WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface lidar remote

  1. Using LiDAR and remote microclimate loggers to downscale near-surface air temperatures for site-level studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew D. George; Frank R. Thompson; John. Faaborg

    2015-01-01

    A spatial mismatch exists between regional climate models and conditions experienced by individual organisms. We demonstrate an approach to downscaling air temperatures for site-level studies using airborne LiDAR data and remote microclimate loggers. In 2012-2013, we established a temperature logger network in the forested region of central Missouri, USA, and obtained...

  2. Assessing Surface Fuel Hazard in Coastal Conifer Forests through the Use of LiDAR Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koulas, Christos

    The research problem that this thesis seeks to examine is a method of predicting conventional fire hazards using data drawn from specific regions, namely the Sooke and Goldstream watershed regions in coastal British Columbia. This thesis investigates whether LiDAR data can be used to describe conventional forest stand fire hazard classes. Three objectives guided this thesis: to discuss the variables associated with fire hazard, specifically the distribution and makeup of fuel; to examine the relationship between derived LiDAR biometrics and forest attributes related to hazard assessment factors defined by the Capitol Regional District (CRD); and to assess the viability of the LiDAR biometric decision tree in the CRD based on current frameworks for use. The research method uses quantitative datasets to assess the optimal generalization of these types of fire hazard data through discriminant analysis. Findings illustrate significant LiDAR-derived data limitations, and reflect the literature in that flawed field application of data modelling techniques has led to a disconnect between the ways in which fire hazard models have been intended to be used by scholars and the ways in which they are used by those tasked with prevention of forest fires. It can be concluded that a significant trade-off exists between computational requirements for wildfire simulation models and the algorithms commonly used by field teams to apply these models with remote sensing data, and that CRD forest management practices would need to change to incorporate a decision tree model in order to decrease risk.

  3. LIDAR and atmosphere remote sensing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Venkataraman, S

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available - UMR-8105, Reunion, FRANCE ) Dr. PHILIPPE KECKHUT (Service d’aéronomie, CNRS - UMR-7620 Paris, FRANCE) South-African French LiDAR (SAFiR) network for study of upper troposphere and lower stratosphere aerosol distributions and dynamics ( January... LIDAR datasets Water vapour cycle study in the Upper Troposphere-Lower Stratosphere Stratospheric ozone variability, transport and mixing processes in the southern tropics: a French-South African observation and research network Ozone and UV...

  4. Miniature and Cost-Effective Remote Raman, Fluorescence, and Lidar Multi-Spectral Instrument for Characterization of Planetary Surfaces and Atmosphere from Robotic Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedin, M. N.; Bradley, A. T.; Ismail, S.; Sharma, S. K.; Lucey, P. G.; Misra, A. K.; Sandford, S. P.

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a remote Raman-Fluorescence spectroscopy and Lidar multi-sensor instrument capable of investigation and identification of minerals, organics, and biogenic materials, as well as atmospheric studies of Mars.

  5. Lidar receivers for picosecond remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoyanov, D. V.; Dreischuh, T. N.

    1992-01-01

    The lidars of picosecond resolution are an attractive tool for remote probing of some highly dynamic objects like sea subsurface waters, small-scale turbulences in the atmosphere, etc. The picosecond lasers are suitable illuminating sources, but the main restrictions are due to the lack of proper receiving methods, combining the both high temporal and amplitude resolution, good sensitivity, short integration time, and wide dynamic range. The methods for short pulse measurements are not suitable for picosecond lidars, operating at low level, with highly dynamic signals. The streak-cameras are of high cost, lower sensitivity, and lower dynamic range (approximately 10(exp 3)). Because of the background, the single quantum regime in photomultipliers (PMT) is ineffective. The sampling of highly dynamic optical signals with resolution less than or equal to 1ns is a serious problem, limiting the application of the high speed PMT-MCP (microchannel plate) in the picosecond lidar systems. The goal of this work is to describe the use of a new photodetection technique which combines the picosecond resolution with the high amplitude resolution, dynamic range, and sensitivity.

  6. Lidar equation for ocean surface and subsurface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josset, Damien; Zhai, Peng-Wang; Hu, Yongxiang; Pelon, Jacques; Lucker, Patricia L

    2010-09-27

    The lidar equation for ocean at optical wavelengths including subsurface signals is revisited using the recent work of the radiative transfer and ocean color community for passive measurements. The previous form of the specular and subsurface echo term are corrected from their heritage, which originated from passive remote sensing of whitecaps, and is improved for more accurate use in future lidar research. A corrected expression for specular and subsurface lidar return is presented. The previous formalism does not correctly address angular dependency of specular lidar return and overestimates the subsurface term by a factor ranging from 89% to 194% for a nadir pointing lidar. Suggestions for future improvements to the lidar equation are also presented.

  7. Airborne Lidar Simulator for the Lidar Surface Topography (LIST) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Anthony W.; Krainak, Michael A.; Abshire, James B.; Cavanaugh, John; Valett, Susan; Ramos-Izquierdo, Luis

    2010-01-01

    In 2007, the National Research Council (NRC) completed its first decadal survey for Earth science at the request of NASA, NOAA, and USGS. The Lidar Surface Topography (LIST) mission is one of fifteen missions recommended by NRC, whose primary objectives are to map global topography and vegetation structure at 5 m spatial resolution, and to acquire global surface height mapping within a few years. NASA Goddard conducted an initial mission concept study for the LIST mission in 2007, and developed the initial measurement requirements for the mission.

  8. Airborne Lidar Surface Topography (LIST) Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Anthony W.; Krainak, Michael A.; Harding, David J.; Abshire, James B.; Sun, Xiaoli; Cavanaugh, John; Valett, Susan; Ramos-Izquierdo, Luis; Winkert, Tom; Plants, Michael; hide

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we will discuss our development effort of an airborne instrument as a pathfinder for the Lidar Surface Technology (LIST) mission. This paper will discuss the system approach, enabling technologies, instrument concept and performance of the Airborne LIST Simulator (A-LISTS).

  9. Lidar Remote Sensing for Characterizing Forest Vegetation - Special Issue. Foreword

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Sorin C.; Nelson, Ross F.

    2011-01-01

    The Silvilaser 2009 conference held in College Station, Texas, USA, was the ninth conference in the Silvilaser series, which started in 2002 with the international workshop on using lidar (Light Detection and Ranging) for analyzing forest structure, held in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. Following the Canadian workshop, subsequent forestry-lidar conferences took place in Australia, Sweden, Germany, USA, Japan, Finland, and the United Kingdom (UK). By the time this Silvilaser 2009 special issue of PE&RS is published, the 10th international conference will have been held in Freiburg, Germany, and planning will be ongoing for the 11th meeting to take place in Tasmania, Australia, in October 2011. Papers presented at the 2005 conference held in Blacksburg, Virginia, USA, were assembled in a special issue of PE&RS published in December 2006. Other special issues resulting from previous conferences were published in journals such as the Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing (2003), the Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research (2004), and Japan s Journal of Forest Planning (2008). Given the conference history and the much longer record of publications on lidar applications for estimating forest biophysical parameters, which dates back to the early 1980s, we may consider lidar an established remote sensing technology for characterizing forest canopy structure and estimating forest biophysical parameters. Randy Wynne, a professor at Virginia Tech and the final keynote speaker at Silvilaser 2009, made the case that it was time to push 30 years of research into operations, along the lines of what has already been done to good effect in the Scandinavian countries. In Randy s words, it s time to "Just do it!" This special issue includes a selection of papers presented during the 2009 Silvilaser conference, which consisted of eight sections as follows: (1) biomass and carbon stock estimates, (2) tree species and forest type classification, (3) data fusion and integration, (4, 5

  10. Gas analysis within remote porous targets using LIDAR multi-scatter techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Z. G.; Lewander, M.; Grönlund, R.; Lundberg, H.; Svanberg, S.

    2008-11-01

    Light detection and ranging (LIDAR) experiments are normally pursued for range resolved atmospheric gas measurements or for analysis of solid target surfaces using fluorescence of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. In contrast, we now demonstrate the monitoring of free gas enclosed in pores of materials, subject to impinging laser radiation, employing the photons emerging back to the surface laterally of the injection point after penetrating the medium in heavy multiple scattering processes. The directly reflected light is blocked by a beam stop. The technique presented is a remote version of the newly introduced gas in scattering media absorption spectroscopy (GASMAS) technique, which so far was pursued with the injection optics and the detector in close contact with the sample. Feasibility measurements of LIDAR-GASMAS on oxygen in polystyrene foam were performed at a distance of 6 m. Multiple-scattering induced delays of the order of 50 ns, which corresponds to 15 m optical path length, were observed. First extensions to a range of 60 m are discussed. Remote observation of gas composition anomalies in snow using differential absorption LIDAR (DIAL) may find application in avalanche victim localization or for leak detection in snow-covered natural gas pipelines. Further, the techniques may be even more useful for short-range, non-intrusive GASMAS measurements, e.g., on packed food products.

  11. Tunable IR differential absorption lidar for remote sensing of chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Coorg R.; Kabro, Pierre; Mathur, Savyasachee L.

    1999-10-01

    Standoff sensors for rapid remote detection of chemical emissions from either clandestine chemical production sites, chemical and biological warfare agents, concealed internal combustion engine emissions or rocket propellants from missiles are required for several DoD applications. The differential absorption lidar (DIAL) operating in the infrared wavelengths has established itself as a very effective tool for rapidly detecting many of the chemicals, with sufficient sensitivity with a range of several kilometers. The wavelengths required for this task lie within the atmospheric window regions 3 to 5 micrometers and 8 to 12 micrometers . We are currently developing a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) tunable in the 3 to 5 micrometers range for detecting low concentrations of chemical species with high sensitivity (5 ppb) and accuracy (error measurements for greater than 5 km range. We have successfully established the feasibility of an innovative frequency agile laser source which is the crucial component of the infrared DIAL. A diode-pumped ytterbium YAG laser was built for pumping and rapidly tuning an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) over the mid-infra red region. Good performance (5 mJ/pulse) of the laser and low threshold wide infra red tuning of OPO (2.2 - 3.1 micrometers ) were demonstrated. The simulated performance of the topographical IR-DIAL showed that 5 ppb concentration can be measured at 5 km range with a 35 cm telescope.

  12. The emerging role of lidar remote sensing in coastal research and resource management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, J.C.; Purkis, S.J.

    2009-01-01

    Knowledge of coastal elevation is an essential requirement for resource management and scientific research. Recognizing the vast potential of lidar remote sensing in coastal studies, this Special Issue includes a collection of articles intended to represent the state-of-the-art for lidar investigations of nearshore submerged and emergent ecosystems, coastal morphodynamics, and hazards due to sea-level rise and severe storms. Some current applications for lidar remote sensing described in this Special Issue include bluegreen wavelength lidar used for submarine coastal benthic environments such as coral reef ecosystems, airborne lidar used for shoreline mapping and coastal change detection, and temporal waveform-resolving lidar used for vegetation mapping. ?? 2009 Coastal Education and Research Foundation.

  13. Lidar remote sensing of laser-induced incandescence on light absorbing particles in the atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miffre, Alain; Anselmo, Christophe; Geffroy, Sylvain; Fréjafon, Emeric; Rairoux, Patrick

    2015-02-09

    Carbon aerosol is now recognized as a major uncertainty on climate change and public health, and specific instruments are required to address the time and space evolution of this aerosol, which efficiently absorbs light. In this paper, we report an experiment, based on coupling lidar remote sensing with Laser-Induced-Incandescence (LII), which allows, in agreement with Planck's law, to retrieve the vertical profile of very low thermal radiation emitted by light-absorbing particles in an urban atmosphere over several hundred meters altitude. Accordingly, we set the LII-lidar formalism and equation and addressed the main features of LII-lidar in the atmosphere by numerically simulating the LII-lidar signal. We believe atmospheric LII-lidar to be a promising tool for radiative transfer, especially when combined with elastic backscattering lidar, as it may then allow a remote partitioning between strong/less light absorbing carbon aerosols.

  14. Remote Sensing of Complex Flows by Doppler Wind Lidar: Issues and Preliminary Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, Andrew [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Boquet, Matthieu [Leosphere, Orsay (France); Burin Des Roziers, Edward [UL International Gmbh, Freemont, CA (United States); Westerhellweg, Annette [UL International Gmbh, Freemont, CA (United States); Hofsass, Martin [Univ. of Stuttgart (Germany). Stuttgart Wind Energy; Klaas, Tobias [Fraunhofer Inst. for Wind Energy and Energy System Technology, Freiburg (Germany); Vogstad, Klaus [Meventus, Hamburg (Germany); Clive, Peter [Sgurr Energy, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Harris, Mike [ZephIR Limited, Kirkcudbrightshire (United Kingdom); Wylie, Scott [ZephIR Limited, Kirkcudbrightshire (United Kingdom); Osler, Evan [Renewable NRG Systems, Hinesburg, VT (United States); Banta, Bob [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Boulder, CO (United States); Choukulkar, Aditya [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Boulder, CO (United States); Lundquist, Julie [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Aitken, Matthew [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Remote sensing of winds using lidar has become popular and useful in the wind energy industry. Extensive experience has been gained with using lidar for applications including land-based and offshore resource assessment, plant operations, and turbine control. Prepared by members of International Energy Agency Task 32, this report describes the state of the art in the use of Doppler wind lidar for resource assessment in complex flows. The report will be used as input for future recommended practices on this topic.

  15. SURFACE FITTING FILTERING OF LIDAR POINT CLOUD WITH WAVEFORM INFORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Xing

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Full-waveform LiDAR is an active technology of photogrammetry and remote sensing. It provides more detailed information about objects along the path of a laser pulse than discrete-return topographic LiDAR. The point cloud and waveform information with high quality can be obtained by waveform decomposition, which could make contributions to accurate filtering. The surface fitting filtering method with waveform information is proposed to present such advantage. Firstly, discrete point cloud and waveform parameters are resolved by global convergent Levenberg Marquardt decomposition. Secondly, the ground seed points are selected, of which the abnormal ones are detected by waveform parameters and robust estimation. Thirdly, the terrain surface is fitted and the height difference threshold is determined in consideration of window size and mean square error. Finally, the points are classified gradually with the rising of window size. The filtering process is finished until window size is larger than threshold. The waveform data in urban, farmland and mountain areas from “WATER (Watershed Allied Telemetry Experimental Research” are selected for experiments. Results prove that compared with traditional method, the accuracy of point cloud filtering is further improved and the proposed method has highly practical value.

  16. Surface Fitting Filtering of LIDAR Point Cloud with Waveform Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, S.; Li, P.; Xu, Q.; Wang, D.; Li, P.

    2017-09-01

    Full-waveform LiDAR is an active technology of photogrammetry and remote sensing. It provides more detailed information about objects along the path of a laser pulse than discrete-return topographic LiDAR. The point cloud and waveform information with high quality can be obtained by waveform decomposition, which could make contributions to accurate filtering. The surface fitting filtering method with waveform information is proposed to present such advantage. Firstly, discrete point cloud and waveform parameters are resolved by global convergent Levenberg Marquardt decomposition. Secondly, the ground seed points are selected, of which the abnormal ones are detected by waveform parameters and robust estimation. Thirdly, the terrain surface is fitted and the height difference threshold is determined in consideration of window size and mean square error. Finally, the points are classified gradually with the rising of window size. The filtering process is finished until window size is larger than threshold. The waveform data in urban, farmland and mountain areas from "WATER (Watershed Allied Telemetry Experimental Research)" are selected for experiments. Results prove that compared with traditional method, the accuracy of point cloud filtering is further improved and the proposed method has highly practical value.

  17. Status and prospects for LiDAR remote sensing of forested ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. A. Wulder; N. C. Coops; A. T. Hudak; F. Morsdorf; R. Nelson; G. Newnham; M. Vastaranta

    2013-01-01

    The science associated with the use of airborne and satellite Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) to remotely sense forest structure has rapidly progressed over the past decade. LiDAR has evolved from being a poorly understood, potentially useful tool to an operational technology in a little over a decade, and these instruments have become a major success story in...

  18. Flexible High Energy Lidar Transmitter for Remote Gas and Wind Sensing, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Fibertek proposes a high energy and flexible operation 1570 nm pulsed lidar transmitter for airborne and space-based remote CO2 gas and doppler wind sensing. The...

  19. Merlin: an integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar for global methane remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, M.; Alpers, M.; Millet, B.; Ehret, G.; Flamant, P.

    2017-11-01

    The Methane Remote Sensing LIDAR Mission (MERLIN) is a joint French-German cooperation on the development, launch and operation of a climate monitoring satellite, executed by the French Space Agency CNES and the German Space Administration DLR.

  20. Structured nonlinear optical materials for LIDAR-based remote sensing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This NASA Phase II STTR effort will develop domain-engineered magnesium oxide doped lithium niobate (MgO:LN) for LIDAR-based remote sensing and communication...

  1. 2015 Oregon Department Forestry Lidar: Northwest OR

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — GeoTerra, Inc. was selected by Oregon Department of Forestry to provide Lidar remote sensing data including LAZ files of the classified Lidar points and surface...

  2. Remote sensing of forest structure using LiDAR and SAR

    OpenAIRE

    Balzter, Heiko; Burwell, Claire; Rowland, Clare S.; Tansey, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    Forests play an important role in the global climate system because they take up and store large amounts of carbon in the form of biomass. This paper examines techniques of retrieving structural forest information using the remote sensing techniques of LiDAR and SAR. Both sensing methods can provide information on the vertical structure of forests. Certain LiDAR instruments can record a vertical waveform of reflected radiation from the forest which can be related to vertical bioma...

  3. Status and prospects for LiDAR remote sensing of forested ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Wulder, Michael A; Coops, Nicholas C; Hudak, Andrew T; Morsdorf, Felix; Nelson, R; Newnham, G; Vastaranta, Mikko

    2013-01-01

    The science associated with the use of airborne and satellite Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) to remotely sense forest structure has rapidly progressed over the past decade. LiDAR has evolved from being a poorly understood, potentially useful tool to an operational technology in a little over a decade, and these instruments have become a major success story in terms of their application to the measurement, mapping, or monitoring of forests worldwide. Invented in 1960, the laser and, a sho...

  4. Lidar: range-resolved optical remote sensing of the atmosphere

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weitkamp, Claus; Walther, Herbert

    2005-01-01

    "Written by leading experts in optical radar, or lidar, this book brings all the recent practices up-to-date and covers a multitude of applications, from atmospheric sciences to environmental protection...

  5. Ground-based lidar remote sensing of contrails

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeger, H.; Freudenthaler, V.; Homburg, F.; Sussmann, R. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Atmosphaerische Umweltforschung (IFU), Garmisch-Partenkirchen (Germany)

    1997-12-01

    A ground-based scanning lidar system with built-in CCD camera has been developed to investigate aerosols and persistent contrails in air traffic corridors with respect to growth and microphysical and optical properties. By calibrating CCD camera images with lidar information the optical depth of larger areas of contrail cover within the 40 degree viewing angle of the camera can be determined. This technique has been extended to investigate contrails in AVHRR satellite images. (orig.) 144 figs., 42 tabs., 497 refs.

  6. CSIR-NLC mobile LIDAR for atmosphere remote sensing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sivakumar, V

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available structure and dynamics (including turbulence), trace constituents, aerosols, clouds as well as the boundary layer and other meteorological applications. LIDARs are used extensively all over the globe to study aerosols/clouds (Mie Scattering), atmospheric... Africa. 2Department of Geography, Geoinformatics and Meteorology, University of Pretoria, Lynwood Road, Pretoria 0002, South Africa. 3Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria 0001, South Africa. ABSTRACT A mobile LIDAR (LIght Detection...

  7. Estimating Turbulence Statistics and Parameters from Lidar Measurements. Remote Sensing Summer School

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sathe, Ameya

    , as well as experimental evidence from different measurement campaigns at a test center in Denmark. Several measurement configurations from the commercial and research lidars are described along with mathematical formulations of estimated turbulence statistics and parameters for the respective......This report is prepared as a written contribution to the Remote Sensing Summer School, that is organized by the Department of Wind Energy, Technical University of Denmark. It provides an overview of the state-of-the-art with regards to estimating turbulence statistics from lidar measurements...... configuration. The so-called velocity Azimuth Display (VAD) and the Doppler Beam Swinging (DBS) methods of post processing the lidar data are investigated in greater details, partly due to their wide use in commercial lidars. It is demonstrated that the VAD or DBS techniques result in introducing significant...

  8. Lidar Remote Sensing of Forests: New Instruments and Modeling Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Bruce D.

    2012-01-01

    Lidar instruments provide scientists with the unique opportunity to characterize the 3D structure of forest ecosystems. This information allows us to estimate properties such as wood volume, biomass density, stocking density, canopy cover, and leaf area. Structural information also can be used as drivers for photosynthesis and ecosystem demography models to predict forest growth and carbon sequestration. All lidars use time-in-flight measurements to compute accurate ranging measurements; however, there is a wide range of instruments and data types that are currently available, and instrument technology continues to advance at a rapid pace. This seminar will present new technologies that are in use and under development at NASA for airborne and space-based missions. Opportunities for instrument and data fusion will also be discussed, as Dr. Cook is the PI for G-LiHT, Goddard's LiDAR, Hyperspectral, and Thermal airborne imager. Lastly, this talk will introduce radiative transfer models that can simulate interactions between laser light and forest canopies. Developing modeling capabilities is important for providing continuity between observations made with different lidars, and to assist the design of new instruments. Dr. Bruce Cook is a research scientist in NASA's Biospheric Sciences Laboratory at Goddard Space Flight Center, and has more than 25 years of experience conducting research on ecosystem processes, soil biogeochemistry, and exchange of carbon, water vapor and energy between the terrestrial biosphere and atmosphere. His research interests include the combined use of lidar, hyperspectral, and thermal data for characterizing ecosystem form and function. He is Deputy Project Scientist for the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM); Project Manager for NASA s Carbon Monitoring System (CMS) pilot project for local-scale forest biomass; and PI of Goddard's LiDAR, Hyperspectral, and Thermal (G-LiHT) airborne imager.

  9. NASA's Space Lidar Measurements of Earth and Planetary Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abshire, James B.

    2010-01-01

    A lidar instrument on a spacecraft was first used to measure planetary surface height and topography on the Apollo 15 mission to the Moon in 1971, The lidar was based around a flashlamp-pumped ruby laser, and the Apollo 15-17 missions used them to make a few thousand measurements of lunar surface height from orbit. With the advent of diode pumped lasers in the late 1980s, the lifetime, efficiency, resolution and mass of lasers and space lidar all improved dramatically. These advances were utilized in NASA space missions to map the shape and surface topography of Mars with > 600 million measurements, demonstrate initial space measurements of the Earth's topography, and measured the detailed shape of asteroid. NASA's ICESat mission in Earth orbit just completed its polar ice measurement mission with almost 2 billion measurements of the Earth's surface and atmosphere, and demonstrated measurements to Antarctica and Greenland with a height resolution of a few em. Space missions presently in cruise phase and in operation include those to Mercury and a topographic mapping mission of the Moon. Orbital lidar also have been used in experiments to demonstrate laser ranging over planetary distances, including laser pulse transmission from Earth to Mars orbit. Based on the demonstrated value of the measurements, lidar is now the preferred measurement approach for many new scientific space missions. Some missions planned by NASA include a planetary mission to measure the shape and dynamics of Europa, and several Earth orbiting missions to continue monitoring ice sheet heights, measure vegetation heights, assess atmospheric CO2 concentrations, and to map the Earth surface topographic heights with 5 m spatial resolution. This presentation will give an overview of history, ongoing work, and plans for using space lidar for measurements of the surfaces of the Earth and planets.

  10. SF6 laser remote sensing by CO2 laser DIAL lidar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parvin, P.; Basam, Z.; Zamanipour, Z.; Kariminezhad, H.; Boyook, N.; Borna, F.; Azari, T.; Eshragi, N.; Ataran, A.; Ghods Ahmad Zadeh, R.

    2004-01-01

    A DIAL system using tunable CO 2 laser has been demonstrated practically for remote sensing of SF 6 components in Mashad Shahid Motahhari Research Complex. Non toxic components of SF 6 as a rare isotope is studied to calibrate the lidar function in several conditions. The whole system enables us to detect ppm amounts of chemical gases as well as pollutants and poisonous species

  11. Lidar remote sensing of above-ground biomass in three biomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael A. Lefsky; Warren B. Cohen; David J. Harding; Geoffrey G. Parkers; Steven A. Acker; S. Thomas. Gower

    2002-01-01

    Estimation of the amount of carbon stored in forests is a key challenge for understanding the global carbon cycle, one which remote sensing is expected to help address. However, estimation of carbon storage in moderate to high biomass forests is difficult for conventional optical and radar sensors. Lidar (light detection and ranging) instruments measure the vertical...

  12. Determining Surface Roughness in Urban Areas Using Lidar Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Donald

    2009-01-01

    An automated procedure has been developed to derive relevant factors, which can increase the ability to produce objective, repeatable methods for determining aerodynamic surface roughness. Aerodynamic surface roughness is used for many applications, like atmospheric dispersive models and wind-damage models. For this technique, existing lidar data was used that was originally collected for terrain analysis, and demonstrated that surface roughness values can be automatically derived, and then subsequently utilized in disaster-management and homeland security models. The developed lidar-processing algorithm effectively distinguishes buildings from trees and characterizes their size, density, orientation, and spacing (see figure); all of these variables are parameters that are required to calculate the estimated surface roughness for a specified area. By using this algorithm, aerodynamic surface roughness values in urban areas can then be extracted automatically. The user can also adjust the algorithm for local conditions and lidar characteristics, like summer/winter vegetation and dense/sparse lidar point spacing. Additionally, the user can also survey variations in surface roughness that occurs due to wind direction; for example, during a hurricane, when wind direction can change dramatically, this variable can be extremely significant. In its current state, the algorithm calculates an estimated surface roughness for a square kilometer area; techniques using the lidar data to calculate the surface roughness for a point, whereby only roughness elements that are upstream from the point of interest are used and the wind direction is a vital concern, are being investigated. This technological advancement will improve the reliability and accuracy of models that use and incorporate surface roughness.

  13. 2015 Oregon Department Forestry Lidar DEM: Northwest OR

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — GeoTerra, Inc. was selected by Oregon Department of Forestry to provide Lidar remote sensing data including LAZ files of the classified Lidar points and surface...

  14. Lidar Range-Resolved Optical Remote Sensing of the Atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Weitkamp, Claus

    2005-01-01

    Written by leading experts in optical radar, or lidar, this book brings all the recent practices up-to-date and covers a multitude of applications, from atmospheric sciences to environmental protection. Its broad cross-disciplinary scope should appeal to both the experienced scientist and the novice in the field. The Foreword is by one of the early pioneers in the area, Herbert Walther.

  15. Remote sensing systems – Platforms and sensors: Aerial, satellites, UAVs, optical, radar, and LiDAR: Chapter 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Sudhanshu S.; Rao, Mahesh N.; Thenkabail, Prasad S.; Fitzerald, James E.

    2015-01-01

    The American Society of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing defined remote sensing as the measurement or acquisition of information of some property of an object or phenomenon, by a recording device that is not in physical or intimate contact with the object or phenomenon under study (Colwell et al., 1983). Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI) in its geographic information system (GIS) dictionary defines remote sensing as “collecting and interpreting information about the environment and the surface of the earth from a distance, primarily by sensing radiation that is naturally emitted or reflected by the earth’s surface or from the atmosphere, or by sending signals transmitted from a device and reflected back to it (ESRI, 2014).” The usual source of passive remote sensing data is the measurement of reflected or transmitted electromagnetic radiation (EMR) from the sun across the electromagnetic spectrum (EMS); this can also include acoustic or sound energy, gravity, or the magnetic field from or of the objects under consideration. In this context, the simple act of reading this text is considered remote sensing. In this case, the eye acts as a sensor and senses the light reflected from the object to obtain information about the object. It is the same technology used by a handheld camera to take a photograph of a person or a distant scenic view. Active remote sensing, however, involves sending a pulse of energy and then measuring the returned energy through a sensor (e.g., Radio Detection and Ranging [RADAR], Light Detection and Ranging [LiDAR]). Thermal sensors measure emitted energy by different objects. Thus, in general, passive remote sensing involves the measurement of solar energy reflected from the Earth’s surface, while active remote sensing involves synthetic (man-made) energy pulsed at the environment and the return signals are measured and recorded.

  16. The Phil-Lidar 2 Program: National Resource Inventory of the Philippines Using LIDAR and Other Remotely Sensed Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, A. C.; Tamondong, A. M.; Perez, A. M. C.; Ang, M. R. C. O.; Paringit, E. C.

    2015-04-01

    The Philippines embarked on a nationwide mapping endeavour through the Disaster Risk and Exposure Assessment for Mitigation (DREAM) Program of the University of the Philippines and the Department of Science and Technology (DOST). The derived accurate digital terrain models (DTMs) are used in flood models to generate risk maps and early warning system. With the availability of LiDAR data sets, the Phil-LiDAR 2 program was conceptualized as complementary to existing programs of various national government agencies and to assist local government units. Phil-LiDAR 2 aims to provide an updated natural resource inventory as detailed as possible using LiDAR point clouds, LiDAR derivative products, orthoimages and other RS data. The program assesses the following natural resources over a period of three years from July 2014: agricultural, forest, coastal, water, and renewable energy. To date, methodologies for extracting features from LiDAR data sets have been developed. The methodologies are based on a combination of object-based image analysis, pixel-based image analysis, optimization of feature selection and parameter values, and field surveys. One of the features of the Phil-LiDAR 2 program is the involvement of fifteen (15) universities throughout the country. Most of these do not have prior experience in remote sensing and mapping. With such, the program has embarked on a massive training and mentoring program. The program is producing more than 200 young RS specialists who are protecting the environment through RS and other geospatial technologies. This paper presents the program, the methodologies so far developed, and the sample outputs.

  17. Use of Remotely Piloted Aircraft System and LiDAR for Alpine forested Landslide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgniet, Laurent; Lachenal, Philippe; Berger, Frédéric

    2017-04-01

    In the last decade Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS) technologies considerably evolved, improving flight stability, GPS positioning and payload. Recent researches shown that RPAS-SfM framework, combining high volumes data acquisition and fast treatments capacity, make it suitable for environmental monitoring. However, monitoring, in a short period, an active landslide with major land displacements in a context of unstable and vegetated mountainous area still represent a real challenge. In this study, we aimed at developing a reproducible and optimized cost-efficiency method to accurately survey active terrain movements. The combined use of two RPAS allows to i)better visualize at large scale (1km2) the phenomenon dimensions and velocity in order to ii) focus our efforts on a safe topographic and photogrammetric data acquisition. The study area is a re-activated landslide previously reported in 1966 by forest management services located near Beaufort in the French Alps. For six time steps between April and September 2017, we acquired aerial photos with two reflex camera (Visible and Near Infra-Red Bands) mounted on a hexacopter with a payload up to 4kg. A validation campaign with aerial LiDAR and Terrestrial Laser Scanner took place on June 2017. Comparison of the digital Surface models and orthophotos derived from RPAS flights gave satisfactory results. Spatial analysis in a GIS allowed a quantitative evaluation of heterogeneous behaviors and dynamic distributions of materials (mineral and vegetal) along the slope. Estimations of displaced volumes (500 000 m3) constitute a precious information for improving in emergency crisis the calibration of deposits place in order to avoid jam and flood on the road network. In this research, we demonstrate the feasibility of a repetitive RPAS based data acquisition method but some limitations still remain. Research efforts will now focus on DEM under vegetation cover determination combining RPAS adapted LiDAR, improved

  18. From LIDAR Scanning to 3d FEM Analysis for Complex Surface and Underground Excavations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, K.; Kemeny, J.

    2017-12-01

    Light detection and ranging (LIDAR) has been a prevalent remote-sensing technology applied in the geological fields due to its high precision and ease to use. One of the major applications is to use the detailed geometrical information of underground structures as a basis for the generation of three-dimensional numerical model that can be used in FEM analysis. To date, however, straightforward techniques in reconstructing numerical model from the scanned data of underground structures have not been well established or tested. In this paper, we propose a comprehensive approach integrating from LIDAR scanning to finite element numerical analysis, specifically converting LIDAR 3D point clouds of object containing complex surface geometry into finite element model. This methodology has been applied to the Kartchner Caverns in Arizona for the stability analysis. Numerical simulations were performed using the finite element code ABAQUS. The results indicate that the highlights of our technologies obtained from LIDAR is effective and provide reference for other similar engineering project in practice.

  19. Quantification of glacial and ground surface velocities from repeat terrestrial LiDAR scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzad, F.; Ehlers, T. A.

    2012-04-01

    Repeat terrestrial LiDAR scans of moving surfaces (e.g. around faults, glaciers, mass movements, etc.) collected at different times offer the opportunity to quantify surface velocities in high resolution. This study presents a new approach for quantifying surface velocities from remote sensing data. Emphasis is placed on the interpretation of terrestrial LiDAR grid point cloud (GPC) data, but the technique presented is also applicable to other (RASTER) remote sensing datasets. The method used consists of investigating two or more temporally variable GPCs referred as a raw and displaced/deformed scans. A user-defined grid is defined on the raw and deformed scans and the center point of each grid is identified. A search window size is determined for comparison between the two scans. Elevations in both scans are then converted to a reference elevation and a normalized cross correlation is applied between the images for pattern recognition. The focal points of the raw image and correlated deformed location are used to prepare an affine transformation for that grid. This procedure is applied on all the grids to prepare the spatial distribution of the affine transformation. Finally, the affine transformation is extended to calculate the horizontal components of surface deformation. These components are used to prepare the spatial distribution of the displacement distance and angle between each grid on each scan. The routine was applied to a series of synthetic (test) datasets and to repeat LiDAR scans (ILRIS-LR) of the Rhone glacier, Switzerland collected in August 2011. Results from the synthetic tests indicate the approach provides a robust reconstruction of spatially non-uniform velocity fields on scans with different surface characteristics. For the Rhone glacier data both temporal and spatial variations in surface velocities were recovered across a large portion of the glacier at centimeter scale. Temporal variations in the glacier surface velocity were resolved

  20. LIDAR and atmosphere remote sensing [DST Space Science Initiatives

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Venkataraman, S

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available .csir.co.za Signal to Noise Performance 20 25 30 35 40 H e i g h t [ k m ] Slide 13 © CSIR 2008 www.csir.co.za 0 5 10 15 1.E+02 1.E+04 1.E+06 1.E+08 1.E+10 Photons per second H e i g h t [ k m ] Preliminary... and particles attenuates the beam as it propagates • Fraction of energy is backscattered in the direction of the LiDAR system and is available for detection. …LiDAR Principle Slide 5 © CSIR 2008 www.csir.co.za Centre for Atmospheric...

  1. LiDAR remote sensing applied to forest resources assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández-Landa, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Disponer de información precisa y actualizada de inventario forestal es una pieza clave para mejorar la gestión forestal sostenible y para proponer y evaluar políticas de conservación de bosques que permitan la reducción de emisiones de carbono debidas a la deforestación y degradación forestal (REDD). En este sentido, la tecnología LiDAR ha demostrado ser una herramienta perfecta para caracterizar y estimar de forma continua y en áreas extensas la estructura del bosque y las principales vari...

  2. Advancing Atmosphere-Ocean Remote Sensing with Spaceborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostetler, C. A.; Behrenfeld, M. J.; Chepfer, H.; Hu, Y.; Hair, J. W.; Trepte, C. R.; Winker, D. M.; Ferrare, R. A.; Burton, S. P.; Scarino, A. J.; Powell, K. A.; Michaud, J.

    2016-12-01

    More than 1600 publications employing observations from the CALIOP lidar on CALIPSO testify to the value of spaceborne lidar for aerosol and cloud remote sensing. Recent publications have shown the value of CALIOP data for retrievals of key ocean carbon cycle stocks. In this presentation we focus on the advantages of a more advanced technique, High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL), for aerosol, cloud, and ocean remote sensing. An atmosphere-ocean optimized HSRL achieves greater accuracy over the standard backscatter lidar technique for retrievals of aerosol and cloud extinction and backscatter profiles, provides additional capability to retrieve aerosol and cloud microphysical parameters, and enables vertically-resolved characterization of scattering and absorption properties of suspended and dissolved materials in the ocean. Numerous publications highlight the synergy of coincident CALIOP and passive A-train observations for studies of aerosol-cloud radiative effects and cloud-climate feedback. Less appreciated is the complementarity that would exist between an optimized spaceborne lidar and passive ocean color. An optimized HSRL flown in formation with the Plankton, Aerosol, and ocean Ecosystem (PACE) mission would provide phytoplankton vertical distribution, which is needed for accurately estimating net primary productivity but absent in the PACE ocean color data. The HSRL would also provide data needed to improve atmospheric correction schemes in ocean color retrievals. Because lidar provides measurements both night and day, through tenuous clouds and aerosol layers, and in holes between clouds, the sampling achieved is highly complementary to passive radiometry, providing data in important high latitude regions where ocean color data are sparse or nonexistent. In this presentation we will discuss 1) relevant aerosol, cloud, and ocean retrievals from airborne HSRL field missions; 2) the advantages of an optimized spaceborne HSRL for aerosol, cloud, and ocean

  3. Developing a portable, autonomous aerosol backscatter lidar for network or remote operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. B. Strawbridge

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Lidar has the ability to detect the complex vertical structure of the atmosphere and can therefore identify the existence and extent of aerosols with high spatial and temporal resolution, making it well suited for understanding atmospheric dynamics and transport processes. Environment Canada has developed a portable, autonomous lidar system that can be monitored remotely and operated continuously except during precipitation events. The lidar, housed in a small trailer, simultaneously emits two wavelengths of laser light (1064 nm and 532 nm at energies of approximately 150 mJ/pulse/wavelength and detects the backscatter signal at 1064 nm and both polarizations at 532 nm. For laser energies of this magnitude, the challenge resides in designing a system that meets the airspace safety requirements for autonomous operations. Through the combination of radar technology, beam divergence, laser cavity interlocks and using computer log files, this risk was mitigated. A Continuum Inlite small footprint laser is the backbone of the system because of three design criteria: requiring infrequent flash lamp changes compared to previous Nd : YAG Q-switch lasers, complete software control capability and a built-in laser energy monitoring system. A computer-controlled interface was designed to monitor the health of the system, adjust operational parameters and maintain a climate-controlled environment. Through an Internet connection, it also transmitted the vital performance indicators and data stream to allow the lidar profile data for multiple instruments from near ground to 15 km, every 10 s, to be viewed, in near real-time via a website. The details of the system design and calibration will be discussed and the success of the instrument as tested within the framework of a national lidar network dubbed CORALNet (Canadian Operational Research Aerosol Lidar Network. In addition, the transport of a forest fire plume across the country will be shown as evidenced

  4. Lidar and Hyperspectral Remote Sensing for the Analysis of Coniferous Biomass Stocks and Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halligan, K. Q.; Roberts, D. A.

    2006-12-01

    Airborne lidar and hyperspectral data can improve estimates of aboveground carbon stocks and fluxes through their complimentary responses to vegetation structure and biochemistry. While strong relationships have been demonstrated between lidar-estimated vegetation structural parameters and field data, research is needed to explore the portability of these methods across a range of topographic conditions, disturbance histories, vegetation type and climate. Additionally, research is needed to evaluate contributions of hyperspectral data in refining biomass estimates and determination of fluxes. To address these questions we are a conducting study of lidar and hyperspectral remote sensing data across sites including coniferous forests, broadleaf deciduous forests and a tropical rainforest. Here we focus on a single study site, Yellowstone National Park, where tree heights, stem locations, above ground biomass and basal area were mapped using first-return small-footprint lidar data. A new method using lidar intensity data was developed for separating the terrain and vegetation components in lidar data using a two-scale iterative local minima filter. Resulting Digital Terrain Models (DTM) and Digital Canopy Models (DCM) were then processed to retrieve a diversity of vertical and horizontal structure metrics. Univariate linear models were used to estimate individual tree heights while stepwise linear regression was used to estimate aboveground biomass and basal area. Three small-area field datasets were compared for their utility in model building and validation of vegetation structure parameters. All structural parameters were linearly correlated with lidar-derived metrics, with higher accuracies obtained where field and imagery data were precisely collocated . Initial analysis of hyperspectral data suggests that vegetation health metrics including measures of live and dead vegetation and stress indices may provide good indicators of carbon flux by mapping vegetation

  5. Current Research in Lidar Technology Used for the Remote Sensing of Atmospheric Aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comerón, Adolfo; Muñoz-Porcar, Constantino; Rocadenbosch, Francesc; Rodríguez-Gómez, Alejandro; Sicard, Michaël

    2017-06-20

    Lidars are active optical remote sensing instruments with unique capabilities for atmospheric sounding. A manifold of atmospheric variables can be profiled using different types of lidar: concentration of species, wind speed, temperature, etc. Among them, measurement of the properties of aerosol particles, whose influence in many atmospheric processes is important but is still poorly stated, stands as one of the main fields of application of current lidar systems. This paper presents a review on fundamentals, technology, methodologies and state-of-the art of the lidar systems used to obtain aerosol information. Retrieval of structural (aerosol layers profiling), optical (backscatter and extinction coefficients) and microphysical (size, shape and type) properties requires however different levels of instrumental complexity; this general outlook is structured following a classification that attends these criteria. Thus, elastic systems (detection only of emitted frequencies), Raman systems (detection also of Raman frequency-shifted spectral lines), high spectral resolution lidars, systems with depolarization measurement capabilities and multi-wavelength instruments are described, and the fundamentals in which the retrieval of aerosol parameters is based is in each case detailed.

  6. Comparison of Surface Flow Features from Lidar-Derived Digital Elevation Models with Historical Elevation and Hydrography Data for Minnehaha County, South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppenga, Sandra K.; Worstell, Bruce B.; Stoker, Jason M.; Greenlee, Susan K.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has taken the lead in the creation of a valuable remote sensing product by incorporating digital elevation models (DEMs) derived from Light Detection and Ranging (lidar) into the National Elevation Dataset (NED), the elevation layer of 'The National Map'. High-resolution lidar-derived DEMs provide the accuracy needed to systematically quantify and fully integrate surface flow including flow direction, flow accumulation, sinks, slope, and a dense drainage network. In 2008, 1-meter resolution lidar data were acquired in Minnehaha County, South Dakota. The acquisition was a collaborative effort between Minnehaha County, the city of Sioux Falls, and the USGS Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center. With the newly acquired lidar data, USGS scientists generated high-resolution DEMs and surface flow features. This report compares lidar-derived surface flow features in Minnehaha County to 30- and 10-meter elevation data previously incorporated in the NED and ancillary hydrography datasets. Surface flow features generated from lidar-derived DEMs are consistently integrated with elevation and are important in understanding surface-water movement to better detect surface-water runoff, flood inundation, and erosion. Many topographic and hydrologic applications will benefit from the increased availability of accurate, high-quality, and high-resolution surface-water data. The remotely sensed data provide topographic information and data integration capabilities needed for meeting current and future human and environmental needs.

  7. FAST OCCLUSION AND SHADOW DETECTION FOR HIGH RESOLUTION REMOTE SENSING IMAGE COMBINED WITH LIDAR POINT CLOUD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Hu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The orthophoto is an important component of GIS database and has been applied in many fields. But occlusion and shadow causes the loss of feature information which has a great effect on the quality of images. One of the critical steps in true orthophoto generation is the detection of occlusion and shadow. Nowadays LiDAR can obtain the digital surface model (DSM directly. Combined with this technology, image occlusion and shadow can be detected automatically. In this paper, the Z-Buffer is applied for occlusion detection. The shadow detection can be regarded as a same problem with occlusion detection considering the angle between the sun and the camera. However, the Z-Buffer algorithm is computationally expensive. And the volume of scanned data and remote sensing images is very large. Efficient algorithm is another challenge. Modern graphics processing unit (GPU is much more powerful than central processing unit (CPU. We introduce this technology to speed up the Z-Buffer algorithm and get 7 times increase in speed compared with CPU. The results of experiments demonstrate that Z-Buffer algorithm plays well in occlusion and shadow detection combined with high density of point cloud and GPU can speed up the computation significantly.

  8. High stability lasers for lidar and remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heine, Frank; Lange, Robert; Seel, Stefan; Smutny, Berry

    2017-11-01

    Tesat-Spacecom is currently building a set flight models of frequency stabilized lasers for the ESA Missions AEOLUS and LTP. Lasers with low intensity noise in the kHz region and analogue tuning capabilities for frequency and output power are developed for the on board metrology of the LTP project, the precursor mission for LISA. This type of laser is internally stabilized by precise temperature control, approaching an ALLAN variance of 10-9 for 100 sec. It can be easily locked to external frequency references with LIDAR) is used as the master frequency reference and is stabilized internally by a optical cavity. It shows a 3* 10-11 Allan variance from time intervals 1 sec - 1000 sec. Furthermore it is step-tunable for calibration of the receiver instrument with a speed of GHz / sec by a digital command interface. Performance and environmental test results will be presented.

  9. Remote measurements of water pollution with a lidar polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheives, T. C.; Rouse, J. W., Jr.; Mayo, W. T., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    This paper examines a dual polarization laser backscatter system as a method for remote measurements of certain water quality parameters. Analytical models for describing the backscatter from turbid water and oil on turbid water are presented and compared with experimental data. Laser backscatter field measurements from natural waterways are presented and compared with simultaneous ground observations of the water quality parameters: turbidity, suspended solids, and transmittance. The results of this study show that the analytical models appear valid and that the sensor investigated is applicable to remote measurements of these water quality parameters and oil spills on water.-

  10. Cubesat Lidar Concepts for Ranging, Topology, Sample Capture, Surface, and Atmospheric Science

    OpenAIRE

    Storm, Mark; Cao, He; Albert, Michael; Engin, Doruk

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses progress Fibertek is making toward development of next-generation remote sensing lidar technology for cube, micro, and small satellite (smallsat) platforms. Our general finding is that small, relatively inexpensive cube/micro/small satellite lidars are feasible and that numerous applications are possible. Lidar is not traditionally thought of as being suitable for cube and smallsat applications because of the cost, complexity, mass, and power typically associated with ...

  11. Feasibility Study of Space-based CO2 Remote Sensing Using Pulsed 2-micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, U. N.; Refaat, T. F.; Ismail, S.; Davis, K. J.; Kawa, S. R.; Menzies, R. T.; Petros, M.; Yu, J.

    2016-12-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is recognized as the most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas. While CO2 concentration is rapidly increasing, understanding of the global carbon cycle remains a primary scientific challenge. This is mainly due to the lack of full characterization of CO2 sources and sinks. Quantifying the current global distribution of CO2 sources and sinks with sufficient accuracy and spatial resolution is a critical requirement for improving models of carbon-climate interactions and for attributing them to specific biogeochemical processes. This requires sustained atmospheric CO2 observations with high precision, and low bias for high accuracy, and spatial and temporal dense representation that cannot be fully realized with current CO2 observing systems, including existing satellite CO2 passive remote sensors. Progress in 2-micron instrument technologies, airborne testing, and system performance simulations indicates that the necessary lower tropospheric weighted CO2 measurements can be achieved from space using new high pulse energy 2-micron direct detection active remote sensing. Advantages of the CO2 active remote sensing include low bias measurements that are independent of sun light or Earth's radiation and day/night coverage over all latitudes and seasons. In addition, the direct detection system provides precise ranging with simultaneous measurement of aerosol and cloud distributions. The 2-micron active remote sensing offers strong CO2 absorption lines with optimum low tropospheric and near surface weighting. A feasibility study, including system optimization and sensitivity analysis of a space-based 2-micron pulsed IPDA lidar for CO2 measurement, is presented. This is based on the successful demonstration of the CO2 double-pulse IPDA lidar and the technology maturation of the triple-pulse IPDA lidar, currently under development at NASA Langley Research Center. Preliminary simulations indicate CO2 random measurement errors of 0.71, 0.35 and 0.13 ppm

  12. Fusion of Remote Sensing Methods, UAV Photogrammetry and LiDAR Scanning products for monitoring fluvial dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lendzioch, Theodora; Langhammer, Jakub; Hartvich, Filip

    2015-04-01

    Fusion of remote sensing data is a common and rapidly developing discipline, which combines data from multiple sources with different spatial and spectral resolution, from satellite sensors, aircraft and ground platforms. Fusion data contains more detailed information than each of the source and enhances the interpretation performance and accuracy of the source data and produces a high-quality visualisation of the final data. Especially, in fluvial geomorphology it is essential to get valuable images in sub-meter resolution to obtain high quality 2D and 3D information for a detailed identification, extraction and description of channel features of different river regimes and to perform a rapid mapping of changes in river topography. In order to design, test and evaluate a new approach for detection of river morphology, we combine different research techniques from remote sensing products to drone-based photogrammetry and LiDAR products (aerial LiDAR Scanner and TLS). Topographic information (e.g. changes in river channel morphology, surface roughness, evaluation of floodplain inundation, mapping gravel bars and slope characteristics) will be extracted either from one single layer or from combined layers in accordance to detect fluvial topographic changes before and after flood events. Besides statistical approaches for predictive geomorphological mapping and the determination of errors and uncertainties of the data, we will also provide 3D modelling of small fluvial features.

  13. Field evaluation of remote wind sensing technologies: Shore-based and buoy mounted LIDAR systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrington, Thomas [Stevens Inst. of Technology, Hoboken, NJ (United States)

    2017-11-03

    In developing a national energy strategy, the United States has a number of objectives, including increasing economic growth, improving environmental quality, and enhancing national energy security. Wind power contributes to these objectives through the deployment of clean, affordable and reliable domestic energy. To achieve U.S. wind generation objectives, the Wind and Water Power Program within the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) instituted the U.S. Offshore Wind: Removing Market Barriers Program in FY 2011. Accurate and comprehensive information on offshore wind resource characteristics across a range of spatial and temporal scales is one market barrier that needs to be addressed through advanced research in remote sensing technologies. There is a pressing need for reliable offshore wind-speed measurements to assess the availability of the potential wind energy resource in terms of power production and to identify any frequently occurring spatial variability in the offshore wind resource that may impact the operational reliability and lifetime of wind turbines and their components and to provide a verification program to validate the “bankability” of the output of these alternative technologies for use by finance institutions for the financing of offshore wind farm construction. The application of emerging remote sensing technologies is viewed as a means to cost-effectively meet the data needs of the offshore wind industry. In particular, scanning and buoy mounted LIDAR have been proposed as a means to obtain accurate offshore wind data at multiple locations without the high cost and regulatory hurdles associated with the construction of offshore meteorological towers. However; before these remote sensing technologies can be accepted the validity of the measured data must be evaluated to ensure their accuracy. The proposed research will establish a unique coastal ocean test-bed in the Mid-Atlantic for

  14. Remote sensing of coastal area near Bari : results of marine campaign performed with lidar fluorosensor; Rapporto sulla campagna di misura con LIDAR fluorosensore effettuate sul mare di Bari

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbini, R.; Colao, F.; Fantoni, R.; Palucci, A.; Ribezzo, S. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Rome (Italy). Dip. Innovazione

    1995-12-01

    The lidar fluorosensor, built at ENEA Frascati to remotely monitor the sea-water quality by collecting the water Raman back scattering and induced fluorescence from dispersed oils, suspended matter and chlorophyll, has been employed in a marine campaign in the southern Adriatic sea. To this aim, the lidar fluorosensor has been installed on a coastal guard boat and operated during the cruise. Extensive calibration measurements have been undertaken by using this system, both in laboratory and during the campaigns, to analyze sea water samples taken at several places along the Italian coasts. Absolute values of organic matter, chlorophyll concentrations have been obtained by calibrating the locally and remotely sensed lidar data with standard physical-chemical methods.

  15. Geospatial revolution and remote sensing LiDAR in Mesoamerican archaeology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Arlen F; Chase, Diane Z; Fisher, Christopher T; Leisz, Stephen J; Weishampel, John F

    2012-08-07

    The application of light detection and ranging (LiDAR), a laser-based remote-sensing technology that is capable of penetrating overlying vegetation and forest canopies, is generating a fundamental shift in Mesoamerican archaeology and has the potential to transform research in forested areas world-wide. Much as radiocarbon dating that half a century ago moved archaeology forward by grounding archaeological remains in time, LiDAR is proving to be a catalyst for an improved spatial understanding of the past. With LiDAR, ancient societies can be contextualized within a fully defined landscape. Interpretations about the scale and organization of densely forested sites no longer are constrained by sample size, as they were when mapping required laborious on-ground survey. The ability to articulate ancient landscapes fully permits a better understanding of the complexity of ancient Mesoamerican urbanism and also aids in modern conservation efforts. The importance of this geospatial innovation is demonstrated with newly acquired LiDAR data from the archaeological sites of Caracol, Cayo, Belize and Angamuco, Michoacán, Mexico. These data illustrate the potential of technology to act as a catalytic enabler of rapid transformational change in archaeological research and interpretation and also underscore the value of on-the-ground archaeological investigation in validating and contextualizing results.

  16. Remote measurement of atmospheric temperature profiles in clouds with rotational Raman lidar; Fernmessung atmosphaerischer Temperaturprofile in Wolken mit Rotations-Raman-Lidar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrendt, A. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Physikalische und Chemische Analytik

    2000-07-01

    The development of a lidar receiver for remote measurements of atmospheric temperature profiles with the rotational Raman method is described. By a new receiver concept, this instrument allowed for the first time remote temperature measurements without any perturbation by the presence of clouds up to a backscatter ratio of 45. In addition, high efficiency of the spectral separation of atmospheric backscatter signals leads to improved measurement resolution: the minimum integration time needed for a statistical uncertainty < {+-}1 K at, e.g., 10 km height and 960 m height resolution is only 5 minutes. The measurement range extends to over 45 km altitude. Results of field campaigns obtained with the instrument are presented and discussed. In winter 1997/98, the instrument was transferred with the GKSS Raman lidar to Esrange (67.9 N, 21.1 E) in northern Sweden, where pioneering remote measurements of local temperatures in orographically induced polar stratospheric clouds could be carried out. (orig.)

  17. Siberian lidar station: the basic complex of remote laser sounding of the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanovskii, O. A.; Matvienko, G. G.; Balin, Yu. S.; Bobrovnikov, S. M.; Nevzorov, A. V.

    2017-10-01

    The Siberian Lidar Station created at V.E. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics and operating in Tomsk (56.5° N, 85.0° E) is a unique atmospheric observatory. It combines up-to-date instruments for remote laser and passive sounding for the study of aerosol and cloud fields, air temperature and humidity, and ozone and gaseous components of the ozone cycles. In addition to controlling a wide range of atmospheric parameters, the observatory allows simultaneous monitoring of the atmosphere throughout the valuable altitude range 0-75 km. In this paper, the instruments and results received at the Station are described.

  18. Airborne Instrument Simulator for the Lidar Surface Topography (LIST) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Anthony W.; Krainak, Michael A.; Harding, David J.; Abshire, James B.; Sun, Xiaoli; Cavanaugh, John; Valett, Susan; Ramos-Izquierdo, Luis

    2010-01-01

    In 2007, the National Research Council (NRC) completed its first decadal survey for Earth science at the request of NASA, NOAA, and USGS. The Lidar Surface Topography (LIST) mission is one of fifteen missions recommended by NRC, whose primary objectives are to map global topography and vegetation structure at 5 m spatial resolution, and to acquire global coverage with a few years. NASA Goddard conducted an initial mission concept study for the LIST mission 2007, and developed the initial measurement requirements for the mission.

  19. Remote Sensing of Sonoran Desert Vegetation Structure and Phenology with Ground-Based LiDAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel B. Sankey

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Long-term vegetation monitoring efforts have become increasingly important for understanding ecosystem response to global change. Many traditional methods for monitoring can be infrequent and limited in scope. Ground-based LiDAR is one remote sensing method that offers a clear advancement to monitor vegetation dynamics at high spatial and temporal resolution. We determined the effectiveness of LiDAR to detect intra-annual variability in vegetation structure at a long-term Sonoran Desert monitoring plot dominated by cacti, deciduous and evergreen shrubs. Monthly repeat LiDAR scans of perennial plant canopies over the course of one year had high precision. LiDAR measurements of canopy height and area were accurate with respect to total station survey measurements of individual plants. We found an increase in the number of LiDAR vegetation returns following the wet North American Monsoon season. This intra-annual variability in vegetation structure detected by LiDAR was attributable to a drought deciduous shrub Ambrosia deltoidea, whereas the evergreen shrub Larrea tridentata and cactus Opuntia engelmannii had low variability. Benefits of using LiDAR over traditional methods to census desert plants are more rapid, consistent, and cost-effective data acquisition in a high-resolution, 3-dimensional context. We conclude that repeat LiDAR measurements can be an effective method for documenting ecosystem response to desert climatology and drought over short time intervals and at detailed-local spatial scale.

  20. Estimating terrestrial aboveground biomass estimation using lidar remote sensing: a meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolkos, S. G.; Goetz, S. J.; Dubayah, R.

    2012-12-01

    Estimating biomass of terrestrial vegetation is a rapidly expanding research area, but also a subject of tremendous interest for reducing carbon emissions associated with deforestation and forest degradation (REDD). The accuracy of biomass estimates is important in the context carbon markets emerging under REDD, since areas with more accurate estimates command higher prices, but also for characterizing uncertainty in estimates of carbon cycling and the global carbon budget. There is particular interest in mapping biomass so that carbon stocks and stock changes can be monitored consistently across a range of scales - from relatively small projects (tens of hectares) to national or continental scales - but also so that other benefits of forest conservation can be factored into decision making (e.g. biodiversity and habitat corridors). We conducted an analysis of reported biomass accuracy estimates from more than 60 refereed articles using different remote sensing platforms (aircraft and satellite) and sensor types (optical, radar, lidar), with a particular focus on lidar since those papers reported the greatest efficacy (lowest errors) when used in the a synergistic manner with other coincident multi-sensor measurements. We show systematic differences in accuracy between different types of lidar systems flown on different platforms but, perhaps more importantly, differences between forest types (biomes) and plot sizes used for field calibration and assessment. We discuss these findings in relation to monitoring, reporting and verification under REDD, and also in the context of more systematic assessment of factors that influence accuracy and error estimation.

  1. Space-Based CO2 Active Optical Remote Sensing using 2-μm Triple-Pulse IPDA Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Upendra; Refaat, Tamer; Ismail, Syed; Petros, Mulugeta

    2017-04-01

    Sustained high-quality column CO2 measurements from space are required to improve estimates of regional and global scale sources and sinks to attribute them to specific biogeochemical processes for improving models of carbon-climate interactions and to reduce uncertainties in projecting future change. Several studies show that space-borne CO2 measurements offer many advantages particularly over high altitudes, tropics and southern oceans. Current satellite-based sensing provides rapid CO2 monitoring with global-scale coverage and high spatial resolution. However, these sensors are based on passive remote sensing, which involves limitations such as full seasonal and high latitude coverage, poor sensitivity to the lower atmosphere, retrieval complexities and radiation path length uncertainties. CO2 active optical remote sensing is an alternative technique that has the potential to overcome these limitations. The need for space-based CO2 active optical remote sensing using the Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar has been advocated by the Advanced Space Carbon and Climate Observation of Planet Earth (A-Scope) and Active Sensing of CO2 Emission over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) studies in Europe and the USA. Space-based IPDA systems can provide sustained, high precision and low-bias column CO2 in presence of thin clouds and aerosols while covering critical regions such as high latitude ecosystems, tropical ecosystems, southern ocean, managed ecosystems, urban and industrial systems and coastal systems. At NASA Langley Research Center, technology developments are in progress to provide high pulse energy 2-μm IPDA that enables optimum, lower troposphere weighted column CO2 measurements from space. This system provides simultaneous ranging; information on aerosol and cloud distributions; measurements over region of broken clouds; and reduces influences of surface complexities. Through the continual support from NASA Earth Science Technology Office

  2. Assessment of lidar remote sensing capability of Raman water temperature from laboratory and field experiments (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josset, Damien B.; Hou, Weilin W.; Goode, Wesley; Matt, Silvia C.; Hu, Yongxiang

    2017-05-01

    Lidar remote sensing based on visible wavelength is one of the only way to penetrate the water surface and to obtain range resolved information of the ocean surface mixed layer at the synoptic scale. Accurate measurement of the mixed layer properties is important for ocean weather forecast and to assist the optimal deployment of military assets. Turbulence within the mixed layer also plays an important role in climate variability as it also influences ocean heat storage and algae photosynthesis (Sverdrup 1953, Behrenfeld 2010). As of today, mixed layer depth changes are represented in the models through various parameterizations constrained mostly by surface properties like wind speed, surface salinity and sea surface temperature. However, cooling by wind and rain can create strong gradients (0.5C) of temperature between the submillimeter surface layer and the subsurface layer (Soloviev and Lukas, 1997) which will manifest itself as a low temperature bias in the observations. Temperature and salinity profiles are typically used to characterize the mixed layer variability (de Boyer Montégut et al. 2004) and are both key components of turbulence characterization (Hou 2009). Recently, several research groups have been investigating ocean temperature profiling with laser remote sensing based either on Brillouin (Fry 2012, Rudolf and Walther 2014) or Raman scattering (Artlett and Pask 2015, Lednev et al. 2016). It is the continuity of promising research that started decades ago (Leonard et al. 1979, Guagliardo and Dufilho 1980, Hirschberg et al. 1984) and can benefit from the current state of laser and detector technology. One aspect of this research that has not been overlooked (Artlett and Pask 2012) but has yet to be revisited is the impact of temperature on vibrational Raman polarization (Chang and Young, 1972). The TURBulence Ocean Lidar is an experimental system, aimed at characterizing underwater turbulence by examining various Stokes parameters. Its

  3. Remote sensing of land surface phenology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, G.A.; Brown, Jesslyn F.

    2014-01-01

    Remote sensing of land-surface phenology is an important method for studying the patterns of plant and animal growth cycles. Phenological events are sensitive to climate variation; therefore phenology data provide important baseline information documenting trends in ecology and detecting the impacts of climate change on multiple scales. The USGS Remote sensing of land surface phenology program produces annually, nine phenology indicator variables at 250 m and 1,000 m resolution for the contiguous U.S. The 12 year archive is available at http://phenology.cr.usgs.gov/index.php.

  4. IceBridge UAF Lidar Profiler L1B Geolocated Surface Elevation Triplets

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA IceBridge UAF Lidar Profiler L1B Geolocated Surface Elevation Triplets data set contains surface profiles of Alaska Glaciers acquired using the airborne...

  5. Analyzing Glacier Surface Motion Using LiDAR Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer W. Telling

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding glacier motion is key to understanding how glaciers are growing, shrinking, and responding to changing environmental conditions. In situ observations are often difficult to collect and offer an analysis of glacier surface motion only at a few discrete points. Using light detection and ranging (LiDAR data collected from surveys over six glaciers in Greenland and Antarctica, particle image velocimetry (PIV was applied to temporally-spaced point clouds to detect and measure surface motion. The type and distribution of surface features, surface roughness, and spatial and temporal resolution of the data were all found to be important factors, which limited the use of PIV to four of the original six glaciers. The PIV results were found to be in good agreement with other, widely accepted, measurement techniques, including manual tracking and GPS, and offered a comprehensive distribution of velocity data points across glacier surfaces. For three glaciers in Taylor Valley, Antarctica, average velocities ranged from 0.8–2.1 m/year. For one glacier in Greenland, the average velocity was 22.1 m/day (8067 m/year.

  6. Application of Lidar remote sensing to the estimation of forest canopy and stand structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefsky, Michael Andrew

    A new remote sensing instrument, SLICER (Scanning Lidar Imager of Canopies by Echo Recovery), has been applied to the problem of remote sensing the canopy and stand structure of two groups of deciduous forests, Tulip Poplar-Oak stands in the vicinity of Annapolis, MD. and bottomland hardwood stands near Williamston, NC. The ability of the SLICER instrument to remotely sense the vertical distribution of canopy structure (Canopy Height Profile), bulk canopy transmittance, and several indices of canopy height has been successfully validated using twelve stands with coincident field and SLICER estimates of canopy structure. Principal components analysis has been applied to canopy height profiles from both field sites, and three significant factors were identified, each closely related to the amount of foliage in a recognizable layer of the forest, either understory, midstory, or overstory. The distribution of canopy structure to these layers is significantly correlated with the size and number of stems supporting them. The same layered structure was shown to apply to both field and SLICER remotely sensed canopy height profiles, and to apply to SLICER remotely sensed canopy profiles from both the bottomland hardwood stands in the coastal plain of North Carolina, and to mesic Tulip-Poplars stands in the upland coastal plain of Maryland. Linear regressions have demonstrated that canopy and stand structure are correlated to both a statistically significant and useful degree. Stand age and stem density is more highly correlated to stand height, while stand basal area and aboveground biomass are more closely related to a new measure of canopy structure, the quadratic mean canopy height. A geometric model of canopy structure has been shown to explain the differing relationships between canopy structure and stand basal area for stands of Eastern Deciduous Forest and Douglas Fir Forest.

  7. Remote surface testing and inspection vehicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyde, E.A.; Goldsmith, H.A.; Proudlove, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    A remotely controlled vehicle capable of roving over the outer surface of a nuclear reactor primary vessel carrying inspection instrumentation. The vehicle comprises an elongate bridge having a pair of suction support pads. Each pad carries gas thrusters for acting in opposition to the suction effort thereby to reduce adherence of the pads and enable displacement of the vehicle over the surface. The vehicle is supported by a services conducting umbilical. (author)

  8. Differential absorption lidar CO2 laser system for remote sensing of TATP related gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Avishekh; Clark, C Douglas; Sigman, Michael; Killinger, Dennis K

    2009-02-01

    A CW tunable 10.6 microm CO(2) laser differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system has been developed, for the first time to our knowledge, for the remote sensing of triacetone triperoxide (TATP) gas vapors, which have strong absorption lines at several wavelengths, including 3.3, 8.3, and 10.6 microm. The DIAL laser beam was transmitted through an enclosed absorption cell containing TATP or SF(6), and backscattered returns were measured from a retroreflector array target at ranges of 5-100 m. DIAL sensitivity for the detection of TATP was about 0.5 ng/microl [52 parts in 10(6)(ppm)] for a 0.3 m path.

