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Sample records for surface mineralogies formed

  1. Reflectance spectroscopy and asteroid surface mineralogy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaffey, M.J.; Bell, J.F.; Cruikshank, D.P.

    1989-01-01

    Information available from reflectance spectroscopy on the surface mineralogy of asteroids is discussed. Current spectral interpretive procedures used in the investigations of asteroid mineralogy are described. Present understanding of the nature and history of asteroids is discussed together with some still unresolved issues such as the source of ordinary chondrites. 100 refs

  2. Martian Surface Mineralogy from Rovers with Spirit, Opportunity, and Curiosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Richard V.

    2016-01-01

    Beginning in 2004, NASA has landed three well-instrumented rovers on the equatorial martian surface. The Spirit rover landed in Gusev crater in early January, 2004, and the Opportunity rover landed on the opposite side of Mars at Meridian Planum 21 days later. The Curiosity rover landed in Gale crater to the west of Gusev crater in August, 2012. Both Opportunity and Curiosity are currently operational. The twin rovers Spirit and Opportunity carried Mossbauer spectrometers to determine the oxidation state of iron and its mineralogical composition. The Curiosity rover has an X-ray diffraction instrument for identification and quantification of crystalline materials including clay minerals. Instrument suites on all three rovers are capable of distinguishing primary rock-forming minerals like olivine, pyroxene and magnetite and products of aqueous alteration in including amorphous iron oxides, hematite, goethite, sulfates, and clay minerals. The oxidation state of iron ranges from that typical for unweathered rocks and soils to nearly completely oxidized (weathered) rocks and soils as products of aqueous and acid-sulfate alteration. The in situ rover mineralogy also serves as ground-truth for orbital observations, and orbital mineralogical inferences are used for evaluating and planning rover exploration.

  3. Mineralogy of the Martian Surface: Crustal Composition to Surface Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustard, John F.

    1999-01-01

    Over the course of this award we have: 1) Completed and published the results of a study of the effects of hyperfine particles on reflectance spectra of olivine and quartz, which included the development of scattering codes. Research has also progressed in the analysis of the effects of fine particle sizes on clay spectra. 2) Completed the analysis of the mineralogy of dark regions, showed the insitu compositions are highly correlated to the SNC meteorites, and determined that the martian mantle was depleted in aluminum prior to 2-3 GA ago; Studies of the mineralogic heterogeneity of surficial materials on Mars have also been conducted. and 3) Performed initial work on the study of the physical and chemical processes likely to form and modify duricrust. This includes assessments of erosion rates, solubility and transport of iron in soil environments, and models of pedogenic crust formation.

  4. Mineralogy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, C.

    2006-01-01

    The classic in the field since 1848, this extraordinary reference offers readers unsurpassed coverage of mineralogy and crystallography. The book is known for integrating complete coverage of concepts and principles with a more systematic and descriptive treatment of mineralogy. The revised edition now includes a CD-ROM to let readers see the minerals and crystals, while also viewing chemical composition, symmetry, and morphological crystallography.

  5. Thermodynamic modeling of mineralogical phases formed by continuous casting powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romo-Castaneda, Julio; Cruz-Ramirez, Alejandro; Romero-Serrano, Antonio; Vargas-Ramirez, Marissa; Hallen-Lopez, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    A great amount of mineralogical phases were predicted and represented in stability phase diagrams, which were obtained by the use of the thermodynamic software FACTSage considering both the chemical composition and the melting temperature of the mould flux. Melting-solidification tests on commercial mould flux glasses for thin slab casting of steel revealed the existence of cuspidine (Ca 4 Si 2 O 7 F 2 ) as the main mineralogical phase formed during the flux solidification by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). This phase directly influences the heat transfer phenomena from the strand to the mould and it is obtained with higher fluorite content (22% CaF 2 ). Cuspidine is desirable only in fluxes to produce medium carbon (included peritectic grade) steels, because it reduces the heat flux from the strand to the mould, thus controlling the shrinkage rate during the flux solidification. The experimental results are in agreement with those obtained by the thermodynamic software. The stability phase diagrams could be used as an important tool in the flux design for continuous casting process.

  6. Thermodynamic modeling of mineralogical phases formed by continuous casting powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romo-Castaneda, Julio [Metallurgy and Materials Department, Instituto Politecnico Nacional-ESIQIE, Apdo. P. 118-431, 07051 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Cruz-Ramirez, Alejandro, E-mail: alcruzr@ipn.mx [Metallurgy and Materials Department, Instituto Politecnico Nacional-ESIQIE, Apdo. P. 118-431, 07051 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Romero-Serrano, Antonio; Vargas-Ramirez, Marissa; Hallen-Lopez, Manuel [Metallurgy and Materials Department, Instituto Politecnico Nacional-ESIQIE, Apdo. P. 118-431, 07051 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2011-01-10

    A great amount of mineralogical phases were predicted and represented in stability phase diagrams, which were obtained by the use of the thermodynamic software FACTSage considering both the chemical composition and the melting temperature of the mould flux. Melting-solidification tests on commercial mould flux glasses for thin slab casting of steel revealed the existence of cuspidine (Ca{sub 4}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7}F{sub 2}) as the main mineralogical phase formed during the flux solidification by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). This phase directly influences the heat transfer phenomena from the strand to the mould and it is obtained with higher fluorite content (22% CaF{sub 2}). Cuspidine is desirable only in fluxes to produce medium carbon (included peritectic grade) steels, because it reduces the heat flux from the strand to the mould, thus controlling the shrinkage rate during the flux solidification. The experimental results are in agreement with those obtained by the thermodynamic software. The stability phase diagrams could be used as an important tool in the flux design for continuous casting process.

  7. Clay mineralogy in different geomorphic surfaces in sugarcane areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, L.; Marques, J., Jr.

    2012-04-01

    The crystallization of the oxides and hydroxides of iron and aluminum and kaolinite of clay fraction is the result of pedogenetic processes controlled by the relief. These minerals have influence on the physical and chemical attributes of soil and exhibit spatial dependence. The pattern of spatial distribution is influenced by forms of relief as the geomorphic surfaces. In this sense, the studies aimed at understanding the relationship between relief and the distribution pattern of the clay fraction attributes contribute to the delineation of specific areas of management in the field. The objective of this study was to evaluate the spatial distribution of oxides and hydroxides of iron and aluminum and kaolinite of clay fraction and its relationship with the physical and chemical attributes in different geomorphic surfaces. Soil samples were collected in a transect each 25 m (100 samples) and in the sides of the same (200 samples) as well as an area of 500 ha (1 sample each six hectare). Geomorphic surfaces (GS) in the transect were mapped in detail to support mapping the entire area. The soil samples were taken to the laboratory for chemical, physical, and mineralogical analysis, and the pattern of spatial distribution of soil attributes was obtained by statistics and geostatistics. The GS I is considered the oldest surface of the study area, with depositional character, and a slope ranging from 0 to 4%. GS II and III are considered to be eroded, and the surface II plan a gentle slope that extends from the edge of the surface until the beginning of I and III. The crystallographic characteristics of the oxides and hydroxides of iron and aluminum and kaolinite showed spatial dependence and the distribution pattern corresponding to the limits present of the GS in the field. Surfaces I and II showed the best environments to the degree of crystallinity of hematite and the surface III to the greatest degree of crystallinity of goethite agreeing to the pedoenvironment

  8. The mineralogic evolution of the Martian surface through time: Implications from chemical reaction path modeling studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumlee, G. S.; Ridley, W. I.; Debraal, J. D.; Reed, M. H.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical reaction path calculations were used to model the minerals that might have formed at or near the Martian surface as a result of volcano or meteorite impact driven hydrothermal systems; weathering at the Martian surface during an early warm, wet climate; and near-zero or sub-zero C brine-regolith reactions in the current cold climate. Although the chemical reaction path calculations carried out do not define the exact mineralogical evolution of the Martian surface over time, they do place valuable geochemical constraints on the types of minerals that formed from an aqueous phase under various surficial and geochemically complex conditions.

  9. Surface Mineralogy Mapping of Ceres from the Dawn Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCord, T. B.; Zambon, F.

    2017-12-01

    Ceres' surface composition is of special interest because it is a window into the interior state and the past evolution of this dwarf planet. Disk-integrated telescopic spectral observations indicated that Ceres' surface is hydroxylated, similar to but not exactly the same as some of the carbonaceous chondrite classes of meteorites. Furthermore, Ceres' bulk density is low, indicating significant water content. The Dawn mission in orbit around Ceres, provided a new and larger set of observations on the mineralogy, molecular and elemental composition, and their distributions in association with surface features and geology. A set of articles was prepared, from which this presentation is derived, that is the first treatment of the entire surface composition of Ceres using the complete High Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO) Dawn Ceres data set and the calibrations from all the Dawn instruments. This report provides a current and comprehensive view of Ceres' surface composition and integrates them into general conclusions. Ceres' surface composition shows a fairly uniform distribution of NH4- and Mg-phyllosilicates, carbonates, mixed with a dark component. The widespread presence of phyllosilicates, and salts on Ceres' surface is indicative of the presence of aqueous alteration processes, which involved the whole dwarf planet. There is also likely some contamination by low velocity infall, as seen on Vesta, but it is more difficult to distinguish this infall from native Ceres material, unlike for the Vesta case.

  10. Clay mineralogy and magnetic susceptibility of Oxisols in geomorphic surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Arantes Camargo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies analyzing the variability of clay minerals and magnetic susceptibility provide data for the delineation of site-specific management areas since many of their attributes are important to agronomy and the environment. This study aimed to evaluate the spatial variability of clay minerals, magnetic susceptibility, adsorbed phosphorus and physical attributes in Oxisols of sandstones in different geomorphic surfaces. For that purpose, soil samples were collected every 25 m along a transect located within the area where the geomorphic surfaces were identified and mapped. The transect occupied the central portion of 500 ha, where it was also sampled for density purposes with one sample per six hectares. Soil samples were collected at a depth of 0.0-0.2 m. The results of the physical, chemical, mineralogical and magnetic susceptibility analyses were subjected to statistical and geostatistical analyses. The nature of the clay minerals and magnetic susceptibility was dependent on the variation of the soil parent material. High values of magnetic susceptibility were associated with the presence of maghemite and magnetite of coarse size. The spatial variability of crystallinity and the content of Fe oxides, as well as magnetic susceptibility, were dependent on the age of the geomorphic surfaces. The youngest surface had greater spatial variability of these attributes. The iron (goethite and hematite and aluminum (gibbsite oxides in the youngest geomorphic surface influenced the low values of soil density and high values of total pore volume, micropores and P adsorption. The characterization of the spatial variability of Fe oxides and susceptibility allowed for the delineation of homogeneous areas.

  11. Mineralogical assemblages forming at hyperalkaline warm springs hosted on ultramafic rocks: A case study of Oman and Ligurian ophiolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavagnac, Valérie; Ceuleneer, Georges; Monnin, Christophe; Lansac, Benjamin; Hoareau, Guilhem; Boulart, Cédric

    2013-07-01

    We report on the mineralogical assemblages found in the hyperalkaline springs hosted on Liguria and Oman ophiolites based on exhaustive X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microprobe analyses. In Liguria, hyperalkaline springs produce a thin brownish calcite precipitate that covers the bedrock due to the concomitant atmospheric CO2 uptake and neutralization of the hyperalkaline waters. No brucite and portlandite minerals are observed. The discharge of alkaline waters in Oman ophiolite forms white-orange precipitates. Calcium carbonate minerals (calcite and/or aragonite) are the most abundant and ubiquitous precipitates and are produced by the same mechanism as in Liguria. This process is observed as a thin surface crust made of rhombohedral calcite. Morphological features of aragonite vary from needle-, bouquet-, dumbbell-, spheroidal-like habitus according to the origin of carbon, temperature, and ionic composition of the hyperalkaline springs, and the biochemical and organic compounds. Brucite is observed both at hyperalkaline springs located at the thrust plane and at the paleo-Moho. The varying mixing proportions between the surface runoff waters and the hyperalkaline ones control brucite precipitation. The layered double hydroxide minerals occur solely in the vicinity of hyperalkaline springs emerging within the bedded gabbros. Finally, the dominant mineralogical associations we found in Oman (Ca-bearing carbonates and brucite) in a serpentinizing environment driven by the meteoric waters are surprisingly the same as those observed at the Lost City hydrothermal site in a totally marine environment.

  12. Lithological and Mineralogical Characteristics and Forming Conditions of the Jurassic Sediments on the West Siberian Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.R. Khaziev

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, lithological and mineralogical features, granulometric composition, as well as reservoir properties of the formation YuV1-1 of the Ety-Purovsky oil field are considered. It is established that the main rock-forming minerals of the reservoir – quartz, potassium feldspar and mica, also fragments of rocks, including carbonate rocks, are also found. Sandstone is diagnosed as carbonate greywack by the examined thin sections. According to the granulometry data, the formation is characterized as fine-grained sandstone with a dominant fraction of grains of 0.1-0.25 mm (47% of the total mass. According to the petrogenetic Passega diagram it was established that the formation was formed under the conditions of the gradation suspension generated in the lower parts of the fast river streams, directly at the bottom, which agrees with the literature data. Moreover, according to design factors (So, Q3, Q1, it is established that the formation is characterized by a poor degree of sorting of the sand material, as well as low roundness of grains and deteriorated reservoir properties, measured in laboratory conditions. It follows from the analysis that the reservoir is characterized by low productivity, and its development requires the use of hydraulic fracturing at an early stage of development.

  13. Mineralogical and geochemical patterns of urban surface soils, the example of Pforzheim, Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norra, Stefan; Lanka-Panditha, Mahesh; Kramar, Utz; Stueben, Doris

    2006-01-01

    This study presents a combined geochemical and mineralogical survey of urban surface soils. Many studies on urban soils are restricted to purely chemical surveys in order to investigate soil pollution caused by anthropogenic activities such as traffic, heating, industrial processing, waste disposal and many more. In environmental studies, chemical elements are often distinguished as lithogenic and anthropogenic elements. As a novel contribution to those studies, the authors combined the analysis of a broad set of chemical elements with the analysis of the main mineralogical phases. The semi-quantification of mineralogical phases supported the assignment of groups of chemical elements to lithogenic or anthropogenic origin. Minerals are important sinks for toxic elements. Thus, knowledge about their distribution in soils is crucial for the assessment of the environmental hazards due to pollution of urban soils. In Pforzheim, surface soils (0-5 cm depth) from various land use types (forest, agriculture, urban green space, settlement areas of various site densities) overlying different geological units (clastic and chemical sediments) were investigated. Urban surface soils of Pforzheim reflect to a considerable degree the mineral and chemical composition of parent rocks. Irrespective of the parent rocks, elevated concentrations of heavy metals (Zn, Cu, Pb, Sn, Ag) were found in soils throughout the whole inner urban settlement area of Pforzheim indicating pollution. These pollutants will tend to accumulate in inner urban surface soils according to the available adsorption capacity, which is normally higher in soils overlying limestone than in soils overlying sandstone. However, inner urban surface soils overlying sandstone show elevated concentrations of carbonates, phyllo-silicates and Fe and elevated pH values compared with forest soils overlying sandstone. Thus, in comparison to forest soils overlying sandstones, inner urban soils overlying sandstone affected by

  14. Data-driven exploration of copper mineralogy and its application to Earth's near-surface oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, S. M.; Eleish, A.; Runyon, S.; Prabhu, A.; Fox, P. A.; Ralph, J.; Golden, J. J.; Downs, R. T.; Liu, C.; Meyer, M.; Hazen, R. M.

    2017-12-01

    Earth's atmospheric composition has changed radically throughout geologic history.1,2 The oxidation of our atmosphere, driven by biology, began with the Great Oxidation Event (GOE) 2.5 Ga and has heavily influenced Earth's near surface mineralogy. Therefore, temporal trends in mineral occurrence elucidate large and small scale geologic and biologic processes. Cu, and other first-row transition elements, are of particular interest due to their variation in valance state and sensitivity to ƒO2. Widespread formation of oxidized Cu mineral species (Cu2+) would not have been possible prior to the GOE and we have found that the proportion of oxidized Cu minerals increased steadily with the increase in atmospheric O2 on Earth's surface (see Fig. 1). To better characterize the changes in Cu mineralogy through time, we have employed advanced analytical and visualization methods. These techniques rely on large and growing mineral databases (e.g., rruff.info, mindat.org, earthchem.org, usgs.gov) and allow us to quantify and visualize multi-dimensional trends.5

  15. Mineralogic control on abundance and diversity of surface-adherent microbial communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauck, Brena S.; Roberts, Jennifer A.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of mineral-bound P and Fe in defining microbial abundance and diversity in a carbon-rich groundwater. Field colonization experiments of initially sterile mineral surfaces were combined with community structure characterization of the attached microbial population. Silicate minerals containing varying concentrations of P (∼1000 ppm P) and Fe (∼4 wt % Fe 2 O3), goethite (FeOOH), and apatite [Ca5(PO4)3(OH)] were incubated for 14 months in three biogeochemically distinct zones within a petroleum-contaminated aquifer. Phospholipid fatty acid analysis of incubated mineral surfaces and groundwater was used as a measure of microbial community structure and biomass. Microbial biomass on minerals exhibited distinct trends as a function of mineralogy depending on the environment of incubation. In the carbon-rich, aerobic groundwater attached biomass did not correlate to the P- or Fe- content of the mineral. In the methanogenic groundwater, however, biomass was most abundant on P-containing minerals. Similarly, in the Fe-reducing groundwater a correlation between Fe-content and biomass was observed. The community structure of the mineral-adherent microbial population was compared to the native groundwater community. These two populations were significantly different regardless of mineralogy, suggesting differentiation of the planktonic community through attachment, growth, and death of colonizing cells. Biomarkers specific for dissimilatory Fe-reducing bacteria native to the aquifer were identified only on Fe-containing minerals in the Fe-reducing groundwater. These results demonstrate that the trace nutrient content of minerals affects both the abundance and diversity of surface-adherent microbial communities. This behavior may be a means to access limiting nutrients from the mineral, creating a niche for a particular microbial population. These results suggest that heterogeneity of microbial populations and their associated

  16. The solonetzic process in surface soils and buried paleosols and its reflection in the mineralogical soil memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizhikova, N. P.; Kovda, I. V.; Borisov, A. V.; Shishlina, N. I.

    2009-10-01

    The development of the solonetzic process in paleosols buried under kurgans and in the modern surface soils has been studied on the basis of the analysis of the clay (memory“ of the solid-phase soil components. The mineralogical characteristics show that the solonetzic process in the modern background soil is more developed. The mineralogical approach allows us to reveal the long-term changes in the soil status; it is less useful for studying the effect of short-term bioclimatic fluctuations. In the latter case, more labile soil characteristics should be used. The mineralogical method, combined with other methods, becomes more informative upon the study of soil chronosequences. Our studies have shown that the data on the clay minerals in the buried paleosols may contain specific information useful for paleoreconstructions that is not provided by other methods.

  17. X-Ray Diffraction and Fluorescence Instrument for Mineralogical Analysis at the Lunar Surface, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop LUNA, a compact and lightweight X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) / X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) instrument for mineralogical analysis of regolith, rock...

  18. X-Ray Diffraction and Fluorescence Instrument for Mineralogical Analysis at the Lunar Surface, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a compact and lightweight X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) / X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) instrument for analysis of mineralogical composition of regolith,...

  19. Investigation of Different Forms of Potassium as a Function of Clay Mineralogy and Soil Evolution in Some Soils of Fars Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Sadri

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The optimum and sustainable use of soil is only possible with a correct and complete understanding of its properties. Potassium (K+ is an essential element for plant growth and is a dynamic ion in the soil system and its importance in agriculture is well recognized. According to increasing order of plant availability, soil K exists in four forms: mineral (5000-25000 ppm, nonexchangeable (50-750 ppm, exchangeable (40-600 ppm, and solution (1-10 ppm. K cycling or transformations among the K forms in soils are dynamic. The objectives of the present research were to study the relationship between different forms of potassium and clay mineralogy as well as soil evolution of 14 surface soil samples from some selected locations of Fars Province. Materials and methods: Fars provinces, with an area of 122000 km2 located in southern Iran. The elevation varies from 500 m to 4400 m above mean sea level. Mean annual precipitation ranges from about 350 mm to 850 mm. Mean annual temperature ranges from 10°C to 24°C. According to Soil Moisture and Temperature Regime Map of Iran, the soils comprise xeric, and ustic moisture regimes along with mesic, thermic and hyperthemic temperature regimes. Based on the previous soil survey maps of Fars province, 14 surface soil samples were collected. Routine physicochemical analyses and clay mineralogy were performed on soil samples. Soil reaction, texture, electrical conductivity, calcium carbonate, and gypsum were identified. Soluble potassium, exchangeable potassium, non exchangeable potassium, and mineral potassium were measured. The amounts of K forms in each sample were determined. Total K was determined following digestion (110°C of soil with 48 % HF and 6 M HCl. Water soluble K was measured in the saturated extract. Exchangeable K was extracted with 20 ml 1.0 M NH4OAc (pH 7.0 for 5 min. Nitric acid-extractable K was measured by extraction of a soil sample with boiling 1.0 M HNO3 for 1 h. Potassium

  20. Size, surface texture, chemical composition and mineralogy interrelations in ferromanganese nodules of central Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banakar, V.K; Pattan, J.N.; Jauhari, P.

    Fiftyseven ferromanganese nodules, classified into 3 size class (4,4-6 and 6-8 cm diam.), from the siliceous sediments of central Indian Ocean were analysed for transition metals and representative sample from each size class for mineralogy. Smaller...

  1. Mineralogy and thermodynamic properties of magnesium phyllosilicates formed during the alteration of a simplified nuclear glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debure, Mathieu, E-mail: m.debure@brgm.fr [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SECM, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); MINES-ParisTech, PSL Research University, Centre de Géosciences, 77305 Fontainebleau (France); De Windt, Laurent [MINES-ParisTech, PSL Research University, Centre de Géosciences, 77305 Fontainebleau (France); Frugier, Pierre; Gin, Stéphane [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SECM, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Vieillard, Philippe [IC2MP-CNRS-UMR 7285, 5 Ave. Albert Turpain TSA 51106, 86073 Poitiers Cedex 09 (France)

    2016-07-15

    The precipitation of crystallized magnesium phyllosilicates generally sustains the alteration rate of nuclear waste containment glass. However, glass alteration slows down to a residual rate as soon as Mg disappears from the solution. The identification of the phyllosilicates formed is therefore crucial for modeling the long-term behavior of nuclear glass. This study deals with batch alteration of the simplified nuclear glass ISG in presence of magnesium, and the characterization of the secondary phases. Morphological, chemical and structural analyses (MET, EDX, XRD) were performed to determine the nature and structure of the precipitated phases identified as trioctahedral smectites. Analyses conducted on the secondary phases proved the presence of Al, Na and Ca in the Mg-phyllosilicate phases. Such elements had been suspected but never quantitatively measured. The experimental results were then used to determine the thermodynamic solubility constants for each precipitated secondary phase at various temperatures. The calculated values were consistent with those available for sodium and magnesium saponites in the existing thermodynamic databases. - Highlights: • The international simple glass dissolution rate increases in presence of magnesium. • Mg added in solution combines with Si from glass to yield trioctahedral smectites. • Their calculated logK are close to smectite thermodynamic constants reported in databases. • It confirms assumptions on Mg-silicates phases made in previous geochemical modeling.

  2. Astrobiological Significance of Definitive Mineralogical Analysis of Martian Surface Samples Using the CheMin XRD/XRF Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, S. M.; Blake, D. F.; Sarrazin, P.; Bish, D. L.; Chipera, S. J.; Vaniman, D. T.; Collins, S.

    2004-01-01

    The search for evidence of habitability, or of extant or extinct life on Mars, will initially be a search for evidence of past or present conditions supportive of life. The three key requirements for the emergence of life are thought to be liquid water; a suitable energy source; and chemical building blocks. CheMin is a miniaturized XRD/XRF (X-Ray diffraction / X-ray fluorescence) instrument which has been developed for definitive mineralogic analysis of soils and rocks on the Martian surface. The CheMin instrument can provide information that is highly relevant to each of these habitability requirements as summarized below.

  3. The carbonate mineralogy and distribution of habitat-forming deep-sea corals in the southwest pacific region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostock, Helen C.; Tracey, Dianne M.; Currie, Kim I.; Dunbar, Gavin B.; Handler, Monica R.; Mikaloff Fletcher, Sara E.; Smith, Abigail M.; Williams, Michael J. M.

    2015-06-01

    Habitat-forming deep-sea scleractinian and alcyonacean corals from around the southwest Pacific were analysed for their calcium carbonate mineralogy. Scleractinian coral species Solenosmilia variabilis, Enallopsammia rostrata, Goniocorella dumosa, Madrepora oculata and Oculina virgosa were all found to be 100% aragonitic, while some members of the alcyonacean taxa Keratoisis spp., Lepidisis spp., and Paragorgia spp. were determined to be high magnesium (Mg) calcite (with 8-11 mol% MgCO3) and Primnoa sp. is bimineralic with both aragonite and Mg calcite. The majority of these habitat-forming deep-sea corals are found at intermediate depths (800-1200 m) in the Antarctic Intermediate Waters (AAIW) with low salinities (~34.5), temperatures of 4-8 °C and high oxygen concentrations (>180 μmol/kg) and currently sitting above the aragonite saturation horizon (ASH). However, habitat-forming corals have been recorded from greater depths, in cooler waters (2-4 °C) that are undersaturated with respect to aragonite (Ωaragonite160 μmol/kg. To address the sampling depth bias the coral records were normalised by the number of benthic stations (sampling effort) in the same depth range. This shows that the highest number of corals per sampling effort is between 1000 and 1400 m with corals present in over 5% of the stations at these depths. The normalised records and Boot Strap analyses suggests that scleractinian corals, especially S. variabilis should be present in >1% of stations down to 1800 m water depth, with E. rostrata, M. oculata and G. dumosa slightly shallower. While alcyonacean corals are found in >1% down to 2600 m, with Keratoisis spp. the deepest down to 2600 m, while Lepidisis spp. and Paragorgia spp. found down to 1800 m. This suggests that most species can probably tolerate some undersaturation of aragonite (Ωaragonite=0.8-0.9), with several species/genera (S. variabilis; Keratoisis spp.) even more tolerant of lower carbonate concentrations ([CO3 2 -]), down

  4. Physico-chemical and mineralogical properties influencing water-stability of aggregates of some Italian surface soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mbagwu, J.S.C.; Bazzoffi, P.; Unamba Oparah, I.

    1994-06-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to determine the relationship between physical, chemical and mineralogical properties of some surface soils (developed in north central Italy) and the stability of their aggregates to water. The index of stability used is the mean-weight diameter of water-stable aggregates (MWD). The ratio of total sand to clay which correlated negatively with MWD (r=-0.638) is the physical property which explained most of the variability in aggregate stability. The chemical properties which correlated best with aggregate stability are FeO (r=0.671), CaO (R=0.635), CaCO 3 (r=0.651) and SiO 2 (r=-0.649). Feldspar, chlorite and calcite are the minerals which influence MWD most, with respective ''r'' values of -0.627, 0.588 and 0.550. The best-fit model developed from soil physical properties explained 59% of the variation in MWD with a standard error of 0.432, that developed from chemical properties explained 97% of the variation in MWD with a standard error of 0.136, whereas the model developed from mineralogical properties explained 78% of the variation in MWD with a standard error of 0.222. Also the closest relationship between measured and model-predicted MWD was obtained with the chemical properties-based model (r=0.985), followed by the mineralogical properties-based model (r=0.884) and then the physical properties-based model (r=0.656). This indicates that the most reliable inference on the stability of these soils in water can be made from a knowledge of the amount and composition of their chemical constituents. (author). 32 refs, 1 fig., 9 tabs

  5. Clay mineralogy of surface sediments as a tool for deciphering river contributions to the Cariaco Basin (Venezuela)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bout-Roumazeilles, V.; Riboulleau, A.; du Châtelet, E. Armynot; Lorenzoni, L.; Tribovillard, N.; Murray, R. W.; Müller-Karger, F.; Astor, Y. M.

    2013-02-01

    The mineralogical composition of 95 surface sediment samples from the Cariaco Basin continental shelf and Orinoco delta was investigated in order to constrain the clay-mineral main provenance and distribution within the Cariaco Basin. The spatial variability of the data set was studied using a geo-statistical approach that allows drawing representative clay-mineral distribution maps. These maps are used to identify present-day dominant sources for each clay-mineral species in agreement with the geological characteristics of the main river watersheds emptying into the basin. This approach allows (1) identifying the most distinctive clay-mineral species/ratios that determine particle provenance, (2) evaluating the respective contribution of local rivers, and (3) confirming the minimal present-day influence of the Orinoco plume on the Cariaco Basin sedimentation. The Tuy, Unare, and Neveri Rivers are the main sources of clay particles to the Cariaco Basin sedimentation. At present, the Tuy River is the main contributor of illite to the western part of the southern Cariaco Basin continental shelf. The Unare River plume, carrying smectite and kaolinite, has a wide westward propagation, whereas the Neveri River contribution is less extended, providing kaolinite and illite toward the eastern Cariaco Basin. The Manzanares, Araya, Tortuga, and Margarita areas are secondary sources of local influence. These insights shed light on the origin of present-day terrigenous sediments of the Cariaco Basin and help to propose alternative explanations for the temporal variability of clay mineralogy observed in previously published studies.

  6. Surface-chemical and mineralogical properties relevant to the flotation of talc and other layer silicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steenberg, E.; Harris, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    Certain physicochemical and mineralogical properties of different talc and pyrophylite samples were measured to show whether differences in floatability could be related to these properties. An indication of the expected hydrophobic nature of the samples was obtained by X-ray-diffraction measurements. The various samples were characterized by measurement of their zeta potentials, contact angles, suspension stability, and flotation behaviour in small-scale flotation cells. All the talc samples proved to be highly floatable and therefore only small differences in recoveries were observed. However, there was some indication that the suspension stability was related to the X-ray-diffraction measurements of the hydrophobic nature of the samples. No trends were observable from the zeta potentials and contact angles measured

  7. Super differential forms on super Riemann surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konisi, Gaku; Takahasi, Wataru; Saito, Takesi.

    1994-01-01

    Line integral on the super Riemann surface is discussed. A 'super differential operator' which possesses both properties of differential and of differential operator is proposed. With this 'super differential operator' a new theory of differential form on the super Riemann surface is constructed. We call 'the new differentials on the super Riemann surface' 'the super differentials'. As the applications of our theory, the existency theorems of singular 'super differentials' such as 'super abelian differentials of the 3rd kind' and of a super projective connection are examined. (author)

  8. Iron oxide and hydroxide precipitation from ferrous solutions and its relevance to Martian surface mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posey-Dowty, J.; Moskowitz, B.; Crerar, D.; Hargraves, R.; Tanenbaum, L.

    1986-01-01

    Experiments were performed to examine if the ubiquitousness of a weak magnetic component in all Martian surface fines tested with the Viking Landers can be attributed to ferric iron precipitation in aqueous solution under oxidizing conditions at neutral pH. Ferrous solutions were mixed in deionized water and various minerals were added to separate liquid samples. The iron-bearing additives included hematite, goethite, magnetite, maghemite, lepidocrocite and potassium bromide blank at varying concentrations. IR spectroscopic scans were made to identify any precipitates resulting from bubbling oxygen throughout the solutions; the magnetic properties of the precipitates were also examined. The data indicated that the lepidocrocite may have been preferentially precipitated, then aged to maghemite. The process would account for the presumed thin residue of maghemite on the present Martian surface, long after abundant liquid water on the Martian surface vanished.

  9. Iron oxide and hydroxide precipitation from ferrous solutions and its relevance to Martian surface mineralogy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Posey-Dowty, J.; Moskowitz, B.; Crerar, D.; Hargraves, R.; Tanenbaum, L.

    1986-01-01

    Experiments were performed to examine if the ubiquitousness of a weak magnetic component in all Martian surface fines tested with the Viking Landers can be attributed to ferric iron precipitation in aqueous solution under oxidizing conditions at neutral pH. Ferrous solutions were mixed in deionized water and various minerals were added to separate liquid samples. The iron-bearing additives included hematite, goethite, magnetite, maghemite, lepidocrocite and potassium bromide blank at varying concentrations. IR spectroscopic scans were made to identify any precipitates resulting from bubbling oxygen throughout the solutions; the magnetic properties of the precipitates were also examined. The data indicated that the lepidocrocite may have been preferentially precipitated, then aged to maghemite. The process would account for the presumed thin residue of maghemite on the present Martian surface, long after abundant liquid water on the Martian surface vanished. 40 references

  10. Sedimentological, mineralogical, and geochemical results from surface sediments and the sediment record from Site 2 of the ICDP drilling project at Lake Towuti, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasberg, A. K.; Melles, M.; Wennrich, V.; Vogel, H.; Just, J.; Russell, J. M.; Bijaksana, S.; Morlock, M.; Opitz, S.

    2017-12-01

    More than 1000 m of sediment core were recovered in spring 2015 from three different drill sites in tropical Lake Towuti (2.5°S, 121°E), Indonesia, during the Towuti Drilling Project (TDP) of the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP). Furthermore, a set of 84 lake surface sediment samples, distributed over the entire lake, was collected in order to better understand modern sedimentary processes. The surface samples were investigated for physical, chemical, mineralogical, and biological properties at the University of Cologne (UoC), Germany. On the sediment cores macro- and microscopical lithological descriptions, line-scan imaging, logging of physical properties (MSCL), and subsampling was conducted at the National Lacustrine Core Facility of the University of Minnesota, USA, in November 2015 and January 2016. Afterwards, the archive core halves and 672 subsamples of TDP Site 2 were shipped to the UoC for X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) scanning and sedimentological, geochemical, and mineralogical analyses, respectively, supplemented by visible to near-infrared spectroscopy (VNIR) at Brown University, USA. The data from the surface samples evidence that allochthonous sedimentation in Lake Towuti today is dominated by fluvial supply from five distinguishable source areas: (i) the Mahalona River to the north, which drains lakes Mahalona and Matano, (ii) inlets around the village of Timampu to the northwest, (iii) the Loeha River to the east, (iv) the Lengke River to the south, and (v) the Lemo-Lemo River to the northeast of Lake Towuti. Of these, source areas (ii) and (iii) as well as (iv) and (v) have similar geochemical compositions, respectively. In addition, the lake sedimentation is significantly influenced by gravitational sediment supply from steep slopes as well as lake-internal gravitational and density-driven processes. The uppermost 41 m of sediment core 2A consist of pelagic sediments (totaling 11 m) and event layers from mass movement

  11. Mineralogical controls on surface colonization by sulfur-metabolizing microbial communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. A.; Bennett, P.

    2012-12-01

    When characterizing microbial diversity and the microbial ecosystem of the shallow subsurface the mineral matrix is generally assumed to be homogenous and unreactive. We report here experimental evidence that microorganisms colonize rock surfaces according to the rock's chemistry and the organism's metabolic requirements and tolerances. We investigated this phenomenon using laboratory biofilm reactors with both a pure culture of sulfur-oxidizing Thiothrix unzii and a mixed environmental sulfur-metabolizing community from Lower Kane, Cave, WY, USA. Reactors contained rock and mineral chips (calcite, albite, microcline, quartz, chert, Madison Limestone (ML), Madison Dolostone (MD), and basalt) amended with one of the two inoculants. Biomass of attached microorganisms on each mineral surface was quantified. The 16S rRNA of attached microbial communities were compared using Roche FLX and Titanium 454 next generation pyrosequencing. A primary controlling factor on taxonomy of attached microorganisms in both pure and mixed culture experiments was mineral buffering capacity. In mixed culture experiments acid-buffering carbonates were preferentially colonized by neutrophilic sulfur-oxidizing microorganisms (~18% to ~27% of microorganisms), while acidophilic sulfur-oxidizing microorganisms colonized non-buffering quartz exclusively (~46% of microorganisms). The nutrient content of the rock was a controlling factor on biomass accumulation, with neutrophilic organisms selecting between carbonate surfaces of equivalent buffer capacities according to the availability of phosphate. Dry biomass on ML was 17.8 ± 2.3 mg/cm2 and MD was 20.6 ± 6.8 mg/cm2; while nutrient poor calcite accumulated 2.4 ± 0.3 mg/cm2. Biomass accumulation was minimal on non-buffering nutrient-limited surfaces. These factors are countered by the competitive exclusion of some populations. A pure culture of T. unzii preferentially colonizes carbonates while a very closely related Thiothrix spp is excluded

  12. Automated Quantitative Rare Earth Elements Mineralogy by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindern, Sven; Meyer, F. Michael

    2016-09-01

    Increasing industrial demand of rare earth elements (REEs) stems from the central role they play for advanced technologies and the accelerating move away from carbon-based fuels. However, REE production is often hampered by the chemical, mineralogical as well as textural complexity of the ores with a need for better understanding of their salient properties. This is not only essential for in-depth genetic interpretations but also for a robust assessment of ore quality and economic viability. The design of energy and cost-efficient processing of REE ores depends heavily on information about REE element deportment that can be made available employing automated quantitative process mineralogy. Quantitative mineralogy assigns numeric values to compositional and textural properties of mineral matter. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with a suitable software package for acquisition of backscatter electron and X-ray signals, phase assignment and image analysis is one of the most efficient tools for quantitative mineralogy. The four different SEM-based automated quantitative mineralogy systems, i.e. FEI QEMSCAN and MLA, Tescan TIMA and Zeiss Mineralogic Mining, which are commercially available, are briefly characterized. Using examples of quantitative REE mineralogy, this chapter illustrates capabilities and limitations of automated SEM-based systems. Chemical variability of REE minerals and analytical uncertainty can reduce performance of phase assignment. This is shown for the REE phases parisite and synchysite. In another example from a monazite REE deposit, the quantitative mineralogical parameters surface roughness and mineral association derived from image analysis are applied for automated discrimination of apatite formed in a breakdown reaction of monazite and apatite formed by metamorphism prior to monazite breakdown. SEM-based automated mineralogy fulfils all requirements for characterization of complex unconventional REE ores that will become

  13. Mineralogical textural and compositional data on the alteration of basaltic glass from Kilauea, Hawaii to 300 degrees C: Insights to the corrosion of a borosilicate glass waste-form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.K.

    1990-01-01

    Mineralogical, textural and compositional data accompanying greenschist facies metamorphism (to 300 degrees C) of basalts of the East Rift Zone (ERZ), Kilauea, Hawaii may be evaluated relative to published and experimental results for the surface corrosion of borosilicate glass. The ERZ alteration sequence is dominated by intermittent palagonite, interlayered smectite-chlorite, chlorite, and actinolite-epidote-anhydrite. Alteration is best developed in fractures and vesicles where surface reaction layers root on the glass matrix forming rinds in excess of 100 microns thick. Fractures control fluid circulation and the alteration sequence. Proximal to the glass surface, palagonite, Fe-Ti oxides and clays replace fresh glass as the surface reaction layer migrates inwards; away from the surface, amphibole, anhydrite, quartz and calcite crystallize from hydrothermal fluids in contact with the glass. The texture and composition of basaltic glass surfaces are similar to those of a SRL-165 glass leached statically for sixty days at 150 degrees C. While the ERZ reservoir is a complex open system, conservative comparisons between the alteration of ERZ and synthetic borosilicate glass are warranted. 31 refs., 2 figs

  14. Tracking Hydrothermal Fluid Pathways from Surface Alteration Mineralogy: The Case of Licancura Geothermal Field, Northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camus, E.; Elizalde, J. D.; Morata, D.; Wechsler, C.

    2017-12-01

    In geothermal systems alteration minerals are evidence of hot fluid flow, being present even in absence of other surface manifestations. Because these minerals result from the interaction between geothermal fluids and surrounding host rocks, they will provide information about features of thermal fluids as temperature, composition and pH, allowing tracking their changes and evolution. In this work, we study the Licancura Geothermal field located in the Andean Cordillera in Northern Chile. The combination of Principal Components Analysis on ASTER-L1T imagery and X Ray Diffraction (XRD) allow us to interpret fluid conditions and the areas where fluid flow took place. Results from red, green, blue color composite imagery show the presence of three types of secondary paragenesis. The first one corresponds to hematite and goethite, mainly at the east of the area, in the zone of eroded Pliocene volcanic edifices. The second one, mainly at the center of the area, highlighting propylitic alteration, includes minerals such as chlorite, illite, calcite, zeolites, and epidote. The third paragenesis, spatially related to the intersection between faults, represents advanced argillic alteration, includes minerals as alunite, kaolinite, and jarosite. XRD analysis support results from remote sensing techniques. These results suggest an acid pH hydrothermal fluid reaching temperatures at surface up to 80-100°C, which used faults as a conduit, originating advanced argillic minerals. The same fluid was, probably, responsible for propylitic paragenesis. However, iron oxides paragenesis identified in the area of eroded volcanoes probably corresponds to other processes associated with weathering rather than geothermal activity. In this work, we propose the applicability of remote sensing techniques as a first level exploration tool useful for high-altitude geothermal fields. Detailed clay mineral studies (XRD and SEM) would allow us to a better characterization of the geothermal fluid

  15. Visible and Near-IR Reflectance Spectra of Smectite Acquired Under Dry Conditions for Interpretation of Martian Surface Mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Richard V.; Achilles, Cherie N; Archer, Paul D.; Graff, Trevor G.; Agresti, David G.; Ming, Douglas W; Golden, Dadi C.; Mertzman, Stanley A.

    2011-01-01

    Visible and near-IR (VNIR) spectra from the MEx OMEGA and the MRO CRISM hyper-spectral imaging instruments have spectral features associated with the H2O molecule and M OH functional groups (M = Mg, Fe, Al, and Si). Mineralogical assignments of martian spectral features are made on the basis of laboratory VNIR spectra, which were often acquired under ambient (humid) conditions. Smectites like nontronite, saponite, and montmorillionite have interlayer H2O that is exchangeable with their environment, and we have acquired smectite reflectance spectra under dry environmental conditions for interpretation of martian surface mineralogy. We also obtained chemical, Moessbauer (MB), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and thermogravimetric (TG) data to understand variations in spectral properties. VNIR spectra were recorded in humid lab air at 25-35C, in a dynamic dry N2 atmosphere (50-150 ppmv H2O) after exposing the smectite samples (5 nontronites, 3 montmorillionites, and 1 saponite) to that atmosphere for up to approximately l000 hr each at 25-35C, approximately 105C, and approximately 215C, and after re-exposure to humid lab air. Heating at 105C and 215C for approximately 1000 hr is taken as a surrogate for geologic time scales at lower temperatures. Upon exposure to dry N2, the position and intensity of spectral features associated with M-OH were relatively insensitive to the dry environment, and the spectral features associated with H2O (e.g., approximately 1.90 micrometers) decreased in intensity and are sometimes not detectable by the end of the 215C heating step. The position and intensity of H2O spectral features recovered upon re-exposure to lab air. XRD data show interlayer collapse for the nontronites and Namontmorillionites, with the interlayer remaining collapsed for the latter after re-exposure to lab air. The interlayer did not collapse for the saponite and Ca-montmorillionite. TG data show that the concentration of H2O derived from structural OH was invariant

  16. Grain surface features and clay mineralogy of the quaternary sediments from Western Deccan Trap Region, India, and their palaeoclimatic significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veena U. Joshi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Quartz sand grains obtained from a deeply gullied topography along the banks of two tributaries of River Pravara in Maharashtra (India have been examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM. Quartz grains have been selected after a heavy mineral separation and micro-photographs of each grain were taken at various angles and magnifications. The sediments reveal features resulting from mechanical grinding as well as from chemical alteration. Conchoidal fractures, cleavage planes, grooves, v-shaped indentations etc. are the mechanical features documented on the grains whereas solution pits of varying sizes and intensity, precipitation surfaces, oriented v-pits, solution crevasses and etching are the features of chemical origin. Several evidences indicate that the samples have undergone digenetic changes. Few grains show the features of intense chemical breakdown. The overall assemblages of the grain surface features suggest that the samples have been subjected to subaqueous transport for a considerable period of time. The minor chemical features such as solution pits or semi circular arcuate steps found in abundance on these grains are due to the dissolution of the sediments in a low energy fluviatile environment. For clay mineralogy, fractions between <2 and <0.2 mm were separated out from the sediments. The clay fractions were then subjected to examination by X-ray diffraction (XRD of oriented K/Ca saturated samples using a Philips Diffractometer and Ni-filtered Cu Ka radiation with the scanning speed of 10 2Ө min -1. The main clay minerals for all the samples are identical and show the presence of hydroxy-interlayered smectites with minor quantities of mica, kaolinite, smectites, quartz and feldspar. The first weathering product of the Deccan Basalt (DB is the dioctahedral smectite. Since the present semi aridic climatic condition of the study area can not transform a smectite to HIS and either smectite to kaolin, it is quite likely that

  17. Surface sensitivity of nuclear-knock-out form factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fratamico, G.

    1984-01-01

    A numerical calculation has been performed to investigate the sensitivity of nuclear-knock-out form factors to nuclear-surface behaviour of bound-state wave functions. The result of our investigation suggests that one can extract the bound-state behaviour at the surface from experimental information on nuclear-knock-out form factors

  18. Mineralogy of Surface Serpentinite Outcrops in the Coast Range Ophiolite: Implications for the Deep Biosphere and Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccann, A. R.; Cardace, D.; Carnevale, D.; Ehlmann, B. L.

    2011-12-01

    California contains a number of ultramafic (Fe- and Mg rich) rock bodies, including the Coast Range Ophiolite, a block of oceanic crust and upper mantle tectonically emplaced onto land. These ultramafic rocks are primarily composed of olivine and pyroxene, both of which are stable at the high temperatures and pressures in the deep subsurface where they crystallize but become unstable at low temperature and low pressure conditions near the surface. They are highly reduced rocks, creating chemical disequilibria, which can theoretically provide energy to chemoautotrophic organisms. Serpentinization (serpentine-forming) reactions between the rocks and water produce hydrogen molecules, which can be metabolized by diverse organisms. Earth and Mars have shown evidence of similar early geologic histories, possibly with widespread reducing habitable environments (Schulte et al., 2006). Recent data from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) have shown serpentine-bearing outcrops near Nili Fossae (21 N, 282 W) and elsewhere in Mars' cratered highlands. Serpentine-bearing outcrops are rare, but their presence confirms that such systems involving the aqueous alteration of ultramafic rocks were active in the past (specifically during the Noachian epoch (older than ~3.7 billion years), possibly producing aqueous habitats suitable for chemoautotrophic life (Ehlmann et al., 2010). Remotely sensed data cannot confirm whether there is active serpentinization on Mars, however exposed, presently serpentinizing ultramafics in terrestrial ophiolites such as those of the California Coast Range provide points of comparison for similar Martian rocks. Volume expansion during serpentinization fractures the host rock, exposing new reaction surfaces, allowing further serpentinization. If subsurface liquid water is present on Mars, serpentinization may still be occurring. We will provide x-ray diffraction and petrographic data for surface serpentinites from the Coast

  19. Trypanosoma cruzi. Surface antigens of blood and culture forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira, N.; Chaplan, S.; Tydings, J.D.; Unkeless, J.; Cohn, Z.

    1981-01-01

    The surface polypeptides of both cultured and blood forms of Trypanosoma cruzi were iodinated by the glucose oxidase-lactoperoxidase technique. Blood-form trypomastigotes (BFT) isolated form infected mice displayed a major 90,000-Mr component. In contrast, both epimastigotes and trypomastigotes obtained form acellular cultures expressed a smaller 75,000-Mr peptide. Both major surface components were presumably glycoproteins in terms of their binding to concanavalin A-Sepharose 4B. Within a 3-h period, both blood and culture forms synthesized their respective surface glycoproteins (90,000 Mr and 75,000 Mr, respectively in vitro. [/sub 35/S]methionine-labeled surface peptides were immunoprecipitated with immune sera of both human and murine origin. A panel of sera form patients with chronic Chagas' disease and hyperimmunized mice recognized similar surface peptides. These immunogens were the same components as the major iodinated species. The major BFT surface peptide was readily removed by trypsin treatment of the parasites, although the procedure did not affect the 75,000-Mr peptide from the culture forms. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that the 90,000-Mr peptide found on BFT was an acidic protein of isoelectric point (pI) 5.0, whereas, the 75,000-Mr peptide form culture-form trypomastigotes has a pI of 7.2. The 90,000-Mr component is thought to be responsible for the anti-phagocytic properties of the BFT

  20. Surface analysis: its uses and abuses in waste form evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McVay, G.L.; Pederson, L.R.

    1981-01-01

    Surface and near-surface analytical techniques are significant aids in understanding waste form-aqueous solution interactions. They can be beneficially employed to evaluate reaction layers on waste forms, to assess surface treatments prior to and after leaching, and to identify interactions with waste forms. Surface analyses are best used in conjunction with other types of analyses, such as solution analyses, in order to obtain a better overall understanding of reaction processes. In spite of all the benefits to be gained by using surface analyses, misinterpretations can result if care is not taken to properly obtain and analyze the data. In particular, the density variations through a reaction layer must be accounted for in both sputtering and data analysis techniques

  1. The CheMin XRD on the Mars Science Laboratory Rover Curiosity: Construction, Operation, and Quantitative Mineralogical Results from the Surface of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, David F.

    2015-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory mission was launched from Cape Canaveral, Florida on Nov. 26, 2011 and landed in Gale crater, Mars on Aug. 6, 2012. MSL's mission is to identify and characterize ancient "habitable" environments on Mars. MSL's precision landing system placed the Curiosity rover within 2 km of the center of its 20 X 6 km landing ellipse, next to Gale's central mound, a 5,000 meter high pile of laminated sediment which may contain 1 billion years of Mars history. Curiosity carries with it a full suite of analytical instruments, including the CheMin X-ray diffractometer, the first XRD flown in space. CheMin is essentially a transmission X-ray pinhole camera. A fine-focus Co source and collimator transmits a 50µm beam through a powdered sample held between X-ray transparent plastic windows. The sample holder is shaken by a piezoelectric actuator such that the powder flows like a liquid, each grain passing in random orientation through the beam over time. Forward-diffracted and fluoresced X-ray photons from the sample are detected by an X-ray sensitive Charge Coupled Device (CCD) operated in single photon counting mode. When operated in this way, both the x,y position and the energy of each photon are detected. The resulting energy-selected Co Kalpha Debye-Scherrer pattern is used to determine the identities and amounts of minerals present via Rietveld refinement, and a histogram of all X-ray events constitutes an X-ray fluorescence analysis of the sample.The key role that definitive mineralogy plays in understanding the Martian surface is a consequence of the fact that minerals are thermodynamic phases, having known and specific ranges of temperature, pressure and composition within which they are stable. More than simple compositional analysis, definitive mineralogical analysis can provide information about pressure/temperature conditions of formation, past climate, water activity and the like. Definitive mineralogical analyses are necessary to establish

  2. Method of predicting surface deformation in the form of sinkholes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chudek, M.; Arkuszewski, J.

    1980-06-01

    Proposes a method for predicting probability of sinkhole shaped subsidence, number of funnel-shaped subsidences and size of individual funnels. The following factors which influence the sudden subsidence of the surface in the form of funnels are analyzed: geologic structure of the strata between mining workings and the surface, mining depth, time factor, and geologic disolocations. Sudden surface subsidence is observed only in the case of workings situated up to a few dozen meters from the surface. Using the proposed method is explained with some examples. It is suggested that the method produces correct results which can be used in coal mining and in ore mining. (1 ref.) (In Polish)

  3. GRINDING OF SURFACES WITH COATINGS FORMED BY ELECTROMAGNETIC FACING WITH SURFACE PLASTIC DEFORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zh. A. Mrochek

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents investigation results on machining of surfaces having a coating formed by electromagnetic facing with surface plastic deformation and using abrasive and diamond wheels having a porous metal binder with orientated drains.

  4. Geochemically structural characteristics of municipal solid waste incineration fly ash particles and mineralogical surface conversions by chelate treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Hiroki; Sawada, Takaya; Shimaoka, Takayuki; Takahashi, Fumitake

    2016-01-01

    Leaching behaviors of heavy metals contained in municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash have been studied well. However, micro-characteristics of MSWI fly ash particles are still uncertain and might be non-negligible to describe their leaching behaviors. Therefore, this study investigated micro-characteristics of MSWI fly ash particles, especially their structural properties and impacts of chelate treatment on surface characteristics. According to SEM observations, raw fly ash particles could be categorized into four types based on their shapes. Because chelate treatment changed the surface of fly ash particles dramatically owing to secondary mineral formations like ettringite, two more types could be categorized for chelate-treated fly ash particles. Acid extraction experiments suggest that fly ash particles, tested in this study, consist of Si-base insoluble core structure, Al/Ca/Si-base semi-soluble matrices inside the body, and KCl/NaCl-base soluble aggregates on the surface. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations of the same fly ash particles during twice moistening treatments showed that KCl/NaCl moved under wet condition and concentrated at different places on the particle surface. However, element mobility depended on secondary mineral formations. When insoluble mineral like gypsum was generated and covered the particle surface, it inhibited element transfer under wet condition. Surface characteristics including secondary mineral formation of MSWI fly ash particles are likely non-negligible to describe trace element leaching behaviors.

  5. Maurer-cartan forms for fields on surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piuze, Emmanuel; Sporring, Jon; Siddiqi, Kaleem

    2015-01-01

    We study the space of first order models of smooth frame fields using the method of moving frames. By exploiting the Maurer-Cartan matrix of connection forms we develop geometrical embeddings for frame fields which lie on spherical, ellipsoidal and generalized helicoid surfaces. We design methods...

  6. Visible and Near-IR Reflectance Spectra for Smectite, Sulfate And Perchlorate under Dry Conditions for Interpretation of Martian Surface Mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, R.V.; Ming, W.; Golden, D.C.; Arvidson, R.E.; Wiseman, S.M.; Lichtenberg, K.A.; Cull, S.; Graff, T.G.

    2009-01-01

    Visible and near-IR (VNIR) spectral data for the martian surface obtained from orbit by the MRO-CRISM and OMEGA instruments are interpreted as having spectral signatures of H2O/OH-bearing phases, including smectites and other phyllosilicates, sulfates, and high-SiO2 phases [e.g., 1-4]. Interpretations of martian spectral signatures are based on and constrained by spectra that are obtained in the laboratory on samples with known mineralogical compositions and other physicochemical characteristics under, as appropriate, Mars-like environmental conditions (e.g., temperature, pressure, and humidity). With respect to environmental conditions, differences in the absolute concentration of atmospheric H2O can effect the hydration state and therefore the spectra signatures of smectite phyllosilicates (solvation H2O) and certain sulfates (hydration H2O) [e.g., 5-7]. We report VNIR spectral data acquired under humid (laboratory air) and dry (dry N2 gas) environments for two natural smectites (nontronite API-33A and saponite SapCa-1) to characterize the effect of solvation H2O on spectral properties. We also report spectral data for the thermal dehydration products of (1) melanterite (FeSO4.7H2O) in both air and dry N2 gas and (2) Mg-perchlorate (Mg(ClO4)2.6H2O) in dry N2 environments. Spectral measurements for samples dehydrated in dry N2 were made without exposing them to humid laboratory air.

  7. Petrographic, mineralogical and geochemical characterization of the Serrinha coal waste pile (Douro Coalfield, Portugal) and the potential environmental impacts on soil, sediments and surface waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, J. [Centro de Geologia, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Ferreira da Silva, E. [GeoBioTec, Geobiosciences, Geotechnologies and Geoengineering Research Center, Universidade de Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Li, Z.; Ward, C. [School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales. Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Flores, D. [Departamento de Geociencias, Ambiente e Ordenamento do Territorio, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal)

    2010-09-01

    Serrinha is the largest coal waste pile resulting from mining activities in the Douro Coalfield, Portugal. The exploitation of anthracite in tens of small mines caused some environmental impacts, as is the case of the coal waste piles that exist in old mines and adjacent areas. The Serrinha waste pile is essentially made up of 2 million tonnes of shales and carbonaceous shales, deposited in a topographical depression over about 30 years. Despite the environmental restoration accomplished in the Serrinha waste pile, some environmental problems seem to persist. In this study a petrographic, mineralogical and geochemical characterization was done in order to recognize and understand these problems. The materials studied were coal waste, sediments and waters from the drainage system and decanting basins, soils from the surrounding areas, leachates from waste material and neoformed minerals formed at the bottom of the waste pile. The main lithologies (carbonaceous shale and lithic arenite) and coal from the Douro Coalfield were also analyzed. Petrographic analysis shows some evidence of weathering (on organic and inorganic matter) related to the time of exposure to the weathering agents and the easy access of air within the waste pile (due to both the poor compaction and the heterogeneity of the material). Mineralogically, the composition of coal waste material has contributions from both the coal and the associated lithologies. R-type cluster analysis of the waste pile material allows two distinct clusters to be identified. In the first cluster a sulfide fraction is represented by the association of As, Cd, Cu, Pb, Ni and Zn, while Fe clustered with Al, Co, and Ti indicates that some of the Fe and the other elements are likely associated with silicate minerals such as clays. The second cluster, represented by Cr, V, Zr, Rb, REE, Mn, Li and Ba, probably represent a silicate fraction, perhaps detrital accessory minerals. The waste pile material, leachates, soils

  8. Terrestrial Ecosystems - Land Surface Forms of the Conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cress, Jill J.; Sayre, Roger G.; Comer, Patrick; Warner, Harumi

    2009-01-01

    As part of an effort to map terrestrial ecosystems, the U.S. Geological Survey has generated land surface form classes to be used in creating maps depicting standardized, terrestrial ecosystem models for the conterminous United States, using an ecosystems classification developed by NatureServe . A biophysical stratification approach, developed for South America and now being implemented globally, was used to model the ecosystem distributions. Since land surface forms strongly influence the differentiation and distribution of terrestrial ecosystems, they are one of the key input layers in this biophysical stratification. After extensive investigation into various land surface form mapping methodologies, the decision was made to use the methodology developed by the Missouri Resource Assessment Partnership (MoRAP). MoRAP made modifications to Hammond's land surface form classification, which allowed the use of 30-meter source data and a 1-km2 window for analyzing the data cell and its surrounding cells (neighborhood analysis). While Hammond's methodology was based on three topographic variables, slope, local relief, and profile type, MoRAP's methodology uses only slope and local relief. Using the MoRAP method, slope is classified as gently sloping when more than 50 percent of the area in a 1-km2 neighborhood has slope less than 8 percent, otherwise the area is considered moderately sloping. Local relief, which is the difference between the maximum and minimum elevation in a neighborhood, is classified into five groups: 0-15 m, 16-30 m, 31-90 m, 91-150 m, and >150 m. The land surface form classes are derived by combining slope and local relief to create eight landform classes: flat plains (gently sloping and local relief = 90 m), low hills (not gently sloping and local relief = 150 m). However, in the USGS application of the MoRAP methodology, an additional local relief group was used (> 400 m) to capture additional local topographic variation. As a result, low

  9. Mineralogy and geochemistry of boehmite-rich coals: New insights from the Haerwusu Surface Mine, Jungar Coalfield, Inner Mongolia, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, S.; Li, D.; Chou, C.-L.; Zhao, L.; Zhang, Y.; Ren, D.; Ma, Y.; Sun, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Boehmite-rich coal of Pennsylvanian age was discovered earlier at the Heidaigou Surface Mine, Jungar Coalfield, Inner Mongolia, China. This paper reports new results on 29 bench samples of the no. 6 coal from a drill core from the adjacent Haerwusu Surface Mine, and provides new insights into the origin of the minerals and elements present. The results show that the proportion of inertinite in the no. 6 coal is higher than in other Late Paleozoic coals in northern China. Based on mineral proportions (boehmite to kaolinite ratio) and major element concentrations in the coal benches of the drill core, the no. 6 coal may be divided into five sections (I to V). Major minerals in Sections I and V are kaolinite. Sections II and IV are mainly kaolinite with a trace of boehmite, and Section III is high in boehmite. The boehmite is derived from bauxite in the weathered surface (Benxi Formation) in the sediment-source region. The no. 6 coal is rich in Al2O3 (8.89%), TiO2 (0.47%), Li (116????g/g), F (286????g/g), Ga (18????g/g), Se (6.1????g/g), Sr (350????g/g), Zr (268????g/g), REEs (172????g/g), Pb (30????g/g), and Th (17????g/g). The elements are classified into five associations by cluster analysis, i.e. Groups A, B, C, D, and E. Group A (ash-SiO2-Al2O3-Na2O-Li) and Group B (REE-Sc-In-Y-K2O-Rb-Zr-Hf-Cs-U-P2O5-Sr-Ba-Ge) are strongly correlated with ash yield and mainly have an inorganic affinity. The elements that are negatively or less strongly correlated with ash yield (with exceptions of Fe2O3, Be, V, and Ni) are grouped in the remaining three associations: Group C, Se-Pb-Hg-Th-TiO2-Bi-Nb-Ta-Cd-Sn; Group D, Co-Mo-Tl-Be-Ni-Sb-MgO-Re-Ga-W-Zn-V-Cr-F-Cu; and Group E, S-As-CaO-MnO-Fe2O3. Aluminum is mainly distributed in boehmite, followed by kaolinite. The high correlation coefficients of the Li-ash, Li-Al2O3, and Li-SiO2 pairs indicate that Li is related to the aluminosilicates in the coal. The boehmite-rich coal is high in gallium and F, which occur in boehmite and the

  10. Truncatable bootstrap equations in algebraic form and critical surface exponents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gliozzi, Ferdinando [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Torino andIstituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - sezione di Torino,Via P. Giuria 1, Torino, I-10125 (Italy)

    2016-10-10

    We describe examples of drastic truncations of conformal bootstrap equations encoding much more information than that obtained by a direct numerical approach. A three-term truncation of the four point function of a free scalar in any space dimensions provides algebraic identities among conformal block derivatives which generate the exact spectrum of the infinitely many primary operators contributing to it. In boundary conformal field theories, we point out that the appearance of free parameters in the solutions of bootstrap equations is not an artifact of truncations, rather it reflects a physical property of permeable conformal interfaces which are described by the same equations. Surface transitions correspond to isolated points in the parameter space. We are able to locate them in the case of 3d Ising model, thanks to a useful algebraic form of 3d boundary bootstrap equations. It turns out that the low-lying spectra of the surface operators in the ordinary and the special transitions of 3d Ising model form two different solutions of the same polynomial equation. Their interplay yields an estimate of the surface renormalization group exponents, y{sub h}=0.72558(18) for the ordinary universality class and y{sub h}=1.646(2) for the special universality class, which compare well with the most recent Monte Carlo calculations. Estimates of other surface exponents as well as OPE coefficients are also obtained.

  11. A study of surface films formed during maraging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.A.; Haq, A.U.; Khan, A.Q.; Waris, J.; Suleman, M.

    1993-01-01

    A study was carried out on thin films produced during maraging at 480 deg. 0 C for 3 hours in vacuum (of the order of 10/sup -4/ torr) and in N/ sub 2/ atmosphere. These surface films have been analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy. Depth profiling for chemical analysis was performed after Ar /sup +/ ion sputtering to predict the compounds formed on the sample surface under prevailing conditions. It was noted that O/sub 2/N/sub 2/ and C are the main constituents of the top layers. These are considered as impurities in the films. Depth profiling showed a smooth interface between the N/sub 2/ and Ti and formation of Titanium nitride is predicted. (author)

  12. Formation, transformation and dissolution of phases formed on surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoesmith, D.W.

    1983-03-01

    The basic mechanisms of film growth, transformation, and dissolution of phases formed on surfaces are discussed. Film growth can occur via solid-state processes or via substrate (usally metal or alloy) dissolution, followed by local supersaturation and precipitation of an insoluble phase. The phase(s) formed may be metastable and transform to a more stable phase, via either solid-state or dissolution-reprecipitation processes. Film dissolution reactions can also occur via a variety of mechanisms, including: (i) direct chemical dissolution when no oxidation state change occurs; (ii) redox dissolution when the film dissolves via a redox reaction involving a reducing or oxidizing agent in solution; and (iii) autoreduction, where film dissolution is coupled to metal dissolution. Such film-growth and dissolution processes, which often produce complex multilayer films, are common in the nuclear industry. A number of examples are discussed

  13. Hydrous ferric oxide: evaluation of Cd-HFO surface complexation models combining Cd(K) EXAFS data, potentiometric titration results, and surface site structures identified from mineralogical knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spadini, Lorenzo; Schindler, Paul W; Charlet, Laurent; Manceau, Alain; Vala Ragnarsdottir, K

    2003-10-01

    The surface properties of ferrihydrite were studied by combining wet chemical data, Cd(K) EXAFS data, and a surface structure and protonation model of the ferrihydrite surface. Acid-base titration experiments and Cd(II)-ferrihydrite sorption experiments were performed within 3titration data could be adequately modeled by triple bond Fe- OH(2)(+1/2)-H(+)triple bond Fe-OH(-1/2),logk((int))=-8.29, assuming the existence of a unique intrinsic microscopic constant, logk((int)), and consequently the existence of a single significant type of acid-base reactive functional groups. The surface structure model indicates that these groups are terminal water groups. The Cd(II) data were modeled assuming the existence of a single reactive site. The model fits the data set at low Cd(II) concentration and up to 50% surface coverage. At high coverage more Cd(II) ions than predicted are adsorbed, which is indicative of the existence of a second type of site of lower affinity. This agrees with the surface structure and protonation model developed, which indicates comparable concentrations of high- and low-affinity sites. The model further shows that for each class of low- and high-affinity sites there exists a variety of corresponding Cd surface complex structure, depending on the model crystal faces on which the complexes develop. Generally, high-affinity surface structures have surface coordinations of 3 and 4, as compared to 1 and 2 for low-affinity surface structures.

  14. Parametric design of a part with free-form surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KIM Yeoung-il; KIM Li-ra; JUN Cha-soo

    2006-01-01

    3D solid models for parts with regular-form surfaces (PRFSs) are effectively generated using traditional parametric design techniques. A new model is obtained by changing some parameters defining the model. The parts with free-form surfaces(PFFSs), however, cannot be defined by several parameters. Usually they are defined by some geometric elements like profile curves. The traditional parametric design approaches have not easily dealt with the PFFSs. A method for generating a solid model and an engineering drawing for PFFSs is proposed in this paper: First, the new profiles are generated from input point data. Second,the profile information is extracted from the existing model. Last, the old profiles are replaced with the new profiles. This method can preserve the associative information of the existing model and automatically generate the drawing including views, dimensions, and annotations. The proposed method has been implemented using a commercial CAD/CAM system, Unigraphics, and API functions written in C-language, and were applied to the blades of a turbine generator. Some illustrative examples are provided in order to show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  15. Efficient free-form surface representation with application in orthodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamany, Sameh M.; El-Bialy, Ahmed M.

    1999-03-01

    Orthodontics is the branch of dentistry concerned with the study of growth of the craniofacial complex. The detection and correction of malocclusion and other dental abnormalities is one of the most important and critical phases of orthodontic diagnosis. This paper introduces a system that can assist in automatic orthodontics diagnosis. The system can be used to classify skeletal and dental malocclusion from a limited number of measurements. This system is not intended to deal with several cases but is aimed at cases more likely to be encountered in epidemiological studies. Prior to the measurement of the orthodontics parameters, the position of the teeth in the jaw model must be detected. A new free-form surface representation is adopted for the efficient and accurate segmentation and separation of teeth from a scanned jaw model. THe new representation encodes the curvature and surface normal information into a 2D image. Image segmentation tools are then sued to extract structures of high/low curvature. By iteratively removing these structures, individual teeth surfaces are obtained.

  16. Characterization of microchannel anechoic corners formed by surface acoustic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destgeer, Ghulam; Alam, Ashar; Ahmed, Husnain; Park, Jinsoo; Jung, Jin Ho; Park, Kwangseok; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2018-02-01

    Surface acoustic waves (SAWs) generated in a piezoelectric substrate couple with a liquid according to Snell's law such that a compressional acoustic wave propagates obliquely at a Rayleigh angle ( θ t) inside the microchannel to form a region devoid of a direct acoustic field, which is termed a microchannel anechoic corner (MAC). In the present study, we used microchannels with various heights and widths to characterize the width of the MAC region formed by a single travelling SAW. The attenuation of high-frequency SAWs produced a strong acoustic streaming flow that moved the particles in and out of the MAC region, whereas reflections of the acoustic waves within the microchannel resulted in standing acoustic waves that trapped particles at acoustic pressure nodes located within or outside of the MAC region. A range of actuation frequencies and particle diameters were used to investigate the effects of the acoustic streaming flow and the direct acoustic radiation forces by the travelling as well as standing waves on the particle motion with respect to the MAC region. The width of the MAC ( w c), measured experimentally by tracing the particles, increased with the height of the microchannel ( h m) according to a simple trigonometric equation w c = h m × tan ( θ t ).

