WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface level measurements

  1. Automatic Measurement of Low Level Contamination on Concrete Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, M.; Itoh, H.; Shimada, T.; Yanagihara, S.

    2002-01-01

    Automatic measurement of radioactivity is necessary for considering cost effectiveness in final radiological survey of building structures in decommissioning nuclear facilities. The RAPID (radiation measuring pilot device for surface contamination) was developed to be applied to automatic measurement of low level contamination on concrete surfaces. The RAPID has a capability to measure contamination with detection limit of 0.14 Bq/cm2 for 60Co in 30 seconds of measurement time and its efficiency is evaluated to be 5 m2/h in a normal measurement option. It was confirmed that low level contamination on concrete surfaces could be surveyed by the RAPID efficiently compared with direct measurement by workers through its actual application

  2. Sea level: measuring the bounding surfaces of the ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamisiea, Mark E; Hughes, Chris W; Williams, Simon D P; Bingley, Richard M

    2014-09-28

    The practical need to understand sea level along the coasts, such as for safe navigation given the spatially variable tides, has resulted in tide gauge observations having the distinction of being some of the longest instrumental ocean records. Archives of these records, along with geological constraints, have allowed us to identify the century-scale rise in global sea level. Additional data sources, particularly satellite altimetry missions, have helped us to better identify the rates and causes of sea-level rise and the mechanisms leading to spatial variability in the observed rates. Analysis of all of the data reveals the need for long-term and stable observation systems to assess accurately the regional changes as well as to improve our ability to estimate future changes in sea level. While information from many scientific disciplines is needed to understand sea-level change, this review focuses on contributions from geodesy and the role of the ocean's bounding surfaces: the sea surface and the Earth's crust. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Sea level: measuring the bounding surfaces of the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamisiea, Mark E.; Hughes, Chris W.; Williams, Simon D. P.; Bingley, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    The practical need to understand sea level along the coasts, such as for safe navigation given the spatially variable tides, has resulted in tide gauge observations having the distinction of being some of the longest instrumental ocean records. Archives of these records, along with geological constraints, have allowed us to identify the century-scale rise in global sea level. Additional data sources, particularly satellite altimetry missions, have helped us to better identify the rates and causes of sea-level rise and the mechanisms leading to spatial variability in the observed rates. Analysis of all of the data reveals the need for long-term and stable observation systems to assess accurately the regional changes as well as to improve our ability to estimate future changes in sea level. While information from many scientific disciplines is needed to understand sea-level change, this review focuses on contributions from geodesy and the role of the ocean's bounding surfaces: the sea surface and the Earth's crust. PMID:25157196

  4. Low-Cost Alternative for the Measurement of Water Levels in Surface Water Streams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis E. PEÑA

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Flood risk management and water resources planning involve a deep knowledge of surface streams so that mitigation strategies and climate change adaptations can be implemented. Commercially, there is a wide range of technologies for the measurement of hydroclimatic variables; however, many of these technologies may not be affordable for institutions with limited budgets. This paper has two main objectives: 1 Present the design of an ultrasound-based water level measurement system, and 2 Propose a methodological alternative for the development of instruments, according to the needs of institutions conducting monitoring of surface waterbodies. To that end, the proposed methodology is based on selection processes defined according to the specific needs of each waterbody. The prototype was tested in real-world scale, with the potential to obtain accurate measurements. Lastly, we present the design of the ultrasound-based water level measurement instrument, which can be built at a low cost. Low-cost instruments can potentially contribute to the sustainable instrumental autonomy of environmental entities and help define measurement and data transmission standards based on the specific requirements of the monitoring.

  5. Abdominal strengthening using the AbVice machine as measured by surface electromyographic activation levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avedisian, Lori; Kowalsky, Don S; Albro, Richard C; Goldner, Daniel; Gill, Robert C

    2005-08-01

    Twenty-four college students served as subjects in a study that examined the effect of a prototypical abdominal muscle strengthening device (AbVice) compared with other devices currently on the market. The purpose of the present study was to investigate a prototypical device (AbVice) that incorporates contraction of the hamstring and gluteal musculature in conjunction with the abdominals, which may assist in decreasing activation of the hip flexors by allowing greater activity levels of the abdominal musculature via the theory of reflex inhibition, compared with other devices currently available on the market (AbRoller and AbRocker). The repeated-measures study included 17 women and 7 men who ranged in age from 20-23 years (mean +/- SD age, 21.3 +/- 1.5 years). Each subject underwent a single session of data collection during which they completed 10 repetitions of abdominal crunches per device. Subjects completed 4 different crunch sets (AbRocker, AbRoller, standard crunch, AbVice). Counterbalancing of the device was used to negate the effect of fatigue. Speed of repetitions was ensured via use of a metronome set at 40 b.min(-1) to permit similar contraction times and rest periods between repetitions. Rest between conditions was 3 minutes. Mean activation levels of surface electromyography (EMG) were recorded for each condition at the following locations on the right side of the body: rectus abdominis 2.5 cm superior to the umbilicus, rectus abdominis 2.5 cm inferior to the umbilicus, external oblique abdominis 1.0 cm medial to the anterior superior iliac spine, and external oblique abdominis less than 1.0 cm superior to the inguinal ligament. Mean (SD) activation was 1,165.21 mV (634.60 mV) with the AbVice, 242.92 mV (263.03 mV) with the AbRocker, 753.29 mV (514.80 mV) with the standard crunch, and 757.67 mV (542.85 mV) with the AbRoller. Broken down by sex, women had the following mean (SD) EMG values: 1,079.76 mV (705.02 mV) with the AbVice, 680.35 mV (535.35 m

  6. Low level chemiluminescence measurement of the binding of 8-methoxypsoralen to proteins and lymphocytic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, B.

    1980-01-01

    Photochemotherapy with 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) and longwave ultraviolet light is beneficial in such different disorders like psoriasis, lichen planus, and mykosis fungoides. In contrast to a widely accepted hypothesis 8-MOP does not solely bind to nucleic acid, but also to certain proteins. The mechanism of this binding as well as the precise binding area are unknown. Therefore the UV-provoked reactions of 8-MOP with a lipid mixture, a glucosaminoglycan solution, a protein solution, and lymphocyte suspensions, respectively were investigated using low level chemiluminescence (LLCL). It was found an 8-MOP concentration-dependent decrease of LLCL intensity in the lymphocyte suspensions (10 3 to 10 4 cells/μl). This effect is result of the diminution of the photoactive 8-MOP content of the solution. 8-MOP binds quickly and in the course of a free radical reaction to lymphocytic surfaces and coincidentally loses its potency to start LLCL-detectable free radical chain responses. (author)

  7. Assessment of the SMAP Level-4 Surface and Root-Zone Soil Moisture Product Using In Situ Measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reichle, Rolf H.; De Lannoy, Gabrielle J. M.; Liu, Qing; Ardizzone, Joseph V.; Colliander, Andreas; Conaty, Austin; Crow, Wade; Jackson, Thomas J.; Jones, Lucas A.; Kimball, John S.; Koster, Randal D.; Mahanama, Sarith P.; Smith, Edmond B.; Berg, Aaron; Bircher, Simone; Bosch, David; Caldwell, Todd G.; Cosh, Michael; Holifield Collins, Chandra D.; Jensen, Karsten H.; Livingston, Stan; Lopez-baeza, Ernesto; Martínez-fernández, José; Mcnairn, Heather; Moghaddam, Mahta; Pacheco, Anna; Pellarin, Thierry; Prueger, John; Rowlandson, Tracy; Seyfried, Mark; Starks, Patrick; Su, Bob; Thibeault, Marc; Van Der Velde, Rogier; Walker, Jeffrey; Wu, Xiaoling; Zeng, Yijian

    2017-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission Level-4 Surface and Root-Zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) data product is generated by assimilating SMAP L-band brightness temperature observations into the NASA Catchment land surface model. The L4_SM product is available from 31 March 2015 to present

  8. Surface cleanliness measurement procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroder, Mark Stewart; Woodmansee, Donald Ernest; Beadie, Douglas Frank

    2002-01-01

    A procedure and tools for quantifying surface cleanliness are described. Cleanliness of a target surface is quantified by wiping a prescribed area of the surface with a flexible, bright white cloth swatch, preferably mounted on a special tool. The cloth picks up a substantial amount of any particulate surface contamination. The amount of contamination is determined by measuring the reflectivity loss of the cloth before and after wiping on the contaminated system and comparing that loss to a previous calibration with similar contamination. In the alternative, a visual comparison of the contaminated cloth to a contamination key provides an indication of the surface cleanliness.

  9. Arctic Radiation Measurement in Column: Atmosphere-Surface (ARMCAS) MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS) Level-1B Data Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the Arctic Radiation Measurement in Column: Atmosphere-Surface (ARMCAS) experiment was to detect and differentiate between clouds, ice, and snow...

  10. Measuring Your Fitness Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... test measures the strength and endurance of your abdominal muscles. Here's how to do the test: Lie on ... and Human Services recommends one of the following activity levels for adult fitness and health benefits: 150 ...

  11. Cosmic-muon intensity measurement and overburden estimation in a building at surface level and in an underground facility using two BC408 scintillation detectors coincidence counting system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weihua; Ungar, Kurt; Liu, Chuanlei; Mailhot, Maverick

    2016-10-01

    A series of measurements have been recently conducted to determine the cosmic-muon intensities and attenuation factors at various indoor and underground locations for a gamma spectrometer. For this purpose, a digital coincidence spectrometer was developed by using two BC408 plastic scintillation detectors and an XIA LLC Digital Gamma Finder (DGF)/Pixie-4 software and card package. The results indicate that the overburden in the building at surface level absorbs a large part of cosmic ray protons while attenuating the cosmic-muon intensity by 20-50%. The underground facility has the largest overburden of 39 m water equivalent, where the cosmic-muon intensity is reduced by a factor of 6. The study provides a cosmic-muon intensity measurement and overburden assessment, which are important parameters for analysing the background of an HPGe counting system, or for comparing the background of similar systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Tools for measuring surface cleanliness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroder, Mark Stewart (Hendersonville, NC); Woodmansee, Donald Ernest (Simpsonville, SC); Beadie, Douglas Frank (Greenville, SC)

    2002-01-01

    A procedure and tools for quantifying surface cleanliness are described. Cleanliness of a target surface is quantified by wiping a prescribed area of the surface with a flexible, bright white cloth swatch, preferably mounted on a special tool. The cloth picks up a substantial amount of any particulate surface contamination. The amount of contamination is determined by measuring the reflectivity loss of the cloth before and after wiping on the contaminated system and comparing that loss to a previous calibration with similar contamination. In the alternative, a visual comparison of the contaminated cloth to a contamination key provides an indication of the surface cleanliness.

  13. Armor Plate Surface Roughness Measurements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stanton, Brian; Coburn, William; Pizzillo, Thomas J

    2005-01-01

    ...., surface texture and coatings) that could become important at high frequency. We measure waviness and roughness of various plates to know the parameter range for smooth aluminum and rolled homogenous armor (RHA...

  14. Novel application of satellite and in-situ measurements to map surface-level NO2 in the Great Lakes region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Mihele

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI tropospheric NO2 vertical column density data were used in conjunction with in-situ NO2 concentrations collected by permanently installed monitoring stations to infer 24 h surface-level NO2 concentrations at 0.1° (~11 km resolution. The region examined included rural and suburban areas, and the highly industrialised area of Windsor, Ontario, which is situated directly across the US-Canada border from Detroit, MI. Photolytic NO2 monitors were collocated with standard NO2 monitors to provide qualitative data regarding NOz interference during the campaign. The accuracy of the OMI-inferred concentrations was tested using two-week integrative NO2 measurements collected with passive monitors at 18 locations, approximating a 15 km grid across the region, for 7 consecutive two-week periods. When compared with these passive results, satellite-inferred concentrations showed an 18% positive bias. The correlation of the passive monitor and OMI-inferred concentrations (R=0.69, n=115 was stronger than that for the passive monitor concentrations and OMI column densities (R=0.52, indicating that using a sparse network of monitoring sites to estimate concentrations improves the direct utility of the OMI observations. OMI-inferred concentrations were then calculated for four years to show an overall declining trend in surface NO2 concentrations in the region. Additionally, by separating OMI-inferred surface concentrations by wind direction, clear patterns in emissions and affected down-wind regions, in particular around the US-Canada border, were revealed.

