbulence and explained by Phillips (1972) argument. The present experiments suggest that internal wave forcing could also induce the formation of density interfaces in the ocean.

  1. Fluctuations of a passive scalar in a turbulent mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Attili, Antonio

    2013-09-19

    The turbulent flow originating downstream of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in a mixing layer has great relevance in many applications, ranging from atmospheric physics to combustion in technical devices. The mixing of a substance by the turbulent velocity field is usually involved. In this paper, a detailed statistical analysis of fluctuations of a passive scalar in the fully developed region of a turbulent mixing layer from a direct numerical simulation is presented. Passive scalar spectra show inertial ranges characterized by scaling exponents −4/3 and −3/2 in the streamwise and spanwise directions, in agreement with a recent theoretical analysis of passive scalar scaling in shear flows [Celani et al., J. Fluid Mech. 523, 99 (2005)]. Scaling exponents of high-order structure functions in the streamwise direction show saturation of intermittency with an asymptotic exponent ζ∞=0.4 at large orders. Saturation of intermittency is confirmed by the self-similarity of the tails of the probability density functions of the scalar increments at different scales r with the scaling factor r−ζ∞ and by the analysis of the cumulative probability of large fluctuations. Conversely, intermittency saturation is not observed for the spanwise increments and the relative scaling exponents agree with recent results for homogeneous isotropic turbulence with mean scalar gradient. Probability density functions of the scalar increments in the three directions are compared to assess anisotropy.

  2. Time-dependent penetrative mixed convection in a porous layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jendoubi, S.; Kulacki, F.A.

    1997-01-01

    In the last few decades, heat and mass transfer in porous media have been studied extensively by many investigators. The main motivations behind these studies were the wide range of applications and the interaction of multiple processes. Examples include geothermal energy production, drying of porous media, high level nuclear waste disposal, and energy-related engineering technologies. Here, a general two-dimensional, time-dependent model has been developed to investigate the transfer of heat and mass in a liquid saturated porous layer locally heated from above. Both free and mixed convection are considered. For mixed convection an eternal flow is assumed to enter the two-dimensional domain in the horizontal direction. At a finite segment of the top wall, two types of heat sources are applied: a constant flux heat source and a time varying heat, constant flux source. The latter is a representation of heat released by spent nuclear fuel in a mined repository located above the layer. Both time-dependent and steady solutions of the flow and temperature fields are obtained. For natural convection, the effects of Rayleigh number on the Nusselt number are obtained. For mixed convection, the effects of both Rayleigh and Peclet numbers are studied. In addition, the effects of the aspect ratio, as well as the length of the heated zone are examined

  3. Simulated seasonal and interannual variability of mixed layer heat budget in the northern Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DeBoyer Montegut, C.; Vialard, J.; Shenoi, S.S.C.; Shankar, D.; Durand, F.; Ethe, C.; Madec, G.

    A global Ocean General Circulation Model (OGCM) is used to investigate the mixed layer heat budget of the Northern Indian Ocean (NIO). The model is validated against observations and shows a fairly good agreement with mixed layer depth data...

  4. Oxygen inhibition layer of composite resins: effects of layer thickness and surface layer treatment on the interlayer bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijelic-Donova, Jasmina; Garoushi, Sufyan; Lassila, Lippo V J; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2015-02-01

    An oxygen inhibition layer develops on surfaces exposed to air during polymerization of particulate filling composite. This study assessed the thickness of the oxygen inhibition layer of short-fiber-reinforced composite in comparison with conventional particulate filling composites. The effect of an oxygen inhibition layer on the shear bond strength of incrementally placed particulate filling composite layers was also evaluated. Four different restorative composites were selected: everX Posterior (a short-fiber-reinforced composite), Z250, SupremeXT, and Silorane. All composites were evaluated regarding the thickness of the oxygen inhibition layer and for shear bond strength. An equal amount of each composite was polymerized in air between two glass plates and the thickness of the oxygen inhibition layer was measured using a stereomicroscope. Cylindrical-shaped specimens were prepared for measurement of shear bond strength by placing incrementally two layers of the same composite material. Before applying the second composite layer, the first increment's bonding site was treated as follows: grinding with 1,000-grit silicon-carbide (SiC) abrasive paper, or treatment with ethanol or with water-spray. The inhibition depth was lowest (11.6 μm) for water-sprayed Silorane and greatest (22.9 μm) for the water-sprayed short-fiber-reinforced composite. The shear bond strength ranged from 5.8 MPa (ground Silorane) to 36.4 MPa (water-sprayed SupremeXT). The presence of an oxygen inhibition layer enhanced the interlayer shear bond strength of all investigated materials, but its absence resulted in cohesive and mixed failures only with the short-fiber-reinforced composite. Thus, more durable adhesion with short-fiber-reinforced composite is expected. © 2014 Eur J Oral Sci.

  5. Influence of convective conditions on three dimensional mixed convective hydromagnetic boundary layer flow of Casson nanofluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauf, A., E-mail: raufamar@ciitsahiwal.edu.pk [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Sahiwal 57000 (Pakistan); Siddiq, M.K. [Centre for Advanced Studies in Pure and Applied Mathematics, Department of Mathematics, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 63000 (Pakistan); Abbasi, F.M. [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Meraj, M.A. [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Sahiwal 57000 (Pakistan); Ashraf, M. [Centre for Advanced Studies in Pure and Applied Mathematics, Department of Mathematics, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 63000 (Pakistan); Shehzad, S.A. [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Sahiwal 57000 (Pakistan)

    2016-10-15

    The present work deals with the steady laminar three-dimensional mixed convective magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) boundary layer flow of Casson nanofluid over a bidirectional stretching surface. A uniform magnetic field is applied normal to the flow direction. Similarity variables are implemented to convert the non-linear partial differential equations into ordinary ones. Convective boundary conditions are utilized at surface of the sheet. A numerical technique of Runge–Kutta–Fehlberg (RFK45) is used to obtain the results of velocity, temperature and concentration fields. The physical dimensionless parameters are discussed through tables and graphs. - Highlights: • Mixed convective boundary layer flow of Casson nanofluid is taken into account. • Impact of magnetic field is examined. • Convective heat and mass conditions are imposed. • Numerical solutions are presented and discussed.

  6. Linear models for sound from supersonic reacting mixing layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chary, P. Shivakanth; Samanta, Arnab

    2016-12-01

    We perform a linearized reduced-order modeling of the aeroacoustic sound sources in supersonic reacting mixing layers to explore their sensitivities to some of the flow parameters in radiating sound. Specifically, we investigate the role of outer modes as the effective flow compressibility is raised, when some of these are expected to dominate over the traditional Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) -type central mode. Although the outer modes are known to be of lesser importance in the near-field mixing, how these radiate to the far-field is uncertain, on which we focus. On keeping the flow compressibility fixed, the outer modes are realized via biasing the respective mean densities of the fast (oxidizer) or slow (fuel) side. Here the mean flows are laminar solutions of two-dimensional compressible boundary layers with an imposed composite (turbulent) spreading rate, which we show to significantly alter the growth of instability waves by saturating them earlier, similar to in nonlinear calculations, achieved here via solving the linear parabolized stability equations. As the flow parameters are varied, instability of the slow modes is shown to be more sensitive to heat release, potentially exceeding equivalent central modes, as these modes yield relatively compact sound sources with lesser spreading of the mixing layer, when compared to the corresponding fast modes. In contrast, the radiated sound seems to be relatively unaffected when the mixture equivalence ratio is varied, except for a lean mixture which is shown to yield a pronounced effect on the slow mode radiation by reducing its modal growth.

  7. Simulation of the convective mixed layer in Athens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, H.P. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1997-10-01

    The region of Athens, Greece, has a highly complicated terrain with irregular coastline and mountains next to the sea. This results in complex flow fields. A case study of a simulation of a sea breeze with the Karlsruhe Atmospheric Mesoscale model KAMM is presented together with remarks on the advection of mixed layer air. The valley of Athens is open to the sea towards the south-west and surrounded by mountains on the other sides. Gaps between the mountains channel the flow into the valley. Simulations were done for 14 September 1994 to compare them with measurements at 6 masts by Risoe during the MEDCAPHOT-TRACE experiment. (au)

  8. Heterogeneities in illite/smectite mixed/layers clays: some comments and recollections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johns, W.D.

    1995-01-01

    A review of some studies of heterogeneities, structure and surface in illite/smectite mixed-layer clays of Vienna Basin using X-ray diffraction, high resolution-transmission electron microscopy, infra-red spectroscopy, laser microprobe mass analysis, Auger electron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy is given. The models of hexyl ammonium ion configuration complexed between silica sheets is discussed. 1 tab., 10 figs., 6 refs

  9. A model study of mixing and entrainment in the horizontally evolving atmospheric convective boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorovich, E.; Kaiser, R. [Univ. Karlsruhe, Inst. fuer Hydrologie und Wasserwirtschaft (Germany)

    1997-10-01

    We present results from a parallel wind-tunnel/large-eddy simulation (LES) model study of mixing and entrainment in the atmospheric convective boundary layer (CBL) longitudinally developing over a heated surface. The advection-type entrainment of warmer air from upper turbulence-free layers into the growing CBL has been investigated. Most of numerical and laboratory model studies of the CBL carried out so far dealt with another type of entrainment, namely the non-steady one, regarding the CBL growth as a non-stationary process. In the atmosphere, both types of the CBL development can take place, often being superimposed. (au)

  10. Effects of Precipitation on Ocean Mixed-Layer Temperature and Salinity as Simulated in a 2-D Coupled Ocean-Cloud Resolving Atmosphere Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaofan; Sui, C.-H.; Lau, K-M.; Adamec, D.

    1999-01-01

    A two-dimensional coupled ocean-cloud resolving atmosphere model is used to investigate possible roles of convective scale ocean disturbances induced by atmospheric precipitation on ocean mixed-layer heat and salt budgets. The model couples a cloud resolving model with an embedded mixed layer-ocean circulation model. Five experiment are performed under imposed large-scale atmospheric forcing in terms of vertical velocity derived from the TOGA COARE observations during a selected seven-day period. The dominant variability of mixed-layer temperature and salinity are simulated by the coupled model with imposed large-scale forcing. The mixed-layer temperatures in the coupled experiments with 1-D and 2-D ocean models show similar variations when salinity effects are not included. When salinity effects are included, however, differences in the domain-mean mixed-layer salinity and temperature between coupled experiments with 1-D and 2-D ocean models could be as large as 0.3 PSU and 0.4 C respectively. Without fresh water effects, the nocturnal heat loss over ocean surface causes deep mixed layers and weak cooling rates so that the nocturnal mixed-layer temperatures tend to be horizontally-uniform. The fresh water flux, however, causes shallow mixed layers over convective areas while the nocturnal heat loss causes deep mixed layer over convection-free areas so that the mixed-layer temperatures have large horizontal fluctuations. Furthermore, fresh water flux exhibits larger spatial fluctuations than surface heat flux because heavy rainfall occurs over convective areas embedded in broad non-convective or clear areas, whereas diurnal signals over whole model areas yield high spatial correlation of surface heat flux. As a result, mixed-layer salinities contribute more to the density differences than do mixed-layer temperatures.

  11. Organic light emitting diode with surface modification layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basil, John D.; Bhandari, Abhinav; Buhay, Harry; Arbab, Mehran; Marietti, Gary J.

    2017-09-12

    An organic light emitting diode (10) includes a substrate (12) having a first surface (14) and a second surface (16), a first electrode (32), and a second electrode (38). An emissive layer (36) is located between the first electrode (32) and the second electrode (38). The organic light emitting diode (10) further includes a surface modification layer (18). The surface modification layer (18) includes a non-planar surface (30, 52).

  12. Local structures around the substituted elements in mixed layered oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akama, Shota; Kobayashi, Wataru; Amaha, Kaoru; Niwa, Hideharu; Nitani, Hiroaki; Moritomo, Yutaka

    2017-03-02

    The chemical substitution of a transition metal (M) is an effective method to improve the functionality of a material, such as its electrochemical, magnetic, and dielectric properties. The substitution, however, causes local lattice distortion because the difference in the ionic radius (r) modifies the local interatomic distances. Here, we systematically investigated the local structures in the pure (x = 0.0) and mixed (x = 0.05 or 0.1) layered oxides, Na(M 1-x M' x )O 2 (M and M' are the majority and minority transition metals, respectively), by means of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis. We found that the local interatomic distance (d M-O ) around the minority element approaches that around the majority element to reduces the local lattice distortion. We further found that the valence of the minority Mn changes so that its ionic radius approaches that of the majority M.

  13. Survey of the mixing-layer experiments WAMIX and NAMIX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigg, B.; Widmer, S.; Dury, T.V.

    1993-01-01

    A survey is given of work in progress in the Thermal-Hydraulics Laboratory on the water and sodium mixing-layer experiments WAMIX and NAMIX, as well as related developments of computational methods. This report describes the test rigs and experimental techniques, states the objectives of the research programme, presents design requirements for NAMIX together with initial results from WAMIX, and discusses questions of sensitivity of experiments and code calculations to external factors, such as inlet and boundary conditions, and noise. The use of visualisation techniques and Ultrasonic Doppler Anemometry in WAMIX has proved to be very helpful for the design of NAMIX. Furthermore, it is shown that the effect of external factors should be carefully analysed in order to obtain optimum performance of experiments and calculations. (author) 5 figs., 26 refs

  14. Simulation of aerosol nucleation and growth in a turbulent mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Kun

    2014-06-25

    A large-scale simulation of aerosol nucleation and growth in a turbulent mixing layer is performed and analyzed with the aim of elucidating the key processes involved. A cold gaseous stream is mixed with a hot stream of vapor, nanometer sized droplets nucleate as the vapor becomes supersaturated, and subsequently grow as more vapor condenses on their surface. All length and time scales of fluid motion and mixing are resolved and the quadrature method of moments is used to describe the dynamics of the condensing, non-inertial droplets. The results show that a region of high nucleation rate is located near the cold, dry stream, while particles undergo intense growth via condensation on the hot, humid vapor side. Supersaturation and residence times are such that number densities are low and neither coagulation nor vapor scavenging due to condensation are significant. The difference in Schmidt numbers of aerosol particles (approximated as infinity) and temperature and vapor (near unity) causes a drift of the aerosol particles in scalar space and contributes to a large scatter in the conditional statistics of aerosol quantities. The spatial distribution of the aerosol reveals high volume fraction on the hot side of the mixing layer. This distribution is due to drift against the mean and is related to turbulent mixing, which displaces particles from the nucleation region (cold side) into the growth region (hot side). Such a mechanism is absent in laminar flows and is a distinct feature of turbulent condensing aerosols.

  15. System for removing contaminated surface layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Kozo.

    1987-04-01

    The object of the present invention is to offer a new type of useful decontamination system, with which the contaminated surface layers can be removed effectively by injection of such solid microparticles. Liquid carbon dioxide is passed from a liquid carbon dioxide tank via the carbon dioxide supply line into the system for injecting solid carbon dioxide particles. Part of the liquid carbon dioxide introduced into the system is converted to solid carbon dioxide particles by the temperature drop resulting from adiabatic expansion in the carbon dioxide expansion space of the injection system. The solid carbon dioxide particles reach the injection nozzle, which is connected through the expansion space. The carbon dioxide microparticles are further cooled and accelerated by nitrogen gas injected from the nitrogen gas nozzle at the tip of the nitrogen gas supply line, which is connected to a liquid nitrogen tank. The cooled and accelerated solid carbon dioxide microparticles are injected from the injection nozzle for the solid carbon dioxide and directed against the contaminated surface to be cleaned, and, as a result, the surface contamination is removed

  16. Numerical simulation of small-scale mixing processes in the upper ocean and atmospheric boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Druzhinin, O; Troitskaya, Yu; Zilitinkevich, S

    2016-01-01

    The processes of turbulent mixing and momentum and heat exchange occur in the upper ocean at depths up to several dozens of meters and in the atmospheric boundary layer within interval of millimeters to dozens of meters and can not be resolved by known large- scale climate models. Thus small-scale processes need to be parameterized with respect to large scale fields. This parameterization involves the so-called bulk coefficients which relate turbulent fluxes with large-scale fields gradients. The bulk coefficients are dependent on the properties of the small-scale mixing processes which are affected by the upper-ocean stratification and characteristics of surface and internal waves. These dependencies are not well understood at present and need to be clarified. We employ Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) as a research tool which resolves all relevant flow scales and does not require closure assumptions typical of Large-Eddy and Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes simulations (LES and RANS). Thus DNS provides a solid ground for correct parameterization of small-scale mixing processes and also can be used for improving LES and RANS closure models. In particular, we discuss the problems of the interaction between small-scale turbulence and internal gravity waves propagating in the pycnocline in the upper ocean as well as the impact of surface waves on the properties of atmospheric boundary layer over wavy water surface. (paper)

  17. Real-Gas Effects on Binary Mixing Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okong'o, Nora; Bellan, Josette

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a computational study of real-gas effects on the mean flow and temporal stability of heptane/nitrogen and oxygen/hydrogen mixing layers at supercritical pressures. These layers consist of two counterflowing free streams of different composition, temperature, and density. As in related prior studies reported in NASA Tech Briefs, the governing conservation equations were the Navier-Stokes equations of compressible flow plus equations for the conservation of total energy and of chemical- species masses. In these equations, the expressions for heat fluxes and chemical-species mass fluxes were derived from fluctuation-dissipation theory and incorporate Soret and Dufour effects. Similarity equations for the streamwise velocity, temperature, and mass fractions were derived as approximations to the governing equations. Similarity profiles showed important real-gas, non-ideal-mixture effects, particularly for temperature, in departing from the error-function profile, which is the similarity solution for incompressible flow. The temperature behavior was attributed to real-gas thermodynamics and variations in Schmidt and Prandtl numbers. Temporal linear inviscid stability analyses were performed using the similarity and error-function profiles as the mean flow. For the similarity profiles, the growth rates were found to be larger and the wavelengths of highest instability shorter, relative to those of the errorfunction profiles and to those obtained from incompressible-flow stability analysis. The range of unstable wavelengths was found to be larger for the similarity profiles than for the error-function profiles

  18. Monolayers and mixed-layers on copper towards corrosion protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinapi, F. [Fonds pour la Formation a la Recherche dans l' Industrie et dans l' Agriculture, Rue d' Egmont 5, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium); Julien, S.; Auguste, D.; Hevesi, L.; Delhalle, J. [Laboratory of Chemistry and Electrochemistry of Surfaces, University of Namur, FUNDP, Rue de Bruxelles, 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Mekhalif, Z. [Laboratory of Chemistry and Electrochemistry of Surfaces, University of Namur, FUNDP, Rue de Bruxelles, 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium)], E-mail: zineb.mekhalif@fundp.ac.be

    2008-05-01

    In order to improve the protection abilities of (3-mercaptopropy)trimethoxysilane (MPTS) self-assembled monolayers on copper surfaces, mixed monolayers have been formed successfully by successive immersions in MPTS and in n-dodecanethiol (DT). A newly synthesised molecule, (11-mercaptoundecyl)trimethoxysilane (MUTS), has also been employed to form a thicker organic film on copper surfaces and, thereby, enhance the inhibitory action of the coating. The grafting has been confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), polarization modulation infrared reflection adsorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS) and water contact angle. The protective efficiency of each protective organic film has been evidenced by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and polarization curve measurements (CP). It was shown that the MUTS and unhydrolyzed MPTS/DT films exhibited significant corrosion protection properties.

  19. Three Dimensional Dynamics of Freshwater Lenses in the Oceans Near Surface Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-14

    the potential impact of these fluxes on the barrier layer and Aquarius and Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite image formations. By...contributing to the salinity field detected in the Aquarius and Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) sat- ellite footprints. The barrier layer (Lukas...operational algorithms for sea surface salinity satellites. Oceanic advection and mixing funda- mentally affect the sea surface salinity sig - nal

  20. Laboratory simulations of the atmospheric mixed-layer in flow over complex topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    A laboratory study of the influence of complex terrain on the interface between a well-mixed boundary layer and an elevated stratified layer was conducted in the towing-tank facility of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The height of the mixed layer in the daytime boundar...

  1. Pathfinder : Applying graph theory for consistent tracking of daytime mixed layer height with backscatter lidar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruine, M.; Apituley, Arnoud; Donovan, Dave; Klein Baltink, Henk; de Haij, Marijn

    2017-01-01

    The height of the atmospheric boundary layer or mixing layer is an important parameter for understanding the dynamics of the atmosphere and the dispersion of trace gases and air pollution. The height of the mixing layer (MLH) can be retrieved, among other methods, from lidar or ceilometer

  2. Acoustic tomography in the atmospheric surface layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ziemann

    Full Text Available Acoustic tomography is presented as a technique for remote monitoring of meteorological quantities. This method and a special algorithm of analysis can directly produce area-averaged values of meteorological parameters. As a result consistent data will be obtained for validation of numerical atmospheric micro-scale models. Such a measuring system can complement conventional point measurements over different surfaces. The procedure of acoustic tomography uses the horizontal propagation of sound waves in the atmospheric surface layer. Therefore, to provide a general overview of sound propagation under various atmospheric conditions a two-dimensional ray-tracing model according to a modified version of Snell's law is used. The state of the crossed atmosphere can be estimated from measurements of acoustic travel time between sources and receivers at different points. Derivation of area-averaged values of the sound speed and furthermore of air temperature results from the inversion of travel time values for all acoustic paths. Thereby, the applied straight ray two-dimensional tomographic model using SIRT (simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique is characterised as a method with small computational requirements, satisfactory convergence and stability properties as well as simple handling, especially, during online evaluation.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (turbulence; instruments and techniques.

  3. Simulating dynamics of (delta){sup 13}C of CO{sub 2} in the planetary boundary layer a boreal forest region: covariation between surface fluxes and atmospheric mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Baozhang; Chen, Jing M. [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada). Dept. of Geography; Tans, Pieter P. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States). Earth System Research Lab.; Huang, Lin [Environment Canada, Toronto, ON (Canada). Atmospheric Science and Technology Directorate

    2006-11-15

    Stable isotopes of CO{sub 2} contain unique information on the biological and physical processes that exchange CO{sub 2} between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. Ecosystem exchange of carbon isotopes with the atmosphere is correlated diurnally and seasonally with the planetary boundary layer (PBL) dynamics. The strength of this kind of covariation affects the vertical gradient of (delta){sup 13}C and thus the global (delta){sup 13}C distribution pattern. We need to understand the various processes involved in transport/diffusion of carbon isotope ratio in the PBL and between the PBL and the biosphere and the troposphere. In this study, we employ a one-dimensional vertical diffusion/transport atmospheric model (VDS), coupled to an ecosystem isotope model (BEPS-EASS) to simulate dynamics of {sup 13}CO{sub 2} in the PBL over a boreal forest region in the vicinity of the Fraserdale (FRD) tower (49 deg 52 min 29.9 sec N, 81 deg 34 min 12.3 sec W) in northern Ontario, Canada. The data from intensive campaigns during the growing season in 1999 at this site are used for model validation in the surface layer. The model performance, overall, is satisfactory in simulating the measured data over the whole course of the growing season. We examine the interaction of the biosphere and the atmosphere through the PBL with respect to (delta){sup 13}C on diurnal and seasonal scales. The simulated annual mean vertical gradient of (delta){sup 13}C in the PBL in the vicinity of the FRD tower was about 0.025% in 1999. The (delta){sup 13}C vertical gradient exhibited strong diurnal (29%) and seasonal (71%) variations that do not exactly mimic those of CO{sub 2}. Most of the vertical gradient (96.5% {+-}) resulted from covariation between ecosystem exchange of carbon isotopes and the PBL dynamics, while the rest (3.5%{+-}) was contributed by isotopic disequilibrium between respiration and photosynthesis. This disequilibrium effect on (delta){sup 13}C of CO{sub 2} dynamics in PBL

  4. Simulating dynamics of {delta}{sup 13}C of CO{sub 2} in the planetary boundary layer a boreal forest region: covariation between surface fluxes and atmospheric mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Baozhang; Chen, Jing M. [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada). Dept. of Geography; Tans, Pieter P. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States). Earth System Research Lab.; Huang, Lin [Environment Canada, Toronto, ON (Canada). Atmospheric Science and Technology Directorate

    2006-11-15

    Stable isotopes of CO{sub 2} contain unique information on the biological and physical processes that exchange CO{sub 2} between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. Ecosystem exchange of carbon isotopes with the atmosphere is correlated diurnally and seasonally with the planetary boundary layer (PBL) dynamics. The strength of this kind of covariation affects the vertical gradient of {delta}{sup 13}C and thus the global {delta}{sup 13}C distribution pattern. We need to understand the various processes involved in transport/diffusion of carbon isotope ratio in the PBL and between the PBL and the biosphere and the troposphere. In this study, we employ a one-dimensional vertical diffusion/transport atmospheric model (VDS), coupled to an ecosystem isotope model (BEPS-EASS) to simulate dynamics of {sup 13}CO{sub 2} in the PBL over a boreal forest region in the vicinity of the Fraserdale (FRD) tower (49 deg 52 min 29.9 sec N, 81 deg 34 min 12.3 sec W) in northern Ontario, Canada. The data from intensive campaigns during the growing season in 1999 at this site are used for model validation in the surface layer. The model performance, overall, is satisfactory in simulating the measured data over the whole course of the growing season. We examine the interaction of the biosphere and the atmosphere through the PBL with respect to {delta}{sup 13}C on diurnal and seasonal scales. The simulated annual mean vertical gradient of {delta}{sup 13}C in the PBL in the vicinity of the FRD tower was about 0.025% in 1999. The {delta}{sup 13}C vertical gradient exhibited strong diurnal (29%) and seasonal (71%) variations that do not exactly mimic those of CO{sub 2}. Most of the vertical gradient (96.5% {+-}) resulted from covariation between ecosystem exchange of carbon isotopes and the PBL dynamics, while the rest (3.5%{+-}) was contributed by isotopic disequilibrium between respiration and photosynthesis. This disequilibrium effect on {delta}{sup 13}C of CO{sub 2} dynamics in PBL

  5. Improve oxidation resistance at high temperature by nanocrystalline surface layer

    OpenAIRE

    Xia, Z. X.; Zhang, C.; Huang, X. F.; Liu, W. B.; Yang, Z. G.

    2015-01-01

    An interesting change of scale sequence occurred during oxidation of nanocrystalline surface layer by means of a surface mechanical attrition treatment. The three-layer oxide structure from the surface towards the matrix is Fe3O4, spinel FeCr2O4 and corundum (Fe,Cr)2O3, which is different from the typical two-layer scale consisted of an Fe3O4 outer layer and an FeCr2O4 inner layer in conventional P91 steel. The diffusivity of Cr, Fe and O is enhanced concurrently in the nanocrystalline surfac...

  6. Exploring Scintillometry in the Stable Atmospheric Surface Layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartogensis, O.K.

    2006-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is to investigate observation methods of heat and momentum exchange and key variables that characterise turbulence in the atmospheric stable surface layer (SSL), a layer defined as the lower part of the stable boundary layer (SBL) where surface fluxes do not change

  7. Mixing processes at the subsurface layer in the Amundsen Sea shelf region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojica, J.; Djoumna, G.; Francis, D. K.; Holland, D.

    2017-12-01

    In the Amundsen Sea shelf region, mixing processes promote an upward transport of diapycnal fluxes of heat and salt from the subsurface to the surface mixing layer. Here we estimate the diapycnal mixing rates on the Amundsen shelf from a multi-year mooring cluster and five research cruises. By applying fine-scale parameterizations, the mixing rates obtained were higher near the southern end of Pine Island glacier front and exceeded 10-2 m2s-1. The eddy diffusivity increased near the critical latitude (74o 28' S) for semi-diurnal M2 tides, which coincided with near-critical topography on the shelf. This condition favored the generation of internal waves of M2 frequency. The semi-diurnal dynamic enhanced the mixing that potentially affected the heat budget and the circulation of the modified Circumpolar Deep Water. This can be observed in the characteristics of water exchange both below the ice shelves and between the continental shelf and the ice shelf cavities. The location of the critical latitude and critical topography provided favorable conditions for the generation of internal waves. KEYWORDS: Mixing processes, diapycnal fluxes, critical latitude, Circumpolar Deep Water.

  8. Comparison of Four Mixed Layer Mesoscale Parameterizations and the Equation for an Arbitrary Tracer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canuto, V. M.; Dubovikov, M. S.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we discuss two issues, the inter-comparison of four mixed layer mesoscale parameterizations and the search for the eddy induced velocity for an arbitrary tracer. It must be stressed that our analysis is limited to mixed layer mesoscales since we do not treat sub-mesoscales and small turbulent mixing. As for the first item, since three of the four parameterizations are expressed in terms of a stream function and a residual flux of the RMT formalism (residual mean theory), while the fourth is expressed in terms of vertical and horizontal fluxes, we needed a formalism to connect the two formulations. The standard RMT representation developed for the deep ocean cannot be extended to the mixed layer since its stream function does not vanish at the ocean's surface. We develop a new RMT representation that satisfies the surface boundary condition. As for the general form of the eddy induced velocity for an arbitrary tracer, thus far, it has been assumed that there is only the one that originates from the curl of the stream function. This is because it was assumed that the tracer residual flux is purely diffusive. On the other hand, we show that in the case of an arbitrary tracer, the residual flux has also a skew component that gives rise to an additional bolus velocity. Therefore, instead of only one bolus velocity, there are now two, one coming from the curl of the stream function and other from the skew part of the residual flux. In the buoyancy case, only one bolus velocity contributes to the mean buoyancy equation since the residual flux is indeed only diffusive.

  9. Laboratory simulations of the atmospheric mixed layer in flow over complex terrain

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — A laboratory study of the influence of complex terrain on the interface between a well-mixed boundary layer and an elevated stratified layer was conducted in the...

  10. Mechanisms of Mixed-Layer Salinity Seasonal Variability in the Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Julia; Serra, Nuno; Bryan, Frank O.; Johnson, Benjamin K.; Stammer, Detlef

    2018-01-01

    Based on a joint analysis of an ensemble mean of satellite sea surface salinity retrievals and the output of a high-resolution numerical ocean circulation simulation, physical processes are identified that control seasonal variations of mixed-layer salinity (MLS) in the Indian Ocean, a basin where salinity changes dominate changes in density. In the northern and near-equatorial Indian Ocean, annual salinity changes are mainly driven by respective changes of the horizontal advection. South of the equatorial region, between 45°E and 90°E, where evaporation minus precipitation has a strong seasonal cycle, surface freshwater fluxes control the seasonal MLS changes. The influence of entrainment on the salinity variance is enhanced in mid-ocean upwelling regions but remains small. The model and observational results reveal that vertical diffusion plays a major role in precipitation and river runoff dominated regions balancing the surface freshwater flux. Vertical diffusion is important as well in regions where the advection of low salinity leads to strong gradients across the mixed-layer base. There, vertical diffusion explains a large percentage of annual MLS variance. The simulation further reveals that (1) high-frequency small-scale eddy processes primarily determine the salinity tendency in coastal regions (in particular in the Bay of Bengal) and (2) shear horizontal advection, brought about by changes in the vertical structure of the mixed layer, acts against mean horizontal advection in the equatorial salinity frontal regions. Observing those latter features with the existing observational components remains a future challenge.

  11. In situ laser sensing of mixed layer turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalgleish, Fraser; Hou, Weilin; Vuorenkoski, Anni; Nootz, Gero; Ouyang, Bing

    2013-06-01

    This paper will discuss and compare some recent oceanic test results from the Bahamas Optical Turbulence Exercise (BOTEX) cruise, where vertical profiling was conducted with both time-resolved laser backscatter measurements being acquired via a subsurface light detection and ranging (lidar) profiling instrument, and laser beam forward deflection measurements were acquired from a matrix of continuous wave (cw) laser beams (i.e. structured lighting) being imaged in the forward direction with a high speed camera over a one-way path, with both transmitter and camera firmly fixed on a rigid frame. From the latter, it was observed that when within a natural turbulent layer, the laser beams were being deflected from their still water location at the image plane, which was 8.8 meters distance from the laser dot matrix transmitter. As well as suggesting that the turbulent structures being encountered were predominately larger than the beam diameter, the magnitude of the deflection has been confirmed to correlate with the temperature dissipation rate. The profiling lidar measurements which were conducted in similar conditions, also used a narrow collimated laser beam in order to resolve small-scale spatial structure, but with the added attribute that sub-nanosecond short pulse temporal profile could potentially resolve small-scale vertical structure. In the clear waters of the Tongue of the Ocean in the Bahamas, it was hypothesized that the backscatter anomalies due to the effect of refractive index discontinuities (i.e. mixed layer turbulence) would be observable. The processed lidar data presented herein indicates that higher backscatter levels were observed in the regions of the water column which corresponded to higher turbulent mixing which occurs at the first and second themoclines. At the same test stations that the laser beam matrix and lidar measurements were conducted, turbulence measurements were made with two non-optical instruments, the Vertical Microstructure

  12. Calculation of the flow field including boundary layer effects for supersonic mixed compression inlets at angles of attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadyak, J.; Hoffman, J. D.

    1982-01-01

    The flow field in supersonic mixed compression aircraft inlets at angle of attack is calculated. A zonal modeling technique is employed to obtain the solution which divides the flow field into different computational regions. The computational regions consist of a supersonic core flow, boundary layer flows adjacent to both the forebody/centerbody and cowl contours, and flow in the shock wave boundary layer interaction regions. The zonal modeling analysis is described and some computational results are presented. The governing equations for the supersonic core flow form a hyperbolic system of partial differential equations. The equations for the characteristic surfaces and the compatibility equations applicable along these surfaces are derived. The characteristic surfaces are the stream surfaces, which are surfaces composed of streamlines, and the wave surfaces, which are surfaces tangent to a Mach conoid. The compatibility equations are expressed as directional derivatives along streamlines and bicharacteristics, which are the lines of tangency between a wave surface and a Mach conoid.

  13. A mechanistic model of an upper bound on oceanic carbon export as a function of mixed layer depth and temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Li

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Export production reflects the amount of organic matter transferred from the ocean surface to depth through biological processes. This export is in large part controlled by nutrient and light availability, which are conditioned by mixed layer depth (MLD. In this study, building on Sverdrup's critical depth hypothesis, we derive a mechanistic model of an upper bound on carbon export based on the metabolic balance between photosynthesis and respiration as a function of MLD and temperature. We find that the upper bound is a positively skewed bell-shaped function of MLD. Specifically, the upper bound increases with deepening mixed layers down to a critical depth, beyond which a long tail of decreasing carbon export is associated with increasing heterotrophic activity and decreasing light availability. We also show that in cold regions the upper bound on carbon export decreases with increasing temperature when mixed layers are deep, but increases with temperature when mixed layers are shallow. A meta-analysis shows that our model envelopes field estimates of carbon export from the mixed layer. When compared to satellite export production estimates, our model indicates that export production in some regions of the Southern Ocean, particularly the subantarctic zone, is likely limited by light for a significant portion of the growing season.

  14. An applied model for the height of the daytime mixed layer and the entrainment zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batchvarova, E.; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    1994-01-01

    A model is presented for the height of the mixed layer and the depth of the entrainment zone under near-neutral and unstable atmospheric conditions. It is based on the zero-order mixed layer height model of Batchvarova and Gryning (1991) and the parameterization of the entrainment zone depth prop...

  15. Efficient charge balance in blue phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes by two types of mixed layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hyung Jin; Lee, Ho Won; Lee, Song Eun; Sun, Yong; Hwang, Kyo Min; Yoo, Han Kyu; Lee, Sung Kyu [Department of Information Display, Hongik University, Seoul 121-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woo Young, E-mail: wykim@hoseo.edu [Department of Green Energy & Semiconductor Engineering, Hoseo University, Asan 336-795 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Kwan, E-mail: kimyk@hongik.ac.kr [Department of Information Display, Hongik University, Seoul 121-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-31

    The authors have demonstrated a highly efficient and long-lifetime blue phosphorescent organic light emitting diode (PHOLED) that uses two types of mixed layers. The mixed layers play the role of carrier injection control and exciton generation zone extension. One of the layers is applied for mixing the hole transport layer (HTL) and host material at the HTL side for carrier injection control. The other works as a mixed electron transporting layer (ETL) and host material at the ETL side. The optimized blue PHOLED has been shown to achieve high performance owing to the mixed layer effects. It gave a maximum luminous efficiency of 25.55 cd/A, maximum external quantum efficiency of 13.05%, and lifetime of 7.24 h under 500 cd/m{sup 2}. These results indicate that applying mixed layers is a simple and efficient method that does not require significant structural change. - Highlights: • Highly efficient blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting diode (PHOLEDs) • Hole transporting layer consists with mixed layer for delayed hole injection • The blue PHOLEDs with long lifetime due to suppression of quenching process.

  16. Observations of the atmospheric surface layer parameters over a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    1999-08-11

    Aug 11, 1999 ... This paper discusses the observations of the Atmospheric Surface Layer (ASL) parameters dur- ing the solar eclipse of August 11th, 1999. Intensive surface layer experiments were conducted at. Ahmedabad (23◦21 N, 72◦36 E), the western part of India, which was close to the totality path. This rare event ...

  17. Formation of biocompatible surface layers depending on the sputtering distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasakina, E. O.; Seregin, A. V.; Baikin, A. S.; Kaplan, M. A.; Konushkin, S. V.; Sergiyenko, K. V.; Kovaleva, E. D.; Kolmakova, A. A.; Leonov, A. V.; Sevost'yanov, M. A.; Kolmakov, A. G.; Simakov, S. V.

    2017-05-01

    Nano- and micro-dimensional surface layers of silver and tantalum on flat and wire NiTi substrates by the method of magnetron sputtering in vacuum were produced. The structure and composition of the samples were determined using SEM and Auger spectroscopy. With an increase in the sputtering distance, the thickness of the surface layers decreases, and the thickness of the transition layer and the dependence of the thickness change as a whole depend on the nature of the sputtered substance.

  18. Contact mechanics for layered materials with randomly rough surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, B N J

    2012-03-07

    The contact mechanics model of Persson is applied to layered materials. We calculate the M function, which relates the surface stress to the surface displacement, for a layered material, where the top layer (thickness d) has different elastic properties than the semi-infinite solid below. Numerical results for the contact area as a function of the magnification are presented for several cases. As an application, we calculate the fluid leak rate for laminated rubber seals.

  19. Assessment of WRF Surface Layer Formulations Over a Complex Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, P.; Sharan, M.

    2017-12-01

    The accurate and efficient estimation of surface turbulent fluxes is crucial to predict an adequate atmospheric evolution by atmospheric models. The Monin-Obukhov similarity theory, which is used to compute these fluxes in numerical models, utilizes the empirical stability correction functions. In the present study, impact of various functional forms of similarity functions on the computation of the surface fluxes under both unstable and stable stratification is analyzed. In addition, this study compares two surface layer parametrization schemes in the Weather Research and Forecasting model over Ranchi (India). The model is run with three nested domains at a high resolution (1 Km) for `five' 4-day periods covering 15 days of Premonsoon season. The two surface layer schemes chosen for the analysis includes MM5 surface layer scheme having Businger-Dyer similarity functions, and revised MM5 scheme utilizing the functions those are valid for full ranges of atmospheric stabilities. The five planetary boundary layer (PBL) schemes are selected to assess the influence of the surface layer schemes on the structure of the boundary layer. The schemes are- Asymmetric Convective Model Version 2 (ACM2), Bougeault-Lacarrere (Boulac), Medium Range Forecast (MRF), Mellor-Yamada-Nakanishi-Niino (MYNN), and Yonsei University (YSU) PBL schemes. The impact of surface layer parametrizations on the near surface diagnostic variables is analyzed and results are compared with the observations.The bias in the 2 m temperature (T2) and 10 m wind speed (U) across the PBL schemes is very small and each PBL scheme is able to reproduce the diurnal variation of T2 irrespective of the surface layer scheme used for the simulations. A relatively higher value nocturnal T2 is predicted with the revised MM5 surface layer scheme as compared to that obtained with the old MM5 scheme, while both the surface layer schemes reproduce almost similar T2 during convective conditions. However, compare to the

  20. Assessment of mixed-layer height estimation from single-wavelength ceilometer profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knepp, Travis N.; Szykman, James J.; Long, Russell; Duvall, Rachelle M.; Krug, Jonathan; Beaver, Melinda; Cavender, Kevin; Kronmiller, Keith; Wheeler, Michael; Delgado, Ruben; Hoff, Raymond; Berkoff, Timothy; Olson, Erik; Clark, Richard; Wolfe, Daniel; Van Gilst, David; Neil, Doreen

    2017-10-01

    Differing boundary/mixed-layer height measurement methods were assessed in moderately polluted and clean environments, with a focus on the Vaisala CL51 ceilometer. This intercomparison was performed as part of ongoing measurements at the Chemistry And Physics of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (CAPABLE) site in Hampton, Virginia and during the 2014 Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ) field campaign that took place in and around Denver, Colorado. We analyzed CL51 data that were collected via two different methods (BLView software, which applied correction factors, and simple terminal emulation logging) to determine the impact of data collection methodology. Further, we evaluated the STRucture of the ATmosphere (STRAT) algorithm as an open-source alternative to BLView (note that the current work presents an evaluation of the BLView and STRAT algorithms and does not intend to act as a validation of either). Filtering criteria were defined according to the change in mixed-layer height (MLH) distributions for each instrument and algorithm and were applied throughout the analysis to remove high-frequency fluctuations from the MLH retrievals. Of primary interest was determining how the different data-collection methodologies and algorithms compare to each other and to radiosonde-derived boundary-layer heights when deployed as part of a larger instrument network. We determined that data-collection methodology is not as important as the processing algorithm and that much of the algorithm differences might be driven by impacts of local meteorology and precipitation events that pose algorithm difficulties. The results of this study show that a common processing algorithm is necessary for light detection and ranging (lidar)-based MLH intercomparisons and ceilometer-network operation, and that sonde-derived boundary layer heights are higher (10-15 % at midday) than lidar

  1. Assessment of mixed-layer height estimation from single-wavelength ceilometer profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. N. Knepp

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Differing boundary/mixed-layer height measurement methods were assessed in moderately polluted and clean environments, with a focus on the Vaisala CL51 ceilometer. This intercomparison was performed as part of ongoing measurements at the Chemistry And Physics of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (CAPABLE site in Hampton, Virginia and during the 2014 Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ field campaign that took place in and around Denver, Colorado. We analyzed CL51 data that were collected via two different methods (BLView software, which applied correction factors, and simple terminal emulation logging to determine the impact of data collection methodology. Further, we evaluated the STRucture of the ATmosphere (STRAT algorithm as an open-source alternative to BLView (note that the current work presents an evaluation of the BLView and STRAT algorithms and does not intend to act as a validation of either. Filtering criteria were defined according to the change in mixed-layer height (MLH distributions for each instrument and algorithm and were applied throughout the analysis to remove high-frequency fluctuations from the MLH retrievals. Of primary interest was determining how the different data-collection methodologies and algorithms compare to each other and to radiosonde-derived boundary-layer heights when deployed as part of a larger instrument network. We determined that data-collection methodology is not as important as the processing algorithm and that much of the algorithm differences might be driven by impacts of local meteorology and precipitation events that pose algorithm difficulties. The results of this study show that a common processing algorithm is necessary for light detection and ranging (lidar-based MLH intercomparisons and ceilometer-network operation, and that sonde-derived boundary layer heights are higher (10–15 % at

  2. Changes in mixed layer depth under climate change projections in two CGCMs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, Sang-Wook [Korea Ocean Research and Development Institute, Ansan (Korea); Yim, Bo Young; Noh, Yign [Yonsei University, Department of Atmospheric Sciences/Global Environmental Laboratory, Seoul (Korea); Dewitte, Boris [Laboratoire d' Etude en Geophysique et Oceanographie Spatiale, Toulouse (France)

    2009-08-15

    Two coupled general circulation models, i.e., the Meteorological Research Institute (MRI) and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) models, were chosen to examine changes in mixed layer depth (MLD) in the equatorial tropical Pacific and its relationship with ENSO under climate change projections. The control experiment used pre-industrial greenhouse gas concentrations whereas the 2 x CO{sub 2} experiment used doubled CO{sub 2} levels. In the control experiment, the MLD simulated in the MRI model was shallower than that in the GFDL model. This resulted in the tropical Pacific's mean sea surface temperature (SST) increasing at different rates under global warming in the two models. The deeper the mean MLD simulated in the control simulation, the lesser the warming rate of the mean SST simulated in the 2 x CO{sub 2} experiment. This demonstrates that the MLD is a key parameter for regulating the response of tropical mean SST to global warming. In particular, in the MRI model, increased stratification associated with global warming amplified wind-driven advection within the mixed layer, leading to greater ENSO variability. On the other hand, in the GFDL model, wind-driven currents were weak, which resulted in mixed-layer dynamics being less sensitive to global warming. The relationship between MLD and ENSO was also examined. Results indicated that the non-linearity between the MLD and ENSO is enhanced from the control run to the 2 x CO{sub 2} run in the MRI model, in contrast, the linear relationship between the MLD index and ENSO is unchanged despite an increase in CO{sub 2} concentrations in the GFDL model. (orig.)

  3. Mixed carboranethiol self-assembled monolayers on gold surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yavuz, Adem [Micro and Nanotechnology Department, Graduate School of Natural and Applied Science, Middle East Technical University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Sohrabnia, Nima [Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Yilmaz, Ayşen [Micro and Nanotechnology Department, Graduate School of Natural and Applied Science, Middle East Technical University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Danışman, M. Fatih, E-mail: danisman@metu.edu.tr [Micro and Nanotechnology Department, Graduate School of Natural and Applied Science, Middle East Technical University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey)

    2017-08-15

    Highlights: • M1 binds to the gold surface preferentially when co-deposited with M9 or O1. • Contact angles show similar trends regardless of the gold substrate roughness. • Contact angles were lower, with higher hysteresis, on template stripped gold. • Mixed carboranethiol SAMs have similar morphological properties regardless of mixing ratio. - Abstract: Carboranethiol self-assembled monolayers on metal surfaces have been shown to be very convenient systems for surface engineering. Here we have studied pure and mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of three different carboranethiol (CT) isomers on gold surfaces. The isomers were chosen with dipole moments pointing parallel to (m-1-carboranethiol, M1), out of (m-9-carboranethiol, M9) and into (o-1-carboranethiol, O1) the surface plane, in order to investigate the effect of dipole moment orientation on the film properties. In addition, influence of the substrate surface morphology on the film properties was also studied by using flame annealed (FA) and template stripped (TS) gold surfaces. Contact angle measurements indicate that in M1/M9 and M1/O1 mixed SAMs, M1 is the dominant species on the surface even for low M1 ratio in the growth solution. Whereas for O1/M9 mixed SAMs no clear evidence could be observed indicating dominance of one of the species over the other one. Though contact angle values were lower and hysteresis values were higher for SAMs grown on TS gold surfaces, the trends in the behavior of the contact angles with changing mixing ratio were identical for SAMs grown on both substrates. Atomic force microscopy images of the SAMs on TS gold surfaces indicate that the films have similar morphological properties regardless of mixing ratio.

  4. Preservation of Archaeal Surface Layer Structure During Mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kish, Adrienne; Miot, Jennyfer; Lombard, Carine; Guigner, Jean-Michel; Bernard, Sylvain; Zirah, Séverine; Guyot, François

    2016-05-01

    Proteinaceous surface layers (S-layers) are highly ordered, crystalline structures commonly found in prokaryotic cell envelopes that augment their structural stability and modify interactions with metals in the environment. While mineral formation associated with S-layers has previously been noted, the mechanisms were unconstrained. Using Sulfolobus acidocaldarius a hyperthermophilic archaeon native to metal-enriched environments and possessing a cell envelope composed only of a S-layer and a lipid cell membrane, we describe a passive process of iron phosphate nucleation and growth within the S-layer of cells and cell-free S-layer “ghosts” during incubation in a Fe-rich medium, independently of metabolic activity. This process followed five steps: (1) initial formation of mineral patches associated with S-layer; (2) patch expansion; (3) patch connection; (4) formation of a continuous mineral encrusted layer at the cell surface; (5) early stages of S-layer fossilization via growth of the extracellular mineralized layer and the mineralization of cytosolic face of the cell membrane. At more advanced stages of encrustation, encrusted outer membrane vesicles are formed, likely in an attempt to remove damaged S-layer proteins. The S-layer structure remains strikingly well preserved even upon the final step of encrustation, offering potential biosignatures to be looked for in the fossil record.

  5. Preservation of Archaeal Surface Layer Structure During Mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kish, Adrienne; Miot, Jennyfer; Lombard, Carine; Guigner, Jean-Michel; Bernard, Sylvain; Zirah, Séverine; Guyot, François

    2016-01-01

    Proteinaceous surface layers (S-layers) are highly ordered, crystalline structures commonly found in prokaryotic cell envelopes that augment their structural stability and modify interactions with metals in the environment. While mineral formation associated with S-layers has previously been noted, the mechanisms were unconstrained. Using Sulfolobus acidocaldarius a hyperthermophilic archaeon native to metal-enriched environments and possessing a cell envelope composed only of a S-layer and a lipid cell membrane, we describe a passive process of iron phosphate nucleation and growth within the S-layer of cells and cell-free S-layer “ghosts” during incubation in a Fe-rich medium, independently of metabolic activity. This process followed five steps: (1) initial formation of mineral patches associated with S-layer; (2) patch expansion; (3) patch connection; (4) formation of a continuous mineral encrusted layer at the cell surface; (5) early stages of S-layer fossilization via growth of the extracellular mineralized layer and the mineralization of cytosolic face of the cell membrane. At more advanced stages of encrustation, encrusted outer membrane vesicles are formed, likely in an attempt to remove damaged S-layer proteins. The S-layer structure remains strikingly well preserved even upon the final step of encrustation, offering potential biosignatures to be looked for in the fossil record. PMID:27221593

  6. Ordered mixed-layer structures in the Mighei carbonaceous chondrite matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackinnon, I. D. R.

    1982-01-01

    High resolution transmission electron microscopy of the Mighei carbonaceous chondrite matrix has revealed the presence of a new mixed layer structure material. This mixed-layer material consists of an ordered arrangement of serpentine-type (S) and brucite-type (B) layers in the sequence SBBSBB. Electron diffraction and imaging techniques show that the basal periodicity is approximately 17 A. Discrete crystals of SBB-type material are typically curved, of small size (less than 1 micron) and show structural variations similar to the serpentine group minerals. Mixed-layer material also occurs in association with planar serpentine. Characteristics of SBB-type material are not consistent with known terrestrial mixed-layer clay minerals. Evidence for formation by a condensation event or by subsequent alteration of pre-existing material is not yet apparent.

  7. Time-resolved PIV measurements of the atmospheric boundary layer over wind-driven surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markfort, Corey; Stegmeir, Matt

    2017-11-01

    Complex interactions at the air-water interface result in two-way coupling between wind-driven surface waves and the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). Turbulence generated at the surface plays an important role in aquatic ecology and biogeochemistry, exchange of gases such as oxygen and carbon dioxide, and it is important for the transfer of energy and controlling evaporation. Energy transferred from the ABL promotes the generation and maintenance of waves. A fraction of the energy is transferred to the surface mixed layer through the generation of turbulence. Energy is also transferred back to the ABL by waves. There is a need to quantify the details of the coupled boundary layers of the air-water system to better understand how turbulence plays a role in the interactions. We employ time-resolved PIV to measure the detailed structure of the air and water boundary layers under varying wind and wave conditions in the newly developed IIHR Boundary-Layer Wind-Wave Tunnel. The facility combines a 30-m long recirculating water channel with an open-return boundary layer wind tunnel. A thick turbulent boundary layer is developed in the 1 m high air channel, over the water surface, allowing for the study of boundary layer turbulence interacting with a wind-driven wave field.

  8. A Method for Deriving the Boundary Layer Mixing Height from MODIS Atmospheric Profile Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueliang Feng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The planetary boundary layer is the medium of energy, moisture, momentum and pollutant exchange between the surface and the atmosphere. In this paper, a method to derive the boundary layer mixing height (MH was introduced and applied over the Heihe river basin. Atmospheric profiles from the MODerate Resolution Imaging Sepctroradiometer (MODIS instrument onboard the NASA-Aqua satellite were used for the high spatial resolution of this method. A gap-filling method was used to replace missing MODIS data. In situ MH data were also calculated from HIWATER (Heihe Watershed Allied Telemetry Experimental Research and WATER (Watershed Allied Telemetry Experimental Research observational radiosonde sounding data from 2008 and 2012 using the Richardson number method combined with a subjective method. The MH occurs where there is an abrupt decrease in the MR (water vapor mixing ratio. The minimum vertical gradient of the MR is used to determine the MH. The method has an average RMSE of 370 m under clear skies and convective conditions. The seasonal variation in the MH at the Gaoya radiosonde station is also presented. The study demonstrates that remote sensing methodologies can successfully estimate the MH without the help of field measurements.

  9. Computations of Nonlinear Propagation of Sound Emitted from High Speed Mixing Layers

    OpenAIRE

    Punekar, J.; Avital, E. J.; Musafir, R. E.

    2014-01-01

    Non-linear sound propagation is investigated computationally by simulating compressible time-developing mixing layers using the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) approach and solving the viscous Burgers Equation. The mixing layers are of convective Mach numbers of 0.4, 0.8 and 1.2. The LES results agree qualitatively with known flow behavior. Mach waves are observed in the near sound field of the supersonic mixing layer computed by the LES. These waves show steepening typical to non-linear propagat...

  10. Chlorophyll modulation of mixed layer thermodynamics in a mixed-layer isopycnal General Circulation Model - An example from Arabian Sea and equatorial Pacific

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nakamoto, S.; PrasannaKumar, S.; Oberhuber, J.M.; Saito, H.; Muneyama, K.; Frouin, R.

    is influenced not only by local vertical mixing but also by horizontal con- vergence of mass and heat, a mixed layer model must consider both full dynamics due to the use of primitive equations and a parameterization for the vertical mass transfer and related... is dynamically determined without such a con- straint. Instantaneous atmospheric elds are inter- polated from the monthly means. Monthly mean climatology of chlorophyll pigment concentrations were obtained from the Coastal Zone Color Scan- ner (CZCS) from...