  17. Geochemistry and mineralogy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plecas, I.; Dimovic, S.; Orta, M.M.; Alba, M.D.; Alvero, R.; Becerro, A.I.; Castro, M.A.; Chain, P.; Escudero, A.; Naranjo, M.; Pavon, E.; Trillo, J.M.; Vejsada, J.; Vokal, A.; Zadvernyuk, H.P.; Fedorenko, Y.G.; Zlobenko, B.P.; Koromyslichenko, T.I.; Battaglia, S.; Cervelli, M.; Millot, R.; Girard, J.P.; Missana, T.; Garcia-Gutierrez, M.; Alonso, U.; Muurinen, A.; Carlsson, T.; Chain, P.; Alba, M.D.; Becerro, A.I.; Castro, M.A.; Escudero, A.; Gonzalez-Carrascosa, T.; Hurtado, S.; Pavon, E.; Villa, M.; Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.; Bourg, A.C.M.; Marques Fernandes, M.; Rabung, Th.; Dahn, R.; Baeyens, B.; Bradbury, M.H.; Breynaert, E.; Maes, A.; Bruggeman, C.; Maes, I.A.; Vancluysen, J.; Credoz, A.; Bildstein, O.; Jullien, M.; Raynal, J.; Petronin, J.C.; Trotignon, L.; Pokrovsky, O.; Jacquier, P.; Beaucaire, C.; Vuillaume, A.L.; Wittebroodt, Ch.; Ly, J.; Page, J.; Savoye, S.; Pitsch, H.; Jacques, D.; Wang, L.; Galunin, E.; Chain, P.; Alba, M.D.; Vidal, M.; Grandia, F.; Domenech, C.; Arcos, D.; Duro, L.; Bruno, J.; Andre, L.; Pauwels, H.; Azaroual, M.; Albrecht, A.; Romero, M.A.; Aerts, S.; Boven, P.; Van Geet, M.; Boever, P. de; Alonso, U.; Albarran, N.; Missana, T.; Garcia-Gutierrez, M.; Truche, L.; Berger, G.; Guillaume, D.; Jacquot, E.; Tournassat, Ch.; Lerouge, C.; Brendle, J.; Greneche, J.M.; Touzelet, St.; Blanc, Ph.; Gaucher, E.C.; Thoenen, T.; Klinkenberg, M.; Kaufhold, S.; Dohrmann, R.; Siegesmund, S.; Liu, D.J.; Bruggeman, C.; Maes, N.; Weber, T.; Trotignon, L.; Pozo, C.; Bildstein, O.; Combarieu, G. de; Frugier, P.; Menut, D

    2007-07-01

    This session gathers 52 articles (posters) dealing with: the influence of natural sorbents immobilization of spent ion exchange resins in cement; the chemical stability of rare-earth silicate; the mineralogical heterogeneity of Rokle bentonite and radionuclide adsorption: A case study for cesium; the rheological and sorption properties of clay-polymer composites; the clay mineral interactions with leachate solutions in landfills; the lithium isotope fractionation during adsorption onto mineral surfaces; the sorption of Sr{sup 2+} onto mixed smectite / illite clays; Eh and pH in the pore water of compacted bentonite; the chemical interaction of {sup 152}Eu with the clay barrier; the modeling of the acid-base surface chemistry of Montmorillonite; a time resolved laser fluorescence and X-ray absorption spectroscopy study of lanthanide/actinide sorption on clay minerals: influence of carbonate complexation; the structure elucidation and occurrence of Tc(IV) pyrogallol complexes; the geochemistry of Se(0) under boom clay conditions; an experimental and modelling study of pure secondary silicate minerals reactivity in geological CO{sub 2} sequestration conditions; an experimental evaluation of a retention model for major groundwater elements on the Tournemire argillite; modelling the long term interaction of cementitious pore water with Boom clay; the sorption-desorption of radionuclides and analogues in clays suitable for barriers; the modelling of the Redox evolution in the tunnel backfill of a high level nuclear waste repository; the reactivity of nitrates in the different storage compartments of type-b wastes; an investigation into the biodiversity of sulphate reducing bacteria in Boom clay; the colloid generation mechanisms from compacted bentonite under different geochemical conditions; the experimental reduction of aqueous sulphate by hydrogen in the context of the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite; cation exchanged Fe(II) and Sr as compared to other divalent cations

  18. Sedimentological, textural, mineralogical and geochemical study of surface sediments and suspension material in Baia da Ribeira, Angra dos Reis, RJ, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Samuel do Carmo

    1985-01-01

    The geochemistry dispersion of the metals in aquatic environment is related to the physical chemistry proprieties of these elements as to their interaction by sorption on and desorption from solid particles. These interaction must be understood within the environmental dynamic, with its hydrological, sedimentological, chemical, physical and biological processes that may take the toxic elements (stables metals and radionuclides) to the bio alimentary chain. It was observed at the Ribeira Bay, its hydrodynamic behaviour through the suspension material and particulate organic carbon dispersion. And, through the textural, mineralogical and chemical parameters it was observed the behaviour of the geochemistry processes of the sedimentary materials and the influence that they may submit to the metals dispersion. (author)

  19. Spinorial characterizations of surfaces into 3-dimensional psuedo-Riemannian space forms

    OpenAIRE

    Lawn , Marie-Amélie; Roth , Julien

    2011-01-01

    9 pages; We give a spinorial characterization of isometrically immersed surfaces of arbitrary signature into 3-dimensional pseudo-Riemannian space forms. For Lorentzian surfaces, this generalizes a recent work of the first author in $\\mathbb{R}^{2,1}$ to other Lorentzian space forms. We also characterize immersions of Riemannian surfaces in these spaces. From this we can deduce analogous results for timelike immersions of Lorentzian surfaces in space forms of corresponding signature, as well ...

  20. Evaluation of metrology technologies for free form surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arámbula, K.; Siller, H.R.; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    equipment when measuring free form components. Results demonstrate that there is the imperative need to assess the uncertainty and reproducibility of CT and photogrammetry measurements by applying some calibration procedures taking into account some recommendations for work piece alignment. This article...

  1. Mineralogical Diversity and Geology of Humboldt Crater Derived Using Moon Mineralogy Mapper Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinot, M.; Besse, S.; Flahaut, J.; Quantin-Nataf, C.; Lozac'h, L.; van Westrenen, W.

    2018-02-01

    Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) spectroscopic data and high-resolution imagery data sets were used to study the mineralogy and geology of the 207 km diameter Humboldt crater. Analyses of M3 data, using a custom-made method for M3 spectra continuum removal and spectral parameters calculation, reveal multiple pure crystalline plagioclase detections within the Humboldt crater central peak complex, hinting at its crustal origin. However, olivine, spinel, and glass are observed in the crater walls and rims, suggesting these minerals derive from shallower levels than the plagioclase of the central peak complex. High-calcium pyroxenes are detected in association with volcanic deposits emplaced on the crater's floor. Geologic mapping was performed, and the age of Humboldt crater's units was estimated from crater counts. Results suggest that volcanic activity within this floor-fractured crater spanned over a billion years. The felsic mineralogy of the central peak complex region, which presumably excavated deeper material, and the shallow mafic minerals (olivine and spinel) detected in Humboldt crater walls and rim are not in accordance with the general view of the structure of the lunar crust. Our observations can be explained by the presence of a mafic pluton emplaced in the anorthositic crust prior to the Humboldt-forming impact event. Alternatively, the excavation of Australe basin ejecta could explain the observed mineralogical detections. This highlights the importance of detailed combined mineralogical and geological remote sensing studies to assess the heterogeneity of the lunar crust.

  2. Mineralogical Diversity and Geology of Humboldt Crater Derived Using Moon Mineralogy Mapper Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinot, M; Besse, S; Flahaut, J; Quantin-Nataf, C; Lozac'h, L; van Westrenen, W

    2018-02-01

    Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M 3 ) spectroscopic data and high-resolution imagery data sets were used to study the mineralogy and geology of the 207 km diameter Humboldt crater. Analyses of M 3 data, using a custom-made method for M 3 spectra continuum removal and spectral parameters calculation, reveal multiple pure crystalline plagioclase detections within the Humboldt crater central peak complex, hinting at its crustal origin. However, olivine, spinel, and glass are observed in the crater walls and rims, suggesting these minerals derive from shallower levels than the plagioclase of the central peak complex. High-calcium pyroxenes are detected in association with volcanic deposits emplaced on the crater's floor. Geologic mapping was performed, and the age of Humboldt crater's units was estimated from crater counts. Results suggest that volcanic activity within this floor-fractured crater spanned over a billion years. The felsic mineralogy of the central peak complex region, which presumably excavated deeper material, and the shallow mafic minerals (olivine and spinel) detected in Humboldt crater walls and rim are not in accordance with the general view of the structure of the lunar crust. Our observations can be explained by the presence of a mafic pluton emplaced in the anorthositic crust prior to the Humboldt-forming impact event. Alternatively, the excavation of Australe basin ejecta could explain the observed mineralogical detections. This highlights the importance of detailed combined mineralogical and geological remote sensing studies to assess the heterogeneity of the lunar crust.

  3. Investigation of chemical forms of elements in surface waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varshal, G.M.; Velyukhanova, T.K.; Koshcheeva, I.Ya.; Dorofeeva, V.A.; Buachidze, N.S.; Kasimova, O.G.; Makharadze, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    The main trends in the research of the state of elements in natural waters are examined. The hydrolysis of CU(2), Hg(2), Au(3), Sb(3), Ru(4) over a pH range, specific for natural waters, has been studied by solubility and paper electrophoresis technnques and by filtration through cellulose ionites. The regions of predominating different forms of hydroxo complexes have been found and the thermodynamic constants of hydrolysis equilibria have been calculated. Solubility, filtration through sephadexes and cellulose ionites, paper electrophoresis techniques were used to study the complexation of Cu(2), Hg(2), Au(3), Sb(3), Ru(4) with fulvic acids. Some data have been obtained on the composition, stability and molecular-mass distribution of fulvate complexes of ten elements in different oxidation states. High-molecular anionic fulvate complexes are among main forms of most easily hydrolysed elments in solution. The possibility has been shown of prediction of the ratio of coexisting forms of trace elements in solution by theoretical calculations and experimentally Using fractionation on cellulose ionites and sephadexes

  4. Algae form brominated organic compounds in surface waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huetteroth, A; Putschew, A; Jekel, M [Tech. Univ. Berlin (Germany)

    2004-09-15

    Monitoring of organic halogen compounds, measured as adsorbable organic bromine (AOBr) revealed seasonal high concentrations of organic bromine compounds in a surface water (Lake Tegel, Berlin, Germany). Usually, in late summer, concentrations are up to five times higher than during the rest of the year. The AOBr of the lake inflows (throughout the year less then 6 {mu}g/L) were always lower then those in the lake, which indicates a production of AOBr in the lake. A correlation of the AOBr and chlorophyll-a concentration (1) in the lake provides first evidence for the influence of phototrophic organisms. The knowledge of the natural production of organohalogens is relatively recent. Up to now there are more then 3800 identified natural organohalogen compounds that have been detected in marine plants, animals, and bacteria and also in terrestrial plants, fungi, lichen, bacteria, insects, some higher animals, and humans. Halogenated organic compounds are commonly considered to be of anthropogenic origin; derived from e.g. pharmaceuticals, herbicides, fungicides, insecticides, flame retardants, intermediates in organic synthesis and solvents. Additionally they are also produced as by-products during industrial processes and by waste water and drinking water disinfection. Organohalogen compounds may be toxic, persistent and/or carcinogenic. In order to understand the source and environmental relevance of naturally produced organobromine compounds in surface waters, the mechanism of the formation was investigated using batch tests with lake water and algae cultures.

  5. Mineralogical compositions of fault rocks from surface ruptures of Wenchuan earthquake and implication of mineral transformation during the seismic cycle along Yingxiu-Beichuan fault, Sichuan Province, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Jiaxiang; Zhou, Yongsheng; He, Changrong; Ma, Shengli

    2018-06-01

    There are two co-seismic bedrock surface ruptures from the Mw 7.9 Wenchuan earthquake in the northern and central parts of the Beichuan-Yingxiu fault, Sichuan Province, southwest China. In this study, we report on the macrostructure of the fault rocks and results from X-ray powder diffraction analysis of minerals from rocks in the fault zone. The most recent fault gouge (the gouge produced by the most recent co-seismic fault movement) in all the studied outcrops is dark or grayish-black, totally unconsolidated and ultrafine-grained. Older fault gouges in the same outcrops are grayish or yellowish and weakly consolidated. X-ray powder diffraction analysis results show that mineral assemblages in both the old fault gouge and the new fault gouge are more complicated than the mineral assemblages in the bedrock as the fault gouge is rich in clay minerals. The fault gouge inherited its major rock-forming minerals from the parent rocks, but the clay minerals in the fault gouge were generated in the fault zone and are therefore authigenic and synkinematic. In profiles across the fault, clay mineral abundances increase as one traverses from the bedrock to the breccia to the old gouge and from the old gouge to the new gouge. Quartz and illite are found in all collected gouge samples. The dominant clay minerals in the new fault gouge are illite and smectite along the northern part of the surface rupture and illite/smectite mixed-layer clay in the middle part of the rupture. Illite/smectite mixed-layer clay found in the middle part of the rupture indicates that fault slip was accompanied by K-rich fluid circulation. The existence of siderite, anhydrite, and barite in the northern part of the rupture suggests that fault slip at this locality was accompanied by acidic fluids containing ions of Fe, Ca, and Ba.

  6. Journal of Mineralogical and Petrological Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Official journal of Japan Association of Mineralogical Sciences (JAMS), focusing on mineralogical and petrological sciences and their related fields. Journal of Mineralogical and Petrological Sciences (JMPS) is the successor journal to both “Journal of Mineralogy, Petrology and Economic Geology” and “Mineralogical Journal”. Journal of Mineralogical and Petrological Sciences (JMPS) is indexed in the ISI database (Thomson Reuters), the Science Citation Index-Expanded, Current Contents/Physical, Chemical & Earth Sciences, and ISI Alerting Services.

  7. Spinorial Characterizations of Surfaces into 3-dimensional Pseudo-Riemannian Space Forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawn, Marie-Amélie; Roth, Julien

    2011-01-01

    We give a spinorial characterization of isometrically immersed surfaces of arbitrary signature into 3-dimensional pseudo-Riemannian space forms. This generalizes a recent work of the first author for spacelike immersed Lorentzian surfaces in ℝ 2,1 to other Lorentzian space forms. We also characterize immersions of Riemannian surfaces in these spaces. From this we can deduce analogous results for timelike immersions of Lorentzian surfaces in space forms of corresponding signature, as well as for spacelike and timelike immersions of surfaces of signature (0, 2), hence achieving a complete spinorial description for this class of pseudo-Riemannian immersions.

  8. Crystallization of glass-forming liquids: Specific surface energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmelzer, Jürn W. P.; Abyzov, Alexander S.

    2016-01-01

    A generalization of the Stefan-Skapski-Turnbull relation for the melt-crystal specific interfacial energy is developed in terms of the generalized Gibbs approach extending its standard formulation to thermodynamic non-equilibrium states. With respect to crystal nucleation, this relation is required in order to determine the parameters of the critical crystal clusters being a prerequisite for the computation of the work of critical cluster formation. As one of its consequences, a relation for the dependence of the specific surface energy of critical clusters on temperature and pressure is derived applicable for small and moderate deviations from liquid-crystal macroscopic equilibrium states. Employing the Stefan-Skapski-Turnbull relation, general expressions for the size and the work of formation of critical crystal clusters are formulated. The resulting expressions are much more complex as compared to the respective relations obtained via the classical Gibbs theory. Latter relations are retained as limiting cases of these more general expressions for moderate undercoolings. By this reason, the formulated, here, general relations for the specification of the critical cluster size and the work of critical cluster formation give a key for an appropriate interpretation of a variety of crystallization phenomena occurring at large undercoolings which cannot be understood in terms of the Gibbs’ classical treatment.

  9. The Influence of the Tool Surface Texture on Friction and the Surface Layers Properties of Formed Component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Šugárová

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The morphological texturing of forming tool surfaces has high potential to reduce friction and tool wear and also has impact on the surface layers properties of formed material. In order to understand the effect of different types of tool textures, produced by nanosecond fibre laser, on the tribological conditions at the interface tool-formed material and on the integrity of formed part surface layers, the series of experimental investigations have been carried out. The coefficient of friction for different texture parameters (individual feature shape, including the depth profile of the cavities and orientation of the features relative to the material flow was evaluated via a Ring Test and the surface layers integrity of formed material (surface roughness and subsurface micro hardness was also experimentally analysed. The results showed a positive effect of surface texturing on the friction coefficients and the strain hardening of test samples material. Application of surface texture consisting of dimple-like depressions arranged in radial layout contributed to the most significant friction reduction of about 40%. On the other hand, this surface texture contributed to the increase of surface roughness parameters, Ra parameter increased from 0.49 μm to 2.19 μm and the Rz parameter increased from 0.99 μm to 16.79 μm.

  10. Mineralogical characterization of West Chestnut Ridge soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.; Kopp, O.C.; Lietzke, D.A.

    1984-12-01

    The morphological, physicochemical, and mineralogical properties of the soils and residua from the proposed site of the Central Waste Disposal Facility were characterized. The proposed site is underlain by cherty dolostones, limestones, and shales of the Knox Group covered by a thick residuum. Three diagnostic horizons from four soil profiles and six samples from residuum cores were selected for mineralogical analysis. The coarse fractions (gravel and sand) of the samples included different types of chert, iron-manganese oxide nodules, and quartz. The samples were high in clay content (except those from the A and E horizons) and low in pH and base saturation. The clay fractions were composed of varying amounts of kaolinite, mica, vermiculite, aluminum hydroxy-interlayered vermiculite, amorphous iron and aluminum oxides, gibbsite, and quartz. Aluminum hydroxy-interlayered vermiculite is the major component in surface horizons, but kaolinite becomes dominant in subsurface horizons of the soils. Degradation of kaolinite and formation of aluminum hydroxy-interlayered vermiculite and iron and aluminum oxides are pronounced chemical weathering processes in the surface soils. The aluminum hydroxy interlayering of vermiculite reduces cation exchange and selective sorption capacities of soils. In the residua, micaceous minerals free of aluminum hydroxy interlayering, kaolinite, and amorphous iron and aluminum oxides are major components in the clay fraction. The sorption ratios of 137 Cs, 90 Sr, 60 Co, and the uranium isotopes expected to be in the radioactive wastes should be very high for the clays having such mineralogical composition. The low acid-buffering capacity (base saturation) of the residua suggest that the fragile chemical and mineralogical equilibria can be easily broken if an extreme chemical condition is imposed on the residua

  11. Tensioned Fabric Structures with Surface in the Form of Chen-Gackstatter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yee Hooi Min

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Form-finding has to be carried out for tensioned fabric structure in order to determine the initial equilibrium shape under prescribed support condition and prestress pattern. Tensioned fabric structures are normally designed to be in the form of equal tensioned surface. Tensioned fabric structure is highly suited to be used for realizing surfaces of complex or new forms. However, research study on a new form as a tensioned fabric structure has not attracted much attention. Another source of inspiration minimal surface which could be adopted as form for tensioned fabric structure is very crucial. The aim of this study is to propose initial equilibrium shape of tensioned fabric structures in the form of Chen-Gackstatter. Computational form-finding using nonlinear analysis method is used to determine the Chen-Gackstatter form of uniformly stressed surfaces. A tensioned fabric structure must curve equally in opposite directions to give the resulting surface a three dimensional stability. In an anticlastic doubly curved surface, the sum of all positive and all negative curvatures is zero. This study provides an alternative choice for structural designer to consider the Chen-Gackstatter applied in tensioned fabric structures. The results on factors affecting initial equilibrium shape can serve as a reference for proper selection of surface parameter for achieving a structurally viable surface.

  12. T-Spline Based Unifying Registration Procedure for Free-Form Surface Workpieces in Intelligent CMM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenhua Han

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available With the development of the modern manufacturing industry, the free-form surface is widely used in various fields, and the automatic detection of a free-form surface is an important function of future intelligent three-coordinate measuring machines (CMMs. To improve the intelligence of CMMs, a new visual system is designed based on the characteristics of CMMs. A unified model of the free-form surface is proposed based on T-splines. A discretization method of the T-spline surface formula model is proposed. Under this discretization, the position and orientation of the workpiece would be recognized by point cloud registration. A high accuracy evaluation method is proposed between the measured point cloud and the T-spline surface formula. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method has the potential to realize the automatic detection of different free-form surfaces and improve the intelligence of CMMs.

  13. Multivariate Tensor-based Brain Anatomical Surface Morphometry via Holomorphic One-Forms

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yalin; Chan, Tony F.; Toga, Arthur W.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2009-01-01

    Here we introduce multivariate tensor-based surface morphometry using holomorphic one-forms to study brain anatomy. We computed new statistics from the Riemannian metric tensors that retain the full information in the deformation tensor fields. We introduce two different holomorphic one-forms that induce different surface conformal parameterizations. We applied this framework to 3D MRI data to analyze hippocampal surface morphometry in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD; 26 subjects), lateral ventricula...

  14. Prediction of the surface roughness of AA6082 flow-formed tubes by design of experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasulu, M.; Komaraiah, M.; Rao, C. S. Krishna Prasada

    2013-01-01

    Flow forming is a modern, chipless metal forming process that is employed for the production of thin-walled seamless tubes. Experiments are conducted on AA6082 alloy pre-forms to flow form into thin-walled tubes on a CNC flow-forming machine with a single roller. Design of experiments is used to predict the surface roughness of flow-formed tubes. The process parameters selected for this study are the roller axial feed, mandrel speed, and roller radius. A standard response surface methodology (RSM) called the Box Behnken design is used to perform the experimental runs. The regression model developed by RSM successfully predicts the surface roughness of AA6082 flow-formed tubes within the range of the selected process parameters.

  15. Prediction of the surface roughness of AA6082 flow-formed tubes by design of experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasulu, M. [Government Polytechnic for Women Badangpet, Hyderabad (India); Komaraiah, M. [Sreenidhi Institute of Science and Technology, Hyderabad (India); Rao, C. S. Krishna Prasada [Bharat Dynamics Limited, Hyderabad (India)

    2013-06-15

    Flow forming is a modern, chipless metal forming process that is employed for the production of thin-walled seamless tubes. Experiments are conducted on AA6082 alloy pre-forms to flow form into thin-walled tubes on a CNC flow-forming machine with a single roller. Design of experiments is used to predict the surface roughness of flow-formed tubes. The process parameters selected for this study are the roller axial feed, mandrel speed, and roller radius. A standard response surface methodology (RSM) called the Box Behnken design is used to perform the experimental runs. The regression model developed by RSM successfully predicts the surface roughness of AA6082 flow-formed tubes within the range of the selected process parameters.

  16. Mineralogy. 2. rev., enlarged ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthes, S.

    1987-01-01

    The textbook is intended for students with a basic knowledge of descriptive mineralogy and crystallography who wish to enhance their knowledge in the fields of determinative mineralogy, petrology, and the geology and genesis of mineral deposits. The material presented concentrates on the essential aspects of the subject fields and is completed by up-to-date information concerning the technical and economic significance of the minerals, rocks and ores as raw materials. With 165 figs., 2 tabs [de

  17. Towards efficient 5-axis flank CNC machining of free-form surfaces via fitting envelopes of surfaces of revolution

    OpenAIRE

    Bo P.; Bartoň M.; Plakhotnik D.; Pottmann H.

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a new method that approximates free-form surfaces by envelopes of one-parameter motions of surfaces of revolution. In the context of 5-axis computer numerically controlled (CNC) machining, we propose a flank machining methodology which is a preferable scallop-free scenario when the milling tool and the machined free-form surface meet tangentially along a smooth curve. We seek both an optimal shape of the milling tool as well as its optimal path in 3D space and propose an optimiza...

  18. Optimization of Surface Roughness and Wall Thickness in Dieless Incremental Forming Of Aluminum Sheet Using Taguchi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamedon, Zamzuri; Kuang, Shea Cheng; Jaafar, Hasnulhadi; Azhari, Azmir

    2018-03-01

    Incremental sheet forming is a versatile sheet metal forming process where a sheet metal is formed into its final shape by a series of localized deformation without a specialised die. However, it still has many shortcomings that need to be overcome such as geometric accuracy, surface roughness, formability, forming speed, and so on. This project focus on minimising the surface roughness of aluminium sheet and improving its thickness uniformity in incremental sheet forming via optimisation of wall angle, feed rate, and step size. Besides, the effect of wall angle, feed rate, and step size to the surface roughness and thickness uniformity of aluminium sheet was investigated in this project. From the results, it was observed that surface roughness and thickness uniformity were inversely varied due to the formation of surface waviness. Increase in feed rate and decrease in step size will produce a lower surface roughness, while uniform thickness reduction was obtained by reducing the wall angle and step size. By using Taguchi analysis, the optimum parameters for minimum surface roughness and uniform thickness reduction of aluminium sheet were determined. The finding of this project helps to reduce the time in optimising the surface roughness and thickness uniformity in incremental sheet forming.

  19. Turbine component having surface cooling channels and method of forming same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Carlos Miguel; Trimmer, Andrew Lee; Kottilingam, Srikanth Chandrudu

    2017-09-05

    A component for a turbine engine includes a substrate that includes a first surface, and an insert coupled to the substrate proximate the substrate first surface. The component also includes a channel. The channel is defined by a first channel wall formed in the substrate and a second channel wall formed by at least one coating disposed on the substrate first surface. The component further includes an inlet opening defined in flow communication with the channel. The inlet opening is defined by a first inlet wall formed in the substrate and a second inlet wall defined by the insert.

  20. Multivariate tensor-based brain anatomical surface morphometry via holomorphic one-forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yalin; Chan, Tony F; Toga, Arthur W; Thompson, Paul M

    2009-01-01

    Here we introduce multivariate tensor-based surface morphometry using holomorphic one-forms to study brain anatomy. We computed new statistics from the Riemannian metric tensors that retain the full information in the deformation tensor fields. We introduce two different holomorphic one-forms that induce different surface conformal parameterizations. We applied this framework to 3D MRI data to analyze hippocampal surface morphometry in Alzheimer's Disease (AD; 26 subjects), lateral ventricular surface morphometry in HIV/AIDS (19 subjects) and cortical surface morphometry in Williams Syndrome (WS; 80 subjects). Experimental results demonstrated that our method powerfully detected brain surface abnormalities. Multivariate statistics on the local tensors outperformed other TBM methods including analysis of the Jacobian determinant, the largest eigenvalue, or the pair of eigenvalues, of the surface Jacobian matrix.

  1. Mineralogical composition changes of postagrogenic soils under different plant communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churilin, Nikita; Chizhikova, Natalia; Varlamov, Evgheni; Churilina, Alexandra

    2017-04-01

    horizons by predominance of chlorite-vermiculite kaolinite and high amount of quartz. All profiles are characterised by accumulation of quartz in upper parts (due to its weathering resistance) and reduction of its content with depth. The 16-year-old spruce forms conditions for differentiation of fine minerals in profile. Acidic spruce litter creates conditions for differentiation of native arable horizon in distribution of 1-5 micron fraction. This results in accumulation of quartz at the surface while content of chlorite decreases twice as compared with underlying horizons. We've noticed less differentiation in profile under the birch forest: accumulation of quartz in the range of 10%, chlorite - 2-3% compared to the lower part of profile. Under the meadow vegetation the differentiation in quartz is more than 4% and chlorite is less than 2% comparing arable and subsurface horizons. This mineralogical research confirms significant trend toward the development of profile differentiation in row from old spruce forest to the soil under meadow.

  2. The XPS study of physical and chemical forms of neptunium group on the surface of minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teterin Anton Yu.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The sorption behavior and the physical and chemical forms of neptunium on the surface of minerals of the two chlorate samples, biotite and kaolin, with different contents of Fe(II was studied. The liquid-liquid extraction and the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were employed to identify the valence forms of neptunium. On the basis of the obtained data the quantitative elemental composition of the surface of the studied minerals, as well as the ionic composition of the formed neptunium complexes was determined. It was shown that the Np(IV and Np(VI containing compounds did not form, while the complexes Np(VO+ -hydroxyl did form on the surface. The oxygen ions bonded with iron and oxygen belonging to water and/or of carboxyl were suggested to be present in the equatorial plane of the neptunyl group NpO+.

  3. Strategic surface topographies for enhanced lubrication in sheet forming of stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Morten Sixten; Olsson, David Dam; Petrushina, Irina

    2010-01-01

    Strategic stainless steel surfaces have been developed for which the tribological properties are significantly improved for sheet-metal forming compared with the as-received surfaces. The improvements have been achieved by modification of the surface to promote Micro-Plasto Hydrodynamic Lubrication....... The technique, which has been developed, is based on an electrochemical treatment changing the topography of the stainless steel surface. Comparative testing of the new surface topographies in ironing and deep drawing of stainless steel sheet shows significant improvements and possibilities of replacing...

  4. Experimental and numerical investigation of laser forming of cylindrical surfaces with arbitrary radius of curvature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Safari

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, laser forming of cylindrical surfaces with arbitrary radius of curvature is investigated experimentally and numerically. For laser forming of cylindrical surfaces with arbitrary radius of curvature, a new and comprehensive method is proposed in this paper. This method contains simple linear irradiating lines and using an analytical method, required process parameters for laser forming of a cylindrical surface with a specific radius of curvature is proposed. In this method, laser output power, laser scanning speed and laser beam diameter are selected based on laser machine and process limitations. As in the laser forming of a cylindrical surface, parallel irradiating lines are needed; therefore key parameter for production of a cylindrical surface with a specific radius of curvature is the number of irradiating lines. Hence, in the proposed analytical method, the required number of irradiating lines for production of a cylindrical surface with a specific radius of curvature is suggested. Performance of the proposed method for production of cylindrical surface with a specific radius of curvature is verified with experimental tests. The results show that using proposed analytical method, cylindrical surfaces with any radius of curvature can be produced successfully.

  5. Application of the moving frame method to deformed Willmore surfaces in space forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paragoda, Thanuja

    2018-06-01

    The main goal of this paper is to use the theory of exterior differential forms in deriving variations of the deformed Willmore energy in space forms and study the minimizers of the deformed Willmore energy in space forms. We derive both first and second order variations of deformed Willmore energy in space forms explicitly using moving frame method. We prove that the second order variation of deformed Willmore energy depends on the intrinsic Laplace Beltrami operator, the sectional curvature and some special operators along with mean and Gauss curvatures of the surface embedded in space forms, while the first order variation depends on the extrinsic Laplace Beltrami operator.

  6. Phosphorus forms of the surface sediment in the Iranian coast of the southern Caspian Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Nasrollahzadeh Saravi, H.; Pouraria, A.; Nowruzi, B.

    2015-01-01

    Sediments from the southern Caspian Sea, located in Iranian coast were examined on the basis of P-fractionation (five forms of phosphorus) by a sequential extraction scheme. Ninety-six surface sediment samples (for each season with triplicate) were collected from eight sampling transects in 10 and 100 m depths during summer and winter in 2010-2011. The result indicated that the most abundant forms of phosphorus were calcium bound phosphorus. Relative abundance of other forms of phosphorus fol...

  7. Evaluating the performance of free-formed surface parts using an analytic network process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xueming; Ma, Yanqiao; Liang, Dezhi

    2018-03-01

    To successfully design parts with a free-formed surface, the critical issue of how to evaluate and select a favourable evaluation strategy before design is raised. The evaluation of free-formed surface parts is a multiple criteria decision-making (MCDM) problem that requires the consideration of a large number of interdependent factors. The analytic network process (ANP) is a relatively new MCDM method that can systematically deal with all kinds of dependences. In this paper, the factors, which come from the life-cycle and influence the design of free-formed surface parts, are proposed. After analysing the interdependence among these factors, a Hybrid ANP (HANP) structure for evaluating the part’s curved surface is constructed. Then, a HANP evaluation of an impeller is presented to illustrate the application of the proposed method.

  8. Uranium favorability of tertiary sedimentary rocks of the Pend Oreille River valley, Washington. [Measurement and sampling of surface sections, collection of samples from isolated outcrops, chemical and mineralogical analyses of samples, and examination of available water logs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marjaniemi, D.K.; Robins, J.W.

    1975-08-01

    Tertiary sedimentary rocks in the Pend Oreille River valley were investigated in a regional study to determine the favorability for potential uranium resources of northeastern Washington. This project involved measurement and sampling of surface sections, collection of samples from isolated outcrops, chemical and mineralogical analyses of samples, and examination of available water well logs. The Box Canyon Dam area north of Ione is judged to have very high favorability. Thick-bedded conglomerates interbedded with sandstones and silty sandstones compose the Tiger Formation in this area, and high radioactivity levels are found near the base of the formation. Uranophane is found along fracture surfaces or in veins. Carbonaceous material is present throughout the Tiger Formation in the area. Part of the broad Pend Oreille valley surrounding Cusick, Washington, is an area of high favorability. Potential host rocks in the Tiger Formation, consisting of arkosic sandstones interbedded with radioactive shales, probably extend throughout the subsurface part of this area. Carbonaceous material is present and some samples contain high concentrations of uranium. In addition, several other possible chemical indicators were found. The Tiger-Lost Creek area is rated as having medium favorability. The Tiger Formation contains very hard, poorly sorted granite conglomerate with some beds of arkosic sandstone and silty sandstone. The granite conglomerate was apparently derived from source rocks having relatively high uranium content. The lower part of the formation is more favorable than the upper part because of the presence of carbonaceous material, anomalously high concentrations of uranium, and other possible chemical indicators. The area west of Ione is judged to have low favorability, because of the very low permeability of the rocks and the very low uranium content. (auth)

  9. Adaptive Sampling based 3D Profile Measuring Method for Free-Form Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xianyin; Zou, Yu; Gao, Qiang; Peng, Fangyu; Zhou, Min; Jiang, Guozhang

    2018-03-01

    In order to solve the problem of adaptability and scanning efficiency of the current surface profile detection device, a high precision and high efficiency detection approach is proposed for surface contour of free-form surface parts based on self- adaptability. The contact mechanical probe and the non-contact laser probe are synthetically integrated according to the sampling approach of adaptive front-end path detection. First, the front-end path is measured by the non-contact laser probe, and the detection path is planned by the internal algorithm of the measuring instrument. Then a reasonable measurement sampling is completed according to the planned path by the contact mechanical probe. The detection approach can effectively improve the measurement efficiency of the free-form surface contours and can simultaneously detect the surface contours of unknown free-form surfaces with different curvatures and even different rate of curvature. The detection approach proposed in this paper also has important reference value for free-form surface contour detection.

  10. Mineralogical applications of Mossbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fysh, S.A.; Clark, P.E.

    1981-01-01

    The Mossbauer effect has been used to study a variety of bauxites, and has been shown to be capable of accurately characterizing the iron mineralogy of bauxite. Such studies may prove to be of great use in determining the suitability of bauxite for aluminium extraction, and in optimizing extraction conditions

  11. Landslide: Mineralogical and Physical Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudor, Viluș; Grozav, Adia; Rogobete, Gheorghe

    2017-10-01

    In order to construct a road bed foundation, if land has moved, on an area with old landslides, there is a high chance of it moving again. The investigation was made in a region with hilly relief, in which the parent materials of soils are argillaceous marls of Pliocene age. Because the slope is scarped and the versant has been cut, the soil mass slide favoured of the particle-size distribution dominated by heavy clay. With a reiteratedly percolative moisture regime, the soil material is saturated in water fora long period (700-800 mm precipitation/year), and that can increase the slope mass, thereby increasing the driving forces. In a soil profile situated on the top of the hill, with landslide for about 40 m length of the road, disturbed and undisturbed soil samples were analysed physic-chemical and mineralogical. For the heavy and light minerals from the sand fraction a polarized light analyser is used, and for clay minerals X-ray, differential thermal and infrared absorption method are used. The particle-size distribution in the soil profile is dominated by the clay fraction, which reached 53.2% in the ABt horizon and 63.0% in the Bt horizon (67-93 cm depth). The structure of the light minerals, consists of quartz (41-58%); feldspar (10.16-18.10%); muscovite (14.10-26.04). The heavy minerals are oxides (2.61-15.26%), hornblende (0.58-2.87%) and biotite (0.51-2.68%). It must be mentioned the presence of the metamorphic minerals, with the source of the Poiana Rusca mountains. These minerals are epidote (1.01-1.86%), disthene (0.70-1.86%), staurolite (0.73-2.46%) and sillimanite (0.35-0.45%). The clay minerals, inherited from the parent material or formed during the soil-forming process are dominated by smectite, which represent (71-85%) from the total clay minerals, illite 10-21%, and Kaolinite, 4-12%. Rheological properties, like plastic index (53.8%), activity index (1.01%) and consistency index (0.99-1.00%) show that the shrinkage - swelling processes are

  12. Mineralogical and geological study of fault rocks and associated strata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jeon Jin; Jeong, Gyo Cheol; Bae, Doo Won; Park, Seong Min; Kim, Jun Yeong

    2007-01-01

    Mineralogical characterizations of fault clay and associated strata in fault zone with field study and analytical methods. Mineral composition and color of fault clay and rock occur in fracture zone different from bed rocks. Fault clay mainly composed of smectite with minor zeolite such as laumontite and stilbite, and halloysite, illite, Illite and halloysite grow on the surface of smectite, and laumontite and stilbite result from precipitation or alteration of Ca rich bed rock. The result of mineralogical study at Ipsil, Wangsan, Gaegok, Yugyeori, Gacheon in Gyeongju area, the detail research of microstructure in the fault clay making it possible for prediction to age of fault activity

  13. Mineralogical and geological study of fault rocks and associated strata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeon Jin; Jeong, Gyo Cheol; Bae, Doo Won; Park, Seong Min; Kim, Jun Yeong [Andong Univ., Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-01-15

    Mineralogical characterizations of fault clay and associated strata in fault zone with field study and analytical methods. Mineral composition and color of fault clay and rock occur in fracture zone different from bed rocks. Fault clay mainly composed of smectite with minor zeolite such as laumontite and stilbite, and halloysite, illite, Illite and halloysite grow on the surface of smectite, and laumontite and stilbite result from precipitation or alteration of Ca rich bed rock. The result of mineralogical study at Ipsil, Wangsan, Gaegok, Yugyeori, Gacheon in Gyeongju area, the detail research of microstructure in the fault clay making it possible for prediction to age of fault activity.

  14. The dependence of the nuclear charge form factor on short range correlations and surface fluctuation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massen, S. E.; Garistov, V. P.; Grypeos, M. E.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of nuclear surface fluctuations on harmonic oscillator elastic charge form factor of light nuclei are investigated, simultaneously approximating the short-range correlations through a Jastrow correlation factor. Inclusion of the surface fluctuation effects within this description, by truncating the cluster expansion at the two-body part, is found to improve somewhat the fit to the elastic charge form-factor of 16 O and 40 Ca. However, the convergence of the cluster expansion is expected to deteriorate. An additional finding is that surface-fluctuation correlations produce a drastic change in the asymptotic behaviour of the point-proton form-factor, which now falls off quite slowly (i.e. as const.q -4 ) at large values of the momentum transfer q

  15. Local electrical properties of thermally grown oxide films formed on duplex stainless steel surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, L. Q.; Yang, B. J.; He, J. Y.; Qiao, L. J.

    2018-06-01

    The local electrical properties of thermally grown oxide films formed on ferrite and austenite surfaces of duplex stainless steel at different temperatures were investigated by Current sensing atomic force microscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES). The current maps and XPS/AES analyses show that the oxide films covering austenite and ferrite surfaces formed at different temperatures exhibit different local electrical characteristics, thickness and composition. The dependence of electrical conductivity of oxide films covering austenite and ferrite surface on the formation temperature is attributed to the film thickness and semiconducting structures, which is intrinsically related to thermodynamics and kinetics process of film grown at different temperature. This is well elucidated by corresponding semiconductor band structures of oxide films formed on austenite and ferrite phases at different temperature.

  16. Springback Simulation and Tool Surface Compensation Algorithm for Sheet Metal Forming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Guozhe; Hu Ping; Zhang Xiangkui; Chen Xiaobin; Li Xiaoda

    2005-01-01

    Springback is an unquenchable forming defect in the sheet metal forming process. How to calculate springback accurately is a big challenge for a lot of FEA software. Springback compensation makes the stamped final part accordant with the designed part shape by modifying tool surface, which depends on the accurate springback amount. How ever, the meshing data based on numerical simulation is expressed by nodes and elements, such data can not be supplied directly to tool surface CAD data. In this paper, a tool surface compensation algorithm based on numerical simulation technique of springback process is proposed in which the independently developed dynamic explicit springback algorithm (DESA) is used to simulate springback amount. When doing the tool surface compensation, the springback amount of the projected point can be obtained by interpolation of the springback amount of the projected element nodes. So the modified values of tool surface can be calculated reversely. After repeating the springback and compensation calculations for 1∼3 times, the reasonable tool surface mesh is gained. Finally, the FEM data on the compensated tool surface is fitted into the surface by CAD modeling software. The examination of a real industrial part shows the validity of the present method

  17. Effects of fibre-form nanostructures on particle emissions from a tungsten surface in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamura, S.; Miyamoto, T.; Ohno, N.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of fibre-form nanostructure of a tungsten surface on both electron emission and sputtering in helium/argon plasmas are represented. Generally, a nano-fibre forest, the so-called ‘fuzz’, made of tungsten with helium gas inside is found to have the tendency of suppressing the particle emission substantially. The electron emission comes from the impact of high-energy primary electrons. In addition, a deeply biased tungsten target, which inhibits the influx of even energetic primary electrons, seems to produce an electron emission, and it may be suppressed on the way to nanostructure formation on the surface of the W target. Such an emission process is discussed here. The sputtering yield of the He-damaged tungsten surface with the fibre-form nanostructure depends on the surface morphology while the sputtering itself changes the surface morphology, so that the time evolutions of sputtering yield from the W surface with an originally well-developed nanostructure are found to show a minimum in sputtering yield, which is about a half for the fresh nanostructured tungsten and roughly one-fifth of the yield for the original flat normal tungsten surface. The surface morphology at that time is, for the first time, made clear with field emission scanning electron microscopy observation. The physical mechanism for the appearance of such a minimum in sputtering yield is discussed. (paper)

  18. Quantification of Galling in Sheet Metal Forming by surface topography characterisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jan Lasson; Bay, Niels; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    1998-01-01

    One of the major problems in forming of stainless steel sheet is galling due to lubricant film breakdown leading to scoring and bad surface quality. In a Danish research programme new lubricants substituting the normally applied chlorinated paraffin oils are being developed and tested...... for this purpose. In order to determine the limits of lubrication of these new lubricants, as well as commercial ones already available on the market, two sheet forming tests have been developed. Quantification of the degree of galling is done by roughness measurements on the workpiece surface. In a strip...

  19. Germanium geochemistry and mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    Germanium is enriched in the following geologic environments: 1. (1) iron meteorites and terrestrial iron-nickel; 2. (2) sulfide ore deposits, particularly those hosted by sedimentary rocks; 3. (3) iron oxide deposits; 4. (4) oxidized zones of Ge-bearing sulfide deposits; 5. (5) pegmatites, greisens, and skarns; and 6. (6) coal and lignitized wood. In silicate melts, Ge is highly siderophile in the presence of native iron-nickel; otherwise, it is highly lithophile. Among silicate minerals, Ge is concentrated in those having less polymerized silicate tetrahedra such as olivine and topaz. In deposits formed from hydrothermal solutions, Ge tends to be enriched mostly in either sulfides or in fluorine-bearing phases; it is thus concentrated both in some hydrothermal sulfide deposits and in pegmatites, greisens, and skarns. In sulfide deposits that formed from solutions having low to moderate sulfur activity, Ge is concentrated in sphalerite in amounts up to 3000 ppm. Sulfide deposits that formed from solutions having higher sulfur activity allowed Ge to either form its own sulfides, particularly with Cu, or to substitute for As, Sn, or other metals in sulfosalts. The Ge in hydrothermal fluids probably derives from enrichment during the fractional crystallization of igneous fluids, or is due to the incorporation of Ge from the country rocks, particularly from those containing organic material. Germanium bonds to lignin-derivative organic compounds that are found in peat and lignite, accounting for its common concentration in coals and related organic material. Germanium is precipitated from water together with iron hydroxide, accounting for its concentration in some sedimentary and supergene iron oxide deposits. It also is able to substitute for Fe in magnetite in a variety of geologic environments. In the oxidized zone of Ge-bearing sulfide deposits, Ge is concentrated in oxides, hydroxides, and hydroxy-sulfates, sometimes forming its own minerals. It is particularly

  20. Mineralogy and pedogenesis in a soil chronosequence on a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies on soils of the floodplain of lower Niger river are scanty although this floodplain forms a very important agricultural resource base in Nigeria. The objective of this study is to provide comprehensive information on the characteristics of the soils with respect to their mineralogy and the effect of seasonal flooding on their ...

  1. Clay mineralogy of the mud banks of Cochin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, R.R.; Murty, P.S.N.

    The mineralogy of the sediments constituting the mud banks formed off Cochin, Kerala, India was studied. The clay mineral composition was used as a means of understanding the nature and source of origin of the muds. Fine fraction of the mud samples...

  2. Biological Behavior of Osteoblast Cell and Apatite Forming Ability of the Surface Modified Ti Alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jingming; Hwang, K H; Choi, W S; Shin, S J; Lee, J K

    2016-02-01

    Titanium as one kind of biomaterials comes in direct contact with the body, making evaluation of biocompatibility an important aspect to biomaterials development. Surface chemistry of titanium plays an important role in osseointegration. Different surface modification alters the surface chemistry and result in different biological response. In this study, three kinds of mixed acid solutions were used to treat Ti specimens to induce Ca-P formation. Following a strong mixed acid activation process, Ca-P coating successfully formed on the Ti surfaces in simulated body fluid. Strong mixed acid increased the roughness of the metal surface, because the porous and rough surface allows better adhesion between Ca-P coatings and substrates. After modification of titanium surface by mixed acidic solution and subsequently H2O2/HCL treatment evaluation of biocompatibility was conducted from hydroxyapatite formation by biomimetic process and cell viability on modified titanium surface. Nano-scale modification of titanium surfaces can alter cellular and tissue responses, which may benefit osseointegration and dental implant therapy. Results from this study indicated that surface treatment methods affect the surface morphology, type of TiO2 layer formed and subsequent apatite deposition and biological responses. The thermo scientific alamarblue cell viability assay reagent is used to quantitatively measure the viability of mammalian cell lines, bacteria and fungi by incorporating a rapid, sensitive and reliable fluorometric/colorimetric growth indicator, without any toxic and side effect to cell line. In addition, mixed acid treatment uses a lower temperature and shorter time period than widely used alkali treatment.

  3. Recovery of tungsten surface with fiber-form nanostructure by the argon plasma irradiation at a high surface temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamura, Shuichi; Miyamoto, Takanori

    2011-01-01

    One of the serious concerns for tungsten materials in fusion devices is the radiation defects caused by helium plasma irradiation, while the helium is one of fusion products. Fiber-formed nanostructure is worried to have a possible weakness against the plasma heat flux and may destroy the reflectivity as an optical mirror. In this communication an interesting method for a recovery of such a tungsten surface is shown. (author)

  4. Off-line testing of multifunctional surfaces for metal forming applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godi, A.; Grønbæk, J.; De Chiffre, L.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, Bending-Under-Tension, an off-line test method simulating deep-drawing, is chosen for investigating the effectiveness of multifunctional (MUFU) surfaces in metal forming operations. Four different MUFU surfaces, characterized by a plateau bearing area and grooves for lubricant...... retention, are manufactured, together with two polished references. During the tests, surface texture is the only variable. The results show how MUFU surfaces perform better than the polished references, which produce severe galling, while MUFU surfaces with low bearing area display no clear evidence...... of galling. Metal-to-metal contact occurs anyway, but the strip material is pulverized and deposited onto the tool instead of cold-welding to it. The pockets create a discontinuity on the texture hindering pick-up propagation....

  5. The influence of form release agent application to the quality of concrete surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klovas, A; Daukšys, M

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of this article was to obtain concrete surface quality changes by the usage of different form release agent application. Secondly, to determine blemishes of concrete surfaces and divide them according to combined method provided by two documents and by using computer program: CIB Report No. 24 T olerances on blemishes of concrete , GOST 13015.0–83 and I mageJ . Two different concrete compositions were made: BA1 (low fluidity, vibration is needed) and BA8 (high fluidity, vibration is not needed). Three castings with each formwork were conducted. Water emulsion based form release agent was used. Different applications (normal and excessive) of form release agent were used on the formwork

  6. GEOCHEMISTRY AND MINERALOGICAL EVALUATION OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Osondu

    2011-11-05

    Nov 5, 2011 ... mica-schist. AAS and XRD techniques were employed in the determination of chemical and mineralogical composition of ten .... Sample %. British Standard. Institution (BSI). %. American standard. (ASTM) %. SiO2. Al2O3. Fe2O3. TiO2. CaO. MgO. Na2O. K2O. P2O5. LO I. 46.65. 47.67. 1.02. 1.28. 0.10. 0.02.

  7. Plasma treatment of porous GaAs surface formed by electrochemical etching method: Characterization and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naddaf, M.; Saloum, S.

    2008-12-01

    Porous GaAs samples were formed by electrochemical anodic etching of Zn doped p-type GaAs (100) wafers at different etching parameters (time, mode of applied voltage or current and electrolyte). The effect of etching parameters and plasma surface treatment on the optical properties of the prepared sample has been investigated by using room temperature photoluminescence (PL), Raman spectroscopy and reflectance spectroscopic measurements in the range (400-800 nm). The surface morphological changes were studied by using atomic force microscope. It has been found that etching parameters can be controlled to produce a considerably low optical reflectivity porous GaAs layer, attractive for use in solar cells. In addition, it has been observed that the deposition of plasma polymerized HMDSO thin film on porous GaAs surface can be utilized to produce a surface with novel optical properties interesting for solar cells and optoelectronic devices. (author)

  8. Surface density: a new parameter in the fundamental metallicity relation of star-forming galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Tetsuya; Goto, Tomotsugu; Momose, Rieko

    2018-04-01

    Star-forming galaxies display a close relation among stellar mass, metallicity, and star formation rate (or molecular-gas mass). This is known as the fundamental metallicity relation (FMR) (or molecular-gas FMR), and it has a profound implication on models of galaxy evolution. However, there still remains a significant residual scatter around the FMR. We show here that a fourth parameter, the surface density of stellar mass, reduces the dispersion around the molecular-gas FMR. In a principal component analysis of 29 physical parameters of 41 338 star-forming galaxies, the surface density of stellar mass is found to be the fourth most important parameter. The new 4D fundamental relation forms a tighter hypersurface that reduces the metallicity dispersion to 50 per cent of that of the molecular-gas FMR. We suggest that future analyses and models of galaxy evolution should consider the FMR in a 4D space that includes surface density. The dilution time-scale of gas inflow and the star-formation efficiency could explain the observational dependence on surface density of stellar mass.

  9. Growth, viability and architecture of biofilms of Listeria monocytogenes formed on abiotic surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Barbosa dos Reis-Teixeira

    Full Text Available Abstract The pathogenic bacterium Listeria monocytogenes can persist in food processing plants for many years, even when appropriate hygienic measures are in place, with potential for contaminating ready-to-eat products and, its ability to form biofilms on abiotic surfaces certainly contributes for the environmental persistence. In this research, L. monocytogenes was grown in biofilms up 8 days attached to stainless steel and glass surfaces, contributing for advancing the knowledge on architecture of mature biofilms, since many literature studies carried out on this topic considered only early stages of cell adhesion. In this study, biofilm populations of two strains of L. monocytogenes (serotypes 1/2a and 4b on stainless steel coupons and glass were examined using regular fluorescence microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy and classic culture method. The biofilms formed were not very dense and microscopic observations revealed uneven biofilm structures, with presence of exopolymeric matrix surrounding single cells, small aggregates and microcolonies, in a honeycomb-like arrangement. Moreover, planktonic population of L. monocytogenes (present in broth media covering the abiotic surface remained stable throughout the incubation time, which indicates an efficient dispersal mechanism, since the culture medium was replaced daily. In conclusion, even if these strains of L. monocytogenes were not able to form thick multilayer biofilms, it was noticeable their high persistence on abiotic surfaces, reinforcing the need to focus on measures to avoid biofilm formation, instead of trying to eradicate mature biofilms.

  10. Growth, viability and architecture of biofilms of Listeria monocytogenes formed on abiotic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis-Teixeira, Fernanda Barbosa Dos; Alves, Virgínia Farias; de Martinis, Elaine Cristina Pereira

    The pathogenic bacterium Listeria monocytogenes can persist in food processing plants for many years, even when appropriate hygienic measures are in place, with potential for contaminating ready-to-eat products and, its ability to form biofilms on abiotic surfaces certainly contributes for the environmental persistence. In this research, L. monocytogenes was grown in biofilms up 8 days attached to stainless steel and glass surfaces, contributing for advancing the knowledge on architecture of mature biofilms, since many literature studies carried out on this topic considered only early stages of cell adhesion. In this study, biofilm populations of two strains of L. monocytogenes (serotypes 1/2a and 4b) on stainless steel coupons and glass were examined using regular fluorescence microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy and classic culture method. The biofilms formed were not very dense and microscopic observations revealed uneven biofilm structures, with presence of exopolymeric matrix surrounding single cells, small aggregates and microcolonies, in a honeycomb-like arrangement. Moreover, planktonic population of L. monocytogenes (present in broth media covering the abiotic surface) remained stable throughout the incubation time, which indicates an efficient dispersal mechanism, since the culture medium was replaced daily. In conclusion, even if these strains of L. monocytogenes were not able to form thick multilayer biofilms, it was noticeable their high persistence on abiotic surfaces, reinforcing the need to focus on measures to avoid biofilm formation, instead of trying to eradicate mature biofilms. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  11. Quantitative characterization of the atomic-scale structure of oxyhydroxides in rusts formed on steel surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, M.; Suzuki, S.; Kimura, M.; Suzuki, T.; Kihira, H.; Waseda, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Quantitative X-ray structural analysis coupled with anomalous X-ray scattering has been used for characterizing the atomic-scale structure of rust formed on steel surfaces. Samples were prepared from rust layers formed on the surfaces of two commercial steels. X-ray scattered intensity profiles of the two samples showed that the rusts consisted mainly of two types of ferric oxyhydroxide, α-FeOOH and γ-FeOOH. The amounts of these rust components and the realistic atomic arrangements in the components were estimated by fitting both the ordinary and the environmental interference functions with a model structure calculated using the reverse Monte Carlo simulation technique. The two rust components were found to be the network structure formed by FeO 6 octahedral units, the network structure itself deviating from the ideal case. The present results also suggest that the structural analysis method using anomalous X-ray scattering and the reverse Monte Carlo technique is very successful in determining the atomic-scale structure of rusts formed on the steel surfaces

  12. Surface Morphology Diagram for Cylinder-Forming Block Copolymer Thin Films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xiaohua; Berry, Brian C.; Yager, Kevin G.; Kim, Sangcheol; Jones, Ronald L.; Satija, Sushil; Pickel, Deanna L.; Douglas, Jack F.; Karim, Alamgir

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the effect of annealing temperature (T), film thickness (hf) on the surface morphology of flow coated films of a cylinder forming block copolymer, poly (styrene-block-methyl methacrylate) (PS-b-PMMA). Surface morphology transitions from a perpendicular to a parallel cylinder orientation with respect to the substrate with increasing hf are observed in these model 'frustrated-interaction' films where the substrate interaction is preferential for one of the blocks (PMMA) and nearly neutral for the other interface (polymer-air). In these films a transition occurs from cylinders oriented parallel to the substrate to a mixed or 'hybrid' state where the two orientations coexist followed by a transition to cylinders oriented perpendicularly to the polymer-air interface for larger hf. The characteristic values of hf defining these surface morphological transitions depend on T and we construct a surface morphology diagram as a function of hf and T. The surface morphology diagram is found to depend on the method of film formation (flow coated versus spun cast films) so non-equilibrium effects evidently have a large effect on the surface pattern morphology. In particular, the residual solvent within the film (quantified by neutron reflectivity measurements) in the context of physics of glass-formation can have a large effect on the surface morphology diagram

  13. Study on the early surface films formed on Mg-Y molten alloy in different atmospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Mirak

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the non-isothermal early stages of surface oxidation of liquid Mg-1%Y alloy during casting were studied under UPH argon, dry air, and air mixed with protective fluorine-bearing gases. The chemistry and morphology of the surface films were characterized by SEM and EDX analyses. The results indicate a layer of smooth and tightly coherent oxidation film composed of MgO and Y2O3 formed on the molten Mg-Y alloy surface with 40–60 nm thickness under dry air. A dendritic/cellular microstructure is clearly visible with Y-rich second phases gathered in surface of the melt and precipitated along the grain/cell boundaries under all gas conditions. Under fluorine-bearing gas mixtures, the surface film was a mixed oxide and fluoride and more even; a flat and folded morphology can be seen under SF6 with oxide as dominated phase and under 1, 1, 1, 2-tetra-fluoroethane, a smooth and compact surface film uniformly covering the inner surface of the bubble with equal oxide and fluoride thickness, which results in a film without any major defects. MgF2 phase appears to be the key characteristic of a good protective film.

  14. The influence of surface topography on the forming friction of automotive aluminum sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, Pamela Ann [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering

    1998-05-01

    Interest in utilizing aluminum alloys in automobiles has increased in recent years as a result of the desire to lower automobile weight and, consequently, increase fuel economy. While aluminum alloy use in cast parts has increased, outer body panel applications are still being investigated. The industry is interested in improving the formability of these sheet alloys by a combination of alloy design and processing. A different avenue of improving the formability of these alloys may be through patterning of the sheet surface. Surface patterns hold the lubricant during the forming process, with a resulting decrease in the sheet-die surface contact. While it has been speculated that an optimum surface pattern would consist of discrete cavities, detailed investigation into the reduction of forming friction by utilizing discrete patterns is lacking. A series of discrete patterns were investigated to determine the dependence of the forming friction of automotive aluminum alloys on pattern lubricant carrying capacity and on material strength. Automotive aluminum alloys used in outer body panel applications were rolled on experimental rolls that had been prepared with a variety of discrete patterns. All patterns for each alloy were characterized before and after testing both optically and, to determine pattern lubricant capacity, using three dimensional laser profilometry. A draw bead simulation (DBS) friction tester was designed and fabricated to determine the forming friction of the patterned sheets. Tensile testing and frictionless DBS testing were performed to ascertain the material properties of each sheet. The most striking result of this work was the inversely linear dependence of forming friction on the lubricant carrying capacity of the discrete patterns.

  15. Surface Defects in Sheet Metal Forming: a Simulative Laboratory Device and Comparison with FE Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuillier, Sandrine; Le Port, Alban; Manach, Pierre-Yves

    2011-08-01

    Surface defects are small concave imperfections that can develop during forming on outer convex panels of automotive parts like doors. They occur during springback steps, after drawing in the vicinity of bending over a curved line and flanging/hemming in the vicinity of the upper corner of a door. They can alter significantly the final quality of the automobile and it is of primary importance to deal with them as early as possible in the design of the forming tools. The aim of this work is to reproduce at the laboratory scale such a defect, in the case of the flanging along a curved edge, made of two orthogonal straight part of length 50 mm and joint by a curved line. A dedicated device has been designed and steel samples were tested. Each sample was measured initially (after laser cutting) and after flanging, with a 3D measuring machine. 2D profiles were extracted and the curvature was calculated. Surface defects were defined between points where the curvature sign changed. Isovalues of surface defect depth could then be plotted, thus displaying also the spatial geometry on the part surface. An experimental database has been created on the influence of process parameters like the flanging height and the flanging radius. Numerical simulations have been performed with the finite element code Abaqus to predict the occurrence of such surface defects and to analyze stress and strain distribution within the defect area.

  16. Optical and electrical properties of porous silicon layer formed on the textured surface by electrochemical etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiying, Ou; Lei, Zhao; Hongwei, Diao; Jun, Zhang; Wenjing, Wang

    2011-05-01

    Porous silicon (PS) layers were formed on textured crystalline silicon by electrochemical etching in HF-based electrolyte. Optical and electrical properties of the TMAH textured surfaces with PS formation are studied. Moreover, the influences of the initial structures and the anodizing time on the optical and electrical properties of the surfaces after PS formation are investigated. The results show that the TMAH textured surfaces with PS formation present a dramatic decrease in reflectance. The longer the anodizing time is, the lower the reflectance. Moreover, an initial surface with bigger pyramids achieved lower reflectance in a short wavelength range. A minimum reflectance of 3.86% at 460 nm is achieved for a short anodizing time of 2 min. Furthermore, the reflectance spectrum of the sample, which was etched in 3 vol.% TMAH for 25 min and then anodized for 20 min, is extremely flat and lies between 3.67% and 6.15% in the wavelength range from 400 to 1040 nm. In addition, for a short anodizing time, a slight increase in the effective carrier lifetime is observed. Our results indicate that PS layers formed on a TMAH textured surface for a short anodization treatment can be used as both broadband antireflection coatings and passivation layers for the application in solar cells.

  17. Optical and electrical properties of porous silicon layer formed on the textured surface by electrochemical etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ou Weiying; Zhao Lei; Diao Hongwei; Zhang Jun; Wang Wenjing, E-mail: wjwangwj@126.com [Key Laboratory of Solar Thermal Energy and Photovoltaic System, Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2011-05-15

    Porous silicon (PS) layers were formed on textured crystalline silicon by electrochemical etching in HF-based electrolyte. Optical and electrical properties of the TMAH textured surfaces with PS formation are studied. Moreover, the influences of the initial structures and the anodizing time on the optical and electrical properties of the surfaces after PS formation are investigated. The results show that the TMAH textured surfaces with PS formation present a dramatic decrease in reflectance. The longer the anodizing time is, the lower the reflectance. Moreover, an initial surface with bigger pyramids achieved lower reflectance in a short wavelength range. A minimum reflectance of 3.86% at 460 nm is achieved for a short anodizing time of 2 min. Furthermore, the reflectance spectrum of the sample, which was etched in 3 vol.% TMAH for 25 min and then anodized for 20 min, is extremely flat and lies between 3.67% and 6.15% in the wavelength range from 400 to 1040 nm. In addition, for a short anodizing time, a slight increase in the effective carrier lifetime is observed. Our results indicate that PS layers formed on a TMAH textured surface for a short anodization treatment can be used as both broadband antireflection coatings and passivation layers for the application in solar cells. (semiconductor technology)

  18. Plasma treatment of porous GaAs surface formed by electrochemical etching method: Characterization and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saloum, S.; Naddaf, M.

    2010-01-01

    Porous GaAs samples were formed by electrochemical anodic etching of Zn doped p-type GaAs (100) wafers at different etching parameters (time, mode of applied voltage or current and electrolyte). The effect of etching parameters and plasma surface treatment on the optical properties of the prepared sample has been investigated by using room temperature photoluminescence (PL), Raman spectroscopy and reflectance spectroscopic measurements in the range (400-800 nm). The surface morphological changes were studied by using atomic force microscope. (author)

  19. Environmental mineralogy - Understanding element behavior in ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown Jr, G.E.; Calas, G.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental Mineralogy has developed over the past decade in response to the recognition that minerals are linked in many important ways with the global ecosystem. Minerals are the main repositories of the chemical elements in Earth's crust and thus are the main sources of elements needed for the development of civilization, contaminant and pollutant elements that impact global and local ecosystems, and elements that are essential plant nutrients. These elements are released from minerals through natural processes, such as chemical weathering, and anthropogenic activities, such as mining and energy production, agriculture and industrial activities, and careless waste disposal. Minerals also play key roles in the biogeochemical cycling of the elements, sequestering elements and releasing them as the primary minerals in crustal rocks undergo various structural and compositional transformations in response to physical, chemical, and biological processes that produce secondary minerals and soils. These processes have resulted in the release of toxic elements such as arsenic in groundwater aquifers, which is having a major impact on the health of millions of people in South and Southeast Asia. The interfaces between mineral surfaces and aqueous solutions are the locations of most chemical reactions that control the composition of the natural environment, including the composition of natural waters. The nuclear fuel cycle, from uranium mining to the disposition of high-level nuclear waste, is also intimately related to minerals. A fundamental understanding of these processes requires molecular-scale information about minerals, their bulk structures and properties such as solubility, their surfaces, and their interactions with aqueous solutions, atmospheric and soil gases, natural organic matter, and biological organisms. Gaining this understanding is further complicated by the presence of natural, incidental, and manufactured nano-particles in the environment, which

  20. XPS studies of SiO2 surface layers formed by oxygen ion implantation into silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulze, D.; Finster, J.

    1983-01-01

    SiO 2 surface layers of 160 nm thickness formed by 16 O + ion implantation into silicon are examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements into the depth after a step-by-step chemical etching. The chemical nature and the thickness of the transition layer were determined. The results of the XPS measurements show that the outer surface and the bulk of the layers formed by oxygen implantation and subsequent high temperature annealing consist of SiO 2 . There is no evidence for Si or SiO/sub x/ (0 2 and Si is similar to that of thin grown oxide layers. Only its thickness is somewhat larger than in thermal oxide

  1. Automatic fitting of conical envelopes to free-form surfaces for flank CNC machining

    OpenAIRE

    Bo P.; Bartoň M.; Pottmann H.

    2017-01-01

    We propose a new algorithm to detect patches of free-form surfaces that can be well approximated by envelopes of a rotational cone under a rigid body motion. These conical envelopes are a preferable choice from the manufacturing point of view as they are, by-definition, manufacturable by computer numerically controlled (CNC) machining using the efficient flank (peripheral) method with standard conical tools. Our geometric approach exploits multi-valued vector fields that consist of vectors in...

  2. Magnetohydrodynamic viscous flow over a nonlinearly moving surface: Closed-form solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Tiegang

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow over a nonlinearly (power-law velocity) moving surface is investigated analytically and solutions are presented for a few special conditions. The solutions are obtained in closed forms with hyperbolic functions. The effects of the magnetic, the wall moving, and the mass transpiration parameters are discussed. These solutions are important to show the flow physics as well as to be used as bench mark problems for numerical validation and development of new solution schemes.

  3. The surface-forming energy release rate versus the local energy release rate

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Si; Wang, He-ling; Landis, Chad M; Hwang, Keh-Chih; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    This paper identifies two ways to extract the energy (or power) flowing into a crack tip during propagation based on the power balance of areas enclosed by a stationary contour and a comoving contour. It is very interesting to find a contradiction that two corresponding energy release rates (ERRs), a surface-forming ERR and a local ERR, are different when stress singularity exists at a crack tip. Besides a rigorous mathematical interpretation, we deduce that the stress singularity leads to an...

  4. Direct Measurement of Surface Dissolution Rates in Potential Nuclear Waste Forms: The Example of Pyrochlore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Cornelius; Finkeldei, Sarah; Brandt, Felix; Bosbach, Dirk; Luttge, Andreas

    2015-08-19

    The long-term stability of ceramic materials that are considered as potential nuclear waste forms is governed by heterogeneous surface reactivity. Thus, instead of a mean rate, the identification of one or more dominant contributors to the overall dissolution rate is the key to predict the stability of waste forms quantitatively. Direct surface measurements by vertical scanning interferometry (VSI) and their analysis via material flux maps and resulting dissolution rate spectra provide data about dominant rate contributors and their variability over time. Using pyrochlore (Nd2Zr2O7) pellet dissolution under acidic conditions as an example, we demonstrate the identification and quantification of dissolution rate contributors, based on VSI data and rate spectrum analysis. Heterogeneous surface alteration of pyrochlore varies by a factor of about 5 and additional material loss by chemo-mechanical grain pull-out within the uppermost grain layer. We identified four different rate contributors that are responsible for the observed dissolution rate range of single grains. Our new concept offers the opportunity to increase our mechanistic understanding and to predict quantitatively the alteration of ceramic waste forms.

  5. Virtual-stereo fringe reflection technique for specular free-form surface testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Suodong; Li, Bo

    2016-11-01

    Due to their excellent ability to improve the performance of optical systems, free-form optics have attracted extensive interest in many fields, e.g. optical design of astronomical telescopes, laser beam expanders, spectral imagers, etc. However, compared with traditional simple ones, testing for such kind of optics is usually more complex and difficult which has been being a big barrier for the manufacture and the application of these optics. Fortunately, owing to the rapid development of electronic devices and computer vision technology, fringe reflection technique (FRT) with advantages of simple system structure, high measurement accuracy and large dynamic range is becoming a powerful tool for specular free-form surface testing. In order to obtain absolute surface shape distributions of test objects, two or more cameras are often required in the conventional FRT which makes the system structure more complex and the measurement cost much higher. Furthermore, high precision synchronization between each camera is also a troublesome issue. To overcome the aforementioned drawback, a virtual-stereo FRT for specular free-form surface testing is put forward in this paper. It is able to achieve absolute profiles with the help of only one single biprism and a camera meanwhile avoiding the problems of stereo FRT based on binocular or multi-ocular cameras. Preliminary experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed technique.

  6. Protein imprinting and recognition via forming nanofilms on microbeads surfaces in aqueous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Yan; Yan Changling; Wang Xuejing; Wang Gongke

    2009-01-01

    In this paler, we present a technique of forming nanofilms of poly-3-aminophenylboronic acid (pAPBA) on the surfaces of polystyrene (PS) microbeads for proteins (papain and trypsin) in aqueous. Papain was chosen as a model to study the feasibility of the technique and trypsin as an extension. Obtained core-shell microbeads were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and BET methods. The results show that pAPBA formed nanofilms (60-100 nm in thickness) on the surfaces of PS microbeads. The specific surface area of the papain-imprinted beads was about 180 m 2 g -1 and its pore size was 31 nm. These imprinted microbeads exhibit high recognition specificity and fast mass transfer kinetics. The specificity of these imprinted beads mainly originates from the spatial effect of imprinted sites. Because the protein-imprinted sites were located at, or close to, the surface, the imprinted beads have good site accessibility toward the template molecules. The facility of the imprinting protocol and the high recognition properties of imprinted microbeads make the approach an attractive solution to problems in the field of biotechnology.

  7. Glu- and Lys-forms of plasminogen differentially affect phosphatidylserine exposure on the platelet surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. D. Zhernossekov

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Plasminogen/plasmin system is known for its ability to support hemostatic balance of blood. However, plasminogen may be considered as an adhesive ligand and in this way could affect the functioning of blood cells. We showed that exogenous Lys-plasminogen, but not its Glu-form, inhibited platelet aggregation and suppressed platelet α-granule secretion. The aim of this work was to investigate the influence of Glu- and Lys-form of plasminogen on the formation of platelet procoagulant surface using phosphatidylserine exposure as a marker. Human platelets were obtained from human platelet-rich plasma (donors were healthy volunteers, men aged 30-40 years by gel-filtration on Sepharose 2B. Phosphatidylserine exposure on the platelet surface was evaluated by flow cytometry with FITC-conjugated annexin A5. Glu- and Lys-plasminogen have different impact on the platelet functioning. Exogenous Lys-plasminogen has no significant effect on phosphatidylserine exposure, while Glu-plasminogen increases phosphatidylserine exposure on the surface of thrombin- and collagen-activated human platelets. Glu-plasminogen can be considered as a co-stimulator of agonist-induced platelet secretion and procoagulant surface formation. Meanwhile effects of Lys-plasminogen are probably directed at platelet-platelet interactions and not related to agonist-stimulated pro-apoptotic changes. The observed different effects of Glu- and Lys-plasminogen on phosphatidylserine exposure can be explained by their structural peculiarities.

  8. Comparison of Oxidative Stresses Mediated by Different Crystalline Forms and Surface Modification of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Samy El-Said

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs are manufactured worldwide for use in a wide range of applications. There are two common crystalline forms of TiO2 anatase and rutile with different physical and chemical characteristics. We previously demonstrated that an increased DNA damage response is mediated by anatase crystalline form compared to rutile. In the present study, we conjugated TiO2 NPs with polyethylene glycol (PEG in order to reduce the genotoxicity and we evaluated some oxidative stress parameters to obtain information on the cellular mechanisms of DNA damage that operate in response to TiO2 NPs different crystalline forms exposure in hepatocarcinoma cell lines (HepG2. Our results indicated a significant increase in oxidative stress mediated by the anatase form of TiO2 NPs compared to rutile form. On the other hand, PEG modified TiO2 NPs showed a significant decrease in oxidative stress as compared to TiO2 NPs. These data suggested that the genotoxic potential of TiO2 NPs varies with crystalline form and surface modification.

  9. Biofilm-Forming Staphylococcus epidermidis Expressing Vancomycin Resistance Early after Adhesion to a Metal Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Sakimura

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated biofilm formation and time of vancomycin (VCM resistance expression after adhesion to a metal surface in Staphylococcus epidermidis. Biofilm-forming Staphylococcus epidermidis with a VCM MIC of 1 μg/mL was used. The bacteria were made to adhere to a stainless steel washer and treated with VCM at different times and concentrations. VCM was administered 0, 2, 4, and 8 hours after adhesion. The amount of biofilm formed was evaluated based on the biofilm coverage rates (BCRs before and after VCM administration, bacterial viability in biofilm was visually observed using the fluorescence staining method, and the viable bacterial count in biofilm was measured. The VCM concentration required to decrease BCR significantly compared with that of VCM-untreated bacteria was 4 μg/mL, even in the 0 hr group. In the 4 and 8 hr groups, VCM could not inhibit biofilm growth even at 1,024 μg/mL. In the 8 hr group, viable bacteria remained in biofilm at a count of 104 CFU even at a high VCM concentration (1,024 μg/mL. It was suggested that biofilm-forming Staphylococcus epidermidis expresses resistance to VCM early after adhesion to a metal surface. Resistance increased over time after adhesion as the biofilm formed, and strong resistance was expressed 4–8 hours after adhesion.