  9. MULTI-SOURCE HIERARCHICAL CONDITIONAL RANDOM FIELD MODEL FOR FEATURE FUSION OF REMOTE SENSING IMAGES AND LIDAR DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Zhang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Feature fusion of remote sensing images and LiDAR points cloud data, which have strong complementarity, can effectively play the advantages of multi-class features to provide more reliable information support for the remote sensing applications, such as object classification and recognition. In this paper, we introduce a novel multi-source hierarchical conditional random field (MSHCRF model to fuse features extracted from remote sensing images and LiDAR data for image classification. Firstly, typical features are selected to obtain the interest regions from multi-source data, then MSHCRF model is constructed to exploit up the features, category compatibility of images and the category consistency of multi-source data based on the regions, and the outputs of the model represents the optimal results of the image classification. Competitive results demonstrate the precision and robustness of the proposed method.

  10. Reducing classification error of grassland overgrowth by combing low-density lidar acquisitions and optical remote sensing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkänen, T. P.; Käyhkö, N.

    2017-08-01

    Mapping structural changes in vegetation dynamics has, for a long time, been carried out using satellite images, orthophotos and, more recently, airborne lidar acquisitions. Lidar has established its position as providing accurate material for structure-based analyses but its limited availability, relatively short history, and lack of spectral information, however, are generally impeding the use of lidar data for change detection purposes. A potential solution in respect of detecting both contemporary vegetation structures and their previous trajectories is to combine lidar acquisitions with optical remote sensing data, which can substantially extend the coverage, span and spectral range needed for vegetation mapping. In this study, we tested the simultaneous use of a single low-density lidar data set, a series of Landsat satellite frames and two high-resolution orthophotos to detect vegetation succession related to grassland overgrowth, i.e. encroachment of woody plants into semi-natural grasslands. We built several alternative Random Forest models with different sets of variables and tested the applicability of respective data sources for change detection purposes, aiming at distinguishing unchanged grassland and woodland areas from overgrown grasslands. Our results show that while lidar alone provides a solid basis for indicating structural differences between grassland and woodland vegetation, and orthophoto-generated variables alone are better in detecting successional changes, their combination works considerably better than its respective parts. More specifically, a model combining all the used data sets reduces the total error from 17.0% to 11.0% and omission error of detecting overgrown grasslands from 56.9% to 31.2%, when compared to model constructed solely based on lidar data. This pinpoints the efficiency of the approach where lidar-generated structural metrics are combined with optical and multitemporal observations, providing a workable framework to

  11. LiDAR Relative Reflectivity Surface (2011) for the St. Thomas East End Reserve, St. Thomas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a LiDAR (Light Detection & Ranging) 0.3x0.3 meter resolution relative seafloor reflectivity surface for the St. Thomas East End Reserve...

  12. Dimensionless parameterization of lidar for laser remote sensing of the atmosphere and its application to systems with SiPM and PMT detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agishev, Ravil; Comerón, Adolfo; Rodriguez, Alejandro; Sicard, Michaël

    2014-05-20

    In this paper, we show a renewed approach to the generalized methodology for atmospheric lidar assessment, which uses the dimensionless parameterization as a core component. It is based on a series of our previous works where the problem of universal parameterization over many lidar technologies were described and analyzed from different points of view. The modernized dimensionless parameterization concept applied to relatively new silicon photomultiplier detectors (SiPMs) and traditional photomultiplier (PMT) detectors for remote-sensing instruments allowed predicting the lidar receiver performance with sky background available. The renewed approach can be widely used to evaluate a broad range of lidar system capabilities for a variety of lidar remote-sensing applications as well as to serve as a basis for selection of appropriate lidar system parameters for a specific application. Such a modernized methodology provides a generalized, uniform, and objective approach for evaluation of a broad range of lidar types and systems (aerosol, Raman, DIAL) operating on different targets (backscatter or topographic) and under intense sky background conditions. It can be used within the lidar community to compare different lidar instruments.

  13. Determining the Center Path of Ground Surface LIDAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    warfighter physiology and performance experiments carried out using the trail despite recent renovations. 2 INTRODUCTION The main...during analysis of human physiologic data gathered as test volunteers traversed the trail. Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) surveying equipment...to right-left bias in the LIDAR data or vegetation ). Any asymmetry in the collected data will cause the minimum rectangle-based method to create a

  14. Modeling plant composition as community continua in a forest landscape with LiDAR and hyperspectral remote sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkenberg, C R; Peet, R K; Urban, D L; Song, C

    2018-01-01

    In light of the need to operationalize the mapping of forest composition at landscape scales, this study uses multi-scale nested vegetation sampling in conjunction with LiDAR-hyperspectral remotely sensed data from the G-LiHT airborne sensor to map vascular plant compositional turnover in a compositionally and structurally complex North Carolina Piedmont forest. Reflecting a shift in emphasis from remotely sensing individual crowns to detecting aggregate optical-structural properties of forest stands, predictive maps reflect the composition of entire vascular plant communities, inclusive of those species smaller than the resolution of the remotely sensed imagery, intertwined with proximate taxa, or otherwise obscured from optical sensors by dense upper canopies. Stand-scale vascular plant composition is modeled as community continua: where discrete community-unit classes at different compositional resolutions provide interpretable context for continuous gradient maps that depict n-dimensional compositional complexity as a single, consistent RGB color combination. In total, derived remotely sensed predictors explain 71%, 54%, and 48% of the variation in the first three components of vascular plant composition, respectively. Among all remotely sensed environmental gradients, topography derived from LiDAR ground returns, forest structure estimated from LiDAR all returns, and morphological-biochemical traits determined from hyperspectral imagery each significantly correspond to the three primary axes of floristic composition in the study site. Results confirm the complementarity of LiDAR and hyperspectral sensors for modeling the environmental gradients constraining landscape turnover in vascular plant composition and hold promise for predictive mapping applications spanning local land management to global ecosystem modeling. © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  15. Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) From Space - Laser Altimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    Light detection and ranging, or lidar, is like radar but atoptical wavelengths. The principle of operation and theirapplications in remote sensing are similar. Lidars havemany advantages over radars in instrument designs andapplications because of the much shorter laser wavelengthsand narrower beams. The lidar transmitters and receiveroptics are much smaller than radar antenna dishes. Thespatial resolution of lidar measurement is much finer thanthat of radar because of the much smaller footprint size onground. Lidar measurements usually give a better temporalresolution because the laser pulses can be much narrowerthan radio frequency (RF) signals. The major limitation oflidar is the ability to penetrate clouds and ground surfaces.

  16. Remote sensing of channels and riparian zones with a narrow-beam aquatic-terrestrial LIDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jim McKean; Dave Nagel; Daniele Tonina; Philip Bailey; Charles Wayne Wright; Carolyn Bohn; Amar Nayegandhi

    2009-01-01

    The high-resolution Experimental Advanced Airborne Research LIDAR (EAARL) is a new technology for cross-environment surveys of channels and floodplains. EAARL measurements of basic channel geometry, such as wetted cross-sectional area, are within a few percent of those from control field surveys. The largest channel mapping errors are along stream banks. The LIDAR data...

  17. Remote wind sensing with a CW diode laser lidar beyond the coherence regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Qi; Rodrigo, Peter John; Pedersen, Christian

    2014-01-01

    optical designs but different laser linewidths. While one system was operating within the coherence regime, the other was measuring at least 2.4 times the coherence range. The probing distance of both lidars is 85 m and the radial wind speed correlation was measured to be r2=0.965 between the two lidars......We experimentally demonstrate for the first time (to our knowledge) a coherent CW lidar system capable of wind speed measurement at a probing distance beyond the coherence regime of the light source. A side-by-side wind measurement was conducted on the field using two lidar systems with identical...... at a sampling rate of 2 Hz. Based on our experimental results, we describe a practical guideline for designing a wind lidar operating beyond the coherence regime....

  18. Integration of TerraSAR-X, RapidEye and airborne lidar for remote sensing of intertidal bedforms on the upper flats of Norderney (German Wadden Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolph, Winny; Jung, Richard; Schmidt, Alena; Ehlers, Manfred; Heipke, Christian; Bartholomä, Alexander; Farke, Hubert

    2017-04-01

    The Wadden Sea is a large coastal transition area adjoining the southern North Sea uniting ecological key functions with an important role in coastal protection. The region is strictly protected by EU directives and national law and is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, requiring frequent quality assessments and regular monitoring. In 2014 an intertidal bedform area characterised by alternating crests and water-covered troughs on the tidal flats of the island of Norderney (German Wadden Sea sector) was chosen to test different remote sensing methods for habitat mapping: airborne lidar, satellite-based radar (TerraSAR-X) and electro-optical sensors (RapidEye). The results revealed that, although sensitive to different surface qualities, all sensors were able to image the bedforms. A digital terrain model generated from the lidar data shows crests and slopes of the bedforms with high geometric accuracy in the centimetre range, but high costs limit the operation area. TerraSAR-X data enabled identifying the positions of the bedforms reflecting the residual water in the troughs also with a high resolution of up to 1.1 m, but with larger footprints and much higher temporal availability. RapidEye data are sensitive to differences in sediment moisture employed to identify crest areas, slopes and troughs, with high spatial coverage but the lowest resolution (6.5 m). Monitoring concepts may differ in their remote sensing requirements regarding areal coverage, spatial and temporal resolution, sensitivity and geometric accuracy. Also financial budgets limit the selection of sensors. Thus, combining differing assets into an integrated concept of remote sensing contributes to solving these issues.

  19. Triple-Pulsed Two-Micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar: A New Active Remote Sensing Capability with Path to Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Refaat, Tamer F.; Petros, Mulugeta; Yu, Jirong

    2015-01-01

    The two-micron wavelength is suitable for monitoring atmospheric water vapor and carbon dioxide, the two most dominant greenhouse gases. Recent advances in 2-micron laser technology paved the way for constructing state-of-the-art lidar transmitters for active remote sensing applications. In this paper, a new triple-pulsed 2-micron integrated path differential absorption lidar is presented. This lidar is capable of measuring either two species or single specie with two different weighting functions, simultaneously and independently. Development of this instrument is conducted at NASA Langley Research Center. Instrument scaling for projected future space missions will be discussed.

  20. Towards Camera-LIDAR Fusion-Based Terrain Modelling for Planetary Surfaces: Review and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaukat, Affan; Blacker, Peter C; Spiteri, Conrad; Gao, Yang

    2016-11-20

    In recent decades, terrain modelling and reconstruction techniques have increased research interest in precise short and long distance autonomous navigation, localisation and mapping within field robotics. One of the most challenging applications is in relation to autonomous planetary exploration using mobile robots. Rovers deployed to explore extraterrestrial surfaces are required to perceive and model the environment with little or no intervention from the ground station. Up to date, stereopsis represents the state-of-the art method and can achieve short-distance planetary surface modelling. However, future space missions will require scene reconstruction at greater distance, fidelity and feature complexity, potentially using other sensors like Light Detection And Ranging (LIDAR). LIDAR has been extensively exploited for target detection, identification, and depth estimation in terrestrial robotics, but is still under development to become a viable technology for space robotics. This paper will first review current methods for scene reconstruction and terrain modelling using cameras in planetary robotics and LIDARs in terrestrial robotics; then we will propose camera-LIDAR fusion as a feasible technique to overcome the limitations of either of these individual sensors for planetary exploration. A comprehensive analysis will be presented to demonstrate the advantages of camera-LIDAR fusion in terms of range, fidelity, accuracy and computation.

  1. Towards Camera-LIDAR Fusion-Based Terrain Modelling for Planetary Surfaces: Review and Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Affan Shaukat

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, terrain modelling and reconstruction techniques have increased research interest in precise short and long distance autonomous navigation, localisation and mapping within field robotics. One of the most challenging applications is in relation to autonomous planetary exploration using mobile robots. Rovers deployed to explore extraterrestrial surfaces are required to perceive and model the environment with little or no intervention from the ground station. Up to date, stereopsis represents the state-of-the art method and can achieve short-distance planetary surface modelling. However, future space missions will require scene reconstruction at greater distance, fidelity and feature complexity, potentially using other sensors like Light Detection And Ranging (LIDAR. LIDAR has been extensively exploited for target detection, identification, and depth estimation in terrestrial robotics, but is still under development to become a viable technology for space robotics. This paper will first review current methods for scene reconstruction and terrain modelling using cameras in planetary robotics and LIDARs in terrestrial robotics; then we will propose camera-LIDAR fusion as a feasible technique to overcome the limitations of either of these individual sensors for planetary exploration. A comprehensive analysis will be presented to demonstrate the advantages of camera-LIDAR fusion in terms of range, fidelity, accuracy and computation.

  2. Development of the Philippine Hydrologic Dataset (PHD) from LiDAR and other remotely-sensed data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, A. M. C.; Gaspa, M. C.; Aloc, D. S.; Mahor, M. A. P.; Gonzalez, K. A. C.; Borlongan, N. J. B.; De La Cruz, R. M.; Olfindo, N. T.; Blanco, A. C.

    2015-10-01

    Water resource monitoring and management has been an important concern in the Philippines, considering that the country is archipelagic in nature and is exposed to a lot of disasters imposed by the global effects of climate change. The design and implementation of an effective management scheme relies heavily on accurate, complete, and updated water resource inventories, usually in the form of digital maps and geodatabases. With the aim of developing a detailed and comprehensive database of all water resources in the Philippines, the 3-year project "Development of the Philippine Hydrologic Dataset (PHD) for Watersheds from LiDAR Surveys" under the Phil-LiDAR 2 Program (National Resource Inventory), has been initiated by the University of the Philippines Diliman (UPD) and the Department of Science and Technology (DOST). Various workflows has already been developed to extract inland hydrologic features in the Philippines using accurate Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) and LiDAR point cloud data obtained through other government-funded programs such as Disaster Risk and Exposure Assessment for Mitigation (DREAM) and Phil-LiDAR 1, supplemented with other remotely-sensed imageries and ancillary information from Local Government Units (LGUs) and National Government Agencies (NGAs). The methodologies implemented are mainly combinations of object-based image analysis, pixel-based image analysis, modeling, and field surveys. This paper presents the PHD project, the methodologies developed, and some sample outputs produced.

  3. A Compact Remote Sensing Lidar for High Resolution Measurements of Methane

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — • Develop the technology for a compact, space-qualifiable laser transmitter for a lidar operating at 1.65 µ to enable Earth observation CH4 measurements. • Reduce...

  4. High Speed Frequency Locking Module for Lidar Based Remote Sensing Systems, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A fundamental requirement for all Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) systems is wavelength switching of the probe laser on and off of an absorption line of the...

  5. Evaluation of Airborne Lidar Elevation Surfaces for Propagation of Coastal Inundation: The Importance of Hydrologic Connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Poppenga

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Detailed information about coastal inundation is vital to understanding dynamic and populated areas that are impacted by storm surge and flooding. To understand these natural hazard risks, lidar elevation surfaces are frequently used to model inundation in coastal areas. A single-value surface method is sometimes used to inundate areas in lidar elevation surfaces that are below a specified elevation value. However, such an approach does not take into consideration hydrologic connectivity between elevation grids cells resulting in inland areas that should be hydrologically connected to the ocean, but are not. Because inland areas that should drain to the ocean are hydrologically disconnected by raised features in a lidar elevation surface, simply raising the water level to propagate coastal inundation will lead to inundation uncertainties. We took advantage of this problem to identify hydrologically disconnected inland areas to point out that they should be considered for coastal inundation, and that a lidar-based hydrologic surface should be developed with hydrologic connectivity prior to inundation analysis. The process of achieving hydrologic connectivity with hydrologic-enforcement is not new, however, the application of hydrologically-enforced lidar elevation surfaces for improved coastal inundation mapping as approached in this research is innovative. In this article, we propagated a high-resolution lidar elevation surface in coastal Staten Island, New York to demonstrate that inland areas lacking hydrologic connectivity to the ocean could potentially be included in inundation delineations. For inland areas that were hydrologically disconnected, we evaluated if drainage to the ocean was evident, and calculated an area exceeding 11 ha (~0.11 km2 that could be considered in inundation delineations. We also assessed land cover for each inland area to determine the type of physical surfaces that would be potentially impacted if the inland areas

  6. LiDAR Relative Reflectivity Surface (2011) for Fish Bay, St. John

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a LiDAR (Light Detection & Ranging) 0.3x0.3 meter resolution relative seafloor reflectivity surface for Fish Bay, St. John in the U.S....

  7. LiDAR Relative Reflectivity Surface (2011) for Coral Bay, St. John

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a LiDAR (Light Detection & Ranging) 0.3x0.3 meter resolution relative seafloor reflectivity surface for Coral Bay, St. John in the U.S....

  8. A comparison of two open source LiDAR surface classification algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    With the progression of LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) towards a mainstream resource management tool, it has become necessary to understand how best to process and analyze the data. While most ground surface identification algorithms remain proprietary and have high purchase costs; a few are op...

  9. A comparison of two open source LiDAR surface classification algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade T. Tinkham; Hongyu Huang; Alistair M.S. Smith; Rupesh Shrestha; Michael J. Falkowski; Andrew T. Hudak; Timothy E. Link; Nancy F. Glenn; Danny G. Marks

    2011-01-01

    With the progression of LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) towards a mainstream resource management tool, it has become necessary to understand how best to process and analyze the data. While most ground surface identification algorithms remain proprietary and have high purchase costs; a few are openly available, free to use, and are supported by published results....

  10. Results from the search-lidar demonstrator project for detection of small Sea-Surface targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel, J.C. van den; Putten, F.J.M. van; Cohen, L.H.; Kemp, R.A.W.; Franssen, G.C.

    2009-01-01

    Coastal surveillance and naval operations in the littoral both have to deal with the threat of small sea-surface targets. These targets have a low radar cross-section and a low velocity that makes them hard to detect by radar. Typical threats include jet skis, FIAC's, and speedboats. Previous lidar

  11. Electrostatic dust detection on remote surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voinier, C.; Skinner, C.H.; Roquemore, A.L.

    2005-01-01

    The inventory of dust in next-step magnetic fusion devices will be regulated for safety reasons, however diagnostics to measure in-vessel dust are still in their infancy. Advances in dust particle detection on remote surfaces are reported. Grids of interlocking circuit traces with spacing in the range 125-25 μm were biased to 30 V. Impinging dust creates a short circuit and the resulting current pulse was recorded. The detector response was measured with particles scraped from a carbon fiber composite tile and sorted by size category. The finest 25 μm grid showed a sensitivity more than an order of magnitude higher than the 125 μm grid. The response to the finest particle categories (5-30 μm) was two orders of magnitude higher than the largest (125-250 μm) category. Longer duration current pulses were observed from the coarser particles. The results indicate a detection threshold for fine particles below 1 μg/cm 2

  12. Specular and diffuse object extraction from a LiDAR derived Digital Surface Model (DSM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saraf, N M; Hamid, J R A; Kamaruddin, M H

    2014-01-01

    This paper intents to investigate the indifferent behaviour quantitatively of target objects of interest due to specular and diffuse reflectivity based on generated LiDAR DSM of the study site in Ampang, Kuala Lumpur. The LiDAR data to be used was initially checked for its reliability and accuracy. The point cloud LiDAR data was converted to raster to allow grid analysis of the next process of generating the DSM and DTM. Filtering and masking were made removing the features of interest (i.e. building and tree) and other unwanted above surface features. A normalised DSM and object segmentation approach were conducted on the trees and buildings separately. Error assessment and findings attained were highlighted and documented. The result of LiDAR verification certified that the data is reliable and useable. The RMSE obtained is within the tolerance value of horizontal and vertical accuracy (x, y, z) i.e. 0.159 m, 0.211 m 0.091 m respectively. Building extraction inclusive of roof top based on slope and contour analysis undertaken indicate the capability of the approach while single tree extraction through aspect analysis appears to preserve the accuracy of the extraction accordingly. The paper has evaluated the suitable methods of extracting non-ground features and the effective segmentation of the LiDAR data

  13. Remotely measuring the wind using turbine-mounted lidars: Application to power performance testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borraccino, Antoine

    of the wind field reconstruction methods. Two wind models were developed in this thesis. The first one employs lidar measurement at a single distance – but several heights –, accounts for shear through a power law profile, and estimates hub height wind speed, direction and the shear exponent. The second model...... combines the wind model with a simple one-dimensional induction model. The lidar inputs were line-of-sight velocity measurements taken at multiple distances close to the rotor, from 0.5 to 1.25 rotor diameters. Using the combined wind-induction model, hub height free stream wind characteristics...... uncertainties were also quantified. Further, the annual energy production (AEP) was computed for a range of annual mean wind speeds. At 8ms−1, the lidar-estimated AEP was within 1% to the one obtained with the cup anemometer. The combined wind-induction reconstruction technique represents a paradigm shift...

  14. Remote Sensing of Channels and Riparian Zones with a Narrow-Beam Aquatic-Terrestrial LIDAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amar Nayegandhi

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The high-resolution Experimental Advanced Airborne Research LIDAR (EAARL is a new technology for cross-environment surveys of channels and floodplains. EAARL measurements of basic channel geometry, such as wetted cross-sectional area, are within a few percent of those from control field surveys. The largest channel mapping errors are along stream banks. The LIDAR data adequately support 1D and 2D computational fluid dynamics models and frequency domain analyses by wavelet transforms. Further work is needed to establish the stream monitoring capability of the EAARL and the range of water quality conditions in which this sensor will accurately map river bathymetry.

  15. Discriminating crop, weeds and soil surface with a terrestrial LIDAR sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andújar, Dionisio; Rueda-Ayala, Victor; Moreno, Hugo; Rosell-Polo, Joan Ramón; Escolá, Alexandre; Valero, Constantino; Gerhards, Roland; Fernández-Quintanilla, César; Dorado, José; Griepentrog, Hans-Werner

    2013-10-29

    In this study, the evaluation of the accuracy and performance of a light detection and ranging (LIDAR) sensor for vegetation using distance and reflection measurements aiming to detect and discriminate maize plants and weeds from soil surface was done. The study continues a previous work carried out in a maize field in Spain with a LIDAR sensor using exclusively one index, the height profile. The current system uses a combination of the two mentioned indexes. The experiment was carried out in a maize field at growth stage 12-14, at 16 different locations selected to represent the widest possible density of three weeds: Echinochloa crus-galli (L.) P.Beauv., Lamium purpureum L., Galium aparine L.and Veronica persica Poir.. A terrestrial LIDAR sensor was mounted on a tripod pointing to the inter-row area, with its horizontal axis and the field of view pointing vertically downwards to the ground, scanning a vertical plane with the potential presence of vegetation. Immediately after the LIDAR data acquisition (distances and reflection measurements), actual heights of plants were estimated using an appropriate methodology. For that purpose, digital images were taken of each sampled area. Data showed a high correlation between LIDAR measured height and actual plant heights (R2 = 0.75). Binary logistic regression between weed presence/absence and the sensor readings (LIDAR height and reflection values) was used to validate the accuracy of the sensor. This permitted the discrimination of vegetation from the ground with an accuracy of up to 95%. In addition, a Canonical Discrimination Analysis (CDA) was able to discriminate mostly between soil and vegetation and, to a far lesser extent, between crop and weeds. The studied methodology arises as a good system for weed detection, which in combination with other principles, such as vision-based technologies, could improve the efficiency and accuracy of herbicide spraying.

  16. Field and LiDAR observations of the Hector Mine California 1999 surface rupture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, F.; Akciz, S. O.; Harvey, J. C.; Hudnut, K. W.; Lynch, D. K.; Scharer, K. M.; Stock, J. M.; Witkosky, R.; Kendrick, K. J.; Wespestad, C.

    2014-12-01

    We report new field- and computer-based investigations of the surface rupture of the October 16, 1999 Hector Mine Earthquake. Since May 2012, in cooperation with the United States Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center (MCAGCC) at Twentynine Palms, CA, our team has been allowed ground and aerial access to the entire surface rupture. We have focused our new field-based research and imagery analysis along the ~10 kilometer-long maximum slip zone (MSZ) which roughly corresponds to the zone of >4 meter dextral horizontal offset. New data include: 1) a 1 km wide aerial LiDAR survey along the entire surface rupture (@ 10 shots/m2, May 2012, www.opentopography.org); 2) terrestrial LiDAR surveys at 5 sites within the MSZ (@ >1000 shots/m2, April 2014); 3) low altitude aerial photography and ground based photography of the entire MSZ; 4) a ground-truthed database of 87 out of the 94 imagery-based offset measurements made within the MSZ; and 5) a database of 50 new field-based offset measurements made within the MSZ by our team on the ground, 31 of which have also been made on the computer (Ladicaoz) with both the 2000 LiDAR data (@ 0.5 m DEM resolution; Chen et al, in review) and 2012 LiDAR data (@ 35 cm DEM resolution; our team). New results to date include 1) significant variability (> 2 m) in horizontal offsets measured along short distances of the surface rupture (~100 m) within segments of the surface rupture that are localized to a single fault strand; 2) strong dependence of decadal scale fault scarp preservation on local lithology (bedrock vs. alluvial fan vs. fine sediment) and geomorphology (uphill vs. downhill facing scarp); 3) newly observed offset features which were never measured during the post-event field response; 4) newly observed offset features too small to be resolved in airborne LiDAR data (judged by our team to warrant removal from the database due to incorrect feature reconstruction; and 6) significant variability in both accuracy of LiDAR offset

  17. Ground-based mobile scanning LIDAR for remote sensing of contrails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Freudenthaler

    1994-08-01

    Full Text Available Air traffic is a source of trace gases in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. Contrails readily form from water vapor exhausts under favorable meteorological conditions. Since contrails are ice crystal clouds like natural cirrus clouds, they bear a greenhouse potential which has to be investigated. The IFU has built a scanning lidar system employing a pulsed Nd:YAG laser as the emitter and a 52-cm diameter telescope as the receiver. Signals are processed in several channels to investigate depolarization and wavelength dependencies of the light backscattered from ice crystals. These investigations are aimed at the formation and life cycles of contrails, their optical properties, and their climatological consequences in areas of dense air traffic. The experimental lidar setup is described and a sample measurement is shown.

  18. Ground-based mobile scanning LIDAR for remote sensing of contrails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Homburg

    Full Text Available Air traffic is a source of trace gases in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. Contrails readily form from water vapor exhausts under favorable meteorological conditions. Since contrails are ice crystal clouds like natural cirrus clouds, they bear a greenhouse potential which has to be investigated. The IFU has built a scanning lidar system employing a pulsed Nd:YAG laser as the emitter and a 52-cm diameter telescope as the receiver. Signals are processed in several channels to investigate depolarization and wavelength dependencies of the light backscattered from ice crystals. These investigations are aimed at the formation and life cycles of contrails, their optical properties, and their climatological consequences in areas of dense air traffic. The experimental lidar setup is described and a sample measurement is shown.

  19. Ground-based mobile scanning LIDAR for remote sensing of contrails

    OpenAIRE

    Freudenthaler, V.; Homburg, F.; Jäger, H.

    1994-01-01

    Air traffic is a source of trace gases in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. Contrails readily form from water vapor exhausts under favorable meteorological conditions. Since contrails are ice crystal clouds like natural cirrus clouds, they bear a greenhouse potential which has to be investigated. The IFU has built a scanning lidar system employing a pulsed Nd:YAG laser as the emitter and a 52-cm diameter telescope as the receiver. Signals are processed in several channels to inves...

  20. Insect remote sensing using a polarization sensitive cw lidar system in chinese rice fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Shiming

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A joint Chinese-Swedish field campaign of Scheimpflug continuous-wave lidar monitoring of rice-field flying pest insects was pursued in very hot July weather conditions close to Guangzhou, China. The occurrence of insects, birds and bats with almost 200 hours of round-the-clock polarization-sensitive recordings was studied. Wing-beat frequency recordings and depolarization properties were used for target classification. Influence of weather conditions on the flying fauna was also investigated.

  1. Differential absorption lidars for remote sensing of atmospheric pressure and temperature profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korb, C. Laurence; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Famiglietti, Joseph; Walden, Harvey; Prasad, Coorg

    1995-01-01

    A near infrared differential absorption lidar technique is developed using atmospheric oxygen as a tracer for high resolution vertical profiles of pressure and temperature with high accuracy. Solid-state tunable lasers and high-resolution spectrum analyzers are developed to carry out ground-based and airborne measurement demonstrations and results of the measurements presented. Numerical error analysis of high-altitude airborne and spaceborne experiments is carried out, and system concepts developed for their implementation.

  2. Estimating Evapotranspiration over Heterogeneously Vegetated Surfaces using Large Aperture Scintillometer, LiDAR, and Airborne Multispectral Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geli, H. M.; Neale, C. M.; Pack, R. T.; Watts, D. R.; Osterberg, J.

    2011-12-01

    Estimates of evapotranspiration (ET) over heterogeneous areas is challenging especially in water-limited sparsely vegetated environments. New techniques such as airborne full-waveform LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) and high resolution multispectral and thermal imagery can provide enough detail of sparse canopies to improve energy balance model estimations as well as footprint analysis of scintillometer data. The objectives of this study were to estimate ET over such areas and develop methodologies for the use of these airborne data technologies. Because of the associated heterogeneity, this study was conducted over the Cibola National wildlife refuge, southern California on an area dominated with tamarisk (salt cedar) forest (90%) interspersed with arrowweed and bare soil (10%). A set of two large aperture scintillometers (LASs) were deployed over the area to provide estimates of sensible heat flux (HLAS). The LASs were distributed over the area in a way that allowed capturing different surface spatial heterogeneity. Bowen ratio systems were used to provide hydrometeorological variables and surface energy balance fluxes (SEBF) (i.e. Rn, G, H, and LE) measurements. Scintillometer-based estimates of HLAS were improved by considering the effect of the corresponding 3D footprint and the associated displacement height (d) and the roughness length (z0) following Geli et al. (2011). The LiDAR data were acquired using the LASSI Lidar developed at Utah State University (USU). The data was used to obtain 1-m spatial resolution DEM's and vegetation canopy height to improve the HLAS estimates. The BR measurements of Rn and G were combined with LAS estimates, HLAS, to provide estimates of LELASas a residual of the energy balance equation. A thermal remote sensing model namely the two source energy balance (TSEB) of Norman et al. (1995) was applied to provide spatial estimates of SEBF. Four airborne images at 1-4 meter spatial resolution acquired using the USU airborne

  3. GEOSTATISTICAL SOLUTIONS FOR DOWNSCALING REMOTELY SENSED LAND SURFACE TEMPERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Wang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Remotely sensed land surface temperature (LST downscaling is an important issue in remote sensing. Geostatistical methods have shown their applicability in downscaling multi/hyperspectral images. In this paper, four geostatistical solutions, including regression kriging (RK, downscaling cokriging (DSCK, kriging with external drift (KED and area-to-point regression kriging (ATPRK, are applied for downscaling remotely sensed LST. Their differences are analyzed theoretically and the performances are compared experimentally using a Landsat 7 ETM+ dataset. They are also compared to the classical TsHARP method.

  4. Stabilized diode seed laser for flight and space-based remote lidar sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Shirley; Pandit, Pushkar; Battle, Philip; Rudd, Joe; Hovis, Floyd

    2017-08-01

    AdvR, through support of the NASA SBIR program, has developed fiber-based components and sub-systems that are routinely used on NASA's airborne missions, and is now developing an environmentally hardened, diode-based, locked wavelength, seed laser for future space-based high spectral resolution lidar applications. The seed laser source utilizes a fiber-coupled diode laser, a fiber-coupled, calibrated iodine reference module to provide an absolute wavelength reference, and an integrated, dual-element, nonlinear optical waveguide component for second harmonic generation, spectral formatting and wavelength locking. The diode laser operates over a range close to 1064.5 nm, provides for stabilization of the seed to the desired iodine transition and allows for a highly-efficient, fully-integrated seed source that is well-suited for use in airborne and space-based environments. A summary of component level environmental testing and spectral purity measurements with a seeded Nd:YAG laser will be presented. A direct-diode, wavelength-locked seed laser will reduce the overall size weight and power (SWaP) requirements of the laser transmitter, thus directly addressing the need for developing compact, efficient, lidar component technologies for use in airborne and space-based environments.

  5. Remote identification of potential polar bear maternal denning habitat in northern Alaska using airborne LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B. M.; Durner, G. M.; Stoker, J.; Shideler, R.; Perham, C.; Liston, G. E.

    2013-12-01

    Polar bear (Ursus maritimus) populations throughout the Arctic are being threatened by reductions in critical sea ice habitat. Throughout much of their range, polar bears give birth to their young in winter dens that are excavated in snowdrifts. New-born cubs, which are unable to survive exposure to Arctic winter weather, require 2-3 months of the relatively warm, stable, and undisturbed environment of the den for their growth. In the southern Beaufort Sea (BS), polar bears may den on the Alaskan Arctic Coastal Plain (ACP).The proportion of dens occurring on land has increased because of reductions in stable multi-year ice, increases in unconsolidated ice, and lengthening of the fall open-water period. Large portions of the ACP are currently being used for oil and gas activities and proposed projects will likely expand this footprint in the near future. Since petroleum exploration and development activities increase during winter there is the potential for human activities to disturb polar bears in maternal dens. Thus, maps showing the potential distribution of terrestrial denning habitat can help to mitigate negative interactions. Prior remote sensing efforts have consisted of manual interpretation of vertical aerial photography and automated classification of Interferometric Synthetic Aperture (IfSAR) derived digital terrain models (DTM) (5-m spatial resolution) focused on the identification of snowdrift forming landscape features. In this study, we assess the feasibility of airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data (2-m spatial resolution) for the automated classification of potential polar bear maternal denning habitat in a 1,400 km2 area on the central portion of the ACP. The study region spans the BS coast from the Prudhoe Bay oilfield in the west to near Point Thompson in the east and extends inland from 10 to 30 km. Approximately 800 km2 of the study area contains 19 known den locations, 51 field survey sites with information on bank height and

  6. Remote Sensing of Suspended Sediment Concentrations Based on the Waveform Decomposition of Airborne LiDAR Bathymetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinglei Zhao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Airborne LiDAR bathymetry (ALB has been shown to have the ability to retrieve water turbidity using the waveform parameters (i.e., slopes and amplitudes of volume backscatter returns. However, directly and accurately extracting the parameters of volume backscatter returns from raw green-pulse waveforms in shallow waters is difficult because of the short waveform. This study proposes a new accurate and efficient method for the remote sensing of suspended sediment concentrations (SSCs in shallow waters based on the waveform decomposition of ALB. The proposed method approaches raw ALB green-pulse waveforms through a synthetic waveform model that comprises a Gaussian function (for fitting the air–water interface returns, triangle function (for fitting the volume backscatter returns, and Weibull function (for fitting the bottom returns. Moreover, the volume backscatter returns are separated from the raw green-pulse waveforms by the triangle function. The separated volume backscatter returns are used as bases to calculate the waveform parameters (i.e., slopes and amplitudes. These waveform parameters and the measured SSCs are used to build two power SSC models (i.e., SSC (C-Slope (K and SSC (C-Amplitude (A models at the measured SSC stations. Thereafter, the combined model is formed by the two established C-K and C-A models to retrieve SSCs. SSCs in the modeling water area are retrieved using the combined model. A complete process for retrieving SSCs using the proposed method is provided. The proposed method was applied to retrieve SSCs from an actual ALB measurement performed using the Optech Coastal Zone Mapping and Imaging LiDAR in a shallow and turbid water area. A mean bias of 0.05 mg/L and standard deviation of 3.8 mg/L were obtained in the experimental area using the combined model.

  7. Microwave Remote Sensing Modeling of Ocean Surface Salinity and Winds Using an Empirical Sea Surface Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yueh, Simon H.

    2004-01-01

    Active and passive microwave remote sensing techniques have been investigated for the remote sensing of ocean surface wind and salinity. We revised an ocean surface spectrum using the CMOD-5 geophysical model function (GMF) for the European Remote Sensing (ERS) C-band scatterometer and the Ku-band GMF for the NASA SeaWinds scatterometer. The predictions of microwave brightness temperatures from this model agree well with satellite, aircraft and tower-based microwave radiometer data. This suggests that the impact of surface roughness on microwave brightness temperatures and radar scattering coefficients of sea surfaces can be consistently characterized by a roughness spectrum, providing physical basis for using combined active and passive remote sensing techniques for ocean surface wind and salinity remote sensing.

  8. Distinguishing sliding area by decision analyzing with remote sensing image and lidar data combined

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Hao; Wu, Jee-Cheng

    2017-10-01

    Every year people in Taiwan have been facing earthquake and typhoon nature disaster challenges which are seriously affecting the people's lives and property. During summer season typhoons bring abundant rainfall resulting in landslides and debris flows. Because the landslide attributes to several environmental factors, we could monitor and analyze endangered areas to prevent damages. In this study Taiwan Provincial Highway 14 branch at 34K 38K+500m is chosen, which has devastated by Earthquake 921 and Typhoon Mindulle. A decision analysis is conducted by utilizing combined ortho-photo and LiDAR Digital Elevation Model (DEM) data to classify landslide areas. The result showed that the performance of overall accuracy could be increased when terrain factors are considered.

  9. Remote sensing of land surface temperature: The directional viewing effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.A.; Schmugge, T.J.; Ballard, J.R. Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) is an important parameter in understanding global environmental change because it controls many of the underlying processes in the energy budget at the surface and heat and water transport between the surface and the atmosphere. The measurement of LST at a variety of spatial and temporal scales and extension to global coverage requires remote sensing means to achieve these goals. Land surface temperature and emissivity products are currently being derived from satellite and aircraft remote sensing data using a variety of techniques to correct for atmospheric effects. Implicit in the commonly employed approaches is the assumption of isotropy in directional thermal infrared exitance. The theoretical analyses indicate angular variations in apparent infrared temperature will typically yield land surface temperature errors ranging from 1 to 4 C unless corrective measures are applied

  10. Airborne lidar measurements of surface ozone depletion over Arctic sea ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Seabrook

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A differential absorption lidar (DIAL for measurement of atmospheric ozone concentration was operated aboard the Polar 5 research aircraft in order to study the depletion of ozone over Arctic sea ice. The lidar measurements during a flight over the sea ice north of Barrow, Alaska, on 3 April 2011 found a surface boundary layer depletion of ozone over a range of 300 km. The photochemical destruction of surface level ozone was strongest at the most northern point of the flight, and steadily decreased towards land. All the observed ozone-depleted air throughout the flight occurred within 300 m of the sea ice surface. A back-trajectory analysis of the air measured throughout the flight indicated that the ozone-depleted air originated from over the ice. Air at the surface that was not depleted in ozone had originated from over land. An investigation into the altitude history of the ozone-depleted air suggests a strong inverse correlation between measured ozone concentration and the amount of time the air directly interacted with the sea ice.

  11. Prediction of Forest Canopy and Surface Fuels from Lidar and Satellite Time Series Data in a Bark Beetle-Affected Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin C. Bright

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Wildfire behavior depends on the type, quantity, and condition of fuels, and the effect that bark beetle outbreaks have on fuels is a topic of current research and debate. Remote sensing can provide estimates of fuels across landscapes, although few studies have estimated surface fuels from remote sensing data. Here we predicted and mapped field-measured canopy and surface fuels from light detection and ranging (lidar and Landsat time series explanatory variables via random forest (RF modeling across a coniferous montane forest in Colorado, USA, which was affected by mountain pine beetles (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins approximately six years prior. We examined relationships between mapped fuels and the severity of tree mortality with correlation tests. RF models explained 59%, 48%, 35%, and 70% of the variation in available canopy fuel, canopy bulk density, canopy base height, and canopy height, respectively (percent root-mean-square error (%RMSE = 12–54%. Surface fuels were predicted less accurately, with models explaining 24%, 28%, 32%, and 30% of the variation in litter and duff, 1 to 100-h, 1000-h, and total surface fuels, respectively (%RMSE = 37–98%. Fuel metrics were negatively correlated with the severity of tree mortality, except canopy base height, which increased with greater tree mortality. Our results showed how bark beetle-caused tree mortality significantly reduced canopy fuels in our study area. We demonstrated that lidar and Landsat time series data contain substantial information about canopy and surface fuels and can be used for large-scale efforts to monitor and map fuel loads for fire behavior modeling at a landscape scale.

  12. Prediction of forest canopy and surface fuels from Lidar and satellite time series data in a bark beetle-affected forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Benjamin C.; Hudak, Andrew T.; Meddens, Arjan J.H.; Hawbaker, Todd J.; Briggs, Jenny S.; Kennedy, Robert E.

    2017-01-01

    Wildfire behavior depends on the type, quantity, and condition of fuels, and the effect that bark beetle outbreaks have on fuels is a topic of current research and debate. Remote sensing can provide estimates of fuels across landscapes, although few studies have estimated surface fuels from remote sensing data. Here we predicted and mapped field-measured canopy and surface fuels from light detection and ranging (lidar) and Landsat time series explanatory variables via random forest (RF) modeling across a coniferous montane forest in Colorado, USA, which was affected by mountain pine beetles (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) approximately six years prior. We examined relationships between mapped fuels and the severity of tree mortality with correlation tests. RF models explained 59%, 48%, 35%, and 70% of the variation in available canopy fuel, canopy bulk density, canopy base height, and canopy height, respectively (percent root-mean-square error (%RMSE) = 12–54%). Surface fuels were predicted less accurately, with models explaining 24%, 28%, 32%, and 30% of the variation in litter and duff, 1 to 100-h, 1000-h, and total surface fuels, respectively (%RMSE = 37–98%). Fuel metrics were negatively correlated with the severity of tree mortality, except canopy base height, which increased with greater tree mortality. Our results showed how bark beetle-caused tree mortality significantly reduced canopy fuels in our study area. We demonstrated that lidar and Landsat time series data contain substantial information about canopy and surface fuels and can be used for large-scale efforts to monitor and map fuel loads for fire behavior modeling at a landscape scale.

  13. Lidar to lidar calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Garcia, Sergio; Villanueva, Héctor

    This report presents the result of the lidar to lidar calibration performed for ground-based lidar. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference lidar wind speed measurements with measurement uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding...... lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from the reference lidar measurements are given for information only....

  14. Estimating evapotranspiration using remote sensing and the Surface ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-07-08

    Jul 8, 2013 ... Remote sensing-based evapotranspiration (ET) algorithms developed in recent years are well suited for estimating evapo- transpiration and its spatial trends over time. In this paper the application of energy balance methods in South Africa is reviewed, showing that the Surface Energy Balance Algorithm ...

  15. Remote sensing estimates of impervious surfaces for pluvial flood modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaspersen, Per Skougaard; Drews, Martin

    This paper investigates the accuracy of medium resolution (MR) satellite imagery in estimating impervious surfaces for European cities at the detail required for pluvial flood modelling. Using remote sensing techniques enables precise and systematic quantification of the influence of the past 30...

  16. Influence of the Precision of LIDAR Data in Surface Water Runoff Estimation for Road Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Jorge, H.; Díaz-Vilariño, L.; Lagüela, S.; Martínez-Sánchez, J.; Arias, P.

    2015-08-01

    Roads affect the natural surface and subsurface drainage pattern of a hill or a watershed. Road drainage systems are designed with the objective of reducing the energy generated by the flowing water and the presence of excess water or moisture within the road. A poorly designed drainage may affect to road maintenance causing cut or fill failures, road surface erosion and degrading the engineering properties of the materials with which it was constructed. Surface drainage pattern can be evaluated from Digital Elevation Models typically calculated from point clouds acquired with aerial LiDAR platforms. However, these systems provide low resolution point clouds especially in cases where slopes with steep grades exist. In this work, Mobile LiDAR systems (aerial and terrestrial) are combined for surveying roads and their surroundings in order to provide complete point cloud. As the precision of the point clouds obtained from these mobile systems is influenced by GNSS outages, Gaussian noise with different standard deviation values is introduced in the point cloud in order to determine its influence in the evaluation of water runoff direction. Results depict an increase in the differences of flow direction with the decrease of cell size of the raster dataset and with the increase of Gaussian noise. The last relation fits to a second-order polynomial Differences in flow direction up to 42º are achieved for a cell size of 0.5 m with a standard deviation of 0.15 m.

  17. INFLUENCE OF THE PRECISION OF LIDAR DATA IN SURFACE WATER RUNOFF ESTIMATION FOR ROAD MAINTENANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. González-Jorge

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Roads affect the natural surface and subsurface drainage pattern of a hill or a watershed. Road drainage systems are designed with the objective of reducing the energy generated by the flowing water and the presence of excess water or moisture within the road. A poorly designed drainage may affect to road maintenance causing cut or fill failures, road surface erosion and degrading the engineering properties of the materials with which it was constructed. Surface drainage pattern can be evaluated from Digital Elevation Models typically calculated from point clouds acquired with aerial LiDAR platforms. However, these systems provide low resolution point clouds especially in cases where slopes with steep grades exist. In this work, Mobile LiDAR systems (aerial and terrestrial are combined for surveying roads and their surroundings in order to provide complete point cloud. As the precision of the point clouds obtained from these mobile systems is influenced by GNSS outages, Gaussian noise with different standard deviation values is introduced in the point cloud in order to determine its influence in the evaluation of water runoff direction. Results depict an increase in the differences of flow direction with the decrease of cell size of the raster dataset and with the increase of Gaussian noise. The last relation fits to a second-order polynomial Differences in flow direction up to 42º are achieved for a cell size of 0.5 m with a standard deviation of 0.15 m.

  18. Detection and correction of LiDAR raster data from the Italian national remote sensing programme and production of a suitable CHM to forest volume estimation in Calabria (southern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floris A

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Detection and correction of LiDAR raster data from the Italian national remote sensing programme and production of a suitable CHM to forest volume estimation in Calabria (southern Italy. The AlForLab project, a Public-Private Laboratory which is part of the Cluster MEA (Materials Energy Environment addressed to the Calabria Region (southern Italy, has gained great benefit by using LiDAR data acquired in the frame of a national remote sensing programme of the Ministry of the Environment and Protection of Land and Sea. This kind of LiDAR data, distributed in raster format and publicly available for research and non-profit purposes, have proved to be a suitable tool to support forest management. Their usage, however, has required the recognition and correction of non-forest elements included in the Digital Surface Model (DSM, like electric powerlines, wind turbines, sub-vertical rocks and viaducts. Such outliers, if remaining into the Canopy height Model (CHM, can generate potential errors in application of LiDAR-based prediction models. This paper proposes some semi-automatic pre-processing procedures, directly applicable on raster data, in order to obtain a CHM without non-forest elements. The methods described here have been developed in open-source environment (R and QGIS. The correction procedures carried out were tested in three municipalities having forest area between 1700 and 5400 ha, and characterized by different types of outliers. The performances of the methods were evaluated by comparing the estimated forest volume obtained before and after their application. Although low total volume changes were observed on the entire study areas (about 0.5%, corresponding to 1500 to 7200 m3, more significant effects, tens to hundreds cubic meters per hectare of overestimation, can occur in stands or forest compartments with a high presence of outliers. In conclusion, the proposed methods have proved to be suitable to achieve a reliable CHM for

  19. Deciduous Forest Structure Estimated with LIDAR-Optimized Spectral Remote Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Chávez, Jason Defibaugh y; Tullis, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Coverage and frequency of remotely sensed forest structural information would benefit from single orbital platforms designed to collect sufficient data. We evaluated forest structural information content using single-date Hyperion hyperspectral imagery collected over full-canopy oak-hickory forests in the Ozark National Forest, Arkansas, USA. Hyperion spectral derivatives were used to develop machine learning regression tree rule sets for predicting forest neighborhood percentile heights gene...

  20. Mapping Plant Diversity and Composition Across North Carolina Piedmont Forest Landscapes Using Lidar-Hyperspectral Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkenberg, Christopher R.

    Forest modification, from local stress to global change, has given rise to efforts to model, map, and monitor critical properties of forest communities like structure, composition, and diversity. Predictive models based on data from spatially-nested field plots and LiDAR-hyperspectral remote sensing systems are one particularly effective means towards the otherwise prohibitively resource-intensive task of consistently characterizing forest community dynamics at landscape scales. However, to date, most predictive models fail to account for actual (rather than idealized) species and community distributions, are unsuccessful in predicting understory components in structurally and taxonomically heterogeneous forests, and may suffer from diminished predictive accuracy due to incongruity in scale and precision between field plot samples, remotely-sensed data, and target biota of varying size and density. This three-part study addresses these and other concerns in the modeling and mapping of emergent properties of forest communities by shifting the scope of prediction from the individual or taxon to the whole stand or community. It is, after all, at the stand scale where emergent properties like functional processes, biodiversity, and habitat aggregate and manifest. In the first study, I explore the relationship between forest structure (a proxy for successional demographics and resource competition) and tree species diversity in the North Carolina Piedmont, highlighting the empirical basis and potential for utilizing forest structure from LiDAR in predictive models of tree species diversity. I then extend these conclusions to map landscape pattern in multi-scale vascular plant diversity as well as turnover in community-continua at varying compositional resolutions in a North Carolina Piedmont landscape using remotely-sensed LiDAR-hyperspectral estimates of topography, canopy structure, and foliar biochemistry. Recognizing that the distinction between correlation and

  1. Lidar fluorosensor system for remote monitoring phytoplankton blooms in the Swedish marine campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbini, Roberto; Colao, Francesco; Fantoni, Roberta; Palucci, Antonio; Ribezzo, Sergio [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Rome (Italy); Micheli, Carla [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy)

    1997-09-01

    The National Agency for New Technologies and the Environments group participated to the ICES/IOC workshop at Kristineberg Marine Research Station (Sweden, 9 - 15 September 1996) with instrumentation suitable to local and remote analysis of phytoplankton. The laser induced fluorescence (LIF) emission of natural communities and cultures has been monitored in vivo allowing to obtain information on the algae species, characterized by different pigments content, and on their photosynthetic activity, the latter differentially measured at different light levels in the presence of a saturating laser pulse. Chemical methods have been used for calibration purposes.

  2. Doppler lidar investigation of wind turbine wake characteristics and atmospheric turbulence under different surface roughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Xiaochun; Wu, Songhua; Liu, Bingyi

    2017-06-12

    Four field experiments based on Pulsed Coherent Doppler Lidar with different surface roughness have been carried out in 2013-2015 to study the turbulent wind field in the vicinity of operating wind turbine in the onshore and offshore wind parks. The turbulence characteristics in ambient atmosphere and wake area was analyzed using transverse structure function based on Plane Position Indicator scanning mode. An automatic wake processing procedure was developed to determine the wake velocity deficit by considering the effect of ambient velocity disturbance and wake meandering with the mean wind direction. It is found that the turbine wake obviously enhances the atmospheric turbulence mixing, and the difference in the correlation of turbulence parameters under different surface roughness is significant. The dependence of wake parameters including the wake velocity deficit and wake length on wind velocity and turbulence intensity are analyzed and compared with other studies, which validates the empirical model and simulation of a turbine wake for various atmosphere conditions.

  3. The Effect of Surface Waves on Airborne Lidar Bathymetry (ALB Measurement Uncertainties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Birkebak

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Airborne Lidar Bathymetry (ALB provides a rapid means of data collection that provides seamless digital elevation maps across land and water. However, environmental factors such as water surface induce significant uncertainty in the ALB measurements. In this study, the effect of water surface on the ALB measurements is characterized both theoretically and empirically. Theoretical analysis includes Monte Carlo ray-tracing simulations that evaluate different environmental and hardware conditions such as wind speed, laser beam footprint diameter and off-nadir angle that are typically observed in ALB survey conditions. The empirical study includes development of an optical detector array to measure and analyze the refraction angle of the laser beam under a variety of environmental and hardware conditions. The results suggest that the refraction angle deviations ( 2 σ in the along-wind direction vary between 3–5° when variations in wind speed, laser beam footprint size and the laser beam incidence angle are taken into account.

  4. Terrain surfaces and 3-D landcover classification from small footprint full-waveform lidar data: application to badlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Bretar

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the use of new remote sensing data acquired from airborne full-waveform lidar systems for hydrological applications. Indeed, the knowledge of an accurate topography and a landcover classification is a prior knowledge for any hydrological and erosion model. Badlands tend to be the most significant areas of erosion in the world with the highest erosion rate values. Monitoring and predicting erosion within badland mountainous catchments is highly strategic due to the arising downstream consequences and the need for natural hazard mitigation engineering.

    Additionally, beyond the elevation information, full-waveform lidar data are processed to extract the amplitude and the width of echoes. They are related to the target reflectance and geometry. We will investigate the relevancy of using lidar-derived Digital Terrain Models (DTMs and the potentiality of the amplitude and the width information for 3-D landcover classification. Considering the novelty and the complexity of such data, they are presented in details as well as guidelines to process them. The morphological validation of DTMs is then performed via the computation of hydrological indexes and photo-interpretation. Finally, a 3-D landcover classification is performed using a Support Vector Machine classifier. The use of an ortho-rectified optical image in the classification process as well as full-waveform lidar data for hydrological purposes is finally discussed.

  5. 2003 Oahu Coastline Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LIDAR data is remotely sensed high-resolution elevation data collected by an airborne collection platform. Using a combination of laser rangefinding, GPS positioning...

  6. TWO METHODS FOR REMOTE ESTIMATION OF COMPLETE URBAN SURFACE TEMPERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Jiang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Complete urban surface temperature (TC is a key parameter for evaluating the energy exchange between the urban surface and atmosphere. At the present stage, the estimation of TC still needs detailed 3D structure information of the urban surface, however, it is often difficult to obtain the geometric structure and composition of the corresponding temperature of urban surface, so that there is still lack of concise and efficient method for estimating the TC by remote sensing. Based on the four typical urban surface scale models, combined with the Envi-met model, thermal radiant directionality forward modeling and kernel model, we analyzed a complete day and night cycle hourly component temperature and radiation temperature in each direction of two seasons of summer and winter, and calculated hemispherical integral temperature and TC. The conclusion is obtained by examining the relationship of directional radiation temperature, hemispherical integral temperature and TC: (1 There is an optimal angle of radiation temperature approaching the TC in a single observation direction when viewing zenith angle is 45–60°, the viewing azimuth near the vertical surface of the sun main plane, the average absolute difference is about 1.1 K in the daytime. (2 There are several (3–5 times directional temperatures of different view angle, under the situation of using the thermal radiation directionality kernel model can more accurately calculate the hemispherical integral temperature close to TC, the mean absolute error is about 1.0 K in the daytime. This study proposed simple and effective strategies for estimating TC by remote sensing, which are expected to improve the quantitative level of remote sensing of urban thermal environment.

  7. Two Methods for Remote Estimation of Complete Urban Surface Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, L.; Zhan, W.; Zou, Z.

    2017-09-01

    Complete urban surface temperature (TC) is a key parameter for evaluating the energy exchange between the urban surface and atmosphere. At the present stage, the estimation of TC still needs detailed 3D structure information of the urban surface, however, it is often difficult to obtain the geometric structure and composition of the corresponding temperature of urban surface, so that there is still lack of concise and efficient method for estimating the TC by remote sensing. Based on the four typical urban surface scale models, combined with the Envi-met model, thermal radiant directionality forward modeling and kernel model, we analyzed a complete day and night cycle hourly component temperature and radiation temperature in each direction of two seasons of summer and winter, and calculated hemispherical integral temperature and TC. The conclusion is obtained by examining the relationship of directional radiation temperature, hemispherical integral temperature and TC: (1) There is an optimal angle of radiation temperature approaching the TC in a single observation direction when viewing zenith angle is 45-60°, the viewing azimuth near the vertical surface of the sun main plane, the average absolute difference is about 1.1 K in the daytime. (2) There are several (3-5 times) directional temperatures of different view angle, under the situation of using the thermal radiation directionality kernel model can more accurately calculate the hemispherical integral temperature close to TC, the mean absolute error is about 1.0 K in the daytime. This study proposed simple and effective strategies for estimating TC by remote sensing, which are expected to improve the quantitative level of remote sensing of urban thermal environment.

  8. Remote sensing of sulphur dioxide emissions of sea-going vessels through lidar; Zwaveldioxide-uitstoot van zeeschepen op afstand gemeten met lidar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkhout, A.J.C.; Swart, D.P.J.; Van der Hoff, G.R.; Bergwerff, J.B.

    2011-12-15

    RIVM developed an instrument to measure from the shore sulphur dioxide emissions of passing sea-going vessels. This instrument uses the lidar technique (Light Detection And Ranging). The instrument uses a laser beam to scan the exhaust plume from a passing ship and determine the emission, unnoticed. It was used from 2006 to 2008 to measure sulphur dioxide emissions from a large number of ships sailing on the Westerscheldt estuary and on the North Sea Canal. The highest measured emission was 37 gram per second. The total emission of sulphur dioxide in the Netherlands has been declining for many years. Since 2006, emissions from ocean shipping are declining as well, but not as fast as those from other sources. Therefore, the contribution from ocean shipping is gaining importance. In 2010, 55 percent of the Dutch sulphur dioxide emissions originated with sea-going vessels. In 1990, this was 21 percent. Sea-going ships are not allowed to use sulphur-rich fuel in territorial waters and at the North Sea. This relatively cheap fuel may be on board, though, for use elsewhere at sea. To what extent ship owners comply with this ban is not known. Traditional measurement methods involve taking fuel samples on board. This requires someone boarding the ship. The crew therefore knows a measurement is taking place and can adjust the type of fuel used. Moreover, with traditional methods, only a few ships per day can be checked. Lidar is not yet recognised as a law enforcement instrument. Therefore, no fines can be imposed based on lidar measurements only. The lidar may be used, though, to identify possible offenders. A law enforcement official may then board that ship to ascertain that the law was breached. When used in this way, the use of the lidar is cost-effective even now. This is because the lidar can measure almost all passing ships. Expensive patrol ships can then be directed to only visit those ships that are the most likely offenders. Moreover, this greatly increases the

  9. Fluorescence lidar monitoring of historic buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondi, V; Cecchi, G; Pantani, L; Chiari, R

    1998-02-20

    Laser-induced fluorescence spectra detected with high-spectral-resolution lidar on the facades of the Baptistery and the Cathedral in Parma are presented and discussed. The data show fluorescence features that are due to the stone materials that constitute the coating of the monuments and to photosynthetically active colonizations on their surfaces. This underlines the feasibility of a remote fluorescence analysis of historic facades. The data were also compared with the fluorescence lidar spectra obtained from similar lithotypes, sampled either in historic extraction areas or in sites exploited recently. The results open good prospects for spectral characterization of historic materials and identification of their provenance.

  10. Where’s the Ground Surface? – Elevation Bias in LIDAR-derived Digital Elevation Models Due to Dense Vegetation in Oregon Tidal Marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) is a powerful resource for coastal and wetland managers and its use is increasing. Vegetation density and other land cover characteristics influence the accuracy of LIDAR-derived ground surface digital elevation models; however the degree to wh...

  11. DEM Development from Ground-Based LiDAR Data: A Method to Remove Non-Surface Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maneesh Sharma

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Topography and land cover characteristics can have significant effects on infiltration, runoff, and erosion processes on watersheds. The ability to model the timing and routing of surface water and erosion is affected by the resolution of the digital elevation model (DEM. High resolution ground-based Light Detecting and Ranging (LiDAR technology can be used to collect detailed topographic and land cover characteristic data. In this study, a method was developed to remove vegetation from ground-based LiDAR data to create high resolution DEMs. Research was conducted on intensively studied rainfall–runoff plots on the USDA-ARS Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed in Southeast Arizona. LiDAR data were used to generate 1 cm resolution digital surface models (DSM for 5 plots. DSMs created directly from LiDAR data contain non-surface objects such as vegetation cover. A vegetation removal method was developed which used a slope threshold and a focal mean filter method to remove vegetation and create bare earth DEMs. The method was validated on a synthetic plot, where rocks and vegetation were added incrementally. Results of the validation showed a vertical error of ±7.5 mm in the final DEM.

  12. Importance of Surface Texture to Infrared Remote Sensing Interpretations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkland, L. E.; Adams, P. M.; Herr, K. C.; Salisbury, J. W.

    2001-11-01

    Thermal infrared remote sensing may be used to identify minerals present on the surface using diagnostic spectral bands. As band depth (spectral contrast) exhibited by the mineral increases, the mineral is easier to detect. In order to determine the expected spectral contrast, thermal infrared spectra of typical mineral endmembers are commonly measured in the laboratory. For example, for calcite, well-crystalline limestone is commonly studied. However, carbonates occur in several forms, including thin coatings, indurated carbonate (calcrete), and hot springs deposits. Different formation pathways may cause different microstructures and surface textures. This in turn can also affect the surface texture of the weathered material. Different surface textures can affect the measured band contrast, through roughness that causes a cavity (hohlraum) effect, and particle size and roughness on a scale that causes volume scattering. Thus since detection limits vary with the spectral contrast, surface texture can be an important variable in how detectable a mineral is. To study these issues, we have examined limestone and calcrete deposits at Mormon Mesa, Nevada that have two distinctly different microstructures and surface texture [Kirkland et al., 2001]. The limestone studied has larger grains and the grains frequently have flat, smooth surfaces on the order of 10-50 microns in cross-section length. The calcrete has smaller, more angular calcite grains, which exhibit almost no flat surfaces longer than 5 microns in cross-section length. We will show scanning electron microscope images to compare the different microstructures and surface textures of both the fresh and weathered surfaces, and we will show corresponding thermal infrared spectra to illustrate the different spectral signatures. The results demonstrate the importance of understanding the microstructure of mineral deposits to accurately interpret infrared remote sensing data, especially for studies that lack ground

  13. Tropospheric ozone seasonal and long-term variability as seen by lidar and surface measurements at the JPL-Table Mountain Facility, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Granados-Muñoz

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A combined surface and tropospheric ozone climatology and interannual variability study was performed for the first time using co-located ozone photometer measurements (2013–2015 and tropospheric ozone differential absorption lidar measurements (2000–2015 at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Table Mountain Facility (TMF; elev. 2285 m, in California. The surface time series were investigated both in terms of seasonal and diurnal variability. The observed surface ozone is typical of high-elevation remote sites, with small amplitude of the seasonal and diurnal cycles, and high ozone values, compared to neighboring lower altitude stations representative of urban boundary layer conditions. The ozone mixing ratio ranges from 45 ppbv in the winter morning hours to 65 ppbv in the spring and summer afternoon hours. At the time of the lidar measurements (early night, the seasonal cycle observed at the surface is similar to that observed by lidar between 3.5 and 9 km. Above 9 km, the local tropopause height variation with time and season impacts significantly the ozone lidar observations. The frequent tropopause folds found in the vicinity of TMF (27 % of the time, mostly in winter and spring produce a dual-peak vertical structure in ozone within the fold layer, characterized by higher-than-average values in the bottom half of the fold (12–14 km, and lower-than-averaged values in the top half of the fold (14–18 km. This structure is consistent with the expected origin of the air parcels within the fold, i.e., mid-latitude stratospheric air folding down below the upper tropospheric sub-tropical air. The influence of the tropopause folds extends down to 5 km, increasing the ozone content in the troposphere. No significant signature of interannual variability could be observed on the 2000–2015 de-seasonalized lidar time series, with only a statistically non-significant positive anomaly during the years 2003–2007. Our trend analysis

  14. Surface-enhanced Raman fiberoptic sensors for remote monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stokes, D.L.; Alarie, J.P.; Vo-Dinh, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Health Sciences Research Div.

    1995-09-01

    A new sensor design for remote surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) measurements has been developed for environmental applications. The design features the modification of an optical fiber using layers of alumina microparticles and silver coatings for inducing the SERS effect at the sensing probe. A single fiber carries both the laser excitation and the SERS signal radiation, keeping optical parameters at the remote tip simple and consistent. The small tip size achievable with this configuration also demonstrates potential of this new design as a microsensor for in-situ measurement in microenvironments. Details of sensor tip fabrication and optical system design are described. SERS spectra of aqueous environmental samples acquired in-situ using the SERS sensor are also presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the SERS sensor.

  15. Patterns of canopy and surface layer consumption in a boreal forest fire from repeat airborne lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Michael; Morton, Douglas C.; Cook, Bruce D.; Andersen, Hans-Erik; Babcock, Chad; Pattison, Robert

    2017-05-01

    Fire in the boreal region is the dominant agent of forest disturbance with direct impacts on ecosystem structure, carbon cycling, and global climate. Global and biome-scale impacts are mediated by burn severity, measured as loss of forest canopy and consumption of the soil organic layer. To date, knowledge of the spatial variability in burn severity has been limited by sparse field sampling and moderate resolution satellite data. Here, we used pre- and post-fire airborne lidar data to directly estimate changes in canopy vertical structure and surface elevation for a 2005 boreal forest fire on Alaska’s Kenai Peninsula. We found that both canopy and surface losses were strongly linked to pre-fire species composition and exhibited important fine-scale spatial variability at sub-30 m resolution. The fractional reduction in canopy volume ranged from 0.61 in lowland black spruce stands to 0.27 in mixed white spruce and broadleaf forest. Residual structure largely reflects standing dead trees, highlighting the influence of pre-fire forest structure on delayed carbon losses from aboveground biomass, post-fire albedo, and variability in understory light environments. Median loss of surface elevation was highest in lowland black spruce stands (0.18 m) but much lower in mixed stands (0.02 m), consistent with differences in pre-fire organic layer accumulation. Spatially continuous depth-of-burn estimates from repeat lidar measurements provide novel information to constrain carbon emissions from the surface organic layer and may inform related research on post-fire successional trajectories. Spectral measures of burn severity from Landsat were correlated with canopy (r = 0.76) and surface (r = -0.71) removal in black spruce stands but captured less of the spatial variability in fire effects for mixed stands (canopy r = 0.56, surface r = -0.26), underscoring the difficulty in capturing fire effects in heterogeneous boreal forest landscapes using proxy measures of burn

  16. Hydrologic Remote Sensing and Land Surface Data Assimilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Moradkhani

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Accurate, reliable and skillful forecasting of key environmental variables such as soil moisture and snow are of paramount importance due to their strong influence on many water resources applications including flood control, agricultural production and effective water resources management which collectively control the behavior of the climate system. Soil moisture is a key state variable in land surface–atmosphere interactions affecting surface energy fluxes, runoff and the radiation balance. Snow processes also have a large influence on land-atmosphere energy exchanges due to snow high albedo, low thermal conductivity and considerable spatial and temporal variability resulting in the dramatic change on surface and ground temperature. Measurement of these two variables is possible through variety of methods using ground-based and remote sensing procedures. Remote sensing, however, holds great promise for soil moisture and snow measurements which have considerable spatial and temporal variability. Merging these measurements with hydrologic model outputs in a systematic and effective way results in an improvement of land surface model prediction. Data Assimilation provides a mechanism to combine these two sources of estimation. Much success has been attained in recent years in using data from passive microwave sensors and assimilating them into the models. This paper provides an overview of the remote sensing measurement techniques for soil moisture and snow data and describes the advances in data assimilation techniques through the ensemble filtering, mainly Ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF and Particle filter (PF, for improving the model prediction and reducing the uncertainties involved in prediction process. It is believed that PF provides a complete representation of the probability distribution of state variables of interests (according to sequential Bayes law and could be a strong alternative to EnKF which is subject to some

  17. Procedure to detect impervious surfaces using satellite images and light detection and ranging (lidar) data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Cuenca, B.; Alonso-Rodríguez, M. C.; Domenech-Tofiño, E.; Valcárcel Sanz, N.; Delgado-Hernández, J.; Peces-Morera, Juan José; Arozarena-Villar, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    The detection of impervious surfaces is an important issue in the study of urban and rural environments. Imperviousness refers to water's inability to pass through a surface. Although impervious surfaces represent a small percentage of the Earth's surface, knowledge of their locations is relevant to planning and managing human activities. Impervious structures are primarily manmade (e.g., roads and rooftops). Impervious surfaces are an environmental concern because many processes that modify the normal function of land, air, and water resources are initiated during their construction. This paper presents a novel method of identifying impervious surfaces using satellite images and light detection and ranging (LIDAR) data. The inputs for the procedure are SPOT images formed by four spectral bands (corresponding to red, green, near-infrared and mid-infrared wavelengths), a digital terrain model, and an .las file. The proposed method computes five decision indexes from the input data to classify the studied area into two categories: impervious (subdivided into buildings and roads) and non-impervious surfaces. The impervious class is divided into two subclasses because the elements forming this category (mainly roads and rooftops) have different spectral and height properties, and it is difficult to combine these elements into one group. The classification is conducted using a decision tree procedure. For every decision index, a threshold is set for which every surface is considered impervious or non-impervious. The proposed method has been applied to four different regions located in the north, center, and south of Spain, providing satisfactory results for every dataset.