  11. Change of Surface Roughness and Planetary Boundary Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Otto

    1978-01-01

    The ratio between upstream and far downstream surface friction velocities relative to a change in surface roughness is given on the basis of results from surface Rossby number similarity theory. By simple theories for the internal boundary layer, which are found to compare quite well with recent ...

  12. Sensitivity of surface temperature to radiative forcing by contrail cirrus in a radiative-mixing model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Ulrich; Mayer, Bernhard

    2017-11-01

    Earth's surface temperature sensitivity to radiative forcing (RF) by contrail cirrus and the related RF efficacy relative to CO2 are investigated in a one-dimensional idealized model of the atmosphere. The model includes energy transport by shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) radiation and by mixing in an otherwise fixed reference atmosphere (no other feedbacks). Mixing includes convective adjustment and turbulent diffusion, where the latter is related to the vertical component of mixing by large-scale eddies. The conceptual study shows that the surface temperature sensitivity to given contrail RF depends strongly on the timescales of energy transport by mixing and radiation. The timescales are derived for steady layered heating (ghost forcing) and for a transient contrail cirrus case. The radiative timescales are shortest at the surface and shorter in the troposphere than in the mid-stratosphere. Without mixing, a large part of the energy induced into the upper troposphere by radiation due to contrails or similar disturbances gets lost to space before it can contribute to surface warming. Because of the different radiative forcing at the surface and at top of atmosphere (TOA) and different radiative heating rate profiles in the troposphere, the local surface temperature sensitivity to stratosphere-adjusted RF is larger for SW than for LW contrail forcing. Without mixing, the surface energy budget is more important for surface warming than the TOA budget. Hence, surface warming by contrails is smaller than suggested by the net RF at TOA. For zero mixing, cooling by contrails cannot be excluded. This may in part explain low efficacy values for contrails found in previous global circulation model studies. Possible implications of this study are discussed. Since the results of this study are model dependent, they should be tested with a comprehensive climate model in the future.

  13. Sensitivity of surface temperature to radiative forcing by contrail cirrus in a radiative-mixing model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Schumann

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Earth's surface temperature sensitivity to radiative forcing (RF by contrail cirrus and the related RF efficacy relative to CO2 are investigated in a one-dimensional idealized model of the atmosphere. The model includes energy transport by shortwave (SW and longwave (LW radiation and by mixing in an otherwise fixed reference atmosphere (no other feedbacks. Mixing includes convective adjustment and turbulent diffusion, where the latter is related to the vertical component of mixing by large-scale eddies. The conceptual study shows that the surface temperature sensitivity to given contrail RF depends strongly on the timescales of energy transport by mixing and radiation. The timescales are derived for steady layered heating (ghost forcing and for a transient contrail cirrus case. The radiative timescales are shortest at the surface and shorter in the troposphere than in the mid-stratosphere. Without mixing, a large part of the energy induced into the upper troposphere by radiation due to contrails or similar disturbances gets lost to space before it can contribute to surface warming. Because of the different radiative forcing at the surface and at top of atmosphere (TOA and different radiative heating rate profiles in the troposphere, the local surface temperature sensitivity to stratosphere-adjusted RF is larger for SW than for LW contrail forcing. Without mixing, the surface energy budget is more important for surface warming than the TOA budget. Hence, surface warming by contrails is smaller than suggested by the net RF at TOA. For zero mixing, cooling by contrails cannot be excluded. This may in part explain low efficacy values for contrails found in previous global circulation model studies. Possible implications of this study are discussed. Since the results of this study are model dependent, they should be tested with a comprehensive climate model in the future.

  14. Mixing times of organic molecules within secondary organic aerosol particles: a global planetary boundary layer perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclean, Adrian M.; Butenhoff, Christopher L.; Grayson, James W.; Barsanti, Kelley; Jimenez, Jose L.; Bertram, Allan K.

    2017-11-01

    When simulating the formation and life cycle of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) with chemical transport models, it is often assumed that organic molecules are well mixed within SOA particles on the timescale of 1 h. While this assumption has been debated vigorously in the literature, the issue remains unresolved in part due to a lack of information on the mixing times within SOA particles as a function of both temperature and relative humidity. Using laboratory data, meteorological fields, and a chemical transport model, we estimated how often mixing times are SOA in the planetary boundary layer (PBL), the region of the atmosphere where SOA concentrations are on average the highest. First, a parameterization for viscosity as a function of temperature and RH was developed for α-pinene SOA using room-temperature and low-temperature viscosity data for α-pinene SOA generated in the laboratory using mass concentrations of ˜ 1000 µg m-3. Based on this parameterization, the mixing times within α-pinene SOA are 0.5 µg m-3 at the surface). Next, as a starting point to quantify how often mixing times of organic molecules are SOA generated using low, atmospherically relevant mass concentrations, we developed a temperature-independent parameterization for viscosity using the room-temperature viscosity data for α-pinene SOA generated in the laboratory using a mass concentration of ˜ 70 µg m-3. Based on this temperature-independent parameterization, mixing times within α-pinene SOA are SOA generated using low, atmospherically relevant mass concentrations. Finally, a parameterization for viscosity of anthropogenic SOA as a function of temperature and RH was developed using sucrose-water data. Based on this parameterization, and assuming sucrose is a good proxy for anthropogenic SOA, 70 and 83 % of the mixing times within anthropogenic SOA in the PBL are < 1 h for January and July, respectively, when concentrations are significant. These percentages are likely lower

  15. Surface plasmon polariton modulator with optimized active layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babicheva, Viktoriia; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    A multilayered waveguide, which supports surface plasmon polaritons, is considered as an absorption modulator. The waveguide core consists of a silicon nitride layer and ultrathin layer with the varied carrier density embedded between two silver plates, which also serve as electrodes. Under apply...

  16. 2nd international conference on ion beam surface layer analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The papers of this conference are concerned with the fundamental aspects and with the application of surface layer analysis. It is reported amongst others about backscattering analysis, Auger electron spectroscopy, channelling and microprobe. (HPOE) [de

  17. The role of PEG conformation in mixed layers: from protein corona substrate to steric stabilization avoiding protein adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Comenge

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Although nanoparticles (NPs have been traditionally modified with a single ligand layer, mixture of ligands might help to combine different functionalities and to further engineer the NP surface. A detailed study of the competition between an alkanethiol (11-mercaptoundecanoic acid and SH-PEG for the surface of AuNPs and the resultant behaviors of this model nanoconjugate is presented here. As a result, the physicochemical properties of these conjugates can be progressively tuned by controlling the composition and especially the conformation of the mixed monolayer. This has implications in the physiological stability. The controlled changes on the SH-PEG conformation rather than its concentration induce a change in the stabilization mechanism from electrostatic repulsion to steric hindrance, which changes the biological fate of NPs. Importantly, the adsorption of proteins on the conjugates can be tailored by tuning the composition and conformation of the mixed layer.

  18. Mechanisms of Turbulent Mixing in the Continental Shelf Bottom Boundary Layer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shaw, William

    2000-01-01

    .... In this thesis, the problem of turbulent mixing in the coastal bottom boundary layer is investigated with a unique set of field measurements of velocity and sound speed that span a significant...

  19. Reactive Shear Layer Mixing and Growth Rate Effects on Afterburning Properties for Axisymetric Rocket Engine Plumes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hartsfield, Carl R

    2006-01-01

    .... The model is based on two characteristic distances, the distance required for turbulent mixing to generate a combustible mixture with the reactive film layer and the distance traveled during the ignition delay...

  20. Spring summer imbalance of dissolved inorganic carbon in the mixed layer of the north-western Sargasso Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchal, Olivier; Monfray, Patrick; Bates, Nicholas R.

    1996-02-01

    The surface concentration of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study site (BATS) decreased gradually by ca. 30μmol kg1from April to October in 1989. This decrease occurred almost in the absence of measurable nitrate in the mixed layer. Although ancillary data about the C system point to the possible importance of lateral transport, horizontal gradients in surface [DIC] and the mean flow in the area indicate that local effects should prevail in the seasonal drawdown of DIC. On the basis of an one-dimensional model, we hence estimate the mixed layer budget of DIC for this period, from surface [DIC] data, temperature profiles, and concomitant meteorological records. According to model uncertainties, the [DIC] drawdown should be mostly explained (71 93%) by a net community production (NCP) averaging 1.4 2.3 mgC m3 d1, and to a lesser extent, by outgassing of CO2 to the atmosphere. These losses are partially compensated (waters of the thermocline. This NCP must be regarded as a lower estimate, since the mean flow from the northeast should bring waters with slightly higher [DIC] to the mixed layer at the BATS site. The model, which is sensitive to short-term variations in atmospheric forcing (hurricane passed through the region. Hence, the surface NCP should not have been supported by unsampled, pulse-like supplies of deep nutrients. Wet atmospheric deposition of nitrogen measured concurrently on Bermuda could contribute to the biological N requirement (10 20%). According to historical estimates, N2 fixation seems however, insufficient to meet the remaining demand. Comparison between NCP and primary production measured in situ suggests that most of photosynthetically fixed C (>50%) is not respired in the mixed layer.

  1. Flexibl Pavement Analysis Considering Temperature Profile and Anisotropy Behavior in Hot Mix Asphalt Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Joonho

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A three Dimensional finite element model (FEM incorporating the anisotropic properties and temperature profile of hot mix asphalt (HMA pavement was developed to predict the structural responses of HMA pavement subject to heavy loads typically encountered in the field. In this study, ABAQUS was adopted to model the stress and strain relationships within the pavement structure. The results of the model were verified using data collected from the Korean Highway Corporation Test Road (KHCTR. The results demonstrated that both the base course and surface course layers follow the anisotropic behavior and the incorporation of the temperature profile throughout the pavement has a substantial effect on the pavement response predictions that impact pavement design. The results also showed that the anisotropy level of HMA and base material can be reduced to as low as 80% and 15% as a result of repeated loading, respectively.

  2. SURFACE LAYER ACCRETION IN CONVENTIONAL AND TRANSITIONAL DISKS DRIVEN BY FAR-ULTRAVIOLET IONIZATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Becker, Daniel; Chiang, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    Whether protoplanetary disks accrete at observationally significant rates by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) depends on how well ionized they are. Disk surface layers ionized by stellar X-rays are susceptible to charge neutralization by small condensates, ranging from ∼0.01 μm sized grains to angstrom-sized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Ion densities in X-ray-irradiated surfaces are so low that ambipolar diffusion weakens the MRI. Here we show that ionization by stellar far-ultraviolet (FUV) radiation enables full-blown MRI turbulence in disk surface layers. Far-UV ionization of atomic carbon and sulfur produces a plasma so dense that it is immune to ion recombination on grains and PAHs. The FUV-ionized layer, of thickness 0.01-0.1 g cm -2 , behaves in the ideal magnetohydrodynamic limit and can accrete at observationally significant rates at radii ∼> 1-10 AU. Surface layer accretion driven by FUV ionization can reproduce the trend of increasing accretion rate with increasing hole size seen in transitional disks. At radii ∼<1-10 AU, FUV-ionized surface layers cannot sustain the accretion rates generated at larger distance, and unless turbulent mixing of plasma can thicken the MRI-active layer, an additional means of transport is needed. In the case of transitional disks, it could be provided by planets.

  3. Surface-layer lattices as patterning element for multimeric extremozymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferner-Ortner-Bleckmann, Judith; Gelbmann, Nicola; Tesarz, Manfred; Egelseer, Eva M; Sleytr, Uwe B

    2013-11-25

    A promising new approach for the production of biocatalysts comprises the use of surface-layer (S-layer) lattices that present functional multimeric enzymes on their surface, thereby guaranteeing most accurate spatial distribution and orientation, as well as maximal effectiveness and stability of these enzymes. For proof of concept, a tetrameric and a trimeric extremozyme are chosen for the construction of S-layer/extremozyme fusion proteins. By using a flexible peptide linker, either one monomer of the tetrameric xylose isomerase XylA from the thermophilic Thermoanaerobacterium strain JW/SL-YS 489 or, in another approach, one monomer of the trimeric carbonic anhydrase from the methanogenic archaeon Methanosarcina thermophila are genetically linked to one monomer of the S-layer protein SbpA of Lysinibacillus sphaericus CCM 2177. After isolation and purification, the self-assembly properties of both S-layer fusion proteins as well as the specific activity of the fused enzymes are confirmed, thus indicating that the S-layer protein moiety does not influence the nature of the multimeric enzymes and vice versa. By recrystallization of the S-layer/extremozyme fusion proteins on solid supports, the active enzyme multimers are exposed on the surface of the square S-layer lattice with 13.1 nm spacing. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Vortex-Transport Element Simulation of a Confined Mixing Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-11-01

    Vol. 125, pp. 397-410. Browand, F. E., and Ho, C.-M. (1983) Journal de Mecanique theorique et Aunliauee Numero Special, pp. 99-120. Chorin, A. J...layers was initiated by Givi and Jou (1988) using a hybrid pseudo-spectral second order finite difference scheme. In all cases, the Reynolds number was...confinement. Therefore, they can provide accurate simulations for high Reynolds number, spatially growing flows. Moreover, vortex methods optimize the

  5. Surface Layer Turbulence and Aerosol Profiles During MAPTIP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davidson, K.L.; Frederickson, P.A.; Leeuw, G. de

    1995-01-01

    The Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) and the TNO Physics and Electronics Laboratory (TNO-FEL) deployed in situ sensors near and on Meetpost Noordwijk (MPN) during MAPTIP to describe the surface layer processes and also to evaluate models for near-surface aerosol profiles. Vertical profiles of aerosol

  6. Whisker Formation On Galvanic Tin Surface Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radanyi A.L.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work reports the effect of substrate composition, thickness of the tin electroplate and its morphology on pressure-induced tin whisker formation. Pure tin deposits of different thickness were obtained on a copper and brass substrates using methane sulfonic industrial bath. The deposits were compressed by a steel bearing ball forming imprint on the surface. The microstructure of tin whiskers obtained at the boundary of each imprint, their length and number were studied using both light and scanning electron microscopy. It was shown that the most intensive formation and growth of whiskers was observed in the first two hours. In general, brass substrate was shown to be more prone to whisker formation than copper independently of the tin coating thickness. The results have been compared with industrial bright tin finish on control unit socket leads and proposals have been made as to modification of the production process in order to minimize the risk of whiskering.

  7. Mixing layer heights derived from ceilometers: Useful for air quality studies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegner, Matthias; Geiß, Alexander; Schäfer, Klaus; Forkel, Renate; Chan, Ka Lok; Münkel, Christoph; von Schneidemesser, Erika; Gerwig, Holger; Nothard, Rainer; Bonn, Boris

    2017-04-01

    Ceilometers have been used for several meteorological applications, often in the framework of air quality studies. Whereas the particle backscatter coefficient can be retrieved in a quantitative way only recently (with the improvements of the hardware, Wiegner et al., 2014), mixing layer heights (MLH) have been derived for more than two decades. Several approaches are documented in the literature, however, automated procedures are still prone to errors because of difficulties in the recognition and attribution of discontinuities ("steps") in the backscatter profiles. For example, it is often not clear whether a detected change in the vertical distribution of aerosol backscatter indicates the residual layer, the stable boundary layer, or an elevated layer. Thus, an assessment of the reliability and accuracy of MLH-retrievals is relevant for air quality studies: on the one hand MLHs are often inversely correlated with ground-based in-situ measurements of particulate matter and gaseous pollutant concentrations, and on the other hand, MLH-retrievals can be used to validate chemistry transport models. To understand the benefit of MLH in the context of air quality, we have compared several retrievals of the MLH from ceilometer measurements during a field-campaign in summer 2014 (Bonn et al., 2016) for background and polluted sites in Berlin. Correlations between the concentrations of several pollutants and MLH are analyzed, and how they are influenced by the uncertainty of the derived MLH. References: Bonn, B. et al.: BAERLIN2014 - the influence of land surface types on and the horizontal heterogeneity of air pollutant levels in Berlin, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 7785-7811, doi:10.5194/acp-16-7785-2016, 2016. Wiegner, M. et al. (2014): What is the benefit of ceilometers for aerosol remote sensing? An answer from EARLINET, Atmos. Meas. Tech., 7, 1979-1997, doi:10.5194/amt-7-1979-2014, 2014.

  8. Multi-layer enhancement to polysilicon surface-micromachining technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sniegowski, J.J.; Rodgers, M.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Intelligent Micromachine Dept.

    1997-10-01

    A multi-level polysilicon surface-micromachining technology consisting of 5 layers of polysilicon is presented. Surface topography and film mechanical stress are the major impediments encountered in the development of a multilayer surface-micromachining process. However, excellent mechanical film characteristics have been obtained through the use of chemical-mechanical polishing for planarization of topography and by proper sequencing of film deposition with thermal anneals. Examples of operating microactuators, geared power-transfer mechanisms, and optical elements demonstrate the mechanical advantages of construction with 5 polysilicon layers.

  9. Numerical simulation of Rayleigh-Taylor turbulent mixing layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poujade, O.; Lardjane, N.; Peybernes, M.; Boulet, M.

    2009-01-01

    Accelerations in actual Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities are often variable. This article focuses on a particular class of variable accelerations where g(t) ∝ t n . A reference database is built from high resolution hydrodynamic numerical simulations. The successful comparison with a simple OD analytical model and the statistical 2SFK (2-Structure, 2-Fluid, 2-Turbulence) turbulence model is provided. Moreover, we show the difference between the mechanism at play in the Rayleigh-Taylor turbulent mixing zone and Kolmogorov's in the self similar developed turbulent regime. (authors)

  10. PIV measurement of turbulent bubbly mixing layer flow with polymer additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning, T; Guo, F; Chen, B; Zhang, X

    2009-01-01

    Based on experimental investigation of single-phase turbulent mixing layer flow with polymer additives, bubbly mixing layer was experimentally investigated by PIV. The velocity ratio between high and low speed is 4:1 and the Reynolds number based on the velocity difference of two steams and hydraulic diameter of the channel ranges is 73333. Gas bubbles with about 0.5% gas fraction were injected into pure water mixing layer with/without polymer additives from three different parts at the end of the splitter plate. The comparison between single phase and bubbly mixing layer shows clearly that the dynamic development of mixing layer is great influenced by the bubble injection. Similar with single phase, the Reynolds stress and vorticity still concentrate in a coniform area of central mixing flow field part and the width will increase with increasing the Reynolds number. Mean Reynolds stress will decrease with bubble injection in high Reynolds numbers and the decreasing of Reynolds stress with polymer additives is much more than pure water case.

  11. Double Charged Surface Layers in Lead Halide Perovskite Crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Sarmah, Smritakshi P.

    2017-02-01

    Understanding defect chemistry, particularly ion migration, and its significant effect on the surface’s optical and electronic properties is one of the major challenges impeding the development of hybrid perovskite-based devices. Here, using both experimental and theoretical approaches, we demonstrated that the surface layers of the perovskite crystals may acquire a high concentration of positively charged vacancies with the complementary negatively charged halide ions pushed to the surface. This charge separation near the surface generates an electric field that can induce an increase of optical band gap in the surface layers relative to the bulk. We found that the charge separation, electric field, and the amplitude of shift in the bandgap strongly depend on the halides and organic moieties of perovskite crystals. Our findings reveal the peculiarity of surface effects that are currently limiting the applications of perovskite crystals and more importantly explain their origins, thus enabling viable surface passivation strategies to remediate them.

  12. A method to estimate the height of temperature inversion layer and the effective mixing depht

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolli, D.

    1978-05-01

    A review of the concept PBL or turbulent boundary layer is made as it is understood in meteorology. Some features of the PBL parameterization are also discussed, as well as the methods used to estimate the temperature inversion heights during morning and afternoon hours. The study bases on the assumption of the dry adiabatic lapse rate in the mixing layer that is, water vapor and airborne material are supposed to be homogeneously mixed below the inversion layer or in the effective mixing depth. The mean mixing heights over Rio de Janeiro area respectively about 500m and 1000m at morning and afternoon hours. For Sao Paulo these values are respectively 400m and 1300m at morning and afternoon hours [pt

  13. Mixing and non-equilibrium chemical reaction in a compressible mixing layer. M.S. Thesis Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberger, Craig J.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of compressibility, chemical reaction exothermicity, and non-equilibrium chemical modeling in a reacting plane mixing layer were investigated by means of two dimensional direct numerical simulations. The chemical reaction was irreversible and second order of the type A + B yields Products + Heat. The general governing fluid equations of a compressible reacting flow field were solved by means of high order finite difference methods. Physical effects were then determined by examining the response of the mixing layer to variation of the relevant non-dimensionalized parameters. The simulations show that increased compressibility generally results in a suppressed mixing, and consequently a reduced chemical reaction conversion rate. Reaction heat release was found to enhance mixing at the initial stages of the layer growth, but had a stabilizing effect at later times. The increased stability manifested itself in the suppression or delay of the formation of large coherent structures within the flow. Calculations were performed for a constant rate chemical kinetics model and an Arrhenius type kinetic prototype. The choice of the model was shown to have an effect on the development of the flow. The Arrhenius model caused a greater temperature increase due to reaction than the constant kinetic model. This had the same effect as increasing the exothermicity of the reaction. Localized flame quenching was also observed when the Zeldovich number was relatively large.

  14. Atomic and molecular layer deposition for surface modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vähä-Nissi, Mika; Sievänen, Jenni; Salo, Erkki; Heikkilä, Pirjo; Kenttä, Eija; Johansson, Leena-Sisko; Koskinen, Jorma T.; Harlin, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Atomic and molecular layer deposition (ALD and MLD, respectively) techniques are based on repeated cycles of gas–solid surface reactions. A partial monolayer of atoms or molecules is deposited to the surface during a single deposition cycle, enabling tailored film composition in principle down to molecular resolution on ideal surfaces. Typically ALD/MLD has been used for applications where uniform and pinhole free thin film is a necessity even on 3D surfaces. However, thin – even non-uniform – atomic and molecular deposited layers can also be used to tailor the surface characteristics of different non-ideal substrates. For example, print quality of inkjet printing on polymer films and penetration of water into porous nonwovens can be adjusted with low-temperature deposited metal oxide. In addition, adhesion of extrusion coated biopolymer to inorganic oxides can be improved with a hybrid layer based on lactic acid. - Graphical abstract: Print quality of a polylactide film surface modified with atomic layer deposition prior to inkjet printing (360 dpi) with an aqueous ink. Number of printed dots illustrated as a function of 0, 5, 15 and 25 deposition cycles of trimethylaluminum and water. - Highlights: • ALD/MLD can be used to adjust surface characteristics of films and fiber materials. • Hydrophobicity after few deposition cycles of Al 2 O 3 due to e.g. complex formation. • Same effect on cellulosic fabrics observed with low temperature deposited TiO 2 . • Different film growth and oxidation potential with different precursors. • Hybrid layer on inorganic layer can be used to improve adhesion of polymer melt

  15. Atomic and molecular layer deposition for surface modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vähä-Nissi, Mika, E-mail: mika.vaha-nissi@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, PO Box 1000, FI‐02044 VTT (Finland); Sievänen, Jenni; Salo, Erkki; Heikkilä, Pirjo; Kenttä, Eija [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, PO Box 1000, FI‐02044 VTT (Finland); Johansson, Leena-Sisko, E-mail: leena-sisko.johansson@aalto.fi [Aalto University, School of Chemical Technology, Department of Forest Products Technology, PO Box 16100, FI‐00076 AALTO (Finland); Koskinen, Jorma T.; Harlin, Ali [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, PO Box 1000, FI‐02044 VTT (Finland)

    2014-06-01

    Atomic and molecular layer deposition (ALD and MLD, respectively) techniques are based on repeated cycles of gas–solid surface reactions. A partial monolayer of atoms or molecules is deposited to the surface during a single deposition cycle, enabling tailored film composition in principle down to molecular resolution on ideal surfaces. Typically ALD/MLD has been used for applications where uniform and pinhole free thin film is a necessity even on 3D surfaces. However, thin – even non-uniform – atomic and molecular deposited layers can also be used to tailor the surface characteristics of different non-ideal substrates. For example, print quality of inkjet printing on polymer films and penetration of water into porous nonwovens can be adjusted with low-temperature deposited metal oxide. In addition, adhesion of extrusion coated biopolymer to inorganic oxides can be improved with a hybrid layer based on lactic acid. - Graphical abstract: Print quality of a polylactide film surface modified with atomic layer deposition prior to inkjet printing (360 dpi) with an aqueous ink. Number of printed dots illustrated as a function of 0, 5, 15 and 25 deposition cycles of trimethylaluminum and water. - Highlights: • ALD/MLD can be used to adjust surface characteristics of films and fiber materials. • Hydrophobicity after few deposition cycles of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} due to e.g. complex formation. • Same effect on cellulosic fabrics observed with low temperature deposited TiO{sub 2}. • Different film growth and oxidation potential with different precursors. • Hybrid layer on inorganic layer can be used to improve adhesion of polymer melt.

  16. Seasonality in onshore normalized wind profiles above the surface layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Jesper Nielsen; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    2010-01-01

    This work aims to study the seasonal difference in normalized wind speed above the surface layer as it is observed at the 160 m high mast at the coastal site Høvsøre at winds from the sea (westerly). Normalized and stability averaged wind speeds above the surface layer are observed to be 20 to 50......% larger in the winter/spring seasons compared to the summer/autumn seasons at winds from west within the same atmospheric stability class. A method combining the mesoscale model, COAMPS, and observations of the surface stability of the marine boundary layer is presented. The objective of the method...... is to reconstruct the seasonal signal in normalized wind speed and identify the physical process behind. The method proved reasonably successful in capturing the relative difference in wind speed between seasons, indicating that the simulated physical processes are likely candidates to the observed seasonal signal...

  17. Analysis of Surface Waves in Saturated Layered Poroelastic Half-Spaces Using the Thin Layer Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Huayou; Cui, Yujun; Zhang, Dianji

    2018-03-01

    There are multiple modes of surface waves in saturated layered poroelastic half-spaces. The phase velocity and the attenuation of the modes are frequency dependent. The frequency behaviour of the modes can be studied using the layer transfer, stiffness and the transmission/reflection matrix methods. However, it is very difficult to find the complex roots of the determinants because the entries of the matrices involve the complex exponential functions of the wavenumber and the thickness of layer. To overcome this difficulty, the entries in the matrix are expressed in the form of algebraic functions using the thin layer method. Thus, the eigenvalues and eigenvectors can be easily solved using the matrix decomposition techniques instead of the root-searching ones. Some of the eigenvalues correspond to the wavenumbers of the surface waves, and can be picked out based on the characteristics of the surface waves. The frequency behaviour, variations of the pore pressure and the skeleton's displacements with the depth can be then investigated from the corresponding eigenvalues and eigenvectors, respectively. The method is verified by comparing the analytical and the discrete results in the saturated poroelastic half-space with the permeable surface. The method is applied to appreciate the effects of an impermeable surface on Rayleigh waves (R-waves) and the existence of Stoneley waves in the poroelastic half-space. The frequency behaviour of Rayleigh waves in three typical layered poroelastic half-spaces is also analyzed.

  18. Upper mixed layer temperature anomalies at the North Atlantic storm-track zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Moshonkin

    1995-10-01

    Full Text Available Synoptic sea surface temperature anomalies (SSTAs were determined as a result of separation of time scales smaller than 183 days. The SSTAs were investigated using daily data of ocean weather station "C" (52.75°N; 35.5°W from 1 January 1976 to 31 December 1980 (1827 days. There were 47 positive and 50 negative significant SSTAs (lifetime longer than 3 days, absolute value greater than 0.10 °C with four main intervals of the lifetime repetitions: 1. 4–7 days (45% of all cases, 2. 9–13 days (20–25%, 3. 14–18 days (10–15%, and 4. 21–30 days (10–15% and with a magnitude 1.5–2.0 °C. An upper layer balance model based on equations for temperature, salinity, mechanical energy (with advanced parametrization, state (density, and drift currents was used to simulate SSTA. The original method of modelling taking into account the mean observed temperature profiles proved to be very stable. The model SSTAs are in a good agreement with the observed amplitudes and phases of synoptic SSTAs during all 5 years. Surface heat flux anomalies are the main source of SSTAs. The influence of anomalous drift heat advection is about 30–50% of the SSTA, and the influence of salinity anomalies is about 10–25% and less. The influence of a large-scale ocean front was isolated only once in February-April 1978 during all 5 years. Synoptic SSTAs develop just in the upper half of the homogeneous layer at each winter. We suggest that there are two main causes of such active sublayer formation: 1. surface heat flux in the warm sectors of cyclones and 2. predominant heat transport by ocean currents from the south. All frequency functions of the ocean temperature synoptic response to heat and momentum surface fluxes are of integral character (red noise, though there is strong resonance with 20-days period of wind-driven horizontal heat advection with mixed layer temperature; there are some other peculiarities on the time scales from 5.5 to 13 days. Observed and

  19. Mixing of Singlet and Triplet Pairing for Surface Superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gor'kov, L. P.; Rashba, E. I.

    2002-07-01

    We consider structure of the Cooper wave function for superconductivity in a surface layer. Broken space inversion at the surface results in lifted spin degeneracy and in two branches of the gapped energy spectrum as caused by the spin-orbit interaction. The pair wave function consists of a mixture of both singlet and triplet components. Anisotropy of the Knight shift measurable in the NMR experiments is calculated in the whole temperature regime. Implications for a few known experimental situations is briefly discussed.

  20. Salinity-induced mixed and barrier layers in the southwestern tropical Atlantic Ocean off the northeast of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Araujo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution hydrographic observations of temperature and salinity are used to analyze the formation and distribution of isothermal depth (ZT, mixed depth (ZM and barrier layer thickness (BLT in a section of the southwestern Atlantic (0°30´ N–14°00´ S; 31°24´–41°48´ W, adjacent to the northeastern Brazilian coast. Analyzed data consists of 279 CTD casts acquired during two cruises under the Brazilian REVIZEE Program. One occurred in late austral winter (August–October 1995 and another in austral summer (January–April 1997. Oceanic observations are compared to numerical modeling results obtained from the French Mercator-Coriolis Program. Results indicate that the intrusion of subtropical Salinity Maximum Waters (SMW is the major process contributing to the seasonal barrier layer formation. These waters are brought by the South Equatorial Current (SEC, from the subtropical region, into the western tropical Atlantic boundary. During late austral winter southeastern trade winds are more intense and ITCZ precipitations induce lower surface salinity values near the equator. During this period a 5–90 m thick BLT (median = 15 m is observed and BLT > 30 m is restricted to latitudes higher than 8° S, where the intrusion of salty waters between 8°–12.3° S creates shallow mixed layers over deep (ZT ≥ 90 m isothermal layers. During austral summer, shallow isothermal and mixed layers prevail, when northeasterly winds are predominant and evaporation overcomes precipitation, causing saltier waters at the surface/subsurface layers. During that period observed BLT varies from 5 to 70 m and presents thicker median value of 35 m, when comparing to the winter. Furthermore, BLT ≥ 30 m is observed not only in the southernmost part of the study area, as verified during late winter, but in the latitude range 2°–14° S, where near-surface salty waters are transported westward by the

  1. Surface tension in plasmas related to double layer formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popescu, Sebastian; Lozneanu, Erzilia [Al. I. Cuza University, Dept. of Plasma Physics, Iasi (Romania)

    2001-07-01

    Self-organized space charge configurations bordered by electric double layers appear in plasma as the result of the transition into a state characterized by local minimum of the free energy. Considering the self-assemblage process of such a complex well-confined space-charge configuration in plasma, known by the name of ball of fire, as a nucleation process, it becomes possible to define an equivalent surface tension for the double layer that covers the core of the ball of fire and to make some predictions for its surface tension coefficient and capacitance. (author)

  2. Composites in small and simple devices to increase mixing on detector surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, L F; Lima, R R; Leite, A R; Silva, M L P; Fachini, E R

    2013-01-01

    This work aims at three different applications for the betterment of plasma generated-composite thin films: pre-mixing, spray formation in miniaturized structures and an increase in the performance of detector surfaces. Miniaturized structures were projected, simulated with FEMLAB ® 3.2 software and then constructed. Clustered films made from tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) and nonafluoro(iso)butyl ether (HFE ® ) precursors were deposited on silicon, acrylic and quartz substrates for different kinds of film characterization/or in the projected structures. Physical and chemical characterization guided the selection of best films previous to/after UVC exposure. The active surfaces (plasma-deposited films) in structures were modified by UVC exposure and then tested. The applications include pre-mixing of liquids and/or spray formation, best results being obtained with surface covered by derivative-HFE films, which acted as passivation layers. Preliminary results show good humidity sensing for TEOS-derivative films.

  3. Modification of surfaces and surface layers by non equilibrium processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beamson, G.; Brennan, W.J.; Clark, D.T.; Howard, J.

    1988-01-01

    Plasmas are examples of non-equilibrium phenomena which are being used increasingly for the synthesis and modification of materials impossible by conventional routes. This paper introduces methods available by describing the construction and characteristics of some equipment used for the production of different types of plasmas and other non-equilibrium phenomena. This includes high energy ion beams. The special features, advantages and disadvantages of the techniques will be described. There are a multitude of potential application relevant to electronic, metallic, ceramic, and polymeric materials. However, scale-up from the laboratory to production equipment depends on establishing a better understanding of both the physics and chemistry of plasma as well as plasma-solid interactions. Examples are given of how such an understanding can be gained. The chemical analysis of polymer surfaces undergoing modification by inert gas, hydrogen or oxygen plasmas is shown to give physical information regarding the relative roles of diffusion of active species, and direct and radiative energy transfer from the plasma. Surface modification by plasma depositing a new material onto an existing substrate is discussed with particular reference to the deposition of amorphous carbon films. Applications of the unique properties of these films are outlined together with our current understanding of these properties based on chemical and physical methods of analysis of both the films and the plasmas producing them. Finally, surface modification by ion beams is briefly illustrated using examples from the electronics and metals industries where the modification has had a largely physical rather than chemical effect on the starting material. (orig.)

  4. Elastic layer under axisymmetric indentation and surface energy effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intarit, Pong-in; Senjuntichai, Teerapong; Rungamornrat, Jaroon

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, a continuum-based approach is adopted to investigate the contact problem of an elastic layer with finite thickness and rigid base subjected to axisymmetric indentation with the consideration of surface energy effects. A complete Gurtin-Murdoch surface elasticity is employed to consider the influence of surface stresses. The indentation problem of a rigid frictionless punch with arbitrary axisymmetric profiles is formulated by employing the displacement Green's functions, derived with the aid of Hankel integral transform technique. The problem is solved by assuming the contact pressure distribution in terms of a linear combination of admissible functions and undetermined coefficients. Those coefficients are then obtained by employing a collocation technique and an efficient numerical quadrature scheme. The accuracy of proposed solution technique is verified by comparing with existing solutions for rigid indentation on an elastic half-space. Selected numerical results for the indenters with flat-ended cylindrical and paraboloidal punch profiles are presented to portray the influence of surface energy effects on elastic fields of the finite layer. It is found that the presence of surface stresses renders the layer stiffer, and the size-dependent behavior of elastic fields is observed in the present solutions. In addition, the surface energy effects become more pronounced with smaller contact area; thus, the influence of surface energy cannot be ignored in the analysis of indentation problem especially when the indenter size is very small such as in the case of nanoindentation.

  5. Impact of Bay-Breeze Circulations on Surface Air Quality and Boundary Layer Export

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughner, Christopher P.; Tzortziou, Maria; Follette-Cook, Melanie; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Goldberg, Daniel; Satam, Chinmay; Weinheimer, Andrew; Crawford, James H.; Knapp, David J.; Montzka, Denise D.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Meteorological and air-quality model simulations are analyzed alongside observations to investigate the role of the Chesapeake Bay breeze on surface air quality, pollutant transport, and boundary layer venting. A case study was conducted to understand why a particular day was the only one during an 11-day ship-based field campaign on which surface ozone was not elevated in concentration over the Chesapeake Bay relative to the closest upwind site and why high ozone concentrations were observed aloft by in situ aircraft observations. Results show that southerly winds during the overnight and early-morning hours prevented the advection of air pollutants from the Washington, D.C., and Baltimore, Maryland, metropolitan areas over the surface waters of the bay. A strong and prolonged bay breeze developed during the late morning and early afternoon along the western coastline of the bay. The strength and duration of the bay breeze allowed pollutants to converge, resulting in high concentrations locally near the bay-breeze front within the Baltimore metropolitan area, where they were then lofted to the top of the planetary boundary layer (PBL). Near the top of the PBL, these pollutants were horizontally advected to a region with lower PBL heights, resulting in pollution transport out of the boundary layer and into the free troposphere. This elevated layer of air pollution aloft was transported downwind into New England by early the following morning where it likely mixed down to the surface, affecting air quality as the boundary layer grew.

  6. The structure of alteration layers on cast glass surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oversby, V.M.; Phinney, D.L.

    1991-11-01

    Alteration layers developed on SRL-165 simulated waste glasses in dilute sodium silicate/bicarbonate leaching solutions have been examined by Secondary Ionization Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) using fine-scale, multiple-element depth profiling. Selected samples were examined with an imaging detector system, which demonstrated the horizontal homogeneity of the layer development at all depths within the layer. After 1 day of reaction at 90 degrees C the reaction layer shows depletion of glass elements to a depth of 0.2 μm. The surface of the layer in contact with the solution shows enrichment of Si, Al, and alkali elements even at this short reaction time, suggesting the early stages of development of secondary aluminosilicate phases. With increased reaction time, the layer thickens to about 1.3 μm at 91 days, while the evidence for aluminosilicate development at the surface of the layer becomes more prominent. Penetration of hydrogen into the ''unreacted'' glass proceeds to a depth of about 0.5 μm deeper than the alkali depletion zone. This suggests the mechanism of initial reaction of the glass is by attack of the silicate structure by molecular water or hydroxide ion rather than by alkali-hydrogen ion exchange. The simple structure of the layers developed in the silicate solution is in contrast to the complexity of layer structure found when glasses are reacted in deionized water. Since the conditions for geologic disposal will be closer to those used in the silicate leaching experiments, these results hold promise for the ability to model the system to predict long-term performance after disposal in a repository

  7. Vibrations of microemulsion droplets and vesicles with compressible surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisy, V.; Brutovsky, B.; Zatovsky, A. V.

    1998-12-01

    The surface vibration spectra of liquid droplets with flexible interfaces, like microemulsion droplets or vesicles, are studied. As distinct from the previous theories, we proceed with exact solutions of hydrodynamic equations for incompressible bulk fluids inside and outside the droplet. The dynamical equations for the interface are those obtained by Lebedev and Muratov [JETP 68, 1011 (1989)] but with the improved continuity equation for the surface layer. Within the Helfrich's concept of the interfacial elasticity and taking into account the compressibility of the surface layer, the exact equation is obtained for the frequencies of the droplet vibrations. The equation describes uniformly a broad region of frequencies from the lowest, almost purely relaxation modes, up to the modes determined mainly by the change of the area per molecule of the layer. The dispersion laws for some of the modes are obtained analytically in the limits of large and small penetration depths of the corresponding waves. Our analysis corrects the previous results concerning the relaxation modes, the capillary wave frequency and the frequency of the mode connected with the fluctuations of molecules in the surface layer. An additional mode of this kind is obtained for almost incompressible layers. In the region corresponding to large penetration depths, a couple of modes exist with frequencies depending both on the surface elasticity and compressibility. In the limit of infinite compressibility of the layer, the lower of the two modes disappears. The conditions necessary for the existence of all the modes were specified. Some representative numerical solutions of the obtained equation are presented as depending on various values of the model parameters including those for realistic microemulsion systems.

  8. Precipitation, Cloud Cover, and Mixing Layer Observations at the Iqaluit Supersite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Z.; Dehghan, A.; Gascon, G.; Joe, P. I.; Burrows, W. R.; Melo, S.

    2016-12-01

    Reliable measurements of light precipitation, cloud cover, and mixing layer height (MLH) are required to quantify the Arctic water cycle and improve parameterization schemes in numerical weather prediction models. Satellite and ground-based observations of light precipitation are frequently underestimated at high latitudes, where 80% of precipitation is light (Canada (ECCC) has recently commissioned a supersite in Iqaluit, NU (64oN, 69oW) to provide automated and continuous observations of altitude-resolved winds, clouds and aerosols, visibility, sensible heat flux, turbulence, and precipitation. New high-resolution cloud and MLH products from a Vaisala CL31 ceilometer are being used to investigate model performance and parameterization schemes. Initial MLH comparisons with the new High Resolution Deterministic Prediction System Arctic domain indicate good agreement, with greater MLH variability observed by the ceilometer. The suite of instruments at Iqaluit can measure the thickness, height, and composition of very light precipitation, as demonstrated during an intensive observation period (January 18 to 22, 2016). Vertical advection of blowing snow up to 450 m a.g.l. was observed by a Doppler Lidar during periods of increased surface winds (> 10 m/s), followed by an ice crystal layer that was observed up to 500 m a.g.l. These events were undetected by traditional precipitation gauges, causing the under-reporting of light precipitation. Given the prevalence of blowing snow and ice crystal events in the Arctic and their large radiative surface forcing of up to 36 W/m2, this can have important consequences when quantifying the Arctic water cycle and radiative balance.

  9. Design and Properties of Thin Surfacing Hot Mix Asphalt Containing Crumb Rubber as Partial Aggregate Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setyawan, Ary; Febrianto, Nugroho; Sarwono, Djoko

    2017-07-01

    Road damage caused as a result of the traffic load and environment. One method to improve the road condition is from an overlay. But the new layer on the top of the pavement structure is thick enough and elevate the surface of the pavement, so it will cause some impact on the user safety and engineering. The use of a thin layer of hot mix asphalt is an alternative to anticipate the thickness problem. Crumb rubber is a waste material that has a flexible nature, these materials are used as an aggregate replacement in the hot mix asphalt thin layer. The research was conducted to find the optimum bitumen content and optimum crumb rubber content on asphalt mixtures by the Marshall procedure. Finally, it was concluded that the addition of crumb rubber in a thin layer of hot mix asphalt indicates the better the interlocking between aggregates so that gave the better Marshall stability, the higher the flow rate, the lower the marshall quotient, reduce the void ratio. The results show that the addition of crumb rubber content as an aggregate replacement leads to the use of less optimum bitumen content.

  10. Structure and stability of surface passivation layers on semiconductor materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluth, George Jonathan

    The structure and stability of passivating layers on silicon surfaces have been examined on the molecular level using the methods of surface science. Hydrogen-terminated surfaces were prepared through wet chemical treatment with ammonium fluoride. The oxidation of these surfaces was studied using high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS), which showed that oxidation occurred through oxygen insertion in silicon backbonds, while the hydrogen termination remained intact. Oxygen was observed in both the surface layer and bulk layers, suggesting that initial oxidation was not restricted to layer-by-layer growth. Because the surface did oxidize with time, other passivating treatments, specifically self-assembled monolayers, were examined. The thermal stability of alkylsiloxane monolayers on oxidized Si(100) was studied in vacuum. Using HREELS it was found that the monolayers were stable up to 740 K. Above that temperature, they began to decompose through cleavage of C-C bonds, resulting in a reduction in chain length. The thermal stability of alkyl monolayers, which form directly on silicon without requiring an oxide layer, was also examined. These monolayers were stable to 620 K, significantly lower than the alkylsiloxane monolayers. Desorption was accompanied by the appearance of Si-H bonds, suggesting that desorption took place through a hydrogen elimination reaction. The thermal behavior of these two different monolayers highlighted the importance of bonding between the surface and the chains. The bonding of alkylsiloxane monolayers was examined in more detail by forming them on both SiOsb2 and Sisb3Nsb4. It was found that cross linking between adjacent head groups was critical to the formation of high quality monolayers. Bonding between the chains and the surface was of secondary importance, but played a key role in the initial stages of growth, when nucleation occurred. The chemical stability of alkylsiloxane monolayers on oxidized silicon was also

  11. Control of wave-driven turbulence and surface heating on the mixing of microplastic marine debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukulka, T.; Lavender Law, K. L.; Proskurowski, G. K.

    2016-02-01

    Buoyant microplastic marine debris (MPMD) is a pollutant in the ocean surface boundary layer (OSBL) that is submerged by turbulent transport processes. Langmuir circulation (LC) is a turbulent process driven by wind and surface waves that enhances mixing in the OSBL. Sea surface cooling also contributes to OSBL turbulence by driving convection. On the other hand, sea surface heating stratifies and stabilizes the water column to reduce turbulent motion. We analyze observed MPMD surface concentrations in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans to reveal a significant increase in MPMD concentrations during surface heating and a decrease during surface cooling. Turbulence resolving large eddy simulations of the OSBL for an idealized diurnal heating cycle suggest that turbulent downward fluxes of buoyant tracers are enhanced at night, facilitating deep submergence of plastics, and suppressed in heating conditions, resulting in surface trapped MPMD. Simulations agree with observations if enhanced mixing due to LC is included. Our results demonstrate the controlling influence of surface heat fluxes and LC on turbulent transport in the OSBL and on vertical distributions of buoyant marine particles.

  12. Photo-polarimetric sensitivities to layering and mixing of absorbing aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Kalashnikova

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigate to what extent multi-angle polarimetric measurements are sensitive to vertical mixing/layering of absorbing aerosols, adopting calibration uncertainty of 1.5% in intensity and 0.5% in the degree of linear polarization of Multiangle Spectro-Polarimetric Imager (MSPI. Employing both deterministic and Monte Carlo radiative transfer codes with polarization, we conduct modeling experiments to determine how the measured Stokes vector elements are affected at UV and short visible wavelengths by the vertical distribution, mixing and layering of smoke and dust aerosols for variety of microphysical parameters. We find that multi-angular polarimetry holds the potential to infer dust-layer heights and thicknesses at blue visible channel due to its lesser sensitivity to changes in dust coarse mode optical properties, but higher sensitivity to the dust vertical profiles. Our studies quantify requirements for obtaining simultaneous information on aerosol layer height and absorption under MSPI measurement uncertainties.

  13. SCALE INTERACTION IN A MIXING LAYER. THE ROLE OF THE LARGE-SCALE GRADIENTS

    KAUST Repository

    Fiscaletti, Daniele

    2015-08-23

    The interaction between scales is investigated in a turbulent mixing layer. The large-scale amplitude modulation of the small scales already observed in other works depends on the crosswise location. Large-scale positive fluctuations correlate with a stronger activity of the small scales on the low speed-side of the mixing layer, and a reduced activity on the high speed-side. However, from physical considerations we would expect the scales to interact in a qualitatively similar way within the flow and across different turbulent flows. Therefore, instead of the large-scale fluctuations, the large-scale gradients modulation of the small scales has been additionally investigated.

  14. Quantized layer growth at liquid-crystal surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ocko, B. M.; Braslau, A.; Pershan, P. S.

    1986-01-01

    of the specular reflectivity is consistent with a sinusoidal density modulation, starting at the surface and terminating abruptly, after an integral number of bilayers. As the transition is approached the number of layers increases in quantized steps from zero to five before the bulk undergoes a first...

  15. Whirlwinds and hairpins in the atmospheric surface layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oncley, Steven P.; Hartogensis, O.K.; Tong, Chenning

    2016-01-01

    Vortices in the atmospheric surface layer are characterized using observations at unprecedented resolution from a fixed array of 31 turbulence sensors. During the day, these vortices likely are dust devils, though no visual observations are available for confirmation. At night, hairpin vortices

  16. Measurement of grassland evaporation using a surface-layer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A dual-beam surface-layer scintillometer (SLS) was used to estimate sensible heat flux (H) every 2 min for a path length of either 50 or 101 m, for more than 30 months in a mesic grassland in eastern South Africa. The SLS method relies on Monin-Obukhov similarity theory, the correlation between the laser beam signal ...

  17. Body surface adaptations to boundary-layer dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Videler, J.J.

    1995-01-01

    Evolutionary processes have adapted nektonic animals to interact efficiently with the water that surrounds them. Not all these adaptations serve the same purpose. This paper concentrates on reduction of drag due to friction in the boundary layer close to the body surface. Mucus, compliant skins,

  18. The determination of turbulent structures in the atmospheric surface layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schols, J.L.J.

    1984-01-01

    The turbulent flow in the atmospheric surface layer (ASL) contains turbulent structures, which are defined as spatially coherent, organized flow motions. 'Organized' means that characteristic patterns, observed at a point in space, occur almost simultaneously in more than one turbulence signal and

  19. DESIGN AND CALCULATION OF AERODROMECOAING WITH HEATED SURFACE LAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim G. Piskunov

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available  The developed constructions with heated by surface layers for aerodromes and auto roads when developed composition of electroconductive concrete reinforced with chemical electrical conductive fibres being used was researched. The experimentally obtained characteristics of ended conductive concrete reinforced with fibers were presented. Calculation by developed heated construction of shell was made.

  20. Tropical Cyclone Footprint in the Ocean Mixed Layer Observed by Argo in the Northwest Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-25

    RESEARCH ARTICLE 10.1002/2014JC010316 Tropical cyclone footprint in the ocean mixed layer observed by Argo in the Northwest Pacific HongLi Fu1...using available Argo profiles during the period of 1998–2011 in the northwest Pacific. Results reveal that iso- thermal layer (IL) deepening and...and TC, subsurface measurements following TC are impor- tant. The Array for Real-time Geostrophic Oceanography ( Argo ) floats measure the global ocean

  1. Electrical double layer interactions between dissimilar oxide surfaces with charge regulation and Stern-Grahame layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Derek Y C; Healy, Thomas W; Supasiti, Tharatorn; Usui, S

    2006-04-01

    Models of surfaces with intrinsic ionisable amphoteric surface sites governed by the dissociation of acid-base potential determining ion species together with the capacity for the adsorption of anion and cations of the supporting electrolyte are required to describe both the results of electrokinetic and titration measurements of inorganic oxides. The Gouy-Chapman-Stern-Grahame (CGSG) model is one such model that has been widely used in the literature. The electrical double layer interaction between two dissimilar CGSG surfaces has been studied by Usui recently [S. Usui, J. Colloid Interface Sci. 280 (2004) 113] where erroneous discontinuities in the slope of the pressure-separation relation were observed. We revisit this calculation and provide a simple general methodology to analyse the electrical double layer interaction between dissimilar ionisable surfaces with ion adsorption.

  2. Stabilization of Leidenfrost vapour layer by textured superhydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakarelski, Ivan U; Patankar, Neelesh A; Marston, Jeremy O; Chan, Derek Y C; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2012-09-13

    In 1756, Leidenfrost observed that water drops skittered on a sufficiently hot skillet, owing to levitation by an evaporative vapour film. Such films are stable only when the hot surface is above a critical temperature, and are a central phenomenon in boiling. In this so-called Leidenfrost regime, the low thermal conductivity of the vapour layer inhibits heat transfer between the hot surface and the liquid. When the temperature of the cooling surface drops below the critical temperature, the vapour film collapses and the system enters a nucleate-boiling regime, which can result in vapour explosions that are particularly detrimental in certain contexts, such as in nuclear power plants. The presence of these vapour films can also reduce liquid-solid drag. Here we show how vapour film collapse can be completely suppressed at textured superhydrophobic surfaces. At a smooth hydrophobic surface, the vapour film still collapses on cooling, albeit at a reduced critical temperature, and the system switches explosively to nucleate boiling. In contrast, at textured, superhydrophobic surfaces, the vapour layer gradually relaxes until the surface is completely cooled, without exhibiting a nucleate-boiling phase. This result demonstrates that topological texture on superhydrophobic materials is critical in stabilizing the vapour layer and thus in controlling--by heat transfer--the liquid-gas phase transition at hot surfaces. This concept can potentially be applied to control other phase transitions, such as ice or frost formation, and to the design of low-drag surfaces at which the vapour phase is stabilized in the grooves of textures without heating.

  3. Stabilization of Leidenfrost vapour layer by textured superhydrophobic surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2012-09-12

    In 1756, Leidenfrost observed that water drops skittered on a sufficiently hot skillet, owing to levitation by an evaporative vapour film. Such films are stable only when the hot surface is above a critical temperature, and are a central phenomenon in boiling. In this so-called Leidenfrost regime, the low thermal conductivity of the vapour layer inhibits heat transfer between the hot surface and the liquid. When the temperature of the cooling surface drops below the critical temperature, the vapour film collapses and the system enters a nucleate-boiling regime, which can result in vapour explosions that are particularly detrimental in certain contexts, such as in nuclear power plants. The presence of these vapour films can also reduce liquid-solid drag. Here we show how vapour film collapse can be completely suppressed at textured superhydrophobic surfaces. At a smooth hydrophobic surface, the vapour film still collapses on cooling, albeit at a reduced critical temperature, and the system switches explosively to nucleate boiling. In contrast, at textured, superhydrophobic surfaces, the vapour layer gradually relaxes until the surface is completely cooled, without exhibiting a nucleate-boiling phase. This result demonstrates that topological texture on superhydrophobic materials is critical in stabilizing the vapour layer and thus in controlling-by heat transfer-the liquid-gas phase transition at hot surfaces. This concept can potentially be applied to control other phase transitions, such as ice or frost formation, and to the design of low-drag surfaces at which the vapour phase is stabilized in the grooves of textures without heating. © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  4. Surface layer temperature inversion in the Bay of Bengal: Main characteristics and related mechanisms

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pankajakshan, T.; Suresh, I.; Gautham, S.; PrasannaKumar, S.; Lengaigne, M.; Rao, R.R; Neetu, S.; Hegde, A

    Surface layer temperature inversion (SLTI), a warm layer sandwiched between surface and subsurface colder waters, has been reported to frequently occur in conjunction with barrier layers in the Bay of Bengal (BoB), with potentially commensurable...

  5. THz detectors using surface Josephson plasma waves in layered superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savel'ev, Sergey; Yampol'skii, Valery; Nori, Franco

    2006-01-01

    We describe a proposal for THz detectors based on the excitation of surface waves, in layered superconductors, at frequencies lower than the Josephson plasma frequency ω J . These waves propagate along the vacuum-superconductor interface and are attenuated in both transverse directions out of the surface (i.e., towards the superconductor and towards the vacuum). The surface Josephson plasma waves are also important for the complete suppression of the specular reflection from a sample (Wood's anomalies, used for gratings) and produce a huge enhancement of the wave absorption, which can be used for the detection of THz waves

  6. Double layer of platinum electrodes: Non-monotonic surface charging phenomena and negative double layer capacitance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jun; Zhou, Tao; Zhang, Jianbo; Eikerling, Michael

    2018-01-01

    In this study, a refined double layer model of platinum electrodes accounting for chemisorbed oxygen species, oriented interfacial water molecules, and ion size effects in solution is presented. It results in a non-monotonic surface charging relation and a peculiar capacitance vs. potential curve with a maximum and possibly negative values in the potential regime of oxide-formation.