  15. The measurement of surface gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crossley, David; Hinderer, Jacques; Riccardi, Umberto

    2013-01-01

    This review covers basic theory and techniques behind the use of ground-based gravimetry at the Earth's surface. The orientation is toward modern instrumentation, data processing and interpretation for observing surface, land-based, time-variable changes to the geopotential. The instrumentation side is covered in some detail, with specifications and performance of the most widely used models of the three main types: the absolute gravimeters (FG5, A10 from Micro-g LaCoste), superconducting gravimeters (OSG, iGrav from GWR instruments), and the new generation of spring instruments (Micro-g LaCoste gPhone, Scintrex CG5 and Burris ZLS). A wide range of applications is covered, with selected examples from tides and ocean loading, atmospheric effects on gravity, local and global hydrology, seismology and normal modes, long period and tectonics, volcanology, exploration gravimetry, and some examples of gravimetry connected to fundamental physics. We show that there are only a modest number of very large signals, i.e. hundreds of µGal (10 −8 m s −2 ), that are easy to see with all gravimeters (e.g. tides, volcanic eruptions, large earthquakes, seasonal hydrology). The majority of signals of interest are in the range 0.1–5.0 µGal and occur at a wide range of time scales (minutes to years) and spatial extent (a few meters to global). Here the competing effects require a careful combination of different gravimeter types and measurement strategies to efficiently characterize and distinguish the signals. Gravimeters are sophisticated instruments, with substantial up-front costs, and they place demands on the operators to maximize the results. Nevertheless their performance characteristics such as drift and precision have improved dramatically in recent years, and their data recording ability and ruggedness have seen similar advances. Many subtle signals are now routinely connected with known geophysical effects such as coseismic earthquake displacements, post

  16. The measurement of surface gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossley, David; Hinderer, Jacques; Riccardi, Umberto

    2013-04-01

    This review covers basic theory and techniques behind the use of ground-based gravimetry at the Earth's surface. The orientation is toward modern instrumentation, data processing and interpretation for observing surface, land-based, time-variable changes to the geopotential. The instrumentation side is covered in some detail, with specifications and performance of the most widely used models of the three main types: the absolute gravimeters (FG5, A10 from Micro-g LaCoste), superconducting gravimeters (OSG, iGrav from GWR instruments), and the new generation of spring instruments (Micro-g LaCoste gPhone, Scintrex CG5 and Burris ZLS). A wide range of applications is covered, with selected examples from tides and ocean loading, atmospheric effects on gravity, local and global hydrology, seismology and normal modes, long period and tectonics, volcanology, exploration gravimetry, and some examples of gravimetry connected to fundamental physics. We show that there are only a modest number of very large signals, i.e. hundreds of µGal (10-8 m s-2), that are easy to see with all gravimeters (e.g. tides, volcanic eruptions, large earthquakes, seasonal hydrology). The majority of signals of interest are in the range 0.1-5.0 µGal and occur at a wide range of time scales (minutes to years) and spatial extent (a few meters to global). Here the competing effects require a careful combination of different gravimeter types and measurement strategies to efficiently characterize and distinguish the signals. Gravimeters are sophisticated instruments, with substantial up-front costs, and they place demands on the operators to maximize the results. Nevertheless their performance characteristics such as drift and precision have improved dramatically in recent years, and their data recording ability and ruggedness have seen similar advances. Many subtle signals are now routinely connected with known geophysical effects such as coseismic earthquake displacements, post-glacial rebound

  17. Nuclear systems of level measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lara, A.J.; Cabrera, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    In the industry there are processes in which is necessary to maintain the products level controlled which are handled for their transformation. The majority of such processes and by the operation conditions, they do not admit measure systems of level of invasive type then the application of nuclear techniques for level measurement results a big aid in these cases, since all the system installation is situated beyond frontiers of vessels that contain the product for measuring. In the Department of Nuclear Technology Applications of Mexican Petroleum Institute was developed a level measurement system by gamma rays transmission which operates in the Low Density Polyethylene plant of Petrochemical Complex Escolin at Poza Rica, Veracruz, Mexico. (Author)

  18. Low-level Radioactivity Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churtgen, C.

    2007-01-01

    The low-level radioactivity measurements service performs measurements of alpha or beta emitters on various types of low-radioactivity samples (biological and environmental) from internal and external clients. to maintain and develop techniques concerning the measurement of low-level radioactivity of alpha and beta emitting radionuclides in environmental or biological samples; to measure these samples by means of low-background counters (liquid scintillators, proportional counters, ZnS counters and alpha-spectrometers); to support and advise the nuclear and non-nuclear industry on problems of radioactive contamination or low level radioactivity measurements; to maintain the quality assurance system according to the ISO17025 standard for which we obtained the Beltest accreditation in 1998; to assess the internal dose from occupational intakes of radionuclides for workers of the nuclear industry;

  19. Radiation Level Changes at RAM Package Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opperman, Erich [Washington Savannah River Company; Hawk, Mark B [ORNL; Kapoor, Ashok [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Packaging and Transportation; Natali, Ronald [R. B. Natali Consulting, Inc.

    2010-01-01

    This paper will explore design considerations required to meet the regulations that limit radiation level variations at external surfaces of radioactive material (RAM) packages. The radiation level requirements at package surfaces (e.g. TS-R-1 paragraphs 531 and 646) invoke not only maximum radiation levels, but also strict limits on the allowable increase in the radiation level during transport. This paper will explore the regulatory requirements by quantifying the amount of near surface movement and/or payload shifting that results in a 20% increase in the radiation level at the package surface. Typical IP-2, IP-3, Type A and Type B packaging and source geometries will be illustrated. Variations in surface radiation levels are typically the result of changes in the geometry of the surface due to an impact, puncture or crush event, or shifting and settling of radioactive contents.

  20. MISR Level 2 Surface parameters V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Level 2 Land Surface product contains information on land directional reflectance properties,albedos(spectral & PAR integrated),FPAR,asssociated radiation...

  1. Low-level Radioactivity Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurtgen, C.

    2001-01-01

    The objectives of the research performed in the area of low-level radioactivity measurements are (1) to maintain and develop techniques for the measurement of low-level environmental and biological samples, (2) to measure these samples by means of low-background counters (liquid scintillators, proportional counters, ZnS counters, alpha spectrometry), (3) to support and advice the nuclear and non-nuclear industry in matters concerning radioactive contamination and/or low-level radioactivity measurements; (4) to maintain the quality assurance system according to the EN45001/ISO17025 standard; and (5) to assess the internal dose from occupational intakes of radionuclides of workers of the nuclear industry. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2000 are reported

  2. Measurements of Near Sea Surface Infrared Propagation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Frost, Shaun

    1999-01-01

    .... Measurements have been made of the atmospheric infrared transmission near the sea surface. Spectral transmission profiles were measured for a number of ranges using a fourier transform spectrometer...

  3. Surface-to-surface registration using level sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mads Fogtmann; Erbou, Søren G.; Vester-Christensen, Martin

    2007-01-01

    problem can be approximated by the image registration (IR) problem of the signed distance maps (SDMs) of the surfaces confined to some narrow band. By shrinking the narrow bands around the zero level sets the solution to the IR problem converges towards the S2SR problem. It is our hypothesis...... that this approach is more robust and less prone to fall into local minima than ordinary surface-to-surface registration. The IR problem is solved using the inverse compositional algorithm. In this paper, a set of 40 pelvic bones of Duroc pigs are registered to each other w.r.t. the Euclidean transformation...

  4. Acoustic Impedance Measurement for Underground Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockcroft, Paul William

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. This thesis investigates the measurement of acoustic impedance for surfaces likely to be found in underground coal mines. By introducing the concepts of industrial noise, the effects of noise on the ear and relevant legislation the need for the protection of workers can be appreciated. Representative acoustic impedance values are vital as input for existing computer models that predict sound levels in various underground environments. These enable the mining engineer to predict the noise level at any point within a mine in the vicinity of noisy machinery. The concepts of acoustic intensity and acoustic impedance are investigated and different acoustic impedance measurement techniques are detailed. The possible use of either an impedance tube or an intensity meter for these kinds of measurements are suggested. The problems with acoustic intensity and acoustic impedance measurements are discussed with reference to the restraints that an underground environment imposes on any measurement technique. The impedance tube method for work in an acoustics laboratory is shown and the theory explained, accompanied by a few representative results. The use of a Metravib intensity meter in a soundproof chamber to gain impedance values is explained in detail. The accompanying software for the analysis of the two measured pressure signals is shown as well as the actual results for a variety of test surfaces. The use of a Nagra IV-SJ tape recorder is investigated to determine the effect of recording on the measurement and subsequent analysis of the input signals, particularly with reference to the phase difference introduced between the two simultaneous pressure signals. The subsequent use of a Norwegian Electronic intensity meter, including a proposal for underground work, is shown along with results for tests completed with this piece of equipment. Finally, recommendations are made on how to link up

  5. Measuring Surface Combatant Fleet Effectiveness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Crary, Michael

    1999-01-01

    ...? While Measures of Effectiveness for an individual ship can include its number of missiles, speed, and endurance, it is difficult to find a Measure of Effectiveness credible to experienced warplanners...

  6. Surface charge measurement by the Pockels effect

    CERN Document Server

    Sam, Y L

    2001-01-01

    have been observed by applying both impulse and AC voltages to a needle electrode in direct contact with the BSO. AC surface discharge behaviour of polymeric materials bonded to the BSO has also been investigated. The effect of the surrounding environment has been experimentally examined by placing the cell inside a vacuum chamber. Surface charge measurements have been made at various atmospheric pressures. The effect of an electro-negative gas (Sulphur Hexafluoride) on the surface charge distribution has also been investigated. This thesis is concerned with the design and development of a surface charge measurement system using Pockels effect. The measurement of surface charge is important in determining the electrical performance of high voltage insulation materials. The method proposed allows on-line measurement of charge and can generate two-dimensional images that represent the charge behaviour on the surface of the material under test. The measurement system is optical and uses a Pockels crystal as the ...

  7. Contact area measurements on structured surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kücükyildiz, Ömer Can; Jensen, Sebastian Hoppe Nesgaard; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    In connection with the use of brass specimens featuring structured surfaces in a tribology test, an algorithm was developed for automatic measurement of the contact area by optical means.......In connection with the use of brass specimens featuring structured surfaces in a tribology test, an algorithm was developed for automatic measurement of the contact area by optical means....

  8. GHRSST Level 2P Global Subskin Sea Surface Temperature from TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) onboard Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) satellite (GDS versions 1 and 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — GDS2 Version -The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI) is a well calibrated passive microwave radiometer, similar to the Special Sensor...

  9. Seasonal slope surface deformation measured with TLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, L; Smethurst, J; Powrie, W; Sellaiya, A

    2014-01-01

    In temperate European climates, soil water removal due to vegetation transpiration peaks in summer and soil rewetting from higher levels of precipitation occurs in winter. In clays of high plasticity, the seasonal cycles of drying and wetting cause the soil to experience a volumetric change, resulting in seasonal shrinking and swelling. For a clay slope exhibiting volume change, such behaviour can lead to excessive deformation and could contribute to strain-softening and progressive slope failure. This can in turn cause traffic disruption and loss of life if roads and railways are founded on or surrounded by such slopes. This paper discusses the driving forces of seasonal surface movement, in particular the role of vegetation, and presents the use of Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) to measure the surface movement of a lightly vegetated London Clay slope near Newbury, UK. Two TLS scans were carried out in early and late summer respectively, representing relative wet and dry conditions of the slope. Continuous field measurements of soil water content in upper layers of the slope were obtained from TDR ThetaProbes already installed at the site. The water content data are used to support the results obtained from TLS by indicating the likely volumetric change in the soil due to loss of water

  10. Surface texture measurement for dental wear applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, R. S.; Mullen, F.; Bartlett, D. W.

    2015-06-01

    The application of surface topography measurement and characterization within dental materials science is highly active and rapidly developing, in line with many modern industries. Surface measurement and structuring is used extensively within oral and dental science to optimize the optical, tribological and biological performance of natural and biomimetic dental materials. Although there has historically been little standardization in the use and reporting of surface metrology instrumentation and software, the dental industry is beginning to adopt modern areal measurement and characterization techniques, especially as the dental industry is increasingly adopting digital impressioning techniques in order to leverage CAD/CAM technologies for the design and construction of dental restorations. As dental treatment becomes increasingly digitized and reliant on advanced technologies such as dental implants, wider adoption of standardized surface topography and characterization techniques will become evermore essential. The dental research community welcomes the advances that are being made in surface topography measurement science towards realizing this ultimate goal.