  10. Optimization of the single point incremental forming process for titanium sheets by using response surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saidi Badreddine

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The single point incremental forming process is well-known to be perfectly suited for prototyping and small series. One of its fields of applicability is the medicine area for the forming of titanium prostheses or titanium medical implants. However this process is not yet very industrialized, mainly due its geometrical inaccuracy, its not homogeneous thickness distribution& Moreover considerable forces can occur. They must be controlled in order to preserve the tooling. In this paper, a numerical approach is proposed in order to minimize the maximum force achieved during the incremental forming of titanium sheets and to maximize the minimal thickness. A surface response methodology is used to find the optimal values of two input parameters of the process, the punch diameter and the vertical step size of the tool path.

  11. Evaluation of the ability of Acinetobacter baumannii to form biofilms on six different biomedical relevant surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, C; Wu, J; Rickard, A H; Xi, C

    2016-10-01

    The human opportunistic pathogen, Acinetobacter baumannii, has the propensity to form biofilms and frequently cause medical device-related infections in hospitals. However, the physio-chemical properties of medical surfaces, in addition to bacterial surface properties, will affect colonization and biofilm development. The objective of this study was to compare the ability of A. baumannii to form biofilms on six different materials common to the hospital environment: glass, porcelain, stainless steel, rubber, polycarbonate plastic and polypropylene plastic. Biofilms were developed on material coupons in a CDC biofilm reactor. Biofilms were visualized and quantified using fluorescent staining and imaged using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and by direct viable cell counts. Image analysis of CLSM stacks indicated that the mean biomass values for biofilms grown on glass, rubber, porcelain, polypropylene, stainless steel and polycarbonate were 0·04, 0·26, 0·62, 1·00, 2·08 and 2·70 μm(3) /μm(2) respectively. Polycarbonate developed statistically more biofilm mass than glass, rubber, porcelain and polypropylene. Viable cell counts data were in agreement with the CLSM-derived data. In conclusion, polycarbonate was the most accommodating surface for A. baumannii ATCC 17978 to form biofilms while glass was least favourable. Alternatives to polycarbonate for use in medical and dental devices may need to be considered. In the hospital environment, Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the most persistent and difficult to control opportunistic pathogens. The persistence of A. baumannii is due, in part, to its ability to colonize surfaces and form biofilms. This study demonstrates that A. baumannii can form biofilms on a variety of different surfaces and develops substantial biofilms on polycarbonate - a thermoplastic material that is often used in the construction of medical devices. The findings highlight the need to further study the in

  12. Predicting the effect of surface texture on the qualitative form of prehension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian John Flatters

    Full Text Available Reach-to-grasp movements change quantitatively in a lawful (i.e. predictable manner with changes in object properties. We explored whether altering object texture would produce qualitative changes in the form of the precontact movement patterns. Twelve participants reached to lift objects from a tabletop. Nine objects were produced, each with one of three grip surface textures (high-friction, medium-friction and low-friction and one of three widths (50 mm, 70 mm and 90 mm. Each object was placed at three distances (100 mm, 300 mm and 500 mm, representing a total of 27 trial conditions. We observed two distinct movement patterns across all trials--participants either: (i brought their arm to a stop, secured the object and lifted it from the tabletop; or (ii grasped the object 'on-the-fly', so it was secured in the hand while the arm was moving. A majority of grasps were on-the-fly when the texture was high-friction and none when the object was low-friction, with medium-friction producing an intermediate proportion. Previous research has shown that the probability of on-the-fly behaviour is a function of grasp surface accuracy constraints. A finger friction rig was used to calculate the coefficients of friction for the objects and these calculations showed that the area available for a stable grasp (the 'functional grasp surface size' increased with surface friction coefficient. Thus, knowledge of functional grasp surface size is required to predict the probability of observing a given qualitative form of grasping in human prehensile behaviour.

  13. The Star-forming Main Sequence of Dwarf Low Surface Brightness Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGaugh, Stacy S.; Schombert, James M.; Lelli, Federico

    2017-12-01

    We explore the star-forming properties of late-type, low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies. The star-forming main sequence ({SFR}-{M}* ) of LSB dwarfs has a steep slope, indistinguishable from unity (1.04 ± 0.06). They form a distinct sequence from more massive spirals, which exhibit a shallower slope. The break occurs around {M}* ≈ {10}10 {M}⊙ , and can also be seen in the gas mass—stellar mass plane. The global Kennicutt-Schmidt law ({SFR}-{M}g) has a slope of 1.47 ± 0.11 without the break seen in the main sequence. There is an ample supply of gas in LSB galaxies, which have gas depletion times well in excess of a Hubble time, and often tens of Hubble times. Only ˜ 3 % of this cold gas needs be in the form of molecular gas to sustain the observed star formation. In analogy with the faint, long-lived stars of the lower stellar main sequence, it may be appropriate to consider the main sequence of star-forming galaxies to be defined by thriving dwarfs (with {M}* {10}10 {M}⊙ ) are weary giants that constitute more of a turn-off population.

  14. In vitro biofilm forming capacity on abiotic contact surfaces by outbreak-associated Vibrio harveyi strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallaval Veera Bramha Chari

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the in vitro biofilm forming capacity on abiotic food contact surfaces by Vibrio harveyi (V. harveyi strains. Methods: Thirty six Gram-negative V. harveyi strains were isolated from various street vended seafood outlets in a food processing line and evaluated for their ability to produce mucoid biofilms on food contact surfaces using a microplate assay. Phenotypic characterization of mucoid biofilm producing V. harveyi strains were screened on Congo red agar, thiosulfate-citrate-bile salts-sucrose agar and tryptic soy agar, respectively. Results: Only five V. harveyi strains (14% were mucoid biofilm producers characterized by formation of black colonies, whereas the remaining 31 strains (86% were not capable of producing biofilm characterized by formation of red colonies or pinkish-red colonies with darkening at the centre. The morphological, physiological and biochemical characteristics of these isolates were studied using standard protocols. Strain identification was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction targeted to species-specific polymerase chain reaction primers VH-1 and VH-2 corresponding to variable regions of V. harveyi 16S rRNA sequence. All the biofilm-forming strains showed resistance to at least three antimicrobial compounds tested. V. harveyi strains isolated from various seafood were able to form biofilms of different capacity, and the strains VB267, VB238 and VB166 isolated from cat fish, shrimp and eel fish exhibited significantly greater biofilm forming ability compared to other isolates. Conclusions: It can be concluded from the present study that the strain VB166 was able to better attach and form subsequent biofilms on glass and stainless steel compared to high density polyethylene. These properties allow these bacteria to survive, proliferate and persist in street vended seafood outlets.

  15. Resistance of bacterial biofilms formed on stainless steel surface to disinfecting agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Królasik, Joanna; Zakowska, Zofia; Krepska, Milena; Klimek, Leszek

    2010-01-01

    The natural ability of microorganisms for adhesion and biofilm formation on various surfaces is one of the factors causing the inefficiency of a disinfection agent, despite its proven activity in vitro. The aim of the study was to determine the effectiveness of disinfecting substances on bacterial biofilms formed on stainless steel surface. A universally applied disinfecting agent was used in the tests. Bacterial strains: Listeria innocua, Pseudomonas putida, Micrococcus luteus, Staphylococcus hominis strains, were isolated from food contact surfaces, after a cleaning and disinfection process. The disinfecting agent was a commercially available acid specimen based on hydrogen peroxide and peroxyacetic acid, the substance that was designed for food industry usage. Model tests were carried out on biofilm formed on stainless steel (type 304, no 4 finish). Biofilms were recorded by electron scanning microscope. The disinfecting agent in usable concentration, 0.5% and during 10 minutes was ineffective for biofilms. The reduction of cells in biofilms was only 1-2 logarithmic cycles. The use of the agent in higher concentration--1% for 30 minutes caused reduction of cell number by around 5 logarithmic cycles only in the case of one microorganism, M. luteus. For other types: L. innocua, P. putida, S. hominis, the requirements placed on disinfecting agents were not fulfilled. The results of experiments proved that bacterial biofilms are resistant to the disinfectant applied in its operational parameters. Disinfecting effectiveness was achieved after twofold increase of the agent's concentration.

  16. Surface Morphology and Bending Deformation of 2024-T3 Thin Sheets with Laser Peen Forming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Junfeng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser peen forming (LPF is a pure mechanical forming method through accumulated plastic strain, which has been successfully applied in wing components. Experimental investigation has been performed to understand the effect of process parameters such as constraint conditions, sheet thickness and laser energy on surface morphology and bending deformation of 2024-T3 thin sheets of dimensions of 76 mm ×19 mm (length × width. The research results indicated that bulges on the aluminum foil were generated at the bottom surface and not generated at the topmost surface. It was different for transition value of two-way bending deformations of thin sheets after LPF with different constraint conditions. Remain flat thicknesses of thin sheets after LPF were about 1 mm ~ 2 mm for 20 J, 25 J and 30 J. Arc heights and curvatures of 3 mm thickness sheets increased with laser energy and those of 2 mm thickness sheets only made little change. It was found that convex deformation, flat, concave deformation and laser deep drawing for thin sheets with different thicknesses after LPF.

  17. Characterizing Martian Soils: Correlating Orbital Observations with Chemistry and Mineralogy from Landed Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, J. L.

    2010-12-01

    Great advances have been achieved recently in our understanding of the surface of Mars at global scales from orbital missions and at local scales from landed missions. This presentation seeks to provide links between the chemistry and mineralogy observed by landed missions with remote detections of minerals from orbit. Spectral data from CRISM, OMEGA and TES characterize a mostly basaltic planet with some outcrops of hematite, clays, sulfates and carbonates at the surface. Recent alteration of these rocks to form soils has likely been dominated by physical processes; however, martian soils probably also contain relicts of early alteration involving aqueous processes. Clays, hydroxides, sulfates, carbonates and perchlorates are examples of surface components that may have formed early in the planet’s history in the presence of liquid water. Some of these minerals have not been detected in the soil, but all have likely contributed to the current soil composition. The grain size, shape, chemistry, mineralogy, and magnetic properties of Martian soils are similar to altered volcanic ash found at many analog sites on Earth. Reflectance and emission spectra of some of these analog soils are consistent with the basic soil spectral properties observed from orbit. The cemented soil units observed by rovers may have formed through interaction of the soil grains with salts, clays, and hydroxides. Lab experiments have shown that cementing of analog grains darkens the VN reflectance, which could explain the low reflectance of Martian soils compared to analog sites. Reflectance spectra of an analog soil mixture containing altered ash and sulfate are shown in Figure 1. A pellet was made by adding water and allowing the sample to dry in air. Finally, the pellet was crushed and ground again to properties might be.

  18. Finite Element Simulation of Sheet Metal Forming Process Using Local Interpolation for Tool Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hama, Takayuki; Takuda, Hirohiko; Takamura, Masato; Makinouchi, Akitake; Teodosiu, Cristian

    2005-01-01

    Treatment of contact between a sheet and tools is one of the most difficult problems to deal with in finite-element simulations of sheet forming processes. In order to obtain more accurate tool models without increasing the number of elements, this paper describes a new formulation for contact problems using interpolation proposed by Nagata for tool surfaces. A contact search algorithm between sheet nodes and the interpolated tool surfaces was developed and was introduced into the static-explicit elastoplastic finite-element method code STAMP3D. Simulations of a square cup deep drawing process with a very coarsely discretized punch model were carried out. The simulated results showed that the proposed algorithm gave the proper drawn shape, demonstrating the validity of the proposed algorithm

  19. Quartzites beneath pyroclastic flows – mineralogical aspects

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malý, Karel; Cajz, Vladimír

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 3 (2005), s. 370-371 ISSN 0369-2086 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA3013302 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : quartzite * ignimbrite * mineralogy Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  20. Recovery of Tungsten Surface with Fiber-Form Nanostructure by Plasmas Exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Takanori; Takamura, Shuichi; Kurishita, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    One of the serious concerns for tungsten materials in fusion devices is the radiation defects caused by helium plasma irradiation since helium is a fusion product. The fiber-formed nanostructure is thought to have a possible weakness against the plasma heat flux on the plasma-facing component and also may destroy the reflectivity of optical mirrors. In this paper an interesting method for the recovery of such tungsten surfaces is shown. The recovery process depends on the grade and manufacturing process of tungsten materials. (fusion engineering)

  1. Surface Structures Formed by a Copper(II Complex of Alkyl-Derivatized Indigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinori Honda

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Assembled structures of dyes have great influence on their coloring function. For example, metal ions added in the dyeing process are known to prevent fading of color. Thus, we have investigated the influence of an addition of copper(II ion on the surface structure of alkyl-derivatized indigo. Scanning tunneling microscope (STM analysis revealed that the copper(II complexes of indigo formed orderly lamellar structures on a HOPG substrate. These lamellar structures of the complexes are found to be more stable than those of alkyl-derivatized indigos alone. Furthermore, 2D chirality was observed.

  2. Review on common calibration and measuremnt practises for mesuring free form surface on CMMs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savio, Enrico; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    the traceability of measuring of free form surfaces on CMMs outlined. A newly developed procedure for performance verification on CMMs with respect to free form measurements is described, and some investigations regarding this method are reviewed. The investigations are concerned with two new tests, the Spiral...... Test and the Cylinder Test developed as a coorperation between the University of Padova and the Technical University of Denmark. Experiments conducted by means of calibrated objects and CAD models created in an independent and external system, using calibrated dimensions are described. The experiments...... have been carried out on two CMMs with different performances. The investigations have clearly shown that the performance verification procedure must be implemented in the specific software in use for the actual measurements. The Spiral Test showed a clear influence on CMM performances from scanning...

  3. Conical surface textures formed by ion bombarding 2% Be-Cu alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panitz, J.K.G.

    1991-01-01

    A homogeneous, micrometer-sized conical surface texture forms on 2% Be-Cu alloy which is bombarded with an argon beam produced by a Kaufman ion source. The dimensions of the features that form depend strongly on argon energy (from 250 to 1500 eV); argon fluence (10 19 to 10 20 ions cm -2 ); and argon flux (0.1 to 1 mA cm -2 ). The texture morphology depends less strongly on the background ambient (Mo versus graphite), earlier alloy heat treatments and the temperature during bombardment (100 o C and 450 o C). As the texture matures with increasing fluence, the number of large features increases at the expense of the number of small features. The observed relationship between texture formation and ion flux suggests that the evolution of these features is not adequately described by theories predicting that the mature conical side-wall angle is related to the angle of the maximum sputtering yield. These textured surfaces can be coated with other metals for a variety of possible applications including pulsed power Li + beam anodes; cold cathode field emission devices; optical absorbers and catalysis supports. (author)

  4. Conical surface textures formed by ion bombarding 2% Be Cu alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panitz, J.K.G.

    1990-01-01

    A homogeneous, micrometer-sized conical surface texture forms on 2% Be-Cu alloy which is bombarded with an argon beam produced by a Kaufman ion source. The dimensions of the features that form strongly depend on: (1) argon energy (from 250 to 1500 eV), (2) fluence (10 19 to 10 20 ions/cm 2 ), and (3) flux (0.1 to 1 mA/cm 2 ). The texture morphology depends less strongly on the background ambient (Mo vs graphite), earlier alloy heat treatments and the temperature during bombardment (100 degree C and 450 degree C). As the texture matures with increasing fluence, the number of large features increases at the expense of the number of small features. The observed relationship between texture formation and ion flux suggests that the evolution of these features is not adequately described by theories predicting that the mature conical sidewall angle is related to the angle of the maximum sputtering yield. These textured surfaces can be coated with other metals for a variety of possible applications including: (1) pulsed power Li+ beam anodes, (2) cold cathode field emission devices, (3) optical absorbers and (4) catalysis supports. 18 refs., 5 figs

  5. Surface modification by metal ion implantation forming metallic nanoparticles in an insulating matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvadori, M.C.; Teixeira, F.S.; Sgubin, L.G.; Cattani, M.; Brown, I.G.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Metal nanoparticles can be produced through metallic ion implantation in insulating substrate, where the implanted metal self-assembles into nanoparticles. • The nanoparticles nucleate near the maximum of the implantation depth profile, that can be estimated by computer simulation using the TRIDYN. • Nanocomposites, obtained by this way, can be produced in different insulator materials. More specifically we have studied Au/PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate), Pt/PMMA, Ti/alumina and Au/alumina systems. • The nanocomposites were characterized by measuring the resistivity of the composite layer as function of the dose implanted, reaching the percolation threshold. • Excellent agreement was found between the experimental results and the predictions of the theory. - Abstract: There is special interest in the incorporation of metallic nanoparticles in a surrounding dielectric matrix for obtaining composites with desirable characteristics such as for surface plasmon resonance, which can be used in photonics and sensing, and controlled surface electrical conductivity. We have investigated nanocomposites produced by metal ion implantation into insulating substrates, where the implanted metal self-assembles into nanoparticles. The nanoparticles nucleate near the maximum of the implantation depth profile (projected range), which can be estimated by computer simulation using the TRIDYN code. TRIDYN is a Monte Carlo simulation program based on the TRIM (Transport and Range of Ions in Matter) code that takes into account compositional changes in the substrate due to two factors: previously implanted dopant atoms, and sputtering of the substrate surface. Our study show that the nanoparticles form a bidimentional array buried a few nanometers below the substrate surface. We have studied Au/PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate), Pt/PMMA, Ti/alumina and Au/alumina systems. Transmission electron microscopy of the implanted samples show that metallic nanoparticles form in

  6. Mineralogy and Oxygen Isotope Compositions of an Unusual Hibonite-Perovskite Refractory Inclusion from Allende

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, L. P.; Snead, C.; Rahman, Z.; McKeegan, K. D.

    2012-01-01

    Hibonite-rich Ca- and Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) are among the earliest formed solids that condensed in the early nebula. We discovered an unusual refractory inclusion from the Allende CV3 chondrite (SHAL) containing an approx 500 micron long single crystal of hibonite and co-existing coarse-grained perovskite. The mineralogy and petrography of SHAL show strong similarities to some FUN inclusions, especially HAL. Here we report on the mineralogy, petrography, mineral chemistry and oxygen isotopic compositions in SHAL.

  7. Initial Results on the Mineralogy and Geochemistry of the Mar Exploration Rover Gusev Landing Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, P. R.

    2004-05-01

    The Spirit rover has investigated the geochemistry and mineralogy of the Gusev crater site using in situ Alpha Proton X-Ray, Mossbauer, visible, and infrared spectroscopy. The Gusev site is covered with angular to sub-rounded rocks that are typically less than 1 m in maximum dimension. More than 90 percent of these rocks are dark-toned, with the remainder being lighter-toned rocks that may predominantly be dark rocks with a thin (10's of microns) coating of easily removed fines. APXS analysis has been obtained of a rock (Adirondack) following the removal by grinding of the surface dust and the upper few mm of the rock surface. These data give a modal mineralogy corresponding to olivine basalt. High quality Mini-TES data have not been obtained of a completely dust-free rock surface. The Mini-TES data of Adirondack do show long wavelength (15-25 microns) absorptions due to olivine of composition ~Fo60. All of the rocks observed are very compositionally homogeneous in the Mini-TES spectra. These findings are consistent with the detection of olivine-bearing basalt at this site from orbital TES infrared spectroscopy. Mossbauer spectra of Adirondack show the presence of forsteritic olivine and magnetite, with possible pyroxene. The soils at Gusev are a mixture of reddish fine-grained to sandy materials, granular-sized particles that occur in ripple forms, and minor pebbles. Mini-TES spectra of the soil show an excellent match to the TES spectra of high-albedo, fine-grained material found in regional bright regions that is interpreted to be windblown dust. This agreement suggests at least the uppermost layer of the soil at Gusev has been accumulated from airfall dust. By analogy with prior analysis of TES data these materials contain several percent carbonate, minor bound water, and a framework silicate interpreted to be either feldspar or zeolite. APXS spectra show similar oxide abundances to those determined for the Pathfinder site, except for higher MgO, and lower

  8. Geometric Parameters of Cutting Tools that Can be Used for Forming Sided Surfaces with Variable Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razumov M.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article describes machining technology of polyhedral surfaces with varying profile, which is provided by planetary motion of multiblade block tools. The features of the technology and urgency of the problem is indicated. The purpose of the study is to determine the minimum value of the clearance angle of the tool. Also, the study is carried out about changing the value of the front and rear corners during the formation of polygonal surface using a planetary gear. The scheme of calculating the impact of various factors on the value of the minimum clearance angle of the tool and kinematic front and rear corners of the instrument is provided. The mathematical formula for calculating the minimum clearance angle of the tool is given. Also, given the formula for determining the front and rear corners of the tool during driving. This study can be used in the calculation of the design operations forming multifaceted external surfaces with a variable profile by using the planetary gear.

  9. Pre-Rationalized Parametric Designing of Roof Shells Formed by Repetitive Modules of Catalan Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Dzwierzynska

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to develop an original, methodical, and practical approach to the early stages of parametric design of roof shells formed by repetitive modules of Catalan surfaces. It is presented on the example of designing the roof shells compound of four concrete elements. The designing process proposed by us consists in linking geometric shaping of roofs’ models with their structural analysis and optimization. Contrary to other methods, which use optimization process in order to find free roof forms, we apply it in order to explore and improve design alternatives. It is realized with the application of designing tools working in Rhinoceros 3D software. The flexible scripts elaborated by us, in order to achieve roofs’ models of regular and symmetrical shapes, are converted into simulation models to perform structural analysis. It is mainly focused on how the roof shells perform dependently on their geometric characteristics. The simulation enables one to evaluate various roof shells’ shapes, as well as to select an optimal design solution. The proposed approach to the conceptual design process may drive the designing to achieve geometric and structural forms which not only follow the design intentions but also target better results.

  10. Expanded heat treatment to form residual compressive hoop stress on inner surface of zirconium alloy tubing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megata, Masao

    1997-01-01

    A specific heat treatment process that introduces hoop stress has been developed. This technique can produce zirconium alloy tubing with a residual compressive hoop stress near the inner surface by taking advantage of the mechanical anisotropy in hexagonal close-packed zirconium crystal. Since a crystal having its basal pole parallel to the tangential direction of the tubing is easier to exhibit plastic elongation under the hoop stress than that having its basal pole parallel to the radial direction, the plastic and elastic elongation can coexist under a certain set of temperature and hoop stress conditions. The mechanical anisotropy plays a role to extend the coexistent stress range. Thus, residual compressive hoop stress is formed at the inner surface where more plastic elongation occurs during the heat treatment. This process is referred to as expanded heat treatment. Since this is a fundamental crystallographic principle, it has various applications. The application to improve PCI/SCC (pellet cladding interaction/stress corrosion cracking) properties of water reactor fuel cladding is promising. Excellent results were obtained with laboratory-scale heat treatment and an out-reactor iodine SCC test. These results included an extension of the time to SCC failure. (author)

  11. Understanding the formation and evolution of rain-formed fresh lenses at the ocean surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drushka, Kyla; Asher, William E.; Ward, Brian; Walesby, Kieran

    2016-04-01

    Rain falling on the ocean produces a layer of buoyant fresher surface water, or "fresh lens." Fresh lenses can have significant impacts on satellite-in situ salinity comparisons and on exchanges between the surface and the bulk mixed layer. However, because these are small, transient features, relatively few observations of fresh lenses have been made. Here the Generalized Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM) is used to explore the response of the upper few meters of the ocean to rain events. Comparisons with observations from several platforms demonstrate that GOTM can reproduce the main characteristics of rain-formed fresh lenses. Idealized sensitivity tests show that the near-surface vertical salinity gradient within fresh lenses has a linear dependence on rain rate and an inverse dependence on wind speed. Yearlong simulations forced with satellite rainfall and reanalysis atmospheric parameters demonstrate that the mean salinity difference between 0.01 and 5 m, equivalent to the measurement depths of satellite radiometers and Argo floats, is -0.04 psu when averaged over the 20°S-20°N tropical band. However, when averaged regionally, the mean vertical salinity difference exceeds -0.15 psu in the Indo-Pacific warm pool, in the Pacific and Atlantic intertropical convergence zone, and in the South Pacific convergence zone. In most of these regions, salinities measured by the Aquarius satellite instrument have a fresh bias relative to Argo measurements at 5 m depth. These results demonstrate that the fresh bias in Aquarius salinities in rainy, low-wind regions may be caused by the presence of rain-produced fresh lenses.

  12. LED surgical lighting system with multiple free-form surfaces for highly sterile operating theater application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Zhang, Yaqin; Zheng, Zhenrong; Li, Haifeng; Liu, Xu

    2014-06-01

    Although the ventilation system is widely employed in the operating theater, a strictly sterile surgical environment still cannot be ensured because of laminar disturbance, which is mainly caused by the surgical lighting system. Abandoning traditional products, we propose an LED surgical lighting system, which can alleviate the laminar disturbance and provide an appropriate lighting condition for surgery. It contains a certain amount of LED lens units, which are embedded in the ceiling and arranged around the air supply smallpox. The LED lens unit integrated with an LED light source and a free-form lens is required to produce a uniform circular illumination with a large tolerance to the change of lighting distance. To achieve such a dedicated lens, two free-form refractive surfaces, which are converted into two ordinary differential equations by the design method presented in this paper, are used to deflect the rays. The results show that the LED surgical lighting system can provide an excellent illumination environment for surgery, and, apparently, the laminar disturbance also can be relieved.

  13. Geometrical Optimization Of Clinch Forming Process Using The Response Surface Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oudjene, M.; Ben-Ayed, L.; Batoz, J.-L.

    2007-01-01

    The determination of optimum tool shapes in clinch forming process is needed to achieve the required high quality of clinch joints. The design of the tools (punch and die) is crucial since the strength of the clinch joints is closely correlated to the tools geometry. To increase the strength of clinch joints, an automatic optimization procedure is developed. The objective function is defined in terms of the maximum value of the tensile force, obtained by separation of the sheets. Feasibility constraints on the geometrical parameters are also taken into account. First, a Python Script is used to generate the ABAQUS finite element model, to run the computations and post-process results, which are exported in an ASCII file. Then, this ASCII file is read by a FORTRAN program, in which the response surface approximation and SQP algorithm are implemented. The results show the potential interest of the developed optimization procedure towards the improvement of the strength of the clinch forming joints to tensile loading

  14. Mineralogical microanalysis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monso, E.; Tura, J.M.; Marsal, M.; Morell, F.; Pujadas, J.; Morera, J.

    1990-01-01

    A mineralogical analysis of lung tissue was conducted on 25 samples from patients who had been diagnosed as having idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) at low magnification and energy-dispersive x-ray analysis (EDXA) was used. In all samples, the surface silicon/sulfur (Si/S) ratio was calculated. The Si/S ratio for 25 samples of normal lung and 6 samples of pneumoconiotic lung was also determined (upper limit of normal Si/S ratio = 0.3). The difference between the Si/S ratio in the group with IPF and group with normal lung tissue was significantly significant (p less than .007, Wilcoxon test). Six of 12 patients with a previous diagnosis of IPF and a Si/S ratio greater than 0.3 had an exposure history that could imply inhalation of silica/silicates, and the correct diagnosis for these patients is most probably pneumoconiosis. The silica/silicate deposits detected in patients with IPF, and who had a ratio and no past exposure to dusts, could be either a cause or an effect of the disease

  15. Mineralogical microanalysis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monso, E.; Tura, J.M.; Marsal, M.; Morell, F.; Pujadas, J.; Morera, J. (Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona (Spain))

    1990-05-01

    A mineralogical analysis of lung tissue was conducted on 25 samples from patients who had been diagnosed as having idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) at low magnification and energy-dispersive x-ray analysis (EDXA) was used. In all samples, the surface silicon/sulfur (Si/S) ratio was calculated. The Si/S ratio for 25 samples of normal lung and 6 samples of pneumoconiotic lung was also determined (upper limit of normal Si/S ratio = 0.3). The difference between the Si/S ratio in the group with IPF and group with normal lung tissue was significantly significant (p less than .007, Wilcoxon test). Six of 12 patients with a previous diagnosis of IPF and a Si/S ratio greater than 0.3 had an exposure history that could imply inhalation of silica/silicates, and the correct diagnosis for these patients is most probably pneumoconiosis. The silica/silicate deposits detected in patients with IPF, and who had a ratio and no past exposure to dusts, could be either a cause or an effect of the disease.

  16. Geochemical and mineralogical characteristics of Lithomargic clay

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Geochemical and mineralogical characteristics of Lithomargic clay. GEOCHEMICAL AND .... tries, as filling material in the pulp and paper, toothpaste and paint industries as well ..... tions very vital to human health and other ac- tivities of man.

  17. Mineralogy of the rare earth elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, A.M.

    1984-01-01

    This paper contains mineralogic properties of the rare earth elements (REE). Notes are given on total REE abundances, distribution patterns, and modes of occurrence. References are confined as far as possible to papers containing usable REE data. The minerals are grouped alphabetically within each major cationic group. The paper includes an alphabetic table of mineral names, chemical formulas, crystal system and section number. It functions as a handy entrance to the mineralogic and bibliographic paper. (G.J.P.)

  18. Mineralogical conversion of asbestos containing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulsford, S.K.; Foltz, A.D.; Ek, R.B.

    1996-01-01

    The principal objective of the Technical Task Plan (TTP) is to demonstrate a thermal-chemical mineralogical asbestos conversion unit at the Hanford Site, which converts non-radiological asbestos containing materials (ACMs) into an asbestos-free material. The permanent thermal-chemical mineralogical conversion of ACMs to a non-toxic, non-hazardous, potentially marketable end product should not only significantly reduce the waste stream volumes but terminate the open-quotes cradle to graveclose quotes ownership liabilities

  19. Opportunities of influence of plasma streams formed in IKA with continuos nor king gas filling en the surface of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Useinov, B.M.; Useinova, A.M.; Amrenova, A.U.; Pusankov, S.A.; Sartin, S.A.; Virko, P.G.

    2001-01-01

    The results of the investigation of influence of plasma stream formed in IKA with continuous working gas filling on the surface of stainless steel 12X18H10T and aluminum are given in this article. It is shown here that the effect of influence of plasma stream on the surface of materials depends on the way of working gas filling. There is the comparison of influence of plasma stream formed in plasma accelerator with impulse and continuous working gas filling

  20. Insights from the correlation of the preliminary Geologic and Mineralogic maps of Vesta from the Dawn mission data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigeri, A.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Ammannito, E.; Yingst, R. A.; Mest, S.; Garry, B.; Magni, G.; Palomba, E.; Petro, N.; Tosi, F.; Williams, D.; Zambon, F.; Jaumann, R.; Pieters, C. M.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2012-04-01

    The Dawn mission to Vesta has greatly improved the quality and resolution of data available to explore the asteroid. Prior to the Dawn mission the best data available was the one from Hubble Space Telescope with a maximum resolution of 50 km per pixel. The survey phase of the mission has pushed spatial resolution up to about 100 meters per pixel by the Framing Camera on-board Dawn, and 700 meters per pixel for the VIR spectrometer, spanning the spectral range from the visible to infrared at 0.25-1 μm and 1-5 μm. The frames of the FC and VIR have been processed and mosaicked. A preliminary Geologic map has been produced by mapping units and structures over the FC mosaic and the DTM derived from stereo processing of visible imagery. We will present some examples of correlation between the preliminary geologic and VIR-derived mineralogic maps. The Dawn mission team is using Geographic Information System tools for locating frames and for data exchange among the team. The use of GIS tools and data formats significantly improves our ability to create and interpret geologic maps, and also improves the interoperability of high level data products among the instruments' team. VIR data have been synthesized into a series of spectral indicators that give indications on the mineralogical composition and the physical state of the surface. We ingested in GIS the the preliminary geologic map as units and structures and we projected the mosaics of spectral indicators in a common coordinate reference system. The first spectral indicators we started to look at were the Band Depth computed on pyroxene Band II and the Band Center also computed on Band II. The comparison of the preliminary geologic map and the mosaics of spectral indicators extracted from VIR data show promising aspects on both the geologic and mineralogic aspects. Geologic units are made up of bodies of rock that are interpreted to have been formed by a particular process or set of related processes over a discrete

  1. Iron and aluminum forms and their relationship with texture, mineralogy and organic carbon in the Cerrado OxisolFormas de ferro e alumínio e suas relações com textura, mineralogia e carbono orgânico em Latossolos do Cerrado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robélio Lenadro Marchão

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Oxisols of the Cerrado region have a simple mineralogy, and are composed mainly of kaolinite and iron and aluminium oxides. The aim of this work was to perform a sequential extraction of iron and aluminium and to relate them to texture, mineralogy and organic carbon in Oxisols of the Cerrado region. The soil samples, 35 in total, were taken from the 0–20 cm layer in Oxisols under pasture located in the Brazilian Cerrado Region. The levels of iron and aluminum extracted by full attack, dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate, ammonium oxalate and sodium pyrophosphate were analyzed according to the textural classes using the Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric test. Then these data were related to the mineralogy and organic carbon through a principal component analysis. Whatever the textures, iron oxides of high degree of crystallinity were the main form of iron and are positively correlated with the iron total content. The aluminum oxides have a high affinity to organic carbon than iron oxides. The levels of iron and aluminum extracted by sodium pyrophosphate were closely related to soil pH.Os Latossolos da região do Cerrado apresentam mineralogia da fração argila relativamente simples, sendo constituídos principalmente por caulinita e óxidos de ferro e de alumínio. O objetivo deste trabalho foi realizar extrações sequênciais de ferro e de alumínio e relacioná-los à mineralogia, textura e teores de carbono orgânico em Latossolos da região do Cerrado. Coletaram-se 35 amostras na camada de 0-20 cm de Latossolos sob pastagem da Região do Cerrado. Os teores de ferro e de alumínio extraídos pelo ataque total, ditionito-citrato-bicarbonato de sódio, oxalato ácido de amônia e pirofosfato de sódio foram analisados de acordo com a classe textural através do teste não paramétrico de Kruskal-Wallis. Em seguida estes dados foram relacionados com a mineralogia e o carbono orgânico por meio de uma análise de componentes principais

  2. A task specific uncertainty analysis method for least-squares-based form characterization of ultra-precision freeform surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, M J; Cheung, C F; Kong, L B

    2012-01-01

    In the measurement of ultra-precision freeform surfaces, least-squares-based form characterization methods are widely used to evaluate the form error of the measured surfaces. Although many methodologies have been proposed in recent years to improve the efficiency of the characterization process, relatively little research has been conducted on the analysis of associated uncertainty in the characterization results which may result from those characterization methods being used. As a result, this paper presents a task specific uncertainty analysis method with application in the least-squares-based form characterization of ultra-precision freeform surfaces. That is, the associated uncertainty in the form characterization results is estimated when the measured data are extracted from a specific surface with specific sampling strategy. Three factors are considered in this study which include measurement error, surface form error and sample size. The task specific uncertainty analysis method has been evaluated through a series of experiments. The results show that the task specific uncertainty analysis method can effectively estimate the uncertainty of the form characterization results for a specific freeform surface measurement

  3. Multimodal Nonlinear Optical Imaging for Sensitive Detection of Multiple Pharmaceutical Solid-State Forms and Surface Transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakovic, Dunja; Saarinen, Jukka; Rojalin, Tatu; Antikainen, Osmo; Fraser-Miller, Sara J; Laaksonen, Timo; Peltonen, Leena; Isomäki, Antti; Strachan, Clare J

    2017-11-07

    Two nonlinear imaging modalities, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and sum-frequency generation (SFG), were successfully combined for sensitive multimodal imaging of multiple solid-state forms and their changes on drug tablet surfaces. Two imaging approaches were used and compared: (i) hyperspectral CARS combined with principal component analysis (PCA) and SFG imaging and (ii) simultaneous narrowband CARS and SFG imaging. Three different solid-state forms of indomethacin-the crystalline gamma and alpha forms, as well as the amorphous form-were clearly distinguished using both approaches. Simultaneous narrowband CARS and SFG imaging was faster, but hyperspectral CARS and SFG imaging has the potential to be applied to a wider variety of more complex samples. These methodologies were further used to follow crystallization of indomethacin on tablet surfaces under two storage conditions: 30 °C/23% RH and 30 °C/75% RH. Imaging with (sub)micron resolution showed that the approach allowed detection of very early stage surface crystallization. The surfaces progressively crystallized to predominantly (but not exclusively) the gamma form at lower humidity and the alpha form at higher humidity. Overall, this study suggests that multimodal nonlinear imaging is a highly sensitive, solid-state (and chemically) specific, rapid, and versatile imaging technique for understanding and hence controlling (surface) solid-state forms and their complex changes in pharmaceuticals.

  4. Mineralogical and geological study of quaternary deposits and weathering profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Gi Young; Lee, Bong Ho [Andong National Univ., Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-01-15

    Movement history of a quaternary reverse fault cutting marine terrace deposit and tertiary bentonite in the Yangnammyon, Gyoungju city was studied by the mineralogical and microtextural analysis of the fault clays and weathered terrace deposits. Two types of fault clays were identified as greenish gray before the deposition of the marine terrace deposits and reddish brown after deposition. Greenish gray fault clay is composed mostly of smectite probably powdered from bentonite showing at least two events of movement from microtextures. After the bentonite was covered by quaternary marine gravel deposits, the reverse fault was reactivated cutting marine gravel deposits to form open spaces along the fault plane which allowed the hydrological infiltration of soil particles and deposition of clays in deep subsurface. The reddish brown 'fault' clays enclosed the fragments of dark brown ultrafine varved clay, proving two events of faulting, and slicken sides bisecting reddish brown clays suggest another faulting event in the final stage. Mineralogical and microtextural analysis of the fault clay show total five events of faulting, which had not been recognized even by thorough conventional paleoseismological investigation using trench, highlighting the importance of microtextural and mineralogical analysis in paleoseismology.

  5. Differentiating pedogenesis from diagenesis in early terrestrial paleoweathering surfaces formed on granitic composition parent materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driese, S.G.; Medaris, L.G.; Ren, M.; Runkel, Anthony C.; Langford, R.P.

    2007-01-01

    Unconformable surfaces separating Precambrian crystalline basement and overlying Proterozoic to Cambrian sedimentary rocks provide an exceptional opportunity to examine the role of primitive soil ecosystems in weathering and resultant formation of saprolite (weathered rock retaining rock structure) and regolith (weathered rock without rock structure), but many appear to have been affected by burial diagenesis and hydrothermal fluid flow, leading some researchers to discount their suitability for such studies. We examine one modern weathering profile (Cecil series), four Cambrian paleoweathering profiles from the North American craton (Squaw Creek, Franklin Mountains, Core SQ-8, and Core 4), one Neoproterozoic profile (Sheigra), and one late Paleoproterozoic profile (Baraboo), to test the hypothesis that these paleoweathering profiles do provide evidence of primitive terrestrial weathering despite their diagenetic and hydrothermal overprinting, especially additions of potassium. We employ an integrated approach using (1) detailed thin-section investigations to identify characteristic pedogenic features associated with saprolitization and formation of well-drained regoliths, (2) electron microprobe analysis to identify specific weathered and new mineral phases, and (3) geochemical mass balance techniques to characterize volume changes during weathering and elemental gains and losses of major and minor elements relative to the inferred parent materials. There is strong pedogenic evidence of paleoweathering, such as clay illuviation, sepic-plasmic fabrics, redoximorphic features, and dissolution and alteration of feldspars and mafic minerals to kaolinite, gibbsite, and Fe oxides, as well as geochemical evidence, such as whole-rock losses of Na, Ca, Mg, Si, Sr, Fe, and Mn greater than in modern profiles. Evidence of diagenesis includes net additions of K, Ba, and Rb determined through geochemical mass balance, K-feldspar overgrowths in overlying sandstone sections, and

  6. Two approaches to form antibacterial surface: Doping with bactericidal element and drug loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukhorukova, I.V.; Sheveyko, A.N.; Kiryukhantsev-Korneev, Ph.V. [National University of Science and Technology “MISIS”, Leninsky pr. 4, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation); Anisimova, N.Y.; Gloushankova, N.A.; Zhitnyak, I.Y. [N.N Blokhin Russian Cancer Research Center of RAMS, Kashirskoe shosse 24, Moscow 115478 (Russian Federation); Benesova, J. [Institute of Experimental Medicine of the ASCR, Vídenska 1083, Prague 14220 (Czech Republic); Institute of Biophysics, 2nd Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, V Uvalu 84, Prague 15006 (Czech Republic); Amler, E. [Institute of Experimental Medicine of the ASCR, Vídenska 1083, Prague 14220 (Czech Republic); Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague (Czech Republic); Shtansky, D.V., E-mail: shtansky@shs.misis.ru [National University of Science and Technology “MISIS”, Leninsky pr. 4, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Bioactive materials with rate-controlled release of antibacterial agent. • Ag{sup +} ion release from TiCaPCON-Ag films depended on Ag content. • TiCaPCON-coated Ti network structure with blind pores loaded with co-amoxiclav. • Strong bactericidal effect of drug-loaded samples. • Antibacterial yet biocompatible and bioactive surfaces. - Abstract: Two approaches (surface doping with bactericidal element and loading of antibiotic into specially formed surface microcontainers) to the fabrication of antibacterial yet biocompatible and bioactive surfaces are described. A network structure with square-shaped blind pores of 2.6 ± 0.6 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 3} for drug loading was obtained by selective laser sintering (SLS). The SLS-fabricated samples were loaded with 0.03, 0.3, 2.4, and 4 mg/cm{sup 2} of co-amoxiclav (amoxicillin and clavulanic acid). Ag-doped TiCaPCON films with 0.4, 1.2, and 4.0 at.% of Ag were obtained by co-sputtering of composite TiC{sub 0.5}-Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} and metallic Ag targets. The surface structure of SLS-prepared samples and cross-sectional morphology of TiCaPCON-Ag films were studied by scanning electron microscopy. The through-thickness of Ag distribution in the TiCaPCON-Ag films was obtained by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy. The kinetics of Ag ion release in normal saline solution was studied using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Bacterial activity of the samples was evaluated against S. epidermidis, S. aureus, and K. pneum. ozaenae using the agar diffusion test and photometric method by controlling the variation of optical density of the bacterial suspension over time. Cytocompatibility of the Ag-doped TiCaPCON films was observed in vitro using chondrocytic and MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells. The viability and proliferation of chondrocytic cells were determined using the MTS assay and PicoGreen assay tests, respectively. The alkaline phosphatase (ALP

  7. Triboelectricity: macroscopic charge patterns formed by self-arraying ions on polymer surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgo, Thiago A L; Ducati, Telma R D; Francisco, Kelly R; Clinckspoor, Karl J; Galembeck, Fernando; Galembeck, Sergio E

    2012-05-15

    Tribocharged polymers display macroscopically patterned positive and negative domains, verifying the fractal geometry of electrostatic mosaics previously detected by electric probe microscopy. Excess charge on contacting polyethylene (PE) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) follows the triboelectric series but with one caveat: net charge is the arithmetic sum of patterned positive and negative charges, as opposed to the usual assumption of uniform but opposite signal charging on each surface. Extraction with n-hexane preferentially removes positive charges from PTFE, while 1,1-difluoroethane and ethanol largely remove both positive and negative charges. Using suitable analytical techniques (electron energy-loss spectral imaging, infrared microspectrophotometry and carbonization/colorimetry) and theoretical calculations, the positive species were identified as hydrocarbocations and the negative species were identified as fluorocarbanions. A comprehensive model is presented for PTFE tribocharging with PE: mechanochemical chain homolytic rupture is followed by electron transfer from hydrocarbon free radicals to the more electronegative fluorocarbon radicals. Polymer ions self-assemble according to Flory-Huggins theory, thus forming the experimentally observed macroscopic patterns. These results show that tribocharging can only be understood by considering the complex chemical events triggered by mechanical action, coupled to well-established physicochemical concepts. Patterned polymers can be cut and mounted to make macroscopic electrets and multipoles.

  8. Cavitation structures formed during the rebound of a sphere from a wetted surface

    KAUST Repository

    Marston, Jeremy; Wang, Yong; Ng, Waikiong; Tan, Reginald; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2010-01-01

    We use high-speed imaging to observe the dynamics of cavitation, caused by the impact and subsequent rebound of a sphere from a solid surface covered with a thin layer of highly viscous liquid. We note marked qualitative differences between the cavitation structures with increase in viscosity, as well as between Newtonian and non-Newtonian liquids. The patterns observed are quite unexpected and intricate, appearing in concentric ring formations around the site of impact. In all cases, we identify a distinct radius from which the primary bubbles emanate. This radius is modelled with a modified form of Hertz contact theory. Within this radius, we show that some fine cavitation structure may exist or that it may be one large cavitation bubble. For the non-Newtonian fluids, we observe foam-like structures extending radially with diminishing bubble sizes with increase in radial position. Whereas for the Newtonian fluids, the opposite trend is observed with increasing bubble size for increasing radial position. Finally, we compare our experimental observations of cavitation to the maximum tension criterion proposed by Joseph (J Fluid Mech 366:367-378, 1998) showing that this provides the lower limit for the onset of cavitation in our experiments. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  9. Cavitation structures formed during the rebound of a sphere from a wetted surface

    KAUST Repository

    Marston, Jeremy

    2010-09-28

    We use high-speed imaging to observe the dynamics of cavitation, caused by the impact and subsequent rebound of a sphere from a solid surface covered with a thin layer of highly viscous liquid. We note marked qualitative differences between the cavitation structures with increase in viscosity, as well as between Newtonian and non-Newtonian liquids. The patterns observed are quite unexpected and intricate, appearing in concentric ring formations around the site of impact. In all cases, we identify a distinct radius from which the primary bubbles emanate. This radius is modelled with a modified form of Hertz contact theory. Within this radius, we show that some fine cavitation structure may exist or that it may be one large cavitation bubble. For the non-Newtonian fluids, we observe foam-like structures extending radially with diminishing bubble sizes with increase in radial position. Whereas for the Newtonian fluids, the opposite trend is observed with increasing bubble size for increasing radial position. Finally, we compare our experimental observations of cavitation to the maximum tension criterion proposed by Joseph (J Fluid Mech 366:367-378, 1998) showing that this provides the lower limit for the onset of cavitation in our experiments. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  10. Experimental identification for physical mechanism of fiber-form nanostructure growth on metal surfaces with helium plasma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takamura, S., E-mail: takamura@aitech.ac.jp [Faculty of Engineering, Aichi Institute of Technology, Yakusa-cho, Toyota 470-0392 (Japan); Uesugi, Y. [Faculty of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Institute of Science and Engineering, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan)

    2015-11-30

    Highlights: • Initial growth process of fiber-form nanostructure on metal surfaces under helium ion irradiation is given based on experimental knowledge, where the pitting of original surface and forming nano-walls and/or loop-like nanostructure works as precursors. • The physical mechanism of fiber growth is discussed in terms of shear modulus of metals influenced by helium content as well as surface temperature. • The physical model explains the reason why tantalum does not make sufficiently grown nano-fibers, and the temperature dependence of surface morphology of titanium. - Abstract: The initial stage of fiber-form nanostructure growth on metal surface with helium plasma irradiation is illustrated, taking recent research knowledge using a flux gradient technique, and including loop-like nano-scale structure as precursors. The growth mechanism of fibers is discussed in terms of the shear modulus of various materials that is influenced by the helium content as well as the surface temperature, and the mobility of helium atoms, clusters and/or nano-bubbles in the bulk, loops and fibers. This model may explain the reason why tantalum does not provide fiber-form nanostructure although the loop-like structure was identified. The model also suggests the mechanism of an existence of two kinds of nanostructure of titanium depending on surface temperature. Industrial applications of such nanostructures are suggested in the properties and the possibilities of its growth on other basic materials.

  11. Mineralogical diversity and geology of Humboldt crater derived using Moon Mineralogy Mapper data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinot, M.; Besse, S.; Flahaut, J.; Quantin-Nataf, C.; Lozac'h, L.; van Westrenen, W.

    2018-01-01

    Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) spectroscopic data and high-resolution imagery data sets were used to study the mineralogy and geology of the 207 km diameter Humboldt crater. Analyses of M3 data, using a custom-made method for M3 spectra continuum removal and spectral parameters calculation, reveal

  12. Weathering of the New Albany Shale, Kentucky, USA: I. Weathering zones defined by mineralogy and major-element composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, M.L.W.; Breit, G.N.

    2009-01-01

    Comprehensive understanding of chemical and mineralogical changes induced by weathering is valuable information when considering the supply of nutrients and toxic elements from rocks. Here minerals that release and fix major elements during progressive weathering of a bed of Devonian New Albany Shale in eastern Kentucky are documented. Samples were collected from unweathered core (parent shale) and across an outcrop excavated into a hillside 40 year prior to sampling. Quantitative X-ray diffraction mineralogical data record progressive shale alteration across the outcrop. Mineral compositional changes reflect subtle alteration processes such as incongruent dissolution and cation exchange. Altered primary minerals include K-feldspars, plagioclase, calcite, pyrite, and chlorite. Secondary minerals include jarosite, gypsum, goethite, amorphous Fe(III) oxides and Fe(II)-Al sulfate salt (efflorescence). The mineralogy in weathered shale defines four weathered intervals on the outcrop-Zones A-C and soil. Alteration of the weakly weathered shale (Zone A) is attributed to the 40-a exposure of the shale. In this zone, pyrite oxidization produces acid that dissolves calcite and attacks chlorite, forming gypsum, jarosite, and minor efflorescent salt. The pre-excavation, active weathering front (Zone B) is where complete pyrite oxidation and alteration of feldspar and organic matter result in increased permeability. Acidic weathering solutions seep through the permeable shale and evaporate on the surface forming abundant efflorescent salt, jarosite and minor goethite. Intensely weathered shale (Zone C) is depleted in feldspars, chlorite, gypsum, jarosite and efflorescent salts, but has retained much of its primary quartz, illite and illite-smectite. Goethite and amorphous FE(III) oxides increase due to hydrolysis of jarosite. Enhanced permeability in this zone is due to a 14% loss of the original mass in parent shale. Denudation rates suggest that characteristics of Zone C

  13. Desorption of SVOCs from Heated Surfaces in the Form of Ultrafine Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallace, Lance A.; Ott, Wayne R.; Weschler, Charles J.

    2017-01-01

    of the accumulation rate of SVOCs on surfaces were similar to those in studies of organic film buildup on indoor windows. Transfer of skin oils by touching the glass or foil surfaces, or after washing the glass surface with detergent and bare hands, was also observed, with measured particle production comparable...

  14. Microbial Diversity and Mineralogical-Mechanical Properties of Calcitic Cave Speleothems in Natural and in Vitro Biomineralization Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navdeep K. Dhami

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Natural mineral formations are a window into important processes leading to carbon storage and mineralized carbonate structures formed through abiotic and biotic processes. In the current study, we made an attempt to undertake a comprehensive approach to characterize the mineralogical, mechanical, and microbial properties of different kinds of speleothems from karstic caves; with an aim to understand the bio-geo-chemical processes in speleothem structures and their impact on nanomechanical properties. We also investigated the biomineralization abilities of speleothem surface associated microbial communities in vitro. Mineralogical profiling using techniques such as X-ray powder Diffraction (XRD and Tescan Integrated Mineral Analyzer (TIMA demonstrated that calcite was the dominant mineral in the majority of speleothems with Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDS indicating a few variations in the elemental components. Differing proportions of polymorphs of calcium carbonate such as aragonite and vaterite were also recorded. Significant variations in trace metal content were recorded through Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM analysis revealed differences in morphological features of the crystals which varied from triangular prismatic shapes to etched spiky forms. Microbial imprints and associations were seen in a few sections. Analysis of the associated microbial diversity showed significant differences between various speleothems at Phylum level; although Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria were found to be the predominant groups. Genus level microbial associations showed a relationship with the geochemistry, mineralogical composition, and metal content of the speleothems. The assessment of nanomechanical properties measured by Nanoindentation revealed that the speleothems with a dominance of calcite were stronger than the speleothems with mixed calcium carbonate polymorphs and silica content

  15. Cavitation structures formed during the collision of a sphere with an ultra-viscous wetted surface

    KAUST Repository

    Mansoor, Mohammad M.

    2016-05-05

    We investigate the inception of cavitation and resulting structures when a sphere collides with a solid surface covered with a layer of non-Newtonian liquid having a kinematic viscosity of up to (Formula presented.) cSt. We show the existence of shear-stress-induced cavitation during sphere approach towards the base wall (i.e. the pressurization stage) in ultra-viscous films using a synchronized dual-view high-speed imaging system. For the experimental parameters employed, liquids having viscoelastic properties of (Formula presented.) are shown to enable sphere rebound without any prior contact with the solid wall. Cavitation by depressurization (i.e. during rebound) in such non-contact cases is observed to onset after a noticeable delay from when the minimum gap distance is reached. Also, the cavities created originate from remnant bubbles, being the remains of the primary bubble entrapment formed by the lubrication pressure of the air during film entry. Cases where physical contact occurs (contact cases) in 10 000 cSt (Formula presented.) cSt films produce cavities attached to the base wall, which extend into an hourglass shape. In contrast, strikingly different structures occur in the most viscous liquids due to the disproportionality in radial expansion and longitudinal extension along the cavity length. Horizontal shear rates calculated using particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements show the apparent fluid viscosity to vary substantially as the sphere approaches and rebounds away from the base wall. A theoretical model based on the lubrication assumption is solved for the squeeze flow in the regime identified for shear-induced cavity events, to investigate the criterion for cavity inception in further detail. © 2016 Cambridge University Press

  16. Cavitation structures formed during the collision of a sphere with an ultra-viscous wetted surface

    KAUST Repository

    Mansoor, Mohammad M.; Marston, J. O.; Uddin, J.; Christopher, G.; Zhang, Z.; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the inception of cavitation and resulting structures when a sphere collides with a solid surface covered with a layer of non-Newtonian liquid having a kinematic viscosity of up to (Formula presented.) cSt. We show the existence of shear-stress-induced cavitation during sphere approach towards the base wall (i.e. the pressurization stage) in ultra-viscous films using a synchronized dual-view high-speed imaging system. For the experimental parameters employed, liquids having viscoelastic properties of (Formula presented.) are shown to enable sphere rebound without any prior contact with the solid wall. Cavitation by depressurization (i.e. during rebound) in such non-contact cases is observed to onset after a noticeable delay from when the minimum gap distance is reached. Also, the cavities created originate from remnant bubbles, being the remains of the primary bubble entrapment formed by the lubrication pressure of the air during film entry. Cases where physical contact occurs (contact cases) in 10 000 cSt (Formula presented.) cSt films produce cavities attached to the base wall, which extend into an hourglass shape. In contrast, strikingly different structures occur in the most viscous liquids due to the disproportionality in radial expansion and longitudinal extension along the cavity length. Horizontal shear rates calculated using particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements show the apparent fluid viscosity to vary substantially as the sphere approaches and rebounds away from the base wall. A theoretical model based on the lubrication assumption is solved for the squeeze flow in the regime identified for shear-induced cavity events, to investigate the criterion for cavity inception in further detail. © 2016 Cambridge University Press

  17. Application of Moessbauer spectrum to geological and mineralogical problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korovushkin, V.V.

    1985-01-01

    Main parameters of γ-resonance spectra (resonance effect value, chemical isomer shift, quadrupole splitting, nuclear Zeeman splitting) are considered. Methods of the sample preparation and technique for geological sample analysis using nuclear gamma-resonance (NGR) spectroscopy are described in brief. Possibility of direct application of the above method to determine the iron valence in minerals, their diagnosis and determination of quantitative distribution of iron between the mineral forms in rocks in the process of uranium ore formation and destruction, are discussed. Prospects for NGR-spectroscopy application to geology and mineralogy are pointed out

  18. Periodic nanostructures formed on a poly-methyl methacrylate surface with a femtosecond laser for biocompatibility improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, Keisuke; Tsukamoto, Masahiro; Sato, Yuji; Ooga, Takahiro; Asai, Satoru; Murai, Kensuke

    2018-06-01

    Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) is widely used as a biomaterial. The formation of periodic nanostructures on the surface is necessary to improve the biocompatibility. A method was proposed and developed to form periodic nanostructures on a PMMA surface. A PMMA plate was placed on titanium (Ti) plate, and then the Ti plate was irradiated with a laser through the PMMA plate. We try to effectively produce periodic nanostructures on PMMA with a femtosecond laser at a fundamental wavelength by increasing the contact pressure and using titanium (Ti) plate. The contact pressure between PMMA and Ti required to form a periodic nanostructure is 300 kPa, and for a contact pressure of 2400 kPa, periodic nanostructures are formed in 62% of the laser-irradiated area on the PMMA surface. These results suggest that the formation efficiency of the periodic nanostructure depends on the laser conditions and the contact pressure.

  19. Skeletal carbonate mineralogy of Scottish bryozoans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer Jones, Mary; Najorka, Jens; Smith, Abigail M.

    2018-01-01

    This paper describes the skeletal carbonate mineralogy of 156 bryozoan species collected from Scotland (sourced both from museum collections and from waters around Scotland) and collated from literature. This collection represents 79% of the species which inhabit Scottish waters and is a greater number and proportion of extant species than any previous regional study. The study is also of significance globally where the data augment the growing database of mineralogical analyses and offers first analyses for 26 genera and four families. Specimens were collated through a combination of field sampling and existing collections and were analysed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and micro-XRD to determine wt% MgCO3 in calcite and wt% aragonite. Species distribution data and phylogenetic organisation were applied to understand distributional, taxonomic and phylo-mineralogical patterns. Analysis of the skeletal composition of Scottish bryozoans shows that the group is statistically different from neighbouring Arctic fauna but features a range of mineralogy comparable to other temperate regions. As has been previously reported, cyclostomes feature low Mg in calcite and very little aragonite, whereas cheilostomes show much more variability, including bimineralic species. Scotland is a highly variable region, open to biological and environmental influx from all directions, and bryozoans exhibit this in the wide range of within-species mineralogical variability they present. This plasticity in skeletal composition may be driven by a combination of environmentally-induced phenotypic variation, or physiological factors. A flexible response to environment, as manifested in a wide range of skeletal mineralogy within a species, may be one characteristic of successful invasive bryozoans. PMID:29897916

  20. Synthesis of freeform refractive surfaces forming various radiation patterns using interpolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voznesenskaya, Anna; Mazur, Iana; Krizskiy, Pavel

    2017-09-01

    Optical freeform surfaces are very popular today in such fields as lighting systems, sensors, photovoltaic concentrators, and others. The application of such surfaces allows to obtain systems with a new quality with a reduced number of optical components to ensure high consumer characteristics: small size, weight, high optical transmittance. This article presents the methods of synthesis of refractive surface for a given source and the radiation pattern of various shapes using a computer simulation cubic spline interpolation.

  1. Mineralogic studies of tuff for high-level waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaniman, D.; Bish, D.; Broxton, D.; Byers, F.; Carlos, B.; Levy, S.

    1986-01-01

    The volcanic rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, consist predominantly of tuff that originated 12 to 14 million years ago as flows and airfalls of hot volcanic particulates. On cooling these units formed two major rock types: crystallized zones formed mostly of feldspar and silica minerals, and zones of glass. Alteration of glass to zeolite minerals occurred largely during structural tilting of Yucca Mountain in the ∼1-3 million years following the major eruptions. The compositions of zeolites formed from glasses strongly indicate open-system chemical exchange. Superimposed on this general alteration of glasses are areas of local high-temperature alteration. High-temperature alteration ended by 11 million years ago. Zeolites such as clinoptilolite persisted during high-temperature alteration at temperatures up to 100 degree C, suggesting that clinoptilolite at Yucca Mountain close to the thermally disturbed zone around a repository may also survive heating to temperatures at least this high. The mineralogic data from tuff at Yucca Mountain will ultimately be used by the Department of Energy Nevada Nuclear Waste storage Investigations for (1) defining the mineralogic component in estimating waste element travel times away from the repository and (2) determining the past history of alteration and the anticipated stability of minerals near the repository

  2. FeII induced mineralogical transformations of ferric oxyhydroxides into magnetite of variable stoichiometry and morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usman, M.; Abdelmoula, M.; Hanna, K.

    2012-01-01

    The Mössbauer spectroscopy was used to monitor the mineralogical transformations of ferrihydrite (F), lepidocrocite (L) and goethite (G) into magnetite as a function of aging time. Ferric oxyhydroxides were reacted with soluble Fe II and OH – in stoichiometric amounts to form magnetite at an initial pH of ∼9.7. Observed transformation extent into magnetite followed the order: F>L>G with almost 30% of untransformed G after 1 month. The departure from stoichiometry, δ, of magnetite (Fe 3−δ O 4 ) generated from F (δ∼0.04) and L (δ∼0.05) was relatively low as compared to that in magnetite from G (δ∼0.08). The analysis by transmission electron microscopy and BET revealed that generated magnetite was also different in terms of morphology, particle size and surface area depending on the nature of initial ferric oxyhydroxide. This method of preparation is a possible way to form nano-sized magnetite. - Graphical abstract: Mössbauer spectrum of the early stage of magnetite formation formed from the interaction of adsorbed Fe II species with goethite. Highlights: ► Ferric oxides were reacted with hydroxylated Fe II to form magnetite. ► Magnetite formation was quantified as a function of aging time. ► Complete transformation of ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite was achieved. ► Almost 70% of initial goethite was transformed. ► Resulting magnetites have differences in stoichiometry and morphological properties.

  3. Surface properties of adsorption layers formed from triterpenoid and steroid saponins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pagureva, N.; Tcholakova, S.; Golemanov, K.; Denkov, N.; Pelan, E.; Stoyanov, S.D.

    2016-01-01

    Saponins are natural surfactants with non-trivial surface and aggregation properties which find numerous important applications in several areas (food, pharma, cosmetic and others). In the current paper we study the surface properties of ten saponin extracts, having different molecular structure

  4. Resistance of pathogenic bacteria on the surface of stainless steel depending on attachment form and efficacy of chemical sanitizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Young-Min; Baek, Seung-Youb; Lee, Sun-Young

    2012-02-15

    Various bacteria including food spoilage bacteria and pathogens can form biofilms on different food processing surfaces, leading to potential food contamination or spoilage. Therefore, the survival of foodborne pathogens (Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus, Cronobacter sakazakii) in different forms (adhered cells, biofilm producing in TSB, biofilm producing at RH 100%) on the surface of stainless steel and stored at various relative humidities (RH 23%, 43%, 68%, 85%, and 100%) at room temperature for 5 days was investigated in this study. Additionally, the efficacy of chemical sanitizers (chlorine-based and alcohol-based commercial sanitizers) on inhibiting various types of biofilms of E. coli O157:H7 and S. aureus on the surface of stainless steel was investigated. The number of pathogens on the surface of stainless steel in TSB stored at 25°C for 7 days or RH 100% at 25°C for 7 days was significantly increased and resulted in the increase of 3 log(10) CFU/coupon after 1 day, and these levels were maintained for 7 days. When stainless steel coupons were stored at 25°C for 5 days, the number of pathogens on the surface of stainless steel was significantly reduced after storage at RH 23%, 43%, 68%, and 85%, but not at 100%. When the bacteria formed biofilms on the surface of stainless steel in TSB after 6 days, the results were similar to those of the attached form. However, levels of S. aureus and C. sakazakii biofilms were more slowly reduced after storage at RH 23%, 43%, 68%, and 85% for 5 days than were those of the other pathogens. Formation of biofilms stored at RH 100% for 5 days displayed the highest levels of resistance to inactivation. Treatment with the alcohol sanitizer was very effective at inactivating attached pathogens or biofilms on the surface of stainless steel. Reduction levels of alcohol sanitizer treatment ranged from 1.91 to 4.77 log and from 4.35 to 5.35 log CFU/coupon in E. coli

  5. Stereo imaging and cytocompatibility of a model dental implant surface formed by direct laser fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangano, Carlo; Raspanti, Mario; Traini, Tonino; Piattelli, Adriano; Sammons, Rachel

    2009-03-01

    Direct laser fabrication (DLF) allows solids with complex geometry to be produced by sintering metal powder particles in a focused laser beam. In this study, 10 Ti6Al4V alloy model dental root implants were obtained by DLF, and surface characterization was carried out using stereo scanning electron microscopy to produce 3D reconstructions. The surfaces were extremely irregular, with approximately 100 microm deep, narrow intercommunicating crevices, shallow depressions and deep, rounded pits of widely variable shape and size, showing ample scope for interlocking with the host bone. Roughness parameters were as follows: R(t), 360.8 microm; R(z), 358.4 microm; R(a), 67.4 microm; and R(q), 78.0 microm. Disc specimens produced by DLF with an identically prepared surface were used for biocompatibility studies with rat calvarial osteoblasts: After 9 days, cells had attached and spread on the DLF surface, spanning across the crevices, and voids. Cell density was similar to that on a commercial rough microtextured surface but lower than on commercial smooth machined and smooth-textured grit-blasted, acid-etched surfaces. Human fibrin clot extension on the DLF surface was slightly improved by inorganic acid etching to increase the microroughness. With further refinements, DLF could be an economical means of manufacturing implants from titanium alloys. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Timescales of carbon turnover in soils with mixed crystalline mineralogies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomo, Lesego; Trumbore, Susan E.; Bern, Carleton R.; Chadwick, Oliver A.

    2017-01-01

    Organic matter–mineral associations stabilize much of the carbon (C) stored globally in soils. Metastable short-range-order (SRO) minerals such as allophane and ferrihydrite provide one mechanism for long-term stabilization of organic matter in young soil. However, in soils with few SRO minerals and a predominance of crystalline aluminosilicate or Fe (and Al) oxyhydroxide, C turnover should be governed by chemisorption with those minerals. Here, we correlate mineral composition from soils containing small amounts of SRO minerals with mean turnover time (TT) of C estimated from radiocarbon (14C) in bulk soil, free light fraction and mineral-associated organic matter. We varied the mineral amount and composition by sampling ancient soils formed on different lithologies in arid to subhumid climates in Kruger National Park (KNP), South Africa. Mineral contents in bulk soils were assessed using chemical extractions to quantify Fe oxyhydroxides and SRO minerals. Because of our interest in the role of silicate clay mineralogy, particularly smectite (2 : 1) and kaolinite (1 : 1), we separately quantified the mineralogy of the clay-sized fraction using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and measured 14C on the same fraction. Density separation demonstrated that mineral associated C accounted for 40–70 % of bulk soil organic C in A and B1 horizons for granite, nephelinite and arid-zone gabbro soils, and > 80 % in other soils. Organic matter strongly associated with the isolated clay-sized fraction represented only 9–47 % of the bulk soil C. The mean TT of C strongly associated with the clay-sized fraction increased with the amount of smectite (2 : 1 clays); in samples with > 40 % smectite it averaged 1020 ± 460 years. The C not strongly associated with clay-sized minerals, including a combination of low-density C, the C associated with minerals of sizes between 2 µm and 2 cm (including Fe oxyhydroxides as coatings), and C removed from clay

  7. Timescales of carbon turnover in soils with mixed crystalline mineralogies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomo, Lesego; Trumbore, Susan; Bern, Carleton R.; Chadwick, Oliver A.

    2017-01-01

    Organic matter-mineral associations stabilize much of the carbon (C) stored globally in soils. Metastable short-range-order (SRO) minerals such as allophane and ferrihydrite provide one mechanism for long-term stabilization of organic matter in young soil. However, in soils with few SRO minerals and a predominance of crystalline aluminosilicate or Fe (and Al) oxyhydroxide, C turnover should be governed by chemisorption with those minerals. Here, we correlate mineral composition from soils containing small amounts of SRO minerals with mean turnover time (TT) of C estimated from radiocarbon (14C) in bulk soil, free light fraction and mineral-associated organic matter. We varied the mineral amount and composition by sampling ancient soils formed on different lithologies in arid to subhumid climates in Kruger National Park (KNP), South Africa. Mineral contents in bulk soils were assessed using chemical extractions to quantify Fe oxyhydroxides and SRO minerals. Because of our interest in the role of silicate clay mineralogy, particularly smectite (2 : 1) and kaolinite (1 : 1), we separately quantified the mineralogy of the clay-sized fraction using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and measured 14C on the same fraction. Density separation demonstrated that mineral associated C accounted for 40-70 % of bulk soil organic C in A and B1 horizons for granite, nephelinite and arid-zone gabbro soils, and > 80 % in other soils. Organic matter strongly associated with the isolated clay-sized fraction represented only 9-47 % of the bulk soil C. The mean TT of C strongly associated with the clay-sized fraction increased with the amount of smectite (2 : 1 clays); in samples with > 40 % smectite it averaged 1020 ± 460 years. The C not strongly associated with clay-sized minerals, including a combination of low-density C, the C associated with minerals of sizes between 2 µm and 2 cm (including Fe oxyhydroxides as coatings), and C removed from clay-sized material by 2 % hydrogen peroxide had

  8. Design of an oval-form cathode for the precision etching process of e-paper surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pa, P.S.

    2009-01-01

    A newly designed oval-form cathode using electroetching for indium-tin-oxide (ITO) microstructure removal from the surface of e-paper polymer PET films is presented. Through ultra-precise microstructural etching, the semiconductor industry can effectively reclaim defective products, thereby reducing production costs. The design features for the ITO removal process and the tool design of oval-form cathodes are of significant interest. A smaller oval-form cathode minor axis, a higher cathode rotational speed, a higher concentration, or a higher electrolyte temperature corresponds to a higher ITO etching rate.

  9. Process for growing a film epitaxially upon an oxide surface and structures formed with the process

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Rodney A.; Walker, Frederick J.

    1995-01-01

    A process and structure wherein a film comprised of a perovskite or a spinel is built epitaxially upon a surface, such as an alkaline earth oxide surface, involves the epitaxial build up of alternating constituent metal oxide planes of the perovskite or spinel. The first layer of metal oxide built upon the surface includes a metal element which provides a small cation in the crystalline structure of the perovskite or spinel, and the second layer of metal oxide built upon the surface includes a metal element which provides a large cation in the crystalline structure of the perovskite or spinel. The layering sequence involved in the film build up reduces problems which would otherwise result from the interfacial electrostatics at the first atomic layers, and these oxides can be stabilized as commensurate thin films at a unit cell thickness or grown with high crystal quality to thicknesses of 0.5-0.7 .mu.m for optical device applications.

  10. Lp-dual affine surface area forms of Busemann–Petty type problems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Associated with the notion of Lp-intersection body which was defined ... Lp-dual affine surface area; Lp-intersection body; Busemann–Petty ..... [11] Schneider R, Convex Bodies: The Brunn–Minkowski Theory (1993) (Cambridge: Cam-.

  11. Progress in the specification of optical instruments for the measurement of surface form and texture

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Peter J.

    2014-05-01

    Specifications for confocal microscopes, optical interferometers and other methods of measuring areal surface topography can be confusing and misleading. The emerging ISO 25178 standards, together with the established international vocabulary of metrology, provide a foundation for improved specifications for 3D surface metrology instrumentation. The approach in this paper links instrument specifications to metrological characteristics that can influence a measurement, using consistent definitions of terms, and reference to verification procedures.