  7. Anatomy of a metabentonite: nucleation and growth of illite crystals and their colescence into mixed-layer illite/smectite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberl, D.D.; Blum, A.E.; Serravezza, M.

    2011-01-01

    The illite layer content of mixed-layer illite/smectite (I/S) in a 2.5 m thick, zoned, metabentonite bed from Montana decreases regularly from the edges to the center of the bed. Traditional X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern modeling using Markovian statistics indicated that this zonation results from a mixing in different proportions of smectite-rich R0 I/S and illite-rich R1 I/S, with each phase having a relatively constant illite layer content. However, a new method for modeling XRD patterns of I/S indicates that R0 and R1 I/S in these samples are not separate phases (in the mineralogical sense of the word), but that the samples are composed of illite crystals that have continuous distributions of crystal thicknesses, and of 1 nm thick smectite crystals. The shapes of these distributions indicate that the crystals were formed by simultaneous nucleation and growth. XRD patterns for R0 and R1 I/S arise by interparticle diffraction from a random stacking of the crystals, with swelling interlayers formed at interfaces between crystals from water or glycol that is sorbed on crystal surfaces. It is the thickness distributions of smectite and illite crystals (also termed fundamental particles, or Nadeau particles), rather than XRD patterns for mixed-layer I/S, that are the more reliable indicators of geologic history, because such distributions are composed of well-defined crystals that are not affected by differences in surface sorption and particle arrangements, and because their thickness distribution shapes conform to the predictions of crystal growth theory, which describes their genesis.

  8. Free energy surfaces in the superconducting mixed state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnemore, D. K.; Fang, M. M.; Bansal, N. P.; Farrell, D. E.

    1989-01-01

    The free energy surface for Tl2Ba2Ca2Cu3O1O has been measured as a function of temperature and magnetic field to determine the fundamental thermodynamic properties of the mixed state. The change in free energy, G(H)-G(O), is found to be linear in temperature over a wide range indicating that the specific heat is independent of field.

  9. A Hybrid Numerical Method for Turbulent Mixing Layers. Degree awarded by Case Western Reserve Univ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.

    2001-01-01

    A hybrid method has been developed for simulations of compressible turbulent mixing layers. Such mixing layers dominate the flows in exhaust systems of modern day aircraft and also those of hypersonic vehicles currently under development. The method configurations in which a dominant structural feature provides an unsteady mechanism to drive the turbulent development in the mixing layer. The hybrid method uses a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) procedure to calculate wall bounded regions entering a mixing section, and a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) procedure to calculate the mixing dominated regions. A numerical technique was developed to enable the use of the hybrid RANS-LES method on stretched, non-Cartesian grids. Closure for the RANS equations was obtained using the Cebeci-Smith algebraic turbulence model in conjunction with the wall-function approach of Ota and Goldberg. The wall-function approach enabled a continuous computational grid from the RANS regions to the LES region. The LES equations were closed using the Smagorinsky subgrid scale model. The hybrid RANS-LES method is applied to a benchmark compressible mixing layer experiment. Preliminary two dimensional calculations are used to investigate the effects of axial grid density and boundary conditions. Vortex shedding from the base region of a splitter plate separating the upstream flows was observed to eventually transition to turbulence. The location of the transition, however, was much further downstream than indicated by experiments. Actual LES calculations, performed in three spatial directions, also indicated vortex shedding, but the transition to turbulence was found to occur much closer to the beginning of the mixing section. which is in agreement with experimental observations. These calculations demonstrated that LES simulations must be performed in three dimensions. Comparisons of time-averaged axial velocities and turbulence intensities indicated reasonable agreement with experimental

  10. Electron Scattering at Surfaces of Epitaxial Metal Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Jasmeet Singh

    In the field of electron transport in metal films and wires, the 'size effect' refers to the increase in the resistivity of the films and wires as their critical dimensions (thickness of film, width and height of wires) approach or become less than the electron mean free path lambda, which is, for example, 39 nm for bulk copper at room temperature. This size-effect is currently of great concern to the semiconductor industry because the continued downscaling of feature sizes has already lead to Cu interconnect wires in this size effect regime, with a reported 2.5 times higher resistivity for 40 nm wide Cu wires than for bulk Cu. Silver is a possible alternate material for interconnect wires and titanium nitride is proposed as a gate metal in novel field-effect-transistors. Therefore, it is important to develop an understanding of how the growth, the surface morphology, and the microstructure of ultrathin (few nanometers) Cu, Ag and TiN layers affect their electrical properties. This dissertation aims to advance the scientific knowledge of electron scattering at surfaces (external surfaces and grain boundaries), that are, the primary reasons for the size-effect in metal conductors. The effect of surface and grain boundary scattering on the resistivity of Cu thin films and nanowires is separately quantified using (i) in situ transport measurements on single-crystal, atomically smooth Cu(001) layers, (ii) textured polycrystalline Cu(111) layers and patterned wires with independently varying grain size, thickness and line width, and (iii) in situ grown interfaces including Cu-Ta, Cu-MgO, Cu-vacuum and Cu-oxygen. In addition, the electron surface scattering is also measured in situ for single-crystal Ag(001), (111) twinned epitaxial Ag(001), and single-crystal TiN(001) layers. Cu(001), Ag(001), and TiN(001) layers with a minimum continuous thickness of 4, 3.5 and 1.8 nm, respectively, are grown by ultra-high vacuum magnetron sputter deposition on MgO(001) substrates with

  11. Superficial hardened layer of cut surface by turning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Croitoru Sorin Mihai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available One of research methods in metal cutting process is to measure hardness in the contact zone between cutting tool and workpiece. The objective of the performed research was to determine thickness and hardness of the superficial layer of cut surface due to cutting process, both orthogonal and complex cutting. The most important finding was that thickness of the superficial hardened layer is very thin under considered conditions, less than 0.01 … 0.02 mm. This research should be continued.

  12. GREY RELATIONAL ANALYSIS AND ITS APPLICATION ON SURFACE PROPERTIES DURING EDM AND POWDER MIXED EDM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. TRIPATHY

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Electrical discharge machining is an extensively used non-conventional process for material removal in die manufacturing and aerospace industries. The mechanism of powder mixed electric discharge machining is very different from that of electrical discharge machining process. It was found that considerable research has been done on different aspects during electric discharge machining of various steels, but sufficient data is not available on the surface properties and optimum process parameters for machining of H-11 die steel. The present work investigates the effect of process parameters like powder oncentration, peak current, pulse-on-time, duty cycle and gap voltage on material removal rate, surface roughness, recast layer thickness and microhardness simultaneously during electrical discharge machining and powder mixed electrical discharge machining of H-11 hot work tool steel. Multiobjective optimization using grey relational analysis was used to determine the optimal setting of process parameters for maximum material removal rate, minimum surface roughness, minimum recast layer thickness and maximum micro-hardness simultaneously. The work material has been selected due to its brilliant mechanical properties and diverse industrial applications. Taguchi’s L27 orthogonal array was used to carry out the experiments. Analysis of variance was performed to determine the significant parameters at a 95% confidence interval. Conductive powder mixed to the dielectric fluid was graphite of size less than 53µm obtained from the sieve analysis. Electrolytic copper was used as the tool electrode. Investigation of micro-structures was done using scanning electron microscope to examine alterations and defects on the machined surface. Grey relational analysis exhibits an improvement of 0.2025 in the grey relational grade. The tendency of deviation of the response curves suggest that powder concentration of 0g/l, peak current of 3A, pulse-ontime of 150µs

  13. Synthesis, characterization and magnetic behavior of Mg–Fe–Al mixed oxides based on layered double hydroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heredia, Angélica C., E-mail: angelicacheredia@gmail.com [Universidad Tecnológica Nacional, Facultad Regional Córdoba-CITeQ, Maestro López esq. Cruz Roja Argentina, Ciudad Universitaria, 5016 Córdoba (Argentina); Oliva, Marcos I. [IFEG, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Córdoba (Argentina); CONICET (Argentina); Agú, Ulises [Universidad Tecnológica Nacional, Facultad Regional Córdoba-CITeQ, Maestro López esq. Cruz Roja Argentina, Ciudad Universitaria, 5016 Córdoba (Argentina); CONICET (Argentina); Zandalazini, Carlos I. [CONICET (Argentina); INFIQC, FCQ Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Córdoba (Argentina); Marchetti, Sergio G. [CINDECA, UNLP, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Herrero, Eduardo R.; Crivello, Mónica E. [Universidad Tecnológica Nacional, Facultad Regional Córdoba-CITeQ, Maestro López esq. Cruz Roja Argentina, Ciudad Universitaria, 5016 Córdoba (Argentina)

    2013-09-15

    In the present work, Mg–Al–Fe layered double hydroxides were prepared by coprecipitation reaction with hydrothermal treatment. The characterization of precursors and their corresponding calcinated products (mixed oxides) were carried out by X ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), termogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry, diffuse reflectance UV–vis spectroscopy, specific surface area, Mössbauaer and magnetic properties. The Fe{sup 3+} species were observed in tetrahedrally and octahedrally coordination in brucite layered. The XPS analysis shows that the Fe{sup 3+} ions can be found in two coordination environments (tetrahedral and octahedral) as mixed oxides, and as spinel-structure. Oxides show a decrease in the specific surface areas when the iron loading is increased. The magnetic and Mössbauaer response show that MgAlFe mixed oxides are different behaviours such as different population ratios of ferromagnetic, weak-ferromagnetic, paramagnetic and superparamagnetic phases. The better crystallization of spinel structure with increased temperature, is correlated with the improved magnetic properties. - Highlights: • Mg–Al–Fe were successfully prepared by coprecipitation with hydrothermal treatment. • MgO, α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3,} MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} were detected by XRD in the calcined samples. • The Fe{sup 3+} is in tetrahedral and octahedral coordination in the brucite layered. • The specific surface area is directly related with the iron content. • The magnetic properties and MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} improve with increasing calcination temperature.

  14. Coherent Structures in Turbulent Shear Layers and Relation to Mixing Reaction and Combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-04-01

    dimensional motion in the turbulent mixing layer. Corcos, G.M. 1983, Journal de Mecanique theorique et appliquee, Numero Special, p. 147-167. The Role of... Reynolds numbers, it is found that such vortices are unstable in shear end are transformed into smaller vortices. The nonlinear evolution of these

  15. Numerical simulation of a plane turbulent mixing layer, with applications to isothermal, rapid reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, P.; Pratt, D. T.

    1987-01-01

    A hybrid method has been developed for the numerical prediction of turbulent mixing in a spatially-developing, free shear layer. Most significantly, the computation incorporates the effects of large-scale structures, Schmidt number and Reynolds number on mixing, which have been overlooked in the past. In flow field prediction, large-eddy simulation was conducted by a modified 2-D vortex method with subgrid-scale modeling. The predicted mean velocities, shear layer growth rates, Reynolds stresses, and the RMS of longitudinal velocity fluctuations were found to be in good agreement with experiments, although the lateral velocity fluctuations were overpredicted. In scalar transport, the Monte Carlo method was extended to the simulation of the time-dependent pdf transport equation. For the first time, the mixing frequency in Curl's coalescence/dispersion model was estimated by using Broadwell and Breidenthal's theory of micromixing, which involves Schmidt number, Reynolds number and the local vorticity. Numerical tests were performed for a gaseous case and an aqueous case. Evidence that pure freestream fluids are entrained into the layer by large-scale motions was found in the predicted pdf. Mean concentration profiles were found to be insensitive to Schmidt number, while the unmixedness was higher for higher Schmidt number. Applications were made to mixing layers with isothermal, fast reactions. The predicted difference in product thickness of the two cases was in reasonable quantitative agreement with experimental measurements.

  16. Regional heat flux over the NOPEX area estimated from the evolution of the mixed-layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gryning, Sven-Erik; Batchvarova, E.

    1999-01-01

    of forest, agricultural fields, mires and lakes within the boreal zone, was determined for 3 days of the campaign in 1994. It was found to be lower than the heat flux over forest and higher than the heat Aux over agricultural fields. The regional heat flux estimated by the mixed-layer evolution method...

  17. Spray Irrigation Effects on Surface-Layer Stability in an Experimental Citrus Orchard during Winter Freezes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Harry J.; Smith, Eric A.; Martsolf, J. David

    1997-02-01

    Observations taken by two surface radiation and energy budget stations deployed in the University of Florida/Institute for Food and Agricultural Service experimental citrus orchard in Gainesville, Florida, have been analyzed to identify the effects of sprayer irrigation on thermal stability and circulation processes within the orchard during three 1992 winter freeze episodes. Lapse rates of temperature observed from a micrometeorological tower near the center of the orchard were also recorded during periods of irrigation for incorporation into the analysis. Comparisons of the near-surface temperature lapse rates observed with the two energy budget stations show consistency between the two sites and with the tower-based lapse rates taken over a vertical layer from 1.5 to 15 m above ground level. A theoretical framework was developed that demonstrates that turbulent-scale processes originating within the canopy, driven by latent heat release associated with condensation and freezing processes from water vapor and liquid water released from sprayer nozzles, can destabilize lapse rates and promote warm air mixing above the orchard canopy. The orchard data were then analyzed in the context of the theory for evidence of local overturning and displacement of surface-layer air, with warmer air from aloft driven by locally buoyant plumes generated by water vapor injected into the orchard during the irrigation periods. It was found that surface-layer lapse rates were lower during irrigation periods than under similar conditions when irrigation was not occurring, indicating a greater degree of vertical mixing of surface-layer air with air from above treetops, as a result of local convective overturning induced by the condensation heating of water vapor released at the nozzles of the sprinklers. This provides an additional explanation to the well-accepted heat of fusion release effect, of how undertree irrigation of a citrus orchard during a freeze period helps protect crops

  18. Surface roughness effects on the hypersonic turbulent boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, D.E.

    1977-09-01

    An experimental investigation of the response of a hypersonic turbulent boundary layer to a step change in surface roughness has been performed. The boundary layer on a flat nozzle wall of a Mach 6 wind tunnel was subjected to abrupt changes in surface roughness and its adjustment to the new surface conditions was examined. Both mean and fluctuating flow properties were acquired for smooth-to-rough and rough-to-smooth surface configurations. The boundary layer was found to respond gradually and to attain new equilibrium profiles, for both the mean and the fluctuating properties, some 10 to 25 delta downstream of the step change. Mean flow self-similarity was the first to establish itself, followed by the mass flux fluctuations, followed in turn by the total temperature fluctuations. Use of a modified Van Driest transformation resulted in good correlations of smooth and rough wall data in the form of the incompressible law of the wall. This is true even in the nonequilibrium vicinity of the step for small roughness heights. The present data are found to correlate well with previously published roughness effect data from low and high speed flows when the roughnesses are characterized by an equivalent sand grain roughness height.

  19. Mixed layer depth calculation in deep convection regions in ocean numerical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtois, Peggy; Hu, Xianmin; Pennelly, Clark; Spence, Paul; Myers, Paul G.

    2017-12-01

    Mixed Layer Depths (MLDs) diagnosed by conventional numerical models are generally based on a density difference with the surface (e.g., 0.01 kg.m-3). However, the temperature-salinity compensation and the lack of vertical resolution contribute to over-estimated MLD, especially in regions of deep convection. In the present work, we examined the diagnostic MLD, associated with the deep convection of the Labrador Sea Water (LSW), calculated with a simple density difference criterion. The over-estimated MLD led us to develop a new tool, based on an observational approach, to recalculate MLD from model output. We used an eddy-permitting, 1/12° regional configuration of the Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean (NEMO) to test and discuss our newly defined MLD. We compared our new MLD with that from observations, and we showed a major improvement with our new algorithm. To show the new MLD is not dependent on a single model and its horizontal resolution, we extended our analysis to include 1/4° eddy-permitting simulations, and simulations using the Modular Ocean Model (MOM) model.

  20. Mesoporous mixed metal oxides derived from P123-templated Mg-Al layered double hydroxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jun; Zhou Jideng; Li Zhanshuang; He Yang; Lin Shuangshuang; Liu Qi; Zhang Milin; Jiang Zhaohua

    2010-01-01

    We report the preparation of mesoporous mixed metal oxides (MMOs) through a soft template method. Different amounts of P123 were used as structure directing agent to synthesize P123-templated Mg-Al layered double hydroxides (LDHs). After calcination of as-synthesized LDHs at 500 o C, the ordered mesopores were obtained by removal of P123. The mesoporous Mg-Al MMOs fabricated by using 2 wt% P123 exhibited a high specific surface area of 108.1 m 2 /g, and wide distribution of pore size (2-18 nm). An investigation of the 'memory effect' of the mesoporous MMOs revealed that they were successfully reconstructed to ibuprofen intercalated LDHs having different gallery heights, which indicated different intercalation capacities. Due to their mesoporosity these unique MMOs have particular potential as drug or catalyst carriers. - Graphical abstract: Ordered mesoporous Mg-Al MMOs can be obtained through the calcination of P123-templated Mg-Al-CO 3 LDHs. The pore diameter is 2.2 nm. At the presence of ibuprofen, the Mg-Al MMOs can recover to Mg-Al-IBU LDHs, based on its 'remember effect'. Display Omitted

  1. Buoyant production and consumption of turbulence kinetic energy in cloud-topped mixed layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that studies of the entraining planetary boundary layer (PBL) have generally emphasized the role of buoyancy fluxes in driving entrainment. The buoyancy flux is proportional to the rate of conversion of the potential energy of the mean flow into the kinetic energy of the turbulence. It is not unusual for conversion to proceed in both directions simultaneously. This occurs, for instance, in both clear and cloudy convective mixed layers which are capped by inversions. A partitioning of the net conversion into positive parts, generating turbulence kinetic energy (TKE), and negative parts (TKE-consuming), would make it possible to include the positive part in the gross production rate, and closure would be achieved. Three different approaches to partitioning have been proposed. The present investigation is concerned with a comparison of the three partitioning theories. Particular attention is given to the cloud-topped mixed layer because in this case the differences between two partitioning approaches are most apparent.

  2. Boundary layer for non-newtonian fluids on curved surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenger, N.

    1981-04-01

    By using the basic equation of fluid motion (conservation of mass and momentum) the boundary layer parameters for a Non-Newtonian, incompressible and laminar fluid flow, has been evaluated. As a test, the flat plate boundary layer is first analized and afterwards, a case with pressure gradient, allowing separation, is studied. In the case of curved surfaces, the problem is first developed in general and afterwards particularized to a circular cylinder. Finally suction and slip in the flow interface are examined. The power law model is used to represent the stress strain relationship in Non-Newtonian flow. By varying the fluid exponent one can then, have an idea of how the Non-Newtonian behavior of the flow influences the parameters of the boundary layer. Two equations, in an appropriate coordinate system have been obtained after an order of magnitude analysis of the terms in the equations of motion is performed. (Author) [pt

  3. Statistics and scaling of turbulence in a spatially developing mixing layer at Reλ = 250

    KAUST Repository

    Attili, Antonio

    2012-03-21

    The turbulent flow originating from the interaction between two parallel streams with different velocities is studied by means of direct numerical simulation. Rather than the more common temporal evolving layer, a spatially evolving configuration, with perturbed laminar inlet conditions is considered. The streamwise evolution and the self-similar state of turbulence statistics are reported and compared to results available in the literature. The characteristics of the transitional region agree with those observed in other simulations and experiments of mixing layers originating from laminar inlets. The present results indicate that the transitional region depends strongly on the inlet flow. Conversely, the self-similar state of turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation agrees quantitatively with those in a temporal mixing layer developing from turbulent initial conditions [M. M. Rogers and R. D. Moser, “Direct simulation of a self-similar turbulent mixing layer,” Phys. Fluids6, 903 (1994)]. The statistical features of turbulence in the self-similar region have been analysed in terms of longitudinal velocity structure functions, and scaling exponents are estimated by applying the extended self-similarity concept. In the small scale range (60 < r/η < 250), the scaling exponents display the universal anomalous scaling observed in homogeneous isotropic turbulence. The hypothesis of isotropy recovery holds in the turbulent mixing layer despite the presence of strong shear and large-scale structures, independently of the means of turbulence generation. At larger scales (r/η > 400), the mean shear and large coherent structures result in a significant deviation from predictions based on homogeneous isotropic turbulence theory. In this second scaling range, the numerical values of the exponents agree quantitatively with those reported for a variety of other flows characterized by strong shear, such as boundary layers, as well as channel and wake flows.

  4. Simulation and Visualization of Flows Laden with Cylindrical Nanoparticles in a Mixing Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqian Lin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The motion of cylindrical particles in a mixing layer is studied using the pseudospectral method and discrete particle model. The effect of the Stokes number and particle aspect ratio on the mixing and orientation distribution of cylindrical particles is analyzed. The results show that the rollup of mixing layer drives the particles to the edge of the vortex by centrifugal force. The cylindrical particles with the small Stokes number almost follow fluid streamlines and are mixed thoroughly, while those with the large Stokes number, centrifugalized and accumulated at the edge of the vortex, are poorly mixed. The mixing degree of particles becomes worse as the particle aspect ratio increases. The cylindrical particles would change their orientation under two torques and rotate around their axis of revolution aligned to the vorticity direction when the shear rate is low, while aligning on the flow-gradient plane beyond a critical shear rate value. More particles are oriented with the flow direction, and this phenomenon becomes more obvious with the decrease of the Stokes number and particle aspect ratio.

  5. Soil erosion rates from mixed soil and gravel surfaces in a wind tunnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligotke, M.W.; Klopfer, D.C.

    1990-08-01

    Protective barriers have been identified as integral components of plans to isolate defense waste on the Hanford Site. The use of natural materials to construct protective barriers over waste site is being considered. Design requirements for protective barriers include preventing exposure of buried waste, and restricting penetration or percolation of surface waters through the waste zone. Studies were initiated to evaluate the effects of wind erosion on candidate protective barrier surfaces. A wind tunnel was used to provide controlled erosive stresses and to investigate the erosive effects of wind forces on proposed surface layers for protective barriers. Mixed soil and gravel surfaces were prepared and tested for resistance to wind erosion at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Aerosol Wind Tunnel Research Facility. These tests were performed to investigate surface deflation caused by suspension of soil from various surface layer configurations and to provide a comparison of the relative resistance of the different surfaces to wind erosion. Planning, testing, and analyzing phases of this wind erosion project were coordinated with other tasks supporting the development of protective barriers. These tasks include climate-change predictions, field studies and modeling efforts. This report provides results of measurements of deflation caused by wind forces over level surfaces. Section 2.0 reviews surface layer characteristics and previous relevant studies on wind erosion, describes effects of erosion, and discusses wind tunnel modeling. Materials and methods of the wind tunnel tests are discussed in Section 3.0. Results and discussion are presented in Section 4.0, and conclusions and recommendations Section 5.0. 53 refs., 29 figs., 7 tabs.

  6. The studies of scale surface produced on outer diffusion layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Augustyn-Pieniążek

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study at attempt was made to examine the scale formed on ferritic-austenitic duplex type steel subjected to previous thermochemical treatment. The treatment consisted in diffusion aluminising in a metallising mixture composed of Fe-Al powder. As an activator, ammonium chloride (NH4Cl added in an amount of 2 wt.% was used. Then, both the base material and samples with the diffusiondeposited surface layers were oxidised at 1000°C in the air. Thus formed scales were identified by light microscopy, SEM and X-ray phase analysis. The aim of the oxidation tests carried out under isothermal conditions was to compare the scale morphology when obtained on untreated substrate material and on the surface layers rich in aluminium.

  7. An experimental investigation of a compliant surface beneath a turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, David Earl

    The interaction between a passive compliant surface and a turbulent boundary layer was studied using a 0.6 m diameter water tunnel. The key idea was the simultaneous determination of surface displacement and turbulence structure. A standard turbulent boundary layer over a flat plate was identified by measuring the first four moments of the streamwise velocity component. Then, two compliant surfaces, consisting of different mixtures of silicone elastomer and silicone oil, were studied by replacing a rigid insert in the flat plate. Varying the amount and viscosity of the oil in the mix allowed one to alter the response of the surface at a variety of Reynolds numbers of interest; in each case, a stable pattern of small amplitude displacements representing the footprints of individual flow structures was obtained. A localized averaging technique (VITA) was used to study any changes in the bursting process that might occur in the presence of a compliant surface. The results indicate that positive pressure pulses which are known to accompany bursting events in the buffer layer produced associated negative displacements in the compliant material beneath.

  8. Combined surface acoustic wave and surface plasmon resonance measurement of collagen and fibrinogen layer physical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-M. Friedt

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We use an instrument combining optical (surface plasmon resonance and acoustic (Love mode surface acoustic wave device real-time measurements on a same surface for the identification of water content in collagen and fibrinogen protein layers. After calibration of the surface acoustic wave device sensitivity by copper electrodeposition and surfactant adsorption, the bound mass and its physical properties – density and optical index – are extracted from the complementary measurement techniques and lead to thickness and water ratio values compatible with the observed signal shifts. Such results are especially usefully for protein layers with a high water content as shown here for collagen on an hydrophobic surface. We obtain the following results: collagen layers include 70±20% water and are 16±3 to 19±3 nm thick for bulk concentrations ranging from 30 to 300 μg/ml. Fibrinogen layers include 50±10% water for layer thicknesses in the 6±1.5 to 13±2 nm range when the bulk concentration is in the 46 to 460 μg/ml range. Keywords: surface acoustic wave, surface plasmon resonance, collagen, fibrinogen, density, thickness

  9. Modeling Turbulence Generation in the Atmospheric Surface and Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    ZT ). The initial acceleration of the rising buoyant air will be a = g∆T/TA. This is simply Archimedes ’ principle applied to the buoyant air. The... applications . 1 Various rules are employed to model C2n in the surface layer, but a key question is how to extend this estimation technique into the lower...in terms of wind turbulence the structure of the fluctuations produces a Reynolds stress tensor whose principle axes are not equal, meaning that at the

  10. Surface layer softing in mechanically polished molybdenum monocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivashchenko, R.K.; Kostyuchenko, V.G.; Lotsko, D.V.; Lukinov, I.V.; Mil'man, Yu.V.; Novikov, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    Softening of the surface layer together with growth of dislocation density is found in molybdenum single crystals mechanically polished with diamond suspension in water solution of CuSO 4 . The penetration of small amount of copper into molybdenum is observed by SIMS. A supposition has been made about molybdenum solid solution softening influenced by copper penetrating into molybdenum by means of a dynamic dislocation mechanism

  11. The influence of the mixed host emitting layer based on the TCTA and TPBi in blue phosphorescent OLED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhong-Lin; Tian, Wei; Kou, Zhi-Qi; Cheng, Shuang; Li, Yi-Hang

    2016-08-01

    The performance of the blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PHOLEDs) can be improved by changing the proportion and structure of the host materials in the emitting layer. A series of devices with the mixed host (TCTAx: TPBi1-x) single emitting layer is fabricated and the best performance appears when x is 1/2. Then, the highest luminance and power efficiency reach 7189 (cd/m2) at 10.5 V and 41.7 lm/W at 2.75 V respectively after changing the position of the single host (TCTA or TPBi) emitting layer and the mixed host (TCTA1/2: TPBi1/2) emitting layer in the multiple emitting layers device. The power efficiency is almost 37% improved in device with the optimized mixed host multiple emitting layers than that of device with the mixed host single emitting layer, the former device shows great potential to realize the high efficiency blue PHOLEDs.

  12. Mixing and trapping of dissolved CO2 in deep geologic formations with shale layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agartan, Elif; Cihan, Abdullah; Illangasekare, Tissa H.; Zhou, Quanlin; Birkholzer, Jens T.

    2017-07-01

    For dissolution trapping, the spatial variability of the geologic properties of naturally complex storage formations can significantly impact flow patterns and storage mechanisms of dissolved CO2. The significance of diffusive mixing that occurs in low permeability layers embedded between relatively higher permeability materials was highlighted by Agartan et al. (2015) using a highly controlled laboratory experimental study on trapping of dissolved CO2 in multilayered systems. In this paper, we present a numerical modeling study on the impacts of low permeability layers on flow and storage of dissolved CO2 in realistic field-scale settings. The simulator of variable-density flow used in this study was first verified using the experimental data in Agartan et al. (2015) to capture the observed processes. The simulator was then applied to a synthetic, field-scale multilayered system, with 19 sensitivity cases having variable permeability and thickness of the shale layers as well as the source strength and geometry of the source zone of dissolved CO2. Simulation results showed that the presence of continuous shale layers in the storage system disrupts the convective mixing by enhancing lateral spreading of dissolved CO2 in sandstone layers and retarding the vertical mixing of dissolved CO2. The effectiveness of trapping of dissolved CO2 depends on the physical properties of the shale layers and configurations of the source zone. The comparison to homogeneous cases with effective vertical permeability shows that it is important to capture these continuous thin shale layers in a storage formation and include them in the models to enhance dissolution trapping.

  13. Surface alloys as interfacial layers between quasicrystalline and periodic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duguet, T.; Ledieu, J.; Dubois, J. M.; Fournée, V.

    2008-08-01

    Low adhesion with normal metals is an intrinsic property of many quasicrystalline surfaces. Although this property could be useful to develop low friction or non-stick coatings, it is also responsible for the poor adhesion of quasicrystalline coatings on metal substrates. Here we investigate the possibility of using complex metallic surface alloys as interface layers to enhance the adhesion between quasicrystals and simple metal substrates. We first review some examples where such complex phases are formed as an overlayer. Then we study the formation of such surface alloys in a controlled way by annealing a thin film deposited on a quasicrystalline substrate. We demonstrate that a coherent buffer layer consisting of the γ-Al4Cu9 approximant can be grown between pure Al and the i-Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystal. The interfacial relationships between the different layers are defined by [111]_{\\mathrm {Al}}\\parallel [110]_{\\mathrm {Al_4Cu_9}}\\parallel [5\\mathrm {f}]_{i\\mbox {-}\\mathrm {Al\\mbox {--}Cu \\mbox {--}Fe}} .

  14. Surface alloys as interfacial layers between quasicrystalline and periodic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duguet, T; Ledieu, J; Dubois, J M; Fournee, V [Laboratoire de Science et Genie des Materiaux et de Metallurgie, UMR 7584 CNRS-Nancy Universite, Ecole des Mines de Nancy, Parc de Saurupt, F-54042 Nancy (France)], E-mail: fournee@lsg2m.org

    2008-08-06

    Low adhesion with normal metals is an intrinsic property of many quasicrystalline surfaces. Although this property could be useful to develop low friction or non-stick coatings, it is also responsible for the poor adhesion of quasicrystalline coatings on metal substrates. Here we investigate the possibility of using complex metallic surface alloys as interface layers to enhance the adhesion between quasicrystals and simple metal substrates. We first review some examples where such complex phases are formed as an overlayer. Then we study the formation of such surface alloys in a controlled way by annealing a thin film deposited on a quasicrystalline substrate. We demonstrate that a coherent buffer layer consisting of the {gamma}-Al{sub 4}Cu{sub 9} approximant can be grown between pure Al and the i-Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystal. The interfacial relationships between the different layers are defined by [111]{sub Al} parallel [110]{sub Al4Cu9} parallel [5f]{sub i-Al-}C{sub u-Fe}.

  15. Examination of evaporative fraction diurnal behaviour using a soil-vegetation model coupled with a mixed-layer model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-P. Lhomme

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In many experimental conditions, the evaporative fraction, defined as the ratio between evaporation and available energy, has been found stable during daylight hours. This constancy is investigated over fully covering vegetation by means of a land surface scheme coupled with a mixed-layer model, which accounts for entrainment of overlying air. The evaporation rate follows the Penman-Monteith equation and the surface resistance is given by a Jarvis type parameterization involving solar radiation, saturation deficit and leaf water potential. The diurnal course of the evaporative fraction is examined, together with the influence of environmental factors (soil water availability, solar radiation input, wind velocity, saturation deficit above the well-mixed layer. In conditions of fair weather, the curves representing the diurnal course of the evaporative fraction have a typical concave-up shape. Around midday (solar time these curves appear as relatively constant, but always lower that the daytime mean value. Evaporative fraction decreases when soil water decreases or when solar energy increases. An increment of saturation deficit above the mixed-layer provokes only a slight increase of evaporative fraction, and wind velocity has almost no effect. The possibility of estimation daytime evaporation from daytime available energy multiplied by the evaporative fraction at a single time of the day is also investigated. It appears that it is possible to obtain fairly good estimates of daytime evaporation by choosing adequately the time of the measurement of the evaporative fraction. The central hours of the day, and preferably about 3 hr before or after noon, are the most appropriate to provide good estimates. The estimation appears also to be much better when soil water availability (or evaporation is high than when it is low.

  16. Soil erosion rates from mixed soil and gravel surfaces in a wind tunnel: A preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligotke, M.W.

    1988-12-01

    Tests of wind erosion were performed in a controlled-environment wind tunnel to support the development of natural-material protective barriers for long-term isolation of radioactive waste. Barrier performance standards currently being developed for internal and external barrier performance are expected to mandate a surface layer that is resistant to wind erosion. The purpose of this study was to initiate a series of tests to determine suitable soil and gravel mixtures for such a barrier and to test worst-case surface layer conditions under the influence of high wind speeds. Six mixed soil and gravel surfaces were prepared, weathered to represent natural wind-blown desert areas, and subjected to controlled wind erosion forces in a wind tunnel. The applied erosive forces, including surface shear forces, were characterized to provide a means of relating wind tunnel results with actual field conditions. Soil particle losses from the surfaces caused by suspension, saltation, and surface creep were monitored by aerosol sample probes and mass balance measurements. 23 refs., 22 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Soil erosion rates from mixed soil and gravel surfaces in a wind tunnel: A preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ligotke, M.W.

    1988-12-01

    Tests of wind erosion were performed in a controlled-environment wind tunnel to support the development of natural-material protective barriers for long-term isolation of radioactive waste. Barrier performance standards currently being developed for internal and external barrier performance are expected to mandate a surface layer that is resistant to wind erosion. The purpose of this study was to initiate a series of tests to determine suitable soil and gravel mixtures for such a barrier and to test worst-case surface layer conditions under the influence of high wind speeds. Six mixed soil and gravel surfaces were prepared, weathered to represent natural wind-blown desert areas, and subjected to controlled wind erosion forces in a wind tunnel. The applied erosive forces, including surface shear forces, were characterized to provide a means of relating wind tunnel results with actual field conditions. Soil particle losses from the surfaces caused by suspension, saltation, and surface creep were monitored by aerosol sample probes and mass balance measurements. 23 refs., 22 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Eulerian-Lagranigan simulation of aerosol evolution in turbulent mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Kun

    2016-09-23

    The formation and evolution of aerosol in turbulent flows are ubiquitous in both industrial processes and nature. The intricate interaction of turbulent mixing and aerosol evolution in a canonical turbulent mixing layer was investigated by a direct numerical simulation (DNS) in a recent study (Zhou, K., Attili, A., Alshaarawi, A., and Bisetti, F. Simulation of aerosol nucleation and growth in a turbulent mixing layer. Physics of Fluids, 26, 065106 (2014)). In this work, Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of aerosol evolution is carried out along Lagrangian trajectories obtained in the previous simulation, in order to quantify the error of the moment method used in the previous simulation. Moreover, the particle size distribution (PSD), not available in the previous works, is also investigated. Along a fluid parcel moving through the turbulent flow, temperature and vapor concentration exhibit complex fluctuations, triggering complicate aerosol processes and rendering complex PSD. However, the mean PSD is found to be bi-modal in most of the mixing layer except that a tri-modal distribution is found in the turbulent transition region. The simulated PSDs agree with the experiment observations available in the literature. A different explanation on the formation of such PSDs is provided.

  19. Virtual ellipsometry on layered micro-facet surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chi; Wilkie, Alexander; Harcuba, Petr; Novosad, Lukas

    2017-09-18

    Microfacet-based BRDF models are a common tool to describe light scattering from glossy surfaces. Apart from their wide-ranging applications in optics, such models also play a significant role in computer graphics for photorealistic rendering purposes. In this paper, we mainly investigate the computer graphics aspect of this technology, and present a polarisation-aware brute force simulation of light interaction with both single and multiple layered micro-facet surfaces. Such surface models are commonly used in computer graphics, but the resulting BRDF is ultimately often only approximated. Recently, there has been work to try to make these approximations more accurate, and to better understand the behaviour of existing analytical models. However, these brute force verification attempts still emitted the polarisation state of light and, as we found out, this renders them prone to mis-estimating the shape of the resulting BRDF lobe for some particular material types, such as smooth layered dielectric surfaces. For these materials, non-polarising computations can mis-estimate some areas of the resulting BRDF shape by up to 23%. But we also identified some other material types, such as dielectric layers over rough conductors, for which the difference turned out to be almost negligible. The main contribution of our work is to clearly demonstrate that the effect of polarisation is important for accurate simulation of certain material types, and that there are also other common materials for which it can apparently be ignored. As this required a BRDF simulator that we could rely on, a secondary contribution is that we went to considerable lengths to validate our software. We compare it against a state-of-art model from graphics, a library from optics, and also against ellipsometric measurements of real surface samples.

  20. Effect of impurities in the description of surface nanobubbles: Role of nonidealities in the surface layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, S.

    2011-01-01

    In a recent study [ S. Das, J. H. Snoeijer and D. Lohse Phys. Rev. E 82 056310 (2010)], we provided quantitative demonstration of the conjecture [ W. A. Ducker Langmuir 25 8907 (2009)] that the presence of impurities at the surface layer (or the air-water interface) of surface nanobubbles can

  1. Amorphous surface layers in Ti-implanted Fe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, J.A.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Picraux, S.T.

    1979-01-01

    Implanting Ti into high-purity Fe results in an amorphous surface layer which is composed of not only Fe and Ti, but also C. Implantations were carried out at room temperature over the energy range 90 to 190 keV and fluence range 1 to 2 x 10/sup 16/ at/cm/sup 2/. The Ti-implanted Fe system has been characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ion backscattering and channeling analysis, and (d,p) nuclear reaction analysis. The amorphous layer was observed to form at the surface and grow inward with increasing Ti fluence. For an implant of 1 x 10/sup 17/ Ti/cm/sup 2/ at 180 keV the layer thickness was 150 A, while the measured range of the implanted Ti was approx. 550 A. This difference is due to the incorporation of C into the amorphous alloy by C being deposited on the surface during implantation and subsequently diffusing into the solid. Our results indicate that C is an essential constituent of the amorphous phase for Ti concentrations less than or equal to 10 at. %. For the 1 x 10/sup 17/ Ti/cm/sup 2/ implant, the concentration of C in the amorphous phase was approx. 25 at. %, while that of Ti was only approx. 3 at. %. A higher fluence implant of 2 x 10/sup 17/ Ti/cm/sup 2/ produced an amorphous layer with a lower C concentration of approx. 10 at. % and a Ti concentration of approx. 20 at. %.

  2. Application of various surface passivation layers in solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ji Youn; Lee, Soo Hong

    2004-01-01

    In this work, we have used different techniques for surface passivation: conventional thermal oxidation (CTO), rapid thermal oxidation (RTO), and plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD). The surface passivation qualities of eight different single and combined double layers have been investigated both on phosphorus non-diffused p-type Float Zone (FZ) silicon wafers and on diffused emitters (100 Ω/□ and 40 Ω/□). CTO/SiN 1 passivates very well not only on a non-diffused surface (τ eff = 1361 μs) but also on an emitter (τ eff = 414 μs). However, we concluded that RTO/SiN 1 and RTO/SiN 2 stacks were more suitable than CTO/SiN stacks for surface passivation in solar cells since those stacks had relatively good passivation qualities and suitable optical reflections. RTO/SiN 1 for rear-surface passivation and RTO/SiN 2 for front-surface passivation were applied to the fabrication of solar cells. We achieved efficiencies of 18.5 % and 18.8 % on 0.5 Ω-cm (FZ) silicon with planar and textured front surfaces, respectively. An excellent open circuit voltage (V oc ) of 675.6 mV was obtained for the planar cell.

  3. Phase mixing and surface wave decay in an inhomogeneous plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cally, P.S.; Sedlacek, Z.

    1992-02-01

    The decay rate is calculated of an Alfven or plasma surface wave propagating along an inhomogeneous layer of plasma. The inhomogeneous profile is thin and odd, but otherwise arbitrary. The wave's decay rate is determined using two fundamentally different methods, the integral-differential equation approach of Sedlacek and the Fourier expansion technique of Cally, and found by both to depend only on the slope of the Alfven or plasma frequency profile at the r esonant point , and not on other details of its shape. The result is verified numerically. This problem represents a good example with which to compare and contrast the two methods. (author) 3 figs., 7 refs

  4. Warmer, deeper, and greener mixed layers in the North Atlantic subpolar gyre over the last 50 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Elodie; Raitsos, Dionysios E; Antoine, David

    2016-02-01

    Shifts in global climate resonate in plankton dynamics, biogeochemical cycles, and marine food webs. We studied these linkages in the North Atlantic subpolar gyre (NASG), which hosts extensive phytoplankton blooms. We show that phytoplankton abundance increased since the 1960s in parallel to a deepening of the mixed layer and a strengthening of winds and heat losses from the ocean, as driven by the low frequency of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). In parallel to these bottom-up processes, the top-down control of phytoplankton by copepods decreased over the same time period in the western NASG, following sea surface temperature changes typical of the Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation (AMO). While previous studies have hypothesized that climate-driven warming would facilitate seasonal stratification of surface waters and long-term phytoplankton increase in subpolar regions, here we show that deeper mixed layers in the NASG can be warmer and host a higher phytoplankton biomass. These results emphasize that different modes of climate variability regulate bottom-up (NAO control) and top-down (AMO control) forcing on phytoplankton at decadal timescales. As a consequence, different relationships between phytoplankton, zooplankton, and their physical environment appear subject to the disparate temporal scale of the observations (seasonal, interannual, or decadal). The prediction of phytoplankton response to climate change should be built upon what is learnt from observations at the longest timescales. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Temporal and spatial changes in mixed layer properties and atmospheric net heat flux in the Nordic Seas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, A; Alekseev, G [SI ' Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute' , St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Korablev, A; Esau, I, E-mail: avsmir@aari.nw.r [Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Centre, Bergen (Norway)

    2010-08-15

    The Nordic Seas are an important area of the World Ocean where warm Atlantic waters penetrate far north forming the mild climate of Northern Europe. These waters represent the northern rim of the global thermohaline circulation. Estimates of the relationships between the net heat flux and mixed layer properties in the Nordic Seas are examined. Oceanographic data are derived from the Oceanographic Data Base (ODB) compiled in the Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute. Ocean weather ship 'Mike' (OWS) data are used to calculate radiative and turbulent components of the net heat flux. The net shortwave flux was calculated using a satellite albedo dataset and the EPA model. The net longwave flux was estimated by Southampton Oceanography Centre (SOC) method. Turbulent fluxes at the air-sea interface were calculated using the COARE 3.0 algorithm. The net heat flux was calculated by using oceanographic and meteorological data of the OWS 'Mike'. The mixed layer depth was estimated for the period since 2002 until 2009 by the 'Mike' data as well. A good correlation between these two parameters has been found. Sensible and latent heat fluxes controlled by surface air temperature/sea surface temperature gradient are the main contributors into net heat flux. Significant correlation was found between heat fluxes variations at the OWS 'Mike' location and sea ice export from the Arctic Ocean.

  6. Influence of Surface Energy Effects on Elastic Fields of a Layered Elastic Medium under Surface Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supakorn Tirapat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the analysis of a layered elastic half space under the action of axisymmetric surface loading and the influence of the surface energy effects. The boundary value problems for the bulk and the surface are formulated based on classical linear elasticity and a complete Gurtin-Murdoch constitutive relation. An analytical technique using Love’s representation and the Hankel integral transform is employed to derive an integral-form solution for both displacement and stress fields. An efficient numerical quadrature is then applied to accurately evaluate all involved integrals. Selected numerical results are presented to portray the influence of various parameters on elastic fields. Numerical results indicate that the surface stress displays a significant influence on both displacement and stress fields. It is also found that the layered half space becomes stiffer with the presence of surface stresses. In addition, unlike the classical elasticity solution, size-dependent behavior of elastic fields is noted. The present analytical solutions provide fundamental understanding of the influence of surface energy on layered elastic materials. It can also be used as a benchmark solution for the development of numerical techniques such as FEM and BEM, for analysis of more complex problems involving a layered medium under the influence of surface energy effects.

  7. Durable superhydrophobic surfaces made by intensely connecting a bipolar top layer to the substrate with a middle connecting layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Jinghui; Zhang, Li-Zhi

    2017-08-30

    This study reported a simple fabrication method for a durable superhydrophobic surface. The superhydrophobic top layer of the durable superhydrophobic surface was connected intensely to the substrate through a middle connecting layer. Glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (KH-560) after hydrolysis was used to obtain a hydrophilic middle connecting layer. It could be adhered to the hydrophilic substrate by covalent bonds. Ring-open reaction with octadecylamine let the KH-560 middle layer form a net-like structure. The net-like sturcture would then encompass and station the silica particles that were used to form the coarse micro structures, intensely to increase the durability. The top hydrophobic layer with nano-structures was formed on the KH-560 middle layer. It was obtained by a bipolar nano-silica solution modified by hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS). This layer was connected to the middle layer intensely by the polar Si hydroxy groups, while the non-polar methyl groups on the surface, accompanied by the micro and nano structures, made the surface rather hydrophobic. The covalently interfacial interactions between the substrate and the middle layer, and between the middle layer and the top layer, strengthened the durability of the superhydrophobic surface. The abrasion test results showed that the superhydrophobic surface could bear 180 abrasion cycles on 1200 CW sandpaper under 2 kPa applied pressure.

  8. Nanoscale Structuring of Surfaces by Using Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, Nicolas; Hess, Christian

    2015-12-07

    Controlled structuring of surfaces is interesting for a wide variety of areas, including microelectronic device fabrication, optical devices, bio(sensing), (electro-, photo)catalysis, batteries, solar cells, fuel cells, and sorption. A unique feature of atomic layer deposition (ALD) is the possibility to form conformal uniform coatings on arbitrarily shaped materials with controlled atomic-scale thickness. In this Minireview, we discuss the potential of ALD for the nanoscale structuring of surfaces, highlighting its versatile application to structuring both planar substrates and powder materials. Recent progress in the application of ALD to porous substrates has even made the nanoscale structuring of high-surface-area materials now feasible, thereby enabling novel applications, such as those in the fields of catalysis and alternative energy. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Surface energy absorbing layers produced by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurarie, V.N.

    1997-01-01

    Single crystals of magnesia have been ion implanted with 80 keV Si and Cr ions at variable doses and then subjected to testing in a shock plasma. The peak surface temperature has been calibrated by measuring the size and temperature deformation of the fragments formed by multiple microcracking during thermal shock. the crack density curves for MgO crystals demonstrate that in a wide range of thermal shock intensity the ion implanted crystals develop a system of microcracks of a considerably higher density than the unimplanted ones. The high density of cracks nucleated in the ion implanted samples results in the formation of a surface energy absorbing layer which effectively absorbs elastic strain energy induced by thermal shock. As a consequence the depth of crack penetration in the layer and hence the degree of fracture damage are decreased. the results indicate that a Si implant decreases the temperature threshold of cracking and simultaneously increases the crack density in MgO crystals. However, in MgO crystals implanted with Cr a substantial increase in the crack density is achieved without a noticeable decrease in the temperature threshold of fracture. This effect is interpreted in terms of different Cr and Si implantation conditions and damage. The mechanical properties of the energy-absorbing layer and the relation to implantation-induced lattice damage are discussed. 11 refs., 4 figs

  10. Submicron Surface Vibration Profiling Using Doppler Self-Mixing Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Doppler self-mixing laser probing techniques are often used for vibration measurement with very high accuracy. A novel optoelectronic probe solution is proposed, based on off-the-shelf components, with a direct reflection optical scheme for contactless characterization of the target’s movement. This probe was tested with two test bench apparatus that enhance its precision performance, with a linear actuator at low frequency (35 µm, 5–60 Hz, and its dynamics, with disc shaped transducers for small amplitude and high frequency (0.6 µm, 100–2500 Hz. The results, obtained from well-established signal processing methods for self-mixing Doppler signals, allowed the evaluation of vibration velocity and amplitudes with an average error of less than 10%. The impedance spectrum of piezoelectric (PZ disc target revealed a maximum of impedance (around 1 kHz for minimal Doppler shift. A bidimensional scan over the PZ disc surface allowed the categorization of the vibration mode (0, 1 and explained its deflection directions. The feasibility of a laser vibrometer based on self-mixing principles and supported by tailored electronics able to accurately measure submicron displacements was, thus, successfully demonstrated.

  11. Growth, intermixing, and surface phase formation for zinc tin oxide nanolaminates produced by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hägglund, Carl, E-mail: carl.hagglund@angstrom.uu.se [Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Engineering Sciences, Division of Solid State Electronics, Uppsala University, 75121 Uppsala (Sweden); Grehl, Thomas; Brongersma, Hidde H. [ION-TOF GmbH, Heisenbergstraße 15, 48149 Münster (Germany); Tanskanen, Jukka T.; Mullings, Marja N.; Mackus, Adriaan J. M.; MacIsaac, Callisto; Bent, Stacey Francine, E-mail: sbent@stanford.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Yee, Ye Sheng [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Clemens, Bruce M. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    A broad and expanding range of materials can be produced by atomic layer deposition at relatively low temperatures, including both oxides and metals. For many applications of interest, however, it is desirable to grow more tailored and complex materials such as semiconductors with a certain doping, mixed oxides, and metallic alloys. How well such mixed materials can be accomplished with atomic layer deposition requires knowledge of the conditions under which the resulting films will be mixed, solid solutions, or laminated. The growth and lamination of zinc oxide and tin oxide is studied here by means of the extremely surface sensitive technique of low energy ion scattering, combined with bulk composition and thickness determination, and x-ray diffraction. At the low temperatures used for deposition (150 °C), there is little evidence for atomic scale mixing even with the smallest possible bilayer period, and instead a morphology with small ZnO inclusions in a SnO{sub x} matrix is deduced. Postannealing of such laminates above 400 °C however produces a stable surface phase with a 30% increased density. From the surface stoichiometry, this is likely the inverted spinel of zinc stannate, Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}. Annealing to 800 °C results in films containing crystalline Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}, or multilayered films of crystalline ZnO, Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}, and SnO{sub 2} phases, depending on the bilayer period.

  12. A novel surface cleaning method for chemical removal of fouling lead layer from chromium surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholivand, Kh.; Khosravi, M.; Hosseini, S. G.; Fathollahi, M.

    2010-10-01

    Most products especially metallic surfaces require cleaning treatment to remove surface contaminations that remain after processing or usage. Lead fouling is a general problem which arises from lead fouling on the chromium surfaces of bores and other interior parts of systems which have interaction with metallic lead in high temperatures and pressures. In this study, a novel chemical solution was introduced as a cleaner reagent for removing metallic lead pollution, as a fouling metal, from chromium surfaces. The cleaner aqueous solution contains hydrogen peroxide (H 2O 2) as oxidizing agent of lead layer on the chromium surface and acetic acid (CH 3COOH) as chelating agent of lead ions. The effect of some experimental parameters such as acetic acid concentration, hydrogen peroxide concentration and temperature of the cleaner solution during the operation on the efficiency of lead cleaning procedure was investigated. The results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that using this procedure, the lead pollution layer could be completely removed from real chromium surfaces without corrosion of the original surface. Finally, the optimum conditions for the complete and fast removing of lead pollution layer from chromium surfaces were proposed. The experimental results showed that at the optimum condition (acetic acid concentration 28% (V/V), hydrogen peroxide 8% (V/V) and temperature 35 °C), only 15-min time is needed for complete removal of 3 g fouling lead from a chromium surface.

  13. Lateral phase separation of mixed polymer brushes on planar and spherical surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lehn, Reid; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    2012-02-01

    A mixed polymer brush consists of two (or more) polymer species grafted to a surface at a high density, inducing the polymers to highly stretch to maximize favorable solvent interactions while minimizing polymer overlap. The enthalpic and entropic interactions between the different polymers give rise to lateral phase behavior on the surface. Understanding this phase separation behavior is interesting for applications in nanotemplating and controlled protein adsorption. In this work, we present a novel theoretical model to quickly predict lateral phase separated morphologies of mixed polymer brushes on planar, cylindrical and spherical surfaces. The model combines a Flory-Huggins model for enthalpic interactions between the polymer components with an Alexander-de Gennes model for the entropy of the brush layers. When there is a length difference between the polymer components, these two interactions along with the conformational entropy of the system lead to a range of morphologies including stripes, dimples, mixing, and complete phase separation. The computational efficiency of this model allows for phase diagrams to be generated with great accuracy. The results of our model thus allow for the fast prediction of lateral morphologies on different geometries.

  14. Hierarchical Composite Membranes with Robust Omniphobic Surface Using Layer-By-Layer Assembly Technique

    KAUST Repository

    Woo, Yun Chul

    2018-01-17

    In this study, composite membranes were fabricated via layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly of negatively-charged silica aerogel (SiA) and 1H, 1H, 2H, 2H – Perfluorodecyltriethoxysilane (FTCS) on a polyvinylidene fluoride phase inversion membrane, and interconnecting them with positively-charged poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) via electrostatic interaction. The results showed that the PDDA-SiA-FTCS coated membrane had significantly enhanced the membrane structure and properties. New trifluoromethyl and tetrafluoroethylene bonds appeared at the surface of the coated membrane, which led to lower surface free energy of the composite membrane. Additionally, the LBL membrane showed increased surface roughness. The improved structure and property gave the LBL membrane an omniphobic property, as indicated by its good wetting resistance. The membrane performed a stable air gap membrane distillation (AGMD) flux of 11.22 L/m2h with very high salt rejection using reverse osmosis brine from coal seam gas produced water as feed with the addition of up to 0.5 mM SDS solution. This performance was much better compared to those of the neat membrane. The present study suggests that the enhanced membrane properties with good omniphobicity via LBL assembly make the porous membranes suitable for long-term AGMD operation with stable permeation flux when treating challenging saline wastewater containing low surface tension organic contaminants.