  18. Remote Laser Cutting of CFRP: Improvements in the Cut Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Johannes; Zaeh, Michael F.; Conrad, Markus

    In the automotive industry carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) are considered as a future key material to reduce the weight of the vehicle. Therefore, capable production techniques are required to process this material in mass industry. E.g., state of the art methods for cutting are limited by the high tool wear or the feasible feed rate. Laser cutting processes are still under investigation. This paper presents detailed new studies on remote laser cutting of CFRP focusing on the influence of the material properties and the quality of the cut surface. By adding light absorbing soot particles to the resin of the matrix, the cutting process is improved and fewer defects emerge.

  19. Comparison of Airborne LiDAR and Satellite Hyperspectral Remote Sensing to Estimate Vascular Plant Richness in Deciduous Mediterranean Forests of Central Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Ceballos

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Andes foothills of central Chile are characterized by high levels of floristic diversity in a scenario, which offers little protection by public protected areas. Knowledge of the spatial distribution of this diversity must be gained in order to aid in conservation management. Heterogeneous environmental conditions involve an important number of niches closely related to species richness. Remote sensing information derived from satellite hyperspectral and airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR data can be used as proxies to generate a spatial prediction of vascular plant richness. This study aimed to estimate the spatial distribution of plant species richness using remote sensing in the Andes foothills of the Maule Region, Chile. This region has a secondary deciduous forest dominated by Nothofagus obliqua mixed with sclerophyll species. Floristic measurements were performed using a nested plot design with 60 plots of 225 m2 each. Multiple predictors were evaluated: 30 topographical and vegetation structure indexes from LiDAR data, and 32 spectral indexes and band transformations from the EO1-Hyperion sensor. A random forest algorithm was used to identify relevant variables in richness prediction, and these variables were used in turn to obtain a final multiple linear regression predictive model (Adjusted R2 = 0.651; RSE = 3.69. An independent validation survey was performed with significant results (Adjusted R2 = 0.571, RMSE = 5.05. Selected variables were statistically significant: catchment slope, altitude, standard deviation of slope, average slope, Multiresolution Ridge Top Flatness index (MrRTF and Digital Crown Height Model (DCM. The information provided by LiDAR delivered the best predictors, whereas hyperspectral data were discarded due to their low predictive power.

  20. Remote laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for the detection and removal of salt on metal and polymeric surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson, M; Grönlund, R; Lundqvist, M; Larsson, A; Kröll, S; Svanberg, S

    2006-10-01

    The detection of contamination such as salt in outdoor high-voltage insulator systems and its subsequent removal are vital for a reliable transmission of electric power. Remote detection of salt on a copper metal surface was carried out by using a mobile laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) Lidar system with a laser wavelength of 355 nm. Detection of salt on a polymeric high-voltage insulator was obtained when an additional lens was inserted into the beam path, and the number of photons that was detected could be calculated by using a calibrated white light source. Ablative cleaning could readily be carried out with LIBS and was verified by observing the disappearance of the sodium D-line emission.

  1. Surface rupture characteristics of the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake from field data and correlation of lidar and optical imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajoie, L. J.; Nissen, E.; Hollingsworth, J.; Maruyama, T.; Chiba, T.

    2016-12-01

    The Kumamoto earthquake sequence of April, 2016 included a Mw 6.2 foreshock on April 14th, followed two days later by the Mw 7.0 mainshock. Here we present a preliminary investigation of the mainshock surface rupture and shallow slip characteristics, including an estimation of the shallow slip deficit and analysis of geometrical rupture propagation effects. We use a combination of fault offsets surveyed on the ground by the Geological Survey of Japan, together with near-field surface displacements calculated from lidar and optical image correlation. We use two 0.5 meter digital surface models provided by Asia Air Survey Co. that are derived from lidar data collected in surveys flown following the foreshock on April 15th, and eight days after the mainshock on April 24th. Although the surface models have not been processed to remove vegetation, the close temporal spacing of acquisitions minimizes non-tectonic surface changes. We also use 2 meter resolution SPOT 7 stereo images collected on December 12th, 2015 and April 20th, 2016. Although the elapsed time between acquisitions is larger for the SPOT 7 images than the lidar data (and includes foreshock surface deformation), it is possible to calculate 3-dimensional displacements using stereo-images and derivative digital elevation models. Lidar and optical datasets were each separately correlated using the COSI-Corr software package, allowing a qualitative comparison of the displacement fields from the two independent datasets. Ongoing work aims to compute the full 3-dimensional displacement field from both datasets.

  2. Connecting meteorology to surface transport in aeolian landscapes: Peering into the boundary layer with Doppler lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, A.; Jerolmack, D. J.; Edmonds, D. A.; Ewing, R. C.; Wanker, M.; David, S. R.

    2017-12-01

    Aolian sand dunes grow to 100s or 1000s of meters in wavelength by sand saltation, which also produces dust plumes that feed cloud formation and may spread around the world. The relations among sediment transport, landscape dynamics and wind are typically observed at the limiting ends of the relevant range: highly resolved and localized ground observations of turbulence and relevant fluxes; or regional and synoptic-scale meteorology and satellite imagery. Between the geostrophic winds aloft and shearing stress on the Earth's surface is the boundary layer, whose stability and structure determines how momentum is transferred and ultimately entrains sediment. Although the literature on atmospheric boundary layer flows is mature, this understanding is rarely applied to aeolian landscape dynamics. Moreover, there are few vertically and time-resolved datasets of atmospheric boundary layer flows in desert sand seas, where buoyancy effects are most pronounced. Here we employ a ground-based upward-looking doppler lidar to examine atmospheric boundary layer flow at the upwind margin of the White Sands (New Mexico) dune field, providing continuous 3D wind velocity data from the surface to 300-m aloft over 70 days of the characteristically windy spring season. Data show highly resolved daily cyles of convective instabilty due to daytime heating and stable stratification due to nightime cooling which act to enhance or depress, respectively, the surface wind stresses for a given free-stream velocity. Our data implicate convective instability in driving strong saltation and dust emission, because enhanced mixing flattens the vertical velocity profile (raising surface wind speed) while upward advection helps to deliver dust to the high atmosphere. We also find evidence for Ekman spiralling, with a magnitude that depends on atmospheric stability. This spiralling gives rise to a deflection in the direction between geostrophic and surface winds, that is significant for the

  3. Integrating remotely sensed surface water extent into continental scale hydrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revilla-Romero, Beatriz; Wanders, Niko; Burek, Peter; Salamon, Peter; de Roo, Ad

    2016-12-01

    In hydrological forecasting, data assimilation techniques are employed to improve estimates of initial conditions to update incorrect model states with observational data. However, the limited availability of continuous and up-to-date ground streamflow data is one of the main constraints for large-scale flood forecasting models. This is the first study that assess the impact of assimilating daily remotely sensed surface water extent at a 0.1° × 0.1° spatial resolution derived from the Global Flood Detection System (GFDS) into a global rainfall-runoff including large ungauged areas at the continental spatial scale in Africa and South America. Surface water extent is observed using a range of passive microwave remote sensors. The methodology uses the brightness temperature as water bodies have a lower emissivity. In a time series, the satellite signal is expected to vary with changes in water surface, and anomalies can be correlated with flood events. The Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) is a Monte-Carlo implementation of data assimilation and used here by applying random sampling perturbations to the precipitation inputs to account for uncertainty obtaining ensemble streamflow simulations from the LISFLOOD model. Results of the updated streamflow simulation are compared to baseline simulations, without assimilation of the satellite-derived surface water extent. Validation is done in over 100 in situ river gauges using daily streamflow observations in the African and South American continent over a one year period. Some of the more commonly used metrics in hydrology were calculated: KGE', NSE, PBIAS%, R 2 , RMSE, and VE. Results show that, for example, NSE score improved on 61 out of 101 stations obtaining significant improvements in both the timing and volume of the flow peaks. Whereas the validation at gauges located in lowland jungle obtained poorest performance mainly due to the closed forest influence on the satellite signal retrieval. The conclusion is that

  4. Spatial aggregation of land surface characteristics : impact of resolution of remote sensing data on land surface modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelgrum, H.

    2000-01-01

    Land surface models describe the exchange of heat, moisture and momentum between the land surface and the atmosphere. These models can be solved regionally using remote sensing measurements as input. Input variables which can be derived from remote sensing measurements are surface albedo,

  5. 2012 MEGIS Topographic Lidar: Statewide Lidar Project Areas 2 and 3 (Mid-Coastal Cleanup), Maine

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LiDAR data is a remotely sensed high resolution elevation data collected by an airborne platform. The LiDAR sensor uses a combination of laser range finding, GPS...

  6. 2012 MEGIS Topographic Lidar: Statewide Lidar Project Area 1 (Aroostook), Maine

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LiDAR data is a remotely sensed high resolution elevation data collected by an airborne platform. The LiDAR sensor uses a combination of laser range finding, GPS...

  7. Dynamic surface fault tolerant control for underwater remotely operated vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldini, Alessandro; Ciabattoni, Lucio; Felicetti, Riccardo; Ferracuti, Francesco; Freddi, Alessandro; Monteriù, Andrea

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we present a two stages actuator Fault Tolerant Control (FTC) strategy for the trajectory tracking of a Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV). Dynamic Surface Control (DSC) is used to generate the moment and forces required by the vehicle to perform the desired motion. In the second stage of the control system, a fault tolerant thruster allocation policy is employed to distribute moment and forces among the thrusters. Exhaustive simulations have been carried out in order to compare the performance of the proposed solution with respect to different control techniques (i.e., PID, backstepping and sliding mode approaches). Saturations, actuator dynamics, sensor noises and time discretization are considered, in fault-free and faulty conditions. Furthermore, in order to provide a fair and exhaustive comparison of the control techniques, the same meta-heuristic approach, namely Artificial Bee Colony algorithm (ABC), has been employed to tune the controllers parameters. Copyright © 2018 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. In situ correlative measurements for the ultraviolet differential absorption lidar and the high spectral resolution lidar air quality remote sensors: 1980 PEPE/NEROS program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, G. L.; Beck, S. M.; Mathis, J. J., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    In situ correlative measurements were obtained with a NASA aircraft in support of two NASA airborne remote sensors participating in the Environmental Protection Agency's 1980persistent elevated pollution episode (PEPE) and Northeast regional oxidant study (NEROS) field program in order to provide data for evaluating the capability of two remote sensors for measuring mixing layer height, and ozone and aerosol concentrations in the troposphere during the 1980 PEPE/NEROS program. The in situ aircraft was instrumented to measure temperature, dewpoint temperature, ozone concentrations, and light scattering coefficient. In situ measurements for ten correlative missions are given and discussed. Each data set is presented in graphical and tabular format aircraft flight plans are included.

  9. Extreme dust storm over the eastern Mediterranean in September 2015: satellite, lidar, and surface observations in the Cyprus region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.-E. Mamouri

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A record-breaking dust storm originating from desert regions in northern Syria and Iraq occurred over the eastern Mediterranean in September 2015. In this contribution of a series of two articles (part 1, observations; part 2, atmospheric modeling, we provide a comprehensive overview of the aerosol conditions during this extreme dust outbreak in the Cyprus region. These observations are based on satellite observations (MODIS, moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer of aerosol optical thickness (AOT and Ångström exponent, surface particle mass (PM10 concentrations measured at four sites in Cyprus, visibility observations at three airports in southern Cyprus and corresponding conversion products (particle extinction coefficient, dust mass concentrations, EARLINET (European Aerosol Research Lidar Network lidar observations of dust vertical layering over Limassol, particle optical properties (backscatter, extinction, lidar ratio, linear depolarization ratio, and derived profiles of dust mass concentrations. Maximum 550 nm AOT exceeded values of 5.0, according to MODIS, and the mass loads were correspondingly >  10 g m−2 over Larnaca and Limassol during the passage of an extremely dense dust front on 8 September 2015. Hourly mean PM10 values were close to 8000 µg m−3 and the observed meteorological optical range (visibility was reduced to 300–750 m at Larnaca and Limassol. The visibility observations suggest peak values of the near-surface total suspended particle (TSP extinction coefficients of 6000 Mm−1 and thus TSP mass concentrations of 10 000 µg m−3. The Raman polarization lidar observations mainly indicated a double layer structure of the dust plumes (reaching to about 4 km height, pointing to at least two different dust source regions. Dust particle extinction coefficients (532 nm already exceeded 1000 Mm−1 and the mass concentrations reached 2000 µg m−3 in the elevated dust layers on

  10. Surface-Wave Relocation of Remote Continental Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kintner, J. A.; Ammon, C. J.; Cleveland, M.

    2017-12-01

    Accurate hypocenter locations are essential for seismic event analysis. Single-event location estimation methods provide relatively imprecise results in remote regions with few nearby seismic stations. Previous work has demonstrated that improved relative epicentroid precision in oceanic environments is obtainable using surface-wave cross correlation measurements. We use intermediate-period regional and teleseismic Rayleigh and Love waves to estimate relative epicentroid locations of moderately-sized seismic events in regions around Iran. Variations in faulting geometry, depth, and intermediate-period dispersion make surface-wave based event relocation challenging across this broad continental region. We compare and integrate surface-wave based relative locations with InSAR centroid location estimates. However, mapping an earthquake sequence mainshock to an InSAR fault deformation model centroid is not always a simple process, since the InSAR observations are sensitive to post-seismic deformation. We explore these ideas using earthquake sequences in western Iran. We also apply surface-wave relocation to smaller magnitude earthquakes (3.5 wave dispersion. Frequency-domain inter-event phase observations are used to understand the time-domain cross-correlation information, and to choose the appropriate band for applications using shorter periods. Over short inter-event distances, the changing group velocity does not strongly degrade the relative locations. For small-magnitude seismic events in continental regions, surface-wave relocation does not appear simple enough to allow broad routine application, but using this method to analyze individual earthquake sequences can provide valuable insight into earthquake and faulting processes.

  11. Voxel-Based LIDAR Analysis and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagstrom, Shea T.

    One of the greatest recent changes in the field of remote sensing is the addition of high-quality Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) instruments. In particular, the past few decades have been greatly beneficial to these systems because of increases in data collection speed and accuracy, as well as a reduction in the costs of components. These improvements allow modern airborne instruments to resolve sub-meter details, making them ideal for a wide variety of applications. Because LIDAR uses active illumination to capture 3D information, its output is fundamentally different from other modalities. Despite this difference, LIDAR datasets are often processed using methods appropriate for 2D images and that do not take advantage of its primary virtue of 3-dimensional data. It is this problem we explore by using volumetric voxel modeling. Voxel-based analysis has been used in many applications, especially medical imaging, but rarely in traditional remote sensing. In part this is because the memory requirements are substantial when handling large areas, but with modern computing and storage this is no longer a significant impediment. Our reason for using voxels to model scenes from LIDAR data is that there are several advantages over standard triangle-based models, including better handling of overlapping surfaces and complex shapes. We show how incorporating system position information from early in the LIDAR point cloud generation process allows radiometrically-correct transmission and other novel voxel properties to be recovered. This voxelization technique is validated on simulated data using the Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Image Generation (DIRSIG) software, a first-principles based ray-tracer developed at the Rochester Institute of Technology. Voxel-based modeling of LIDAR can be useful on its own, but we believe its primary advantage is when applied to problems where simpler surface-based 3D models conflict with the requirement of realistic geometry. To

  12. Estimating the relationship between urban 3D morphology and land surface temperature using airborne LiDAR and Landsat-8 Thermal Infrared Sensor data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    Urban forests are known for mitigating the urban heat island effect and heat-related health issues by reducing air and surface temperature. Beyond the amount of the canopy area, however, little is known what kind of spatial patterns and structures of urban forests best contributes to reducing temperatures and mitigating the urban heat effects. Previous studies attempted to find the relationship between the land surface temperature and various indicators of vegetation abundance using remote sensed data but the majority of those studies relied on two dimensional area based metrics, such as tree canopy cover, impervious surface area, and Normalized Differential Vegetation Index, etc. This study investigates the relationship between the three-dimensional spatial structure of urban forests and urban surface temperature focusing on vertical variance. We use a Landsat-8 Thermal Infrared Sensor image (acquired on July 24, 2014) to estimate the land surface temperature of the City of Sacramento, CA. We extract the height and volume of urban features (both vegetation and non-vegetation) using airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) and high spatial resolution aerial imagery. Using regression analysis, we apply empirical approach to find the relationship between the land surface temperature and different sets of variables, which describe spatial patterns and structures of various urban features including trees. Our analysis demonstrates that incorporating vertical variance parameters improve the accuracy of the model. The results of the study suggest urban tree planting is an effective and viable solution to mitigate urban heat by increasing the variance of urban surface as well as evaporative cooling effect.

  13. Remote Sensing of Three-dimensional Winds with Elastic Lidar: Explanation of Maximum Cross-correlation Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttler, William T.; Soriano, Cecilia; Baldasano, Jose M.; Nickel, George H.

    Maximum cross-correlation provides a method toremotely de-ter-mine high-lyre-solved three-dimensional fields of horizontalwinds with e-las-tic li-darthrough-out large volumes of the planetaryboundary layer (PBL). This paperdetails the technique and shows comparisonsbetween elastic lidar winds, remotelysensed laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) windprofiles, and radiosonde winds.Radiosonde wind data were acquired at Barcelona,Spain, during the BarcelonaAir-Quality Initiative (1992), and the LDVwind data were acquired at SunlandPark, New Mexico during the 1994 Border AreaAir-Quality Study. Comparisonsshow good agreement between the differentinstruments, and demonstrate the methoduseful for air pollution management at thelocal/regional scale. Elastic lidar windscould thus offer insight into aerosol andpollution transport within the PBL. Lidarwind fields might also be used to nudge orimprove initialization and evaluation ofatmospheric meteorological models.

  14. Channel Storage change: a new remote sensed surface water measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coss, S. P.; Durand, M. T.; Yi, Y.; Guo, Q.; Shum, C. K.; Allen, G. H.; Pavelsky, T.

    2017-12-01

    Here we present river channel storage change (CSC) measurements for 17 major world rivers from 2002-2016. We combined interpolated daily 1 km resolution Global River Radar Altimeter Time Series (GRRATS) river surface elevation data with static widths from the global river Global River Widths from Landsat (GRWL) dataset, to generate preliminary channel storage measurements. CSC is a previously unmeasured component of the terrestrial water balance It is a fundamental Earth science quantity with global bearing on floodplains, ecology, and geochemistry. CSC calculations require only remote sensed data, making them an ideal tool for studying remote regions where hydrological data is not easily accessible. CSC is uniquely suited to determine the role of hydrologic and hydraulic controls in basins with strong seasonal cycles (freeze-up and break-up). The cumulative CSC anomaly can impart spatial details that discharge measurements cannot. With this new measurement, we may be able to determine critical hydrological and hydraulic controls on rapidly changing systems like Arctic rivers. Results for Mississippi River indicate that peak CSC anomaly was the highest in 2011 (12.6 km3) and minimum CSC anomaly was in 2012 (-12.2 km3). Peak CSC has most frequently occurs in May (5 years), but has come as late in the year as July, and as early as January. Results for the Yukon River indicate that peak CSC anomaly was the highest in 2013 (13.9 km3) and minimum CSC anomaly was in 2010 (-14.2 km3). Peak CSC has most frequently come in early to mid-June (4-18), but has occurred in May (19-31) four years in the study period (three of the last 6 years) and once on April 30th.

  15. Overview of the Chinese lidar satellite development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinwei; Dai, Jun; He, Tao; Zhao, Chenguang; Huang, Jin; Li, Xu; Huang, Genghua; Cao, Haiyi

    2017-11-01

    The Domestic Spaceborne Lidar as a pivotal method in satellite remote sensing is introduced, including the development status and the key technology. By analysing the Lidar system design among the weighted Chang'e-1, resource satellite, the expectation of Spaceborne Lidar Development is released.

  16. Integration of LiDAR and cropmark remote sensing for the study of fluvial and anthropogenic landforms in the Brenta-Bacchiglione alluvial plain (NE Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninfo, Andrea; Mozzi, Paolo; Abbà, Tiziano

    2016-05-01

    The geomorphological study of alluvial plains takes great advantage from the integration of detailed altimetry with high-resolution images, especially in the lower-relief sectors, like those in the distal plain of the Brenta and Bacchiglione rivers near the city of Padua (mean slope 1-0.8‰). The LiDAR data which were specifically acquired for this research (Riegl LMS-Q560, mean density 7 points/m2, overall area 123 km2), were classified and interpolated in order to map fluvial and anthropogenic landforms. The acquisition was carried out in a moment of minimal vegetation luxuriance (March 2011), in order to minimize ground cover. The DEM (z accuracy hand augerings and description of stratigraphic sections in pits, in order to validate the remote sensing interpretations. The detailed topography allowed the identification and mapping of low rise interfluves and scarps (morphology of the multi-stratified archeological mound in the historical center of Padua. The remote sensing of cropmarks is the most appropriate method to complete the mapping of the numerous fluvial forms that have little or no topographic expression being too small (i.e. minor crevasse channels and splays) and/or flattened by anthropogenic activity (mainly plowing). LiDAR intensity permitted a precise mapping of LGM deposits that have shown peculiar reflectivity related to specific soil characteristics (i.e., presence of calcic horizons in well-drained, elevated position). High resolution images and LiDAR DEM allow the analysis of this largely anthropized low-plain environment at cell-size scale of 0.5-1 m, i.e. approximating the original complexity of the alluvial sedimentary environment. The results bring advances in the comprehension of the Last Glacial Maximum and Holocene evolution of the Brenta-Bacchiglione plain. The large-scale mapping of paleohydrographic features led to the recognition of different fluvial styles adopted by the Brenta River: i) braided to wandering paleochannels, 100

  17. Mapping multi-scale vascular plant richness in a forest landscape with integrated LiDAR and hyperspectral remote-sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkenberg, C R; Zhu, K; Peet, R K; Song, C

    2018-02-01

    The central role of floristic diversity in maintaining habitat integrity and ecosystem function has propelled efforts to map and monitor its distribution across forest landscapes. While biodiversity studies have traditionally relied largely on ground-based observations, the immensity of the task of generating accurate, repeatable, and spatially-continuous data on biodiversity patterns at large scales has stimulated the development of remote-sensing methods for scaling up from field plot measurements. One such approach is through integrated LiDAR and hyperspectral remote-sensing. However, despite their efficiencies in cost and effort, LiDAR-hyperspectral sensors are still highly constrained in structurally- and taxonomically-heterogeneous forests - especially when species' cover is smaller than the image resolution, intertwined with neighboring taxa, or otherwise obscured by overlapping canopy strata. In light of these challenges, this study goes beyond the remote characterization of upper canopy diversity to instead model total vascular plant species richness in a continuous-cover North Carolina Piedmont forest landscape. We focus on two related, but parallel, tasks. First, we demonstrate an application of predictive biodiversity mapping, using nonparametric models trained with spatially-nested field plots and aerial LiDAR-hyperspectral data, to predict spatially-explicit landscape patterns in floristic diversity across seven spatial scales between 0.01-900 m 2 . Second, we employ bivariate parametric models to test the significance of individual, remotely-sensed predictors of plant richness to determine how parameter estimates vary with scale. Cross-validated results indicate that predictive models were able to account for 15-70% of variance in plant richness, with LiDAR-derived estimates of topography and forest structural complexity, as well as spectral variance in hyperspectral imagery explaining the largest portion of variance in diversity levels. Importantly

  18. Exploring the Atmosphere with Lidars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Laser remote sensing of the atmosphere is generally referred as. LIDAR, the acronym for LIght Detection And Ranging. Simi- lar to radar, in lidar, a laser pulse is sent into the atmosphere and is used as a spectroscopic probe of its physical state and chemical composition. The emitted laser beam interacts with the atmo-.

  19. Understanding Europa's Surface Texture from Remote Sensing Photopolarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, R. M.; Boryta, M. D.; Hapke, B. W.; Shkuratov, Y.; Vandervoort, K.; Vides, C. L.

    2016-12-01

    We use a Goniometric Photopolarimeter (GPP) to make angular scattering reflectance and polarization measurements of the light reflected from particulate materials that simulate a planetary regolith. We compare these laboratory results to astronomical remote sensing observations in an effort to understand the chemical and textural state of object's surface. The GPP employs the Helmholtz Reciprocity Principle (1,2) -the incident light is linearly polarized - the intensity of the reflected component is measured. The light encounters fewer optical surfaces, improving signal to noise. These lab data are physically equivalent to the astronomical data. Our reflectance and polarization phase curves of highly reflective, fine grained, media simulate the regolith of Jupiter's satellite Europa. Our laboratory data exhibit polarization phase curves that are remarkably similar to reports by experienced astronomers (4). Our previous reflectance phase curve data of the same materials also agree with the reflectance phase curves reported by same astronomical observers (5). We find these materials exhibit an increase in circular polarization ratio with decreasing phase angle (3). This suggests coherent backscattering (CB) of photons in the regolith (3). Shkuratov et al. report that the polarization properties of these particulate media are also consistent with the CB enhancement process (5). Our results replicate the astronomical data and indicate that Europa's regolith is fine-grained, highly porous with void space exceeding 90%. Future spacecraft missions to the Jovian system will enhance science return by incorporating angular scattering measurements of the reflectance and polarizatin of the surface. Minnaert, M. (1941).Asrophys. J., 93, 403-410. Hapke, B. W. (2012). ISBN 978-0-521-88349-8 Nelson, R. M. et al. (1998). Icarus, 131, 223-230. Rosenbush, V. et al. (2015). ISBN 978-1-107-04390-9, pp 340-359. Shkuratov, Yu. et al. (2002) Icarus 159, 396-416.

  20. 2004 Connecticut Coastline Lidar Mapping

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LIDAR data is remotely sensed high-resolution elevation data collected by an airborne collection platform. Using a combination of laser rangefinding, GPS positioning...

  1. Advances in Electrostatic Dust Detection on Remote Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voinier, C; Skinner, C H; Roquemore, A L

    2005-02-09

    The inventory of dust in next-step magnetic fusion devices will be regulated for safety reasons, however diagnostics to measure in-vessel dust are still in their infancy. Advances in dust particle detection on remote surfaces are reported. Two grids of interlocking circuit traces with spacing in the range 125 mu m to 25 mu m are biased to 30 V. Impinging dust creates a short circuit and the result current pulse is recorded. The detector response was measured with particles scraped from a carbon fiber composite tile and sorted by size category. The finest 25 mu m grid showed a sensitivity more than an order of magnitude higher than the 125 mu m grid. The response to the finest particle categories (5 30 mu m) was two orders of magnitude higher than the largest (125 250 mu m) category. Longer duration current pulses were observed from the coarser particles. The results indicate a detection threshold for fine particles below 1 mu g/cm^2.

  2. Advances in Electrostatic Dust Detection on Remote Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voinier, C.; Skinner, C.H.; Roquemore, A.L.

    2005-01-01

    The inventory of dust in next-step magnetic fusion devices will be regulated for safety reasons, however diagnostics to measure in-vessel dust are still in their infancy. Advances in dust particle detection on remote surfaces are reported. Two grids of interlocking circuit traces with spacing in the range 125 (micro)m to 25 (micro)m are biased to 30 V. Impinging dust creates a short circuit and the result current pulse is recorded. The detector response was measured with particles scraped from a carbon fiber composite tile and sorted by size category. The finest 25 (micro)m grid showed a sensitivity more than an order of magnitude higher than the 125 (micro)m grid. The response to the finest particle categories (5-30 (micro)m) was two orders of magnitude higher than the largest (125-250 (micro)m) category. Longer duration current pulses were observed from the coarser particles. The results indicate a detection threshold for fine particles below 1 (micro)g/cm 2

  3. Remote mapping of vegetation and geological features by lidar in the 9-11-μm region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foy, Bernard R.; McVey, Brian D.; Petrin, Roger R.; Tiee, Joe J.; Wilson, Carl W.

    2001-01-01

    We report examples of the use of a scanning tunable CO 2 laser lidar system in the 9-11-μm region to construct images of vegetation and rocks at ranges as far as 5 km from the instrument. Range information is combined with horizontal and vertical distances to yield an image with three spatial dimensions simultaneous with the classification of target type. Object classification is based on reflectance spectra, which are sufficiently distinct to allow discrimination between several tree species, between trees and scrub vegetation, and between natural and artificial targets. Limitations imposed by laser speckle noise are discussed

  4. Estimation of tropical forest height and biomass dynamics using lidar remote sensing at La Selva, Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubayah, R. O.; Sheldon, S. L.; Clark, D. B.; Hofton, M. A.; Blair, J. B.; Hurtt, G. C.; Chazdon, R. L.

    2010-06-01

    In this paper we present the results of an experiment to measure forest structure and biomass dynamics over the tropical forests of La Selva Biological Station in Costa Rica using a medium resolution lidar. Our main objective was to observe changes in forest canopy height, related height metrics, and biomass, and from these map sources and sinks of carbon across the landscape. The Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS) measured canopy structure over La Selva in 1998 and again in 2005. Changes in waveform metrics were related to field-derived changes in estimated aboveground biomass from a series of old growth and secondary forest plots. Pairwise comparisons of nearly coincident lidar footprints between years showed canopy top height changes that coincided with expected changes based on land cover types. Old growth forests had a net loss in height of -0.33 m, while secondary forests had net gain of 2.08 m. Multiple linear regression was used to relate lidar metrics with biomass changes for combined old growth and secondary forest plots, giving an r2 of 0.65 and an RSE of 10.5 Mg/ha, but both parametric and bootstrapped confidence intervals were wide, suggesting weaker model performance. The plot level relationships were then used to map biomass changes across La Selva using LVIS at a 1 ha scale. The spatial patterns of biomass changes matched expected patterns given the distribution of land cover types at La Selva, with secondary forests showing a gain of 25 Mg/ha and old growth forests showing little change (2 Mg/ha). Prediction intervals were calculated to assess uncertainty for each 1 ha cell to ascertain whether the data and methods used could confidently estimate the sign (source or sink) of the biomass changes. The resulting map showed most of the old growth areas as neutral (no net biomass change), with widely scattered and isolated sources and sinks. Secondary forests in contrast were mostly sinks or neutral, but were never sources. By quantifying both the

  5. Surface modification with a remote atmospheric pressure plasma: dc glow discharge and surface streamer regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temmerman, Eef; Akishev, Yuri; Trushkin, Nikolay; Leys, Christophe; Verschuren, Jo

    2005-01-01

    A remote atmospheric pressure discharge working with ambient air is used for the near room temperature treatment of polymer foils and textiles of varying thickness. The envisaged plasma effect is an increase in the surface energy of the treated material, leading, e.g., to a better wettability or adhesion. Changes in wettability are examined by measuring the contact angle or the liquid absorptive capacity. Two regimes of the remote atmospheric pressure discharge are investigated: the glow regime and the streamer regime. These regimes differ mainly in power density and in the details of the electrode design. The results show that this kind of discharge makes up a convenient non-thermal plasma source to be integrated into a treatment installation working at atmospheric pressure

  6. Surface expression of intraplate postglacial faults in Sweden: from LiDAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abduljabbar, Mawaheb; Ask, Maria; Bauer, Tobias; Lund, Björn; Smith, Colby; Mikko, Henrik; Munier, Raymond

    2016-04-01

    Large intraplate earthquakes, up to magnitude 8.0±0.3 (Lindblom et al. 2015) are inferred to have occurred in northern Fennoscandia at the end of, or just after the Weichselian deglaciation. More than a dozen large so-called postglacial faults (PGF) have been found in the region. The present-day microseismic activity is rather high in north Sweden, and there is a correlation between microseismicity and mapped PGF scarps: 71% of the observed earthquakes north of 66°N locate within 30 km to the southeast and 10 km to the northwest of PGFs (Lindblom et al., 2015). Surface expressions of PGFs in Sweden have mainly been mapped using aerial photogrammetry and trenching (e.g. Lagerbäck & Sundh 2008). Their detailed surface geometry may be investigated using the new high-resolution elevation model of Sweden (NNH) that has a vertical- and lateral resolution of 2 m and 0.25 m, respectively. With NNH data, known PGFs have been modified, and a number of new potential PGFs have been identified (Smith et al. 2014; Mikko et al. 2015). However, the detailed variation of their surface expression remains to be determined. Our main objective is to constrain the strike and surface offset (i.e., apparent vertical throw because of soil cover overlays the bedrock) across the PGF scarps. We anticipate using the results to constrain direction of fault motion and paleomagnitudes of PGFs, and in numerical analyzes to investigate the nature of PGFs. We have developed a methodology for analyzing PGF-geomorphology from LiDAR data using two main software platforms (Ask et al. 2015): (1) Move2015 by Midland Valley has been used for constructing 3D models of the surface traces of the PGFs to determine apparent vertical throw. The apparent hanging- and footwall cut off lines are digitized, and subsequent computation of coordinates is rather time efficient and provide continuous data of fault and soil geomorphology that can be statistically analyzed; and (2) ArcGIS 10.3 by Esri has mostly been

  7. Integrated remote sensing and visualization (IRSV) system for transportation infrastructure operations and management, phase two, volume 3 : advanced consideration in LiDAR technology for bridge evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    This report describes Phase Two enhancement of terrestrial LiDAR scanning for bridge damage : evaluation that was initially developed in Phase One. Considering the spatial and reflectivity : information contained in LiDAR scans, two detection algorit...

  8. High resolution remote sensing of water surface patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodget, A.; Visser, F.; Maddock, I.; Carbonneau, P.

    2012-12-01

    The assessment of in-stream habitat availability within fluvial environments in the UK traditionally includes the mapping of patterns which appear on the surface of the water, known as 'surface flow types' (SFTs). The UK's River Habitat Survey identifies ten key SFTs, including categories such as rippled flow, upwelling, broken standing waves and smooth flow. SFTs result from the interaction between the underlying channel morphology, water depth and velocity and reflect the local flow hydraulics. It has been shown that SFTs can be both biologically and hydraulically distinct. SFT mapping is usually conducted from the river banks where estimates of spatial coverage are made by eye. This approach is affected by user subjectivity and inaccuracies in the spatial extent of mapped units. Remote sensing and specifically the recent developments in unmanned aerial systems (UAS) may now offer an alternative approach for SFT mapping, with the capability for rapid and repeatable collection of very high resolution imagery from low altitudes, under bespoke flight conditions. This PhD research is aimed at investigating the mapping of SFTs using high resolution optical imagery (less than 10cm) collected from a helicopter-based UAS flown at low altitudes (less than 100m). This paper presents the initial findings from a series of structured experiments on the River Arrow, a small lowland river in Warwickshire, UK. These experiments investigate the potential for mapping SFTs from still and video imagery of different spatial resolutions collected at different flying altitudes and from different viewing angles (i.e. vertical and oblique). Imagery is processed using 3D mosaicking software to create orthophotos and digital elevation models (DEM). The types of image analysis which are tested include a simple, manual visual assessment undertaken in a GIS environment, based on the high resolution optical imagery. In addition, an object-based image analysis approach which makes use of the

  9. Methods of remote surface chemical analysis for asteroid missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagdeev, R.Z.; Managadze, G.G.; Shutyaev, I.Yu.; Timofeev, P.P.; Szegoe, K.

    1984-06-01

    Different remote sensing methods are discussed which can be applied to investigate the chemical composition of minor bodies of the Solar System. The secondary-ion method, remote laser mass-analysis and electron beam induced X-ray emission analysis are treated in detail. Relative advantages of these techniques are analyzed. The physical limitation of the methods: effects of solar magnetic field and solar wind on the secondary-ion and laser methods and the effect of electrostatic potential of the space apparatus on the ion and electron beam methods are described. First laboratory results of remote laser method are given. (D.Gy.)

  10. Assessment of particle emissions inventories in northeastern U.S., using remote sensing, Lidar technology, air pollution sensors, and a Lagrangian particle dispersion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, Y.; Swofsy, S. C.; Li, L.; Hegarty, J. D.; Nehrkorn, T.; Koutrakis, P.

    2017-12-01

    In the most recent issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, a new study found that 95% of Medicare beneficiaries over the age of 65 showed an increased risk of mortality, even at fine particulate matter (PM2.5) levels below the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). This new finding suggests that although a state may be designated under attainment for meeting the primary and secondary PM2.5 NAAQS, sensitive populations dispersed throughout the region may still be experiencing adverse health effects. To conduct accurate public health impact assessments, reliable information regarding PM2.5 concentrations in cities are required at high spatial and temporal resolutions. A newly developed particle emissions inventory using remote sensing (PEIRS) captured both primary and secondary formation in northeastern U.S. at a 1km x 1km spatial resolution during the period 2002-2014 (Tang et al., 2017). The PEIRS annual emissions inventory used the MODIS satellite to fill-in the spatial gaps where, EPA monitoring stations were not available. However, simulations of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) were a key factor in estimating PM2.5 concentrations on the ground and hence, testing PEIRS products with observationally based quantifications are critical. Recent advances in light ranging and detection (Lidar) technology allow us to estimate PBL heights in cities. This study combines information from a network of Mini Micropulse Lidar (MPL) instruments, meteorological and air pollution measuring sensors, and a Lagrangian particle dispersion model to test the performance of PEIRS at the neighborhood and urban scale. MPL observations were processed using image recognition and fuzzy logic to estimate PBL heights that were inputted into PEIRS to predict daily PM2.5 concentrations. To compare vertical distribution of aerosols, we use our LPDM model "footprints" to predict vertical profiles of PM2.5 distribution at our Lidar locations. Our model-data assimilation improved

  11. Enhanced Modeling of Remotely Sensed Annual Land Surface Temperature Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Z.; Zhan, W.; Jiang, L.

    2017-09-01

    Satellite thermal remote sensing provides access to acquire large-scale Land surface temperature (LST) data, but also generates missing and abnormal values resulting from non-clear-sky conditions. Given this limitation, Annual Temperature Cycle (ATC) model was employed to reconstruct the continuous daily LST data over a year. The original model ATCO used harmonic functions, but the dramatic changes of the real LST caused by the weather changes remained unclear due to the smooth sine curve. Using Aqua/MODIS LST products, NDVI and meteorological data, we proposed enhanced model ATCE based on ATCO to describe the fluctuation and compared their performances for the Yangtze River Delta region of China. The results demonstrated that, the overall root mean square errors (RMSEs) of the ATCE was lower than ATCO, and the improved accuracy of daytime was better than that of night, with the errors decreased by 0.64 K and 0.36 K, respectively. The improvements of accuracies varied with different land cover types: the forest, grassland and built-up areas improved larger than water. And the spatial heterogeneity was observed for performance of ATC model: the RMSEs of built-up area, forest and grassland were around 3.0 K in the daytime, while the water attained 2.27 K; at night, the accuracies of all types significantly increased to similar RMSEs level about 2 K. By comparing the differences between LSTs simulated by two models in different seasons, it was found that the differences were smaller in the spring and autumn, while larger in the summer and winter.

  12. Remote sensing of surface water for environmental flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulbure, M. G.; Kingsford, R.; Lucas, R.; Keith, D.

    2013-12-01

    Environmental flows represent water management activities that release flushes of water stored in dams on regulated rivers during dry periods. These flows aim to mimic natural flow and inundation regimes to maintain ecological health and function of rivers and wetlands. Assessment and understanding of the effectiveness of environmental flows requires quantification of temporal and spatial pattern of surface water and inundation dynamic in a synoptic yet detailed way and understanding dynamics of vegetation response to flooding. Here we focused on the on the entire Murray-Darling Basin (MDB) of Australia as a case study. The MDB is a large semi-arid region with scarce water resources, high hydroclimatic variability and competing water demands, impacted by climate change, altered flow regimes and land use changes. The basin covers 14% of the Australian continent and contains the nation's largest river system, important groundwater systems, and represents the most important agricultural area in the country. We used Landsat TM and ETM+ data time series to synoptically map the dynamic of surface water extent with an internally consistent algorithm over decades. Within the basin-wide study area we carried out a detailed investigation of the largest river red gum forest in the world, a key site for environmental flow and conservation management. Here we tracked the response of vegetation community condition to flooding across space and time. Results show high interannual variability in number and size of flooded areas. Vegetation community response to flooding varied in space and time and with vegetation types, densities and location relative to areas frequently inundated by environmental water release. Knowledge of the spatial and temporal dynamic of flooding and the response of vegetation communities to flooding is important for management of floodplain wetlands and vegetation communities and for investigating effectiveness of environmental flows and flow regimes in the

  13. Space-borne remote sensing of CO2 by IPDA lidar with heterodyne detection: random error estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matvienko, G. G.; Sukhanov, A. Y.

    2015-11-01

    Possibilities of measuring the CO2 column concentration by spaceborne integrated path differential lidar (IPDA) signals in the near IR absorption bands are investigated. It is shown that coherent detection principles applied in the nearinfrared spectral region promise a high sensitivity for the measurement of the integrated dry air column mixing ratio of the CO2. The simulations indicate that for CO2 the target observational requirements (0.2%) for the relative random error can be met with telescope aperture 0.5 m, detector bandwidth 10 MHz, laser energy per impulse 0.3 mJ and averaging 7500 impulses. It should also be noted that heterodyne technique allows to significantly reduce laser power and receiver overall dimensions compared to direct detection.

  14. 2012 NRCS-USGS Tupelo, MS Lidar Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LiDAR data is a remotely sensed high resolution elevation data collected by an airborne platform. The LiDAR sensor uses a combination of laser range finding, GPS...

  15. 2009 - 2011 CA Coastal Conservancy Coastal Lidar Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data is remotely sensed high-resolution elevation data collected by an airborne collection platform. This LiDAR dataset is a...

  16. 2006 FEMA New Jersey Flood Mitigation Lidar: Highlands Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data is remotely sensed high-resolution elevation data collected by an airborne collection platform. LiDAR was flown for...

  17. Semiconductor Laser Lidar Wind Velocity Sensor for Turbine Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigo, Peter John; Hu, Qi; Pedersen, Christian

    2014-01-01

    A dual line-of-sight CW lidar that measures both wind speed and direction is presented . The wind lidar employs a semiconductor laser, which allows for inexpensive remote sensors geared towards enhanced control of wind turbines .......A dual line-of-sight CW lidar that measures both wind speed and direction is presented . The wind lidar employs a semiconductor laser, which allows for inexpensive remote sensors geared towards enhanced control of wind turbines ....

  18. Laser Remote Sensing of Pollution on Water Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunkin, A. F.; Surovegin, Aleksander L.

    1992-01-01

    One of the most important problems of modern environmental science is the detection and identification of various impurities in the ocean. Sources of impurities in sea water are diverse. The most common of them are accidental transport, agricultural, and oil industry spills. Once the ecological balance is disturbed, biological processes in sea water become affected, resulting in changes in chlorophyll concentrations, water turbidity, and temperature. During the last few years, we have created new types of lidars and arranged nearly ten aircraft and shipboard expeditions. Some aircraft expeditions dealt with terrestrial investigations. Others were devoted to oceanological research, the results of which are discussed here. Emphasis is on the detection of phytoplankton chlorophyll and hydrocarbon in sea water.

  19. Impact of the Sun on Remote Sensing of Sea Surface Salinity from Space

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Le Vine, David M; Abraham, Saji; Wentz, F; Lagerloef, G. S

    2005-01-01

    ... to monitor soil moisture and sea surface salinity. Radiation from the sun can impact passive remote sensing systems in several ways, including line-of-sight radiation that comes directly from the sun and enters through antenna side lobes...

  20. Into the third dimension: Benefits of incorporating LiDAR data in wildlife habitat models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melissa J. Merrick; John L. Koprowski; Craig Wilcox

    2013-01-01

    LiDAR (Light detection and ranging) is a tool with potential for characterizing wildlife habitat by providing detailed, three-dimensional landscape information not available from other remote sensing applications. The ability to accurately map structural components such as canopy height, canopy cover, woody debris, tree density, and ground surface has potential to...

  1. Effects of reduced terrestrial LiDAR point density on high-resolution grain crop surface models in precision agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hämmerle, Martin; Höfle, Bernhard

    2014-12-16

    3D geodata play an increasingly important role in precision agriculture, e.g., for modeling in-field variations of grain crop features such as height or biomass. A common data capturing method is LiDAR, which often requires expensive equipment and produces large datasets. This study contributes to the improvement of 3D geodata capturing efficiency by assessing the effect of reduced scanning resolution on crop surface models (CSMs). The analysis is based on high-end LiDAR point clouds of grain crop fields of different varieties (rye and wheat) and nitrogen fertilization stages (100%, 50%, 10%). Lower scanning resolutions are simulated by keeping every n-th laser beam with increasing step widths n. For each iteration step, high-resolution CSMs (0.01 m2 cells) are derived and assessed regarding their coverage relative to a seamless CSM derived from the original point cloud, standard deviation of elevation and mean elevation. Reducing the resolution to, e.g., 25% still leads to a coverage of >90% and a mean CSM elevation of >96% of measured crop height. CSM types (maximum elevation or 90th-percentile elevation) react differently to reduced scanning resolutions in different crops (variety, density). The results can help to assess the trade-off between CSM quality and minimum requirements regarding equipment and capturing set-up.

  2. The Scheimpflug lidar method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brydegaard, Mikkel; Malmqvist, Elin; Jansson, Samuel; Larsson, Jim; Török, Sandra; Zhao, Guangyu

    2017-08-01

    The recent several years we developed the Scheimpflug lidar method. We combined an invention from the 19th century with modern optoelectronics such as diode lasers and CMOS array from the 21st century. The approach exceeds expectations of background suppression, sensitivity and resolution beyond known from time-of-flight lidars. We accomplished multiband elastic atmospheric lidars for resolving single particles and aerosol plumes from 405 nm to 1550 nm. We pursued hyperspectral differential absorption lidar for molecular species. We demonstrated a simple method of inelastic hyperspectral lidar for profiling aquatic environments and vegetation structure. Not least, we have developed polarimetric Scheimpflug lidar with multi-kHz sampling rates for remote modulation spectroscopy and classification of aerofauna. All these advances are thanks to the Scheimpflug principle. Here we give a review of how far we have come and shed light on the limitations and opportunities for future directions. In particular, we show how the biosphere can be resolved with unsurpassed resolution in space and time, and share our expectation on how this can revolutionize ecological analysis and management in relation to agricultural pests, disease vectors and pollinator problematics.

  3. Surface morphology of caldera-forming eruption deposits revealed by lidar mapping of Crater Lake National Park, Oregon - Implications for deposition and surface modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Joel E.; Bacon, Charles R.; Major, Jon J.; Wright, Heather M.; Vallance, James W.

    2017-08-01

    Large explosive eruptions of silicic magma can produce widespread pumice fall, extensive ignimbrite sheets, and collapse calderas. The surfaces of voluminous ignimbrites are rarely preserved or documented because most terrestrial examples are heavily vegetated, or severely modified by post-depositional processes. Much research addresses the internal sedimentary characteristics, flow processes, and depositional mechanisms of ignimbrites, however, surface features of ignimbrites are less well documented and understood, except for comparatively small-volume deposits of historical eruptions. The 7700 calendar year B.P. climactic eruption of Mount Manama, USA, vented 50 km3 of magma, deposited first as rhyodacite pumice fall and then as a zoned rhyodacite-to-andesite ignimbrite as Crater Lake caldera collapsed. Lidar collected during summer 2010 reveals the remarkably well-preserved surface of the Manama ignimbrite and related deposits surrounding Crater Lake caldera in unprecedented detail despite forest cover. The ± 1 m lateral and ± 4 cm vertical resolution lidar allows surface morphologies to be classified. Surface morphologies are created by internal depositional processes and can point to the processes at work when pyroclastic flows come to rest. We describe nine surface features including furrow-ridge sets and wedge-shaped mounds in pumice fall eroded by high-energy pyroclastic surges, flow-parallel ridges that record the passage of multiple pyroclastic flows, perched benches of marginal deposits stranded by more-mobile pyroclastic-flow cores, hummocks of dense clasts interpreted as lag deposit, transverse ridges that mark the compression and imbrication of flows as they came to rest, scarps indicating ignimbrite remobilization, fields of closely spaced pits caused by phreatic explosions, fractures and cracks due to extensional processes resulting from ignimbrite volume loss, and stream channels eroded in the newly formed surface. The nine morphologies

  4. Optical parametric oscillator lidar for the gas constituents sensing in the spectral range of 3-4 μm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharchenko, O. V.; Romanovskii, O. A.; Sadovnikov, S. A.; Yakovlev, S. V.

    2017-10-01

    The applicability of a KTA crystal-based laser system with optical parametric oscillators (OPO) generation to lidar sounding of the atmosphere in the spectral range 3-4 μm is studied in this work. A technique developed for lidar sounding of trace atmospheric gases (TAG) is based on differential absorption lidar (DIAL) method and differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS). The DIAL-DOAS technique is tested to estimate its efficiency for lidar sounding of atmospheric trace gases. The numerical simulation performed shows that a KTA-based OPO laser is a promising source of radiation for remote DIAL-DOAS sounding of the TAGs under study along surface tropospheric paths. A possibility of using Ophir PE25-C and PE10-C piezoelectric sensors for the DIAL gas analysis of the atmosphere is shown. Echoes of the broadband lidar in the above ranges are experimentally detected.

  5. Near-surface and columnar measurements with a micro pulse lidar of atmospheric pollen in Barcelona, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sicard

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We present for the first time continuous hourly measurements of pollen near-surface concentration and lidar-derived profiles of particle backscatter coefficients and of volume and particle depolarization ratios during a 5-day pollination event observed in Barcelona, Spain, between 27 and 31 March 2015. Daily average concentrations ranged from 1082 to 2830 pollen m−3. Platanus and Pinus pollen types represented together more than 80 % of the total pollen. Maximum hourly pollen concentrations of 4700 and 1200 m−3 were found for Platanus and Pinus, respectively. Every day a clear diurnal cycle caused by the vertical transport of the airborne pollen was visible on the lidar-derived profiles with maxima usually reached between 12:00 and 15:00 UT. A method based on the lidar polarization capabilities was used to retrieve the contribution of the pollen to the total aerosol optical depth (AOD. On average the diurnal (09:00–17:00 UT pollen AOD was 0.05, which represented 29 % of the total AOD. Maximum values of the pollen AOD and its contribution to the total AOD reached 0.12 and 78 %, respectively. The diurnal means of the volume and particle depolarization ratios in the pollen plume were 0.08 and 0.14, with hourly maxima of 0.18 and 0.33, respectively. The diurnal mean of the height of the pollen plume was found at 1.24 km with maxima varying in the range of 1.47–1.78 km. A correlation study is performed (1 between the depolarization ratios and the pollen near-surface concentration to evaluate the ability of the former parameter to monitor pollen release and (2 between the depolarization ratios as well as pollen AOD and surface downward solar fluxes, which cause the atmospheric turbulences responsible for the particle vertical motion, to examine the dependency of the depolarization ratios and the pollen AOD upon solar fluxes. For the volume depolarization ratio the first correlation study yields to correlation

  6. Forest inventory with LiDAR and stereo DSM on Washington department of natural resources lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob L. Strunk; Peter J. Gould

    2015-01-01

    DNR’s forest inventory group has completed its first version of a new remote-sensing based forest inventory system covering 1.4 million acres of DNR forest lands. We use a combination of field plots, lidar, NAIP, and a NAIP-derived canopy surface DSM. Given that height drives many key inventory variables (e.g. height, volume, biomass, carbon), remote-sensing derived...

  7. Performance simulations for a spaceborne methane lidar mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiemle, C.; Kawa, S. R.; Quatrevalet, M.; Browell, E. V.

    2014-04-01

    Future spaceborne lidar measurements of key anthropogenic greenhouse gases are expected to close current observational gaps particularly over remote, polar, and aerosol-contaminated regions, where actual in situ and passive remote sensing observation techniques have difficulties. For methane, a "Methane Remote Lidar Mission" was proposed by Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt and Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales in the frame of a German-French climate monitoring initiative. Simulations assess the performance of this mission with the help of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations of the earth's surface albedo and atmospheric optical depth. These are key environmental parameters for integrated path differential absorption lidar which uses the surface backscatter to measure the total atmospheric methane column. Results show that a lidar with an average optical power of 0.45 W at 1.6 µm wavelength and a telescope diameter of 0.55 m, installed on a low Earth orbit platform (506 km), will measure methane columns at precisions of 1.2%, 1.7%, and 2.1% over land, water, and snow or ice surfaces, respectively, for monthly aggregated measurement samples within areas of 50 × 50 km2. Globally, the mean precision for the simulated year 2007 is 1.6%, with a standard deviation of 0.7%. At high latitudes, a lower reflectance due to snow and ice is compensated by denser measurements, owing to the orbital pattern. Over key methane source regions such as densely populated areas, boreal and tropical wetlands, or permafrost, our simulations show that the measurement precision will be between 1 and 2%.

  8. Performance Simulations for a Spaceborne Methane Lidar Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiemle, C.; Kawa, Stephan Randolph; Quatrevalet, Mathieu; Browell, Edward V.

    2014-01-01

    Future spaceborne lidar measurements of key anthropogenic greenhouse gases are expected to close current observational gaps particularly over remote, polar, and aerosol-contaminated regions, where actual in situ and passive remote sensing observation techniques have difficulties. For methane, a "Methane Remote Lidar Mission" was proposed by Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt and Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales in the frame of a German-French climate monitoring initiative. Simulations assess the performance of this mission with the help of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations of the earth's surface albedo and atmospheric optical depth. These are key environmental parameters for integrated path differential absorption lidar which uses the surface backscatter to measure the total atmospheric methane column. Results showthat a lidar with an average optical power of 0.45W at 1.6 µm wavelength and a telescope diameter of 0.55 m, installed on a low Earth orbit platform(506 km), will measure methane columns at precisions of 1.2%, 1.7%, and 2.1% over land, water, and snow or ice surfaces, respectively, for monthly aggregated measurement samples within areas of 50 × 50 km2. Globally, the mean precision for the simulated year 2007 is 1.6%, with a standard deviation of 0.7%. At high latitudes, a lower reflectance due to snow and ice is compensated by denser measurements, owing to the orbital pattern. Over key methane source regions such as densely populated areas, boreal and tropical wetlands, or permafrost, our simulations show that the measurement precision will be between 1 and 2%.

  9. Insect monitoring with fluorescence lidar techniques: feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brydegaard, Mikkel; Guan, Zuguang; Wellenreuther, Maren; Svanberg, Sune

    2009-10-20

    We investigate the possibilities of light detection and ranging (lidar) techniques to study migration of the damselfly species Calopteryx splendens and C. virgo. Laboratory and testing-range measurements at a distance of 60 m were performed using dried, mounted damselfly specimens. Laboratory measurements, including color photography in polarized light and spectroscopy of reflectance and induced fluorescence, reveal that damselflies exhibit reflectance and fluorescence properties that are closely tied to the generation of structural color. Lidar studies on C. splendens of both genders show that gender can be remotely determined, especially for specimens that were marked with Coumarin 102 and Rhodamine 6G dyes. The results obtained in this study will be useful for future field experiments, and provide guidelines for studying damselflies in their natural habitat using lidar to survey the air above the river surface. The findings will be applicable for many other insect species and should, therefore, bring new insights into migration and movement patterns of insects in general.

  10. Volumetric visualization of multiple-return LIDAR data: Using voxels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoker, Jason M.

    2009-01-01

    Elevation data are an important component in the visualization and analysis of geographic information. The creation and display of 3D models representing bare earth, vegetation, and surface structures have become a major focus of light detection and ranging (lidar) remote sensing research in the past few years. Lidar is an active sensor that records the distance, or range, of a laser usually fi red from an airplane, helicopter, or satellite. By converting the millions of 3D lidar returns from a system into bare ground, vegetation, or structural elevation information, extremely accurate, high-resolution elevation models can be derived and produced to visualize and quantify scenes in three dimensions. These data can be used to produce high-resolution bare-earth digital elevation models; quantitative estimates of vegetative features such as canopy height, canopy closure, and biomass; and models of urban areas such as building footprints and 3D city models.

  11. 2009 Bayfield County Lake Superior Lidar Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The LIDAR survey presents digital elevation data sets of a bald earth surface model and 2ft interval contours covering Bayfield County, Wisconsin. The LIDAR data was...

  12. LIDAR for atmospheric backscatter and temperature measurements

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to demonstrate key capabilities of a multifunctional atmospheric lidar. This lidar could be part of a Surface Weather Station to measure atmospheric...

  13. Space-based Lidar Measurements of Greenhouse Gases and Their Projected Impact on Quantification of Surface Sources and Sinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawa, S. R.; Baker, D. F.; Chatterjee, A.; Crowell, S.

    2016-12-01

    The measurement of atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHG), principally CO2 and CH4, from space using active (lidar) sensing techniques has several potentially significant advantages in comparison to missions using passive instrument approaches. A great deal of progress has been made in development of the active methods since the US National Academy of Sciences (NAS) 2007 Decadal Survey recommended the ASCENDS mission (Active Sensing of Carbon Emissions, Nights, Days, and Seasons) for NASA's next generation CO2 observing system. Active GHG missions remain in consideration by the current NAS Decadal Survey for Earth Science 2017. In this presentation, we update the measurement characteristics expected for active GHG sensing, test how these measurements will enhance our ability to quantify GHG surface fluxes, and examine the potential role of active sensing to address carbon cycle issues as required for confident projection of carbon-climate interactions. Over the past decade, laser CO2 instrument concepts, retrieval approaches, and measurement techniques have matured significantly, driven by technology advances and by analysis of data from airborne simulators. Performance simulations updated to match the latest developments show substantially lower random errors, better spatial resolution, and more information content for global XCO2 data than just a few years ago. Observing System Simulation Experiments using global flux inversion models show corresponding improvements in resolving surface fluxes and reducing flux uncertainties for the expected lidar data. Simulations including prospective systematic (bias) errors, which are expected to be lesser for the lidar system compared to passive measurements, provide guidance for instrument design requirements. We will comment on the impact of errors in knowledge of the atmospheric state including the need for coincident measurements of O2 column in order to normalize the column abundances to dry air mole fraction. We will also

  14. Two micron Heterodyne Doppler DIAL Lidar remote sensing of atmospheric CO{sub 2}; Teledetection du CO{sub 2} atmospherique par Lidar DIAL Doppler Heterodyne a 2 microns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibert, F

    2005-11-15

    This work deals with the development of a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) instrument and its use for absolute CO{sub 2} measurements with a 1-2% precision. The first chapter describes the scientific framework of the thesis: atmospheric branch of the carbon cycle, climatic change and Kyoto protocol, present day monitoring network and main space missions. The modeling, experimental and theoretical aspects of the study are presented in the more general framework of the recovery of surface fluxes and atmospheric CO{sub 2} measurements. Chapter 2 treats of the evolution of atmospheric CO{sub 2} at the meso-scale. The time, horizontal and vertical representativeness of a CO{sub 2} measurement is evaluated. The processes at the origin of the variability of a mixing ratio in the different parts of the atmosphere is presented in order to develop an efficient measurement method. Chapter 3 discusses the DIAL measurement and its optimization for a maximum preciseness of the concentration measurement. A particular attention is given to the spectroscopy and to the optimization of parameters like the optical thickness of the air column, the energy of laser pulses in the atmosphere, and the analysis of statistical and systematic errors. Chapter 4 describes the experimental setup 'LIDIA', the existing Lidar used, its transformations and added parts. A particular attention is given to the signal processing. Then follows the presentation and discussion of the measurements performed night and day during the end of 2004 and during 2005: integrated measurements at the ground level and validation using in-situ measurements, vertical measurements inside the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), use of cloudy targets, measurements inside the free troposphere and resolved measurements inside the ABL. The contribution of simultaneous wind and vertical velocity measurements with concentration measurements is used to explain the natural and anthropic processes at the origin of the

  15. LAnd surface remote sensing Products VAlidation System (LAPVAS) and its preliminary application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xingwen; Wen, Jianguang; Tang, Yong; Ma, Mingguo; Dou, Baocheng; Wu, Xiaodan; Meng, Lumin

    2014-11-01

    The long term record of remote sensing product shows the land surface parameters with spatial and temporal change to support regional and global scientific research widely. Remote sensing product with different sensors and different algorithms is necessary to be validated to ensure the high quality remote sensing product. Investigation about the remote sensing product validation shows that it is a complex processing both the quality of in-situ data requirement and method of precision assessment. A comprehensive validation should be needed with long time series and multiple land surface types. So a system named as land surface remote sensing product is designed in this paper to assess the uncertainty information of the remote sensing products based on a amount of in situ data and the validation techniques. The designed validation system platform consists of three parts: Validation databases Precision analysis subsystem, Inter-external interface of system. These three parts are built by some essential service modules, such as Data-Read service modules, Data-Insert service modules, Data-Associated service modules, Precision-Analysis service modules, Scale-Change service modules and so on. To run the validation system platform, users could order these service modules and choreograph them by the user interactive and then compete the validation tasks of remote sensing products (such as LAI ,ALBEDO ,VI etc.) . Taking SOA-based architecture as the framework of this system. The benefit of this architecture is the good service modules which could be independent of any development environment by standards such as the Web-Service Description Language(WSDL). The standard language: C++ and java will used as the primary programming language to create service modules. One of the key land surface parameter, albedo, is selected as an example of the system application. It is illustrated that the LAPVAS has a good performance to implement the land surface remote sensing product

  16. Remote Sensing of Complex Flows by Doppler Wind Lidar: Summary of Issues and Preliminary Recommendations from IEA Wind Task 32 Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, Andrew

    2017-06-21

    IEA Wind Task 32 seeks to identify and mitigate the barriers to the adoption of lidar for wind energy applications. In Phase 1 of the task, a working group looked at the state of the art of wind lidar in complex flow conditions. This presentation is a short summary of that work, given at the start of Phase 2.

  17. Using LiDAR surveys to document floods: A case study of the 2008 Iowa flood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo; Krajewski, Witold F.; Goska, Radek; Young, Nathan

    2017-10-01

    Can we use Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR), an emergent remote sensing technology with wide applications, to document floods with high accuracy? To explore the feasibility of this application, we propose a method to extract distributed inundation depths from a LiDAR survey conducted during flooding. This method consists of three steps: (1) collecting LiDAR data during flooding; (2) classifying the LiDAR observational points as flooded water surface points and non-flooded points, and generating a floodwater surface elevation model; and (3) subtracting the bare earth Digital Terrain Model (DTM) from the flood surface elevation model to obtain a flood depth map. We applied this method to the 2008 Iowa flood in the United States and evaluated the results using the high-water mark measurements, flood extent extracted from SPOT (Small Programmable Object Technology) imagery, and the near-simultaneously acquired aerial photography. The root mean squared error of the LiDAR-derived floodwater surface profile to high-water marks was 30 cm, the consistency between the two flooded areas derived from LiDAR and SPOT imagery was 72% (81% if suspicious isolated ponds in the SPOT-derived extent were removed), and LiDAR-derived flood extent had a horizontal resolution of ∼3 m. This work demonstrates that LiDAR technology has the potential to provide calibration and validation reference data with appreciable accuracy for improved flood inundation modeling.

  18. Studies on surface modification of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) film by remote and direct Ar plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chen; Chen Jierong; Li Ru

    2008-01-01

    Poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) surfaces are modified with remote and direct Ar plasma, and the effects of the modification on the hydrophilicity of PTFE are investigated. The surface microstructures and compositions of the PTFE film were characterized with the goniometer, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Results show that the remote and direct plasma treatments modify the PTFE surface in morphology and composition, and both modifications cause surface oxidation of PTFE films, in the forming of some polar functional groups enhancing polymer wettability. When the remote and direct Ar plasma treats PTFE film, the contact angles decrease from the untreated 108-58 o and 65.2 o , respectively. The effect of the remote Ar plasma is more noticeable. The role of all kinds of active species, e.g. electrons, ions and free radicals involved in plasma surface modification is further evaluated. This shows that remote Ar plasma can restrain the ion and electron etching reaction and enhance radical reaction

  19. Integrated Geohazard Screening Using Remote Sensing, Including Satellite and Helicopter Based Imagery, LiDAR, and Geophysics, in Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan, Central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, A. M.; Kozaci, O.; Hitchcock, C. S.; Konieczny, G.; Garrie, D.