  11. Technique for measuring very high surface velocities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maron, Y.

    1977-01-01

    An interferometric technique for measuring displacements of surfaces moving at velocities in the range of a few millimeters per microsecond is presented. The Doppler shift of frequency of light scattered from such surfaces is too high to be detectable by known devices. The present technique is based upon monitoring the signal resulting from the interference between two beams reflected from the surface at different incidence angles. Measurement systems for specularly as well as diffusely reflecting surfaces are described. Light source with very modest temporal coherence delivering about 100 mw power is required. The accuracy of the technique is discussed. (author)

  12. Surface texture measurement for additive manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triantaphyllou, Andrew; Tomita, Ben; Milne, Katherine A; Giusca, Claudiu L; Macaulay, Gavin D; Roerig, Felix; Hoebel, Matthias; Leach, Richard K

    2015-01-01

    The surface texture of additively manufactured metallic surfaces made by powder bed methods is affected by a number of factors, including the powder’s particle size distribution, the effect of the heat source, the thickness of the printed layers, the angle of the surface relative to the horizontal build bed and the effect of any post processing/finishing. The aim of the research reported here is to understand the way these surfaces should be measured in order to characterise them. In published research to date, the surface texture is generally reported as an Ra value, measured across the lay. The appropriateness of this method for such surfaces is investigated here. A preliminary investigation was carried out on two additive manufacturing processes—selective laser melting (SLM) and electron beam melting (EBM)—focusing on the effect of build angle and post processing. The surfaces were measured using both tactile and optical methods and a range of profile and areal parameters were reported. Test coupons were manufactured at four angles relative to the horizontal plane of the powder bed using both SLM and EBM. The effect of lay—caused by the layered nature of the manufacturing process—was investigated, as was the required sample area for optical measurements. The surfaces were also measured before and after grit blasting. (paper)

  13. Constructing invariant fairness measures for surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravesen, Jens; Ungstrup, Michael

    2002-01-01

    The paper proposes a rational method to derive fairness measures for surfaces. It works in cases where isophotes, reflection lines, planar intersection curves, or other curves are used to judge the fairness of the surface. The surface fairness measure is derived by demanding that all the given cu...... of curves. Six basic third order invariants by which the fairing measures can be expressed are defined. Furthermore, the geometry of a plane intersection curve is studied, and the variation of the total, the normal, and the geodesic curvature and the geodesic torsion is determined....

  14. A siphon gage for monitoring surface-water levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCobb, T.D.; LeBlanc, D.R.; Socolow, R.S.

    1999-01-01

    A device that uses a siphon tube to establish a hydraulic connection between the bottom of an onshore standpipe and a point at the bottom of a water body was designed and tested for monitoring surface-water levels. Water is added to the standpipe to a level sufficient to drive a complete slug of water through the siphoning tube and to flush all air out of the system. The water levels in the standpipe and the water body equilibrate and provide a measurable static water surface in the standpipe. The siphon gage was designed to allow quick and accurate year-round measurements with minimal maintenance. Currently available devices for monitoring surface-water levels commonly involve time-consuming and costly installation and surveying, and the movement of reference points and the presence of ice cover in cold regions cause discontinuity and inaccuracy in the data collected. Installation and field testing of a siphon gage using 0.75-in-diameter polyethylene tubing at Ashumet Pond in Falmouth, Massachusetts, demonstrated that the siphon gage can provide long-term data with a field effort and accuracy equivalent to measurement of ground-water levels at an observation well.A device that uses a siphon tube to establish a hydraulic connection between the bottom of an onshore standpipe and a point at the bottom of a water body was designed and tested for monitoring surface-water levels. Water is added to the standpipe to a level sufficient to drive a complete slug of water through the siphoning tube and to flush all air out of the system. The water levels in the standpipe and the water body equilibrate and provide a measurable static water surface in the standpipe. The siphon gage was designed to allow quick and accurate year-round measurements with minimal maintenance. Currently available devices for monitoring surface-water levels commonly involve time-consuming and costly installation and surveying, and the movement of reference points and the presence of ice cover in cold

  15. Sea Surface Temperatures (SST): Significance and Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, S. F.

    2006-05-01

    Oceans cover 71 percent of Earth's surface and control the global climate. Quoted global mean temperature values and trends, largely based on land thermometers, differ substantially -" mainly because of uncertainties about SST. The ongoing controversy about the relative importance of natural climate changes and Anthropogenic Global Warming (AGW) revolves mainly around disparities between temperature trends of the atmosphere and surface (in the tropics and SH, i.e. mostly SST). Accurate measurement of SST is difficult. Geographic coverage is poor and there are many different techniques, each with its own problems and uncertainties: Water temperatures from buckets and ship-engine inlets; fixed and floating buoys; air temperatures from shipboard and island stations; and remote sensing from satellites using IR and microwaves. As is evident, each technique refers to a different level below the air-water interface. Drifter buoys (at around 50 cm) measure temperatures in the euphotic layers that are generally warmer than the bulk mixed layer sampled by ships (typically around 10 m). The IR emission arises from a 10-micron-thick skin that interacts dynamically with the underlying "mixed layer." The microwave data depend also on emissivity and therefore on surface roughness and sea state. SST data derived from corals provide some support for instrumental data but are not conclusive. The majority of corals show a warming trend since 1979; others show cooling or are ambiguous. There are different ways of interpreting this result. Physical optics dictates that the downwelling IR radiation from atmospheric greenhouse gases is absorbed in the first instance within the skin. Only direct measurements can establish how much of this energy is shared with the bulk mixed layer (to which the usual SST values refer.). SST controls evaporation and therefore global precipitation. SST influences tropical cyclones and sea-level rise; but there is lively debate on those issues. Changes in

  16. Application of neural network technique to determine a corrector surface for global geopotential model using GPS/levelling measurements in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshambaky, Hossam Talaat

    2018-01-01

    Owing to the appearance of many global geopotential models, it is necessary to determine the most appropriate model for use in Egyptian territory. In this study, we aim to investigate three global models, namely EGM2008, EIGEN-6c4, and GECO. We use five mathematical transformation techniques, i.e., polynomial expression, exponential regression, least-squares collocation, multilayer feed forward neural network, and radial basis neural networks to make the conversion from regional geometrical geoid to global geoid models and vice versa. From a statistical comparison study based on quality indexes between previous transformation techniques, we confirm that the multilayer feed forward neural network with two neurons is the most accurate of the examined transformation technique, and based on the mean tide condition, EGM2008 represents the most suitable global geopotential model for use in Egyptian territory to date. The final product gained from this study was the corrector surface that was used to facilitate the transformation process between regional geometrical geoid model and the global geoid model.

  17. Surface tension measurements with a smartphone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goy, Nicolas-Alexandre; Denis, Zakari; Lavaud, Maxime; Grolleau, Adrian; Dufour, Nicolas; Deblais, Antoine; Delabre, Ulysse

    2017-11-01

    Smartphones are increasingly used in higher education and at university in mechanics, acoustics, and even thermodynamics as they offer a unique way to do simple science experiments. In this article, we show how smartphones can be used in fluid mechanics to measure surface tension of various liquids, which could help students understand the concept of surface tension through simple experiments.

  18. Constructing Invariant Fairness Measures for Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravesen, Jens; Ungstrup, Michael

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a general method which from an invariant curve fairness measure constructs an invariant surface fairness measure. Besides the curve fairness measure one only needs a class of curves on the surface for which one wants to apply the curve measure. The surface measure at a point...... variation.The method is extended to the case where one considers, not the fairness of one curve, but the fairness of a one parameter family of curves. Such a family is generated by the flow of a vector field, orthogonal to the curves. The first, respectively the second order derivative along the curve...... of the size of this vector field is used as the fairness measure on the family.Six basic 3rd order invariants satisfying two quadratic equations are defined. They form a complete set in the sense that any invariant 3rd order function can be written as a function of the six basic invariants together...

  19. Preparation of stable silica surfaces for surface forces measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Huai-Yin; Mizukami, Masashi; Kurihara, Kazue

    2017-09-01

    A surface forces apparatus (SFA) measures the forces between two surfaces as a function of the surface separation distance. It is regarded as an essential tool for studying the interactions between two surfaces. However, sample surfaces used for the conventional SFA measurements have been mostly limited to thin (ca. 2-3 μm) micas, which are coated with silver layers (ca. 50 nm) on their back, due to the requirement of the distance determination by transmission mode optical interferometry called FECO (fringes of equal chromatic order). The FECO method has the advantage of determining the absolute distance, so it should be important to increase the availability of samples other than mica, which is chemically nonreactive and also requires significant efforts for cleaving. Recently, silica sheets have been occasionally used in place of mica, which increases the possibility of surface modification. However, in this case, the silver layer side of the sheet is glued on a cylindrical quartz disc using epoxy resin, which is not stable in organic solvents and can be easily swollen or dissolved. The preparation of substrates more stable under severe conditions, such as in organic solvents, is necessary for extending application of the measurement. In this study, we report an easy method for preparing stable silica layers of ca. 2 μm in thickness deposited on gold layers (41 nm)/silica discs by sputtering, then annealed to enhance the stability. The obtained silica layers were stable and showed no swelling in organic solvents such as ethanol and toluene.

  20. Fabrication and characterization of multi-level hierarchical surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhushan, Bharat; Lee, Hyungoo

    2012-01-01

    A nanostructured surface may exhibit low adhesion or high adhesion depending upon fibrillar density, and it presents the possibility of realizing eco-friendly surface structures with desirable adhesion by mimicking the mechanics of fibrillar adhesive surfaces of biological systems. The current research uses a patterning technique to fabricate smart adhesion surfaces: one-, two- and three-level hierarchical synthetic adhesive structure surfaces with various fibrillar densities and diameters. The contact angles and contact angle hysteresis were measured to characterize the wettability. A conventional and a glass ball attached to an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip were used to obtain the adhesive forces via force-distance curves and to study the buckling behavior of a single fiber on the hierarchical structures.

  1. Practical aspects of tritium measurement in ground and surface waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitzsche, O. [Technische Univ. Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Angewandte Physik; Hebert, D. [Technische Univ. Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Angewandte Physik

    1997-03-01

    Tritium measurements are a powerful tool in hydrological and hydrogeological investigations for detecting mean residence times of several water reservoirs. Due to the low tritium activities in precipitation, ground and surface waters a low level measurement is necessary. Therefore often the liquid scintillation counting after an electrolytic enrichment of water is used. In this paper some practical aspects and problems of measurement are discussed and the problem of contamination in low level laboratories is shown. (orig.)

  2. Market survey of level measurement equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    In a market survey of level measurement equipment from 42 manufacturers, which is based on different principles of measurement and which is used for different applications, the data of the various manufacturers is compiled. (orig./HP) [de

  3. Measurement of Gas-Surface Accommodation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trott, W. M.; Rader, D. J.; Castañeda, J. N.; Torczynski, J. R.; Gallis, M. A.

    2008-12-01

    Thermal accommodation coefficients have been determined for a variety of gas-surface combinations using an experimental apparatus developed to measure both the pressure dependence of the conductive heat flux and the variation of gas density between parallel plates separated by a gas-filled gap. Effects of gas composition, surface roughness and surface contamination have been examined with this system, and the behavior of gas mixtures has also been explored. Results are discussed in comparison with previous parallel-plate experimental studies as well as numerical simulations.

  4. Interpreting the probe-surface interaction of surface measuring instruments, or what is a surface?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Richard; Weckenmann, Albert; Coupland, Jeremy; Hartmann, Wito

    2014-09-01

    When using dimensional measuring instruments it is assumed that there is a property of the object, which we call surface, that is present before during and after the measurement, i.e. the surface is a fundamental property of an object that can, by appropriate means, be used to measure geometry. This paper will attempt to show that the fundamental property ‘surface’ does not exist in any simple form and that all the information we can have about a surface is the measurement data, which will include measurement uncertainty. Measurement data, or what will be referred to as the measured surface, is all that really exists. In this paper the basic physical differences between mechanically, electromagnetically and electrically measured surfaces are highlighted and discussed and accompanied by measurement results on a roughness artefact.