  15. Sodar measurements of the mixed-layer depth over a large city

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shurygin, E.A. [Russia Academy of Sciences, Inst. of Atmospheric Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-10-01

    The results of synchronous sodar`s measurements on a territory of city and suburban area have shown: (a) The types of stratification over centre of the city and periphery considerably differ, and these distinctions are more often displayed in morning and evening transition period. The agreement between types of stratification in the centre and on the periphery was observed in 40% of cases; (b) At equal temperature stratification the mixed-layer depth in centre of the city is about 50-150 m higher at inversions in comparison with a periphery, at advanced convection - these depths are identical; (c) At different stratification between the city and periphery the distinction in the mixed-layer depth can reach 200. (au)

  16. Mixed-layered bismuth-oxygen-iodine materials for capture and waste disposal of radioactive iodine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumhansl, James L; Nenoff, Tina M

    2013-02-26

    Materials and methods of synthesizing mixed-layered bismuth oxy-iodine materials, which can be synthesized in the presence of aqueous radioactive iodine species found in caustic solutions (e.g. NaOH or KOH). This technology provides a one-step process for both iodine sequestration and storage from nuclear fuel cycles. It results in materials that will be durable for repository conditions much like those found in Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and estimated for Yucca Mountain (YMP). By controlled reactant concentrations, optimized compositions of these mixed-layered bismuth oxy-iodine inorganic materials are produced that have both a high iodine weight percentage and a low solubility in groundwater environments.

  17. Mixed-layered bismuth--oxygen--iodine materials for capture and waste disposal of radioactive iodine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumhansl, James L; Nenoff, Tina M

    2015-01-06

    Materials and methods of synthesizing mixed-layered bismuth oxy-iodine materials, which can be synthesized in the presence of aqueous radioactive iodine species found in caustic solutions (e.g. NaOH or KOH). This technology provides a one-step process for both iodine sequestration and storage from nuclear fuel cycles. It results in materials that will be durable for repository conditions much like those found in Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and estimated for Yucca Mountain (YMP). By controlled reactant concentrations, optimized compositions of these mixed-layered bismuth oxy-iodine inorganic materials are produced that have both a high iodine weight percentage and a low solubility in groundwater environments.

  18. Seasonal variability of the mixed layer in the central Bay of Bengal and associated changes in nutrients and chlorophyll

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Narvekar, J.; PrasannaKumar, S.

    greater wind-driven mixing, while the intrusion of high-salinity waters erodes the halocline and weakens the upper-layer stratification of the water column and aids in vertical mixing. The deep MLD in the south during winter was driven by wind-mixing when...

  19. On the Pairing Process in an Excited, Plane, Turbulent Mixing Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-08-01

    1984). 17. Browand, F.K.; Ho, C.M.: The mixing layer: an example of quasi two- dimensional turbulence. J. de Mcanique Th~orique et Appliqu~e, Numero ...completed when the disturbance becomes neutrally stable to its local environment. Browand and Weidman [13] observed that the Reynolds stress generated...this process. This can be-explained by the- fact that the- Reynolds -! stress produced by large coherent structures vanishes when the pairing process

  20. Investigation of the mixing layer of underexpanded supersonic jets by particle image velocimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    André, Benoît; Castelain, Thomas; Bailly, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Particle image velocimetry is applied to slightly underexpanded supersonic jets. • The jet shock-cell structure and turbulence are investigated in detail. • An influence of the former on the latter is visible at higher Mach numbers. • The estimates of the wideband intrinsic length scales of turbulence are of the order of the shock-cell length. - Abstract: The present experimental study focuses on some properties of the turbulence and the shock-cell structure in underexpanded supersonic jets, which are of practical relevance in air transport. Choked jets at fully expanded Mach numbers M j = 1.10, 1.15, 1.35 and 1.50 are investigated using particle image velocimetry. The strength of the shock-cell structure is studied from mean velocity profiles, both in the jet core and in the mixing layer. The general geometry of the latter and its location relatively to the mean shock-cell structure are established. Furthermore, detailed accounts of mixing layer thickness, turbulence levels, spatial correlations and intrinsic turbulence length scales are given. While the mean velocity variations related to the shock-cell structure extend up to the subsonic part of the studied jets, their mixing layer is found to be mostly located in the subsonic region. Some of the observed turbulence properties, like the mixing layer thickness and turbulence levels, are close to what is found for subsonic jets. The effect of the shock-cell structure on turbulence is however visible for M j ⩾1.35. The spatial correlations of turbulence are used to estimate intrinsic turbulence length scales and these are found to be of the order of the shock-cell length. These data are used to make some comments upon the generation mechanism of shock-associated noise, a noise component produced by imperfectly expanded supersonic jets

  1. Magnetic behavior of Mg-Al-Zn-Fe mixed oxides from precursors layered double hydroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliva, M.I., E-mail: marcosivanoliva@gmail.com [Facultad de Matematica, Astronomia y Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, M. Allende y H. de la Torre Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); IFFAM AF (CONICET - FaMAF UNC), M. Allende y H. de la Torre Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Heredia, A. [CITeQ - Facultad R. Cordoba, Universidad Tecnologica Nacional Maestro Lopez esq. Cruz Roja Argentina, CP 5016 Cordoba (Argentina); Zandalazini, C.I. [Centro Laser de Ciencias Moleculares. INFIQC-FCQ-Grupo de Ciencia de Materiales-FaMAF-Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Ciudad Universitaria, CP5000 Cordoba, Argentina CONICET (Argentina); Crivello, M. [CITeQ - Facultad R. Cordoba, Universidad Tecnologica Nacional Maestro Lopez esq. Cruz Roja Argentina, CP 5016 Cordoba (Argentina); Corchero, E. [Facultad de Matematica, Astronomia y Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, M. Allende y H. de la Torre Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina)

    2012-08-15

    Mixed oxides of Mg-Al-Zn-Fe were obtained by calcination of layered double hydroxides (LDH) prepared by coprecipitation reaction with hydrothermal treatment. The structural characterization of precursors and oxides was carried out by X rays diffraction, showing increases of ZnO phase with the increase of the zinc content. Magnetic behavior was studied by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and by a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) showing both paramagnetic and super paramagnetic behavior depending on both particles size and composition.

  2. Transport of desert dust mixed with North African industrial pollutants in the subtropical Saharan Air Layer

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez González, Sergio; Alastuey Urós, José Andrés; Alonso Pérez, Silvia; Querol, X.; Cuevas, Emilio; Abreu Afonso, J.; Viana, M.; Pandolfi, M.; Rosa Díaz, Jesús de la

    2011-01-01

    An analysis of chemical composition data of particulate matter samples (TSP, PM10 and PM2.5) collected from 2002 to 2008 in the North Atlantic free troposphere at the Izana Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW) observatory (Tenerife, Canary Islands) shows that desert dust is very frequently mixed with particulate pollutants in the Saharan Air Layer (SAL). The study of this data set with Median Concentrations At Receptor (MCAR) plots allowed the identification of the potential source regions of the d...

  3. Modification of the surfaces of stainless steel during titanium nitride deposition by a dynamic mixing method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Katsuhiro; Tamura, Susumu; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Horiguchi, Motohiro; Nakaiwa, Hiroki; Sugimoto, Takashi; Akamatsu, Katsuya; Nakao, Kazuyoshi

    2000-05-01

    Surfaces of stainless steel SUS304 were coated with titanium nitride (TiN) at temperatures ranging from 400°C to 770°C using a dynamic mixing technique. The N+ ions were accelerated at energies of 0.5-2.0 keV, and were implanted into the stainless steel. The composition of the prepared TiN films was measured using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry with He ions at an energy of 2.0 MeV. Intermediate layers containing compounds such as FesNq, Cr2N, and CrFe were formed between the TiN films and substrates at substrate temperatures higher than 700°C. The thickness of the TiN films decreased significantly when the intermediate layers were formed.

  4. Effect of shock interactions on mixing layer between co-flowing supersonic flows in a confined duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, S. M. V.; Asano, S.; Imani, I.; Saito, T.

    2018-03-01

    Experiments are conducted to observe the effect of shock interactions on a mixing layer generated between two supersonic streams of Mach number M _{1} = 1.76 and M _{2} = 1.36 in a confined duct. The development of this mixing layer within the duct is observed using high-speed schlieren and static pressure measurements. Two-dimensional, compressible Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved using the k-ω SST turbulence model in Fluent. Further, adverse pressure gradients are imposed by placing inserts of small ( boundary layer thickness) thickness on the walls of the test section. The unmatched pressures cause the mixing layer to bend and lead to the formation of shock structures that interact with the mixing layer. The mixing layer growth rate is found to increase after the shock interaction (nearly doubles). The strongest shock is observed when a wedge insert is placed in the M _{2} flow. This shock interacts with the mixing layer exciting flow modes that produce sinusoidal flapping structures which enhance the mixing layer growth rate to the maximum (by 1.75 times). Shock fluctuations are characterized, and it is observed that the maximum amplitude occurs when a wedge insert is placed in the M _{2} flow.

  5. Noncondensable gas effect on film condensation of boundary layer flow in the entire mixed convection regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Y.; Guentay, S.

    2009-01-01

    The mixed convection regime for film condensation is enveloped by free convection at one end and forced convection at the other. At both ends, the noncondensable gas effect on film condensation was established in the pioneering work by Sparrow and Minkowycz. But most practical flows are in the mixed convection regime, where it was observed in recent experiments that the pioneering work could not be applied satisfactorily. The current work tries to bridge the gap by presenting a generic boundary layer formulation of the noncondensable gas effect in the entire mixed convection regime. The current formulation is reduced to two specific cases which mathematically coincide with the pioneering work at two ends. In between, the current work fills the gap by presenting solution for the full spectrum of the mixed convection regime. The presented mixed convection solution intermediates between Minkowycz's prediction on the free convection flow and Sparrow's prediction on the forced convection flow, and is in fair agreement with the recent experiments performed in the mixed convection regime. It is found that although a slight vapor flow imposed on free convection has little effect on film condensation in the absence of noncondensable gases, a slight gas flow imposed on condensation in the presence of noncondensable gases can drastically affect the mass transfer boundary and reduce the accumulation of gas at the interface due to a strong coupling between hydrodynamics and convective mass diffusion. (author)

  6. Initial condition effects on large scale structure in numerical simulations of plane mixing layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullan, W. A.; Garrett, S. J.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, Large Eddy Simulations are performed on the spatially developing plane turbulent mixing layer. The simulated mixing layers originate from initially laminar conditions. The focus of this research is on the effect of the nature of the imposed fluctuations on the large-scale spanwise and streamwise structures in the flow. Two simulations are performed; one with low-level three-dimensional inflow fluctuations obtained from pseudo-random numbers, the other with physically correlated fluctuations of the same magnitude obtained from an inflow generation technique. Where white-noise fluctuations provide the inflow disturbances, no spatially stationary streamwise vortex structure is observed, and the large-scale spanwise turbulent vortical structures grow continuously and linearly. These structures are observed to have a three-dimensional internal geometry with branches and dislocations. Where physically correlated provide the inflow disturbances a "streaky" streamwise structure that is spatially stationary is observed, with the large-scale turbulent vortical structures growing with the square-root of time. These large-scale structures are quasi-two-dimensional, on top of which the secondary structure rides. The simulation results are discussed in the context of the varying interpretations of mixing layer growth that have been postulated. Recommendations are made concerning the data required from experiments in order to produce accurate numerical simulation recreations of real flows.

  7. Mixed convection boundary layer flow over a moving vertical flat plate in an external fluid flow with viscous dissipation effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norfifah Bachok

    Full Text Available The steady boundary layer flow of a viscous and incompressible fluid over a moving vertical flat plate in an external moving fluid with viscous dissipation is theoretically investigated. Using appropriate similarity variables, the governing system of partial differential equations is transformed into a system of ordinary (similarity differential equations, which is then solved numerically using a Maple software. Results for the skin friction or shear stress coefficient, local Nusselt number, velocity and temperature profiles are presented for different values of the governing parameters. It is found that the set of the similarity equations has unique solutions, dual solutions or no solutions, depending on the values of the mixed convection parameter, the velocity ratio parameter and the Eckert number. The Eckert number significantly affects the surface shear stress as well as the heat transfer rate at the surface.

  8. Frazil-ice growth rate and dynamics in mixed layers and sub-ice-shelf plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees Jones, David W.; Wells, Andrew J.

    2018-01-01

    The growth of frazil or granular ice is an important mode of ice formation in the cryosphere. Recent advances have improved our understanding of the microphysical processes that control the rate of ice-crystal growth when water is cooled beneath its freezing temperature. These advances suggest that crystals grow much faster than previously thought. In this paper, we consider models of a population of ice crystals with different sizes to provide insight into the treatment of frazil ice in large-scale models. We consider the role of crystal growth alongside the other physical processes that determine the dynamics of frazil ice. We apply our model to a simple mixed layer (such as at the surface of the ocean) and to a buoyant plume under a floating ice shelf. We provide numerical calculations and scaling arguments to predict the occurrence of frazil-ice explosions, which we show are controlled by crystal growth, nucleation, and gravitational removal. Faster crystal growth, higher secondary nucleation, and slower gravitational removal make frazil-ice explosions more likely. We identify steady-state crystal size distributions, which are largely insensitive to crystal growth rate but are affected by the relative importance of secondary nucleation to gravitational removal. Finally, we show that the fate of plumes underneath ice shelves is dramatically affected by frazil-ice dynamics. Differences in the parameterization of crystal growth and nucleation give rise to radically different predictions of basal accretion and plume dynamics, and can even impact whether a plume reaches the end of the ice shelf or intrudes at depth.

  9. Study of the equatorial Atlantic Ocean mixing layer using a one-dimensional turbulence model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udo Tersiano Skielka

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM is applied to the diagnostic turbulence field of the mixing layer (ML over the equatorial region of the Atlantic Ocean. Two situations were investigated: rainy and dry seasons, defined, respectively, by the presence of the intertropical convergence zone and by its northward displacement. Simulations were carried out using data from a PIRATA buoy located on the equator at 23º W to compute surface turbulent fluxes and from the NASA/GEWEX Surface Radiation Budget Project to close the surface radiation balance. A data assimilation scheme was used as a surrogate for the physical effects not present in the one-dimensional model. In the rainy season, results show that the ML is shallower due to the weaker surface stress and stronger stable stratification; the maximum ML depth reached during this season is around 15 m, with an averaged diurnal variation of 7 m depth. In the dry season, the stronger surface stress and the enhanced surface heat balance components enable higher mechanical production of turbulent kinetic energy and, at night, the buoyancy acts also enhancing turbulence in the first meters of depth, characterizing a deeper ML, reaching around 60 m and presenting an average diurnal variation of 30 m.O modelo General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM é aplicado para diagnosticar o campo de turbulência da camada de mistura oceânica (CM na região equatorial do Oceano Atlântico. Foram investigadas as estações chuvosa e seca, definidas, respectivamente, pela presença da zona de convergência intertropical e pelo seu deslocamento para norte. Simulações foram realizadas usando dados da bóia PIRATA (0º, 23ºW para o cálculo dos fluxos turbulentos de superfície e dados do Projeto NASA/GEWEX Surface Radiation Budget para "fechar" o balanço de radiação na superfície. Um esquema para assimilação de dados foi usado para considerar os mecanismos físicos não representados pelo modelo unidimensional

  10. Moored surface buoy observations of the diurnal warm layer

    KAUST Repository

    Prytherch, J.

    2013-09-01

    An extensive data set is used to examine the dynamics of diurnal warming in the upper ocean. The data set comprises more than 4700 days of measurements at five sites in the tropics and subtropics, obtained from surface moorings equipped to make comprehensive meteorological, incoming solar and infrared radiation, and high-resolution subsurface temperature (and, in some cases, velocity) measurements. The observations, which include surface warmings of up to 3.4°C, are compared with a selection of existing models of the diurnal warm layer (DWL). A simple one-layer physical model is shown to give a reasonable estimate of both the magnitude of diurnal surface warming (model-observation correlation 0.88) and the structure and temporal evolution of the DWL. Novel observations of velocity shear obtained during 346 days at one site, incorporating high-resolution (1 m) upper ocean (5-15 m) acoustic Doppler current profile measurements, are also shown to be in reasonable agreement with estimates from the physical model (daily maximum shear model-observation correlation 0.77). Physics-based improvements to the one-layer model (incorporation of rotation and freshwater terms) are discussed, though they do not provide significant improvements against the observations reported here. The simplicity and limitations of the physical model are used to discuss DWL dynamics. The physical model is shown to give better model performance under the range of forcing conditions experienced across the five sites than the more empirical models. ©2013. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Influence of Subgrade and Unbound Granular Layers Stiffness on Fatigue Life of Hot Mix Asphalts - HMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo A. Rondón-Quintana

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The mainly factors studied to predict fatigue life of hot mix asphalt-HMA in flexible pavements are the loading effect, type of test, compaction methods, design parameters of HMA (e.g., particle size and size distribution curve, fine content, type of bitumen and the variables associated with the environment (mainly moisture, temperature, aging. This study evaluated through a computer simulation, the influence of the granular layers and subgrade on the fatigue life of asphalt layers in flexible pavement structures. Mechanics parameters of granular layers of subgrade, base and subbase were obtained using the mathematical equations currently used for this purpose in the world. The emphasis of the study was the city of Bogotá, where the average annual temperature is 14°C and soils predominantly clay, generally experience CBR magnitudes between 1% and 4%. General conclusion: stiffness of the granular layers and subgrade significantly affect the fatigue resistance of HMA mixtures. Likewise, the use of different equations reported in reference literature in order to characterize granular layers may vary the fatigue life between 4.6 and 48.5 times, varying the thickness of the pavement layers in the design.

  12. Boundary layer flow of nanofluid over an exponentially stretching surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeem, Sohail; Lee, Changhoon

    2012-01-01

    The steady boundary layer flow of nanofluid over an exponential stretching surface is investigated analytically. The transport equations include the effects of Brownian motion parameter and thermophoresis parameter. The highly nonlinear coupled partial differential equations are simplified with the help of suitable similarity transformations. The reduced equations are then solved analytically with the help of homotopy analysis method (HAM). The convergence of HAM solutions are obtained by plotting h-curve. The expressions for velocity, temperature and nanoparticle volume fraction are computed for some values of the parameters namely, suction injection parameter α, Lewis number Le, the Brownian motion parameter Nb and thermophoresis parameter Nt.

  13. Boundary layer flow of nanofluid over an exponentially stretching surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeem, Sohail; Lee, Changhoon

    2012-01-30

    The steady boundary layer flow of nanofluid over an exponential stretching surface is investigated analytically. The transport equations include the effects of Brownian motion parameter and thermophoresis parameter. The highly nonlinear coupled partial differential equations are simplified with the help of suitable similarity transformations. The reduced equations are then solved analytically with the help of homotopy analysis method (HAM). The convergence of HAM solutions are obtained by plotting h-curve. The expressions for velocity, temperature and nanoparticle volume fraction are computed for some values of the parameters namely, suction injection parameter α, Lewis number Le, the Brownian motion parameter Nb and thermophoresis parameter Nt.

  14. Connecting meteorology to surface transport in aeolian landscapes: Peering into the boundary layer with Doppler lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, A.; Jerolmack, D. J.; Edmonds, D. A.; Ewing, R. C.; Wanker, M.; David, S. R.

    2017-12-01

    Aolian sand dunes grow to 100s or 1000s of meters in wavelength by sand saltation, which also produces dust plumes that feed cloud formation and may spread around the world. The relations among sediment transport, landscape dynamics and wind are typically observed at the limiting ends of the relevant range: highly resolved and localized ground observations of turbulence and relevant fluxes; or regional and synoptic-scale meteorology and satellite imagery. Between the geostrophic winds aloft and shearing stress on the Earth's surface is the boundary layer, whose stability and structure determines how momentum is transferred and ultimately entrains sediment. Although the literature on atmospheric boundary layer flows is mature, this understanding is rarely applied to aeolian landscape dynamics. Moreover, there are few vertically and time-resolved datasets of atmospheric boundary layer flows in desert sand seas, where buoyancy effects are most pronounced. Here we employ a ground-based upward-looking doppler lidar to examine atmospheric boundary layer flow at the upwind margin of the White Sands (New Mexico) dune field, providing continuous 3D wind velocity data from the surface to 300-m aloft over 70 days of the characteristically windy spring season. Data show highly resolved daily cyles of convective instabilty due to daytime heating and stable stratification due to nightime cooling which act to enhance or depress, respectively, the surface wind stresses for a given free-stream velocity. Our data implicate convective instability in driving strong saltation and dust emission, because enhanced mixing flattens the vertical velocity profile (raising surface wind speed) while upward advection helps to deliver dust to the high atmosphere. We also find evidence for Ekman spiralling, with a magnitude that depends on atmospheric stability. This spiralling gives rise to a deflection in the direction between geostrophic and surface winds, that is significant for the

  15. Monodisperse gold nanoparticles formed on bacterial crystalline surface layers (S-layers) by electroless deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dieluweit, S. [Center for Nanobiotechnology, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences (BOKU), Gregor Mendel-Strasse 33, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Pum, D. [Center for Nanobiotechnology, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences (BOKU), Gregor Mendel-Strasse 33, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Sleytr, U.B. [Center for Nanobiotechnology, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences (BOKU), Gregor Mendel-Strasse 33, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Kautek, W. [Department for Physical Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringer Strasse 42, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: wolfgang.kautek@univie.ac.at

    2005-12-15

    The fabrication of patterned arrays of nanoparticles whose electronic, optical and magnetic properties will find technological applications, such as ultra-high-density memories, is currently one of the most important objectives of inorganic material research. In this study, the in situ electroless nucleation of ordered two-dimensional arrays of gold nanoparticles (5 nm in size) by using bacterial S-layers as molecular templates and their characterization by small spot X-ray photoelectron emission spectroscopy (XPS) is presented. This yielded the elemental composition of the nanoclusters, which consisted of almost entirely elemental gold, and possible side reactions on the cluster and protein surface. The preferential deposition of the gold nanoparticles on the S-layer suggests that topography and functional groups are important for superlattice formation.

  16. Nanofilms of hyaluronan/chitosan assembled layer-by-layer: An antibacterial surface for Xylella fastidiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Montelongo, Jacobo; Nascimento, Vicente F; Murillo, Duber; Taketa, Thiago B; Sahoo, Prasana; de Souza, Alessandra A; Beppu, Marisa M; Cotta, Monica A

    2016-01-20

    In this work, nanofilms of hyaluronan/chitosan (HA/CHI) assembled layer by layer were synthesized; their application as a potential antimicrobial material was demonstrated for the phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa, a gram-negative bacterium, here used as a model. For the synthesis, the influence of pH and ionic strength of these natural polymer stem-solutions on final characteristics of the HA/CHI nanofilms was studied in detail. The antibacterial effect was evaluated using widefield fluorescence microscopy. These results were correlated with the chemical properties of the nanofilms, studied by FTIR and Raman spectroscopy, as well as with their morphology and surface properties characterized using SEM and AFM. The present findings can be extended to design and optimize HA/CHI nanofilms with enhanced antimicrobial behavior for other type of phytopathogenic gram-negative bacteria species, such as Xanthomonas citri, Xanthomas campestri and Ralstonia solanacearum. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Interactions between a tropical mixed boundary layer and cumulus convection in a radiative-convective model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dean, Caryn L. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1993-05-01

    This report details a radiative-convective model, combining previously developed cumulus, stable cloud and radiation parameterizations with a boundary layer scheme, which was developed in the current study. The cloud model was modified to incorporate the effects of both small and large clouds. The boundary layer model was adapted from a mixed layer model was only slightly modified to couple it with the more sophisticated cloud model. The model was tested for a variety of imposed divergence profiles, which simulate the regions of the tropical ocean from approximately the intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) to the subtropical high region. The sounding used to initialize the model for most of the runs is from the trade wind region of ATEX. For each experiment, the model was run with a timestep of 300 seconds for a period of 7 days.

  18. Atomic and molecular layer activation of dielectric surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senkevich, John Joseph

    Strong interaction between the material deposit and substrate is critical to stable deposits and interfaces. The work presented here focuses on the surface activation of dielectric surfaces and oxidized metal surfaces to promote the chemisorption of palladium (II) hexafluoroacetylacetonate (PdII (hfac)2). The goal is to develop reliable, robust metallization protocols, which enable strong interactions between the metal and substrate. SiO2, air exposed Ta, Trikon, and SiLK were activated with sulfur or phosphorus. Two types of activations were developed; one based on self-assembled chemistry, and the other a plasma-assisted process. Activation of the surface using self-assembly techniques was carried out using mercaptan-terminated silane and tetrasulfide silane. The resulting films were characterized by variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry, contact angle goniometry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Tetrasulfide silane sources films exhibit self-limiting behavior, even in the presence of water vapor; whereas mercaptan-terminated silane sourced films tend to be thicker. The surface activations using atomic layers of sulfur and phosphorus were carried out in a rf plasma chamber using hydrogen sulfide and phosphine sources, respectively. The activations were studied as functions of rf power, system pressure, and substrate material. Results show that higher rf powers and lower system pressures promote greater surface coverages by sulfur with a reduced oxidation state. The activated dielectrics show evidence of PdII(hfac)2 chemisorption, in contrast to non-activated surfaces. The binding energy shift of the Pd3d 5/2 XPS peak towards elemental Pd provides evidence for the dissociative chemisorption of PdII(hfac)2. The extent of dissociation depends on the substrate temperature and the activation method used. The conclusions of the work presented here have implications for metallization using highly polarizable transition metals. Specifically, it can be applied to

  19. A numerical model for chemical reaction on slag layer surface and slag layer behavior in entrained-flow gasifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper concerns with slag layer accumulation, chemical reaction on slag layer surface, and slag layer flow, heat and mass transfer on the wall of entrained-flow coal gasifier. A slag layer model is developed to simulate slag layer behaviors in the coal gasifier. This 3-D model can predict temperature, slag particle disposition rate, disposition particle composition, and syngas distribution in the gasifier hearth. The model is used to evaluate the effects of O2/coal ratio on slag layer behaviors.

  20. New surface layers with low rolling resistance tested in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pettinari, Matteo; Schmidt, Bjarne; Jensen, Bjarne Bo

    2014-01-01

    The project ‘CO2 emission reduction by exploitation of rolling resistance modeling of pavements’ (COOEE) was started in 2011 to establish a scientific background for development of novel pavement types and asset management solutions that minimize the rolling resistance for cars and trucks......, the purpose being to reduce CO2 emission from the transport sector. In summer 2012, three different test sections were constructed on a highway located near Vordingborg, Denmark, in order to verify the respective Rolling Resistances; the main purpose was to develop and design new surface layers with reduced...... Rolling Resistance coefficient that could improve energy efficiency of the roads. In particular, two new types of Split Mastic Asphalt (SMA) were developed and compared to a reference one; both mixtures have a relatively small maximum grain-size, 6 mm and 8 mm, respectively. Surface measurements...

  1. Formation of nanocrystalline surface layers in various metallic materials by near surface severe plastic deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahide Sato, Nobuhiro Tsuji, Yoritoshi Minamino and Yuichiro Koizumi

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The surface of the various kinds of metallic materials sheets were severely deformed by wire-brushing at ambient temperature to achieve nanocrystalline surface layer. The surface layers of the metallic materials developed by the near surface severe plastic deformation (NS-SPD were characterized by means of TEM. Nearly equiaxed nanocrystals with grain sizes ranging from 30 to 200 nm were observed in the near surface regions of all the severely scratched metallic materials, which are Ti-added ultra-low carbon interstitial free steel, austenitic stainless steel (SUS304, 99.99 wt.%Al, commercial purity aluminum (A1050 and A1100, Al–Mg alloy (A5083, Al-4 wt.%Cu alloy, OFHC-Cu (C1020, Cu–Zn alloy (C2600 and Pb-1.5%Sn alloy. In case of the 1050-H24 aluminum, the depth of the surface nanocrystalline layer was about 15 μm. It was clarified that wire-brushing is an effective way of NS-SPD, and surface nanocrystallization can be easily achieved in most of metallic materials.

  2. Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part I: Single layer cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Stephen A.; McCoy, Renata B.; Morrison, Hugh; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Avramov, Alexander; de Boer, Gijs; Chen, Mingxuan; Cole, Jason N.S.; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Falk, Michael; Foster, Michael J.; Fridlind, Ann; Golaz, Jean-Christophe; Hashino, Tempei; Harrington, Jerry Y.; Hoose, Corinna; Khairoutdinov, Marat F.; Larson, Vincent E.; Liu, Xiaohong; Luo, Yali; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Menon, Surabi; Neggers, Roel A. J.; Park, Sungsu; Poellot, Michael R.; Schmidt, Jerome M.; Sednev, Igor; Shipway, Ben J.; Shupe, Matthew D.; Spangenberg, Douglas A.; Sud, Yogesh C.; Turner, David D.; Veron, Dana E.; von Salzen, Knut; Walker, Gregory K.; Wang, Zhien; Wolf, Audrey B.; Xie, Shaocheng; Xu, Kuan-Man; Yang, Fanglin; Zhang, Gong

    2009-02-02

    Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a cold-air outbreak mixed-phase stratocumulus cloud observed during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. The observed cloud occurred in a well-mixed boundary layer with a cloud top temperature of -15 C. The observed average liquid water path of around 160 g m{sup -2} was about two-thirds of the adiabatic value and much greater than the average mass of ice crystal precipitation which when integrated from the surface to cloud top was around 15 g m{sup -2}. The simulations were performed by seventeen single-column models (SCMs) and nine cloud-resolving models (CRMs). While the simulated ice water path is generally consistent with the observed values, the median SCM and CRM liquid water path is a factor of three smaller than observed. Results from a sensitivity study in which models removed ice microphysics suggest that in many models the interaction between liquid and ice-phase microphysics is responsible for the large model underestimate of liquid water path. Despite this general underestimate, the simulated liquid and ice water paths of several models are consistent with the observed values. Furthermore, there is evidence that models with more sophisticated microphysics simulate liquid and ice water paths that are in better agreement with the observed values, although considerable scatter is also present. Although no single factor guarantees a good simulation, these results emphasize the need for improvement in the model representation of mixed-phase microphysics.

  3. Patterns of canopy and surface layer consumption in a boreal forest fire from repeat airborne lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Michael; Morton, Douglas C.; Cook, Bruce D.; Andersen, Hans-Erik; Babcock, Chad; Pattison, Robert

    2017-05-01

    Fire in the boreal region is the dominant agent of forest disturbance with direct impacts on ecosystem structure, carbon cycling, and global climate. Global and biome-scale impacts are mediated by burn severity, measured as loss of forest canopy and consumption of the soil organic layer. To date, knowledge of the spatial variability in burn severity has been limited by sparse field sampling and moderate resolution satellite data. Here, we used pre- and post-fire airborne lidar data to directly estimate changes in canopy vertical structure and surface elevation for a 2005 boreal forest fire on Alaska’s Kenai Peninsula. We found that both canopy and surface losses were strongly linked to pre-fire species composition and exhibited important fine-scale spatial variability at sub-30 m resolution. The fractional reduction in canopy volume ranged from 0.61 in lowland black spruce stands to 0.27 in mixed white spruce and broadleaf forest. Residual structure largely reflects standing dead trees, highlighting the influence of pre-fire forest structure on delayed carbon losses from aboveground biomass, post-fire albedo, and variability in understory light environments. Median loss of surface elevation was highest in lowland black spruce stands (0.18 m) but much lower in mixed stands (0.02 m), consistent with differences in pre-fire organic layer accumulation. Spatially continuous depth-of-burn estimates from repeat lidar measurements provide novel information to constrain carbon emissions from the surface organic layer and may inform related research on post-fire successional trajectories. Spectral measures of burn severity from Landsat were correlated with canopy (r = 0.76) and surface (r = -0.71) removal in black spruce stands but captured less of the spatial variability in fire effects for mixed stands (canopy r = 0.56, surface r = -0.26), underscoring the difficulty in capturing fire effects in heterogeneous boreal forest landscapes using proxy measures of burn

  4. Surface plasmon resonance investigation of optical detection in plasma-modified phospholipid layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Byoungchoo; Cho, Chanyoun; Choi, Kyoungho; Jeon, Honggoo [Kwangwoon University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    We herein report on a study of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) in thin gold (Au) films coated with thin layers of phospholipid material, which had been exposed to an atmospheric pressure (AP) plasma containing both pure Ar and Ar mixed with O{sub 2} (Ar/O{sub 2}, 0.8%). The phospholipid material that we used for the SPR experiments was lecithin, and the AP plasma system was applied in air by means of a radio-frequency (RF) plasma generator. A thin (∼60 nm) film of Au and a thin (∼15 nm) layer of lecithin were deposited and attached to the face of a prism, and surface plasmon modes were excited along the interfaces of the prism-Au-lecithin-air system by means of prism coupling using a He-Ne Laser (632.8 nm). The experimental SPR reflectance curves of the Au-lecithin-air modes were found to be shifted towards those of the Au-air mode with increasing applications of AP RF plasma treatment. From the shifts in the SPR curves, we found that the estimated thickness of the lecithin layer treated with a pure Ar plasma showed a linear decrease with etching rate of about 3 nm per treatment while the thickness of the lecithin layer treated with a mixed Ar/O{sub 2} plasma showed a tendency to saturate following a large initial decrease (ca. 14 nm). All these results demonstrate that the use of SPR sensing could facilitate the detection of extremely small variations in plasma-treated films of biomaterials.

  5. Characterize Cold Bituminous Emulsion Mixtures Incorporated Ordinary Portland Cement Filler for Local Surface Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Amoori Kadhim

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Cold Bituminous Emulsion Mixtures have many environmental, logistical, and economic advantages over conventional Hot Mix Asphalt. Nevertheless, their inferior performance and high water sensitivity at early life attract little attentions. Moreover, it is impossible to apply CBEM as a structural surface layer if left without treatment or enhancement. The main aim of this study is to enhance the properties of CBEM for the hope of using it as a structural layer. Thus, a trial has been made to improve CBEM mechanical and durability properties by replacing the Ordinary Portland Cement by the Conventional Mineral Filler with 3 percentages; namely, 0, 50%, and 100%. CBEM mixtures mechanical properties were evaluated in term of Marshall Stability and Flow, Indirect Tensile Strength, and Wheel Track Test. While Moisture damage was evaluated in terms of Retained Marshall Stability. Test results showed that the addition of 100%OPC filler can improve CBEM mechanical and durability properties efficiently. In terms of mechanical properties results, CBEM comprised 100%OPC, can be used as a structural Surface layer based on local Iraqi specifications limits, where mixture enhanced about 1.9, 1.78, 9,4.85, and 2.6  times in term of MS, MF, rutting deformation resistance, resistance to tensile cracking, and moisture damage resistance, respectively as compared to untreated CBEM. Also, CBEM-100%OPC mix seemed comparable (and sometime superior to HMA, e.g., resistance to rutting of CBEM is about 6.2 times higher than that of HMA. It’s worth to say that OPC upgrades CBEM to a significant level that enables it to use as a structural layer in terms of the mechanical and the durability properties.

  6. Surface layer conditions of the atmosphere over western Bay of Bengal during Monex

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anto, A.F.; Rao, L.V.G.; Somayajulu, Y.K.

    Based on surface meteorological data and wave data collected from 2 stations in the western Bay of Bengal in July 1979, surface layer (SL) conditions of the atmosphere for different situations of surface circulations and the associated sea surface...

  7. Crystalline Bacterial Surface Layer (S-Layer) Opens Golden Opportunities for Nanobiotechnology in Textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi, Narges; Chand, Nima; Rassa, Mehdi

    2015-12-01

    This study focuses on the successful recrystallization of bacterial S-layer arrays of the Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 at textile surfaces to create a novel method and material. Optimum bacterial growth was obtained at approximately 45 °C, pH 5.0, and 14 h pi. The cells were resuspended in guanidine hydrochloride and the 43 kDa S-protein was dialyzed and purified. The optimum reassembly on the polypropylene fabric surface in terms of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), reflectance, and uniformity (spectrophotometry) was obtained at 30 °C, pH 5.0 for 30 minutes in the presence of 2 gr/l (liquor ratio; 1:40) of the S-protein. Overall, our data showed that the functional aspects and specialty applications of the fabric would be very attractive for the textile and related sciences, and result in advanced technical textiles.

  8. Mesopelagic Prokaryotes Alter Surface Phytoplankton Production during Simulated Deep Mixing Experiments in Eastern Mediterranean Sea Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Or Hazan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesopelagic prokaryotes (archaea and bacteria, which are transported together with nutrient-rich intermediate-water to the surface layer by deep convection in the oceans (e.g., winter mixing, upwelling systems, can interact with surface microbial populations. This interaction can potentially affect production rates and biomass of surface microbial populations, and thus play an important role in the marine carbon cycle and oceanic carbon sequestration. The Eastern Mediterranean Sea (EMS is one of the most oligotrophic and warm systems in the world's oceans, with usually very shallow winter mixing (<200 m and lack of large-size spring algal blooms. In this study, we collected seawater (0–1,500 m in 9 different cruises at the open EMS during both the stratified and the mixed seasons. We show that the EMS is a highly oligotrophic regime, resulting in low autotrophic biomass and primary productivity and relatively high heterotrophic prokaryotic biomass and production. Further, we simulated deep water mixing in on-board microcosms using Levantine surface (LSW, ~0.5 m and intermediate (LIW, ~400 m waters at a 9:1 ratio, respectively and examined the responses of the microbial populations to such a scenario. We hypothesized that the LIW, being nutrient-rich (e.g., N, P and a “hot-spot” for microbial activity (due to the warm conditions that prevail in these depths, may supply the LSW with not only key-limiting nutrients but also with viable and active heterotrophic prokaryotes that can interact with the ambient surface microbial population. Indeed, we show that LIW heterotrophic prokaryotes negatively affected the surface phytoplankton populations, resulting in lower chlorophyll-a levels and primary production rates. This may be due to out-competition of phytoplankton by LIW populations for resources and/or by a phytoplankton cell lysis via viral infection. Our results suggest that phytoplankton in the EMS may not likely form blooms, even after

  9. Surface Modification of Dental Titanium Implant by Layer-by-Layer Electrostatic Self-Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan Shi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In vivo implants that are composed of titanium and titanium alloys as raw materials are widely used in the fields of biology and medicine. In the field of dental medicine, titanium is considered to be an ideal dental implant material. Good osseointegration and soft tissue closure are the foundation for the success of dental implants. Therefore, the enhancement of the osseointegration and antibacterial abilities of titanium and its alloys has been the focus of much research. With its many advantages, layer-by-layer (LbL assembly is a self-assembly technique that is used to develop multilayer films based on complementary interactions between differently charged polyelectrolytes. The LbL approach provides new methods and applications for the surface modification of dental titanium implant. In this review, the application of the LbL technique to surface modification of titanium including promoting osteogenesis and osseointegration, promoting the formation and healing of soft tissues, improving the antibacterial properties of titanium implant, achieving local drug delivery and sustained release is summarized.

  10. Intercomparison of cloud model simulations of Arctic mixed-phase boundary layer clouds observed during SHEBA/FIRE-ACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Ovchinnikov

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available An intercomparison of six cloud-resolving and large-eddy simulation models is presented. This case study is based on observations of a persistent mixed-phase boundary layer cloud gathered on 7 May, 1998 from the Surface Heat Budget of Arctic Ocean (SHEBA and First ISCCP Regional Experiment - Arctic Cloud Experiment (FIRE-ACE. Ice nucleation is constrained in the simulations in a way that holds the ice crystal concentration approximately fixed, with two sets of sensitivity runs in addition to the baseline simulations utilizing different specified ice nucleus (IN concentrations. All of the baseline and sensitivity simulations group into two distinct quasi-steady states associated with either persistent mixed-phase clouds or all-ice clouds after the first few hours of integration, implying the existence of multiple equilibria. These two states are associated with distinctly different microphysical, thermodynamic, and radiative characteristics. Most but not all of the models produce a persistent mixed-phase cloud qualitatively similar to observations using the baseline IN/crystal concentration, while small increases in the IN/crystal concentration generally lead to rapid glaciation and conversion to the all-ice state. Budget analysis indicates that larger ice deposition rates associated with increased IN/crystal concentrations have a limited direct impact on dissipation of liquid in these simulations. However, the impact of increased ice deposition is greatly enhanced by several interaction pathways that lead to an increased surface precipitation flux, weaker cloud top radiative cooling and cloud dynamics, and reduced vertical mixing, promoting rapid glaciation of the mixed-phase cloud for deposition rates in the cloud layer greater than about 1-2x10-5 g kg-1 s-1. These results indicate the critical importance of precipitation-radiative-dynamical interactions in simulating cloud phase, which have been neglected in previous fixed-dynamical parcel

  11. Detailed experimental investigations on flow behaviors and velocity field properties of a supersonic mixing layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jianguo; Zhang, Dongdong; Li, Hao; Hou, Juwei

    2018-03-01

    The flow behaviors and mixing characteristics of a supersonic mixing layer with a convective Mach number of 0.2 have been experimentally investigated utilizing nanoparticle-based planar laser scattering and particle image velocimetry techniques. The full development and evolution process, including the formation of Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices, breakdown of large-scale structures and establishment of self-similar turbulence, is exhibited clearly in the experiments, which can give a qualitative graphically comparing for the DNS and LES results. The shocklets are first captured at this low convective Mach number, and their generation mechanisms are elaborated and analyzed. The convective velocity derived from two images with space-time correlations is well consistent with the theoretical result. The pairing and merging process of large-scale vortices in transition region is clearly revealed in the velocity vector field. The analysis of turbulent statistics indicates that in weakly compressible mixing layers, with the increase of convective Mach number, the peak values of streamwise turbulence intensity and Reynolds shear stress experience a sharp decrease, while the anisotropy ratio seems to keep quasi unchanged. The normalized growth rate of the present experiments shows a well agreement with former experimental and DNS data. The validation of present experimental results is important for that in the future the present work can be a reference for assessing the accuracy of numerical data.

  12. Evaluation of layered and mixed passive treatment systems for acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeen, Sung-Wook; Mattson, Bruce

    2016-11-01

    Laboratory column tests for passive treatment systems for mine drainage from a waste rock storage area were conducted to evaluate suitable reactive mixture, system configuration, effects of influent water chemistry, and required residence time. Five columns containing straw, chicken manure, mushroom compost, and limestone (LS), in either layered or mixed configurations, were set up to simulate the treatment system. The results showed that all of the five columns removed metals of concern (i.e. Al, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Ni, and Zn) with a residence time of 15 h and greater. Reaction mechanisms responsible for the removal of metals may include sulfate reduction and subsequent sulfide precipitation, precipitation of secondary carbonates and hydroxides, co-precipitation, and sorption on organic substrates and secondary precipitates. The results suggest that the mixed systems containing organic materials and LS perform better than the layered systems, sequentially treated by organic and LS layers, due to the enhanced pH adjustment, which is beneficial to bacterial activity and precipitation of secondary minerals. The column tests provide a basis for the design of a field-scale passive treatment system, such as a reducing and alkalinity producing system or a permeable reactive barrier.

  13. Immunity of Surface Layer Protein of Aeromonas ‎hydrophila in Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lobna Adil Al-Noori

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study the Surface layer (S-layer protein was extracted from Aeromonas hydrophila bacteria ,the humoral immune response that induced by S-layer protein only or as adjuvant was investigated  by using 16 males New Zealand rabbits and divided into four groups, each group contained four rabbits, the first group was immunized with  S-layer protein only, the second group was immunized with heated killed antigen(HKAof Sallmonella typhi only, the third group was immunized with mixed antigens (S-layer+ HKA,while the fourth group considered as control group and immunized with normal saline. The HKA of S. typhi  was used to evaluate the efficiency of S-layer protein as adjuvant. After the immunization period, the humoral immune response was investigated by several tests include, tube agglutination test and passive agglutination test that used to detect the antibody titer. Biuret method was used to determine the total protein concentration in serum  samples and total protein concentration of secretory immunoglobulin that extracted form appendix samples. In addition the Radical Immunodiffution (RID  method was used to detect the concentration level of the IgG in serum samples. Moreover the concentration level of the CD4 in the serum samples was determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA method .In all these tests the result revealed, both of S-layer protein only , HKA of only and mixed antigens(S-layer+ HKA were given significantly increased in comparison with control group at P<0.05. The result showed that the  concentration level of IgG with mean values (2365.5 , 3505 and 2916 mg/dl respectively  while the control group with mean value (1662mg/dl. In addition the concentration  level of CD4 molecule with mean values (9.37, 11.77 and 17.36 ng/ml respectively while the control group with mean value (6.91 ng/ml .The results showed that these three types of antigens induced the humoral immune response

  14. Layer-dependent surface potential of phosphorene and anisotropic/layer-dependent charge transfer in phosphorene-gold hybrid systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Renjing; Yang, Jiong; Zhu, Yi; Yan, Han; Pei, Jiajie; Myint, Ye Win; Zhang, Shuang; Lu, Yuerui

    2016-01-07

    The surface potential and the efficiency of interfacial charge transfer are extremely important for designing future semiconductor devices based on the emerging two-dimensional (2D) phosphorene. Here, we directly measured the strong layer-dependent surface potential of mono- and few-layered phosphorene on gold, which is consistent with the reported theoretical prediction. At the same time, we used an optical way photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy to probe charge transfer in the phosphorene-gold hybrid system. We firstly observed highly anisotropic and layer-dependent PL quenching in the phosphorene-gold hybrid system, which is attributed to the highly anisotropic/layer-dependent interfacial charge transfer.

  15. Controlling molecular deposition and layer structure with supramolecular surface assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theobald, James A.; Oxtoby, Neil S.; Phillips, Michael A.; Champness, Neil R.; Beton, Peter H.

    2003-08-01

    Selective non-covalent interactions have been widely exploited in solution-based chemistry to direct the assembly of molecules into nanometre-sized functional structures such as capsules, switches and prototype machines. More recently, the concepts of supramolecular organization have also been applied to two-dimensional assemblies on surfaces stabilized by hydrogen bonding, dipolar coupling or metal co-ordination. Structures realized to date include isolated rows, clusters and extended networks, as well as more complex multi-component arrangements. Another approach to controlling surface structures uses adsorbed molecular monolayers to create preferential binding sites that accommodate individual target molecules. Here we combine these approaches, by using hydrogen bonding to guide the assembly of two types of molecules into a two-dimensional open honeycomb network that then controls and templates new surface phases formed by subsequently deposited fullerene molecules. We find that the open network acts as a two-dimensional array of large pores of sufficient capacity to accommodate several large guest molecules, with the network itself also serving as a template for the formation of a fullerene layer.

  16. Characterization of Organic Thin Film Solar Cells of PCDTBT : PC71BM Prepared by Different Mixing Ratio and Effect of Hole Transport Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Srinivasan Murugesan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The organic thin film solar cells (OTFSCs have been successfully fabricated using PCDTBT : PC71BM with different mixing ratios (1 : 1 to 1 : 8 and the influence of hole transport layer thickness (PEDOT : PSS. The active layers with different mixing ratios of PCDTBT : PC71BM have been fabricated using o-dichlorobenzene (o-DCB. The surface morphology of the active layers and PEDOT : PSS layer with different thicknesses were characterized by AFM analysis. Here, we report that the OTFSCs with high performance have been optimized with 1 : 4 ratios of PCDTBT : PC71BM. The power conversion efficiency (PCE = 5.17% of the solar cells was significantly improved by changing thickness of PEDOT : PSS layer. The thickness of the PEDOT : PSS layer was found to be of significant importance; the thickness of the PEDOT : PSS layer at 45 nm (higher spin speed 5000 rpm shows higher short circuit current density (Jsc and lower series resistance (Rs and higher PCE.

  17. Scale interactions in a mixing layer – the role of the large-scale gradients

    KAUST Repository

    Fiscaletti, D.

    2016-02-15

    © 2016 Cambridge University Press. The interaction between the large and the small scales of turbulence is investigated in a mixing layer, at a Reynolds number based on the Taylor microscale of , via direct numerical simulations. The analysis is performed in physical space, and the local vorticity root-mean-square (r.m.s.) is taken as a measure of the small-scale activity. It is found that positive large-scale velocity fluctuations correspond to large vorticity r.m.s. on the low-speed side of the mixing layer, whereas, they correspond to low vorticity r.m.s. on the high-speed side. The relationship between large and small scales thus depends on position if the vorticity r.m.s. is correlated with the large-scale velocity fluctuations. On the contrary, the correlation coefficient is nearly constant throughout the mixing layer and close to unity if the vorticity r.m.s. is correlated with the large-scale velocity gradients. Therefore, the small-scale activity appears closely related to large-scale gradients, while the correlation between the small-scale activity and the large-scale velocity fluctuations is shown to reflect a property of the large scales. Furthermore, the vorticity from unfiltered (small scales) and from low pass filtered (large scales) velocity fields tend to be aligned when examined within vortical tubes. These results provide evidence for the so-called \\'scale invariance\\' (Meneveau & Katz, Annu. Rev. Fluid Mech., vol. 32, 2000, pp. 1-32), and suggest that some of the large-scale characteristics are not lost at the small scales, at least at the Reynolds number achieved in the present simulation.

  18. Homotopy simulation of axisymmetric laminar mixed convection nanofluid boundary layer flow over a vertical cylinder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freidooni Mehr N.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the semi-analytical/numerical technique known as the homotopy analysis method (HAM is employed to derive solutions for the laminar axisymmetric mixed convection boundary-layer nanofluid flow past a vertical cylinder. The similarity solutions are employed to transform the parabolic partial differential conservation equations into system of nonlinear, coupled ordinary differential equations, subject to appropriate boundary conditions. A comparison has been done to verify the obtained results with the purely numerical results of Grosan and Pop (2011 with excellent correlation achieved. The effects of nanoparticle volume fraction, curvature parameter and mixed convection or buoyancy parameter on the dimensionless velocity and temperature distributions, skin friction and wall temperature gradients are illustrated graphically. HAM is found to demonstrate excellent potential for simulating nanofluid dynamics problems. Applications of the study include materials processing and also thermal enhancement of energy systems.

  19. Defining the ecologically relevant mixed-layer depth for Antarctica's coastal seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Filipa; Kohut, Josh; Oliver, Matthew J.; Schofield, Oscar

    2017-01-01

    Mixed-layer depth (MLD) has been widely linked to phytoplankton dynamics in Antarctica's coastal regions; however, inconsistent definitions have made intercomparisons among region-specific studies difficult. Using a data set with over 20,000 water column profiles corresponding to 32 Slocum glider deployments in three coastal Antarctic regions (Ross Sea, Amundsen Sea, and West Antarctic Peninsula), we evaluated the relationship between MLD and phytoplankton vertical distribution. Comparisons of these MLD estimates to an applied definition of phytoplankton bloom depth, as defined by the deepest inflection point in the chlorophyll profile, show that the maximum of buoyancy frequency is a good proxy for an ecologically relevant MLD. A quality index is used to filter profiles where MLD is not determined. Despite the different regional physical settings, we found that the MLD definition based on the maximum of buoyancy frequency best describes the depth to which phytoplankton can be mixed in Antarctica's coastal seas.

  20. Response of the equatorial Pacific to chlorophyll pigment in a mixed layer isopycnal ocean general circulation model

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nakamoto, S.; PrasannaKumar, S.; Oberhuber, J.M.; Ishizaka, J.; Muneyama, K.; Frouin, R.

    pigment concentration from the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS). In the equatorial Pacific heat accumulation due to a higher abundance of chlorophyll pigments in the equatorial Pacific leads to a decrease of the mixed layer thickness. This generates...

  1. Variability of mixed layer depth in the northern Indian Ocean during 1977 and 1979 summer monsoon seasons

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gopalakrishna, V.V.; Sadhuram, Y.; RameshBabu, V.

    Influences of wind stress (tau) and wind stress curl (Grad Gamma) on the short term variability of the mixed layer depth at different locations in the northern Indian Ocean during different phases of summer monsoon activity were examined...

  2. Measurement of atmospheric surface layer turbulence using unmanned aerial vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sean; Canter, Caleb

    2017-11-01

    We describe measurements of the turbulence within the atmospheric surface layer using highly instrumented and autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). Results from the CLOUDMAP measurement campaign in Stillwater Oklahoma are presented including turbulence statistics measured during the transition from stably stratified to convective conditions. The measurements were made using pre-fabricated fixed-wing remote-control aircraft adapted to fly autonomously and carry multi-hole pressure probes, pressure, temperature and humidity sensors. Two aircraft were flown simultaneously, with one flying a flight path intended to profile the boundary layer up to 100 m and the other flying at a constant fixed altitude of 50 m. The evolution of various turbulent statistics was determined from these flights, including Reynolds stresses, correlations, spectra and structure functions. These results were compared to those measured by a sonic anemometer located on a 7.5 m tower. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation through Grant #CBET-1351411 and by National Science Foundation award #1539070, Collaboration Leading Operational UAS Development for Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics (CLOUDMAP).

  3. Hygrothermal analysis of surface layers of historical masonry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kočí, Václav; Maděra, Jiří; Keppert, Martin; Černý, Robert

    2017-11-01

    The paper deals with the hygrothermal analysis of surface layers of historical masonry. Solid brick provided with a traditional and two modified lime-based plasters is studied. The heat and moisture transport in the envelope is induced by an exposure of the wall from the exterior side to dynamic climatic conditions of Olomouc, Czech Republic. The transport processes are described using diffusion type of mathematical model based on experimentally determined material properties. The computational results indicate that hygric transport and accumulation properties of exterior plasters affect the hygrothermal performance of the underlying solid brick in a very significant way, being able to regulate the amount of transported moisture. The modified lime plasters are not found generally superior to the traditional lime plasters in that respect. Therefore, their suitability for historical masonry should be assessed case by case, with a particular attention to the climatic conditions and to the properties of the load bearing structure.