    2015-12-01

    We performed a detailed geohazard investigation of a 5 km-wide, 650km-long corridor through Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan, Central Asia. The study area includes the Rasht and Alai valleys at the boundary between the Pamir Mountains and the Alai Range of the southern Tien Shan. Ongoing collision between the India and Eurasia plates has resulted in the Tien Shan orogenic belt and the Pamir Mountains. Thus the study area is one of the most seismically active regions in the world. Rapid uplift, erosion, and steep slopes give rise to widespread landsliding and massive rock slope failures in both the Pamir and Tien Shan Mountains. Our integrated data acquisition and interpretation plan used airborne and remote sensing methods including satellite based DEMs and high resolution imagery, LiDAR, aerial photography, and helicopter based electromagnetic resistivity (HEM). Analysis of these data sets allowed us to delineate potential geohazards through surficial geologic mapping. Initial desktop geohazard screening included 1:50,000-scale mapping for potential faults, landslides, and liquefiable deposits, which included traffic light-style susceptibility maps for route refinement and hazard mitigation. As part of detailed investigations, continuous HEM data was collected and processed at a spatial sampling interval of approximately 3m. Apparent resistivity was calculated for each of the five operating frequencies over the entire survey area. For the purposes of this study, resistivity values at 10 m and 20 m depths were sliced from the interpolated 3D Differential Resistivity model for use in the analysis. Using GIS, we compared these results with mapped Quaternary units and found good correlation between resistivity contrasts and the boundaries of mapped surficial units. With this confidence, the HEM measurements were further analyzed to identify subsurface features and to develop a 3D geologic model. Based on this analysis we provided a framework for an optimized geotechnical

  20. Lidar instruments proposed for Eos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, William B.; Browell, Edward V.

    1990-01-01

    Lidar, an acronym for light detection and ranging, represents a class of instruments that utilize lasers to send probe beams into the atmosphere or onto the surface of the Earth and detect the backscattered return in order to measure properties of the atmosphere or surface. The associated technology has matured to the point where two lidar facilities, Geodynamics Laser Ranging System (GLRS), and Laser Atmospheric Wind Sensor (LAWS) were accepted for Phase 2 studies for Eos. A third lidar facility Laser Atmospheric Sounder and Altimeter (LASA), with the lidar experiment EAGLE (Eos Atmospheric Global Lidar Experiment) was proposed for Eos. The generic lidar system has a number of components. They include controlling electronics, laser transmitters, collimating optics, a receiving telescope, spectral filters, detectors, signal chain electronics, and a data system. Lidar systems that measure atmospheric constituents or meteorological parameters record the signal versus time as the beam propagates through the atmosphere. The backscatter arises from molecular (Rayleigh) and aerosol (Mie) scattering, while attenuation arises from molecular and aerosol scattering and absorption. Lidar systems that measure distance to the Earth's surface or retroreflectors in a ranging mode record signals with high temporal resolution over a short time period. The overall characteristics and measurements objectives of the three lidar systems proposed for Eos are given.

  1. Characterization of clouds and aerosols by lidar remote sensing with regard to the transfer of UV radiation. Final report; Leitthema 4: Solare UV-B-Strahlung. Teilvorhaben: Charakterisierung von Wolken und Aerosolen durch Lidar-Fernerkundung hinsichtlich des UV-Strahlungstransfers. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeger, H.; Muecke, R.; Kreipl, S.

    2000-05-01

    The investigations characterize aerosols and clouds over Garmisch-Partenkirchen by lidar remote sensing, and support the interpretation of measurements of the transfer of UV radiation. Extensive tests of calibration procedures were performed, and the lidar system was modified to meet the requirements. The focal point were measurements accompanying the CUVRA (Characteristics of the UV Radiation field in the Alps) campaign at IFU in March 1999. 767 lidar measurements in two wavelength channels were performed on 12 days during this campaign. Aerosol and cloud situations were characterized by determining lower and upper layer heights (time resolution down to 1 minute, height resolution down to 15 meters), multi layer situations from ground to the tropopause region (up to 5 aerosol and cloud layers), optical depths at 532 nm and 355 nm (range 0.01 to 3), wavelength dependences of the optical depth between 532 nm and 355 nm (range of wavelength exponent 0 to -2), and lidar ratios (extinction/backscatter) at 532 nm (range 20 to 38). (orig.) [German] Die Untersuchungen charakterisieren Aerosole und Wolken ueber Garmisch-Partenkirchen durch Lidar-Fernerkundung und dienen der Interpretation von Messungen des UV-Strahlungsflusses. Hierzu waren umfangreiche Arbeiten zum Testen von Eichverfahren notwendig, ebenso wie Modifizerungen des Lidarsystems. Schwerpunkt der Untersuchungen waren Messungen waehrend der CUVRA (Characteristics of the UV Radiation field in the Alps) Messkampagne im Maerz 1999 am IFU. Waehrend dieser Kampagne wurden an 12 Messtagen 767 Lidarmessungen in jeweils zwei Wellenlaengenkanaelen durchgefuehrt. Die Aerosol- und Wolkensituationen wurden charakterisiert durch die Bestimmung von Schichtunter- und obergrenzen (Zeitaufloesung bis zu 1 Minute, Hoehenaufloesung bis zu 15 m), der Mehrschichtigkeit vom Boden bis zum Tropopausenbereich (bis zu 5 Aerosol- und Wolkenschichten), der optischen Dicken bei 532 nm und 355 nm (Bereich 0.01 bis 3), der

  2. Lidar - Wind, Raman, and Other Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Rocadenbosch Burillo, Francisco

    2003-01-01

    Lidar stands for Llght Detection and Ranging. Laser radars or lidars, which are optically the closest counterparts of conventional rnicrowave radars, take advantage of the relatively strong interaction of laser light with atmospheric constituents. They offer superior spatial and temporal resolution and are effective remote sensing instruments. Wind, Raman, and other lidar sensing instruments encompass a wide range of systems-unprecedented long-range wind, aerosol, and molecular chemical...

  3. Investigating the influence of LiDAR ground surface errors on the utility of derived forest inventories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade T. Tinkham; Alistair M. S. Smith; Chad Hoffman; Andrew T. Hudak; Michael J. Falkowski; Mark E. Swanson; Paul E. Gessler

    2012-01-01

    Light detection and ranging, or LiDAR, effectively produces products spatially characterizing both terrain and vegetation structure; however, development and use of those products has outpaced our understanding of the errors within them. LiDAR's ability to capture three-dimensional structure has led to interest in conducting or augmenting forest inventories with...

  4. An Easy-to-Use Airborne LiDAR Data Filtering Method Based on Cloth Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wuming Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Separating point clouds into ground and non-ground measurements is an essential step to generate digital terrain models (DTMs from airborne LiDAR (light detection and ranging data. However, most filtering algorithms need to carefully set up a number of complicated parameters to achieve high accuracy. In this paper, we present a new filtering method which only needs a few easy-to-set integer and Boolean parameters. Within the proposed approach, a LiDAR point cloud is inverted, and then a rigid cloth is used to cover the inverted surface. By analyzing the interactions between the cloth nodes and the corresponding LiDAR points, the locations of the cloth nodes can be determined to generate an approximation of the ground surface. Finally, the ground points can be extracted from the LiDAR point cloud by comparing the original LiDAR points and the generated surface. Benchmark datasets provided by ISPRS (International Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing working Group III/3 are used to validate the proposed filtering method, and the experimental results yield an average total error of 4.58%, which is comparable with most of the state-of-the-art filtering algorithms. The proposed easy-to-use filtering method may help the users without much experience to use LiDAR data and related technology in their own applications more easily.

  5. Two-pulse rapid remote surface contamination measurement.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Headrick, Jeffrey M.; Kulp, Thomas J.; Bisson, Scott E.; Reichardt, Thomas A.; Farrow, Roger L.

    2010-11-01

    This project demonstrated the feasibility of a 'pump-probe' optical detection method for standoff sensing of chemicals on surfaces. Such a measurement uses two optical pulses - one to remove the analyte (or a fragment of it) from the surface and the second to sense the removed material. As a particular example, this project targeted photofragmentation laser-induced fluorescence (PF-LIF) to detect of surface deposits of low-volatility chemical warfare agents (LVAs). Feasibility was demonstrated for four agent surrogates on eight realistic surfaces. Its sensitivity was established for measurements on concrete and aluminum. Extrapolations were made to demonstrate relevance to the needs of outside users. Several aspects of the surface PF-LIF physical mechanism were investigated and compared to that of vapor-phase measurements. The use of PF-LIF as a rapid screening tool to 'cue' more specific sensors was recommended. Its sensitivity was compared to that of Raman spectroscopy, which is both a potential 'confirmer' of PF-LIF 'hits' and is also a competing screening technology.

  6. Aquarius and Remote Sensing of Sea Surface Salinity from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeVine, David M.; Lagerloef, G. S. E.; Torrusio, S.

    2012-01-01

    Aquarius is an L-band radiometer and scatterometer instrument combination designed to map the salinity field at the surface of the ocean from space. The instrument is designed to provide global salinity maps on a monthly basis with a spatial resolution of 150 km and an accuracy of 0.2 psu. The science objective is to monitor the seasonal and interannual variation of the large scale features of the surface salinity field in the open ocean. This data will promote understanding of ocean circulation and its role in the global water cycle and climate.

  7. 2005 Oahu/Maui Lidar Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LIDAR data is remotely sensed high-resolution elevation data collected by an airborne collection platform. Using a combination of laser rangefinding, GPS positioning...

  8. 2008 USGS New Jersey Lidar: Somerset County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data support the general geospatial needs of the USGS and other federal agencies. LiDAR data is remotely sensed high-resolution elevation data collected by an...

  9. 2011 USGS Lidar: Orange County (CA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) discrete-return point cloud data are available in the American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS) LAS format....

  10. 2004 USGS Lidar: San Francisco Bay (CA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Lidar (Light detection and ranging) discrete-return point cloud data are available in the American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS) LAS format....

  11. Dimensionless parameterization of lidar for laser remote sensing of the atmosphere and its application to systems with SiPM and PMT detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Agishev, Ravil R.; Comerón Tejero, Adolfo; Rodríguez Gómez, Alejandro Antonio; Sicard, Michaël

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we show a renewed approach to the generalized methodology for atmospheric lidar assessment, which uses the dimensionless parameterization as a core component. It is based on a series of our previous works where the problem of universal parameterization over many lidar technologies were described and analyzed from different points of view. The modernized dimensionless parameterization concept applied to relatively new silicon photomultiplier detectors (SiPMs) and traditional pho...

  12. Calibration Methods for a Space Borne Backscatter Lidar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunz, G.J.

    1996-01-01

    Lidar returns from cloud decks and from the Earth's surface are useful for calibrating single scatter lidar signals from space. To this end analytical methods (forward and backward) are presented for inverting lidar waveforms in terms of the path integrated lidar retum and the transmission losses

  13. Near-surface remote sensing of spatial and temporal variation in canopy phenology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew D. Richardson; Bobby H. Braswell; David Y. Hollinger; Julian P. Jenkins; Scott V. Ollinger

    2009-01-01

    There is a need to document how plant phenology is responding to global change factors, particularly warming trends. "Near-surface" remote sensing, using radiometric instruments or imaging sensors, has great potential to improve phenological monitoring because automated observations can be made at high temporal frequency. Here we build on previous work and...

  14. [An operational remote sensing algorithm of land surface evapotranspiration based on NOAA PAL dataset].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ying-Yu; He, Yan-Bo; Wang, Jian-Lin; Tian, Guo-Liang

    2009-10-01

    Based on the time series 10-day composite NOAA Pathfinder AVHRR Land (PAL) dataset (8 km x 8 km), and by using land surface energy balance equation and "VI-Ts" (vegetation index-land surface temperature) method, a new algorithm of land surface evapotranspiration (ET) was constructed. This new algorithm did not need the support from meteorological observation data, and all of its parameters and variables were directly inversed or derived from remote sensing data. A widely accepted ET model of remote sensing, i. e., SEBS model, was chosen to validate the new algorithm. The validation test showed that both the ET and its seasonal variation trend estimated by SEBS model and our new algorithm accorded well, suggesting that the ET estimated from the new algorithm was reliable, being able to reflect the actual land surface ET. The new ET algorithm of remote sensing was practical and operational, which offered a new approach to study the spatiotemporal variation of ET in continental scale and global scale based on the long-term time series satellite remote sensing images.

  15. Multi-sensor remote sensing parameterization of heat fluxes over heterogeneous land surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faivre, R.D.

    2014-01-01

    The parameterization of heat transfer by remote sensing, and based on SEBS scheme for turbulent heat fluxes retrieval, already proved to be very convenient for estimating evapotranspiration (ET) over homogeneous land surfaces. However, the use of such a method over heterogeneous landscapes (e.g.

  16. Combining surface reanalysis and remote sensing data for monitoring evapotranspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, M.; Tu, K.; Funk, C.; Michaelsen, J.; Williams, Pat; Williams, C.; Ardö, J.; Marie, B.; Cappelaere, B.; Grandcourt, A.; Nickless, A.; Noubellon, Y.; Scholes, R.; Kutsch, W.

    2012-01-01

    Climate change is expected to have the greatest impact on the world's poor. In the Sahel, a climatically sensitive region where rain-fed agriculture is the primary livelihood, expected decreases in water supply will increase food insecurity. Studies on climate change and the intensification of the water cycle in sub-Saharan Africa are few. This is due in part to poor calibration of modeled actual evapotranspiration (AET), a key input in continental-scale hydrologic models. In this study, a model driven by dynamic canopy AET was combined with the Global Land Data Assimilation System realization of the NOAH Land Surface Model (GNOAH) wet canopy and soil AET for monitoring purposes in sub-Saharan Africa. The performance of the hybrid model was compared against AET from the GNOAH model and dynamic model using eight eddy flux towers representing major biomes of sub-Saharan Africa. The greatest improvements in model performance are at humid sites with dense vegetation, while performance at semi-arid sites is poor, but better than individual models. The reduction in errors using the hybrid model can be attributed to the integration of a dynamic vegetation component with land surface model estimates, improved model parameterization, and reduction of multiplicative effects of uncertain data.

  17. i-LOVE: ISS-JEM lidar for observation of vegetation environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Kazuhiro; Sawada, Haruo; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Mizutani, Kohei; Ishii, Shoken; Nishizawa, Tomoaki; Shimoda, Haruhisa; Honda, Yoshiaki; Kajiwara, Koji; Takao, Gen; Hirata, Yasumasa; Saigusa, Nobuko; Hayashi, Masatomo; Oguma, Hiroyuki; Saito, Hideki; Awaya, Yoshio; Endo, Takahiro; Imai, Tadashi; Murooka, Jumpei; Kobatashi, Takashi; Suzuki, Keiko; Sato, Ryota

    2012-11-01

    It is very important to watch the spatial distribution of vegetation biomass and changes in biomass over time, representing invaluable information to improve present assessments and future projections of the terrestrial carbon cycle. A space lidar is well known as a powerful remote sensing technology for measuring the canopy height accurately. This paper describes the ISS(International Space Station)-JEM(Japanese Experimental Module)-EF(Exposed Facility) borne vegetation lidar using a two dimensional array detector in order to reduce the root mean square error (RMSE) of tree height due to sloped surface.

  18. Measurements of surface-layer turbulence in awide norwegian fjord using synchronized long-range doppler wind lidars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheynet, Etienne; Jakobsen, Jasna B.; Snæbjörnsson, Jónas

    2017-01-01

    lidar data with point-measurement to reduce the uncertainties linked to the atmospheric stability and the spatial averaging of the lidar probe volume. The measured lateral coherence was associated with a decay coefficient larger than expected for the along-wind component, with a value around 21...... for a mean wind velocity bounded between 10m·s-1 and 14m·s-1, which may be related to a stable atmospheric stratification....

  19. Application of SMAP Data for Ocean Surface Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fore, A.; Yueh, S. H.; Tang, W.; Stiles, B. W.; Hayashi, A.

    2017-12-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission was launched January 31st, 2015. It is designed to measure the soil moisture over land using a combined active / passive L-band system. Due to the Aquarius mission, L-band model functions for ocean winds and salinity are mature and are directly applicable to the SMAP mission. In contrast to Aquarius, the higher resolution and scanning geometry of SMAP allow for wide-swath ocean winds and salinities to be retrieved. In this talk we present the SMAP Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) and extreme winds dataset and its performance. First we discuss the heritage of SMAP SSS algorithms, showing that SMAP and Aquarius show excellent agreement in the ocean surface roughness correction. Then, we give an overview of some newly developed algorithms that are only relevant to the SMAP system; a new galaxy correction and land correction enabling SSS retrievals up to 40 km from coast. We discuss recent improvements to the SMAP data processing for version 4.0. Next we compare the performance of the SMAP SSS to in-situ salinity measurements obtained from ARGO floats, tropical moored buoys, and ship-based data. SMAP SSS has accuracy of 0.2 PSU on a monthly basis compared to ARGO gridded data in tropics and mid-latitudes. In tropical oceans, time series comparison of salinity measured at 1 m depth by moored buoys indicates SMAP can track large salinity changes within a month. Synergetic analysis of SMAP, SMOS, and Argo data allows us to identify and exclude erroneous buoy data from assessment of SMAP SSS. The resulting SMAP-buoy matchup analysis gives a mean standard deviation (STD) of 0.22 PSU and correlation of 0.73 on weekly scale; at monthly scale the mean STD decreased to 0.17 PSU and the correlation increased to 0.8. In addition to SSS, SMAP provides a view into tropical cyclones having much higher sensitivity than traditional scatterometers. We validate the high-winds using collocations with SFMR during tropical cyclones as well as

  20. Remote control of tissue interactions via engineered photo-switchable cell surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wei; Pulsipher, Abigail; Dutta, Debjit; Lamb, Brian M; Yousaf, Muhammad N

    2014-09-10

    We report a general cell surface molecular engineering strategy via liposome fusion delivery to create a dual photo-active and bio-orthogonal cell surface for remote controlled spatial and temporal manipulation of microtissue assembly and disassembly. Cell surface tailoring of chemoselective functional groups was achieved by a liposome fusion delivery method and quantified by flow cytometry and characterized by a new cell surface lipid pull down mass spectrometry strategy. Dynamic co-culture spheroid tissue assembly in solution and co-culture tissue multilayer assembly on materials was demonstrated by an intercellular photo-oxime ligation that could be remotely cleaved and disassembled on demand. Spatial and temporal control of microtissue structures containing multiple cell types was demonstrated by the generation of patterned multilayers for controlling stem cell differentiation. Remote control of cell interactions via cell surface engineering that allows for real-time manipulation of tissue dynamics may provide tools with the scope to answer fundamental questions of cell communication and initiate new biotechnologies ranging from imaging probes to drug delivery vehicles to regenerative medicine, inexpensive bioreactor technology and tissue engineering therapies.

  1. Remote Control of Tissue Interactions via Engineered Photo-switchable Cell Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wei; Pulsipher, Abigail; Dutta, Debjit; Lamb, Brian M.; Yousaf, Muhammad N.

    2014-01-01

    We report a general cell surface molecular engineering strategy via liposome fusion delivery to create a dual photo-active and bio-orthogonal cell surface for remote controlled spatial and temporal manipulation of microtissue assembly and disassembly. Cell surface tailoring of chemoselective functional groups was achieved by a liposome fusion delivery method and quantified by flow cytometry and characterized by a new cell surface lipid pull down mass spectrometry strategy. Dynamic co-culture spheroid tissue assembly in solution and co-culture tissue multilayer assembly on materials was demonstrated by an intercellular photo-oxime ligation that could be remotely cleaved and disassembled on demand. Spatial and temporal control of microtissue structures containing multiple cell types was demonstrated by the generation of patterned multilayers for controlling stem cell differentiation. Remote control of cell interactions via cell surface engineering that allows for real-time manipulation of tissue dynamics may provide tools with the scope to answer fundamental questions of cell communication and initiate new biotechnologies ranging from imaging probes to drug delivery vehicles to regenerative medicine, inexpensive bioreactor technology and tissue engineering therapies. PMID:25204325

  2. Lidar Detection of Explosives Traces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobrovnikov Sergei M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of remote detection of traces of explosives using laser fragmentation/laser-induced fluorescence (LF/LIF is studied. Experimental data on the remote visualization of traces of trinitrotoluene (TNT, hexogen (RDX, trotyl-hexogen (Comp B, octogen (HMX, and tetryl with a scanning lidar detector of traces of nitrogen-containing explosives at a distance of 5 m are presented.

  3. FULL WAVEFORM ACTIVE HYPERSPECTRAL LIDAR

    OpenAIRE

    T. Hakala; J. Suomalainen; S. Kaasalainen

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a prototype full waveform hyperspectral LiDAR and investigated its potential for remote sensing applications. Traditionally hyperspectral remote sensing is based on passive measurement of sunlit targets. These methods are sensitive to errors in illumination conditions and lack the range information. Our prototype can measure both the range and the spectral information from a single laser pulse. At this stage, the instrument is optimized for short range terrestrial a...

  4. Sensitivity studies for a space-based methane lidar mission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Kiemle

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Methane is the third most important greenhouse gas in the atmosphere after water vapour and carbon dioxide. A major handicap to quantify the emissions at the Earth's surface in order to better understand biosphere-atmosphere exchange processes and potential climate feedbacks is the lack of accurate and global observations of methane. Space-based integrated path differential absorption (IPDA lidar has potential to fill this gap, and a Methane Remote Lidar Mission (MERLIN on a small satellite in polar orbit was proposed by DLR and CNES in the frame of a German-French climate monitoring initiative. System simulations are used to identify key performance parameters and to find an advantageous instrument configuration, given the environmental, technological, and budget constraints. The sensitivity studies use representative averages of the atmospheric and surface state to estimate the measurement precision, i.e. the random uncertainty due to instrument noise. Key performance parameters for MERLIN are average laser power, telescope size, orbit height, surface reflectance, and detector noise. A modest-size lidar instrument with 0.45 W average laser power and 0.55 m telescope diameter on a 506 km orbit could provide 50-km averaged methane column measurement along the sub-satellite track with a precision of about 1% over vegetation. The use of a methane absorption trough at 1.65 μm improves the near-surface measurement sensitivity and vastly relaxes the wavelength stability requirement that was identified as one of the major technological risks in the pre-phase A studies for A-SCOPE, a space-based IPDA lidar for carbon dioxide at the European Space Agency. Minimal humidity and temperature sensitivity at this wavelength position will enable accurate measurements in tropical wetlands, key regions with largely uncertain methane emissions. In contrast to actual passive remote sensors, measurements in Polar Regions will be possible and biases due to aerosol

  5. 2009 - 2011 CA Coastal Conservancy Coastal Lidar Project: Hydro-flattened Bare Earth DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data is remotely sensed high-resolution elevation data collected by an airborne collection platform. This LiDAR dataset is a...

  6. Development of an online platform for streamlining highway LiDAR data collection, sharing, and processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Lidar (a portmanteau of "light" and "radar.") is a remote sensing technology that measures distance by illuminating a target with a laser and analyzing the reflected light. Among other applications, lidar is particularly useful for detailed mapping o...

  7. 2004 Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Bare Earth Topographic LiDAR: Connecticut River

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LiDAR data is remotely sensed high-resolution elevation data collected by an airborne collection platform. The LiDAR files were converted from .PTS format to LAS...

  8. QUANTIFYING FOREST ABOVEGROUND CARBON POOLS AND FLUXES USING MULTI-TEMPORAL LIDAR A report on field monitoring, remote sensing MMV, GIS integration, and modeling results for forestry field validation test to quantify aboveground tree biomass and carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee Spangler; Lee A. Vierling; Eva K. Stand; Andrew T. Hudak; Jan U.H. Eitel; Sebastian Martinuzzi

    2012-04-01

    Sound policy recommendations relating to the role of forest management in mitigating atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) depend upon establishing accurate methodologies for quantifying forest carbon pools for large tracts of land that can be dynamically updated over time. Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) remote sensing is a promising technology for achieving accurate estimates of aboveground biomass and thereby carbon pools; however, not much is known about the accuracy of estimating biomass change and carbon flux from repeat LiDAR acquisitions containing different data sampling characteristics. In this study, discrete return airborne LiDAR data was collected in 2003 and 2009 across {approx}20,000 hectares (ha) of an actively managed, mixed conifer forest landscape in northern Idaho, USA. Forest inventory plots, established via a random stratified sampling design, were established and sampled in 2003 and 2009. The Random Forest machine learning algorithm was used to establish statistical relationships between inventory data and forest structural metrics derived from the LiDAR acquisitions. Aboveground biomass maps were created for the study area based on statistical relationships developed at the plot level. Over this 6-year period, we found that the mean increase in biomass due to forest growth across the non-harvested portions of the study area was 4.8 metric ton/hectare (Mg/ha). In these non-harvested areas, we found a significant difference in biomass increase among forest successional stages, with a higher biomass increase in mature and old forest compared to stand initiation and young forest. Approximately 20% of the landscape had been disturbed by harvest activities during the six-year time period, representing a biomass loss of >70 Mg/ha in these areas. During the study period, these harvest activities outweighed growth at the landscape scale, resulting in an overall loss in aboveground carbon at this site. The 30-fold increase in sampling density

  9. Detection of Small Sea-Surface Targets with a Search Lidar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel, J.C. van den; Bekman, H.H.P.T.; Putten, F.J.M.; Cohen, L.A.

    2007-01-01

    Naval operations in the littoral have to deal with the threat of small sea-surface targets. These targets have a low radar cross-section and low velocity, which makes them hard to detect by radar in the presence of sea clutter. Typical threats include periscopes, jet skies, FIAC’s, and speedboats.

  10. Lidar to lidar calibration of Ground-based Lidar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Garcia, Sergio; Courtney, Michael

    This report presents the result of the lidar to lidar calibration performed for ground-based lidar. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference lidar wind speed measurements with measurement uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding...... lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from the reference lidar measurements are given for information only....

  11. Airborne lidar-based estimates of tropical forest structure in complex terrain: opportunities and trade-offs for REDD+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitold, Veronika; Keller, Michael; Morton, Douglas C; Cook, Bruce D; Shimabukuro, Yosio E

    2015-12-01

    Carbon stocks and fluxes in tropical forests remain large sources of uncertainty in the global carbon budget. Airborne lidar remote sensing is a powerful tool for estimating aboveground biomass, provided that lidar measurements penetrate dense forest vegetation to generate accurate estimates of surface topography and canopy heights. Tropical forest areas with complex topography present a challenge for lidar remote sensing. We compared digital terrain models (DTM) derived from airborne lidar data from a mountainous region of the Atlantic Forest in Brazil to 35 ground control points measured with survey grade GNSS receivers. The terrain model generated from full-density (~20 returns m -2 ) data was highly accurate (mean signed error of 0.19 ± 0.97 m), while those derived from reduced-density datasets (8 m -2 , 4 m -2 , 2 m -2 and 1 m -2 ) were increasingly less accurate. Canopy heights calculated from reduced-density lidar data declined as data density decreased due to the inability to accurately model the terrain surface. For lidar return densities below 4 m -2 , the bias in height estimates translated into errors of 80-125 Mg ha -1 in predicted aboveground biomass. Given the growing emphasis on the use of airborne lidar for forest management, carbon monitoring, and conservation efforts, the results of this study highlight the importance of careful survey planning and consistent sampling for accurate quantification of aboveground biomass stocks and dynamics. Approaches that rely primarily on canopy height to estimate aboveground biomass are sensitive to DTM errors from variability in lidar sampling density.

  12. Remote microscopy and volumetric imaging on the surface of icy satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Alejandro; Nowicki, Keith; Howett, Carly; Feldkhun, Daniel; Retherford, Kurt D.

    2017-10-01

    With NASA PIDDP support we have applied recent advancements in Fourier-domain microscopy to develop an instrument capable of microscopic imaging from meter-scale distances for use on a planetary lander on the surface of an icy satellite or other planetary bodies. Without moving parts, our instrument projects dynamic patterns of laser light onto a distant target using a lightweight large-aperture reflector, which then collects the light scattered or fluoresced by the target on a fast photon-bucket detector. Using Fourier Transform based techniques, we reconstruct an image from the detected light. The remote microscope has been demonstrated to produce 2D images with better than 15 micron lateral resolution for targets at a distance of 5 meters and is capable of linearly proportionally higher resolution at shorter distances. The remote microscope is also capable of providing three-dimensional (3D) microscopic imaging capabilities, allowing future surface scientists to explore the morphology of microscopic features in surface ices, for example. The instrument enables microscopic in-situ imaging during day or night without the use of a robotic arm, greatly facilitating the surface operations for a lander or rover while expanding the area of investigation near a landing site for improved science targeting. We are developing this remote microscope for in-situ planetary exploration as a collaboration between the Southwest Research Institute, LambdaMetrics, and the University of Colorado.

  13. Monitoring of petroleum hydrocarbon pollution in surface waters by a direct comparison of fluorescence spectroscopy and remote sensing techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Domenico, L.; Crisafi, E. (Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Messina (Italy). Thalassografic Inst.); Magazzu, G. (Lecce Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Biology); Puglisi, A. (Mediterranean Oceanological Centre (CEOM), Palermo (Italy)); La Rosa, A. (Air-Survey, Italy s.r.l., Catania (Italy))

    1994-10-01

    Oil pollution levels were estimated using simultaneous acquisition of data from remote sensing by helicopter and fluorescence spectroscopy on surface samples. Laboratory quantitative analysis of hydrocarbons was used to calibrate remotely sensed data. The data were treated using a computer to generate a colour-coded map not attainable with conventional methods representing seawater pollution. Results were in good agreement and indicated that remotely sensed data together with those achieved by fluorescence spectroscopy are applicable for monitoring hydrocarbon pollution. (author)

  14. An innovative rotational Raman lidar to measure the temperature profile from the surface to 30 km altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauchecorne, Alain; Keckhut, Philippe; Mariscal, Jean-François; d'Almeida, Eric; Dahoo, Pierre-Richard; Porteneuve, Jacques

    2016-06-01

    A concept of innovative rotational Raman lidar with daylight measurement capability is proposed to measure the vertical profile of temperature from the ground to the middle stratosphere. The optical filtering is made using a Fabry-Pérot Interferometer with line spacing equal to the line spacing of the Raman spectrum. The detection is made using a linear PMT array operated in photon counting mode. We plan to build a prototype and to test it at the Haute-Provence Observatory lidar facility. to achieve a time resolution permitting the observation of small-scale atmospheric processes playing a role in the troposphere-stratosphere interaction as gravity waves. If successful, this project will open the possibility to consider a Raman space lidar for the global observation of atmospheric temperature profiles.

  15. An innovative rotational Raman lidar to measure the temperature profile from the surface to 30 km altitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hauchecorne Alain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A concept of innovative rotational Raman lidar with daylight measurement capability is proposed to measure the vertical profile of temperature from the ground to the middle stratosphere. The optical filtering is made using a Fabry-Pérot Interferometer with line spacing equal to the line spacing of the Raman spectrum. The detection is made using a linear PMT array operated in photon counting mode. We plan to build a prototype and to test it at the Haute-Provence Observatory lidar facility. to achieve a time resolution permitting the observation of small-scale atmospheric processes playing a role in the troposphere-stratosphere interaction as gravity waves. If successful, this project will open the possibility to consider a Raman space lidar for the global observation of atmospheric temperature profiles.

  16. A One-Source Approach for Estimating Land Surface Heat Fluxes Using Remotely Sensed Land Surface Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongmin Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The partitioning of available energy between sensible heat and latent heat is important for precise water resources planning and management in the context of global climate change. Land surface temperature (LST is a key variable in energy balance process and remotely sensed LST is widely used for estimating surface heat fluxes at regional scale. However, the inequality between LST and aerodynamic surface temperature (Taero poses a great challenge for regional heat fluxes estimation in one-source energy balance models. To address this issue, we proposed a One-Source Model for Land (OSML to estimate regional surface heat fluxes without requirements for empirical extra resistance, roughness parameterization and wind velocity. The proposed OSML employs both conceptual VFC/LST trapezoid model and the electrical analog formula of sensible heat flux (H to analytically estimate the radiometric-convective resistance (rae via a quartic equation. To evaluate the performance of OSML, the model was applied to the Soil Moisture-Atmosphere Coupling Experiment (SMACEX in United States and the Multi-Scale Observation Experiment on Evapotranspiration (MUSOEXE in China, using remotely sensed retrievals as auxiliary data sets at regional scale. Validated against tower-based surface fluxes observations, the root mean square deviation (RMSD of H and latent heat flux (LE from OSML are 34.5 W/m2 and 46.5 W/m2 at SMACEX site and 50.1 W/m2 and 67.0 W/m2 at MUSOEXE site. The performance of OSML is very comparable to other published studies. In addition, the proposed OSML model demonstrates similar skills of predicting surface heat fluxes in comparison to SEBS (Surface Energy Balance System. Since OSML does not require specification of aerodynamic surface characteristics, roughness parameterization and meteorological conditions with high spatial variation such as wind speed, this proposed method shows high potential for routinely acquisition of latent heat flux estimation

  17. Studying groundwater and surface water interactions using airborne remote sensing in Heihe River basin, northwest China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Liu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Managing surface water and groundwater as a unified system is important for water resource exploitation and aquatic ecosystem conservation. The unified approach to water management needs accurate characterization of surface water and groundwater interactions. Temperature is a natural tracer for identifying surface water and groundwater interactions, and the use of remote sensing techniques facilitates basin-scale temperature measurement. This study focuses on the Heihe River basin, the second largest inland river basin in the arid and semi-arid northwest of China where surface water and groundwater undergoes dynamic exchanges. The spatially continuous river-surface temperature of the midstream section of the Heihe River was obtained by using an airborne pushbroom hyperspectral thermal sensor system. By using the hot spot analysis toolkit in the ArcGIS software, abnormally cold water zones were identified as indicators of the spatial pattern of groundwater discharge to the river.

  18. LANDSAT remote sensing: observations of an Appalachian mountaintop surface coal mining and reclamation operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-10-01

    The potential benefits of using LANDSAT remote sensing data by state agencies as an aide in monitoring surface coal mining operations are reviewed. A mountaintop surface mine in eastern Kentucky was surveyed over a 5 year period using satellite multispectral scanner data that were classified by computer analyses. The analyses were guided by aerial photography and by ground surveys of the surface mines procured in 1976. The application of the LANDSAT data indicates that: (1) computer classification of the various landcover categories provides information for monitoring the progress of surface mining and reclamation operations, (2) successive yearly changes in barren and revegetated areas can be qualitatively assessed for surface mines of 100 acres or more of disrupted area, (3) barren areas consisting of limestone and shale mixtures may be recognized, and revegetated areas in various stages of growth may be identified against the hilly forest background

  19. Super-Resolution Mapping of Impervious Surfaces from Remotely Sensed Imagery with Points-of-Interest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuehong Chen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The accurate mapping of impervious surfaces is of key significance for various urban applications. Usually, traditional methods extract the proportion image of impervious surfaces from remote sensing images; however, the proportion image cannot specify where the impervious surfaces spatially distribute within a pixel. Meanwhile, impervious surfaces often locate urban areas and have a strong correlation with the relatively new big (geodata points of interest (POIs. This study, therefore, proposed a novel impervious surfaces mapping method (super-resolution mapping of impervious surfaces, SRMIS by combining a super-resolution mapping technique and POIs to increase the spatial resolution of impervious surfaces in proportion images and determine the accurate spatial location of impervious surfaces within each pixel. SRMIS was evaluated using a 10-m Sentinel-2 image and a 30-m Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI image of Nanjing city, China. The experimental results show that SRMIS generated satisfactory impervious surface maps with better-classified image quality and greater accuracy than a traditional hard classifier, the two existing super-resolution mapping (SRM methods of the subpixel-swapping algorithm, or the method using both pixel-level and subpixel-level spatial dependence. The experimental results show that the overall accuracy increase of SRMIS was from 2.34% to 5.59% compared with the hard classification method and the two SRM methods in the first experiment, while the overall accuracy of SRMIS was 1.34–3.09% greater than that of the compared methods in the second experiment. Hence, this study provides a useful solution to combining SRM techniques and the relatively new big (geodata (i.e., POIs to extract impervious surface maps with a higher spatial resolution than that of the input remote sensing images, and thereby supports urban research.

  20. Thermal infrared remote sensing of surface features for renewable resource applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welker, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    The subjects of infrared remote sensing of surface features for renewable resource applications is reviewed with respect to the basic physical concepts involved at the Earth's surface and up through the atmosphere, as well as the historical development of satellite systems which produce such data at increasingly greater spatial resolution. With this general background in hand, the growth of a variety of specific renewable resource applications using the developing thermal infrared technology are discussed, including data from HCMM investigators. Recommendations are made for continued growth in this field of applications.

  1. A New Framework for Quantifying Lidar Uncertainty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Jennifer, F.; Clifton, Andrew; Bonin, Timothy A.; Churchfield, Matthew J.

    2017-03-24

    As wind turbine sizes increase and wind energy expands to more complex and remote sites, remote sensing devices such as lidars are expected to play a key role in wind resource assessment and power performance testing. The switch to remote sensing devices represents a paradigm shift in the way the wind industry typically obtains and interprets measurement data for wind energy. For example, the measurement techniques and sources of uncertainty for a remote sensing device are vastly different from those associated with a cup anemometer on a meteorological tower. Current IEC standards discuss uncertainty due to mounting, calibration, and classification of the remote sensing device, among other parameters. Values of the uncertainty are typically given as a function of the mean wind speed measured by a reference device. However, real-world experience has shown that lidar performance is highly dependent on atmospheric conditions, such as wind shear, turbulence, and aerosol content. At present, these conditions are not directly incorporated into the estimated uncertainty of a lidar device. In this presentation, we propose the development of a new lidar uncertainty framework that adapts to current flow conditions and more accurately represents the actual uncertainty inherent in lidar measurements under different conditions. In this new framework, sources of uncertainty are identified for estimation of the line-of-sight wind speed and reconstruction of the three-dimensional wind field. These sources are then related to physical processes caused by the atmosphere and lidar operating conditions. The framework is applied to lidar data from an operational wind farm to assess the ability of the framework to predict errors in lidar-measured wind speed.

  2. Retrieval of surface temperature by remote sensing. [of earth surface using brightness temperature of air pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S. K.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1976-01-01

    A simple procedure and computer program were developed for retrieving the surface temperature from the measurement of upwelling infrared radiance in a single spectral region in the atmosphere. The program evaluates the total upwelling radiance at any altitude in the region of the CO fundamental band (2070-2220 1/cm) for several values of surface temperature. Actual surface temperature is inferred by interpolation of the measured upwelling radiance between the computed values of radiance for the same altitude. Sensitivity calculations were made to determine the effect of uncertainty in various surface, atmospheric and experimental parameters on the inferred value of surface temperature. It is found that the uncertainties in water vapor concentration and surface emittance are the most important factors affecting the accuracy of the inferred value of surface temperature.

  3. Lidar cirrus cloud retrieval - methodology and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larroza, Eliane; Keckhut, Philippe; Nakaema, Walter; Brogniez, Gérard; Dubuisson, Philippe; Pelon, Jacques; Duflot, Valentin; Marquestaut, Nicolas; Payen, Guillaume

    2016-04-01

    In the last decades numerical modeling has experimented sensitive improvements on accuracy and capability for climate predictions. In the same time it has demanded the reduction of uncertainties related with the respective input parameters. In this context, high altitude clouds (cirrus) have attracted special attention for their role as radiative forcing. Also such clouds are associated with the vertical transport of water vapor from the surface to upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (URLS) in form of ice crystals with variability of concentration and morphology. Still cirrus formation can occur spatially and temporally in great part of the globe due to horizontal motion of air masses and circulations. Determining accurately the physical properties of cirrus clouds still represents a challenge. Especially the so-called subvisible cirrus clouds (optical depth inferior to 0.03) are invisible for space-based passive observations. On the other hand, ground based active remote sensing as lidar can be used to suppress such deficiency. Lidar signal can provide spatial and temporal high resolution to characterize physically (height, geometric thickness, mean temperature) and optically (optical depth, extinction-to-scattering ratio or lidar ratio, depolarization ratio) the cirrus clouds. This report describes the evolution of the methodology initially adopted to retrieval systematically the lidar ratio and the subsequent application on case studies and climatology on the tropical sites of the globe - São Paulo, Brazil (23.33 S, 46.44 W) and OPAR observatory at Ille de La Réunion (21.07 S, 55.38 W). Also is attempting a synergy between different instrumentations and lidar measurements: a infrared radiometer to estimate the kind of ice crystals compounding the clouds; CALIPSO satellite observations and trajectory model (HYSPLIT) for tracking air masses potentially responsible for the horizontal displacement of cirrus. This last approach is particularly interesting to

  4. Quantitative Evaluation of Surface Color of Tomato Fruits Cultivated in Remote Farm Using Digital Camera Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Atsushi; Suehara, Ken-Ichiro; Kameoka, Takaharu

    To measure the quantitative surface color information of agricultural products with the ambient information during cultivation, a color calibration method for digital camera images and a remote monitoring system of color imaging using the Web were developed. Single-lens reflex and web digital cameras were used for the image acquisitions. The tomato images through the post-ripening process were taken by the digital camera in both the standard image acquisition system and in the field conditions from the morning to evening. Several kinds of images were acquired with the standard RGB color chart set up just behind the tomato fruit on a black matte, and a color calibration was carried out. The influence of the sunlight could be experimentally eliminated, and the calibrated color information consistently agreed with the standard ones acquired in the system through the post-ripening process. Furthermore, the surface color change of the tomato on the tree in a greenhouse was remotely monitored during maturation using the digital cameras equipped with the Field Server. The acquired digital color images were sent from the Farm Station to the BIFE Laboratory of Mie University via VPN. The time behavior of the tomato surface color change during the maturing process could be measured using the color parameter calculated based on the obtained and calibrated color images along with the ambient atmospheric record. This study is a very important step in developing the surface color analysis for both the simple and rapid evaluation of the crop vigor in the field and to construct an ambient and networked remote monitoring system for food security, precision agriculture, and agricultural research.

  5. Satellite remotely-sensed land surface parameters and their climatic effects on urban areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoran, M.; Savastru, R.; Savastru, D.; Ciobanu, M.; Tautan, M. N.; Miclos, S.

    2009-04-01

    Rapid urbanization transforms the natural landscape to anthropogenic urban land and changes surface biogeophysical characteristics.Urban growth affects the ecology of cities in a number of ways, such as eliminating and fragmenting native habitats, modifying local climate conditions, and generating anthropogenic pollutants.Urbanization has changed many landscapes throughout the world with serious ecological consequences.To understand the ecology of urban systems, it is necessary to quantify the spatial and temporal patterns of urbanization, which often requires dynamic modeling and spatial analysis. Geospatial information provided by satellite remote sensing sensors and biogeophysical field data are very useful for urban landuse-landcover dynamics and impacts analysis. The spatial and spectral variability of urban environments present fundamental challenges to deriving accurate remote sensing information for urban areas. By integrating high-resolution and medium-resolution satellite imagery with other geospatial information, have been investigated several land surface parameters including impervious surfaces and land surface temperatures for Bucharest metropolitan area in Romania. Percent impervious surface was used to quantitatively define the spatial extent and development density of urban land use. Land surface temperatures were retrieved by using a single band algorithm that processes both thermal infrared satellite data and total atmospheric water vapour content. Land surface temperatures have been analysed for different land use and land cover categories both in urban as well as in periurban areas. Because of the removal of vegetative cover and the reduction in evaporation over urban impervious surfaces, the urban heterogeneity of land surface and associated spatial extents influence surface thermal conditions. In situ meteorological data were integrated to assess regional climatic conditions. The spatial structure of surface heating influenced by landscape

  6. Semiconductor Laser Wind Lidar for Turbine Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Qi

    This thesis describes an experimentally oriented study of continuous wave (CW) coherent Doppler lidar system design. The main application is remote wind sensing for active wind turbine control using nacelle mounted lidar systems; and the primary focus is to devise an industrial instrument that can...... been investigated. The results hows a much less SNR penalty than expected, due to a finite signal bandwidth of the wind signal.For applications such as active yaw or pitch control, multiple lines of sight are required of the lidar system. Thus, two different beam steering methods have been investigated...... improve the efficiency of harvesting wind energy in commercial wind farms. This work attempts to provide a complete investigation of all the necessary building blocks in a CW wind lidar, from the light source to the optical transceiver. The basic concept of Doppler lidar is introduced along with a brief...

  7. Lidar to lidar calibration phase 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Courtney, Michael

    This report presents the results from phase 2 of a lidar to lidar (L2L) calibration procedure. Phase two of the project included two measurement campaigns conducted at given sites. The purpose was to find out if the lidar-to-lidar calibration procedure can be conducted with similar results...

  8. Raman lidar measurements of water vapor and aerosols during the atmospheric radiation measurement (ARM) remote clouds sensing (RCS) intensive observation period (IOP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melfi, S.H.; Starr, D.O`C.; Whiteman, D. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    The first Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) remote Cloud Study (RCS) Intensive Operations Period (IOP) was held during April 1994 at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. This experiment was conducted to evaluate and calibrate state-of-the-art, ground based remote sensing instruments and to use the data acquired by these instruments to validate retrieval algorithms developed under the ARM program.

  9. Laboratory insights into the detection of surface biosignatures by remote-sensing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poch, O.; Pommerol, A.; Jost, B.; Roditi, I.; Frey, J.; Thomas, N.

    2014-03-01

    With the progress of direct imaging techniques, it will be possible in the short or long-term future to retrieve more efficiently the information on the physical properties of the light reflected by rocky exoplanets (Traub et al., 2010). The search for visible-infrared absorption bands of peculiar gases (O2, CH4 etc.) in this light could give clues for the presence of life (Kaltenegger and Selsis, 2007). Even more uplifting would be the direct detection of life itself, on the surface of an exoplanet. Considering this latter possibility, what is the potential of optical remote-sensing methods to detect surface biosignatures? Reflected light from the surface of the Earth exhibits a strong surface biosignature in the form of an abrupt change of reflectance between the visible and infrared range of the spectrum (Seager et al., 2005). This spectral feature called "vegetation red-edge" is possibly the consequence of biological evolution selecting the right chemical structures enabling the plants to absorb the visible energy, while preventing them from overheating by reflecting more efficiently the infrared. Such red-edge is also found in primitive photosynthetic bacteria, cyanobacteria, that colonized the surface of the Earth ocean and continents billions of years before multicellular plants (Knacke, 2003). If life ever arose on an Earth-like exoplanet, one could hypothesize that some form of its surface-life evolves into similar photo-active organisms, also exhibiting a red-edge. In this paper, we will present our plan and preliminary results of a laboratory study aiming at precising the potentiality of remote sensing techniques in detecting such surface biosignatures. Using equipment that has been developed in our team for surface photometry studies (Pommerol 2011, Jost 2013, Pommerol 2013), we will investigate the reflectance spectra and bidirectional reflectance function of soils containing bacteria such as cyanobacteria, in various environmental conditions. We will

  10. Spatial Scaling Assessment of Surface Soil Moisture Estimations Using Remotely Sensed Data for Precision Agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan Esfahani, L.; Torres-Rua, A. F.; Jensen, A.; McKee, M.

    2014-12-01

    Airborne and Landsat remote sensing are promising technologies for measuring the response of agricultural crops to variations in several agricultural inputs and environmental conditions. Of particular significance to precision agriculture is surface soil moisture, a key component of the soil water balance, which addresses water and energy exchanges at the surface/atmosphere interface and affects vegetation health. Its estimation using the spectral reflectance of agricultural fields could be of value to agricultural management decisions. While top soil moisture can be estimated using radiometric information from aircraft or satellites and data mining techniques, comparison of results from two different aerial platforms might be complicated because of the differences in spatial scales (high resolution of approximately 0.15m versus coarser resolutions of 30m). This paper presents a combined modeling and scale-based approach to evaluate the impact of spatial scaling in the estimation of surface soil moisture content derived from remote sensing data. Data from Landsat 7 ETM+, Landsat 8 OLI and AggieAirTM aerial imagery are utilized. AggieAirTM is an airborne remote sensing platform developed by Utah State University that includes an autonomous Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) which captures radiometric information at visual, near-infrared, and thermal wavebands at spatial resolutions of 0.15 m or smaller for the optical cameras and about 0.6 m or smaller for the thermal infrared camera. Top soil moisture maps for AggieAir and Landsat are developed and statistically compared at different scales to determine the impact in terms of quantitative predictive capability and feasibility of applicability of results in improving in field management.

  11. Aerosol Optical Retrieval and Surface Reflectance from Airborne Remote Sensing Data over Land

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana Bassani

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative analysis of atmospheric optical properties and surface reflectance can be performed by applying radiative transfer theory in the Atmosphere-Earth coupled system, for the atmospheric correction of hyperspectral remote sensing data. This paper describes a new physically-based algorithm to retrieve the aerosol optical thickness at 550nm (τ550 and the surface reflectance (ρ from airborne acquired data in the atmospheric window of the Visible and Near-Infrared (VNIR range. The algorithm is realized in two modules. Module A retrieves τ550 with a minimization algorithm, then Module B retrieves the surface reflectance ρ for each pixel of the image. The method was tested on five remote sensing images acquired by an airborne sensor under different geometric conditions to evaluate the reliability of the method. The results, τ550 and ρ, retrieved from each image were validated with field data contemporaneously acquired by a sun-sky radiometer and a spectroradiometer, respectively. Good correlation index, r, and low root mean square deviations, RMSD, were obtained for the τ550 retrieved by Module A (r2 = 0.75, RMSD = 0.08 and the ρ retrieved by Module B (r2 ≤ 0.9, RMSD ≤ 0.003. Overall, the results are encouraging, indicating that the method is reliable for optical atmospheric studies and the atmospheric correction of airborne hyperspectral images. The method does not require additional at-ground measurements about at-ground reflectance of the reference pixel and aerosol optical thickness.

  12. Remote sensing algorithm for surface evapotranspiration considering landscape and statistical effects on mixed pixels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Q. Peng

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Evapotranspiration (ET plays an important role in surface–atmosphere interactions and can be monitored using remote sensing data. However, surface heterogeneity, including the inhomogeneity of landscapes and surface variables, significantly affects the accuracy of ET estimated from satellite data. The objective of this study is to assess and reduce the uncertainties resulting from surface heterogeneity in remotely sensed ET using Chinese HJ-1B satellite data, which is of 30 m spatial resolution in VIS/NIR bands and 300 m spatial resolution in the thermal-infrared (TIR band. A temperature-sharpening and flux aggregation scheme (TSFA was developed to obtain accurate heat fluxes from the HJ-1B satellite data. The IPUS (input parameter upscaling and TRFA (temperature resampling and flux aggregation methods were used to compare with the TSFA in this study. The three methods represent three typical schemes used to handle mixed pixels from the simplest to the most complex. IPUS handles all surface variables at coarse resolution of 300 m in this study, TSFA handles them at 30 m resolution, and TRFA handles them at 30 and 300 m resolution, which depends on the actual spatial resolution. Analyzing and comparing the three methods can help us to get a better understanding of spatial-scale errors in remote sensing of surface heat fluxes. In situ data collected during HiWATER-MUSOEXE (Multi-Scale Observation Experiment on Evapotranspiration over heterogeneous land surfaces of the Heihe Watershed Allied Telemetry Experimental Research were used to validate and analyze the methods. ET estimated by TSFA exhibited the best agreement with in situ observations, and the footprint validation results showed that the R2, MBE, and RMSE values of the sensible heat flux (H were 0.61, 0.90, and 50.99 W m−2, respectively, and those for the latent heat flux (LE were 0.82, −20.54, and 71.24 W m−2, respectively. IPUS yielded the largest errors

  13. Lidar to lidar calibration phase 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Courtney, Michael

    This report presents a feasibility study of a lidar to lidar (L2L) calibration procedure. Phase one of the project was conducted at Høvsøre, Denmark. Two windcubes were placed next to the 116m met mast and different methods were applied to obtain the sensing height error of the lidars. The purpose...... is to find the most consistent method and use it in a potential lidar to lidar calibration procedure....

  14. Wind measurement via direct detection lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afek, I.; Sela, N.; Narkiss, N.; Shamai, G.; Tsadka, S.

    2013-10-01

    Wind sensing Lidar is considered a promising technology for high quality wind measurements required for various applications such as hub height wind resource assessment, power curve measurements and advanced, real time, forward looking turbine control. Until recently, the only available Lidar technology was based on coherent Doppler shift detection, whose market acceptance has been slow primarily due to its exuberant price. Direct detection Lidar technology provides an alternative to remote sensing of wind by incorporating high precision measurement, a robust design and an affordable price tag.

  15. Atmospheric lidar multiuser instrument - A Spacelab payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crumbly, K. H.; Harris, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    With the advent of the Space Shuttle, it will be possible to place a sophisticated Lidar instrument onto a spacelab pallet and probe the atmosphere, at will, globally, remotely, at different wavelengths. NASA has been concerned with the implementation of such a concept. A study was conducted to define the type of Lidar system and the measurements needed for such an implementation. A description is presented of the definition study, which was subdivided in four major task areas. The Lidar instrument system obtained as a result of the study represents NASA-Langley's current design which has been proposed for continued development, implementation, and launch in the late 1980's.

  16. Spatial and temporal patterns of land surface fluxes from remotely sensed surface temperatures within an uncertainty modelling framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. McCabe

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Characterising the development of evapotranspiration through time is a difficult task, particularly when utilising remote sensing data, because retrieved information is often spatially dense, but temporally sparse. Techniques to expand these essentially instantaneous measures are not only limited, they are restricted by the general paucity of information describing the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of evaporative patterns. In a novel approach, temporal changes in land surface temperatures, derived from NOAA-AVHRR imagery and a generalised split-window algorithm, are used as a calibration variable in a simple land surface scheme (TOPUP and combined within the Generalised Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation (GLUE methodology to provide estimates of areal evapotranspiration at the pixel scale. Such an approach offers an innovative means of transcending the patch or landscape scale of SVAT type models, to spatially distributed estimates of model output. The resulting spatial and temporal patterns of land surface fluxes and surface resistance are used to more fully understand the hydro-ecological trends observed across a study catchment in eastern Australia. The modelling approach is assessed by comparing predicted cumulative evapotranspiration values with surface fluxes determined from Bowen ratio systems and using auxiliary information such as in-situ soil moisture measurements and depth to groundwater to corroborate observed responses.

  17. Retrieval of savanna vegetation canopy height from ICESat-GLAS spaceborne LiDAR with terrain correction

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Khalefa, E

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Light detection and ranging (LiDAR) remote sensing enables accurate estimation and monitoring of vegetation structural properties. Airborne and spaceborne LiDAR is known to provide reliable information on terrain elevation and forest canopy height...

  18. 2012 NOAA American Samoa Lidar: Islands of Tutuila, Aunu'u, Ofu, Olosega, Ta'u and Rose Atoll

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data is remotely sensed high-resolution elevation data collected by an airborne collection platform. This LiDAR dataset is a...

  19. Near Surface Soil Moisture Controls Beyond the Darcy Support Scale: A Remote Sensing Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, B.; Gaur, N.

    2014-12-01

    Variability observed in near-surface soil moisture is a function of spatial and temporal scale and an understanding of the same is required in numerous environmental and hydrological applications. Past literature has focused largely on the Darcy support scale of measurement for generating knowledge about soil moisture variability and the factors causing it. With the advent of a remote sensing era, it is essential to develop a comprehensive understanding of soil moisture variability and the factors creating it at the remote sensing footprint scale. This understanding will facilitate knowledge transfer between scales which remains an area of active research. In this study, we have presented the hierarchy of controls that physical factors namely, soil, vegetation and topography exert on soil moisture distributions from airborne remote sensor footprint scale (~800 m) to a satellite footprint scale (12800 m) across 3 hydro-climates- humid (Iowa), sub-humid (Oklahoma) and semi-arid (Arizona). We evaluated the effect of physical factors on soil moisture variability at coarse spatial support scales but fine (daily) temporal spacing scales which are typical of remotely sensed soil moisture data. The hierarchy or ranking scheme defined in the study is a function of the areal extent of controls of the different physical factors and the magnitude of their effect in creating spatial variability of soil moisture. We found that even though the areal influence of soil on soil moisture variability remained significant at all scales, it decreased as we went from airborne scale to coarser scales whereas the influence of topography and vegetation increased for all three hydro-climates. The magnitude of the effect of these factors, however, was dependent on antecedent soil moisture conditions and hydro-climate.

  20. Aluminum metal surface cleaning and activation by atmospheric-pressure remote plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muñoz, J., E-mail: jmespadero@uco.es; Bravo, J.A.; Calzada, M.D.

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Atmospheric-pressure postdischarges have been applied on aluminium surfaces. • The outer hydrocarbon layer is reduced by the action of the postdischarge. • The treatment promotes the appearance of hydrophilic OH radicals in the surface. • Effectivity for distances up to 5 cm allows for treating irregular surfaces. • Ageing in air due to the disappearance of OH radicals has been reported. - Abstract: The use of the remote plasma (postdischarge) of argon and argon-nitrogen microwave plasmas for cleaning and activating the surface of metallic commercial aluminum samples has been studied. The influence of the nitrogen content and the distance between the treated samples and the end of the discharge on the hydrophilicity and the surface energy has been analyzed by means of the sessile drop technique and the Owens-Wendt method. A significant increase in the hydrophilicity has been noted in the treated samples, together with an increase in the surface energy from values around 37 mJ/m{sup 2} to 77 mJ/m{sup 2}. Such increase weakly depends on the nitrogen content of the discharge, and the effectivity of the treatment extends to distances up to 5 cm from the end of the discharge, much longer than those reported in other plasma-based treatments. The analysis of the treated samples using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that such increase in the surface energy takes place due to a reduction of the carbon content and an increase in the amount of OH radicals in the surface. These radicals tend to disappear within 24–48 h after the treatment when the samples are stored in contact with ambient air, resulting in the ageing of the treated surface and a partial retrieval of the hydrophobicity of the surface.

  1. A study of a dual polarization laser backscatter system for remote identification and measurement of water pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheives, T. C.

    1974-01-01

    Remote identification and measurement of subsurface water turbidity and oil on water was accomplished with analytical models which describe the backscatter from smooth surface turbid water, including single scatter and multiple scatter effects. Lidar measurements from natural waterways are also presented and compared with ground observations of several physical water quality parameters.

  2. FULL WAVEFORM ACTIVE HYPERSPECTRAL LIDAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hakala

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a prototype full waveform hyperspectral LiDAR and investigated its potential for remote sensing applications. Traditionally hyperspectral remote sensing is based on passive measurement of sunlit targets. These methods are sensitive to errors in illumination conditions and lack the range information. Our prototype can measure both the range and the spectral information from a single laser pulse. At this stage, the instrument is optimized for short range terrestrial applications. An active hyperspectral LiDAR opens up new possibilities for LiDAR data analysis. The lack of spectral information in traditional monochrome LiDARs rules out many of the classification techniques available for processing of hyperspectral data. Similarly, passive hyperspectral data does not allow extensive use of the classifications based on 3D shape parameters. With both hyperspectral and range data available in a single dataset, the best of the techniques can be applied to form more reliable classification results. The data also allows the mapping of spectral indices in 3D. As an example a Norway spruce is measured and spatial distribution of several spectral indices is illustrated.

  3. Use of land surface remotely sensed satellite and airborne data for environmental exposure assessment in cancer research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, S.K.; Meliker, J.R.; Goovaerts, P.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, geographic information systems (GIS) have increasingly been used for reconstructing individual-level exposures to environmental contaminants in epidemiological research. Remotely sensed data can be useful in creating space-time models of environmental measures. The primary advantage of using remotely sensed data is that it allows for study at the local scale (e.g., residential level) without requiring expensive, time-consuming monitoring campaigns. The purpose of our study was to identify how land surface remotely sensed data are currently being used to study the relationship between cancer and environmental contaminants, focusing primarily on agricultural chemical exposure assessment applications. We present the results of a comprehensive literature review of epidemiological research where remotely sensed imagery or land cover maps derived from remotely sensed imagery were applied. We also discuss the strengths and limitations of the most commonly used imagery data (aerial photographs and Landsat satellite imagery) and land cover maps.

  4. Performance of a Space-based Methane Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiemle, Christoph; Ehret, Gerhard; Flamant, Pierre; Kawa, Randy; Browell, Ed

    2014-05-01

    Future space-based lidar measurements of anthropogenic greenhouse gases are expected to close observational gaps particularly over remote, polar, and aerosol-contaminated regions where in-situ and passive remote sensing observation techniques have difficulties. Recently, a "Methane Remote Lidar Mission" (MERLIN) was proposed by DLR and CNES in the frame of a German-French climate monitoring initiative. The goal is to measure atmospheric methane at high precision and unprecedented accuracy sufficient to constrain the various surface sources significantly better than with the current observational network. The MERLIN mission will have a minimum operational lifetime of 3 years. It is currently in Phase B, in which all mission components are planned in detail. Launch is foreseen in 2017. The MERLIN data will primarily be supplied to inverse numerical models that use the globally observed concentration gradients to infer methane surface fluxes. Simulations with an instrument model are used to assess the performance of this mission in terms of random error (measurement precision) with the help of MODIS and CALIPSO satellite observations of earth surface albedo and atmospheric optical depth, respectively. These are key environmental state parameters for integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar which uses the surface backscatter to measure the atmospheric methane column beneath the satellite. Our results show that a lidar with an average optical power of 0.45 W at 1.6 µm wavelength and a telescope diameter of 0.55 m, installed on a low earth orbit platform (506 km), will measure methane columns at precisions of 1.2 %, 1.7 % and 2.1 % over land, water, and snow or ice surfaces, respectively. This applies to monthly aggregated measurement samples within areas of 50x50 km², and approaches the requirements that had been formulated by future users of the data in order to meet the abovementioned goal. Globally, the mean precision for the simulated year 2007 is 1

  5. Improving Lidar Turbulence Estimates for Wind Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Jennifer F.; Clifton, Andrew; Churchfield, Matthew J.; Klein, Petra

    2016-10-06

    Remote sensing devices (e.g., lidars) are quickly becoming a cost-effective and reliable alternative to meteorological towers for wind energy applications. Although lidars can measure mean wind speeds accurately, these devices measure different values of turbulence intensity (TI) than an instrument on a tower. In response to these issues, a lidar TI error reduction model was recently developed for commercially available lidars. The TI error model first applies physics-based corrections to the lidar measurements, then uses machine-learning techniques to further reduce errors in lidar TI estimates. The model was tested at two sites in the Southern Plains where vertically profiling lidars were collocated with meteorological towers. This presentation primarily focuses on the physics-based corrections, which include corrections for instrument noise, volume averaging, and variance contamination. As different factors affect TI under different stability conditions, the combination of physical corrections applied in L-TERRA changes depending on the atmospheric stability during each 10-minute time period. This stability-dependent version of L-TERRA performed well at both sites, reducing TI error and bringing lidar TI estimates closer to estimates from instruments on towers. However, there is still scatter evident in the lidar TI estimates, indicating that there are physics that are not being captured in the current version of L-TERRA. Two options are discussed for modeling the remainder of the TI error physics in L-TERRA: machine learning and lidar simulations. Lidar simulations appear to be a better approach, as they can help improve understanding of atmospheric effects on TI error and do not require a large training data set.

  6. LiDAR Remote Sensing of Forest Structure and GPS Telemetry Data Provide Insights on Winter Habitat Selection of European Roe Deer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Ewald

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The combination of GPS-Telemetry and resource selection functions is widely used to analyze animal habitat selection. Rapid large-scale assessment of vegetation structure allows bridging the requirements of habitat selection studies on grain size and extent, particularly in forest habitats. For roe deer, the cold period in winter forces individuals to optimize their trade off in searching for food and shelter. We analyzed the winter habitat selection of roe deer (Capreolus capreolus in a montane forest landscape combining estimates of vegetation cover in three different height strata, derived from high resolution airborne Laser-scanning (LiDAR, Light detection and ranging, and activity data from GPS telemetry. Specifically, we tested the influence of temperature, snow height, and wind speed on site selection, differentiating between active and resting animals using mixed-effects conditional logistic regression models in a case-control design. Site selection was best explained by temperature deviations from hourly means, snow height, and activity status of the animals. Roe deer tended to use forests of high canopy cover more frequently with decreasing temperature, and when snow height exceeded 0.6 m. Active animals preferred lower canopy cover, but higher understory cover. Our approach demonstrates the potential of LiDAR measures for studying fine scale habitat selection in complex three-dimensional habitats, such as forests.

  7. Demystifying LiDAR technologies for temperate rainforest in the Pacific Northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhonda Mazza; Demetrios Gatziolis

    2013-01-01

    Light detection and ranging (LiDAR), also known as airborne laser scanning, is a rapidly emerging technology for remote sensing. Used to help map, monitor, and assess natural resources, LiDAR data were first embraced by forestry professionals in Scandinavia as a tool for conducting forest inventories in the mid to late 1990s. Thus early LiDAR theory and applications...

  8. Remote Sensing and GIS for Surface Water Resources in Rawa Biru – Torasi Merauke Papua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartono Hartono

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The research describe about surface water ecosystem study in Merauke Papua by using multisource and multistage remote sensing data which was splitted into two parts based on the study areas. First, it is for micro scale spatial analysis focusing on the Rawa Biru – Torasi watershed, while the second is for macro scale spatial analysis for Transfly ecoregionin the floodplain areas of Merauke. Multispectral approach was adopted for Landsat image analysis, followed by field survey on the selected areas. Auxilary data used are maps, secondary documents in order to improve understanding of the areas. Interview and discussion with related institutions (Wasur National Sanctuary, Potable Water Services, Internal Affairs Government, Forestry Service accordingly were carried out. The research result showed that remote sensing imagery are usefull for surface water resources study. Physical condition of the Rawa Biru – Torasi watershed, vegetation analysis by using multitemporal data, wetland type, hydrological process in the floodplain were presented. Rawa Biru watershed as a resource for drinking water supply environmentaly decreased considerably due to the species invasion, with successively dominated by hydrophilla, tebu rawa, rumput pisau, dan Mellaleuca and sedimentation took place in the main body of swamp. Upper part of the watershed is actually included in the Papua New Guinea, in long water resources development scheme, it need administratively belong to one recharge areas for the watershed.