  5. Interpreting the probe-surface interaction of surface measuring instruments, or what is a surface?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leach, Richard; Weckenmann, Albert; Hartmann, Wito; Coupland, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    When using dimensional measuring instruments it is assumed that there is a property of the object, which we call surface, that is present before during and after the measurement, i.e. the surface is a fundamental property of an object that can, by appropriate means, be used to measure geometry. This paper will attempt to show that the fundamental property ‘surface’ does not exist in any simple form and that all the information we can have about a surface is the measurement data, which will include measurement uncertainty. Measurement data, or what will be referred to as the measured surface, is all that really exists. In this paper the basic physical differences between mechanically, electromagnetically and electrically measured surfaces are highlighted and discussed and accompanied by measurement results on a roughness artefact. (paper)

  6. Measurement of near neighbor separations of surface atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, P.I.

    Two techniques are being developed to measure the nearest neighbor distances of atoms at the surfaces of solids. Both measures extended fine structure in the excitation probability of core level electrons which are excited by an incident electron beam. This is an important problem because the structures of most surface systems are as yet unknown, even though the location of surface atoms is the basis for any quantitative understanding of the chemistry and physics of surfaces and interfaces. These methods would allow any laboratory to make in situ determinations of surface structure in conjunction with most other laboratory probes of surfaces. Each of these two techniques has different advantages; further, the combination of the two will increase confidence in the results by reducing systematic error in the data analysis

  7. Surface resistivity measurement of plasma treated polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, D.; Pigram, P.J.; Liesegang, J.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Resistivity of insulators is an important property of materials used within the integrated circuit and packaging industries. The measurement of electrical resistivity of insulator materials in the surface region in this work is interpreted through observations of surface charge decay. A self-field driven and diffusion charge transport theory is used to model the process and resistivity values obtained computationally. Data for the charge decay of surface charged samples are collected by suspending them inside a coaxial cylinder connected to an electrometer. Samples used have been low density polyethylene LDPE sheet, both pristine and surface treated. Some samples have been treated by air plasma at low vacuum pressures for different periods of time; others have been washed in ethyl acetate and then plasma treated before the resistivity measurement. The sets of resistivity measurements form the various treatments are compared below. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has also been used to investigate and account for the observed variations in surface resistivity

  8. Surface Tension Measurements with a Smartphone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goy, Nicolas-Alexandre; Denis, Zakari; Lavaud, Maxime; Grolleau, Adrian; Dufour, Nicolas; Deblais, Antoine; Delabre, Ulysse

    2017-01-01

    Smartphones are increasingly used in higher education and at university in mechanics, acoustics, and even thermodynamics as they offer a unique way to do simple science experiments. In this article, we show how smartphones can be used in fluid mechanics to measure surface tension of various liquids, which could help students understand the concept…

  9. Surface charge measurement using an electrostatic probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crichton, George C; McAllister, Iain Wilson

    1998-01-01

    During the 1960s, the first measurements of charge on dielectric surfaces using simple electrostatic probes were reported. However it is only within the last 10 years that a proper understanding of the probe response has been developed. This situation arose as a consequence of the earlier studies...

  10. Optical measurement of surface roughness in manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodmann, R.

    1984-11-01

    The measuring system described here is based on the light-scattering method, and was developed by Optische Werke G. Rodenstock, Munich. It is especially useful for rapid non-contact monitoring of surface roughness in production-related areas. This paper outlines the differences between this system and the common stylus instrument, including descriptions of some applications in industry.

  11. Surface dose extrapolation measurements with radiographic film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butson, Martin J; Cheung Tsang; Yu, Peter K N; Currie, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Assessment of surface dose delivered from radiotherapy x-ray beams for optimal results should be performed both inside and outside the prescribed treatment fields. An extrapolation technique can be used with radiographic film to perform surface dose assessment for open field high energy x-ray beams. This can produce an accurate two-dimensional map of surface dose if required. Results have shown that the surface percentage dose can be estimated within ±3% of parallel plate ionization chamber results with radiographic film using a series of film layers to produce an extrapolated result. Extrapolated percentage dose assessment for 10 cm, 20 cm and 30 cm square fields was estimated to be 15% ± 2%, 29% ± 3% and 38% ± 3% at the central axis and relatively uniform across the treatment field. The corresponding parallel plate ionization chamber measurements are 16%, 27% and 37%, respectively. Surface doses are also measured outside the treatment field which are mainly due to scattered electron contamination. To achieve this result, film calibration curves must be irradiated to similar x-ray field sizes as the experimental film to minimize quantitative variations in film optical density caused by varying x-ray spectrum with field size. (note)

  12. Novel surface measurement system reading cost savings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sword, M.

    1996-05-01

    A new state-of-the-art data acquisition system for the oil and natural gas industries is being marketed by OPSCO`92 Industries Ltd. The unit is portable, it measures surface data which is calibrated to bottom-hole conditions and designed to measure temperature and pressure information without the necessity of sending testing equipment downhole. The Surface Data System (SDS) uses silicon-crystal technology, is mounted in a suitcase size carrying case, and runs off a 12-volt battery enclosure which can be backed up by a small solar panel. The first generation system can handle 16 different channels of information input on a laptop computer. Pressure, pressure differential, temperature, frequency and pulse signals for flow meter measurements are handled by standard sensors. Areas of application include build-up and fall-off tests, pipeline evaluation, pre-frac tests, underbalanced drilling and gas well evaluation. 1 fig., 1 photo.

  13. Evaluation of hydrogen and oxygen impurity levels on silicon surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenny, M.J.; Wielunski, L.S.; Netterfield, R.P.; Martin, P.J.; Leistner, A. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Lindfield, NSW (Australia). Div. of Applied Physics

    1996-12-31

    This paper reports on surface analytical techniques used to quantify surface concentrations of impurities such as oxygen and hydrogen. The following analytical techniques were used: Rutherford and Backscattering, elastic recoil detection, time-of-flight SIMS, spectroscopic ellipsometry, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results have shown a spread in thickness of oxide layer, ranging from unmeasurable to 1.6 nm. The data must be considered as preliminary at this stage, but give some insight into the suitability of the techniques and a general idea of the significance of impurities at the monolayer level. These measurements have been carried out on a small number of silicon surfaces both semiconductor grade <111> crystalline material and silicon which has been used in sphere fabrication. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  14. Minimizing Uncertainty in Cryogenic Surface Figure Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Peter; Mink, Ronald G.; Chambers, John; Robinson, F. David; Content, David; Davila, Pamela

    2005-01-01

    A new facility at the Goddard Space Flight Center is designed to measure with unusual accuracy the surface figure of mirrors at cryogenic temperatures down to 12 K. The facility is currently configured for spherical mirrors with a radius of curvature (ROC) of 600 mm, and apertures of about 150 mm or less. The goals of the current experiment were to 1) Obtain the best possible estimate of test mirror surface figure, S(x,y) at 87 K and 20 K; 2) Obtain the best estimate of the cryo-change, Delta (x,y): the change in surface figure between room temperature and the two cryo-temperatures; and 3) Determine the uncertainty of these measurements, using the definitions and guidelines of the ISO Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement. A silicon mirror was tested, and the cry-change from room temperature to 20K was found to be 3.7 nm rms, with a standard uncertainty of 0.23 nm in the rms statistic. Both the cryo-change figure and the uncertainty are among the lowest such figures yet published. This report describes the facilities, experimental methods, and uncertainty analysis of the measurements.

  15. Rivited panel surface measurement using photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrick, W. D.; Lobb, V. B.; Lansing, F. L.; Stoller, F. W.

    1986-01-01

    Two riveted antenna panels on rings number 3 and 9 were removed from the 34m antenna at DSS-15, fixed in the leveled position and the surface was photographed indoors. The results from this pilot photogrammetric demonstration and diagnostics of panel surface contours, are presented. The photogrammetric network for each panel incorporated eight photographs, two from each of four camera stations and observed over 200 targets. The accuracy (1 sigma) of the XYZ coordinates for the error ellipsoids was + or - 0.013 mm (0.0005 inch). This level of precision relative to the object size corresponds roughly to 1 part in 250,000 which is superior to conventional dial sweep-arm template techniques by at least a factor of 4.

  16. Radioimmunoassay to quantitatively measure cell surface immunoglobulins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishman, E.C.; Jewell, W.R.

    1975-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay techniques developed to quantitatively measure the presence of immunoglobulins on the surface of cells, is described. The amount of immunoglobulins found on different tumor cells varied from 200 to 1140 ng/10 6 cells. Determination of immunoglobulins on the peripheral lymphocytes obtained from different cancer patients varied between 340 to 1040 ng/10 6 cells. Cultured tumor cells, on the other hand, were found to contain negligible quantities of human IgG [pt

  17. Description of measurement techniques for surface contaminations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourrez, E.

    2001-01-01

    The needs of evaluation of the surface contamination are numerous in the processes of production and management of radioactive waste. The market of radiation protection materials proposes a lot of devices answering to the almost all these needs. These device have however their conditions and particular limits for use. To realize correct measurements it is use the device, the technique and the methods adapted to the need, by taking into account the optimization of economical aspect. (N.C.)

  18. Optical remote measurement of liquid level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanbing; Yang, Yong-Hua

    1993-09-01

    In this paper, we introduce an approach to the remote measurement of liquid level in oil storage tank.The measurement is made by the method of CW rangefinding. The design, performance and limitation of the system are discussed with a view to a practical working system.

  19. Silicon surface barrier detectors used for liquid hydrogen density measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, D. T.; Milam, J. K.; Winslett, H. B.

    1968-01-01

    Multichannel system employing a radioisotope radiation source, strontium-90, radiation detector, and a silicon surface barrier detector, measures the local density of liquid hydrogen at various levels in a storage tank. The instrument contains electronic equipment for collecting the density information, and a data handling system for processing this information.

  20. Fermi level on hydrogen terminated diamond surfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rezek, Bohuslav; Saurer, C.; Nebel, C. E.; Stutzmann, M.; Ristein, J.; Ley, L.; Snidero, E.; Bergonzo, P.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 14 (2003), s. 2266-2268 ISSN 0003-6951 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) HPRN-CT-1999-00139 Grant - others:DFC(DE) NE524-2 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : atomic force microscope(AFM) * Kelvin probe experiments * diamond surface Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.049, year: 2003

  1. Measuring the Valence of Nanocrystal Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, Jonathan Scharle [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2016-11-30

    The goal of this project is to understand and control the interplay between nanocrystal stoichiometry, surface ligand binding and exchange, and the optoelectronic properties of semiconductor nanocrystals in solution and in thin solid films. We pursued three research directions with this goal in mind: 1) We characterized nanocrystal stoichiometry and its influence on the binding of L-type and X-type ligands, including the thermodynamics of binding and the kinetics of ligand exchange. 2) We developed a quantitative understanding of the relationship between surface ligand passivation and photoluminescence quantum yield. 3) We developed methods to replace the organic ligands on the nanocrystal with halide ligands and controllably deposit these nanocrystals into thin films, where electrical measurements were used to investigate the electrical transport and internanocrystal electronic coupling.

  2. Estimating the breast surface using UWB microwave monostatic backscatter measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, David W; Shea, Jacob D; Madsen, Ernest L; Frank, Gary R; Van Veen, Barry D; Hagness, Susan C

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for estimating the location of the breast surface from scattered ultrawideband (UWB) microwave signals recorded across an antenna array. Knowing the location of the breast surface can improve imaging performance if incorporated as a priori information into recently proposed microwave imaging algorithms. These techniques transmit low-power microwaves into the breast using an antenna array, which in turn measures the scattered microwave signals for the purpose of detecting anomalies or changes in the dielectric properties of breast tissue. Our proposed surface identification algorithm consists of three procedures, the first of which estimates M points on the breast surface given M channels of measured microwave backscatter data. The second procedure applies interpolation and extrapolation to these M points to generate N > M points that are approximately uniformly distributed over the breast surface, while the third procedure uses these N points to generate a 3-D estimated breast surface. Numerical as well as experimental tests indicate that the maximum absolute error in the estimated surface generated by the algorithm is on the order of several millimeters. An error analysis conducted for a basic microwave radar imaging algorithm (least-squares narrowband beamforming) indicates that this level of error is acceptable. A key advantage of the algorithm is that it uses the same measured signals that are used for UWB microwave imaging, thereby minimizing patient scan time and avoiding the need for additional hardware.

  3. Lifetime measurements of excited Co I levels

    CERN Document Server

    Klotz, W D; Gobel, L H

    1977-01-01

    In the region of 3500 AA the lifetimes of eight excited Cobalt I levels have been measured by means of the zero field level crossing method. The measured lifetimes belong to the odd configurations 3d/sup 7/4s4p and 3d/sup 8/4p and are of the accuracy of about 5%. The hyperfine structure of levels with I not=J has to be taken into account in evaluating lifetimes from level crossing data, because the nuclear spin of the natural isotope /sup 59/Co is I=7/2. Therefore the influence of the line profile of the exciting resonance lines on the lifetimes has been investigated. The results are compared with those of other authors. Furthermore absolute oscillator strengths were calculated with known branching ratios and a new absolute scale has been established. (23 refs).

  4. Monitoring sea level and sea surface temperature trends from ERS satellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Knudsen, Per; Beckley, B.

    2002-01-01

    Data from the two ESA satellites ERS-1 and ERS-2 are used in global and regional analysis of sea level and sea surface temperature trends over the last, 7.8 years. T he ERS satellites and in the future the ENVISAT satellite provide unique opportunity for monitoring both changes in sea level and sea...... surface temperature as these satellites are equipped with an altimeter to measure sea level height as well as an along track scanning radiometer (ATSR) to measure the sea surface temperature. Consistent increase in both sea level and sea surface temperatures are found in most parts of the Atlantic Ocean...