  4. Thin hydroxyapatite surface layers on titanium produced by ion implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Baumann, H; Bilger, G; Jones, D; Symietz, I

    2002-01-01

    In medicine metallic implants are widely used as hip replacement protheses or artificial teeth. The biocompatibility is in all cases the most important requirement. Hydroxyapatite (HAp) is frequently used as coating on metallic implants because of its high acceptance by the human body. In this paper a process is described by which a HAp surface layer is produced by ion implantation with a continuous transition to the bulk material. Calcium and phosphorus ions are successively implanted into titanium under different vacuum conditions by backfilling oxygen into the implantation chamber. Afterwards the implanted samples are thermally treated. The elemental composition inside the implanted region was determined by nuclear analysis methods as (alpha,alpha) backscattering and the resonant nuclear reaction sup 1 H( sup 1 sup 5 N,alpha gamma) sup 1 sup 2 C. The results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicate the formation of HAp. In addition a first biocompatibility test was performed to compare the growing of m...

  5. Averaging of diffusing contaminant concentrations in atmosphere surface layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, E.A.; Ramzina, T.V.

    1985-01-01

    Calculations permitting to average concentration fields of diffusing radioactive contaminant coming from the NPP exhaust stack in the atmospheric surface layer are given. Formulae of contaminant concentration field calculation are presented; it depends on the average wind direction value (THETA) for time(T) and stability of this direction (σsub(tgTHETA) or σsub(THETA)). Probability of wind direction deviation from the average value for time T is satisfactory described by the Gauss law. With instability increase in the atmosphere σ increases, when wind velocity increasing the values of σ decreases for all types of temperature gradients. Nonuniformity of σ value dependence on averaging time T is underlined, that requires accurate choice of σsub(tgTHETA) and σsub(THETA) parameters in calculations

  6. Assembly, Structure, and Functionality of Metal-Organic Networks and Organic Semiconductor Layers at Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempas, Christopher D.

    Self-assembled nanostructures at surfaces show promise for the development of next generation technologies including organic electronic devices and heterogeneous catalysis. In many cases, the functionality of these nanostructures is not well understood. This thesis presents strategies for the structural design of new on-surface metal-organic networks and probes their chemical reactivity. It is shown that creating uniform metal sites greatly increases selectivity when compared to ligand-free metal islands. When O2 reacts with single-site vanadium centers, in redox-active self-assembled coordination networks on the Au(100) surface, it forms one product. When O2 reacts with vanadium metal islands on the same surface, multiple products are formed. Other metal-organic networks described in this thesis include a mixed valence network containing Pt0 and PtII and a network where two Fe centers reside in close proximity. This structure is stable to temperatures >450 °C. These new on-surface assemblies may offer the ability to perform reactions of increasing complexity as future heterogeneous catalysts. The functionalization of organic semiconductor molecules is also shown. When a few molecular layers are grown on the surface, it is seen that the addition of functional groups changes both the film's structure and charge transport properties. This is due to changes in both first layer packing structure and the pi-electron distribution in the functionalized molecules compared to the original molecule. The systems described in this thesis were studied using high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy, non-contact atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Overall, this work provides strategies for the creation of new, well-defined on-surface nanostructures and adds additional chemical insight into their properties.

  7. Linear and Weakly Nonlinear Instability of Shallow Mixing Layers with Variable Friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Eglite

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Linear and weakly nonlinear instability of shallow mixing layers is analysed in the present paper. It is assumed that the resistance force varies in the transverse direction. Linear stability problem is solved numerically using collocation method. It is shown that the increase in the ratio of the friction coefficients in the main channel to that in the floodplain has a stabilizing influence on the flow. The amplitude evolution equation for the most unstable mode (the complex Ginzburg–Landau equation is derived from the shallow water equations under the rigid-lid assumption. Results of numerical calculations are presented.

  8. An analytical solution for the Marangoni mixed convection boundary layer flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghimi, M. A.; Kimiaeifar, Amin; Rahimpour, M.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, an analytical solution for a Marangoni mixed convection boundary layer flow is presented. A similarity transform reduces the Navier-Stokes equations to a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations, which are solved analytically by means of the homotopy analysis method (HAM......). The results obtained in this study are compared with the numerical results released in the literature. A close agreement of the two sets of results indicates the accuracy of the HAM. The method can obtain an expression that is acceptable for all values of effective parameters and is also able to control...

  9. Transport of desert dust mixed with North African industrial pollutants in the subtropical Saharan Air Layer

    OpenAIRE

    S. Rodríguez; A. Alastuey; S. Alonso-Pérez; X. Querol; E. Cuevas; J. Abreu-Afonso; M. Viana; N. Pérez; M. Pandolfi; J. de la Rosa

    2011-01-01

    An analysis of chemical composition data of particulate matter samples (TSP, PM10 and PM2.5) collected from 2002 to 2008 in the North Atlantic free troposphere at the Izaña Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW) observatory (Tenerife, Canary Islands) shows that desert dust is very frequently mixed with particulate pollutants in the Saharan Air Layer (SAL). The study of this data set with Median Concentrations At Receptor (MCAR) plots allowed the identification of the potential source regions of the d...

  10. Mixed layer variability and chlorophyll a biomass in the Bay of Bengal.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Narvekar, J.; PrasannaKumar, S.

    ), the winds are weak and from northeasterly direc- tion. These northeast trade winds bring cool and dry con- tinental air mass to the Bay of Bengal. The unique feature Published by Copernicus Publications on behalf of the European Geosciences Union. 3820 J... with sufficient details the role of the mixed layer in regulating the basin-wide variability in chlorophyll biomass and primary productivity. It is in this context that the present paper attempts to understand (1) processes con- trolling basin-wide variability...

  11. The anatomy of the mixing transition in homogeneous and stratified free shear layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, C. P.; Peltier, W. R.

    2000-06-01

    We investigate the detailed nature of the ‘mixing transition’ through which turbulence may develop in both homogeneous and stratified free shear layers. Our focus is upon the fundamental role in transition, and in particular the associated ‘mixing’ (i.e. small-scale motions which lead to an irreversible increase in the total potential energy of the flow) that is played by streamwise vortex streaks, which develop once the primary and typically two-dimensional Kelvin Helmholtz (KH) billow saturates at finite amplitude.

  12. Ensemble Data Assimilation to Characterize Surface-Layer Errors In Numerical Weather Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Joshua; Angevine, Wayne

    2013-04-01

    Experiments with the single-column implementation of the Weather Research and Forecasting mesoscale model provide a basis for deducing land-atmosphere coupling errors in the model. Coupling occurs both through heat and moisture fluxes through the land-atmosphere interface and roughness sub-layer, and turbulent heat, moisture, and momentum fluxes through the atmospheric surface layer. This work primarily addresses the turbulent fluxes, which are parameterized following Monin-Obukhov similarity theory applied to the atmospheric surface layer. By combining ensemble data assimilation and parameter estimation, the model error can be characterized. Ensemble data assimilation of 2-m temperature and water vapor mixing ratio, and 10-m wind components, forces the model to follow observations during a month-long simulation for a column over the well-instrumented ARM Central Facility near Lamont, OK. One-hour errors in predicted observations are systematically small but non-zero, and the systematic errors measure bias as a function of local time of day. Analysis increments for state elements nearby (15-m AGL) can be too small or have the wrong sign, indicating systematically biased covariances and model error. Experiments using the ensemble filter to objectively estimate a parameter controlling the thermal land-atmosphere coupling show that the parameter adapts to offset the model errors, but that the errors cannot be eliminated. Results suggest either structural error or further parametric error that may be difficult to estimate. Experiments omitting atypical observations such as soil and flux measurements lead to qualitatively similar deductions, showing potential for assimilating common in-situ observations as an inexpensive framework for deducing and isolating model errors. We finish by presenting recent results from a deeper examination of the second-moment ensemble statistics, which demonstrate the effect of assimilation on the coupling through the stability function in

  13. Physiological characteristics and production of mixed layer and chlorophyll maximum phytoplankton populations in the Caribbean Sea and western Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Satoru; DiTullio, Giacomo R.; Laws, Edward A.

    1988-08-01

    Phytoplankton photosynthetic rates and relative and absolute growth rates were estimated using 14C techniques at five stations in the Carribean Sea and two stations in the western Atlantic. Integral photosynthetic rates at the Caribbean stations averaged (±1 S.D.) 633 ± 77 mg C m -2 d -1. Light-saturated growth rates were about 0.6 d -1. Relative growth rates averaged 85% in the surface mixed layer and 93% in the lower euphotic zone. Uptake of 14C at night accounted for 26% of the integral production at the Caribbean stations. The specific activity of Chl a carbon increased at night, and growth rates inferred from this increase were highly correlated with nocturnal 14C uptake. Based on the Chl a carbon specific activity data, about 76% of the nocturnal 14C uptake was attributed to phytoplankton. This uptake may have represented assimilation of labeled DOC excreted during the photoperiod. Over 80% of the Chl a in the chlorophyll maximum layers fell in the picoplankton size range. Incubation of these populations at higher irradiance levels revealed no indication of light adaptation over a 24 h period, a result consistent with recent studies of Synechococcus. Chlorophyll maximum populations occurred at about the 3% light level and were estimated to be growing with a doubling time of a little over 2 days. Estimated phytoplankton carbon concentrations were virtually identical in the mixed layers and chlorophyll maxima. The latter were therefore the result of adaptation of the phytoplankton to low irradiance levels and did not represent biomass maxima.

  14. Heterogeneous distribution of plankton within the mixed layer and its implications for bloom formation in tropical seas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calbet, Albert; Agersted, Mette Dalgaard; Kaartvedt, Stein

    2015-01-01

    Intensive sampling at the coastal waters of the central Red Sea during a period of thermal stratification, prior to the main seasonal bloom during winter, showed that vertical patches of prokaryotes and microplankton developed and persisted for several days within the apparently density uniform...... of the upper layer. These findings suggest that vertical structures within the mixed layer provide critical seeding stocks that can rapidly exploit nutrient influx during mixing, leading to winter bloom formation...

  15. Soft chemical control of the crystal and magnetic structure of a layered mixed valent manganite oxide sulfide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack N. Blandy

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative deintercalation of copper ions from the sulfide layers of the layered mixed-valent manganite oxide sulfide Sr2MnO2Cu1.5S2 results in control of the copper-vacancy modulated superstructure and the ordered arrangement of magnetic moments carried by the manganese ions. This soft chemistry enables control of the structures and properties of these complex materials which complement mixed-valent perovskite and perovskite-related transition metal oxides.

  16. Water Surface Ripples Generated by the Turbulent Boundary Layer of a Surface-Piercing Moving Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washuta, N.; Masnadi, N.; Duncan, J. H.

    2014-11-01

    Free surface ripples created by subsurface turbulence along a surface-piercing moving wall are studied experimentally. In this experiment, a meter-wide stainless steel belt travels horizontally in a loop around two rollers with vertically oriented axes, which are separated by 7.5 meters. One of the two 7.5-m-long belt sections between the rollers is in contact with the water in a large open-surface water tank and the water level is adjusted so that the top of the belt pierces the water free surface. The belt is launched from rest with a 3 g acceleration in order to quickly reach a steady state velocity. This belt motion creates a temporally evolving boundary layer analogous to the spatially evolving boundary layer created along the side of a ship hull moving at the belt velocity, with a length equivalent to the length of belt that has passed the measurement region. The water surface ripples generated by the subsurface turbulence are measured in a plane normal to the belt using a cinematic LIF technique. It is found that the overall RMS surface fluctuations increase linearly with belt speed and that the spatial distributions of the fluctuations show a sharp increase near the wall. The support of the Office of Naval Research is gratefully acknowledged.

  17. Ion doping of surface layers in conducting electrical materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zukowski, P.; Karwat, Cz.; Kozak, Cz. M.; Kolasik, M.; Kiszczak, K.

    2009-01-01

    The presented article gives basic component elements of an implanter MKPCz-99, its parameters and methods for doping surface layers of conducting electrical materials. The discussed device makes possible to dope the materials with ions of gaseous elements. At the application of cones made of solid-element sheets it is possible to perform doping with atoms that do not chemically react with the modified material. By performing voltage drop measurements with a specialized circuit between a movable testing electrode and the modified sample the dependence of transition resistance on pressure force of the testing electrode on the sample can be determined. The testing can be performed at the current passage of a determined value for surfaces modified with ions of gaseous elements or atoms of solid elements. A computer stand for switch testing makes possible to measure temperature of switch contacts and voltage drop at the contact and thereby to determine contact resistance of a switch depending on the number of switch cycles (ON-OFF). Pattern recording of current and voltage at the switch contacts and the application of an adequate computer software makes possible to determined the value of energy between fixed and moving contacts at their getting apart. In order to eliminate action of the environment onto the switch operation measurements can be performed at placing the tested switch together with the driving system in an atmosphere of noble gas like argon. (authors)

  18. Mixed layer processes of the Arabian Sea Warm Pool during spring intermonsoon: a study based on observational and satellite data

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sabu, P.; Revichandran, C.

    in the mixed layer warming while the advection plays a role in spreading the warm water from the coastal region to the far west. In the southern part of the warm pool, the eddy induced horizontal mixing provides a substantial amount of heat spreading...

  19. Effect of Strong Acid Functional Groups on Electrode Rise Potential in Capacitive Mixing by Double Layer Expansion

    KAUST Repository

    Hatzell, Marta C.

    2014-12-02

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. The amount of salinity-gradient energy that can be obtained through capacitive mixing based on double layer expansion depends on the extent the electric double layer (EDL) is altered in a low salt concentration (LC) electrolyte (e.g., river water). We show that the electrode-rise potential, which is a measure of the EDL perturbation process, was significantly (P = 10-5) correlated to the concentration of strong acid surface functional groups using five types of activated carbon. Electrodes with the lowest concentration of strong acids (0.05 mmol g-1) had a positive rise potential of 59 ± 4 mV in the LC solution, whereas the carbon with the highest concentration (0.36 mmol g-1) had a negative rise potential (-31 ± 5 mV). Chemical oxidation of a carbon (YP50) using nitric acid decreased the electrode rise potential from 46 ± 2 mV (unaltered) to -6 ± 0.5 mV (oxidized), producing a whole cell potential (53 ± 1.7 mV) that was 4.4 times larger than that obtained with identical electrode materials (from 12 ± 1 mV). Changes in the EDL were linked to the behavior of specific ions in a LC solution using molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations. The EDL expanded in the LC solution when a carbon surface (pristine graphene) lacked strong acid functional groups, producing a positive-rise potential at the electrode. In contrast, the EDL was compressed for an oxidized surface (graphene oxide), producing a negative-rise electrode potential. These results established the linkage between rise potentials and specific surface functional groups (strong acids) and demonstrated on a molecular scale changes in the EDL using oxidized or pristine carbons.

  20. Impacts of Ocean Waves on the Atmospheric Surface Layer: Simulations and Observations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sullivan, Peter P; McWilliams, James C; Melville, W. K

    2008-01-01

    ... planetary boundary layers (PBL). Efforts were focused on the effects of surface gravity waves on the near-surface dynamics, surface fluxes, and coupling between the atmospheric and oceanic PBLs...

  1. Surface quality analysis of die steels in powder-mixed electrical discharge machining using titan powder in fine machining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banh Tien Long

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Improving the quality of surface molds after electrical discharge machining is still being considered by many researchers. Powder-mixed dielectric in electrical discharge machining showed that it is one of the processing methods with high efficiency. This article reports on the results of surface quality of mold steels after powder-mixed electrical discharge machining using titanium powder in fine machining. The process parameters such as electrode material, workpiece material, electrode polarity, pulse on-time, pulse off-time, current, and titanium powder concentration were considered in the research. These materials are most commonly used with die-sinking electrical discharge machining in the manufacture of molds and has been selected as the subject of research: workpiece materials were SKD61, SKT4, and SKD11 mold steels, and electrode materials were copper and graphite. Taguchi’s method is used to design experiments. The influence of the parameters on surface roughness was evaluated through the average value and ratio (S/N. Results showed that the parameters such as electrical current, electrode material, pulse on-time, electrode polarity, and interaction between the electrode materials with concentration powder mostly influence surface roughness and surface roughness at optimal parameters SRopt = 1.73 ± 0.39 µm. Analysis of the surface layer after powder-mixed electrical discharge machining using titanium powder in optimal conditions has shown that the white layer with more uniform thickness and increased hardness (≈861.0 HV, and amount and size of microscopic cracks, is reduced. This significantly leads to the increase in the quality of the surface layer.

  2. A Study of the Surface Photovoltage of ZnO-Resin Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, I; Kimura, T; Endo, K

    1969-01-01

    The surface photovoltage of ZnO resin layer has been used as the basis for an imaging process generally known as chargeless electrophotography. This paper explores effects of the ambient air pressure and the layer temperature on the surface photovoltage of ZnO resin layers. Experiments were made by using ZnO-silicone resin layer, ZnO-alkyd resin layer, and ZnO-acryl resin layer. The surface potential of the dark adapted layers were measured while the ambient air pressure decreased, and the surface photovoltage and its decay curve were measured under various ambient air pressures. ZnO-silicone resin layer showed a remarkably high sensitivity in terms of surface photovoltage to the ambient air pressure changes. Marked variations were observed in the surface potential of the dark adapted layers both in air and in a vacuum of 5 x 10(-5) Torr when the layer temperature had been slowly raised. The surface potential exhibited a maximum peak when silicone resin was used as a binder and a minimum peak when alkyd resin or acryl resin was used, both peaks being registered at a temperature slightly higher than room temperature in air. After the layers had been annealed for a few hours at a high temperature, relationships between the surface photovoltage and the layer temperature were measured while the layer temperature decreased. The surface photovoltage and its decay of the ZnO-silicone resin layer revealed higher sensitivity to the changes of ambient air pressure and layer temperature than to those of other ZnO-resin layers. This difference is accounted for by a specific property of the silicone resin that enforces adsorption of the water molecule onto the surface of ZnO. Some applications of the above experiments are also discussed.

  3. Global and Koopman modes analysis of sound generation in mixing layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, G.; Robinet, J.-C.; Gloerfelt, X. [Laboratoire DynFluid, Arts et Métiers ParisTech, 151 Boulevard de l’Hopital, 75013 Paris (France); Alizard, F. [Laboratoire DynFluid, CNAM, 151 Boulevard de l’Hopital, 75013 Paris (France)

    2013-12-15

    It is now well established that linear and nonlinear instability waves play a significant role in the noise generation process for a wide variety of shear flows such as jets or mixing layers. In that context, the problem of acoustic radiation generated by spatially growing instability waves of two-dimensional subsonic and supersonic mixing layers are revisited in a global point of view, i.e., without any assumption about the base flow, in both a linear and a nonlinear framework by using global and Koopman mode decompositions. In that respect, a timestepping technique based on disturbance equations is employed to extract the most dynamically relevant coherent structures for both linear and nonlinear regimes. The present analysis proposes thus a general strategy for analysing the near-field coherent structures which are responsible for the acoustic noise in these configurations. In particular, we illustrate the failure of linear global modes to describe the noise generation mechanism associated with the vortex pairing for the subsonic regime whereas they appropriately explain the Mach wave radiation of instability waves in the supersonic regime. By contrast, the Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD) analysis captures both the near-field dynamics and the far-field acoustics with a few number of modes for both configurations. In addition, the combination of DMD and linear global modes analyses provides new insight about the influence on the radiated noise of nonlinear interactions and saturation of instability waves as well as their interaction with the mean flow.

  4. Mixed colloidal suspensions of reduced graphene oxide and layered metal oxide nanosheets: useful precursors for the porous nanocomposites and hybrid films of graphene/metal oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu Ri; Kim, In Young; Kim, Tae Woo; Lee, Jang Mee; Hwang, Seong-Ju

    2012-02-20

    Homogeneously mixed colloidal suspensions of reduced graphene oxide, or RGO, and layered manganate nanosheets have been synthesized by a simple addition of the exfoliated colloid of RGO into that of layered MnO(2). The obtained mixed colloidal suspensions with the RGO/MnO(2) ratio of ≤0.3 show good colloidal stability without any phase separation and a negatively charged state with a zeta (ζ) potential of -30 to -40 mV. The flocculation of these mixed colloidal suspensions with lithium cations yields porous nanocomposites of Li/RGO-layered MnO(2) with high electrochemical activity and a markedly expanded surface area of around 70-100 m(2)  g(-1). Relative to the Li/RGO and Li/layered MnO(2) nanocomposites (≈116 and ≈167 F g(-1)), the obtained Li/RGO-layered MnO(2) nanocomposites deliver a larger capacitance of approximately 210 F g(-1) with good cyclability of around 95-97 % up to the 1000th cycle, thus indicating the positive effect of hybridization on the electrode performances of RGO and lithium manganate. Also, an electrophoretic deposition of the mixed colloidal suspensions makes it possible to easily fabricate uniform hybrid films composed of graphene and manganese oxide. The obtained films show a distinct electrochemical activity and a homogeneous distribution of RGO and MnO(2). The present experimental findings clearly demonstrate that the utilization of the mixed colloidal suspensions as precursors provides a facile and universal methodology to synthesize various types of graphene/metal oxide hybrid materials. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. The 2008 North Atlantic Spring Bloom Experiment II: Autonomous Platforms and Mixed Layer Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C. M.; D'Asaro, E. A.; Perry, M.; Fennel, K.; Gray, A.; Rehm, E.; Briggs, N.; Sackmann, B. S.; Gudmundsson, K.

    2008-12-01

    The 2008 North Atlantic Spring Bloom Experiment (NAB08) employed a system of drifting floats, mobile gliders and ship-based measurements to resolve patch-scale physical and biological variability over the 3- month course of an entire bloom. Although both autonomous and ship-based elements were essential to achieving NAB08 goals, the autonomous system provided a novel perspective by employing long-range gliders to repeatedly survey the volume surrounding a drifting Lagrangian float, thus characterizing patch- scale bloom evolution. Integration of physical and biogeochemical sensors (temperature, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll and CDOM fluorescence, light transmission, optical backscatter, spectral light, and nitrate) and development of in situ calibration techniques were required to support this new autonomous approach. Energetic, small-scale eddy activity at the experiment site (southeast of Iceland, near the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study and Marine Light Mixed Layer sites) produced a swift, heterogeneous velocity field that challenged the gliders" operational abilities and drove refinements to the piloting techniques used to maintain float-following surveys. Although intentionally deployed outside of energetic eddies, floats and gliders were rapidly entrained into these features. Floats circulated within eddies near the start and end of the experiment, drifting generally northwest, across the basin, in-between. An eddy sampled late in the deployment provided particularly interesting signatures, with elevated biological signals manifest consistently in one quadrant. As measurements were collected in a parcel-following Lagrangian frame, this suggests energetic small-scale exchange process (such as vertical or lateral mixing) paired with fast-acting biological processes capable of modifying the newly entrained water as it navigates its path around the eddy. Despite this energetic kilometer-scale heterogeneity, broadly distributed platforms appeared to

  6. Efficient white phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes consisting of orange ultrathin and blue mixed host emission layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Ren; Zuo, Liangmei; Xue, Kaiwen; Duan, Yu; Chen, Ping; Cheng, Gang; Zhao, Yi

    2016-08-01

    We have successfully demonstrated highly efficient white phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) by inserting an ultrathin non-doped orange layer within blue mixed host emission layer. The key feature of the novel device is the employment of blue mixed host and orange ultrathin layers, resulting in an extended recombination region and more balanced charge carrier. The maximum efficiencies of 33.8 lm W-1 and 32.2 cd A-1 are obtained. Moreover, the resulting white device achieves a slight efficiency roll-off and a high luminance at low operating voltage. Our versatile concept suggests a promising simple method to achieve high performance white OLEDs.

  7. The OSMOSIS Model of the Wind-Driven Ocean Surface Boundary Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, A. L.; Belcher, S. E.; Pearson, B.; Polton, J.

    2016-02-01

    In the wind-driven ocean surface boundary layer (OSBL) the vertical velocity variance is observed to be larger than in shear driven turbulence. The observed variances are consistent with the results from large-eddy simulations (LES) which parametrize the interaction between the Stokes drift of the surface waves and vorticity. The resulting flow is known as Langmuir turbulence and the close connection between winds and waves suggests that Langmuir turbulence is common in the OSBL. This poster describes a model of the OSBL, developed as part of the OSMOSIS project, in which mixing is by Langmuir turbulence. The transports of momentum, heat and salinity are represented by a first-order closure scheme with flux-gradient relationships that include non-gradient contributions. In this the model is similar to the KPP scheme which uses flux-gradient relationships with non-gradient contributions to represent scalar transports. The flux-gradient relationships are derived from an analysis of the turbulent flux budgets of momentum and scalars (heat) obtained from LES. The non-gradient terms represent the contributions to the turbulent flux by the terms in the turbulent flux budget that represent the effects of the Stokes shear, buoyancy and turbulent transport. The eddy viscosity, diffusivities and non-gradient components are represented by similarity profiles. The depth of the boundary layer is determined by a prognostic equation, which represents the time variation of the boundary layer depth in both unstable and stable conditions. It is based on the equation for the depth integrated potential energy combined with a parametrization of the turbulent kinetic energy budget. The use of the prognostic equation allows the effects of Langmuir turbulence on boundary layer depth to be explicitly represented in the model. Comparison with the results from LES of the diurnal cycle of the OSBL are presented as a test for the model.

  8. Gravity Wave Dynamics in a Mesospheric Inversion Layer: 2. Instabilities, Turbulence, Fluxes, and Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritts, David C.; Wang, Ling; Laughman, Brian; Lund, Thomas S.; Collins, Richard L.

    2018-01-01

    A companion paper by Fritts, Laughman, et al. (2017) employed an anelastic numerical model to explore the dynamics of gravity waves (GWs) encountering a mesospheric inversion layer (MIL) having a moderate static stability enhancement and a layer of weaker static stability above. That study revealed that MIL responses, including GW transmission, reflection, and instabilities, are sensitive functions of GW parameters. This paper expands on two of the Fritts, Laughman, et al. (2017) simulations to examine GW instability dynamics and turbulence in the MIL; forcing of the mean wind and stability environments by GW, instability, and turbulence fluxes; and associated heat and momentum transports. These direct numerical simulations resolve turbulence inertial-range scales and yield the following results: GW breaking and turbulence in the MIL occur below where they would otherwise, due to enhancements of GW amplitudes and shears in the MIL. 2-D GW and instability heat and momentum fluxes are 20-30 times larger than 3-D instability and turbulence fluxes. Mean fields are driven largely by 2-D GW and instability dynamics rather than 3-D instabilities and turbulence. 2-D and 3-D heat fluxes in regions of strong turbulence yield small departures from initial T(z) and N2(z) profiles, hence do not yield nearly adiabatic "mixed" layers. Our MIL results are consistent with the relation between the turbulent vertical velocity variance and energy dissipation rate proposed by Weinstock (1981) for the limited intervals evaluated.

  9. Efficient green phosphorescent tandem organic light emitting diodes with solution processable mixed hosts charge generating layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talik, N.A.; Yeoh, K.H.; Ng, C.Y.B [Low Dimensional Research Center, Department of Physics, University Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); ItraMAS Corporation. Sdn. Bhd., 542A-B Mukim 1, Lorong Perusahaan Baru 2, Kawasan Perindustrian, Perai 13600, Penang (Malaysia); Yap, B.K. [Center of Microelectronic and Nanotechnology Engineering (CeMNE), College of Engineering, Universiti Tenaga Nasional, Jln. Uniten-Ikram, 4300 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Woon, K.L., E-mail: ph7klw76@um.edu.my [Low Dimensional Research Center, Department of Physics, University Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-10-15

    A novel solution processable charge generating layer (CGL) that consists of 1,4,5,8,9,11-hexaazatriphenylene hexacarbonitrile (HATCN{sub 6})/Poly(N-vinylcarbazole) (PVK): 1,1-bis-(4-bis(4-tolyl)-aminophenyl) cyclohexene (TAPC) for a tandem green phosphorescent organic light emitting diode (PHOLED) is demonstrated. The use of orthogonal solvent to dissolve HATCN{sub 6} and PVK:TAPC is the key to overcome the interface erosion problem for the solution processed CGL. The current efficiency of the 2 wt% TAPC mixed with PVK is the highest at 24.2 cd/A, which is more than three-folds higher than that of the single device at 1000 cd/m{sup 2}. - Highlights: • A solution processable tandem OLED is built using a novel charge generating layer. • HATCN{sub 6} and PVK:TAPC are shown to be effective charge generating layers. • The turn on voltages for tandem devices are almost similar to single unit. • 2 wt% TAPC blended with PVK exhibits three-folds increase in efficiency.

  10. Heat and turbulent kinetic energy budgets for surface layer cooling induced by the passage of Hurricane Frances (2004)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Peisheng; Sanford, Thomas B.; Imberger, JöRg

    2009-12-01

    Heat and turbulent kinetic energy budgets of the ocean surface layer during the passage of Hurricane Frances were examined using a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model. In situ data obtained with the Electromagnetic-Autonomous Profiling Explorer (EM-APEX) floats were used to set up the initial conditions of the model simulation and to compare to the simulation results. The spatial heat budgets reveal that during the hurricane passage, not only the entrainment in the bottom of surface mixed layer but also the horizontal water advection were important factors determining the spatial pattern of sea surface temperature. At the free surface, the hurricane-brought precipitation contributed a negligible amount to the air-sea heat exchange, but the precipitation produced a negative buoyancy flux in the surface layer that overwhelmed the instability induced by the heat loss to the atmosphere. Integrated over the domain within 400 km of the hurricane eye on day 245.71 of 2004, the rate of heat anomaly in the surface water was estimated to be about 0.45 PW (1 PW = 1015 W), with about 20% (0.09 PW in total) of this was due to the heat exchange at the air-sea interface, and almost all the remainder (0.36 PW) was downward transported by oceanic vertical mixing. Shear production was the major source of turbulent kinetic energy amounting 88.5% of the source of turbulent kinetic energy, while the rest (11.5%) was attributed to the wind stirring at sea surface. The increase of ocean potential energy due to vertical mixing represented 7.3% of the energy deposited by wind stress.

  11. Surface Complexation Modeling of Calcite Zeta Potential Measurement in Mixed Brines for Carbonate Wettability Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, J.; Zeng, Y.; Biswal, S. L.; Hirasaki, G. J.

    2017-12-01

    We presents zeta potential measurements and surface complexation modeling (SCM) of synthetic calcite in various conditions. The systematic zeta potential measurement and the proposed SCM provide insight into the role of four potential determining cations (Mg2+, SO42- , Ca2+ and CO32-) and CO2 partial pressure in calcite surface charge formation and facilitate the revealing of calcite wettability alteration induced by brines with designed ionic composition ("smart water"). Brines with varying potential determining ions (PDI) concentration in two different CO2 partial pressure (PCO2) are investigated in experiments. Then, a double layer SCM is developed to model the zeta potential measurements. Moreover, we propose a definition for contribution of charged surface species and quantitatively analyze the variation of charged species contribution when changing brine composition. After showing our model can accurately predict calcite zeta potential in brines containing mixed PDIs, we apply it to predict zeta potential in ultra-low and pressurized CO2 environments for potential applications in carbonate enhanced oil recovery including miscible CO2 flooding and CO2 sequestration in carbonate reservoirs. Model prediction reveals that pure calcite surface will be positively charged in all investigated brines in pressurized CO2 environment (>1atm). Moreover, the sensitivity of calcite zeta potential to CO2 partial pressure in the various brine is found to be in the sequence of Na2CO3 > Na2SO4 > NaCl > MgCl2 > CaCl2 (Ionic strength=0.1M).

  12. New Material Development for Surface Layer and Surface Technology in Tribology Science to Improve Energy Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, R.; Tauviqirrahman, M.; Jamari, Jamari; Schipper, D. J.

    2009-09-01

    This paper reviews the development of new material and surface technology in tribology and its contribution to energy efficiency. Two examples of the economic benefits, resulted from the optimum tribology in the transportation sector and the manufacturing industry are discussed. The new materials are proposed to modify the surface property by laminating the bulk material with thin layer/coating. Under a suitable condition, the thin layer on a surface can provide a combination of good wear, a low friction and corrosion resistance for the mechanical components. The innovation in layer technology results molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), diamond like carbon (DLC), cubic boron nitride (CBN) and diamond which perform satisfactory outcome. The application of the metallic coatings to carbon fibre reinforced polymer matrix composites (CFRP) has the capacity to provide considerable weight and power savings for many engineering components. The green material for lubricant and additives such as the use of sunflower oil which possesses good oxidation resistance and the use of mallee leaves as bio-degradable solvent are used to answer the demand of the environmentally friendly material with good performance. The tribology research implementation for energy efficiency also touches the simple things around us such as: erasing the laser-print in a paper with different abrasion techniques. For the technology in the engineering surface, the consideration for generating the suitable surface of the components in running-in period has been discussed in order to prolong the components life and reduce the machine downtime. The conclusion, tribology can result in reducing manufacturing time, reducing the maintenance requirements, prolonging the service interval, improving durability, reliability and mechanical components life, and reducing harmful exhaust emission and waste. All of these advantages will increase the energy efficiency and the economic benefits.

  13. Coherent structures in stratocumulus topped boundary layer: sensitivity to surface fluxes, radiative cooling and vertical stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davini, Paolo; D'Andrea, Fabio; Park, Seung-bu; Gentine, Pierre

    2017-04-01

    The representation of stratocumulus clouds in global climate models is still a concern for the climate modelling community. This is due to the low efficacy of current parametrization to simulate the full set of phenomena that governs the stratocumulus topped boundary layer (STBL), but also by the inaccurate knowledge of the sensitivities of the STBL dynamics to external large scale forcing. Here we show that making of a series of high-resolution LES simulations, we are able to detect and track coherent structures such as updrafts, downdrafts and their returning shells (i.e. both ascending and subsiding), together with the entraining air from the inversion layer or the free troposphere in a non-precipitating marine nighttime STBL. This is done with a new classification method based on octant analysis - using vertical velocity and two passive scalars - which defines the structures also in cloud-free regions. We are thus able to quantify the geometrical and thermodynamic characteristics (e.g. areal fraction, temperature, liquid and total water mixing ratio, buoyancy, etc.) of those structures, highlighting the single contributions to the turbulent transport of mass, heat and moisture. It is thus possible to estimate the sensitivity of the turbulent fluxes to the intensity of the cloud-top radiative cooling, to the surface latent and sensible fluxes and to the strength of the vertical stability is explored. Indeed, this analysis lays the foundation for a new parametrization of stratocumulus-topped boundary layer for global climate models.

  14. Patterning of gold nanoparticles on fluoropolymer films by using patterned surface grafting and layer-by-layer deposition techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Chang-Hee; Hwang, In-Tae; Jung, Chan-Hee; Choi, Jae-Hak; Kwon, Oh-Sun; Shin, Kwanwoo

    2013-09-11

    The patterning of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) on the surface of a fluoropolymer substrate by using patterned surface grafting and layer-by-layer deposition techniques is described. The surface of a poly(tetrafluoroethylene-co-perfluorovinyl ether) (PFA) substrate was selectively implanted with 150 keV proton ions. Peroxide groups were successfully formed on the implanted PFA surface, and their concentration depended on the fluence. Acrylic acid was graft polymerized onto the implanted regions of the PFA substrate, resulting in well-defined patterns of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) on the PFA substrate. The surface properties of the PAA-patterned PFA surface, such as chemical compositions, wettability, and morphology, were investigated. The surface analysis results revealed that PAA was definitely present on the implanted regions of the PFA surface, and the degree of grafting was dependent on three factors: fluence, grafting time, and monomer concentration. Furthermore, GNP patterns were generated on the prepared PAA-patterned PFA surface by layer-by-layer deposition of GNPs and poly(diallyldimethyl ammonium chloride). The multilayers of GNPs were deposited only onto the PAA-grafted regions separated by bare PFA regions, and the resulting GNP patterns exhibited good electrical conductivity.

  15. The Open-Ocean Sensible Heat Flux and Its Significance for Arctic Boundary Layer Mixing During Early Fall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganeshan, Manisha; Wu, Dongliang

    2016-01-01

    The increasing ice-free area during late summer has transformed the Arctic to a climate system with more dynamic boundary layer (BL) clouds and seasonal sea ice growth. The open-ocean sensible heat flux, a crucial mechanism of excessive ocean heat loss to the atmosphere during the fall freeze season, is speculated to play an important role in the recently observed cloud cover increase and BL instability. However, lack of observations and understanding of the resilience of the proposed mechanisms, especially in relation to meteorological and interannual variability, has left a poorly constrained BL parameterization scheme in Arctic climate models. In this study, we use multiyear Japanese cruise-ship observations from RV Mirai over the open Arctic Ocean to characterize the surface sensible heat flux (SSHF) during early fall and investigate its contribution to BL turbulence. It is found that mixing by SSHF is favored during episodes of high surface wind speed and is also influenced by the prevailing cloud regime. The deepest BLs and maximum ocean-atmosphere temperature difference are observed during cold air advection (associated with the stratocumulus regime), yet, contrary to previous speculation, the efficiency of sensible heat exchange is low. On the other hand, the SSHF contributes significantly to BL mixing during the uplift (low pressure) followed by the highly stable (stratus) regime. Overall, it can explain 10 of the open ocean BL height variability, whereas cloud-driven (moisture and radiative) mechanisms appear to be the other dominant source of convective turbulence. Nevertheless, there is strong interannual variability in the relationship between the SSHF and the BL height which can be intensified by the changing occurrence of Arctic climate patterns, such as positive surface wind speed anomalies and more frequent conditions of uplift. This study highlights the need for comprehensive BL observations like the RV Mirai for better understanding and

  16. The open-ocean sensible heat flux and its significance for Arctic boundary layer mixing during early fall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ganeshan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The increasing ice-free area during late summer has transformed the Arctic to a climate system with more dynamic boundary layer (BL clouds and seasonal sea ice growth. The open-ocean sensible heat flux, a crucial mechanism of excessive ocean heat loss to the atmosphere during the fall freeze season, is speculated to play an important role in the recently observed cloud cover increase and BL instability. However, lack of observations and understanding of the resilience of the proposed mechanisms, especially in relation to meteorological and interannual variability, has left a poorly constrained BL parameterization scheme in Arctic climate models. In this study, we use multi-year Japanese cruise-ship observations from R/V Mirai over the open Arctic Ocean to characterize the surface sensible heat flux (SSHF during early fall and investigate its contribution to BL turbulence. It is found that mixing by SSHF is favored during episodes of high surface wind speed and is also influenced by the prevailing cloud regime. The deepest BLs and maximum ocean–atmosphere temperature difference are observed during cold air advection (associated with the stratocumulus regime, yet, contrary to previous speculation, the efficiency of sensible heat exchange is low. On the other hand, the SSHF contributes significantly to BL mixing during the uplift (low pressure followed by the highly stable (stratus regime. Overall, it can explain  ∼  10 % of the open-ocean BL height variability, whereas cloud-driven (moisture and radiative mechanisms appear to be the other dominant source of convective turbulence. Nevertheless, there is strong interannual variability in the relationship between the SSHF and the BL height which can be intensified by the changing occurrence of Arctic climate patterns, such as positive surface wind speed anomalies and more frequent conditions of uplift. This study highlights the need for comprehensive BL observations like the R/V Mirai for

  17. Friction Modifier Using Adherent Metallic Multilayered or Mixed Element Layer Conversion Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Harry F. (Inventor); Defalco, Francis G. (Inventor); Starks, Lloyd L., Sr. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A process for creating conversion coatings and spin, drawing, and extrusion finishes for surfaces, wherein the conversion coatings and spin, drawing, and extrusion finishes contain potassium, phosphorus, nitrogen, and one or more non-alkaline metals and/or one or more metalloids. The process comprises forming an aqueous solution of water, phosphoric acid or sulfuric acid, ammonium hydroxide, an alkali metal hydroxide, and one or more non-alkaline metals and/or one or more metalloids. The aqueous solution forms an anti-friction multilayer conversion and/or mixed element coating or a spin, drawing, and extrusion finish on a surface when applied to the surface, either directly without the use of applied external electromotive force, or as an additive in lubricating fluids.

  18. Selectivity of layered double hydroxides and their derivative mixed metal oxides as sorbents of hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Mohamed A; Zahid, Waleed M; Abasaeed, Ahmed E

    2013-06-15

    In the context of finding high efficient sorbent materials for removing hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from air stream, a screening study was performed to find the best combination of metals for the synthesis of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) and their derivative mixed metal oxides. Based on selectivity of 998 natural mineral species of sulfur-containing compounds, Cu(2+), Ni(2+) and Zn(2+) were selected as divalent metals, and Fe(3+), Al(3+) and Cr(3+) as trivalent metals to synthesis the LDHs sorbents. 10 LDHs materials and their calcined mixed metal oxides, Ni(0.66)Al(0.34), Cu(0.35)Ni(0.32)Al(0.33), Zn(0.66)Al(0.34), Cu(0.36)Zn(0.32)Al(0.32), Ni(0.64)Fe(0.36), Cu(0.35)Ni(0.31)Fe(0.34), Ni(0.66)Cr(0.34), Cu(0.35)Ni(0.31)Cr(0.34), Zn(0.66)Cr(0.34), Cu(0.33)Zn(0.32)Cr(0.35) were synthesized, characterized chemically and physically, and then tested using breakthrough test to determine their sulfur uptake. Ni(0.64)Fe(0.36) mixed metal oxides was found to have the best uptake of hydrogen sulfide (136 mg H₂S/g). Regeneration of spent Ni(0.64)Fe(0.36) mixed metal oxides was studied using two different mixture solutions, NaCl/NaOH and acetate-buffer/NaCl/NaOH. The latter mixture successfully desorbed the sulfur from the Ni0.64Fe0.36 sorbent for 2 cycles of regeneration/sorption. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Lateral surface superlattices in strained InGaAs layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milton, B.

    2000-08-01

    Lateral Surface Superlattices were fabricated by etching in strained InGaAs layers above a GaAs/AlGaAs 2DEG channel. These were etched both by dry plasma wet chemical etching to produce periods of 100nm, 200nm and 300nm. These superlattices were fabricated on Hall bars to allow four terminal measurement and a blanket gate was placed on top, to allow variations in the carrier concentration. The magnetoresistance effects of these superlattices were studied at varying values of gate voltage, which varies the carrier concentration and the electrostatic periodic potential and at temperatures down to 45mK in a dilution refrigerator. From the oscillations observed in the magnetoresistance trace's it is possible to calculate the magnitude of the periodic potential. This showed that the etched, strained InGaAs was producing an anisotropic piezoelectric potential, along with an isotropic electrostatic potential. The variation in period allowed a study of the change of this piezoelectric potential with the period as well as a study of the interactions between the electrostatic and piezoelectric potentials. Further, at the lowest temperatures a strong interaction was observed between the Commensurability Oscillations, caused by the periodic potential, and the Shubnikov-de Haas Oscillations due to the Landau. Levels. This interaction was studied as it varied with temperature and carrier concentration. (author)

  20. Retrieving 4-dimensional atmospheric boundary layer structure from surface observations and profiles over a single station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pu, Zhaoxia [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2015-10-06

    Most routine measurements from climate study facilities, such as the Department of Energy’s ARM SGP site, come from individual sites over a long period of time. While single-station data are very useful for many studies, it is challenging to obtain 3-dimensional spatial structures of atmospheric boundary layers that include prominent signatures of deep convection from these data. The principal objective of this project is to create realistic estimates of high-resolution (~ 1km × 1km horizontal grids) atmospheric boundary layer structure and the characteristics of precipitating convection. These characteristics include updraft and downdraft cumulus mass fluxes and cold pool properties over a region the size of a GCM grid column from analyses that assimilate surface mesonet observations of wind, temperature, and water vapor mixing ratio and available profiling data from single or multiple surface stations. The ultimate goal of the project is to enhance our understanding of the properties of mesoscale convective systems and also to improve their representation in analysis and numerical simulations. During the proposed period (09/15/2011–09/14/2014) and the no-cost extension period (09/15/2014–09/14/2015), significant accomplishments have been achieved relating to the stated goals. Efforts have been extended to various research and applications. Results have been published in professional journals and presented in related science team meetings and conferences. These are summarized in the report.

  1. Role of the ocean mixed layer processes in the response of the North Pacific winter SST and MLD to global warming in CGCMs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yim, Bo Young; Noh, Yign [Yonsei University, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Global Environmental Laboratory, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yeh, Sang-Wook [Hanyang University, Department of Environmental Marine Science, Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    It is investigated how the changes of winter sea surface temperature (SST) and mixed layer depth (MLD) under climate change projections are predicted differently in the North Pacific depending on the coupled general circulation models (CGCMs), and how they are related to the dynamical property of the simulated ocean mixed layer. For this purpose the dataset from eleven CGCMs reported to IPCC's AR4 are used, while detailed analysis is given to the MRI and MIROC models. Analysis of the CGCM data reveals that the increase of SST and the decrease of MLD in response to global warming tend to be smaller for the CGCM in which the ratio of ocean heat transport (OHT) to surface heat flux (SHF), R (=OHT/SHF), is larger in the heat budget of the mixed layer. The negative correlation is found between the changes of OHT and SHF under global warming, which may weaken the response to global warming in the CGCM with larger R. It is also found that the models with low horizontal resolution tend to give broader western boundary currents, larger R, and the smaller changes of SST and MLD under global warming. (orig.)

  2. Validation of source approval of HMA surface mix aggregate : research summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Pavement surfaces must maintain an adequate level of friction in order to provide a : safe surface for vehicles. The Maryland State Highway Administration (SHA) is : responsible for ensuring that flexible pavement construction, using hot mix asphalt ...

  3. The relation of mixed-layer net community production to phytoplankton community composition in the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassar, Nicolas; Wright, Simon W.; Thomson, Paul G.; Trull, Thomas W.; Westwood, Karen J.; de Salas, Miguel; Davidson, Andrew; Pearce, Imojen; Davies, Diana M.; Matear, Richard J.

    2015-04-01

    Surface ocean productivity mediates the transfer of carbon to the deep ocean and in the process regulates atmospheric CO2 levels. A common axiom in oceanography is that large phytoplankton contribute disproportionally to the transfer of carbon to the deep ocean because of their greater ability to escape grazing pressure, build biomass, and sink. In the present study, we assessed the relationship of net community production to phytoplankton assemblages and plankton size distribution in the Sub-Antarctic Zone and northern reaches of the Polar Frontal Zone in the Australian sector of the Southern Ocean. We reanalyzed and synthesized previously published estimates of O2/Ar net community oxygen production (NCP) and triple-O2 isotopes gross primary oxygen production (GPP) along with microscopic and pigment analyses of the microbial community. Overall, we found that the axiom that large phytoplankton drive carbon export was not supported in this region. Mixed-layer-depth-integrated NCP was correlated to particulate organic carbon (POC) concentration in the mixed layer. While lower NCP/GPP and NCP/POC values were generally associated with communities dominated by smaller plankton size (as would be expected), these communities did not preclude high values for both properties. Vigorous NCP in some regions occurred in the virtual absence of large phytoplankton (and specifically diatoms) and in communities dominated by nanoplankton and picoplankton. We also observed a positive correlation between NCP and the proportion of the phytoplankton community grazed by microheterotrophs, supporting the mediating role of grazers in carbon export. The novel combination of techniques allowed us to determine how NCP relates to upper ocean ecosystem characteristics and may lead to improved models of carbon export.

  4. Structure function scaling in a Reλ = 250 turbulent mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Attili, Antonio

    2011-12-22

    A highly resolved Direct Numerical Simulation of a spatially developing turbulent mixing layer is presented. In the fully developed region, the flow achieves a turbulent Reynolds number Reλ = 250, high enough for a clear separation between large and dissipative scales, so for the presence of an inertial range. Structure functions have been calculated in the self-similar region using velocity time series and Taylor\\'s frozen turbulence hypothesis. The Extended Self-Similarity (ESS) concept has been employed to evaluate relative scaling exponents. A wide range of scales with scaling exponents and intermittency levels equal to homogeneous isotropic turbulence has been identified. Moreover an additional scaling range exists for larger scales; it is characterized by smaller exponents, similar to the values reported in the literature for flows with strong shear.

  5. Transport of desert dust mixed with North African industrial pollutants in the subtropical Saharan Air Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, S.; Alastuey, A.; Alonso-Pérez, S.; Querol, X.; Cuevas, E.; Abreu-Afonso, J.; Viana, M.; Pérez, N.; Pandolfi, M.; de La Rosa, J.

    2011-07-01

    An analysis of chemical composition data of particulate matter samples (TSP, PM10 and PM2.5) collected from 2002 to 2008 in the North Atlantic free troposphere at the Izaña Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW) observatory (Tenerife, Canary Islands) shows that desert dust is very frequently mixed with particulate pollutants in the Saharan Air Layer (SAL). The study of this data set with Median Concentrations At Receptor (MCAR) plots allowed the identification of the potential source regions of the dust and particulate pollutants. Areas located at the south of the southern slope of the Atlas mountains emerge as the most frequent source of the soil desert dust advected to the northern edge of the SAL in summer. Industrial emissions occurring in Northern Algeria, Eastern Algeria, Tunisia and the Atlantic coast of Morocco appear as the most important source of the nitrate, ammonium and a fraction of sulphate (at least 60 % of the sulphate phosphate-based fertilizer industry and power plants. Although desert dust emissions appear as the most frequent source of the phosphorous observed in the SAL, high P concentrations are observed when the SAL is affected by emissions from open mines of phosphate and phosphate based fertilizer industry. The results also show that a significant fraction of the sulphate (up to 90 % of sulphate <10 μm transported from some regions) observed in the SAL may be influenced by soil emissions of evaporite minerals in well defined regions where dry saline lakes (chotts) are present. These interpretations of the MCAR plots are consistent with the results obtained with the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF2) receptor modelling. The results of this study show that North African industrial pollutants may be mixed with desert dust and exported to the North Atlantic in the Saharan Air Layer.

  6. Transport of desert dust mixed with North African industrial pollutants in the subtropical Saharan Air Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Rodríguez

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of chemical composition data of particulate matter samples (TSP, PM10 and PM2.5 collected from 2002 to 2008 in the North Atlantic free troposphere at the Izaña Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW observatory (Tenerife, Canary Islands shows that desert dust is very frequently mixed with particulate pollutants in the Saharan Air Layer (SAL. The study of this data set with Median Concentrations At Receptor (MCAR plots allowed the identification of the potential source regions of the dust and particulate pollutants. Areas located at the south of the southern slope of the Atlas mountains emerge as the most frequent source of the soil desert dust advected to the northern edge of the SAL in summer. Industrial emissions occurring in Northern Algeria, Eastern Algeria, Tunisia and the Atlantic coast of Morocco appear as the most important source of the nitrate, ammonium and a fraction of sulphate (at least 60 % of the sulphate <10 μm transported from some regions observed in the SAL. These emissions are mostly linked to crude oil refineries, phosphate-based fertilizer industry and power plants. Although desert dust emissions appear as the most frequent source of the phosphorous observed in the SAL, high P concentrations are observed when the SAL is affected by emissions from open mines of phosphate and phosphate based fertilizer industry. The results also show that a significant fraction of the sulphate (up to 90 % of sulphate <10 μm transported from some regions observed in the SAL may be influenced by soil emissions of evaporite minerals in well defined regions where dry saline lakes (chotts are present. These interpretations of the MCAR plots are consistent with the results obtained with the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF2 receptor modelling. The results of this study show that North African industrial pollutants may be mixed with desert dust and exported to the North Atlantic in the Saharan Air Layer.

  7. Mixed oxides derived from layered double hydroxides as novel catalysts for phenol photodegradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puscasu, C. M.; Carja, G.; Mureseanu, M.; Zaharia, C.

    2017-08-01

    The removal of organic pollutants is nowadays a very challenging aspect of the environmental research. There are strong interests to develop novel semiconducting photocatalysts able to efficiently promote advanced oxidation reactions. The development of photocatalysts based on the mixtures of mixed oxides derived from layered double hydroxides (LDHs) - a family of naturally occurring anionic clays - might offer novel environmental-friendly solutions for the cost effective removal of organic pollutants. This work presents ZnO/ZnAl2O4, ZnO/Zn2TiO4 and ZnO/ZnCr2O4 as novel photocatalytic formulations for phenol degradation under UV irradiation. They were obtained by the controlled thermal treatment of the layered double hydroxides matrices (LDHs), as precursors materials, type ZnM-LDH (M = Al3+, Cr3+ or Ti4+). The LDHs were synthesized by the co-precipitation method at a constant pH. Controlled calcination at 650°C gives rise to solutions of mixed metal oxides. The structural and nanoarchitectonics characteristics of the studied catalysts were described by: XRD, SEM/TEM and TG/DTG techniques. Results show that in the photocatalytic process of the phenol degradation from aqueous solutions, ZnO/ZnCr2O4 and ZnO/ZnAl2O4 showed the best performance degrading ∼98% of phenol after 3.5 hs and 5 hs, respectively; while ZnO/Zn2TiO4 has degraded almost 80 % after 7.5 hs of UV irradiation. These results open new opportunities in the development of new cost effective photoresponsive formulations able to facilitate the photo-degradation of the organic pollution as “green” solution for removal of dangerous pollutants.

  8. Layer-by-layer construction of the heparin/fibronectin coatings on titanium surface:stability and functionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guicai; Yang, Ping; Huang, Nan

    Layer-by-layer assembly as a versatile bottom-up nanofabrication technique has been widely used in the development of biomimetic materials with superior mechanical and biological properties. In this study, layer-by-layer assembled heparin/fibronectin biofunctional films were fabricated on titanium (Ti) surface to enhance the blood anticoagulation and accelerate the endothelialization simultaneously. The wettability and chemical changes of the assembled films were investigated by static water contact angle measurement and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The morphology of modified Ti surfaces were observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The real time assembly process was in-situ monitored by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). The stability of the films was evaluated by measuring the changes in wettability and the quantity of heparin and fibronectin on the surfaces. The anticoagulation properties of the films were quantitatively rated using Activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) analysis. New peaks of hydroxyl and amino group were observed on the assembled Ti srufaces by FTIR. The contact angles varied among the films with different bilayer numbers, indicating the successful graft of the heparin and fibronectin layer-by-layer. QCM-D results showed that the frequency shift increased with the bilayer numbers, and the heparin and fibronectin could form multilayers. The assembly films were stable after incubation in PBS for 24 h based on the results of the contact angle measurement and the quantity of heparin and fibronectin analysis. APTT results suggested that the assembled films kept excellent antithrombotic properties. All these results revealed that the assembled heparin/fibronectin films with stabiltiy and anticoagulation property could be firmly formed on titanium surfaces. Our study further demonstrates that layer-by-layer assembly of heparin and fibronectin will provide a potential and effective tool for

  9. Synergetic Influences of Mixed-Host Emitting Layer Structures and Hole Injection Layers on Efficiency and Lifetime of Simplified Phosphorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tae-Hee; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Myung Hwan; Song, Wonjun; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-03-09

    We used various nondestructive analyses to investigate various host material systems in the emitting layer (EML) of simple-structured, green phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) to clarify how the host systems affect its luminous efficiency (LE) and operational stability. An OLED that has a unipolar single-host EML with conventional poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) ( PSS) showed high operating voltage, low LE (∼26.6 cd/A, 13.7 lm/W), and short lifetime (∼4.4 h @ 1000 cd/m(2)). However, the combined use of a gradient mixed-host EML and a molecularly controlled HIL that has increased surface work function (WF) remarkably decreased operating voltage and improved LE (∼68.7 cd/A, 77.0 lm/W) and lifetime (∼70.7 h @ 1000 cd/m(2)). Accumulated charges at the injecting interfaces and formation of a narrow recombination zone close to the interfaces are the major factors that accelerate degradation of charge injection/transport and electroluminescent properties of OLEDs, so achievement of simple-structured OLEDs with high efficiency and long lifetime requires facilitating charge injection and balanced transport into the EML and distributing charge carriers and excitons in EML.