  9. Improving operational land surface model canopy evapotranspiration in Africa using a direct remote sensing approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, M.; Tu, K.; Funk, C.; Michaelsen, J.; Williams, P.; Williams, C.; Ardö, J.; Boucher, M.; Cappelaere, B.; de Grandcourt, A.; Nickless, A.; Nouvellon, Y.; Scholes, R.; Kutsch, W.

    2013-03-01

    Climate change is expected to have the greatest impact on the world's economically poor. In the Sahel, a climatically sensitive region where rain-fed agriculture is the primary livelihood, expected decreases in water supply will increase food insecurity. Studies on climate change and the intensification of the water cycle in sub-Saharan Africa are few. This is due in part to poor calibration of modeled evapotranspiration (ET), a key input in continental-scale hydrologic models. In this study, a remote sensing model of transpiration (the primary component of ET), driven by a time series of vegetation indices, was used to substitute transpiration from the Global Land Data Assimilation System realization of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction, Oregon State University, Air Force, and Hydrology Research Laboratory at National Weather Service Land Surface Model (GNOAH) to improve total ET model estimates for monitoring purposes in sub-Saharan Africa. The performance of the hybrid model was compared against GNOAH ET and the remote sensing method using eight eddy flux towers representing major biomes of sub-Saharan Africa. The greatest improvements in model performance were at humid sites with dense vegetation, while performance at semi-arid sites was poor, but better than the models before hybridization. The reduction in errors using the hybrid model can be attributed to the integration of a simple canopy scheme that depends primarily on low bias surface climate reanalysis data and is driven primarily by a time series of vegetation indices.

  10. Improving operational land surface model canopy evapotranspiration in Africa using a direct remote sensing approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Marshall

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Climate change is expected to have the greatest impact on the world's economically poor. In the Sahel, a climatically sensitive region where rain-fed agriculture is the primary livelihood, expected decreases in water supply will increase food insecurity. Studies on climate change and the intensification of the water cycle in sub-Saharan Africa are few. This is due in part to poor calibration of modeled evapotranspiration (ET, a key input in continental-scale hydrologic models. In this study, a remote sensing model of transpiration (the primary component of ET, driven by a time series of vegetation indices, was used to substitute transpiration from the Global Land Data Assimilation System realization of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction, Oregon State University, Air Force, and Hydrology Research Laboratory at National Weather Service Land Surface Model (GNOAH to improve total ET model estimates for monitoring purposes in sub-Saharan Africa. The performance of the hybrid model was compared against GNOAH ET and the remote sensing method using eight eddy flux towers representing major biomes of sub-Saharan Africa. The greatest improvements in model performance were at humid sites with dense vegetation, while performance at semi-arid sites was poor, but better than the models before hybridization. The reduction in errors using the hybrid model can be attributed to the integration of a simple canopy scheme that depends primarily on low bias surface climate reanalysis data and is driven primarily by a time series of vegetation indices.

  11. Using LiDAR to as a Potential Method for Detection Plastics in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, G.; Neal, A.; Mielke, R.; Bookhagen, B.

    2010-12-01

    We conducted a series of experiments using Light Detection and Range (LiDAR) technology as an innovative way to detect the presence of plastics in water. The purpose of this study was to determine if LiDAR technology is a feasible, non-intrusive alternative to dredging in the ocean to determine the amount of plastics in the ocean. We used a tripod mounted RIEGL LMS-Z420i terrestrial LiDAR 3-D scanner and the associated operating software RiSCAN Pro. The terrestrial LiDAR is an optical remote sensing technology that measures the reflection of near infared light to find the range of a distant target that is most commonly used to create high precision digital elevation models of terrestrial surfaces. In theory, water should absorb the near infared light, while the plastics should reflect the light. The experiments consisted of different scale models of plastic pellets in water, ranging from a small plastic dish to a large tank to test the range of the LiDAR in different salt and fresh water mediums.

  12. Combining land surface models and remote sensing data to estimate evapotranspiration for drought monitoring in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammalleri, C.; Sepulcre-Cantó, G.; Vogt, J.

    2014-10-01

    The main hydrologic feedback from the land-surface to the atmosphere is the evapotranspiration, ET, which embraces the response of both the soil and vegetated surface to the atmospheric forcing (e.g., precipitation and temperature), as well as influences locally atmospheric humidity, cloud formation and precipitation, the main driver for drought. Actual ET is regulated by several factors, including biological quantities (e.g., rooting depth, leaf area, fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation) and soil water status. The ET temporal dynamic is strongly affected by rainfall deficits, and in turn it represents a robust proxy of the effects of water shortage on plants. These characteristics make ET a promising quantity for monitoring environmental drought, defined as a shortage of water availability that reduces the ecosystem productivity. In the last few decades, the capability to accurately model ET over large areas in a spatial-distributed fashion has increased notably. Most of the improvements in this field are related to the increasing availability of remote sensing data, and the achievements in modelling of ET-related quantities. Several land-surface models exploit the richness of newly available datasets, including the Community Land Model (CLM) and the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) ET outputs. Here, the potentiality of ET maps obtained by combining land-surface models and remote sensing data through these two schemes is explored, with a special focus on the reliability of ET (and derived standardized variables) as drought indicator. Tests were performed over Europe at moderate spatial resolution (3-5 km), with the final goal to improve the estimation of soil water status as a contribution to the European Drought Observatory (EDO, http://edo.jrc.ec.europa.eu).

  13. Estimating evapotranspiration of riparian vegetation using high resolution multispectral, thermal infrared and lidar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, Christopher M. U.; Geli, Hatim; Taghvaeian, Saleh; Masih, Ashish; Pack, Robert T.; Simms, Ronald D.; Baker, Michael; Milliken, Jeff A.; O'Meara, Scott; Witherall, Amy J.

    2011-11-01

    High resolution airborne multispectral and thermal infrared imagery was acquired over the Mojave River, California with the Utah State University airborne remote sensing system integrated with the LASSI imaging Lidar also built and operated at USU. The data were acquired in pre-established mapping blocks over a 2 day period covering approximately 144 Km of the Mojave River floodplain and riparian zone, approximately 1500 meters in width. The multispectral imagery (green, red and near-infrared bands) was ortho-rectified using the Lidar point cloud data through a direct geo-referencing technique. Thermal Infrared imagery was rectified to the multispectral ortho-mosaics. The lidar point cloud data was classified to separate ground surface returns from vegetation returns as well as structures such as buildings, bridges etc. One-meter DEM's were produced from the surface returns along with vegetation canopy height also at 1-meter grids. Two surface energy balance models that use remote sensing inputs were applied to the high resolution imagery, namely the SEBAL and the Two Source Model. The model parameterizations were slightly modified to accept high resolution imagery (1-meter) as well as the lidar-based vegetation height product, which was used to estimate the aerodynamic roughness length. Both models produced very similar results in terms of latent heat fluxes (LE). Instantaneous LE values were extrapolated to daily evapotranspiration rates (ET) using the reference ET fraction, with data obtained from a local weather station. Seasonal rates were obtained by extrapolating the reference ET fraction according to the seasonal growth habits of the different species. Vegetation species distribution and area were obtained from classification of the multispectral imagery. Results indicate that cottonwood and salt cedar (tamarisk) had the highest evapotranspiration rates followed by mesophytes, arundo, mesquite and desert shrubs. This research showed that high

  14. An evaluation of the WindEye wind lidar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dellwik, Ebba; Sjöholm, Mikael; Mann, Jakob

    Prevision of the wind field by remote sensing wind lidars has the potential to improve the performance of wind turbines. The functionality of a WindEye lidar developed by Windar Photonics A/S (Denmark) for the wind energy market was tested in a two months long field experiment. The WindEye sensor...... with a high accuracy during the whole campaign....

  15. LiDAR utility for natural resource managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew Thomas Hudak; Jeffrey Scott Evans; Alistair Mattthew Stuart. Smith

    2009-01-01

    Applications of LiDAR remote sensing are exploding, while moving from the research to the operational realm. Increasingly, natural resource managers are recognizing the tremendous utility of LiDAR-derived information to make improved decisions. This review provides a cross-section of studies, many recent, that demonstrate the relevance of LiDAR across a suite of...

  16. Analysis of inflow parameters using LiDARs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giyanani, A.H.; Bierbooms, W.A.A.M.; Van Bussel, G.J.W.

    2014-01-01

    Remote sensing of the atmospheric variables with the use of LiDAR is a relatively new technique for wind resource assessment and oncoming wind prediction in wind energy. The validation of LiDAR measurements and comparisons with other sensing elements thus, is of high importance for further

  17. Spatio-Temporal Relationship Between Surface Temperature and NDVI Using Remotely Sensed data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghobadi, Yasser; Pradhan, Biswajeet; Kabiri, Keivan

    2016-07-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) is a significant factor to analyze the global climate changes, and LULC (Land use/Land cover) changes, as well as urban thermal behavior. Land surface temperature exhibit the surface atmosphere in relation with energy flux between earth and atmosphere. This paper intended to examine the evaluation of LST and assessment of relationship between LST and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) with associated different LULC. Al- Hawizeh wetland located in the Iraq-Iran border was selected as a study area. Two Landsat satellite thermal infrared (TIR) images of October 26, 1998, thematic mapper (TM), and October 26, 2002 enhanced thematic mapper (ETM+) were used. Both images were corrected geometrically and atmospherically before carried out any analysis. NDVI was estimated from reflectance values of the visible band (band 3, Red) and the near infrared band (band 4, VNIR). Maximum likelihood classifier (MLC) was applied to determine the different LULC. Plank equation was utilized to extract land surface temperature over the study region. The results provide information about the spatial distribution of LST over different LULC during mentioned date. The highest mean temperature was observed over the rangeland and the lowest mean temperature was found in water bodies. The results of regression analysis exhibited that the LST and NDVI has an inverse correlation except for water bodies. The negative correlation coefficient was observed over vegetation (-0.733, R2=0.66). Keywords-component; Land Surface Temperature, Remote Sensing, Al-Havizeh wetland, Regression Analysis, NDVI, GIS

  18. Signal Processing and Calibration of Continuous-Wave Focused CO2 Doppler Lidars for Atmospheric Backscatter Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; Chambers, Diana M.; Jarzembski, Maurice A.; Srivastava, Vandana; Bowdle, David A.; Jones, William D.

    1996-01-01

    Two continuous-wave(CW)focused C02 Doppler lidars (9.1 and 10.6 micrometers) were developed for airborne in situ aerosol backscatter measurements. The complex path of reliably calibrating these systems, with different signal processors, for accurate derivation of atmospheric backscatter coefficients is documented. Lidar calibration for absolute backscatter measurement for both lidars is based on range response over the lidar sample volume, not solely at focus. Both lidars were calibrated with a new technique using well-characterized aerosols as radiometric standard targets and related to conventional hard-target calibration. A digital signal processor (DSP), a surface acoustic and spectrum analyzer and manually tuned spectrum analyzer signal analyzers were used. The DSP signals were analyzed with an innovative method of correcting for systematic noise fluctuation; the noise statistics exhibit the chi-square distribution predicted by theory. System parametric studies and detailed calibration improved the accuracy of conversion from the measured signal-to-noise ratio to absolute backscatter. The minimum backscatter sensitivity is approximately 3 x 10(exp -12)/m/sr at 9.1 micrometers and approximately 9 x 10(exp -12)/m/sr at 10.6 micrometers. Sample measurements are shown for a flight over the remote Pacific Ocean in 1990 as part of the NASA Global Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) survey missions, the first time to our knowledge that 9.1-10.6 micrometer lidar intercomparisons were made. Measurements at 9.1 micrometers, a potential wavelength for space-based lidar remote-sensing applications, are to our knowledge the first based on the rare isotope C-12 O(2)-18 gas.

  19. LIDAR vertical profiles over the Oil Sands Region: an important tool in understanding atmospheric particulate matter transport, mixing and transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strawbridge, K. B.

    2013-12-01

    LIDAR technology is an excellent tool to probe the complex vertical structure of the atmosphere at high spatial and temporal resolution. This provides the critical vertical context for the interpretation of ground-based chemistry measurements, airborne measurements and model verification and validation. In recent years, Environment Canada has designed an autonomous aerosol LIDAR system that can be deployed to remote areas such as the oil sands. Currently two autonomous LIDAR systems are making measurements in the oil sands region, one since December, 2012 and the other since July, 2013. The LIDAR transmitter emits two wavelengths (1064nm and 532nm) and the detector assembly collects four channels (1064nm backscatter, 532nm backscatter and 532nm depolarization, 607 nm nitrogen channel). Aerosol profiles from near ground to 20 km are collected every 10-60 s providing sufficient resolution to probe atmospheric dynamics, mixing and transport. The depolarization channel provides key information in identifying and discriminating the various aerosol layers aloft such as dust, forest fire plumes, industrial plume sources or ice crystals. The vertical resolution of the LIDAR can determine whether industrial plumes remain aloft or mix down to the surface and also provide estimates as to the concentration of the particulate at various altitudes. It operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week except during precipitation events. The system is operated remotely and the data are updated every hour to a website to allow near real-time capability. An intensive measurement campaign will be carried out in August and September of 2013 and will provide coincident airborne and ground-based measurements for the two LIDAR systems. The first results from this field study will be presented as well as some statistics on the frequency and evolution of plume events that were detected by the LIDARs.

  20. Using Remote Sensing Platforms to Estimate Near-Surface Soil Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, D. G.; Shaw, J. N.; Rickman, D.; Mask, P. L.; Wersinger, J. M.; Luvall, J.

    2003-01-01

    Evaluation of near-surface soil properties via remote sensing (RS) could facilitate soil survey mapping, erosion prediction, fertilization regimes, and allocation of agrochemicals. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between soil spectral signature and near surface soil properties in conventionally managed row crop systems. High resolution RS data were acquired over bare fields in the Coastal Plain, Appalachian Plateau, and Ridge and Valley provinces of Alabama using the Airborne Terrestrial Applications Sensor (ATLAS) multispectral scanner. Soils ranged from sandy Kandiudults to fine textured Rhodudults. Surface soil samples (0-1 cm) were collected from 163 sampling points for soil water content, soil organic carbon (SOC), particle size distribution (PSD), and citrate dithionite extractable iron (Fed) content. Surface roughness, soil water content, and crusting were also measured at sampling. Results showed RS data acquired from lands with less than 4 % surface soil water content best approximated near-surface soil properties at the Coastal Plain site where loamy sand textured surfaces were predominant. Utilizing a combination of band ratios in stepwise regression, Fed (r2 = 0.61), SOC (r2 = 0.36), sand (r2 = 0.52), and clay (r2 = 0.76) were related to RS data at the Coastal Plain site. In contrast, the more clayey Ridge and Valley soils had r-squares of 0.50, 0.36, 0.17, and 0.57. for Fed, SOC, sand and clay, respectively. Use of estimated eEmissivity did not generally improve estimates of near-surface soil attributes.

  1. Raman Lidar Measurements of Aerosol Extinction and Backscattering. Report 1; Methods and Comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrare, R. A.; Melfi, S. H.; Whiteman, D. N.; Evans, K. D.; Leifer, R.

    1998-01-01

    This paper examines the aerosol backscattering and extinction profiles measured at night by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL) during the remote cloud sensing (RCS) intensive operations period (IOP) at the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) southern Great Plains (SGP) site in April 1994. These lidar data are used to derive aerosol profiles for altitudes between 0.0 1 5 and 5 km. Since this lidar detects Raman scattering from nitrogen and oxygen molecules as well as the elastic scattering from molecules and aerosols, it measures both aerosol backscattering and extinction simultaneously. The aerosol extinction/backscattering ratio varied between approximately 30 sr and 75 sr at 351 nm. Aerosol optical thicknesses derived by integrating the lidar profiles of aerosol extinction measured at night between 0. I and 5 km are found to be about 10-40% lower than those measured by a Sun photometer during the day. This difference is attributed to the contribution by stratospheric aerosols not included in the lidar estimates as well as to diurnal differences in aerosol properties and concentrations. Aerosol profiles close to the surface were acquired by pointing the lidar nearly horizontally. Measurements of aerosol scattering from a tower-mounted nephelometer are found to be 40% lower than lidar measurements of aerosol extinction over a wide range of relative humidities even after accounting for the difference in wavelengths. The reasons for this difference are not clear but may be due to the inability of the nephelometer to accurately measure scattering by large particles.

  2. Cloud parameters from IR lidar and other instruments - CLARET design and preliminary results. [Cloud Lidar And Radar Exploratory Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhard, Wynn L.; Uttal, Taneil; Intrieri, Janet M.; Willis, Ron J.

    1990-01-01

    The paper describes the objectives and experimental design of the Cloud Lidar and Radar Exploratory Test (CLARET) project. Early results for some of the objectives are presented. Particular attention is given to polarization of IR lidar backscatter, cirrus size distribution, and cirrus emissivity. CLARET has produced a good data set for cloud/radiation research and evaluation of remote sensing methods and technologies.

  3. 2007 FEMA New Jersey Flood Mitigation Lidar: Gloucester County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LIDAR data is remotely sensed high-resolution elevation data collected by an airborne collection platform. By positioning laser range finding with the use of 1...

  4. 2006 FEMA New Jersey Flood Mitigation Lidar: Middlesex County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LIDAR data is remotely sensed high-resolution elevation data collected by an airborne collection platform. By positioning laser range finding with the use of 1...

  5. New Scheme for Validating Remote-Sensing Land Surface Temperature Products with Station Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenping Yu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Continuous land-surface temperature (LST observations from ground-based stations are an important reference dataset for validating remote-sensing LST products. However, a lack of evaluations of the representativeness of station observations limits the reliability of validation results. In this study, a new practical validation scheme is presented for validating remote-sensing LST products that includes a key step: assessing the spatial representativeness of ground-based LST measurements. Three indicators, namely, the dominant land-cover type (DLCT, relative bias (RB, and average structure scale (ASS, are established to quantify the representative levels of station observations based on the land-cover type (LCT and LST reference maps with high spatial resolution. We validated MODIS LSTs using station observations from the Heihe River Basin (HRB in China. The spatial representative evaluation steps show that the representativeness of observations greatly differs among stations and varies with different vegetation growth and other factors. Large differences in the validation results occur when using different representative level observations, which indicates a large potential for large error during the traditional T-based validation scheme. Comparisons show that the new validation scheme greatly improves the reliability of LST product validation through high-level representative observations.

  6. Leveraging Open Standards and Technologies to Enhance Community Access to Earth Science Lidar Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, C. J.; Nandigam, V.; Krishnan, S.; Cowart, C.; Baru, C.; Arrowsmith, R.

    2011-12-01

    Lidar (Light Detection and Ranging) data, collected from space, airborne and terrestrial platforms, have emerged as an invaluable tool for a variety of Earth science applications ranging from ice sheet monitoring to modeling of earth surface processes. However, lidar present a unique suite of challenges from the perspective of building cyberinfrastructure systems that enable the scientific community to access these valuable research datasets. Lidar data are typically characterized by millions to billions of individual measurements of x,y,z position plus attributes; these "raw" data are also often accompanied by derived raster products and are frequently terabytes in size. As a relatively new and rapidly evolving data collection technology, relevant open data standards and software projects are immature compared to those for other remote sensing platforms. The NSF-funded OpenTopography Facility project has developed an online lidar data access and processing system that co-locates data with on-demand processing tools to enable users to access both raw point cloud data as well as custom derived products and visualizations. OpenTopography is built on a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) in which applications and data resources are deployed as standards compliant (XML and SOAP) Web services with the open source Opal Toolkit. To develop the underlying applications for data access, filtering and conversion, and various processing tasks, OpenTopography has heavily leveraged existing open source software efforts for both lidar and raster data. Operating on the de facto LAS binary point cloud format (maintained by ASPRS), open source libLAS and LASlib libraries provide OpenTopography data ingestion, query and translation capabilities. Similarly, raster data manipulation is performed through a suite of services built on the Geospatial Data Abstraction Library (GDAL). OpenTopography has also developed our own algorithm for high-performance gridding of lidar point cloud data

  7. Advances in Remote Sensing of Flooding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Wang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available With the publication of eight original research articles, four types of advances in the remote sensing of floods are achieved. The uncertainty of modeled outputs using precipitation datasets derived from in situ observations and remote sensors is further understood. With the terrestrial laser scanner and airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR coupled with high resolution optical and radar imagery, researchers improve accuracy levels in estimating the surface water height, extent, and flow of floods. The unmanned aircraft system (UAS can be the game changer in the acquisition and application of remote sensing data. The UAS may fly everywhere and every time when a flood event occurs. With the development of urban structure maps, the flood risk and possible damage is well assessed. The flood mitigation plans and response activities become effective and efficient using geographic information system (GIS-based urban flood vulnerability and risk maps.

  8. Mapping invasive woody species in coastal dunes in the Netherlands: a remote sensing approach using LIDAR and high-resolution aerial photographs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hantson, W.P.R.; Kooistra, L.; Slim, P.A.

    2012-01-01

    Questions Does remote sensing improve classification of invasive woody species in dunes, useful for shrub management? Does additional height information and an object-based classifier increase woody species classification accuracy? Location The dunes of Vlieland, one of the Wadden Sea Islands, the

  9. Active and Passive Remote Sensing Data Time Series for Flood Detection and Surface Water Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bioresita, Filsa; Puissant, Anne; Stumpf, André; Malet, Jean-Philippe

    2017-04-01

    As a consequence of environmental changes surface waters are undergoing changes in time and space. A better knowledge of the spatial and temporal distribution of surface waters resources becomes essential to support sustainable policies and development activities. Especially because surface waters, are not only a vital sweet water resource, but can also pose hazards to human settlements and infrastructures through flooding. Floods are a highly frequent disaster in the world and can caused huge material losses. Detecting and mapping their spatial distribution is fundamental to ascertain damages and for relief efforts. Spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is an effective way to monitor surface waters bodies over large areas since it provides excellent temporal coverage and, all-weather day-and-night imaging capabilities. However, emergent vegetation, trees, wind or flow turbulence can increase radar back-scatter returns and pose problems for the delineation of inundated areas. In such areas, passive remote sensing data can be used to identify vegetated areas and support the interpretation of SAR data. The availability of new Earth Observation products, for example Sentinel-1 (active) and Sentinel-2 (passive) imageries, with both high spatial and temporal resolution, have the potential to facilitate flood detection and monitoring of surface waters changes which are very dynamic in space and time. In this context, the research consists of two parts. In the first part, the objective is to propose generic and reproducible methodologies for the analysis of Sentinel-1 time series data for floods detection and surface waters mapping. The processing chain comprises a series of pre-processing steps and the statistical modeling of the pixel value distribution to produce probabilistic maps for the presence of surface waters. Images pre-processing for all Sentinel-1 images comprise the reduction SAR effect like orbit errors, speckle noise, and geometric effects. A modified

  10. Hydrogen desorption from hydrogen fluoride and remote hydrogen plasma cleaned silicon carbide (0001) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Sean W., E-mail: sean.king@intel.com; Tanaka, Satoru; Davis, Robert F. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Nemanich, Robert J. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Due to the extreme chemical inertness of silicon carbide (SiC), in-situ thermal desorption is commonly utilized as a means to remove surface contamination prior to initiating critical semiconductor processing steps such as epitaxy, gate dielectric formation, and contact metallization. In-situ thermal desorption and silicon sublimation has also recently become a popular method for epitaxial growth of mono and few layer graphene. Accordingly, numerous thermal desorption experiments of various processed silicon carbide surfaces have been performed, but have ignored the presence of hydrogen, which is ubiquitous throughout semiconductor processing. In this regard, the authors have performed a combined temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) investigation of the desorption of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and various other oxygen, carbon, and fluorine related species from ex-situ aqueous hydrogen fluoride (HF) and in-situ remote hydrogen plasma cleaned 6H-SiC (0001) surfaces. Using XPS, the authors observed that temperatures on the order of 700–1000 °C are needed to fully desorb C-H, C-O and Si-O species from these surfaces. However, using TPD, the authors observed H{sub 2} desorption at both lower temperatures (200–550 °C) as well as higher temperatures (>700 °C). The low temperature H{sub 2} desorption was deconvoluted into multiple desorption states that, based on similarities to H{sub 2} desorption from Si (111), were attributed to silicon mono, di, and trihydride surface species as well as hydrogen trapped by subsurface defects, steps, or dopants. The higher temperature H{sub 2} desorption was similarly attributed to H{sub 2} evolved from surface O-H groups at ∼750 °C as well as the liberation of H{sub 2} during Si-O desorption at temperatures >800 °C. These results indicate that while ex-situ aqueous HF processed 6H-SiC (0001) surfaces annealed at <700 °C remain terminated by some surface C–O and

  11. A review on remotely sensed land surface temperature anomaly as an earthquake precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Anshuman; Singh, Shaktiman; Sam, Lydia; Joshi, P. K.; Bhardwaj, Akanksha; Martín-Torres, F. Javier; Kumar, Rajesh

    2017-12-01

    The low predictability of earthquakes and the high uncertainty associated with their forecasts make earthquakes one of the worst natural calamities, capable of causing instant loss of life and property. Here, we discuss the studies reporting the observed anomalies in the satellite-derived Land Surface Temperature (LST) before an earthquake. We compile the conclusions of these studies and evaluate the use of remotely sensed LST anomalies as precursors of earthquakes. The arrival times and the amplitudes of the anomalies vary widely, thus making it difficult to consider them as universal markers to issue earthquake warnings. Based on the randomness in the observations of these precursors, we support employing a global-scale monitoring system to detect statistically robust anomalous geophysical signals prior to earthquakes before considering them as definite precursors.

  12. Application of remote sensing to thermal pollution analysis. [satellite sea surface temperature measurement assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiser, H. W.; Lee, S. S.; Veziroglu, T. N.; Sengupta, S.

    1975-01-01

    A comprehensive numerical model development program for near-field thermal plume discharge and far field general circulation in coastal regions is being carried on at the University of Miami Clean Energy Research Institute. The objective of the program is to develop a generalized, three-dimensional, predictive model for thermal pollution studies. Two regions of specific application of the model are the power plants sites at the Biscayne Bay and Hutchinson Island area along the Florida coastline. Remote sensing from aircraft as well as satellites are used in parallel with in situ measurements to provide information needed for the development and verification of the mathematical model. This paper describes the efforts that have been made to identify problems and limitations of the presently available satellite data and to develop methods for enhancing and enlarging thermal infrared displays for mesoscale sea surface temperature measurements.

  13. First comparison of products from the NCAR Raman-shifted Eye-safe Aerosol Lidar (REAL) and the NCAR Integrated Surface Flux Facility (ISFF) during the Canopy Horizontal Array Turbulence Study (CHATS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayor, S. D.; Spuler, S. M.; Morley, B. M.; Horst, T. W.; Oncley, S. P.; Patton, E. G.; Lenschow, D. H.

    2007-12-01

    The NCAR Raman-shifted Eye-safe Aerosol Lidar (REAL) and the Integrated Surface Flux Facility (ISFF) operated from 15 March to 11 June, 2007, for the Canopy Horizontal Array Turbulence Study (CHATS). Lidar aerosol backscatter data at 1.5 microns wavelength were recorded at 1.5 meter intervals to ranges of 5.8 kilometers. Scanning resulted in almost half a million vertical cross-sections and near horizontal slices. The horizontal scans ranged in altitude from meters to tens of meters above the surface and covered approximately 10-square kilometer areas. Scans were repeated at approximately 15 second intervals in order to create time-lapse animations of the flow. The ISFF 30-meter tall tower was located 1.6 km from the REAL. The tower intersected all of the horizontal scans and the vertical scan planes were approximately 10 meters or less from the tower. Time- series of in situ measurements and fluxes from the tower will be compared with the lidar backscatter at that range. Ultimately, by combining the spatial imaging and time-lapse visualization capability of the lidar with the precision of the in situ measurements, we hope to improve understanding of near-surface fluxes and their impact on the larger scales.

  14. From Ground Truth to Space: Surface, Subsurface and Remote Observations Associated with Nuclear Test Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, A. J.; Anderson, D.; Burt, C.; Craven, J.; Kimblin, C.; McKenna, I.; Schultz-Fellenz, E. S.; Miller, E.; Yocky, D. A.; Haas, D.

    2016-12-01

    Underground nuclear explosions (UNEs) result in numerous signatures that manifest on a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. Currently, prompt signals, such as the detection of seismic waves provide only generalized locations and the timing and amplitude of non-prompt signals are difficult to predict. As such, research into improving the detection, location, and identification of suspect events has been conducted, resulting in advancement of nuclear test detection science. In this presentation, we demonstrate the scalar variably of surface and subsurface observables, briefly discuss current capabilities to locate, detect and characterize potential nuclear explosion locations, and explain how emergent technologies and amalgamation of disparate data sets will facilitate improved monitoring and verification. At the smaller scales, material and fracture characterization efforts on rock collected from legacy UNE sites and from underground experiments using chemical explosions can be incorporated into predictive modeling efforts. Spatial analyses of digital elevation models and orthoimagery of both modern conventional and legacy nuclear sites show subtle surface topographic changes and damage at nearby outcrops. Additionally, at sites where such technology cannot penetrate vegetative cover, it is possible to use the vegetation itself as both a companion signature reflecting geologic conditions and showing subsurface impacts to water, nutrients, and chemicals. Aerial systems based on RGB imagery, light detection and ranging, and hyperspectral imaging can allow for combined remote sensing modalities to perform pattern recognition and classification tasks. Finally, more remote systems such as satellite based synthetic aperture radar and satellite imagery are other techniques in development for UNE site detection, location and characterization.

  15. A comparison between remotely-sensed and modelled surface soil moisture (and frozen status) at high latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouttevin, I.; Bartsch, A.; Krinner, G.; Naeimi, V.

    2013-08-01

    In this study, the combined surface status and surface soil moisture products retrieved by the ASCAT sensor within the ESA-DUE Permafrost project are compared to the hydrological outputs of the land surface model ORCHIDEE over Northern Eurasia. The objective is to derive broad conclusions as to the strengths and weaknesses of hydrological modelling and, to a minor extent, remote sensing of soil moisture over an area where data is rare and hydrological modelling is though crucial for climate and ecological applications. The spatial and temporal resolutions of the ASCAT products make them suitable for comparison with model outputs. Modelled and remotely-sensed surface frozen and unfrozen statuses agree reasonably well, which allows for a seasonal comparison between modelled and observed (liquid) surface soil moisture. The atmospheric forcing and the snow scheme of the land surface model are identified as causes of moderate model-to-data divergence in terms of surface status. For unfrozen soils, the modelled and remotely-sensed surface soil moisture signals are positively correlated over most of the study area. The correlation deteriorates in the North-Eastern Siberian regions, which is consistent with the lack of accurate model parameters and the scarcity of meteorological data. The model shows a reduced ability to capture the main seasonal dynamics and spatial patterns of observed surface soil moisture in Northern Eurasia, namely a characteristic spring surface moistening resulting from snow melt and flooding. We hypothesize that these weak performances mainly originate from the non-representation of flooding and surface ponding in the model. Further identified limitations proceed from the coarse treatment of the hydrological specificities of mountainous areas and spatial inaccuracies in the meteorological forcing in remote, North-Eastern Siberian areas. Investigations are currently underway to determine to which extent plausible inaccuracies in the satellite data

  16. Using Remote Sensing Data to Evaluate Surface Soil Properties in Alabama Ultisols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Dana G.; Shaw, Joey N.; Rickman, Doug; Mask, Paul L.; Luvall, Jeff

    2005-01-01

    Evaluation of surface soil properties via remote sensing could facilitate soil survey mapping, erosion prediction and allocation of agrochemicals for precision management. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between soil spectral signature and surface soil properties in conventionally managed row crop systems. High-resolution RS data were acquired over bare fields in the Coastal Plain, Appalachian Plateau, and Ridge and Valley provinces of Alabama using the Airborne Terrestrial Applications Sensor multispectral scanner. Soils ranged from sandy Kandiudults to fine textured Rhodudults. Surface soil samples (0-1 cm) were collected from 163 sampling points for soil organic carbon, particle size distribution, and citrate dithionite extractable iron content. Surface roughness, soil water content, and crusting were also measured during sampling. Two methods of analysis were evaluated: 1) multiple linear regression using common spectral band ratios, and 2) partial least squares regression. Our data show that thermal infrared spectra are highly, linearly related to soil organic carbon, sand and clay content. Soil organic carbon content was the most difficult to quantify in these highly weathered systems, where soil organic carbon was generally less than 1.2%. Estimates of sand and clay content were best using partial least squares regression at the Valley site, explaining 42-59% of the variability. In the Coastal Plain, sandy surfaces prone to crusting limited estimates of sand and clay content via partial least squares and regression with common band ratios. Estimates of iron oxide content were a function of mineralogy and best accomplished using specific band ratios, with regression explaining 36-65% of the variability at the Valley and Coastal Plain sites, respectively.

  17. Measurement and Study of Lidar Ratio by Using a Raman Lidar in Central China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We comprehensively evaluated particle lidar ratios (i.e., particle extinction to backscatter ratio at 532 nm over Wuhan in Central China by using a Raman lidar from July 2013 to May 2015. We utilized the Raman lidar data to obtain homogeneous aerosol lidar ratios near the surface through the Raman method during no-rain nights. The lidar ratios were approximately 57 ± 7 sr, 50 ± 5 sr, and 22 ± 4 sr under the three cases with obviously different pollution levels. The haze layer below 1.8 km has a large particle extinction coefficient (from 5.4e-4 m−1 to 1.6e-4 m−1 and particle backscatter coefficient (between 1.1e-05 m−1sr−1 and 1.7e-06 m−1sr−1 in the heavily polluted case. Furthermore, the particle lidar ratios varied according to season, especially between winter (57 ± 13 sr and summer (33 ± 10 sr. The seasonal variation in lidar ratios at Wuhan suggests that the East Asian monsoon significantly affects the primary aerosol types and aerosol optical properties in this region. The relationships between particle lidar ratios and wind indicate that large lidar ratio values correspond well with weak winds and strong northerly winds, whereas significantly low lidar ratio values are associated with prevailing southwesterly and southerly wind.

  18. Atmospheric lidar: Legal, scientific and technological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbini, R.; Colao, F.; Fiorani, L.; Palucci, A.

    2000-01-01

    The Atmospheric Lidar is one of the systems of the Mobile Laboratory of Laser Remote Sensing under development at the ENEA Research Center of Frascati. This technical report addresses the legislative, scientific and technological aspects that are the basis for the identification of the requirements, the definition of the architecture and the fixation of the specifications of the Atmospheric Lidar. The problems of air pollution are introduced in section 2. A summary of the Italian laws on that topic is then given. Section 4 provides a survey of the atmospheric measurements that can be achieved with the lidar. The sensitivity in the monitoring of pollutants is discussed in section 5. The other systems of the Mobile Laboratory of Laser Remote Sensing are shortly described in section 6. The last section is devoted to conclusions and perspectives [it

  19. Lidar postcards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreppel, Heather A.; Cimitile, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Program develops and uses specialized technology to build high-resolution topographic and habitat maps. High-resolution maps of topography, bathymetry, and habitat describe important features affected by coastal-management decisions. The mapped information serves as a baseline for evaluating resources and tracking the effectiveness of resource- and conservation-management decisions. These data products are critical to researchers, decision makers, resource managers, planners, and the public. To learn more about Lidar (light detection and ranging) technology visit: http://ngom.usgs.gov/dsp/.

  20. Development of a Dynamic Lidar Uncertainty Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Jennifer [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Clifton, Andrew [WindForS; Bonin, Timothy [CIRES/NOAA ESRL; Choukulkar, Aditya [CIRES/NOAA ESRL; Brewer, W. Alan [NOAA ESRL; Delgado, Ruben [University of Maryland Baltimore County

    2017-08-07

    As wind turbine sizes increase and wind energy expands to more complex and remote sites, remote-sensing devices such as lidars are expected to play a key role in wind resource assessment and power performance testing. The switch to remote-sensing devices represents a paradigm shift in the way the wind industry typically obtains and interprets measurement data for wind energy. For example, the measurement techniques and sources of uncertainty for a remote-sensing device are vastly different from those associated with a cup anemometer on a meteorological tower. Current IEC standards for quantifying remote sensing device uncertainty for power performance testing consider uncertainty due to mounting, calibration, and classification of the remote sensing device, among other parameters. Values of the uncertainty are typically given as a function of the mean wind speed measured by a reference device and are generally fixed, leading to climatic uncertainty values that apply to the entire measurement campaign. However, real-world experience and a consideration of the fundamentals of the measurement process have shown that lidar performance is highly dependent on atmospheric conditions, such as wind shear, turbulence, and aerosol content. At present, these conditions are not directly incorporated into the estimated uncertainty of a lidar device. In this presentation, we describe the development of a new dynamic lidar uncertainty framework that adapts to current flow conditions and more accurately represents the actual uncertainty inherent in lidar measurements under different conditions. In this new framework, sources of uncertainty are identified for estimation of the line-of-sight wind speed and reconstruction of the three-dimensional wind field. These sources are then related to physical processes caused by the atmosphere and lidar operating conditions. The framework is applied to lidar data from a field measurement site to assess the ability of the framework to predict

  1. Integration of LIDAR, optical remotely sensed, and ancillary data for forest monitoring and Grizzly bear habitat characterization / Integração de LIDAR, sensores remotos óticos e dados auxiliares para o monitoramento fl orestal e caracterização do habitat dos ursos Grizzly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Wulder

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Forest management and reporting information needs are becomingincreasingly complex in Canada. Inclusion of timber and non-timber considerations for both management and reporting has resulted inopportunities for integration of data from differing sources to provide the desired information. Canada’s forested land-base is over 400million hectares in size and fulfi lls important ecological and economic functions. In this communication we describe how remotely senseddata and other available spatial data layers capture different forestcharacteristics and conditions, and how these varying data sources may be combined to provide otherwise unavailable information. For instance, light detection and ranging (LIDAR confers information regardingvertical forest structure; high spatial resolution imagery captures (indetail the horizontal distribution and arrangement of vegetation andvegetation conditions; and, moderate spatial resolution imagery providesconsistent wide-area depictions of forest conditions. Furthermore, coarsespatial resolution imagery, with a high temporal density, can be blended with data of a higher spatial resolution to generate moderate spatialresolution data with a high temporal density. These remotely sensed datasources, when combined with existing spatial data layers such as forest inventory and digital terrain models, provide useful information thatmay be used to address, through modelling, questions regarding forest condition, structure, and change. In this communication, we discuss the importance of data integration and ultimately, information generation, inthe context of Grizzly bear habitat characterization. Grizzly bear habitat in western Canada is currently undergoing pressure from a combination of anthropogenic activities and a widespread outbreak of mountain pine beetle, resulting in a variety of information needs, including: detailed depictions of horizontal and vertical vegetation structure over large areasto support bark

  2. Fourier transform spectrometers for remote sensing of planetary atmospheres and surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakun, Alexey; Korablev, Oleg; Moshkin, Boris; Grigoriev, Alexey; Ignatiev, Nikolay; Maslov, Igor; Sazonov, Oleg; Patsaev, Dmitry; Kungurov, Andrey; Santos-Skripko, Alexander; Zharkov, Alexander; Stupin, Igor; Merzlyakov, Dmitry; Makarov, Vladislav; Martinovich, Fedor; Nikolskiy, Yuri; Shashkin, Victor

    2017-12-01

    In planetary research, Fourier transform infrared spectrometers (FTIR) solve a number of important scientific goals related both to the atmosphere and to the surface sounding. For remote orbital measurements, these goals are the thermal sounding of the atmosphere using, in particular, the 15-µm CO2 band, sensitive detections of minor gaseous species and aerosol characterization. FTIR can address similar atmospheric science goals when observing from a planetary surface allowing for better-resolved boundary layer and achieving greater accuracy (longer integration) for minor species detection. For studies of planetary surfaces, characterization of mineralogical composition in a wide IR range including sensitive measurements of hydration of the soil on airless bodies can be done. We outline a family of FTIR instruments dedicated to studies of Mars and the Moon. TIRVIM is a channel of ACS on ExoMars TGO (in orbit around Mars since October 2016). It is a 2-inch interferometer for nadir and solar occultation measurements of Mars' atmosphere. It covers a spectral range of 1.7-17 µm with spectral resolution up to 0.13 cm-1. LUMIS is a similar instrument for Luna-Resource Orbiter (Luna-26) Roscosmos mission dedicated to the search for hydration of the lunar regolith in the 6-µm band. The spectral range of LUMIS is broad (1.7-17 µm), but its sensitivity is optimized for the 4-8 µm region. The spectral resolution is 50 cm-1. We also describe recent developments focused on technical solutions for miniaturized FTIR instruments with a very high spectral resolution (0.05 cm-1 and higher). The prototype targets measurements of minor atmospheric species from the surface of Mars using the Sun tracking. One important task is to provide a high precision of interferometer's mirror movement. Another task is the development of a precise two-coordinate mechanism to seek for and follow the Sun.

  3. Characterizing the Surface Connectivity of Depressional Wetlands: Linking Remote Sensing and Hydrologic Modeling Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, J.; Evenson, G. R.; Vanderhoof, M.; Wu, Q.; Golden, H. E.; Lane, C.

    2017-12-01

    Surface connectivity of wetlands in the 700,000 km2 Prairie Pothole Region of North America (PPR) can occur through fill-spill and fill-merge mechanisms, with some wetlands eventually spilling into stream/river systems. These wetland-to-wetland and wetland-to-stream connections vary both spatially and temporally in PPR watersheds and are important to understanding hydrologic and biogeochemical processes in the landscape. To explore how to best characterize spatial and temporal variability in aquatic connectivity, we compared three approaches, 1) hydrological modeling alone, 2) remotely-sensed data alone, and 3) integrating remotely-sensed data into a hydrological model. These approaches were tested in the Pipestem Creek Watershed, North Dakota across a drought to deluge cycle (1990-2011). A Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model was modified to include the water storage capacity of individual non-floodplain wetlands identified in the National Wetland Inventory (NWI) dataset. The SWAT-NWI model simulated the water balance and storage of each wetland and the temporal variability of their hydrologic connections between wetlands during the 21-year study period. However, SWAT-NWI only accounted for fill-spill, and did not allow for the expansion and merging of wetlands situated within larger depressions. Alternatively, we assessed the occurrence of fill-merge mechanisms using inundation maps derived from Landsat images on 19 cloud-free days during the 21 years. We found fill-merge mechanisms to be prevalent across the Pipestem watershed during times of deluge. The SWAT-NWI model was then modified to use LiDAR-derived depressions that account for the potential maximum depression extent, including the merging of smaller wetlands. The inundation maps were used to evaluate the ability of the SWAT-depression model to simulate fill-merge dynamics in addition to fill-spill dynamics throughout the study watershed. Ultimately, using remote sensing to inform and validate

  4. Mapping Surface Soil Organic Carbon for Crop Fields with Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng; Kissel, David E.; West, Larry T.; Rickman, Doug; Luvall, J. C.; Adkins, Wayne

    2004-01-01

    The organic C concentration of surface soil can be used in agricultural fields to vary crop production inputs. Organic C is often highly spatially variable, so that maps of soil organic C can be used to vary crop production inputs using precision farming technology. The objective of this research was to demonstrate the feasibility of mapping soil organic C on three fields, using remotely sensed images of the fields with a bare surface. Enough soil samples covering the range in soil organic C must be taken from each field to develop a satisfactory relationship between soil organic C content and image reflectance values. The number of soil samples analyzed in the three fields varied from 22 to 26. The regression equations differed between fields, but gave highly significant relationships with R2 values of 0.93, 0.95, and 0.89 for the three fields. A comparison of predicted and measured values of soil organic C for an independent set of 2 soil samples taken on one of the fields gave highly satisfactory results, with a comparison equation of % organic C measured + 1.02% organic C predicted, with r2 = 0.87.

  5. The Inylchek Glacier in Kyrgyzstan, Central Asia: Insight on Surface Kinematics from Optical Remote Sensing Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Nobakht

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mountain chains of Central Asia host a large number of glaciated areas that provide critical water supplies to the semi-arid populated foothills and lowlands of this region. Spatio-temporal variations of glacier flows are a key indicator of the impact of climate change on water resources as the glaciers react sensitively to climate. Satellite remote sensing using optical imagery is an efficient method for studying ice-velocity fields on mountain glaciers. In this study, temporal and spatial changes in surface velocity associated with the Inylchek glacier in Kyrgyzstan are investigated. We present a detailed map for the kinematics of the Inylchek glacier obtained by cross-correlation analysis of Landsat images, acquired between 2000 and 2011, and a set of ASTER images covering the time period between 2001 and 2007. Our results indicate a high-velocity region in the elevated part of the glacier, moving up to a rate of about 0.5 m/day. Time series analysis of optical data reveals some annual variations in the mean surface velocity of the Inylchek during 2000–2011. In particular, our findings suggest an opposite trend between periods of the northward glacial flow in Proletarskyi and Zvezdochka glacier, and the rate of westward motion observed for the main stream of the Inylchek.

  6. Field test of a lidar wind profiler

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunz, G.J.

    1996-01-01

    Wind speeds and wind directions are measured remotely using an incoherent backscatter lidar system operating at a wavelength of 1.06 mm with a maximum repetition rate of 13 Hz. The principle of the measurements is based on following detectable atmospheric structures, which are transported by the

  7. 2011 - 2012 New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) Lidar: Coastal New York (Long Island and along the Hudson River)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data is remotely sensed high-resolution elevation data collected by an airborne collection platform. This LiDAR dataset is a...

  8. Determination of land surface temperature and soil moisture from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission/Microwave Imager remote sensing data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wen, J.; Su, Z.; Ma, Y.

    2003-01-01

    An analytical algorithm for the determination of land surface temperature and soil moisture from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission/Microwave Imager (TRMM/TMI) remote sensing data has been developed in this study. The error analyses indicate that the uncertainties of the enrolled parameters

  9. Improving Lidar Turbulence Estimates for Wind Energy: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Jennifer; Clifton, Andrew; Churchfield, Matthew; Klein, Petra

    2016-10-01

    Remote sensing devices (e.g., lidars) are quickly becoming a cost-effective and reliable alternative to meteorological towers for wind energy applications. Although lidars can measure mean wind speeds accurately, these devices measure different values of turbulence intensity (TI) than an instrument on a tower. In response to these issues, a lidar TI error reduction model was recently developed for commercially available lidars. The TI error model first applies physics-based corrections to the lidar measurements, then uses machine-learning techniques to further reduce errors in lidar TI estimates. The model was tested at two sites in the Southern Plains where vertically profiling lidars were collocated with meteorological towers. Results indicate that the model works well under stable conditions but cannot fully mitigate the effects of variance contamination under unstable conditions. To understand how variance contamination affects lidar TI estimates, a new set of equations was derived in previous work to characterize the actual variance measured by a lidar. Terms in these equations were quantified using a lidar simulator and modeled wind field, and the new equations were then implemented into the TI error model.

  10. Planialtimetric Accuracy Evaluation of Digital Surface Model (dsm) and Digital Terrain Model (dtm) Obtained from Aerial Survey with LIDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, C. B. M.; Barros, R. S.; Rabaco, L. M. L.

    2012-07-01

    It's noticed a significant increase in the development of orbital and airborne sensors that enable the extraction of three-dimensional data. Consequently, it's important the increment of studies about the quality of altimetric values derived from these sensors to verify if the improvements implemented in the acquisition of data may influence the results. In this context, as part of a larger project that aims to evaluate the accuracy of various sensors, this work aims to analysis the planialtimetric accuracy of DSM and DTM generated from an aerial survey with LIDAR, using as reference for the planimetric analysis of the orthophotos obtained. The project was developed for an area of São Sebastião city, located in the basin of the North Coast of São Paulo state. The area's relief is very steep, with a predominance of dense forest vegetation, typical of the Atlantic Forest. All points have been established in the field, with the use of GNSS of one frequency (L1) through static relative positioning, acquiring a minimum of 1,500 epochs, for a distance less than 20 km to the base. In this work it's considered the Brazilian standard specifications for classification of cartographic bases (PEC). The Brazilian company responsible for the aerial survey (LACTEC) gave the following products for analysis: point clouds in raw format (x, y, z) using orthometric heights; point clouds (first and last pulse) for each range of flight to verify systematic errors; DTM uniformly spaced, filtering small natural obstacles, buildings and vegetation, in Geotiff format; DSM also uniformly spaced, in Geotiff format; and the mosaic of georeferenced digital images. The analysis realized on products from the LIDAR indicated their adoption to the scales 1:2,000 (Class A for the orthophotos and Class B for the DTM) and 1:5,000 (class C for the DSM). There were no indications of trends in the results. The average error was 0.01 m. It's important that new areas with different topographic

  11. PLANIALTIMETRIC ACCURACY EVALUATION OF DIGITAL SURFACE MODEL (DSM AND DIGITAL TERRAIN MODEL (DTM OBTAINED FROM AERIAL SURVEY WITH LIDAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. B. M. Cruz

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available It’s noticed a significant increase in the development of orbital and airborne sensors that enable the extraction of three-dimensional data. Consequently, it's important the increment of studies about the quality of altimetric values derived from these sensors to verify if the improvements implemented in the acquisition of data may influence the results. In this context, as part of a larger project that aims to evaluate the accuracy of various sensors, this work aims to analysis the planialtimetric accuracy of DSM and DTM generated from an aerial survey with LIDAR, using as reference for the planimetric analysis of the orthophotos obtained. The project was developed for an area of São Sebastião city, located in the basin of the North Coast of São Paulo state. The area's relief is very steep, with a predominance of dense forest vegetation, typical of the Atlantic Forest. All points have been established in the field, with the use of GNSS of one frequency (L1 through static relative positioning, acquiring a minimum of 1,500 epochs, for a distance less than 20 km to the base. In this work it's considered the Brazilian standard specifications for classification of cartographic bases (PEC. The Brazilian company responsible for the aerial survey (LACTEC gave the following products for analysis: point clouds in raw format (x, y, z using orthometric heights; point clouds (first and last pulse for each range of flight to verify systematic errors; DTM uniformly spaced, filtering small natural obstacles, buildings and vegetation, in Geotiff format; DSM also uniformly spaced, in Geotiff format; and the mosaic of georeferenced digital images. The analysis realized on products from the LIDAR indicated their adoption to the scales 1:2,000 (Class A for the orthophotos and Class B for the DTM and 1:5,000 (class C for the DSM. There were no indications of trends in the results. The average error was 0.01 m. It's important that new areas with different

  12. Microwave remote sensing: Active and passive. Volume 2 - Radar remote sensing and surface scattering and emission theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Moore, R. K.; Fung, A. K.

    1982-01-01

    The fundamental principles of radar backscattering measurements are presented, including measurement statistics, Doppler and pulse discrimination techniques, and associated ambiguity functions. The operation of real and synthetic aperture sidelooking airborne radar systems is described, along with the internal and external calibration techniques employed in scattering measurements. Attention is given to the physical mechanisms responsible for the scattering emission behavior of homogeneous and inhomogeneous media, through a discussion of surface roughness, dielectric properties and inhomogeneity, and penetration depth. Simple semiempirical models are presented. Theoretical models involving greater mathematical sophistication are also given for extended ocean and bare soil surfaces, and the more general case of a vegetation canopy over a rough surface.

  13. Lidar Observations of Atmospheric CO2 Column During 2014 Summer Flight Campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bing; Harrison, F. Wallace; Fan, Tai-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Advanced knowledge in atmospheric CO2 is critical in reducing large uncertainties in predictions of the Earth' future climate. Thus, Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) from space was recommended by the U.S. National Research Council to NASA. As part of the preparation for the ASCENDS mission, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) and Exelis, Inc. have been collaborating in development and demonstration of the Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar approach for measuring atmospheric CO2 column from space. Airborne laser absorption lidars such as the Multi-Functional Fiber Laser Lidar (MFLL) and ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator (ACES) operating in the 1.57 micron CO2 absorption band have been developed and tested to obtain precise atmospheric CO2 column measurements using integrated path differential absorption technique and to evaluate the potential of the space ASCENDS mission. This presentation reports the results of our lidar atmospheric CO2 column measurements from 2014 summer flight campaign. Analysis shows that for the 27 Aug OCO-2 under flight over northern California forest regions, significant variations of CO2 column approximately 2 ppm) in the lower troposphere have been observed, which may be a challenge for space measurements owing to complicated topographic condition, heterogeneity of surface reflection and difference in vegetation evapotranspiration. Compared to the observed 2011 summer CO2 drawdown (about 8 ppm) over mid-west, 2014 summer drawdown in the same region measured was much weak (approximately 3 ppm). The observed drawdown difference could be the results of the changes in both meteorological states and the phases of growing seasons. Individual lidar CO2 column measurements of 0.1-s integration were within 1-2 ppm of the CO2 estimates obtained from on-board in-situ sensors. For weak surface reflection conditions such as ocean surfaces, the 1- s integrated signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of

  14. Utilization of Hydrologic Remote Sensing Data in Land Surface Modeling and Data Assimilation: Current Status and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sujay V.; Peters-Lidard, Christa; Reichl, Rolf; Harrison, Kenneth; Santanello, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in remote sensing technologies have enabled the monitoring and measurement of the Earth's land surface at an unprecedented scale and frequency. The myriad of these land surface observations must be integrated with the state-of-the-art land surface model forecasts using data assimilation to generate spatially and temporally coherent estimates of environmental conditions. These analyses are of critical importance to real-world applications such as agricultural production, water resources management and flood, drought, weather and climate prediction. This need motivated the development of NASA Land Information System (LIS), which is an expert system encapsulating a suite of modeling, computational and data assimilation tools required to address challenging hydrological problems. LIS integrates the use of several community land surface models, use of ground and satellite based observations, data assimilation and uncertainty estimation techniques and high performance computing and data management tools to enable the assessment and prediction of hydrologic conditions at various spatial and temporal scales of interest. This presentation will focus on describing the results, challenges and lessons learned from the use of remote sensing data for improving land surface modeling, within LIS. More specifically, studies related to the improved estimation of soil moisture, snow and land surface temperature conditions through data assimilation will be discussed. The presentation will also address the characterization of uncertainty in the modeling process through Bayesian remote sensing and computational methods.

  15. Synergistic using medium-resolution and high-resolution remote sensing imagery to extract impervious surface for Dianci Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Liang; Deng, Ming; Yang, Kun; Liu, Cun

    2014-01-01

    The knowledge of impervious surfaces, especially the magnitude, location, geometry, spatial pattern of impervious surfaces, is significant to urban ecosystem studies, including urban hydrology, urban climate, land use planning and resource management.Impervious surface area (ISA) is considered a key indicator of environmental quality and can be used to address complex urban environmental issues, particularly those related to the health of urban watersheds. ISA is also an indicator of non-point source pollution or polluted runoff. Remote sensing offers a consistent framework for representing spatial patterns and rates of urbanization over time through accurate observations of impervious surface area. Most of the existing methods of extracting impervious surface based on remote sensing concentrate on an urban scale, but the rapid and accurate methods of extracting impervious surfaces in a basin scale are nearly nonexistent in China and abroad. In recent years,with the rapid urbanization especially surrounding the Dianchi water body, the impervious surface coverage rate also grows rapidly and results in severe degradation of basin water environment within Dianchi watershed. In this study, we developed an approach to extract impervious surface for Dianci Basin by synergistic using medium-resolution and high-resolution remote sensing imagery. Subpixel percent impervious surfaces at Thematic Mapper (TM) images were mapped using the classification and regression tree(CART) algorithm. Sub-pixel impervious surfaces at 30m resolution were mapped in this study area through regression tree models. The estimated ISA results were evaluated through independent ISA reference data derived from high resolution QuickBird. The results prove the suitability of the approach for a widely automated and mapping of impervious surfaces in a basin scale

  16. Comparative Evaluation of Hyperspectral Imaging and Bathymetric Lidar for Measuring Channel Morphology Across a Range of River Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legleiter, C. J.; Overstreet, B. T.; Glennie, C. L.; Pan, Z.; Fernandez-Diaz, J. C.; Singhania, A.

    2014-12-01

    Reliable topographic information is critical to many applications in the riverine sciences. Quantifying morphologic change, modeling flow and sediment transport, and assessing aquatic habitat all require accurate, spatially distributed measurements of bed elevation. Remote sensing has emerged as a powerful tool for acquiring such data, but the capabilities and limitations associated with various remote sensing techniques must be evaluated systematically. In this study, we assessed the potential of hyperspectral imaging and bathymetric LiDAR for measuring channel morphology across a range of conditions in two distinct field sites: the clear-flowing Snake River in Grand Teton National Park and the confluence of the Blue and Colorado Rivers in north-central Colorado, USA. Field measurements of water column optical properties highlighted differences among these streams, including the highly turbid Muddy Creek also entering the Colorado, and enabled theoretical calculations of bathymetric precision (smallest detectable change in depth) and dynamic range (maximum detectable depth). Hyperspectral imaging can yield more precise depth estimates in shallow, clear water but bathymetric LiDAR could provide more consistent performance across a broader range of depths. Spectrally-based depth retrieval was highly accurate on the Snake River but less reliable in the more complex confluence setting. Stratification of the Blue/Colorado site into clear and turbid subsets did not improve depth retrieval performance. To obtain bed elevations, image-derived depth estimates were subtracted from water surface elevations derived from near-infrared LiDAR acquired at the same time as the hyperspectral images. For the water-penetrating green LiDAR, bed elevations were inferred from laser waveforms. On the Snake River, hyperspectral imaging resulted in smaller mean and root mean square errors than bathymetric LiDAR, but at the Blue/Colorado site the optical approach was subject to a shallow

  17. CALIPSO lidar ratio retrieval over the ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josset, Damien; Rogers, Raymond; Pelon, Jacques; Hu, Yongxiang; Liu, Zhaoyan; Omar, Ali; Zhai, Peng-Wang

    2011-09-12

    We are demonstrating on a few cases the capability of CALIPSO to retrieve the 532 nm lidar ratio over the ocean when CloudSat surface scattering cross section is used as a constraint. We are presenting the algorithm used and comparisons with the column lidar ratio retrieved by the NASA airborne high spectral resolution lidar. For the three cases presented here, the agreement is fairly good. The average CALIPSO 532 nm column lidar ratio bias is 13.7% relative to HSRL, and the relative standard deviation is 13.6%. Considering the natural variability of aerosol microphysical properties, this level of accuracy is significant since the lidar ratio is a good indicator of aerosol types. We are discussing dependencies of the accuracy of retrieved aerosol lidar ratio on atmospheric aerosol homogeneity, lidar signal to noise ratio, and errors in the optical depth retrievals. We are obtaining the best result (bias 7% and standard deviation around 6%) for a nighttime case with a relatively constant lidar ratio (in the vertical) indicative of homogeneous aerosol type.

  18. Analysis of airborne Doppler lidar, Doppler radar and tall tower measurements of atmospheric flows in quiescent and stormy weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluestein, H. B.; Doviak, R. J.; Eilts, M. D.; Mccaul, E. W.; Rabin, R.; Sundara-Rajan, A.; Zrnic, D. S.

    1986-01-01

    The first experiment to combine airborne Doppler Lidar and ground-based dual Doppler Radar measurements of wind to detail the lower tropospheric flows in quiescent and stormy weather was conducted in central Oklahoma during four days in June-July 1981. Data from these unique remote sensing instruments, coupled with data from conventional in-situ facilities, i.e., 500-m meteorological tower, rawinsonde, and surface based sensors, were analyzed to enhance understanding of wind, waves and turbulence. The purposes of the study were to: (1) compare winds mapped by ground-based dual Doppler radars, airborne Doppler lidar, and anemometers on a tower; (2) compare measured atmospheric boundary layer flow with flows predicted by theoretical models; (3) investigate the kinematic structure of air mass boundaries that precede the development of severe storms; and (4) study the kinematic structure of thunderstorm phenomena (downdrafts, gust fronts, etc.) that produce wind shear and turbulence hazardous to aircraft operations. The report consists of three parts: Part 1, Intercomparison of Wind Data from Airborne Lidar, Ground-Based Radars and Instrumented 444 m Tower; Part 2, The Structure of the Convective Atmospheric Boundary Layer as Revealed by Lidar and Doppler Radars; and Part 3, Doppler Lidar Observations in Thunderstorm Environments.

  19. A graph signal filtering-based approach for detection of different edge types on airborne lidar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayram, Eda; Vural, Elif; Alatan, Aydin

    2017-10-01

    Airborne Laser Scanning is a well-known remote sensing technology, which provides a dense and highly accurate, yet unorganized point cloud of earth surface. During the last decade, extracting information from the data generated by airborne LiDAR systems has been addressed by many studies in geo-spatial analysis and urban monitoring applications. However, the processing of LiDAR point clouds is challenging due to their irregular structure and 3D geometry. In this study, we propose a novel framework for the detection of the boundaries of an object or scene captured by LiDAR. Our approach is motivated by edge detection techniques in vision research and it is established on graph signal filtering which is an exciting and promising field of signal processing for irregular data types. Due to the convenient applicability of graph signal processing tools on unstructured point clouds, we achieve the detection of the edge points directly on 3D data by using a graph representation that is constructed exclusively to answer the requirements of the application. Moreover, considering the elevation data as the (graph) signal, we leverage aerial characteristic of the airborne LiDAR data. The proposed method can be employed both for discovering the jump edges on a segmentation problem and for exploring the crease edges on a LiDAR object on a reconstruction/modeling problem, by only adjusting the filter characteristics.

  20. A novel algorithm for delineating wetland depressions and mapping surface hydrologic flow pathways using LiDAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    In traditional watershed delineation and topographic modeling, surface depressions are generally treated as spurious features and simply removed from a digital elevation model (DEM) to enforce flow continuity of water across the topographic surface to the watershed outlets. In re...

  1. A comparison of two systems for lunar surface remote and mobile power applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Determan, W.R.; Otting, W.D.; Hunt, M.E.

    1993-01-01

    The free piston Stirling engine (FPSE) is now being developed by Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI) and NASA-LeRC for space power applications. Some conceptualizations of an isotope powered FPSE have been proposed. The performance characteristics of the proposed 2.5-kWe Stirling Isotope Power (STIP) system were developed for lunar surface remote and mobile applications. The Stirling system configuration uses a nonredundant power conversion system coupled to an annular heat source assembly (HSA) using an array of sodium heat pipes which transfer energy from the annular general-purpose heat source (GPHS) stack within the HSA to the Stirling heater head. The Stirling engine uses a dual-opposed piston design with heater head coupling. The engine coolers are connected to a single-pumped coolant loop, which rejects the cycle's waste heat to a radiator. Quantitative information, such as mass, area, and efficiency, are reported for the system. The results of a qualitative evaluation of the proposed STIP system against the desirable attributes of a lunar-based isotope power system are presented. Alternate configurations are also presented

  2. Quantification of the Scale Effect in Downscaling Remotely Sensed Land Surface Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Zhou

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Most current statistical models for downscaling the remotely sensed land surface temperature (LST are based on the assumption of the scale-invariant LST-descriptors relationship, which is being debated and requires an in-depth examination. Additionally, research on downscaling LST to high or very high resolutions (~10 m is still rare. Here, a simple analytical model was developed to quantify the scale effect in downscaling the LST from a medium resolution (~100 m to high resolutions. The model was verified in the Zhangye oasis and Beijing city. Examinations of the simulation datasets that were generated based on airborne and space station LSTs demonstrate that the developed model can predict the scale effect in LST downscaling; the scale effect exists in both of these two study areas. The model was further applied to 12 ASTER images in the Zhangye oasis during a complete crop growing season and one Landsat-8 TIRS image in Beijing city in the summer. The results demonstrate that the scale effect is intrinsically caused by the varying probability distribution of the LST and its descriptors at the native and target resolutions. The scale effect depends on the values of the descriptors, the phenology, and the ratio of the native resolution to the target resolution. Removing the scale effect would not necessarily improve the accuracy of the downscaled LST.

  3. REMOTE SENSING AND SURFACE ENERGY FLUX MODELS TO DERIVE EVAPOTRANSPIRATION AND CROP COEFFICIENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Barbagallo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing techniques using high resolution satellite images provide opportunities to evaluate daily crop water use and its spatial and temporal distribution on a field by field basis. Mapping this indicator with pixels of few meters of size on extend areas allows to characterize different processes and parameters. Satellite data on vegetation reflectance, integrated with in field measurements of canopy coverage features and the monitoring of energy fluxes through the soil-plant-atmosphere system, allow to estimate conventional irrigation components (ET, Kc thus improving irrigation strategies. In the study, satellite potential evapotranspiration (ETp and crop coefficient (Kc maps of orange orchards are derived using semi-empirical approaches between reflectance data from IKONOS imagery and ground measurements of vegetation features. The monitoring of energy fluxes through the orchard allows to estimate actual crop evapotranspiration (ETa using energy balance and the Surface Renewal theory. The approach indicates substantial promise as an efficient, accurate and relatively inexpensive procedure to predict actual ET fluxes and Kc from irrigated lands.

  4. Remote sensing of impervious surface growth: A framework for quantifying urban expansion and re-densification mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahtahmassebi, Amir Reza; Song, Jie; Zheng, Qing; Blackburn, George Alan; Wang, Ke; Huang, Ling Yan; Pan, Yi; Moore, Nathan; Shahtahmassebi, Golnaz; Sadrabadi Haghighi, Reza; Deng, Jing Song

    2016-04-01

    A substantial body of literature has accumulated on the topic of using remotely sensed data to map impervious surfaces which are widely recognized as an important indicator of urbanization. However, the remote sensing of impervious surface growth has not been successfully addressed. This study proposes a new framework for deriving and summarizing urban expansion and re-densification using time series of impervious surface fractions (ISFs) derived from remotely sensed imagery. This approach integrates multiple endmember spectral mixture analysis (MESMA), analysis of regression residuals, spatial statistics (Getis_Ord) and urban growth theories; hence, the framework is abbreviated as MRGU. The performance of MRGU was compared with commonly used change detection techniques in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the approach. The results suggested that the ISF regression residuals were optimal for detecting impervious surface changes while Getis_Ord was effective for mapping hotspot regions in the regression residuals image. Moreover, the MRGU outputs agreed with the mechanisms proposed in several existing urban growth theories, but importantly the outputs enable the refinement of such models by explicitly accounting for the spatial distribution of both expansion and re-densification mechanisms. Based on Landsat data, the MRGU is somewhat restricted in its ability to measure re-densification in the urban core but this may be improved through the use of higher spatial resolution satellite imagery. The paper ends with an assessment of the present gaps in remote sensing of impervious surface growth and suggests some solutions. The application of impervious surface fractions in urban change detection is a stimulating new research idea which is driving future research with new models and algorithms.