  12. Mineralogical and particulate morphological characterization of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Six representative geophagic clayey soils from Botswana were mineralogically characterized using X-ray powder diffractometry (XRPD), optical microscopy, and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Results of identified mineral phases revealed quartz (SiO2) as the most dominant in all samples constituting ...

  13. Chemical and mineralogical characterization and ceramic suitability ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The chemical and mineralogical characterization of raw feldspathic materials from Dschang (Cameroon) was realized by means of X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analyses, optical and scanning electron microscopies, and analytical techniques. It was found that these materials consist of albite (43 ± 3 wt.%), microcline ...

  14. The nature of chemisorbates formed from ammonia on gold and palladium electrodes as discerned from surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vooys, de A.C.A.; Mrozek, M.F.; Koper, M.T.M.; Santen, van R.A.; Veen, van J.A.R.; Weaver, M.J.

    2001-01-01

    The chemisorbates formed from ammonia-containing alkaline electrolyte on gold and palladium electrodes have been identified using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). On gold, a potential-dependent band at ca. 365-385 cm(-1) is observed, consistent with the metal-nitrogen stretch for

  15. Textured surface structures formed using new techniques on transparent conducting Al-doped zinc oxide films prepared by magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minami, Tadatsugu; Miyata, Toshihiro; Uozaki, Ryousuke; Sai, Hitoshi; Koida, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Surface-textured Al-doped ZnO (AZO) films formed using two new techniques based on magnetron sputtering deposition were developed by optimizing the light scattering properties to be suitable for transparent electrode applications in thin-film silicon solar cells. Scrambled egg-like surface-textured AZO films were prepared using a new texture formation technique that post-etched pyramidal surface-textured AZO films prepared under deposition conditions suppressing c-axis orientation. In addition, double surface-textured AZO films were prepared using another new texture formation technique that completely removed, by post-etching, the pyramidal surface-textured AZO films previously prepared onto the initially deposited low resistivity AZO films; simultaneously, the surface of the low resistivity films was slightly etched. However, the obtained very high haze value in the range from the near ultraviolet to visible light in the scrambled egg-like surface-textured AZO films did not contribute significantly to the obtainable photovoltaic properties in the solar cells fabricated using the films. Significant light scattering properties as well as a low sheet resistance could be achieved in the double surface-textured AZO films. In addition, a significant improvement of external quantum efficiency in the range from the near ultraviolet to visible light was achieved in superstrate-type n-i-p μc-Si:H solar cells fabricated using a double surface-textured AZO film prepared under optimized conditions as the transparent electrode. - Highlights: • Double surface-textured AZO films prepared using a new texture formation technique • Extensive light scattering properties with low sheet resistance achieved in the double surface-textured AZO films • Improved external quantum efficiency of μc-Si:H solar cells using a double surface-textured AZO film

  16. Textured surface structures formed using new techniques on transparent conducting Al-doped zinc oxide films prepared by magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minami, Tadatsugu [Optoelectronic Device System R& D Center, Kanazawa Institute of Technology, Nonoichi, Ishikawa 921-8501 (Japan); Miyata, Toshihiro, E-mail: tmiyata@neptune.kanazawa-it.ac.jp [Optoelectronic Device System R& D Center, Kanazawa Institute of Technology, Nonoichi, Ishikawa 921-8501 (Japan); Uozaki, Ryousuke [Optoelectronic Device System R& D Center, Kanazawa Institute of Technology, Nonoichi, Ishikawa 921-8501 (Japan); Sai, Hitoshi; Koida, Takashi [Research Center for Photovoltaics, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2016-09-01

    Surface-textured Al-doped ZnO (AZO) films formed using two new techniques based on magnetron sputtering deposition were developed by optimizing the light scattering properties to be suitable for transparent electrode applications in thin-film silicon solar cells. Scrambled egg-like surface-textured AZO films were prepared using a new texture formation technique that post-etched pyramidal surface-textured AZO films prepared under deposition conditions suppressing c-axis orientation. In addition, double surface-textured AZO films were prepared using another new texture formation technique that completely removed, by post-etching, the pyramidal surface-textured AZO films previously prepared onto the initially deposited low resistivity AZO films; simultaneously, the surface of the low resistivity films was slightly etched. However, the obtained very high haze value in the range from the near ultraviolet to visible light in the scrambled egg-like surface-textured AZO films did not contribute significantly to the obtainable photovoltaic properties in the solar cells fabricated using the films. Significant light scattering properties as well as a low sheet resistance could be achieved in the double surface-textured AZO films. In addition, a significant improvement of external quantum efficiency in the range from the near ultraviolet to visible light was achieved in superstrate-type n-i-p μc-Si:H solar cells fabricated using a double surface-textured AZO film prepared under optimized conditions as the transparent electrode. - Highlights: • Double surface-textured AZO films prepared using a new texture formation technique • Extensive light scattering properties with low sheet resistance achieved in the double surface-textured AZO films • Improved external quantum efficiency of μc-Si:H solar cells using a double surface-textured AZO film.

  17. Crystalline and quasicrystalline allotropes of Pb formed on the fivefold surface of icosahedral Ag-In-Yb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, H. R., E-mail: H.R.Sharma@liv.ac.uk; Smerdon, J. A.; Nugent, P. J.; Ribeiro, A.; McGrath, R. [Surface Science Research Centre and Department of Physics, The University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3BX (United Kingdom); McLeod, I.; Dhanak, V. R. [Department of Physics and the Stephenson Institute for Renewable Energy, The University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3BX (United Kingdom); Shimoda, M. [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Tsai, A. P. [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2014-05-07

    Crystalline and quasicrystalline allotropes of Pb are formed by evaporation on the fivefold surface of the icosahedral (i) Ag-In-Yb quasicrystal under ultra-high vacuum. Lead grows in three dimensional quasicrystalline order and subsequently forms fivefold-twinned islands with the fcc(111) surface orientation atop of the quasicrystalline Pb. The islands exhibit specific heights (magic heights), possibly due to the confinement of electrons in the islands. We also study the adsorption behavior of C{sub 60} on the two allotropes of Pb. Scanning tunneling microcopy reveals that a high corrugation of the quasicrystalline Pb limits the diffusion of the C{sub 60} molecules and thus produces a disordered film, similar to adsorption behavior of the same molecules on the clean substrate surface. However, the sticking coefficient of C{sub 60} molecules atop the Pb islands approaches zero, regardless of the overall C{sub 60} coverage.

  18. Spray forming: A numerical investigation of the influence of the gas to melt ratio on the billet surface temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pryds, Nini; Hattel, Jesper

    2005-01-01

    atomisation taking thermal coupling into consideration and the deposition of material at the surface of the billet taking geometrical aspects such as shading into account. The coupling between these two models is accomplished by ensuring that the total droplet size distribution of the spray is the summation......The relationship between the Gas to Melt Ratio (GMR) and the surface temperature of an evolving billet surface in spray forming is investigated numerically. The basis for the analysis is an integrated approach for modelling the entire spray forming process. This model includes the droplet...... of "local" droplet size distributions along the r-axis of the spray cone. The criterion for a successful process has been a predefined process window characterised by a desired fraction solid range at a certain distance from the atomizer. Inside this process window, the gas and melt flows have been varied...

  19. Reorganization of lipid nanocapsules at air-water interface: Part 2. Properties of the formed surface film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkov, I; Ivanova, Tz; Panaiotov, I; Proust, J; Saulnier, P

    2005-09-01

    The state, electrical and dilatational rheological properties of surface films formed at air-water interface from lipid nanocapsules (LNC) with various compositions as well as model monolayers formed by the LNC constituents-Labrafac, Solutol and Lipoid are investigated. These nanocapsules constitute potential drug delivery systems where lypophilic drug will be loaded in their core. The study of the model Labrafac/Solutol (Lab/Sol) mixed monolayers shows behavior close to the ideal. Small negative deviations in the mean molecular areas a and dipole moments mu are observed. All studied monolayers have elastic behavior during the small continuous compressions. The comparison between the properties of surface films formed from LNC with those of the model monolayers confirms the idea developed in the kinetic study that the surface films formed after a rapid disaggregation of the unstable nanocapsule fraction (LNC I) contains mainly Labrafac and Solutol. The Labrafac molar part (xLab) in the formed Lab/Sol mixed layer is established.

  20. SITE-94. Mineralogy of the Aespoe site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Karin

    1996-12-01

    The water composition has several impacts on the repository. It will influence the behaviour of the engineered materials (e.g. corrosion). It may also determine the possible solubility and speciation of released radionuclides. It also acts as a transport medium for the released elements. The groundwater composition and the potential development of the composition due to the presence of the repository as well as due to external variations is thus an important issue in a safety analysis. The development of the groundwater composition is strongly dependent on reactions with the minerals present in water bearing fractures. Here equilibrium chemistry may be of importance, but also reaction kinetics is important to the long-term behaviour. Within the SITE-94 project, a safety analysis is performed for the conditions at the Aespoe site. The mineralogy of the area has been evaluated from drill cores at various places at the site. In this report a recommendation for selection of mineralogy to be used in geochemical modelling of the repository is given. Calcite and iron containing minerals dominate the fracture filling mineralogy at the Aespoe site. Some typical fracture filling mineralogies may be identified in the fractures: epidote, chlorite, calcite, hematite, some illite/smectite + quartz, fluorite, pyrite and goethite. In addition to these a number of minor minerals are found in the fractures. Uncertainties in the fracture filling data may be due to problems when taking out the drill cores. Drilling water may remove important clay minerals and sealed fractures may be reopened mechanically and treated as water conducting fractures. The problem of determining the variability of the mineralogy along the flow paths also remains. This problem will never be solved when the investigation is performed by drilling investigation holes

  1. Mineralogical Controls over Carbon Storage and Residence Times in Grassland Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, D.; Riley, W. J.; Torn, M. S.; Spycher, N.

    2014-12-01

    Globally, soil organic matter (SOM) contains approximately three times more carbon than the atmosphere and terrestrial vegetation contain combined. However, it is not well understood why some SOM persists for a long time while other SOM decomposes quickly. For future climate predictions, representing soil organic matter (SOM) dynamics accurately in Earth system models is essential. Soil minerals stabilize organic carbon in soil; however, there are gaps in our understanding of how soil mineralogy controls the quantity and turnover of long-residence-time organic carbon. To investigate the impact of soil mineralogy on SOM dynamics, we used a new model (Biotic and Abiotic Model of SOM—BAMS1 [Riley et al., 2014]) integrated with a three-dimensional, multiphase reactive transport solver (TOUGHREACT). The model represents bacterial and fungal activity, archetypal polymer and monomer carbon substrate groups, aqueous chemistry, gaseous diffusion, aqueous advection and diffusion, and adsorption and desorption processes. BAMS1 can predict bulk SOM and radiocarbon signatures without resorting to an arbitrary depth-dependent decline in SOM turnover rates. Results show a reasonable match between observed and simulated depth-resolved SOM and Δ14C in grassland ecosystems (soils formed on terraces south of Eureka, California, and the Central Chernozem Region of Russia) and were consistent with expectations of depth-resolved profiles of lignin content and fungi:aerobic bacteria ratios. Results also suggest that clay-mineral surface area and soil sorption coefficients constitute dominant controls over organic carbon stocks and residence times, respectively. Bibliography: Riley, W.J., F.M. Maggi, M. Kleber, M.S. Torn, J.Y. Tang, D. Dwivedi, and N. Guerry (2014), Long residence times of rapidly decomposable soil organic matter: application of a multi-phase, multi-component, and vertically resolved model (BAMS1) to soil carbon dynamics, Geoscientific Model Development, vol. 7, 1335

  2. Mineralogical and lithochemical studies of strata beneath the Harwell research site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilmot, R.D.; Morgan, D.J.

    1982-11-01

    Determinations have been made of the mineralogy and lithochemistry of the principal lithological units of the Mesozoic and Palaeozoic rocks penetrated by boreholes at the Harwell Research Site. Samples were taken at approximately 9m intervals from the Upper Greensand to the Coal Measures, together with a number from the Chalk. Mineralogical analyses were carried out using X-ray diffraction, with thermal analysis and surface area measurements aiding quantification. Major and trace element determinations were made using direct electron excitation X-ray spectrometry and X-ray fluorescence respectively. Other chemical determinations included organic carbon, sulphate and 'exchangeable' cations. The mineralogical and lithochemical variations within and between the major litho-stratigraphic units are discussed and compared with published data for other localities. (author)

  3. Reproducible and recyclable SERS substrates: Flower-like Ag structures with concave surfaces formed by electrodeposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Juncao; Shu, Shiwei; Li, Jianfu; Huang, Chao; Li, Yang Yang; Zhang, Rui-Qin

    2015-04-01

    Direct synthesis of three-dimensional Ag structures on solid substrates for the purposes of producing reproducible and recyclable surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) applications remains challenging. In this work, flower-like Ag structures with concave surfaces (FACS) were successfully electrodeposited onto ITO glass using the double-potentiostatic method. The FACS, with an enhancement factor of the order of 108, exhibited a SERS signal intensity 3.3 times stronger than that measured from Ag nanostructures without concave surfaces. A cleaning procedure involving lengthy immersion of the sample in ethanol and KNO3 was proposed to recycle the substrate and confirmed by using rhodamine 6G, adenine, and 4-aminothiophenol as target molecules. The findings can help to advance the practical applications of Ag nanostructure-based SERS substrates.

  4. Research on Pin Tumbler Locks and the Characteristics of Surface Traces Formed by Unlocking Guns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Gao; Yifeng, Jin; Yanping, Bai; Hongcheng, Mei; Zhen, Xu

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, taking the structure of the pin tumbler locks and the principle of opening and closing locks as breakthrough point, we have studied the machining traces of pin tumbler components and trace characters of pin surface during normal operating. At the same time, taking the unlocking gun as an example, the paper analyzes the unlocking technology and the formation of traces, and summarizes the changing rules of the surface traces of elastic bead locks by comparing the positions and the characteristics of the traces, which provides technical support for the future study of traces of pin tumbler locks.

  5. The contribution to surface dose form air scatter in mega voltage photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carolan, M.G.; Butson, M.; Metcalfe, P.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: The minimisation of surface dose is an important requirement in radiotherapy in order to avoid undesirable skin reactions. For this reason significant effort has been expended to avoid and understand photon and electron scatter in the heads of linear accelerators which may contribute to surface dose. In this study we have examined the contribution to surface dose which arises due to scatter in the air above the patient. Experimental investigations of air contributions are difficult to design and execute. Therefore we have used Monte Carlo calculations to determine the effect that the presence of air has on surface dose. Methods: The Los Alamos Monte Carlo Neutron and Photon transport code, MCNP4A which incorporates the ETRAN electron transport code from the Integrated TIGER Series of codes was used for our simulations. The geometry used in the model was a 30 cm cube of water. The dose was tallied in cylindrical elements of 7 cm diameter along the axis of the photon beam. For the first millimetre along the beam axis in the phantom, the dose was determined at 0.1 mm increments in 0.1 mm thick volumes. For depths between 1.0 mm and 15.0 mm the dose was determined every 1 mm in 1 mm cylindrical volumes. This yields a depth dose profile with fine spatial resolution near the phantom surface. Dose was also tallied at depths of 5.0, 10.0, 15.0 and 20.0 cm. The simulations were done assuming a 6 MV photon source with a diameter of 1.5 cm, a gaussian intensity profile and a photon energy spectrum based on Mohan et al. (Med. Phys. 12 (1985) 592). No accelerator head geometry was modelled. The field size was defined by virtual collimators which were simply thin regions of zero photon importance and therefore do not contribute to photon or electron scatter. All simulations were run for sufficient particle histories (∼2x10 7 - 5x10 7 source photons) to give statistical uncertainties of ≤ 10% and in most cases ≤ 5%. Fields of size 10, 15, 20 and 25 cm were used

  6. Characterization of deposits formed on catalyst surfaces during hydrotreatment of coal-derived liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furimsky, E.

    1982-04-01

    Loss of catalyst activity is attributed to the formation of polynuclear aromatic structures on the surface. Heavy species containing N and O heteroatoms were also present in deposits. Phenols, aromatic and heterocyclic compounds are considered to be the precursors for the formation of the deposits. (16 refs.)

  7. Aerosols and surface UV products form Ozone Monitoring Instrument observations: An overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torres, O.; Tanskanen, A.; Veihelmann, B.; Ahn, C.; Braak, R.; Bhartia, P.K.; Veefkind, J.P.; Levelt, P.F.

    2007-01-01

    We present an overview of the theoretical and algorithmic aspects of the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) aerosol and surface UV algorithms. Aerosol properties are derived from two independent algorithms. The nearUV algorithm makes use of OMI observations in the 350-390 nm spectral region to

  8. Preparation of MgO Catalytic Support in Shaped Mesoporous High Surface Area Form

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gulková, Daniela; Šolcová, Olga; Zdražil, Miroslav

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 76, 1-3 (2004), s. 137-149 ISSN 1387-1811 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4072306 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Keywords : MgO support * sigh Surface area * texture Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.093, year: 2004

  9. Memory for non-native language: the role of lexical processing in the retention of surface form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Cristina; Konopka, Agnieszka E

    2013-01-01

    Research on memory for native language (L1) has consistently shown that retention of surface form is inferior to that of gist (e.g., Sachs, 1967). This paper investigates whether the same pattern is found in memory for non-native language (L2). We apply a model of bilingual word processing to more complex linguistic structures and predict that memory for L2 sentences ought to contain more surface information than L1 sentences. Native and non-native speakers of English were tested on a set of sentence pairs with different surface forms but the same meaning (e.g., "The bullet hit/struck the bull's eye"). Memory for these sentences was assessed with a cued recall procedure. Responses showed that native and non-native speakers did not differ in the accuracy of gist-based recall but that non-native speakers outperformed native speakers in the retention of surface form. The results suggest that L2 processing involves more intensive encoding of lexical level information than L1 processing.

  10. Atypical Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Strains form Biofilm on Abiotic Surfaces Regardless of Their Adherence Pattern on Cultured Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hebert F. Culler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the capacity of biofilm formation of atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (aEPEC strains on abiotic and biotic surfaces. Ninety-one aEPEC strains, isolated from feces of children with diarrhea, were analyzed by the crystal violet (CV assay on an abiotic surface after 24 h of incubation. aEPEC strains representing each HEp-2 cell type of adherence were analyzed after 24 h and 6, 12, and 18 days of incubation at 37°C on abiotic and cell surfaces by CFU/cm2 counting and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM. Biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces occurred in 55 (60.4% of the aEPEC strains. There was no significant difference in biofilm biomass formation on an abiotic versus prefixed cell surface. The biofilms could be visualized by CLSM at various developmental stages. aEPEC strains are able to form biofilm on an abiotic surface with no association with their adherence pattern on HEp-2 cells with the exception of the strains expressing UND (undetermined adherence. This study revealed the capacity of adhesion and biofilm formation by aEPEC strains on abiotic and biotic surfaces, possibly playing a role in pathogenesis, mainly in cases of persistent diarrhea.

  11. Antigens of hepatitis B virus: failure to detect HBeAg on the surfaces of HBsAg forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerin, J L [Oak Ridge National Lab., Rockville, MD; Shih, J W.K.; McAuliffee, V J; Purcell, R H

    1978-01-01

    The particulate forms of HBsAg were analysed for the presence of HBeAG on their surfaces. By immunodiffusion analysis, anti-HBe did not form precipitin bands with the purified forms of HBsAg and hyperimmune guinea pig antisera to these forms did not react with HBeAg. Lines of non-identity were observed between the HBeAg determinants (e/sub 1/ and e/sub 2/) and the Dane particles and filaments isolated from an HBeAg-positive serum. Finally, anti-HBe failed to precipitate the polymerase-positive subpopulation of Dane particles, indicating that anti-HBe has no direct role in virus neutralization.

  12. Surface species formed by the adsorption and dissociation of water molecules on Ru(0001) surface containing a small coverage of carbon atoms studied by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dept of Materials Science and Engineering UCB; Dept of Applied Science and Technology, UCB; Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Madrid, Spain; Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yale University; Salmeron, Miquel; Shimizu, Tomoko K.; Mugarza, Aitor; Cerda, Jorge I.; Heyde, Markus; Qi, Yabing; Schwarz, Udo D.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Salmeron, Miquel

    2008-04-26

    The adsorption and dissociation of water on a Ru(0001) surface containing a small amount ({le} 3 %) of carbon impurities was studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Various surface species are formed depending on the temperature. These include molecular H{sub 2}O, H{sub 2}O-C complexes, H, O, OH and CH. Clusters of either pure H{sub 2}O or mixed H{sub 2}O-OH species are also formed. Each of these species produces a characteristic contrast in the STM images and can be identified by experiment and by ab initio total energy calculations coupled with STM image simulations. Manipulation of individual species via excitation of vibrational modes with the tunneling electrons has been used as supporting evidence.

  13. Sensitivity analysis of alkaline plume modelling: influence of mineralogy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaboreau, S.; Claret, F.; Marty, N.; Burnol, A.; Tournassat, C.; Gaucher, E.C.; Munier, I.; Michau, N.; Cochepin, B.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the context of a disposal facility for radioactive waste in clayey geological formation, an important modelling effort has been carried out in order to predict the time evolution of interacting cement based (concrete or cement) and clay (argillites and bentonite) materials. The high number of modelling input parameters associated with non negligible uncertainties makes often difficult the interpretation of modelling results. As a consequence, it is necessary to carry out sensitivity analysis on main modelling parameters. In a recent study, Marty et al. (2009) could demonstrate that numerical mesh refinement and consideration of dissolution/precipitation kinetics have a marked effect on (i) the time necessary to numerically clog the initial porosity and (ii) on the final mineral assemblage at the interface. On the contrary, these input parameters have little effect on the extension of the alkaline pH plume. In the present study, we propose to investigate the effects of the considered initial mineralogy on the principal simulation outputs: (1) the extension of the high pH plume, (2) the time to clog the porosity and (3) the alteration front in the clay barrier (extension and nature of mineralogy changes). This was done through sensitivity analysis on both concrete composition and clay mineralogical assemblies since in most published studies, authors considered either only one composition per materials or simplified mineralogy in order to facilitate or to reduce their calculation times. 1D Cartesian reactive transport models were run in order to point out the importance of (1) the crystallinity of concrete phases, (2) the type of clayey materials and (3) the choice of secondary phases that are allowed to precipitate during calculations. Two concrete materials with either nanocrystalline or crystalline phases were simulated in contact with two clayey materials (smectite MX80 or Callovo- Oxfordian argillites). Both

  14. Characterization of Nitride Layers Formed by Nitrogen Ion Implantation into Surface Region of Iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudjatmoko; Subki, M. Iyos R.

    2000-01-01

    Ion implantation is a convenient means of modifying the physical and chemical properties of the near-surface region of materials. The nitrogen implantation into pure iron has been performed at room temperature with ion dose of 1.310 17 to 1.310 18 ions/cm 2 and ion energy of 20 to 100 keV. The optimum dose of nitrogen ions implanted into pure iron was around 2.2310 17 ions/cm 2 in order to get the maximum wear resistant. SEM micrographs and EDX show that the nitride layers were found on the surface of substrate. The nitrogen concentration profile was measured using EDX in combination with spot technique, and it can be shown that the depth profile of nitrogen implanted into substrate was nearly Gaussian. (author)

  15. Superstructure of self-aligned hexagonal GaN nanorods formed on nitrided Si(111) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Praveen; Tuteja, Mohit; Kesaria, Manoj; Waghmare, U. V.; Shivaprasad, S. M. [Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur, Bangalore 560 064 (India)

    2012-09-24

    We present here the spontaneous formation of catalyst-free, self-aligned crystalline (wurtzite) nanorods on Si(111) surfaces modified by surface nitridation. Nanorods grown by molecular beam epitaxy on bare Si(111) and non-stoichiometric silicon nitride interface are found to be single crystalline but disoriented. Those grown on single crystalline Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} intermediate layer are highly dense c-oriented hexagonal shaped nanorods. The morphology and the self-assembly of the nanorods shows an ordered epitaxial hexagonal superstructure, suggesting that they are nucleated at screw dislocations at the interface and grow spirally in the c-direction. The aligned nanorod assembly shows high-quality structural and optical emission properties.

  16. Kirchhoff approximation and closed-form expressions for atom-surface scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marvin, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    In this paper an approximate solution for atom-surface scattering is presented beyond the physical optics approximation. The potential is well represented by a hard corrugated surface but includes an attractive tail in front. The calculation is carried out analytically by two different methods, and the limit of validity of our formulas is well established in the text. In contrast with other workers, I find those expressions to be exact in both limits of small (Rayleigh region) and large momenta (classical region), with the correct behavior at the threshold. The result is attained through a particular use of the extinction theorem in writing the scattered amplitudes, hitherto not employed, and not for particular boundary values of the field. An explicit evaluation of the field on the surface shows in fact the present formulas to be simply related to the well known Kirchhoff approximation (KA) or more generally to an ''extended'' KA fit to the potential model above. A possible application of the theory to treat strong resonance-overlapping effects is suggested in the last part of the work

  17. Laterally enhanced growth of electrodeposited Au to form ultrathin films on nonconductive surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Chiaki; Saito, Mikiko; Homma, Takayuki

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the laterally enhanced growth of electrodeposited Au for fabricating nanogap electrodes. To enhance the lateral growth, we carried out electrodeposition over patterned electrodes onto a SiO 2 surface modified with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) or dendrimers with amine groups. The morphology and thickness of the Au films were controlled by adjusting deposition conditions such as duration, applied potential, and Au ion concentration in the bath. To investigate the mechanism of the laterally enhanced growth, the surface states of SAM- or dendrimer-modified SiO 2 were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The XPS results indicate the existence of organic molecules and Au ions on the SiO 2 surface, which suggests that laterally enhanced growth is induced by the Au ions coordinated on the amine groups of the organic molecules. To further analyze the mechanism of the laterally enhanced growth, we investigated the relationship between the morphology of the laterally enhanced growth of Au and the amount of Au ions on organic molecules. The laterally enhanced growth of Au is expected to be useful for fabricating thin film nanogap electrodes.

  18. The Design of Case Products’ Shape Form Information Database Based on NURBS Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xing; Liu, Guo-zhong; Xu, Nuo-qi; Zhang, Wei-she

    2017-07-01

    In order to improve the computer design of product shape design,applying the Non-uniform Rational B-splines(NURBS) of curves and surfaces surface to the representation of the product shape helps designers to design the product effectively.On the basis of the typical product image contour extraction and using Pro/Engineer(Pro/E) to extract the geometric feature of scanning mold,in order to structure the information data base system of value point,control point and node vector parameter information,this paper put forward a unified expression method of using NURBS curves and surfaces to describe products’ geometric shape and using matrix laboratory(MATLAB) to simulate when products have the same or similar function.A case study of electric vehicle’s front cover illustrates the access process of geometric shape information of case product in this paper.This method can not only greatly reduce the capacity of information debate,but also improve the effectiveness of computer aided geometric innovation modeling.

  19. Ge clusters and wetting layers forming from granular films on the Si(001) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storozhevykh, M S; Arapkina, L V; Yuryev, V A

    2016-01-01

    The report studies the transformation of a Ge granular film deposited on the Si(001) surface at room temperature into a Ge/Si(001) heterostructure as a result of rapid heating and annealing at 600 °C. As a result of the short-term annealing at 600 °C in conditions of a closed system, the Ge granular film transforms into a usual wetting layer and Ge clusters with multimodal size distribution and Ge oval drops having the highest number density. After the long-term thermal treatment of the Ge film at the same temperature, Ge drops disappear; the large clusters increase their sizes at the expense of the smaller ones. The total density of Ge clusters on the surface drastically decreases. The wetting layer mixed c(4 x 2) + p(2 x 2) reconstruction transforms into a single c(4 x 2) one which is likely to be thermodynamically favoured. Pyramids or domes are not observed on the surface after any annealing. (paper)

  20. Influence of non-thermal plasma forming gases on improvement of surface properties of low density polyethylene (LDPE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandiyaraj, K. Navaneetha, E-mail: dr.knpr@gmail.com [Surface Engineering Laboratory, Department of Physics, Sri Shakthi Institute of Engineering and Technology, L and T by pass, Chinniyam Palayam (post), Coimbatore 641062 (India); Deshmukh, R.R. [Department of Physics, Institute of Chemical Technology, Matunga, Mumbai 400 019 (India); Ruzybayev, Inci; Shah, S. Ismat [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Delaware, 208 Dupont Hall, Newark, NJ (United States); Su, Pi-Guey [Department of Chemistry, Chinese Culture University, Taipei 111, Taiwan (China); Halleluyah, Jr. mercy; Halim, Ahmad Sukari [School of Medical Sciences, Health Campus Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan (Malaysia)

    2014-07-01

    Owing to the superior physico-chemical properties, the low density polyethylene (LDPE) has been widely used in the various industrial applications; especially in biomedical field for artificial organs, medical devices and disposable clinical apparatus. However, the poor anticoagulation property is one of the main drawbacks of the LDPE due to its poor surface properties. Therefore, in this paper we present the effect of plasma forming gases such as argon (Ar), oxygen (O{sub 2}), air and argon-oxygen (Ar + O{sub 2}) mixture on improvement of the surfaces properties of LDPE film using direct current (dc) excited glow discharge plasma. Contact angle with evaluation of surface energy, X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques were used to examine the change in surface properties such as hydrophilicity, chemical composition and surface topography, respectively. Furthermore, the hydrophobic recovery of the plasma treated LDPE was analyzed using ageing effect under different storage condition i.e. in air and water. The adhesive strength of the LDPE films was determined using T-peel test. In vitro tests were used to examine the blood compatibility of the surface modified LDPE films. It has been found that the hydrophilicity of the various plasma treated LDPE films was improved significantly due to the formation of oxygen containing polar groups such as OH, COO, C-O, C=O as confirmed by contact angle and XPS analysis. AFM revealed the changes in surface topography of plasma processed films. The gas mixture Ar + O{sub 2} plasma influenced the remarkable improvement on the surface properties of a LDPE film compared with other gaseous plasmas. These physiochemical changes induced by the plasma on the surface facilitate to improve the adhesive strength and blood compatibility.

  1. Influence of non-thermal plasma forming gases on improvement of surface properties of low density polyethylene (LDPE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandiyaraj, K. Navaneetha; Deshmukh, R.R.; Ruzybayev, Inci; Shah, S. Ismat; Su, Pi-Guey; Halleluyah, Jr. mercy; Halim, Ahmad Sukari

    2014-01-01

    Owing to the superior physico-chemical properties, the low density polyethylene (LDPE) has been widely used in the various industrial applications; especially in biomedical field for artificial organs, medical devices and disposable clinical apparatus. However, the poor anticoagulation property is one of the main drawbacks of the LDPE due to its poor surface properties. Therefore, in this paper we present the effect of plasma forming gases such as argon (Ar), oxygen (O 2 ), air and argon-oxygen (Ar + O 2 ) mixture on improvement of the surfaces properties of LDPE film using direct current (dc) excited glow discharge plasma. Contact angle with evaluation of surface energy, X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques were used to examine the change in surface properties such as hydrophilicity, chemical composition and surface topography, respectively. Furthermore, the hydrophobic recovery of the plasma treated LDPE was analyzed using ageing effect under different storage condition i.e. in air and water. The adhesive strength of the LDPE films was determined using T-peel test. In vitro tests were used to examine the blood compatibility of the surface modified LDPE films. It has been found that the hydrophilicity of the various plasma treated LDPE films was improved significantly due to the formation of oxygen containing polar groups such as OH, COO, C-O, C=O as confirmed by contact angle and XPS analysis. AFM revealed the changes in surface topography of plasma processed films. The gas mixture Ar + O 2 plasma influenced the remarkable improvement on the surface properties of a LDPE film compared with other gaseous plasmas. These physiochemical changes induced by the plasma on the surface facilitate to improve the adhesive strength and blood compatibility.

  2. Forming of film surface of very viscous liquid flowing with gas in pipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Czernek Krystian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The study presents the possible use of optoelectronic system for the measurement of the values, which are specific for hydrodynamics of two-phase gas liquid flow in vertical pipes, where a very-high-viscosity liquid forms a falling film in a pipe. The experimental method was provided, and the findings were presented and analysed for selected values, which characterize the two-phase flow. Attempt was also made to evaluate the effects of flow parameters and properties of the liquid on the gas-liquid interface value, which is decisive for the conditions of heat exchange and mass transfer in falling film equipment. The nature and form of created waves at various velocities were also described.

  3. Effect of plasma surface functionalization on preosteoblast cells spreading and adhesion on a biomimetic hydroxyapatite layer formed on a titanium surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myung, Sung Woon; Ko, Yeong Mu; Kim, Byung Hoon

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the plasma surface modification of biomimetic hydroxyapatite (HAp) formed on a titanium (Ti) surface as well as its influence on the behavior of preosteoblast cells. Ti substrates pre-treated with a plasma-polymerized thin film rich in carboxyl groups were subjected to a biomimetic process in a simulated body fluid solution to synthesize the HAp. The HAp layer grown on Ti substrate was then coated with two types of plasma polymerized acrylic acid and allyl amine thin film. The different types of Ti substrates were characterized by attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. HAp with a Ca/P ratio from 1.25 to 1.38 was obtained on the Ti substrate and hydrophilic carboxyl (-COOH) and amine (-NH 2 ) functional groups were introduced to its surface. Scanning electron microscopy was used to observe the surface of the HAp coatings and the morphology of MC3T3-E1 cells. These results showed that the -COOH-modified HAp surfaces promoted the cell spreading synergistically by changing the surface morphology and chemical state.-NH 2 modified HAp had the lowest cell spreading and proliferation compared to HAp and -COOH-modified HAp. These results correspond to fluorescein analysis, which showed many more cell spreading of COOH/HAp/Ti surface compared to HAp and NH 2 modified HAp. A MTT assay was used to evaluate cell proliferation. The results showed that the proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells increased in the order of COOH/HAp/Ti > HAp/Ti > NH 2 /Ti > Ti, corresponding to the effect of cell spreading for 6 days. The change in morphology and the chemical surface properties of the biomaterial via plasma polymerization can affect the behavior of MC3T3-E1 cells.

  4. Effect of plasma surface functionalization on preosteoblast cells spreading and adhesion on a biomimetic hydroxyapatite layer formed on a titanium surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myung, Sung Woon; Ko, Yeong Mu; Kim, Byung Hoon, E-mail: kim5055@chosun.ac.kr

    2013-12-15

    This study examined the plasma surface modification of biomimetic hydroxyapatite (HAp) formed on a titanium (Ti) surface as well as its influence on the behavior of preosteoblast cells. Ti substrates pre-treated with a plasma-polymerized thin film rich in carboxyl groups were subjected to a biomimetic process in a simulated body fluid solution to synthesize the HAp. The HAp layer grown on Ti substrate was then coated with two types of plasma polymerized acrylic acid and allyl amine thin film. The different types of Ti substrates were characterized by attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. HAp with a Ca/P ratio from 1.25 to 1.38 was obtained on the Ti substrate and hydrophilic carboxyl (-COOH) and amine (-NH{sub 2}) functional groups were introduced to its surface. Scanning electron microscopy was used to observe the surface of the HAp coatings and the morphology of MC3T3-E1 cells. These results showed that the -COOH-modified HAp surfaces promoted the cell spreading synergistically by changing the surface morphology and chemical state.-NH{sub 2} modified HAp had the lowest cell spreading and proliferation compared to HAp and -COOH-modified HAp. These results correspond to fluorescein analysis, which showed many more cell spreading of COOH/HAp/Ti surface compared to HAp and NH{sub 2} modified HAp. A MTT assay was used to evaluate cell proliferation. The results showed that the proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells increased in the order of COOH/HAp/Ti > HAp/Ti > NH{sub 2}/Ti > Ti, corresponding to the effect of cell spreading for 6 days. The change in morphology and the chemical surface properties of the biomaterial via plasma polymerization can affect the behavior of MC3T3-E1 cells.

  5. Endommagement en surface des alliages d'aluminium en mise en forme à froid

    OpenAIRE

    Pham , Tat Thang

    2015-01-01

    The thesis investigates the mechanisms of galling of aluminum alloys on tools during cold forming. First, an experimental methodology using the test bench UST is proposed. It enables the simulation in the laboratory of the conditions of contact similar to those encountered in industries. A series of trials is performed, testing the material in various conditions of contact pressures, sliding speeds and of lubrication. A link between the contact conditions on the one hand and mass transfer on ...

  6. Structural analysis of surface film on alloy 600 formed under environment of PWR primary water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terachi, Takumi; Totsuka, Nobuo; Yamada, Takuyo; Nakagawa, Tomokazu [Inst. of Nuclear Safety System Inc., Mihama, Fukui (Japan); Deguchi, Hiroshi [Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Osaka (Japan); Horiuchi, Masaki; Oshitani, Masato [Kanden Kako Co., Ltd., Osaka (Japan)

    2002-09-01

    It has been shown by one of the present authors and so forth that PWSCC of alloy 600 relates to dissolved hydrogen concentration (DH) in water and oxide film structure. However, the mechanism of PWSCC has not been clear yet. Therefore, in order to investigate relationship between them, structural analysis of the oxide film formed under the environment of PWR primary water was carried out by using X-ray diffraction, the scanning electron microscope and the transmission electron microscope. Especially, to perform accurate analysis, the synchrotron orbital radiation with SPring-8 was tried to use for thin film X-ray diffraction measurement. From the results, observed are as follows: 1. the oxide film is mainly composed of NiO, under the condition without hydrogen. 2. In the environment of DH 2.75ppm, the oxide film forms thin spinel structures. 3. On the other hand, needlelike oxides are formed at DH 1ppm. For this reason, around 1ppm of DH there would be the boundary that stable NiO and spinel oxide generate, and it agrees with the peak range of the PWSCC susceptibility on hydrogen. From this, it is suggested that the boundary of NiO/spinel oxide affects the SCC susceptibility. (author)

  7. Effect of nature of base cation on surface conductivity of H forms of stratified silicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasil'ev, N.G.; Ovcharenko, F.D.; Savkin, A.G.

    1976-01-01

    Interpretation has been proposed for curves of conductometric titration of diluted suspensions of natural silicates in hydrogen forms with solutions of alkalies and organic bases. The curves of conductometric are presented for suspensions of H-form of montmorillonite with solutions of alkali metal hydroxides and with Ba(OH) 2 . A linear decrease in electroconductiv;ty of the system is observed when H-mineral is neutralized with LIOH and NaOH solution. If hydroxides of other metals are added to such a system, the titration curves have an anomalous character. It is especially pronounced when H-mineral is titrated with RbOH and CsOH solutions. When these solutions are added to the suspension of h H-mineral, an additional amount of highly mobile H+-ions is formed which increases electroconductivity of the system. When all the exchange protons in a flat double layer are replaced by Rb 1 or Cs 1 ions, electroconductivity decreases which is related to neutralization of protons in the diffusion part of the layer

  8. Comparative mineralogical characteristics of red soils from South Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlena Yaneva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to compare mineralogical composition of red soils, formed on marbles in South Bulgaria. We used mineralogical analysis of heavy and light mineral fraction in immersion under polarizing microscope and X-ray diffraction analysis of bulk sample and clay fraction. Three test polygons, located in South Bulgaria were examined: Petrovo, Nova Lovcha and Dobrostan, which are characterized with different latitude, altitude, and exposition. Three or more sites from each polygon were sampled and analyzed. The red soils are formed on white and gray calcite and calcite-dolomite marbles, impure silicate-rich marbles and only in one site – on marble breccias. We determined the following mineral phases in red soils: calcite, dolomite, quarts, and feldspars, mica, illite-type mica, illite, smectite, vermiculite-smectite, and kaolinite. Heavy minerals are represented by amphibole, titanite and epidote, and minor amounts of zircon, garnet, tourmaline, rutile, pyroxene, andalusite, kyanite, sillimanite and apatite. Opaque minerals are predominantly goethite and hematite. Plant tissue is abundant in light fraction from the uppermost soil horizons. Analyses of heavy mineral fraction show presence of metamorphic and igneous minerals which indicate participation of weathering products from other rock types in the nearby area. The types of heavy minerals in soils depend more on composition of parent rocks and geomorphic position than on climate type. Soils from Nova Lovcha show similar composition, but the quantity of goethite and hematite significantly increase in soil from plain. Typical high-metamorphic minerals as andalusite, kyanite and sillimanite present only in Nova Lovcha, while garnet dominates in Petrovo and opaque minerals - in Dobrostan. Red soils, formed on slopes, where erosion prevails over accumulation, contain more illite, smectite and vermiculite-smectite, and very few or no kaolinite, whereas the kaolinite is dominant in soils

  9. Tailoring the morphology and electrocatalytic properties of electrochemically formed Ag/TiO2 composite deposits on titanium surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. MENTUS

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Three different forms of Ag/TiO2 composite layers, which have whisker-, dot- and island-like distribution of silver were obtained on a mechanically polished titanium surface by adjusting the conditions of silver deposition from an aqueous AgNO3 solution. The deposit morphology was the result of both the program of electrode polarization and the template action of the simultaneously formed TiO2 layer. The catalytic activity of the composite layers toward the oxygen reduction reaction was studied in aqueous 0.1 M NaOH solutions and found to be a function of both the surface loading of silver and the type of silver distribution within the Ag/TiO2 composite layers. The reaction path of oxygen reduction on the composite layers was found to be always a 4e- one, characteristic otherwise of polycrystalline silver electrodes.

  10. Silica-forming articles having engineered surfaces to enhance resistance to creep sliding under high-temperature loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipkin, Don Mark; Johnson, Curtis Alan; Meschter, Peter Joel; Sundaram, Sairam; Wan, Julin

    2017-02-07

    An article includes a silicon-containing region; at least one outer layer overlying a surface of the silicon-containing region; and a constituent layer on the surface of the silicon-containing region and between and contacting the silicon-containing region and the at least one outer layer, the constituent layer being formed by constituents of the silicon-containing region and being susceptible to creep within an operating environment of the article, wherein the silicon-containing region defines a plurality of channels and a plurality of ridges that interlock within the plurality of channels are formed in the silicon-containing region to physically interlock the at least one outer layer with the silicon-containing region through the constituent layer.

  11. XPS studies of SiO/sub 2/ surface layers formed by oxygen ion implantation into silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze, D.; Finster, J. (Karl-Marx-Universitaet, Leipzig (German Democratic Republic). Sektion Chemie); Hensel, E.; Skorupa, W.; Kreissig, U. (Zentralinstitut fuer Kernforschung, Rossendorf bei Dresden (German Democratic Republic))

    1983-03-16

    SiO/sub 2/ surface layers of 160 nm thickness formed by /sup 16/O/sup +/ ion implantation into silicon are examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements into the depth after a step-by-step chemical etching. The chemical nature and the thickness of the transition layer were determined. The results of the XPS measurements show that the outer surface and the bulk of the layers formed by oxygen implantation and subsequent high temperature annealing consist of SiO/sub 2/. There is no evidence for Si or SiO/sub x/ (0

  12. Mineralogical characterization of uranium yellow cake concentrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausen, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    Uranium yellow cake concentrates have been analyzed and characterized mineralogically by means of differential thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, infrared spectra and wet chemical methods. On the basis of mineralogical methods of characterization, the following four major structural types of yellow cake may be classified: Uranyl Hydroxide Hydrate, UO 2 (OH) 2 nH 2 O; Basic Uranyl Sulfate Hydrate, (UO 2 ) x (SO 4 ) y (OH) s(x-y ).nH 2 O; Sodium Para-Uranate, Na 5 U 7 O 24 and Uranyl Peroxide Hydrate, UO 4 .nH 2 O. In this paper conditions of yellow cake preparation and characterization are described, along with discussion of significance of structural types to the physical and chemical properties of yellow cake production

  13. [DNA complexes, formed on aqueous phase surfaces: new planar polymeric and composite nanostructures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antipina, M N; Gaĭnutdinov, R V; Rakhnianskaia, A A; Sergeev-Cherenkov, A N; Tolstikhina, A L; Iurova, T V; Kislov, V V; Khomutov, G B

    2003-01-01

    The formation of DNA complexes with Langmuir monolayers of the cationic lipid octadecylamine (ODA) and the new amphiphilic polycation poly-4-vinylpyridine with 16% of cetylpyridinium groups (PVP-16) on the surface of an aqueous solution of native DNA of low ionic strength was studied. Topographic images of Langmuir-Blodgett films of DNA/ODA and DNA/PVP-16 complexes applied to micaceous substrates were investigated by the method of atomic force microscopy. It was found that films of the amphiphilic polycation have an ordered planar polycrystalline structure. The morphology of planar DNA complexes with the amphiphilic cation substantially depended on the incubation time and the phase state of the monolayer on the surface of the aqueous DNA solution. Complex structures and individual DNA molecules were observed on the surface of the amphiphilic monolayer. Along with quasi-linear individual bound DNA molecules, characteristic extended net-like structures and quasi-circular toroidal condensed conformations of planar DNA complexes were detected. Mono- and multilayer films of DNA/PVP-16 complexes were used as templates and nanoreactors for the synthesis of inorganic nanostructures via the binding of metal cations from the solution and subsequent generation of the inorganic phase. As a result, ultrathin polymeric composite films with integrated DNA building blocks and quasi-linear arrays of inorganic semiconductor (CdS) and iron oxide nanoparticles and nanowires were obtained. The nanostructures obtained were characterized by scanning probe microscopy and transmission electron microscopy techniques. The methods developed are promising for investigating the mechanisms of structural organization and transformation in DNA and polyelectrolyte complexes at the gas-liquid interface and for the design of new extremely thin highly ordered planar polymeric and composite materials, films, and coatings with controlled ultrastructure for applications in nanoelectronics and

  14. Analysis of hyper-baric biofilms on engineering surfaces formed in the Deep Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, A.; Tsaloglou, N. M.; Connelly, D.; Keevil, B.; Mowlem, M.

    2012-04-01

    Long-term monitoring of the environment is essential to our understanding of global processes, such as global warming, and their impact. As biofilm formation occurs after only short deployment periods in the marine environment, it is a major problem in long-term operation of environmental sensors. This makes the development of anti-fouling strategies for in situ sensors critical to their function. The effects on sensors can range from measurement drift, which can be compensated, to blockage of channels and material degradation, rendering them inoperative. In general, the longer the deployment period the more severe the effects of the biofouling become. Until now, biofilm research has focused mainly on the eutrophic and euphotic zones of the oceans. Hyper-baric biofilms are poorly understood due to difficulties in experimental setup and the assumption that biofouling in these oligotrophic regions could be regarded as insignificant. Our study shows significant biofilm formation occurs in the deep sea. We deployed a variety of materials, typically used in engineering structures, on a 4500 metre deep mooring during a cruise to the Cayman Trough, for 10 days. The materials were clear plain glass, poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA), Delrin™, and copper, a known antifouling agent. The biofilms were studied by fluorescence microscopy and molecular analysis. For microscopy the nucleic acid stain, SYTO©9, was used and surface coverage was quantified by using a custom MATLAB™ program. Further molecular analyses, including UV Vis spectrometric quantification of DNA, nucleic acid amplification using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), and Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE), were utilised for the analysis of the microbial community composition of these biofilms. Six 16S/18S universal primer sets representative for the three kingdoms, Archea, Bacteria, and Eukarya were used for the PCR and DGGE. Preliminary results from fluorescence microscopy showed that the biofilm

  15. Application of bacteriophages to reduce biofilms formed by hydrogen sulfide producing bacteria on surfaces in a rendering plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chao; Jiang, Xiuping

    2015-08-01

    Hydrogen sulfide producing bacteria (SPB) in raw animal by-products are likely to grow and form biofilms in the rendering processing environments, resulting in the release of harmful hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas. The objective of this study was to reduce SPB biofilms formed on different surfaces typically found in rendering plants by applying a bacteriophage cocktail. Using a 96-well microplate method, we determined that 3 SPB strains of Citrobacter freundii and Hafnia alvei are strong biofilm formers. Application of 9 bacteriophages (10(7) PFU/mL) from families of Siphoviridae and Myoviridae resulted in a 33%-70% reduction of biofilm formation by each SPB strain. On stainless steel and plastic templates, phage treatment (10(8) PFU/mL) reduced the attached cells of a mixed SPB culture (no biofilm) by 2.3 and 2.7 log CFU/cm(2) within 6 h at 30 °C, respectively, as compared with 2 and 1.5 log CFU/cm(2) reductions of SPB biofilms within 6 h at 30 °C. Phage treatment was also applied to indigenous SPB biofilms formed on the environmental surface, stainless steel, high-density polyethylene plastic, and rubber templates in a rendering plant. With phage treatment (10(9) PFU/mL), SPB biofilms were reduced by 0.7-1.4, 0.3-0.6, and 0.2-0.6 log CFU/cm(2) in spring, summer, and fall trials, respectively. Our study demonstrated that bacteriophages could effectively reduce the selected SPB strains either attached to or in formed biofilms on various surfaces and could to some extent reduce the indigenous SPB biofilms on the surfaces in the rendering environment.

  16. Contribution of electron microscopy to the study of alteration layers formed on the surface of glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crovisier, J.L.; Eberhart, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    In order to understand the whole process of glass corrosion in aqueous solutions, the analysis of the reagent must be completed by a study of the actual alteration layers on the glass surface. Transmission electron microscopy on ultramicrotomic thin sections turns out to be a most suitable tool to achieve this. It enables to supplement the conventional methods of surface investigation, such as A.E.S., ESCA, IRRS, SIMS. Two examples are given. The first deals with a (SiO 2 -CaO-Na 2 O-P 2 O 5 )- glass leached in a buffer solution of tris-hydromethyl-aminomethane at 40 0 C. The major feature is ion exchange within a residual porous glass, followed by the precipitation of hydroxyapatite. In the second example, a basaltic glass is altered in sea-water at 50 0 C. The glass constituents are dissolved simultaneously and the alteration layer is a precipitate of crystalline and amorphous phases which have reached their saturation level [fr

  17. Fabrication of conductive network formed by polyaniline-ZnO composite on fabric surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yaping; Cai Zaisheng; Zhou Zhaoyi; Fu Xiaolan

    2011-01-01

    A conductive network consisting of polyaniline (PANI) and PANI/nm-ZnO immobilized on the surfaces of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) fabrics was synthesized by a route involving a wet-chemical technique and in-situ chemical oxidative polymerization procedures. Morphological, structural, thermal and electrical properties of the PET fabrics modified with PANI-ZnO composites were analyzed. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements of the composites revealed that the crystal structure of incorporated ZnO undergone a weak distortion during the polymerization reaction and the XRD pattern of PANI was predominate. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic studies indicated the presence of interaction between ZnO nanorods and molecular chains of PANI in the ZnO/PANI layers. Field emission scanning electron microscope images implied the thin composite layers showed a submicro-sized rod like network and the homogeneous distribution on the substrates. Thermogravimetric studies exhibited that the PET-ZnO/PANI composite had a higher thermal stability than anyone of PET and PET-PANI. The surface resistance of ZnO/PANI conductive films was found to be smaller than the PANI film, which was declined as aniline concentration in adsorption bath increased and reached a relatively low value when Zn(NO 3 ) 2 concentration was at 0.03 mol/L in the precursor solution.

  18. Effects of surface tension and viscosity on the forming and transferring process of microscale droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shulei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Cunbin; Wang, Dongyang; Ba, Dechun; Xie, Yuanhua; Du, Guangyu; Ba, Yaoshuai; Lin, Qiao

    2016-12-01

    Surface tension and viscosity act as important roles on the fluid flow in microchannel channels. In order to understand the influencing mechanism, three dimensional numerical simulations as well as experimental investigations were carried out on the slug formation and transfer in a rectangle T-junction microchannel. The simulation showed that the increasing Capillary number (Ca) resulted in the decreasing slug volume. Due to the existence of film thickness and corner flow, the characteristic length of slug was not the same trend completely. The results also showed that the pressure of junction point fluctuated periodically in the process of slug formation, which can reflect the slug formation period and the effect of the various conditions on pressure change. Two other pressure monitoring points were located in vertical channel and main channel and they monitored the pressure of two phase flow respectively. The increasing surface tension resulted in an increasing of total pressure, the interface pressure drop of two phases and the period of slug formation. The frequency of slug formation and two phases total pressure increased with the viscosity of continuous phase.

  19. A novel surface modification technique for forming porous polymer monoliths in poly(dimethylsiloxane).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Jeffrey M; Smela, Elisabeth

    2012-03-01

    A new method of surface modification is described for enabling the in situ formation of homogenous porous polymer monoliths (PPMs) within poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic channels that uses 365 nm UV illumination for polymerization. Porous polymer monolith formation in PDMS can be challenging because PDMS readily absorbs the monomers and solvents, changing the final monolith morphology, and because PDMS absorbs oxygen, which inhibits free-radical polymerization. The new approach is based on sequentially absorbing a non-hydrogen-abstracting photoinitiator and the monomers methyl methacrylate and ethylene diacrylate within the walls of the microchannel, and then polymerizing the surface treatment polymer within the PDMS, entangled with it but not covalently bound. Four different monolith compositions were tested, all of which yielded monoliths that were securely anchored and could withstand pressures exceeding the bonding strength of PDMS (40 psi) without dislodging. One was a recipe that was optimized to give a larger average pore size, required for low back pressure. This monolith was used to concentrate and subsequently mechanical lyse B lymphocytes.

  20. A nitride-based epitaxial surface layer formed by ammonia treatment of silicene-terminated ZrB{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiggers, F. B., E-mail: F.B.Wiggers@utwente.nl; Van Bui, H.; Schmitz, J.; Kovalgin, A. Y.; Jong, M. P. de [MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Friedlein, R.; Yamada-Takamura, Y. [School of Materials Science, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan)

    2016-04-07

    We present a method for the formation of an epitaxial  surface layer involving B, N, and Si atoms on a ZrB{sub 2}(0001) thin film on Si(111). It has the potential to be an insulating growth template for 2D semiconductors. The chemical reaction of NH{sub 3} molecules with the silicene-terminated ZrB{sub 2}  surface was characterized by synchrotron-based, high-resolution core-level photoelectron spectroscopy and low-energy electron diffraction. In particular, the dissociative chemisorption of NH{sub 3} at 400 °C leads to surface  nitridation, and subsequent annealing up to 830 °C results in a solid phase reaction with the ZrB{sub 2} subsurface layers. In this way, a new nitride-based epitaxial  surface layer is formed with hexagonal symmetry and a single in-plane crystal orientation.

  1. An investigation of the sensitivity of a land surface model to climate change using a reduced form model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, A.H.; McIlwaine, S. [PAOS/CIRES, Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Beringer, J. [Inst. of Arctic Biology, Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks (United States); Bonan, G.B. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2001-05-01

    In an illustration of a model evaluation methodology, a multivariate reduced form model is developed to evaluate the sensitivity of a land surface model to changes in atmospheric forcing. The reduced form model is constructed in terms of a set of ten integrative response metrics, including the timing of spring snow melt, sensible and latent heat fluxes in summer, and soil temperature. The responses are evaluated as a function of a selected set of six atmospheric forcing perturbations which are varied simultaneously, and hence each may be thought of as a six-dimensional response surface. The sensitivities of the land surface model are interdependent and in some cases illustrate a physically plausible feedback process. The important predictors of land surface response in a changing climate are the atmospheric temperature and downwelling longwave radiation. Scenarios characterized by warming and drying produce a large relative response compared to warm, moist scenarios. The insensitivity of the model to increases in precipitation and atmospheric humidity is expected to change in applications to coupled models, since these parameters are also strongly implicated, through the representation of clouds, in the simulation of both longwave and shortwave radiation. (orig.)

  2. Quantitative Mineralogical Analysis of Mars Analogues Using CHEMIN Data and Rietveld Refinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bish, D. L.; Sarrazin, P.; Chipera, S. J.; Vaniman, D. T.; Blake, D.

    2004-01-01

    Mineralogical analysis is a critical component of planetary surface exploration. Chemical data alone leave serious gaps in our understanding of the surfaces of planets where complex minerals may form in combination with H, S, and halogens. On such planets (e.g., Mars) a single chemical composition may represent a range of mineral assemblages. For example, Viking chemical analyses of excavated duricrust indicate that Mg and S are correlated and 10% MgSO4 (anhydrous weight) is a likely cementing agent. Pathfinder chemical data support a similar abundance of MgSO4 in the most altered materials. However, there are many possible Mg-sulfates with widely varying hydration states (including dehydrated and 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, 5-, 6-, and 7-hydrates). In addition, other sulfate minerals such as gypsum (CaSO4 .2H2O) and other salts containing Cl may also exist. X-ray diffraction (XRD) has the ability to decipher mixtures of these phases that would be difficult, if not impossible to unravel using only chemical or spectral data.

  3. Chemical sanitizers to control biofilms formed by two Pseudomonas species on stainless steel surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danila Soares Caixeta

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas fluorescens on AISI 304 stainless steel in the presence of reconstituted skim milk under different temperatures was conducted, and the potential of three chemical sanitizers in removing the mono-species biofilms formed was compared. Pseudomonas aeruginosa cultivated in skim milk at 28 °C presented better growth rate (10.4 log CFU.mL-1 when compared with 3.7 and 4.2 log CFU.mL-1 for P. aeruginosa and P. fluorescens cultivated at 7 °C, respectively. Pseudomonas aeruginosa formed biofilm when cultivated at 28 °C. However, only the adhesion of P. aeruginosa and P. fluorescens was observed when incubated at 7 °C. The sodium dichloroisocyanurate was the most efficient sanitizer in the reduction of the adhered P. aeruginosa cells at 7 and 28 °C and those on the biofilm, respectively. The hydrogen peroxide was more effective in the reduction of adhered cells of P. fluorescens at 7 °C.

  4. Surface morphology of caldera-forming eruption deposits revealed by lidar mapping of Crater Lake National Park, Oregon- Implications for emplacement and surface modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Joel E.; Bacon, Charles R.; Major, Jon J.; Wright, Heather M.; Vallance, James W.

    2017-01-01

    Large explosive eruptions of silicic magma can produce widespread pumice fall, extensive ignimbrite sheets, and collapse calderas. The surfaces of voluminous ignimbrites are rarely preserved or documented because most terrestrial examples are heavily vegetated, or severely modified by post-depositional processes. Much research addresses the internal sedimentary characteristics, flow processes, and depositional mechanisms of ignimbrites, however, surface features of ignimbrites are less well documented and understood, except for comparatively small-volume deposits of historical eruptions. The ~7,700 calendar year B.P. climactic eruption of Mount Mazama, USA vented ~50 km3 of magma, deposited first as rhyodacite pumice fall and then as a zoned rhyodacite-to-andesite ignimbrite as Crater Lake caldera collapsed. Lidar collected during summer 2010 reveals the remarkably well-preserved surface of the Mazama ignimbrite and related deposits surrounding Crater Lake caldera in unprecedented detail despite forest cover. The ±1 m lateral and ±4 cm vertical resolution lidar allows surface morphologies to be classified. Surface morphologies are created by internal depositional processes and can point to the processes at work when pyroclastic flows come to rest. We describe nine surface features including furrow-ridge sets and wedge-shaped mounds in pumice fall eroded by high-energy pyroclastic surges, flow- parallel ridges that record the passage of multiple pyroclastic flows, perched benches of marginal deposits stranded by more-mobile pyroclastic-flow cores, hummocks of dense clasts interpreted as lag deposit, transverse ridges that mark the compression and imbrication of flows as they came to rest, scarps indicating ignimbrite remobilization, fields of pit craters caused by phreatic explosions, fractures and cracks caused by extensional processes resulting from ignimbrite volume loss, and stream channels eroded in the newly formed surface. The nine morphologies presented

  5. Influence of MgO containing strontium on the structure of ceramic film formed on grain oriented silicon steel surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela C. Leite Vasconcelos

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available The oxide layer formed on the surface of a grain oriented silicon steel was characterized by SEM and EDS. 3% Si steel substrates were coated by two types of slurries: one formed by MgO and water and other formed by MgO, water and SrSO4. The ceramic films were evaluated by SEM, EDS and X-ray diffraction. Depth profiles of Fe, Si and Mg were obtained by GDS. The magnetic core losses (at 1.7 Tesla, 60 Hz of the coated steel samples were evaluated as well. The use of MgO containing strontium reduced the volume fraction of forsterite particles beneath the outermost ceramic layer. It was observed a reduced magnetic core loss with the use of the slurry with MgO containing strontium.

  6. Temperature effect of irradiated target surface on distribution of nanoparticles formed by implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Stepanov, A L; Popok, V N

    2001-01-01

    The composition layers, containing the metal nanoparticles, synthesized thorough implantation of the Ag sup + ions with the energy of 60 keV and the dose of 3 x 10 sup 1 sup 6 ion/cm sup 2 into the sodium-calcium silicate glass by the ion current of 3 mu A/cm sup 2 and the sublayer temperature of 35 deg C are studied. The obtained implantation results are analyzed in dependence on the temperature effects, developing for the glass samples of various thickness. The data on the silver distribution, the metal nanoparticles formation and growth by depth are obtained from the optical reflection spectra. It is demonstrated that minor changes in the surface temperature of the irradiated glass sublayer lead to noticeable diversities in the regularities of the nanoparticles formation in the sample volume

  7. Characterisation by esca of iron componds formed on the nuclear steels by surface engeneering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minca, M.; Oncioiu, G.; Coaca, E.; Rusu, O.; Florea, S.; Andrei, V.

    2013-01-01

    In this work it is presented an approach for characterization of the oxide films by assigning the binding energy of the chemical states according with a theoretical analysis. In order to exemplify the method developed there are presented analyses on the internal standards a-Fe 2 O 3 and Fe 3 O 4 ), as well as analysis of superficial structure on austenitic steel samples on which different treatments of surface engineering were made. It is also presented a depth profiling analysis type, achieved by ball cratering method, which allow determining the distribution of different chemical elements with depth. One can follow the distribution of the valence states, Fe 2+ and Fe 3+ , with depth. By means of the presented method it can be precisely determined the valence states of Fe and their weight in the oxide iron films. (authors)

  8. Development and Testing of Tailored Tool Surfaces for Sheet Metal Forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sulaiman, Mohd Hafis Bin

    MPa. The above mentioned simple experimental procedure for determining lubricant bulk modulus gives a first rough estimate, and it is supplemented by a more advanced laboratory test based on a newly designed equipment. The lubricant compressibility experiment with a direct pressure measurement inside...... to achieve this purpose. A simple laboratory test consisting of upsetting a specially designed metal cylinder with a lubricant reservoir together with elasto-plastic, numerical modelling of the metal cylinder is carried out in order to determine the bulk modulus at low pressure regimes of approximately 100...... for the manufacturing. The SRT tools were manufactured with longitudinal, shallow pocket geometries oriented perpendicular to the sliding direction. The pockets have small angles to the workpiece surface and varying distance. The experiments show an optimum distance between the pockets to exist that creates a table...

  9. Uranium favorability of tertiary sedimentary rocks of the western Okanogan highlands and of the upper Columbia River valley, Washington. [Measurement and sampling of surface sections, collection of samples from isolated outcrops, and chemical and mineralogical analyses of samples; no known uranium deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marjaniemi, D.K.; Robins, J.W.

    1975-08-01

    Tertiary sedimentary rocks in the northern portions of the western Okanogan highlands and in the upper Columbia River valley were investigated during a regional study to determine the favorability for potential uranium resources of the Tertiary sedimentary rocks of northeastern Washington. This project involved measurement and sampling of surface sections, collection of samples from isolated outcrops, and chemical and mineralogical analyses of samples. No portion of the project area of this report is rated of high or of medium favorability for potential uranium resources. Low favorability ratings are given to Oroville, Tonasket, and Pine Creek areas of the Okanogan River valley; to the Republic graben; and to the William Lakes, Colville, and Sheep Creek areas of the upper Columbia River valley. All these areas contain some fluvial, poorly sorted feldspathic or arkosic sandstones and conglomerates. These rocks are characterized by very low permeability and a consistently high siliceous matrix suggesting very low initial permeability. There are no known uranium deposits in any of these areas, and low level uranium anomalies are rare.

  10. Computation of coupled surface radiation and natural convection in an inclined form cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amraqui, Samir; Mezrhab, Ahmed; Abid, Cherifa

    2011-01-01

    The present paper is concerned with computation of the radiation-natural convection interactions in an inclined form cavity. The cavity contains two symmetrically identical isothermal blocks and is vented by two opening located in a vertical median axis at the top and the bottom parts of the cavity. Calculations are made by using a finite volume method and an efficient numerical procedure is introduced for calculating the view factors, with shadow effects included. Effects of Rayleigh number Ra and inclination angle φ are investigated for Pr = 0.71 in presence and in absence of the radiation exchange. Results are reported in terms of isotherms, streamlines, local and average Nusselt numbers and mass flow rate. In light of the obtained results, we can conclude that the heat transfer decreases with increasing φ. In addition, the increase of Ra and the taking into account of the radiation exchange produce a considerable increase in the heat transfer.

  11. Method of generating magnetoactive plasma for forming thin surface layers on solid substrates and equipment therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardos, L.; Loncar, G.; Musil, J.; Zacek, F.

    1979-01-01

    The invention essentially consists in the use of the axially symmetrical high-frequency magnetized plasma column for thin layer formation. The plasma is generated using a cylindrical microwave slow-down structure in the outer magnetic field. Plasma particles density and temperature and their radial distribution are adjusted by changing the intensity of the magnetic field and of high-frequency power. The plasma may be generated from any gases in a pressure range of 10 -3 to 10 2 Pa. In an oxygen plasma, e.g., it is thus possible to form layers of 200 nm in thickness in 60 mins at an input high-frequency power of 100 to 300 W. (J.U.)

  12. Chemical and mineralogical characterization of waste generated in the petroleum industry and its correlation with 226Ra and 228Ra contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gazineu, M.H.P.; Hazin, C.H.; Godoy, J.M.O.

    2004-01-01

    Scales and sludge are commonly formed during oil and gas extracting and processing operations. They usually appear when injection and formation water with different chemical characteristics come into contact. When the produced water is brought to the surface alongside with the oil, the precipitate can be deposited on the walls of tubing and equipment, forming the so-called scales. Otherwise they can also accumulate in the form of sludge on the bottom of storage tanks, separators, and other equipment. Radium is the main radionuclide brought to the surface with oil and produced water and it co-precipitates with barium forming complex compounds of sulfates, carbonates and silicates. These compounds are the main constituents of scale and sludge. The objective of this work was to relate the radium content of scales and sludge to their chemical and mineralogical composition. Samples were taken from a PETROBRAS unit in the State of Sergipe, in Northeast Brazil. They were collected either from the inner surface of water pipes or from containers stored in the waste storage area of the unit. Oil was separated from the solid material in a Soxhlet extractor equipment by using aguarras as solvent. The concentrations of 226 Ra and 228 Ra were determined by gamma spectrometry. The mineralogical and the chemical composition of the samples were determined by x-ray diffraction and x-ray fluorescence, respectively, and used to characterize the samples as scales or sludge. The results have shown that scales are mainly formed by BaSO 4 and CaCO 3 while sludge has a higher content of SiO 2 and FeO 3 than that observed on the scale samples. The measured activity concentrations of 226 Ra and 228 Ra are strongly correlated for both kinds of samples. Based on the 228 Th/ 228 Ra ratio, ages between one and five years were estimated for the material stored in the waste area. (author)

  13. Control of morphology and surface wettability of anodic niobium oxide microcones formed in hot phosphate-glycerol electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Shu; Habazaki, Hiroki; Fujii, Takashi; Aoki, Yoshitaka; Skeldon, Peter; Thompson, George E.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Anodic niobium oxide microcones with nanofiber morphology are formed simply by anodizing. → The cone size and its tip angle are controlled by anodizing condition. → The surface shows extremely high contact angle for water after coating with a fluoroalkyl layer. - Abstract: We report the fabrication of superhydrophobic surfaces with a hierarchical morphology by self-organized anodizing process. Simply by anodizing of niobium metal in hot phosphate-glycerol electrolyte, niobium oxide microcones, consisting of highly branched oxide nanofibers, develop on the surface. The size of the microcones and their tip angles are controlled by changing the applied potential difference in anodizing and the water content in the electrolyte. Reduction of the water content increases the size of the microcones, with the nanofibers changing to nanoparticles. The size of microcones is also reduced by increasing the applied potential difference, without influencing the tip angle. The hierarchical oxide surfaces are superhydrophilic, with static contact angles close to 0 o . Coating of the anodic oxide films with a monolayer of fluoroalkyl phosphate makes the surfaces superhydrophobic with a contact angle for water as high as 175 o and a very small contact angle hysteresis of only 2 o . The present results indicate that the larger microcones with smaller tip angles show the higher contact angle for water.

  14. Presence and Impact of Surface Films formed on Mg in Chloroaluminate Electrolytes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, Nathan [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Joint Center for Energy Storage Research (JCESR); Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kotula, Paul G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wetzel, David J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Joint Center for Energy Storage Research (JCESR); Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Malone, Marvin A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Joint Center for Energy Storage Research (JCESR); Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Nuzzo, Ralph G. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Joint Center for Energy Storage Research (JCESR); Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Zavadil, Kevin R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Joint Center for Energy Storage Research (JCESR); Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The impact of surface film formation on Mg is explored during electrodeposition and electrodissolution in two high activity, aprotic electrolytes: the all phenyl complex (APC) and the magnesium aluminum chloride complex (MACC). Where past studies have argued such films are benign, results show that interfacial films are responsible for controlling the Mg deposit structure when deposition and dissolution are conducted at the rates required for practical Mg batteries. Chronopotentiometry is shown to provide clear signatures of the impact of interfacial films on deposition and dissolution. The particular combination of cycling punctuated by periods of open circuit equilibration is shown to yield a noticeable decrease in coulombic efficiency over a 50 cycle sequence. High resolution electron imaging shows that cycling results in porosity development and accumulation of electrolyte constituents within the deposit. Reduced coulombic efficiency signaling Mg loss appears related to progressive isolation of a fraction of the deposit. Mg and electrolyte loss must be compensated for in a practical cell through the introduction of excess inventory and resulting in a reduced energy density of the system.

  15. Surface chemical compositions and dispersity of starch nanocrystals formed by sulfuric and hydrochloric acid hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Benxi; Xu, Xueming; Jin, Zhengyu; Tian, Yaoqi

    2014-01-01

    Surface chemical compositions of starch nanocrystals (SNC) prepared using sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and hydrochloric acid (HCl) hydrolysis were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and FT-IR. The results showed that carboxyl groups and sulfate esters were presented in SNC after hydrolysis with H2SO4, while no sulfate esters were detected in SNC during HCl-hydrolysis. TEM results showed that, compared to H2SO4-hydrolyzed sample, a wider size distribution of SNC prepared by HCl-hydrolysis were observed. Zeta-potentials were -23.1 and -5.02 mV for H2SO4- and HCl-hydrolyzed SNC suspensions at pH 6.5, respectively. Nevertheless, the zeta-potential values decreased to -32.3 and -10.2 mV as the dispersion pH was adjusted to 10.6. After placed 48 h at pH 10.6, zeta-potential increased to -24.1 mV for H2SO4-hydrolyzed SNC, while no change was detected for HCl-hydrolyzed one. The higher zeta-potential and relative small particle distribution of SNC caused more stable suspensions compared to HCl-hydrolyzed sample.