  10. New results on the structure of turbulence in a mixing layer with and without swirl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davoust, Samuel; Jacquin, Laurent; Leclaire, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We study the near field of a round jet at Re ≈ 200,000, with and without swirl. • The dynamics of streamwise vortices inducing mixing is analyzed with TR-PIV. • Vortices of alternate sign are organized as radial arrays, instead of azimuthal. • Swirl acts by tilting this structure, leading to enhanced injections and ejections. • Dynamical scenarios are proposed to explain the origin of this spatial organization. - Abstract: The near field of a 2.14 × 10 5 Reynolds number, low-Mach-number, cylindrical jet with and without swirl has been investigated by high-speed stereo PIV in a transverse plane, two diameters downstream of the jet exit. Using spatiotemporal correlations, we investigate the dynamics of streamwise vorticity in the shear layer, responsible for the mixing properties of the jet, and show how swirl affects this vorticity. A dynamical scenario is proposed, which explains how the mean shear and the azimuthal m = 0 vortices contribute to the spatial organization observed

  11. On the instabilities of supersonic mixing layers - A high-Mach-number asymptotic theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsa, Thomas F.; Goldstein, M. E.

    1990-01-01

    The stability of a family of tanh mixing layers is studied at large Mach numbers using perturbation methods. It is found that the eigenfunction develops a multilayered structure, and the eigenvalue is obtained by solving a simplified version of the Rayleigh equation (with homogeneous boundary conditions) in one of these layers which lies in either of the external streams. This analysis leads to a simple hypersonic similarity law which explains how spatial and temporal phase speeds and growth rates scale with Mach number and temperature ratio. Comparisons are made with numerical results, and it is found that this similarity law provides a good qualitative guide for the behavior of the instability at high Mach numbers. In addition to this asymptotic theory, some fully numerical results are also presented (with no limitation on the Mach number) in order to explain the origin of the hypersonic modes (through mode splitting) and to discuss the role of oblique modes over a very wide range of Mach number and temperature ratio.

  12. Investigating the role of air-sea forcing on the variability of hydrography, circulation, and mixed layer depth in the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Srivastava

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: An effort is made to understand and quantify the influence of near surface zonal and meridional winds, incoming shortwave radiation, and freshwater flux air-sea forcings on the seasonal variability of the hydrography, circulation, and mixed layer depth of the Arabian Sea (AS and Bay of Bengal (BoB. Sensitivity experiments using an ocean general circulation model are carried out for this purpose in the Indian ocean around 65°–95°E, 5°–22°N during 1998–2014 (17 years. In the absence of near surface wind forcing, the sea surface temperature of the region greatly increases in all the seasons, whereas, in the absence of incoming shortwave radiation forcing, exactly opposite is the case. The sea surface salinity of the AS and BoB decreases in the absence of wind and shortwave radiation forcings, whereas, in the northern BoB it increases in the absence of freshwater flux forcing. The sub-surface changes in the stratification of temperature and salinity are also investigated. The influence of the air-sea forcings on the mixed layer depth of the region is found to be highly seasonally dependent. The effect of air-sea forcings on the seasonal variability of the upper ocean vertical stability is studied using the vertical shear of the horizontal velocity, buoyancy frequency, and energy required for mixing as quantifiers. The near surface wind forcing has highest contribution in changing the surface circulation of the region. Keywords: Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal, Air-sea forcing, Ocean general circulation model, Hydrography and circulation, Vertical stability

  13. Rapid removal of plutonium from the oceanic surface layer by zooplankton faecal pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgo, J.J.W.; Cherry, R.D.; Heyraud, M.; Fowler, S.W.

    1977-01-01

    In view of the possibility that increasing quantities of Pu may in due course be introduced into the marine environment, it is important to have a detailed knowledge of its oceanic behaviour. It has been suggested that algae and perhaps the phytoplanktonic mass may have an important role in determining the chemical and physical forms of Pu predominant in the ocean. The role of the zooplanktonic mass has not been investigated in detail, but it is known that for several elements zooplankton metabolism may be an important biological factor in the removal of elements from the surface layers of the ocean. The particular importance of zooplankton faecal pellets in this process has been stressed, and it has been found that M. norvegica is rich in the naturally-occurring α-emitter 210 Po when compared with whole organism levels. A study is here described for Pu, and it is reported that M. norvegica faecal pellets are relatively rich in Pu. It is suggested that zooplankton faecal pellet deposition might be an important vector in the vertical oceanic transport of this element. Experimental details are given and results are shown in tabular form. The implications of the high concentrations of Pu in faecal pellets are described, and rough estimates are made for the removal time of Pu from the upper mixed ocean layers by zooplankton pellets alone; the result is 3.6 years. It is suggested that faecal pellets may have a significant role in the removal of Pu from the surface layers of the sea. (U.K.)

  14. Quantifying the relationship between PM2.5 concentration, visibility and planetary boundary layer height for long-lasting haze and fog-haze mixed events in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Tian; Guo, Xueliang; Guo, Lijun; Zhang, Tianhang

    2018-01-01

    inversion layer was formed by the persistent warm and humid southwestern airflow, while the low-level inversion layer was initially produced by the surface long-wave radiation cooling in the nighttime and maintained by the reduction of surface solar radiation in the daytime. The obvious descending process of the upper-level inversion layer induced by the radiation process could be responsible for the enhancement of the low-level inversion layer and the lowering PBL height, as well as high aerosol loading for these polluted events. The reduction of surface solar radiation in the daytime could be around 35 % for the haze event and 94 % for the fog-haze mixed event. Therefore, the formation and subsequent descending processes of the upper-level inversion layer should be an important factor in maintaining and strengthening the long-lasting severe polluted events, which has not been revealed in previous publications. The interactions and feedbacks between PM2.5 concentration and PBL height linked by radiation process caused a more significant and long-lasting deterioration of air quality and visibility in fog-haze mixed events. The interactions and feedbacks of all processes were particularly strong when the PM2.5 mass concentration was larger than 150-200 µg m-3.

  15. Observational constraints on Arctic boundary-layer clouds, surface moisture and sensible heat fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, D. L.; Boisvert, L.; Klaus, D.; Dethloff, K.; Ganeshan, M.

    2016-12-01

    The dry, cold environment and dynamic surface variations make the Arctic a unique but difficult region for observations, especially in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). Spaceborne platforms have been the key vantage point to capture basin-scale changes during the recent Arctic warming. Using the AIRS temperature, moisture and surface data, we found that the Arctic surface moisture flux (SMF) had increased by 7% during 2003-2013 (18 W/m2 equivalent in latent heat), mostly in spring and fall near the Arctic coastal seas where large sea ice reduction and sea surface temperature (SST) increase were observed. The increase in Arctic SMF correlated well with the increases in total atmospheric column water vapor and low-level clouds, when compared to CALIPSO cloud observations. It has been challenging for climate models to reliably determine Arctic cloud radiative forcing (CRF). Using the regional climate model HIRHAM5 and assuming a more efficient Bergeron-Findeisen process with generalized subgrid-scale variability for total water content, we were able to produce a cloud distribution that is more consistent with the CloudSat/CALIPSO observations. More importantly, the modified schemes decrease (increase) the cloud water (ice) content in mixed-phase clouds, which help to improve the modeled CRF and energy budget at the surface, because of the dominant role of the liquid water in CRF. Yet, the coupling between Arctic low clouds and the surface is complex and has strong impacts on ABL. Studying GPS/COSMIC radio occultation (RO) refractivity profiles in the Arctic coldest and driest months, we successfully derived ABL inversion height and surface-based inversion (SBI) frequency, and they were anti-correlated over the Arctic Ocean. For the late summer and early fall season, we further analyzed Japanese R/V Mirai ship measurements and found that the open-ocean surface sensible heat flux (SSHF) can explain 10 % of the ABL height variability, whereas mechanisms such as cloud

  16. Heterogeneous distribution of plankton within the mixed layer and its implications for bloom formation in tropical seas

    KAUST Repository

    Calbet, Albert

    2015-06-11

    Intensive sampling at the coastal waters of the central Red Sea during a period of thermal stratification, prior to the main seasonal bloom during winter, showed that vertical patches of prokaryotes and microplankton developed and persisted for several days within the apparently density uniform upper layer. These vertical structures were most likely the result of in situ growth and mortality (e.g., grazing) rather than physical or behavioural aggregation. Simulating a mixing event by adding nutrient-rich deep water abruptly triggered dense phytoplankton blooms in the nutrient-poor environment of the upper layer. These findings suggest that vertical structures within the mixed layer provide critical seeding stocks that can rapidly exploit nutrient influx during mixing, leading to winter bloom formation.

  17. Highly efficient white phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes using a mixed host structure in deep blue emitting layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Chang Woo; Lee, Jun Yeob, E-mail: leej17@dankook.ac.kr

    2012-05-31

    Highly efficient phosphorescent white organic light-emitting diodes (PHWOLEDs) were developed using a deep blue phosphorescent emitter doped into a mixed host of high triplet energy host materials. The deep blue emitting layer was combined with a red:green emitting layer to fabricate PHWOLEDs. A high quantum efficiency of 19.5% with a color coordinate of (0.29,0.38) and 19.8% with a color coordinate of (0.39,0.46) were achieved in the PHWOLEDs using the mixed host emitting layer doped with a deep blue phosphorescent dopant. In addition, a low optimum doping concentration below 5% in red, green and blue dopants was realized in the PHWOLEDs. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High quantum efficiency in phosphorescent white device. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mixed host structure for high power efficiency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low doping concentration below 5% in phosphorescent white device.

  18. Influence of the surface layer characteristics on the regularities of the cutting process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krainev Dmitriy V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the influence of the surface layer characteristics on the regularities of the cutting process and the formation of the quality of the surface machined. This effect has been confirmed by the study results of the combined cutting method with advanced plastic deformation (APD. The work estimates the impact of the change in the surface layer properties on the forces and temperature of cutting, stability of the chip formation and quality parameters of the surface machined.

  19. Zero mean curvature surfaces of mixed type in Minkowski space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klyachin, V A

    2003-01-01

    We investigate zero mean curvature surfaces in the Minkowski space R 3 1 such that their first fundamental quadratic form changes signature. Part of such a surface is space-like and part is time-like. We obtain complete information about the structure of the set of points where the surface changes type and prove the related existence and uniqueness theorems

  20. Surface analysis of topmost layer of epitaxial layered oxide thin film: Application to delafossite oxide for oxygen evolution reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Kenji; Adachi, Hideaki; Miyata, Nobuhiro; Hinogami, Reiko; Orikasa, Yuki; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu

    2018-02-01

    Delafossite oxides (ABO2) have a layered structure with alternating layers of A and B elements, the topmost layer of which appears to determine their performance, such as the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) activity. In this study, we investigated the topmost layer of single-domain (0 0 1)-oriented AgCoO2 epitaxial thin film for potential use as an OER catalyst. The thin film was confirmed to possess OER activity at a level comparable to the catalyst in powder form. Atomic scattering spectroscopy revealed the topmost layer to be composed of CoO6 octahedra. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy showed that the oxidation of Co at the surface did not change under different potentials, which suggests that there is no valence fluctuation of Co in the stable CoO6 octahedral structure. However, the oxidation number of Co at the surface was lower than that in the bulk. Our density functional theoretical calculations also showed the Co atoms at the surface to have a slightly higher electron occupancy than those in the bulk, and suggests that the unoccupied t2g states of Co at the surface have an influence on OER activity.

  1. Eulerian and Lagrangian Parameterization of the Oceanic Mixed Layer using Large Eddy Simulation and MPAS-Ocean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Roekel, Luke [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-01-30

    We have conducted a suite of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) to form the basis of a multi-model comparison (left). The results have led to proposed model improvements. We have verified that Eulerian-Lagrangian effective diffusivity estimates of mesoscale mixing are consistent with traditional particle statistics metrics (right). LES and Lagrangian particles will be utilized to better represent the movement of water into and out of the mixed layer.

  2. Surface modification of layered zirconium phosphates: a novel pathway to multifunctional materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosby, Brian M; Díaz, Agustín; Clearfield, Abraham

    2014-07-21

    The intercalation of inorganic layered materials has resulted in a wide range of applicability. In such cases the applicability of the material is largely dependent upon the species intercalated within the layer, and the layered material acts largely as a host. Recently, the surface modification of inorganic layered materials has been investigated and it has been shown that the exterior layers can be exclusively functionalized. The advent of surface chemistry allows for the synthesis of particles with both a controlled interlayer and surface. This approach can be used to tailor nanoparticles for specific applications. Herein we review the surface chemistry of α-zirconium bis(monohydrogen orthophosphate) monohydrate (Zr(HPO4)2·H2O, α-ZrP) along with some applications of recent interest. Not only can these reactions be applied to α-ZrP, but similar chemistry can also be expanded to other layered materials and systems.

  3. Localized surface plasmon microscopy of submicron domain structures of mixed lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Koyo; Miyazaki, Ryosuke; Terakado, Goro; Okazaki, Takashi; Morigaki, Kenichi; Kano, Hiroshi

    2012-09-01

    We propose scanning localized surface plasmon microscopy of mixed lipid bilayers with submicron domain structures. Our observation technique, which employs localized surface plasmons excited on a flat metal surface as a sensing probe, provides non-label and non-contact imaging with the spatial resolution of ∼ 170 nm. We experimentally show that submicron domain structures of mixed lipid bilayers can be observed. A detailed analysis finds that the domains are classified into two groups.

  4. Identification of a surface layer structure and analysis of humidity ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    institutional effort to probe the atmospheric boundary layer over the monsoon trough over northern India. For this experiment, four micrometeorological towers were set up at four different locations along the normal position of the trough. One such ...

  5. Impacts of Ocean Waves on the Atmospheric Surface Layer: Simulations and Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-06

    than about 5 m s −1 (Makin, Kudryavtsev & Mastenbroek 1995; Banner & Peirson 1998). Ocean boundary layers with vortex force and stochastic breaking...amplitude. Proc. Roy. Soc. Lond. A 342, 157–174. Makin, V. K., Kudryavtsev , V. N. & Mastenbroek, C. 1995 Drag of the sea surface. Boundary- Layer Met. 73...to study some of the impacts of fast-moving waves on marine surface layers (e.g., Gent and Taylor 1976; Gent 1977; Li 1995; Kudryavtsev and Makin 2004

  6. Surface Modification of Titanium with Heparin-Chitosan Multilayers via Layer-by-Layer Self-Assembly Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Shu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular matrix (ECM, like biomimetic surface modification of titanium implants, is a promising method for improving its biocompatibility. In this paper chitosan (Chi and heparin (Hep multilayer was coated on pure titanium using a layer-by-layer (LbL self-assembly technique. The Hep-Chi multilayer growth was carried out by first depositing a single layer of positively charged poly-L-lysine (PLL on the NaOH-treated titanium substrate (negatively charged surface, followed by alternate deposition of negatively charged Hep and positively charged Chi, and terminated by an outermost layer of Chi. The multilayer was characterized by DR-FTIR, SEM, and AFM, and osteoblasts were cocultured with the modified titanium and untreated titanium surfaces, respectively, to evaluate their cytocompatibility in vitro. The results confirmed that Hep-Chi multilayer was fabricated gradually on the titanium surface. The Hep-Chi multilayer-coated titanium improved the adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts. Thus, the approach described here may provide a basis for the preparation of modified titanium surfaces for use in dental or orthopedic implants.

  7. Layer-by-Layer Method for the Synthesis and Growth of Surface Mounted Metal-Organic Frameworks (SURMOFs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama Shekhah

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A layer-by-layer method has been developed for the synthesis of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs and their deposition on functionalized organic surfaces. The approach is based on the sequential immersion of functionalized organic surfaces into solutions of the building blocks of the MOF, i.e., the organic ligand and the inorganic unit. The synthesis and growth of different types of MOFs on substrates with different functionalization, like COOH, OH and pyridine terminated surfaces, were studied and characterized with different surface characterization techniques. A controlled and highly oriented growth of very homogenous films was obtained using this method. The layer-by-layer method offered also the possibility to study the kinetics of film formation in more detail using surface plasmon resonance and quartz crystal microbalance. In addition, this method demonstrates the potential to synthesize new classes of MOFs not accessible by conventional methods. Finally, the controlled growth of MOF thin films is important for many applications like chemical sensors, membranes and related electrodes.

  8. Surface layer scintillometry for estimating the sensible heat flux component of the surface energy balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Savage

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The relatively recently developed scintillometry method, with a focus on the dual-beam surface layer scintillometer (SLS, allows boundary layer atmospheric turbulence, surface sensible heat and momentum flux to be estimated in real-time. Much of the previous research using the scintillometer method has involved the large aperture scintillometer method, with only a few studies using the SLS method. The SLS method has been mainly used by agrometeorologists, hydrologists and micrometeorologists for atmospheric stability and surface energy balance studies to obtain estimates of sensible heat from which evaporation estimates representing areas of one hectare or larger are possible. Other applications include the use of the SLS method in obtaining crucial input parameters for atmospheric dispersion and turbulence models. The SLS method relies upon optical scintillation of a horizontal laser beam between transmitter and receiver for a separation distance typically between 50 and 250 m caused by refractive index inhomogeneities in the atmosphere that arise from turbulence fluctuations in air temperature and to a much lesser extent the fluctuations in water vapour pressure. Measurements of SLS beam transmission allow turbulence of the atmosphere to be determined, from which sub-hourly, real-time and in situ path-weighted fluxes of sensible heat and momentum may be calculated by application of the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. Unlike the eddy covariance (EC method for which corrections for flow distortion and coordinate rotation are applied, no corrections to the SLS measurements, apart from a correction for water vapour pressure, are applied. Also, path-weighted SLS estimates over the propagation path are obtained. The SLS method also offers high temporal measurement resolution and usually greater spatial coverage compared to EC, Bowen ratio energy balance, surface renewal and other sensible heat measurement methods. Applying the shortened surface

  9. Thiol-ene thermosets exploiting surface reactivity for layer-by-layer structures and control of penetration depth for selective surface reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Anders Egede; Westh, Andreas; Pereira Rosinha Grundtvig, Ines

    Thiol-ene thermosets have been shown to be an efficient platform for preparation of functional polymer surfaces. Especially the effectiveness and versatility of the system has enabled a large variety of network properties to be obtained in a simple and straight-forward way. Due to its selectivity...... groups in thµe surface of thiol-ene thermosets, it is possible to prepare surface functional thermosets or to exploit the reactive groups for modular construction and subsequent chemical bonding. Here a different approach preparing monolithic layer-by-layer structures with controlled mechanical...... in controlling the penetration depth and surface grafting. The methodology was used for surface immobilization of enzymes providing a direct link between the distribution of enzymes on the surface and the activity of the reactor....

  10. Remote sensing of the surface layer dynamics of a stratified lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steissberg, Todd Eugene

    . In situ velocity profiles of a cool-core eddy revealed elevated velocities up to 12 cm/s throughout the surface mixed layer, rotating with depth in an Ekman spiral. Average upward vertical velocities approaching 0.58 cm/s indicated Ekman pumping and enhanced stability. A time series of moderate-resolution WST maps confirmed the eddy's stability, showing it persisted 3.5 days until it abruptly disintegrated, spreading its contents across the surface layer. The findings suggest upwelling and eddies contribute to the patchiness of the surface layer.

  11. The influence of anatase-rutile mixed phase and ZnO blocking layer on dye-sensitized solar cells based on TiO2nanofiberphotoanodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jianning; Li, Yan; Hu, Hongwei; Bai, Li; Zhang, Shuai; Yuan, Ningyi

    2013-01-01

    High performance is expected in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) that utilize one-dimensional (1-D) TiO2 nanostructures owing to the effective electron transport. However, due to the low dye adsorption, mainly because of their smooth surfaces, 1-D TiO2 DSSCs show relatively lower efficiencies than nanoparticle-based ones. Herein, we demonstrate a very simple approach using thick TiO2 electrospun nanofiber films as photoanodes to obtain high conversion efficiency. To improve the performance of the DSCCs, anatase-rutile mixed-phase TiO2 nanofibers are achieved by increasing sintering temperature above 500°C, and very thin ZnO films are deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) method as blocking layers. With approximately 40-μm-thick mixed-phase (approximately 15.6 wt.% rutile) TiO2 nanofiber as photoanode and 15-nm-thick compact ZnO film as a blocking layer in DSSC, the photoelectric conversion efficiency and short-circuit current are measured as 8.01% and 17.3 mA cm-2, respectively. Intensity-modulated photocurrent spectroscopy and intensity-modulated photovoltage spectroscopy measurements reveal that extremely large electron diffusion length is the key point to support the usage of thick TiO2 nanofibers as photoanodes with very thin ZnO blocking layers to obtain high photocurrents and high conversion efficiencies.

  12. A literature review of surface alteration layer effects on waste glass behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, X.; Cunnane, J.C.; Bates, J.K.

    1993-01-01

    When in contact with an aqueous solution, nuclear waste glass is subject to a chemical attack that results in progressive alteration. During tills alteration, constituent elements of the glass pass into the solution; elements initially in solution diffuse into, or are adsorbed onto, the solid; and new phases appear. This results in the formation of surface layers on the reacted glass. The glass corrosion and radionuclide release can be better understood by investigating these surface layer effects. In the past decade, there have been numerous studies regarding the effects of surface layers on glass reactions. This paper presents a systematic analysis and summary of the past knowledge regarding the effects of surface layers on glass-water interaction. This paper describes the major formation mechanisms of surface layers; reviews the role of surface layers in controlling mass transport and glass reaction affinity (through crystalline phases, an amorphous silica, a gel layer, or all the components in the glass); and discusses how the surface layers contribute to the retention of radionuclides during glass dissolution

  13. Study of Near-Surface Models in Large-Eddy Simulations of a Neutrally Stratified Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senocak, I.; Ackerman, A. S.; Kirkpatrick, M. P.; Stevens, D. E.; Mansour, N. N.

    2004-01-01

    Large-eddy simulation (LES) is a widely used technique in armospheric modeling research. In LES, large, unsteady, three dimensional structures are resolved and small structures that are not resolved on the computational grid are modeled. A filtering operation is applied to distinguish between resolved and unresolved scales. We present two near-surface models that have found use in atmospheric modeling. We also suggest a simpler eddy viscosity model that adopts Prandtl's mixing length model (Prandtl 1925) in the vicinity of the surface and blends with the dynamic Smagotinsky model (Germano et al, 1991) away from the surface. We evaluate the performance of these surface models by simulating a neutraly stratified atmospheric boundary layer.

  14. Surface passivation investigation on ultra-thin atomic layer deposited aluminum oxide layers for their potential application to form tunnel layer passivated contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Zheng; Ling, Zhi Peng; Nandakumar, Naomi; Kaur, Gurleen; Ke, Cangming; Liao, Baochen; Aberle, Armin G.; Stangl, Rolf

    2017-08-01

    The surface passivation performance of atomic layer deposited ultra-thin aluminium oxide layers with different thickness in the tunnel layer regime, i.e., ranging from one atomic cycle (∼0.13 nm) to 11 atomic cycles (∼1.5 nm) on n-type silicon wafers is studied. The effect of thickness and thermal activation on passivation performance is investigated with corona-voltage metrology to measure the interface defect density D it(E) and the total interface charge Q tot. Furthermore, the bonding configuration variation of the AlO x films under various post-deposition thermal activation conditions is analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Additionally, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(styrene sulfonate) is used as capping layer on ultra-thin AlO x tunneling layers to further reduce the surface recombination current density to values as low as 42 fA/cm2. This work is a useful reference for using ultra-thin ALD AlO x layers as tunnel layers in order to form hole selective passivated contacts for silicon solar cells.

  15. Anticorrosive behaviour of lumefantrine hydrophobic layer on mild steel surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavithra M. Krishnegowda

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The surface modification of mild steel was achieved by chemical treatment in lumefantrine (LF solution. The surface morphology and wettability of modified surface was analysed by 3D profilometer and contact angle goniometer. The corrosion inhibition performance of modified mild steel surface in 1.0 M HCl solution was investigated by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance techniques.Electroche­mical measurements illustrate that the corrosion of mild steel in acidic chloride medium get substantially reduced by introducing LF film on its surface (94 % efficiency. Quantum chemical parameters were evaluated by ab initio method and they confer appropriate theoretical support to the experimental findings.

  16. A Review of Additive Mixed-Electric Discharge Machining: Current Status and Future Perspectives for Surface Modification of Biomedical Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul’Azeez Abdu Aliyu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface treatment remained a key solution to numerous problems of synthetic hard tissues. The basic methods of implant surface modification include various physical and chemical deposition techniques. However, most of these techniques have several drawbacks such as excessive cost and surface cracks and require very high sintering temperature. Additive mixed-electric discharge machining (AM-EDM is an emerging technology which simultaneously acts as a machining and surface modification technique. Aside from the mere molds, dies, and tool fabrication, AM-EDM is materializing to finishing of automobiles and aerospace, nuclear, and biomedical components, through the concept of material migrations. The mechanism of material transfer by AM-EDM resembles electrophoretic deposition, whereby the additives in the AM-EDM dielectric fluids are melted and migrate to the machined surface, forming a mirror-like finishing characterized by extremely hard, nanostructured, and nanoporous layers. These layers promote the bone in-growth and strengthen the cell adhesion. Implant shaping and surface treatment through AM-EDM are becoming a key research focus in recent years. This paper reports and summarizes the current advancement of AM-EDM as a potential tool for orthopedic and dental implant fabrication. Towards the end of this paper, the current challenges and future research trends are highlighted.

  17. Quality control on the mixing layer height retrieved from LIDAR-ceilometer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffineur, Quentin; De Backer, Hugo; Delcloo, Andy; Hamdi, Rafiq; Nemeghaire, Jean; Debal, Fabian

    2013-04-01

    LIDAR ceilometers were primarily designed for cloud base height detection (for air traffic safety and weather forecasting). They greatly improved over the last years and now offer the opportunity to monitor the vertical profile of aerosols and the mixing layer height (MLH) on a continuous temporal scale. The knowledge of MLH can improve the forecasting of the dispersion of trace gases and aerosols in the lowest layers of the atmosphere and can also improve the accuracy of the greenhouse gas concentration budgets highly depending on MLH. Therefore, during the next years, operational MLH monitoring networks of LIDAR ceilometers are established around the world, and in particular in Europe. To perform this task, different algorithms have been developed to retrieve the MLH from the ceilometer measurements. However, under specific atmospheric conditions, these algorithms fail to retrieve a similar MLH than other remote sensing retrieval techniques. On the other hand, the ceilometers are sometimes located in places where no other remote sensing measurements are available to assess the accuracy of the MLH retrieved by the algorithm. In this context, the development of several MLH quality control flags based on the ceilometer measurements only is desirable to detect automatically the failure of the MLH retrieval algorithms without the support of additional measurements. In Belgium, in 2013, three new ceilometers (Vaisala CL51) will be installed by the Royal Meteorological Institute of Belgium (RMI) in addition to the one in Uccle (Belgium) that has already been installed since May 2011. RMI developed its own MLH retrieval algorithm based on the gradient and variance methods. The computation of several quality flags will be presented. In this work, an assessment of these quality flags is made by comparing the MLH retrieved by ceilometer measurements with the MLH retrieved by radio-sounding and the boundary layer height (BLH) directly computed by the ECMWF and the ALARO7

  18. Surface layer temperature inversion in the Arabian Sea during winter

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pankajakshan, T.; Ghosh, A.K.

    picture of the actual inversion phenomena occurring in this area. Figure 1 illustrates the procedure adopted in finding the inversion stations. If the temperature difference (Del T) obtained from (T U –T L ) is greater than 0.2°C, then the station... is more or less consistent. Figure 3-A shows the frequency distribution of temperature difference of the inversion layer (Del T). Figure 3-B shows the frequency distribution of the thickness of the inversion layers in meters (Di). Del T is distributed over...

  19. Expansible apparatus for removing the surface layer from a concrete object

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, C.H.

    1979-01-01

    A method and apparatus for removing the surface layer from a concrete object are described. The method consists of providing a hole having a circular wall in the surface layer of the object, the hole being at least as deep as the thickness of the surface layer to be removed, and applying an outward wedging pressure on the wall of the hole sufficient to spall the surface layer around the hole. By the proper spacing of an appropriate number of holes, it is possible to remove the entire surface layer. The apparatus consists of an elongated tubular-shaped body having a relatively short handle with a solid wall at one end. The wall of the remainder of the body contains a plurality of evenly spaced longitudinal cuts to form a relatively long expandable section. The outer end of the expandable section has an expandable, wedge-shaped spalling edge extending from the outer surface of the wall, perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the body, and expanding means in the body for outwardly expanding the expandable section and forcing the spalling edge into the wall of a hole with sufficient outward pressure to spall away the surface layer of concrete. The method and apparatus are particularly suitable for removing surface layers of concrete which are radioactively contaminated

  20. Efficient mixed-solvent exfoliation of few-quintuple layer Bi2S3 and its photoelectric response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yaohui; Zhao, Qiyi; Yao, Zehan; Si, Keyu; Zhou, Yixuan; Xu, Xinlong

    2017-08-01

    A scalable liquid exfoliation of layered Bi2S3 employing a mixed-solvent strategy was used for the fabrication of Bi2S3 nanosheets. We found that 10% deionized water in 90% isopropyl alcohol is the best mixed solvent for the efficient and effective exfoliation of layered Bi2S3. These results are consistent with the absorbance spectra and enthalpy of mixing theory. The obtained Bi2S3 nanosheets had few-quintuple layers and were investigated by transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. These Bi2S3 nanosheets can be used to fabricate large-scale thin films by filtration method; the films demonstrated sensitive photoelectric response with the rise and decay response of photocurrent on the sub-second scale under visible light excitation. The electronic structures of bulk and one-quintuple layer Bi2S3 are calculated by first-principle calculation for better understanding of the photoelectric response. A green mixed-solvent processing of Bi2S3 opens up the potential application of Bi2S3 optoelectric films to photoelectric detection and solar energy conversion devices.

  1. Progress Toward Analytic Predictions of Supersonic Hydrocarbon-Air Combustion: Computation of Ignition Times and Supersonic Mixing Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, Scott Michael

    Combustion in scramjet engines is faced with the limitation of brief residence time in the combustion chamber, requiring fuel and preheated air streams to mix and ignite in a matter of milliseconds. Accurate predictions of autoignition times are needed to design reliable supersonic combustion chambers. Most efforts in estimating non-premixed autoignition times have been devoted to hydrogen-air mixtures. The present work addresses hydrocarbon-air combustion, which is of interest for future scramjet engines. Computation of ignition in supersonic flows requires adequate characterization of ignition chemistry and description of the flow, both of which are derived in this work. In particular, we have shown that activation energy asymptotics combined with a previously derived reduced chemical kinetic mechanism provides analytic predictions of autoignition times in homogeneous systems. Results are compared with data from shock tube experiments, and previous expressions which employ a fuel depletion criterion. Ignition in scramjet engines has a strong dependence on temperature, which is found by perturbing the chemically frozen mixing layer solution. The frozen solution is obtained here, accounting for effects of viscous dissipation between the fuel and air streams. We investigate variations of thermodynamic and transport properties, and compare these to simplified mixing layers which neglect these variations. Numerically integrating the mixing layer problem reveals a nonmonotonic temperature profile, with a peak occurring inside the shear layer for sufficiently high Mach numbers. These results will be essential in computation of ignition distances in supersonic combustion chambers.

  2. Surface modification of passive iron by alkyl-phosphonic acid layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paszternak, A. [Chemical Research Center of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, 1025 Budapest, Pusztaszeri ut 59-67 (Hungary); Stichleutner, S. [Research Group for Nuclear Methods in Structural Chemistry, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Chemistry, Eoetvoes Lorand University, 1117 Budapest, Pazmany P. setany 1/a (Hungary); Felhosi, I.; Keresztes, Z. [Chemical Research Center of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, 1025 Budapest, Pusztaszeri ut 59-67 (Hungary); Nagy, F.; Kuzmann, E.; Vertes, A.; Homonnay, Z. [Research Group for Nuclear Methods in Structural Chemistry, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Chemistry, Eoetvoes Lorand University, 1117 Budapest, Pazmany P. setany 1/a (Hungary); Peto, G. [Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, 1121 Budapest, Konkoly Thege ut 29-33 (Hungary); Kalman, E. [Chemical Research Center of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, 1025 Budapest, Pusztaszeri ut 59-67 (Hungary)], E-mail: erika.kalman@chemres.hu

    2007-12-01

    Phosphonate layer formation on passive iron surface has been investigated by electrochemical, conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy (CEMS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. Electrochemical methods revealed that the prepassivation of iron surface results in stabilization of the phosphonate layer exhibiting favorable corrosion resistance. The rate of anodic dissolution is continuously decreasing due to the time-dependent formation of a protective phosphonate layer. The large R{sub ct} values of 1-20 M{omega} cm{sup 2} indicate rather high blocking effect of metal dissolution by the phosphonate layer. The phosphonate layer formation has been also followed by the decrease of capacitance. CEMS investigations were carried out to evaluate the differences in the composition of the passive layer as a result of the phosphonate treatment. Moessbauer spectroscopy indicated the presence of iron phosphonate. Changes in morphology due to the phosphonate layer formation have been observed.

  3. Atomisation and droplet formation mechanisms in a model two-phase mixing layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleski, Stephane; Ling, Yue; Fuster, Daniel; Tryggvason, Gretar

    2017-11-01

    We study atomization in a turbulent two-phase mixing layer inspired by the Grenoble air-water experiments. A planar gas jet of large velocity is emitted on top of a planar liquid jet of smaller velocity. The density ratio and momentum ratios are both set at 20 in the numerical simulation in order to ease the simulation. We use a Volume-Of-Fluid method with good parallelisation properties, implemented in our code http://parissimulator.sf.net. Our simulations show two distinct droplet formation mechanisms, one in which thin liquid sheets are punctured to form rapidly expanding holes and the other in which ligaments of irregular shape form and breakup in a manner similar but not identical to jets in Rayleigh-Plateau-Savart instabilities. Observed distributions of particle sizes are extracted for a sequence of ever more refined grids, the largest grid containing approximately eight billion points. Although their accuracy is limited at small sizes by the grid resolution and at large size by statistical effects, the distributions overlap in the central region. The observed distributions are much closer to log normal distributions than to gamma distributions as is also the case for experiments.

  4. Statistics of the turbulent/non-turbulent interface in a spatially developing mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Attili, Antonio

    2014-06-02

    The thin interface separating the inner turbulent region from the outer irrotational fluid is analysed in a direct numerical simulation of a spatially developing turbulent mixing layer. A vorticity threshold is defined to detect the interface separating the turbulent from the non-turbulent regions of the flow, and to calculate statistics conditioned on the distance from this interface. The conditional statistics for velocity are in remarkable agreement with the results for other free shear flows available in the literature, such as turbulent jets and wakes. In addition, an analysis of the passive scalar field in the vicinity of the interface is presented. It is shown that the scalar has a jump at the interface, even stronger than that observed for velocity. The strong jump for the scalar has been observed before in the case of high Schmidt number (Sc). In the present study, such a strong jump is observed for a scalar with Sc ≈ 1. Conditional statistics of kinetic energy and scalar dissipation are presented. While the kinetic energy dissipation has its maximum far from the interface, the scalar dissipation is characterised by a strong peak very close to the interface. Finally, it is shown that the geometric features of the interfaces correlate with relatively large scale structures as visualised by low-pressure isosurfaces. © 2014 Taylor & Francis.

  5. Seasonal variation of the global mixed layer depth: comparison between Argo data and FIO-ESM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yutong; Xu, Haiming; Qiao, Fangli; Dong, Changming

    2018-03-01

    The present study evaluates a simulation of the global ocean mixed layer depth (MLD) using the First Institute of Oceanography-Earth System Model (FIOESM). The seasonal variation of the global MLD from the FIO-ESM simulation is compared to Argo observational data. The Argo data show that the global ocean MLD has a strong seasonal variation with a deep MLD in winter and a shallow MLD in summer, while the spring and fall seasons act as transitional periods. Overall, the FIO-ESM simulation accurately captures the seasonal variation in MLD in most areas. It exhibits a better performance during summer and fall than during winter and spring. The simulated MLD in the Southern Hemisphere is much closer to observations than that in the Northern Hemisphere. In general, the simulated MLD over the South Atlantic Ocean matches the observation best among the six areas. Additionally, the model slightly underestimates the MLD in parts of the North Atlantic Ocean, and slightly overestimates the MLD over the other ocean basins.

  6. Statistics of the turbulent/non-turbulent interface in a spatially evolving mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Cristancho, Juan

    2012-12-01

    The thin interface separating the inner turbulent region from the outer irrotational fluid is analyzed in a direct numerical simulation of a spatially developing turbulent mixing layer. A vorticity threshold is defined to detect the interface separating the turbulent from the non-turbulent regions of the flow, and to calculate statistics conditioned on the distance from this interface. Velocity and passive scalar statistics are computed and compared to the results of studies addressing other shear flows, such as turbulent jets and wakes. The conditional statistics for velocity are in remarkable agreement with the results for other types of free shear flow available in the literature. In addition, a detailed analysis of the passive scalar field (with Sc 1) in the vicinity of the interface is presented. The scalar has a jump at the interface, even stronger than that observed for velocity. The strong jump for the scalar has been observed before in the case of high Schmidt number, but it is a new result for Schmidt number of order one. Finally, the dissipation for the kinetic energy and the scalar are presented. While the kinetic energy dissipation has its maximum far from the interface, the scalar dissipation is characterized by a strong peak very close to the interface.

  7. Effects of radiative heat transfer on the turbulence structure in inert and reacting mixing layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Somnath; Friedrich, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    We use large-eddy simulation to study the interaction between turbulence and radiative heat transfer in low-speed inert and reacting plane temporal mixing layers. An explicit filtering scheme based on approximate deconvolution is applied to treat the closure problem arising from quadratic nonlinearities of the filtered transport equations. In the reacting case, the working fluid is a mixture of ideal gases where the low-speed stream consists of hydrogen and nitrogen and the high-speed stream consists of oxygen and nitrogen. Both streams are premixed in a way that the free-stream densities are the same and the stoichiometric mixture fraction is 0.3. The filtered heat release term is modelled using equilibrium chemistry. In the inert case, the low-speed stream consists of nitrogen at a temperature of 1000 K and the highspeed stream is pure water vapour of 2000 K, when radiation is turned off. Simulations assuming the gas mixtures as gray gases with artificially increased Planck mean absorption coefficients are performed in which the large-eddy simulation code and the radiation code PRISSMA are fully coupled. In both cases, radiative heat transfer is found to clearly affect fluctuations of thermodynamic variables, Reynolds stresses, and Reynolds stress budget terms like pressure-strain correlations. Source terms in the transport equation for the variance of temperature are used to explain the decrease of this variance in the reacting case and its increase in the inert case

  8. Effects of radiative heat transfer on the turbulence structure in inert and reacting mixing layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Somnath; Friedrich, Rainer

    2015-05-01

    We use large-eddy simulation to study the interaction between turbulence and radiative heat transfer in low-speed inert and reacting plane temporal mixing layers. An explicit filtering scheme based on approximate deconvolution is applied to treat the closure problem arising from quadratic nonlinearities of the filtered transport equations. In the reacting case, the working fluid is a mixture of ideal gases where the low-speed stream consists of hydrogen and nitrogen and the high-speed stream consists of oxygen and nitrogen. Both streams are premixed in a way that the free-stream densities are the same and the stoichiometric mixture fraction is 0.3. The filtered heat release term is modelled using equilibrium chemistry. In the inert case, the low-speed stream consists of nitrogen at a temperature of 1000 K and the highspeed stream is pure water vapour of 2000 K, when radiation is turned off. Simulations assuming the gas mixtures as gray gases with artificially increased Planck mean absorption coefficients are performed in which the large-eddy simulation code and the radiation code PRISSMA are fully coupled. In both cases, radiative heat transfer is found to clearly affect fluctuations of thermodynamic variables, Reynolds stresses, and Reynolds stress budget terms like pressure-strain correlations. Source terms in the transport equation for the variance of temperature are used to explain the decrease of this variance in the reacting case and its increase in the inert case.

  9. Competitive adsorption from mixed hen egg-white lysozyme/surfactant solutions at the air-water interface studied by tensiometry, ellipsometry, and surface dilational rheology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alahverdjieva, V S; Grigoriev, D O; Fainerman, V B; Aksenenko, E V; Miller, R; Möhwald, H

    2008-02-21

    The competitive adsorption at the air-water interface from mixed adsorption layers of hen egg-white lysozyme with a non-ionic surfactant (C10DMPO) was studied and compared to the mixture with an ionic surfactant (SDS) using bubble and drop shape analysis tensiometry, ellipsometry, and surface dilational rheology. The set of equilibrium and kinetic data of the mixed solutions is described by a thermodynamic model developed recently. The theoretical description of the mixed system is based on the model parameters for the individual components.

  10. Design of bituminous surface mixes with high skid resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    The Virginia Highway Research Council has proposed a study of the skid resistance of bituminous surfaces incorporating relatively hard and expensive aggregates. The hardness of the aggregates to be used aluminum oxide (Exolon) and calcined kaolin -- ...

  11. A Study on Parameterization of the Beijing Winter Heavy Haze Events Associated with Height of Pollution Mixing Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Niu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available North China Plain, Beijing, Tianjin, and Hebei province are the major areas facing the decreasing air quality and frequent pollution events in the recent years. Identifying the effect of meteorological conditions on changes in aerosol concentration and the mechanism for forming such heavy pollution in North China Plain has become the focus of scientific research. The influence of atmospheric boundary layer characteristics on air quality has become the focus of attention and research. However, the boundary layer describes that the influences of air pollution have sometimes been duplicated and confused with each other in some of the studies. It is necessary to pay attention to some extent, raising awareness of related pollution mixing layer. The conclusions of the study include the following: (1 The lowered height of pollution mixing layer (H_PML was favorable for the increase of the PM2.5 density. The lowered height of pollution mixing layer had significant impacts on formation of severe haze. (2 A statistical analysis of large-scale heavy pollution cases in eastern China shows that the H_PML parameters have significant contributions. (3 The feedback effect of the high value of the convection inhibition (CIN, which is unfavorable to vertical diffusion of pollution, causes further reduction of H_PML, resulting in cumulative pollution again.

  12. 2D dynamical arrest transition in a mixed nanoparticle-phospholipid layer studied in real and momentum spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsi, Davide; Guzmán, Eduardo; Liggieri, Libero; Ravera, Francesca; Ruta, Beatrice; Chushkin, Yuriy; Rimoldi, Tiziano; Cristofolini, Luigi

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the interfacial dynamics of a 2D self-organized mixed layer made of silica nanoparticles interacting with phospholipid (DPPC) monolayers at the air/water interface. This system has biological relevance, allowing investigation of toxicological effects of nanoparticles on model membranes and lung surfactants. It might also provide bio-inspired technological solutions, exploiting the self-organization of DPPC to produce a non-trivial 2D structuration of nanoparticles. The characterization of interfacial dynamics yields information on the effects of NPs on the mechanical properties, important to improve performances of systems such as colloidosomes, foams, creams. For this, we combine micro-tracking in real-space with measurement in momentum-space via x-ray photon-correlation spectroscopy and Digital Fourier Microscopy. Using these complementary techniques, we extend the spatial range of investigation beyond the limits of each one. We find a dynamical transition from Brownian diffusion to an arrested state driven by compression, characterized by intermittent rearrangements, compatible with a repulsive glass phase. The rearrangement and relaxation of the monolayer structure results dramatically hindered by the presence of NPs, which is relevant to explain some the mechanical features observed for the dynamic surface pressure response of these systems and which can be relevant for the respiratory physiology and for future drug-delivery composite systems.

  13. Effects of fluid layer at micropolar orthotropic boundary surface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The displacement, microrotation and stress components for a micropolar orthotropic elastic solid so obtained in the physical domain are computed numerically by applying the numerical inversion technique. Micropolarity and anisotropy effects along with that of the depth of the fluid layer on various expressions have been ...

  14. Effects of fluid layer at micropolar orthotropic boundary surface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Abstract. Effects of a fluid layer at a micropolar orthotropic elastic solid inter- face to a moving point load have been studied. After using the Fourier transform an eigen value approach has been employed to solve the problem. The displacement, microrotation and stress components for a micropolar orthotropic elastic solid so.

  15. The nanostructure and microstructure of SiC surface layers deposited by MWCVD and ECRCVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dul, K.; Jonas, S.; Handke, B.

    2017-12-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Atomic force microscopy (AFM) have been used to investigate ex-situ the surface topography of SiC layers deposited on Si(100) by Microwave Chemical Vapour Deposition (MWCVD) -S1,S2 layers and Electron Cyclotron Resonance Chemical Vapor Deposition (ECRCVD) - layers S3,S4, using silane, methane, and hydrogen. The effects of sample temperature and gas flow on the nanostructure and microstructure have been investigated. The nanostructure was described by three-dimensional surface roughness analysis based on digital image processing, which gives a tool to quantify different aspects of surface features. A total of 13 different numerical parameters used to describe the surface topography were used. The scanning electron image (SEM) of the microstructure of layers S1, S2, and S4 was similar, however, layer S3 was completely different; appearing like grains. Nonetheless, it can be seen that no grain boundary structure is present in the AFM images.

  16. Validation of source approval of HMA surface mix aggregate using spectrometer : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The main focus of this research project was to develop methodologies for the validation of source approval of hot : mix asphalt surface mix aggregate. In order to further enhance the validation process, a secondary focus was also to : create a spectr...

  17. Validation of source approval of HMA surface mix aggregate : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The main focus of this research project was to develop methodologies for the validation of source approval of hot : mix asphalt surface mix aggregate. In order to further enhance the validation process, a secondary focus was also to : create a spectr...

  18. Mixed Potential Energy Surfaces of the Ultrafast Isomerization of Retinal in Bacteriorhodopsin

    OpenAIRE

    Prokhorenko Valentyn I.; Morizumi Takefumi; Halpin Alexei; Johnson Philip J. M.; Ernst Oliver P.; Dwayne Miller R. J.

    2013-01-01

    We observe, using electronic two-dimensional photon echo spectroscopy, that the cis and trans potential energy surfaces of the ultrafast isomerization of retinal in bacteriorhodopsin are mixed via the hydrogen out of plane (HOOP) mode.

  19. Mixed Potential Energy Surfaces of the Ultrafast Isomerization of Retinal in Bacteriorhodopsin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prokhorenko Valentyn I.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We observe, using electronic two-dimensional photon echo spectroscopy, that the cis and trans potential energy surfaces of the ultrafast isomerization of retinal in bacteriorhodopsin are mixed via the hydrogen out of plane (HOOP mode.

  20. Electric double layer interactions in bacterial adhesion to surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poortinga, AT; Norde, W; Busscher, HJ; Bos, R.R.M.

    2002-01-01

    The DLVO (Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, Overbeek) theory was originally developed to describe interactions between non-biological lyophobic colloids such as polystyrene particles, but is also used to describe bacterial adhesion to surfaces. Despite the differences between the surface of bacteria and

  1. X-ray evaluation of residual stress distributions within surface machined layer generated by surface machining and sequential welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, Yuu; Okano, Shigetaka; Mochizuki, Masahito

    2017-01-01

    The excessive tensile residual stress generated by welding after surface machining may be an important factor to cause stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in nuclear power plants. Therefore we need to understand and control the residual stress distribution appropriately. In this study, residual stress distributions within surface machined layer generated by surface machining and sequential welding were evaluated by X-ray diffraction method. Depth directional distributions were also investigated by electrolytic polishing. In addition, to consider the effect of work hardened layer on the residual stress distributions, we also measured full width at half maximum (FWHM) obtained from X-ray diffraction. Testing material was a low-carbon austenitic stainless steel type SUS316L. Test specimens were prepared by surface machining with different cutting conditions. Then, bead-on-plate welding under the same welding condition was carried out on the test specimens with different surface machined layer. As a result, the tensile residual stress generated by surface machining increased with increasing cutting speed and showed nearly uniform distributions on the surface. Furthermore, the tensile residual stress drastically decreased with increasing measurement depth within surface machined layer. Then, the residual stress approached 0 MPa after the compressive value showed. FWHM also decreased drastically with increasing measurement depth and almost constant value from a certain depth, which was almost equal regardless of the machining condition, within surface machined layer in all specimens. After welding, the transverse distribution of the longitudinal residual stress varied in the area apart from the weld center according to machining conditions and had a maximum value in heat affected zone. The magnitude of the maximum residual stress was almost equal regardless of the machining condition and decreased with increasing measurement depth within surface machined layer. Finally, the

  2. Dynamical structure of the turbulent boundary layer on rough surface

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uruba, Václav; Jonáš, Pavel; Hladík, Ondřej

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 1 (2011), s. 603-604 ISSN 1617-7061 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/08/1112; GA ČR GAP101/10/1230 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : turbulent boundary layer * rough wall * hairpin vortex Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/pamm.201110291/abstract

  3. Al2O3 dielectric layers on H-terminated diamond: Controlling surface conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu; Koeck, Franz A.; Dutta, Maitreya; Wang, Xingye; Chowdhury, Srabanti; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2017-10-01

    This study investigates how the surface conductivity of H-terminated diamond can be preserved and stabilized by using a dielectric layer with an in situ post-deposition treatment. Thin layers of Al2O3 were grown by plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) on H-terminated undoped diamond (100) surfaces. The changes of the hole accumulation layer were monitored by correlating the binding energy of the diamond C 1s core level with electrical measurements. The initial PEALD of 1 nm Al2O3 resulted in an increase of the C 1s core level binding energy consistent with a reduction of the surface hole accumulation and a reduction of the surface conductivity. A hydrogen plasma step restored the C 1s binding energy to the value of the conductive surface, and the resistance of the diamond surface was found to be within the range for surface transfer doping. Further, the PEALD growth did not appear to degrade the surface conductive layer according to the position of the C 1s core level and electrical measurements. This work provides insight into the approaches to establish and control the two-dimensional hole-accumulation layer of the H-terminated diamond and improve the stability and performance of H-terminated diamond electronic devices.

  4. Abrasive wear mechanisms and surface layer structure of refractory materials after mechanical working

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milman, Y.V.; Lotsko, D.V.

    1989-01-01

    The mechanisms of abrasive wear and surface layer structure formation after different kinds of mechanical working are considered in terms of fracture and plastic deformation mechanisms for various refractory materials. The principles for classification of abrasive wear mechanisms are proposed, the four types of wear mechanisms are distinguished for various combinations of fractures and plastic deformation types. The concept of characteristic deformation temperature t * (knee temperature) is used. Detailed examples are given of investigating the surface layer structures in grinded crystals of sapphire and molybdenum. The amorphisation tendency of the thinnest surface layer while mechanical polishing is discussed separately. 19 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs. (Author)

  5. Influence of the Surface Layer on the Electrochemical Deposition of Metals and Semiconductors into Mesoporous Silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chubenko, E. B., E-mail: eugene.chubenko@gmail.com; Redko, S. V.; Sherstnyov, A. I.; Petrovich, V. A.; Kotov, D. A.; Bondarenko, V. P. [Belarusian State University of Information and RadioElectronics (Belarus)

    2016-03-15

    The influence of the surface layer on the process of the electrochemical deposition of metals and semiconductors into porous silicon is studied. It is shown that the surface layer differs in structure and electrical characteristics from the host porous silicon bulk. It is established that a decrease in the conductivity of silicon crystallites that form the surface layer of porous silicon has a positive effect on the process of the filling of porous silicon with metals and semiconductors. This is demonstrated by the example of nickel and zinc oxide. The effect can be used for the formation of nanocomposite materials on the basis of porous silicon and nanostructures with a high aspect ratio.

  6. Hard Surface Layers by Pack Boriding and Gaseous Thermo-Reactive Deposition and Diffusion Treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Bottoli, Federico; Dahl, Kristian Vinter

    2017-01-01

    subjected to TRD (chromizing and titanizing) and boriding treatments. For the steels with low carbon content, chromizing results in surface alloying with chromium, i.e., formation of a (soft) “stainless” surface zone. Steels containing higher levels of carbon form chromium carbide (viz. Cr23C6, Cr7C3......) layers with hardnesses up to 1800 HV. Titanizing of ARNE tool steel results in a surface layer consisting of TiC with a hardness of approximately 4000 HV. Duplex treatments, where boriding is combined with subsequent (TRD) titanizing, result in formation of hard TiB2 on top of a thick layer of Fe...