  5. A demonstration of adjoint methods for multi-dimensional remote sensing of the atmosphere and surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, William G. K.; Hasekamp, Otto P.

    2018-01-01

    In previous work, we derived the adjoint method as a computationally efficient path to three-dimensional (3D) retrievals of clouds and aerosols. In this paper we will demonstrate the use of adjoint methods for retrieving two-dimensional (2D) fields of cloud extinction. The demonstration uses a new 2D radiative transfer solver (FSDOM). This radiation code was augmented with adjoint methods to allow efficient derivative calculations needed to retrieve cloud and surface properties from multi-angle reflectance measurements. The code was then used in three synthetic retrieval studies. Our retrieval algorithm adjusts the cloud extinction field and surface albedo to minimize the measurement misfit function with a gradient-based, quasi-Newton approach. At each step we compute the value of the misfit function and its gradient with two calls to the solver FSDOM. First we solve the forward radiative transfer equation to compute the residual misfit with measurements, and second we solve the adjoint radiative transfer equation to compute the gradient of the misfit function with respect to all unknowns. The synthetic retrieval studies verify that adjoint methods are scalable to retrieval problems with many measurements and unknowns. We can retrieve the vertically-integrated optical depth of moderately thick clouds as a function of the horizontal coordinate. It is also possible to retrieve the vertical profile of clouds that are separated by clear regions. The vertical profile retrievals improve for smaller cloud fractions. This leads to the conclusion that cloud edges actually increase the amount of information that is available for retrieving the vertical profile of clouds. However, to exploit this information one must retrieve the horizontally heterogeneous cloud properties with a 2D (or 3D) model. This prototype shows that adjoint methods can efficiently compute the gradient of the misfit function. This work paves the way for the application of similar methods to 3D remote

  6. Assimilation of remotely sensed chlorophyll fluorescence data into the land surface model CLM4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieneke, S.; Ahrends, H. E.; Rascher, U.; Schween, J.; Schickling, A.; Crewell, S.

    2013-12-01

    Photosynthesis is the most important exchange process of CO2 between the atmosphere and the land-surface. Therefore, the prediction of vegetation response to environmental conditions like increasing CO2 concentrations or plant stress is crucial for a reliable prediction of climate change. Photosynthesis is a complex physiological process that consists of numerous bio-physical sub-processes and chemical reactions. Spatial and temporal patterns of photosynthesis depend on dynamic plant-specific adaptation strategies to highly variable environmental conditions. Photosynthesis can be estimated using land-surface models, but, while state-of-the-art models often rely on Plant Functional Type (PFT) specific constants, they poorly simulate the dynamic adaptation of the physiological status of plant canopies in space and time. Remotely sensed sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SICF) gives us now the possibility to estimate the diurnal dynamic vitality of the photosynthetic apparatus at both, the leaf and canopy levels. We installed within the framework of the Transregio32 project (www.tr32.de) automated hyperspectral fluorescence sensors at an agricultural site (winter wheat) in the Rur catchment area in West Germany at the end of July 2012. End of August, additional measurements of SIFC on nearby temperate grassland site (riparian meadow) and on a sugar beet field were performed. Spatial covering SICF data of the region were obtained during a measurement campaign using the newly developed air-borne hyperspectral sensor HyPlant on the 23 and 27 August 2012. SIFC data and data provided by eddy covariance measurements will be used to update certain model parameters that are normally set as constants. First model results demonstrate that the assimilation of SIFC into the Community Land Model 4 (CLM4) will result in a more realistic simulation of plant-specific adaptation strategies and therefore in a more realistic simulation of photosynthesis in space and time.

  7. Assessing irrigated agriculture's surface water and groundwater consumption by combining satellite remote sensing and hydrologic modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Arancibia, Jorge L; Mainuddin, Mohammed; Kirby, John M; Chiew, Francis H S; McVicar, Tim R; Vaze, Jai

    2016-01-15

    Globally, irrigation accounts for more than two thirds of freshwater demand. Recent regional and global assessments indicate that groundwater extraction (GWE) for irrigation has increased more rapidly than surface water extraction (SWE), potentially resulting in groundwater depletion. Irrigated agriculture in semi-arid and arid regions is usually from a combination of stored surface water and groundwater. This paper assesses the usefulness of remotely-sensed (RS) derived information on both irrigation dynamics and rates of actual evapotranspiration which are both input to a river-reach water balance model in order to quantify irrigation water use and water provenance (either surface water or groundwater). The assessment is implemented for the water-years 2004/05-2010/11 in five reaches of the Murray-Darling Basin (Australia); a heavily regulated basin with large irrigated areas and periodic droughts and floods. Irrigated area and water use are identified each water-year (from July to June) through a Random Forest model which uses RS vegetation phenology and actual evapotranspiration as predicting variables. Both irrigated areas and actual evapotranspiration from irrigated areas were compared against published estimates of irrigated areas and total water extraction (SWE+GWE).The river-reach model determines the irrigated area that can be serviced with stored surface water (SWE), and the remainder area (as determined by the Random Forest Model) is assumed to be supplemented by groundwater (GWE). Model results were evaluated against observed SWE and GWE. The modelled SWE generally captures the observed interannual patterns and to some extent the magnitudes, with Pearson's correlation coefficients >0.8 and normalised root-mean-square-error<30%. In terms of magnitude, the results were as accurate as or better than those of more traditional (i.e., using areas that fluctuate based on water resource availability and prescribed crop factors) irrigation modelling. The RS

  8. An Innovative Concept for Spacebased Lidar Measurement of Ocean Carbon Biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yongxiang; Behrenfeld, Michael; Hostetler, Chris; Pelon, Jacques; Trepte, Charles; Hair, John; Slade, Wayne; Cetinic, Ivona; Vaughan, Mark; Lu, Xiaomei; hide

    2015-01-01

    Beam attenuation coefficient, c, provides an important optical index of plankton standing stocks, such as phytoplankton biomass and total particulate carbon concentration. Unfortunately, c has proven difficult to quantify through remote sensing. Here, we introduce an innovative approach for estimating c using lidar depolarization measurements and diffuse attenuation coefficients from ocean color products or lidar measurements of Brillouin scattering. The new approach is based on a theoretical formula established from Monte Carlo simulations that links the depolarization ratio of sea water to the ratio of diffuse attenuation Kd and beam attenuation C (i.e., a multiple scattering factor). On July 17, 2014, the CALIPSO satellite was tilted 30Âdeg off-nadir for one nighttime orbit in order to minimize ocean surface backscatter and demonstrate the lidar ocean subsurface measurement concept from space. Depolarization ratios of ocean subsurface backscatter are measured accurately. Beam attenuation coefficients computed from the depolarization ratio measurements compare well with empirical estimates from ocean color measurements. We further verify the beam attenuation coefficient retrievals using aircraft-based high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) data that are collocated with in-water optical measurements.

  9. DECISION LEVEL FUSION OF ORTHOPHOTO AND LIDAR DATA USING CONFUSION MATRIX INFORMATION FOR LNAD COVER CLASSIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Daneshtalab

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Automatic urban objects extraction from airborne remote sensing data is essential to process and efficiently interpret the vast amount of airborne imagery and Lidar data available today. The aim of this study is to propose a new approach for the integration of high-resolution aerial imagery and Lidar data to improve the accuracy of classification in the city complications. In the proposed method, first, the classification of each data is separately performed using Support Vector Machine algorithm. In this case, extracted Normalized Digital Surface Model (nDSM and pulse intensity are used in classification of LiDAR data, and three spectral visible bands (Red, Green, Blue are considered as feature vector for the orthoimage classification. Moreover, combining the extracted features of the image and Lidar data another classification is also performed using all the features. The outputs of these classifications are integrated in a decision level fusion system according to the their confusion matrices to find the final classification result. The proposed method was evaluated using an urban area of Zeebruges, Belgium. The obtained results represented several advantages of image fusion with respect to a single shot dataset. With the capabilities of the proposed decision level fusion method, most of the object extraction difficulties and uncertainty were decreased and, the overall accuracy and the kappa values were improved 7% and 10%, respectively.

  10. CLICK: The new USGS center for LIDAR information coordination and knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoker, Jason M.; Greenlee, Susan K.; Gesch, Dean B.; Menig, Jordan C.

    2006-01-01

    Elevation data is rapidly becoming an important tool for the visualization and analysis of geographic information. The creation and display of three-dimensional models representing bare earth, vegetation, and structures have become major requirements for geographic research in the past few years. Light Detection and Ranging (lidar) has been increasingly accepted as an effective and accurate technology for acquiring high-resolution elevation data for bare earth, vegetation, and structures. Lidar is an active remote sensing system that records the distance, or range, of a laser fi red from an airborne or space borne platform such as an airplane, helicopter or satellite to objects or features on the Earth’s surface. By converting lidar data into bare ground topography and vegetation or structural morphologic information, extremely accurate, high-resolution elevation models can be derived to visualize and quantitatively represent scenes in three dimensions. In addition to high-resolution digital elevation models (Evans et al., 2001), other lidar-derived products include quantitative estimates of vegetative features such as canopy height, canopy closure, and biomass (Lefsky et al., 2002), and models of urban areas such as building footprints and three-dimensional city models (Maas, 2001).

  11. Estimation of urban surface temperatures using remote sensing in eThekwini municipality

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ellero, M

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available of surrounding natural environments amongst others. The best method of determining the presence and magnitude of UHI’s is through remote sensor thermal imaging. However, due to differing resolution characteristics, certain remote sensors would be better equipped...

  12. An Integrated Method for Mapping Impervious and Pervious Areas in Urban Environments Using Hyperspectral and LiDAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi Beni, L.; McArdle, S.; Khayer, Y.

    2014-11-01

    As urbanization continues to increase and extreme climatic events become more prevalent, urban planners and engineers are actively implementing adaptive measures to protect urban assets and communities. To support the urban planning adaptation process, mapping of impervious and pervious areas is essential to understanding the hydrodynamic environment within urban areas for flood risk planning. The application of advance geospatial data and analytical techniques using remote sensing and GIS can improve land surface characterization to better quantify surface run-off and infiltration. This study presents a method to combine airborne hyperspectral and LiDAR data for classifying pervious (e.g. vegetation, gravel, and soil) and impervious (e.g. asphalt and concrete) areas within road allowance areas for the City of Surrey, British Columbia, Canada. Hyperspectral data was acquired using the Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI) at 1 m ground spatial resolution, consisting of 72 spectral bands, and LiDAR data acquired from Leica Airborne LiDAR system at a density of 20 points/m2. A spectral library was established using 10 cm orthophotography and GIS data to identify surface features. In addition to spectral functions such as mean and standard deviation, several spectral indices were developed to discriminate between asphalt, concrete, gravel, vegetation, and shadows respectively. A spectral analysis of selected endmembers was conducted and an initial classification technique was applied using Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM). The classification results (i.e. shadows) were improved by integrating LIDAR data with the hyperspectral data.

  13. Moving Beyond 2% Uncertainty: A New Framework for Quantifying Lidar Uncertainty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Jennifer F.; Clifton, Andrew

    2017-03-08

    Remote sensing of wind using lidar is revolutionizing wind energy. However, current generations of wind lidar are ascribed a climatic value of uncertainty, which is based on a poor description of lidar sensitivity to external conditions. In this presentation, we show how it is important to consider the complete lidar measurement process to define the measurement uncertainty, which in turn offers the ability to define a much more granular and dynamic measurement uncertainty. This approach is a progression from the 'white box' lidar uncertainty method.

  14. Using surface remote sensors to derive radiative characteristics of Mixed-Phase Clouds: an example from M-PACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. de Boer

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Measurements from ground-based cloud radar, high spectral resolution lidar and microwave radiometer are used in conjunction with a column version of the Rapid Radiative Transfer Model (RRTMG and radiosonde measurements to derive the surface radiative properties under mixed-phase cloud conditions. These clouds were observed during the United States Department of Energy (US DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds Experiment (M-PACE between September and November of 2004. In total, sixteen half hour time periods are reviewed due to their coincidence with radiosonde launches. Cloud liquid (ice water paths are found to range between 11.0–366.4 (0.5–114.1 gm−2, and cloud physical thicknesses fall between 286–2075 m. Combined with temperature and hydrometeor size estimates, this information is used to calculate surface radiative flux densities using RRTMG, which are demonstrated to generally agree with measured flux densities from surface-based radiometric instrumentation. Errors in longwave flux density estimates are found to be largest for thin clouds, while shortwave flux density errors are generally largest for thicker clouds. A sensitivity study is performed to understand the impact of retrieval assumptions and uncertainties on derived surface radiation estimates. Cloud radiative forcing is calculated for all profiles, illustrating longwave dominance during this time of year, with net cloud forcing generally between 50 and 90 Wm−2.

  15. Modeling of mean radiant temperature based on comparison of airborne remote sensing data with surface measured data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Cheng; Chen, Chih-Yu; Matzarakis, Andreas; Liu, Jin-King; Lin, Tzu-Ping

    2016-06-01

    Assessment of outdoor thermal comfort is becoming increasingly important due to the urban heat island effect, which strongly affects the urban thermal environment. The mean radiant temperature (Tmrt) quantifies the effect of the radiation environment on humans, but it can only be estimated based on influencing parameters and factors. Knowledge of Tmrt is important for quantifying the heat load on human beings, especially during heat waves. This study estimates Tmrt using several methods, which are based on climatic data from a traditional weather station, microscale ground surface measurements, land surface temperature (LST) and light detection and ranging (LIDAR) data measured using airborne devices. Analytical results reveal that the best means of estimating Tmrt combines information about LST and surface elevation information with meteorological data from the closest weather station. The application in this method can eliminate the inconvenience of executing a wide range ground surface measurement, the insufficient resolution of satellite data and the incomplete data of current urban built environments. This method can be used to map a whole city to identify hot spots, and can be contributed to understanding human biometeorological conditions quickly and accurately.

  16. Three-dimension imaging lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degnan, John J. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    This invention is directed to a 3-dimensional imaging lidar, which utilizes modest power kHz rate lasers, array detectors, photon-counting multi-channel timing receivers, and dual wedge optical scanners with transmitter point-ahead correction to provide contiguous high spatial resolution mapping of surface features including ground, water, man-made objects, vegetation and submerged surfaces from an aircraft or a spacecraft.

  17. LIDAR Research & Development Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The LIDAR Research and Development labs are used to investigate and improve LIDAR components such as laser sources, optical signal detectors and optical filters. The...

  18. Lidar calibration experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejsing Jørgensen, Hans; Mikkelsen, T.; Streicher, J.

    1997-01-01

    A series of atmospheric aerosol diffusion experiments combined with lidar detection was conducted to evaluate and calibrate an existing retrieval algorithm for aerosol backscatter lidar systems. The calibration experiments made use of two (almost) identical mini-lidar systems for aerosol cloud...... detection to test the reproducibility and uncertainty of lidars. Lidar data were obtained from both single-ended and double-ended Lidar configurations. A backstop was introduced in one of the experiments and a new method was developed where information obtained from the backstop can be used in the inversion...... algorithm. Independent in-situ aerosol plume concentrations were obtained from a simultaneous tracer gas experiment with SF6, and comparisons with the two lidars were made. The study shows that the reproducibility of the lidars is within 15%, including measurements from both sides of a plume...

  19. 2015 OLC Lidar: Chelan

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Quantum Spatial has collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data for the Oregon LiDAR Consortium (OLC) Chelan FEMA study area. This study area is located in...

  20. Beam optimization for imaging lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppert, Lyle

    2015-05-01

    Active remote sensing returns information of the highest value at the lowest cost when outgoing energy can be carefully shaped and directed to the task at hand. This paper presents results of lab and airborne testing of an Electronically Steerable Flash Lidar (ESFL) under continuing development by Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corp. The results highlight the adaptive nature of this and other active instruments having fine control of illumination, and show the benefits of combining lab simulation with flight testing in validation of algorithms and control design.

  1. Random-modulation CW lidar system for space-borne carbon dioxide remote sensing based on a high-brightness semiconductor laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivias, I.; Pérez-Serrano, A.; Tijero, J. M. G.; Faugeron, M.; Van Dijk, F.; Krakowski, M.; Kochem, G.; Traub, M.; Barbero, J.; Adamiec, P.; Ai, X.; Rarity, J.; Quatrevalet, M.; Ehret, G.

    2017-11-01

    The accurate determination of the atmospheric distribution of carbon dioxide (CO2) on planetary scale is a key requirement for setting up modeling tools able to make reliable predictions of Earth climate dynamics which are essential for the understanding of such important issues as climate change and global warming. Nowadays, the concentrations of CO2 are mainly measured in-situ at a number of surface stations that are unevenly distributed over the planet. Air-borne and space-borne missions have the potential to provide a denser and better distributed set of observations to complement those provided by the surface network.

  2. On the sensitivity of numerical weather prediction to remotely sensed marine surface wind data - A simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cane, M. A.; Cardone, V. J.; Halem, M.; Halberstam, I.

    1981-01-01

    The reported investigation has the objective to assess the potential impact on numerical weather prediction (NWP) of remotely sensed surface wind data. Other investigations conducted with similar objectives have not been satisfactory in connection with a use of procedures providing an unrealistic distribution of initial errors. In the current study, care has been taken to duplicate the actual distribution of information in the conventional observing system, thus shifting the emphasis from accuracy of the data to the data coverage. It is pointed out that this is an important consideration in assessing satellite observing systems since experience with sounder data has shown that improvements in forecasts due to satellite-derived information is due less to a general error reduction than to the ability to fill data-sparse regions. The reported study concentrates on the evaluation of the observing system simulation experimental design and on the assessment of the potential of remotely sensed marine surface wind data.

  3. Surface biosignatures of exo-earths: remote detection of extraterrestrial life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Siddharth; Paulino-Lima, Ivan G; Kent, Ryan; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Rothschild, Lynn

    2015-03-31

    Exoplanet discovery has made remarkable progress, with the first rocky planets having been detected in the central star's liquid water habitable zone. The remote sensing techniques used to characterize such planets for potential habitability and life rely solely on our understanding of life on Earth. The vegetation red edge from terrestrial land plants is often used as a direct signature of life, but it occupies only a small niche in the environmental parameter space that binds life on present-day Earth and has been widespread for only about 460 My. To more fully exploit the diversity of the one example of life known, we measured the spectral characteristics of 137 microorganisms containing a range of pigments, including ones isolated from Earth's most extreme environments. Our database covers the visible and near-infrared to the short-wavelength infrared (0.35-2.5 µm) portions of the electromagnetic spectrum and is made freely available from biosignatures.astro.cornell.edu. Our results show how the reflectance properties are dominated by the absorption of light by pigments in the visible portion and by strong absorptions by the cellular water of hydration in the infrared (up to 2.5 µm) portion of the spectrum. Our spectral library provides a broader and more realistic guide based on Earth life for the search for surface features of extraterrestrial life. The library, when used as inputs for modeling disk-integrated spectra of exoplanets, in preparation for the next generation of space- and ground-based instruments, will increase the chances of detecting life.

  4. Comparing land surface phenology derived from satellite and GPS network microwave remote sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Matthew O; Kimball, John S; Small, Eric E; Larson, Kristine M

    2014-08-01

    The land surface phenology (LSP) start of season (SOS) metric signals the seasonal onset of vegetation activity, including canopy growth and associated increases in land-atmosphere water, energy and carbon (CO2) exchanges influencing weather and climate variability. The vegetation optical depth (VOD) parameter determined from satellite passive microwave remote sensing provides for global LSP monitoring that is sensitive to changes in vegetation canopy water content and biomass, and insensitive to atmosphere and solar illumination constraints. Direct field measures of canopy water content and biomass changes desired for LSP validation are generally lacking due to the prohibitive costs of maintaining regional monitoring networks. Alternatively, a normalized microwave reflectance index (NMRI) derived from GPS base station measurements is sensitive to daily vegetation water content changes and may provide for effective microwave LSP validation. We compared multiyear (2007-2011) NMRI and satellite VOD records at over 300 GPS sites in North America, and their derived SOS metrics for a subset of 24 homogenous land cover sites to investigate VOD and NMRI correspondence, and potential NMRI utility for LSP validation. Significant correlations (P<0.05) were found at 276 of 305 sites (90.5 %), with generally favorable correspondence in the resulting SOS metrics (r (2)=0.73, P<0.001, RMSE=36.8 days). This study is the first attempt to compare satellite microwave LSP metrics to a GPS network derived reflectance index and highlights both the utility and limitations of the NMRI data for LSP validation, including spatial scale discrepancies between local NMRI measurements and relatively coarse satellite VOD retrievals.

  5. LAND COVER INFORMATION EXTRACTION USING LIDAR DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Shaker

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR systems are used intensively in terrain surface modelling based on the range data determined by the LiDAR sensors. LiDAR sensors record the distance between the sensor and the targets (range data with a capability to record the strength of the backscatter energy reflected from the targets (intensity data. The LiDAR sensors use the near-infrared spectrum range which has high separability in the reflected energy from different targets. This characteristic is investigated to implement the LiDAR intensity data in land-cover classification. The goal of this paper is to investigate and evaluates the use of LiDAR data only (range and intensity data to extract land cover information. Different bands generated from the LiDAR data (Normal Heights, Intensity Texture, Surfaces Slopes, and PCA are combined with the original data to study the influence of including these layers on the classification accuracy. The Maximum likelihood classifier is used to conduct the classification process for the LiDAR Data as one of the best classification techniques from literature. A study area covering an urban district in Burnaby, British Colombia, Canada, is selected to test the different band combinations to extract four information classes: buildings, roads and parking areas, trees, and low vegetation (grass areas. The results show that an overall accuracy of more than 70% can be achieved using the intensity data, and other auxiliary data generated from the range and intensity data. Bands of the Principle Component Analysis (PCA are also created from the LiDAR original and auxiliary data. Similar overall accuracy of the results can be achieved using the four bands extracted from the Principal Component Analysis (PCA.

  6. Land Cover Information Extraction Using LIDAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaker, A.; El-Ashmawy, N.

    2012-07-01

    Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) systems are used intensively in terrain surface modelling based on the range data determined by the LiDAR sensors. LiDAR sensors record the distance between the sensor and the targets (range data) with a capability to record the strength of the backscatter energy reflected from the targets (intensity data). The LiDAR sensors use the near-infrared spectrum range which has high separability in the reflected energy from different targets. This characteristic is investigated to implement the LiDAR intensity data in land-cover classification. The goal of this paper is to investigate and evaluates the use of LiDAR data only (range and intensity data) to extract land cover information. Different bands generated from the LiDAR data (Normal Heights, Intensity Texture, Surfaces Slopes, and PCA) are combined with the original data to study the influence of including these layers on the classification accuracy. The Maximum likelihood classifier is used to conduct the classification process for the LiDAR Data as one of the best classification techniques from literature. A study area covering an urban district in Burnaby, British Colombia, Canada, is selected to test the different band combinations to extract four information classes: buildings, roads and parking areas, trees, and low vegetation (grass) areas. The results show that an overall accuracy of more than 70% can be achieved using the intensity data, and other auxiliary data generated from the range and intensity data. Bands of the Principle Component Analysis (PCA) are also created from the LiDAR original and auxiliary data. Similar overall accuracy of the results can be achieved using the four bands extracted from the Principal Component Analysis (PCA).

  7. Aerodynamic roughness length estimation from very high-resolution imaging LIDAR observations over the Heihe basin in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Colin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Roughness length of land surfaces is an essential variable for the parameterisation of momentum and heat exchanges. The growing interest in the estimation of the surface turbulent flux parameterisation from passive remote sensing leads to an increasing development of models, and the common use of simple semi-empirical formulations to estimate surface roughness. Over complex surface land cover, these approaches would benefit from the combined use of passive remote sensing and land surface structure measurements from Light Detection And Ranging (LIDAR techniques. Following early studies based on LIDAR profile data, this paper explores the use of imaging LIDAR measurements for the estimation of the aerodynamic roughness length over a heterogeneous landscape of the Heihe river basin, a typical inland river basin in the northwest of China. The point cloud obtained from multiple flight passes over an irrigated farmland area were used to separate the land surface topography and the vegetation canopy into a Digital Elevation Model (DEM and a Digital Surface Model (DSM respectively. These two models were then incorporated in two approaches: (i a strictly geometrical approach based on the calculation of the plan surface density and the frontal surface density to derive a geometrical surface roughness; (ii a more aerodynamic approach where both the DEM and DSM are introduced in a Computational Fluid Dynamics model (CFD. The inversion of the resulting 3-D wind field leads to a fine representation of the aerodynamic surface roughness. Examples of the use of these three approaches are presented for various wind directions together with a cross-comparison of results on heterogeneous land cover and complex roughness element structures.

  8. Development of a Remotely Operated, Field-Deployable Tritium Analysis System for Surface and Ground Water Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Cable, P.R.; Noakes, J.E.; Spaulding, J.D.; Neary, M. P.; Wasyl, M.S.

    1996-01-01

    The environmental contamination resulting from decades of testing and manufacturing of nuclear materials for a national defense purposes is a problem now being faced by the United States. The Center for Applied Isotope Studies at the University of Georgia, in cooperation with the Westinghouse Savannah River Company and Packard Instrument Company, have developed a prototype unit for remote, near real time, in situ analysis of tritium in surface and ground water samples

  9. Development of a passive and remote magnetic microsensor with thin-film giant magnetoimpedance element and surface acoustic wave transponder

    KAUST Repository

    Al Rowais, Hommood

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a wireless magnetic field sensor consisting of a three-layer thin-film giant magnetoimpedance sensor and a surface acoustic wave device on one substrate. The goal of this integration is a passive and remotely interrogated sensor that can be easily mass fabricated using standard microfabrication tools. The design parameters, fabrication process, and a model of the integrated sensor are presented together with experimental results of the sensor. © 2011 American Institute of Physics.

  10. Passive New UV Polarimeter for Remote Surface and Atmospheric Sensing, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Our imaging polarimeter concept makes available for the first time, the passive remote imagery of all four Stokes vector components at UV wavelengths shorter than...

  11. Can in vivo surface dental enamelmicrobiopsies be used to measure remote lead exposure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olympio, Kelly Polido Kaneshiro; Huila, Manuel Fernando Gonzalez; de Almeida Baldini Cardoso, Cristiane; da Silva Ferreira, Ana Paula Sacone; Ortiz, Adrielly Garcia; Toma, Henrique Eisi; da Silva, Ricardo Henrique Alves; Luz, Maciel Santos; Cardoso, Maria Regina Alves; Kelmer, Gislayne Aparecida Rodrigues; de Oliveira, Pedro Vitoriano; Bechara, Etelvino José Henriques; Günhter, Wanda Maria Risso; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo

    2017-12-20

    Measuring lead in the surface dental enamel (SDE) using biopsies is a rapid, safe, and painless procedure. The dental enamel lead levels (DELLs) decrease from the outermost superficial layer to the inner layer of dental enamel, which becomes crucial for the biopsy depth (BD) measurement. However, whether the origin of lead found in SDE is fully endogenous is not yet established. There is also controversy about the biopsy protocol. The aims of this study were to investigate if DELLs are altered by extrinsic contamination (A) and to evaluate the real geometric figure formed by the erosion provoked by biopsy procedure and the respective BD in SDE (B). To accomplish the aim A, lead from 90 bovine incisor crowns lead was determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer as a function of exposure time and lead concentration. Two biopsies were performed in each tooth, before and after lead exposure. Six 15-tooth groups differed by exposure time (1 or 30 min) and lead concentrations (A. 0 mg/L-placebo, B. 0.01 mg/L-standard for drinking water, or C. 0.06 mg/L-concentration found in contaminated groundwater). Phosphorus was determined by an inductively coupled plasm optical emission spectrometer to quantify the enamel removed. To compare intakes/losses of lead in SDE among the groups, values of DELL differences between before and after lead exposure were compared by ANOVA (p bottom surface area, analyzed by microscopy, showed an irregular area, with regions of peaks and valleys, where areas with depth ranging from 0.2 (peaks) to 1.8 μm (valleys) (± 0.1 μm) could be found. BD carried out in vivo is commonly calculated using the cylinder height formula. The real BD was shown to be very similar to already published data. In conclusion, the SDE of erupted teeth does not seem to be susceptible to environmental lead intake, being thus reliable to measure remote exposures to lead.

  12. Comparing and Combining Remotely Sensed Land Surface Temperature Products for Improved Hydrological Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M. Parinussa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Land surface temperature (LST is an important variable that provides a valuable connection between the energy and water budget and is strongly linked to land surface hydrology. Space-borne remote sensing provides a consistent means for regularly observing LST using thermal infrared (TIR and passive microwave observations each with unique strengths and weaknesses. The spatial resolution of TIR based LST observations is around 1 km, a major advantage when compared to passive microwave observations (around 10 km. However, a major advantage of passive microwaves is their cloud penetrating capability making them all-weather sensors whereas TIR observations are routinely masked under the presence of clouds and aerosols. In this study, a relatively simple combination approach that benefits from the cloud penetrating capacity of passive microwave sensors was proposed. In the first step, TIR and passive microwave LST products were compared over Australia for both anomalies and raw timeseries. A very high agreement was shown over the vast majority of the country with R2 typically ranging from 0.50 to 0.75 for the anomalies and from 0.80 to 1.00 for the raw timeseries. Then, the scalability of the passive microwave based LST product was examined and a pixel based merging approach through linear scaling was proposed. The individual and merged LST products were further compared against independent LST from the re-analysis model outputs. This comparison revealed that the TIR based LST product agrees best with the re-analysis data (R2 0.26 for anomalies and R2 0.76 for raw data, followed by the passive microwave LST product (R2 0.16 for anomalies and R2 0.66 for raw data and the combined LST product (R2 0.18 for anomalies and R2 0.62 for raw data. It should be noted that the drop in performance comes with an increased revisit frequency of approximately 20% compared to the revised frequency of the TIR alone. Additionally, this comparison against re

  13. Quantifying TOLNet ozone lidar accuracy during the 2014 DISCOVER-AQ and FRAPPÉ campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lihua; Newchurch, Michael J.; Alvarez, Raul J., II; Berkoff, Timothy A.; Brown, Steven S.; Carrion, William; De Young, Russell J.; Johnson, Bryan J.; Ganoe, Rene; Gronoff, Guillaume; Kirgis, Guillaume; Kuang, Shi; Langford, Andrew O.; Leblanc, Thierry; McDuffie, Erin E.; McGee, Thomas J.; Pliutau, Denis; Senff, Christoph J.; Sullivan, John T.; Sumnicht, Grant; Twigg, Laurence W.; Weinheimer, Andrew J.

    2017-10-01

    The Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Network (TOLNet) is a unique network of lidar systems that measure high-resolution atmospheric profiles of ozone. The accurate characterization of these lidars is necessary to determine the uniformity of the network calibration. From July to August 2014, three lidars, the TROPospheric OZone (TROPOZ) lidar, the Tunable Optical Profiler for Aerosol and oZone (TOPAZ) lidar, and the Langley Mobile Ozone Lidar (LMOL), of TOLNet participated in the Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ) mission and the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Éxperiment (FRAPPÉ) to measure ozone variations from the boundary layer to the top of the troposphere. This study presents the analysis of the intercomparison between the TROPOZ, TOPAZ, and LMOL lidars, along with comparisons between the lidars and other in situ ozone instruments including ozonesondes and a P-3B airborne chemiluminescence sensor. The TOLNet lidars measured vertical ozone structures with an accuracy generally better than ±15 % within the troposphere. Larger differences occur at some individual altitudes in both the near-field and far-field range of the lidar systems, largely as expected. In terms of column average, the TOLNet lidars measured ozone with an accuracy better than ±5 % for both the intercomparison between the lidars and between the lidars and other instruments. These results indicate that these three TOLNet lidars are suitable for use in air quality, satellite validation, and ozone modeling efforts.

  14. Atmospheric pressure and temperature profiling using near IR differential absorption lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korb, C. L.; Schwemmer, G. K.; Dombrowski, M.; Weng, C. Y.

    1983-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with differential absorption lidar techniques for remotely measuring the atmospheric temperature and pressure profile, surface pressure, and cloud top pressure-height. The procedure used in determining the pressure is based on the conduction of high-resolution measurements of absorption in the wings of lines in the oxygen A band. Absorption with respect to these areas is highly pressure sensitive in connection with the mechanism of collisional line broadening. The method of temperature measurement utilizes a determination of the absorption at the center of a selected line in the oxygen A band which originates from a quantum state with high ground state energy.

  15. Atmospheric aerosol monitoring by an elastic Scheimpflug lidar system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Liang; Brydegaard, Mikkel

    2015-11-30

    This work demonstrates a new approach - Scheimpflug lidar - for atmospheric aerosol monitoring. The atmospheric backscattering echo of a high-power continuous-wave laser diode is received by a Newtonian telescope and recorded by a tilted imaging sensor satisfying the Scheimpflug condition. The principles as well as the lidar equation are discussed in details. A Scheimpflug lidar system operating at around 808 nm is developed and employed for continuous atmospheric aerosol monitoring at daytime. Localized emission, atmospheric variation, as well as the changes of cloud height are observed from the recorded lidar signals. The extinction coefficient is retrieved according to the slope method for a homogeneous atmosphere. This work opens up new possibilities of using a compact and robust Scheimpflug lidar system for atmospheric aerosol remote sensing.

  16. Optical Backscattering Measured by Airborne Lidar and Underwater Glider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James H. Churnside

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The optical backscattering from particles in the ocean is an important quantity that has been measured by remote sensing techniques and in situ instruments. In this paper, we compare estimates of this quantity from airborne lidar with those from an in situ instrument on an underwater glider. Both of these technologies allow much denser sampling of backscatter profiles than traditional ship surveys. We found a moderate correlation (R = 0.28, p < 10−5, with differences that are partially explained by spatial and temporal sampling mismatches, variability in particle composition, and lidar retrieval errors. The data suggest that there are two different regimes with different scattering properties. For backscattering coefficients below about 0.001 m−1, the lidar values were generally greater than the glider values. For larger values, the lidar was generally lower than the glider. Overall, the results are promising and suggest that airborne lidar and gliders provide comparable and complementary information on optical particulate backscattering.

  17. PROCESSING UAV AND LIDAR POINT CLOUDS IN GRASS GIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Petras

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Today’s methods of acquiring Earth surface data, namely lidar and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV imagery, non-selectively collect or generate large amounts of points. Point clouds from different sources vary in their properties such as number of returns, density, or quality. We present a set of tools with applications for different types of points clouds obtained by a lidar scanner, structure from motion technique (SfM, and a low-cost 3D scanner. To take advantage of the vertical structure of multiple return lidar point clouds, we demonstrate tools to process them using 3D raster techniques which allow, for example, the development of custom vegetation classification methods. Dense point clouds obtained from UAV imagery, often containing redundant points, can be decimated using various techniques before further processing. We implemented and compared several decimation techniques in regard to their performance and the final digital surface model (DSM. Finally, we will describe the processing of a point cloud from a low-cost 3D scanner, namely Microsoft Kinect, and its application for interaction with physical models. All the presented tools are open source and integrated in GRASS GIS, a multi-purpose open source GIS with remote sensing capabilities. The tools integrate with other open source projects, specifically Point Data Abstraction Library (PDAL, Point Cloud Library (PCL, and OpenKinect libfreenect2 library to benefit from the open source point cloud ecosystem. The implementation in GRASS GIS ensures long term maintenance and reproducibility by the scientific community but also by the original authors themselves.

  18. Perspectives of methods of laser monitoring of the atmosphere and sea surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashayev, Arif; Tunaboylu, Bahadir; Usta, Metin; Sadixov, Ilham; Allahverdiyev, Kerim

    2016-01-01

    Laser monitoring (remote sensing) may be considered as the science of collecting and interpreting information about the atmosphere, earth and sea using sensors on earth, on platforms in our atmosphere (airplanes, balloons) or in space (satellites) without being in direct physical contact with them. Remote sensing by LIDARs (Light Identification Detection and Ranging) has wide applications as technique to probe the Earth's atmosphere, ocean and land surfaces. LIDARs are widely used to get knowledge of spatial and temporal variations in meteorological quantities (e.g. temperature, humidity, clouds and aerosol properties) and to monitor the changes in these quantities on different timescales. Subject of the present work is quite wide. It is rather difficult to perform analysis and to provide full knowledge about existing information. In the present work, in addition to the literature data, the information will be provided also about KA-09 aerosol LIDAR developed at the Marmara Research Centre of TÜBITAK (Turkish Scientific and technological Research Council) and also about KA-14 LIDAR developed at the National Aviation Academy of Azerbaijan for remote sensing of contaminations on water surfaces taking place during oil-gas production. The main goal of this paper is to give students insight in different remote sensing instruments and techniques (including their perspectives) that are used for the derivation of meteorological quantities and obtaining the information about water surface.

  19. Single-source surface energy balance algorithms to estimate evapotranspiration from satellite-based remotely sensed data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, Nishan

    The flow of water and energy fluxes at the Earth's surface and within the climate system is difficult to quantify. Recent advances in remote sensing technologies have provided scientists with a useful means to improve characterization of these complex processes. However, many challenges remain that limit our ability to optimize remote sensing data in determining evapotranspiration (ET) and energy fluxes. For example, periodic cloud cover limits the operational use of remotely sensed data from passive sensors in monitoring seasonal fluxes. Additionally, there are many remote sensing-based single-source surface energy balance (SEB) models, but no clear guidance on which one to use in a particular application. Two widely used models---surface energy balance algorithm for land (SEBAL) and mapping ET at high resolution with internalized calibration (METRIC)---need substantial human-intervention that limits their applicability in broad-scale studies. This dissertation addressed some of these challenges by proposing novel ways to optimize available resources within the SEB-based ET modeling framework. A simple regression-based Landsat-Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) fusion model was developed to integrate Landsat spatial and MODIS temporal characteristics in calculating ET. The fusion model produced reliable estimates of seasonal ET at moderate spatial resolution while mitigating the impact that cloud cover can have on image availability. The dissertation also evaluated five commonly used remote sensing-based single-source SEB models and found the surface energy balance system (SEBS) may be the best overall model for use in humid subtropical climates. The study also determined that model accuracy varies with land cover type, for example, all models worked well for wet marsh conditions, but the SEBAL and simplified surface energy balance index (S-SEBI) models worked better than the alternatives for grass cover. A new automated approach based on

  20. CSIR-NLC mobile LIDAR: first scientific results

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sivakumar, V

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available and Meteorology, University of Pretoria, Lynwood Road, Pretoria 0002, South Africa. 3Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria 0001, South Africa. ABSTRACT In this paper, we present the obtained first scientific results from CSIR-NLC mobile LIDAR... sun-photometer employed under AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET). Index Terms— Atmospheric measurements, Remote sensing, Aerosols, Air pollution, Meteorology 1. INTRODUCTION Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) has become an excellent tool...

  1. Design of a lidar receiver with fiber-optic output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenness, J R; Lysak, D B; Philbrick, C R

    1997-06-20

    Design considerations for a coaxial lidar receiver are examined, including details of coupling to an optical fiber for transfer of return light to a remote detector box. Attention is concentrated on the influence of fiber position on return-light capture efficiency and dynamic range of the return signal. The effect of a central obstruction on short-range signals is included. The analysis is augmented with simulations of lidar receiver performance.

  2. The marbll experiment: towards a martian wind lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Määttänen Anni

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Operating a lidar on Mars would fulfill the need of accessing wind and aerosol profiles in the atmospheric boundary layer. This is the purpose of the MARs Boundary Layer Lidar (MARBLL instrument. We report recent developments of this compact direct-detection wind lidar designed to operate from the surface of Mars. A new laser source has been developed and an azimuthal scanning capability has been added. Preliminary results of a field campaign are presented.

  3. Predicting surface fuel models and fuel metrics using lidar and CIR imagery in a dense mixed conifer forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek K. Jakubowksi; Qinghua Guo; Brandon Collins; Scott Stephens; Maggi. Kelly

    2013-01-01

    We compared the ability of several classification and regression algorithms to predict forest stand structure metrics and standard surface fuel models. Our study area spans a dense, topographically complex Sierra Nevada mixed-conifer forest. We used clustering, regression trees, and support vector machine algorithms to analyze high density (average 9 pulses/m

  4. Controlled source radiomagnetotellurics: A tool for near surface investigations in remote regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraev, Alexander; Simakov, Alexander; Shlykov, Arseny; Tezkan, Bülent

    2017-11-01

    In the course of near surface measurements, we investigated the application of the controlled source radiomagnetotelluric (CSRMT) sounding method. The used equipment RMT-C includes a five-channel recorder (frequency range 1-1000 kHz), two electric and three magnetic sensors, and a transmitter (1 kW) with a horizontal electric dipole as a source. The electric field measurements are carried out with ungrounded lines thus enabling surveys in the wintertime on snow and ice, and in the summertime in conditions adverse to the groundings. The use of electric dipole as a source ensures operating in a wide frequency range at a significant distance (up to 3-4 km) from the source. Measurements of basic signals and their odd sub harmonics raise the efficiency of the field surveys. For the covering of the full frequency range 1-1000 kHz, three basic frequencies are usually transmitted; each one is accompanied by 8-12 sub harmonics. This provides a high rate of measurements, i.e. about 70 sounding stations per day - 10 times faster than by the vertical electric sounding (VES) method. The CSRMT method offers the possibility to work in the far-field zone of the controlled source where the plane wave approximation of the primary field can be used. For the analysis of the high-frequency field of the electric dipole, an approach is used considering quasi-stationary and wave zones of the source. Features of the electromagnetic field are analyzed by taking into account displacement currents in the air. In the wave zone, at a certain distance from the source (tens to hundreds of meters), field components are characterized by a number of differences compared to a quasi-stationary zone (slower drop of the field's amplitudes, change of the directional diagram of the source, appearance of the ellipticity of polarization of electric and magnetic fields). The CSRMT method is intended for the application in remote regions where surveys by the standard RMT method could only use Very Low

  5. Investigating Land Surface Phenology Derived from Satellite and GPS Network Microwave Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M. O.; Kimball, J. S.; Small, E. E.; Larson, K. M.

    2013-12-01

    The land surface phenology (LSP) start of season (SOS) metric signals the seasonal onset of vegetation activity, including canopy growth and associated increases in land-atmosphere water, energy and carbon (CO2) exchanges influencing weather and climate variability. The Vegetation Optical Depth (VOD) parameter determined from satellite passive microwave remote sensing provides for global LSP monitoring that is sensitive to changes in vegetation canopy water content and biomass, and insensitive to atmosphere and solar illumination constraints. Direct field measures of canopy water content and biomass changes desired for LSP validation are generally lacking due to prohibitive costs of maintaining regional monitoring networks. Alternatively, a Normalized Microwave Reflectance Index (NMRI) derived from GPS base station measurements is sensitive to daily vegetation water content changes and may provide for effective microwave LSP validation as a relatively high spatial (1000m2) and temporal resolution vegetation phenology measure. We compared NMRI (1.2 and 1.5 GHz) and satellite microwave (AMSR-E sensor) 18.7 GHz frequency VOD records (2007 to 2011) at over 300 GPS sites in North America and their derived SOS metrics for a subset of 24 homogenous land cover sites. Significant correlations were found at 276 of 305 sites, with generally favorable correspondence in the resulting SOS metrics. We also investigated the temporal dynamics of nine NMRI sites within a single 25km resolution VOD pixel and with corresponding 250m MODIS NDVI measures of the three dominant land covers within the pixel to assess the spatial scale discrepancies between these high, moderate, and coarse resolution retrievals. This study is the first attempt to compare satellite microwave LSP metrics to a GPS network derived reflectance index and highlights both the utility and limitations of the NMRI data for LSP validation. Integration of GPS base stations and the NMRI into current phenology observation

  6. Mathematic modeling of the Earth's surface and the process of remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balter, B. M.

    1979-01-01

    It is shown that real data from remote sensing of the Earth from outer space are not best suited to the search for optimal procedures with which to process such data. To work out the procedures, it was proposed that data synthesized with the help of mathematical modeling be used. A criterion for simularity to reality was formulated. The basic principles for constructing methods for modeling the data from remote sensing are recommended. A concrete method is formulated for modeling a complete cycle of radiation transformations in remote sensing. A computer program is described which realizes the proposed method. Some results from calculations are presented which show that the method satisfies the requirements imposed on it.

  7. Advancements in Modelling of Land Surface Energy Fluxes with Remote Sensing at Different Spatial Scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guzinski, Radoslaw

    uxes, such as sensible heat ux, ground heat ux and net radiation, are also necessary. While it is possible to measure those uxes with ground-based instruments at local scales, at region scales they usually need to be modelled or estimated with the help of satellite remote sensing data. Even though...... to increase the spatial resolution of the reliable DTD-modelled fluxes from 1 km to 30 m. Furthermore, synergies between remote sensing based models and distributed hydrological models were studied with the aim of improving spatial performance of the hydrological models through incorporation of remote sensing......Evaporation of water from soil and its transpiration by vegetation together form a ux between the land and the atmosphere called evapotranspiration (ET). ET is a key factor in many natural and anthropogenic processes. It forms the basis of the hydrological cycle and has a strong inuence on local...

  8. Towards Linking 3D SAR and Lidar Models with a Spatially Explicit Individual Based Forest Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmanoglu, B.; Ranson, J.; Sun, G.; Armstrong, A. H.; Fischer, R.; Huth, A.

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we present a parameterization of the FORMIND individual-based gap model (IBGM)for old growth Atlantic lowland rainforest in La Selva, Costa Rica for the purpose of informing multisensor remote sensing techniques for above ground biomass techniques. The model was successfully parameterized and calibrated for the study site; results show that the simulated forest reproduces the structural complexity of Costa Rican rainforest based on comparisons with CARBONO inventory plot data. Though the simulated stem numbers (378) slightly underestimated the plot data (418), particularly for canopy dominant intermediate shade tolerant trees and shade tolerant understory trees, overall there was a 9.7% difference. Aboveground biomass (kg/ha) showed a 0.1% difference between the simulated forest and inventory plot dataset. The Costa Rica FORMIND simulation was then used to parameterize a spatially explicit (3D) SAR and lidar backscatter models. The simulated forest stands were used to generate a Look Up Table as a tractable means to estimate aboveground forest biomass for these complex forests. Various combinations of lidar and radar variables were evaluated in the LUT inversion. To test the capability of future data for estimation of forest height and biomass, we considered data of 1) L- (or P-) band polarimetric data (backscattering coefficients of HH, HV and VV); 2) L-band dual-pol repeat-pass InSAR data (HH/HV backscattering coefficients and coherences, height of scattering phase center at HH and HV using DEM or surface height from lidar data as reference); 3) P-band polarimetric InSAR data (canopy height from inversion of PolInSAR data or use the coherences and height of scattering phase center at HH, HV and VV); 4) various height indices from waveform lidar data); and 5) surface and canopy top height from photon-counting lidar data. The methods for parameterizing the remote sensing models with the IBGM and developing Look Up Tables will be discussed. Results

  9. Atmospheric Methane measurements with a multiwavelength IPDA LIDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riris, H.; Numata, K.; Wu, S.; Gonzalez, B.; Mao, J.; Kawa, S. R.; Rodriguez, M.

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric methane (CH4) is the second most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas with approximately 25 times the radiative forcing of carbon dioxide (CO2) per molecule. CH4 also contributes to pollution in the lower atmosphere through chemical reactions leading to ozone production. At Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) we have been developing the technology needed to remotely measure CH4 from orbit, using lasers. Our concept for a CH4 lidar is a nadir viewing instrument that uses the strong laser echoes from the Earth's surface to measure CH4. The instrument has a tunable, narrow-frequency light source and photon-sensitive detector to make continuous measurements from orbit, in sunlight and darkness, at all latitudes and can be relatively immune to errors introduced by scattering from clouds and aerosols. Our measurement technique uses Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA), which measures the absorption of laser pulses by a trace gas when tuned to a wavelength coincident with an absorption line

  10. Holographic Airborne Rotating Lidar Instrument Experiment (HARLIE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.

    1998-01-01

    Scanning holographic lidar receivers are currently in use in two operational lidar systems, PHASERS (Prototype Holographic Atmospheric Scanner for Environmental Remote Sensing) and now HARLIE (Holographic Airborne Rotating Lidar Instrument Experiment). These systems are based on volume phase holograms made in dichromated gelatin (DCG) sandwiched between 2 layers of high quality float glass. They have demonstrated the practical application of this technology to compact scanning lidar systems at 532 and 1064 nm wavelengths, the ability to withstand moderately high laser power and energy loading, sufficient optical quality for most direct detection systems, overall efficiencies rivaling conventional receivers, and the stability to last several years under typical lidar system environments. Their size and weight are approximately half of similar performing scanning systems using reflective optics. The cost of holographic systems will eventually be lower than the reflective optical systems depending on their degree of commercialization. There are a number of applications that require or can greatly benefit from a scanning capability. Several of these are airborne systems, which either use focal plane scanning, as in the Laser Vegetation Imaging System or use primary aperture scanning, as in the Airborne Oceanographic Lidar or the Large Aperture Scanning Airborne Lidar. The latter class requires a large clear aperture opening or window in the aircraft. This type of system can greatly benefit from the use of scanning transmission holograms of the HARLIE type because the clear aperture required is only about 25% larger than the collecting aperture as opposed to 200-300% larger for scan angles of 45 degrees off nadir.

  11. Land Cover Classification Accuracy Assessment Using Full-Waveform LiDAR Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan-Tsung Chang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The geomorphology of Taiwan is characterized by marked changes in terrain, geological fractures, and frequent natural disasters. Because of sustained economic growth, urbanization and land development, the land cover in Taiwan has undergone frequent use changes. Among the various technologies for monitoring changes in land cover, remote sensing technologies, such as LiDAR, are efficient tools for collecting a broad range of spectral and spatial data. Two types of airborne LiDAR systems exist; full-waveform (FW LiDAR and traditional discrete-echo LiDAR. Because reflected waveforms are affected by the land object material type and properties, the waveform features can be applied to analyze the characteristics specifically associated with land-cover classification (LCC. Five types of land cover that characterize the volcanic Guishan Island were investigated. The automatic LCC method was used to elucidate the spectral, geomorphometric and textural characteristics. Interpretation keys accompanied by additional information were extracted from the FW LiDAR data for subsequent statistical and separation analyses. The results show that the Gabor texture and geomorphometric features, such as the normalized digital surface model (nDSM and slopes can enhance the overall LCC accuracy to higher than 90%. Moreover, both the producer and user accuracy can be higher than 92% for forest and built-up types using amplitude and pulse width. Although the waveform characteristics did not perform as well as anticipated due to the waveform data sampling rate, the data provides suitable training samples for testing the waveform feature effects.

  12. Optimizing Lidar Scanning Strategies for Wind Energy Measurements (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, J. F.; Bonin, T. A.; Klein, P.; Wharton, S.; Chilson, P. B.

    2013-12-01

    Environmental concerns and rising fossil fuel prices have prompted rapid development in the renewable energy sector. Wind energy, in particular, has become increasingly popular in the United States. However, the intermittency of available wind energy makes it difficult to integrate wind energy into the power grid. Thus, the expansion and successful implementation of wind energy requires accurate wind resource assessments and wind power forecasts. The actual power produced by a turbine is affected by the wind speeds and turbulence levels experienced across the turbine rotor disk. Because of the range of measurement heights required for wind power estimation, remote sensing devices (e.g., lidar) are ideally suited for these purposes. However, the volume averaging inherent in remote sensing technology produces turbulence estimates that are different from those estimated by a sonic anemometer mounted on a standard meteorological tower. In addition, most lidars intended for wind energy purposes utilize a standard Doppler beam-swinging or Velocity-Azimuth Display technique to estimate the three-dimensional wind vector. These scanning strategies are ideal for measuring mean wind speeds but are likely inadequate for measuring turbulence. In order to examine the impact of different lidar scanning strategies on turbulence measurements, a WindCube lidar, a scanning Halo lidar, and a scanning Galion lidar were deployed at the Southern Great Plains Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site in Summer 2013. Existing instrumentation at the ARM site, including a 60-m meteorological tower and an additional scanning Halo lidar, were used in conjunction with the deployed lidars to evaluate several user-defined scanning strategies. For part of the experiment, all three scanning lidars were pointed at approximately the same point in space and a tri-Doppler analysis was completed to calculate the three-dimensional wind vector every 1 second. In another part of the experiment, one of

  13. Radar and optical remote sensing in offshore domain to detect, characterize, and quantify ocean surface oil slicks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelliaume, S.; Ceamanos, X.; Viallefont-Robinet, F.; Baqué, R.; Déliot, Ph.; Miegebielle, V.

    2017-10-01

    Radar and optical sensors are operationally used by authorities or petroleum companies for detecting and characterizing maritime pollution. The interest lies not only in exploration but also in the monitoring of the maritime environment. Occurrence of natural seeps on the sea surface is a key indicator of the presence of mature source rock in the subsurface. These natural seeps, as well as the oil slicks, are commonly detected using radar sensors but the addition of optical imagery can deliver extra information such as the oil real fraction, which is critical for both exploration purposes and efficient cleanup operations. Today state-of-the-art approaches combine multiple data collected by optical and radar sensors embedded on-board different airborne and spaceborne platforms, to ensure wide spatial coverage and high frequency revisit time. Multi-wavelength imaging system may create a breakthrough in remote sensing applications, but it requires adapted processing techniques that need to be developed. To explore performances offered by multi-wavelength radar and optical sensors for oil slick monitoring, remote sensing data have been collected by SETHI, the airborne system developed by ONERA, during an oil spill cleanup exercise carried out in 2015 in the North Sea, Europe. The uniqueness of this data set lies in its high spatial resolution, low noise level and quasi-simultaneous acquisitions of different part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Specific processing techniques have been developed in order to extract meaningful information associated with oil-covered sea surface. Analysis of this unique and rich dataset demonstrates that remote sensing imagery, collected in both optical and microwave domains, allows to estimate slick surface properties such as the spatial abundance of oil and the relative concentration of hydrocarbons on the sea surface.

  14. GeoComplexity and scale: surface processes and remote sensing of geosystems. GeoComplexity and scale: surface processes and remote sensing of geosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Jan-Peter

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the role of scaling in different planetary surface processes within our Solar System is one of the fundamental goals of planetary and solid earth scientific research. There has been a revolution in planetary surface observations over the past decade for the Earth, Mars and the Moon, especially in 3D imaging of surface shape (from the planetary scale down to resolutions of 75cm). I will examine three areas that I have been active in over the last 25 years giving examples of newly processed global datasets ripe for scaling analysis: topography, BRDF/albedo and imaging. For understanding scaling in terrestrial land surface topography we now have global 30m digital elevation models (DEMs) from different types of sensors (InSAR and stereo-optical) along with laser altimeter data to provide global reference models (to better than 1m in cross-over areas) and airborne laser altimeter data over small areas at resolutions better than 1m and height accuracies better than 10-15cm. We also have an increasing number of sub-surface observations from long wavelength SAR in arid regions, which will allow us to look at the true surface rather than the one buried by sand. We also still have a major limitation of these DEMs in that they represent an unknown observable surface with C-band InSAR DEMs representing being somewhere near the top of the canopy and X-band InSAR and stereo near the top of the canopy but only P-band representing the true understorey surface. I will present some of the recent highlights of topography on Mars including 3D modelling of surface shape from the ESA Mars Express HRSC (High Resolution Stereo Camera), see [1], [2] at 30-100m grid-spacing; and then co-registered to HRSC using a resolution cascade of 20m DTMs from NASA MRO stereo-CTX and 0.75m digital terrain models (as there is no land cover on Mars) DTMs from MRO stereo-HiRISE [3]. Comparable DTMs now exist for the Moon from 100m up to 1m. I will show examples of these DEM/DTM datasets

  15. Effects of ice crystal surface roughness and air bubble inclusions on cirrus cloud radiative properties from remote sensing perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Guanglin; Panetta, R. Lee; Yang, Ping; Kattawar, George W.; Zhai, Peng-Wang

    2017-07-01

    We study the combined effects of surface roughness and inhomogeneity on the optical scattering properties of ice crystals and explore the consequent implications to remote sensing of cirrus cloud properties. Specifically, surface roughness and inhomogeneity are added to the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) collection 6 (MC6) cirrus cloud particle habit model. Light scattering properties of the new habit model are simulated using a modified version of the Improved Geometric Optics Method (IGOM). Both inhomogeneity and surface roughness affect the single scattering properties significantly. In visible bands, inhomogeneity and surface roughness both tend to smooth the phase function and eliminate halos and the backscattering peak. The asymmetry parameter varies with the degree of surface roughness following a U shape - decreases and then increases - with a minimum at around 0.15, whereas it decreases monotonically with the air bubble volume fraction. Air bubble inclusions significantly increase phase matrix element -P12 for scattering angles between 20°-120°, whereas surface roughness has a much weaker effect, increasing -P12 slightly from 60°-120°. Radiative transfer simulations and cirrus cloud property retrievals are conducted by including both the factors. In terms of surface roughness and air bubble volume fraction, retrievals of cirrus cloud optical thickness or the asymmetry parameter using solar bands show similar patterns of variation. Polarimetric simulations using the MC6 cirrus cloud particle habit model are shown to be more consistent with observations when both surface roughness and inhomogeneity are simultaneously considered.

  16. 2015 Lowndes County (GA) Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TASK NAME: NOAA OCM Lidar for Lowndes County, GA with the option to Collect Lidar in Cook and Tift Counties, GA Lidar Data Acquisition and Processing Production Task...

  17. 2015 OLC Lidar: Wasco, WA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — WSI collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data for the Oregon LiDAR Consortium (OLC) Wasco County, WA, study area. The Oregon LiDAR Consortium's Wasco County...

  18. Quantifying aboveground forest carbon pools and fluxes from repeat LiDAR surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew T. Hudak; Eva K. Strand; Lee A. Vierling; John C. Byrne; Jan U. H. Eitel; Sebastian Martinuzzi; Michael J. Falkowski

    2012-01-01

    Sound forest policy and management decisions to mitigate rising atmospheric CO2 depend upon accurate methodologies to quantify forest carbon pools and fluxes over large tracts of land. LiDAR remote sensing is a rapidly evolving technology for quantifying aboveground biomass and thereby carbon pools; however, little work has evaluated the efficacy of repeat LiDAR...

  19. The absolute frequency reference unit for the methane-sensing lidar mission Merlin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinecke, D.; Liebherr, T.; Diekmann, C.; Baatzsch, A.; Herding, M.; Taha, M.; Birmuske, R.; Wang, X.; Battles, D.; Dahl, K.; Kiewe, B.; Schleisiek, K.; Beller, N.; Schafer, H.; Nicklaus, K.

    2017-09-01

    The French-German Methane Remote Sensing LIDAR Mission (MERLIN) planned for launch in 2020 aims to provide a global methane concentration map. The instrument is a differential absorption LIDAR (DIAL) system measuring the column-weighted dry-air mixing ratios of methane with a horizontal resolution of 50 km employing an absorption line at 1645 nm [1].

  20. Essentials of LIDAR multiangle data processing methodology for smoke polluted atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    V. A. Kovalev; A. Petkov; C. Wold; S. Urbanski; W. M. Hao

    2009-01-01

    Mobile scanning lidar is the most appropriate tool for monitoring wildfire smoke-plume dynamics and optical properties. Lidar is the only remote sensing instrument capable of obtaining detailed three-dimensional range-resolved information for smoke distributions and optical properties over ranges of 10+ km at different wavelengths simultaneously.

  1. Test Flight Results of the New Airborne CH4 and CO2 Lidar CHARM-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiemle, Christoph; Amediek, Axel; Fix, Andreas; Wirth, Martin; Quatrevalet, Mathieu; Büdenbender, Christian; Ehret, Gerhard

    2017-04-01

    Installed onboard the German research aircraft HALO the integrated-path differential-absorption (IPDA) lidar CHARM-F measures weighted vertical columns of the greenhouse gases CO2 and CH4 below the aircraft and along its flight track aiming at high accuracy and precision. CHARM-F was designed and built as an airborne demonstrator for the space lidar MERLIN, the "Methane Remote Lidar Mission", conducted by the German and French space agencies DLR and CNES with launch foreseen in 2021. It provides excellent opportunities for targeted measurements of regional fluxes and hot spots. We present exemplary measurements from several flights performed in spring 2015 over Central Europe. Our analyses reveal a measurement precision of below 0.5% for 20-km averages. A methane plume from a coal mine ventilation shaft was overflown, as well as a carbon dioxide plume from a large coal-fired power plant. The method to estimate fluxes from the lidar signals will be explained. The results show good agreement with reported emission rates. The airborne measurements are expected to improve the retrieval of future space-borne IPDA lidar systems such as MERLIN. CHARM-F measurements over mountains, water and clouds help assess the strength and variability of backscatter from such challenging surfaces. The IPDA weighting function, or measurement sensitivity, is dependent on atmospheric pressure and temperature. We use ECMWF analyses interpolated in space and time to the aircraft track that provide these auxiliary data. The relatively coarse model representation of orography, with respect to the lidar, causes uncertainties that we assess. CHARM-F will be a key instrument in the upcoming CoMet field experiment, where active and passive remote sensing, as well as in-situ instruments will be installed onboard HALO. The flights are scheduled in April and May 2017 over Central Europe and will focus on point sources such as power plants, coal mines, and landfills, as well as on urban gradients and

  2. 3D Spatial and Spectral Fusion of Terrestrial Hyperspectral Imagery and Lidar for Hyperspectral Image Shadow Restoration Applied to a Geologic Outcrop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzell, P. J.; Glennie, C. L.; Hauser, D. L.; Okyay, U.; Khan, S.; Finnegan, D. C.

    2016-12-01

    Recent advances in remote sensing technology have expanded the acquisition and fusion of active lidar and passive hyperspectral imagery (HSI) from an exclusively airborne technique to terrestrial modalities. This enables high resolution 3D spatial and spectral quantification of vertical geologic structures for applications such as virtual 3D rock outcrop models for hydrocarbon reservoir analog analysis and mineral quantification in open pit mining environments. In contrast to airborne observation geometry, the vertical surfaces observed by horizontal-viewing terrestrial HSI sensors are prone to extensive topography-induced solar shadowing, which leads to reduced pixel classification accuracy or outright removal of shadowed pixels from analysis tasks. Using a precisely calibrated and registered offset cylindrical linear array camera model, we demonstrate the use of 3D lidar data for sub-pixel HSI shadow detection and the restoration of the shadowed pixel spectra via empirical methods that utilize illuminated and shadowed pixels of similar material composition. We further introduce a new HSI shadow restoration technique that leverages collocated backscattered lidar intensity, which is resistant to solar conditions, obtained by projecting the 3D lidar points through the HSI camera model into HSI pixel space. Using ratios derived from the overlapping lidar laser and HSI wavelengths, restored shadow pixel spectra are approximated using a simple scale factor. Simulations of multiple lidar wavelengths, i.e., multi-spectral lidar, indicate the potential for robust HSI spectral restoration that is independent of the complexity and costs associated with rigorous radiometric transfer models, which have yet to be developed for horizontal-viewing terrestrial HSI sensors. The spectral restoration performance is quantified through HSI pixel classification consistency between full sun and partial sun exposures of a single geologic outcrop.

  3. Atmospheric aerosol and gas sensing using Scheimpflug lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Liang; Brydegaard, Mikkel

    2015-04-01

    This work presents a new lidar technique for atmospheric remote sensing based on Scheimpflug principle, which describes the relationship between nonparallel image- and object-planes[1]. When a laser beam is transmitted into the atmosphere, the implication is that the backscattering echo of the entire illuminated probe volume can be in focus simultaneously without diminishing the aperture. The range-resolved backscattering echo can be retrieved by using a tilted line scan or two-dimensional CCD/CMOS camera. Rather than employing nanosecond-pulsed lasers, cascade detectors, and MHz signal sampling, all of high cost and complexity, we have developed a robust and inexpensive atmospheric lidar system based on compact laser diodes and array detectors. We present initial applications of the Scheimpflug lidar for atmospheric aerosol monitoring in bright sunlight, with a 3 W, 808 nm CW laser diode. Kilohertz sampling rates are also achieved with applications for wind speed and entomology [2]. Further, a proof-of-principle demonstration of differential absorption lidar (DIAL) based on the Scheimpflug lidar technique is presented [3]. By utilizing a 30 mW narrow band CW laser diode emitting at around 760 nm, the detailed shape of an oxygen absorption line can be resolved remotely with an integration time of 6 s and measurement cycle of 1 minute during night time. The promising results demonstrated in this work show potential for the Scheimpflug lidar technique for remote atmospheric aerosol and gas sensing, and renews hope for robust and realistic instrumentation for atmospheric lidar sensing. [1] F. Blais, "Review of 20 years of range sensor development," Journal of Electronic Imaging, vol. 13, pp. 231-243, Jan 2004. [2] M. Brydegaard, A. Gebru, and S. Svanberg, "Super resolution laser radar with blinking atmospheric particles - application to interacting flying insects " Progress In Electromagnetics Research, vol. 147, pp. 141-151, 2014. [3] L. Mei and M. Brydegaard

  4. A Conceptual Model of Surface Reflectance Estimation for Satellite Remote Sensing Images Using in situ Reference Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke-Sheng Cheng

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available For satellite remote sensing, radiances received at the sensor are not only affected by the atmosphere but also by the topographic properties of the terrain surface. As a result, atmospheric correction alone does not yield output images that truly reflect terrain surface properties, namely surface reflectance (bidirectional reflectance factor, BRF of objects on the earth surface. Following the concept of the radiometric control area (RCA-based path radiance estimation method, we herein propose a statistical approach for surface reflectance estimation utilizing DEM data and surface reflectance of selected radiometric control areas. An algorithm for identification of shaded samples and a shape factor model were also developed in this study. The proposed RCA-based surface reflectance estimation method is capable of achieving good reflectance estimates in a region where elevation varies from 0 to approximately 600 m above the mean sea level. However, further study is recommended in order to extend the application of the proposed method to areas with substantial terrain variation.