  5. Evaluation of Arctic broadband surface radiation measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Matsui

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The Arctic is a challenging environment for making in-situ surface radiation measurements. A standard suite of radiation sensors is typically designed to measure incoming and outgoing shortwave (SW and thermal infrared, or longwave (LW, radiation. Enhancements may include various sensors for measuring irradiance in narrower bandwidths. Many solar radiation/thermal infrared flux sensors utilize protective glass domes and some are mounted on complex mechanical platforms (solar trackers that keep sensors and shading devices trained on the sun along its diurnal path. High quality measurements require striking a balance between locating stations in a pristine undisturbed setting free of artificial blockage (such as from buildings and towers and providing accessibility to allow operators to clean and maintain the instruments. Three significant sources of erroneous data in the Arctic include solar tracker malfunctions, rime/frost/snow deposition on the protective glass domes of the radiometers and operational problems due to limited operator access in extreme weather conditions. In this study, comparisons are made between the global and component sum (direct [vertical component] + diffuse SW measurements. The difference between these two quantities (that theoretically should be zero is used to illustrate the magnitude and seasonality of arctic radiation flux measurement problems. The problem of rime/frost/snow deposition is investigated in more detail for one case study utilizing both SW and LW measurements. Solutions to these operational problems that utilize measurement redundancy, more sophisticated heating and ventilation strategies and a more systematic program of operational support and subsequent data quality protocols are proposed.

  6. Calibration of areal surface topography measuring instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seewig, J.; Eifler, M.

    2017-06-01

    The ISO standards which are related to the calibration of areal surface topography measuring instruments are the ISO 25178-6xx series which defines the relevant metrological characteristics for the calibration of different measuring principles and the ISO 25178-7xx series which defines the actual calibration procedures. As the field of areal measurement is however not yet fully standardized, there are still open questions to be addressed which are subject to current research. Based on this, selected research results of the authors in this area are presented. This includes the design and fabrication of areal material measures. For this topic, two examples are presented with the direct laser writing of a stepless material measure for the calibration of the height axis which is based on the Abbott- Curve and the manufacturing of a Siemens star for the determination of the lateral resolution limit. Based on these results, as well a new definition for the resolution criterion, the small scale fidelity, which is still under discussion, is presented. Additionally, a software solution for automated calibration procedures is outlined.

  7. Torsional ultrasonic wave based level measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, David E [Oak Ridge, TN; Kisner, Roger A [Knoxville, TN

    2012-07-10

    A level measurement system suitable for use in a high temperature and pressure environment to measure the level of coolant fluid within the environment, the system including a volume of coolant fluid located in a coolant region of the high temperature and pressure environment and having a level therein; an ultrasonic waveguide blade that is positioned within the desired coolant region of the high temperature and pressure environment; a magnetostrictive electrical assembly located within the high temperature and pressure environment and configured to operate in the environment and cooperate with the waveguide blade to launch and receive ultrasonic waves; and an external signal processing system located outside of the high temperature and pressure environment and configured for communicating with the electrical assembly located within the high temperature and pressure environment.

  8. Quadrotor helicopter for surface hydrological measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, C.; Tauro, F.; Porfiri, M.; Grimaldi, S.

    2013-12-01

    Surface hydrological measurements are typically performed through user-assisted and intrusive field methodologies which can be inadequate to monitor remote and extended areas. In this poster, we present the design and development of a quadrotor helicopter equipped with digital acquisition system and image calibration units for surface flow measurements. This custom-built aerial vehicle is engineered to be lightweight, low-cost, highly customizable, and stable to guarantee optimal image quality. Quadricopter stability guarantees minimal vibrations during image acquisition and, therefore, improved accuracy in flow velocity estimation through large scale particle image velocimetry algorithms or particle tracking procedures. Stability during the vehicle pitching and rolling is achieved by adopting large arm span and high-wing configurations. Further, the vehicle framework is composed of lightweight aluminum and durable carbon fiber for optimal resilience. The open source Ardupilot microcontroller is used for remote control of the quadricopter. The microcontroller includes an inertial measurement unit (IMU) equipped with accelerometers and gyroscopes for stable flight through feedback control. The vehicle is powered by a 3 cell (11.1V) 3000 mAh Lithium-polymer battery. Electronic equipment and wiring are hosted into the hollow arms and on several carbon fiber platforms in the waterproof fuselage. Four 35A high-torque motors are supported at the far end of each arm with 10 × 4.7 inch propellers. Energy dissipation during landing is accomplished by four pivoting legs that, through the use of shock absorbers, prevent the impact energy from affecting the frame thus causing significant damage. The data capturing system consists of a GoPro Hero3 camera and in-house built camera gimbal and shock absorber damping device. The camera gimbal, hosted below the vehicle fuselage, is engineered to maintain the orthogonality of the camera axis with respect to the water surface by

  9. Acoustics and Surface Pressure Measurements from Tandem Cylinder Configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Lockard, David P.; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Stead, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic and unsteady surface pressure measurements from two cylinders in tandem configurations were acquired to study the effect of spacing, surface trip and freestream velocity on the radiated noise. The Reynolds number ranged from 1.15x10(exp 5) to 2.17x10(exp 5), and the cylinder spacing varied between 1.435 and 3.7 cylinder diameters. The acoustic and surface pressure spectral characteristics associated with the different flow regimes produced by the cylinders' wake interference were identified. The dependence of the Strouhal number, peak Sound Pressure Level and spanwise coherence on cylinder spacing and flow velocity was examined. Directivity measurements were performed to determine how well the dipole assumption for the radiation of vortex shedding noise holds for the largest and smallest cylinder spacing tested.

  10. A new approach of surface flux measurements using DTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Emmerik, T. H. M.; Wenker, K. J. R.; Rimmer, A.; de Jong, S. A. P.; Lechinsky, Y.; van de Giesen, N. C.

    2012-04-01

    Estimation of surface fluxes is a difficult task, especially over lakes. Determining latent heat flux (evaporation), sensible heat flux and ground heat flux involves measurements and (or calculations) of net radiation, air temperature, water temperature, wind speed and relative humidity. This research presents a new method to measure surface fluxes by means of Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS). From 0.5 m above lake level to 1.5 m under lake level DTS was applied to measure temperature. Using a PVC hyperboloid construction, a floating standalone measuring device was developed. This new setup distinguished itself by the open construction, so it is almost insensitive to direct radiation. While most of the lake ground heat changes occur very close to the lake surface, most measuring methods only obtain rough results. With this construction it was possible to create a spiral shaped fiber-optic cable setup, with which a vertical spatial resolution of 0.02 m and a temporal resolution of 1 min was obtained. The new method was tested in the deep Lake Kinneret (Israel) from 6 October, 2011 to 11 October, 2011and in the shallow Lake Binaba (Ghana) from 24 October, 2011 to 28 October, 2011. This study shows that with the developed method it is possible to capture the energy fluxes within the top water layer with a high resolution. When the old low resolution method was compared with the new high resolution method, it could be concluded that the impact of the surface fluxes in the upper layer is high on the energy balance on a daily scale. During the measuring period it was possible to use the temperature measured by the DTS to determine the sensible heat flux, the latent heat flux and the ground heat flux of both lakes.

  11. Effects of microelectronics on industrial level measuring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaudel, D.E.

    1979-01-01

    Microelectronic elements and production technologies have begun to change industrial level measurement, and this trend will continue. Spectacular breakthroughs cannot be expected, due to the major demand of reliability and to administrative constraints. The demand for transducers has increased with the advance of low-cost computer hardware. Electronics makes well-known method of measurements more universally applicable; it helps to realize new methods, and to design multifunctional transducers which always give the necessary signal for process guidance. The effects on society and environment are wholly positive: More and better measuring technologies permit a better utilisation of raw materials and energies, help to prevent environmental damage, and to raise the standard of living. Negative results are not to be expected on this sector. (orig./RW) [de

  12. CMS High Level Trigger Timing Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, Clint

    2015-01-01

    The two-level trigger system employed by CMS consists of the Level 1 (L1) Trigger, which is implemented using custom-built electronics, and the High Level Trigger (HLT), a farm of commercial CPUs running a streamlined version of the offline CMS reconstruction software. The operational L1 output rate of 100 kHz, together with the number of CPUs in the HLT farm, imposes a fundamental constraint on the amount of time available for the HLT to process events. Exceeding this limit impacts the experiment's ability to collect data efficiently. Hence, there is a critical need to characterize the performance of the HLT farm as well as the algorithms run prior to start up in order to ensure optimal data taking. Additional complications arise from the fact that the HLT farm consists of multiple generations of hardware and there can be subtleties in machine performance. We present our methods of measuring the timing performance of the CMS HLT, including the challenges of making such measurements. Results for the performance of various Intel Xeon architectures from 2009-2014 and different data taking scenarios are also presented. (paper)

  13. Measuring receptive collocational competence across proficiency levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Déogratias Nizonkiza

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates, (i English as Foreign Language (EFL learners’ receptive collocational knowledge growth in relation to their linguistic proficiency level; (ii how much receptive collocational knowledge is acquired as proficiency develops; and (iii the extent to which receptive knowledge of collocations of EFL learners varies across word frequency bands. A proficiency measure and a collocation test were administered to English majors at the University of Burundi. Results of the study suggest that receptive collocational competence develops alongside EFL learners’ linguistic proficiency; which lends empirical support to Gyllstad (2007, 2009 and Author (2011 among others, who reported similar findings. Furthermore, EFL learners’ collocations growth seems to be quantifiable wherein both linguistic proficiency level and word frequency occupy a crucial role. While more gains in terms of collocations that EFL learners could potentially add as a result of change in proficiency are found at lower levels of proficiency; collocations of words from more frequent word bands seem to be mastered first, and more gains are found at more frequent word bands. These results confirm earlier findings on the non-linearity nature of vocabulary growth (cf. Meara 1996 and the fundamental role played by frequency in word knowledge for vocabulary in general (Nation 1983, 1990, Nation and Beglar 2007, which are extended here to collocations knowledge.

  14. Optical triangulation method for height measurements on water surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Hans-Gerd; Hentschel, Bernd; Schreiber, Frank

    2003-01-01

    Optical triangulation methods based on a laser light sheet and a camera are frequently used as a surface measurement technique in a wide range of applications. They allow for the fast accurate determination of height profiles, based on relatively simple hardware and software configurations. Moreover, they can be implemented very efficiently and are especially suited for measurements on moving objects such as products on an assembly line. The study presented in the paper describes the adaptation of laser light sheet optical triangulation techniques to the task of water level profile measurements in hydromechanics experimental facilities. The properties of water surfaces necessitate several modifications of optical triangulation techniques to make them applicable: The mirror-like reflection properties of water surfaces form a contradiction to the assumption of diffuse reflection, on which standard light sheet triangulation techniques are based; this problem can be circumvented by using a diffuse reflecting projection plane to capture the mirror-like reflection of the laser line from the water surface. Due to the angle of incidence law, however, water surface tilts caused by waves will usually cause a strong degradation of the quality of the results when using reflected light; this effect can largely be compensated by processing max-store images derived from short image sequences rather than single images. These extensions of optical triangulation turned out to be crucial for the applicability of the method on water surfaces. Besides the theoretical concept and a sensitivity analysis of the method, a system configuration is outlined, and the results of a number of practical experiments are shown and discussed.

  15. [Measuring microhardness of laser exposed tooth surface].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florin, R; Herrmann, C; Bernhardt, W

    1990-02-01

    In principle it is possible to homogenize the enamel surface by melting structural elements with the continuous wave CO2 laser. Using the precision instrument NEOPHOT 2 (Carl Zeiss JENA) the microhardness of extracted laserexposed premolares were tested so as to clarify the functional strain capasity and the mechanical characteristics of laserexposed regions of enamel surfaces. The proven higher hardness in the centre of the laserinduced fusing zones (in comparison with adjacent enamel) objectify an attainable refining of the enamel surface that probably causes an increase in the caries-preventive resistance.

  16. Surface texturing of crystalline silicon and effective area measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tietun; Chen, Dong; Chui, Rongqiang

    2000-11-01

    In this paper, the surface area of solar cell is determined by the capacitance measurements of MOS structure. The texture etching technology can be controlled according to the change of silicon surface area, furthermore, the textured silicon surface and interface characteristic of solar cell can be studied by measuring the relationship of capacitance and voltage for MOS structure.