  16. Surface chemical compositions and dispersity of starch nanocrystals formed by sulfuric and hydrochloric acid hydrolysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benxi Wei

    Full Text Available Surface chemical compositions of starch nanocrystals (SNC prepared using sulfuric acid (H2SO4 and hydrochloric acid (HCl hydrolysis were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and FT-IR. The results showed that carboxyl groups and sulfate esters were presented in SNC after hydrolysis with H2SO4, while no sulfate esters were detected in SNC during HCl-hydrolysis. TEM results showed that, compared to H2SO4-hydrolyzed sample, a wider size distribution of SNC prepared by HCl-hydrolysis were observed. Zeta-potentials were -23.1 and -5.02 mV for H2SO4- and HCl-hydrolyzed SNC suspensions at pH 6.5, respectively. Nevertheless, the zeta-potential values decreased to -32.3 and -10.2 mV as the dispersion pH was adjusted to 10.6. After placed 48 h at pH 10.6, zeta-potential increased to -24.1 mV for H2SO4-hydrolyzed SNC, while no change was detected for HCl-hydrolyzed one. The higher zeta-potential and relative small particle distribution of SNC caused more stable suspensions compared to HCl-hydrolyzed sample.

  17. Surface morphology and preferential orientation growth of TaC crystals formed by chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong Xiang, E-mail: Xiong228@sina.co [State Key Lab for Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Chen Zhaoke; Huang Baiyun; Li Guodong [State Key Lab for Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Zheng Feng [School of Material Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Xiao Peng; Zhang Hongbo [State Key Lab for Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2009-04-02

    TaC film was deposited on (002) graphite sheet by isothermal chemical vapor deposition using TaCl{sub 5}-Ar-C{sub 3}H{sub 6} mixtures, with deposition temperature 1200 {sup o}C and pressure about 200 Pa. The influence of deposition position (or deposition rate) on preferential orientation and surface morphology of TaC crystals were investigated by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy methods. The deposits are TaC plus trace of C. The crystals are large individual columns with pyramidal-shape at deposition rate of 32.4-37.3 {mu}m/h, complex columnar at 37.3-45.6 {mu}m/h, lenticular-like at 45.6-54.6 {mu}m/h and cauliflower-like at 54.6-77.3 {mu}m/h, with <001>, near <001>, <110> and no clear preferential orientation, respectively. These results agree in part with the preditions of the Pangarov's model of the relationship between deposition rate and preferential growth orientation. The growth mechanism of TaC crystals in <001>, near <001>, <111> and no clear preferential orientation can be fairly explained by the growth parameter {alpha} with Van der Drift's model, deterioration model and Meakin model. Furthermore, a nucleation and coalescence model is also proposed to explain the formation mechanism of <110> lenticular-like crystals.

  18. Surface Chemical Compositions and Dispersity of Starch Nanocrystals Formed by Sulfuric and Hydrochloric Acid Hydrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Benxi; Xu, Xueming; Jin, Zhengyu; Tian, Yaoqi

    2014-01-01

    Surface chemical compositions of starch nanocrystals (SNC) prepared using sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and hydrochloric acid (HCl) hydrolysis were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and FT-IR. The results showed that carboxyl groups and sulfate esters were presented in SNC after hydrolysis with H2SO4, while no sulfate esters were detected in SNC during HCl-hydrolysis. TEM results showed that, compared to H2SO4-hydrolyzed sample, a wider size distribution of SNC prepared by HCl-hydrolysis were observed. Zeta-potentials were −23.1 and −5.02 mV for H2SO4- and HCl-hydrolyzed SNC suspensions at pH 6.5, respectively. Nevertheless, the zeta-potential values decreased to −32.3 and −10.2 mV as the dispersion pH was adjusted to 10.6. After placed 48 h at pH 10.6, zeta-potential increased to −24.1 mV for H2SO4-hydrolyzed SNC, while no change was detected for HCl-hydrolyzed one. The higher zeta-potential and relative small particle distribution of SNC caused more stable suspensions compared to HCl-hydrolyzed sample. PMID:24586246

  19. Electric and electrochemical properties of surface films formed on copper in the presence of bicarbonate anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirkiae, P.; Saario, T.; Maekelae, K.; Laitinen, T.; Bojinov, M.

    1999-01-01

    Copper is used as an outer shield of cast iron canisters planned for storage of spent nuclear fuel. The copper shield is responsible for the corrosion protection of the canister. The aim of the present work was to study the influence of bicarbonate (HCO 3 - ) anions on the stability of the copper oxide film. The work consists of a brief literature survey and an experimental part, in which voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and dc resistance measurements via the Contact Electric Resistance (CER) technique were used. The studies reported in the literature indicated that HCO 3 - ions increase the solubility of copper in the stability region of Cu(II). Thus they render the oxide film formed on copper susceptible to local damage and to localised corrosion at high potentials. Unfortunately, despite the great importance of bicarbonates in copper corrosion, most of the environments used in the electrochemical and corrosion studies are not comparable with repository conditions. In the existing studies either the bicarbonate concentrations or pH of the solutions were too high. In addition, no such studies were available, in which not only the effect of carbonate ions, but also possible synergetic effects of them with other aggressive ions would have been clarified. The voltammetric results of the experimental part of this work point to a bilayer structure of the anodic film on copper in neutral solutions containing HCO 3 - ions. The transport of ionic defects through a thin continuous p-type semiconductor layer was concluded to be the rate limiting step of the anodic oxidation of copper in the stability region of monovalent copper and in the mixed oxide (Cu(I)/Cu(II) oxide) region. Films formed in the divalent copper region did not show well-pronounced semiconductor behaviour. Substantial evidence was found in the voltammetric, CER and impedance results for the increased defectiveness of the anodic film in the Cu(II) region. The oxidation rate of copper in

  20. Electric and electrochemical properties of surface films formed on copper in the presence of bicarbonate anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirkiae, P.; Saario, T.; Maekelae, K.; Laitinen, T.; Bojinov, M. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-11-01

    Copper is used as an outer shield of cast iron canisters planned for storage of spent nuclear fuel. The copper shield is responsible for the corrosion protection of the canister. The aim of the present work was to study the influence of bicarbonate (HCO{sub 3}{sup -}) anions on the stability of the copper oxide film. The work consists of a brief literature survey and an experimental part, in which voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and dc resistance measurements via the Contact Electric Resistance (CER) technique were used. The studies reported in the literature indicated that HCO{sub 3}{sup -} ions increase the solubility of copper in the stability region of Cu(II). Thus they render the oxide film formed on copper susceptible to local damage and to localised corrosion at high potentials. Unfortunately, despite the great importance of bicarbonates in copper corrosion, most of the environments used in the electrochemical and corrosion studies are not comparable with repository conditions. In the existing studies either the bicarbonate concentrations or pH of the solutions were too high. In addition, no such studies were available, in which not only the effect of carbonate ions, but also possible synergetic effects of them with other aggressive ions would have been clarified. The voltammetric results of the experimental part of this work point to a bilayer structure of the anodic film on copper in neutral solutions containing HCO{sub 3}{sup -}ions. The transport of ionic defects through a thin continuous p-type semiconductor layer was concluded to be the rate limiting step of the anodic oxidation of copper in the stability region of monovalent copper and in the mixed oxide (Cu(I)/Cu(II) oxide) region. Films formed in the divalent copper region did not show well-pronounced semiconductor behaviour. Substantial evidence was found in the voltammetric, CER and impedance results for the increased defectiveness of the anodic film in the Cu(II) region. The

  1. The role of city size and urban form in the surface urban heat island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bin; Rybski, Diego; Kropp, Jürgen P

    2017-07-06

    Urban climate is determined by a variety of factors, whose knowledge can help to attenuate heat stress in the context of ongoing urbanization and climate change. We study the influence of city size and urban form on the Urban Heat Island (UHI) phenomenon in Europe and find a complex interplay between UHI intensity and city size, fractality, and anisometry. Due to correlations among these urban factors, interactions in the multi-linear regression need to be taken into account. We find that among the largest 5,000 cities, the UHI intensity increases with the logarithm of the city size and with the fractal dimension, but decreases with the logarithm of the anisometry. Typically, the size has the strongest influence, followed by the compactness, and the smallest is the influence of the degree to which the cities stretch. Accordingly, from the point of view of UHI alleviation, small, disperse, and stretched cities are preferable. However, such recommendations need to be balanced against e.g. positive agglomeration effects of large cities. Therefore, trade-offs must be made regarding local and global aims.

  2. In silico, in vitro and antifungal activity of the surface layers formed on zinc during this biomaterial degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Marta M.; Marques, Luísa M.; Nogueira, Isabel; Santos, Catarina F.; Salazar, Sara B.; Eugénio, Sónia; Mira, Nuno P.; Montemor, M. F.

    2018-07-01

    Zinc (Zn) has been proposed as an alternative metallic biodegradable material to support transient wound-healing processes. Once a Zn piece is implanted inside the organism the degradation will depend upon the physiological surrounding environment. This, by modulating the composition of the surface layers formed on Zn devices, will govern the subsequent interactions with the surrounding living cells (e.g. biocompatibility and/or antifungal behaviour). In silico simulation of an implanted Zn piece at bone-muscle interface or inside the bone yielded the preferential precipitation of simonkolleite or zincite, respectively. To study the impact of these surface layers in the in vitro behaviour of Zn biomaterials, simonkolleite and zincite where synthesised. The successful production of simonkolleite or zincite was confirmed by an extensive physicochemical characterization. An in vitro layer formed on the top of these surface layers revealed that simonkolleite was rather inert, while zincite yielded a complex matrix containing hydroxyapatite, an important bone analogue. When analysing the "anti-biofilm" activity simonkolleite stood out for its activity against an important pathogenic fungi involved in implant-device infections, Candida albicans. The possible physiological implications of these findings are discussed.

  3. Laser surface forming of AlCoCrCuFeNi particle reinforced AZ91D matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Guanghui; Yue, T. M.; Lin, Xin; Yang, Haiou; Xie, Hui; Ding, Xu

    2015-07-01

    Traditionally, the laser melt injection (LMI) technique can only be used for forming ceramic particles reinforced metal matrix composites (MMCs) for enhancing surface properties of lightweight engineering materials. In this research, the LMI method was employed to form metal particles reinforced MMCs on AZ91D instead. This was viable because of the unique properties of the AlCoCrCuFeNi high-entropy alloy (HEA) metal particles used. The large difference in melting point between the HEA and the substrate material (AZ91D), and the limited reaction and the lack of fusion between the HEA and Mg have made it possible that a metal particles reinforced AZ91D composite material was produced. The reason of limited reaction was considered mainly due to the relatively high mixing enthalpy between the HEA constituent elements and Mg. Although there was some melting occurred at the particles surface with some solute segregation found in the vicinity close to the surface, intermetallic compounds were not observed. With regard to the wear resistance of the MMCs, it was found that when the volume fraction of the reinforcement phase, i.e. the HEA particles, reached about 0.4, the wear volume loss of the coating was only one-seventh of that of the substrate material.

  4. Transforming high-dimensional potential energy surfaces into sum-of-products form using Monte Carlo methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Markus; Meyer, Hans-Dieter

    2017-08-01

    We propose a Monte Carlo method, "Monte Carlo Potfit," for transforming high-dimensional potential energy surfaces evaluated on discrete grid points into a sum-of-products form, more precisely into a Tucker form. To this end we use a variational ansatz in which we replace numerically exact integrals with Monte Carlo integrals. This largely reduces the numerical cost by avoiding the evaluation of the potential on all grid points and allows a treatment of surfaces up to 15-18 degrees of freedom. We furthermore show that the error made with this ansatz can be controlled and vanishes in certain limits. We present calculations on the potential of HFCO to demonstrate the features of the algorithm. To demonstrate the power of the method, we transformed a 15D potential of the protonated water dimer (Zundel cation) in a sum-of-products form and calculated the ground and lowest 26 vibrationally excited states of the Zundel cation with the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method.

  5. Surface characterization by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry of products formed during the potentiostatic reduction of chalcopyrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nava, Dora; Gonzalez, Ignacio; Leinen, Dietmar; Ramos-Barrado, Jose R.

    2008-01-01

    Surface characterization of the transient products that precede chalcocite formation during chalcopyrite reduction was carried out. The experimental strategy employed in the present work consisted of the application of different potential pulses (fixed energetic conditions) on the surface of chalcopyrite electrodes in 1.7 M H 2 SO 4 . The chemical products formed at different potential pulses were characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and XPS. Each electrogenerated species presented a specific voltammetric behavior and an XPS spectrum, in which the values of principal photoelectronic peak bond energies for Cu 2p 3/2 , Fe 2p 3/2 and S 2p 3/2 and the atomic concentrations were considered. Several potential intervals could be identified: in 0.115 ≥ E cat ≥ -0.085 V vs. SHE, an intermediate copper sulfide is formed whose composition is between those of chalcopyrite and bornite, such as talnakhite. The reduction of this product occurs slowly, giving bornite at potentials less than -0.085 V. In the applied potential region -0.085 ≥ E cat > -0.185 V, the bornite gradually decomposes causing the incomplete conversion to chalcocite. In the potential interval -0.185 > E cat ≥ -0.285 V, energetic conditions are large enough to allow the immediate decomposition of bornite, forming chalcocite in a more quantitative manner

  6. Shock-induced microdeformations in quartz and other mineralogical indications of an impact event at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohor, B.F.

    1990-01-01

    The event terminating the Cretaceous period and the Mesozoic era caused massive extinctions of flora and fauna worldwide. Theories of the nature of this event can be classed as endogenic (volcanic, climatic, etc.) or exogenic (extraterrestrial causes). Mineralogical evidence from the boundary clays and claystones strongly favor the impact of an extraterrestrial body as the cause of this event. Nonmarine KT boundary claystones are comprised of two separate layers-an upper layer composed of high-angle ejecta material (shocked quartz, altered glass and spinel) and a basal kaolinitic layer containing spherules, clasts, and altered glass, together with some shocked grains. Recognition of this dual-layered nature of the boundary clay is important for the determination of the timing and processes involved in the impact event and in the assignment and interpretation of geochemical signatures. Multiple sets of shock-induced microdeformations (planar features) in quartz grains separated from KT boundary clays provide compelling evidence of an impact event. This mineralogical manifestation of shock metamorphism is associated worldwide with a large positive anomaly of iridium in these boundary clays, which has also been considered indicative of the impact of a large extraterrestrial body. Global distributions of maximum sizes of shocked quartz grains from the boundary clays and the mineralogy of the ejecta components favor an impact on or near the North American continent. Spinel crystals (magnesioferrite) occur in the boundary clays as micrometer-sized octahedra or skeletal forms. Their composition differs from that of spinels found in terrestrial oceanic basalts. Magnesioferrite crystals are restricted to the high-angle ejecta layer of the boundary clays and their small size and skeletal morphology suggest that they are condensation products of a vaporized bolide. Hollow spherules ranging up to 1 mm in size are ubiquitously associated with the boundary clays. In nonmarine

  7. Soil chemistry and mineralogy of the Santa Cruz coastal terraces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinney, Colin; Aniku, Jacob; Burke, Raymond; Harden, Jennifer; Singer, Michael; Munster, Jennie

    2002-01-01

    Marine terraces in the central coast of California provide an opportunity to study a soil chronosequence in which similar materials (beach deposits) have been weathered under similar slope, climatic, and vegetation conditions during the Quaternary. The terraces between Santa Cruz and Año Nuevo, California, have been studied for decades and are thought to be one of the best example of marine terraces in California {Lawson (1893), Wilson (1907); Branner and others (1909), Rode (1930) Page and Holmes (1945), Alexander (1953), Bradley (1956, 1957, 1958, and 1965), Bradley and Addicott (1968), Clark (1966 and 1970), Jahns and Hamilton (1971), Lajoie and others (1972), Bradley and Griggs (1976). Hanks and others (1986), Aniku (1986), Fine and others (1988), Anderson (1990 and 1994), and Rosenbloom and Anderson (1994).} Here we report morphological, chemical, physical, and mineralogical data for the soils that were formed in deposits on the Santa Cruz marine terraces in order to examine soil characteristics as a function of increasing terrace age.

  8. Mineralogy and geochemistry of soils from glass houses and solariums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgariu, Dumitru; Filipov, Feodor; Rusu, Constantin; Bulgariu, Laura

    2010-05-01

    The experimental studies have been performed on soil samples from Copou-Iaşi, Bacău and Bârlad (România) glass houses. We have specially follow the aspects concerning to the distribution of occurrence forms, composition and structure of mineral and organic components, and the genetic correlations between these in conditions of soils from glass houses, respectively. The results regarding the distribution tendencies on profile and the correlations between mineral and organic components of studied soils have been correlated with the results of microscopic, spectral (IR and Raman) and X-ray diffraction studies, and with the results of thermodynamic modelling of mineral equilibriums and dynamics of pedogenesis processes, in conditions of soils from glass houses. The utilization of intensive cultivation technologies of vegetables in glass houses determined the degradation of morphological, physical and chemical characteristics of soils, by fast evolution of salted processes (salinization and / or sodization), compaction, carbonatation, eluviation-illuviation, frangipane formation, stagnogleization, gleization, etc. Under these conditions, at depth of 30-40 cm is formed a compact and impenetrable horizon with frangipane characteristics, expresses more or less. The aspects about the formation of frangipane horizon in soils from glasshouses are not yet sufficiently know. Whatever of the formation processes, the frangipane horizons determined a sever segregation in pedo-geochemical evolution of soils from glasshouses, with very important consequences on the agrochemical quality of these soils. The soils from glass houses are characterized by a very large variability of mineralogy and chemistry, which are traduced by intense modifications of superior horizons, in many cases there are conditions for the apparition of new pedogenetic horizons through new-pedogenesis processes. Under these conditions the definition of some general characteristics of soils from glasshouses is

  9. Mineralogical and paragenetical problems of the Mecsek uranium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincze, J.; Fazekas, V.

    1979-01-01

    The latest results of the ore-mineralogical examination of the uranium ore of a deposit included in Permian sandstones in the Mecsek Mountains, southern Hungary, are presented. The phases of the minerals belonging to the uranium oxide series and their types of development, the post-coffinite nasturan pseudomorphs and the relationship between nasturan and coffinite are dealt with. Of the sulphide ore minerals associated with uranium ore mineralization the type determinant mineral is pyrite, i.e. the mineral forming their bulk and partly represented by characteristically finely aggregated ''bacteriopyrite'' and/or spherical pyrite and ''framboidal pyrite. The textural pattern of the ore mineralization is of typically matrix type. The matrix of sandstone is constituted by carbonate minerals, ''hydromicas'' and ore minerals. The matrix and, consequently, the ore minerals will corrode and consume the allothigenic detrital rockforming minerals, the feldspar, quartz-porphyry and quartz. (A.L.)

  10. Effect of Alkali-Acid-Heat Chemical Surface Treatment on Electron Beam Melted Porous Titanium and Its Apatite Forming Ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzan Bsat

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Advanced additive manufacturing techniques such as electron beam melting (EBM, can produce highly porous structures that resemble the mechanical properties and structure of native bone. However, for orthopaedic applications, such as joint prostheses or bone substitution, the surface must also be bio-functionalized to promote bone growth. In the current work, EBM porous Ti6Al4V alloy was exposed to an alkali acid heat (AlAcH treatment to bio-functionalize the surface of the porous structure. Various molar concentrations (3, 5, 10M and immersion times (6, 24 h of the alkali treatment were used to determine optimal parameters. The apatite forming ability of the samples was evaluated using simulated body fluid (SBF immersion testing. The micro-topography and surface chemistry of AlAcH treated samples were evaluated before and after SBF testing using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The AlAcH treatment successfully modified the topographical and chemical characteristics of EBM porous titanium surface creating nano-topographical features ranging from 200–300 nm in size with a titania layer ideal for apatite formation. After 1 and 3 week immersion in SBF, there was no Ca or P present on the surface of as manufactured porous titanium while both elements were present on all AlAcH treated samples except those exposed to 3M, 6 h alkali treatment. An increase in molar concentration and/or immersion time of alkali treatment resulted in an increase in the number of nano-topographical features per unit area as well as the amount of titania on the surface.

  11. Effect of Alkali-Acid-Heat Chemical Surface Treatment on Electron Beam Melted Porous Titanium and Its Apatite Forming Ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bsat, Suzan; Yavari, Saber Amin; Munsch, Maximilian; Valstar, Edward R; Zadpoor, Amir A

    2015-04-08

    Advanced additive manufacturing techniques such as electron beam melting (EBM), can produce highly porous structures that resemble the mechanical properties and structure of native bone. However, for orthopaedic applications, such as joint prostheses or bone substitution, the surface must also be bio-functionalized to promote bone growth. In the current work, EBM porous Ti6Al4V alloy was exposed to an alkali acid heat (AlAcH) treatment to bio-functionalize the surface of the porous structure. Various molar concentrations (3, 5, 10M) and immersion times (6, 24 h) of the alkali treatment were used to determine optimal parameters. The apatite forming ability of the samples was evaluated using simulated body fluid (SBF) immersion testing. The micro-topography and surface chemistry of AlAcH treated samples were evaluated before and after SBF testing using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The AlAcH treatment successfully modified the topographical and chemical characteristics of EBM porous titanium surface creating nano-topographical features ranging from 200-300 nm in size with a titania layer ideal for apatite formation. After 1 and 3 week immersion in SBF, there was no Ca or P present on the surface of as manufactured porous titanium while both elements were present on all AlAcH treated samples except those exposed to 3M, 6 h alkali treatment. An increase in molar concentration and/or immersion time of alkali treatment resulted in an increase in the number of nano-topographical features per unit area as well as the amount of titania on the surface.

  12. Microbiota formed on attached stainless steel coupons correlates with the natural biofilm of the sink surface in domestic kitchens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, Birgitte; Røssvoll, Elin; Måge, Ingrid; Møretrø, Trond; Langsrud, Solveig

    2016-02-01

    Stainless steel coupons are frequently used in biofilm studies in the laboratory, as this material is commonly used in the food industry. The coupons are attached to different surfaces to create a "natural" biofilm to be studied further in laboratory trials. However, little has been done to investigate how well the microbiota on such coupons represents the surrounding environment. The microbiota on sink wall surfaces and on new stainless steel coupons attached to the sink wall for 3 months in 8 domestic kitchen sinks was investigated by next-generation sequencing (MiSeq) of the 16S rRNA gene derived from DNA and RNA (cDNA), and by plating and identification of colonies. The mean number of colony-forming units was about 10-fold higher for coupons than sink surfaces, and more variation in bacterial counts between kitchens was seen on sink surfaces than coupons. The microbiota in the majority of biofilms was dominated by Moraxellaceae (genus Moraxella/Enhydrobacter) and Micrococcaceae (genus Kocuria). The results demonstrated that the variation in the microbiota was mainly due to differences between kitchens (38.2%), followed by the different nucleic acid template (DNA vs RNA) (10.8%), and that only 5.1% of the variation was a result of differences between coupons and sink surfaces. The microbiota variation between sink surfaces and coupons was smaller for samples based on their RNA than on their DNA. Overall, our results suggest that new stainless steel coupons are suited to model the dominating part of the natural microbiota of the surrounding environment and, furthermore, are suitable for different downstream studies.

  13. Guest-Host Complex Formed between Ascorbic Acid and β-Cyclodextrin Immobilized on the Surface of an Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Teresa Ramírez-Silva

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the formation of supramolecular complexes between ascorbic acid (AA, the guest, and β-cyclodextrin (β-CD, the host, that was first potentiodynamically immobilized on the surface of a carbon paste electrode (CPE throughout the formation of a β-CD-based conducting polymer (poly-β-CD. With the bare CPE and the β-CD-modified CPE, an electrochemical study was performed to understand the effect of such surface modification on the electrochemical response of the AA. From this study it was shown that on the modified-CPE, the AA was surface-immobilized through formation of an inclusion complex with β-CD, which provoked the adsorption of AA in such a way that this stage became the limiting step for the electrochemical oxidation of AA. Moreover, from the analysis of the experimental voltammetric plots recorded during AA oxidation on the CPE/poly-β-CD electrode surfaces, the Gibbs’ standard free energy of the inclusion complex formed by the oxidation product of AA and β-CD has been determined for the first time, ∆G0inclus = −36.4 kJ/mol.

  14. The Influence of Electrolytic Concentration on the Electrochemical Deposition of Calcium Phosphate Coating on a Direct Laser Metal Forming Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianyue Sun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A calcium phosphate (CaP coating on titanium surface enhances its biocompatibility, thus facilitating osteoconduction and osteoinduction with the inorganic phase of the human bone. Electrochemical deposition has been suggested as an effective means of fabricating CaP coatings on porous surface. The purpose of this study was to develop CaP coatings on a direct laser metal forming implant using electrochemical deposition and to investigate the effect of electrolytic concentration on the coating’s morphology and structure by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, water contact angle analysis, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. In group 10−2, coatings were rich in dicalcium phosphate, characterized to be thick, layered, and disordered plates. In contrast, in groups 10−3 and 10−4, the relatively thin and well-ordered coatings predominantly consisted of granular hydroxyapatite. Further, the hydrophilicity and cell affinity were improved as electrolytic concentration increased. In particular, the cells cultured in group 10−3 appeared to have spindle morphology with thick pseudopodia on CaP coatings; these spindles and pseudopodia strongly adhered to the rough and porous surface. By analyzing and evaluating the surface properties, we provided further knowledge on the electrolytic concentration effect, which will be critical for improving CaP coated Ti implants in the future.

  15. Efficient frequency-domain numerical analysis of modified surface plasmon waveguides formed by a metallic sleeve and coaxial rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Jinping; Xue Wenrui

    2012-01-01

    Some types of modified surface plasmonic waveguides formed by nanometric silver rods with triangular and square cross-section and a coaxial silver sleeve are proposed in this paper. The finite-difference frequency-domain method is used to study the propagation properties of the fundamental mode supported by these types of surface plasmonic waveguides. The field distribution of the fundamental mode and the dependences of the propagation properties on the geometrical parameters, working wavelength and gain media are discussed in detail. The results show that the above physical properties can be adjusted by choosing proper structure parameters, working wavelength and gain media. So the advantages of the properties of the modes render these waveguides promising optical components or photonic device integration and sensors that would benefit future plasmonic interconnects and circuits.

  16. Modelling the influence of the gas to melt ratio on the fraction solid of the surface in spray formed billets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper Henri; Pryds, Nini

    2006-01-01

    the atomisation stage taking thermal coupling into consideration and the deposition of the droplets at the surface of the billet taking geometrical aspects such as shading into account. The coupling between these two models is accomplished by ensuring that the total droplet size distribution of the spray......In this paper, the relationship between the Gas to Melt Ratio (GMR) and the solid fraction of an evolving billet surface is investigated numerically. The basis for the analysis is a recently developed integrated procedure for modelling the entire spray forming process. This model includes...... is the summation of “local” droplet size distributions along the r-axis of the spray cone. The criterion for a successful process has been a predefined process window characterised by a desired solid fraction range at a certain distance from the atomizer. Inside this process window, the gas and melt flows have...

  17. Energy-switching potential energy surface for the water molecule revisited: A highly accurate singled-sheeted form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvão, B R L; Rodrigues, S P J; Varandas, A J C

    2008-07-28

    A global ab initio potential energy surface is proposed for the water molecule by energy-switching/merging a highly accurate isotope-dependent local potential function reported by Polyansky et al. [Science 299, 539 (2003)] with a global form of the many-body expansion type suitably adapted to account explicitly for the dynamical correlation and parametrized from extensive accurate multireference configuration interaction energies extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. The new function mimics also the complicated Sigma/Pi crossing that arises at linear geometries of the water molecule.

  18. Reconstruction of the palaeoenvironment using biomarkers and clay mineralogy in loess deposits of northern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Shahriari

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Knowledge about palaeoenviroment and palaeovegetation provides information about how vegetation reacts on climate fluctuations in the past, what will help understanding current and future developments caused by e.g. climate change. Northern Iranian Loess-Plateau forms a strongly dissected landscape with steeply sloping loess hills. This loess record reflects numerous cycles of climate change and landscape evolution for the Middle to Late Quaternary period. therefore, this study was done for reconstruction of palaeoenvironment (climate and vegetation in loess-palaeosol sequences in northern Iran. Therefore, this study aims at a preliminary reconstruction of palaeovegetation and palaeoenvironment, in loess-palaeosol sequences along a cliomosequnce in Northern Iran. Materials and Methods: Two loess-palaeosol sequences (Agh Band and Nowdeh sections were chosen in Golestan province, in northern Iran and step-wise profiles were prepared. Agh Band section is located in the western most part of the Northern Iranian loess plateau and has about 50 m thickness of loess deposits. Nowdeh loess-palaeosol sequence is located about 20 km southeast of Gonbad-e Kavus, in the vicinity of the Nowdeh River. Soil sampling was done in several field campaigns in spring 2012. More than 30cm of the surface deposits were removed in order to reach for undisturbed loess and palaeosols and one mixed sample was taken from each horizonA comparison of palaeosols with modern soils formed under known Holocene climatic conditions, which are derived from substrates with similar granulometric and mineralogical composition are suited for reconstructing past climate and environment. Hence, six modern soil profiles were prepared along the climosequnce and the vegetation cover changed from grassland in the dry area to dense shrub land and forest in the moist part of the ecological gradient. For reconstruction of palaeoenvironment (climate and vegetation some basic physico

  19. Uranium geochemistry, mineralogy, geology, exploration and resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Vivo, B.

    1984-01-01

    This book comprises papers on the following topics: history of radioactivity; uranium in mantle processes; transport and deposition of uranium in hydrothermal systems at temperatures up to 300 0 C: Geological implications; geochemical behaviour of uranium in the supergene environment; uranium exploration techniques; uranium mineralogy; time, crustal evolution and generation of uranium deposits; uranium exploration; geochemistry of uranium in the hydrographic network; uranium deposits of the world, excluding Europe; uranium deposits in Europe; uranium in the economics of energy; role of high heat production granites in uranium province formation; and uranium deposits

  20. Mineralogic Model (MM3.0) Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, A.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a three-dimensional (3-D) representation of the mineral abundance within the geologic framework model domain. The mineralogic model enables project personnel to estimate mineral abundances at any position, within the model region, and within any stratigraphic unit in the model area. The model provides the abundance and distribution of 10 minerals and mineral groups within 22 stratigraphic sequences or model layers in the Yucca Mountain area. The uncertainties and limitations associated with this model are discussed in Section 6.4. Model validation accomplished by corroboration with data not cited as direct input is discussed in Section 7

  1. Advances and Opportunities in Ore Mineralogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel J. Cook

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The study of ore minerals is rapidly transforming due to an explosion of new micro- and nano-analytical technologies. These advanced microbeam techniques can expose the physical and chemical character of ore minerals at ever-better spatial resolution and analytical precision. The insights that can be obtained from ten of today’s most important, or emerging, techniques and methodologies are reviewed: laser-ablation inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry; focussed ion beam-scanning electron microscopy; high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy; electron back-scatter diffraction; synchrotron X-ray fluorescence mapping; automated mineral analysis (Quantitative Evaluation of Mineralogy via Scanning Electron Microscopy and Mineral Liberation Analysis; nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry; atom probe tomography; radioisotope geochronology using ore minerals; and, non-traditional stable isotopes. Many of these technical advances cut across conceptual boundaries between mineralogy and geochemistry and require an in-depth knowledge of the material that is being analysed. These technological advances are accompanied by changing approaches to ore mineralogy: the increased focus on trace element distributions; the challenges offered by nanoscale characterisation; and the recognition of the critical petrogenetic information in gangue minerals, and, thus the need to for a holistic approach to the characterization of mineral assemblages. Using original examples, with an emphasis on iron oxide-copper-gold deposits, we show how increased analytical capabilities, particularly imaging and chemical mapping at the nanoscale, offer the potential to resolve outstanding questions in ore mineralogy. Broad regional or deposit-scale genetic models can be validated or refuted by careful analysis at the smallest scales of observation. As the volume of information at different scales of observation expands, the level of complexity

  2. Extensional flow of low-viscosity fluids in capillary bridges formed by pulsed surface acoustic wave jetting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharjee, P K; McDonnell, A G; Prabhakar, R; Yeo, L Y; Friend, J, E-mail: james.friend@monash.edu.au [MicroNanophysics Research Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC 3800 (Australia); Melbourne Centre for Nanofabrication, Melbourne, VIC 3800 (Australia)

    2011-02-15

    Forming capillary bridges of low-viscosity ({approx}<10 mPa s) fluids is difficult, making the study of their capillary-thinning behavior and the measurement of the fluid's extensional viscosity difficult as well. Current techniques require some time to form a liquid bridge from the stretching of a droplet. Rapidly stretching a liquid bridge using these methods can cause its breakup if the viscosity is too low. Stretching more slowly allows the bridge to thin and break up before a suitable bridge geometry can be established to provide reliable and accurate rheological data. Using a pulsed surface acoustic wave to eject a jet from a sessile droplet, a capillary bridge may be formed in about 7.5 ms, about seven times quicker than current methods. With this approach, capillary bridges may be formed from Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids having much lower viscosities-water, 0.04% by weight solution of high-molecular-weight (7 MDa) polystyrene in dioctyl phthalate and 0.25% fibrinogen solution in demineralized water, for example. Details of the relatively simple system used to achieve these results are provided, as are experimental results indicating deviations from a Newtonian response by the low-viscosity non-Newtonian fluids used in our study.

  3. Extensional flow of low-viscosity fluids in capillary bridges formed by pulsed surface acoustic wave jetting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharjee, P K; McDonnell, A G; Prabhakar, R; Yeo, L Y; Friend, J

    2011-01-01

    Forming capillary bridges of low-viscosity (∼<10 mPa s) fluids is difficult, making the study of their capillary-thinning behavior and the measurement of the fluid's extensional viscosity difficult as well. Current techniques require some time to form a liquid bridge from the stretching of a droplet. Rapidly stretching a liquid bridge using these methods can cause its breakup if the viscosity is too low. Stretching more slowly allows the bridge to thin and break up before a suitable bridge geometry can be established to provide reliable and accurate rheological data. Using a pulsed surface acoustic wave to eject a jet from a sessile droplet, a capillary bridge may be formed in about 7.5 ms, about seven times quicker than current methods. With this approach, capillary bridges may be formed from Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids having much lower viscosities-water, 0.04% by weight solution of high-molecular-weight (7 MDa) polystyrene in dioctyl phthalate and 0.25% fibrinogen solution in demineralized water, for example. Details of the relatively simple system used to achieve these results are provided, as are experimental results indicating deviations from a Newtonian response by the low-viscosity non-Newtonian fluids used in our study.

  4. Major surface glycoproteins of insect forms of Trypanosoma brucei are not essential for cyclical transmission by tsetse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Vassella

    Full Text Available Procyclic forms of Trypanosoma brucei reside in the midgut of tsetse flies where they are covered by several million copies of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins known as procyclins. It has been proposed that procyclins protect parasites against proteases and/or participate in tropism, directing them from the midgut to the salivary glands. There are four different procyclin genes, each subject to elaborate levels of regulation. To determine if procyclins are essential for survival and transmission of T. brucei, all four genes were deleted and parasite fitness was compared in vitro and in vivo. When co-cultured in vitro, the null mutant and wild type trypanosomes (tagged with cyan fluorescent protein maintained a near-constant equilibrium. In contrast, when flies were infected with the same mixture, the null mutant was rapidly overgrown in the midgut, reflecting a reduction in fitness in vivo. Although the null mutant is patently defective in competition with procyclin-positive parasites, on its own it can complete the life cycle and generate infectious metacyclic forms. The procyclic form of T. brucei thus differs strikingly from the bloodstream form, which does not tolerate any perturbation of its variant surface glycoprotein coat, and from other parasites such as Plasmodium berghei, which requires the circumsporozoite protein for successful transmission to a new host.

  5. Chemical and mineralogical changes in a Brazilian Rhodic Paleudult under different land use and managements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessé Rodrigo Fink

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Changes in land use and management can affect the dynamic equilibrium of soil systems and induce chemical and mineralogical alterations. This study was based on two long-term experiments (10 and 27 years to evaluate soil used for no-tillage maize cultivation, with and without poultry litter application (NTPL and NTM, and with grazed native pasture fertilized with cattle droppings (GrP, on the chemical and mineralogical characteristics of a Rhodic Paleudult in Southern Brazil, in comparison with the same soil under native grassland (NGr. In the four treatments, soil was sampled from the 0.0-2.5 and 2.5-5.0 cm layers. In the air-dried fine soil (ADFS fraction (∅ < 2 mm, chemical characteristics of solid and liquid phases and the specific surface area (SSA were evaluated. The clay fraction (∅ < 0.002 mm in the 0.0-2.5 cm layer was analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD after treatments for identification and characterization of 2:1 clay minerals. Animal waste application increased the total organic C concentration (COT and specific surface area (SSA in the 0.0-2.5 cm layer. In comparison to NGr, poultry litter application (NTPL increased the concentrations of Ca and CECpH7, while cattle droppings (GrP increased the P and K concentrations. In the soil solution, the concentration of dissolved organic C was positively related with COT levels. With regard to NGr, the soil use with crops (NTM and NTPL had practically no effect on the chemical elements in solution. On the other hand, the concentrations of most chemical elements in solution were higher in GrP, especially of Fe, Al and Si. The Fe and Al concentrations in the soil iron oxides were lower, indicating reductive/complexive dissolution of crystalline forms. The X-ray diffraction (XRD patterns of clay in the GrP environment showed a decrease in intensity and reflection area of the 2:1 clay minerals. This fact, along with the intensified Al and Si activity in soil solution indicate dissolution of

  6. Superficial alteration mineralogy in active volcanic systems: An example of Poás volcano, Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Alejandro; van Bergen, Manfred J.

    2017-10-01

    The alteration mineralogy in the crater area of Poás volcano (Costa Rica) has been studied to constrain acid fluid-rock interaction processes and conditions relevant for the formation of sulphate-bearing mineral assemblages found on the surface of Mars. Individual sub-environments, which include the hyperacid lake (Laguna Caliente), ephemeral hot springs, fumarole vents and areas affected by acid rain and/or spray from the lake, are marked by distinct secondary mineral associations, with sulphates commonly as prevailing component. The sulphates occur in a wide mineralogical diversity comprising gypsum/anhydrite, various polyhydrated Al-sulphates, alunite-jarosite group minerals, halotrichite-, voltaite- and copiapite-group minerals, epsomite and römerite. Depending on the sub-environment, they are variably associated with clay minerals (kaolinite-group and smectite-group), zeolites, SiO2-polymorphs, Fe-(hydro)oxides, Ti-oxides, native sulphur, sulphides, chlorides, fluorides, phosphates and carbonates. Geochemical modelling was performed to identify mechanisms responsible for the formation of the secondary minerals found in the field, and to predict their possible stability under conditions not seen at the surface. The results indicate that the appearance of amorphous silica, hematite, anhydrite/gypsum, pyrite, anatase and kaolinite is relatively insensitive to the degree of acidity of the local aqueous system. On the other hand, alunite-jarosite group minerals, elemental sulphur and Al(OH)SO4 only form under acidic conditions (pH rain or brine spray. Modelling suggests that their formation required a repetitive sequence of olivine dissolution and evaporation in an open system involving limited amounts of fluid. The mineral variety in the crater of Poás is remarkably similar to sulphate-bearing assemblages considered to be the product of acid-sulphate alteration on Mars. The analogy suggests that comparable fluid-rock interaction controls operated in Martian

  7. Characterization of rock samples and mineralogical controls on leachates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Cravotta, Charles A.; Galeone, Daniel G.; Jackson, John C.; Dulong, Frank T.; Hornberger, Roger J.; Brady, Keith B.C.

    2009-01-01

    Rocks associated with coal beds typically include shale, sandstone, and (or) limestone. In addition to common rock-forming minerals, all of these rock types may contain sulfide and sulfate minerals, various carbonate minerals, and organic material. These different minerals have inherently different solubility characteristics, as well as different acid-generating or acid-neutralizing potentials. The abundance and composition of sulfur- and carbonate-bearing minerals are of particular interest in interpreting the leaching column data because (1) pyrite and carbonate minerals are the primary controls on the acid-base account of a sample, (2) these minerals incorporate trace metals that can be released during weathering, and (3) these minerals readily react during weathering due to mineral dissolution and oxidation of iron.Rock samples were collected by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PaDEP) from five different sites to assess the draft standardized leaching column method (ADTI-WP2) for the prediction of weathering rates and water quality at coal mines. Samples were sent to USGS laboratories for mineralogical characterization and to ActLabs for chemical analysis. The samples represent a variety of rock types (shales, sandstones, and coal refuse) that are typical of coal overburden in the eastern United States. These particular samples were chosen for testing the weathering protocols because they represent a range of geochemical and lithologic characteristics, sulfur contents, and acid-base accounting characteristics (Hornberger et al., 2003). The rocks contain variable amounts of pyrite and carbonate minerals and vary in texture.This chapter includes bulk rock chemical data and detailed mineralogical and textural data for unweathered starting materials used in the interlaboratory validation study, and for two samples used in the early phases of leaching column tests (Wadesville Sandstone, Leechburg Coal Refuse). We also characterize some of the

  8. Fine particle magnetic mineralogy of archaeological ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, D; King, J A

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the magnetic mineralogy of a worldwide collection of archaeological pottery. The mineral types, the mass fractions and the domain states of the constituent magnetic fine particles were elucidated from a range of measurements including magnetic hysteresis behaviour, the acquisition of isothermal remanence, low field susceptibility and thermomagnetic curves. The magnetic mineralogy of most samples was dominated by magnetite. Titanomagnetites with limited titanium substitution and cation deficient magnetites (indicative of low temperature oxidation) were dominant in some samples. Haematite was detected in 53% of the samples, but seldom contributed much to the saturation magnetization. Magnetic particle sizes are skewed to smaller sizes, with sherds mostly having a large superparamagnetic or a stable single domain fraction. Low temperature susceptibility data suggest that 30% of samples had some multidomain component. The percentage by mass of magnetic material in the ancient pottery studied was less than 0.8% for all but one of the samples and the majority of samples contain less than 0.3% by weight of magnetic fine particles. The presence of low temperature oxidation in many samples and the occurrence of a multidomain component in a third of the collection suggest that ancient pottery may not always be suitable for determining the intensity of the ancient geomagnetic field

  9. Matrix mineralogy of the Lance CO3 carbonaceous chondrite: A transmission electron microscope study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, L.P.; Buseck, P.R.

    1990-01-01

    The Lance CO3 carbonaceous chondrite (CC) is less altered than the CI and CM chondrites and so provides a view of the mineralogy and textures resulting from the earliest stages of aqueous alteration of CCs. Matrix olivine in Lance has been partly altered to fine-grained, Fe-bearing serpentine and poorly crystalline Fe 3+ oxide, a process that required both hydration and oxidation. Serpentine occurs as discrete packets separated from the olivine surfaces by the Fe 3+ oxide. The Fe released during the dissolution of olivine was partly incorporated into the serpentine; the remainder was oxidized to form Fe 3+ oxide. Matrix metal was also altered to produce Fe oxides, leaving the residual metal enriched in Ni. Olivine grains in Lance matrix contain channels along their [100] and [001] directions. The formation and convergence of such channels resulted in a grain-size reduction of the olivine. The alteration was pervasive but incomplete, suggesting a limited availability of fluid. A brief study of two other CO chondrites, Kainsaz and Warrenton, shows that these meteorites do not contain phyllosilicates in their matrices, although both contain Fe 3+ oxide between olivine grains. Prior to its alteration, Lance probably resembled Kainsaz, an unaltered CO3 chondrite. The alteration assemblage in Lance is only slightly different from that in Mokoia and essentially the same as that in C3 xenoliths from Murchison. Alteration products in Lance show greater similarities to CI than to CM chondrites

  10. Stress intensity factors for deep cracks emanating from the corner formed by a hole intersecting a plate surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcgowan, J. J.; Smith, C. W.

    1976-01-01

    The stress intensity factors (SIFs) at the end points of flaws emanating from the corner formed by the intersection of a plate with a hole were determined using stress freezing photoelasticity and a numerical technique known as the Taylor series correction method to extract the SIF values from the photoelastic data. The geometries studied were crack depth to thickness ratios of about 0.2, 0.5, and 0.75; crack depth to crack length ratios of about 1.0 to 2.0; and crack length to hole radius ratios of about 0.5 to 2.0. The SIFs were determined at the intersection of the flaw border with the plate surface (KS) and with the edge of the hole (KH). It is shown that extension of a crack emanating from a corner of intersection of a hole with a plate under monotonically increasing load is not self-similar and that as the flaw depth increases, KH decreases and KS increases. Existing theories and design criteria significantly overestimate the SIF at both the hole and the surface except for shallow flaws at the hole and deep flaws at the surface.

  11. Mechanical properties of cohesive soils in dependence on the water quantity and mineralogical composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludvik Trauner

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available This article explains the relationships between the water content, mineralogical properties and mechanical properties of saturated clays. The findings are based on theoretical analysis and were confirmed experimentally on monomineral clay samples. It was foundthat the quantity of intergrain water, which determines the undrained shear strength and compressibility of clays, consists of free pore water, and the firmly adsorbed water on the external surfaces of the clay grains. The free water quantity is the same for differentsaturated clays, at the same undrained shear strength, and same effective stress after consolidation and, likewise, the thickness of the water film around the clay grains. The total quantity of firmly adsorbed water depends on the specific surfaces of the clays. Theresult of this work is a new analytical formulation that gives the relationship between the water content and the mechanical properties of clays, taking into account their mineralogical characteristics.

  12. Mineralogical characteristics of the silica polymorphs in relation to their biological activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guthrie, G.D. Jr. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Heaney, P.J. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Geological and Geophysical Sciences

    1993-10-01

    Numerous aspects of minerals (including the silica polymorphs) can effect their biological activities. These include periodic structures, compositional variations, dissolution characteristics, surface properties, and particle size/shape. In order to understand mineral-induced pathogenesis in a mechanistic way, the links between these properties and biochemical processes must be elucidated. This paper presents some of the basic properties of the silica polymorphs that may relate to pathogenicity and mineralogical strategies for designing biological assays to evaluate these properties.

  13. Test and Delivery of the Chemin Mineralogical Instrument for Mars Science Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, D. F.; Vaniman, D.; Anderson, R.; Bish, D.; Chipera, S.; Chemtob, S.; Crisp, J.; DesMarais, D. J.; Downs, R.; Feldman, S.; hide

    2010-01-01

    The CheMin mineralogical instrument on MSL will return quantitative powder X-ray diffraction data (XRD) and qualitative X-ray fluorescence data (XRF; 14surface. The geometry of the source, sample, and detector is shown. A transmission geometry was chosen so that diffracted intensities in the low-20 region (5-15 deg), important for phyllosilicate identification, could be detected.

  14. Influence of surface roughness and melt superheat on HDA process to form a tritium permeation barrier on RAFM steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purushothaman, J. [B.S. Abdur Rahman University, Chennai 600048 (India); MTD, MMG, IGCAR, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Ramaseshan, R., E-mail: seshan@igcar.gov.in [TFCS, SND, MSG, IGCAR, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Albert, S.K. [MTD, MMG, IGCAR, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Rajendran, R. [B.S. Abdur Rahman University, Chennai 600048 (India); Gowrishankar, N. [IP Rings Ltd., Maraimalainagar, Chennai 603209 (India); Ramasubbu, V. [MTD, MMG, IGCAR, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Murugesan, S.; Dasgupta, Arup [PMG, MMG, IGCAR, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Jayakumar, T. [MTD, MMG, IGCAR, Kalpakkam 603102 (India)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Surface modified RAFMS samples were subjected to HDA and thermal oxidation. • Sample modified by SB process showed better coating and interface morphology. • Aluminized samples at 740 °C for 2 min showed Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 9}Si{sub 2} intermetallic phase. • Oxidized samples showed Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 8}Si, Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 3}Si{sub 3} and Fe{sub 3}Al{sub 2}Si{sub 3} intermetallic phases. • A uniform permeation barrier Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was formed on the coating of oxidized HDA samples. - Abstract: The most optimal candidate material for fabrication of Test Blanket Module (TBM) in the installation of ITER and future fusion reactors is Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steel, yet one of the major challenges that need to be addressed with RAFM is minimizing the loss of tritium in a reactor environment through the formation of tritium permeation barrier. One of the most promising methods for the tritium permeation barrier is through duplex coating with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Fe–Al which is well known to reduce tritium permeation rate by several orders of magnitude. The present work aims to form an alumina layer on RAFM steel by a two-step method, which consists of (i) Hot Dip Aluminizing (HDA) and (ii) conversion of Al into alumina by a subsequent oxidation process. In addition, the influence of surface roughness of the substrate, superheat condition of the Al alloy melt and its composition on microstructural properties of coating before and after oxidation were investigated using OM, SEM–EDS, XRD, indentation micro hardness and scratch test. The experimental results confirmed the formation of alumina layer on RAFM steel after the HDA and oxidation process. Moreover, the surface roughness of the substrate, melt superheat of Al alloy and its composition are found to have a significant influence on the microstructure, thickness, micro-hardness, nature of intermetallic compounds formed and adhesion strength of the coating.

  15. Comparison of the surfaces and interfaces formed for sputter and electroless deposited gold contacts on CdZnTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Steven J.; Baker, Mark A.; Duarte, Diana D.; Schneider, Andreas; Seller, Paul; Sellin, Paul J.; Veale, Matthew C.; Wilson, Matthew D.

    2018-01-01

    Cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) is a leading sensor material for spectroscopic X/γ-ray imaging in the fields of homeland security, medical imaging, industrial analysis and astrophysics. The metal-semiconductor interface formed during contact deposition is of fundamental importance to the spectroscopic performance of the detector and is primarily determined by the deposition method. A multi-technique analysis of the metal-semiconductor interface formed by sputter and electroless deposition of gold onto (111) aligned CdZnTe is presented. Focused ion beam (FIB) cross section imaging, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth profiling and current-voltage (IV) analysis have been applied to determine the structural, chemical and electronic properties of the gold contacts. In a novel approach, principal component analysis has been employed on the XPS depth profiles to extract detailed chemical state information from different depths within the profile. It was found that electroless deposition forms a complicated, graded interface comprised of tellurium oxide, gold/gold telluride particulates, and cadmium chloride. This compared with a sharp transition from surface gold to bulk CdZnTe observed for the interface formed by sputter deposition. The electronic (IV) response for the detector with electroless deposited contacts was symmetric, but was asymmetric for the detector with sputtered gold contacts. This is due to the electroless deposition degrading the difference between the Cd- and Te-faces of the CdZnTe (111) crystal, whilst these differences are maintained for the sputter deposited gold contacts. This work represents an important step in the optimisation of the metal-semiconductor interface which currently is a limiting factor in the development of high resolution CdZnTe detectors.

  16. Contribution to chemical-mineralogical study of carbonatites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, M.Q. da; Lima, W.N. de; Correa, S.L.A.

    1982-01-01

    A preliminary chemical-mineralogical study of carbonatites from Jacupiranga (SP,Brazil) and Alto Pinheiros (SC,Brazil) enabled not only to ratify hypotheses previously described by Brazilian researchers but also made clear certain aspects related to the geochemistry of carbonatites concerning their occurrence, the probable genesis of these species and their chemical and mineralogical characteristics.(Author) [pt

  17. Mineralogical composition and functionality of clays used for pottery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mineralogical composition and functionality of clays used for pottery education by physically challenged learners at the Ikwezi-Lokusa Educational Centre, Eastern Cape, South Africa. ... The clays were mineralogically characterised using Munsell Soil Color Chart, X-ray powder diffractometry (XRPD) and optical microscopy.

  18. Mineralogy of the Chaparra IOCG deposit, southern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yáñez, Juan; Alfonso, Pura

    2014-05-01

    The Chaparra IOCG, located in southern Peru, near Chala, is mined and exploited by small-scale miners for gold, however, it has not been studied until now. Here we present a preliminary geological and mineralogic study of this deposit. Powder X ray diffraction, electron microscopy and electron microprobe were used to characterize the mineralization. This deposit is hosted in magmatic rocks from the Coastal Batholith. Host rocks belong to the Linga Super-unit, of Upper Cretaceous age and are mainly constituted by monzonites, monzogabbros and diorites. Major alterations are the propylitic (chlorite - albite - quartz), advanced argillic (jarosite - natrojarosite) and sericitic (muscovite-sericite-quartz). Gypsum and other alteration minerals such as potassium feldspar and phlogopite, vermiculite and natrolite are widespread. Mineralization occurs mainly in quartz veins up to 1 m thick, emplaced filling fractures. Ore mineralogy is mainly composed of hematite, goethite, and sulphides (mainly pyrite, chalcopyrite and covellite). Gold and REE-rich minerals also occur. Native gold can reach up to 1 mm in size, but usually is few μm in size. Its composition is 82-92 wt% Au, up to 12 wt% of Ag and Fe can reach up to 4 wt%. The paragenetic sequence in the Chaparra deposit was divided into three stages: (I) primary mineralization, (II) Fracture filling, and (III) supergene alteration. The sequence begins with the crystallization of magnetite, quartz, pyrrhotite and pyrite. Subsequently, native gold, native Bismuth and uraninite crystallices together with the former minerals, in which are enclosed. Later, monacite is formed, being enclosed in quartz. Pyrite also presents small grains of chalcopyrite inside. Galena, sphalerite and arsenopyrite also are formed, whether included in pyrite or outside. Scarce grains of sakuraiite also occur in this stage. Structural formula of sakuraiie from this deposit is Cu 01.78-1.90 Zn 0.07-12Fe 1.16-124In 0.22-0.26Sn 0.79-082S4). Indium

  19. Using mineralogy as a guide to understanding slagging: a case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creelman, R.A. [R.A. Creelman & Associates (Australia)

    1994-12-31

    This paper details the mineralogy that accompanied the Callide B Power station slagging investigations. Investigations were made of coal mineral matter, particles collected from the furnace, flyash and the slag deposits. Objectives were to characterise the particles formed from burning Callide coal, to relate them to the slag deposits and flyash, and by applying thermodynamics gain an understanding of the underlying mechanisms that lead to attachment and accumulation of particles in the furnace. 9 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  20. Mineralogical Study of Workable Material Coming from Mina Fe Ciudad Rodrigo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mingarro Martin, E.

    1962-01-01

    A mineralogical analysis is made to ascertain the effects of acid bleaching on normalized conditions. Uranium is mainly found under uranotile, pitchblende and autunite form with an average assay of 0.4 p. ct. The loss of uranium in tailings under current conditions of attach, mainly is due to pitchblende resistance, being practically no leachable, and to uranium absorption by hydrated iron oxides and colloidal ores. This last problem will be discussed in a next paper. (Author) 5 refs

  1. Physicochemical Properties, Micromorphology and Clay Mineralogy of Soils Affected by Geological Formations, Geomorphology and Climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bayat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Soil genesis and development in arid and semi-arid areas are strongly affected by geological formations and geomorphic surfaces. Various morphological, physical, and geochemical soil properties at different geomorphic positions are usually attributed to different soil forming factors including parent material and climate. Due to variations in climate, geological formations (Quaternary, Neogene and Cretaceous and geomorphology, the aim of the present research was the study of genesis, development, clay mineralogy, and micromorphology of soils affected by climate, geology and geomorphology in Bardsir area, Kerman Province. Materials and Methods: The study area, 25000 ha, starts from Bardsir and extends to Khanesorkh elevations close to Sirjan city. The climate of the area is warm and semi-arid with mean annual temperature and precipitation of 14.9 °C and 199 mm, respectively. Soil moisture and temperature regimes of the area are aridic and mesic due to 1:2500000 map, provided by Soil and Water Research Institute. Moving to west and southwest, soil moisture regime of the area changes to xeric with increasing elevation. Using topography and geology maps (1:100000 together with Google Earth images, geomorphic surfaces and geologic formations of the area were investigated. Mantled pediment (pedons 1, 3, 7, and 8, rock pediment (pedon 2, semi-stable alluvial plain (pedon 6, unstable alluvial plain (pedon 5, piedmont plain (pedons 9 and 11, intermediate surface of alluvial plain and pediment (pedon 4, and old river terrace (pedon 10 are among geomorphic surfaces investigated in the area. Mantled pediment is composed of young Quaternary sediments and Cretaceous marls. Rock pediments are mainly formed by Cretaceous marls. Quaternary formations are dominant in alluvial plains. Alluvial terraces and intermediate surface of alluvial plain and pediment are dominated by Neogene conglomerates. Siltstone, sandstone, and Neogene marls together with

  2. Mineralogy of Non-Silicified Fossil Wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George E. Mustoe

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The best-known and most-studied petrified wood specimens are those that are mineralized with polymorphs of silica: opal-A, opal-C, chalcedony, and quartz. Less familiar are fossil woods preserved with non-silica minerals. This report reviews discoveries of woods mineralized with calcium carbonate, calcium phosphate, various iron and copper minerals, manganese oxide, fluorite, barite, natrolite, and smectite clay. Regardless of composition, the processes of mineralization involve the same factors: availability of dissolved elements, pH, Eh, and burial temperature. Permeability of the wood and anatomical features also plays important roles in determining mineralization. When precipitation occurs in several episodes, fossil wood may have complex mineralogy.

  3. Mineralogical aspects of the laterites of Maicuru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemos, V.P.; Costa, M.C. da

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the prelimary mineralogical data of the weathering materials derived from the alkaline-ultramafic-carbonatitic Maicuru complex, State of Para. These material include several minerals species: iron, titanium and aluminium oxides/hydroxides as aluminous goethite, geothite, hematite, maghemite, lepidocrocite, anatase; and gibbsite; clay minerals of the smectite, chlorite, vermiculite and kaolinite groups and interstratified chlorite-smectite, mica-vermiculite, vermiculite-chlorite and Kaolinite-smectite; and aluminous phosphates of the crandalite group, wardite, augelite, senegalite, wavelite and variscite. The principal characteristics of these minerals were obtained by X-ray diffraction, optical methods, electron probe microanalysis, energy dispersive scanning electron microscope, X-ray fluorescence, atomic absorption, inductively coupled plasma-ICP source spectrometry and colorimetric methods. (author) [pt

  4. Surface analysis and depth profiling of corrosion products formed in lead pipes used to supply low alkalinity drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, C M; Peters, N J; Britton, A; Brady, L; Gardiner, P H E; Lewis, B D

    2004-01-01

    Modern analytical techniques have been applied to investigate the nature of lead pipe corrosion products formed in pH adjusted, orthophosphate-treated, low alkalinity water, under supply conditions. Depth profiling and surface analysis have been carried out on pipe samples obtained from the water distribution system in Glasgow, Scotland, UK. X-ray diffraction spectrometry identified basic lead carbonate, lead oxide and lead phosphate as the principal components. Scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry revealed the crystalline structure within the corrosion product and also showed spatial correlations existed between calcium, iron, lead, oxygen and phosphorus. Elemental profiling, conducted by means of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and secondary neutrals mass spectrometry (SNMS) indicated that the corrosion product was not uniform with depth. However, no clear stratification was apparent. Indeed, counts obtained for carbonate, phosphate and oxide were well correlated within the depth range probed by SIMS. SNMS showed relationships existed between carbon, calcium, iron, and phosphorus within the bulk of the scale, as well as at the surface. SIMS imaging confirmed the relationship between calcium and lead and suggested there might also be an association between chloride and phosphorus.

  5. Characterisation of rust surfaces formed on mild steel exposed to marine atmospheres using XRD and SEM/Micro-Raman techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuente, D. de la; Alcántara, J.; Chico, B.; Díaz, I.; Jiménez, J.A.; Morcillo, M.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • SEM/Micro-Raman is very useful for characterizing rust phases morphologies. • SEM/Micro-Raman enables unequivocal rust phases identification. • γ-FeOOH basically presents two types of morphologies: globular and laminar. • Fe 3 O 4 presents two morphologies: flat patches and black doughnut-type formations. • β-FeOOH presents highly porous morphologies comprised by fine prismatic crystals. - Abstract: The exposure of mild steel to marine atmospheres gives rise to the formation of various corrosion products, mainly lepidocrocite, goethite, magnetite and akaganeite. In this study, Grazing Incidence X-Ray Diffraction, Micro-X-Ray Diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy/Micro-Raman are used to characterise rust layer surfaces and to identify the principal component rust phases and their morphology. The main conclusion reached is that lepidocrocite is preferentially located on the outermost surface while magnetite and akaganeite form mostly close to base steel. The Scanning Electron Microscopy/Micro-Raman technique has been very useful for characterising (identifying) the wide variety of morphologies presented by the rust phases.

  6. Semantic Interoperability for Computational Mineralogy: Experiences of the eMinerals Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, A. M.; White, T. O.; Dove, M. T.; Bruin, R. P.; Couch, P. A.; Tyer, R. P.

    2006-12-01

    The use of atomic scale computer simulation of minerals to obtain information for geophysics and environmental science has grown enormously over the past couple of decades. It is now routine to probe mineral behavior in the Earth's deep interior and in the surface environment by borrowing methods and simulation codes from computational chemistry and physics. It is becoming increasingly important to use methods embodied in more than one of these codes to solve any single scientific problem. However, scientific codes are rarely designed for easy interoperability and data exchange; data formats are often code-specific, poorly documented and fragile, liable to frequent change between software versions, and even compiler versions. This means that the scientist's simple desire to use the methodological approaches offered by multiple codes is frustrated, and even the sharing of data between collaborators becomes fraught with difficulties. The eMinerals consortium was formed in the early stages of the UK eScience program with the aim of developing the tools needed to apply atomic scale simulation to environmental problems in a grid-enabled world, and to harness the computational power offered by grid technologies to address some outstanding mineralogical problems. One example of the kind of problem we can tackle is the origin of the compressibility anomaly in silica glass. By passing data directly between simulation and analysis tools we were able to probe this effect in more detail than has previously been possible and have shown how the anomaly is related to the details of the amorphous structure. In order to approach this kind of problem we have constructed a mini-grid, a small scale and extensible combined compute- and data-grid that allows the execution of many calculations in parallel, and the transparent storage of semantically-rich marked-up result data. Importantly, we automatically capture multiple kinds of metadata and key results from each calculation. We

  7. Multiscale characteristics of mechanical and mineralogical heterogeneity using nanoindentation and Maps Mineralogy in Mancos Shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, H.; Mook, W. M.; Dewers, T. A.

    2017-12-01

    Multiscale characteristics of textural and compositional (e.g., clay, cement, organics, etc.) heterogeneity profoundly influence the mechanical properties of shale. In particular, strongly anisotropic (i.e., laminated) heterogeneities are often observed to have a significant influence on hydrological and mechanical properties. In this work, we investigate a sample of the Cretaceous Mancos Shale to explore the importance of lamination, cements, organic content, and the spatial distribution of these characteristics. For compositional and structural characterization, the mineralogical distribution of thin core sample polished by ion-milling is analyzed using QEMSCAN® with MAPS MineralogyTM (developed by FEI Corporoation). Based on mineralogy and organic matter distribution, multi-scale nanoindentation testing was performed to directly link compositional heterogeneity to mechanical properties. With FIB-SEM (3D) and high-magnitude SEM (2D) images, key nanoindentation patterns are analyzed to evaluate elastic and plastic responses. Combined with MAPs Mineralogy data and fine-resolution BSE images, nanoindentation results are explained as a function of compositional and structural heterogeneity. Finite element modeling is used to quantitatively evaluate the link between the heterogeneity and mechanical behavior during nanoindentation. In addition, the spatial distribution of compositional heterogeneity, anisotropic bedding patterns, and mechanical anisotropy are employed as inputs for multiscale brittle fracture simulations using a phase field model. Comparison of experimental and numerical simulations reveal that proper incorporation of additional material information, such as bedding layer thickness and other geometrical attributes of the microstructures, may yield improvements on the numerical predictions of the mesoscale fracture patterns and hence the macroscopic effective toughness. Sandia National Laboratories is a multimission laboratory managed and operated by

  8. Superficial alteration mineralogy in active volcanic systems : An example of Poás volcano, Costa Rica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodríguez, Alejandro; van Bergen, Manfred J.

    2017-01-01

    The alteration mineralogy in the crater area of Poás volcano (Costa Rica) has been studied to constrain acid fluid-rock interaction processes and conditions relevant for the formation of sulphate-bearing mineral assemblages found on the surface of Mars. Individual sub-environments, which include the

  9. Role of particle size and composition in metal adsorption by solids deposited on urban road surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunawardana, Chandima; Egodawatta, Prasanna; Goonetilleke, Ashantha

    2014-01-01

    Despite common knowledge that the metal content adsorbed by fine particles is relatively higher compared to coarser particles, the reasons for this phenomenon have gained little research attention. The research study discussed in the paper investigated the variations in metal content for different particle sizes of solids associated with pollutant build-up on urban road surfaces. Data analysis confirmed that parameters favourable for metal adsorption to solids such as specific surface area, organic carbon content, effective cation exchange capacity and clay forming minerals content decrease with the increase in particle size. Furthermore, the mineralogical composition of solids was found to be the governing factor influencing the specific surface area and effective cation exchange capacity. There is high quartz content in particles >150 μm compared to particles <150 μm. As particle size reduces below 150 μm, the clay forming minerals content increases, providing favourable physical and chemical properties that influence adsorption. -- Highlights: • Physico-chemical parameters investigated in build-up samples from 32 road surfaces. • Mineralogical composition primarily governs the physico-chemical characteristics. • High clay forming mineral content in fine solids increases SSA and ECEC. • Characteristics influenced by quartz and amorphous content with particle size. • High quartz content in coarse particles contributes reduced metal adsorption. -- The mineralogical composition of solids is the governing factor influencing metal adsorption to solids in pollutant build-up on urban surfaces

  10. Fine structure of the electromagnetic fields formed by backward surface waves in an azimuthally symmetric surface wave-excited plasma source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kousaka, Hiroyuki; Ono, Kouichi

    2003-01-01

    The electromagnetic fields and plasma parameters have been studied in an azimuthally symmetric surface wave-excited plasma (SWP) source, by using a two-dimensional numerical analysis based on the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) approximation to Maxwell's equations self-consistently coupled with a fluid model for plasma evolution. The FDTD/fluid hybrid simulation was performed for different gas pressures in Ar and different microwave powers at 2.45 GHz, showing that the surface waves (SWs) occur along the plasma-dielectric interfaces to sustain overdense plasmas. The numerical results indicated that the electromagnetic SWs consist of two different waves, Wave-1 and Wave-2, having relatively shorter and longer wavelengths. The Wave-1 was seen to fade away with increasing pressure and increasing power, while the Wave-2 remained relatively unchanged over the range of pressure and power investigated. The numerical results revealed that the Wave-1 propagates as backward SWs whose phase velocity and group velocity point in the opposite directions. In contrast, the Wave-2 appeared to form standing waves, being ascribed to a superposition of forward SWs whose phase and group velocities point in the same direction. The fadeaway of the Wave-1 or backward SWs at increased pressures and increased powers was seen with the damping rate increasing in the axial direction, being related to the increased plasma electron densities. A comparison with the conventional FDTD simulation indicated that such fine structure of the electromagnetic fields of SWs is not observed in the FDTD simulation with spatially uniform and time-independent plasma distributions; thus, the FDTD/fluid hybrid model should be employed in simulating the electromagnetic fields and plasma parameters in SWPs with high accuracy

  11. Bioleaching of two different genetic types of chalcopyrite and their comparative mineralogical assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Sha; Gu, Guohua; Ji, Jing; Xu, Baoke

    2018-02-01

    The bioleaching of two different genetic types of chalcopyrite by the moderate thermophile Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans was investigated by leaching behaviors elucidation and their comparative mineralogical assessment. The leaching experiment showed that the skarn-type chalcopyrite (STC) revealed a much faster leaching rate with 33.34% copper extracted finally, while only 23.53% copper was bioleached for the porphyry-type chalcopyrite (PTC). The mineralogical properties were analyzed by XRD, SEM, XPS, and Fermi energy calculation. XRD indicated that the unit cell volume of STC was a little larger than that of PTC. SEM indicated that the surface of STC had more steps and ridges. XPS spectra showed that Cu(I) was the dominant species of copper on the surfaces of the two chalcopyrite samples, and STC had much more copper with lower Cu 2p 3/2 binding energy. Additionally, the Fermi energy of STC was much higher than that of PTC. These mineralogical differences were in good agreement with the bioleaching behaviors of chalcopyrite. This study will provide some new information for evaluating the oxidation kinetics of chalcopyrite.

  12. Mineralogical In-situ Investigation of Acid-Sulfate Samples from the Rio Tinto River, Spain, with a Portable XRD/XRF Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrazin, P.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Fernandez-Remolar, D.; Amils, R.; Arvidson, R. E.; Blake, D.; Bish, D. L.

    2007-01-01

    A field campaign was organized in September 2006 by Centro de Astobiologica (Spain) and Washington University (St Louis, USA) for the geological study of the Rio Tinto river bed sediments using a suite of in-situ instruments comprising an ASD reflectance spectrometer, an emission spectrometer, panoramic and close-up color imaging cameras, a life detection system and NASA's CheMin 4 XRD/XRF prototype. The primary objectives of the field campaign were to study the geology of the site and test the potential of the instrument suite in an astrobiological investigation context for future Mars surface robotic missions. The results of the overall campaign will be presented elsewhere. This paper focuses on the results of the XRD/XRF instrument deployment. The specific objectives of the CheMin 4 prototype in Rio Tinto were to 1) characterize the mineralogy of efflorescent salts in their native environments; 2) analyze the mineralogy of salts and oxides from the modern environment to terraces formed earlier as part of the Rio Tinto evaporative system; and 3) map the transition from hematite-dominated terraces to the mixed goethite/salt-bearing terraces where biosignatures are best preserved.

  13. The mineralogical characterization of tellurium in copper anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, T. T.; Dutrizac, J. E.

    1993-12-01

    A mineralogical study of a «normal» commercial copper anode and six tellurium-rich copper anodes from the CCR Refinery of the Noranda Copper Smelting and Refining Company was carried out to identify the tellurium carriers and their relative abundances. In all the anodes, the major tellurium carrier is the Cu2Se-Cu2Te phase which occurs as a constituent of complex inclusions at the copper grain boundaries. In tellurium-rich anodes, the molar tellurium content of the Cu2Se-Cu2Te phase can exceed that of selenium. Although >85 pct of the tellurium occurs as the Cu2Se-Cu2Te phase, minor amounts are present in Cu-Pb-As-Bi-Sb oxide, Cu-Bi-As oxide, and Cu-Te-As oxide phases which form part of the grain-boundary inclusions. About 1 pct of the tellurium content of silver-rich anodes occurs in various silver alloys, but gold tellurides were never detected. Surprising is the fact that 2 to 8 pct of the total tellurium content of the anodes occurs in solid solution in the copper-metal matrix, and presumably, this form of tellurium dissolves at the anode interface during electrorefining.