  5. Use of ground-based remotely sensed data for surface energy balance evaluation of a semiarid rangeland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, M.S.; Kustas, William P.; Vidal, A.; Stannard, D.I.; Blanford, J.H.; Nichols, W.D.

    1994-01-01

    An interdisciplinary field experiment was conducted to study the water and energy balance of a semiarid rangeland watershed in southeast Arizona during the summer of 1990. Two subwatersheds, one grass dominated and the other shrub dominated, were selected for intensive study with ground-based remote sensing systems and hydrometeorological instrumentation. Surface energy balance was evaluated at both sites using direct and indirect measurements of the turbulent fluxes (eddy correlation, variance, and Bowen ratio methods) and using an aerodynamic approach based on remote measurements of surface reflectance and temperature and conventional meteorological information. Estimates of net radiant flux density (Rn), derived from measurements of air temperature, incoming solar radiation, and surface temperature and radiance compared well with values measured using a net radiometer (mean absolute difference (MAD) ≃ 50 W/m2 over a range from 115 to 670 W/m2). Soil heat flux density (G) was estimated using a relation between G/Rn and a spectral vegetation index computed from the red and near-infrared surface reflectance. These G estimates compared well with conventional measurements of G using buried soil heat flux plates (MAD ≃ 20 W/m2 over a range from −13 to 213 W/m2). In order to account for the effects of sparse vegetation, semiempirical adjustments to the single-layer bulk aerodynamic resistance approach were required for evaluation of sensible heat flux density (H). This yielded differences between measurements and remote estimates of H of approximately 33 W/m2 over a range from 13 to 303 W/m2. The resulting estimates of latent heat flux density, LE, were of the same magnitude and trend as measured values; however, a significant scatter was still observed: MAD ≃ 40 W/m2 over a range from 0 to 340 W/m2. Because LE was solved as a residual, there was a cumulative effect of errors associated with remote estimates of Rn, G, and H.

  6. Remote sensing estimates of impervious surfaces for hydrological modelling of changes in flood risk during high-intensity rainfall events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaspersen, Per Skougaard; Fensholt, Rasmus; Drews, Martin

    areas at different geographical locations within Europe, and to be applicable for cities with diverse morphologies and dissimilar climatic and vegetative conditions. Detailed data on urban land cover changes can be used to examine the diverse environmental impacts of past and present urbanisation......This paper addresses the accuracy and applicability of medium resolution (MR) remote sensing estimates of impervious surfaces (IS) for urban land cover change analysis. Landsat-based vegetation indices (VI) are found to provide fairly accurate measurements of sub-pixel imperviousness for urban......, including the importance of such changes for the exposure of cities towards the occurrence and impacts of climate extremes like high-intensity rainfall events....

  7. Remote sensing estimates of impervious surfaces for hydrological modelling of changes in flood risk during high-intensity rainfall events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaspersen, Per Skougaard; Fensholt, Rasmus; Drews, Martin

    This paper addresses the accuracy and applicability of medium resolution (MR) remote sensing estimates of impervious surfaces (IS) for urban land cover change analysis. Landsat-based vegetation indices (VI) are found to provide fairly accurate measurements of sub-pixel imperviousness for urban...... areas at different geographical locations within Europe, and to be applicable for cities with diverse morphologies and dissimilar climatic and vegetative conditions. Detailed data on urban land cover changes can be used to examine the diverse environmental impacts of past and present urbanisation...

  8. Lidar techniques for environmental and ecological monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svanberg, Sune

    2015-04-01

    An overview of optical probing of the atmosphere will be given, where mostly active remote- sensing techniques of the laser-radar type will be covered, but also some passive techniques employing ambient radiation. Atmospheric objects of quite varying sizes can be studied. Mercury is the only pollutant in atomic form in the atmosphere, while other pollutants are either molecular or in particle form. Light detection and ranging (Lidar) techniques allow three-dimensional mapping of such constituents, and examples from atmospheric lidar work in Lund and in Guangzhou will be given. Recently, much larger lidar targets have been studied. Monitoring of flying insects and birds is of considerable ecological interest, and several projects have been pursued in collaboration with biologists. Mostly, elastic backscattering and fluorescence techniques are employed. Some references to recent activities by the author and his colleagues are given below. [1] Z.G. Guan, L. Mei, P. Lundin, G. Somesfalean, and S. Svanberg, Vertical Lidar Sounding of Air Pollutants in a Major Chinese City, Appl. Phys. B 101, 465 (2010) [2] L. Mei, G.Y. Zhou and S. Svanberg, Differential Absorption Lidar System Employed for Background Atomic Mercury Vertical Profiling in South China, Lasers Opt. Eng. 55, 128 (2013) [3] Z.G. Guan, M. Brydegaard, P. Lundin, M. Wellenreuther, E. Svensson, and S. Svanberg, Insect Monitoring with Fluorescence LIDAR techniques - Field experiments, Appl. Optics 48, 5668 (2010) [4] A. Runemark, M. Wellereuther, H. Jayaweera, S. Svanberg and M. Brydegaard, Rare Events in Remote Dark Field Spectroscopy: An Ecological Case study of Insects, IEEE JSTQE 18, 1573 (2011) [5] L. Mei, Z.G. Guan, H.J. Zhou, J. Lv, Z.R. Zhu, J.A. Cheng, F.J. Chen, C. Löfstedt, S. Svanberg, and G. Somesfalean, Agricultural Pest Monitoring using Fluorescence Lidar Techniques, Applied Physics B 106, 733 (2011) [6] P. Lundin, P. Samuelsson, S. Svanberg, A. Runemark, S. Åkesson, and M. Brydegaard, Remote

  9. Direct measurement of initial wake separation (bo) and initial circulation (ro) using pulsed lidars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    The initial separation distance (bo) between a counter-rotating vortex pair generated by an aircraft is a fundamental parameter affecting wake turbulence decay. For the past decade Pulsed Doppler Lidars have emerged as the primary remote sensors for ...

  10. 2007 Northwest Florida Water Management District (NWFWMD) Lidar: North Jefferson County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LIDAR data is remotely sensed high-resolution elevation data collected by an airborne collection platform. Using a combination of laser range finding, GPS...

  11. Autonomous Alignment Advancements for Eye-safe Coherent Lidar, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Eye-safe coherent lidar technology holds increasing promise of meeting NASA's demanding remote 3D space winds goal near term. Highly autonomous, long-range coherent...

  12. Next Generation Fiber Coherent Lidar System for Wake Vortex Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — LIDAR (LIght Detection And Ranging) systems have proven their value in the remote measurement of spatially resolved atmospheric wind velocities in a number of...

  13. 2006 Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Topographic LiDAR: Connecticut Coastline Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LIDAR data is remotely sensed high-resolution elevation data collected by an airborne collection platform. By positioning laser range finding with the use of 1...

  14. Novel Hemispherical Scanner for a Coherent Fiber LIDAR System, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — LIDAR (LIght Detection And Ranging) systems have proven their value in the remote measurement of spatially resolved atmospheric wind velocities in a number of...

  15. Ghost imaging lidar via sparsity constraints

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Chengqiang; Gong, Wenlin; Chen, Mingliang; Li, Enrong; Wang, Hui; Xu, Wendong; Han, Shensheng

    2012-01-01

    For remote sensing, high-resolution imaging techniques are helpful to catch more characteristic information of the target. We extend pseudo-thermal light ghost imaging to the area of remote imaging and propose a ghost imaging lidar system. For the first time, we demonstrate experimentally that the real-space image of a target at about 1.0 km range with 20 mm resolution is achieved by ghost imaging via sparsity constraints (GISC) technique. The characters of GISC technique compared to the exis...

  16. Neural Network-Based Retrieval of Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture using Multi-Frequency Remotely-Sensed Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed Alemohammad, Seyed; Kolassa, Jana; Prigent, Catherine; Aires, Filipe; Gentine, Pierre

    2017-04-01

    Knowledge of root zone soil moisture is essential in studying plant's response to different stress conditions since plant photosynthetic activity and transpiration rate are constrained by the water available through their roots. Current global root zone soil moisture estimates are based on either outputs from physical models constrained by observations, or assimilation of remotely-sensed microwave-based surface soil moisture estimates with physical model outputs. However, quality of these estimates are limited by the accuracy of the model representations of physical processes (such as radiative transfer, infiltration, percolation, and evapotranspiration) as well as errors in the estimates of the surface parameters. Additionally, statistical approaches provide an alternative efficient platform to develop root zone soil moisture retrieval algorithms from remotely-sensed observations. In this study, we present a new neural network based retrieval algorithm to estimate surface and root zone soil moisture from passive microwave observations of SMAP satellite (L-band) and AMSR2 instrument (X-band). SMAP early morning observations are ideal for surface soil moisture retrieval. AMSR2 mid-night observations are used here as an indicator of plant hydraulic properties that are related to root zone soil moisture. The combined observations from SMAP and AMSR2 together with other ancillary observations including the Solar-Induced Fluorescence (SIF) estimates from GOME-2 instrument provide necessary information to estimate surface and root zone soil moisture. The algorithm is applied to observations from the first 18 months of SMAP mission and retrievals are validated against in-situ observations and other global datasets.

  17. Comparison of Surface and Column Variations of CO2 Over Urban Areas for Future Active Remote CO2 Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yonghoon; Yang, Melissa; Kooi, Susan; Browell, Edward

    2015-01-01

    High resolution in-situ CO2 measurements were recorded onboard the NASA P-3B during the DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) Field Campaign, to investigate the ability of space-based observations to accurately assess near surface conditions related to air quality. This campaign includes, Washington DC/Baltimore, MD (July 2011), San Joaquin Valley, CA (January - February 2013), Houston, TX (September 2013), and Denver, CO (July-August 2014). Each of these campaigns consisted of missed approaches and approximately two hundred vertical soundings of CO2 within the lower troposphere (surface to about 5 km). In this study, surface (0 - 1 km) and column-averaged (0 - 3.5 km) CO2 mixing ratio values from the vertical soundings in the four geographically different urban areas are used to investigate the temporal and spatial variability of CO2 within the different urban atmospheric emission environments. Tracers such as CO, CH2O, NOx, and NMHCs are used to identify the source of CO2 variations in the urban sites. Additionally, we apply nominal CO2 column weighting functions for potential future active remote CO2 sensors operating in the 1.57-microns and 2.05-microns measurement regions to convert the in situ CO2 vertical mixing ratio profiles to variations in CO2 column optical depths, which is what the active remote sensors actually measure. Using statistics calculated from the optical depths at each urban site measured during the DISCOVER-AQ field campaign and for each nominal weighting function, we investigate the natural variability of CO2 columns in the lower troposphere; relate the CO2 column variability to the urban surface emissions; and show the measurement requirements for the future ASCENDS (Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons) in the continental U.S. urban areas.

  18. Soil surface roughness modeling: limit of global characterization in remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimi-Chiadjeu, O.; Vannier, E.; Dusséaux, R.; Taconet, O.

    2013-10-01

    Many scientists use a global characterization of bare soil surface random roughness. Surface roughness is often characterized by statistical parameters deduced from its autocorrelation function. Assuming an autocorrelation model and a Gaussian height distribution, some authors have developed algorithms for numerical generation of soil surfaces that have the same statistical properties. This approach is widespread and does not take into account morphological aspects of the soil surface micro-topography. Now a detail surface roughness analysis reveals that the micro-topography is structured by holes, aggregates and clods. In the present study, we clearly show that when describing surface roughness as a whole, some information related to morphological aspects is lost. Two Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of a same natural seedbed surface were recorded by stereo photogrammetry. After estimating global parameters of these natural surfaces, we generated numerical surfaces of the same average characteristics by linear filtering. Big aggregates and clods were then captured by a contour-based approach. We show that the two-dimensional autocorrelation functions of generated surfaces and of the two agricultural surfaces are close together. Nevertheless, the number and shape of segmented object contours change from generated surfaces to the natural surfaces. Generated surfaces show fewer and bigger segmented objects than in the natural case. Moreover, the shape of some segmented objects is unrealistic in comparison to real clods, which have to be convex and of low circularity.

  19. Lidar Technology at the Goddard Laser and Electro-Optics Branch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaps, William S.; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Discovery-class orbiters now in the NASA planetary program. The purpose of the lidar is to continuously profile the water vapor and dust in the Mars atmosphere from orbit in order to quantify its dynamics, their relationship in the diurnal cycles, and to infer water vapor exchange with the Mars surface. To remotely measure the water-vapor height profiles, we will use the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique. We are also developing a laser sensor for measuring the total column content of CO2 in the atmosphere of the earth. CO2 is the principal greenhouse gas and has increased by roughly 80 ppm in the last century and a half. We will report our efforts in the development of the laser transmitter and photon counting detector components for a Mars Orbiting DIAL system and for the CO2 sounder.

  20. IEA Task 32: Wind Lidar Systems for Wind Energy Deployment (LIDAR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhn, Martin; Trabucchi, Davide; Clifton, Andrew; Courtney, Mike; Rettenmeier, Andreas

    2016-05-25

    Under the International Energy Agency Wind Implementing Agreement (IEA Wind) Task 11, researchers started examining novel applications for remote sensing and the issues around them during the 51st topical expert meeting about remote sensing in January 2007. The 59th topical expert meeting organized by Task 11 in October 2009 was also dedicated to remote sensing, and the first draft of the Task's recommended practices on remote sensing was published in January 2013. The results of the Task 11 topical expert meetings provided solid groundwork for a new IEA Wind Task 32 on wind lidar technologies. Members of the wind community identified the need to consolidate the knowledge about wind lidar systems to facilitate their use, and to investigate how to exploit the advantages offered by this technology. This was the motivation that led to the start of IEA Wind Task 32 'Lidar Application for Wind Energy Deployment' in November 2011. The kick-off was meeting was held in May 2012.

  1. Latent Heat Flux Estimate Through an Energy Water Balance Model and Land Surface Temperature from Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbari, Chiara; Sobrino, Jose A.; Mancini, Marco; Hidalgo, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Soil moisture plays a key role in the terrestrial water cycle and is responsible for the partitioning of precipitation between runoff and infiltration. Moreover, surface soil moisture controls the redistribution of the incoming solar radiation on land surface into sensible and latent heat fluxes. Recent developments have been made to improve soil moisture dynamics predictions with hydrologic land surface models (LSMs) that compute water and energy balances between the land surface and the low atmosphere. However, most of the time soil moisture is confined to an internal numerical model variable mainly due to its intrinsic space and time variability and to the well known difficulties in assessing its value from remote sensing as from in situ measurements. In order to exploit the synergy between hydrological distributed models and thermal remote sensed data, FEST-EWB, a land surface model that solves the energy balance equation, was developed. In this hydrological model, the energy budget is solved looking for the representative thermodynamic equilibrium temperature (RET) defined as the land surface temperature that closes the energy balance equation. So using this approach, soil moisture is linked to the latent heat flux and then to LST. In this work the relationship between land surface temperature and soil moisture is analysed using LST from AHS (airborne hyperspectral scanner), with a spatial resolution of 2-4 m, LST from MODIS, with a spatial resolution of 1000 m, and thermal infrared radiometric ground measurements that are compared with the thermodynamic equilibrium temperature from the energy water balance model. Moreover soil moisture measurements were carried out during the airborne overpasses and then compared with SM from the hydrological model. An improvement of this well known inverse relationship between soil moisture and land surface temperature is obtained when the thermodynamic approach is used. The analysis of the scale effects of the different

  2. Structural health monitoring and remote sensing of transportation infrastructure using embedded frequency selective surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this project was to investigate the use of Frequency Selective Surfaces (FSS) for structural health monitoring applications. Frequency Selective Surfaces (FSS) have long been used in the RF/microwave community to control scattering f...

  3. Leveraging High Resolution Topography for Education and Outreach: Updates to OpenTopography to make EarthScope and Other Lidar Datasets more Prominent in Geoscience Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleber, E.; Crosby, C. J.; Arrowsmith, R.; Robinson, S.; Haddad, D. E.

    2013-12-01

    The use of Light Detection and Ranging (lidar) derived topography has become an indispensable tool in Earth science research. The collection of high-resolution lidar topography from an airborne or terrestrial platform allows landscapes and landforms to be represented at sub-meter resolution and in three dimensions. In addition to its high value for scientific research, lidar derived topography has tremendous potential as a tool for Earth science education. Recent science education initiatives and a community call for access to research-level data make the time ripe to expose lidar data and derived data products as a teaching tool. High resolution topographic data fosters several Disciplinary Core Ideas (DCIs) of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGS, 2013), presents respective Big Ideas of the new community-driven Earth Science Literacy Initiative (ESLI, 2009), teaches to a number National Science Education Standards (NSES, 1996), and Benchmarks for Science Literacy (AAAS, 1993) for science education for undergraduate physical and environmental earth science classes. The spatial context of lidar data complements concepts like visualization, place-based learning, inquiry based teaching and active learning essential to teaching in the geosciences. As official host to EarthScope lidar datasets for tectonically active areas in the western United States, the NSF-funded OpenTopography facility provides user-friendly access to a wealth of data that is easily incorporated into Earth science educational materials. OpenTopography (www.opentopography.org), in collaboration with EarthScope, has developed education and outreach activities to foster teacher, student and researcher utilization of lidar data. These educational resources use lidar data coupled with free tools such as Google Earth to provide a means for students and the interested public to visualize and explore Earth's surface in an interactive manner not possible with most other remotely sensed imagery. The

  4. Removal of Surface-Reflected Light for the Measurement of Remote-Sensing Reflectance from an Above-Surface Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-06

    REPORT DATE IDD-MM- YYYY) 14-02-2011 2. REPORT TYPE Journal Article 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Removal of Surface...impossible to obtain Rr, from measurements of vertical profiles of Lu and Elt [6]. During the experiment, the surface was calm [see Fig. 8(a)] and

  5. Evaluating lidar point densities for effective estimation of aboveground biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhuoting; Dye, Dennis G.; Stoker, Jason M.; Vogel, John M.; Velasco, Miguel G.; Middleton, Barry R.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) was recently established to provide airborne lidar data coverage on a national scale. As part of a broader research effort of the USGS to develop an effective remote sensing-based methodology for the creation of an operational biomass Essential Climate Variable (Biomass ECV) data product, we evaluated the performance of airborne lidar data at various pulse densities against Landsat 8 satellite imagery in estimating above ground biomass for forests and woodlands in a study area in east-central Arizona, U.S. High point density airborne lidar data, were randomly sampled to produce five lidar datasets with reduced densities ranging from 0.5 to 8 point(s)/m2, corresponding to the point density range of 3DEP to provide national lidar coverage over time. Lidar-derived aboveground biomass estimate errors showed an overall decreasing trend as lidar point density increased from 0.5 to 8 points/m2. Landsat 8-based aboveground biomass estimates produced errors larger than the lowest lidar point density of 0.5 point/m2, and therefore Landsat 8 observations alone were ineffective relative to airborne lidar for generating a Biomass ECV product, at least for the forest and woodland vegetation types of the Southwestern U.S. While a national Biomass ECV product with optimal accuracy could potentially be achieved with 3DEP data at 8 points/m2, our results indicate that even lower density lidar data could be sufficient to provide a national Biomass ECV product with accuracies significantly higher than that from Landsat observations alone.

  6. Effects of ice crystal surface roughness and air bubble inclusions on cirrus cloud radiative properties from remote sensing perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Guanglin; Panetta, R. Lee; Yang, Ping; Kattawar, George W.; Zhai, Peng-Wang

    2017-01-01

    We study the combined effects of surface roughness and inhomogeneity on the optical scattering properties of ice crystals and explore the consequent implications to remote sensing of cirrus cloud properties. Specifically, surface roughness and inhomogeneity are added to the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) collection 6 (MC6) cirrus cloud particle habit model. Light scattering properties of the new habit model are simulated using a modified version of the Improved Geometric Optics Method (IGOM). Both inhomogeneity and surface roughness affect the single scattering properties significantly. In visible bands, inhomogeneity and surface roughness both tend to smooth the phase function and eliminate halos and the backscattering peak. The asymmetry parameter varies with the degree of surface roughness following a U shape - decreases and then increases - with a minimum at around 0.15, whereas it decreases monotonically with the air bubble volume fraction. Air bubble inclusions significantly increase phase matrix element -P 12 for scattering angles between 20°–120°, whereas surface roughness has a much weaker effect, increasing -P 12 slightly from 60°–120°. Radiative transfer simulations and cirrus cloud property retrievals are conducted by including both the factors. In terms of surface roughness and air bubble volume fraction, retrievals of cirrus cloud optical thickness or the asymmetry parameter using solar bands show similar patterns of variation. Polarimetric simulations using the MC6 cirrus cloud particle habit model are shown to be more consistent with observations when both surface roughness and inhomogeneity are simultaneously considered. - Highlights: • Surface roughness and air bubble inclusions affect optical properties of ice crystals significantly. • Including both factors improves simulations of ice cloud.• Cirrus cloud particle habit model of the MODIS collection 6 achieves better self-consistency and consistency with

  7. Remote measurement of surface-water velocity using infrared videography and PIV: a proof-of-concept for Alaskan rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzel, Paul J.; Legleiter, Carl; Nelson, Jonathan M.; Conaway, Jeffrey S.

    2017-01-01

    Thermal cameras with high sensitivity to medium and long wavelengths can resolve features at the surface of flowing water arising from turbulent mixing. Images acquired by these cameras can be processed with particle image velocimetry (PIV) to compute surface velocities based on the displacement of thermal features as they advect with the flow. We conducted a series of field measurements to test this methodology for remote sensing of surface velocities in rivers. We positioned an infrared video camera at multiple stations across bridges that spanned five rivers in Alaska. Simultaneous non-contact measurements of surface velocity were collected with a radar gun. In situ velocity profiles were collected with Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP). Infrared image time series were collected at a frequency of 10Hz for a one-minute duration at a number of stations spaced across each bridge. Commercial PIV software used a cross-correlation algorithm to calculate pixel displacements between successive frames, which were then scaled to produce surface velocities. A blanking distance below the ADCP prevents a direct measurement of the surface velocity. However, we estimated surface velocity from the ADCP measurements using a program that normalizes each ADCP transect and combines those normalized transects to compute a mean measurement profile. The program can fit a power law to the profile and in so doing provides a velocity index, the ratio between the depth-averaged and surface velocity. For the rivers in this study, the velocity index ranged from 0.82 – 0.92. Average radar and extrapolated ADCP surface velocities were in good agreement with average infrared PIV calculations.

  8. Characterization of groundwater and surface water interactions along Kirmir Stream using field measurements and thermal remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varli, Dilge; Kamil Yilmaz, Koray; Lütfi Suzen, M.

    2015-04-01

    The exchange processes between surface water and groundwater have recently received attention due to the important implications on the basin-scale water management as well as biogeochemical and ecological status of watersheds. We investigated the exchange processes between Kirmir Stream - a controlled stream nearby the city of Ankara, Turkey - and groundwater using a hierarchical multi-scale approach incorporating catchment physical characteristics (geology, geomorphology, DEM etc.), water quality field parameters as well as in-situ and remotely sensed measurements. Geological and geomorphological information pinpointed potential stream reaches where the interaction could occur. The identified reach was then investigated through in-situ measurements including differential discharge measurements, temperature measurements at different depths (temperature sticks), as well as remotely-sensed thermal images to identify discharge variations and temperature anomalies. Nested piezometers were then installed at possible discharge locations to investigate the variation in the vertical hydraulic gradient over time. Temperature probes (i-buttons) installed at various depths into the streambed for a period of time and helped to quantify temporal variations in vertical flow components. Basic water quality field parameters (temperature, electrical conductivity, total dissolved solid amount, salinity and dissolved oxygen) collected along the Kirmir Stream and nearby springs were investigated through Cluster Analysis to identify potential source areas. This hierarchical, multi-scale methodology provided an efficient and effective way to determine the locations and the direction of groundwater and surface water exchange processes. It was found that geology and channel modification exerted strong controls on the exchange processes.

  9. Atmospheric lidar: legislative, scientific and technological aspects; Lidar atmosferico. Aspetti legislativi, scientifici e tecnologici

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbini, R.; Colao, F.; Fiorani, L.; Palucci, A. [ENEA, Divisione Fisica Applicata, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Frascati, RM (Italy)

    2000-07-01

    The Atmospheric Lidar is one of the systems of the Mobile Laboratory of Laser Remote Sensing under development at the ENEA Research Center of Frascati. This technical report addresses the legislative, scientific and technological aspects that are the basis for the identification of the requirements, the definition of the architecture and the fixation of the specifications of the Atmospheric Lidar. The problems of air pollution are introduced in section 2. A summary of the Italian laws on that topic is then given. Section 4 provides a survey of the atmospheric measurements that can be achieved with the lidar. The sensitivity in the monitoring of pollutants is discussed in section 5. The other systems of the Mobile Laboratory of Laser Remote Sensing are shortly described in section 6. The last section is devoted to conclusions and perspectives. [Italian] Il lidar atmosferico e' uno dei sistemi del Laboratorio Mobile di Telerilevamento Laser in corso di realizzazione presso il Centro Ricerche di Frascati dell'ENEA. Questo rapporto tecnico discute gli aspetti legislativi, scientifici, tecnologici che sono alla base dell'individuazione dei requisiti, della definizione dell'architettura e della fissazione delle specifiche del Lidar atmosferico. La problematica dell'inquinamento dell'aria e' introdotta nella sezione 2. Segue un riassunto della legislazione italiana su tale tematica. La sezione 4 offre una panoramica delle misure atmosferiche realizzabili con il Lidar. La sensibilita' nel monitoraggio di inquinanti e' discussa nella sezione 5. Gli altri sistemi del Laboratorio Mobile di Telerilevamento Laser sono descritti brevemente nella sezione 6. L'ultima sezione e' dedicata alle conclusioni e alle prospettive.

  10. Seasonal and optical characterisation of cirrus clouds over Indian sub-continent using LIDAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayeshlal, G. S., E-mail: drssatyanarayana.malladi@gmail.com; Satyanarayana, Malladi, E-mail: drssatyanarayana.malladi@gmail.com; Dhaman, Reji K., E-mail: drssatyanarayana.malladi@gmail.com; Motty, G. S., E-mail: drssatyanarayana.malladi@gmail.com [Department of Optoelectronics, University of Kerala, Karyavattom, Trivandrum-695 581, Kerala (India)

    2014-10-15

    Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) is an important remote sensing technique to study about the cirrus clouds. The subject of cirrus clouds and related climate is challenging one. The received scattered signal from Lidar contains information on the physical and optical properties of cirrus clouds. The Lidar profile of the cirrus cloud provides information on the optical characteristics like depolarisation ratio, lidar ratio and optical depth, which give knowledge about possible phase, structure and orientation of cloud particle that affect the radiative budgeting of cirrus clouds. The findings from the study are subjected to generate inputs for better climatic modelling.

  11. Airborne LIDAR Data Processing and Analysis Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, K.

    2007-12-01

    Airborne LIDAR technology allows accurate and inexpensive measurements of topography, vegetation canopy heights, and buildings over large areas. In order to provide researchers high quality data, NSF has created the National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping (NCALM) to collect, archive, and distribute the LIDAR data. However, the LIDAR systems collect voluminous irregularly-spaced, three-dimensional point measurements of ground and non-ground objects scanned by the laser beneath the aircraft. To advance the use of the technology and data, NCALM is developing public domain algorithms for ground and non-ground measurement classification and tools for data retrieval and transformation. We present the main functions of the ALDPAT (Airborne LIDAR Data Processing and Analysis Tools) developed by NCALM. While Geographic Information Systems (GIS) provide a useful platform for storing, analyzing, and visualizing most spatial data, the shear volume of raw LIDAR data makes most commercial GIS packages impractical. Instead, we have developed a suite of applications in ALDPAT which combine self developed C++ programs with the APIs of commercial remote sensing and GIS software. Tasks performed by these applications include: 1) transforming data into specified horizontal coordinate systems and vertical datums; 2) merging and sorting data into manageable sized tiles, typically 4 square kilometers in dimension; 3) filtering point data to separate measurements for the ground from those for non-ground objects; 4) interpolating the irregularly spaced elevations onto a regularly spaced grid to allow raster based analysis; and 5) converting the gridded data into standard GIS import formats. The ALDPAT 1.0 is available through http://lidar.ihrc.fiu.edu/.

  12. Dynamics Change of Honghu Lake's Water Surface Area and Its Driving Force Analysis Based on Remote Sensing Technique and TOPMODEL model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, X; Cao, B; Shen, S; Hu, D; Tang, X

    2014-01-01

    Honghu Lake is the largest freshwater lake in the Hubei Province of China. This paper introduces a remote sensing approach to monitor the lake's water surface area dynamics over the last 40 years by using multi-temporal remote sensing imagery including Landsat and HJ-1. Meanwhile, the daily precipitation and evaporation data provided by Honghu meteorological station since 1970s were also collected and used to analyze the influence of climate change factors. The typical situation for precipitation was selected as an input into the TOPMODEL model to simulate the hydrological process in Honghu Lake. The simulation result with the water surface area extracted from remote sensing imagery was analyzed. This experiment shows the precipitation and timing of precipitation effects changes in the lake with remote sensing data and it showed the potential of using TOPMODEL model to analyze the combined hydrological process in Honghu Lake

  13. Satellite remotely-sensed land surface parameters and their climatic effects for three metropolitan regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, George

    2008-01-01

    By using both high-resolution orthoimagery and medium-resolution Landsat satellite imagery with other geospatial information, several land surface parameters including impervious surfaces and land surface temperatures for three geographically distinct urban areas in the United States – Seattle, Washington, Tampa Bay, Florida, and Las Vegas, Nevada, are obtained. Percent impervious surface is used to quantitatively define the spatial extent and development density of urban land use. Land surface temperatures were retrieved by using a single band algorithm that processes both thermal infrared satellite data and total atmospheric water vapor content. Land surface temperatures were analyzed for different land use and land cover categories in the three regions. The heterogeneity of urban land surface and associated spatial extents were shown to influence surface thermal conditions because of the removal of vegetative cover, the introduction of non-transpiring surfaces, and the reduction in evaporation over urban impervious surfaces. Fifty years of in situ climate data were integrated to assess regional climatic conditions. The spatial structure of surface heating influenced by landscape characteristics has a profound influence on regional climate conditions, especially through urban heat island effects.

  14. Characterizing Surface Energy Budget Components in Urban Regions Using Combination of Flux Tower Observations and Satellite Remote Sensing Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norouzi, H.; Vant-hull, B.; Ramamurthy, P.; Blake, R.; Prakash, D. S.

    2016-12-01

    Urban and built regions because of their lack of surface moisture and their surface impermeability significantly perform differently in surface energy budget than natural and non-urban regions. Characterizing the effect and the response of each surface type in the cities can help to increase our understanding of climate, anthropogenic heat, and urban heat islands. Both ground observations and remote sensing observations are important when the extent of the heat energy balance components in big cities is targeted. This is study aims to provide a novel approach to use ground observations and map the maxima and minima air temperature in New York City using satellite measurements. Complete energy balance stations are installed over distinct materials such as concrete, asphalt, and rooftops. The footprint of these stations is restricted to the individual materials. The energy balance stations monitor the sensible and latent heat fluxes through eddy covariance method. To account for the incoming and outgoing radiation, a 4-component radiometer is used that can observe both incoming and outgoing longwave and shortwave radiation. Moreover, satellite observations from Landsat 8 are utilized to classify the city surfaces to distinct defined surfaces where ground observations were performed. The mapped temperatures will be linked to MODIS surface temperatures to develop a model that can downscale MODIS skin temperatures to fine resolution air temperature over urban regions. The results are compared with ground observations, which they reveal a great potential of using synergetic use of flux tower observations and satellite measurement to study urban surface energy budget. The results of this study can enhance our understanding about urban heat islands as well as climate studies and their effects on the environment.

  15. Local Versus Remote Contributions of Soil Moisture to Near-Surface Temperature Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, R.; Schubert, S.; Wang, H.; Chang, Y.

    2018-01-01

    Soil moisture variations have a straightforward impact on overlying air temperatures, wetter soils can induce higher evaporative cooling of the soil and thus, locally, cooler temperatures overall. Not known, however, is the degree to which soil moisture variations can affect remote air temperatures through their impact on the atmospheric circulation. In this talk we describe a two-pronged analysis that addresses this question. In the first segment, an extensive ensemble of NASA/GSFC GEOS-5 atmospheric model simulations is analyzed statistically to isolate and quantify the contributions of various soil moisture states, both local and remote, to the variability of air temperature at a given local site. In the second segment, the relevance of the derived statistical relationships is evaluated by applying them to observations-based data. Results from the second segment suggest that the GEOS-5-based relationships do, at least to first order, hold in nature and thus may provide some skill to forecasts of air temperature at subseasonal time scales, at least in certain regions.

  16. Monitoring arid-land groundwater abstraction through optimization of a land surface model with remote sensing-based evaporation

    KAUST Repository

    Lopez Valencia, Oliver Miguel

    2018-02-01

    The increase in irrigated agriculture in Saudi Arabia is having a large impact on its limited groundwater resources. While large-scale water storage changes can be estimated using satellite data, monitoring groundwater abstraction rates is largely non-existent at either farm or regional level, so water management decisions remain ill-informed. Although determining water use from space at high spatiotemporal resolutions remains challenging, a number of approaches have shown promise, particularly in the retrieval of crop water use via evaporation. Apart from satellite-based estimates, land surface models offer a continuous spatial-temporal evolution of full land-atmosphere water and energy exchanges. In this study, we first examine recent trends in terrestrial water storage depletion within the Arabian Peninsula and explore its relation to increased agricultural activity in the region using satellite data. Next, we evaluate a number of large-scale remote sensing-based evaporation models, giving insight into the challenges of evaporation retrieval in arid environments. Finally, we present a novel method aimed to retrieve groundwater abstraction rates used in irrigated fields by constraining a land surface model with remote sensing-based evaporation observations. The approach is used to reproduce reported irrigation rates over 41 center-pivot irrigation fields presenting a range of crop dynamics over the course of one year. The results of this application are promising, with mean absolute errors below 3 mm:day-1, bias of -1.6 mm:day-1, and a first rough estimate of total annual abstractions of 65.8 Mm3 (close to the estimated value using reported farm data, 69.42 Mm3). However, further efforts to address the overestimation of bare soil evaporation in the model are required. The uneven coverage of satellite data within the study site allowed us to evaluate its impact on the optimization, with a better match between observed and obtained irrigation rates on fields with

  17. Detection of Wind Evolution and Lidar Trajectory Optimization for Lidar-Assisted Wind Turbine Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Schlipf

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in remote sensing are offering a promising opportunity to rethink conventional control strategies of wind turbines. With technologies such as lidar, the information about the incoming wind field - the main disturbance to the system - can be made available ahead of time. Initial field testing of collective pitch feedforward control shows, that lidar measurements are only beneficial if they are filtered properly to avoid harmful control action. However, commercial lidar systems developed for site assessment are usually unable to provide a usable signal for real time control. Recent research shows, that the correlation between the measurement of rotor effective wind speed and the turbine reaction can be modeled and that the model can be used to optimize a scan pattern. This correlation depends on several criteria such as turbine size, position of the measurements, measurement volume, and how the wind evolves on its way towards the rotor. In this work the longitudinal wind evolution is identified with the line-of-sight measurements of a pulsed lidar system installed on a large commercial wind turbine. This is done by staring directly into the inflowing wind during operation of the turbine and fitting the coherence between the wind at different measurement distances to an exponential model taking into account the yaw misalignment, limitation to line-of-sight measurements and the pulse volume. The identified wind evolution is then used to optimize the scan trajectory of a scanning lidar for lidar-assisted feedforward control in order to get the best correlation possible within the constraints of the system. Further, an adaptive filer is fitted to the modeled correlation to avoid negative impact of feedforward control because of uncorrelated frequencies of the wind measurement. The main results of the presented work are a first estimate of the wind evolution in front of operating wind turbines and an approach which manufacturers of

  18. Applications of airborne remote sensing in atmospheric sciences research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafin, Robert J.; Szejwach, Gerard; Phillips, Byron B.

    1986-02-01

    The potential for airborne remote sensing for atmospheric sciences research and in particular for research over the oceans is explored. Passive and active techniques from the microwave to visible bands are discussed. It is concluded that technology has progressed sufficiently in several areas that the time is right to develop and operate new remote sensing instruments for use by the community of atmospheric scientists as general purpose tools. There exists promising candidates of both active and passive types in the electromagnetic spectrum from microwave to visible wavelengths. Short-range, rapid response measurements of temperature, water vapor, winds, and turbulence are all possible using infrared radiometry and Doppler lidar velocimetry. Pulsed Doppler radar for measurements of the three-dimensional structures of winds and hydrometeors in precipitating systems has been clearly established. Pulsed Doppler lidar is less well developed in comparison to Doppler radar but promises to be an important complement to radar observations by providing wind measurements in the nonprecipitating and cloud free atmosphere. It is possible now to equip a single aircraft or several aircraft with a variety of remote sensing instruments that together form a powerful, highly mobile atmospheric observing system for measurement of fundamental meteorological variables in three dimensions on a variety of spatial scales. This capability is of major importance to the study of mesoscale systems, particularly to those over the ocean, where the deployment of surface based sensors is exceedingly difficult, if not impossible, and costly.

  19. Assessment of vertically-resolved PM10 from mobile lidar observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-C. Raut

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigate in this study the vertical PM10 distributions from mobile measurements carried out from locations along the Paris Peripherique (highly trafficked beltway around Paris, examine distinctions in terms of aerosol concentrations between the outlying regions of Paris and the inner city and eventually discuss the influence of aerosol sources, meteorology, and dynamics on the retrieved PM10 distributions. To achieve these purposes, we combine in situ surface measurements with active remote sensing observations obtained from a great number of research programs in Paris area since 1999. Two approaches, devoted to the conversion of vertical profiles of lidar-derived extinction coefficients into PM10, have been set up. A very good agreement is found between the theoretical and empirical methods with a discrepancy of 3%. Hence, specific extinction cross-sections at 355 nm are provided with a reasonable relative uncertainty lower than 12% for urban (4.5 m2 g−1 and periurban (5.9 m2 g−1 aersols, lower than 26% for rural (7.1 m2 g−1 aerosols, biomass burning (2.6 m2 g−1 and dust (1.1 m2 g−1 aerosols The high spatial and temporal resolutions of the mobile lidar (respectively 1.5 m and 1 min enable to follow the spatiotemporal variability of various layers trapping aerosols in the troposphere. Appropriate specific extinction cross-sections are applied in each layer detected in the vertical heterogeneities from the lidar profiles. The standard deviation (rms between lidar-derived PM10 at 200 m above ground and surface network stations measurements was ~14μg m−3. This difference is particularly ascribed to a decorrelation of mass concentrations in the first meters of the boundary layer, as highlighted through multiangular lidar observations. Lidar signals can be used to follow mass concentrations with an uncertainty lower than 25% above urban areas and provide useful information on PM10 peak forecasting that affect air quality.

  20. Can we use remotely sensed land surface temperatures to evaluate and improve model simulations of the urban heat island?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, L.; Monaghan, A. J.; Brunsell, N. A.; Barlage, M. J.; Feddema, J. J.; Wilhelmi, O.

    2013-12-01

    Extreme heat events are the leading cause of weather-related human mortality in the United States and in many countries world-wide, and the development of highly accurate urban climate models to predict heat waves and extreme heat events is critical. However, the heterogeneous urban surface with myriad energy and moisture fluxes increases model complexity and uncertainty. Remotely sensed land surface temperature (LST) offers advantages such as comparable spatial scale, global coverage, steady periodicity, and long-term observations, which can be applied to assess model simulations. This research proposes a sampling technique to select and compare MODIS LST and model-simulated radiative temperature for eight configurations of the High Resolution Land Data Assimilation System (HRLDAS) during 2003-2012 summers (JJA) for Houston, TX. The objective is to decrease comparison biases between MODIS and HRLDAS caused by clouds, view angles, and the LST retrieval algorithm, and to understand which urban surface properties are critical for accurate UHI simulations. The results show that the accurate description of urban fraction can effectively decrease more than 25% of RMSE for HRLDAS LST for both daytime and nighttime comparisons. Assuming irrigated vegetation in the urban area largely improved the RMSE by about 2K during the daytime, while there was no significant difference for the nighttime periods. In the most realistic scenario HRLDAS performed quite well at night, both temporally and spatially. HRLDAS daytime LST simulations are warmer than MODIS observations by approximately 5K but with relatively strong correlations. In summary, remotely sensed LST can be a good observational source for the assessment of UHI simulations, but requires careful pre-processing beforehand to avoid unrepresentative comparisons. The proposed sampling method is practical and effective for validation of long-term urban-scale model simulations.

  1. A coupled remote sensing and the Surface Energy Balance with Topography Algorithm (SEBTA to estimate actual evapotranspiration over heterogeneous terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Q. Gao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Evapotranspiration (ET may be used as an ecological indicator to address the ecosystem complexity. The accurate measurement of ET is of great significance for studying environmental sustainability, global climate changes, and biodiversity. Remote sensing technologies are capable of monitoring both energy and water fluxes on the surface of the Earth. With this advancement, existing models, such as SEBAL, S_SEBI and SEBS, enable us to estimate the regional ET with limited temporal and spatial coverage in the study areas. This paper extends the existing modeling efforts with the inclusion of new components for ET estimation at different temporal and spatial scales under heterogeneous terrain with varying elevations, slopes and aspects. Following a coupled remote sensing and surface energy balance approach, this study emphasizes the structure and function of the Surface Energy Balance with Topography Algorithm (SEBTA. With the aid of the elevation and landscape information, such as slope and aspect parameters derived from the digital elevation model (DEM, and the vegetation cover derived from satellite images, the SEBTA can account for the dynamic impacts of heterogeneous terrain and changing land cover with some varying kinetic parameters (i.e., roughness and zero-plane displacement. Besides, the dry and wet pixels can be recognized automatically and dynamically in image processing thereby making the SEBTA more sensitive to derive the sensible heat flux for ET estimation. To prove the application potential, the SEBTA was carried out to present the robust estimates of 24 h solar radiation over time, which leads to the smooth simulation of the ET over seasons in northern China where the regional climate and vegetation cover in different seasons compound the ET calculations. The SEBTA was validated by the measured data at the ground level. During validation, it shows that the consistency index reached 0.92 and the correlation coefficient was 0.87.

  2. Season Spotter: Using Citizen Science to Validate and Scale Plant Phenology from Near-Surface Remote Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Kosmala

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The impact of a rapidly changing climate on the biosphere is an urgent area of research for mitigation policy and management. Plant phenology is a sensitive indicator of climate change and regulates the seasonality of carbon, water, and energy fluxes between the land surface and the climate system, making it an important tool for studying biosphere–atmosphere interactions. To monitor plant phenology at regional and continental scales, automated near-surface cameras are being increasingly used to supplement phenology data derived from satellite imagery and data from ground-based human observers. We used imagery from a network of phenology cameras in a citizen science project called Season Spotter to investigate whether information could be derived from these images beyond standard, color-based vegetation indices. We found that engaging citizen science volunteers resulted in useful science knowledge in three ways: first, volunteers were able to detect some, but not all, reproductive phenology events, connecting landscape-level measures with field-based measures. Second, volunteers successfully demarcated individual trees in landscape imagery, facilitating scaling of vegetation indices from organism to ecosystem. And third, volunteers’ data were used to validate phenology transition dates calculated from vegetation indices and to identify potential improvements to existing algorithms to enable better biological interpretation. As a result, the use of citizen science in combination with near-surface remote sensing of phenology can be used to link ground-based phenology observations to satellite sensor data for scaling and validation. Well-designed citizen science projects targeting improved data processing and validation of remote sensing imagery hold promise for providing the data needed to address grand challenges in environmental science and Earth observation.

  3. A coupled remote sensing and the Surface Energy Balance with Topography Algorithm (SEBTA) to estimate actual evapotranspiration over heterogeneous terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Z. Q.; Liu, C. S.; Gao, W.; Chang, N.-B.

    2011-01-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) may be used as an ecological indicator to address the ecosystem complexity. The accurate measurement of ET is of great significance for studying environmental sustainability, global climate changes, and biodiversity. Remote sensing technologies are capable of monitoring both energy and water fluxes on the surface of the Earth. With this advancement, existing models, such as SEBAL, S_SEBI and SEBS, enable us to estimate the regional ET with limited temporal and spatial coverage in the study areas. This paper extends the existing modeling efforts with the inclusion of new components for ET estimation at different temporal and spatial scales under heterogeneous terrain with varying elevations, slopes and aspects. Following a coupled remote sensing and surface energy balance approach, this study emphasizes the structure and function of the Surface Energy Balance with Topography Algorithm (SEBTA). With the aid of the elevation and landscape information, such as slope and aspect parameters derived from the digital elevation model (DEM), and the vegetation cover derived from satellite images, the SEBTA can account for the dynamic impacts of heterogeneous terrain and changing land cover with some varying kinetic parameters (i.e., roughness and zero-plane displacement). Besides, the dry and wet pixels can be recognized automatically and dynamically in image processing thereby making the SEBTA more sensitive to derive the sensible heat flux for ET estimation. To prove the application potential, the SEBTA was carried out to present the robust estimates of 24 h solar radiation over time, which leads to the smooth simulation of the ET over seasons in northern China where the regional climate and vegetation cover in different seasons compound the ET calculations. The SEBTA was validated by the measured data at the ground level. During validation, it shows that the consistency index reached 0.92 and the correlation coefficient was 0.87.

  4. A coupled remote sensing and the Surface Energy Balance with Topography Algorithm (SEBTA) to estimate actual evapotranspiration under complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Z. Q.; Liu, C. S.; Gao, W.; Chang, N. B.

    2010-07-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) may be used as an ecological indicator to address the ecosystem complexity. The accurate measurement of ET is of great significance for studying environmental sustainability, global climate changes, and biodiversity. Remote sensing technologies are capable of monitoring both energy and water fluxes on the surface of the Earth. With this advancement, existing models, such as SEBAL, S_SEBI and SEBS, enable us to estimate the regional ET with limited temporal and spatial scales. This paper extends the existing modeling efforts with the inclusion of new components for ET estimation at varying temporal and spatial scales under complex terrain. Following a coupled remote sensing and surface energy balance approach, this study emphasizes the structure and function of the Surface Energy Balance with Topography Algorithm (SEBTA). With the aid of the elevation and landscape information, such as slope and aspect parameters derived from the digital elevation model (DEM), and the vegetation cover derived from satellite images, the SEBTA can fully account for the dynamic impacts of complex terrain and changing land cover in concert with some varying kinetic parameters (i.e., roughness and zero-plane displacement) over time. Besides, the dry and wet pixels can be recognized automatically and dynamically in image processing thereby making the SEBTA more sensitive to derive the sensible heat flux for ET estimation. To prove the application potential, the SEBTA was carried out to present the robust estimates of 24 h solar radiation over time, which leads to the smooth simulation of the ET over seasons in northern China where the regional climate and vegetation cover in different seasons compound the ET calculations. The SEBTA was validated by the measured data at the ground level. During validation, it shows that the consistency index reached 0.92 and the correlation coefficient was 0.87.

  5. Mapping Surface Water DOC in the Northern Gulf of Mexico Using CDOM Absorption Coefficients and Remote Sensing Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, B.; Chelsky, A.; Bulygina, E.; Roberts, B. J.

    2017-12-01

    Remote sensing techniques have become valuable tools to researchers, providing the capability to measure and visualize important parameters without the need for time or resource intensive sampling trips. Relationships between dissolved organic carbon (DOC), colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and spectral data have been used to remotely sense DOC concentrations in riverine systems, however, this approach has not been applied to the northern Gulf of Mexico (GoM) and needs to be tested to determine how accurate these relationships are in riverine-dominated shelf systems. In April, July, and October 2017 we sampled surface water from 80+ sites over an area of 100,000 km2 along the Louisiana-Texas shelf in the northern GoM. DOC concentrations were measured on filtered water samples using a Shimadzu TOC-VCSH analyzer using standard techniques. Additionally, DOC concentrations were estimated from CDOM absorption coefficients of filtered water samples on a UV-Vis spectrophotometer using a modification of the methods of Fichot and Benner (2011). These values were regressed against Landsat visible band spectral data for those same locations to establish a relationship between the spectral data, CDOM absorption coefficients. This allowed us to spatially map CDOM absorption coefficients in the Gulf of Mexico using the Landsat spectral data in GIS. We then used a multiple linear regressions model to derive DOC concentrations from the CDOM absorption coefficients and applied those to our map. This study provides an evaluation of the viability of scaling up CDOM absorption coefficient and remote-sensing derived estimates of DOC concentrations to the scale of the LA-TX shelf ecosystem.

  6. Volcanic ash supply to the surface ocean – remote sensing of biological responses and their wider biogeochemical significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J. Browning

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Transient micronutrient enrichment of the surface ocean can enhance phytoplankton growth rates and alter microbial community structure with an ensuing spectrum of biogeochemical feedbacks. Strong phytoplankton responses to micronutrients supplied by volcanic ash have been reported recently. Here we: (i synthesize findings from these recent studies; (ii report the results of a new remote sensing study of ash fertilization; and (iii calculate theoretical bounds of ash-fertilized carbon export. Our synthesis highlights that phytoplankton responses to ash do not always simply mimic that of iron amendment; the exact mechanisms for this are likely biogeochemically important but are not yet well understood. Inherent optical properties of ash-loaded seawater suggest rhyolitic ash biases routine satellite chlorophyll-a estimation upwards by more than an order of magnitude for waters with 0.5 mg chlorophyll-a m-3. For this reason post-ash-deposition chlorophyll-a changes in oligotrophic waters detected via standard Case 1 (open ocean algorithms should be interpreted with caution. Remote sensing analysis of historic events with a bias less than a factor of 2 provided limited stand-alone evidence for ash-fertilization. Confounding factors were poor coverage, incoherent ash dispersal, and ambiguity ascribing biomass changes to ash supply over other potential drivers. Using current estimates of iron release and carbon export efficiencies, uncertainty bounds of ash-fertilized carbon export for 3 events are presented. Patagonian iron supply to the Southern Ocean from volcanic eruptions is less than that of windblown dust on thousand year timescales but can dominate supply at shorter timescales. Reducing uncertainties in remote sensing of phytoplankton response and nutrient release from ash are avenues for enabling assessment of the oceanic response to large-scale transient nutrient enrichment.

  7. Lidar detection of carbon dioxide in volcanic plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorani, Luca; Santoro, Simone; Parracino, Stefano; Maio, Giovanni; Del Franco, Mario; Aiuppa, Alessandro

    2015-06-01

    Volcanic gases give information on magmatic processes. In particular, anomalous releases of carbon dioxide precede volcanic eruptions. Up to now, this gas has been measured in volcanic plumes with conventional measurements that imply the severe risks of local sampling and can last many hours. For these reasons and for the great advantages of laser sensing, the thorough development of volcanic lidar has been undertaken at the Diagnostics and Metrology Laboratory (UTAPRAD-DIM) of the Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development (ENEA). In fact, lidar profiling allows one to scan remotely volcanic plumes in a fast and continuous way, and with high spatial and temporal resolution. Two differential absorption lidar instruments will be presented in this paper: BILLI (BrIdge voLcanic LIdar), based on injection seeded Nd:YAG laser, double grating dye laser, difference frequency mixing (DFM) and optical parametric amplifier (OPA), and VULLI (VULcamed Lidar), based on injection seeded Nd:YAG laser and optical parametric oscillator (OPO). The first one is funded by the ERC (European Research Council) project BRIDGE and the second one by the ERDF (European Regional Development Fund) project VULCAMED. While VULLI has not yet been tested in a volcanic site, BILLI scanned the gas emitted by Pozzuoli Solfatara (Campi Flegrei volcanic area, Naples, Italy) during a field campaign carried out from 13 to 17 October 2014. Carbon dioxide concentration maps were retrieved remotely in few minutes in the crater area. Lidar measurements were in good agreement with well-established techniques, based on different operating principles. To our knowledge, it is the first time that carbon dioxide in a volcanic plume is retrieved by lidar, representing the first direct measurement of this kind ever performed on an active volcano and showing the high potential of laser remote sensing in geophysical research.

  8. Characterizing Mediterranean Land Surfaces as Component of the Regional Climate System by Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolle, H.-J.; Koslowsky, D.; Menenti, M.; Nerry, F.; Otterman, Joseph; Starr, D.

    1998-01-01

    Extensive areas in the Mediterranean region are subject to land degradation and desertification. The high variability of the coupling between the surface and the atmosphere affects the regional climate. Relevant surface characteristics, such as spectral reflectance, surface emissivity in the thermal-infrared region, and vegetation indices, serve as "primary" level indicators for the state of the surface. Their spatial, seasonal and interannual variability can be monitored from satellites. Using relationships between these primary data and combining them with prior information about the land surfaces (such as topography, dominant soil type, land use, collateral ground measurements and models), a second layer of information is built up which specifies the land surfaces as a component of the regional climate system. To this category of parameters which are directly involved in the exchange of energy, momentum and mass between the surface and the atmosphere, belong broadband albedo, thermodynamic surface temperature, vegetation types, vegetation cover density, soil top moisture, and soil heat flux. Information about these parameters finally leads to the computation of sensible and latent heat fluxes. The methodology was tested with pilot data sets. Full resolution, properly calibrated and normalized NOAA-AVHRR multi-annual primary data sets are presently compiled for the whole Mediterranean area, to study interannual variability and longer term trends.

  9. Lake Chad Total Surface Water Area as Derived from Land Surface Temperature and Radar Remote Sensing Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick Policelli

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Lake Chad, located in the middle of the African Sahel belt, underwent dramatic decreases in the 1970s and 1980s leaving less than ten percent of its 1960s surface water extent as open water. In this paper, we present an extended record (dry seasons 1988–2016 of the total surface water area of the lake (including both open water and flooded vegetation derived using Land Surface Temperature (LST data (dry seasons 2000–2016 from the NASA Terra MODIS sensor and EUMETSAT Meteosat-based LST measurements (dry seasons 1988–2001 from an earlier study. We also examine the total surface water area for Lake Chad using radar data (dry seasons 2015–2016 from the ESA Sentinel-1a mission. For the limited number of radar data sets available to us (18 data sets, we find on average a close match between the estimates from these data and the corresponding estimates from LST, though we find spatial differences in the estimates using the two types of data. We use these spatial differences to adjust the record (dry seasons 2000–2016 from MODIS LST. Then we use the adjusted record to remove the bias of the existing LST record (dry seasons 1988–2001 derived from Meteosat measurements and combine the two records. From this composite, extended record, we plot the total surface water area of the lake for the dry seasons of 1988–1989 through 2016–2017. We find for the dry seasons of 1988–1989 to 2016–2017 that the maximum total surface water area of the lake was approximately 16,800 sq. km (February and May, 2000, the minimum total surface water area of the lake was approximately 6400 sq. km (November, 1990, and the average was approximately 12,700 sq. km. Further, we find the total surface water area of the lake to be highly variable during this period, with an average rate of increase of approximately 143 km2 per year.

  10. Remote sensing of surface hemispherical reflectance (albedo) using pointable multispectral imaging spectroradiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimes, D. S.; Deering, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    Remote techniques for determining albedo are examined in terms of the range of view angles required in the use of string techniques with the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the High Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (HIRIS). Ground data are used to compute full and half strings out to 15, 30, 45, and 60 degrees for various sun angles and ground cover types. A knowledge-based system is employed to evaluate both the visible and near-IR bands, and the results indicate errors of up to 7 percent for the MODIS data, HIRIS data, and the full-string +/- 60 degrees. In the cases of large extrapolations greater ranges of error are noted indicating that 60-deg systems are most effective. The error is increased in the case of sensor systems that only view in the fore or aft direction, and the MODIS full string for +/- 45 deg is also considered a good system.

  11. Surface Biophysical Parameters Derived From Remote Sensing Data For Urban Changes Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoran, M.; Pavelescu, G.; Nicolae, D.N.; Talianu, C.

    2007-01-01

    Remote sensing is a key application in global-change science, being very useful for urban climatology and land use-Landcover dynamics analysis.Multi-spectral and multi-temporal satellite imagery (LANDSAT TM, ETM ;SAR ) over 1984 - 2004 period for Bucharest urban area provide the most reliable technique of monitoring of different urban structures regarding the net radiation and heat fluxes associated with urbanization at the regional scale. This study attempts to provide environmental awareness to urban planners in future urban development. The land cover information, properly classified, can provide a spatially and temporally explicit view of societal and environmental attributes and can be an important complement to in-situ measurements

  12. Effect of remote sea surface temperature change on tropical cyclone potential intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchi, Gabriel A; Soden, Brian J

    2007-12-13

    The response of tropical cyclone activity to global warming is widely debated. It is often assumed that warmer sea surface temperatures provide a more favourable environment for the development and intensification of tropical cyclones, but cyclone genesis and intensity are also affected by the vertical thermodynamic properties of the atmosphere. Here we use climate models and observational reconstructions to explore the relationship between changes in sea surface temperature and tropical cyclone 'potential intensity'--a measure that provides an upper bound on cyclone intensity and can also reflect the likelihood of cyclone development. We find that changes in local sea surface temperature are inadequate for characterizing even the sign of changes in potential intensity, but that long-term changes in potential intensity are closely related to the regional structure of warming; regions that warm more than the tropical average are characterized by increased potential intensity, and vice versa. We use this relationship to reconstruct changes in potential intensity over the twentieth century from observational reconstructions of sea surface temperature. We find that, even though tropical Atlantic sea surface temperatures are currently at a historical high, Atlantic potential intensity probably peaked in the 1930s and 1950s, and recent values are near the historical average. Our results indicate that--per unit local sea surface temperature change--the response of tropical cyclone activity to natural climate variations, which tend to involve localized changes in sea surface temperature, may be larger than the response to the more uniform patterns of greenhouse-gas-induced warming.

  13. Detecting surface coal mining areas from remote sensing imagery: an approach based on object-oriented decision trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiaoji; Liu, Zhifeng; He, Chunyang; Ma, Qun; Wu, Jianguo

    2017-01-01

    Detecting surface coal mining areas (SCMAs) using remote sensing data in a timely and an accurate manner is necessary for coal industry management and environmental assessment. We developed an approach to effectively extract SCMAs from remote sensing imagery based on object-oriented decision trees (OODT). This OODT approach involves three main steps: object-oriented segmentation, calculation of spectral characteristics, and extraction of SCMAs. The advantage of this approach lies in its effective integration of the spectral and spatial characteristics of SCMAs so as to distinguish the mining areas (i.e., the extracting areas, stripped areas, and dumping areas) from other areas that exhibit similar spectral features (e.g., bare soils and built-up areas). We implemented this method to extract SCMAs in the eastern part of Ordos City in Inner Mongolia, China. Our results had an overall accuracy of 97.07% and a kappa coefficient of 0.80. As compared with three other spectral information-based methods, our OODT approach is more accurate in quantifying the amount and spatial pattern of SCMAs in dryland regions.

  14. Automated integration of lidar into the LANDFIRE product suite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birgit Peterson; Kurtis J. Nelson; Carl Seielstad; Jason Stoker; W. Matt Jolly; Russell Parsons

    2015-01-01

    Accurate information about three-dimensional canopy structure and wildland fuel across the landscape is necessary for fire behaviour modelling system predictions. Remotely sensed data are invaluable for assessing these canopy characteristics over large areas; lidar data, in particular, are uniquely suited for quantifying three-dimensional canopy structure. Although...

  15. Automated Tree Crown Delineation and Biomass Estimation from Airborne LiDAR data: A Comparison of Statistical and Machine Learning Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, C. J.; Im, J.

    2011-12-01

    Airborne LiDAR remote sensing has been used effectively in assessing forest biomass because of its canopy penetrating effects and its ability to accurately describe the canopy surface. Current research in assessing biomass using airborne LiDAR focuses on either the individual tree as a base unit of study or statistical representations of a small aggregation of trees (i.e., plot level), and both methods usually rely on regression against field data to model the relationship between the LiDAR-derived data (e.g., volume) and biomass. This study estimates biomass for mixed forests and coniferous plantations (Picea Abies) within Heiberg Memorial Forest, Tully, NY, at both the plot and individual tree level. Plots are regularly spaced with a radius of 13m, and field data include diameter at breast height (dbh), tree height, and tree species. Field data collection and LiDAR data acquisition were seasonally coincident and both obtained in August of 2010. Resulting point cloud density was >5pts/m2. LiDAR data were processed to provide a canopy height surface, and a combination of watershed segmentation, active contouring, and genetic algorithm optimization was applied to delineate individual trees from the surface. This updated delineation method was shown to be more accurate than traditional watershed segmentation. Once trees had been delineated, four biomass estimation models were applied and compared: support vector regression (SVR), linear mixed effects regression (LME), random forest (RF), and Cubist regression. Candidate variables to be used in modeling were derived from the LiDAR surface, and include metrics of height, width, and volume per delineated tree footprint. Previously published allometric equations provided field estimates of biomass to inform the regressions and calculate their accuracy via leave-one-out cross validation. This study found that for forests such as found in the study area, aggregation of individual trees to form a plot-based estimate of

  16. Urban surface energy fluxes based on remotely-sensed data and micrometeorological measurements over the Kansai area, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukeyasu, T.; Ueyama, M.; Ando, T.; Kosugi, Y.; Kominami, Y.

    2017-12-01

    The urban heat island is associated with land cover changes and increases in anthropogenic heat fluxes. Clear understanding of the surface energy budget at urban area is the most important for evaluating the urban heat island. In this study, we develop a model based on remotely-sensed data for the Kansai area in Japan and clarify temporal transitions and spatial distributions of the surface energy flux from 2000 to 2016. The model calculated the surface energy fluxes based on various satellite and GIS products. The model used land surface temperature, surface emissivity, air temperature, albedo, downward shortwave radiation and land cover/use type from the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) under cloud free skies from 2000 to 2016 over the Kansai area in Japan (34 to 35 ° N, 135 to 136 ° E). Net radiation was estimated by a radiation budget of upward/downward shortwave and longwave radiation. Sensible heat flux was estimated by a bulk aerodynamic method. Anthropogenic heat flux was estimated by the inventory data. Latent heat flux was examined with residues of the energy budget and parameterization of bulk transfer coefficients. We validated the model using observed fluxes from five eddy-covariance measurement sites: three urban sites and two forested sites. The estimated net radiation roughly agreed with the observations, but the sensible heat flux were underestimated. Based on the modeled spatial distributions of the fluxes, the daytime net radiation in the forested area was larger than those in the urban area, owing to higher albedo and land surface temperatures in the urban area than the forested area. The estimated anthropogenic heat flux was high in the summer and winter periods due to increases in energy-requirements.

  17. New lidar challenges for gas hazard management in industrial environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cézard, Nicolas; Liméry, Anasthase; Bertrand, Johan; Le Méhauté, Simon; Benoit, Philippe; Fleury, Didier; Goular, Didier; Planchat, Christophe; Valla, Matthieu; Augère, Béatrice; Dolfi-Bouteyre, Agnès.

    2017-10-01

    The capability of Lidars to perform range-resolved gas profiles makes them an appealing choice for many applications. In order to address new remote sensing challenges, arising from industrial contexts, Onera currently develops two lidar systems, one Raman and one DIAL. On the Raman side, a high spatial-resolution multi-channel Raman Lidar is developed in partnership with the French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (Andra). This development aims at enabling future monitoring of hydrogen gas and water vapor profiles inside disposal cells containing radioactive wastes. We report on the development and first tests of a three-channel Raman Lidar (H2, H2O, N2) designed to address this issue. Simultaneous hydrogen and water vapor profiles have been successfully performed along a 5m-long gas cell with 1m resolution at a distance of 85 m. On the DIAL side, a new instrumental concept is being explored and developed in partnership with Total E and P. The objective is to perform methane plume monitoring and flux assessment in the vicinity of industrials plants or platforms. For flux assessment, both gas concentration and air speed must be profiled by lidar. Therefore, we started developing a bi-function, all-fiber, coherent DIAL/Doppler Lidar. The first challenge was to design and build an appropriate fiber laser source. The achieved demonstrator delivers 200 W peak power, polarized, spectrally narrow (<15 MHz), 110 ns pulses of light out of a monomode fiber at 1645 nm. It fulfills the requirements for a future implementation in a bi-function Dial/Doppler lidar with km-range expectation. We report on the laser and lidar architecture, and on first lidar tests at 1645 nm.

  18. Detecting Precontact Anthropogenic Microtopographic Features in a Forested Landscape with Lidar: A Case Study from the Upper Great Lakes Region, AD 1000-1600.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howey, Meghan C L; Sullivan, Franklin B; Tallant, Jason; Kopple, Robert Vande; Palace, Michael W

    2016-01-01

    Forested settings present challenges for understanding the full extent of past human landscape modifications. Field-based archaeological reconnaissance in forests is low-efficiency and most remote sensing techniques are of limited utility, and together, this means many past sites and features in forests are unknown. Archaeologists have increasingly used light detection and ranging (lidar), a remote sensing tool that uses pulses of light to measure reflecting surfaces at high spatial resolution, to address these limitations. Archaeology studies using lidar have made significant progress identifying permanent structures built by large-scale complex agriculturalist societies. Largely unaccounted for, however, are numerous small and more practical modifications of landscapes by smaller-scale societies. Here we show these may also be detectable with lidar by identifying remnants of food storage pits (cache pits) created by mobile hunter-gatherers in the upper Great Lakes during Late Precontact (ca. AD 1000-1600) that now only exist as subtle microtopographic features. Years of intensive field survey identified 69 cache pit groups between two inland lakes in northern Michigan, almost all of which were located within ~500 m of a lakeshore. Applying a novel series of image processing techniques and statistical analyses to a high spatial resolution DTM we created from commercial-grade lidar, our detection routine identified 139 high potential cache pit clusters. These included most of the previously known clusters as well as several unknown clusters located >1500 m from either lakeshore, much further from lakeshores than all previously identified cultural sites. Food storage is understood to have emerged regionally as a risk-buffering strategy after AD 1000 but our results indicate the current record of hunter-gatherer cache pit food storage is markedly incomplete and this practice and its associated impact on the landscape may be greater than anticipated. Our study also

  19. Optics of the ozone lidar ELSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porteneuve, J.

    1992-01-01

    In order to study the ozone layer in the Arctic, we have to define a new optical concept for a lidar. It was necessary to build a transportable system with a large collecting surface in a minimum of volume. It was too useful to have a multichannel receptor. A description of the Emettor Receptor System, collecting system, and analysis system is provided.