  17. Characterization of silicon surface states at clean and copper contaminated condition via transient capacitance measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lihui; Xie, Meng; Yu, Xuegong; Yang, Deren

    2017-10-01

    Silicon surface is one of the dominant recombination sites for silicon solar cells. Generally, the recombination ability of silicon surface is characterized in terms of surface recombination velocity. However, silicon surface actually contain a series of donor and acceptor levels across the silicon band gap, and therefore the surface recombination velocity is too general to provide detailed information of the silicon surface states. In this paper, we used the measured transient capacitance data to extract the detailed information (like defect energy levels, defect densities, and capture cross sections) of the silicon surface states. Furthermore, the influence of copper contamination on silicon surface states was examined, and it was found that copper contamination can change the localized energy levels of "clean" silicon surface states to the band-like energy levels, meanwhile the defect densities and capture cross sections were both enlarged.

  18. High speed machined surface roughness measurement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surface roughness monitoring techniques using non-contact methods based on computer vision technology are becoming popular and cost effective. An evolvable hardware configuration using reconfigurable Xilinx Virtex FPGA xcv1000 architecture with capability to compensate for poor illumination environment is ...

  19. The prediction of BRDFs from surface profile measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Church, E.L.; Takacs, P.Z.; Leonard, T.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses methods of predicting the BRDF of smooth surfaces from profile measurements of their surface finish. The conversion of optical profile data to the BRDF at the same wavelength is essentially independent of scattering models, while the conversion of mechanical measurements, and wavelength scaling in general, are model dependent. Procedures are illustrated for several surfaces, including two from the recent HeNe BRDF round robin, and results are compared with measured data. Reasonable agreement is found except for surfaces which involve significant scattering from isolated surface defects which are poorly sampled in the profile data

  20. Microthermal Instrument for Measuring Surface Layer Seeing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue-Bao; Zheng, Yan-Fang; Deng, Lin Hua; Xu, Guang

    2012-02-01

    Microthermal fluctuations are introduced by atmospheric turbulence very near the ground. In order to detect microthermal fluctuations at Fuxian Solar Observatory (FSO), a microthermal instrument has been developed. The microthermal instrument consists of a microthermal sensor, which is based on a Wheatstone bridge circuit and uses fine tungsten filaments as resistance temperature detectors, an associated signal processing unit, and a data collection, & communication subsystem. In this paper, after a brief introduction to surface layer seeing, we discuss the instrumentation behind the microthermal detector we have developed and then present the results obtained. The results of the evaluation indicate that the effect of the turbulent surface boundary layer to astronomical seeing would become sufficiently small when installing a telescope at a height of 16m or higher from the ground at FSO.

  1. Surface Temperature Measurement Using Hematite Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencic, Timothy J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Systems and methods that are capable of measuring temperature via spectrophotometry principles are discussed herein. These systems and methods are based on the temperature dependence of the reflection spectrum of hematite. Light reflected from these sensors can be measured to determine a temperature, based on changes in the reflection spectrum discussed herein.

  2. The impact of accelerometer mounting methods on the level of vibrations recorded at ground surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Czech

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of field research based on the measurements of accelerations recorded at ground surface. The source of the vibration characterized by high repetition rate of pulse parameters was light falling weight deflectometer ZFG-01. Measurements of vibrations have been carried out using top quality high-precision measuring system produced by Brüel&Kiær. Accelerometers were mounted on a sandy soil surface at the measuring points located radially at 5-m and 10-m distances from the source of vibration. The paper analyses the impact that the method of mounting accelerometers on the ground has on the level of the recorded values of accelerations of vibrations. It has been shown that the method of attaching the sensor to the surface of the ground is crucial for the credibility of the performed measurements.[b]Keywords[/b]: geotechnics, surface vibrations, ground, vibration measurement

  3. Experimental study on source efficiencies for estimating surface contamination level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichiji, Takeshi; Ogino, Haruyuki

    2008-01-01

    Source efficiency was measured experimentally for various materials, such as metals, nonmetals, flooring materials, sheet materials and other materials, contaminated by alpha and beta emitter radioactive nuclides. Five nuclides, 147 Pm, 60 Co, 137 Cs, 204 Tl and 90 Sr- 90 Y, were used as the beta emitters, and one nuclide 241 Am was used as the alpha emitter. The test samples were prepared by placing drops of the radioactive standardized solutions uniformly on the various materials using an automatic quantitative dispenser system from Musashi Engineering, Inc. After placing drops of the radioactive standardized solutions, the test materials were allowed to dry for more than 12 hours in a draft chamber with a hood. The radioactivity of each test material was about 30 Bq. Beta rays or alpha rays from the test materials were measured with a 2-pi gas flow proportional counter from Aloka Co., Ltd. The source efficiencies of the metals, nonmetals and sheet materials were higher than 0.5 in the case of contamination by the 137 Cs, 204 Tl and 90 Sr- 90 Y radioactive standardized solutions, higher than 0.4 in the case of contamination by the 60 Co radioactive standardized solution, and higher than 0.25 in the case of contamination by the alpha emitter the 241 Am radioactive standardized solution. These values were higher than those given in Japanese Industrial Standards (JIS) documents. In contrast, the source efficiencies of some permeable materials were lower than those given in JIS documents, because source efficiency varies depending on whether the materials or radioactive sources are wet or dry. This study provides basic data on source efficiency, which is useful for estimating the surface contamination level of materials. (author)

  4. Immobilized enzymes: understanding enzyme - surface interactions at the molecular level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoarau, Marie; Badieyan, Somayesadat; Marsh, E Neil G

    2017-11-22

    Enzymes immobilized on solid supports have important and industrial and medical applications. However, their uses are limited by the significant reductions in activity and stability that often accompany the immobilization process. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of the molecular level interactions between proteins and supporting surfaces that contribute to changes in stability and activity. This understanding has been facilitated by the application of various surface-sensitive spectroscopic techniques that allow the structure and orientation of enzymes at the solid/liquid interface to be probed, often with monolayer sensitivity. An appreciation of the molecular interactions between enzyme and surface support has allowed the surface chemistry and method of enzyme attachement to be fine-tuned such that activity and stability can be greatly enhanced. These advances suggest that a much wider variety of enzymes may eventually be amenable to immobilization as green catalysts.

  5. Origin of metallic surface core-level shifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldén, Magnus; Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Abrikosov, I. A.

    1995-01-01

    The unique property of the open 4f energy shell in the lanthanide metals is used to show that the initial-state energy shift gives an insufficient description of surface core-level shifts. Instead a treatment, which fully includes the final-state screening, account for the experimentally observed...

  6. Interferometric Surface Relief Measurements with Subnano/Picometer Height Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sysoev, Evgeny; Kosolobov, Sergey; Kulikov, Rodion; Latyshev, Alexander; Sitnikov, Sergey; Vykhristyuk, Ignat

    2017-10-01

    We present an optical interference system nanoprofiler MNP-1 designed for high-precision noncontact measurement of surface relief with subnanometer resolution (root mean square of measured values), based on partial scanning of interference signal. The paper describes the construction of the measurement system with Linnik interferometer and the algorithm for nanorelief surface reconstruction. Experimental measurement results of silicon sample with profile height of surface structure of one interatomic distance obtained by MNP-1 are shown. It was proposed to use an atomically smooth surface as the reference mirror in the interferometer MNP-1 that allowed us to measure monatomic steps of the presented silicon sample. Monatomic steps of 0.31 nm in height on silicon (111) surface were measured with resolution up to 5 pm.

  7. Improving sea level record in arctic using ENVISAT altimeter measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibaut, Pierre; Poisson, Jean-Christophe; Hoang, Duc; Quartly, Graham; Kurekin, Andrey

    2015-04-01

    The Arctic is an important component of the climate system whose exact influence on ocean circulation is still poorly understood today. This region is also very sensitive to global warming and some direct consequences like melting ice are particularly visible. In this context, extending the knowledge of the sea level variability as far as possible in the Arctic Ocean is a valuable contribution to the understanding of rapid changes occurring in this region. Due to a particularly complex and unstable environment, ocean observation is challenging considering that sea level measurements can be widely corrupted by the presence of sea ice in the altimeter footprint. In the framework of the ESA Sea Level Climate Change Initiative project, new algorithms have been developed and implemented to process 10 years of ENVISAT altimeter data over the Arctic Ocean and to improve the sea level measurement in this region. The new processing chain contains three main steps. The first task consists in identifying altimetric returns for which a standard proven estimation processing may be used, and in flagging those requiring more sophisticated processing. This will include introducing a novel approach that uses the relationship with neighbouring waveforms to aid in the identification of key reflecting surfaces. The second task consists in applying estimators that performs better in situations where sea-ice covers partially or totally the observed surface. The last task consists in investigating the transition zones to make sure that no artificial discontinuities are introduced by the different processing and to reduce these discontinuities. We propose in this talk, to explain and illustrate the different steps of this study and to show important figures of improvement regarding the estimation of sea level variability in the Arctic Ocean.

  8. Radioactivity Measurements on Glazed Ceramic Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Hobbs, Thomas G.

    2000-01-01

    A variety of commonly available household and industrial ceramic items and some specialty glass materials were assayed by alpha pulse counting and ion chamber voltage measurements for radioactivity concentrations. Identification of radionuclides in some of the items was performed by gamma spectroscopy. The samples included tableware, construction tiles and decorative tiles, figurines, and other products with a clay based composition. The concentrations of radioactivity ranged from near backgr...

  9. Piezotransistive GaN microcantilevers based surface work function measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayram, Ferhat; Khan, Digangana; Li, Hongmei; Maksudul Hossain, Md.; Koley, Goutam

    2018-04-01

    Surface work function (SWF) measurements using a piezotransistive III–nitride cantilever has been demonstrated on multiple surfaces. The minimum detectable surface potential change of 10 mV was achieved with a signal to noise ratio of 3. This method was applied to determine the surface potential changes due to exposure of 5 ppm NO2 in graphene and In2O3 thin film, simultaneously with conductivity changes. The potentiometric measurements yielded 100 and 80 mV potential changes in SWFs of graphene and In2O3 respectively, which matches very well with experimental data published earlier indicating the efficacy of this readily miniaturizable measurement technique.

  10. Comparative analyses of measured evapotranspiration for various land surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suat Irmak

    2016-01-01

    There is a significant lack of continuously measured ET data for multiple land surfaces in the same area to be able to make comparisons of water use rates of different agroecosystems. This research presentation will provide continuous evapotranspiration and other surface energy balance variables measured above multiple land use and management practices.

  11. Specific surface as a measure of burial diagenesis of chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borre, Mai Kirstine; Lind, Ida; Mortensen, Jeanette

    1997-01-01

    the relative importance of the three processes, simple models have been established to illustrate changes in pore space, particle size and -shape and the resulting trends in the specific surface. Specific surface and porosity of the samples were measured using image analysis on electron micrographs of polished...... sections. Using these simple models, trends in the measured specific surface can be interpred throughout the majority of the geological sequence....

  12. Development of material measures for performance verifying surface topography measuring instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leach, Richard; Giusca, Claudiu; Rickens, Kai; Riemer, Oltmann; Rubert, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The development of two irregular-geometry material measures for performance verifying surface topography measuring instruments is described. The material measures are designed to be used to performance verify tactile and optical areal surface topography measuring instruments. The manufacture of the material measures using diamond turning followed by nickel electroforming is described in detail. Measurement results are then obtained using a traceable stylus instrument and a commercial coherence scanning interferometer, and the results are shown to agree to within the measurement uncertainties. The material measures are now commercially available as part of a suite of material measures aimed at the calibration and performance verification of areal surface topography measuring instruments

  13. Radioactivity Measurements on Glazed Ceramic Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, T G

    2000-01-01

    A variety of commonly available household and industrial ceramic items and some specialty glass materials were assayed by alpha pulse counting and ion chamber voltage measurements for radioactivity concentrations. Identification of radionuclides in some of the items was performed by gamma spectroscopy. The samples included tableware, construction tiles and decorative tiles, figurines, and other products with a clay based composition. The concentrations of radioactivity ranged from near background to about four orders of magnitude higher. Almost every nuclide identification test demonstrated some radioactivity content from one or more of the naturally occurring radionuclide series of thorium or uranium. The glazes seemed to contribute most of the activity, although a sample of unglazed pottery greenware showed some activity. Samples of glazing paints and samples of deliberately doped glass from the World War II era were included in the test, as was a section of foam filled poster board. A glass disc with known (232)Th radioactivity concentration was cast for use as a calibration source. The results from the two assay methods are compared, and a projection of sensitivity from larger electret ion chamber devices is presented.

  14. Trace-level mercury removal from surface water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klasson, K.T.; Bostick, D.T.