  14. An integrated view of the chemistry and mineralogy of martian soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, A. S.; Gellert, Ralf; Schroder, C.; Morris, R.V.; Bell, J.F.; Knudson, A.T.; Clark, B. C.; Ming, D. W.; Crisp, J.A.; Arvidson, R. E.; Blaney, D.; Brückner, J.; Christensen, P.R.; DesMarais, D.J.; De Souza, P.A.; Economou, T.E.; Ghosh, A.; Hahn, B.C.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Haskin, L.A.; Hurowitz, J.A.; Joliff, B.L.; Johnson, J. R.; Klingelhofer, G.; Madsen, M.B.; McLennan, S.M.; McSween, H.Y.; Richter, L.; Rieder, R.; Rodionov, D.; Soderblom, L.; Squyres, S. W.; Tosca, N.J.; Wang, A.; Wyatt, M.; Zipfel, J.

    2005-01-01

    The mineralogical and elemental compositions of the martian soil are indicators of chemical and physical weathering processes. Using data from the Mars Exploration Rovers, we show that bright dust deposits on opposite sides of the planet are part of a global unit and not dominated by the composition of local rocks. Dark soil deposits at both sites have similar basaltic mineralogies, and could reflect either a global component or the general similarity in the compositions of the rocks from which they were derived. Increased levels of bromine are consistent with mobilization of soluble salts by thin films of liquid water, but the presence of olivine in analysed soil samples indicates that the extent of aqueous alteration of soils has been limited. Nickel abundances are enhanced at the immediate surface and indicate that the upper few millimetres of soil could contain up to one per cent meteoritic material.

  15. Expected Geochemical and Mineralogical Properties of Meteorites from Mercury: Inferences from Messenger Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCubbin, F. M.; McCoy, T. J.

    2016-01-01

    Meteorites from the Moon, Mars, and many types of asteroid bodies have been identified among our global inventory of meteorites, however samples of Mercury and Venus have not been identified. The absence of mercurian and venusian meteorites could be attributed to an inability to recognize them in our collections due to a paucity of geochemical information for Venus and Mercury. In the case of mercurian meteorites, this possibility is further supported by dynamical calculations that suggest mercurian meteorites should be present on Earth at a factor of 2-3 less than meteorites from Mars [1]. In the present study, we focus on the putative mineralogy of mercurian meteorites using data obtained from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, which has provided us with our first quantitative constraints on the geochemistry of planet Mercury. We have used the MESSENGER data to compile a list of mineralogical and geochemical characteristics that a meteorite from Mercury is likely to exhibit.

  16. Corrosion resistance and durability of superhydrophobic surface formed on magnesium alloy coated with nanostructured cerium oxide film and fluoroalkylsilane molecules in corrosive NaCl aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizaki, Takahiro; Masuda, Yoshitake; Sakamoto, Michiru

    2011-04-19

    The corrosion resistant performance and durability of the superhydrophobic surface on magnesium alloy coated with nanostructured cerium oxide film and fluoroalkylsilane molecules in corrosive NaCl aqueous solution were investigated using electrochemical and contact angle measurements. The durability of the superhydrophobic surface in corrosive 5 wt% NaCl aqueous solution was elucidated. The corrosion resistant performance of the superhydrophobic surface formed on magnesium alloy was estimated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. The EIS measurements and appropriate equivalent circuit models revealed that the superhydrophobic surface considerably improved the corrosion resistant performance of magnesium alloy AZ31. American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard D 3359-02 cross cut tape test was performed to investigate the adhesion of the superhydrophobic film to the magnesium alloy surface. The corrosion formation mechanism of the superhydrophobic surface formed on the magnesium alloy was also proposed. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  17. The "chessboard" classification scheme of mineral deposits: Mineralogy and geology from aluminum to zirconium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dill, Harald G.

    2010-06-01

    Economic geology is a mixtum compositum of all geoscientific disciplines focused on one goal, finding new mineral depsosits and enhancing their exploitation. The keystones of this mixtum compositum are geology and mineralogy whose studies are centered around the emplacement of the ore body and the development of its minerals and rocks. In the present study, mineralogy and geology act as x- and y-coordinates of a classification chart of mineral resources called the "chessboard" (or "spreadsheet") classification scheme. Magmatic and sedimentary lithologies together with tectonic structures (1 -D/pipes, 2 -D/veins) are plotted along the x-axis in the header of the spreadsheet diagram representing the columns in this chart diagram. 63 commodity groups, encompassing minerals and elements are plotted along the y-axis, forming the lines of the spreadsheet. These commodities are subjected to a tripartite subdivision into ore minerals, industrial minerals/rocks and gemstones/ornamental stones. Further information on the various types of mineral deposits, as to the major ore and gangue minerals, the current models and the mode of formation or when and in which geodynamic setting these deposits mainly formed throughout the geological past may be obtained from the text by simply using the code of each deposit in the chart. This code can be created by combining the commodity (lines) shown by numbers plus lower caps with the host rocks or structure (columns) given by capital letters. Each commodity has a small preface on the mineralogy and chemistry and ends up with an outlook into its final use and the supply situation of the raw material on a global basis, which may be updated by the user through a direct link to databases available on the internet. In this case the study has been linked to the commodity database of the US Geological Survey. The internal subdivision of each commodity section corresponds to the common host rock lithologies (magmatic, sedimentary, and

  18. Growth kinetics of boride coatings formed at the surface AISI M2 during dehydrated paste pack boriding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doñu Ruiz, M.A., E-mail: mdonur0800@alumno.ipn.mx [Universidad Politécnica del Valle de México UPVM, Grupo Ciencia e Ingeniería de Materiales, Av. Mexiquense S/N Esquina Av. Universidad Politécnica, Col Villa Esmeralda, 54910 Tultitlan (Mexico); López Perrusquia, N.; Sánchez Huerta, D. [Universidad Politécnica del Valle de México UPVM, Grupo Ciencia e Ingeniería de Materiales, Av. Mexiquense S/N Esquina Av. Universidad Politécnica, Col Villa Esmeralda, 54910 Tultitlan (Mexico); Torres San Miguel, C.R.; Urriolagoitia Calderón, G.M. [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, SEPI-ESIME, Unidad Profesional Adolfo López Mateos Zacatenco, Edificio 5, 2do. Piso, Col. Lindavista, CP 07738 México, D.F. (Mexico); Cerillo Moreno, E.A. [Universidad Politécnica del Valle de México UPVM, Grupo Ciencia e Ingeniería de Materiales, Av. Mexiquense S/N Esquina Av. Universidad Politécnica, Col Villa Esmeralda, 54910 Tultitlan (Mexico); Cortes Suarez, J.V. [Univerisdad Autónoma Metropolitana Unidad Azcapotzalco, Av. San Pablo 180 Azcapotzalco 02200, Área de Ciencia de los Materiales, México, D.F. (Mexico)

    2015-12-01

    The growth kinetics of the boride coatings (FeB and Fe{sub 2}B) at the surface of AISI M2 high speed steels were studied in this work. Boriding thermochemical treatment was carried out by dehydrated paste pack at three different temperatures 1173, 1223, and 1273 K and four exposure times 1, 3, 5, and 7 h, respectively. The presence of FeB and Fe{sub 2}B phases was identified by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and X-ray diffraction method. In order to obtain the boron diffusion coefficients at the FeB/Fe{sub 2}B boride coatings, a mathematical model based on the mass balance at the growing interfaces was proposed under certain assumptions. Likewise the parabolic growth constants and the boride incubation time were established as a function of the parameters η (T) and ε (T). The activation energy values estimated for the FeB and Fe{sub 2}B layers were 233.42 and 211.89 kJ mol{sup −1} respectively. A good agreement was obtained between the simulated values of boride layer thicknesses and the experimental results. Finally, empirical relationships of boride coating thickness as a function of boriding temperature and time are presented. - Highlights: • Formed boride coatings at the surface of AISI M2 high speed steels by new process dehydrated paste pack boriding. • The model was based on the mass balance equation at the FeB/Fe{sub 2}B and Fe{sub 2}B/Fe interfaces by considering the boride incubation time. • A good agreement was obtained between the simulated values of boride layers coatings and the experimental results.

  19. Mineralogy of the Hydrous Lower Mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, S. H.; Chen, H.; Leinenweber, K. D.; Kunz, M.; Prakapenka, V.; Bechtel, H.; Liu, Z.

    2017-12-01

    The hydrous ringwoodite inclusions found in diamonds suggest water storage in the mantle transition zone. However, water storage in the lower mantle remains unclear. Bridgmanite and magnesiowustite appear to have very little storage capacity for water. Here, we report experimental results indicating significant changes in the lower-mantle mineralogy under the presence of water. We have synthesized Mg2SiO4 ringwoodite with 2 wt% water in multi-anvil press at 20 GPa and 1573 K at ASU. The hydrous ringwoodite sample was then loaded to diamond anvil cells with Ar or Ne as a pressure medium. We heated the pure hydrous ringwoodite samples at lower-mantle pressure using a CO2 laser heating system at ASU. We measured X-ray diffraction patterns at the GSECARS sector of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) and 12.2.2 sector of the Advanced Light Source (ALS). For the separate Pt-mixed samples, we have conducted in situ heating at the beamlines using near IR laser heating systems. We measured the infrared spectra of the heated samples at high pressure and after pressure quench at 1.4.4 sector of ALS. In the in situ experiments with hydrous ringwoodite + Pt mixture as a starting material, we found formation of stishovite together with bridgmanite and periclase during heating with a near IR laser beams at 1300-2500 K and 35-66 GPa. However, some hydrous ringwoodite still remains even after a total of 45 min of heating. In contrast, the hydrous ringwoodite samples heated without Pt by CO2 laser beams are transformed completely to bridgmanite, periclase and stishovite at 31-55 GPa and 1600-1900 K. We have detected IR active OH mode of stishovite from the samples heated at lower-mantle pressures. The unit-cell volume of stishovite measured after pressure quench is greater than that of dry stishovite by 0.3-0.6%, supporting 0.5-1 wt% of H2O in stishovite in these samples. Stishovite is a thermodynamically forbidden phase in the dry lower mantle because of the existence of periclase and

  20. LAYER STRUCTURES FORMED BY SILICA NANOPARTICLES AND CELLULOSE NANOFIBRILS WITH CATIONIC POLYACRYLAMIDE (C-PAM ON CELLULOSE SURFACE AND THEIR INFLUENCE ON INTERACTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jani Salmi

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available A quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D was used to study the adsorption of the layer formed by silica nanoparticles (SNP and cellulose nanofibrils (NFC together with cationic polyacrylamide (C-PAM on cellulose surface, accompanied by use of atomic force microscope (AFM to study the interactions between cellulose surfaces. The purpose was to understand the multilayer build-up compared to complex structure adsorption. The layer thickness and consequently also the repulsion between surfaces increased with each addition step during layer formation in the SNP-C-PAM systems, whereas the second addition of C-PAM decreased the repulsion in the case of NFC-C-PAM multilayer formation. An exceptionally high repulsion between surfaces was observed when nanofibrillar cellulose was added. This together with the extremely high dissipation values recorded with QCM-D indicated that nanofibrillar cellulose formed a loose and thick layer containing a lot of water. The multilayer systems formed fully and uniformly covered the surfaces. Silica nanoparticles were able to penetrate inside the loose C-PAM structure due to their small size. In contrast, NFC formed individual layers between C-PAM layers. The complex of C-PAM and SNP formed only a partly covered surface, leading to long-ranged pull-off force. This might explain the good flocculation properties reported for polyelectrolyte-nanoparticle systems.

  1. Bulk mineralogy of the NE Syrtis and Jezero crater regions of Mars derived through thermal infrared spectral analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatore, M. R.; Goudge, T. A.; Bramble, M. S.; Edwards, C. S.; Bandfield, J. L.; Amador, E. S.; Mustard, J. F.; Christensen, P. R.

    2018-02-01

    We investigated the area to the northwest of the Isidis impact basin (hereby referred to as "NW Isidis") using thermal infrared emission datasets to characterize and quantify bulk surface mineralogy throughout this region. This area is home to Jezero crater and the watershed associated with its two deltaic deposits in addition to NE Syrtis and the strong and diverse visible/near-infrared spectral signatures observed in well-exposed stratigraphic sections. The spectral signatures throughout this region show a diversity of primary and secondary surface mineralogies, including olivine, pyroxene, smectite clays, sulfates, and carbonates. While previous thermal infrared investigations have sought to characterize individual mineral groups within this region, none have systematically assessed bulk surface mineralogy and related these observations to visible/near-infrared studies. We utilize an iterative spectral unmixing method to statistically evaluate our linear thermal infrared spectral unmixing models to derive surface mineralogy. All relevant primary and secondary phases identified in visible/near-infrared studies are included in the unmixing models and their modeled spectral contributions are discussed in detail. While the stratigraphy and compositional diversity observed in visible/near-infrared spectra are much better exposed and more diverse than most other regions of Mars, our thermal infrared analyses suggest the dominance of basaltic compositions with less observed variability in the amount and diversity of alteration phases. These results help to constrain the mineralogical context of these previously reported visible/near-infrared spectral identifications. The results are also discussed in the context of future in situ investigations, as the NW Isidis region has long been promoted as a region of paleoenvironmental interest on Mars.

  2. chemical and mineralogical characterization of lateritic iron ore

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DJFLEX

    2010-04-22

    Apr 22, 2010 ... The laterite iron ore deposit at Auchi, Edo State, Nigeria was studied chemically and mineralogically. The results of the chemical ... SAMPLE PREPARATION. The samples .... 2µm) and were subjected to X-ray diffraction using.

  3. Mineralogy of halloysites and their interaction with porphyrine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vašutová, V.; Bezdička, Petr; Lang, Kamil; Hradil, David

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 3 (2013), s. 243-250 ISSN 0862-5468 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : organoclays * mineralogy * porphyrine * CEC Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.434, year: 2013

  4. Kinetics of Cs adsorption on soils with different mineralogical composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakao, Atsushi; Funakawa, Shinya; Kosaki, Takashi

    2004-01-01

    137 Cs is one of the main radioisotopes released into the environment by nuclear powerstation accidents (e.g. Chernobyl) and nuclear weapons tests. Many studies have shown that Cs tends to remain at surface soils due to the high adsorption selectivity of clay minerals for this element. This behavior of the Cs + ion is, however, assumed to vary significantly depending on the mineralogical composition of the soil. The main objective of this study is to analyze the kinetics of Cs adsorption on soils with different mineralogical composition. Soil samples used in this study were Mollisols (Um) and Alfisols (Ua) from Ukraine, Ultisols (Tu) from Thailand and Spodosols (Js) from Japan. The dominant clay species of these soils are montmorillonite (Um, Ua), kaolinite and mica (Tu) and beidellite (Js). The rates of Cs adsorption and Ca or K desorption were measured using a continuous flow method. Soil samples that were previously saturated with Ca 2+ were leached with a 0.75 mmol/l Cs + solution at a constant rate of 2.0 ml/min. The leachate was collected every 10 minutes and the concentrations of Cs + , Ca 2+ and K + of each aliquot were measured by atomic adsorption spectrophotometry (Cs + , Ca 2+ ) and flame spectrophotometry (K + ). The datasets obtained were simulated using the first order kinetic model: y = a(1 - exp(-kt)), where a is the adsorption (desorption) maximum and k the rate constant. It is here assumed that Ca 2+ is desorbed from cation exchange sites and K + desorbed from the frayed edges of micaceous minerals. The values of a obtained for both Cs adsorption and Ca desorption was in the order Js>Um>Tu>Ua, whereas the values of k were in the order Tu>Ua>Um>Js. This result reflects the values of permanent negative charge of clays which are originated from the substitution of cations in the structure of 2:1 clay minerals. The value of a for K + desorption was, however, highest in Tu, suggesting that the values of Cs + -exchangeable K + correspond to the amount

  5. The mineralogy of ordinary chondrites and implications for asteroid spectrophotometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcsween, Harry Y., Jr.; Bennett, Marvin E., III; Jarosewich, Eugene

    1991-01-01

    Published data from bulk chemical analyses of 94 ordinary chondrites are compiled in a table of normative mineralogy and discussed in detail. Significant variations in olivine, pyroxene, and metal abundance ratios are found within each chondrite class and attributed to redox processes superimposed on initial differences in metal/silicate ratios. The use of the diagrams constructed here to predict the mineralogic characteristics of asteroids on the basis of spectrophotometric observations is suggested.

  6. Mineralogy and microstructure of sintered lignite coal fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marina Ilic; Christopher Cheeseman; Christopher Sollars; Jonathan Knight [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    2003-02-01

    Lignite coal fly ash from the 'Nikola Tesla' power plant in Yugoslavia has been characterised, milled, compacted and sintered to form monolithic ceramic materials. The effect of firing at temperatures between 1130 and 1190{sup o}C on the density, water accessible porosity, mineralogy and microstructure of sintered samples is reported. This class C fly ash has an initial average particle size of 82 {mu}m and contains siliceous glass together with the crystalline phases quartz, anorthite, gehlenite, hematite and mullite. Milling the ash to an average particle size of 5.6 m, compacting and firing at 1170{sup o}C for 1 h produces materials with densities similar to clay-based ceramics that exhibit low water absorption. Sintering reduces the amount of glass, quartz, gehlenite and anhydrite, but increases formation of anorthite, mullite, hematite and cristobalite. SEM confirms the formation of a dense ceramic at 1170{sup o}C and indicates that pyroplastic effects cause pore formation and bloating at 1190{sup o}C. 23 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Matrix metalloproteinase 9 and transglutaminase 2 expression at the ocular surface in patients with different forms of dry eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragona, Pasquale; Aguennouz, M'Hammed; Rania, Laura; Postorino, Elisa; Sommario, Margherita Serena; Roszkowska, Anna Maria; De Pasquale, Maria Grazia; Pisani, Antonina; Puzzolo, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) and transglutaminase 2 (TG2) in different forms of dry eye. Case control study. Seventy-five female subjects divided into 3 groups: group 1, 15 healthy controls; group 2, 30 subjects with Sjögren syndrome (SS); and group 3, 30 subjects with Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD). A clinical assessment was carried out and impression cytologic specimens were processed for immunoperoxidase staining for MMP9 and TG2 and real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses were carried out for MMP9, TG2, interleukin-6, interferon-γ, B-cell lymphoma 2, and caspase 3. To study MMP9 and TG2 expression after anti-inflammatory treatment, patients were divided into 2 subgroups, one treated with saline and the other treated with saline plus topical corticosteroid eye drops (0.5% loteprednol etabonate) 4 times daily for 15 days. For statistical analysis, Student t test, Mann-Whitney U test, and Spearman's correlation coefficient were used as appropriate. Conjunctival expression of MMP9 and TG2. MMP9 and TG2 expression were higher in both patient groups than in controls (P < 0.0001). Group 2 patients showed higher expression than group 3 (P < 0.0001). The Spearman's correlation coefficient showed in group 2 a positive correlation between MMP9 and TG2 expression (ρ = 0.437; P = 0.01), but no correlation in group 3 (ρ = 0.143; P = 0.45). Corticosteroid treatment significantly reduced MMP9 and TG2 expression in both groups, ameliorating symptoms and signs. A much higher percentage reduction was observed in SS. The pathogenic mechanisms of the 2 forms of dry eye give an account for the different MMP9 and TG2 expressions in the 2 groups of patients. The higher expression in SS is determined by the direct autoimmune insult to the ocular surface epithelia, whereas in MGD patients, with an epithelial damage due to an unbalanced tear secretion, the molecules expression is significantly lower, although higher than in controls. The

  8. A numerical study on the behavior of the water meniscus formed between a flat surface and a flat or circular tip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Sung Wan; Ha, Man Yeong; Yoon, Hyun Sik; Kim, Chang Min [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Sun [Korea Aerospace Industries, Sacheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    We numerically investigated the behavior of the water meniscus formed between a flat surface and a tip surface, which is flat or circular in shape, using the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The shape of the water meniscus formed between the flat bottom surface and the tip surface depends on the tip shape and the interaction between the water meniscus and the bottom or tip surface. The interaction is determined by the contact angles of the bottom and tip surfaces, resulting in different contact lengths between the water meniscus and the bottom or tip surface. The difference in these contact lengths depends on the effects of both the tip curvature and the interaction between the water meniscus and the bottom or tip surface. We classified the shapes of the water meniscus into seven different patterns as a function of the contact angles of the flat bottom and tip surfaces: concave, semi-concave, inverse semi-concave, column, convex, semiconvex, and inverse semi-convex.

  9. A numerical study on the behavior of the water meniscus formed between a flat surface and a flat or circular tip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Sung Wan; Ha, Man Yeong; Yoon, Hyun Sik; Kim, Chang Min; Kim, Sang Sun

    2014-01-01

    We numerically investigated the behavior of the water meniscus formed between a flat surface and a tip surface, which is flat or circular in shape, using the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The shape of the water meniscus formed between the flat bottom surface and the tip surface depends on the tip shape and the interaction between the water meniscus and the bottom or tip surface. The interaction is determined by the contact angles of the bottom and tip surfaces, resulting in different contact lengths between the water meniscus and the bottom or tip surface. The difference in these contact lengths depends on the effects of both the tip curvature and the interaction between the water meniscus and the bottom or tip surface. We classified the shapes of the water meniscus into seven different patterns as a function of the contact angles of the flat bottom and tip surfaces: concave, semi-concave, inverse semi-concave, column, convex, semiconvex, and inverse semi-convex

  10. A new optimization tool path planning for 3-axis end milling of free-form surfaces based on efficient machining intervals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Duy-Duc; Monies, Frédéric; Rubio, Walter

    2018-05-01

    A large number of studies, based on 3-axis end milling of free-form surfaces, seek to optimize tool path planning. Approaches try to optimize the machining time by reducing the total tool path length while respecting the criterion of the maximum scallop height. Theoretically, the tool path trajectories that remove the most material follow the directions in which the machined width is the largest. The free-form surface is often considered as a single machining area. Therefore, the optimization on the entire surface is limited. Indeed, it is difficult to define tool trajectories with optimal feed directions which generate largest machined widths. Another limiting point of previous approaches for effectively reduce machining time is the inadequate choice of the tool. Researchers use generally a spherical tool on the entire surface. However, the gains proposed by these different methods developed with these tools lead to relatively small time savings. Therefore, this study proposes a new method, using toroidal milling tools, for generating toolpaths in different regions on the machining surface. The surface is divided into several regions based on machining intervals. These intervals ensure that the effective radius of the tool, at each cutter-contact points on the surface, is always greater than the radius of the tool in an optimized feed direction. A parallel plane strategy is then used on the sub-surfaces with an optimal specific feed direction for each sub-surface. This method allows one to mill the entire surface with efficiency greater than with the use of a spherical tool. The proposed method is calculated and modeled using Maple software to find optimal regions and feed directions in each region. This new method is tested on a free-form surface. A comparison is made with a spherical cutter to show the significant gains obtained with a toroidal milling cutter. Comparisons with CAM software and experimental validations are also done. The results show the

  11. Recombinant Forms of Leishmania amazonensis Excreted/Secreted Promastigote Surface Antigen (PSA Induce Protective Immune Responses in Dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie Petitdidier

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Preventive vaccination is a highly promising strategy for interrupting leishmaniasis transmission that can, additionally, contribute to elimination. A vaccine formulation based on naturally excreted secreted (ES antigens was prepared from L. infantum promastigote culture supernatant. This vaccine achieved successful results in Phase III trials and was licensed and marketed as CaniLeish. We recently showed that newly identified ES promastigote surface antigen (PSA, from both viable promastigotes and axenically-grown amastigotes, represented the major constituent and the highly immunogenic antigen of L. infantum and L. amazonensis ES products. We report here that three immunizations with either the recombinant ES LaPSA-38S (rPSA or its carboxy terminal part LaPSA-12S (Cter-rPSA, combined with QA-21 as adjuvant, confer high levels of protection in naive L. infantum-infected Beagle dogs, as checked by bone marrow parasite absence in respectively 78.8% and 80% of vaccinated dogs at 6 months post-challenge. The parasite burden in infected vaccinated dogs was significantly reduced compared to placebo group, as measured by q-PCR. Moreover, our results reveal humoral and cellular immune response clear-cut differences between vaccinated and control dogs. An early increase in specific IgG2 antibodies was observed in rPSA/QA-21- and Cter-rPSA/QA-21-immunized dogs only. They were found functionally active in vitro and were highly correlated with vaccine protection. In vaccinated protected dogs, IFN-γ and NO productions, as well as anti-leishmanial macrophage activity, were increased. These data strongly suggest that ES PSA or its carboxy-terminal part, in recombinant forms, induce protection in a canine model of zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis by inducing a Th1-dominant immune response and an appropriate specific antibody response. These data suggest that they could be considered as important active components in vaccine candidates.

  12. Contents and composition of organic matter in subsurface soils affected by land use and soil mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellerbrock, Ruth H.; Kaiser, Michael

    2010-05-01

    Land use and mineralogy affect the ability of surface as well as subsurface soils to sequester organic carbon and their contribution to mitigate the greenhouse effect. This study aimed to investigate the long-term impact of land use (i.e., arable and forest) and soil mineralogy on contents and composition of soil organic matter (SOM) from subsurface soils. Seven soils different in mineralogy (Albic and Haplic Luvisol, Colluvic and Haplic Regosol, Haplic and Vertic Cambisol, Haplic Stagnosol) were selected within Germany. Soil samples were taken from forest and adjacent arable sites. First, particulate and water soluble organic matter were separated from the subsurface soil samples. From the remaining solid residues the OM(PY) fractions were separated, analyzed for its OC content (OCPY) and characterized by FTIR spectroscopy. For the arable subsurface soils multiple regression analyses indicate significant positive relationships between the soil organic carbon contents and the contents of i) exchangeable Ca and oxalate soluble Fe, and Alox contents. Further for the neutral arable subsurface soils the contents OCPY weighted by its C=O contents were found to be related to the contents of Ca indicating interactions between OM(PY) and Ca cations. For the forest subsurface soils (pH <5) the OCPY contents were positively related with the contents of Na-pyrophosphate soluble Fe and Al. For the acidic forest subsurface soils such findings indicate interactions between OM(PY) and Fe3+ and Al3+ cations. The effects of land use and soil mineralogy on contents and composition of SOM and OM(PY) will be discussed.

  13. Hydrothermally-induced changes in mineralogy and magnetic properties of oxidized A-type granites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nédélec, Anne; Trindade, Ricardo; Peschler, Anne; Archanjo, Carlos; Macouin, Mélina; Poitrasson, Franck; Bouchez, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    The changes in magnetic mineralogy due to the hydrothermal alteration of A-type granitic rocks have been thoroughly investigated in samples from the granite of Tana (Corsica, France), and compared with other A-type granites: Meruoca (NE Brazil), Bushveld (South Africa), Mount Scott (Wichita Mountains, Oklahoma, USA) and the stratoid hypersolvus granites of Madagascar. The altered red-colored samples and their non-altered equivalents were magnetically characterized by means of magnetic susceptibility measurements, hysteresis loops, remanent coercivity spectra, and Lowrie test. It is shown that hydrothermalization in magnetite-bearing granites is related to the formation of fine-grained magnetite and hematite, and to coeval depletion in the content of primary low-coercive coarse-grained magnetite. These mineralogical changes give typical rock magnetic signatures, namely lower susceptibility magnitudes and anisotropy degrees, prolate AMS (anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility) fabrics and increased coercivities. Optical microscopy and SEM (scanning electronic microscopy) images suggest that the orientation of the secondary magnetic minerals is related to fluid-pathways and micro-fractures formed during the hydrothermal event and therefore may be unrelated to magma emplacement and crystallization fabrics. Changes in magnetic mineralogy and grain-size distribution have also to be considered for any paleomagnetic and iron isotope studies in granites.

  14. Mineralogy of Fluvio-Lacustrine Sediments Investigated by Curiosity During the Prime Mission: Implications for Diagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampe, Elizabeth B.; Morris, R. V.; Bish, D. L.; Vaniman, D. T.; Bristow, T. F.; Chipera, S. J.; Blake, D. F.; Ming, D. W.; Farmer, J. D.; Morrison, S. M.; hide

    2014-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity investigated sedimentary rocks that were deposited in a diversity of fluvio-lacustrine settings. The entire science payload was employed to characterize the mineralogy and chemistry of the Sheepbed mudstone at Yellowknife Bay and the Windjana sandstone at the Kimberley. Data from the CheMin instrument, a transmission Xray diffractometer, were used to determine the quantitative mineralogy of both samples. The Sheepbed mudstone contains detrital basaltic minerals, calcium sulfates, iron oxides or hydroxides, iron sulfides, trioctahedral smectite, and amorphous material. The mineral assemblage and chemical data from APXS suggest that the trioctahedral smectite and magnetite formed authigenically as a result of alteration of olivine. The apparent lack of higher-grade phyllosilicates (e.g., illite and chlorite) and the presence of anhydrite indicate diagenesis at 50- 80 ºC. The mineralogy of the Windjana sandstone is different than the Sheepbed mudstone. Windjana contains significant abundances of K-feldspar, low- and high-Ca pyroxenes, magnetite, phyllosilicates, and amorphous material. At least two distinct phyllosilicate phases exist: a 10 Å phase and a component that is expanded with a peak at 11.8 Å. The identity of the expanded phase is currently unknown, but could be a smectite with interlayer H2O, and the 10 Å phase could be illite or collapsed smectite. Further work is necessary to characterize the phyllosilicates, but the presence of illite could suggest that Windjana experienced burial diagenesis. Candidates for the cementing agents include fine-grained phyllosilicates, Fe-oxides, and/or amorphous material. Interpretations of CheMin data from the Windjana sandstone are ongoing at the time of writing, but we will present an estimate of the composition of the amorphous material from mass balance calculations using the APXS bulk chemistry and quantitative mineralogy from CheMin.

  15. Clay Mineralogy of AN Alluvial Aquifer in a Mountainous, Semiarid Terrain, AN Example from Rifle, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, W. C.; Lim, D.; Zaunbrecher, L. K.; Pickering, R. A.; Williams, K. H.; Navarre-Sitchler, A.; Long, P. E.; Noel, V.; Bargar, J.; Qafoku, N. P.

    2015-12-01

    Alluvial sediments deposited along the Colorado River corridor in the semi-arid regions of central to western Colorado can be important hosts for legacy contamination including U, V, As and Se. These alluvial sediments host aquifers which are thought to provide important "hot spots" and "hot moments" for microbiological activity controlling organic carbon processing and fluxes in the subsurface. Relatively little is known about the clay mineralogy of these alluvial aquifers and the parent alluvial sediments in spite of the fact that they commonly include lenses of silt-clay materials. These lenses are typically more reduced than coarser grained materials, but zones of reduced and more oxidized materials are present in these alluvial aquifer sediments. The clay mineralogy of the non-reduced parent alluvial sediments of the alluvial aquifer located in Rifle, CO (USA) is composed of chlorite, smectite, illite, kaolinite and quartz. The clay mineralogy of non-reduced fine-grained materials at Rifle are composed of the same suite of minerals found in the sediments plus a vermiculite-smectite intergrade that occurs near the bottom of the aquifer near the top of the Wasatch Formation. The clay mineral assemblages of the system reflect the mineralogically immature character of the source sediments. These assemblages are consistent with sediments and soils that formed in a moderately low rainfall climate and suggestive of minimal transport of the alluvial sediments from their source areas. Chlorite, smectite, smectite-vermiculite intergrade, and illite are the likely phases involved in the sorption of organic carbon and related microbial redox transformations of metals in these sediments. Both the occurrence and abundance of chlorite, smectite-vermiculite, illite and smectite can therefore exert an important control on the contaminant fluxes and are important determinants of biogeofacies in mountainous, semiarid terrains.

  16. Geochemical and Mineralogical Changes in Compacted MX-80 Bentonite Submitted to Heat and Water Gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez-Espina, R.; Villar, M. V.

    2010-01-01

    A 20-cm high column of MX80 bentonite compacted at dry density 1.70 g/cm 3 with an initial water content of 16 percent was submitted to heating and hydration by opposite ends for 496 days (TH test). The temperature at the bottom of the column was set at 140 degree centigrade and on top at 30 degree centigrade, and deionised water was injected on top at a pressure of 0.01 MPa. Upon dismantling water content, dry density, mineralogy, specific surface area, cation exchange capacity, content of exchangeable cations, and concentration of soluble salts and pH of aqueous extracts were determined in different positions along the bentonite column. The pore water composition was modelled with a geochemical software. The test tried to simulate the conditions of an engineered barrier in a deep geological repository for high-level radioactive waste. The water intake and distribution of water content and dry density along the bentonite were conditioned by the thermal gradient. Liquid water did not penetrate into the column beyond the area in which the temperature was higher than 100 degree centigrade. A convection cell was formed above this area, and liquid water loaded with ions evaporated towards cooler bentonite as it reached the area where the temperature was too high. In this area precipitation of mineral phases took place, Advection, interlayer exchange and dissolution/precipitation processes conditioned the composition of the pore water along the column. In most of the column the pore water was Na-SO 4 2 - type, and changed to Na-Cl near the heater. TH treatment did not cause significant changes in the smectite content or the other mineral phases of the bentonite. (Author) 41 refs.

  17. Geochemical and Mineralogical Changes in Compacted MX-80 Bentonite Submitted to Heat and Water Gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Espina, R.; Villar, M. V.

    2010-05-01

    A 20-cm high column of MX80 bentonite compacted at dry density 1.70 g/cm{sup 3} with an initial water content of 16 percent was submitted to heating and hydration by opposite ends for 496 days (TH test). The temperature at the bottom of the column was set at 140 degree centigrade and on top at 30 degree centigrade, and deionised water was injected on top at a pressure of 0.01 MPa. Upon dismantling water content, dry density, mineralogy, specific surface area, cation exchange capacity, content of exchangeable cations, and concentration of soluble salts and pH of aqueous extracts were determined in different positions along the bentonite column. The pore water composition was modelled with a geochemical software. The test tried to simulate the conditions of an engineered barrier in a deep geological repository for high-level radioactive waste. The water intake and distribution of water content and dry density along the bentonite were conditioned by the thermal gradient. Liquid water did not penetrate into the column beyond the area in which the temperature was higher than 100 degree centigrade. A convection cell was formed above this area, and liquid water loaded with ions evaporated towards cooler bentonite as it reached the area where the temperature was too high. In this area precipitation of mineral phases took place, Advection, interlayer exchange and dissolution/precipitation processes conditioned the composition of the pore water along the column. In most of the column the pore water was Na-SO{sub 4} {sup 2}- type, and changed to Na-Cl near the heater. TH treatment did not cause significant changes in the smectite content or the other mineral phases of the bentonite. (Author) 41 refs.

  18. Mineralogy and environmental geochemistry of historical iron slag, Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site, Pennsylvania, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatak, Nadine; Seal, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site in southeastern Pennsylvania, which features an Fe smelter that was operational in the 18th and 19th centuries, is dominated by three slag piles. Pile 1 slag, from the Hopewell Furnace, and pile 2 slag, likely from the nearby Cornwall Furnace, were both produced in cold-blast charcoal-fired smelters. In contrast, pile 3 slag was produced in an anthracite furnace. Ore samples from the nearby Jones and Hopewell mines that fed the smelter are mainly magnetite-rich with some sulfides (pyrite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite) and accessory silicates (quartz, garnet, feldspar, and clay minerals). Slag piles 1 and 2 are similar mineralogically containing predominantly skeletal and dendritic aluminian diopside and augite, skeletal forsteritic olivine, glass, rounded blebs of metallic Fe, and exotic quartz. Olivine is a major phase in all samples from pile 2, whereas it occurs in only a few samples from pile 1. Samples of the <2 mm-size fraction of surface composite slag material or crushed slag from at depth in piles 1 and 2 are mineralogically similar to the large surface slag fragments from those piles with the addition of phases such as feldspars, Fe oxides, and clay minerals that are either secondary weathering products or entrained from the underlying bedrock. Pile 3 slag contains mostly skeletal forsteritic olivine and Ti-bearing aluminian diopside, dendritic or fine-grained subhedral melilite, glass, euhedral spinel, metallic Fe, alabandite–oldhamite solid solution, as well as a sparse Ti carbonitride phase. The bulk chemistry of the slag is dominated by Al2O3 (8.5–16.2 wt.%), CaO (8.2–26.2 wt.%), MgO (4.2–24.7 wt.%), and SiO2 (36.4–59.8 wt.%), constituting between 81% and 97% of the mass of the samples. Piles 1 and 2 are chemically similar; pile 1 slag overall contains the highest Fe2O3, K2O and MnO, and the lowest MgO concentrations. Pile 3 slag is high in Al2O3, CaO and S, and low in Fe2O3, K2O and SiO2

  19. In situ micro Raman spectroscopy for characterization of oxide film formed on the new surface and for measurements of the stress of oxide film formed on 304L stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kai, A.; Takegoshi, M.; Shoji, T. [Fracture Research Inst., Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    Environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) consists of two distinct events viz., i) crack initiation and ii) crack propagation. On a smooth surface, the EAC initiates by the rupture or by the degradation of the surface film due to the combined action of stress and an electrochemical reaction of the materials with the environment. The mechanical properties of the surface oxide films are also important considerations when determining the susceptibility to EAC. In this research, Micro Raman Spectroscopy (MRS) was applied for in-situ oxides characterization and for in-situ measurements of the stress in oxide film formed on the surface of 304L stainless steel during the scratching electrode and the slow strain rate test (SSRT), respectively. The passive oxide film growth formed on the bare surface was continuously monitored by MRS as a function of time. For stress measurements, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} was focused on and raman shift at Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} peak of Raman spectrum was measured continuously. The strain rate was 8.2 x 10{sup -7}/sec. In the initial stage of SSRT, the Raman shift of surface film decreased gradually with strain. At 5% strain, the Raman shift of surface film increased rapidly to around the initial value of Raman shift. It is considered that the surface film was ruptured at this time. At 5% strain, the shift value of Raman peak of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} reached to 5 cm{sup -1}. This value (5 cm{sup -1}) corresponds to 1.2 GPa which value of tensile stress is calculated from reference data. These characteristics of oxide film will be implemented into the theoretical formulation of EAC and their implication to EAC growth rate will be discussed. (orig.)

  20. Tribological evaluation of surface modified H13 tool steel in warm forming of Ti–6Al–4V titanium alloy sheet

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Dan; Li, Heng; Yang, He; Ma, Jun; Li, Guangjun

    2014-01-01

    The H13 hot-working tool steel is widely used as die material in the warm forming of Ti–6Al–4V titanium alloy sheet. However, under the heating condition, severe friction and lubricating conditions between the H13 tools and Ti–6Al–4V titanium alloy sheet would cause difficulty in guaranteeing forming quality. Surface modification may be used to control the level of friction force, reduce the friction wear and extend the service life of dies. In this paper, four surface modification methods (c...

  1. Impedance and dielectric characterizations of ionic partitioning in interfaces that membranous, biomimetic and gold surfaces form with electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chilcott, Terry C.; Guo, Chuan

    2013-01-01

    Silicon dioxide, organic monolayers covalently attached to silicon and gold are used as biosensor substrates and anchoring platforms for hybrid, tethered and supported lipid membranes used in membrane-protein studies. Electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) studies of gold in contact with potassium chloride electrolytes of concentrations ranging from 1 mM to 300 mM, characterized the gold–electrolyte interface as principally a Stern layer 20–30 Å thick and conductivity many orders of magnitude less than that of the bulk electrolyte. EIS studies of SiO 2 –electrolyte system that were similar to studies of a tetradecane–electrolyte system are presented herein that reveal an interface comprised of at least two interfacial layers and extending some 10 5 Å into the electrolyte. The average conductivity and thickness values for the layer in contact with the SiO 2 surface (∼10 −6 S m −1 and ∼28 Å, respectively) were of the order of magnitude expected for the Gouy–Chapman layer but the dependency of the thickness on concentration did not reflect the expected dependency of the Debye length over the full range of concentrations. The average values for the next layer (∼10 −3 S m −1 and ∼10 5 Å) exhibited a dependency on concentration similar to that expected for the bulk electrolyte. The theoretical derivations of ionic partitioning arising from the Born (dielectric) energy distributions in both the SiO 2 and gold interfaces were generally consistent with the respective EIS studies and revealed that partitioning in the SiO 2 interface mimicked that in bio-membranous interfaces. The dielectric characterizations suggest that; ionic partitioning in biomimetic interfaces play a role in long-ranging sequestration of organic molecules, the extensiveness of these interfaces contributes to differences in the lipid densities of bilayers formed on biomimetic substrates, and chloride ions have a greater affinity than the smaller potassium ions for gold

  2. Engineering durable hydrophobic surfaces on porous alumina ceramics using in-situ formed inorganic-organic hybrid nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gu, Jianqiang; Wang, Junwei; Li, Yanan; Xu, Xin; Chen, Chusheng; Winnubst, Louis

    2017-01-01

    Hydrophobic surfaces are required for a variety of applications owing to their water repellent and self-cleaning properties. In this work, we present a novel approach to prepare durable hydrophobic surfaces on porous ceramics. A polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) film was applied to a porous alumina wafer,

  3. Geomicrobiology; inseparable from low temperature geochemistry & mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southam, G.

    2009-05-01

    Bacteria play an important role in catalyzing a wide array of biogeochemical processes that affect the dissolution of minerals, the aqueous geochemistry of their surroundings and secondary mineral formation. Processes occurring at the bacteria-mineral interface can occur on the scale of nanoenvironments and will normally extend to microenvironments or even, to macroscopic features where extensive growth of bacteria is supported. The action of bacteria in these systems can produce a wide range of biomarkers that can be preserved over geologic time periods. Possible biomarkers include dissolution features in mineral substrates, fossil structures of individual cells to complex cell-cell associations, and chemical (isotopic and organic) signatures. In any system, we need to focus at the scale of the bacteria themselves to appreciate the actual chemistry of their surroundings and the kinds of reactions that they can catalyse. For example, photosynthetic microbial mats in an Atlin, BC wetland create ideal conditions for biologically induced precipitation of magnesium carbonates, specifically dypingite Mg5(CO3)4(OH)25H2O, which we were unable to reproduce abiotically. The preservation of biosignatures over geologic time presents obvious challenges, and the effect of diagenesis on fossils and their mineralogical assemblages deserves attention, especially with respect to the preservation and analysis of materials on (or from) Mars. For this, we need to rely on our Earth analogue sites as a way to triage the wide range of samples that are available for collection and analysis. The preservation of organic materials and cells in salts is particularly interesting. Conversely, the hematite nodules on Mars may not be good samples to target in the search for a Martian biosphere. The possibility of finding an extant biosphere increases with depth; however, evidence from Earth's deep subsurface demonstrates that it does not contain an abundant biosphere. Bacteria thrive in

  4. Surface morphology of laser tracks used for forming the non-smooth biomimetic unit of 3Cr2W8V steel under different processing parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhihui; Zhou Hong; Ren Luquan; Tong Xin; Shan Hongyu; Li Xianzhou

    2008-01-01

    Aiming to form the high quality of non-smooth biomimetic unit, the influence of laser processing parameters (pulse energy, pulse duration, frequency and scanning speed in the present work) on the surface morphology of scanned tracks was studied based on the 3Cr2W8V die steel. The evolution of the surface morphology was explained according to the degree of melting and vaporization of surface material, and the trend of mean surface roughness and maximum peak-to-valley height. Cross-section morphology revealed the significant microstructural characteristic of the laser-treated zone used for forming the functional zone on the biomimetic surface. Results showed that the combination of pulse energy and pulse duration plays a major role in determining the local height difference on the irradiated surface and the occurrence of melting or vaporization. While frequency and scanning speed have a minor effect on the change of the surface morphology, acting mainly by the different overlapping amount and overlapping mode. The mechanisms behind these influences were discussed, and schematic drawings were introduced to describe the mechanisms

  5. Spatial distribution of crystalline corrosion products formed during corrosion of stainless steel in concrete

    KAUST Repository

    Serdar, Marijana

    2015-05-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved. The mineralogy and spatial distribution of nano-crystalline corrosion products that form in the steel/concrete interface were characterized using synchrotron X-ray micro-diffraction (μ-XRD). Two types of low-nickel high-chromium reinforcing steels embedded into mortar and exposed to NaCl solution were investigated. Corrosion in the samples was confirmed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). μ-XRD revealed that goethite (α-FeOOH) and akaganeite (β-FeOOH) are the main iron oxide-hydroxides formed during the chloride-induced corrosion of stainless steel in concrete. Goethite is formed closer to the surface of the steel due to the presence of chromium in the steel, while akaganeite is formed further away from the surface due to the presence of chloride ions. Detailed microstructural analysis is shown and discussed on one sample of each type of steel.

  6. Spatial distribution of crystalline corrosion products formed during corrosion of stainless steel in concrete

    KAUST Repository

    Serdar, Marijana; Meral, Cagla; Kunz, Martin; Bjegovic, Dubravka; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved. The mineralogy and spatial distribution of nano-crystalline corrosion products that form in the steel/concrete interface were characterized using synchrotron X-ray micro-diffraction (μ-XRD). Two types of low-nickel high-chromium reinforcing steels embedded into mortar and exposed to NaCl solution were investigated. Corrosion in the samples was confirmed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). μ-XRD revealed that goethite (α-FeOOH) and akaganeite (β-FeOOH) are the main iron oxide-hydroxides formed during the chloride-induced corrosion of stainless steel in concrete. Goethite is formed closer to the surface of the steel due to the presence of chromium in the steel, while akaganeite is formed further away from the surface due to the presence of chloride ions. Detailed microstructural analysis is shown and discussed on one sample of each type of steel.

  7. Coordinating Chemical and Mineralogical Analyses of Antarctic Dry Valley Sediments as Potential Analogs for Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, S. N.; Bishop, J. L.; Englert, P.; Gibson, E. K.

    2015-01-01

    The Antarctic Dry Valleys (ADV) provide a unique terrestrial analog for Martian surface processes as they are extremely cold and dry sedimentary environments. The surface geology and the chemical composition of the Dry Valleys that are similar to Mars suggest the possible presence of these soil-formation processes on Mars. The soils and sediments from Wright Valley, Antarctica were investigated in this study to examine mineralogical and chemical changes along the surface layer in this region and as a function of depth. Surface samples collected near Prospect Mesa and Don Juan Pond of the ADV were analyzed using visible/near-infrared (VNIR) and mid-IR reflectance spectroscopy and major and trace element abundances.

  8. Mineralogical characterization of tailing dams: incidence of abandoned mining works on soil pollution (Linares, Jaén)

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre, M. J.; Hidalgo, C.; Rey, J.; Martínez, J.

    2012-04-01

    The metallogenic district of Linares-La Carolina (Jaén, Spain) consists of dyke mineralizations mainly of galena, accompanied by blende, chalcopyrite and barite. Associated to these abandoned mines, relatively extensive areas occupied by spoil heaps and tailing impoundments exist and constitute potential sources of soil pollution by metals and semimetals. In order to analyze the pollution potential of these mining wastes, we have carried out a mineralogical and geochemical study of seven tailing dams and surrounding soils in the area. The mineralogy of the samples was studied by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). In addition, the total metal content of samples was determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis. Samples were taken from the first 30 cm of the waste piles and soil deposits and white efflorescences were also obtained from the surface of the tailings. In all analyzed heaps, high to very high total contents in Pb (1220-22890 mg/kg), Zn (150-51280 mg/kg), Mn (2658-4160 mg/kg), Ba (1026-19610 mg/kg) and Fe (19400-138000 mg/kg) were observed. The concentrations for these same elements in the studied soils range from 527-9900 mg/kg for Pb, 27-1700 mg/kg for Zn, 506-2464 mg/kg for Mn, 2832-4306 for Ba and 8642-29753 mg/kg for Fe, and these figures indicate a contamination of the soils, according to the guidelines established by the Spanish law. The XRD and SEM results indicate that the tailings are primarily constituted by gangue of the exploited mineralization: quartz, calcite, ankerite, feldspars and phyllosilicates. They are inherited, primary mineral phases. Galena, also primary, appears in low proportion, as well as lepidocrocite, melanterite and cerussite, being these three last secondary minerals and indicating a certain remobilization of metal cations, especially lead and iron. On the other hand, quartz and phyllosilicates predominate in the soils, in which, in addition, is identified a

  9. Differential Control of ErbB2 Surface Expression in Breast Cancer Cells by an Alternatively Spliced Form of ERBIN

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ching, Kathryn

    2004-01-01

    .... Following ligand binding and receptor activation, many cell surface receptors enter the Multivesicular Body pathway, where they are sorted and either targeted for degradation or recycled back to the plasma membrane...

  10. Effect of the submergence, the bed form geometry, and the speed of the surface water flow on the mitigation of pesticides in agricultural ditches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutron, Olivier; Margoum, Christelle; Chovelon, Jean-Marc; Guillemain, CéLine; Gouy, VéRonique

    2011-08-01

    Pesticides, which have been extensively used in agriculture, have become a major environmental issue, especially regarding surface and groundwater contamination. Of particular importance are vegetated farm drainage ditches, which can play an important role in the mitigation of pesticide contamination by adsorption onto ditch bed substrates. This role is, however, poorly understood, especially regarding the influence of hydrodynamic parameters, which make it difficult to promote best management practice of these systems. We have assessed the influence of three of these parameters (speed of the surface water flow, submergence, and geometrical characteristics of the bed forms) on the transfer and adsorption of selected pesticides (isoproturon, diuron, tebuconazole, and azoxystrobin) into the bed substrate by performing experiments with a tilted experimental flume, using hemp fibers as a standard of natural organic substrates that are found at the bottom of agricultural ditches. Results show the transfer of pesticides from surface water flow into bed substrate is favored, both regarding the amounts transferred into the bed substrate and the kinetics of the transfer, when the surface water speed and the submergence increase and when the bed forms are made of rectangular shapes. Extrapolation of flume data over a distance of several hundred meters suggests that an interesting possibility for improving the mitigation of pesticides in ditches would be to increase the submergence and to favor bed forms that tend to enhance perturbations and subsequent infiltration of the surface water flow.

  11. Multivariate analysis of the geochemistry and mineralogy of soils along two continental-scale transects in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, L.J.; Grunsky, E.C.; Sutphin, D.M.; Woodruff, L.G.

    2010-01-01

    Soils collected in 2004 along two North American continental-scale transects were subjected to geochemical and mineralogical analyses. In previous interpretations of these analyses, data were expressed in weight percent and parts per million, and thus were subject to the effect of the constant-sum phenomenon. In a new approach to the data, this effect was removed by using centered log-ratio transformations to 'open' the mineralogical and geochemical arrays. Multivariate analyses, including principal component and linear discriminant analyses, of the centered log-ratio data reveal the effects of soil-forming processes, including soil parent material, weathering, and soil age, at the continental-scale of the data arrays that were not readily apparent in the more conventionally presented data. Linear discriminant analysis of the data arrays indicates that the majority of the soil samples collected along the transects can be more successfully classified with Level 1 ecological regional-scale classification by the soil geochemistry than soil mineralogy. A primary objective of this study is to discover and describe, in a parsimonious way, geochemical processes that are both independent and inter-dependent and manifested through compositional data including estimates of the elements and corresponding mineralogy. ?? 2010.

  12. In Situ Planetary Mineralogy Using Simultaneous Time Resolved Fluorescence and Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacksberg, J.; Rossman , G.R.

    2011-01-01

    Micro-Raman spectroscopy is one of the primary methods of mineralogical analysis in the laboratory, and more recently in the field. Because of its versatility and ability to interrogate rocks in their natural form it is one of the front runners for the next generation of in situ instruments designed to explore adverse set of solar system bodies (e.g. Mars, Venus, the Moon, and other primitive bodies such as asteroids and the Martian moons Phobos and Deimos), as well as for pre-selection of rock and soil samples for potential cache and return missions.

  13. Basalts as probes of planetary interiors: constraints on the chemistry and mineralogy of their source regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bence, A.E.; Grove, T.L.; Papike, J.J.

    1980-01-01

    Basalt magmas, derived by the partial melting of planetary interiors, have compositions that reflect the pre-accretionary history of the material from which the planet formed, the planets, subsequent evolutionary history, the chemistry and mineralogy of the source regions, and the intensive thermodynamic parameters operating at the source and emplacement sites. Studies of basalt suites from the Earth, its Moon, and the eucrite parent body reveal compositional differences intrinsic to their source regions which are, in turn, a characteristic of the planet and its formational and evolutionary history. (Auth.)

  14. Clay mineralogy and geochemistry of the soils derived from metamorphic and mafic igneous parent rocks in Lahijan area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramezanpour, H.; Hesami, R.; Zanjanchi, M. A.

    2007-01-01

    The mineralogical and geochemical composition of the soils of three representative pedons formed on basaltic andesite, andesitic basalt and phyllite were investigated. Results by x-ray diffraction showed that progressive weathering of rocks have been marked by gradual accumulation of Al, Fe, Ti, Mg, H 3 O + and depletion of Na, K, Ca and Si in the soil; although, predominant clay, loss and gain trend of elements was different on the various rocks. Based on x-ray diffraction analysis, minerals in basaltic andesite and andesitic basalt were similar but, the intensity of mica to smectite or vermiculite transformation for latter was relatively higher than the former. This process revealed the degradation mineral because of two reasons: (i) - smectite and vermiculite increased whereas mica decreased in surface horizons. (i i)-Irregular mixed layer of mica-smectite or vermiculite was present in deeper part (170 cm) of the soils from andesitic basalt but shallower depth (75 em) of the soils from basaltic andesite. Clay minerals in phyllite were mica and chlorite that stratified with vermiculite. However, the absence of smectite in phyllite might be attributed to more acidic condition or position of the Fe ion in the mineral lattice of chlorite (higher Fe in the interlayer hydroxide sheet)

  15. Automated quantitative micro-mineralogical characterization for environmental applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kathleen S.; Hoal, K.O.; Walton-Day, Katherine; Stammer, J.G.; Pietersen, K.

    2013-01-01

    Characterization of ore and waste-rock material using automated quantitative micro-mineralogical techniques (e.g., QEMSCAN® and MLA) has the potential to complement traditional acid-base accounting and humidity cell techniques when predicting acid generation and metal release. These characterization techniques, which most commonly are used for metallurgical, mineral-processing, and geometallurgical applications, can be broadly applied throughout the mine-life cycle to include numerous environmental applications. Critical insights into mineral liberation, mineral associations, particle size, particle texture, and mineralogical residence phase(s) of environmentally important elements can be used to anticipate potential environmental challenges. Resources spent on initial characterization result in lower uncertainties of potential environmental impacts and possible cost savings associated with remediation and closure. Examples illustrate mineralogical and textural characterization of fluvial tailings material from the upper Arkansas River in Colorado.

  16. X-ray Spectroscopy and Magnetism in Mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainctavit, Philippe; Brice-Profeta, Sandrine; Gaudry, Emilie; Letard, Isabelle; Arrio, Marie-Anne

    The objective of this paper is to present the kind of information that can be gained in the field of mineralogy from the use of x-ray magnetic spectroscopies. We review some of the questions that are unsettled and that could benefit from an interdisciplinary approach where magnetism, spectroscopy and mineralogy could be mixed. Most of the attention is focused on iron and some other 3d transition elements. The mineralogy of planetary cores and its relation with known meteorites are exemplified. The various oxide phases in the mantle and the nature of iron in these phases is also underlined. The presence of transition elements in insulating minerals and its relation with macroscopic properties such as the color of gemstones are reviewed. Finally an introduction to paleomagnetism is given with a special attention to nanomaghemites.

  17. A flow chamber assay for quantitative evaluation of bacterial surface colonization used to investigate the influence of temperature and surface hydrophilicity on the biofilm forming capacity of uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Emil; Kingshott, Peter; Palarasah, Yaseelan

    2010-01-01

    to those found on an implanted device. We have used the method to evaluate the biofilm forming capacity of clinically isolated Escherichia coli on silicone rubber and on silicone rubber containing a hydrophilic coating. It was found that the surface chemistry influenced the colonization of the isolates...... very differently. In addition, the temperature was found to have a considerable influence upon the adhesion and biofilm forming capacity of some of the isolates, and that the influence of surface chemistry depended on temperature. Our results suggest that the step from using E. coli laboratory strains...

  18. Tribological evaluation of surface modified H13 tool steel in warm forming of Ti–6Al–4V titanium alloy sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Dan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The H13 hot-working tool steel is widely used as die material in the warm forming of Ti–6Al–4V titanium alloy sheet. However, under the heating condition, severe friction and lubricating conditions between the H13 tools and Ti–6Al–4V titanium alloy sheet would cause difficulty in guaranteeing forming quality. Surface modification may be used to control the level of friction force, reduce the friction wear and extend the service life of dies. In this paper, four surface modification methods (chromium plating, TiAlN coating, surface polishing and nitriding treatment were applied to the H13 surfaces. Taking the coefficient of friction (CoF and the wear degree as evaluation indicators, the high-temperature tribological behavior of the surface modified H13 steel was experimentally investigated under different tribological conditions. The results of this study indicate that the tribological properties of the TiAlN coating under dry friction condition are better than the others for a wide range of temperature (from room temperature to 500 °C, while there is little difference of tribological properties between different surface modifications under graphite lubricated condition, and the variation law of CoF with temperature under graphite lubricated is opposite to that under the dry friction.

  19. The Representation of Color across the Human Visual Cortex: Distinguishing Chromatic Signals Contributing to Object Form Versus Surface Color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, K J; Williams, M A; Rich, A N

    2016-05-01

    Many theories of visual object perception assume the visual system initially extracts borders between objects and their background and then "fills in" color to the resulting object surfaces. We investigated the transformation of chromatic signals across the human ventral visual stream, with particular interest in distinguishing representations of object surface color from representations of chromatic signals reflecting the retinal input. We used fMRI to measure brain activity while participants viewed figure-ground stimuli that differed either in the position or in the color contrast polarity of the foreground object (the figure). Multivariate pattern analysis revealed that classifiers were able to decode information about which color was presented at a particular retinal location from early visual areas, whereas regions further along the ventral stream exhibited biases for representing color as part of an object's surface, irrespective of its position on the retina. Additional analyses showed that although activity in V2 contained strong chromatic contrast information to support the early parsing of objects within a visual scene, activity in this area also signaled information about object surface color. These findings are consistent with the view that mechanisms underlying scene segmentation and the binding of color to object surfaces converge in V2. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Comparative Mineralogy, Microstructure and Compositional Trends in the Sub-Micron Size Fractions of Mare and Highland Lunar Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, M. S.; Christoffersen, R.; Noble, S. K.; Keller, L. P.

    2012-01-01

    The morphology, mineralogy, chemical composition and optical properties of lunar soils show distinct correlations as a function of grain size and origin [1,2,3]. In the fraction, there is an increased correlation between lunar surface properties observed through remote sensing techniques and those attributed to space weathering phenomenae [1,2]. Despite the establishment of recognizable trends in lunar grains fraction fraction for both highland and mare derived soils. The properties of these materials provide the focus for many aspects of lunar research including the nature of space weathering on surface properties, electrostatic grain transport [4,5] and dusty plasmas [5]. In this study, we have used analytical transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM) to characterize the mineralogy type, microstructure and major element compositions of grains in this important size range in lunar soils.

  1. Subsurface variations in arsenic mineralogy and geochemistry following long-term weathering of gold mine tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeSisto, Stephanie L.; Jamieson, Heather E.; Parsons, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Variations in arsenic (As) mineralogy and geochemical controls on its mobility were evaluated in subsurface tailings at the historical Montague and Goldenville mine sites in Nova Scotia, Canada. Tailings at these sites contain some of the highest As concentrations in Nova Scotia and are located in close proximity to local communities. Pore water in the subsurface tailings is characterized by circumneutral to alkaline pH (6.2 to 8.7) and mildly reducing to oxidizing redox conditions (+130 mV to +347 mV). Bulk chemistry, scanning electron microscopy, and synchrotron micro-X-ray diffraction analyses showed As mineral hosts differ with depth. The deepest tailings (max. 2 m) are in direct contact with partially decomposed vegetation, which supports reducing conditions and the precipitation of authigenic As and Fe sulfides. Under reducing conditions, dissolved As concentrations are also controlled by desorption of As from dissolution of Fe and Mn oxides and the sorption or co-precipitation of As with carbonates. These geochemical controls differ from those influencing dissolved As concentrations under oxidizing conditions. In the near surface, As mobility is controlled by oxidative dissolution of primary arsenopyrite, precipitation of secondary Fe arsenates, Fe oxyhydroxides and Mn oxides, secondary Ca-Fe arsenates, and sorption onto Fe oxyhydroxides and gangue minerals. Some of these mineral species are stable under different conditions yet occur in close association, indicating the importance of microenvironments. The results of this study show that the weathering characteristics of these tailings vary with depth, leading to the formation of new As hosts that are distinct from those observed in the near surface. Identification of these As hosts provides an understanding of current controls on As mobility and has implications for future reprocessing and/or remediation efforts. - Highlights: • Subsurface mineralogy does not reflect surface tailings end

  2. Mineralogy of Rocks and Sediments at Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achilles, Cherie; Downs, Robert; Blake, David; Vaniman, David; Ming, Doug; Rampe, Elizabeth; Morris, Dick; Morrison, Shaunna; Treiman, Allan; Chipera, Steve; Yen, Albert; Bristow, Thomas; Craig, Patricia; Hazen, Robert; Crisp, Joy; Grotzinger, John; Des Marias, David; Farmer, Jack; Sarrazin, Philippe; Morookian, John Michael

    2017-04-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover, Curiosity, is providing in situ mineralogical, geochemical, and sedimentological assessments of rocks and soils in Gale crater. Since landing in 2012, Curiosity has traveled over 15 km, providing analyses of mudstones and sandstones to build a stratigraphic history of the region. The CheMin X-ray diffraction (XRD) instrument is the first instrument on Mars to provide quantitative mineralogical analyses of drilled powders and scooped sediment based on X-ray crystallography. CheMin identifies and determines mineral abundances and unit-cell parameters of major crystalline phases, and identifies minor phases at abundances >1 wt%. In conjunction with elemental analyses, CheMin-derived crystal chemistry allows for the first calculations of crystalline and amorphous material compositions. These mineralogy, crystal chemistry, and amorphous chemistry datasets are playing central roles in the characterization of Gale crater paleoenvironments. CheMin has analyzed 17 rock and sediment samples. In the first phase of the mission, Curiosity explored the sedimentary units of Aeolis Palus (Bradbury group), including two mudstones from Yellowknife Bay. CheMin analyses of the Yellowknife Bay mudstones identified clay minerals among an overall basaltic mineral assemblage. These mineralogical results, along with imaging and geochemical analyses, were used to characterize an ancient lacustrine setting that is thought to have once been a habitable environment. Following the investigations of the Bradbury group, Curiosity arrived at the lower reaches of Aeolis Mons, commonly called Mt. Sharp. A strategic sample campaign was initiated, drilling bedrock at X-ray amorphous phases. Adjacent to fractures, light-toned, halo-like zones are thought to result from significant aqueous alteration of the primary sandstone and show decreased abundances of feldspar and pyroxene, and an increase in the amorphous component, specifically high-silica phases. The Murray

  3. Significance of mineralogy in the development of flowsheets for processing uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This report has been prepared from material developed at and subsequent to a consultants' meeting held in Vienna in January 1978. The main purpose of the meeting was to prepare a document in the form of a guide for planning and developing treatment flowsheets for uranium ore processing. It was apparent that ore mineralogy, analysed, described and interpreted in ways most meaningful to the metallurgist, is the most essential information required for forming the basis of such planning. This topic, here termed metallurgical mineralogy, is therefore a major theme of this publication. In preparing the report the Agency has borne in mind the important need to impart the experience and knowledge gained in the more developed countries to those who are in the early stages of exploiting their uranium resources. The contents may be criticized as lacking, in some respects, the requisite depth and detail of treatment. The Agency and the consultants are conscious of the need to expand the information in a number of ways. However, the report is presented in its present form in the belief that, as the first attempt to correlate, on a world-wide basis, ore type with processing, it will be considered as a useful basis for future development of these themes

  4. Adsorption of benzene and toluene from aqueous solutions onto activated carbon and its acid and heat treated forms: influence of surface chemistry on adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibowo, N; Setyadhi, L; Wibowo, D; Setiawan, J; Ismadji, S

    2007-07-19

    The influence of surface chemistry and solution pH on the adsorption of benzene and toluene on activated carbon and its acid and heat treated forms were studied. A commercial coal-based activated carbon F-400 was chosen as carbon parent. The carbon samples were obtained by modification of F-400 by means of chemical treatment with HNO3 and thermal treatment under nitrogen flow. The treatment with nitric acid caused the introduction of a significant number of oxygenated acidic surface groups onto the carbon surface, while the heat treatment increases the basicity of carbon. The pore characteristics were not significantly changed after these modifications. The dispersive interactions are the most important factor in this adsorption process. Activated carbon with low oxygenated acidic surface groups (F-400Tox) has the best adsorption capacity.

  5. Geochemistry and mineralogy of Ogun phosphate rock

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    m deep) within the same location. The pellets ... diffracted rays are collected by a detector and the information relayed to a ... Ogun phosphate deposits were formed in shallow marine ... process thus confirming the earlier work done by Jones.

  6. Effect of Alkali-Acid-Heat Chemical Surface Treatment on Electron Beam Melted Porous Titanium and Its Apatite Forming Ability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bsat, S.; Yavari, S.; Munsch, M.; Valstar, E.R.; Zadpoor, A.A.

    2015-01-01

    Advanced additive manufacturing techniques such as electron beam melting (EBM), can produce highly porous structures that resemble the mechanical properties and structure of native bone. However, for orthopaedic applications, such as joint prostheses or bone substitution, the surface must also be

  7. Gold surfaces and nanoparticles are protected by Au(0)-thiyl species and are destroyed when Au(I)-thiolates form

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimers, Jeffrey R.; Ford, Michael J.; Halder, Arnab

    2016-01-01

    that it is the noble character of gold and nanoparticle surfaces that destabilizes Au(I)-thiolates. Bonding results from large van der Waals forces, influenced by covalent bonding induced through s-d hybridization and charge polarization effects that perturbatively mix in some Au(I)-thiolate character. A simple method...

  8. Prediction of the shape of inline wave force and free surface elevation using First Order Reliability Method (FORM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghadirian, Amin; Bredmose, Henrik; Schløer, Signe

    2017-01-01

    theory, that is, the most likely time history of inline force around a force peak of given value. The results of FORM and NewForce are linearly identical and show only minor deviations at second order. The FORM results are then compared to wave averaged measurements of the same criteria for crest height......In design of substructures for offshore wind turbines, the extreme wave loads which are of interest in Ultimate Limit States are often estimated by choosing extreme events from linear random sea states and replacing them by either stream function wave theory or the NewWave theory of a certain...... design wave height. As these wave theories super from limitations such as symmetry around the crest, other methods to estimate the wave loads are needed. In the present paper, the First Order Reliability Method, FORM, is used systematically to estimate the most likely extreme wave shapes. Two parameters...

  9. Mineralogy: a modern approach to teaching a traditional discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, G. W.

    2011-12-01

    Mineralogy has traditionally been a primary component in undergraduate geoscience curriculum. In recent years, there has been a trend in which mineralogy and petrology have been combined into Earth Materials courses. This is unfortunate as these disciplines each have much to offer students, and content once considered essential is eliminated out of necessity. Mineralogy is still fundamental to students' understanding of the Earth and Earth processes. Using a modern approach to time-honored concepts, I teach a quarter-long Introductory Mineralogy class offered through the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego. Student evaluations of this course unequivocally indicate a high degree of learning and interest in the material, confirming that mineralogy continues to be a valuable class into the 21st century. While much of the content remains similar to what has been taught over the last century, my strategy involves a well-balanced approach to old and new. The first third of the course is background including the relevance of mineralogy, crystal chemistry, and crystallography; the second third of the course is systematic mineralogy using the Dana system; the last third of the course is devoted to understanding optical mineralogy, using modern analytical equipment such as XRD and SEM, and learning to use the petrographic microscope. Throughout the quarter, a strong emphasis is placed on the importance of hand-sample identification. Field work, traditionally not emphasized in mineralogy courses, has been re-introduced to the curriculum. I use modern technology to facilitate and support student learning. A lecture-based approach is employed with carefully crafted and organized PowerPoint presentations. PowerPoint lectures can be effective and highly engaging. The key is to ensure that the lectures are not overly reliant on text, instead relying on diagrams, charts, photos, and embedded media such as 3-D animations (ex. to teach

  10. The RSV F and G glycoproteins interact to form a complex on the surface of infected cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low, Kit-Wei; Tan, Timothy; Ng, Ken; Tan, Boon-Huan; Sugrue, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the interaction between the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) fusion (F) protein, attachment (G) protein, and small hydrophobic (SH) proteins was examined. Immunoprecipitation analysis suggested that the F and G proteins exist as a protein complex on the surface of RSV-infected cells, and this conclusion was supported by ultracentrifugation analysis that demonstrated co-migration of surface-expressed F and G proteins. Although our analysis provided evidence for an interaction between the G and SH proteins, no evidence was obtained for a single protein complex involving all three of the virus proteins. These data suggest the existence of multiple virus glycoprotein complexes within the RSV envelope. Although the stimulus that drives RSV-mediated membrane fusion is unknown, the association between the G and F proteins suggest an indirect role for the G protein in this process

  11. Simulation, microstructure and microhardness of the nano-SiC coating formed on Al surface via laser shock processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, C.Y.; Cui, X.G.; Zhao, Q.; Ren, X.D.; Zhou, J.Z.; Liu, Z.; Wang, Y.M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Nano-SiC coating is successfully fabricated on pure Al surface via LSPC. • Movement states of the nano-SiC particles are analyzed by FEM. • Formation mechanism of the nano-SiC coating is put forward and discussed. • Microhardness of the Al is significantly improved due to the nano-SiC coating. - Abstract: A novel method, laser shock processing coating (LSPC), has been developed to fabricate a particle-reinforced coating based on laser shock processing (LSP). In this study, a nano-SiC coating is successfully prepared on pure Al surface via LSPC. The surface and cross section morphologies as well as the compositions of nano-SiC coating are investigated. Moreover, a finite element method (FEM) is employed to clarify the formation process of nano-SiC coating. On the basis of the above analyzed results, a possible formation mechanism of the nano-SiC coating is tentatively put forward and discussed. Furthermore, the nano-SiC coating shows superior microhardness over the Al substrate

  12. Research on Forming Mechanisms and Controlling Measurements for Surface Light Spot Defects of Galvanizing Steel Coils for Automobile Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guangmin, Wei; Haiyan, Sun; Jianqiang, Shi; Lianxuan, Wang; Haihong, Wu

    When producing high surface quality galvanizing steel coils for automobile use, there are always many light spots on the surface since Hansteel CGL No.1 has been put into operation. The defect samples were analyzed by SEM and EDS. The result shows that cause for light spot is not only one. There are more Mn and P in high strength auto sheet, which can result in difficulty to be cleaned off the oxide on the hot rolled coils, so the defects coming. This is why the defects come with high strength auto sheet. When coils galvanized, the defects can't be covered up. To the contrary, the defects will be more obvious when zinc growing on the surface. And sometimes zinc or residue can adhere to work rolls when strips passing through SPM. The deposits then press normal coating. So the light spots come more. When the defect comes from pressing, there is no defect on steel base. The causation is found and measures were taken including high pressure cleaning equipments adopted. Result shows that the defects disappeared.