  7. Study on the influence of carbon monoxide to the surface oxide layer of uranium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaolin; Duan Rongliang; Fu Yibei; Xie Renshou; Zuo Changming; Zhao Chunpei; Chen Hong

    1997-01-01

    The influence of carbon monoxide to the surface oxide layer of uranium metal has been studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and gas chromatography (GC). Carbon monoxide adsorption on the oxide layer resulted in U4f peak shifting to the lower binding energy. The content of oxygen in the oxide is decreased and the atomic ratio (O/U) is decreased by 7.2%. The amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere after the surface reaction is increased by 11.0%. The investigation indicates that the surface layer can prevent the further oxidation uranium metal in the atmosphere of carbon monoxide

  8. The microstructure of the surface layer of magnesium laser alloyed with aluminum and silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dziadoń, Andrzej; Mola, Renata; Błaż, Ludwik

    2016-01-01

    The surface layer under analysis was formed as a result of diffusion bonding of a thin AlSi20 plate to a magnesium substrate followed by laser melting. Depending on the process parameters, the laser beam melted the AlSi20 plate only or the AlSi20 plate and a layer of the magnesium surface adjacent to it. Two types of microstructure of the remelted layer were thus analyzed. If the melting zone was limited to the AlSi20 plate, the microstructure of the surface layer was typical of a rapidly solidified hypereutectic Al–Si alloy. Since, however, the liquid AlSi20 reacted with the magnesium substrate, the following intermetallic phases formed: Al 3 Mg 2 , Mg 17 Al 12 and Mg 2 Si. The microstructure of the modified surface layer of magnesium was examined using optical, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy. The analysis of the surface properties of the laser modified magnesium revealed that the thin layer has a microstructure of a rapidly solidified Al–Si alloy offering good protection against corrosion. By contrast, the surface layer containing particles of intermetallic phases was more resistant to abrasion but had lower corrosion resistance than the silumin type layer. - Highlights: •A CO 2 laser was used for surface alloying of Mg with AlSi20. •Before alloying, an AlSi20 plate was diffusion bonded with the Mg substrate. •The process parameters affected the alloyed layer microstructure and properties. •With melting limited to AlSi20, the layer had a structure of rapidly solidified AlSi20. •Mg–Al and Mg–Si phases were present when both the substrate and the plate were melted.

  9. A Tropical Lake Breeze System : The Effect on Surface NO, NO2, O3, and CO2 Mixing Ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima Moura, M. A.; Eça D'Almeida Rocha, C. H.; Trebs, I.; Andreae, M. O.; Meixner, F. X.

    2003-04-01

    During the Cooperative LBA Airborne Regional Experiment 2001 (CLAIRE2001, July 2001), we investigated diel variations of nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO_2), ozone (O_3) and carbon dioxide (CO_2) mixing ratios at Balbina Limnological Station (01^o55'994''S, 59^o28'071''W, Amazonia,Brazil). We applied sensitive and species-specific chemiluminescence (NO, NO_2, O_3) and NDIR (CO_2) analysers to record ambient mixing ratios on 1 min intervals. Simultaneously, we extensively monitored (micro-)meteorological qauntities (air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and -direction, thermal stratification, rainfall intensity, soil temperatures and moisture, as well as radiation fluxes (global, net, short wave, NO_2 photolysis, and photosynthetic active)). Balbina Limnological Station is located just a few hundred meters south of a 2.360 km^2 hydroelectric power dam (Usina Hidrelétrica de Balbina) and about 100m north from the edge of a primary rainforest. Marked differences in surface albedo and heat storage capacity generate a local wind system, the lake breeze, which advects air from the dam (09:00 to 15:00 local) and from the rainforest (18:00 to 06:00 local), respectively. Generally, we observed marked diel variations of NO, NO_2, O_3, and CO_2 (high/low levels during night/day) and O_3 (low/high levels during night/day). Especially in the tropics, this behaviour is usually related to (a) accumulation of soil emissions (NO, CO_2), chemical reactions (NO, from NO_2-O_3 reaction) and surface destruction (O_3) in a shallow and strong nocturnal boundary layer inversion, and (b) to soil emission (NO), photochemical reactions (NO-NO_2-O_3), dry deposition/plant uptake (NO_2, O_3, and CO_2) and strong turbulent vertical mixing in the daytime mixed layer. However, under the specific conditions of the lake breeze soil emission and dry deposition/ plant uptake can be neglected during daytime. Consequently, the investigation of daytime mixing ratios can be confined to

  10. Effect of Cholesterol on the Stability and Lubrication Efficiency of Phosphatidylcholine Surface Layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorkin, Raya; Kampf, Nir; Klein, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    The lubrication properties of saturated PC lipid vesicles containing high cholesterol content under high loads were examined by detailed surface force balance measurements of normal and shear forces between two surface-attached lipid layers. Forces between two opposing mica surfaces bearing

  11. Research Note : Near-surface layer replacement for sparse data: Is interpolation needed?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, Yimin; Verschuur, D.J.; Luo, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Near-surface problem is a common challenge faced by land seismic data processing, where often, due to near-surface anomalies, events of interest are obscured. One method to handle this challenge is near-surface layer replacement, which is a wavefield reconstruction process based on downward

  12. Influence of changes in surface layer properties on tire/pavement noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, M.; Van Keulen, W.; Ceylan, H.; Van de Ven, M.F.C.; Molenaar, A.A.A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates changes in tire/pavement noise caused by variations in the road surface characteristics. This research is based on the analysis of noise and surface characteristics collected from sections with 25 mm thickness thin layer surfacings in the Netherlands. Investigations are first

  13. Laminar boundary layer response to rotation of a finite diameter surface patch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klewicki, J.C.; Hill, R.B.

    2003-01-01

    The responses of the flat plate laminar boundary layer to perturbations generated by rotating a finite patch of the bounding surface are explored experimentally. The size of the surface patch was of the same order as the boundary layer thickness. The displacement thickness Reynolds number range of the boundary layers explored was 72-527. The rotation rates of the surface patch ranged from 2.14 to 62.8 s-1. Qualitative flow visualizations and quantitative molecular tagging velocimetry measurements revealed that rotation of a finite surface patch generates an asymmetric loop-like vortex. Significant features of this vortex include that, (i) the sign of the vorticity in the vortex head is opposite that of the boundary layer vorticity regardless of the sign of the input rotation, (ii) one leg of the vortex exhibits motion akin to solid body rotation while the other leg is best characterized as a spanwise shear layer, (iii) the vortex leg exhibiting near solid body rotation lifts more rapidly from the surface than the leg more like a shear layer, and (iv) the vortex leg exhibiting near solid body rotation always occurs on the side of the surface patch experiencing downstream motion. These asymmetries switch sides depending on the sign of the input rotation. The present results are interpreted and discussed relative to analytical solutions for infinite geometries. By way of analogy, plausible connections are drawn between the present results and the influences of wall normal vortices in turbulent boundary layer flows

  14. [Texture variation of CC 5052 aluminum alloy slab from surface to center layer by XRD].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Biao; Liu, Wen-Chang; Ma, Xiao-Yi; Li, Jian; Yang, Qing-Xiang; Wang, Shan; Ma, Min; Liu, Chang; Zhao, Y M

    2013-05-01

    For improvement of the processing and gaining uniformity texture structure and performance of direct chill cast CCAA 5052 aluminum alloy band after first hot rolling with different reduction, the material was annealed at 454 degrees C and then cold rolling with different reduction was conducted, the texture at surface, quarter and center layer of the sample was tested and examined by X-ray diffraction method, the data calculated using special software and the difference of texture at surface, quarter and center layer was analyzed. There existed an elevated gradient of intensity from surface layer to center layer after cold rolled with less than or equal to 40% reduction, The main texture of beta is stronger mainly due to transformation from remainder exposure, while the goss and remainder is infirm, the state of texture at each layer is close to each other after cold rolling with reduction high than 56.1%.

  15. Seasonal features of atmospheric surface-layer characteristics over a tropical coastal station in Southern India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hari Prasad, K.B.R.R.; Srinivas, C.V.; Baskaran, R.; Venkatraman, B.

    2016-01-01

    Dispersion of air-borne effluents occurs in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) where turbulence is the main physical processes. In the surface layer of ABL, the mechanical (shear) generation of turbulence exceeds the buoyant generation or consumption of turbulence. In this layer, under steady state and horizontally homogeneous conditions various forces in the governing equation can be neglected and one can apply Monin-Obukhov Similarity Theory (MOST) to estimate the turbulent fluxes and other surface layer variables. Understanding the turbulent characteristics of the surface layer is vital for modeling of turbulent diffusion in regional numerical weather and pollution dispersion models. The objective of this study is to verify the validity of the MOST at the coastal site Kalpakkam under various atmospheric stability conditions with respect to different seasons for modeling atmospheric dispersion of radioactive effluents

  16. On periodically excited turbulent mixing layer created downstream of a plane Chevron partition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kit, E; Wygnanski, I

    2008-01-01

    The flow in a turbulent mixing layer resulting from the merger of two parallel, different velocity streams, created downstream of a 'Chevron'-shaped jagged partition was simulated numerically on the basis of experiments published in 2007. A small flap that was hinged at the trailing edge of the partition could oscillate at a prescribed frequency, and induce regular oscillations in the flow. The latter regulated the large eddy structure that was amenable to phase-locked data acquisition revealing the large spanwise vortices that were generated by Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and streamwise vortices that were triggered by the chevron and were enhanced by a secondary instability in the flow. These, being locked in phase, were mapped by using particle image velocimetry. Numerical simulation of the equations of motion was then carried out in order to reveal the most unstable mechanisms leading to the generation of the streamwise vortical structure. The simulation started by assuming the flow to be two-dimensional (2D) and allowing the large spanwise eddies to develop temporally. At a prescribed time (or the state of development of the large spanwise rolls) the 2D computation was frozen and 3D simulation initiated. The latter exhibited typical evolution of translative instability, which bent the large spanwise structures and stretched some of them to create streamwise vorticity. Bulging of the spanwise eddies was also observed, but the bulging instability is a slower process than the bending one. The results of the simulations compare well to experiments and provide some understanding of this complex interaction.

  17. Surface water management at a mixed waste remediation site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlotzhauer, D.S.; Warbritton, K.R.

    1991-01-01

    The Weldon Spring Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) deals with chemical and radiological contaminants. MK-Ferguson Company is managing the project under contract with the US Department of Energy. Remedial activities include demolishing buildings, constructing material storage and staging areas, excavating and consolidating waste materials, and treating and disposing of the materials in a land disposal facility. Due to the excavation and construction required during remediation, a well-planned surface water management system is essential. Planning involves characterization of source areas and surface water transport mechanisms and identification of applicable regulations. System components include: erosion control sediment control, flow attenuation, and management of contaminated water. Combinations of these components may be utilized during actual construction and remediation to obtain optimum control. Monitoring is performed during implementation in order to assess the effectiveness of control measures. This management scheme provides for comprehensive management of surface water at this site by providing control and/or treatment to appropriate standards. Although some treatment methodologies for contaminated water are specific to site contaminants, this comprehensive program provides a management approach which is applicable to many remedial projects in order to minimize contaminant release and meet Clean Water Act requirements

  18. A laboratory investigation of mixing dynamics between biofuels and surface waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoxiang; Cotel, Aline

    2017-11-01

    Recently, production and usage of ethanol-blend fuels or biofuels have increased dramatically along with increasing risk of spilling into surface waters. Lack of understanding of the environmental impacts and absence of standard clean-up procedures make it crucial to study the mixing behavior between biofuels and water. Biofuels are represented by a solution of ethanol and glycol. A Plexiglas tank in conjunction with a wave generator is used to simulate the mixing of surface waters and biofuels under different natural conditions. In our previous experiments, two distinct mixing regimes were observed. One regime was driven by turbulence and the other by interfacial instabilities. However, under more realistic situations, without wind driven waves, only the first mixing regime was found. After one minute of rapid turbulent mixing, biofuels and water were fully mixed and no interface was formed. During the mixing process, chemical reactions happened simultaneously and influenced mixing dynamics. Current experiments are investigating the effect of waves on the mixing dynamics. Support from NSF CBET 1335878.

  19. Surface passivation of GaAs nanowires by the atomic layer deposition of AlN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shtrom, I. V., E-mail: igorstrohm@mail.ru; Bouravleuv, A. D. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Samsonenko, Yu. B.; Khrebtov, A. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg National Research Academic University—Nanotechnology Research and Education Center (Russian Federation); Soshnikov, I. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Reznik, R. R.; Cirlin, G. E., E-mail: cirlin@beam.ioffe.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg National Research Academic University—Nanotechnology Research and Education Center (Russian Federation); Dhaka, V.; Perros, A.; Lipsanen, H. [Aalto University (Finland)

    2016-12-15

    It is shown that the atomic layer deposition of thin AlN layers can be used to passivate the surface states of GaAs nanowires synthesized by molecular-beam epitaxy. Studies of the optical properties of samples by low-temperature photoluminescence measurements shows that the photoluminescence-signal intensity can be increased by a factor of up to five by passivating the nanowires with a 25-Å-thick AlN layer.

  20. Evolution of a Western Arctic Ice Ocean Boundary Layer and Mixed Layer Across a Developing Thermodynamically Forced Marginal Ice Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    on measurements made by the turbulence package on AOFB 33. For shortwave radiative input (QH), we set the fractional solar radiation terms in Eqn...2.6. Air-Ocean Shortwave Radiation Overview at MIZ C2 .............................77 Figure 2.7. Ice-Ocean Boundary Layer Processes Overview at MIZ C2...2005 (Perovich et al. 2007a). Identifying the processes that drive SIZ expansion requires an understanding of how this incoming solar radiation is

  1. A new first-order turbulence mixing model for the stable atmospheric boundary-layer: development and testing in large-eddy and single column models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J.; Bou-Zeid, E.; Golaz, J.

    2011-12-01

    Parameterization of the stably-stratified atmospheric boundary-layer is of crucial importance to different aspects of numerical weather prediction at regional scales and climate modeling at global scales, such as land-surface temperature forecasts, fog and frost prediction, and polar climate. It is well-known that most operational climate models require excessive turbulence mixing of the stable boundary-layer to prevent decoupling of the atmospheric component from the land component under strong stability, but the performance of such a model is unlikely to be satisfactory under weakly and moderately stable conditions. In this study we develop and test a general turbulence mixing model of the stable boundary-layer which works under different stabilities and for steady as well as unsteady conditions. A-priori large-eddy simulation (LES) tests are presented to motivate and verify the new parameterization. Subsequently, an assessment of this model using the GFDL single-column model (SCM) is performed. Idealized test cases including continuously varying stability, as well as stability discontinuity, are used to test the new SCM against LES results. A good match of mean and flux profiles is found when the new parameterization is used, while other traditional first-order turbulence models using the concept of stability function perform poorly. SCM spatial resolution is also found to have little impact on the performance of the new turbulence closure, but temporal resolution is important and a numerical stability criterion based on the model time step is presented.

  2. Observational assessment of the role of nocturnal residual-layer chemistry in determining daytime surface particulate nitrate concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Prabhakar

    2017-12-01

    3 gas to the surface on daytime particulate nitrate concentrations is important but limited by an excess of ammonia in the region, which leads to only a small fraction of nitrate existing in the gas phase even during the warmer daytime. However, in the late afternoon, when diminishing solar heating leads to a rapid fall in the mixed boundary layer height (BLH, the impact of surface deposition is temporarily enhanced and can lead to a substantial decline in surface-level particulate nitrate concentrations; this enhanced deposition is quickly arrested by a decrease in surface temperature, which drops the gas-phase fraction to near zero. The overall importance of enhanced late-afternoon gas-phase loss to the multiday buildup of pollution events is limited by the very shallow nocturnal boundary layer. The case study here demonstrates that mixing down of NO3−(p from the RL can contribute a majority of the surface-level NO3−(p in the morning (here,  ∼  80 %, and a strong influence can persist into the afternoon even when photochemical production is maximum. The particular day-to-day contribution of aloft nocturnal NO3−(p production to surface concentrations will depend on prevailing chemical and meteorological conditions. Although specific to the SJV, the observations and conceptual framework further developed here provide general insights into the evolution of pollution episodes in wintertime environments.

  3. Observational assessment of the role of nocturnal residual-layer chemistry in determining daytime surface particulate nitrate concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, Gouri; Parworth, Caroline L.; Zhang, Xiaolu; Kim, Hwajin; Young, Dominique E.; Beyersdorf, Andreas J.; Ziemba, Luke D.; Nowak, John B.; Bertram, Timothy H.; Faloona, Ian C.; Zhang, Qi; Cappa, Christopher D.

    2017-12-01

    daytime particulate nitrate concentrations is important but limited by an excess of ammonia in the region, which leads to only a small fraction of nitrate existing in the gas phase even during the warmer daytime. However, in the late afternoon, when diminishing solar heating leads to a rapid fall in the mixed boundary layer height (BLH), the impact of surface deposition is temporarily enhanced and can lead to a substantial decline in surface-level particulate nitrate concentrations; this enhanced deposition is quickly arrested by a decrease in surface temperature, which drops the gas-phase fraction to near zero. The overall importance of enhanced late-afternoon gas-phase loss to the multiday buildup of pollution events is limited by the very shallow nocturnal boundary layer. The case study here demonstrates that mixing down of NO3-(p) from the RL can contribute a majority of the surface-level NO3-(p) in the morning (here, ˜ 80 %), and a strong influence can persist into the afternoon even when photochemical production is maximum. The particular day-to-day contribution of aloft nocturnal NO3-(p) production to surface concentrations will depend on prevailing chemical and meteorological conditions. Although specific to the SJV, the observations and conceptual framework further developed here provide general insights into the evolution of pollution episodes in wintertime environments.

  4. Investigation of using steel slag in hot mix asphalt for the surface course of flexible pavements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hien Q.; Lu, Dai X.; Le, Son D.

    2018-04-01

    The rapid development of heavy industry in Vietnam leads to the establishments of steel industry. Steel slag, a by-product of steelwork industry, under Vietnamese’s law, was considered as a deleterious solid waste which needed to be processed and landfilled. However, this has changed recently, and steel slag is now seen as a normal or non-deleterious solid waste, and has been studied for reuse in the construction industry. In this study, steel slag was used, as a replacement for mineral aggregate, in hot mix asphalt. Two hot mix asphalt mixtures with an equivalent nominal aggregate size of 12.5 (C12.5) and 19 mm (C19) were produced using steel slag. In addition, one conventional hot mix asphalt mixture of C19 was produced using mineral aggregate for comparison purpose. Investigation in laboratory condition and trial sections was carried out on Marshall tests, surface roughness, skid resistance, and modulus of the pavement before and after applying a new surface course of hot mix asphalt. The study showed that all steel slag asphalt mixtures passed the Marshall stability and flow test requirements. The skid resistance of steel slag hot mix asphalt mixtures for the surface course satisfied the Vietnamese specification for asphalt. Moreover, the pavement sections with the surface course of steel slag hot mix asphalt showed a considerable higher modulus than that of the conventional one. Only the roughness of the surface course paved with C19 did not pass the requirement of the specification.

  5. On the homogeneity of a thick layer of mixed granules in optical quality inspection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.C.M.; Xia, H.

    2016-01-01

    Optical inspection of a thick layer of granules for foreign particles does not directly reveal their true number and the more so if the layer is not homogenous. This raises questions such as “how do I know if the layer is homogenous?” and “what is the relation between the observable particles and

  6. Seasonal cyclogenesis and the role of near-surface stratified layer in the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Murty, V.S.N.; Sarma, M.S.S.; Tilvi, V.

    The role of the near-surface stratified layer developed due to the spread of low salinity waters under the influence of freshwater influx on the cyclogenesis over the Bay of Bengal is addressed. The seasonal variation of the Effective Oceanic Layer...

  7. Formation of Titanium Carbide in the Surface Layer of Cavityless-Cast Iron-Carbon Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovcharenko, P. G.; Leshchev, A. Yu.; Makhneva, T. M.

    2018-01-01

    Special features of formation of titanium carbide in the surface layer of castings of iron-carbon alloys obtained with the use of investment patterns and "Ti - C" and "FeTi - C" alloying compositions are considered. The phase composition, the structure, and the hardness of the alloyed layers are determined.

  8. A manufacturing method for multi-layer polysilicon surface-micromachining technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sniegowski, J.J.; Rodgers, M.S.

    1998-01-01

    An advanced manufacturing technology which provides multi-layered polysilicon surface micromachining technology for advanced weapon systems is presented. Specifically, the addition of another design layer to a 4 levels process to create a 5 levels process allows consideration of fundamentally new architecture in designs for weapon advanced surety components.

  9. A Physically Based Horizontal Subgrid-scale Turbulent Mixing Parameterization for the Convective Boundary Layer in Mesoscale Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bowen; Xue, Ming; Zhu, Kefeng

    2017-04-01

    Compared to the representation of vertical turbulent mixing through various PBL schemes, the treatment of horizontal turbulence mixing in the boundary layer within mesoscale models, with O(10) km horizontal grid spacing, has received much less attention. In mesoscale models, subgrid-scale horizontal fluxes most often adopt the gradient-diffusion assumption. The horizontal mixing coefficients are usually set to a constant, or through the 2D Smagorinsky formulation, or in some cases based on the 1.5-order turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) closure. In this work, horizontal turbulent mixing parameterizations using physically based characteristic velocity and length scales are proposed for the convective boundary layer based on analysis of a well-resolved, wide-domain large-eddy simulation (LES). The proposed schemes involve different levels of sophistication. The first two schemes can be used together with first-order PBL schemes, while the third uses TKE to define its characteristic velocity scale and can be used together with TKE-based higher-order PBL schemes. The current horizontal mixing formulations are also assessed a priori through the filtered LES results to illustrate their limitations. The proposed parameterizations are tested a posteriori in idealized simulations of turbulent dispersion of a passive scalar. Comparisons show improved horizontal dispersion by the proposed schemes, and further demonstrate the weakness of the current schemes.

  10. Investigation of Corrosion and Cathodic Protection in Reinforced Concrete. II : Properties of Steel Surface Layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koleva, D.A.; De Wit, J.H.W.; Van Breugel, K.; Lodhi, Z.F.; Ye, G.

    2007-01-01

    The present study explores the formation of corrosion products on the steel surface (using as-received low carbon construction steel) in reinforced concrete in conditions of corrosion and subsequent transformation of these layers in conditions of cathodic protection (CP).

  11. The influence of wind speed on surface layer stability and turbulent ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    wind regime (Mahrt et al. ... Influence of wind speed on surface layer stability and turbulent fluxes. 1401. Table 1. Specifications of the eddy ..... different soil and vegetation properties and other regional climatic factors. Earlier, it was found that.

  12. A parametric description of a skewed puff in the diabatic surface layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikkelsen, T.

    1982-10-01

    The spreading of passive material in the stable, neutral and unstable surface layer from an instantaneous ground source is parameterized in a form appropriate for use with an operational puff diffusion model. (author)

  13. FORMING A PARTING LAYER OF COATING ON THE SURFACE OF THE MOULD DURING DIE-CASTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pivovarchik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of research on the study of the possibility of accumulation of the lubricating layer coating on the surface of the separation process of foundry equipment with high pressure die casting aluminum alloys.

  14. Experimental Investigation of Surface Layer Properties of High Thermal Conductivity Tool Steel after Electrical Discharge Machining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał Świercz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available New materials require the use of advanced technology in manufacturing complex shape parts. One of the modern materials widely used in the tool industry for injection molds or hot stamping dies is high conductivity tool steel (HTCS 150. Due to its hardness (55 HRC and thermal conductivity at 66 W/mK, this material is difficult to machine by conventional treatment and is being increasingly manufactured by nonconventional technology such as electrical discharge machining (EDM. In the EDM process, material is removed from the workpiece by a series of electrical discharges that cause changes to the surface layers properties. The final state of the surface layer directly influences the durability of the produced elements. This paper presents the influence of EDM process parameters: discharge current Ic and the pulse time ton on surface layer properties. The experimental investigation was carried out with an experimental methodology design. Surface layers properties including roughness 3D parameters, the thickness of the white layer, heat affected zone, tempered layer and occurring micro cracks were investigated and described. The influence of the response surface methodology (RSM of discharge current Ic and the pulse time ton on the thickness of the white layer and roughness parameters Sa, Sds and Ssc were described and established.

  15. Thermographic analysis of plasma facing components covered by carbon surface layer in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardarein, Jean-Laurent

    2007-01-01

    Tokamaks are reactors based on the thermonuclear fusion energy with magnetic confinement of the plasma. In theses machines, several MW are coupled to the plasma for about 10 s. A large part of this power is directed towards plasma facing components (PFC). For better understanding and control the heat flux transfer from the plasma to the surrounding wall, it is very important to measure the surface temperature of the PFC and to estimate the imposed heat flux. In most of tokamaks using carbon PFC, the eroded carbon is circulating in the plasma and redeposited elsewhere. During the plasma operations, this leads at some locations to the formation of thin or thick carbon layers usually poorly attached to the PFC. These surface layers with unknown thermal properties complicate the calculation of the heat flux from IR surface temperature measurements. To solve this problem, we develop first, inverse method to estimate the heat flux using thermocouple (not sensitive to the carbon surface layers) temperature measurements. Then, we propose a front face pulsed photothermal method allowing an estimation of layers thermal diffusivity, conductivity, effusivity and the thermal contact resistance between the layer and the tile. The principle is to study with an infrared sensor, the cooling of the layer surface after heating by a short laser pulse, this cooling depending on the thermal properties of the successive layers. (author) [fr

  16. Boron Diffused Thermoluminescent Surface Layer in LiF TLDs for Skin Dose Assessments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Poul; Majborn, Benny

    1980-01-01

    A new high-temperature glow peak produced in a thin surface layer of LiF TLDs by diffusion of boron into the LiF material has been studied for skin dose assessments in personnel dosimetry.......A new high-temperature glow peak produced in a thin surface layer of LiF TLDs by diffusion of boron into the LiF material has been studied for skin dose assessments in personnel dosimetry....

  17. Streams and magnetic fields in surface layers of Ap-stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolginov, A.Z.; Urpin, V.A.

    1978-01-01

    Magnetic field generation of Ap-stars is considered. It is shown that in the surface layers of Ap-stars inhomogeneity of chemical composition produces a strong magnetic field. Velocities of possible circulation of stellar matter are estimated. It is shown that circulation does not prevent the process of the magnetic field generation. It needs the order of million years, for arranging the stationary magnetic field in surface layers

  18. Formation of Layered Double Hydroxides on Alumina Surface in Aqueous Solutions Containing Divalent Metal Cations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kovanda, F.; Mašátová, P.; Novotná, P.; Jirátová, Květa

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 4 (2009), s. 425-432 ISSN 0009-8604 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/07/1400 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : deposition * layered double hydroxides * supported mixed oxides Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.431, year: 2009

  19. The surface layer of austempered ductile iron investment castings properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Myszka

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a unique process of carbonnitriding and nitriding the precision casting surfaces of austempered ductile iron. The results of the research are pointing that adequate process parameters allow to obtain multiple increase of wear resistance and a significant increase of corrosion resistance. Also, changes of cast microstructure and hardness are presented.

  20. Surface reactivity and layer analysis of chemisorbed reaction films in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. Studies on surface reactivity of substrate iron (Fe-particles) were made in the tribo-chemical environment of alkyl octadecenoates. Two alkyl octadecenoates namely ethyl octadecenoate and methyl. 12-hydroxy octadecenoate, slightly different in their chemical nature, were taken for preparing the chemisorbed ...

  1. Surface reactivity and layer analysis of chemisorbed reaction films in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Studies on surface reactivity of substrate iron (Fe-particles) were made in the tribo-chemical environment of alkyl octadecenoates. Two alkyl octadecenoates namely ethyl octadecenoate and methyl. 12-hydroxy octadecenoate, slightly different in their chemical nature, were taken for preparing the chemisorbed reaction films ...

  2. Influence of carbon monoxide to the surface layer of uranium metal and its oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaoling; Fu Yibei; Xie Renshou; Huang Ruiliang

    1996-09-01

    The surface structures of uranium metal and triuranium octaoxide (U 3 O 8 ) and the influence of carbon monoxide to the surface layers have been studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). After exposure to carbon monoxide, contents of oxygen in the surface oxides of uranium metal and U 3 O 8 are decreased and O/U ratios decrease 7.2%, 8.0% respectively. The investigation indicated the surface layers of uranium metal and its oxides were forbidden to further oxidation in the atmosphere of carbon monoxide. (11 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.)

  3. EMF measurements across the front of combustion wave during layer by layer surface laser sintering of exothermal powder compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishkovskiy, I.; Sherbakov, V.; Morozov, Yu.

    2007-06-01

    Rapid prototyping (RP) and manufacturing (M) is a novel layer-by-layer fabrication technique which has become increasingly popular due to its inherent flexibility for the manufacture of simple and complex 3D parts. Early we had been shown opportunity of selective laser sintering (SLS) of different type powder systems (intermetallics, ceramics, ferrites, high-temperature superconductors), traditional use for self-propagated high-temperature synthesis (SHS). The non-thermal heating affect of an external electromagnetic field during SHS is related to the specific system under study due to differences in movement of defects and ions at the 'plasma-like' molten combustion wave front. We have developed and refined the testing scheme for electro-thermal phenomena studies which can directly influence on the SHS combustion wave front. This work studies electromotive force (EMF) measurements across the front of combustion wave during layer by layer surface laser sintering of exothermal powder compositions (Ni-Ti, Ni-Al). Analysis using an analog-digital-analog computer converter allowed some control of the laser movement and hence some control of the exothermal reaction - in so doing it provided near optimum conditions for forming layered 3D articles. Comparative results of structural-phase transformation during laser control SHS in reaction-capable compositions are presented.

  4. Effect of High-Speed Milling Parameters on Surface Metamorphic Layer of TC17 Titanium Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TAN Liang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to provide the relatively accurate experimental basis for optimizing parameters and controlling surface metamorphic layer, ball end high-speed milling experiments of TC17 titanium alloy were carried out utilizing one of experimental design techniques based on the response surface methodology. The surface roughness prediction model was built, variance analyses were applied to check the significances of surface roughness model and input parameters, the effect of parameters on surface roughness was analyzed. Meanwhile, the residual stress, microhardness and microstructure under the condition of high, medium and low level of parameters were investigated. Results indicate that the model can predict the surface roughness effectively and feed per tooth and radial depth of cut have an obvious effect on surface roughness. Compressive residual stresses are detected on all milled surfaces and surface residual stresses are increased with the increase of the level of the milling parameters. The compressive residual stress layer is approximately 20 μm regardless of milling parameters level used. The process of thermal softening, then work hardening, and finally tending to stabilize are observed in the microhardness profiles. Grains of the surface layer are broken and bent, the thickness of plastic deformation layer is approximately 10 μm.

  5. The Influence of the Tool Surface Texture on Friction and the Surface Layers Properties of Formed Component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Šugárová

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The morphological texturing of forming tool surfaces has high potential to reduce friction and tool wear and also has impact on the surface layers properties of formed material. In order to understand the effect of different types of tool textures, produced by nanosecond fibre laser, on the tribological conditions at the interface tool-formed material and on the integrity of formed part surface layers, the series of experimental investigations have been carried out. The coefficient of friction for different texture parameters (individual feature shape, including the depth profile of the cavities and orientation of the features relative to the material flow was evaluated via a Ring Test and the surface layers integrity of formed material (surface roughness and subsurface micro hardness was also experimentally analysed. The results showed a positive effect of surface texturing on the friction coefficients and the strain hardening of test samples material. Application of surface texture consisting of dimple-like depressions arranged in radial layout contributed to the most significant friction reduction of about 40%. On the other hand, this surface texture contributed to the increase of surface roughness parameters, Ra parameter increased from 0.49 μm to 2.19 μm and the Rz parameter increased from 0.99 μm to 16.79 μm.

  6. Mixed convection boundary layer flow of viscoelastic nanofluid past a horizontal circular cylinder: Case of constant heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahat, Rahimah; Afiqah Rawi, Noraihan; Kasim, Abdul Rahman Mohd; Shafie, Sharidan

    2017-09-01

    The steady of two-dimensional convection boundary layer flow of a viscoelastic nanofluid over a circular cylinder is investigated in this paper. Carboxymethyl cellulose solution (CMC) is chosen as the base fluid and copper as a nanoparticle with the Prandtl number Pr = 6.2. The governing boundary layer partial differential equations are transformed into dimensionless forms. Then they are solved numerically by using the Keller-Box method. This paper focus on the effects of selected parameter on the flow and heat transfer characteristics and be presented in graphs. The results show that, the velocity profiles and the temperature profiles are increased by increasing the values of nanoparticles volume fraction. While velocity profile decreases when viscoelastic parameter is increase. The reverse trend is observed for the temperature profiles. Also, the values of reduced skin friction are increased by increasing mixed convection parameter, but the values of heat transfer coefficient produce an opposite behaviour with an increasing in mixed convection parameter.

  7. Free surface simulation of a two-layer fluid by boundary element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weoncheol Koo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A two-layer fluid with free surface is simulated in the time domain by a two-dimensional potential-based Numerical Wave Tank (NWT. The developed NWT is based on the boundary element method and a leap-frog time integration scheme. A whole domain scheme including interaction terms between two layers is applied to solve the boundary integral equation. The time histories of surface elevations on both fluid layers in the respective wave modes are verified with analytic results. The amplitude ratios of upper to lower elevation for various density ratios and water depths are also compared.

  8. Effect of electric spark pulses on surface layer structure of chromium monocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evstyukhin, A.I.; Krapivka, N.A.; Barinov, I.P.

    1981-01-01

    Effect of electric spark pulses on the character of fracture of surface layers of chromium monocrystals during cutting in crystallographic planes (100), (110) and (111) is established. Crystallographical anisotropy of defect formation is determined and the value of defective layers during cutting in the above planes is found. A conclusion is made that cracks in chromium monocrystals of commercial grade during electric-spark cutting are formed in planes (100) and more seldom in (111) ones. A high-temperature annealing for the reduction of initial properties of chromium surface layers is suggested

  9. Absorption and reflectivity of the lithium niobate surface masked with a graphene layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Salas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We performed simulations of the interaction of a graphene layer with the surface of lithium niobate utilizing density functional theory and molecular dynamics at 300K and atmospheric pressure. We found that the graphene layer is physisorbed on the lithium niobate surface with an adsorption energy of -0.8205 eV/(carbon-atom. Subsequently, the energy band structure, the optical absorption and reflectivity of the new system were calculated. We found important changes in these physical properties with respect to the corresponding ones of a graphene layer and of a lithium niobate crystal.

  10. The mechanism of the surface alloy layer creation for cast steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Walasek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a detailed description of the process of creation of a surface alloy layer (using high-carbon ferrochromium on the cast steel casting. The mechanism of the surface alloy layer is based on the known theories [5,6]. The proposed course of formation of the layers has been extended to decarburization stage of steel. The research included proving the presence of carbon-lean zone. The experiment included the analysis of the distribution of elements and microhardness measurement.

  11. UV and plasma treatment of thin silver layers and glass surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hluschi, J.H. [University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Von-Ossietzky-Str. 99, D-37085 Goettingen (Germany); Helmke, A. [University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Von-Ossietzky-Str. 99, D-37085 Goettingen (Germany); Roth, P. [University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Von-Ossietzky-Str. 99, D-37085 Goettingen (Germany); Boewer, R. [Interpane Glasbeschichtungsgesellschaft mbH and Co KG, Sohnreystr. 21, D-37697 Lauenfoerde (Germany); Herlitze, L. [Interpane Glasbeschichtungsgesellschaft mbH and Co KG, Sohnreystr. 21, D-37697 Lauenfoerde (Germany); Vioel, W. [University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Von-Ossietzky-Str. 99, D-37085 Goettingen (Germany)]. E-mail: vioel@hawk-hhg.de

    2006-11-10

    Thin silver layers can be modified by treatment with UV radiation or a plasma discharge. UV treatment at a wavelength of {lambda}=308 -bar nm improves the layer properties, thus leading to an enhancement of the layers IR reflectivity. For the purpose of in situ-measurement the sheet resistance is recorded during the process. Due to the Hagen-Rubens-Relation [E. Hagen, H. Rubens, Ann. Phys. 11 (1903) 873]-bar the sheet resistance is linked to the IR reflectivity of thin metal-films. A pretreatment of uncoated glass using a dielectric barrier discharge activates and cleans its surface, thus leading to an increase in adhesion of thin layers.

  12. UV and plasma treatment of thin silver layers and glass surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hluschi, J.H.; Helmke, A.; Roth, P.; Boewer, R.; Herlitze, L.; Vioel, W.

    2006-01-01

    Thin silver layers can be modified by treatment with UV radiation or a plasma discharge. UV treatment at a wavelength of λ=308 -bar nm improves the layer properties, thus leading to an enhancement of the layers IR reflectivity. For the purpose of in situ-measurement the sheet resistance is recorded during the process. Due to the Hagen-Rubens-Relation [E. Hagen, H. Rubens, Ann. Phys. 11 (1903) 873]-bar the sheet resistance is linked to the IR reflectivity of thin metal-films. A pretreatment of uncoated glass using a dielectric barrier discharge activates and cleans its surface, thus leading to an increase in adhesion of thin layers

  13. Supported Layered Double Hydroxide-Related Mixed Oxides and Their Application in the Total Oxidation of Volatile Organic Compounds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kovanda, F.; Jirátová, Květa

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 2 (2011), s. 305-316 ISSN 0169-1317 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP106/10/1762; GA ČR GA106/09/1664 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : layered double hydroxides * hydrothermal reaction * mixed oxides Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 2.474, year: 2011

  14. Formation Mechanism of Surface Metamorphic Layer on Turning End Face of GH4169 Superalloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YAO Changfeng

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Turning experiments and Deform-3D finite element methods were used to study the formation mechanism of surface metamorphic layer on turning GH4169 processed. The investigations were carried out by analyzing the changing of cutting force, the temperature and strain field, the residual stress, micro-hardness, microstructure, as well as the distribution of the above all along the direction of the depth under various process parameters. The results show that the surface metamorphic layer is formed due to the thermal-mechanical coupled effects on the microstructure of the material in the machining process. The cutting force, heat and strain of surface material are increased with the increase of machining intensity. Besides the higher strength of machining, the greater changes of plastic deformation, metallographic and grain deformation are acquired. In the range of processing parameters, the temperature layer is 130-200 μm,the strain layer is 100-220 μm, the residual stress layer is 80-110 μm, the depth of hardening layer is 50-80 μm, and the depth of surface metamorphic layer is 2.5-5μm.

  15. Investigation of Selective Laser Melting Surface Alloyed Aluminium Metal Matrix Dispersive Reinforced Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamburov, V. V.; Dimitrova, R. B.; Kandeva, M. K.; Sofronov, Y. P.

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to investigate the improvement of mechanical properties and in particular wear resistance of laser surface alloyed dispersive reinforced thin layers produced by selective laser melting (SLM) technology. The wear resistance investigation of aluminium matrix composite layers in the conditions of dry friction surface with abrasive particles and nanoindentation tests were carried out. The process parameters (as scan speed) and their impact on the wear resistant layers have been evaluated. The alloyed layers containing metalized SiC particles were studied by Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX). The obtained experimental results of the laser alloyed thin layers show significant development of their wear resistance and nanohardness due to the incorporated reinforced phase of electroless nickel coated SiC particles.

  16. Inferring strength and deformation properties of hot mix asphalt layers from the GPR signal: recent advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosti, Fabio; Benedetto, Andrea; Bianchini Ciampoli, Luca; Adabi, Saba; Pajewski, Lara

    2015-04-01

    , of both the different strength provision of each layer composing the hot mix asphalt pavement structure, and of the attenuation occurring to electromagnetic waves during their in-depth propagation. Promising results are achieved by matching modelled and measured elastic modulus data. This continuous statistically-based model enables to consider the whole set of information related to each single depth, in order to provide a more comprehensive prediction of the strength and deformation behavior of such a complex multi-layered medium. Amongst some further developments to be tackled in the near future, a model improvement could be reached through laboratory activities under controlled conditions and by adopting several frequency bandwidths suited for purposes. In addition, the perspective to compare electromagnetic data with mechanical measurements retrieved continuously, i.e., by means of specifically equipped lorries, could pave the way to considerable enhancements in this field of research. Acknowledgements - This work has benefited from networking activities carried out within the EU funded COST Action TU1208 "Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar".

  17. Physical and chemical properties of the regional mixed layer of Mexico's Megapolis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Arnott

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The concentration of gases and aerosol particles have been measured at the mountain site of Altzomoni, 4010 m in altitude, located 60 km southeast of Mexico City, 50 km east of Puebla and 70 km northeast of Cuernavaca. The objective of this study was to evaluate the properties of gases and particles in the Regional Mixed Layer (RML of Mexico's Megapolis. Altzomoni is generally above the RML from late evening until late morning at which time the arrival of the RML is marked by increasing concentrations of CO and aerosol particles that reach their maxima in mid-afternoon. The average diurnal cycles for fourteen days in March, 2006 were evaluated during which time the synoptic scale circulation had three principal patterns: from the east (E, southwest (SW and west northwest (WNW. The original hypothesis was that air arriving from the direction of Mexico City would have much higher concentrations of anthropogenic gases and particles than air from Puebla or Cuernavaca, due to the relatively large differences in populations. In fact, not only were the average, maximum concentrations of CO and O3 (0.3 and 0.1 ppmv approximately the same for air originating from the WNW and E, but the average maximum concentrations of Peroxyacyl nitrates (PAN,PPN and particle organic matter (POM in air from the E exceeded those in air from the WNW. Comparisons of measurements from the mountain site with those made by aircraft during the same period, using the same type of aerosol mass spectrometer, show that the total masses of POM, NO3−, SO42− and NH4+ were approximately the same from aircraft measurements made over Mexico City and when winds were from the east at the mountain site. In contrast 75% of the total aerosol mass at the mountain site was POM whereas over Mexico City the fraction of POM was less than 60%. The measurements suggest the occasional influence of emissions from the nearby volcano, Popocatepetl, as well as possible incursions of biomass

  18. Surface modification of acetaminophen particles by atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kääriäinen, Tommi O; Kemell, Marianna; Vehkamäki, Marko; Kääriäinen, Marja-Leena; Correia, Alexandra; Santos, Hélder A; Bimbo, Luis M; Hirvonen, Jouni; Hoppu, Pekka; George, Steven M; Cameron, David C; Ritala, Mikko; Leskelä, Markku

    2017-06-15

    Active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) are predominantly organic solid powders. Due to their bulk properties many APIs require processing to improve pharmaceutical formulation and manufacturing in the preparation for various drug dosage forms. Improved powder flow and protection of the APIs are often anticipated characteristics in pharmaceutical manufacturing. In this work, we have modified acetaminophen particles with atomic layer deposition (ALD) by conformal nanometer scale coatings in a one-step coating process. According to the results, ALD, utilizing common chemistries for Al 2 O 3 , TiO 2 and ZnO, is shown to be a promising coating method for solid pharmaceutical powders. Acetaminophen does not undergo degradation during the ALD coating process and maintains its stable polymorphic structure. Acetaminophen with nanometer scale ALD coatings shows slowed drug release. ALD TiO 2 coated acetaminophen particles show cytocompatibility whereas those coated with thicker ZnO coatings exhibit the most cytotoxicity among the ALD materials under study when assessed in vitro by their effect on intestinal Caco-2 cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Polyethylenimine surface layer for enhanced virus immobilization on cellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiliket, Ghania; Ladam, Guy; Nguyen, Quang Trong; Lebrun, Laurent

    2016-05-01

    Thin regenerated cellulose films are prepared by hydrolysis of cellulose acetate (CA). A polycation, namely polyethylenimine (PEI), is then adsorbed onto the films. From QCM-D analysis, PEI readily adsorbs from a 0.1% w/v solution in NaCl 0.2 M (ca. 100 ng cm-2). Further PEI adsorption steps at higher PEI concentrations induce a linear growth of the PEI films, suggesting that free adsorption sites still exist after the initial adsorption. The adsorbed PEI chains are resistant to variations of the ionic strength up to NaCl 1 M. Promisingly, the adsorption of T4D bacteriophages are 15-fold more efficient onto the PEI-treated, compared to the native regenerated cellulose films, as measured by QCM-D. This confirms the strong affinity between the negatively charged viruses and PEI, even at low PEI concentration, probably governed by strong electrostatic attractive interactions. This result explains the remarkable improvement of the affinity of medical masks for virus droplets when one of their cellulose layers was changed by two-PEI-functionalized cellulose-based filters.

  20. Formation of a mixed Fe(II)-Zn-Al layered hydroxide: Effects of Zn co-sorption on Fe(II) layered hydroxide formation and kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starcher, Autumn N.; Elzinga, Evert J.; Sparks, Donald L.

    2017-08-01

    Previous research demonstrated the formation of single divalent metal (Co, Ni, and ZnAl) and mixed divalent metal (NiZnAl) layered double hydroxide (LDH) phases from reactions of the divalent metal with Al-bearing substrates and soils in both laboratory experiments and in the natural environment. Recently Fe(II)-Al-LDH phases have been found in laboratory batch reaction studies, and although they have yet to be found in the natural environment. Potential locations of Fe(II)-Al-LDH phases in nature include areas with suboxic and anoxic conditions. Because these areas can be environments of significant contaminant accumulation, it is important to understand the possible interactions and impacts of contaminant elements on LDH phase formation. One such contaminant, Zn, can also form as an LDH and has been found to form as a mixed divalent layered hydroxide phase. To understand how Zn impacts the formation of Fe(II)-Al-LDH phase formation and kinetics, 3 mM or 0.8 mM Fe(II) and 0.8 mM Zn were batch reacted with either 10 g/L pyrophyllite or 7.5 g/L γ-Al2O3 for up to three months under anoxic conditions. Aqueous samples were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and solid samples were analyzed with X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Shell-by-shell fits of Fe(II) and co-sorption samples with pyrophyllite show the formation of a mixed divalent metal (Fe(II)-Zn-Al) layered hydroxide phase, while Fe(II) and Zn co-sorption samples with γ-Al2O3 produce Fe(II)-Al-LDH phases and Zn in inner-sphere complexation with the γ-Al2O3. This study demonstrates the formation of a mixed divalent metal layered hydroxide and further iterates the importance of sorbent reactivity on LDH phase formation.

  1. Where surface physics and fluid dynamics meet: rupture of an amphiphile layer by fluid flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandi, M M; Goldburg, W I; Cressman, J R; Kellay, H

    2006-03-14

    We investigate the fluctuating pattern created by a jet of fluid impingent upon an amphiphile-covered surface. This microscopically thin layer is initially covered with 50 microm floating particles so that the layer can be visualized. A vertical jet of water located below the surface and directed upward drives a hole in this layer. The hole is particle-free and is surrounded by the particle-laden amphiphile region. The jet ruptures the amphiphile layer creating a particle-free region that is surrounded by the particle-covered surface. The aim of the experiment is to understand the (fluctuating) shape of the ramified interface between the particle-laden and particle-free regions.

  2. Identification and characterization of the surface-layer protein of Clostridium tetani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qazi, Omar; Brailsford, Alan; Wright, Anne; Faraar, Jeremy; Campbell, Jim; Fairweather, Neil

    2007-09-01

    Many bacterial species produce a paracrystalline layer, the surface layer, which completely surrounds the exterior of the cell. In some bacteria, the surface layer is implicated in pathogenesis. Two proteins present in cell wall extracts from Clostridium tetani have been investigated and identified one of these has been unambiguously as the surface-layer protein (SLP). The gene, slpA, has been located in the genome of C. tetani E88 that encodes the SLP. The molecular mass of the protein as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis is considerably larger than that predicted from the gene; however the protein does not appear to be glycosylated. Furthermore, analysis of five C. tetani strains, including three recent clinical isolates, shows considerable variation in the sizes of the SLP.

  3. CHARACTERIZING SURFACE LAYERS IN NITINOL USING X-RAY PHOTOELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopfel, R.; Mehta, A.

    2008-01-01

    Nitinol is a shape memory alloy whose properties allow for large reversible deformations and a return to its original geometry. This nickel-titanium (NiTi) alloy has become a material used widely in the biomedical fi eld as a stent to open up collapsed arteries. Both ambient and biological conditions cause surface oxidation in these devices which in turn change its biocompatibility. The thickness of oxidized layers can cause fractures in the material if too large and can allow for penetration if too thin. Depending on the type and abundance of the chemical species on or near the surface, highly toxic metal ions can leak into the body causing cell damage or even cell death. Thus, biocompatibility of such devices is crucial. By using highly surface sensitive x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to probe the surface of these structures, it is possible to decipher both layer composition and layer thickness. Two samples, both of which were mechanically polished, were investigated. Of the two samples, one was then exposed to a phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution to mimic the chemical properties of blood, while the other remained unexposed. Although both samples were found to have oxide layers of appropriate thickness (on the order of a few nm), it was found that the sample exposed to the saline solution had a slightly thicker oxide layer and more signifi cantly, a phosphate layer very near the surface suggesting toxic metal components are well contained within the sample. These are considerable indications of a biocompatible device.

  4. Enhanced magneto-optical imaging of internal stresses in the removed surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agalidi, Yuriy; Kozhukhar, Pavlo; Levyi, Sergii; Turbin, Dmitriy

    2015-10-01

    The paper describes a software method of reconstructing the state of the removed surface layer by visualising internal stresses in the underlying layers of the sample. Such a problem typically needs to be solved as part of forensic investigation that aims to reveal original marking of a sample with removed surface layer. For example, one may be interested in serial numbers of weapons or vehicles that had the surface layer of metal removed from the number plate. Experimental results of studying gradient internal stress fields in ferromagnetic sample using the NDI method of magneto-optical imaging (MOI) are presented. Numerical modelling results of internal stresses enclosed in the surface marking region are analysed and compared to the experimental results of magneto-optical imaging (MOI). MOI correction algorithm intended for reconstructing internal stress fields in the removed surface layer by extracting stresses retained by the underlying layers is described. Limiting ratios between parameters of a marking font are defined for the considered correction algorithm. Enhanced recognition properties for hidden stresses left by marking symbols are experimentally verified and confirmed.

  5. Numerial simulation and experimental study of non-newtonian mixing flow with a free surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dular

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The object of this work was to evaluate the capability of numerical simulation to predict different features of non-Newtonian fluid mixing process. A relatively simple impeller (six bladed vane rotor was used for the mixing of carboxymethyl cellulose. A LDA method was used to measure the tangential velocity at two points inside the mixing vessel. Using visualization, a significant vortex above the impeller was observed. The shape of the free surface was determined by a geometrical reconstruction of the images of the illuminated section. Torque on the impeller shaft was measured to determine the characteristics of the fluid. Fluent program package was used for the simulation. The problem is challenging since the effects of non-Newtonian fluid, mixing process and free surface have to be included in the simulation. The comparison between the experimental and numerical results confirms the accuracy of the simulations.

  6. Influence of the liquid layer within mixed-phase clouds on radar observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pfitzenmaier, L.; Dufournet, Y.; Unal, C.M.H.; Russchenberg, H.W.J.

    2014-01-01

    Mixed-phase clouds play an important role in the earth system. They affect earth radiative balance and the climate (Comstock et al., 2007; Solomon et al., 2007) as well as the formation of precipitation (de Boer et al., 2009; Fan et al., 2011; Lamb and Verlinde, 2011). Within such mixed-phase clouds

  7. Preparation of lanthanum fluoride nanolayers by depositing ionic layers on silicon surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuchkov, B.S.; Tolstoi, V.P.; Murin, I.V.; Kirillov, S.N. [St. Petersburg State Univ. (Russian Federation)

    1995-11-10

    The kinetics of growth of LaF{sub 3} nanolayers on silicon surface was studied. Influences due to preparation conditions (the concentration and the pH values of the solution, the time of surface treatment, the number of cycles of ionic layer deposition) were evaluated.

  8. Macrofauna under sea ice and in the open surface layer of the Lazarev Sea, Southern Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flores, Hauke; van Franeker, Jan-Andries; Cisewski, Boris; Leach, Harry; Van de Putte, Anton P.; Meesters, Erik (H. W. G.); Bathmann, Ulrich; Wolff, Wirn J.

    2011-01-01

    A new fishing gear was used to sample the macrozooplankton and micronekton community in the surface layer (0-2 m) under ice and in open water, the Surface and Under Ice Trawl (SUIT). In total, 57 quantitative hauls were conducted in the Lazarev Sea (Southern Ocean) during 3 different seasons (autumn

  9. Macrofauna under sea ice and in the open surface layer of the Lazarev Sea, Southern Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Florentino De Souza Silva, A.P.; Franeker, van J.A.; Cisewski, B.; Leach, H.; Putte, van de A.P.; Meesters, H.W.G.; Bathmann, U.; Wolff, W.J.

    2011-01-01

    A new fishing gear was used to sample the macrozooplankton and micronekton community in the surface layer (0–2 m) under ice and in open water, the Surface and Under Ice Trawl (SUIT). In total, 57 quantitative hauls were conducted in the Lazarev Sea (Southern Ocean) during 3 different seasons (autumn

  10. CONCENTRATION DEPENDENCE OF STERN LAYER CAPACITANCES AND SURFACE EQUILIBRIUM CONSTANTS IN SILICA-BASED NANOFLUIDIC CHANNELS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mathias Bækbo; Frey, J.; Bruus, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    ]. The current models used to describe surface phenomena in nanofluidics can differ by orders of magnitude from experimentally measured values [2]. To mitigate the discrepancies, we hypothesize that the Stern-layer capacitance Cs and the surface equilibrium constants pKa, vary with the composition of the solid...

  11. Measuring air layer volumes retained by submerged floating-ferns Salvinia and biomimetic superhydrophobic surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias J. Mayser

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Some plants and animals feature superhydrophobic surfaces capable of retaining a layer of air when submerged under water. Long-term air retaining surfaces (Salvinia-effect are of high interest for biomimetic applications like drag reduction in ship coatings of up to 30%. Here we present a novel method for measuring air volumes and air loss under water. We recorded the buoyancy force of the air layer on leaf surfaces of four different Salvinia species and on one biomimetic surface using a highly sensitive custom made strain gauge force transducer setup. The volume of air held by a surface was quantified by comparing the buoyancy force of the specimen with and then without an air layer. Air volumes retained by the Salvinia-surfaces ranged between 0.15 and 1 L/m2 depending on differences in surface architecture. We verified the precision of the method by comparing the measured air volumes with theoretical volume calculations and could find a good agreement between both values. In this context we present techniques to calculate air volumes on surfaces with complex microstructures. The introduced method also allows to measure decrease or increase of air layers with high accuracy in real-time to understand dynamic processes.

  12. Copper(II) Schiff base complexes and their mixed thin layers with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ning electron microscopy (SEM/EDS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescence spectroscopy. For. Cu(II) layers the most intensive fluorescence bands due to intra-ligand transitions were observed between 462 and 503 nm. The fluorescence intensity of thin layers was corelated to the rotation speed. In the case of ...