    1998-01-01

    Many sorbents have been developed for the removal of mercury and heavy metals from waters; however, most of the data published thus far do not address the removal of mercury to the target levels represented in this project. The application to which these sorbents are targeted for use is the removal of mercury from microgram-per-liter levels to low nanogram-per-liter levels. Sorbents with thiouronium, thiol, amine, sulfur, and proprietary functional groups were selected for these studies. Mercury was successfully removed from surface water via adsorption onto Ionac SR-4 and Mersorb resins to levels below the target goal of 12 ng/L in batch studies. A thiol-based resin performed the best, indicating that over 200,000 volumes of water could be treated with one volume of resin. The cost of the resin is approximately $0.24 per 1,000 gal of water

  15. Surface drainage in leveled land: Implication of slope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoniony S. Winkler

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In the lowlands of Rio Grande do Sul, land leveling is mostly carried out with no slope for the purpose of rice production. In this environment, soils with a low hydraulic conductivity are predominant owing to the presence of a practically impermeable B-horizon near the surface. Land leveling leads to soil accommodation resulting in the formation of depressions where water accumulates after heavy rainfalls, subsequently leading to problems with crops implanted in succession to rice, such as soybeans. The objective of this research was to quantify the areas and volumes of water accumulation in soil as a function of the slope of land leveling. Five typical leveled lowland areas were studied as a part of this research. The original areas presented slopes of 0, 0.20, 0.25, 0.28 and 0.40%, which were used to generate new digital elevation models with slopes between 0 and 0.5%. These newly generated digital models were used to map the depressions with surface water storage. In conclusion, land leveling with slopes higher than 0.1% is recommended to minimize problems with superficial water storage in rice fields.

  16. SGP Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC): Measurement Platforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MA Miller; R Avissar; LK Berg; SA Edgerton; ML Fischer; TJ Jackson; B. Kustas; PJ Lamb; G McFarquhar; Q Min; B Schmid; MS Torn; DD Tuner

    2007-06-01

    The Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) will be conducted from June 8 to June 30, 2007, at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. Data will be collected using eight aircraft equipped with a variety of specialized sensors, four specially instrumented surface sites, and two prototype surface radar systems. The architecture of CLASIC includes a high-altitude surveillance aircraft and enhanced vertical thermodynamic and wind profile measurements that will characterize the synoptic scale structure of the clouds and the land surface within the ACRF SGP site. Mesoscale and microscale structures will be sampled with a variety of aircraft, surface, and radar observations. An overview of the measurement platforms that will be used during the CLASIC are described in this report. The coordination of measurements, especially as it relates to aircraft flight plans, will be discussed in the CLASIC Implementation Plan.

  17. A Study on 3-Dimensional Surface Measurement using Confocal Principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Young June; Song, Dae Ho; You, Weon Jae

    2001-01-01

    In modern industry, the accuracy and the sulfate-finish requirements for machined parts have been becoming ever more stringent. In addition, the measurement and understanding of surface topography is rapidly attracting the attention of the physicist and chemist as well as the engineer. Optical measuring method is used in vibration measurement, crack and defect detection with the advent of opto-mechatronics, and it is expected to play an important role in surface topography. In this study, the principle of confocal microscope is described, and the advanced 3-D surface measuring system that has better performance than the traditional confocal microscope is developed. Suitable fixtures arc developed and integrated with the computer system for generating 3-D surface and form data. Software for data acquisition and analysis of various parameters in surface geometrical features has been developed

  18. Measured ground-surface movements, Cerro Prieto geothermal field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massey, B.L.

    1981-01-01

    The Cerro Prieto geothermal area in the Mexicali Valley, 30 kilometers southeast of Mexicali, Baja California, incurred slight deformation because of the extraction of hot water and steam, and probably, active tectonism. During 1977 to 1978, the US Geological Survey established and measured two networks of horizontal control in an effort to define both types of movement. These networks consisted of: (1) a regional trilateration net brought into the mountain ranges west of the geothermal area from stations on an existing US Geological Survey crustal-strain network north of the international border; and (2) a local net tied to stations in the regional net and encompassing the present and planned geothermal production area. Electronic distance measuring instruments were used to measure the distances between stations in both networks in 1978, 1979 and 1981. Lines in the regional net averaged 25 km. in length and the standard deviation of an individual measurement is estimated to be approx. 0.3 part per million of line length. The local network was measured using different instrumentation and techniques. The average line length was about 5 km. and the standard deviation of an individual measurement approached 3 parts per million per line length. Ground-surface movements in the regional net, as measured by both the 1979 and 1981 resurveys, were small and did not exceed the noise level. The 1979 resurvey of the local net showed an apparent movement of 2 to 3 centimeters inward toward the center of the production area. This apparent movement was restricted to the general limits of the production area. The 1981 resurvey of the local net did not show increased movement attributable to fluid extraction.

  19. ROUGHNESS ON WOOD SURFACES AND ROUGHNESS MEASUREMENT METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İsmail Aydın

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Some visual characteristics of wood such as color, pattern and texture determine the quality of manufactured products. Surface properties of wood material are important both in production and marketing after production. Initial studies related to the roughness of wood surface were begun in early 1950’s. However, no general agreed standardization can not have been developed for wood surfaces. Surface roughness of wood is function of the production process, product type and the natural anatomical properties of wood. Contact and non-contact tracing methods are used to measure of wood surface roughness. Surface roughness also affects the gluability and wettability of wood surfaces. The success in finishing also depends on the surface roughness of wood.

  20. Partial compensation interferometry for measurement of surface parameter error of high-order aspheric surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Qun; Li, Tengfei; Hu, Yao

    2018-01-01

    Surface parameters are the properties to describe the shape characters of aspheric surface, which mainly include vertex radius of curvature (VROC) and conic constant (CC). The VROC affects the basic properties, such as focal length of an aspheric surface, while the CC is the basis of classification for aspheric surface. The deviations of the two parameters are defined as surface parameter error (SPE). Precisely measuring SPE is critical for manufacturing and aligning aspheric surface. Generally, SPE of aspheric surface is measured directly by curvature fitting on the absolute profile measurement data from contact or non-contact testing. And most interferometry-based methods adopt null compensators or null computer-generated holograms to measure SPE. To our knowledge, there is no effective way to measure SPE of highorder aspheric surface with non-null interferometry. In this paper, based on the theory of slope asphericity and the best compensation distance (BCD) established in our previous work, we propose a SPE measurement method for high-order aspheric surface in partial compensation interferometry (PCI) system. In the procedure, firstly, we establish the system of two element equations by utilizing the SPE-caused BCD change and surface shape change. Then, we can simultaneously obtain the VROC error and CC error in PCI system by solving the equations. Simulations are made to verify the method, and the results show a high relative accuracy.

  1. Measurements of sea level off Tikkavanipalem - Coast India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Joseph, A.; Desai, R.G.P.; Peshwe, V.B.; Desa, E.; VijayKumar, K.; Desa, E.S.; Mehra, P.; Nagvekar, S.

    Sea level and meteorological measurements have been made, off Tikkavanipalem coast in Andhra Pradesh, India in 1997-98. Sea level measurements were made in four temporal segments of one-month duration each during a one-year period...

  2. THE INEXPENSIVE DEVICE FOR SEA LEVEL MEASUREMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Annunziato

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A new mareograph device has been designed at the Joint Research Centre (JRC of the European Commission (EC in order improve the sea level network in use for the Tsunami Hazard monitoring in the Mediterranean Sea and in the North Atlantic area (NEAMTWS area of UNESCO. The instrument has the characteristic to be cheap and very effective but its reliability, duration and quality need to be determined and qualified. For this reason a number of experimental campaigns are being conducted, whose first results are presented here. In collaboration with the UNESCO/IOC (Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, responsible of the definition of the Tsunami Warning System of this geographical area, a set of 20 devices has been offered by JRC for a period of 1 year of testing of the devices; the surveys for the installation of the devices is under way and the installation should be completed by the end of 2015.

  3. Experiences on pollution level measurement in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya-Tena, Gerardo; Hernandez-Corona, Ramiro; Ramirez-Vazquez, Isaias

    2005-01-01

    The pollution on overhead insulators is influenced by the pollutant type as well as by the climate of the site. In Mexico, due to its orography and diversity of lands, there are several areas where the failures on the overhead insulation are mainly caused by the pollution. Since the decade of 1980s, various studies have been performed to solve or at least alleviate such transmission and distribution power line pollution-related problems. This paper presents a description of several studies conducted by the Mexican Electrical Research Institute 'Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas' (IIE) together with the Mexican electrical utility 'Comision Federal de Electricidad' (CFE), from the elaboration of a contamination map to the development of a system for measuring leakage current, which is used as a tool for the in-service diagnostic of insulators installed on lines of transmission. (author)

  4. Open questions in surface topography measurement: a roadmap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leach, Richard; Evans, Christopher; He, Liangyu; Davies, Angela; Duparré, Angela; Henning, Andrew; Jones, Christopher W; O’Connor, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Control of surface topography has always been of vital importance for manufacturing and many other engineering and scientific disciplines. However, despite over one hundred years of quantitative surface topography measurement, there are still many open questions. At the top of the list of questions is ‘Are we getting the right answer?’ This begs the obvious question ‘How would we know?’ There are many other questions relating to applications, the appropriateness of a technique for a given scenario, or the relationship between a particular analysis and the function of the surface. In this first ‘open questions’ article we have gathered together some experts in surface topography measurement and asked them to address timely, unresolved questions about the subject. We hope that their responses will go some way to answer these questions, address areas where further research is required, and look at the future of the subject. The first section ‘Spatial content characterization for precision surfaces’ addresses the need to characterise the spatial content of precision surfaces. Whilst we have been manufacturing optics for centuries, there still isn’t a consensus on how to specify the surface for manufacture. The most common three methods for spatial characterisation are reviewed and compared, and the need for further work on quantifying measurement uncertainties is highlighted. The article is focussed on optical surfaces, but the ideas are more pervasive. Different communities refer to ‘figure, mid-spatial frequencies, and finish’ and ‘form, waviness, and roughness’, but the mathematics are identical. The second section ‘Light scattering methods’ is focussed on light scattering techniques; an important topic with in-line metrology becoming essential in many manufacturing scenarios. The potential of scattering methods has long been recognized; in the ‘smooth surface limit’ functionally significant relationships can be derived from first

  5. Measurement of Dynamic Friction Coefficient on the Irregular Free Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeom, S. H.; Seo, K. S.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, K. H.

    2007-01-01

    A spent fuel storage cask must be estimated for a structural integrity when an earthquake occurs because it freely stands on ground surface without a restriction condition. Usually the integrity estimation for a seismic load is performed by a FEM analysis, the friction coefficient for a standing surface is an important parameter in seismic analysis when a sliding happens. When a storage cask is placed on an irregular ground surface, measuring a friction coefficient of an irregular surface is very difficult because the friction coefficient is affected by the surface condition. In this research, dynamic friction coefficients on the irregular surfaces between a concrete cylinder block and a flat concrete slab are measured with two methods by one direction actuator

  6. Surface deposition measurements of the TMI-2 gross decontamination experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIssac, C.V.; Hetzer, D.C.

    1982-01-01

    In order to measure the effectiveness of the gross decontamination experiment (principally a water spray technique) performed in the TMI-2 reactor building, the Technical Information and Examination Program's Radiation and Environment personnel made surface activity measurements before and after the experiment. In conjunction with surface sampling, thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) and gamma spectrometry measurements were also performed to distinguish between radiation fields and contamination. The surface sampler used to collect samples from external surfaces within the reactor building is a milling tool having four major components: a 1.27-cm constant-speed drill; a drill support assembly that allows setting sample penetration depth; filter cartridges for intake air purification and sample collection; and an air pump that forces air across the surface being sampled and through the sample filter cartridge

  7. Surface and interfacial tension measurement, theory, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hartland, Stanley

    2004-01-01

    This edited volume offers complete coverage of the latest theoretical, experimental, and computer-based data as summarized by leading international researchers. It promotes full understanding of the physical phenomena and mechanisms at work in surface and interfacial tensions and gradients, their direct impact on interface shape and movement, and their significance to numerous applications. Assessing methods for the accurate measurement of surface tension, interfacial tension, and contact angles, Surface and Interfacial Tension presents modern simulations of complex interfacial motions, such a

  8. NASA's Space Lidar Measurements of Earth and Planetary Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abshire, James B.