  13. 2D surface optical lattice formed by plasmon polaritons with application to nanometer-scale molecular deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yanning; Xu, Supeng; Li, Tao; Yin, Yaling; Xia, Yong; Yin, Jianping

    2017-08-10

    Surface plasmon polaritons, due to their tight spatial confinement and high local intensity, hold great promises in nanofabrication which is beyond the diffraction limit of conventional lithography. Here, we demonstrate theoretically the 2D surface optical lattices based on the surface plasmon polariton interference field, and the potential application to nanometer-scale molecular deposition. We present the different topologies of lattices generated by simple configurations on the substrate. By explicit theoretical derivations, we explain their formation and characteristics including field distribution, periodicity and phase dependence. We conclude that the topologies can not only possess a high stability, but also be dynamically manipulated via changing the polarization of the excitation laser. Nanometer-scale molecular deposition is simulated with these 2D lattices and discussed for improving the deposition resolution. The periodic lattice point with a width resolution of 33.2 nm can be obtained when the fullerene molecular beam is well-collimated. Our study can offer a superior alternative method to fabricate the spatially complicated 2D nanostructures, with the deposition array pitch serving as a reference standard for accurate and traceable metrology of the SI length standard.

  14. Current status of application of Moessbauer effect in geology and mineralogy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Binfu

    1995-01-01

    The paper briefly introduces the current status of the application of Moessbauer effect in geology and mineralogy. It shows that geology and mineralogy are very active fields in the application of Moessbauer effect

  15. Mineralogical Results from the Mars Science Laboratory Rover Curiosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, David Frederick.

    2017-01-01

    NASA's CheMin instrument, the first X-ray Diffractometer flown in space, has been operating on Mars for nearly five years. CheMin was first to establish the quantitative mineralogy of the Mars global soil (1). The instrument was next used to determine the mineralogy of a 3.7 billion year old lacustrine mudstone, a result that, together with findings from other instruments on the MSL Curiosity rover, documented the first habitable environment found on another planet (2). The mineralogy of this mudstone from an ancient playa lake was also used to derive the maximum concentration of CO2 in the early Mars atmosphere, a surprisingly low value that calls into question the current theory that CO2 greenhouse warming was responsible for the warm and wet environment of early Mars. CheMin later identified the mineral tridymite, indicative of silica-rich volcanism, in mudstones of the Murray formation on Mt. Sharp. This discovery challenges the paradigm of Mars as a basaltic planet and ushers in a new chapter of comparative terrestrial planetology (3). CheMin is now being used to systematically sample the sedimentary layers that comprise the lower strata of Mt. Sharp, a 5,000 meter sequence of sedimentary rock laid down in what was once a crater lake, characterizing isochemical sediments that through their changing mineralogy, document the oxidation and drying out of the Mars in early Hesperian time.

  16. Mineralogy and geochemistry of bauxite and bentonite deposits from Mozambique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dos Muchangos, A.C.

    2000-01-01

    Results of mineralogical and geochemical studies of bauxites, kaolinitic clays and bentoniteS from Mozambique are presented in this thesis. The bauxite and kaolinitic clay deposits in Penhalonga area (in the central western part of Mozambique) are associated with Precambrian magmatic rocks and

  17. Moessbauer mineralogy on the Moon: The lunar regolith

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, Richard V.; Klingelhoefer, Goestar; Korotev, Randy L.; Shelfer, Tad D.

    1998-01-01

    A first-order requirement for spacecraft missions that land on solid planetary objects is instrumentation for mineralogical analyses. For purposes of providing diagnostic information about naturally-occurring materials, the element iron is particularly important because it is abundant and multivalent. Knowledge of the oxidation state of iron and its distribution among iron-bearing mineralogies tightly constrains the types of materials present and provides information about formation and modification (weathering) processes. Because Moessbauer spectroscopy is sensitive to both the valence of iron and its local chemical environment, the technique is unique in providing information about both the relative abundance of iron-bearing phases and oxidation state of the iron. The Moessbauer mineralogy of lunar regolith samples (primarily soils from the Apollo 16 and 17 missions to the Moon) were measured in the laboratory to demonstrate the strength of the technique for in-situ mineralogical exploration of the Moon. The regolith samples were modeled as mixtures of five iron-bearing phases: olivine, pyroxene, glass, ilmenite, and metal. Based on differences in relative proportions of iron associated with these phases, volcanic-ash regolith can be distinguished from impact-derived regolith, impact-derived soils of different geologic affinity (e.g., highlands and maria) can be distinguished on the basis of their constituent minerals, and soil maturity can be estimated. The total resonant absorption area of the Moessbauer spectrum can be used to estimate total FeO concentrations

  18. Mineralogy and geochemistry of density-separated Greek lignite fractions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iordanidis, A.; Doesburg, van J.D.J.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, lignite samples were collected from the Ptolemais region, northern Greece, homogenized, crushed to less than I nun, and separated in three density fractions using heavy media. The mineralogical investigation of the density fractions showed a predominance of pyrite in the light

  19. Mineralogy of Tailings Dump around Selebi Phikwe Nickel-Copper ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed at mineralogically characterizing the tailings dump emanating from the mining and smelting of nickel-copper (Ni-Cu) at Selebi Phikwe, Botswana, Southern Africa. Samples of tailings dump around the Selebi Phikwe Ni-Cu plant were studied using petrographic microscopy and X-ray Powder Diffraction ...

  20. Mineralogical and geochemical studies of phosphorite nodules in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mineralogical and geochemical studies of phosphorite nodules in the Dange Formation Sokoto Basin, Northwestern Niveria. OA Adekeye, SO Akande. Abstract. No Abstract Available Journal of Mining and Geology Vol.40(2) 2004: 101-106. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ...

  1. Mineralogy and trace element chemistry of the Siliceous Earth of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    We report the presence of a 3–5 cm thick loose fragmental layer in the Siliceous Earth at Matti ka. Gol in the Barmer basin of Rajasthan. Petrographic, chemical and mineralogical study reveals the presence of abundant volcanic debris such as glass shards, agglutinates, hollow spheroids, kinked biotites, feldspars showing ...

  2. Physico-chemical and Mineralogical Characterisation of Subsurface ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies were carried out on subsurface sediments obtained around the Gaborone landfill area Botswana, in order to characterize their mineralogy and physico-chemistry, appraise any contaminant inputs from the landfill and assess their ability to attenuate contaminants from the landfill. Physico-chemical properties ...

  3. Characterization of North American lignite fly ashes. II. XRD Mineralogy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, G.J.; Johansen, D.M.; Thedchanamoorthy, A.; Steinwand, S.J.; Swanson, K.D.

    1988-01-01

    X-ray powder diffraction has been used to determine the crystalline phase mineralogy in samples of fly ash from each of the lignite mining areas of North America. The characteristic phases of North Dakota lignite fly ashes were periclase, lime, merwinite and the sulfate phases anhydrite, thenardite and a sodalite-structure phase. Mullite was absent in these low-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ ashes. Montana lignite ash mineralogy had characteristics of ND lignite and MT subbituminous coal fly ashes; mullite and C/sub 3/A were present and the alkali sulfates were absent. Texas and Louisiana lignite fly ashes had the characteristic mineralogy of bituminous coal fly ash: quartz, mullite, ferrite-spinel (magnetite) and minor hematite. Even though their analytical CaO contents were 7-14%, all but one lacked crystalline CaO-containing phases. Lignite fly ashes from Saskatchewan were generally the least crystalline of those studied and had a mineralogy consisting of quartz, mullite, ferrite spinel and periclase. Quantitative XRD data were obtained. The position of the diffuse scattering maximum in the x-ray diffractograms was indicative of the glass composition of the lignite fly ash

  4. Characteristic of the Nanoparticles Formed on the Carbon Steel Surface Contacting with 3d-Metal Water Salt Solutions in the Open-Air System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrynenko, O. M.; Pavlenko, O. Yu; Shchukin, Yu S.

    2016-02-01

    The contact of a steel electrode with water dispersion medium in an open-air system leads to the development of various polymorphic iron oxides and oxyhydroxides on the steel surface. Whereas the usage of distilled water causes the obtaining of Fe(II)-Fe(III) layered double hydroxides (green rust) as a primary mineral phase, but in the presence of inorganic 3d-metal water salt solutions, mixed layered double hydroxides (LDHs) together with non-stoichiometric spinel ferrite nanoparticles are formed on the steel surface. Mixed LDHs keep stability against further oxidation and complicate the obtaining of spinel ferrite nanoparticles. Thermal treatment of mixed LDHs among other mineral phases formed via the rotation-corrosion dispergation process at certain temperatures permits to obtain homogenous nanoparticles of spinel ferrites as well as maghemite or hematite doped by 3d-metal cations.

  5. Clays for brick manufacturing in Actopan, Hidalgo: physical, chemical and mineralogical characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno-Tovar, Raul; Yañez-Hernández, Osiris Annel; Pérez-Moreno, Fidel; Rodríguez-Lugo, Ventura [Área de Ciencias de la Tierra y Materiales, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Hidalgo (Mexico); Rivera, José de Jesús Cruz [Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí (Mexico); Rivera, Ana Leonor, E-mail: analeonor.ventura.2016@gmail.com [Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, DF (Mexico)

    2017-10-15

    Samples of clays from Actopan, Hidalgo employed in brick manufacturing are physical, chemical and mineralogical characterized. Transmitted polarized light microscopy showed a uniform particle size with grain morphology characteristic of euhedral crystals with quartz, feldspars, nontronite, and iron oxides particles. Scanning Electron Microscopy revealed 75 μm to 90 μm wide subhedral structures formed by particles from 2.0 μm to 5.0 μm; and rombohedrales forms 40 μm wide, 70 µm long, constituted of silicon, aluminum, iron, titanium, calcium, minor amounts of potassium, magnesium, and sodium. Minerals such as quartz, albite, cristobalite, calcium and Hematite phases were recognized by X-Ray Diffraction technique. Chemical analysis by atomic emission spectrometry with Inductively Coupled Plasma confirmed this mineralogy composition while laser granulometry method found the same particle size. Grain size analysis determined submicrometric dimensions, and multimodal type curves, that can be interpreted as the mixing of two or more different mineral phases in each sample. (author)

  6. The Private Lives of Minerals: Social Network Analysis Applied to Mineralogy and Petrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazen, R. M.; Morrison, S. M.; Fox, P. A.; Golden, J. J.; Downs, R. T.; Eleish, A.; Prabhu, A.; Li, C.; Liu, C.

    2016-12-01

    Comprehensive databases of mineral species (rruff.info/ima) and their geographic localities and co-existing mineral assemblages (mindat.org) reveal patterns of mineral association and distribution that mimic social networks, as commonly applied to such varied topics as social media interactions, the spread of disease, terrorism networks, and research collaborations. Applying social network analysis (SNA) to common assemblages of rock-forming igneous and regional metamorphic mineral species, we find patterns of cohesion, segregation, density, and cliques that are similar to those of human social networks. These patterns highlight classic trends in lithologic evolution and are illustrated with sociograms, in which mineral species are the "nodes" and co-existing species form "links." Filters based on chemistry, age, structural group, and other parameters highlight visually both familiar and new aspects of mineralogy and petrology. We quantify sociograms with SNA metrics, including connectivity (based on the frequency of co-occurrence of mineral pairs), homophily (the extent to which co-existing mineral species share compositional and other characteristics), network closure (based on the degree of network interconnectivity), and segmentation (as revealed by isolated "cliques" of mineral species). Exploitation of large and growing mineral data resources with SNA offers promising avenues for discovering previously hidden trends in mineral diversity-distribution systematics, as well as providing new pedagogical approaches to teaching mineralogy and petrology.

  7. Clays for brick manufacturing in Actopan, Hidalgo: physical, chemical and mineralogical characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno-Tovar, Raul; Yañez-Hernández, Osiris Annel; Pérez-Moreno, Fidel; Rodríguez-Lugo, Ventura; Rivera, José de Jesús Cruz; Rivera, Ana Leonor

    2017-01-01

    Samples of clays from Actopan, Hidalgo employed in brick manufacturing are physical, chemical and mineralogical characterized. Transmitted polarized light microscopy showed a uniform particle size with grain morphology characteristic of euhedral crystals with quartz, feldspars, nontronite, and iron oxides particles. Scanning Electron Microscopy revealed 75 μm to 90 μm wide subhedral structures formed by particles from 2.0 μm to 5.0 μm; and rombohedrales forms 40 μm wide, 70 µm long, constituted of silicon, aluminum, iron, titanium, calcium, minor amounts of potassium, magnesium, and sodium. Minerals such as quartz, albite, cristobalite, calcium and Hematite phases were recognized by X-Ray Diffraction technique. Chemical analysis by atomic emission spectrometry with Inductively Coupled Plasma confirmed this mineralogy composition while laser granulometry method found the same particle size. Grain size analysis determined submicrometric dimensions, and multimodal type curves, that can be interpreted as the mixing of two or more different mineral phases in each sample. (author)

  8. A new and improved methodology for qualitative and quantitative mineralogical analysis of Boom Clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeelmaekers, E.; Vandenberghe, N.; Honty, M.; De Craen, M.; Derkowski, A.; Van Geet, M.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. A good knowledge of the mineralogy of any host formation studied for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste, is a prerequisite for understanding the geochemical environment which will determine the migration and retention behaviour of radionuclides. In this respect, the Boom Clay mineralogical composition has been extensively studied last decades as reference host formation (e.g. ARCHIMEDEARGILE project, OECD-NEA clay catalogue report) with the aim to provide reliable data for a safety assessment. However, a comparison of the available literature data clearly showed a serious discrepancy among studies, not only in the quantitative, but also in the qualitative mineralogical composition of the Boom Clay (SAFIR II). The reason for such a huge disagreement could be related, among others, to variable grain size distributions of the studied samples (sample heterogeneity) and differences in the methodological approaches. In particular, the unambiguous characterisation of clay minerals and the quantification of mixed-layer phases appeared as an everlasting problem. This study is aimed at achieving a consensus on the qualitative and quantitative mineralogical data of the Boom Clay using the most advanced techniques currently available in the clay science. A new sampling campaign was performed in such a way that samples are (20 in total) more or less regularly distributed over Boom Clay Formation, ensuring that variations in the grain size distributions due to silty clay-clayey silt layers alternations are accounted for. The novel concept based on an analysis at two levels was applied: (1) bulk rock and (2) clay fraction analysis. (1) A bulk rock analysis consists of conventional XRD analysis with the identification of the principal mineral phases. As a next step, the bulk rock was mixed with a ZnO internal standard and experimental diffraction patterns of randomly oriented powders were analyzed using &apos

  9. The Mineralogy of Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    principle for precipitation reactions. They concluded that many sulfides under near-surface natural environmental conditions could only be produced...during microbial corrosion, Corrosion 46 (1990) 599-600. [57] R.A. Berner, The synthesis of framboidal pyrite, Econ . Geol. Bull. Soc. 64 (1969) 383-384...at Bourbon I’ Archambault, Cr Hebd Acad. Sci. 80 (1875) 1297-1300. [86] L.G.M. Baas Beck:ing, D. Moore, Biogenic sulfides, Econ . Geol. Bull. Soc. 56

  10. Effects of Surface Charge and Functional Groups on the Adsorption and Binding Forms of Cu and Cd on Roots of indica and japonica Rice Cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao-Dong Liu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This work was designed to understand the mechanisms of adsorption of copper (Cu and cadmium (Cd on roots of indica and japonica varieties of rice. Six varieties each of indica and japonica rice were grown in hydroponics and the chemical properties of the root surface were analyzed, including surface charges and functional groups (-COO- groups as measured by the streaming potential and attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR. Binding forms of heavy metals adsorbed on rice roots were identified using sequential extraction methods. In rice roots exposed to Cu and Cd solutions, Cu existed mainly in both exchangeable and complexed forms, whereas Cd existed mainly in the exchangeable form. The amounts of exchangeable Cu and Cd and total adsorbed metal cations on the roots of indica varieties were significantly greater than those on the roots of japonica varieties, and the higher negative charges and the larger number of functional groups on the roots of indica varieties were responsible for their higher adsorption capacity and greater binding strength for Cu and Cd. Surface charge and functional groups on roots play an important role in the adsorption of Cu and Cd on the rice roots.

  11. Surface tectonics of nanoporous networks of melamine-capped molecular building blocks formed through interface Schiff-base reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuan-He; Wang, Dong; Wan, Li-Jun

    2013-10-01

    Control over the assembly of molecules on a surface is of great importance for the fabrication of molecule-based miniature devices. Melamine (MA) and molecules with terminal MA units are promising candidates for supramolecular interfacial packing patterning, owing to their multiple hydrogen-bonding sites. Herein, we report the formation of self-assembled structures of MA-capped molecules through a simple on-surface synthetic route. MA terminal groups were successfully fabricated onto rigid molecular cores with 2-fold and 3-fold symmetry through interfacial Schiff-base reactions between MA and aldehyde groups. Sub-molecular scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) imaging of the resultant adlayer revealed the formation of nanoporous networks. Detailed structural analysis indicated that strong hydrogen-bonding interactions between the MA groups persistently drove the formation of nanoporous networks. Herein, we demonstrate that functional groups with strong hydrogen-bond-formation ability are promising building blocks for the guided assembly of nanoporous networks and other hierarchical 2D assemblies. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Optimization of lactic acid production by pellet-form Rhizopus oryzae in 3-L airlift bioreactor using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneeboon, Thanapoom; Vanichsriratana, Wirat; Pomchaitaward, Chaiyaporn; Kitpreechavanich, Vichien

    2010-05-01

    The influence of two key environmental factors, pH and oxygen transfer coefficient (k(L)a), was evaluated on the lactic acid production as the main answer and, on the size of cell pellets of the fungal strain Rhizopus oryzae KPS106, as second dependant answer by response surface methodology using a central composite design. The results of the analysis of variance and modeling demonstrated that pH and k(L)a had a significant effect on lactic acid production by this strain. However, no interaction was observed between these two experimental factors. pH and k(L)a had no significant influence on the pellet size. Optimal pH and k(L)a of the fermentation medium for lactic acid production from response surface analysis was 5.85 and of 3.6 h(-1), respectively. The predicted and experimental lactic acid maximal values were 75.4 and 72.0 g/l, respectively, with pellets of an average of 2.54 +/- 0.41 mm. Five repeated batches in series were conducted with a mean lactic acid production of 77.54 g/l. The productivity was increased from 0.75 in the first batch to 0.99 g/l h in the last fifth batch.

  13. A new approach to the form and position error measurement of the auto frame surface based on laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hua; Li, Wei

    2013-03-01

    Auto frame is a very large workpiece, with length up to 12 meters and width up to 2 meters, and it's very easy to know that it's inconvenient and not automatic to measure such a large workpiece by independent manual operation. In this paper we propose a new approach to reconstruct the 3D model of the large workpiece, especially the auto truck frame, based on multiple pulsed lasers, for the purpose of measuring the form and position errors. In a concerned area, it just needs one high-speed camera and two lasers. It is a fast, high-precision and economical approach.

  14. Anti-corrosion film formed on HAl77-2 copper alloy surface by aliphatic polyamine in 3 wt.% NaCl solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Yinzhe; Yang, Dong; Zhang, Daquan, E-mail: zhdq@sh163.net; Wang, Yizhen; Gao, Lixin

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Properties of ADDD meet environment-friendly requirements. • ADDD’s inhibition efficiency is better than BTA at the low concentration. • ADDD adsorbs on the copper alloy surface by via the N atom in its amino group using flat mode. - Abstract: The corrosion inhibition of a polyamine compound, N-(4-amino-2, 3-dimethylbutyl)-2, 3-dimethylbutane-1, 4-diamine (ADDD), was investigated for HAl77-2 copper alloy in 3 wt.% NaCl solution. Electrochemical measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscope (AFM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) techniques were employed for this research. The results show that ADDD strongly suppresses the corrosion of HAl77-2 alloy. The inhibition efficiency of ADDD is 98.6% at 0.5 mM, which is better than benzotriazole (BTAH) at the same concentration. Polarization curves indicate that ADDD is an anodic type inhibitor. Surface analysis suggests that a protective film is formed via the interaction of ADDD and copper. FT-IR reveals that the inhibition mechanism of ADDD is dominated by chemisorption onto the copper alloy surface to form an inhibition film. Furthermore, quantum chemical calculation and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations methods show that ADDD adsorbs on HAl77-2 surface via amino group in its molecule.

  15. Forming chemical composition of surface waters in the Arctic as "water - rock" interaction. Case study of lake Inari and river Paz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazukhina, Svetlana; Sandimirov, Sergey; Pozhilenko, Vladimir; Ivanov, Stanislav; Maksimova, Viktoriia

    2017-04-01

    Due to the depletion of fresh water supplies and the deterioration of their quality as a result of anthropogenic impact on the Arctic ecosystems, the research questions of forming surface and ground waters, their interactions with the rocks, development of the foundations for their rational use and protection are of great fundamental and practical importance. The aim of the work is to evaluate the influence of the chemical composition of rocks of the northern part of the Fennoscandian (Baltic) shield on forming surface waters chemical composition (Lake Inari, river Paz) using physical-chemical modeling (Chudnenko, 2010, Selector software package). River Paz (Paatsjoki) is the largest river in North Fennoscandia and flows through the territory of three countries - Finland, Russia and Norway. It originates from Lake Inari, which a large number of streams and rivers flow into, coming from the mountain range of the northern Finland (Maanselkä hill). Within the catchment of inflows feeding the lake Inari and river Paz in its upper flow there are mainly diverse early Precambrian metamorphic and intrusive rocks of the Lapland granulite belt and its framing, and to a lesser extent - various gneisses and migmatites with relicts of amphibolites, granitic gneisses, plagioclase and plagio- and plagiomicrocline granites, and quartz diorites of Inari terrane (Meriläinen, 1976, fig 1; Hörmann et al, 1980, fig 1; Geologicalmap, 2001). Basing on the techniques developed earlier (Mazukhina, 2012), and the data of monitoring of the chemical composition of surface waters and investigation of the chemical composition of the rocks, physical-chemical modeling (FCM) (Selector software package) was carried out. FCM includes 34 independent components (Al-B-Br-Ar-He-Ne-C-Ca-Cl-F-Fe-K-Mg-Mn-N-Na-P-S-Si-Sr-Cu-Zn-Ni-Pb-V-Ba-Co-Cr-Hg-As-Cd-H-O-e), 996 dependent components, of them 369 in aqueous solution, 76 in the gas phase, 111 liquid hydrocarbons, and 440 solid phases, organic and mineral

  16. Ultra-thin flexible GaAs photovoltaics in vertical forms printed on metal surfaces without interlayer adhesives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Juho; Song, Kwangsun; Kim, Namyun; Lee, Jongho, E-mail: jong@gist.ac.kr [School of Mechanical Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), Gwangju 61005 (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute for Solar and Sustainable Energies (RISE), Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), Gwangju 61005 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Jeongwoo [Photonic Bio Research Center, Korea Photonics Technology Institute (KOPTI), 9 Cheomdanventure-ro 108beon-gil, Gwangju 61007 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Jae Cheol [Department of Physics, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan, Gyeongbuk 38541 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-20

    Wearable flexible electronics often require sustainable power sources that are also mechanically flexible to survive the extreme bending that accompanies their general use. In general, thinner microelectronic devices are under less strain when bent. This paper describes strategies to realize ultra-thin GaAs photovoltaics through the interlayer adhesiveless transfer-printing of vertical-type devices onto metal surfaces. The vertical-type GaAs photovoltaic devices recycle reflected photons by means of bottom electrodes. Systematic studies with four different types of solar microcells indicate that the vertical-type solar microcells, at only a quarter of the thickness of similarly designed lateral-type cells, generate a level of electric power similar to that of thicker cells. The experimental results along with the theoretical analysis conducted here show that the ultra-thin vertical-type solar microcells are durable under extreme bending and thus suitable for use in the manufacturing of wearable flexible electronics.

  17. THEMIS analysis of Olympus Mons' mineralogical makeup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, N. D.

    2016-12-01

    Olympus Mons is the largest shield volcano in our known solar system. In previous studies, the composition of the basaltic lava flows on Olympus Mons was shown to be similar to the composition of those lava flows of Earth's shield volcanoes. It has been suggested that basalt located near volcanoes contained bacteria living below the surface of the Earth. In this pilot study, the effect of Olympus Mons' aspect (i.e. north- vs. south-facing slope) on its mineral composition was examined. Imagery from Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), onboard the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft, were used because Olympus Mons' size and surface roughness hinder rover exploration. After removing transmission errors and performing an atmospheric correction, the THEMIS images were ready to be analyzed via a mineral spectral library. Using Arizona State University's Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) derived mineral spectral library, the images were classified in ENVI. These classifications were verified using ASU's GIS tool, Java Mission-planning and Analysis for Remote Sensing (JMARS) and TES. Results show a significant amount of silicates located throughout the sampled areas of Olympus Mons. The results also show differences in the mineral composition and in the geological features on Olympus Mons' surface. The minerals vanadinite and halloysite were shown to be prevalent on the sampled southern portions of Olympus Mons, but were sparse on the sampled northern portions. Previous studies suggested that the mineral ilmenite, which this study found in high concentrations on the sampled northern portions of Olympus Mons, might serve as a food source for iron-oxidizing and iron-scavenging bacteria. Future research should focus on better understanding these concentrations on Olympus Mons to see if these minerals play a role in the potential bacterial presence on Olympus Mons.

  18. The Effect of Land Use Change on Soil Type and Clay Mineralogy in Safashahr Area, Fars Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Karimi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, changing the rangelands to agriculture and garden is common. To investigate the impact of land use change on the soils type and clay mineralogy, four land uses including rangeland with poor vegetation, agricultural land, new and old apple orchards were selected in Safashahr area, Fars province. In each land use, three soil profiles were excavated and described and one profile was considered as representative. After required physical and chemical analyses, they were classified according to Soil Taxonomy (ST and the World Reference Base for Soil Resources (WRB. Selected surface and subsurface samples were also collected for clay mineralogy studies. Results showed that changing land use did not have significant effect on soil type and clay minerals and all soils consist of mica, chlorite, smectite, kaolinite and mixed layer minerals. Results demonstrated that ST is more efficient compared to WRB to classify the studied soils.

  19. Surface Properties of the IN SITU Formed Ceramics Reinforced Composite Coatings on TI-3AL-2V Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Guo, Wei; Hu, Dakui; Luo, Hui; Zhang, Yuanbin

    2012-04-01

    The synthesis of hard composite coating on titanium alloy by laser cladding of Al/Fe/Ni+C/Si3N4 pre-placed powders has been investigated in detail. SEM result indicated that a composite coating with metallurgical joint to the substrate was formed. XRD result indicated that the composite coating mainly consisted of γ-(Fe, Ni), FeAl, Ti3Al, TiC, TiNi, TiC0.3N0.7, Ti2N, SiC, Ti5Si3 and TiNi. Compared with Ti-3Al-2V substrate, an improvement of the micro-hardness and the wear resistance was observed for this composite coating.

  20. SURFACE PROPERTIES OF THE IN SITU FORMED CERAMICS REINFORCED COMPOSITE COATINGS ON TI-3AL-2V ALLOYS

    OpenAIRE

    PENG LIU; WEI GUO; DAKUI HU; HUI LUO; YUANBIN ZHANG

    2012-01-01

    The synthesis of hard composite coating on titanium alloy by laser cladding of Al/Fe/Ni+C/Si3N4 pre-placed powders has been investigated in detail. SEM result indicated that a composite coating with metallurgical joint to the substrate was formed. XRD result indicated that the composite coating mainly consisted of γ-(Fe, Ni), FeAl, Ti3Al, TiC, TiNi, TiC0.3N0.7, Ti2N, SiC, Ti5Si3 and TiNi. Compared with Ti-3Al-2V substrate, an improvement of the micro-hardness and the wear resistance was obser...

  1. Teaching Form as Form

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2012-01-01

    understanding of form per se, or, to use an expression from this text, of form as form. This challenge can be reduced to one question: how can design teaching support students in achieving not only the ability to recognize and describe different form-related concepts in existing design (i.e. analytical...

  2. Significance of mineralogy in soil mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojana Dolinar

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The research of consistency limits according to Atterberg is of key importance in soil mechanics because it determines, in a simple way, results of interactions between solid and liquid phases in soils, and thus provides possibility to classify them in groups withsimilar mechanic properties. In most cases, the results of these investigations provide a good basis for predicting other properties such as deformability, expansion, hydraulic conductivity and strength of soils. This proves that basis factors influencing the valuesof consistency limits and other mechanic properties are the same. It is known that the values of consistency limits primarily depend on the type and quantity of clay minerals in soils. The article focuses on experimental evidence of dependence between the quantityof water at the liquid limit for soils and type, portion and specific surface of clay grains.Experiments were performed with monomineral soils, their mixtures and composed samples of clay- and non-clay components. It was established that in parallel orientation of clay particles the quantity of water between grains at liquid limit is dependent on their external specific surface.

  3. Microstructural study by XPS and GISAXS of surface layers formed via phase separation and percolation in polystyren/tetrabutyl titanate/alumina composite films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Yanwei; Tian Changan; Liu Junliang

    2006-01-01

    The XPS and GISAXS have been employed as useful tools to probe the chemical compositional and microstructural evolutions in the surface layers formed via phase separation and percolation in polystyren/Ti(OBut) 4 /alumina composite thick films. The surface enrichment of Ti species due to the migration of Ti(OBut) 4 molecules in the films was found to show an incubation period of ∼15 h while the samples were treated at 100 deg. C before a remarkable progress can be identified. According to the XPS and GISAXS data, Key mechanism to govern this surface process is phenomenologically considered to be the specific phase separation behavior in Ti(OBut) 4 /PS blend and the subsequent percolating process. The extended thermal treatment was found to make the surface layer microstructure evolve from local phase separation featured with an increasing population of individual microbeads of Ti(OBut) 4 (∼1.5 nm in radius) to the formation of large size clusters of microbeads due to their interconnections, accompanied by the growth of every microbead itself to ∼10 nm on the average, which provokes and then enhances the surface enrichment of Ti(OBut) 4 since these clusters act as a fast diffusion network due to percolation effect

  4. Ultrahigh surface area meso/microporous carbon formed with self-template for high-voltage aqueous supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Hu, Jiangtao; Zhu, Min; Zhao, Yan; Chen, Haibiao; Pan, Feng

    2017-10-01

    A new hierarchically porous carbon has been synthesized with self-template of silica phase from a commercial silicone resin by pyrolysis and subsequent NaOH activation. The obtained carbon materials achieve an ultrahigh specific surface area (2896 m2 g-1) with abundant mesopores. The C800 sample demonstrates excellent performance in supercapacitors, with a high capacitance of 322 F g-1 at 0.5 A g-1 and outstanding rate capability (182 F g-1 at 100 A g-1) in a three-electrode system using 6.0 mol L-1 KOH electrolyte. The energy density is improved by widening the voltage window using 1.0 mol L-1 alkali metal nitrate solutions (LiNO3, NaNO3, KNO3) in which the strong solvation of alkali metal cations and nitrate anions effectively reduce the activity of water. In a symmetric supercapacitor, the maximum operating voltage is essentially restricted by the potential of positive electrode and the total capacitance is dominated by the capacitance of the anion at the positive electrode. The symmetric supercapacitors based on C800 deliver a high energy density of 22.4 Wh kg-1 at a power density of 0.23 kW kg-1 in 1.0 mol L-1 LiNO3 with a voltage of 1.8 V and long-term stability with a retention of 89.87% after 10000 cycles.

  5. The Mechanism Forming the Cell Surface of Tip-Growing Rooting Cells Is Conserved among Land Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honkanen, Suvi; Jones, Victor A S; Morieri, Giulia; Champion, Clement; Hetherington, Alexander J; Kelly, Steve; Proust, Hélène; Saint-Marcoux, Denis; Prescott, Helen; Dolan, Liam

    2016-12-05

    To discover mechanisms that controlled the growth of the rooting system in the earliest land plants, we identified genes that control the development of rhizoids in the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha. 336,000 T-DNA transformed lines were screened for mutants with defects in rhizoid growth, and a de novo genome assembly was generated to identify the mutant genes. We report the identification of 33 genes required for rhizoid growth, of which 6 had not previously been functionally characterized in green plants. We demonstrate that members of the same orthogroup are active in cell wall synthesis, cell wall integrity sensing, and vesicle trafficking during M. polymorpha rhizoid and Arabidopsis thaliana root hair growth. This indicates that the mechanism for constructing the cell surface of tip-growing rooting cells is conserved among land plants and was active in the earliest land plants that existed sometime more than 470 million years ago [1, 2]. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. The postglacial Stuoragurra Fault, North Norway - A textural and mineralogical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roaldset, E.

    2012-04-01

    The postglacial Stuoragurra Fault, North Norway - A textural and mineralogical study Elen Roaldset(1), Mari Åm (2), and Oddleiv Olesen(3) 1) Natural History Museum, University of Oslo, P.O.Box 1172 Blindern, 0318 Oslo, Norway 2) Statoil R &D, P. O. Box 2470, 7005 Trondheim, Norway 3) Norwegian Geological Survey, P.O.Box 6315 Sluppen, 7491 Trondheim, Norway The Stuoragurra Fault is part of the Lapland province of postglacial faults and was identified in 1983 during a colloborative project between the Geological Surveys of Finland Norway and Sweden. The Stuoragurra Fault is an 80 km long fault zone which contains three main segments of eastward dipping faults (30-55 deg.) with up to 10 m of reverse displacement and a 7 m high escarpment. It cross-cuts glaciofluvial deposits and consequently being younger than 10.000 years. The postglacial fault segments follow to a large extent older fault zones represented by lithified breccias and diabases of Proterozoic age. In this paper we will present textural and mineralogical study of a 135 m continous core drilled across the fault zone. The investigation methods include quality assessments by rock quality designation methods (RQD and Q- methods), textural and petrological descriptions visually and by thin section microscopy, and mineralogical analysis by X-ray diffraction. Special attention is drawn to neoformed and/or degraded minerals like clay minerals and iron oxides/hydroxides. The quality assessments of the cored material reflect the degree of rock deformation and fragmentation and show the quality of the bedrock generally to be of very poor (about 60%) to poor quality" (25%) The main minerals in the fresh rock are quarts, feldspar, mica and iron oxides (magnetite and ilmenite). Throughout the cored borehole products of weathering have formed on fissures, fractures and in strongly deformed, gravelly, zones. The neoformed minerals include kaolinite, smectite, and vermiculite, as well as goethite. The mineralogical

  7. Inactivation of lipoprotein lipase occurs on the surface of THP-1 macrophages where oligomers of angiopoietin-like protein 4 are formed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makoveichuk, Elena; Sukonina, Valentina; Kroupa, Olessia [Department of Medical Biosciences, Physiological Chemistry Umea University, SE-901 87 Umea (Sweden); Thulin, Petra; Ehrenborg, Ewa [Atherosclerosis Research Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Olivecrona, Thomas [Department of Medical Biosciences, Physiological Chemistry Umea University, SE-901 87 Umea (Sweden); Olivecrona, Gunilla, E-mail: Gunilla.Olivecrona@medbio.umu.se [Department of Medical Biosciences, Physiological Chemistry Umea University, SE-901 87 Umea (Sweden)

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity is controlled by ANGPTL4 in THP-1 macrophages. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both LPL and ANGPTL4 bind to THP-1 macrophages in a heparin-releasable fashion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Only monomers of ANGPTL4 are present within THP-1 macrophages. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Covalent oligomers of ANGPTL4 appear on cell surface and in medium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inactivation of LPL coincide with ANGPTL4 oligomer formation on cell surfaces. -- Abstract: Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) hydrolyzes triglycerides in plasma lipoproteins causing release of fatty acids for metabolic purposes in muscles and adipose tissue. LPL in macrophages in the artery wall may, however, promote foam cell formation and atherosclerosis. Angiopoietin-like protein (ANGPTL) 4 inactivates LPL and ANGPTL4 expression is controlled by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR). The mechanisms for inactivation of LPL by ANGPTL4 was studied in THP-1 macrophages where active LPL is associated with cell surfaces in a heparin-releasable form, while LPL in the culture medium is mostly inactive. The PPAR{delta} agonist GW501516 had no effect on LPL mRNA, but increased ANGPTL4 mRNA and caused a marked reduction of the heparin-releasable LPL activity concomitantly with accumulation of inactive, monomeric LPL in the medium. Intracellular ANGPTL4 was monomeric, while dimers and tetramers of ANGPTL4 were present in the heparin-releasable fraction and medium. GW501516 caused an increase in the amount of ANGPTL4 oligomers on the cell surface that paralleled the decrease in LPL activity. Actinomycin D blocked the effects of GW501516 on ANGPTL4 oligomer formation and prevented the inactivation of LPL. Antibodies against ANGPTL4 interfered with the inactivation of LPL. We conclude that inactivation of LPL in THP-1 macrophages primarily occurs on the cell surface where oligomers of ANGPTL4 are formed.

  8. Preparation of bone-implants by coating hydroxyapatite nanoparticles on self-formed titanium dioxide thin-layers on titanium metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijesinghe, W.P.S.L.; Mantilaka, M.M.M.G.P.G.; Chathuranga Senarathna, K.G. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Peradeniya, 20400 Peradeniya (Sri Lanka); Postgraduate Institute of Science, University of Peradeniya, 20400 Peradeniya (Sri Lanka); Herath, H.M.T.U. [Postgraduate Institute of Science, University of Peradeniya, 20400 Peradeniya (Sri Lanka); Department of Medical Laboratory Science, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, University of Peradeniya, 20400 Peradeniya (Sri Lanka); Premachandra, T.N. [Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Peradeniya, 20400 Peradeniya (Sri Lanka); Ranasinghe, C.S.K. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Peradeniya, 20400 Peradeniya (Sri Lanka); Postgraduate Institute of Science, University of Peradeniya, 20400 Peradeniya (Sri Lanka); Rajapakse, R.P.V.J. [Postgraduate Institute of Science, University of Peradeniya, 20400 Peradeniya (Sri Lanka); Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Peradeniya, 20400 Peradeniya (Sri Lanka); Rajapakse, R.M.G., E-mail: rmgr@pdn.ac.lk [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Peradeniya, 20400 Peradeniya (Sri Lanka); Postgraduate Institute of Science, University of Peradeniya, 20400 Peradeniya (Sri Lanka); Edirisinghe, Mohan; Mahalingam, S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University College London, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Bandara, I.M.C.C.D. [School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, Brisbane 4001, QLD (Australia); Singh, Sanjleena [Central Analytical Research Facility, Institute of Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, Brisbane 4001, QLD (Australia)

    2016-06-01

    Preparation of hydroxyapatite coated custom-made metallic bone-implants is very important for the replacement of injured bones of the body. Furthermore, these bone-implants are more stable under the corrosive environment of the body and biocompatible than bone-implants made up of pure metals and metal alloys. Herein, we describe a novel, simple and low-cost technique to prepare biocompatible hydroxyapatite coated titanium metal (TiM) implants through growth of self-formed TiO{sub 2} thin-layer (SFTL) on TiM via a heat treatment process. SFTL acts as a surface binder of HA nanoparticles in order to produce HA coated implants. Colloidal HA nanorods prepared by a novel surfactant-assisted synthesis method, have been coated on SFTL via atomized spray pyrolysis (ASP) technique. The corrosion behavior of the bare and surface-modified TiM (SMTiM) in a simulated body fluid (SBF) medium is also studied. The highest corrosion rate is found to be for the bare TiM plate, but the corrosion rate has been reduced with the heat-treatment of TiM due to the formation of SFTL. The lowest corrosion rate is recorded for the implant prepared by heat treatment of TiM at 700 °C. The HA-coating further assists in the passivation of the TiM in the SBF medium. Both SMTiM and HA coated SMTiM are noncytotoxic against osteoblast-like (HOS) cells and are in high-bioactivity. The overall production process of bone-implant described in this paper is in high economic value. - Highlights: • Colloidal hydroxyapatite nanorods are prepared by a novel method. • Surfaces of titanium metal plates are modified by self-forming TiO{sub 2} thin-films. • Prostheses are prepared by coating hydroxyapatite on surface modified Ti metal. • Bioactivity and noncytotoxicity are increased with surface modifications.

  9. Inactivation of lipoprotein lipase occurs on the surface of THP-1 macrophages where oligomers of angiopoietin-like protein 4 are formed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makoveichuk, Elena; Sukonina, Valentina; Kroupa, Olessia; Thulin, Petra; Ehrenborg, Ewa; Olivecrona, Thomas; Olivecrona, Gunilla

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity is controlled by ANGPTL4 in THP-1 macrophages. ► Both LPL and ANGPTL4 bind to THP-1 macrophages in a heparin-releasable fashion. ► Only monomers of ANGPTL4 are present within THP-1 macrophages. ► Covalent oligomers of ANGPTL4 appear on cell surface and in medium. ► Inactivation of LPL coincide with ANGPTL4 oligomer formation on cell surfaces. -- Abstract: Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) hydrolyzes triglycerides in plasma lipoproteins causing release of fatty acids for metabolic purposes in muscles and adipose tissue. LPL in macrophages in the artery wall may, however, promote foam cell formation and atherosclerosis. Angiopoietin-like protein (ANGPTL) 4 inactivates LPL and ANGPTL4 expression is controlled by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR). The mechanisms for inactivation of LPL by ANGPTL4 was studied in THP-1 macrophages where active LPL is associated with cell surfaces in a heparin-releasable form, while LPL in the culture medium is mostly inactive. The PPARδ agonist GW501516 had no effect on LPL mRNA, but increased ANGPTL4 mRNA and caused a marked reduction of the heparin-releasable LPL activity concomitantly with accumulation of inactive, monomeric LPL in the medium. Intracellular ANGPTL4 was monomeric, while dimers and tetramers of ANGPTL4 were present in the heparin-releasable fraction and medium. GW501516 caused an increase in the amount of ANGPTL4 oligomers on the cell surface that paralleled the decrease in LPL activity. Actinomycin D blocked the effects of GW501516 on ANGPTL4 oligomer formation and prevented the inactivation of LPL. Antibodies against ANGPTL4 interfered with the inactivation of LPL. We conclude that inactivation of LPL in THP-1 macrophages primarily occurs on the cell surface where oligomers of ANGPTL4 are formed.

  10. Preparation of bone-implants by coating hydroxyapatite nanoparticles on self-formed titanium dioxide thin-layers on titanium metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wijesinghe, W.P.S.L.; Mantilaka, M.M.M.G.P.G.; Chathuranga Senarathna, K.G.; Herath, H.M.T.U.; Premachandra, T.N.; Ranasinghe, C.S.K.; Rajapakse, R.P.V.J.; Rajapakse, R.M.G.; Edirisinghe, Mohan; Mahalingam, S.; Bandara, I.M.C.C.D.; Singh, Sanjleena

    2016-01-01

    Preparation of hydroxyapatite coated custom-made metallic bone-implants is very important for the replacement of injured bones of the body. Furthermore, these bone-implants are more stable under the corrosive environment of the body and biocompatible than bone-implants made up of pure metals and metal alloys. Herein, we describe a novel, simple and low-cost technique to prepare biocompatible hydroxyapatite coated titanium metal (TiM) implants through growth of self-formed TiO_2 thin-layer (SFTL) on TiM via a heat treatment process. SFTL acts as a surface binder of HA nanoparticles in order to produce HA coated implants. Colloidal HA nanorods prepared by a novel surfactant-assisted synthesis method, have been coated on SFTL via atomized spray pyrolysis (ASP) technique. The corrosion behavior of the bare and surface-modified TiM (SMTiM) in a simulated body fluid (SBF) medium is also studied. The highest corrosion rate is found to be for the bare TiM plate, but the corrosion rate has been reduced with the heat-treatment of TiM due to the formation of SFTL. The lowest corrosion rate is recorded for the implant prepared by heat treatment of TiM at 700 °C. The HA-coating further assists in the passivation of the TiM in the SBF medium. Both SMTiM and HA coated SMTiM are noncytotoxic against osteoblast-like (HOS) cells and are in high-bioactivity. The overall production process of bone-implant described in this paper is in high economic value. - Highlights: • Colloidal hydroxyapatite nanorods are prepared by a novel method. • Surfaces of titanium metal plates are modified by self-forming TiO_2 thin-films. • Prostheses are prepared by coating hydroxyapatite on surface modified Ti metal. • Bioactivity and noncytotoxicity are increased with surface modifications.

  11. What's weathering? Mineralogy and field leach studies in mine waste, Leadville and Montezuma mining districts, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, S.F.; Hageman, Phil L.; Smith, Kathleen S.

    2006-01-01

    high Pb level already mentioned, it contains high levels of K (1.9 ppm), Mn (6720 ppb), and Zn (1550 ppb). The high concentration of metals, despite the intermediate pH of the leachate, may be explained by acidic microenvironments that exist at the surfaces of sulfide minerals, where sulfur-and iron-oxidizing microbes may flourish. It is at the reactive mineral-oxygen-water interface where metals are released and low-pH sulfate precipitates such as jarosite-beudantite form.

  12. Mineralogical Mapping of the Av-5 Floronia Quadrangle of Asteroid 4 Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combe, J.-Ph.; Fulchinioni, M.; McCord, T. B.; Ammannito, E.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Nathues, A.; Capaccioni, F.; Frigeri, A.; Jaumann, R.; Le Corre, L.; Palomba, E.; Preusker, F.; Reddy, V.; Stephan, K.; Tosi, F.; Zambon, F.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2012-04-01

    Asteroid 4 Vesta is currently under investigation by NASA's Dawn orbiter. The Dawn Science Team is conducting mineralogical mapping of Vesta's surface in the form of 15 quadrangle maps, and here we report results from the mapping of Floronia quadrangle Av-5. The maps are based on the data acquired by the Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIR-MS) and the Framing Camera (FC) (De Sanctis et al., this meeting). This abstract is focused on the analysis of band ratios, as well as the depth and position of the 2-µm absorption band of pyroxenes, but additional information will be presented. Absorption band depth is sensitive to abundance, texture and multiple scattering effects. Absorption band position is controlled by composition, shorter wavelength positions indicate less Calcium (and more Magnesium) in pyroxenes. The inferred composition is compared with that of Howardite, Eucite and Diogenite meteorites (HEDs). Diogenites are Mg-rich with large orthopyroxene crystals suggesting formation in depth; Eucrites are Ca-poor pyroxene, with smaller crystals. Av-5 Floronia Quadrangle is located between ~20-66˚N and 270˚-360˚E. It covers a portion of the heavily-cratered northern hemisphere of Vesta, and part of it is in permanent night, until August 2012. Long shadows make the visualization of albedo variations difficult, because of limited effectiveness of photometric corrections. Most of the variations of the band depth at 2 µm are partly affected by illumination geometry in this area. Only regional tendencies are meaningful at this time of the analysis. The 2-µm absorption band depth seems to be deeper towards the south of the quadrangle, in particular to the south of Floronia crater. It is not possible to interpret the value of the band depth in the floor the craters because of the absence of direct sunlight. However, the illuminated rims seem to have a deeper 2-µm absorption band, as does the ejecta from an unnamed crater located further south, within

  13. Nuclear waste forms for actinides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Rodney C.

    1999-01-01

    The disposition of actinides, most recently 239Pu from dismantled nuclear weapons, requires effective containment of waste generated by the nuclear fuel cycle. Because actinides (e.g., 239Pu and 237Np) are long-lived, they have a major impact on risk assessments of geologic repositories. Thus, demonstrable, long-term chemical and mechanical durability are essential properties of waste forms for the immobilization of actinides. Mineralogic and geologic studies provide excellent candidate phases for immobilization and a unique database that cannot be duplicated by a purely materials science approach. The “mineralogic approach” is illustrated by a discussion of zircon as a phase for the immobilization of excess weapons plutonium. PMID:10097054

  14. Coprecipitation of arsenate with metal oxides. 3. Nature, mineralogy, and reactivity of iron(III)-aluminum precipitates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Violante, Antonio; Pigna, Massimo; Del Gaudio, Stefania; Cozzolino, Vincenza; Banerjee, Dipanjan

    2009-03-01

    Coprecipitation involving arsenic with aluminum or iron has been studied because this technique is considered particularly efficient for removal of this toxic element from polluted waters. Coprecipitation of arsenic with mixed iron-aluminum solutions has received scant attention. In this work we studied (i)the mineralogy, surface properties, and chemical composition of mixed iron-aluminum oxides formed at initial Fe/Al molar ratio of 1.0 in the absence or presence of arsenate [As/ Fe+Al molar ratio (R) of 0, 0.01, or 0.1] and at pH 4.0, 7.0, and 10.0 and aged for 30 and 210 days at 50 degrees C and (ii) the removal of arsenate from the coprecipitates after addition of phosphate. The amounts of short-range ordered precipitates (ferrihydrite, aluminous ferrihydrite and/or poorly crystalline boehmite) were greater than those found in iron and aluminum systems (studied in previous works), due to the capacity of both aluminum and arsenate to retard or inhibitthe transformation of the initially formed precipitates into well-crystallized oxides (gibbsite, bayerite, and hematite). As a consequence, the surface areas of the iron-aluminum oxides formed in the absence or presence of arsenate were usually much larger than those of aluminum or iron oxides formed under the same conditions. Arsenate was found to be associated mainly into short-range ordered materials. Chemical composition of all samples was affected by pH, initial R, and aging. Phosphate sorption was facilitated by the presence of short-range ordered materials, mainly those richer in aluminum, but was inhibited by arsenate present in the samples. The quantities of arsenate replaced by phosphate, expressed as percentages of its total amount present in the samples, were particularly low, ranging from 10% to 26%. A comparison of the desorption of arsenate by phosphate from aluminum-arsenate and iron-arsenate (studied in previous works) and iron-aluminum-arsenate coprecipitates evidenced that phosphate has a greater

  15. Moessbauer effect and TEM in mineralogy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrow, E.A.

    1994-01-01

    Moessbauer effect (ME) provides useful information on oxidation state, co-ordination number, co-ordination state, site occupancies, and magnetic properties of Fe-bearing phases. The information gained by ME together with the information provided by other conventional techniques is used to extract temperature, pressure, and kinetics of rock-forming processes. Nevertheless, ME requires that the phases studied are homogeneous over an extremely large volume and that Fe is a major component of the system. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), on the other hand, provides similar information over a very small volume for a system of any component. However, present TEM spectrometers do not provide sufficient resolution to detect the mixed oxidation state. A complete characterisation of phases in rocks requires, therefore, that conventional techniques be combined with TEM. (orig.)

  16. Study of the corrosion behavior and the corrosion films formed on the surfaces of Mg–xSn alloys in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jingfeng; Li, Yang; Huang, Song; Zhou, Xiaoen

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Corrosion of four cast Mg–xSn alloys in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution was investigated. • Both Mg(OH) 2 /SnO 2 corrosion product film and Mg(OH) 2 /MgSnO 3 clusters formed on Mg–1.5Sn. • Compact Mg(OH) 2 /MgSnO 3 film suppressed the cathodic effect of the impurity inclusions. • Mg–xSn (x = 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 wt.%) alloys only formed loose Mg(OH) 2 /SnO 2 corrosion product film. - Abstract: The corrosion behavior and the corrosion films formed on the surfaces of Mg–xSn (x = 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 wt.%) alloys in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution were investigated by immersion tests, electrochemical measurements, corrosion morphology observations, and X-ray diffraction analysis. Immersion tests and electrochemical measurements illustrated that the best corrosion resistance was reported for the Mg–1.5Sn alloy. Both Mg(OH) 2 /SnO 2 corrosion product film and Mg(OH) 2 /MgSnO 3 clusters formed on Mg–1.5Sn alloy surface. Mg(OH) 2 /MgSnO 3 clusters were compact and suppressed the cathodic effect of the impurity inclusions greatly. The Mg–xSn (x = 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 wt.%) alloys only formed loose Mg(OH) 2 /SnO 2 corrosion product film during the corrosion process

  17. Approach to the surface characteristics of the H+ and H+-La3+ forms of cation-exchange resins by measurement of the heat of immersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, T.; Uematsu, T.

    1985-01-01

    Surface characteristics of H + and its multivalent cation-exchanged resins, which have been used as catalysts, were probed by measurement of the heats of immersion in 1-nitropropane, n-hexane, and water. It was found that the electrostatic field strengths (F) calculated from the heats of immersion in 1-nitropropane and n-hexane increased with increasing ratios of the exchanged multivalent cation (La 3+ ) in the univalent form (H + ) cation-exchange resin. This tendency was also observed in the differences in F between the La 3+ exchanged resins and H + form of the resin by using the calorimetric data obtained from the heats of immersion in water. These results suggest that the exchanged La 3 μ ion does not homogeneously interact with three univalent anionic sites (SO 3 - ) of the cation-exchange resin, but interacts with only two SO 3 - ions, that is, the La 3+ ion is localized on the surface of the resin. The difference in F obtained from the heats of immersion into water was found to be useful as a simple and rapid criterion of the surface characteristics of the cation-exchange resins. 18 references, 4 figures, 1 table

  18. Studies on waves and instabilities in a plasma sheath formed on the outer surface of a space craft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aria, Anil K.; Malik, Hitendra K.

    2008-01-01

    Using the normal mode analysis, the number of possible modes is obtained in a magnetized inhomogeneous plasma sheath formed during the motion of a space craft which consists of negative ions (due to dust) along with the positive ions and the isothermal electrons. In addition to three propagating modes with phase velocities λ 1 , λ 2 , and λ 3 such that λ 1 2 3 , two types of instabilities with growth rates γ 1 and γ 2 also occur in such a plasma sheath. The growth rate γ 1 is increased with the negative to positive ion density ratio r 0 , ion temperature T, and obliqueness θ of the magnetic field B 0 . The growth rate γ 2 of the other instability gets lower with the density ratio r 0 but gets higher with the temperature T. The growth rate γ 2 is sensitive to the temperature T, whereas the growth rate γ 1 gets prominently changed with the density ratio r 0 . The increase in the growth rate γ 1 with the obliqueness θ is more pronounced under the effect of stronger magnetic field. On other hand, the phase velocity λ 1 shows weak dependence on r 0 and T (though it gets larger) but it gets significantly changed (increased) for the larger obliqueness θ. The phase velocity λ 2 gets larger with r 0 , B 0 , and θ and becomes lower for the higher temperature T. The phase velocity λ 3 is decreased for the higher values of r 0 and B 0 and is increased for the larger values of T and θ

  19. Mineralogical, textural, structural and geochemical aspects of Nakhlak lead mine, Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Jazi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Nakhlak lead mine is located at the Nakhlak mountain 55 km NE of Anarak town in Isfahan province. The mineralogy is simple; galena and barite are the main primary minerals and cerussite is the main secondary mineral. Sphalerite, pyrite, chalcopyrite, tetrahedrite-tennantite and acanthite occur as minor and trace mineral inclusions in galena. Secondary minerals are anglesite, plattnerite, wulfenite and malachite. The host rock has undergone a pre-mineralization dolomitization process. Four types of dolomite have been identified which saddle dolomite is the most distinguished. Open space filling textures occur in the form of breccia, cockade, crustification and colloform. Analysis of the galena samples indicates presence of many trace elements in galena among which silver is the most important. Element pairs such as Ag-As, Zn-Cd, As-Cu and As-Sb are highly correlated. This correlation may be explained by the presence of inclusions. Ag-Sb-Bi ternary diagram indicates that galena samples from Nakhlak are rich in Ag and Sb and poor in Bi. Sb/Bi (3773 ratio in galena is suggestive of a low temperature of formation for the deposit. The Upper Cretaceous carbonate host rocks and their dolomitization, the stratabound and epigenetic mineralization, the absence of igneous activity, the open space filling texture, the simple mineralogy and geochemistry all point to a Mississippi valley type model for the Nakhlak Pb deposit.

  20. Analytical electron microscopy study of surface layers formed on the French SON68 nuclear waste glass during vapor hydration at 200 C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, W.L.; Wang, L.M.; Ewing, R.C.; Bates, J.K.; Ebert, W.L.

    1998-01-01

    Extensive solid-state characterization (AEM/SEM/HRTEM) was completed on six SON68 (inactive R7T7) waste glasses which were altered in the presence of saturated water vapor (200 C) for 22, 91, 241, 908, 1000, 1013, and 1021 days. The samples were examined by AEM in cross-section (lattice-fringe imaging, micro-diffraction, and quantitative thin-film EDS analysis). The glass monoliths were invariably covered by a thin altered rind, and the surface layer thickness increased with increasing time of reaction, ranging from 0.5 to 30 μm in thickness. Six distinctive zones, based on phase chemistry and microstructure, were distinguished within the well-developed surface layers. Numerous crystalline phases such as analcime, gyrolite, tobermorite, apatite, and weeksite were identified on the surfaces of the reacted glasses as precipitates. The majority of the surface layer volume was composed of two basic structures that are morphologically and chemically distinct: The A-domain consisted of well-crystallized fibrous smectite aggregates; and the B-domain consisted of poorly-crystallized regions containing smectite, possibly montmorillonite, crystallites and a ZrO 2 -rich amorphous silica matrix. The retention of the rare-earth elements, Mo, and Zr mostly occurred within the B-domain; while transition metal elements, such as Zn, Cr, Ni, Mn, and Fe, were retained in the A-domain. The element partitioning among A-domains and B-domains and recrystallization of the earlier-formed B-domains into the A-domain smectites were the basic processes which have controlled the chemical and structural evolution of the surface layer. The mechanism of surface layer formation during vapor hydration are discussed based on these cross-sectional AEM results. (orig.)

  1. Fracture mineralogy of the Forsmark site. SDM-Site Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstroem, Bjoern (Dept. of Earth Sciences, Univ. of Goeteborg (Sweden)); Tullborg, Eva-Lena (Terralogica AB, Graabo (Sweden)); Smellie, John (Conterra AB, Luleaa (Sweden)); MacKenzie, Angus B. (SUERC, Scottish Enterprise Technology Park, East Kilbride (United Kingdom)); Suksi, Juhani (Dept. of Chemistry, Univ. of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland))

    2008-08-15

    Detailed investigations of the fracture mineralogy and altered wall rock have been carried out as part of the site characterisation programme between 2003 and 2007 at Forsmark. The results have been published in a number of P-reports and in contributions to scientific journals. This report summarises and evaluates the data obtained during the detailed fracture mineralogical studies. The report includes descriptions of the identified fracture minerals and their chemical composition. A sequence of fracture mineralisations has been distinguished and provides information of the low to moderate temperature (brittle) geological and hydrogeological evolution at the site. Special focus has been paid to the chemical and stable isotopic composition of calcite to obtain palaeohydrogeological information. Chemical analyses of bulk fracture filling material have been carried out to identify possible sinks for certain elements and also to reveal the presence of minor phases rich in certain elements which have not been possible to detect by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Statistical analysis of the mineralogy in fractures outside deformation zones (i.e. within fracture domains FFM01, FFM02, FFM03 and FFM06) have been carried out concerning variation of fracture mineral distribution at depth and in different fracture domains. Uranium contents and uranium-series isotopes have been analysed on fracture coating material from hydraulically conductive fractures. Such analyses are also available from the groundwaters and the results are combined in order to reveal recent (< 1 Ma) removal/deposition of uranium in the fracture system. The redox conditions in the fracture system have been evaluated based on mineralogical and chemical indicators as well as Moessbauer analyses

  2. Clay Mineralogy of Brazilian Oxisols with Shrinkage Properties

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    Samara Alves Testoni

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Shrinkage capacity (caráter retrátil in Portuguese is a new diagnostic characteristic recently introduced in the Brazilian System of Soil Classification (SiBCS to indicate shrink and swell properties observed in subtropical soils from highland plateaus in southern Brazil, specifically in Oxisols with brown colors. In soils located in road cuts exposed to drying for some weeks, strong shrinkage of soil volume is observed in these soils, resulting in the formation of pronounced vertical cracks and large and very large prismatic structures, which crumble in blocks when handled. We hypothesize that such properties are related to their clay mineralogy, although there are no conclusive studies about this, the motive for the present study. Samples of the A and B horizons from six Oxisols with expansive capacity from the states of Santa Catarina and Rio Grande do Sul were analyzed. One Rhodic Hapludox, from the state of Paraná, without expansive capacity, was used for comparison. All the soils are very clayey, originated from basalt, and have similar iron oxide content. For identification of clay mineralogy, X-ray diffraction techniques were employed, together with the use of NEWMOD® software to investigate and describe the interstratified minerals. The results showed that most expansive soils have a similar mineralogical composition, with kaolinite, interstratified kaolinite-smectite (K-S, and hydroxy-Al interlayered smectites (HIS, unlike the non-expansive Rhodic Hapludox, which exhibited kaolinite with significant amounts of gibbsite and low amount of interstratified K-S. According to the mineralogical assemblage identified in the expansive soils, we can affirm that the mechanism of smectite expansion and contraction is related to the shrinkage capacity of the soil, considering that the level of hydroxy-Al intercalation is low. In addition, these mechanisms also are related to the presence of quasicrystals and domains that control the

  3. Effect of Relative Humidity on the Tribological Properties of Self-Lubricating H3BO3 Films Formed on the Surface of Steel Suitable for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Hernández-Sanchez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of environmental humidity on the self-lubricating properties of a thin film of boric acid (H3BO3 was evaluated. H3BO4 films were successfully formed on the surface of AISI 316L steel. The study was conducted on AISI 316L steel because of its use in biomedical applications. First, the samples were exposed to boriding to generate a continuous surface layer of iron borides. The samples were then exposed to a short annealing process (SAP at 1023 K for 5 min and cooled to room temperature while controlling the relative humidity (RH. Five different RH conditions were tested. The purpose of SAP was to promote the formation of a surface film of boric acid from the boron atoms present in the iron boride layers. The presence of the boric acid at the surface of the borided layer was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD. The self-lubricating capability of the films was demonstrated using the pin-on-disk technique. The influence of RH was reflected by the friction coefficient (FC, as the samples cooled with 20% of RH exhibited FC values of 0.16, whereas the samples cooled at 60% RH showed FC values of 0.02.

  4. Pinning-free GaAs MIS structures with Si interface control layers formed on (4 x 6) reconstructed (0 0 1) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anantathanasarn, Sanguan; Hasegawa, Hideki

    2003-06-30

    (0 0 1)-Oriented GaAs metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structures having a silicon interface control layer (Si ICL) were fabricated on surfaces having Ga-rich (4x6) reconstructions. Si ICL was grown by molecular beam epitaxy. MIS structures were fabricated by partially converting Si ICL to SiN{sub x} by direct nitridation, and further depositing a thick SiO{sub 2} layer on top as the main passivation dielectric by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction, in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and MIS capacitance-voltage (C-V) techniques were used for characterization. The initial surface reconstruction was found to have a surprisingly strong effect on the degree of Fermi level pinning at the MIS interface. In contrast to the standard As-rich (2x4) surface, which results in strongly pinned MIS interfaces, the novel SiO{sub 2}/SiN{sub x}/Si ICL/GaAs MIS structures formed on ''genuine'' (4x6) surface realized complete unpinning of Fermi level over the entire band gap with a minimum interface state density of 4x10{sup 10} cm{sup -2} eV{sup -1} range.

  5. Mineralogy affects geoavailability, bioaccessibility and bioavailability of zinc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina, Ramon M.; Schaider, Laurel A.; Donaghey, Thomas C.; Shine, James P.; Brain, Joseph D.

    2013-01-01

    We correlated mineralogical and particle characteristics of Zn-containing particles with Zn geoavailability, bioaccessibility, and bioavailability following gavage and intranasal (IN) administration in rats. We compared samples of Zn/Pb mine waste and five pulverized pure-phase Zn minerals ( 65 Zn. We assessed geoavailability using sequential extractions and bioaccessibility using in vitro extraction tests simulating various pH and biological conditions. Zn in vivo bioavailability and in vitro bioaccessibility decreased as follows: mine waste > hydrozincite > hemimorphite > zincite ≈ smithsonite >> sphalerite. We found significant correlations among geoavailability, bioaccessibility and bioavailability. In particular, Zn bioavailability post-gavage and post-IN was significantly correlated with bioaccessibility in simulated phagolysosomal fluid and gastric fluid. These data indicate that solid phase speciation influences biological uptake of Zn and that in vitro tests can be used to predict Zn bioavailability in exposure assessment and effective remediation design. Highlights: •Zinc particle mineralogy influences bioaccessibility and bioavailability. •Zn bioavailability via gavage was 1.2–1.6 times higher than via intranasal route. •Zn particle geoavailability correlates with bioaccessibility. •In vitro bioaccessibility tests can predict in vivo Zn bioavailability. •Metal speciation and geochemical alterations can impact Zn bioavailability. -- Zinc mineralogy influences in vitro bioaccessibility and in vivo bioavailability and in vitro extraction tests can be used to predict Zn bioavailability from particles

  6. Mineralogy, geochemistry and petrophysics of red coloured granite adjacent to fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliasson, T.

    1993-03-01

    Mineralogical, geochemical and petrophysical investigations were conducted of red-coloured alteration rims and of the neighbouring unaltered equivalents along fractures within granite from Aespoe. An investigation was made also of a weak to rather strong, red-coloured granite from the Stripa mine, as well as a weak brownish-red colouration, definitely no hydrothermal in origin, of weathered rinds at a glacial polished rock surface in the Bohus granite. When approaching the fracture planes in the Aespoe granite, the most diagnostic alteration features are * the saussuritisation and Fe-oxyhydroxide staining of plagioclase, * the crystallisation chlorite pseudomorphs after biotite and * the hematisation of magnetite. The porosity within the alteration zones increases generally 2 to 3 times compared with the protolith rock, whereas the densities decrease by some 5 to 10%. The oxidation of magnetite gives as much as a tenfold lowering of the magnetic susceptibility. The red colouration of the Stripa granite is caused by hematite ± Fe-oxyhydroxide formation along microfractures, grain boundaries and, subordinately, the main minerals. Oxidation and re-precipitation of iron liberated during a retrograde muscovitisation of principally chlorite is interpreted to be the cause of the formation of the ferric oxides. The rather homogeneous density and porosity values of the grey and of the red-coloured granites reflect the minor change in the mineralogy when going from fresh into altered granite. Weathering and whitening of plagioclase in the bleached, outer zone and precipitation of small quantities of Fe-oxyhydroxides/hydroxides in the brownish-red zone cause the macroscopic colouration of the weathering rind below the glacial polished rock surface of Bohus granite. There is a marked increase in porosity from the interior fresh (c. 0.4-0.5%) towards the exterior bleached zone (c.1.5-2%) of the subaerialy, weathered Bohus granite surface. The incipient decomposition of

  7. Preliminary Mineralogic and Stable Isotope Studies of Altered Summit and Flank Rocks and Osceola Mudflow Deposits on Mount Rainier, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rye, Robert O.; Breit, George N.; Zimbelman, David R.

    2003-01-01

    About 5600 years ago part of Mount Rainier?s edifice collapsed with the resultant Osceola Mudflow traveling more than 120 km and covering an area of at least 505 km2. Mineralogic and stable isotope studies were conducted on altered rocks from outcrops near the summit and east flank of the volcano and samples of clasts and matrix from the Osceola Mudflow. Results of these analyses are used to constrain processes responsible for pre-collapse alteration and provide insight into the role of alteration in edifice instability prior to the Osceola collapse event. Jarosite, pyrite, alunite, and kaolinite occur in hydrothermally altered rock exposed in summit scarps formed by edifice collapse events and in altered rock within the east-west structural zone (EWSZ) of the volcano?s east flank. Deposits of the Osceola Mudflow contain clasts of variably altered and unaltered andesite within a clay-rich matrix. Minerals detected in samples from the edifice are also present in many of the clasts. The matrix includes abundant smectite, kaolinite and variably abundant jarosite. Hydrothermal fluid compositions calculated from hydrogen and oxygen isotope data of alunite, and smectite on Mount Rainier reflect mixing of magmatic and meteoric waters. The range in the dD values of modern meteoric water on the volcano (-85 to 155?) reflect the influence of elevation on the dD of precipitation. The d34S and d18OSO4 values of alunite, gypsum and jarosite are distinct but together range from 1.7 to 17.6? and -12.3 to 15.0?, respectively; both parameters increase from jarosite to gypsum to alunite. The variations in sulfur isotope composition are attributed to the varying contributions of disproportionation of magmatic SO2, the supergene oxidation of hydrothermal pyrite and possible oxidation of H2S to the parent aqueous sulfate. The 18OSO4 values of jarosite are the lowest recorded for the mineral, consistent with a supergene origin. The mineralogy and isotope composition of alteration

  8. Geochemical and mineralogical constraints on the distribution and enrichment of the rare earth elements during pedogenesis and tropical weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Liam; Smith, Martin; Moles, Norman; Marsellos, Antonios

    2015-04-01

    ? These results will then be applied in targeted, environmentally focused exploration projects, and perhaps enhance techniques used industrially for the extraction of HREEs, for less environmentally damaging production in sensitive areas (with current research sites within national parks in Italy and Portugal; and in areas where it is believed more attention should be paid to environmental preservation, including Central Turkey and Southern China). It is hypothesised that: HREE content in tropical laterite formations is due primarily to the source rock's mineralogy, although it's distribution is a result of slower genesis and leaching as opposed to more common biogenetic pedogenesis. It is suggested this distribution initially forms banded horizontal enrichment zones according to protolith, but eventual separation of heavy and light REEs is controlled by clay-surface (the protolith's weathering style), solvent type, fluctuation and availability. It may be found, as in Fe-Ni laterite resources globally (Herrington, Boni, Skarpelis, & Large, 2007) (Eliopoulos, 2000), that high initial bedrock concentrations of REEs are not necessarily required if prolonged weathering continues to concentrate these elements/minerals over longer periods (although this has been found inversely in certain Turkish bauxites (Karadag˘, Peli, Ary, & Ayhan, 2008)). Regardless of eventual concentrations, identifying the argillic phase and the time scales required for clay REE hosting clay formation may broaden the European search for supergene enrichments to REE hosting marine shales, mineral sands and other sedimentary formations that have been long-term- weathered without major displacement.