  20. A 30 meter soil properties map of the contiguous United States for use in remote sensing and land surface models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaney, N.; Morgan, C.; McBratney, A.; Wood, E. F.; Yimam, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Soil moisture plays a critical role in the terrestrial water, energy, and biogeochemical cycles. For this reason, numerical weather prediction, global circulation models, and hydrologic monitoring systems increasingly emphasize modeling soil moisture and assimilating soil moisture remote sensing products. In both cases, the prescribed soil hydraulic properties play a pivotal role in accurately describing the soil moisture state. However, an accurate characterization of soil hydraulic properties remains a persistent challenge—existing continental soil databases are too coarse and outdated for contemporary applications. To address this challenge, we have developed the Probabilistic Remapping of SSURGO database (POLARIS); a new soil database that covers the contiguous United States (CONUS) at a 30-meter spatial resolution. POLARIS was constructed using available high-resolution geospatial environmental data and a state-of-the-art machine learning algorithm to remap the rich yet incomplete Soil Survey Geographic (SSURGO) database to create spatially complete probabilistic soil series maps over CONUS (Chaney et al., 2016). These maps are then combined with the vertical profile information of each soil series to create the corresponding maps of soil hydraulic properties and their associated uncertainties. The mapped soil hydraulic properties include soil texture, saturated hydraulic conductivity, porosity, field capacity, and wilting point. POLARIS provides a breakthrough in soil information. To illustrate this database's potential, we will both explore the database at multiple spatial scales and discuss recent land surface modeling results that have used POLARIS to simulate soil moisture at a 30-meter spatial resolution over CONUS between 2004 and 2014. We will discuss the added benefit of using POLARIS and the opportunity it presents to improve the characterization of soil hydraulic properties in land surface models and soil moisture remote sensing. References

  1. Large Aperture Scanning Lidar Based on Holographic Optical Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.; Miller, David O.; Wilkerson, Thomas D.; Andrus, Ionio; Guerra, David V.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Lidar remote sensing instruments can make a significant contribution to satisfying many of the required measurements of atmospheric and surface parameters for future spaceborne platforms, including topographic altimeters, atmospheric profiles of, wind, humidity, temperature, trace molecules, aerosols, and clouds. It is highly desirable to have wide measurement swaths for rapid coverage rather than just the narrow ribbon of data that is obtained with a nadir only observation. For most applications global coverage is required, and for wind measurements scanning or pointing is required in order to retrieve the full 3-D wind vector from multiple line-of-sight Doppler measurements. Conventional lidar receivers make up a substantial portion of the instrument's size and weight. Wide angle scanning typically requires a large scanning mirror in front of the receiver telescope, or pointing the entire telescope and aft optics assembly, Either of these methods entails the use of large bearings, motors, gearing and their associated electronics. Spaceborne instruments also need reaction wheels to counter the torque applied to the spacecraft by these motions. NASA has developed simplified conical scanning telescopes using Holographic Optical Elements (HOEs) to reduce the size, mass, angular momentum, and cost of scanning lidar systems. NASA has developed two operating lidar systems based on 40 cm diameter HOEs. The first such system, named Prototype Holographic Atmospheric Scanner for Environmental Remote Sensing (PHASERS) was a joint development between NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and the University of Maryland College Park. PHASERS is based on a reflection HOE for use at the doubled Nd:YAG laser wavelength of 532 nm and has recently undergone a number of design changes in a collaborative effort between GSFC and Saint Anselm College in New Hampshire. The next step was to develop IR transmission HOEs for use with the Nd:YAG fundamental in the Holographic Airborne

  2. A Framework for Land Cover Classification Using Discrete Return LiDAR Data: Adopting Pseudo-Waveform and Hierarchical Segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jinha; Pasolli, Edoardo; Prasad, Saurabh; Tilton, James C.; Crawford, Melba M.

    2014-01-01

    Acquiring current, accurate land-use information is critical for monitoring and understanding the impact of anthropogenic activities on natural environments.Remote sensing technologies are of increasing importance because of their capability to acquire information for large areas in a timely manner, enabling decision makers to be more effective in complex environments. Although optical imagery has demonstrated to be successful for land cover classification, active sensors, such as light detection and ranging (LiDAR), have distinct capabilities that can be exploited to improve classification results. However, utilization of LiDAR data for land cover classification has not been fully exploited. Moreover, spatial-spectral classification has recently gained significant attention since classification accuracy can be improved by extracting additional information from the neighboring pixels. Although spatial information has been widely used for spectral data, less attention has been given to LiDARdata. In this work, a new framework for land cover classification using discrete return LiDAR data is proposed. Pseudo-waveforms are generated from the LiDAR data and processed by hierarchical segmentation. Spatial featuresare extracted in a region-based way using a new unsupervised strategy for multiple pruning of the segmentation hierarchy. The proposed framework is validated experimentally on a real dataset acquired in an urban area. Better classification results are exhibited by the proposed framework compared to the cases in which basic LiDAR products such as digital surface model and intensity image are used. Moreover, the proposed region-based feature extraction strategy results in improved classification accuracies in comparison with a more traditional window-based approach.

  3. Analysis of remotely sensed and surface data of aerosols and meteorology for the Mexico Megalopolis Area between 2003 and 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Marco; Braun, Rachel A.; Shingler, Taylor; Sorooshian, Armin

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an aerosol characterization study from 2003 to 2015 for the Mexico City Metropolitan Area using remotely sensed aerosol data, ground-based measurements, air mass trajectory modeling, aerosol chemical composition modeling, and reanalysis data for the broader Megalopolis of Central Mexico region. The most extensive biomass burning emissions occur between March and May concurrent with the highest aerosol optical depth, ultraviolet aerosol index, and surface particulate matter (PM) mass concentration values. A notable enhancement in coarse PM levels is observed during vehicular rush hour periods on weekdays versus weekends owing to nonengine-related emissions such as resuspended dust. Among wet deposition species measured, PM2.5, PM10, and PMcoarse (PM10−PM2.5) were best correlated with NH4+, SO42−, and Ca2+, suggesting that the latter three constituents are important components of the aerosol seeding raindrops that eventually deposit to the surface in the study region. Reductions in surface PM mass concentrations were observed in 2014–2015 owing to reduced regional biomass burning as compared to 2003–2013. PMID:28955600

  4. Global climatology and variability of potential new production estimated from remote sensing of sea-surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugdale, Richard C.; Wilkerson, Frances P.

    1995-01-01

    During this project we have collected numerous shipboard data-bases of oceanic nitrate and silicate versus temperature for both equatorial and coastal upwelling regions. These cruises all have accompanying N-15 measurements of new production. The inverse relationships between nutrients and temperatures have been determined and are being used to obtain surface nutrient fields from sea surface temperatures measured remotely by satellite borne sensors- i.e. AVHRR data from NOAA satellites contained in the MCSST data set for the world ocean provided by the University of Miami. The images and data derived from space in this way show the strong seasonal fluctuations and interannual el Nino fluctuations of the nitrate field. the nitrate data has been used to make estimates of new production for the equatorial pacific which are compared with shipboard measurements when available. The importance of silicate as a nutrient driving new production and the ratio of nitrate to silicate has been discovered to be crucial to better understand the causes of new production variability, so we have added these parameters to our study and have begun to make estimates of these for the equatorial Pacific, derived from the weekly averaged sea surface temperatures (SSTs).

  5. Analysis of remotely sensed and surface data of aerosols and meteorology for the Mexico Megalopolis Area between 2003 and 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Marco; Braun, Rachel A; Shingler, Taylor; Sorooshian, Armin

    2017-08-27

    This paper presents an aerosol characterization study from 2003 to 2015 for the Mexico City Metropolitan Area using remotely sensed aerosol data, ground-based measurements, air mass trajectory modeling, aerosol chemical composition modeling, and reanalysis data for the broader Megalopolis of Central Mexico region. The most extensive biomass burning emissions occur between March and May concurrent with the highest aerosol optical depth, ultraviolet aerosol index, and surface particulate matter (PM) mass concentration values. A notable enhancement in coarse PM levels is observed during vehicular rush hour periods on weekdays versus weekends owing to nonengine-related emissions such as resuspended dust. Among wet deposition species measured, PM 2.5 , PM 10 , and PM coarse (PM 10 -PM 2.5 ) were best correlated with NH 4 + , SO 4 2- , and Ca 2+ , suggesting that the latter three constituents are important components of the aerosol seeding raindrops that eventually deposit to the surface in the study region. Reductions in surface PM mass concentrations were observed in 2014-2015 owing to reduced regional biomass burning as compared to 2003-2013.

  6. Remote sensing of surface water quality in relation to catchment condition in Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masocha, Mhosisi; Murwira, Amon; Magadza, Christopher H. D.; Hirji, Rafik; Dube, Timothy

    2017-08-01

    The degradation of river catchments is one of the most important contemporary environmental problems affecting water quality in tropical countries. In this study, we used remotely sensed Normalised Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) to assess how catchment condition varies within and across river catchments in Zimbabwe. We then used non-linear regression to test whether catchment condition assessed using the NDVI is significantly (α = 0.05) related with levels of Total Suspended Solids (TSS) measured at different sampling points in thirty-two sub-catchments in Zimbabwe. The results showed a consistent negative curvilinear relationship between Landsat 8 derived NDVI and TSS measured across the catchments under study. In the drier catchments of the country, 98% of the variation in TSS is explained by NDVI, while in wetter catchments, 64% of the variation in TSS is explained by NDVI. Our results suggest that NDVI derived from free and readily available multispectral Landsat series data (Landsat 8) is a potential valuable tool for the rapid assessment of physical water quality in data poor catchments. Overall, the finding of this study underscores the usefulness of readily available satellite data for near-real time monitoring of the physical water quality at river catchment scale, especially in resource-constrained areas, such as the sub-Saharan Africa.

  7. Modeling surface water storage from space altimetry, remote sensing and gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boy, Jean-Paul; Loomis, Bryant; Luthcke, Scott

    2017-04-01

    Since its launch in 2002, the GRACE (Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment) is recording Earth gravity field variations with unprecedented temporal and spatial resolutions, mainly due to global circulation of surface geophysical fluids. Continental water storage variations estimated with GRACE are classically compared to global hydrology models such as GLDAS (Global Land Data Assimilation System) or MERRA (Modern Era-Retrospective Analysis) hydrology models. However most of these models do not take into account both the groundwater and the surface water (lakes and rivers) components of the hydrological cycle. We derive surface water storage in several large river basins, characterized by various climates, using a simple routing scheme, forced by runoff outputs of GLDAS and MERRA-land hydrology models. We adjust the flow velocity, i.e. the only free parameter in our modeling by fitting the modeled equivalent water height to the observed water elevation from radar altimetry measurements. The conversion of the observed geometric heights into the modeled equivalent water heights requires the knowledge of the variations of the river widths, which can be derived from MODIS observations. We validate river models by comparing the estimated discharge to independent in-situ measurements. We finally add to the soil-moisture and snow components of the GLDAS and MERRA-land models our estimates of surface water variations and show that they are in better agreement with GRACE. We also compare these estimates to WGHM, which includes both groundwater and surface components.

  8. Atmospheric CO2 Concentration Measurements with Clouds from an Airborne Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, J.; Abshire, J. B.; Kawa, S. R.; Riris, H.; Allan, G. R.; Hasselbrack, W. E.; Numata, K.; Chen, J. R.; Sun, X.; DiGangi, J. P.; Choi, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Globally distributed atmospheric CO2 concentration measurements with high precision, low bias and full seasonal sampling are crucial to advance carbon cycle sciences. However, two thirds of the Earth's surface is typically covered by clouds, and passive remote sensing approaches from space are limited to cloud-free scenes. NASA Goddard is developing a pulsed, integrated-path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar approach to measure atmospheric column CO2 concentrations, XCO2, from space as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission. Measurements of time-resolved laser backscatter profiles from the atmosphere also allow this technique to estimate XCO2 and range to cloud tops in addition to those to the ground with precise knowledge of the photon path-length. We demonstrate this measurement capability using airborne lidar measurements from summer 2017 ASCENDS airborne science campaign in Alaska. We show retrievals of XCO2 to ground and to a variety of cloud tops. We will also demonstrate how the partial column XCO2 to cloud tops and cloud slicing approach help resolving vertical and horizontal gradient of CO2 in cloudy conditions. The XCO2 retrievals from the lidar are validated against in situ measurements and compared to the Goddard Parameterized Chemistry Transport Model (PCTM) simulations. Adding this measurement capability to the future lidar mission for XCO2 will provide full global and seasonal data coverage and some information about vertical structure of CO2. This unique facility is expected to benefit atmospheric transport process studies, carbon data assimilation in models, and global and regional carbon flux estimation.

  9. NASA Goddards LiDAR, Hyperspectral and Thermal (G-LiHT) Airborne Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Bruce D.; Corp, Lawrence A.; Nelson, Ross F.; Middleton, Elizabeth M.; Morton, Douglas C.; McCorkel, Joel T.; Masek, Jeffrey G.; Ranson, Kenneth J.; Ly, Vuong; Montesano, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    The combination of LiDAR and optical remotely sensed data provides unique information about ecosystem structure and function. Here, we describe the development, validation and application of a new airborne system that integrates commercial off the shelf LiDAR hyperspectral and thermal components in a compact, lightweight and portable system. Goddard's LiDAR, Hyperspectral and Thermal (G-LiHT) airborne imager is a unique system that permits simultaneous measurements of vegetation structure, foliar spectra and surface temperatures at very high spatial resolution (approximately 1 m) on a wide range of airborne platforms. The complementary nature of LiDAR, optical and thermal data provide an analytical framework for the development of new algorithms to map plant species composition, plant functional types, biodiversity, biomass and carbon stocks, and plant growth. In addition, G-LiHT data enhance our ability to validate data from existing satellite missions and support NASA Earth Science research. G-LiHT's data processing and distribution system is designed to give scientists open access to both low- and high-level data products (http://gliht.gsfc.nasa.gov), which will stimulate the community development of synergistic data fusion algorithms. G-LiHT has been used to collect more than 6,500 km2 of data for NASA-sponsored studies across a broad range of ecoregions in the USA and Mexico. In this paper, we document G-LiHT design considerations, physical specifications, instrument performance and calibration and acquisition parameters. In addition, we describe the data processing system and higher-level data products that are freely distributed under NASA's Data and Information policy.

  10. NASA Goddard’s LiDAR, Hyperspectral and Thermal (G-LiHT Airborne Imager

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuong Ly

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The combination of LiDAR and optical remotely sensed data provides unique information about ecosystem structure and function. Here, we describe the development, validation and application of a new airborne system that integrates commercial off the shelf LiDAR hyperspectral and thermal components in a compact, lightweight and portable system. Goddard’s LiDAR, Hyperspectral and Thermal (G-LiHT airborne imager is a unique system that permits simultaneous measurements of vegetation structure, foliar spectra and surface temperatures at very high spatial resolution (~1 m on a wide range of airborne platforms. The complementary nature of LiDAR, optical and thermal data provide an analytical framework for the development of new algorithms to map plant species composition, plant functional types, biodiversity, biomass and carbon stocks, and plant growth. In addition, G-LiHT data enhance our ability to validate data from existing satellite missions and support NASA Earth Science research. G-LiHT’s data processing and distribution system is designed to give scientists open access to both low- and high-level data products (http://gliht.gsfc.nasa.gov, which will stimulate the community development of synergistic data fusion algorithms. G-LiHT has been used to collect more than 6,500 km2 of data for NASA-sponsored studies across a broad range of ecoregions in the USA and Mexico. In this paper, we document G-LiHT design considerations, physical specifications, instrument performance and calibration and acquisition parameters. In addition, we describe the data processing system and higher-level data products that are freely distributed under NASA’s Data and Information policy.

  11. Remote sensing of global surface shortwave radiation and PAR over the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautier, Catherine H.; Byers, Michael L.

    1992-12-01

    During the past few years many methods have been proposed for estimating surface radiative fluxes (shortwave radiation, photosynthetically active radiation - PAR) from satellite observations. We have developed algorithms for computing the shortwave radiative flux (shortwave irradiance) at the ocean surface from visible radiance observations and they have been found to be quite successful under most atmospheric and cloud conditions. For broken clouds, however, the simple plane parallel assumption for solving the radiative transfer equations may need to be corrected to account for cloud geometry. The estimation of PAR is simpler because the most commonly used satellite radiance measurements cover a similar region of the solar spectrum. We are in the process of producing global $ARDNSW and PAR as a contribution to the Sequoia 2000 project (to implement a distributed processing system designed for the needs of global change researchers). Results from our algorithms developed for Sequoia and preliminary global surface solar irradiance and PAR fields are presented and discussed.

  12. USING MULTI-DIMENSIONAL MICROWAVE REMOTE SENSING INFORMATION FOR THE RETRIEVAL OF SOIL SURFACE ROUGHNESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Marzahn

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this Paper the potential of multi parametric polarimetric SAR (PolSAR data for soil surface roughness estimation is investigated and its potential for hydrological modeling is evaluated. The study utilizes microwave backscatter collected from the Demmin testsite in the North-East Germany during AgriSAR 2006 campaign using fully polarimetric L-Band airborne SAR data. For ground truthing extensive soil surface roughness in addition to various other soil physical properties measurements were carried out using photogrammetric image matching techniques. The correlation between ground truth roughness indices and three well established polarimetric roughness estimators showed only good results for Re[ρRRLL] and the RMS Height s. Results in form of multitemporal roughness maps showed only satisfying results due to the fact that the presence and development of particular plants affected the derivation. However roughness derivation for bare soil surfaces showed promising results.

  13. Advancements in Modelling of Land Surface Energy Fluxes with Remote Sensing at Different Spatial Scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guzinski, Radoslaw

    Evaporation of water from soil and its transpiration by vegetation together form a ux between the land and the atmosphere called evapotranspiration (ET). ET is a key factor in many natural and anthropogenic processes. It forms the basis of the hydrological cycle and has a strong inuence on local...... climate, weather and numerous biophysical processes, such as plant productivity. As energy is required for ET to occur, it also forms a link between the land-surface energy uxes and water uxes. Therefore, to be able to obtain reliable estimates of ET, reliable estimates of the other land-surface energy...... of this study was to look at, and improve, various approaches for modelling the land-surface energy uxes at different spatial scales. The work was done using physically-based Two-Source Energy Balance (TSEB) approach as well as semi-empirical \\Triangle" approach. The TSEB-based approach was the main focus...

  14. Remotely sensed sea surface temperature variability off California during a 'Santa Ana' clearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, R. J.; Svejkovsky, J.

    1984-01-01

    Multichannel atmospheric correction equations for the NOAA 6 proposed by Bernstein (1982) and by McClain (1981) are evaluated by using satellite and in situ data collected over and in the Southern California Bight. The temporal and spatial variation of sea surface temperature over small scales is estimated from the data, and the effect of this variation in matching satellite and in situ data sets is discussed. Changes in the temperature fields between images are examined for diurnal variation and for surface advection of horizontal temperature gradients.

  15. Estimation of actual evapotranspiration of Mediterranean perennial crops by means of remote-sensing based surface energy balance models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Rallo

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Actual evapotranspiration from typical Mediterranean crops has been assessed in a Sicilian study area by using surface energy balance (SEB and soil-water balance models. Both modelling approaches use remotely sensed data to estimate evapotranspiration fluxes in a spatially distributed way. The first approach exploits visible (VIS, near-infrared (NIR and thermal (TIR observations to solve the surface energy balance equation whereas the soil-water balance model uses only VIS-NIR data to detect the spatial variability of crop parameters. Considering that the study area is characterized by typical spatially sparse Mediterranean vegetation, i.e. olive, citrus and vineyards, alternating bare soil and canopy, we focused the attention on the main conceptual differences between one-source and two-sources energy balance models. Two different models have been tested: the widely used one-source SEBAL model, where soil and vegetation are considered as the sole source (mostly appropriate in the case of uniform vegetation coverage and the two-sources TSEB model, where soil and vegetation components of the surface energy balance are treated separately. Actual evapotranspiration estimates by means of the two surface energy balance models have been compared vs. the outputs of the agro-hydrological SWAP model, which was applied in a spatially distributed way to simulate one-dimensional water flow in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum. Remote sensing data in the VIS and NIR spectral ranges have been used to infer spatially distributed vegetation parameters needed to set up the upper boundary condition of SWAP. Actual evapotranspiration values obtained from the application of the soil water balance model SWAP have been considered as the reference to be used for energy balance models accuracy assessment.

    Airborne hyperspectral data acquired during a NERC (Natural Environment Research Council, UK campaign in 2005 have been used. The results of this

  16. Cloud tolerance of remote sensing technologies to measure land surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conventional means to estimate land surface temperature (LST) from space relies on the thermal infrared (TIR) spectral window and is limited to cloud-free scenes. To also provide LST estimates during periods with clouds, a new method was developed to estimate LST based on passive microwave (MW) obse...

  17. Mapping surface flow in low gradient areas with thermal remote sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prinds, Christian; Petersen, Rasmus Jes; Greve, Mogens Humlekrog

    Thermal infrared (TIR) imagery has long been used for mapping groundwater-surface water interactions and mainly for locating areas of groundwater seepage in lakes and shorelines (Rundquist et al. 1985, Banks et al. 1996). In this study, we used the method for locating discharge from tile drains...

  18. Characterizing the Surface Connectivity of Depressional Wetlands: Linking Remote Sensing and Hydrologic Modeling Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surface connectivity of wetlands in the 700,000 km2 Prairie Pothole Region of North America (PPR) can occur through fill-spill and fill-merge mechanisms, with some wetlands eventually spilling into stream/river systems. These wetland-to-wetland and wetland-to-stream connections v...

  19. LIDAR Thomson scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    This collection contains 21 papers on the application and development of LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) Thomson scattering techniques for the determination of spatially resolved electron temperature and density in magnetic confinement experiments, particularly tokamaks. Refs, figs and tabs

  20. Lidar 2009 - All Returns

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — LIDAR-derived binary (.las) files containing classified points of all returns. We have 3 classifications Unclassified, Ground, Low points. The average Ground Sample...

  1. Alexandrite Lidar Receiver

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wilkerson, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    ...". The chosen vendor, Orca Photonics, In. (Redmond, WA), in close collaboration with USU personnel, built a portable, computerized lidar system that not only is suitable as a receiver for a near IR alexandrite laser, but also contains an independent Nd...

  2. Gas-correlation lidar

    OpenAIRE

    Edner, H; Svanberg, Sune; Uneus, L; Wendt, W

    1984-01-01

    Basic principles for the extension of gas-correlation techniques to the lidar situation are discussed. Favorable signal-to-noise ratios and relaxed laser requirements characterize the technique. Preliminary experiments on atomic mercury are reported.

  3. Predicting live and dead tree basal area of bark beetle affected forests from discrete-return lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin C. Bright; Andrew T. Hudak; Robert McGaughey; Hans-Erik Andersen; Jose Negron

    2013-01-01

    Bark beetle outbreaks have killed large numbers of trees across North America in recent years. Lidar remote sensing can be used to effectively estimate forest biomass, but prediction of both live and dead standing biomass in beetle-affected forests using lidar alone has not been demonstrated. We developed Random Forest (RF) models predicting total, live, dead, and...

  4. Assessing degradation across a land-use gradient in the Kruger National Park area using advanced remote sensing modalities

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Aardt, JAN

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available relatively novel remote sensing approaches, namely imaging spectroscopy (hyperspectral remote sensing) and light detection and ranging (lidar), have the potential to alleviate this constraint. Specifically, the Carnegie Airborne Observatory, a state-of-the-art...

  5. Installation report - Lidar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgieva Yankova, Ginka; Villanueva, Héctor

    The report describes the installation, configuration and data transfer for the ground-based lidar. The unit is provided by a customer but is installed and operated by DTU while in this project.......The report describes the installation, configuration and data transfer for the ground-based lidar. The unit is provided by a customer but is installed and operated by DTU while in this project....

  6. Remote sensing: Earth's surface and atmosphere; Proceedings of Workshop X and the Topical Meeting of the 26th COSPAR Plenary Meeting, Toulouse, France, June 30-July 11, 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, W. D. (Editor); Arking, A. (Editor); Mccormick, M. P. (Editor); Raschke, E. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The present conference on space-based remote sensing of the earth's surface and atmosphere addresses the two broad issues of remote sensing activities of interest to developing countries and the results obtained to date by the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project, the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment, and the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE). Attention is given to the remote sensing of environmental factors affecting health, applications of satellite microwave radiometry, earth science missions for the NASA Space Station, and digitally produced Landsat map images. Also discussed are time-accumulated visible and IR histograms used as cloud cover descriptors, the estimation of the radiation budget's sensitivity to cloud variations, monitoring global surface temperature variations using cloud data sets, and an analysis of preliminary SAGE II data on ozone and NO2.

  7. Remote sensing of coastal sea-surface features off northern British Columbia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jardine, I.D.; Thomson, K.A.; LeBlond, P.H.; Foreman, M.G.

    1993-01-01

    This article presents an overview of surface oceanographic features identified by AVHRR imagery in Hecate Strait and adjacent waters surrounding the Queen Charlotte Islands, Canada, an area still poor in in situ observations. The observed features and their temporal variability are interpreted in terms of meteorological and hydrological forcing. The effects of tidal mixing are discussed through the application of a finite element numerical model

  8. Recent Improvements in Retrieving Near-Surface Air Temperature and Humidity Using Microwave Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, J. Brent

    2010-01-01

    Detailed studies of the energy and water cycles require accurate estimation of the turbulent fluxes of moisture and heat across the atmosphere-ocean interface at regional to basin scale. Providing estimates of these latent and sensible heat fluxes over the global ocean necessitates the use of satellite or reanalysis-based estimates of near surface variables. Recent studies have shown that errors in the surface (10 meter)estimates of humidity and temperature are currently the largest sources of uncertainty in the production of turbulent fluxes from satellite observations. Therefore, emphasis has been placed on reducing the systematic errors in the retrieval of these parameters from microwave radiometers. This study discusses recent improvements in the retrieval of air temperature and humidity through improvements in the choice of algorithms (linear vs. nonlinear) and the choice of microwave sensors. Particular focus is placed on improvements using a neural network approach with a single sensor (Special Sensor Microwave/Imager) and the use of combined sensors from the NASA AQUA satellite platform. The latter algorithm utilizes the unique sampling available on AQUA from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) and the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU-A). Current estimates of uncertainty in the near-surface humidity and temperature from single and multi-sensor approaches are discussed and used to estimate errors in the turbulent fluxes.

  9. Remote sensing based water-use efficiency evaluation in sub-surface irrigated wine grape vines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zúñiga, Carlos Espinoza; Khot, Lav R.; Jacoby, Pete; Sankaran, Sindhuja

    2016-05-01

    Increased water demands have forced agriculture industry to investigate better irrigation management strategies in crop production. Efficient irrigation systems, improved irrigation scheduling, and selection of crop varieties with better water-use efficiencies can aid towards conserving water. In an ongoing experiment carried on in Red Mountain American Viticulture area near Benton City, Washington, subsurface drip irrigation treatments at 30, 60 and 90 cm depth, and 15, 30 and 60% irrigation were applied to satisfy evapotranspiration demand using pulse and continuous irrigation. These treatments were compared to continuous surface irrigation applied at 100% evapotranspiration demand. Thermal infrared and multispectral images were acquired using unmanned aerial vehicle during the growing season. Obtained results indicated no difference in yield among treatments (p<0.05), however there was statistical difference in leaf temperature comparing surface and subsurface irrigation (p<0.05). Normalized vegetation index obtained from the analysis of multispectral images showed statistical difference among treatments when surface and subsurface irrigation methods were compared. Similar differences in vegetation index values were observed, when irrigation rates were compared. Obtained results show the applicability of aerial thermal infrared and multispectral images to characterize plant responses to different irrigation treatments and use of such information in irrigation scheduling or high-throughput selection of water-use efficient crop varieties in plant breeding.

  10. Understanding Groundwater and Surface Water Exchange Processes Along a Controlled Stream Using Thermal Remote Sensing and In-Situ Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varli, D.; Yilmaz, K. K.

    2016-12-01

    Effective management of water resources requires understanding and quantification of interaction between groundwater and surface water bodies. Moreover, the exchange processes have recently received increasing attention due to important influences on biogeochemical and ecological status of watersheds. In this study we investigated the exchange processes between surface water and groundwater along Kirmir stream - a controlled stream nearby Kizilcahamam, Ankara, Turkey. At the first stage, potential stream reaches where the exchange processes could occur were pinpointed using geological and geomorphological information. Then, thermal remote sensing was utilized to further narrow down the potential locations in which interaction could occur at a smaller scale. Nested piezometers were installed at identified locations to observe the variations in vertical hydraulic gradient over time. Differential discharge measurements were performed to understand the gains and losses along the stream reach. Streambed temperature measurements were taken at two different depths for a period of time using temperature loggers to calculate the vertical fluid fluxes through the streambed at various locations. Basic water quality field parameters (temperature, electrical conductivity, total dissolved solid amount, dissolved oxygen, pH and oxidation - reduction potential) were measured along the stream reach, from surface water and the piezometers as wells as from the nearby springs and wells. Chloride mass balance was performed to find the contribution of groundwater and chloride concentrations were associated with the geology of the area. This hierarchical, multi-scale methodology provided an efficient and effective way to determine the locations and the direction of groundwater and surface water exchange processes within the study area.

  11. Assessment of land surface temperature and heat fluxes over Delhi using remote sensing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Surya Deb; Kant, Yogesh; Mitra, Debashis

    2015-01-15

    Surface energy processes has an essential role in urban weather, climate and hydrosphere cycles, as well in urban heat redistribution. The research was undertaken to analyze the potential of Landsat and MODIS data in retrieving biophysical parameters in estimating land surface temperature & heat fluxes diurnally in summer and winter seasons of years 2000 and 2010 and understanding its effect on anthropogenic heat disturbance over Delhi and surrounding region. Results show that during years 2000-2010, settlement and industrial area increased from 5.66 to 11.74% and 4.92 to 11.87% respectively which in turn has direct effect on land surface temperature (LST) and heat fluxes including anthropogenic heat flux. Based on the energy balance model for land surface, a method to estimate the increase in anthropogenic heat flux (Has) has been proposed. The settlement and industrial areas has higher amounts of energy consumed and has high values of Has in all seasons. The comparison of satellite derived LST with that of field measured values show that Landsat estimated values are in close agreement within error of ±2 °C than MODIS with an error of ±3 °C. It was observed that, during 2000 and 2010, the average change in surface temperature using Landsat over settlement & industrial areas of both seasons is 1.4 °C & for MODIS data is 3.7 °C. The seasonal average change in anthropogenic heat flux (Has) estimated using Landsat & MODIS is up by around 38 W/m(2) and 62 W/m(2) respectively while higher change is observed over settlement and concrete structures. The study reveals that the dynamic range of Has values has increased in the 10 year period due to the strong anthropogenic influence over the area. The study showed that anthropogenic heat flux is an indicator of the strength of urban heat island effect, and can be used to quantify the magnitude of the urban heat island effect. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Regional Estimation of Remotely Sensed Evapotranspiration Using the Surface Energy Balance-Advection (SEB-A Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhua Liu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Evapotranspiration (ET is an essential part of the hydrological cycle and accurately estimating it plays a crucial role in water resource management. Surface energy balance (SEB models are widely used to estimate regional ET with remote sensing. The presence of horizontal advection, however, perturbs the surface energy balance system and contributes to the uncertainty of energy influxes. Thus, it is vital to consider horizontal advection when applying SEB models to estimate ET. This study proposes an innovative and simplified approach, the surface energy balance-advection (SEB-A method, which is based on the energy balance theory and also takes into account the horizontal advection to determine ET by remote sensing. The SEB-A method considers that the actual ET consists of two parts: the local ET that is regulated by the energy balance system and the exotic ET that arises from horizontal advection. To evaluate the SEB-A method, it was applied to the middle region of the Heihe River in China. Instantaneous ET for three days were acquired and assessed with ET measurements from eddy covariance (EC systems. The results demonstrated that the ET estimates had a high accuracy, with a correlation coefficient (R2 of 0.713, a mean average error (MAE of 39.3 W/m2 and a root mean square error (RMSE of 54.6 W/m2 between the estimates and corresponding measurements. Percent error was calculated to more rigorously assess the accuracy of these estimates, and it ranged from 0% to 35%, with over 80% of the locations within a 20% error. To better understand the SEB-A method, the relationship between the ET estimates and land use types was analyzed, and the results indicated that the ET estimates had spatial distributions that correlated with vegetation patterns and could well demonstrate the ET differences caused by different land use types. The sensitivity analysis suggested that the SEB-A method requested accurate estimation of the available energy, R n − G

  13. Detecting geothermal anomalies and evaluating LST geothermal component by combining thermal remote sensing time series and land surface model data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaguera, Mireia; Vaughan, R. Greg; Ettema, J.; Izquierdo-Verdiguier, E.; Hecker, C. A.; van der Meer, F.D.

    2018-01-01

    This paper explores for the first time the possibilities to use two land surface temperature (LST) time series of different origins (geostationary Meteosat Second Generation satellite data and Noah land surface modelling, LSM), to detect geothermal anomalies and extract the geothermal component of LST, the LSTgt. We hypothesize that in geothermal areas the LSM time series will underestimate the LST as compared to the remote sensing data, since the former does not account for the geothermal component in its model.In order to extract LSTgt, two approaches of different nature (physical based and data mining) were developed and tested in an area of about 560 × 560 km2 centered at the Kenyan Rift. Pre-dawn data in the study area during the first 45 days of 2012 were analyzed.The results show consistent spatial and temporal LSTgt patterns between the two approaches, and systematic differences of about 2 K. A geothermal area map from surface studies was used to assess LSTgt inside and outside the geothermal boundaries. Spatial means were found to be higher inside the geothermal limits, as well as the relative frequency of occurrence of high LSTgt. Results further show that areas with strong topography can result in anomalously high LSTgt values (false positives), which suggests the need for a slope and aspect correction in the inputs to achieve realistic results in those areas. The uncertainty analysis indicates that large uncertainties of the input parameters may limit detection of LSTgt anomalies. To validate the approaches, higher spatial resolution images from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) data over the Olkaria geothermal field were used. An established method to estimate radiant geothermal flux was applied providing values between 9 and 24 W/m2 in the geothermal area, which coincides with the LSTgt flux rates obtained with the proposed approaches.The proposed approaches are a first step in estimating LSTgt

  14. Fiber-optic Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy for remote label-free sensing of medical device surface contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Moinuddin; Tan, Xin; Welle, Elissa; Ilev, Ilko

    2013-05-01

    As a potential major source of biochemical contamination, medical device surfaces are of critical safety concerns in the clinical practice and public health. The development of innovative sensing methods for accurate and real-time detection of medical device surface contamination is essential to protect patients from high risk infection. In this paper, we demonstrate an alternative fiber-optic Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy based sensing approach for remote, non-contact, and label-free detection of biochemical contaminants in the mid-infrared (mid-IR) region. The sensing probe is designed using mid-IR hollow fibers and FTIR measurements are carried out in reflection mode. Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) and bacterial endotoxin of different concentrations under thoroughly dry condition are used to evaluate the detection sensitivity. The devised system can identify ≤0.0025% (≤4 × 1011 molecules) BSA and 0.5% (0.5 EU/ml) endotoxin concentration. The developed sensing approach may be applied to detect various pathogens that pose public health threats.

  15. Thermal infrared remote sensing in assessing groundwater and surface-water resources related to Hannukainen mining development site, northern Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautio, Anne B.; Korkka-Niemi, Kirsti I.; Salonen, Veli-Pekka

    2018-02-01

    Mining development sites occasionally host complicated aquifer systems with notable connections to natural surface water (SW) bodies. A low-altitude thermal infrared (TIR) imaging survey was conducted to identify hydraulic connections between aquifers and rivers and to map spatial surface temperature patterns along the subarctic rivers in the proximity of the Hannukainen mining development area, northern Finland. In addition to TIR data, stable isotopic compositions ( δ 18O, δD) and dissolved silica concentrations were used as tracers to verify the observed groundwater (GW) discharge into the river system. Based on the TIR survey, notable GW discharge into the main river channel and its tributaries (61 km altogether) was observed and over 500 GW discharge sites were located. On the basis of the survey, the longitudinal temperature patterns of the studied rivers were found to be highly variable. Hydrological and hydrogeological information is crucial in planning and siting essential mining operations, such as tailing areas, in order to prevent any undesirable environmental impacts. The observed notable GW discharge was taken into consideration in the planning of the Hannukainen mining development area. The results of this study support the use of TIR imagery in GW-SW interaction and environmental studies in extensive and remote areas with special concerns for water-related issues but lacking the baseline research.

  16. Development and Validation of Remote Sensing-Based Surface Inundation Products for Vector-Borne Disease Risk in East Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, K.; McDonald, K. C.; Ceccato, P.; Schroeder, R.; Podest, E.

    2014-12-01

    The potential impact of climate variability and change on the spread of infectious disease is of increasingly critical concern to public health. Newly-available remote sensing datasets may be combined with predictive modeling to develop new capabilities to mitigate risks of vector-borne diseases such as malaria, leishmaniasis, and rift valley fever. We have developed improved remote sensing-based products for monitoring water bodies and inundation dynamics that have potential utility for improving risk forecasts of vector-borne disease epidemics. These products include daily and seasonal surface inundation based on the global mappings of inundated area fraction derived at the 25-km scale from active and passive microwave instruments ERS, QuikSCAT, ASCAT, and SSM/I data - the Satellite Water Microwave Product Series (SWAMPS). Focusing on the East African region, we present validation of this product using multi-temporal classification of inundated areas in this region derived from high resolution PALSAR (100m) and Landsat (30m) observations. We assess historical occurrence of malaria in the east African country of Eritrea with respect to the time series SWAMPS datasets, and we aim to construct a framework for use of these new datasets to improve prediction of future malaria risk in this region. This work is supported through funding from the NASA Applied Sciences Program, the NASA Terrestrial Ecology Program, and the NASA Making Earth System Data Records for Use in Research Environments (MEaSUREs) Program. This study is also supported and monitored by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) under Grant - CREST Grant # NA11SEC4810004. The statements contained within the manuscript/research article are not the opinions of the funding agency or the U.S. government, but reflect the authors' opinions. This work was conducted in part under the framework of the ALOS Kyoto and Carbon Initiative. ALOS PALSAR data were provided by JAXA EORC.

  17. Utility of remote sensing-based surface energy balance models to track water stress in rain-fed switchgrass under dry and wet conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability of remote sensing-based surface energy balance (SEB) models to track water stress in rain-fed switchgrass has not been explored yet. In this paper, the theoretical framework of crop water stress index (CWSI) was utilized to estimate CWSI in rain-fed switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) usin...

  18. Laser beam shaping optical system design methods and their application in edge-emitting semiconductor laser-based LIDAR systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serkan, Mert

    LIDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) systems are employed for numerous applications such as remote sensing, military applications, optical data storage, display technology, and material processing. Furthermore, they are superior to other active remote sensing tools such as RADAR systems, considering their higher accuracy and more precise resolution due to their much shorter wavelengths and narrower beamwidth. Several types of lasers can be utilized as the radiation source of several LIDAR systems. Semiconductor laser-based LIDAR systems have several advantages such as low cost, compactness, broad range of wavelengths, and high PRFs (Pulse Repetition Frequency). However, semiconductor lasers have different origins and angles of divergence in the two transverse directions, resulting in the inherent astigmatism and elliptical beam shape. Specifically, elliptical beam shape is not desirable for several laser-based applications including LIDAR systems specifically designed to operate in the far-field region. In this dissertation, two mirror-based and two lens-based beam shapers are designed to circularize, collimate, and expand an edge-emitting semiconductor laser beam to a desired beam diameter for possible application in LIDAR systems. Additionally, most laser beams including semiconductor laser beams have Gaussian irradiance distribution. For applications that require uniform illumination of an extended target area, Gaussian irradiance distribution is undesirable. Therefore, a specific beam shaper is designed to transform the irradiance distribution from Gaussian to uniform in addition to circularizing, collimating, and expanding the semiconductor laser beam. For the design of beam shapers, aperture sizes of the surfaces are preset for desired power transmission and allowed diffraction level, surface parameters of the optical components and the distances between these surfaces are determined. Design equations specific to these beam shaping optical systems are

  19. Evaluation of coarse scale land surface remote sensing albedo product over rugged terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, J.; Xinwen, L.; You, D.; Dou, B.

    2017-12-01

    Satellite derived Land surface albedo is an essential climate variable which controls the earth energy budget and it can be used in applications such as climate change, hydrology, and numerical weather prediction. The accuracy and uncertainty of surface albedo products should be evaluated with a reliable reference truth data prior to applications. And more literatures investigated the validation methods about the albedo validation in a flat or homogenous surface. However, the albedo performance over rugged terrain is still unknow due to the validation method limited. A multi-validation strategy is implemented to give a comprehensive albedo validation, which will involve the high resolution albedo processing, high resolution albedo validation based on in situ albedo, and the method to upscale the high resolution albedo to a coarse scale albedo. Among them, the high resolution albedo generation and the upscale method is the core step for the coarse scale albedo validation. In this paper, the high resolution albedo is generated by Angular Bin algorithm. And a albedo upscale method over rugged terrain is developed to obtain the coarse scale albedo truth. The in situ albedo located 40 sites in mountain area are selected globally to validate the high resolution albedo, and then upscaled to the coarse scale albedo by the upscale method. This paper takes MODIS and GLASS albedo product as a example, and the prelimarily results show the RMSE of MODIS and GLASS albedo product over rugged terrain are 0.047 and 0.057, respectively under the RMSE with 0.036 of high resolution albedo.

  20. Enhancing Extreme Heat Health-Related Intervention and Preparedness Activities Using Remote Sensing Analysis of Daily Surface Temperature, Surface Observation Networks and Ecmwf Reanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, R. L.; Booth, J.; Hondula, D.; Ross, K. W.; Stuyvesant, A.; Alm, G.; Baghel, E.

    2015-12-01

    Extreme heat causes more human fatalities in the United States than any other natural disaster, elevating the concern of heat-related mortality. Maricopa County Arizona is known for its high heat index and its sprawling metropolitan complex which makes this region a perfect candidate for human health research. Individuals at higher risk are unequally spatially distributed, leaving the poor, homeless, non-native English speakers, elderly, and the socially isolated vulnerable to heat events. The Arizona Department of Health Services, Arizona State University and NASA DEVELOP LaRC are working to establish a more effective method of placing hydration and cooling centers in addition to enhancing the heat warning system to aid those with the highest exposure. Using NASA's Earth Observation Systems from Aqua and Terra satellites, the daily spatial variability within the UHI was quantified over the summer heat seasons from 2005 - 2014, effectively establishing a remotely sensed surface temperature climatology for the county. A series of One-way Analysis of Variance revealed significant differences between daily surface temperature averages of the top 30% of census tracts within the study period. Furthermore, synoptic upper tropospheric circulation patterns were classified to relate surface weather types and heat index. The surface weather observation networks were also reviewed for analyzing the veracity of the other methods. The results provide detailed information regarding nuances within the UHI effect and will allow pertinent recommendations regarding the health department's adaptive capacity. They also hold essential components for future policy decision-making regarding appropriate locations for cooling centers and efficient warning systems.

  1. Inter-comparison of four remote sensing based surface energy balance methods to retrieve surface evapotranspiration and water stress of irrigated fields in semi-arid climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirouze, J.; Boulet, G.; Jarlan, L.; Fieuzal, R.; Rodriguez, J. C.; Ezzahar, J.; Er-Raki, S.; Bigeard, G.; Merlin, O.; Garatuza-Payan, J.; Watts, C.; Chehbouni, G.

    2013-01-01

    Remotely sensed surface temperature can provide a good proxy for water stress level and is therefore particularly useful to estimate spatially distributed evapotranspiration. Instantaneous stress levels or instantaneous latent heat flux are deduced from the surface energy balance equation constrained by this equilibrium temperature. Pixel average surface temperature depends on two main factors: stress and vegetation fraction cover. Methods estimating stress vary according to the way they treat each factor. Two families of methods can be defined: the contextual methods, where stress levels are scaled on a given image between hot/dry and cool/wet pixels for a particular vegetation cover, and single-pixel methods which evaluate latent heat as the residual of the surface energy balance for one pixel independently from the others. Four models, two contextual (S-SEBI and a triangle method, inspired by Moran et al., 1994) and two single-pixel (TSEB, SEBS) are applied at seasonal scale over a four by four km irrigated agricultural area in semi-arid northern Mexico. Their performances, both at local and spatial standpoints, are compared relatively to energy balance data acquired at seven locations within the area, as well as a more complex soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer model forced with true irrigation and rainfall data. Stress levels are not always well retrieved by most models, but S-SEBI as well as TSEB, although slightly biased, show good performances. Drop in model performances is observed when vegetation is senescent, mostly due to a poor partitioning both between turbulent fluxes and between the soil/plant components of the latent heat flux and the available energy. As expected, contextual methods perform well when extreme hydric and vegetation conditions are encountered in the same image (therefore, esp. in spring and early summer) while they tend to exaggerate the spread in water status in more homogeneous conditions (esp. in winter).

  2. Remote sensing of the surface layer dynamics of a stratified lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steissberg, Todd Eugene

    Physical processes, such as upwelling, circulation, and small-scale eddies, affect aquatic ecosystem functioning, controlling nutrient and light availability and pollutant transport in inland and coastal waters. These processes can be characterized and tracked across time and space using a combination of thermal infrared and reflective-solar (visible light) satellite measurements. Thermal gradients, created and altered by physical processes, facilitate daytime and nighttime detection and tracking of upwelling fronts, surface jets, basin-scale gyres, and small-scale eddies. Similarly, sunglint patterns in reflective-solar satellite measurements are altered by internal waves, current shear, and rotation, improving delineation of fronts, jets, and eddies, and determination of transport direction or rotational characteristics. This study applied thermal infrared and reflective-solar satellite images and field measurements, collected across multiple spatial and temporal scales, to characterize upwelling, circulation, and eddies at Lake Tahoe, California-Nevada. This included developing a novel technique to improve the quality of moderate-resolution satellite temperature data, creating filtered, calibrated Water Skin Temperature (WST) maps that clearly delineate thermal features, while preserving nearshore data and temperature accuracy. Time series of filtered WST maps acquired by two moderate-resolution satellite sensors were used to track up-welling fronts and jets, which can recur at moderate wind speeds when wind forcing is in phase with internal wave motion. High-resolution temperature and sunglint maps were used to characterize several, small-scale "spiral eddies" at Lake Tahoe. These features, although common in the ocean, have not been documented before in lakes. Satellite measurements showed spiral eddies form along thermal fronts and shear zones at Lake Tahoe, rotating predominantly cyclonically, as in the ocean, with sub-inertial periods longer than 21 hours

  3. Remote sensing and geochemical investigations of selected surface processes in Egypt and Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crombie, Mary Katherine

    This thesis consists of three studies of surface processes on Earth: 1. Age and isotopic constraints of pluvial episodes in the Western Desert of Egypt. North Africa has undergone drastic climatic change over the past several hundred thousand years. Timing of humid intervals called pluvials was investigated by uranium- series disequilibrium dating of travertines from the Kurkur Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt. Stable oxygen isotopes of the travertines were used in equilibrium oxygen isotope fractionation calculations indicating the Kurkur travertines have δ18O values similar to ancient Western Desert groundwaters (~[- ]11/perthous). The ages of the of the travertines correspond to times of monsoonal maxima, eustatic sea level high stands and interglacial maxima. Increased precipitation, recharge of Western Desert groundwaters, and resultant travertine deposition are interpreted to be consequences of Milankovitch cycle forcing, through enhanced Atlantic and Indian Ocean monsoons during periods of enhanced northern summer insolation. 2. Identification of soil moisture as an environmental risk factor for filariasis in Egypt. Bancroftian filariasis is a deforming illness transmitted by mosquitoes (Culex. pipiens) and caused by the parasite Wuchereria bancrofti (WHO technical report 821; Neva and Brown, 1994). Environmental variables, such as humidity, play an important role in the transmission cycle of filariasis. Landsat Thematic Mapper data were used to model the surface soil moisture conditions of the southern Nile Delta region of Egypt as a proxy for environmental humidity. Filariasis infection rates were found to be negligible for areas with low surface soil moisture availability (>20%). Variable infection rates were observed for regions with higher surface soil moisture content, possibly due to anthropogenic influences such as insect control and the use of anti- filarial drugs. 3. Monitoring of Pb aerosol fallout in the vicinity of the Glover smelter, Southeastern

  4. Utilizing Higher Resolution Land Surface Remote Sensing Data for Assessing Recent Trends over Asia Monsoon Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Suhung; Leptoukh, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    The slide presentation discusses the integration of 1-kilometer spatial resolution land temperature data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), with 8-day temporal resolution, into the NASA Monsoon-Asia Integrated Regional Study (MAIRS) Data Center. The data will be available for analysis and visualization in the Giovanni data system. It discusses the NASA MAIRS Data Center, presents an introduction to the data access tools, and an introduction of Products available from the service, discusses the higher resolution Land Surface Temperature (LST) and presents preliminary results of LST Trends over China.

  5. Remote Sensing of Surface Soil Moisture using Semi-Concurrent Radar and Radiometer Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L.; Ouellette, J. D.; Colliander, A.; Cosh, M. H.; Caldwell, T. G.; Walker, J. P.

    2017-12-01

    Radar backscatter and radiometer brightness temperature both have well-documented sensitivity to surface soil moisture, particularly in the microwave regime. While radiometer-derived soil moisture retrievals have been shown to be stable and accurate, they are only available at coarse spatial resolutions on the order of tens of kilometers. Backscatter from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is similarly sensitive to soil moisture but can yield higher spatial resolutions, with pixel sizes about an order of magnitude smaller. Soil moisture retrieval from radar backscatter is more difficult, however, due to the combined sensitivity of radar scattering to surface roughness, vegetation structure, and soil moisture. The algorithm uses a time-series of SAR data to retrieval soil moisture information, constraining the SAR-derived soil moisture estimates with radiometer observations. This effectively combines the high spatial resolution offered by SAR with the precision offered by passive radiometry. The algorithm is a change detection approach which maps changes in the radar backscatter to changes in surface soil moisture. This new algorithm differs from existing retrieval techniques in that it does not require ancillary vegetation information, but assumes vegetation and surface roughness are stable between pairs of consecutive radar overpasses. Furthermore, this method does not require a radar scattering model for the vegetation canopy, nor the use of a training data set. The algorithm works over a long time series, and is constrained by hard bounds which are defined using a coarse-resolution radiometer soil moisture product. The presentation will include soil moisture retrievals from Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) SAR data. Two sets of optimization bounds will constrain the radar change detection algorithm: one defined by SMAP radiometer retrievals and one defined by WindSat radiometer retrievals. Retrieved soil moisture values will be presented on a world map and will

  6. Correlation of Coral Bleaching Events and Remotely-Sensed Sea Surface Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-05-19

    corals , Pacific Science, 30(2), 159-166, 1976. Coles, S.L., and P.L. Jokiel, Effects of temperature on photosynthesis and respiration in hermatypic ...compounds (S-320) in a hermatypic scleractinian, Coral Reefs, 5, 155-159, 1986. Elms, J.D. and R.G. Quayle, Multi-decade sea surface temperature...effluent on hermatypic corals at Kahe Point, Oahu, Pacific Science, 28, 1-18, 1974 57 Jokiel, P.L. and S.L, Coles, Effects of temperature on the

  7. An error reduction algorithm to improve lidar turbulence estimates for wind energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Newman

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Remote-sensing devices such as lidars are currently being investigated as alternatives to cup anemometers on meteorological towers for the measurement of wind speed and direction. Although lidars can measure mean wind speeds at heights spanning an entire turbine rotor disk and can be easily moved from one location to another, they measure different values of turbulence than an instrument on a tower. Current methods for improving lidar turbulence estimates include the use of analytical turbulence models and expensive scanning lidars. While these methods provide accurate results in a research setting, they cannot be easily applied to smaller, vertically profiling lidars in locations where high-resolution sonic anemometer data are not available. Thus, there is clearly a need for a turbulence error reduction model that is simpler and more easily applicable to lidars that are used in the wind energy industry. In this work, a new turbulence error reduction algorithm for lidars is described. The Lidar Turbulence Error Reduction Algorithm, L-TERRA, can be applied using only data from a stand-alone vertically profiling lidar and requires minimal training with meteorological tower data. The basis of L-TERRA is a series of physics-based corrections that are applied to the lidar data to mitigate errors from instrument noise, volume averaging, and variance contamination. These corrections are applied in conjunction with a trained machine-learning model to improve turbulence estimates from a vertically profiling WINDCUBE v2 lidar. The lessons learned from creating the L-TERRA model for a WINDCUBE v2 lidar can also be applied to other lidar devices. L-TERRA was tested on data from two sites in the Southern Plains region of the United States. The physics-based corrections in L-TERRA brought regression line slopes much closer to 1 at both sites and significantly reduced the sensitivity of lidar turbulence errors to atmospheric stability. The accuracy of machine

  8. Nitrogen concentration estimation with hyperspectral LiDAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Nevalainen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural lands have strong impact on global carbon dynamics and nitrogen availability. Monitoring changes in agricultural lands require more efficient and accurate methods. The first prototype of a full waveform hyperspectral Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR instrument has been developed at the Finnish Geodetic Institute (FGI. The instrument efficiently combines the benefits of passive and active remote sensing sensors. It is able to produce 3D point clouds with spectral information included for every point which offers great potential in the field of remote sensing of environment. This study investigates the performance of the hyperspectral LiDAR instrument in nitrogen estimation. The investigation was conducted by finding vegetation indices sensitive to nitrogen concentration using hyperspectral LiDAR data and validating their performance in nitrogen estimation. The nitrogen estimation was performed by calculating 28 published vegetation indices to ten oat samples grown in different fertilization conditions. Reference data was acquired by laboratory nitrogen concentration analysis. The performance of the indices in nitrogen estimation was determined by linear regression and leave-one-out cross-validation. The results indicate that the hyperspectral LiDAR instrument holds a good capability to estimate plant biochemical parameters such as nitrogen concentration. The instrument holds much potential in various environmental applications and provides a significant improvement to the remote sensing of environment.

  9. Sand Dune Dynamics on Mars: Integration of Surface Imaging, Wind Measurements, and Orbital Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, N.; Sullivan, R. J., Jr.; Ewing, R. C.; Newman, C. E.; Ayoub, F.; Lapotre, M. G. A.; van Beek, J.

    2016-12-01

    In early 2016, the Mars Science Laboratory rover completed the first in situ investigation of an active dune field on another planetary body, the "Bagnold Dunes" in Gale Crater. During the campaign, a series of Mastcam and RMI time-series images of local sand patches, dump piles, ripples, and the lee face and margin of Namib Dune (a barchan in the Bagnold field) were acquired. These were at cadences of a sol or more that were generally at nearly the same local time, and intra-sol imaging bridged by continuous wind measurements from REMS. The dune field has also been imaged 16 times by HiRISE since 2008. By combining the two datasets, long term dune dynamics over the whole field can be compared to small-scale and short-term observations on the surface. From HiRISE, Namib Dune and other barchans and longitudinal dunes to the south and west migrate generally toward the south to southeast. The most active sand deposits are the longitudinal and barchans dunes, with the highest ripple migration rates found on the highest elevations. Rippled sand patches exhibit little of no motion. From MSL, the scrambling of grains on the surfaces of local rippled sand patches and Namib Dune is obvious over periods as short as a single sol, with light-toned grains showing the greatest tendency. On the lee face of Namib, images show grain scrambling, one case of modification to a secondary grainflow, and possibly ripple motion over 3-16 sols. At the dune margin, grain scrambling and one major slump on the lee face of a dune ripple are seen. The daytime REMS record shows wind speeds up to 20 m/s with confidence. As yet, we do not have a demonstrable correlation between measured wind speeds and changes, suggesting that short term gusts or non-aeolian processes acting as triggers may precede significant activity. The changes, occurring in a low flux season based on HiRISE analysis and global circulation models, indicate an active surface at all times of the year to some degree.

  10. Remote Sensing of Surface Water and Recent Developments in the SWOT Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsdorf, D. E.; Mognard, N. M.; Lettenmaier, D. P.; SWOT Virtual Mission Team

    2011-12-01

    CNES, NASA, and the CSA are partners in the Surface Water and Ocean Topography satellite mission (SWOT, http://swot.jpl.nasa.gov/). The following exemplify some of the recent challenges in mission development that are being solved by an international team. (1) River discharge is typically defined as the flux through a channel cross-sectional area, thus river bathymetry is required to estimate discharge. While SWOT will not measure bottom-depths, it will enable cross-section measurements above the lowest water levels that occur during the mission. Moreover, recent algorithm developments combined with data assimilation show promise of using fluvial geomorphology and SWOT's hydraulic measurements to provide reasonable discharge estimates. Depending on algorithm complexity, errors in total discharge are 17% RMS for a non-data assimilation method and 10.5% RMS for a method that uses assimilation. Under development is an idea based on SWOT's hydraulic measurements that will enable discharge anomalies, perhaps even more accurate than total discharge. (2) The impact of floods on economies and on life is of great importance and thus SWOT researchers are investigating how the satellite-based hydraulic measurements will improve our understanding of flood processes. Simulation experiments using SWOT's orbital configuration over the Kanawha River (an Ohio River tributary) show an ability to measure flow hydraulics and hence estimate discharge at the initial arrival of the flood wave and again three days later during the falling limb of the wave. An important advance that will be made by the mission is that measurements will be made all along river reaches, thus providing a high-spatial resolution mapping of flood wave hydraulics and the connectivity to associated floodplains. This is particularly important as demonstrated by a study of the River Po, Italy, showing that 2D modeling inclusive of floodplain geomorphology improves model performance compared to a 1D version. (3

  11. Recent Progress in Characterization of Dust over Land Surfaces with Space-borne Passive Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, N. Christina

    2008-01-01

    Among the many components that contribute to air pollution, airborne mineral dust plays an important role due to its biogeochemical impact on the ecosystem and its radiative-forcing effect on the climate system. In East Asia, dust storms frequently accompany the cold and dry air masses that occur as part of springtime cold front systems. Outbreaks of Asian dust storms occur often in the arid and semi-arid areas of northwestern China -about 1.6x10(exp 6) square kilometers including the Gobi and Taklimakan deserts- with continuous expanding of spatial coverage. These airborne dust particles, originating in desert areas far from polluted regions, interact with anthropogenic sulfate and soot aerosols emitted from Chinese mega-cities during their transport over the mainland. Adding the intricate effects of clouds and marine aerosols, dust particles reaching the marine environment can have drastically different properties than those from their sources. Furthermore, these aerosols, once generated over the source regions, can be transported out of the boundary layer into the free troposphere and can travel thousands of kilometers across the Pacific into the United States and beyond. In this paper, we will demonstrate the capability of a new satellite algorithm to retrieve aerosol properties (e.g., optical thickness, single scattering albedo) over bright-reflecting surfaces such as urban areas and deserts. Such retrievals have been difficult to perform using previously available algorithms that use wavelengths from the mid-visible to the near IR because they have trouble separating the aerosol signal from the contribution due to the bright surface reflectance. This new algorithm, called Deep Blue, utilizes blue-wavelength measurements from instruments such as SeaWiFS and MODIS to infer the properties of aerosols, since the surface reflectance over land in the blue part of the spectrum is much lower than for longer wavelength channels. Reasonable agreements have been

  12. Airborne lidar aerosol measurements during the ASSESS II mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, C; Bachstein, F; Dietz, S; Herrmann, H; Köpp, F; Löffler, H

    1978-07-01

    During May 1977 the Airborne Science Spacelab Experiments System Simulation (ASSESS II) took place, using the NASA CV 990 aircraft. A ND:glass lidar system, measuring the aerosol mass concentration over large areas, was proxy operated by trained ''Payload Specialists.'' The main part of this paper is concerned with the lidar experiment and its results. The participants in the mission viewed it as a tool for judging their spacelab science management and as the final stage of a guide for future planning of experiments. A general result that has emerged is that, for a real spacelab mission, the handling of remote sensing experiments should be fully automatic.

  13. A lidar system for measuring atmospheric pressure and temperature profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.; Dombrowski, Mark; Korb, C. Laurence; Milrod, Jeffry; Walden, Harvey

    1987-01-01

    The design and operation of a differential absorption lidar system capable of remotely measuring the vertical structure of tropospheric pressure and temperature are described. The measurements are based on the absorption by atmospheric oxygen of the spectrally narrowband output of two pulsed alexandrite lasers. Detailed laser output spectral characteristics, which are critical to successful lidar measurements, are presented. Spectral linewidths of 0.026 and 0.018 per cm for the lasers were measured with over 99.99 percent of the energy contained in three longitudinal modes.

  14. COHERENT LIDAR SYSTEM BASED ON A SEMICONDUCTOR LASER AND AMPLIFIER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to a compact, reliable and low-cost coherent LIDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) system for remote wind-speed determination, determination of particle concentration, and/or temperature based on an all semiconductor light source and related methods. The present...... invention provides a coherent LIDAR system comprising a semiconductor laser for emission of a measurement beam of electromagnetic radiation directed towards a measurement volume for illumination of particles in the measurement volume, a reference beam generator for generation of a reference beam, a detector...

  15. Adaptive optics in coherent lidar wind measurements: A feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leland, Robert P.

    1991-01-01

    Laser Doppler radar (lidar) is widely used for remote sensing of wind velocities. Usable wavelengths for the laser are limited by the effects of atmospheric turbulence. An adaptive optical system is proposed to compensate for turbulence effects on signal power. The feasibility of an adaptive system is considered in light of the effects of speckle from the aerosol target. It is concluded that adaptive optics is a promising technique for improving the performance of a 2 micron lidar wind measurement system. The chief technical challenges are a laser that will give the required output and pulse repetition rate, a combined Hartmann sensor and heterodyne detector, and a suitable reconstruction algorithm.

  16. Cross-evaluation of modelled and remotely sensed surface soil moisture with in situ data in southwestern France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albergel, C.; Calvet, J.-C.; de Rosnay, P.; Balsamo, G.; Wagner, W.; Hasenauer, S.; Naeimi, V.; Martin, E.; Bazile, E.; Bouyssel, F.; Mahfouf, J.-F.

    2010-11-01

    The SMOSMANIA soil moisture network in Southwestern France is used to evaluate modelled and remotely sensed soil moisture products. The surface soil moisture (SSM) measured in situ at 5 cm permits to evaluate SSM from the SIM operational hydrometeorological model of Météo-France and to perform a cross-evaluation of the normalised SSM estimates derived from coarse-resolution (25 km) active microwave observations from the ASCAT scatterometer instrument (C-band, onboard METOP), issued by EUMETSAT and resampled to the Discrete Global Grid (DGG, 12.5 km gridspacing) by TU-Wien (Vienna University of Technology) over a two year period (2007-2008). A downscaled ASCAT product at one kilometre scale is evaluated as well, together with operational soil moisture products of two meteorological services, namely the ALADIN numerical weather prediction model (NWP) and the Integrated Forecasting System (IFS) analysis of Météo-France and ECMWF, respectively. In addition to the operational SSM analysis of ECMWF, a second analysis using a simplified extended Kalman filter and assimilating the ASCAT SSM estimates is tested. The ECMWF SSM estimates correlate better with the in situ observations than the Météo-France products. This may be due to the higher ability of the multi-layer land surface model used at ECMWF to represent the soil moisture profile. However, the SSM derived from SIM corresponds to a thin soil surface layer and presents good correlations with ASCAT SSM estimates for the very first centimetres of soil. At ECMWF, the use of a new data assimilation technique, which is able to use the ASCAT SSM, improves the SSM and the root-zone soil moisture analyses.

  17. Cross-evaluation of modelled and remotely sensed surface soil moisture with in situ data in southwestern France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Albergel

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The SMOSMANIA soil moisture network in Southwestern France is used to evaluate modelled and remotely sensed soil moisture products. The surface soil moisture (SSM measured in situ at 5 cm permits to evaluate SSM from the SIM operational hydrometeorological model of Météo-France and to perform a cross-evaluation of the normalised SSM estimates derived from coarse-resolution (25 km active microwave observations from the ASCAT scatterometer instrument (C-band, onboard METOP, issued by EUMETSAT and resampled to the Discrete Global Grid (DGG, 12.5 km gridspacing by TU-Wien (Vienna University of Technology over a two year period (2007–2008. A downscaled ASCAT product at one kilometre scale is evaluated as well, together with operational soil moisture products of two meteorological services, namely the ALADIN numerical weather prediction model (NWP and the Integrated Forecasting System (IFS analysis of Météo-France and ECMWF, respectively. In addition to the operational SSM analysis of ECMWF, a second analysis using a simplified extended Kalman filter and assimilating the ASCAT SSM estimates is tested. The ECMWF SSM estimates correlate better with the in situ observations than the Météo-France products. This may be due to the higher ability of the multi-layer land surface model used at ECMWF to represent the soil moisture profile. However, the SSM derived from SIM corresponds to a thin soil surface layer and presents good correlations with ASCAT SSM estimates for the very first centimetres of soil. At ECMWF, the use of a new data assimilation technique, which is able to use the ASCAT SSM, improves the SSM and the root-zone soil moisture analyses.

  18. Regional-scale estimates of surface moisture availability and thermal inertia using remote thermal measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, T. N.

    1986-01-01

    A review is presented of numerical models which were developed to interpret thermal IR data and to identify the governing parameters and surface energy fluxes recorded in the images. Analytic, predictive, diagnostic and empirical models are described. The limitations of each type of modeling approach are explored in terms of the error sources and inherent constraints due to theoretical or measurement limitations. Sample results of regional-scale soil moisture or evaporation patterns derived from the Heat Capacity Mapping Mission and GOES satellite data through application of the predictive model devised by Carlson (1981) are discussed. The analysis indicates that pattern recognition will probably be highest when data are collected over flat, arid, sparsely vegetated terrain. The soil moisture data then obtained may be accurate to within 10-20 percent.