  13. Redox-triggered mixing and demixing of surfactants within assemblies formed in solution and at surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Timothy J; Wang, Chenxuan; Abbott, Nicholas L

    2017-09-15

    We report experiments that test the hypothesis that redox-triggered changes in the architectures of surfactants permit control of mixing of surfactants within assemblies. Specifically, we describe surface tension, light scattering, atomic force microscopy, and quartz crystal microbalance measurements that characterize the redox-dependent behaviors of cationic surfactants with a ferrocene group located either at the surfactant terminus (11-ferrocenylundecyl-trimethylammonium bromide; FTMA) or head (N,N-dimethylferrocenylmethyldecylammonium bromide; DMFA). In bulk solution, we find that reduced and oxidized FTMA do not mix within micellar assemblies but that reduced and oxidized DMFA do form mixed micelles. Because oxidized FTMA has the architecture of a bolaform surfactant whereas oxidized DMFA has a conventional surfactant architecture with a divalent head group, these results suggest that redox-triggered changes in molecular architecture permit control of the extent of mixing of surfactants in micellar assemblies in bulk solution. This conclusion receives further support from measurements performed with mixtures of dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide and FTMA, with FTMA in either reduced or oxidized states, and was found to extend to hemimicellar assemblies formed at hydrophobic solid surfaces but not to mixed monolayers formed at the surface of water. The latter is attributed to differences in the conformations of surfactants within monolayers and micellar assemblies. Overall, these results provide insight into the design of surfactant assemblies within which mixing can be controlled reversibly using redox processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of thermophoresis and variable properties on mixed convection along a vertical wavy surface in a fluid saturated porous medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darbhasayanam Srinivasacharya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the influence of thermophoresis on mixed convection heat and mass transfer flow over a vertical wavy surface in a porous medium with variable properties, namely variable viscosity and variable thermal conductivity. The effect of wavy surface is incorporated into non-dimensional equations by using suitable transformations and then transformed into non-linear ordinary differential equations by employing the similarity transformations and then solved numerically. The transport process of flow, heat and mass transfer in the boundary layer for aiding and opposing flow cases is discussed. The structure of flow, temperature and concentration fields in the Darcy porous media are more pronounced by complex interactions among variable viscosity, variable thermal conductivity, mixed convective parameter, thermophoresis and amplitude of the wavy surface. Increasing thermophoresis parameter enhances velocity profile, concentration distribution and Sherwood number while reduces Nusselt number. As increase in variable viscosity, temperature and concentration distributions are enhanced while velocity profile, Nusselt number and Sherwood numbers are reduced. This study finds applications in aerosol Technology, space technology and processes involving high temperatures.

  15. Stability of underpotentially deposited Ag layers on a Au(111) surface studied by surface X-ray scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Kondo, Toshihiro; Takakusagi, Satoru; Uosaki, Kohei

    2009-01-01

    Stability of underpotentially deposited (upd) Ag layers on Au(111) surface was investigated by surface X-ray scattering (SXS). While the complete pseudomorphic Ag bilayer on Au(111) surface obtained by upd at 10 mV (vs. Ag/Ag+) was maintained its structure even after the circuit was disconnected and the surface was exposed to ambient atmosphere, the pseudomorphic Ag monolayer obtained by upd at 50 mV was converted to a partial bilayer with the coverage of 0.66 ML and 0.46 ML for the 1st and 2...

  16. Surface crack formation on rails at grinding induced martensite white etching layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Carsten Jørn; Fæster, Søren; Dhar, Somrita

    2017-01-01

    The connection between profile grinding of rails, martensite surface layers and crack initiation has been investigated using visual inspection, optical microscopy and 3D X-ray computerized tomography. Newly grinded rails were extracted and found to be covered by a continuous surface layer...... of martensite with varying thickness formed by the grinding process. Worn R350HT and R200 rails were extracted from the Danish rail network as they had transverse bands resembling grinding marks on the running surface. The transverse bands were shown to consist of martensite which had extensive crack formation...

  17. Problems of surface morphology and layer deposition during plasma etching processes. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiller, H.-J.; Krausse, J.; Voigt, R.

    1982-01-01

    The plasma etching of Si in CF 4 -, CF 4 /O 2 - and CF 4 /H 2 plasmas was investigated in dependence on the etching gas, the plasma conditions (pressure, power density) and etching time in different reactors. A roughening of the surface and the formation of a 'semi-amorphous' surface layer with a powder-like morphology was detected by TEM-and RHEED methods. It is supposed that the surface layer has a fundamental consequence as an intermediate state in the etching mechanism. (author)

  18. Layer-by-layer generation of PEG-based regenerable immunosensing surfaces for small-sized analytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, Maria; Ben Haddada, Maroua; Méthivier, Christophe; Niessner, Reinhard; Knopp, Dietmar; Boujday, Souhir

    2015-05-15

    Small molecules (haptens) like pharmaceuticals or peptides can serve as targets for antibody binding in competitive immunoassay-based flow-through assays. In this work, a strategy for preparing polyethylene glycol (PEG) coatings for subsequent hapten immobilization on glass-type silica surfaces is presented and characterized in detail. Two substrates bearing terminal silanol groups were utilized, a glass slide and a silicon wafer. First, surfaces were thoroughly cleaned and pretreated to generate additional silanol groups. Then, a silane layer with terminal epoxy groups was created using 3-glycidyloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GOPTS). Epoxy groups were used to bind a layer of diamino-poly(ethylene glycol) (DAPEG) with terminal amino groups. Finally, the low molecular weight compound diclofenac was bound to the surface to be used as model ligand for competitive biosensing of haptens. The elementary steps were characterized using atomic force microscopy (AFM), water contact angle measurement, grazing-angle attenuated total reflection (GA-ATR) FT-IR spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The data collected using these techniques have confirmed the successive grafting of the molecular species, evidencing, that homogeneous monolayers were created on the silica surfaces and validated the proposed mechanism of functionalization. The resulting surfaces were used to investigate polyclonal anti-diclofenac antibodies recognition and reversibility using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) measurements or an automated flow-through immunoassay with chemiluminescence (CL) read-out. For both techniques, recognition and reversibility of the antibody binding were observed. The stability of sensors over time was also assessed and no decrease in CL response was observed upon 14 days in aqueous solution. The herein presented strategy for surface functionalization can be used in the future as reproducible and reusable universal platform for hapten

  19. Surface layer composition of titania produced by various methods. The change of layer state under illumination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakharenko, V; Daibova, E; Zmeeva, O; Kosova, N

    2016-01-01

    The comparative analysis of experimental data over titanium dioxide powders prepared by various ways under ambient air is carried out. The results over TiO 2 prepared by high-temperature heating of anatase, produced by burning of titanium micro particles and grinding of rutile crystal are used for that comparison. Water and carbon dioxide were the main products released from the surface of the titania powders. It was found that under UV irradiation absorbed by titania, in absent oxygen, water effectively reacts with lattice oxygen of titanium dioxide. (paper)

  20. Analysis of asphalt mix surface-tread rubber interaction by using finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Kumar Srirangam

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The surface texture of the pavement plays a very important role in driving the frictional properties at the tire rubber-pavement interface. Particularly, the hysteretic friction due to viscoelastic deformations of rubber depends mainly on the pavement surface texture. In the present paper, the effect of micromechanical pavement surface morphology on rubber block friction was brought in by comparing the friction results for three different asphalt mix morphological surfaces, named stone mastic asphalt (SMA, ultra-thin surfacing (UTS and porous asphalt (PA. The asphalt surface morphologies of these mixes were captured by using an X-ray tomographer, from which the resulting images micromechanical finite element (FE meshes for SMA, UTS and PA pavements were developed by means of the SimpleWare software. In the FE model, the rubber and asphalt binder were modeled as viscoelastic (VE materials and the formulation was given in the large deformation framework. FE simulations were then carried out by using contact algorithm between rubber and the road surface. It was observed that the rubber friction inversely varies with the sliding speed and positively varies with the pressure for all the pavement morphological and stiffness conditions. Furthermore, it was observed that the highly porous pavement surface results in large dissipation of energy, hence, large rubber friction which shows that the mix characteristics of pavements have a significant effect on rubber friction.

  1. Thermocouple Rakes for Measuring Boundary Layer Flows Extremely Close to Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Danny P.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Martin, Lisa C.; Blaha, Charles A.

    2001-01-01

    Of vital interest to aerodynamic researchers is precise knowledge of the flow velocity profile next to the surface. This information is needed for turbulence model development and the calculation of viscous shear force. Though many instruments can determine the flow velocity profile near the surface, none of them can make measurements closer than approximately 0.01 in. from the surface. The thermocouple boundary-layer rake can measure much closer to the surface than conventional instruments can, such as a total pressure boundary layer rake, hot wire, or hot film. By embedding the sensors (thermocouples) in the region where the velocity is equivalent to the velocity ahead of a constant thickness strut, the boundary-layer flow profile can be obtained. The present device fabricated at the NASA Glenn Research Center microsystem clean room has a heater made of platinum and thermocouples made of platinum and gold. Equal numbers of thermocouples are placed both upstream and downstream of the heater, so that the voltage generated by each pair at the same distance from the surface is indicative of the difference in temperature between the upstream and downstream thermocouple locations. This voltage differential is a function of the flow velocity, and like the conventional total pressure rake, it can provide the velocity profile. In order to measure flow extremely close to the surface, the strut is made of fused quartz with extremely low heat conductivity. A large size thermocouple boundary layer rake is shown in the following photo. The latest medium size sensors already provide smooth velocity profiles well into the boundary layer, as close as 0.0025 in. from the surface. This is about 4 times closer to the surface than the previously used total pressure rakes. This device also has the advantage of providing the flow profile of separated flow and also it is possible to measure simultaneous turbulence levels within the boundary layer.

  2. Steady Boundary Layer Disturbances Created By Two-Dimensional Surface Ripples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuester, Matthew

    2017-11-01

    Multiple experiments have shown that surface roughness can enhance the growth of Tollmien-Schlichting (T-S) waves in a laminar boundary layer. One of the common observations from these studies is a ``wall displacement'' effect, where the boundary layer profile shape remains relatively unchanged, but the origin of the profile pushes away from the wall. The objective of this work is to calculate the steady velocity field (including this wall displacement) of a laminar boundary layer over a surface with small, 2D surface ripples. The velocity field is a combination of a Blasius boundary layer and multiple disturbance modes, calculated using the linearized Navier-Stokes equations. The method of multiple scales is used to include non-parallel boundary layer effects of O (Rδ- 1) ; the non-parallel terms are necessary, because a wall displacement is mathematically inconsistent with a parallel boundary layer assumption. This technique is used to calculate the steady velocity field over ripples of varying height and wavelength, including cases where a separation bubble forms on the leeward side of the ripple. In future work, the steady velocity field will be the input for stability calculations, which will quantify the growth of T-S waves over rough surfaces. The author would like to acknowledge the support of the Kevin T. Crofton Aerospace & Ocean Engineering Department at Virginia Tech.

  3. Self-Assembled Layering of Magnetic Nanoparticles in a Ferrofluid on Silicon Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theis-Bröhl, Katharina; Vreeland, Erika C; Gomez, Andrew; Huber, Dale L; Saini, Apurve; Wolff, Max; Maranville, Brian B; Brok, Erik; Krycka, Kathryn L; Dura, Joseph A; Borchers, Julie A

    2018-02-07

    This article describes the three-dimensional self-assembly of monodisperse colloidal magnetite nanoparticles (NPs) from a dilute water-based ferrofluid onto a silicon surface and the dependence of the resultant magnetic structure on the applied field. The NPs assemble into close-packed layers on the surface followed by more loosely packed ones. The magnetic field-dependent magnetization of the individual NP layers depends on both the rotational freedom of the layer and the magnetization of the adjacent layers. For layers in which the NPs are more free to rotate, the easy axis of the NP can readily orient along the field direction. In more dense packing, free rotation of the NPs is hampered, and the NP ensembles likely build up quasi-domain states to minimize energy, which leads to lower magnetization in those layers. Detailed analysis of polarized neutron reflectometry data together with model calculations of the arrangement of the NPs within the layers and input from small-angle scattering measurements provide full characterization of the core/shell NP dimensions, degree of chaining, arrangement of the NPs within the different layers, and magnetization depth profile.

  4. Evolution of surfaces properties for 100Cr6 steel by implantation and ionic mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faussemagne, A.

    1996-01-01

    Physico-chemical characterizations performed on samples of 100Cr6 steel implanted both with boron and nitrogen revealed the formation of boron nitride along with the following new phases: Fe 1-x (B, N), Fe 2-x (B, N) and Fe 3-x (B, N). A thorough analysis of boron NITRIDE 5BN) indicates that a low ion current density (3 μA.cm -2 ) in the case of the boron plus nitrogen sequence favours the formation of sp 2 bonds (hexagonal-BN) while a higher ion current density (6μA.cm -2 ) promotes sp 3 bonds cubic-BN) in the opposite sequence. Tribological tests carried out on these samples revealed that nitrogen and boron implantations do not lead to any significant improvement of friction and wear at variance with the results obtained by others authors. However, on a set samples accidentally contaminated with carbon during implantation, we noticed a considerable improvement of these tribological parameters. As this pollution is commonly encountered in surface treatment by ion beams, one can invoke this phenomenon to explain the origin of the discrepancy reported by the literature. Extensive investigations allowed us to conclude that surface carbon, whatever its origin (contamination, ion implantation or ion beam mixed coating), provided that its amount is sufficiently high (≥2 x 10 16 C.cm -2 ), decreases the coefficient of friction by a factor 5 and reduces drastically (∼ 100) the wear. A careful examination of the whole results led us to propose a theoretical model, based on the role of the asperities of the two bodies in contact, to explain the evolution of the coefficient of friction and wear with the amount of surface carbon. This analysis revealed that in order to improve friction and wear of 100Cr6 steel, one needs to coat this material with a well adherent carbon layer having a thickness higher than the asperity heights of the two bodies in contact. Finally, this study allowed us to develop a simple lower-cost process for the improvement of the tribological

  5. Determining water sources in the boundary layer from tall tower profiles of water vapor and surface water isotope ratios after a snowstorm in Colorado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Noone

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The D/H isotope ratio is used to attribute boundary layer humidity changes to the set of contributing fluxes for a case following a snowstorm in which a snow pack of about 10 cm vanished. Profiles of H2O and CO2 mixing ratio, D/H isotope ratio, and several thermodynamic properties were measured from the surface to 300 m every 15 min during four winter days near Boulder, Colorado. Coeval analysis of the D/H ratios and CO2 concentrations find these two variables to be complementary with the former being sensitive to daytime surface fluxes and the latter particularly indicative of nocturnal surface sources. Together they capture evidence for strong vertical mixing during the day, weaker mixing by turbulent bursts and low level jets within the nocturnal stable boundary layer during the night, and frost formation in the morning. The profiles are generally not well described with a gradient mixing line analysis because D/H ratios of the end members (i.e., surface fluxes and the free troposphere evolve throughout the day which leads to large uncertainties in the estimate of the D/H ratio of surface water flux. A mass balance model is constructed for the snow pack, and constrained with observations to provide an optimal estimate of the partitioning of the surface water flux into contributions from sublimation, evaporation of melt water in the snow and evaporation from ponds. Results show that while vapor measurements are important in constraining surface fluxes, measurements of the source reservoirs (soil water, snow pack and standing liquid offer stronger constraint on the surface water balance. Measurements of surface water are therefore essential in developing observational programs that seek to use isotopic data for flux attribution.

  6. Diffusion of C and Cr During Creation of Surface Layer on Cast Steel Casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szajnar J.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In paper a method of improvement in utility properties of unalloyed cast steel casting in result of diffusion of C and Cr in process of creation of surface layer is presented. The aim of paper was determination of diffusion range of basic elements of alloyed surface layer. Moreover a quantitative analysis of carbides phase strengthens alloyed surface layer of casting was carried out. The results of studies shown that important factors of surface layer creation are maximal temperature Tmax on granular insert – cast steel boundary dependent of pouring temperature, granularity Zw of Fe-Cr-C alloy insert and thickness of casting wall gśo. On the basis of obtained results was affirmed that with increase of thickness of casting wall increases range of diffusion in solid state in Fe-Cr-C grains and in liquid state. Moreover the range of Tmax = 13001500oC favours creation of the proper alloyed surface layers on cast steel.

  7. Mixed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pau Baya

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Remenat (Catalan (Mixed, "revoltillo" (Scrambled in Spanish, is a dish which, in Catalunya, consists of a beaten egg cooked with vegetables or other ingredients, normally prawns or asparagus. It is delicious. Scrambled refers to the action of mixing the beaten egg with other ingredients in a pan, normally using a wooden spoon Thought is frequently an amalgam of past ideas put through a spinner and rhythmically shaken around like a cocktail until a uniform and dense paste is made. This malleable product, rather like a cake mixture can be deformed pulling it out, rolling it around, adapting its shape to the commands of one’s hands or the tool which is being used on it. In the piece Mixed, the contortion of the wood seeks to reproduce the plasticity of this slow heavy movement. Each piece lays itself on the next piece consecutively like a tongue of incandescent lava slowly advancing but with unstoppable inertia.

  8. Interfacial mixing in as-deposited Si/Ni/Si layers analyzed by x-ray and polarized neutron reflectometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharya, Debarati, E-mail: debarati@barc.gov.in [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Basu, Saibal; Singh, Surendra [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Roy, Sumalay; Dev, Bhupendra Nath [Department of Materials Science, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, 2A and 2B Raja S.C. Mullick Road, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Room temperature diffusion in Si/Ni/Si trilayer detected through complementary x-ray and polarized neutron reflectometry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analyses of XPNR data generated the construction of the layered structure in terms of physical parameters along with alloy layers created by diffusion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Scattering length density information from XPNR provided quantitative assessment of the stoichiometry of alloys formed at the Si/Ni and Ni/Si interfaces. - Abstract: Interdiffusion occurring across the interfaces in a Si/Ni/Si layered system during deposition at room temperature was probed using x-ray reflectivity (XRR) and polarized neutron reflectivity (PNR). Exploiting the complementarity of these techniques, both structural and magnetic characterization with nanometer depth resolution could be achieved. Suitable model fitting of the reflectivity profiles identified the formation of Ni-Si mixed alloy layers at the Si/Ni and Ni/Si interfaces. The physical parameters of the layered structure, including quantitative assessment of the stoichiometry of interfacial alloys, were obtained from the analyses of XRR and PNR patterns. In addition, PNR provided magnetic moment density profile as a function of depth in the stratified medium.

  9. Copper (II) Schiff base complexes and their mixed thin layers with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    111) substrates by a spin coating method and characterized with a scanningelectron microscopy (SEM/EDS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescence spectroscopy. For Cu(II) layers the most intensive fluorescence bands due to ...

  10. Surfactant-free carnauba wax dispersion and its use for layer-by-layer assembled protective surface coatings on wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lozhechnikova, Alina [Department of Forest Products Technology, School of Chemical Technology, Aalto University, P.O. Box 16300, FI-00076, Aalto (Finland); Bellanger, Hervé; Michen, Benjamin; Burgert, Ingo [Institute for Building Materials (IfB), Wood Materials Science, ETH Zürich, Stefano-Franscini-Platz 3, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Applied Wood Materials Laboratory, Empa − Swiss Federal Laboratories for Material Testing and Research, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Österberg, Monika, E-mail: monika.osterberg@aalto.fi [Department of Forest Products Technology, School of Chemical Technology, Aalto University, P.O. Box 16300, FI-00076, Aalto (Finland)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • A facile sonication route to produce aqueous wax dispersions is developed. • The wax dispersion is naturally stable and free of surfactants or stabilizers. • Wax and ZnO particles are coated onto wood using layer-by-layer assembly. • The coating brings superhydrophobicity while preserving moisture buffering. • ZnO improves the color stability of wood to UV light. - Abstract: Protection from liquid water and UV radiation are equally important, and a sophisticated approach is needed when developing surface coatings that preserve the natural and well-appreciated aesthetic appearance of wood. In order to prevent degradation and prolong the service life of timber, a protective coating was assembled using carnauba wax particles and zinc oxide nanoparticles via layer-by-layer deposition in water. For this purpose, a facile sonication route was developed to produce aqueous wax dispersion without any surfactants or stabilizers. The suspension was stable above pH 4 due to the electrostatic repulsion between the negatively charged wax particles. The particle size could be controlled by the initial wax concentration with average particle sizes ranging from 260 to 360 nm for 1 and 10 g/L, respectively. The deposition of wax particles onto the surface of spruce wood introduced additional roughness to the wood surface at micron level, while zinc oxide provided nano roughness and UV-absorbing properties. In addition to making wood superhydrophobic, this novel multilayer coating enhanced the natural moisture buffering capability of spruce. Moreover, wood surfaces prepared in this fashion showed a significant reduction in color change after exposure to UV light. A degradation of the wax through photocatalytic activity of the ZnO particles was measured by FTIR, indicating that further studies are required to achieve long-term stability. Nevertheless, the developed coating showed a unique combination of superhydrophobicity and excellent moisture buffering

  11. Hard Coat Layers by PE-CVD Process for the Top Surface of Touch Panel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okunishi, T; Sato, N; Yazawa, K

    2013-01-01

    In order to protect surface from damages, the high pencil hardness and the high abrasion resistance are required for the hard coat layers on polyethylene telephthalate (PET) films for the application of touch panel surface. We have already found that the UV-curing-hard-coat-polymer (UHP) coated PET films show the poor abrasion resistance, while they have the high pencil hardness. It reveals that the abrasion resistance of hard coat layers of the UHP is not simply dependent on the pencil hardness. In this work, we have studied to improve the abrasion resistance of SiOC films as hard coat layers, which were formed by PE-CVD process on UHP coated PET. The abrasion resistance was evaluated by Taber abrasion test. PE-CVD hard coat layers which formed on UHP coater PET films have showed the better abrasion resistance and have the possibility of substitution to the thin glass sheets for touch panel application.

  12. Noncontact Quantification of Topography of Anterior Corneal Surface and Bowman's Layer With High-Speed OCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matalia, Himanshu; Francis, Mathew; Gangil, Tarun; Chandapura, Rachana S; Kurian, Mathew; Shetty, Rohit; Nelson, Everette Jacob Remington; Sinha Roy, Abhijit

    2017-05-01

    To quantify keratometry and wavefront aberration of the anterior corneal surface and epithelium-Bowman's layer interface using anterior segment optical coherence tomography (OCT). Twenty-five normal eyes and 25 eyes with keratoconus were retrospectively analyzed. The anterior corneal edge and epithelium-Bowman's layer interface were segmented from 12 distortion-corrected OCT B-scans. Axial tangential curvatures and wavefront aberration were calculated by ray tracing and 6th order Zernike analyses. All eyes underwent simultaneous imaging with Pentacam (Oculus Optikgeräte GmbH, Wetzlar, Germany). The Pentacam elevation data were used for aberration analyses using the same ray-tracing method. The paired t test was used to compare the variables. In normal eyes, mean steep axis and maximum keratometry of OCT of the anterior corneal surface and epithelium-Bowman's layer interface were significantly greater than the same of the Pentacam anterior corneal surface (P OCT surfaces was greater than the same of the Pentacam surface by a factor of 4. In eyes with keratoconus, mean steep axis and maximum keratometry of the OCT epithelium-Bowman's layer interface was the greatest (P OCT epithelium-Bowman's layer interface was the greatest (P OCT epithelium-Bowman's layer interface were significantly greater than those of the Pentacam anterior corneal surface. A noncontact method to quantify the topography and aberrations of corneal surfaces with OCT was presented. OCT measurements yielded greater curvature and aberrations than Pentacam in both normal and keratoconic eyes. [J Refract Surg. 2017;33(5):330-336.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Study on dynamic deformation synchronized measurement technology of double-layer liquid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Huiying; Dong, Huimin; Liu, Zhanwei

    2017-11-01

    Accurate measurement of the dynamic deformation of double-layer liquid surfaces plays an important role in many fields, such as fluid mechanics, biomechanics, petrochemical industry and aerospace engineering. It is difficult to measure dynamic deformation of double-layer liquid surfaces synchronously for traditional methods. In this paper, a novel and effective method for full-field static and dynamic deformation measurement of double-layer liquid surfaces has been developed, that is wavefront distortion of double-wavelength transmission light with geometric phase analysis (GPA) method. Double wavelength lattice patterns used here are produced by two techniques, one is by double wavelength laser, and the other is by liquid crystal display (LCD). The techniques combine the characteristics such as high transparency, low reflectivity and fluidity of liquid. Two color lattice patterns produced by laser and LCD were adjusted at a certain angle through the tested double-layer liquid surfaces simultaneously. On the basis of the refractive indexes difference of two transmitted lights, the double-layer liquid surfaces were decoupled with GPA method. Combined with the derived relationship between phase variation of transmission-lattice patterns and out-of plane heights of two surfaces, as well as considering the height curves of the liquid level, the double-layer liquid surfaces can be reconstructed successfully. Compared with the traditional measurement method, the developed method not only has the common advantages of the optical measurement methods, such as high-precision, full-field and non-contact, but also simple, low cost and easy to set up.

  14. Interfacial layers from the protein HFBII hydrophobin: dynamic surface tension, dilatational elasticity and relaxation times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, Nikola A; Marinova, Krastanka G; Gurkov, Theodor D; Danov, Krassimir D; Kralchevsky, Peter A; Stoyanov, Simeon D; Blijdenstein, Theodorus B J; Arnaudov, Luben N; Pelan, Eddie G; Lips, Alex

    2012-06-15

    The pendant-drop method (with drop-shape analysis) and Langmuir trough are applied to investigate the characteristic relaxation times and elasticity of interfacial layers from the protein HFBII hydrophobin. Such layers undergo a transition from fluid to elastic solid films. The transition is detected as an increase in the error of the fit of the pendant-drop profile by means of the Laplace equation of capillarity. The relaxation of surface tension after interfacial expansion follows an exponential-decay law, which indicates adsorption kinetics under barrier control. The experimental data for the relaxation time suggest that the adsorption rate is determined by the balance of two opposing factors: (i) the barrier to detachment of protein molecules from bulk aggregates and (ii) the attraction of the detached molecules by the adsorption layer due to the hydrophobic surface force. The hydrophobic attraction can explain why a greater surface coverage leads to a faster adsorption. The relaxation of surface tension after interfacial compression follows a different, square-root law. Such behavior can be attributed to surface diffusion of adsorbed protein molecules that are condensing at the periphery of interfacial protein aggregates. The surface dilatational elasticity, E, is determined in experiments on quick expansion or compression of the interfacial protein layers. At lower surface pressures (<11 mN/m) the experiments on expansion, compression and oscillations give close values of E that are increasing with the rise of surface pressure. At higher surface pressures, E exhibits the opposite tendency and the data are scattered. The latter behavior can be explained with a two-dimensional condensation of adsorbed protein molecules at the higher surface pressures. The results could be important for the understanding and control of dynamic processes in foams and emulsions stabilized by hydrophobins, as well as for the modification of solid surfaces by adsorption of such

  15. Formation of a nanocrystalline layer on the surface of stone wool fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yue, Yuanzheng; Korsgaard, Martin; Kirkegaard, Lise Frank

    2009-01-01

    In the present paper, we report a simple approach for creating a nanocrystalline layer on the surface of stone wool fibers (SWFs) with a basalt-like composition. The approach is based on a preoxidation process of the SWFs in atmospheric air at a temperature around the glass transition temperature....... The nanocrystalline layer plays a significant role in enhancing the high-temperature stability of the SWFs....

  16. Heat-resistant organic molecular layer as a joint interface for metal reduction on plastics surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sang, Jing [Department of Frontier Materials and Function Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Iwate University, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Aisawa, Sumio, E-mail: aisawa@iwate-u.ac.jp [Department of Frontier Materials and Function Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Iwate University, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Hirahara, Hidetoshi [Department of Frontier Materials and Function Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Iwate University, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Kudo, Takahiro [Sulfur Chemical Institute, 210, Collabo MIU, 4-3-5, Ueda, Morioka 020-0066 (Japan); Mori, Kunio [Department of Frontier Materials and Function Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Iwate University, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Sulfur Chemical Institute, 210, Collabo MIU, 4-3-5, Ueda, Morioka 020-0066 (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • In situ adsorption behaviors of TES on PA6 surface were clarified by QCM. • Highest adsorption of TES on PA6 was obtained in pH 3 and 0.1 M solution. • Molecular layers of TES with uniform structures were prepared on PA6 surface. • TES layer improved PA6 local heat resistance from 150 °C to 230 °C. • TES molecular layer successfully reduced Ag ion to Ag{sup 0}. - Abstract: Heat-resistant organic molecular layers have been fabricated by triazine-based silane coupling agent for metal reduction on plastic surfaces using adsorption method. These molecular layers were used as an interfacial layer between polyamide (PA6) and metal solution to reduce Ag{sup +} ion to Ag{sup 0}. The interfacial behaviors of triazine molecular layer at the interfaces between PA6 and Ag solution were investigated using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The kinetics of molecular adsorption on PA6 was investigated by using triazine-based silane coupling agent solutions at different pH and concentration. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscope (AFM), and local nano thermal analysis were employed to characterize the surfaces and interfaces. The nano thermal analysis results show that molecular layers of triazine-based silane coupling agent greatly improved heat resistance of PA6 resin from 170 °C up to 230 °C. This research developed an in-depth insight for molecular behaviors of triazine-based silane coupling agent at the PA6 and Ag solution interfaces and should be of significant value for interfacial research between plastics and metal solution in plating industry.

  17. Experimental characterization of initial conditions and spatio-temporal evolution of a small Atwood number Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueschke, N J; Andrews, M J; Schilling, O

    2005-09-26

    The initial multi-mode interfacial velocity and density perturbations present at the onset of a small Atwood number, incompressible, miscible, Rayleigh-Taylor instability-driven mixing layer have been quantified using a combination of experimental techniques. The streamwise interfacial and spanwise interfacial perturbations were measured using high-resolution thermocouples and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF), respectively. The initial multi-mode streamwise velocity perturbations at the two-fluid density interface were measured using particle-image velocimetry (PIV). It was found that the measured initial conditions describe an initially anisotropic state, in which the perturbations in the streamwise and spanwise directions are independent of one another. The evolution of various fluctuating velocity and density statistics, together with velocity and density variance spectra, were measured using PIV and high-resolution thermocouple data. The evolution of the velocity and density statistics is used to investigate the early-time evolution and the onset of strongly-nonlinear, transitional dynamics within the mixing layer. The early-time evolution of the density and vertical velocity variance spectra indicate that velocity fluctuations are the dominant mechanism driving the instability development. The implications of the present experimental measurements on the initialization of Reynolds-averaged turbulent transport and mixing models and of direct and large-eddy simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor instability-induced turbulence are discussed.

  18. Energetics of Wind-Induced Internal Wave Radiation from the Base of the Mixed Layer in the North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelker, G. S.; Mertens, C.; Myers, P. G.; Olbers, D. J.; Walter, M.

    2016-02-01

    Energy transfer mechanisms between atmosphere and the deep ocean have been studied for many years. Their importance to the ocean's energy balance and possible implications on mixing are widely accepted. The slab model is a well-established simulation of near-inertial motion and energy inferred through wind-ocean interaction. However, temporally coarse resolution wind forcing data in combination with rough internal wave energy flux assumptions are mainly used. A slab model using hourly wind forcing from the NCEP-CFSR reanalysis allowing computations up to high latitudes without loss of resonance was set up. It was validated with buoy data from 44 sites in the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Oceans and the Mediterranean Sea. Augmenting the one-dimensional model by the horizontal divergence of the near-inertial current field at the mixed layer base led to direct estimates of energy transfer spectra of radiation of internal waves into the ocean interior. No crucial assumptions on transfer physics were made. Results of the hybrid model indicated the presence of internal wave modes at the base of the mixed layer. Spatially-advancing wind stress fronts were identified as their main driver and thus they acted as the major source for internal wave radiation into the deep ocean. Accordingly, mid-latitude storms with a strong seasonal cycle as well as isolated tropical storm tracks are dominant in energy fluxes in the North Atlantic.

  19. Study of surface plasmon resonance of Au nanoparticles coated with dielectric layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jia-Yu; Huang, Chan-yan; Dai, Ning; Zhu, Da-ming

    2011-08-01

    In this work, atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used to deposit different thickness layers of Al2O3 on Au nanoparticles fabricated by thermal annealing of Au thin films. The effects of the Au-coated Al2O3 layer thickness variation to local surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) in gold (Au) nanoparticles was investigated using transmission surface plasmon resonance (T-SPR) spectroscopy. Thermal annealing of ultrathin films of Au sputtered on transparent substrates can get a dispersed metal particles system which exhibit transmission spectra showing an extinction band attributed to localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). The particles prepared by thermal annealing are much more like elliptical rather than sphere. The dielectric medium layer Al2O3 was deposited on these Au particles with the thickness from few nanometers to tens of nanometers by ALD. We found that All the LSPR peak positions of particles on different substrates red shifted as the thickness of deposition layer increase, but the LSPR red-shift effect of particles on alumina substrate was much more remarkable than particles on glass substrate. The results in this paper show that it is a very continent method to manipulate LSPR position which is a profound useful effect in solar cell application by controlling the deposition layer thickness on particles prepared by thermal annealing on suitable substrate.

  20. Relevance of sub-surface chip layers for the lifetime of magnetically trapped atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, H. B.; Henkel, C; Haller, E.

    2005-01-01

    on the thickness of that layer, as long as the layers below have a much smaller conductivity; essentially the same magnetic noise would be obtained with a metallic membrane suspended in vacuum. Based on our theory we give general scaling laws of how to reduce the effect of surface magnetic noise on the trapped...... measurements where the center of a side guide trap is laterally shifted with respect to the current carrying wire using additional bias fields. Comparing the experiment to theory, we find a fair agreement and demonstrate that for a chip whose topmost layer is metallic, the magnetic noise depends essentially...

  1. Investigation of mechanical characteristics of composite surface layers using materials with thermoelastic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusinov, P. O.; Blednova, Zh. M.; Borovets, O. I.

    2017-12-01

    We developed the formation technology of the steel-layer with elastic phase transformations-ceramic wear-resistant layer composition by means of high-velocity oxygen fuel spraying (HVOF) in the protective medium of mechanically activated powders TiNiCu and cBN-Co-Mo. We also determined optimal processing parameters. We revealed regularities in the formation of the nanoscale state of the composition on the basis of complex X-ray diffraction and electron-microscopic studies. We carried out tests of steel 1045 with surface-modified layers TiNiCu + cBN-Co-Mo on friction wear, which showed an increase in wear resistance.

  2. Removing device and method for radiation-contaminated concrete surface layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, Kiyoshi.

    1996-01-01

    When a radiation-contaminated concrete surface layer is crushed, peeled or melted, and the products generated by the procedures are captured by sucking, the activity of the products is measured. It is judged whether the result is higher than a predetermined level or not, and when the activity is lowered to a predetermined level or less, the portion to be crushed, peeled or melted is moved and the radiation-contaminated concrete surface layer is thus successively removed. In the device of the present invention, microwave energy, millimeter wave energy, or AC arc plasma is used as an energy irradiation means. With such procedures, the contaminated concrete surface layer can be removed efficiently with neither more nor less. (T.M.)

  3. Structure of the surface layer protein of the outer membrane of Spirillum serpens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaeser, R.M.; Chiu, W.; Grano, D.

    1979-01-01

    The outer membrane of the Gram negative bacterium, Spirillum serpens VHA, possesses an ordered surface-layer protein. A morphological model of this protein is proposed on the basis of electron micrographs that have been obtained of unstained, hydrated specimens as well as of negatively stained specimens. The molecular weight of the protein monomer in this model is consistent with the surface-layer protein molecular weight obtained by gel electrophoresis and estimated to be 140,000. In addition, gel electrophoresis reveals the presence of proteins of MW approx. = 35,000 and MW approx. = 78,000, which remain associated with the outer membrane under conditions where the ordered surface-layer protein is released in soluble form.

  4. Manufacture of silicon-based devices having disordered sulfur-doped surface layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, III, James Edward; Mazur, Eric

    2008-04-08

    The present invention provides methods of fabricating a radiation-absorbing semiconductor wafer by irradiating at least one surface location of a silicon substrate, e.g., an n-doped crystalline silicon, by a plurality of temporally short laser pulses, e.g., femtosecond pulses, while exposing that location to a substance, e.g., SF.sub.6, having an electron-donating constituent so as to generate a substantially disordered surface layer (i.e., a microstructured layer) that incorporates a concentration of that electron-donating constituent, e.g., sulfur. The substrate is also annealed at an elevated temperature and for a duration selected to enhance the charge carrier density in the surface layer. For example, the substrate can be annealed at a temperature in a range of about 700 K to about 900 K.

  5. Surfactant-free carnauba wax dispersion and its use for layer-by-layer assembled protective surface coatings on wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozhechnikova, Alina; Bellanger, Hervé; Michen, Benjamin; Burgert, Ingo; Österberg, Monika

    2017-02-01

    Protection from liquid water and UV radiation are equally important, and a sophisticated approach is needed when developing surface coatings that preserve the natural and well-appreciated aesthetic appearance of wood. In order to prevent degradation and prolong the service life of timber, a protective coating was assembled using carnauba wax particles and zinc oxide nanoparticles via layer-by-layer deposition in water. For this purpose, a facile sonication route was developed to produce aqueous wax dispersion without any surfactants or stabilizers. The suspension was stable above pH 4 due to the electrostatic repulsion between the negatively charged wax particles. The particle size could be controlled by the initial wax concentration with average particle sizes ranging from 260 to 360 nm for 1 and 10 g/L, respectively. The deposition of wax particles onto the surface of spruce wood introduced additional roughness to the wood surface at micron level, while zinc oxide provided nano roughness and UV-absorbing properties. In addition to making wood superhydrophobic, this novel multilayer coating enhanced the natural moisture buffering capability of spruce. Moreover, wood surfaces prepared in this fashion showed a significant reduction in color change after exposure to UV light. A degradation of the wax through photocatalytic activity of the ZnO particles was measured by FTIR, indicating that further studies are required to achieve long-term stability. Nevertheless, the developed coating showed a unique combination of superhydrophobicity and excellent moisture buffering ability and some UV protection, all achieved using an environmentally friendly coating process, which is beneficial to retain the natural appearance of wood and improve indoor air quality and comfort.

  6. Reduction of microbial contamination on the surfaces of layer houses using slightly acidic electrolyzed water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, L; Cao, W; Zheng, W C; Zhang, Q; Li, B M

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of slightly acidic electrolyzed water (SAEW) in reducing pathogens on pure cultures and on cotton fabric surfaces in the presence of organic matter and estimate its efficacy in comparison with povidone iodine solution for reducing pathogenic microorganisms on internal surfaces of layer houses. Pure cultures of E.coli, S.enteritidis, and S.aureus and cotton fabric surfaces inoculated with these strains were treated with SAEW in the presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA). In the absence of BSA, complete inactivation of all strains in pure cultures and on cotton fabric surfaces was observed after 2.5 and 5 min treatment with SAEW at 40 mg/L of available chlorine concentration (ACC), respectively. The bactericidal efficiency of SAEW increased with increasing ACC, but decreased with increasing BSA concentration. Then, the surfaces of the layer houses were sprayed with SAEW at 60, 80, and 100 mg/L of ACC and povidone iodine using the automated disinfection system at a rate of 110 mL/m(2), respectively. Samples from the floor, wall, feed trough, and egg conveyor belt surfaces were collected with sterile cotton swabs before and after spraying disinfection. Compared to tap water, SAEW and povidone iodine significantly reduced microbial populations on each surface of the layer houses. SAEW with 80 or 100 mg/L of ACC showed significantly higher efficacy than povidone iodine for total aerobic bacteria, staphylococci, coliforms, or yeasts and moulds on the floor and feed trough surfaces (P conveyor belt. Results suggest that SAEW exerts a higher or equivalent bactericidal efficiency for the surfaces compared to povidone iodine, and it may be used as an effective alternative for reducing microbial contamination on surfaces in layer houses. © 2015 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  7. Surface Floating 2D Bands in Layered Nonsymmorphic Semimetals: ZrSiS and Related Compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Topp, Andreas; Queiroz, Raquel; Grüneis, Andreas; Müchler, Lukas; Rost, Andreas W.; Varykhalov, Andrei; Marchenko, Dmitry; Krivenkov, Maxim; Rodolakis, Fanny; McChesney, Jessica L.; Lotsch, Bettina V.; Schoop, Leslie M.; Ast, Christian R.

    2017-12-01

    In this work, we present a model of the surface states of nonsymmorphic semimetals. These are derived from surface mass terms that lift the high degeneracy imposed in the band structure by the nonsymmorphic bulk symmetries. Reflecting the reduced symmetry at the surface, the bulk bands are strongly modified. This leads to the creation of two-dimensional floating bands, which are distinct from Shockley states, quantum well states or topologically protected surface states. We focus on the layered semimetal ZrSiS to clarify the origin of its surface states. We demonstrate an excellent agreement between DFT calculations and ARPES measurements and present an effective four-band model in which similar surface bands appear. Finally, we emphasize the role of the surface chemical potential by comparing the surface density of states in samples with and without potassium coating. Our findings can be extended to related compounds and generalized to other crystals with nonsymmorphic symmetries.

  8. `Surface-Layer' momentum fluxes in nocturnal slope flows over steep terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldroyd, H. J.; Pardyjak, E.; Higgins, C. W.; Parlange, M. B.

    2017-12-01

    A common working definition for the `surface layer' is the lowest 10% of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) where the turbulent fluxes are essentially constant. The latter part of this definition is a critical assumption that must hold for accurate flux estimations from land-surface models, wall models, similarity theory, flux-gradient relations and bulk transfer methods. We present cases from observed momentum fluxes in nocturnal slope flows over steep (35.5 degree), alpine terrain in Val Ferret, Switzerland that satisfy the classical definitions of the surface layer and other cases where no traditional surface layer is observed. These cases broadly fall into two distinct flow regimes occurring under clear-sky conditions: (1) buoyancy-driven, `katabatic flow', characterized by an elevated velocity maximum (katabatic jet peak) and (2) `downslope winds', for which larger-scale forcing prevents formation of a katabatic jet. Velocity profiles in downslope wind cases are quite similar to logarithmic profiles typically observed over horizontal and homogeneous terrain, and the corresponding momentum fluxes roughly resemble a constant-flux surface-layer. Contrastingly, velocity profiles in the katabatic regime exhibit a jet-like shape. This jet strongly modulates the corresponding momentum fluxes, which exhibit strong gradients over the shallow katabatic layer and usually change sign near the jet peak, where the velocity gradients also change sign. However, a counter-gradient momentum flux is frequently observed near the jet peak (and sometimes at higher levels), suggesting strong non-local turbulent transport within the katabatic jet layer. We compare our observations with katabatic flow theories and observational studies over shallow-angle slopes and use co-spectral analyses to better identify and understand the non-local transport dynamics. Finally, we show that because of the counter-gradient momentum fluxes, surface layer stability and even local stability can be

  9. Tuning Tribological Performance of Layered Zirconium Phosphate Nanoplatelets in Oil by Surface and Interlayer Modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiao; Yong, Huaisong; Sun, Dazhi

    2017-09-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) inorganic layered nanoplatelets exhibit superior lubricating properties in both solid states and oil dispersions. In this paper, we have systematically investigated the effects of surface and interlayer modifications on the tribological performance of layered α-zirconium phosphate (ZrP) nanoplatelets in mineral oil. The pristine layered ZrP nanoplatelets were first reacted with silanes of different alkyl chains to achieve outer surface modifications, followed by intercalation with different alkyl amines to alter the interlayer spacing. Friction and anti-wear studies on ZrP nanoplatelets with various modifications in mineral oils suggest that a longer alkyl chain on the outer surfaces along with a small increase in interlayer spacing would lead to a better tribological behavior especially under a relatively heavy load condition. Our results illustrate the ability of tuning the tribological properties of 2D layered nanoplatelets in oils by varying their surface and interlayer functionalities and would be helpful for understanding the underlying tribological mechanisms of nanolubricating oils containing 2D layered nanoplatelets. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  10. Evidence of a Transition Layer between the Free Surface and the Bulk

    KAUST Repository

    Ogieglo, Wojciech

    2018-02-21

    The free surface, a very thin layer at the interface between polymer and air, is considered the main source of the perturbations in the properties of ultrathin polymer films, i.e., nanoconfinement effects. The structural relaxation of such a layer is decoupled from the molecular dynamics of the bulk. The free surface is, in fact, able to stay liquid even below the temperature where the polymer resides in the glassy state. Importantly, this surface layer is expected to have a very sharp interface with the underlying bulk. Here, by analyzing the penetration of n-hexane into polystyrene films, we report on the existence of a transition region, not observed by previous investigations, extending for 12 nm below the free surface. The presence of such a layer permits reconciling the behavior of interfacial layers with current models and has profound implications on the performance of ultrathin membranes. We show that the expected increase in the flux of the permeating species is actually overruled by nanoconfinement.

  11. Tuning Tribological Performance of Layered Zirconium Phosphate Nanoplatelets in Oil by Surface and Interlayer Modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiao; Yong, Huaisong; Sun, Dazhi

    2017-09-20

    Two-dimensional (2D) inorganic layered nanoplatelets exhibit superior lubricating properties in both solid states and oil dispersions. In this paper, we have systematically investigated the effects of surface and interlayer modifications on the tribological performance of layered α-zirconium phosphate (ZrP) nanoplatelets in mineral oil. The pristine layered ZrP nanoplatelets were first reacted with silanes of different alkyl chains to achieve outer surface modifications, followed by intercalation with different alkyl amines to alter the interlayer spacing. Friction and anti-wear studies on ZrP nanoplatelets with various modifications in mineral oils suggest that a longer alkyl chain on the outer surfaces along with a small increase in interlayer spacing would lead to a better tribological behavior especially under a relatively heavy load condition. Our results illustrate the ability of tuning the tribological properties of 2D layered nanoplatelets in oils by varying their surface and interlayer functionalities and would be helpful for understanding the underlying tribological mechanisms of nanolubricating oils containing 2D layered nanoplatelets. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  12. Surface modification induced phase transformation and structure variation on the rapidly solidified recast layer of titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Ming-Hung [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Graduate Institute of Mechanical and Precision Engineering, National Kaoshiung University of Applied Sciences, Kaoshiung 807, Taiwan (China); School of Dentistry, College of Oral Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Haung, Chiung-Fang [School of Dental Technology, College of Oral Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Division of Family and Operative Dentistry, Department of Dentistry, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Biomedical Devices and Prototyping Production, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Shyu, Shih-Shiun [Department of Dentistry, Taipei Tzu Chi Hospital, Buddhist Tzu Chi Medical Foundation, New Taipei City 231, Taiwan (China); Chou, Yen-Ru [Research Center for Biomedical Devices and Prototyping Production, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, College of Oral Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Lin, Ming-Hong [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Graduate Institute of Mechanical and Precision Engineering, National Kaoshiung University of Applied Sciences, Kaoshiung 807, Taiwan (China); Peng, Pei-Wen, E-mail: apon@tmu.edu.tw [School of Dental Technology, College of Oral Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); and others

    2015-08-15

    In this study, neodymium-doped yttrium orthovanadate (Nd:YVO{sub 4}) as a laser source with different scanning speeds was used on biomedical Ti surface. The microstructural and biological properties of laser-modified samples were investigated by means of optical microscope, electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, surface roughness instrument, contact angle and cell cytotoxicity assay. After laser modification, the rough volcano-like recast layer with micro-/nanoporous structure and wave-like recast layer with nanoporous structure were generated on the surfaces of laser-modified samples, respectively. It was also found out that, an α → (α + rutile-TiO{sub 2}) phase transition occurred on the recast layers of laser-modified samples. The Ti surface becomes hydrophilic at a high speed laser scanning. Moreover, the cell cytotoxicity assay demonstrated that laser-modified samples did not influence the cell adhesion and proliferation behaviors of osteoblast (MG-63) cell. The laser with 50 mm/s scanning speed induced formation of rough volcano-like recast layer accompanied with micro-/nanoporous structure, which can promote cell adhesion and proliferation of MG-63 cell on Ti surface. The results indicated that the laser treatment was a potential technology to enhance the biocompatibility for titanium. - Highlights: • Laser induced the formation of recast layer with micro-/nanoporous structure on Ti. • An α → (α + rutile-TiO{sub 2}) phase transition was observed within the recast layer. • The Ti surface becomes hydrophilic at a high speed laser scanning. • Laser-modified samples exhibit good biocompatibility to osteoblast (MG-63) cell.

  13. Towards Automated Characterization of Canopy Layering in Mixed Temperate Forests Using Airborne Laser Scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reik Leiterer

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Canopy layers form essential structural components, affecting stand productivity and wildlife habitats. Airborne laser scanning (ALS provides horizontal and vertical information on canopy structure simultaneously. Existing approaches to assess canopy layering often require prior information about stand characteristics or rely on pre-defined height thresholds. We developed a multi-scale method using ALS data with point densities >10 pts/m2 to determine the number and vertical extent of canopy layers (canopylayer, canopylength, seasonal variations in the topmost canopy layer (canopytype, as well as small-scale heterogeneities in the canopy (canopyheterogeneity. We first tested and developed the method on a small forest patch (800 ha and afterwards tested transferability and robustness of the method on a larger patch (180,000 ha. We validated the approach using an extensive set of ground data, achieving overall accuracies >77% for canopytype and canopyheterogeneity, and >62% for canopylayer and canopylength. We conclude that our method provides a robust characterization of canopy layering supporting automated canopy structure monitoring.

  14. Seasonal variation in surface fuel moisture between unthinned and thinned mixed conifer forest, northern California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becky L. Estes; Eric E. Knapp; Carl N. Skinner; Fabian C. C. Uzoh

    2012-01-01

    Reducing stand density is often used as a tool for mitigating the risk of high-intensity crown fires. However, concern has been expressed that opening stands might lead to greater drying of surface fuels, contributing to increased fire risk. The objective of this study was to determine whether woody fuel moisture differed between unthinned and thinned mixed-conifer...

  15. 46 CFR 197.434 - Surface-supplied mixed-gas diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Surface-supplied mixed-gas diving. 197.434 Section 197... HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Specific Diving Mode Procedures § 197... diving is conducted, a decompression chamber or a closed bell meeting the requirements of § 197.332 is...

  16. An improved thin-layer chromatography/mass spectrometry coupling using a surface sampling probe electrospray ion trap system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, Michael J [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL

    2004-01-01

    A combined surface sampling probe/electrospray emitter coupled with an ion trap mass spectrometer was used for the direct read out of unmodified reversed-phase C18 thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plates. The operation of the surface sampling electrospray ionization interface in positive and negative ionization modes was demonstrated through the direct analysis of TLC plates on which a commercial test mix comprised of four dye compounds viz., rhodamine B, fluorescein, naphthol blue black, and fast green FCF, and an extract of the caffeine-containing plant Ilex vomitoria, were spotted and developed. Acquisition of full-scan mass spectra and automated collection of MS/MS product ion spectra while scanning a development lane along the surface of a TLC plate demonstrated the advantages of using an ion trap in this combination. Details of the sampling system, benefits of analyzing a developed lane in both positive ion and negative ion modes, levels of detection while surface scanning, surface scan speed effects, and the utility of three-dimensional data display, are also discussed.

  17. The effect of using waste newspaper in surface layers on physical and mechanical properties of three-layer particleboard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    vahid vaziri

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, physical and mechanical properties of particleboard made from recycled newspaper in the surface layers were investigated. Coarse and fine wood chips and recycled newspaper with dimension of 0.5 × 4 cm2 were used. The variable in this research were the ratio of recycled newspaper to wood chips (at five levels; 0:100, 15:85, 30:70, 45:55, 60:40. Urea formaldehyde resin used at 10% content on dry weight basis of the wood particles and newspaper and ammonium chloride was used as a catalyst to 2% of the dry weight of adhesive. Physical and mechanical properties of panels measured according to EN Standard. The results showed that panels containing recycled newspapers at the level of 45% had the highest bending strength and modulus of elasticity. Internal bonding and screw holding strength decreased with increasing of recycled newspaper and control sample had the highest strength. Water absorption and thickness swelling increased with increasing of recycled newspaper portion. On the basis of results of this study can be concluded that particleboard containing recycled newspapers in the surface layers up to the level of 30% can be used for general purpose boards and interior fitments (including furniture for use in dry conditions.

  18. Antiferroelectric surface layers in a liquid crystal as observed by synchrotron x-ray scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramsbergen, E. F.; de Jeu, W. H.; Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage

    1986-01-01

    The X-ray reflectivity form the surface of a liquid crystal with terminally polar (cyano substituted) molecules has been studied using a high-resolution triple-axis X-ray spectrometer in combination with a synchrotron source. It is demonstrated that at the surface of the smectic Al phase a few...... antiferroelectric double layers develop that can be distinguished from the bulk single layer structure. A model is developed that separates the electron density in a contribution from the molecular form factor, and from the structure factor of the mono- and the bilayers, respectively. It shows that (i) the first...

  19. Effectiveness of Protective Action of Coatings from Moisture Sorption into Surface Layer of Sand Moulds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaźnica N.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of investigations of the sorption process of surface layers of sand moulds covered by zirconium and zirconium - graphite alcohol coatings are presented in the paper. Investigations comprised two kinds of sand grains (silica sand and reclaimed sand of moulding sand with furan resin. Tests were performed under conditions of a high relative air humidity 75 - 85% and a constant temperature within the range 28 – 33°C. To evaluate the effectiveness of coatings protective action from moisture penetration into surface layers of sand moulds gravimetric method of quantitavie moisture sorption and ultrasonic method were applied in measurements.

  20. Adhesion of oxide layer to metal-doped aluminum hydride surface: Density functional calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takezawa, Tomoki; Itoi, Junichi; Kannan, Takashi

    2017-07-01

    The density functional theory (DFT) calculations were carried out to evaluate the adhesion energy of the oxide layer to the metal-doped surface of hydrogen storage material, aluminum hydride (alane, AlH3). The total energy calculations using slab model revealed that the surface doping of some metals to aluminum hydride weakens the adhesion strength of the oxide layer. The influence of titanium, iron, cobalt, and zirconium doping on adhesion strength were evaluated. Except for iron doping, the adhesion strength becomes weak by the doping.