  9. Distribution of Candida albicans and non-albicans Candida species in oral candidiasis patients: Correlation between cell surface hydrophobicity and biofilm forming activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muadcheingka, Thaniya; Tantivitayakul, Pornpen

    2015-06-01

    The purposes of this investigation were to study the prevalence of Candida albicans and non-albicans Candida (NAC) species from oral candidiasis patients and evaluate the cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) and biofilm forming capacity of the clinical isolates Candida species from oral cavity. This study identified a total of 250 Candida strains isolated from 207 oral candidiasis patients with PCR-RFLP technique. CSH value, total biomass of biofilm and biofilm forming ability of 117 oral Candida isolates were evaluated. C. albicans (61.6%) was still the predominant species in oral candidiasis patients with and without denture wearer, respectively, followed by C. glabrata (15.2%), C. tropicalis (10.4%), C. parapsilosis (3.2%), C. kefyr (3.6%), C. dubliniensis (2%), C. lusitaniae (2%), C. krusei (1.6%), and C. guilliermondii (0.4%). The proportion of mixed colonization with more than one Candida species was 18% from total cases. The relative CSH value and biofilm biomass of NAC species were greater than C. albicans (poral isolates NAC species had biofilm forming ability, whereas 78% of C. albicans were biofilm formers. Furthermore, the significant difference of relative CSH values between biofilm formers and non-biofilm formers was observed in the NAC species (poral cavity was gradually increasing. The possible contributing factors might be high cell surface hydrophobicity and biofilm forming ability. The relative CSH value could be a putative factor for determining biofilm formation ability of the non-albicans Candida species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Mineralogy of the clay fraction of alfisols in two slope curvatures: IV - spatial correlation with physical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Arantes Camargo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Although the influence of clay mineralogy on soil physical properties has been widely studied, spatial relationships between these features in Alfisols have rarely been examined. The purpose of this work was to relate the clay minerals and physical properties of an Alfisol of sandstone origin in two slope curvatures. The crystallographic properties such as mean crystallite size (MCS and width at half height (WHH of hematite, goethite, kaolinite and gibbsite; contents of hematite and goethite; aluminium substitution (AS and specific surface area (SSA of hematite and goethite; the goethite/(goethite+hematite and kaolinite/(kaolinite+gibbsite ratios; and the citrate/bicarbonate/dithionite extractable Fe (Fe d were correlated with the soil physical properties through Pearson correlation coefficients and cross-semivariograms. The correlations found between aluminium substitution in goethite and the soil physical properties suggest that the degree of crystallinity of this mineral influences soil properties used as soil quality indicators. Thus, goethite with a high aluminium substitution resulted in large aggregate sizes and a high porosity, and also in a low bulk density and soil penetration resistance. The presence of highly crystalline gibbsite resulted in a high density and micropore content, as well as in smaller aggregates. Interpretation of the cross-semivariogram and classification of landscape compartments in terms of the spatial dependence pattern for the relief-dependent physical and mineralogical properties of the soil proved an effective supplementary method for assessing Pearson correlations between the soil physical and mineralogical properties.

  11. Mineralogical characteristics of sediments and heavy metal mobilization along a river watershed affected by acid mine drainage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingying Xie

    Full Text Available Trace-element concentrations in acid mine drainage (AMD are primarily controlled by the mineralogy at the sediment-water interface. Results are presented for a combined geochemical and mineralogical survey of Dabaoshan Mine, South China. Developed sequential extraction experiments with the analysis of the main mineralogical phases by semi-quantitative XRD, differential X-ray diffraction (DXRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM were conducted to identify the quantitative relationship between iron minerals and heavy metals. Results showed that schwertmannite, jarosite, goethite and ferrihydrite were the dominant Fe-oxyhydroxide minerals which were detected alternately in the surface sediment with the increasing pH from 2.50 to 6.93 along the Hengshi River. Decreasing contents of schwertmannite ranging from 35 wt % to 6.5 wt % were detected along the Hengshi River, which was corresponding to the decreasing metal contents. The easily reducible fractions exert higher affinity of metals while compared with reducible and relatively stable minerals. A qualitative analysis of heavy metals extracted from the sediments indicated that the retention ability varied: Pb > Mn > Zn > As ≈ Cu > Cr > Cd ≈ Ni. Results in this study are avail for understanding the fate and transport of heavy metals associated with iron minerals and establishing the remediation strategies of AMD systems.

  12. Mineralogical characteristics of sediments and heavy metal mobilization along a river watershed affected by acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yingying; Lu, Guining; Yang, Chengfang; Qu, Lu; Chen, Meiqin; Guo, Chuling; Dang, Zhi

    2018-01-01

    Trace-element concentrations in acid mine drainage (AMD) are primarily controlled by the mineralogy at the sediment-water interface. Results are presented for a combined geochemical and mineralogical survey of Dabaoshan Mine, South China. Developed sequential extraction experiments with the analysis of the main mineralogical phases by semi-quantitative XRD, differential X-ray diffraction (DXRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were conducted to identify the quantitative relationship between iron minerals and heavy metals. Results showed that schwertmannite, jarosite, goethite and ferrihydrite were the dominant Fe-oxyhydroxide minerals which were detected alternately in the surface sediment with the increasing pH from 2.50 to 6.93 along the Hengshi River. Decreasing contents of schwertmannite ranging from 35 wt % to 6.5 wt % were detected along the Hengshi River, which was corresponding to the decreasing metal contents. The easily reducible fractions exert higher affinity of metals while compared with reducible and relatively stable minerals. A qualitative analysis of heavy metals extracted from the sediments indicated that the retention ability varied: Pb > Mn > Zn > As ≈ Cu > Cr > Cd ≈ Ni. Results in this study are avail for understanding the fate and transport of heavy metals associated with iron minerals and establishing the remediation strategies of AMD systems.

  13. An unpublished text of Jovellanos about mineralogy Notas inéditas de Jovellanos sobre mineralogía

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge ORDAZ GARGALLO

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An unpublished manuscript of Gaspar Melchor de Jovellanos about the history of mineralogy, written during his captivity in Bellver Castle (Palma de Mallorca is presented and analyzed. In this writing the importance of the chemical knowledge as a source of other branches of science and its applications in different fields of agriculture, mining and industry is considered. The author made a historical synthesis reviewing the men of science that contributed in a great extent to the advance of the chemistry and mineralogy. The text clearly supports the new contributions of Lavoisier and other supporters of experimentation as a scientific method, which agrees with Jovellanos’ ideas about the development of the «useful» sciences for the progress of the countries.Se presenta y analiza un manuscrito inédito de Gaspar Melchor de Jovellanos sobre la historia de la mineralogía, que redactó durante su cautiverio en el Castillo de Bellver (Palma de Mallorca. En el escrito considera de gran importancia los conocimientos químicos como fuente de otras ramas del saber científico y sus aplicaciones en distintos ámbitos de la agricultura, minería e industria. El autor hace una síntesis histórica repasando los hombres de ciencia que en mayor medida contribuyeron al avance de la química y la mineralogía. El texto apoya claramente las nuevas aportaciones de Lavoisier y otros químicos partidarios de la experimentación como método científico, y es acorde con las ideas de Jovellanos acerca del cultivo de las ciencias «útiles» para el progreso de los pueblos.

  14. Impact of chemical oxidation and water acidification on the mineralogical and physico-chemical properties of the Tournemire argillaceous formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charpentier, D.

    2001-11-01

    The French Institute for Protection and Nuclear Safety (IPSN) has selected a site near Tournemire (France) for research programmes on deep geological waste disposal in clay-rich rock formation. A railway tunnel was built about 100 years ago through the thick indurated Toarcian argillite of the Tournemire Massif and two galleries were constructed five years ago. They are used to study the evolution of rock mineralogical composition, texture, water content and water-rock interactions in the excavated disturbed zone. Multi-scale and multi-technique investigations were carried out on the evolution of physical and mineralogical rock properties. Experiments and numerical modelling were used to predict changes due to water-rock interactions and subsequent rock mineralogy and water chemistry modifications. The argillite consists of detrital clay-rich layers and carbonate layers. Pyrites are always present in significant amounts (2 to 2.5 %). The rock presents very low porosity and very low water content (around 3 %). Leaching experiments show that the interstitial water is Na and SO 4 -rich and Cl-poor. The tunnel and galleries digging induces fracture formation. In the altered samples, the clay particles show a better orientation in the stratification plan, which increases the porosity. The oxidation effect yields to mineralogical transformation on the surfaces of the argillite: oxidation of pyrite, dissolution of calcite, dissolution of illite layers in interstratified I/S and formation of gypsum, Fe-oxi/hydroxides, celestite and jarosite. During cycles of hydration/dehydration, condensation water interacts with the argillite and quickly becomes Ca and SO 4 -rich. The local dissolution of clay particles leads to an increase of the chloride and potassium water content. These phenomena are important for the consideration of the underground work stability, especially the evolution of the water-rock equilibria during the re-hydration of the excavated disturbed zones. (author)

  15. A scientific approach to the attribution problem of renaissance ceramic productions based on chemical and mineralogical markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padeletti, G.; Fermo, P.

    2010-09-01

    Renaissance lustred majolica shards from Gubbio and Deruta (Central Italy) were investigated in order to point out differences in chemical and mineralogical composition between these two very similar Italian potteries and furthermore to find correlations with the local raw clay materials probably used for their production. Chemical and mineralogical analysis on the ceramic body were performed by ICP-OES (inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy) and XRD (X-ray diffraction), respectively. Investigation of the ceramic body revealed significant differences on calcium content indicating that it could be used as a marker for the two different productions. A separation of the ceramic shards in groups, on the base of their provenance, has been achieved applying to the data set formed by the chemical compositional data some multivariate techniques, such as PCA (principal component analysis) and HCA (hierarchical cluster analysis). Even the mineralogical composition of the groups shows very interesting features, differing Gubbio production from Deruta one for the presence of several mineralogical species. The investigations carried out on clays that were collected in the two geographical places have confirmed these differences. In fact, the clay materials have a chemical composition coherent with that one found in the shards. Firing tests performed by heating these clay in different conditions (temperature and soaking time) have shown a different behaviour as concerns the formation of the minerals and it is compatible with the shard composition found. From the comparison between the fired clay and the ceramic shards, some assumptions about the firing conditions applied by the ancient potters have been drawn.

  16. Mineralogic-chemical and physical characteristics of the mud in Ä°zmir (western Turkey): suitability for use in pelotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik Karakaya, Muazzez; Karakaya, Necati

    2013-04-01

    The study conducted on peloid used spas in İzmir city region (western part of Turkey) included the investigation of the mineralogical, physico-chemical and geochemical properties of the three types of peloid samples in order to assess the suitability of the material for healing- aesthetic-related purposes. In situ formed muds in lagoons near the Aegean Sea (named as first group) and inner swamp muds (second group) unprocessed and raw have been using therapy and thermal baths. Mud and hot springs at around the Aegean Sea have been popular since ancient times for the treatment of rheumatic diseases, musculoskeletal disorders in the region. The mineralogical characteristics of the thermal muds are in accordance with the geological origin of the material and water sources. Mineralogic composition, mineral content and morphologic properties of the samples were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDS). Chemical composition of the muds and thermal waters were determined by ICP-EAS and ICP-MS. Both of the sediment is fine- to medium size-grained and composed mostly of clay minerals, partially quartz, feldspar, carbonates, and halite, and rarely gypsum. The mineralogic composition of the muds controls the physico-chemical properties of the muds. Anion e.g., Cl, Br, and SO4, contents the thermal waters of the first group is extremely different and so the springs contain a high level of sodium chloride, magnesium sulphate, and calcium bicarbonate. The water temperature is 45 oC with a pH of 6.95 and electrical conductivity (EC) is 4.5 mS/lt in the first group while 71 oC with a pH 6.58 and EC is 2.52 mS/lt in the second ones. However, major and some of the trace element concentration of the mud samples are nearly similar, As, Cd, Cu, Hg, Ni, Sb, Se, T and Zn content of the first group is exceptionally lower than the second ones. And the hazardous element concentrations are extremely higher than the pharmaceutical clay in the second

  17. Complex chemical composition of colored surface films formed from reactions of propanal in sulfuric acid at upper troposphere/lower stratosphere aerosol acidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wyngarden, A L; Pérez-Montaño, S; Bui, J V H; Li, E S W; Nelson, T E; Ha, K T; Leong, L; Iraci, L T

    Particles in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS) consist mostly of concentrated sulfuric acid (40-80 wt %) in water. However, airborne measurements have shown that these particles also contain a significant fraction of organic compounds of unknown chemical composition. Acid-catalyzed reactions of carbonyl species are believed to be responsible for significant transfer of gas phase organic species into tropospheric aerosols and are potentially more important at the high acidities characteristic of UT/LS particles. In this study, experiments combining sulfuric acid (H 2 SO 4 ) with propanal and with mixtures of propanal with glyoxal and/or methylglyoxal at acidities typical of UT/LS aerosols produced highly colored surface films (and solutions) that may have implications for aerosol properties. In order to identify the chemical processes responsible for the formation of the surface films, attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) and 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies were used to analyze the chemical composition of the films. Films formed from propanal were a complex mixture of aldol condensation products, acetals and propanal itself. The major aldol condensation products were the dimer (2-methyl-2-pentenal) and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene that was formed by cyclization of the linear aldol condensation trimer. Additionally, the strong visible absorption of the films indicates that higher-order aldol condensation products must also be present as minor species. The major acetal species were 2,4,6-triethyl-1,3,5-trioxane and longer-chain linear polyacetals which are likely to separate from the aqueous phase. Films formed on mixtures of propanal with glyoxal and/or methylglyoxal also showed evidence of products of cross-reactions. Since cross-reactions would be more likely than self-reactions under atmospheric conditions, similar reactions of aldehydes like propanal with common aerosol organic species like glyoxal

  18. Antibiotic resistance, ability to form biofilm and susceptibility to copper alloys of selected staphylococcal strains isolated from touch surfaces in Polish hospital wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Różańska

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the employment of sanitary regimes, contact transmission of the aetiological agents of hospital infections is still exceedingly common. The issue of microbe transmission becomes particularly important when facing multidrug-resistant microorganisms such as methicillin-resistant staphylococci. In the case of deficiencies in cleaning and disinfection procedures, hospital equipment made of copper alloys can play an important role, complementing traditional hospital hygiene procedures. The objective of this study was to characterize staphylococcal strains isolated from touch surfaces in Polish hospital wards in terms of their drug resistance, ability to form biofilm and susceptibility to antimicrobial activity of copper alloys. Methods The materials for the study were 95 staphylococcal strains isolated from touch surfaces in 13 different hospital wards from Małopolska province (the south of Poland. Phenotypic and genotypic antibiotic resistance were checked for erythromycin, clindamycin, gentamycin, ciprofloxacin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and mupirocin. Biofilm formation ability for the tested strains was checked with the use of culture on Congo red agar. Susceptibility to copper, tin bronze, brass and new silver was tested using a modification of the Japanese standard. Results Over 67% of the analysed staphylococcal strains were methicillin-resistant (MR. Four strains were resistant to all of the tested antibiotics, and 14 were resistant to all except mupirocin. Strains classified as MR had significantly increased resistance to the remaining antibiotic groups. About one-third of the analysed strains revealed biofilm-forming ability. Among the majority of species, biofilm-forming and non-biofilm-forming strains were distributed evenly; in the case of S. haemolyticus only, negative strains accounted for 92.8%. Susceptibility to copper alloys was different between strains and rather lower than in the case of the SA

  19. Cavitation resistance of surface composition "Steel-Ni-TiNi-TiNiZr-cBNCo", formed by High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel spraying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blednova, Zh. M.; Dmitrenko, D. V.; Balaev, E. U. O.

    2018-01-01

    The object of the study is a multilayered surface composition "Steel - a Multicomponent material with Shape Memory Effect - a wear-resistant layer" under conditions of cavitation effects in sea water. Multicomponent TiNi-based coatings with addition of alloying elements such as Zr in an amount up to 10% mass, allow to create a composite material with a gradient of properties at the interface of layers, which gives new properties to coatings and improves their performance significantly. The use of materials with shape memory effect (SME) as surface layers or in the composition of surface layered compositions allows to provide an effective reaction of materials to the influence of external factors and adaptation to external influences. The surface composite layer cBN-10%Co has high hardness and strength, which ensures its resistance to shock cyclic influences of collapsing caverns. The increased roughness of the surface of a solid surface composite in the form of strong columnar structures ensures the crushing of vacuum voids, redistributing their effect on the entire surface, and not concentrating them in certain zones. In addition, the gradient structure of the multilayer composite coating TiNi-Ti33Ni49Zr18-cBN-10%Co Co makes it possible to create conditions for the relaxation of stresses created by the variable impact load of cavitation caverns and the manifestation of compensating internal forces due to thermo-elastic martensitic transformations of SME materials. The cavitation resistance of the coating TiNi-Ti33Ni49Zr18-cBN-10%Co according to the criterion of mass wear is 15-20 times higher than that of the base material without coating and 10-12 times higher than that of the TiNi-TiNiZr coating. The proposed architecture of the multifunctional gradient composition, "steel-Ni-TiNi- Ti33Ni49Zr18-cBN-10%Co", each layer of which has its functional purpose, allows to increase the service life of parts operating under conditions of cavitation-fatigue loading in

  20. The Mineralosphere Concept: Mineralogical Control of the Distribution and Function of Mineral-associated Bacterial Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uroz, Stephane; Kelly, Laura Catherine; Turpault, Marie-Pierre; Lepleux, Cendrella; Frey-Klett, Pascale

    2015-12-01

    Soil is composed of a mosaic of different rocks and minerals, usually considered as an inert substrata for microbial colonization. However, recent findings suggest that minerals, in soils and elsewhere, favour the development of specific microbial communities according to their mineralogy, nutritive content, and weatherability. Based upon recent studies, we highlight how bacterial communities are distributed on the surface of, and in close proximity to, minerals. We also consider the potential role of the mineral-associated bacterial communities in mineral weathering and nutrient cycling in soils, with a specific focus on nutrient-poor and acidic forest ecosystems. We propose to define this microbial habitat as the mineralosphere, where key drivers of the microbial communities are the physicochemical properties of the minerals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. MSL Chemistry and Mineralogy X-Ray Diffraction X-Ray Fluorescence (CheMin) Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Wayne; Blake, Dave; Harris, William; Morookian, John Michael; Randall, Dave; Reder, Leonard J.; Sarrazin, Phillipe

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Chemistry and Mineralogy Xray Diffraction (XRD), X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) (CheMin) Instrument, an element of the landed Curiosity rover payload, which landed on Mars in August of 2012. The scientific goal of the MSL mission is to explore and quantitatively assess regions in Gale Crater as a potential habitat for life - past or present. The CheMin instrument will receive Martian rock and soil samples from the MSL Sample Acquisition/Sample Processing and Handling (SA/SPaH) system, and process it utilizing X-Ray spectroscopy methods to determine mineral composition. The Chemin instrument will analyze Martian soil and rocks to enable scientists to investigate geophysical processes occurring on Mars. The CheMin science objectives and proposed surface operations are described along with the CheMin hardware with an emphasis on the system engineering challenges associated with developing such a complex instrument.

  2. A measurement strategy and an error-compensation model for the on-machine laser measurement of large-scale free-form surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Bin; Li, Feng; Liu, Hongqi; Cai, Hui; Mao, Xinyong; Peng, Fangyu

    2014-01-01

    This study presents a novel measurement strategy and an error-compensation model for the measurement of large-scale free-form surfaces in on-machine laser measurement systems. To improve the measurement accuracy, the effects of the scan depth, surface roughness, incident angle and azimuth angle on the measurement results were investigated experimentally, and a practical measurement strategy considering the position and orientation of the sensor is presented. Also, a semi-quantitative model based on geometrical optics is proposed to compensate for the measurement error associated with the incident angle. The normal vector of the measurement point is determined using a cross-curve method from the acquired surface data. Then, the azimuth angle and incident angle are calculated to inform the measurement strategy and error-compensation model, respectively. The measurement strategy and error-compensation model are verified through the measurement of a large propeller blade on a heavy machine tool in a factory environment. The results demonstrate that the strategy and the model are effective in increasing the measurement accuracy. (paper)

  3. Integrating petrography, mineralogy and hydrochemistry to constrain the influence and distribution of groundwater contributions to baseflow in poorly productive aquifers: insights from Gortinlieve catchment, Co. Donegal, NW Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, John; Chelliah, Merlyn; Comte, Jean-Christophe; Cassidy, Rachel; Flynn, Raymond

    2014-12-01

    Identifying groundwater contributions to baseflow forms an essential part of surface water body characterisation. The Gortinlieve catchment (5 km(2)) comprises a headwater stream network of the Carrigans River, itself a tributary of the River Foyle, NW Ireland. The bedrock comprises poorly productive metasediments that are characterised by fracture porosity. We present the findings of a multi-disciplinary study that integrates new hydrochemical and mineralogical investigations with existing hydraulic, geophysical and structural data to identify the scales of groundwater flow and the nature of groundwater/bedrock interaction (chemical denudation). At the catchment scale, the development of deep weathering profiles is controlled by NE-SW regional scale fracture zones associated with mountain building during the Grampian orogeny. In-situ chemical denudation of mineral phases is controlled by micro- to meso-scale fractures related to Alpine compression during Palaeocene to Oligocene times. The alteration of primary muscovite, chlorite (clinochlore) and albite along the surfaces of these small-scale fractures has resulted in the precipitation of illite, montmorillonite and illite-montmorillonite clay admixtures. The interconnected but discontinuous nature of these small-scale structures highlights the role of larger scale faults and fissures in the supply and transportation of weathering solutions to/from the sites of mineral weathering. The dissolution of primarily mineral phases releases the major ions Mg, Ca and HCO3 that are shown to subsequently form the chemical makeup of groundwaters. Borehole groundwater and stream baseflow hydrochemical data are used to constrain the depths of groundwater flow pathways influencing the chemistry of surface waters throughout the stream profile. The results show that it is predominantly the lower part of the catchment, which receives inputs from catchment/regional scale groundwater flow, that is found to contribute to the

  4. Mineralogy, geochemistry, genesis, and industrial application of silica in Arefi area, south of Mashhad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hassan Karimpour

    2014-10-01

    than 600ºC with average 559ºC and the salinity is between 49.6 and 72.1 wt% NaCl with average 61.2 wt% NaCl. These data indicate a magmatic origin according to Kesler (Kesler, 2005 diagram. Homogenization temperature of two phases (LV inclusions in the metamorphosed quartz is between 287 and 365ºC with average 318ºC. The main source of quartz pebbles is quartz veins formed within the top of pegmatite-granite (upper Triassic of Khajeh-Morad area and quartz veins formed due to regional metamorphism. Based on chemical analysis of 93 samples which were taken from the surface (channel method and power drilling, the SiO2 content is more than 98%, TFeO is less than 0.42% and TiO2 is less than 0.16%. The proved ore reserve is more than 50 million tonnes. Using dry magnetic method, the TFeO became less that 0.03% and TiO2 less than 0.02%. Arefi silica deposit is a first-class reserve and can be used in different types of ceramic. Acknowledgments The Research Foundation of Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran, supported this study (Project No. 29057.2. We also thank Danesh Faravaran Engineering Company for the ore dressing analyses. Reference Hasemi, S.F., 2004. Petrology and depositional environment of Jurrasic conglomerate in south of Mashhad. Unpublished M.Sc. thesis, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad, Iran, 200 pp. (in Persian Kesler, E.S., 2005. Fluids in Planetary Systems: ore-Forming Fluids. Elements, 1(1: 13–18. Lecumberri-Sanchez, P., Steel-MacInnis, M. and Bodnar, R.J., 2012. A numerical model to estimate trapping conditions of fluid inclusions that homogenize by halite disappearance. Geochim Cosmochim Acta, 92: 14-22. Roedder, E., 1984. Fluid inclusions. Reviews in Mineralogy 12, 644 pp. Steele-MacInnis, M., Lecumberri-Sanchez, P. and Bodnar, R.J., 2012. HOKIEFLINCS-H2O-NACL: A Microsoft Excel spreadsheet for interpreting microthermometric data from fluid inclusions based on the PVTX properties of H2O–NaCl. Computers Geosciences, 49: 334–337.

  5. Mineralogy and petrography of HAL, an isotopically-unusual Allende inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J. M.; Grossman, L.; Lee, T.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1980-01-01

    Results of a detailed mineralogical and textural study of the HAL (Hibonite ALlende) inclusion of the Allende meteorite, which has been found to exhibit no Mg-26 excesses despite very high Al-27/Mg-24 ratios and large fractionation effects with small nuclear effects in its Ca, are reported. The inclusion is found to consist of three up to 1-mm diameter hibonite crystals partially surrounded by a black rim resembling a devitrified glass and containing an anisotropic Al-Fe oxide, which is in turn surrounded by a 2-mm thick friable rim sequence consisting of five layers distinguishable by mineral composition. From the available evidence, it is concluded that each of the layers of the friable rim formed by the accretion of an assemblage of condensate grains rather than by the complete reaction of a HAL precursor with a nebular gas, thus explaining its unusual isotopic characteristics and supporting the conclusion that the solar nebular contained isotopically-distinct reservoirs.

  6. The mineralogy and geochemistry of some of the iron-formations of Bushmanland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, T.Q.

    1986-01-01

    A great diversity of metasedimentary and metavolcanic rock types form inselbergs on the sandcovered plains of Bushmanland in the north-western Cape Province. Algoma-type iron-formation occurs as isolated units in the Proterozoic metasediments of Namaqualand and Bushmanland, varying in size and stratigraphical position. In many cases, the iron-formations are closely associated with base metal mineralization. Examples are the huge base metal deposits at Black Mountain, Gamsberg and Broken Hill in the Aggeneys area. The oxidation zones are expressed as black magnetite-rich outcrops which can in some cases be traced for as much as a kilometre. This study was undertaken to investigate the mineralogy and geochemistry of a selection of the iron-formations of Bushmanland. Some of the iron-formations, associated ferriferous metasediments and gossans contain a wide variety of secondary minerals. These minerals were examined by X-ray diffraction and analyses were obtained by means of an electron microprobe

  7. Insights from Synthetic Star-forming Regions. II. Verifying Dust Surface Density, Dust Temperature, and Gas Mass Measurements With Modified Blackbody Fitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koepferl, Christine M.; Robitaille, Thomas P. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Dale, James E., E-mail: koepferl@usm.lmu.de [University Observatory Munich, Scheinerstr. 1, D-81679 Munich (Germany)

    2017-11-01

    We use a large data set of realistic synthetic observations (produced in Paper I of this series) to assess how observational techniques affect the measurement physical properties of star-forming regions. In this part of the series (Paper II), we explore the reliability of the measured total gas mass, dust surface density and dust temperature maps derived from modified blackbody fitting of synthetic Herschel observations. We find from our pixel-by-pixel analysis of the measured dust surface density and dust temperature a worrisome error spread especially close to star formation sites and low-density regions, where for those “contaminated” pixels the surface densities can be under/overestimated by up to three orders of magnitude. In light of this, we recommend to treat the pixel-based results from this technique with caution in regions with active star formation. In regions of high background typical in the inner Galactic plane, we are not able to recover reliable surface density maps of individual synthetic regions, since low-mass regions are lost in the far-infrared background. When measuring the total gas mass of regions in moderate background, we find that modified blackbody fitting works well (absolute error: + 9%; −13%) up to 10 kpc distance (errors increase with distance). Commonly, the initial images are convolved to the largest common beam-size, which smears contaminated pixels over large areas. The resulting information loss makes this commonly used technique less verifiable as now χ {sup 2} values cannot be used as a quality indicator of a fitted pixel. Our control measurements of the total gas mass (without the step of convolution to the largest common beam size) produce similar results (absolute error: +20%; −7%) while having much lower median errors especially for the high-mass stellar feedback phase. In upcoming papers (Paper III; Paper IV) of this series we test the reliability of measured star formation rate with direct and indirect

  8. Insights from Synthetic Star-forming Regions. II. Verifying Dust Surface Density, Dust Temperature, and Gas Mass Measurements with Modified Blackbody Fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koepferl, Christine M.; Robitaille, Thomas P.; Dale, James E.

    2017-11-01

    We use a large data set of realistic synthetic observations (produced in Paper I of this series) to assess how observational techniques affect the measurement physical properties of star-forming regions. In this part of the series (Paper II), we explore the reliability of the measured total gas mass, dust surface density and dust temperature maps derived from modified blackbody fitting of synthetic Herschel observations. We find from our pixel-by-pixel analysis of the measured dust surface density and dust temperature a worrisome error spread especially close to star formation sites and low-density regions, where for those “contaminated” pixels the surface densities can be under/overestimated by up to three orders of magnitude. In light of this, we recommend to treat the pixel-based results from this technique with caution in regions with active star formation. In regions of high background typical in the inner Galactic plane, we are not able to recover reliable surface density maps of individual synthetic regions, since low-mass regions are lost in the far-infrared background. When measuring the total gas mass of regions in moderate background, we find that modified blackbody fitting works well (absolute error: + 9%; -13%) up to 10 kpc distance (errors increase with distance). Commonly, the initial images are convolved to the largest common beam-size, which smears contaminated pixels over large areas. The resulting information loss makes this commonly used technique less verifiable as now χ 2 values cannot be used as a quality indicator of a fitted pixel. Our control measurements of the total gas mass (without the step of convolution to the largest common beam size) produce similar results (absolute error: +20%; -7%) while having much lower median errors especially for the high-mass stellar feedback phase. In upcoming papers (Paper III; Paper IV) of this series we test the reliability of measured star formation rate with direct and indirect techniques.

  9. Characterisation of Oxides Formed on the Internal Surface of Steam Generator Tubes in Alloy 690 Corroded in the Primary Environment of Pressurised Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrette, Florence; Leclercq, Stephanie; Legras, Laurent

    2012-09-01

    Since the end of the 1990s, EDF R and D has been studying the phenomenon of corrosion product release from Steam Generator tubes in order to minimize the Source Term of the contamination and radiation exposure during operation and maintenance of Pressurised Water Reactors. With the BOREAL loop, release tests in primary water at 325 deg. C were performed on various Steam Generator tubes made of alloy 690. The experimental conditions of these tests (chemistry, temperature and hydraulics) were the same for all the tests but the results showed various behaviours towards release. For some tubes, the release was weak whereas for others, it was higher; the release rate of the tubes decreased more or less quickly with time. In order to explain these results, the internal surface of the tubes was characterised before and after the tests. Before the tests, various parameters were studied; the main parameters were the roughness, the impurities, the grain size and the cold work. The results demonstrated that it was not easy to quantify the influence of each parameter on release and to differentiate the tubes. A new parameter was proposed to characterise the internal extreme surface of SG tubes: the surface nano-hardness by nano-indentation measurements. The tubes were also observed and analysed by SEM, (X)TEM. Data obtained by (X)TEM revealed differences of the surface state (layer of perturbed microstructure, density of dislocations, grain size, impurities, initial oxide,...). After the tests, the oxides formed on the internal surface and the underlying material of the samples were characterised by SEM, (X)TEM and SIMS. The examinations showed various types of oxides. For some tubes, a duplex oxide scale was identified, for the others, only one oxide scale was observed. For equivalent durations of corrosion, the thickness of the enriched - chromium oxide layer can vary from 5 nm to 100 nm and the chemical composition can be different. The examinations of the underlying

  10. Automated mineralogy and petrology - applications of TESCAN Integrated Mineral Analyzer (TIMA)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrstka, Tomáš; Gottlieb, P.; Skála, Roman; Breiter, Karel; Motl, D.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 1 (2018), s. 47-63 ISSN 1802-6222 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) StrategieAV21/4 Program:StrategieAV Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : TIMA * Automated SEM/EDS * applied mineralogy * modal analysis * artificial intelligence * neural networks Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy OBOR OECD: Mineralogy Impact factor: 0.609, year: 2016

  11. Influence of clay mineralogy on clay based ceramic products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radzali Othman; Tuan Besar Tuan Sarif; Zainal Arifin Ahmad; Ahmad Fauzi Mohd Noor; Abu Bakar Aramjat

    1996-01-01

    Clay-based ceramic products can either be produced directly from a suitable clay source without the need further addition or such products can be produced from a ceramic body formulated by additions of other raw materials such as feldspar and silica sand. In either case, the mineralogical make-up of the clay component plays a dominating role in the fabrication and properties of the ceramic product. This study was sparked off by a peculiar result observed in one of five local ball clay samples that were used to reformulate a ceramic body. Initial characterisation tests conducted on the clays indicated that these clays can be classified as kaolinitic. However, one of these clays produced a ceramic body that is distinctively different in terms of whiteness, smoothness and density as compared to the other four clays. Careful re-examination of other characterisation data, such as particle size distribution and chemical analysis, failed to offer any plausible explanation. Consequently, the mineralogical analysis by x-ray diffraction was repeated by paying meticulous attention to specimen preparation. Diffraction data for the clay with anomalous behaviour indicated the presence of a ∼ 10A peak that diminished when the same specimen was re-tested after heating in an oven at 12O degree C whilst the other four clays only exhibit the characteristic kaolinite (Al sub 2 O sub 3. 2SiO sub 2. 2H sub 2 0) and muscovite peaks at ∼ 7A and ∼ 10A before and after heat treatment. This suggests the presence of the mineral halloysite (A1 sub 2 0 sub 3. 2SiO sub 2.4H sub 2 0) in that particular clay. This difference in mineralogy can be attributed to account for the variations in physical properties of the final product. Consequently, this paper reviews in general the precautionary measures that must be adhered to during any mineralogical investigation of clay minerals or clay-based materials. The common pitfalls during specimen preparation, machine settings and interpretation of

  12. Temperature buffer test. Hydro-mechanical and chemical/ mineralogical characterizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aakesson, Mattias; Olsson, Siv; Dueck, Ann; Nilsson, Ulf; Karnland, Ola; Kiviranta, Leena; Kumpulainen, Sirpa; Linden, Johan

    2012-01-01

    The Temperature Buffer Test (TBT) is a joint project between SKB/ANDRA and supported by ENRESA (modeling) and DBE (instrumentation), which aims at improving the understanding and to model the thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior of buffers made of swelling clay submitted to high temperatures (over 100 deg C) during the water saturation process. The test has been carried out in a KBS-3 deposition hole at Aspo HRL. It was installed during the spring of 2003. Two steel heaters (3 m long, 0.6 m diameter) and two buffer arrangements have been investigated: the lower heater was surrounded by rings of compacted Wyoming bentonite only, whereas the upper heater was surrounded by a composite barrier, with a sand shield between the heater and the bentonite. The test was dismantled and sampled during the winter of 2009/2010. This report presents the hydro-mechanical and chemical/mineralogical characterization program which was launched subsequent to the dismantling operation. The main goal has been to investigate if any significant differences could be observed between material from the field experiment and the reference material. The field samples were mainly taken from Ring 4 (located at the mid-section around the lower heater), in which the temperature in the innermost part reached 155 deg C. The following hydro-mechanical properties have been determined for the material (test technique within brackets): hydraulic conductivity (swelling pressure device), swelling pressure (swelling pressure device), unconfined compression strength (mechanical press), shear strength (triaxial cell) and retention properties (jar method). The following chemical/mineralogical properties (methods within brackets) were determined: anion analysis of water leachates (IC), chemical composition (ICP/AES+MS, EGA), cation exchange capacity (CEC, Cu-trien method) and exchangeable cations (exchange with NH4, ICPAES), mineralogical composition (XRD and FTIR), element distribution and microstructure (SEM and

  13. Petrology, mineralogy and geochemistry of surficial uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagel, M.

    1984-01-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the petrology, mineralogy, and geochemistry of surficial uranium ore deposits is important for developing prospecting and evaluation strategies. Carnotite is the main uranium mineral and is found in those deposits that have the greatest potential uranium resources. The following uranium-bearing minerals have been reported to occur in surficial deposits: carnotite, tyuyamunite, soddyite, weeksite, haiweeite, uranophane, betauranophane, metaankoleite, torbernite, autunite, phosphuranylite, schroeckingerite, Pb-V-U hydroxide (unnamed mineral), uraninite and organourano complexes. The interrelationships between some of the minerals of the host rocks (especially the clays) are not well understood. (author)

  14. Low-power, high-uniform, and forming-free resistive memory based on Mg-deficient amorphous MgO film with rough surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jiajun; Ren, Shuxia; Wu, Liqian; Kang, Xin; Chen, Wei; Zhao, Xu

    2018-03-01

    Saving energy and reducing operation parameter fluctuations remain crucial for enabling resistive random access memory (RRAM) to emerge as a universal memory. In this work, we report a resistive memory device based on an amorphous MgO (a-MgO) film that not only exhibits ultralow programming voltage (just 0.22 V) and low power consumption (less than 176.7 μW) but also shows excellent operative uniformity (the coefficient of variation is only 1.7% and 2.2% for SET and RESET voltage, respectively). Moreover, it also shows a forming-free characteristic. Further analysis indicates that these distinctive properties can be attributed to the unstable local structures and the rough surface of the Mg-deficient a-MgO film. These findings show the potential of using a-MgO in high-performance nonvolatile memory applications.

  15. Spatial variation of the number of graphene layers formed on the scratched 6H-SiC(0 0 0 1) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osaklung, J. [School of Physics, Suranaree University of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000 (Thailand); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Euaruksakul, C. [Synchrotron Light Research Institute, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, CHE, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Meevasana, W., E-mail: worawat@g.sut.ac.th [School of Physics, Suranaree University of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000 (Thailand); Synchrotron Light Research Institute, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, CHE, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Songsiriritthigul, P. [School of Physics, Suranaree University of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000 (Thailand); Synchrotron Light Research Institute, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, CHE, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2012-03-01

    The unique properties of graphene can vary greatly depending on the number of graphene layers; therefore, spatial control of graphene thickness is desired to fully exploit these properties in promising new devices. Using low energy electron microscopy (LEEM), we investigate how scratches on the surface of 6H-SiC(0 0 0 1) affect the epitaxial growth of graphene. Oscillations in the LEEM-image intensity as a function of electron energy (I-V LEEM analysis) show that the number of graphene layers clearly differs between regions of scratched and smooth substrate. The extent of the thicker graphene layers formed above scratches is found to be significantly larger than the width of the scratch itself. This finding can be implemented as an additional technique for spatially modulating graphene thickness.

  16. Mineralogical evolution of argilites in dehydrated-oxidised zones: the example of the argilitic walls from Tournemire tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charpentier, D.; Cathelineau, M.; Mosser-Ruck, R.; Bruno, G.

    2001-01-01

    Digging of underground work such as that of the Tournemire tunnel in a Toarcian argillite formation, has an impact on the surface mineralogy of the rock blocks. In spite of its very low water content, the argillite is reactive as a consequence of the modification of the redox conditions. Thus, atmospheric oxygen in presence of adsorbed water induces pyrite corrosion and formation of secondary mineral phases such as gypsum, celestite, jarosite and Fe-hydroxides, which play a significant role on the water-rock equilibria of the mechanically disturbed zone. (authors)

  17. Characterization of the alteration products formed at the surface of LaYSiAlO and CeYSiAlO glasses using ERDA and RBS techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavarini, S.; Trocellier, P.; Matzen, G.

    2004-01-01

    Leaching tests have been performed on LnYSiAlO glasses (Ln = La or Ce) that are considered as potential matrices for the specific immobilization of minor actinides. Elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) performed on leached samples indicated a superficial hydration of LaYSiAlO glass of about 100-150 nm. This hydrated layer is (Al, Y)-enriched according to SEM-EDS analysis, suggesting the formation of hydroxide (or hydroxycarbonates) compounds including these two elements. This process leads to a very efficient passivation of the material due to the low solubility of Al and Y hydroxides (and hydroxycarbonates) species in near neutral media, even when the solution is rapidly replenished is dynamic leaching experiments. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry elemental mapping revealed very localized and significantly Y-enriched deposits at the surface of the sample after leaching. This could be the sign of heterogeneities already present on the pristine glass. These may be correlated with the weak solubility of yttrium (and rare earth) elements in silicate matrices (Y + Ln initial content in the glass ∼11 at.%). In the case of CeYSiAlO glass, a thin layer was formed on the solid after leaching. The simulation of the corresponding RBS spectra showed a surface (Y, Ce)-enrichment and (Al, Si)-depletion in both cases. This could be explained by the oxidation of trivalent cerium initially present in the glass structure during leaching. This might be explained by the low solubility of Ce(IV)-compounds (CeO 2 and/or Ce(OH) 4 ) in solution leading to an enrichment of this element at the glass/solution interface, to form a mixture of amorphous CeO 2 and Y(OH) 3 , as confirmed by XPS and XRD experiments

  18. Fragility Fracture Incidence in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Patients Associates With Nanoporosity, Mineral/Matrix Ratio, and Pyridinoline Content at Actively Bone-Forming Trabecular Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschalis, Eleftherios P; Gamsjaeger, Sonja; Dempster, David; Jorgetti, Vanda; Borba, Victoria; Boguszewski, Cesar L; Klaushofer, Klaus; Moreira, Carolina A

    2017-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with low areal bone mineral density (aBMD) by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and altered microstructure by bone histomorphometry and micro-computed tomography. Nevertheless, not all COPD patients sustain fragility fractures. In the present study, we used Raman microspectroscopic analysis to determine bone compositional properties at actively forming trabecular surfaces (based on double fluorescent labels) in iliac crest biopsies from 19 postmenopausal COPD patients (aged 62.1 ± 7.3 years). Additionally, we analyzed trabecular geometrical centers, representing tissue much older than the forming surfaces. Eight of the patients had sustained fragility fractures, and 13 had received treatment with inhaled glucocorticoids. None of the patients had taken oral glucocorticoids. The monitored parameters were mineral/matrix ratio (MM), nanoporosity, and relative glycosaminoglycan (GAG), lipid, and pyridinoline contents (PYD). There were no significant differences between the glucocorticoid-treated patients and those who did not receive any. On the other hand, COPD patients sustaining fragility fractures had significantly lower nanoporosity and higher MM and PYD values compared with COPD patients without fragility fractures. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to discriminate between fracture and non-fracture COPD patients based on differences in the material properties of bone matrix. Given that these bone material compositional differences are evident close to the cement line (a major bone interface), they may contribute to the inferior bone toughness and coupled with the lower lumbar spine bone mineral density values result in the fragility fractures prevalent in these patients. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  19. Surface analytical and electrochemical characterization of oxide films formed on Incoloy-800 and carbon steel in simulated secondary water chemistry conditions of PHWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangarajan, S.; Sinu, C.; Balaji, V.; Narasimhan, S.V.

    2010-01-01

    The water chemistry in the Steam Generator (SG) Circuits of Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs) is controlled by the all volatile treatment (AVT) procedure, wherein volatile amines are used to maintain the alkaline pH required for minimizing the corrosion of the structural materials. Earlier, Monel and morpholine were used as the Steam Generator material and the alkalizing agent respectively. However, currently they are replaced by Incoloy-800 and Ethanolamine (ETA). ETA was chosen because of its beneficial effects due to low pK b and K d values, loading behaviour on condensate polishing unit (CPU) and also on cost comparison with other amines. Since we have Incoloy-800 on the tube side and Carbon steel(CS) on the shell side in the SG circuits, efforts were taken to study the nature of the oxide films formed on these surfaces and to evaluate the corrosion resistance and electrochemical properties of the same, under simulated secondary water chemistry conditions of PHWRs containing different dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration. In this context, experiments were carried out by exposing finely polished CS and Incoloy -800 coupons to ETA based medium in the presence and absence of Hydrazine (pH: 9.2) at 240 o C under two different DO conditions (< 10 ppb and 200 ppb) for 24 hours. Oxide films formed under these conditions were characterized using SEM, Raman spectroscopy, electrochemical impedance, polarization and Mott-Schottky techniques. Further, studies at a controlled DO level ( < 10 ppb) were carried out for different time durations viz., 7- and 30- days. The composition, surface morphology, oxide thickness, resistance, type of semi-conductivity and defect density of the oxide films were evaluated and correlated with the DO levels and discussed elaborately in this paper. (author)

  20. Electrochemical and in-situ Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopic (SERS) study of passive films formed on low-carbon steel in highly alkaline environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancio, Mauricio

    In reinforced concrete, a passive layer forms because of the alkaline conditions in the pores of the cement paste, where large concentrations of hydroxides create a solution with pH typically between 12 and 14. The corrosion resistance of the material depends on the characteristics and integrity of the passive film; however, currently very limited information is available about the passive films formed on carbon steel under such conditions. This work presents an electrochemical and in-situ Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopic (SERS) study of passive films formed on low-carbon steel in highly alkaline environments. More specifically, the study focuses on the characterization of the films formed on ASTM A36 steel reinforcing bar exposed to aqueous solutions that aim to reproduce the chemistry of the environment typically found within the cement paste. Electrochemical techniques such as cyclic potentiodynamic polarization curves, galvanostatic cathodic polarization and linear polarization resistance were employed, in addition to in-situ Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS). The experimental setup was built in a way that SERS experiments could be performed simultaneously with potentiodynamic polarization curves, enabling a detailed analysis of the formation and reduction of the surface films as a function of applied potential. Three solutions with different pH levels were used for the polarization and SERS experiments, namely 0.55M KOH + 0.16M NaOH ([OH-]=0.71), 0.08M KOH + 0.02M NaOH ([OH-]=0.10) and 0.008M KOH + 0.002M NaOH ([OH-]=0.01). Additional NaOH solutions in which the pH was varied from 13 to 9 and the ionic strength from 10 -5 to 10-1 were prepared for a pilot study using linear polarization resistance. Results show that the features observed in the cyclic potentiodynamic polarization curves correlated well with the potential arrests observed in the GCP plots as well as with the changes observed in the SERS spectra, providing valuable information about

  1. Mineralogical and chemical properties of the lunar regolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckay, David S.; Ming, Douglas W.

    1989-01-01

    The composition of lunar regolith and its attendant properties are discussed. Tables are provided listing lunar minerals, the abundance of plagioclase feldspar, pyroxene, olivine, and ilmenite in lunar materials, typical compositions of common lunar minerals, and cumulative grain-size distribution for a large number of lunar soils. Also provided are charts on the chemistry of breccias, the chemistry of lunar glass, and the comparative chemistry of surface soils for the Apollo sites. Lunar agglutinates, constructional particles made of lithic, mineral, and glass fragments welded together by a glassy matrix containing extremely fine-grained metallic iron and formed by micrometeoric impacts at the lunar surface, are discussed. Crystalline, igneous rock fragments, breccias, and lunar glass are examined. Volatiles implanted in lunar materials and regolith maturity are also addressed.

  2. Technical note: Mineralogical, chemical, morphological, and optical interrelationships of mineral dust re-suspensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Engelbrecht

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper promotes an understanding of the mineralogical, chemical, and physical interrelationships of re-suspended mineral dusts collected as grab samples from global dust sources. Surface soils were collected from arid regions, including the southwestern USA, Mali, Chad, Morocco, Canary Islands, Cabo Verde, Djibouti, Afghanistan, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, UAE, Serbia, China, Namibia, Botswana, Australia, and Chile. The  <  38 µm sieved fraction of each sample was re-suspended in a chamber, from which the airborne mineral dust could be extracted, sampled, and analyzed. Instruments integrated into the entrainment facility included two PM10 and two PM2.5 filter samplers, a beta attenuation gauge for the continuous measurement of PM10 and PM2.5 particulate mass fractions, an aerodynamic particle size analyzer, and a three-wavelength (405, 532, 781 nm photoacoustic instrument with integrating reciprocal nephelometer for monitoring absorption and scattering coefficients during the dust re-suspension process. Filter sampling media included Teflon® membrane and quartz fiber filters for chemical analysis and Nuclepore® filters for individual particle analysis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The  <  38 µm sieved fractions were also analyzed by X-ray diffraction for their mineral content while the  >  75,  <  125 µm soil fractions were mineralogically assessed by optical microscopy. Presented here are results of the optical measurements, showing the interdependency of single-scattering albedos (SSA at three different wavelengths and mineralogical content of the entrained dust samples. To explain the elevated concentrations of iron (Fe and Fe ∕ Al ratios in the soil re-suspensions, we propose that dust particles are to a large extent composed of nano-sized particles of micas, clays, metal oxides, and ions of potassium (K+, calcium (Ca2+, and sodium (Na+ evenly dispersed as a colloid or adsorbed in amorphous

  3. Influences of surface charge, size, and concentration of colloidal nanoparticles on fabrication of self-organized porous silica in film and particle forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandiyanto, Asep Bayu Dani; Suhendi, Asep; Arutanti, Osi; Ogi, Takashi; Okuyama, Kikuo

    2013-05-28

    Studies on preparation of porous material have attracted tremendous attention because existence of pores can provide material with excellent performances. However, current preparation reports described successful production of porous material with only partial information on charges, interactions, sizes, and compositions of the template and host materials. In this report, influences of self-assembly parameters (i.e., surface charge, size, and concentration of colloidal nanoparticles) on self-organized porous material fabrication were investigated. Silica nanoparticles (as a host material) and polystyrene (PS) spheres (as a template) were combined to produce self-assembly porous materials in film and particle forms. The experimental results showed that the porous structure and pore size were controllable and strongly depended on the self-assembly parameters. Materials containing highly ordered pores were effectively created only when process parameters fall within appropriate conditions (i.e., PS surface charge ≤ -30 mV; silica-to-PS size ratio ≤0.078; and silica-to-PS mass ratio of about 0.50). The investigation of the self-assembly parameter landscape was also completed using geometric considerations. Because optimization of these parameters provides significant information in regard to practical uses, results of this report could be relevant to other functional properties.

  4. A Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensing Method for Simultaneous Determination of Atenolol and Amiloride in Pharmaceutical Dosage Forms and Urine Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwa R. El-Zahry

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This contribution describes a simple, fast, and sensitive application of localized surface plasmon resonance effect of silver nanoparticles for simultaneous determination of antihypertensive drugs’ mixture atenolol and amiloride in both pharmaceutical dosage forms and in biological samples (urine. Silver nanoparticles were prepared by chemical reduction of silver nitrate using hydroxylamine HCL in an alkaline medium. Application of silver-hydroxylamine nanoparticles (SH NPs provides many advantages including reproducibility, sensitivity, and cost effective way of analyte determination. Amiloride has four amino groups which act as attachment points on the surface of silver nanoparticles resulting in a synergistic effect on the absorption intensity of atenolol, leading to increase the sensitivity of the determination of both compounds. This method shows excellent advantages comparing with the previously reported methods, including accuracy, precision, and selectivity. The linear range of atenolol is 1 × 10−5–1 × 10−4 mol·L−1 and of amiloride is 1 × 10−6–1 × 10−5 mol·L−1. The limit of detection (LOD values of atenolol and amiloride are 0.89 × 10−5 and 0.42 × 10−6 mol·L−1, respectively.

  5. Research on the Influence of Cutting Rates on Macrogeometry Deflections of Surfaces under Processing Complex form Products Made of Aluminium Aloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ieva Švagždytė

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article reviews the influence of cutting rates on macrogeometry deflection of milling complex form products and turning an outside surface. For that purpose, one of the most popular aluminium alloys 6082 has been chosen. A ball nose mill of 8 mm in diameter has been milled employing CNC vertical centre HAAS MINI MILL and applying CNC lathe HAAS ST 20 for turning. Measurements have been carried out using coordinate measuring machine DEA micro-hite DCC, applying the probe sphere of 3mm in diameter and the probe equipped with a needle. A deviation of the surface profile from tangent to therophore parabola has been investigated. The determinants R2 of the obtained regressive equation have disclosed that the depth of the cut has the biggest influence on macrogeometry deflections, whereas feed rate has a slighter influence and cutting speed has no radical influence. For the turning process, the depth of the cut has the strongest influence on circularity while cilindrisity has been mainly affected by cutting speed.

  6. Extruded Al-Al2O3 composites formed in situ during consolidation of ultrafine Al powders: Effect of the powder surface area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balog, Martin; Simancik, Frantisek; Walcher, Martin; Rajner, Walter; Poletti, Cecilia

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → 25 gas atomised Al 99.5% powders with particle size 2 O 3 dispersoids. → Compacts showed good thermal stability due to grain pinning of Al 2 O 3 dispersoids. - Abstract: Twenty-five samples of commercially available, gas-atomised Al (99.5%) powders with particle sizes 2 O 3 composites formed in situ during extrusion. The effect of particle size, surface area, oxygen content and atomisation atmosphere of the powder on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the extruded compacts were studied by Brunauer, Emmett, Teller (BET) analysis, hot gas extraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and tensile tests. Thermal stability of the compacts and the individual strengthening mechanisms operating in the compacts were discussed. It was found that the properties of the compacts stemmed from the extraordinary grain boundary strengthening effect of the ultrafine-grained compacts due to their microstructures. The efficiency of the grain boundary strengthening was significantly enhanced by the presence of nano-metric Al 2 O 3 dispersoids introduced in situ. The strength of the compacts was closely related to the surface area of the powder particles. In addition, the entrapped gasses and chemically bonded humidity had a negative effect on the mechanical properties of the compacts.

  7. Extruded Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites formed in situ during consolidation of ultrafine Al powders: Effect of the powder surface area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balog, Martin, E-mail: martin.balog@savba.sk [Institute of Materials and Machine Mechanics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava (Slovakia); Simancik, Frantisek [Institute of Materials and Machine Mechanics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava (Slovakia); Walcher, Martin; Rajner, Walter [NMD - New Materials Development GmbH, St. Pantaleon (Austria); Poletti, Cecilia [Institute of Materials Science and Welding, Graz University of Technology, Kopernikusgasse 24/I, A8010 Graz (Austria)

    2011-11-25

    Highlights: {yields} 25 gas atomised Al 99.5% powders with particle size <10 {mu}m were hot extruded. {yields} The strength of compacts was closely related to powder surface area. {yields} Grain boundary strengthening was enhanced by the presence of in situ Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersoids. {yields} Compacts showed good thermal stability due to grain pinning of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersoids. - Abstract: Twenty-five samples of commercially available, gas-atomised Al (99.5%) powders with particle sizes <10 {mu}m were hot extruded into Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites formed in situ during extrusion. The effect of particle size, surface area, oxygen content and atomisation atmosphere of the powder on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the extruded compacts were studied by Brunauer, Emmett, Teller (BET) analysis, hot gas extraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and tensile tests. Thermal stability of the compacts and the individual strengthening mechanisms operating in the compacts were discussed. It was found that the properties of the compacts stemmed from the extraordinary grain boundary strengthening effect of the ultrafine-grained compacts due to their microstructures. The efficiency of the grain boundary strengthening was significantly enhanced by the presence of nano-metric Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersoids introduced in situ. The strength of the compacts was closely related to the surface area of the powder particles. In addition, the entrapped gasses and chemically bonded humidity had a negative effect on the mechanical properties of the compacts.

  8. Micrometer and nanometer scale photopatterning of proteins on glass surfaces by photo-degradation of films formed from oligo(ethylene glycol) terminated silanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tizazu, Getachew; el Zubir, Osama; Patole, Samson; McLaren, Anna; Vasilev, Cvetelin; Mothersole, David J; Adawi, Ali; Hunter, C Neil; Lidzey, David G; Lopez, Gabriel P; Leggett, Graham J

    2012-12-01

    Exposure of films formed by the adsorption of oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) functionalized trichlorosilanes on glass to UV light from a frequency-doubled argon ion laser (244 nm) causes photodegradation of the OEG chain. Although the rate of degradation is substantially slower than for monolayers of OEG terminated thiolates on gold, it is nevertheless possible to form micrometer-scale patterns by elective adsorption of streptavidin to exposed regions. A low density of aldehyde functional groups is produced, and this enables derivatization with nitrilotriacetic acid via an amine linker. Complexation with nickel enables the site-specific immobilization of histidine-tagged yellow and green fluorescent proteins. Nanometer-scale patterns may be fabricated using a Lloyd's mirror interferometer, with a sample and mirror set at right angles to each other. At low exposures, partial degradation of the OEG chains does not remove the protein-resistance of the surface, even though friction force microscopy reveals the formation of patterns. At an exposure of ca. 18 J cm(-2), the modified regions became adhesive to proteins in a narrow region ca. 30 nm (λ/8) wide. As the exposure is increased further the lines quickly broaden to ca. 90 nm. Adjustment of the angle between the sample and mirror enables the fabrication of lines of His-tagged green fluorescent protein at a period of 340 nm that could be resolved using a confocal microscope.

  9. Arsenic mineralogy and mobility in the arsenic-rich historical mine waste dump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippi, Michal; Drahota, Petr; Machovič, Vladimír; Böhmová, Vlasta; Mihaljevič, Martin

    2015-01-01

    A more than 250 year-old mine dump was studied to document the products of long-term arsenopyrite oxidation under natural conditions in a coarse-grained mine waste dump and to evaluate the environmental hazards associated with this material. Using complementary mineralogical and chemical approaches (SEM/EDS/WDS, XRD, micro-Raman spectroscopy, pore water analysis, chemical extraction techniques and thermodynamic PHREEQC-2 modeling), we documented the mineralogical/geochemical characteristics of the dumped arsenopyrite-rich material and environmental stability of the newly formed secondary minerals. A distinct mineralogical zonation was found (listed based on the distance from the decomposed arsenopyrite): scorodite (locally associated with native sulfur pseudomorphs) plus amorphous ferric arsenate (AFA/pitticite), kaňkite, As-bearing ferric (hydr)oxides and jarosite. Ferric arsenates and ferric (hydr)oxides were found to dissolve and again precipitate from downward migrating As-rich solutions cementing rock fragments. Acidic pore water (pH 3.8) has elevated concentrations of As with an average value of about 2.9 mg L −1 . Aqueous As is highly correlated with pH (R 2 = 0.97, p < 0.001) indicating that incongruent dissolution of ferric arsenates controls dissolved As well as the pH of the percolating waste solution. Arsenic released from the dissolution of ferric arsenates into the pore water is, however, trapped by latter and lower-down precipitating jarosite and especially ferric (hydr)oxides. The efficiency of As sequestration by ferric (hydr)oxides in the waste dump and underlying soil has been found to be very effective, suggesting limited environmental impact of the mine waste dump on the surrounding soil ecosystems. - Highlights: • More than 250 year-old arsenopyrite-rich mine waste dump was studied. • Mineral transformation and the environmental stability of different secondary arsenic mineral phases were assessed. • High efficiency of As

  10. Geology, mineralogy, geochemistry and origin of phosphates from Jandia, Cansa Perna, Itacupim (Para) and Pirocaua and Trauira (Maranhao)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, M. L. da.

    1980-01-01

    The phosphate occurrences of Northeastern Para and Northwestern Maranhao were formed by strong lateritic weathering of phosphorus-rich Precambrian rocks. The rock formation affected by those processes were phyllites and schists of the Gurupi Group in Cansa Perna and Pirocaua, a complex of felsic to mafic and ultramafic rocks metamorphosed in the greenschist facies in Itacupim and Trauira and probably phosphoritic sandstone in Jandia. The geology, the mineralogy of phosphates, oxides, hydroxides and silicates, the geochemistry of element distribution (aluminium, silicon, iron, calcium, etc) and trace elements distribution (strontium, rubidium, barium, rare earths, zirconium, niobium uranium, thorium, etc) and the phosphates origin are studied. (C.G.C.)

  11. Automated mineralogical logging of coal and coal measure core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen Fraser; Joan Esterle; Colin Ward; Ruth Henwood; Peter Mason; Jon Huntington; Phil Connor; Reneta Sliwa; Dave Coward; Lew Whitbourn [CSIRO Exploration & Mining (Australia)

    2006-06-15

    A mineralogical core logging system based on spectral reflectance (HyLogger{trademark}) has been used to detect and quantify mineralogies in coal and coal measure sediments. The HyLogger{trademark} system, as tested, operates in the visible-to-shortwave infrared spectral region, where iron oxides, sulphates, hydroxyl-bearing and carbonate minerals have characteristic spectral responses. Specialized software assists with mineral identification and data display. Three Phases of activity were undertaken. In Phase I, carbonates (siderite, ankerite, calcite) and clays (halloysite, dickite) were successfully detected and mapped in coal. Repeat measurements taken from one of the cores after three months demonstrated the reproducibility of the spectral approach, with some spectral differences being attributed to variations in moisture content and oxidation. Also, investigated was HyLogger{trademark} ability to create a 'brightness-profile' on coal materials, and these results were encouraging. In Phase II, geotechnically significant smectitic clays (montmorillonite) were detected and mapped in cores of clastic roof and floor materials. Such knowledge would be useful for mine planning and design purposes. In Phase III, our attempts at determining whether phosphorus-bearing minerals such as apatite could be spectrally detected were less than conclusive. A spectral index could only be created for apatite, and the relationships between the spectrally-derived apatite-index, the XRD results and the analytically-derived phosphorus measurements were ambiguous.

  12. Mineralogical behaviour of bentonites in open and closed systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbert, H.J.; Kasbohm, J.

    2004-01-01

    Mineralogical and chemical changes of bentonites were investigated in a natural analogue study and in laboratory experiments. As a working hypothesis we assumed that in geological, i.e. open systems, bentonites may be penetrated over geological time scales by larger water volumes than high compacted bentonites used as technical barriers in repositories in salt formations. Under this assumption open geological systems are characterised by low solid/liquid ratios and closed repository systems by high solid/liquid ratios. Consequently in laboratory experiments the mineralogical changes were investigated under different solid/liquid ratios and compared with results of a natural analogue study. In the natural analogue study in deep boreholes in the East Slovakian Basin the expandability of montmorillonite and the degree of transformation in illite-smectite (IS) mixed layer structures was found to be dependent not only on depth and temperature but also on the salinity of the pore waters. In this open geological system with a comparatively low solid/liquid ratio the observed changes in the montmorillonite were significantly different than those observed in the laboratory study on compacted MX-80 bentonite. (authors)

  13. Iron concretions in Brazilian Soils. 2. Mineralogical characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontes, M.R.; Silva, E.G. da

    1985-01-01

    The mineralogy of six concretionary material from several pedological domains in Brazil were examined by x-ray diffratometry analysis and room temperature (RT) 57 Fe Moessbauer Spectroscopy. In two samples (from 'Quadrilatero Ferrifero' and Itaituba, in the state of Para) hematite was the predominant mineralogical phase, while in the other samples, from Chapada do Apodi (State of Rio Grande do Norte), Calciolandia (State of Minas Gerais), and Vicosa (State of Minas Gerais), goethite appeared as the main occurring mineral, in the (hydr) oxide crystallized fraction. The goethitic character was related to the manganese content in the concretions. The Moessbauer patterns exhibited superparamagnetic relaxation effects, although a six line hyperfine magnetic splitting, and a central doublet appeared at least in three cases. Exceptionally, in the two samples from Chapada do Apodi the six line pattern collapsed completely, and only a central doublet remained. The hyperfine magnetic field was drastically reduced both by particle size and isomorphically substituted aluminum in the iron oxide structure, probably, of Al-hematites. From the Moessbauer parameters, Al-goethite seemed to be present only in the sample from Vicosa, although it should be emphasized that the RT measurements do not always permit access to the hyperfine strucutre in this kind of material, as a result of small size particle effects. (Author) [pt

  14. Mineralogical and chemical characteristics of marble of Bela Pola deposite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shijakova-Ivanova, Tena; Boev, Blazho; Panov, Zoran; Pavlov, Dejan

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents mineralogical characteristics of marbles from the Bela Pola deposit. We have made mineralogical-chemical analyses of marbles and associated minerals in them. The investigation was carried out at the Faculty of natural and technical sciences - Shtip. Marbles from Bela Pola are dolomite and dolomite-calcite types. Microscope investigations have shown that marbles from Bela Pola have granoblastic structure but at some places it can be found with porphyroblastic structures. Percentage on calcite and dolomite is: 94.08% dolomite, 6.25% is calcite in white marbles. On the other hand calcite is present with 93% in gray marbles. Except dolomite and calcite also appear the following accessoring minerals: quartz, fluorite, corundum and paragonite. In general, after summarizing all the facts, which have resulted from this research we could say that, the Bela Pola marbles are massive, compact and white with high quality. In accordance to all formerly mentioned features, this marbles can be classified in the commercial group of marbles suitable for external application or internal design

  15. Mineralogy of the clay fraction of Alfisols in two slope curvatures: III - spatial variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Arantes Camargo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A good knowledge of the spatial distribution of clay minerals in the landscape facilitates the understanding of the influence of relief on the content and crystallographic attributes of soil minerals such as goethite, hematite, kaolinite and gibbsite. This study aimed at describing the relationships between the mineral properties of the clay fraction and landscape shapes by determining the mineral properties of goethite, hematite, kaolinite and gibbsite, and assessing their dependence and spatial variability, in two slope curvatures. To this end, two 100 × 100 m grids were used to establish a total of 121 regularly spaced georeferenced sampling nodes 10 m apart. Samples were collected from the layer 0.0-0.2 m and analysed for iron oxides, and kaolinite and gibbsite in the clay fraction. Minerals in the clay fraction were characterized from their X-ray diffraction (XRD patterns, which were interpreted and used to calculate the width at half height (WHH and mean crystallite dimension (MCD of iron oxides, kaolinite, and gibbsite, as well as aluminium substitution and specific surface area (SSA in hematite and goethite. Additional calculations included the goethite and hematite contents, and the goethite/(goethite+hematite [Gt/(Gt+Hm] and kaolinite/(kaolinite+gibbsite [Kt/(Kt+Gb] ratios. Mineral properties were established by statistical analysis of the XRD data, and spatial dependence was assessed geostatistically. Mineralogical properties differed significantly between the convex area and concave area. The geostatistical analysis showed a greater number of mineralogical properties with spatial dependence and a higher range in the convex than in the concave area.

  16. Mineralogic Model (MM3.0) Analysis Model Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Lum

    2002-02-12

    The purpose of this report is to document the Mineralogic Model (MM), Version 3.0 (MM3.0) with regard to data input, modeling methods, assumptions, uncertainties, limitations and validation of the model results, qualification status of the model, and the differences between Version 3.0 and previous versions. A three-dimensional (3-D) Mineralogic Model was developed for Yucca Mountain to support the analyses of hydrologic properties, radionuclide transport, mineral health hazards, repository performance, and repository design. Version 3.0 of the MM was developed from mineralogic data obtained from borehole samples. It consists of matrix mineral abundances as a function of x (easting), y (northing), and z (elevation), referenced to the stratigraphic framework defined in Version 3.1 of the Geologic Framework Model (GFM). The MM was developed specifically for incorporation into the 3-D Integrated Site Model (ISM). The MM enables project personnel to obtain calculated mineral abundances at any position, within any region, or within any stratigraphic unit in the model area. The significance of the MM for key aspects of site characterization and performance assessment is explained in the following subsections. This work was conducted in accordance with the Development Plan for the MM (CRWMS M&O 2000). The planning document for this Rev. 00, ICN 02 of this AMR is Technical Work Plan, TWP-NBS-GS-000003, Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model, Process Model Report, Revision 01 (CRWMS M&O 2000). The purpose of this ICN is to record changes in the classification of input status by the resolution of the use of TBV software and data in this report. Constraints and limitations of the MM are discussed in the appropriate sections that follow. The MM is one component of the ISM, which has been developed to provide a consistent volumetric portrayal of the rock layers, rock properties, and mineralogy of the Yucca Mountain site. The ISM consists of three components: (1

  17. Mineralogic Model (MM3.0) Analysis Model Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lum, C.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the Mineralogic Model (MM), Version 3.0 (MM3.0) with regard to data input, modeling methods, assumptions, uncertainties, limitations and validation of the model results, qualification status of the model, and the differences between Version 3.0 and previous versions. A three-dimensional (3-D) Mineralogic Model was developed for Yucca Mountain to support the analyses of hydrologic properties, radionuclide transport, mineral health hazards, repository performance, and repository design. Version 3.0 of the MM was developed from mineralogic data obtained from borehole samples. It consists of matrix mineral abundances as a function of x (easting), y (northing), and z (elevation), referenced to the stratigraphic framework defined in Version 3.1 of the Geologic Framework Model (GFM). The MM was developed specifically for incorporation into the 3-D Integrated Site Model (ISM). The MM enables project personnel to obtain calculated mineral abundances at any position, within any region, or within any stratigraphic unit in the model area. The significance of the MM for key aspects of site characterization and performance assessment is explained in the following subsections. This work was conducted in accordance with the Development Plan for the MM (CRWMS M and O 2000). The planning document for this Rev. 00, ICN 02 of this AMR is Technical Work Plan, TWP-NBS-GS-000003, Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model, Process Model Report, Revision 01 (CRWMS M and O 2000). The purpose of this ICN is to record changes in the classification of input status by the resolution of the use of TBV software and data in this report. Constraints and limitations of the MM are discussed in the appropriate sections that follow. The MM is one component of the ISM, which has been developed to provide a consistent volumetric portrayal of the rock layers, rock properties, and mineralogy of the Yucca Mountain site. The ISM consists of three components

  18. Occurrence and Mineralogical Characteristics of Tremolite Asbestos Occurred in Boryeong area, Chungnam, South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, K.; Hwang, J.; Oh, J.; Lee, H.

    2009-12-01

    Abandoned tremolite mines, which had been exploited for several decades since 1930, are distributed in Boryeong, Chungnam. It is known that tremolite asbestos is approximately 100 times more harmful than chrysotile asbestos. Recently, it become a regional social problem because lung disease (mesothelioma and lung cancer) suspect patients are largely found among the residents of the mining area. Therefore, Korean government making every endeavor to remove asbestos risk in the area. However, there is insufficiency geological and mineralogical studies for tremolite asbestos. In the present study, the occurrence and mineralogical characteristics of tremolite asbestos were studied using polarization microscope, XRD, XRF, EPMA, SEM and TEM. Mica-schist of precambrian metasedimentary rock, which is widely distributed in the area, is the host rock of tremolite deposits. The rocks are largely disturbed by faults and folds, and shows sudden changes in strike and slope of strata. Tremolite ore bodies, which show relatively light colored, mainly occur as stratiform or veinlet and some occurs in brecciated rock fragments. Tremolite is a major asbestos mineral, and chrysotile, talc, mica, chlorite and quartz occurs as associated minerals. Considerable amount of ore containing pure tremolite is found, and ores having mineral assemblages of tremolite+talc, tremolite+quartz and chrysotile+talc also occurs. From optical microscope observations, most tremolites are asbestos from that meets to the criterion (length > 5 μm, diameter 3:1) defined by the international organization (WHO, ILO), but non-asbestos form tremolites are also included. Most asbestos form tremolites have the size range of 1.0-2.0 μm width and 5-10 μm length. The length can be shorten with crushing experiments, but the width remains unchanged. Non-asbestos form hardly change to asbestos form by mechanical crushing. From comprehensive studies for geological occurrence and mineral assemblage, it is considered that

  19. Erratum to: Psammoma bodies in two types of human ovarian tumours: a mineralogical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fanlu; Wang, Changqiu; Li, Yan; Lu, Anhuai; Mei, Fang; Liu, Jianying; Du, Jingyun; Zhang, Yan

    2015-06-01

    Psammoma body (PB) is a common form of calcification in pathological diagnosis and closely relevant to tumours. This paper focuses on the mineralogical characteristics of PBs in ovarian serous cancer and teratoma by using polarization microscope (POM), environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM), micro-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (micro-FT-IR), transmission electron microscope (TEM), micro-area synchrotron radiation X-ray powder diffraction (μ-SRXRD) and fluorescence (μ-SRXRF). Both the PBs in tissues and separated from eight typical cases were investigated. POM and ESEM observation revealed the inside-out growth pattern of PBs. μ-SRXRD and micro-FT-IR results demonstrated the dominant mineral phase of PBs in ovarian serous cancer and teratoma was AB-type carbonate hydroxyapatite (Ca10[(PO4)6-x-y(CO3)x(HPO4)y][(OH)2-u(CO3)u] with 0 ≤ x,y,u ≤ 2). As observed by ESEM and TEM, the layer-rich PBs in teratoma were up to 70 μm and mainly consisted of 5 nm-wide, 5-12 nm-long columnar crystals; the PBs in ovarian serous cancer with a maximum diameter of 35 μm were composed of slightly longer columnar crystals and granulates with 20-100 nm in diameter. The selected area electron diffraction patterns showed dispersed polycrystalline diffraction rings with arching behavior of (002) diffraction, indicating the aggregated nanocrystals grew in the preferred orientation of (002) face. The EDX and μ-SRXRF results together indicated the existence of Na, Mg, Zn and Sr in PBs. These detailed mineralogical characteristics may help uncover the nature of the pat