    2010-01-01

    A lidar instrument on a spacecraft was first used to measure planetary surface height and topography on the Apollo 15 mission to the Moon in 1971, The lidar was based around a flashlamp-pumped ruby laser, and the Apollo 15-17 missions used them to make a few thousand measurements of lunar surface height from orbit. With the advent of diode pumped lasers in the late 1980s, the lifetime, efficiency, resolution and mass of lasers and space lidar all improved dramatically. These advances were utilized in NASA space missions to map the shape and surface topography of Mars with > 600 million measurements, demonstrate initial space measurements of the Earth's topography, and measured the detailed shape of asteroid. NASA's ICESat mission in Earth orbit just completed its polar ice measurement mission with almost 2 billion measurements of the Earth's surface and atmosphere, and demonstrated measurements to Antarctica and Greenland with a height resolution of a few em. Space missions presently in cruise phase and in operation include those to Mercury and a topographic mapping mission of the Moon. Orbital lidar also have been used in experiments to demonstrate laser ranging over planetary distances, including laser pulse transmission from Earth to Mars orbit. Based on the demonstrated value of the measurements, lidar is now the preferred measurement approach for many new scientific space missions. Some missions planned by NASA include a planetary mission to measure the shape and dynamics of Europa, and several Earth orbiting missions to continue monitoring ice sheet heights, measure vegetation heights, assess atmospheric CO2 concentrations, and to map the Earth surface topographic heights with 5 m spatial resolution. This presentation will give an overview of history, ongoing work, and plans for using space lidar for measurements of the surfaces of the Earth and planets.

  9. 45 CFR 305.40 - Penalty performance measures and levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES PROGRAM PERFORMANCE MEASURES, STANDARDS, FINANCIAL INCENTIVES, AND PENALTIES § 305.40 Penalty performance measures and levels. (a) There are three performance measures for which States must... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Penalty performance measures and levels. 305.40...

  10. Ab initio surface core-level shifts and surface segregation energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldén, Magnus; Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Johansson, Börje

    1993-01-01

    We have calculated the surface core-level energy shifts of the 4d and 5d transition metals by means of local-density theory and a Green’s-function technique based on the linear muffin-tin orbitals method. Final-state effects are included by treating the core-ionized atom as an impurity located...

  11. A computer-aided surface roughness measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, F.J.; Schankula, M.H.

    1983-11-01

    A diamond stylus profilometer with computer-based data acquisitions/analysis system is being used to characterize surfaces of reactor components and materials, and to examine the effects of surface topography on thermal contact conductance. The current system is described; measurement problems and system development are discussed in general terms and possible future improvements are outlined

  12. Measuring Forces between Oxide Surfaces Using the Atomic Force Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Henrik Guldberg; Høj, Jakob Weiland

    1996-01-01

    The interactions between colloidal particles play a major role in processing of ceramics, especially in casting processes. With the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) it is possible to measure the inter-action force between a small oxide particle (a few micron) and a surface as function of surface...

  13. Drop shape visualization and contact angle measurement on curved surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilizzoni, Manfredo

    2011-12-01

    The shape and contact angles of drops on curved surfaces is experimentally investigated. Image processing, spline fitting and numerical integration are used to extract the drop contour in a number of cross-sections. The three-dimensional surfaces which describe the surface-air and drop-air interfaces can be visualized and a simple procedure to determine the equilibrium contact angle starting from measurements on curved surfaces is proposed. Contact angles on flat surfaces serve as a reference term and a procedure to measure them is proposed. Such procedure is not as accurate as the axisymmetric drop shape analysis algorithms, but it has the advantage of requiring only a side view of the drop-surface couple and no further information. It can therefore be used also for fluids with unknown surface tension and there is no need to measure the drop volume. Examples of application of the proposed techniques for distilled water drops on gemstones confirm that they can be useful for drop shape analysis and contact angle measurement on three-dimensional sculptured surfaces. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Device for radiometric measurement, e.g. of surface density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregor, J.; Kopl, F.

    1973-01-01

    A design is described of a device for radiometric measurements, such as of material surface density, thickness of coating layers, surface moisture, and for the analysis of chemical composition. The device uses backscattered radiation indicated by two ionization chambers with gas filling; the radiation source is placed in between the chambers. (J.K.)

  15. Laboratory measurements of dusty surface charging in plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Kevin; Wang, Joseph

    2017-09-01

    A novel method is developed to study the charging of a conducting surface covered by a thin dust layer in plasma. The potential profile in the dust layer and the floating potential of the surface underneath are measured directly by embedding conducting wires in the dust and connecting the wires to a measurement plate outside the vacuum chamber, where a Trek non-contacting electrostatic voltmeter measures the floating potential of the measurement plate. Laboratory experiments are carried out to study plasma charging of a conducting plate covered by lunar dust simulant, JSC-1A. The results show that the plate potential is dependent on both the ambient plasma condition and the dust layer thickness. The current balance condition controls the floating potential of the dust surface while the dust layer acts as a capacitor and controls the potential of the plate with respect to the dust surface. Hence, a dust covered conducting plate will be charged more negatively than a clean plate.

  16. Matrix elements for level shifts and widths of hydrogenic levels in ion-surface interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thumm, U.; Kuerpick, P.

    1996-05-01

    The authors present a derivation of basic one-electron matrix elements involved in the ion-metal surface scattering theory. Their method allows for the convenient generation of matrix elements for high principal quantum numbers of the projectile states and thus provides basic building blocks for the ab-initio description of highly charged ion-surface interactions. The matrix elements related to the energy shifts can be evaluated for an arbitrary one-dimensional potential therefore allowing the inclusion of electronic and nuclear self-image potentials. The authors extend these concepts to wave functions generated from an arbitrary one-dimensional surface potential and show applications to various surface potentials, projectile nuclear charges and hydrogenic levels.

  17. Accuracy of Surface Plate Measurements - General Purpose Software for Flatness Measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, J.; Heuvelman, C.J.

    1990-01-01

    Flatness departures of surface plates are generally obtained from straightness measurements of lines on the surface. A computer program has been developed for on-line measurement and evaluation, based on the simultaneous coupling of measurements in all grid points. Statistical methods are used to

  18. Surface core-level shifts for simple metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldén, Magnus; Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Johansson, Börje

    1994-01-01

    We have performed an ab initio study of the surface core-level binding energy shift (SCLS) for 11 of the simple metals by means of a Green’s-function technique within the tight-binding linear-muffin-tin-orbitals method. Initial- and final-state effects are included within the concept of complete....... We furthermore conclude that the unexpected negative sign of the SCLS in beryllium is predominantly an initial-state effect and is caused by the high electron density in this metal....

  19. Water level observations from Unmanned Aerial Vehicles for improving estimates of surface water-groundwater interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandini, Filippo; Butts, Michael; Vammen Jacobsen, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    . However, traditional river gauging stations are normally spaced too far apart to capture spatial patterns in the water surface, while spaceborne observations have limited spatial and temporal resolution. UAVs (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles) can retrieve river water level measurements, providing: i) high...

  20. Cantilever measurements of surface stress, surface reconstruction, film stress and magnetoelastic stress of monolayersc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Kirschner

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available We review the application of cantilever-based stress measurements in surface science and magnetism. The application of thin (thickness appr. 0.1 mm single crystalline substrates as cantilevers has been used successfully to measure adsorbate-induced surface stress changes, lattice misfit induced film stress, and magneto-elastic stress of ferromagnetic monolayers. Surface stress changes as small as 0.01 N/m can be readily measured, and this translates into a sensitivity for adsorbate-coverage well below 0.01 of one layer. Stress as large as several GPa, beyond the elasticity limits of high strength materials, is measured, and it is ascribed to the lattice misfit between film and substrate. Our results point at the intimate relation between surface stress and surface reconstruction, stress-induced structural changes in epitaxially strained films, and strain-induced modifications of the magneto-elastic coupling in ferromagnetic monolayers.

  1. Cantilever measurements of surface stress, surface reconstruction, film stress and magnetoelastic stress of monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Dirk; Tian, Zhen; Kirschner, Jürgen

    2008-07-29

    We review the application of cantilever-based stress measurements in surface science and magnetism. The application of thin (thickness appr. 0.1 mm) single crystalline substrates as cantilevers has been used successfully to measure adsorbate-induced surface stress changes, lattice misfit induced film stress, and magneto-elastic stress of ferromagnetic monolayers. Surface stress changes as small as 0.01 N/m can be readily measured, and this translates into a sensitivity for adsorbate-coverage well below 0.01 of one layer. Stress as large as several GPa, beyond the elasticity limits of high strength materials, is measured, and it is ascribed to the lattice misfit between film and substrate. Our results point at the intimate relation between surface stress and surface reconstruction, stress-induced structural changes in epitaxially strained films, and strain-induced modifications of the magneto-elastic coupling in ferromagnetic monolayers.

  2. Dynamics of gas-surface interactions atomic-level understanding of scattering processes at surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Díez Muniño, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    This book gives a representative survey of the state of the art of research on gas-surface interactions. It provides an overview of the current understanding of gas surface dynamics and, in particular, of the reactive and non-reactive processes of atoms and small molecules at surfaces. Leading scientists in the field, both from the theoretical and the experimental sides, write in this book about their most recent advances. Surface science grew as an interdisciplinary research area over the last decades, mostly because of new experimental technologies (ultra-high vacuum, for instance), as well as because of a novel paradigm, the ‘surface science’ approach. The book describes the second transformation which is now taking place pushed by the availability of powerful quantum-mechanical theoretical methods implemented numerically. In the book, experiment and theory progress hand in hand with an unprecedented degree of accuracy and control. The book presents how modern surface science targets the atomic-level u...

  3. Summations over equilaterally triangulated surfaces and the critical string measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Dirk-Jan

    1992-01-01

    We propose a new approach to the summation over dynamically triangulated Riemann surfaces which does not rely on properties of the potential in a matrix model. Instead, we formulate a purely algebraic discretization of critical string path integral. This is combined with a technique which assigns to each equilateral triangulation of a two-dimensional surface a Riemann surface defined over a certain finite extension of the field of rational numbers, i.e. an arthmetic surface. Thus we establish a new formulation in which the sum over randomly triangulated surfaces defines an invariant measure on the moduli space of arithmetic surfaces. It is shown that because of this it is far from obvious that this measure for large genera approximates the measure defined by the continuum theory, i.e. Liouville theory or critical string theory. In low genus this subtlety does not exist. In the case of critical string theory we explicity compute the volume of the moduli space of arithmetic surfaces in terms of the modular height function and show that for low genus it approximates correctly the continuum measure. We also discuss a continuum limit which bears some resemblance with a double scaling limit in matrix models.

  4. Summations over equilaterally triangulated surfaces and the critical string measure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smit, D.J.; Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA

    1992-01-01

    We propose a new approach to the summation over dynamically triangulated Riemann surfaces which does not rely on properties of the potential in a matrix model. Instead, we formulate a purely algebraic discretization of critical string path integral. This is combined with a technique which assigns to each equilateral triangulation of a two-dimensional surface a Riemann surface defined over a certain finite extension of the field of rational numbers, i.e. an arithmetic surface. Thus we establish a new formulated in which the sum over randomly triangulated surfaces defines an invariant measure on the moduli space of arithmetic surfaces. It is shown that because of this it is far from obvious that this measure for large genera approximates the measure defined by the continuum theory, i.e. Liouville theory or critical string theory. In low genus this subtlety does not exist. In the case of critical string theory we explicitly compute the volume of the moduli space of arithmetic surfaces in terms of the modular height function and show that for low genus it approximates correctly the continuum measure. We also discuss a continuum limit which bears some resemblance with a double scaling limit in matrix models. (orig.)

  5. Measuring healthcare productivity - from unit to system level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kämäräinen, Vesa Johannes; Peltokorpi, Antti; Torkki, Paulus; Tallbacka, Kaj

    2016-04-18

    Purpose - Healthcare productivity is a growing issue in most Western countries where healthcare expenditure is rapidly increasing. Therefore, accurate productivity metrics are essential to avoid sub-optimization within a healthcare system. The purpose of this paper is to focus on healthcare production system productivity measurement. Design/methodology/approach - Traditionally, healthcare productivity has been studied and measured independently at the unit, organization and system level. Suggesting that productivity measurement should be done in different levels, while simultaneously linking productivity measurement to incentives, this study presents the challenges of productivity measurement at the different levels. The study introduces different methods to measure productivity in healthcare. In addition, it provides background information on the methods used to measure productivity and the parameters used in these methods. A pilot investigation of productivity measurement is used to illustrate the challenges of measurement, to test the developed measures and to prove the practical information for managers. Findings - The study introduces different approaches and methods to measure productivity in healthcare. Practical implications - A pilot investigation of productivity measurement is used to illustrate the challenges of measurement, to test the developed measures and to prove the practical benefits for managers. Originality/value - The authors focus on the measurement of the whole healthcare production system and try to avoid sub-optimization. Additionally considering an individual patient approach, productivity measurement is examined at the unit level, the organizational level and the system level.

  6. Radioactivity levels in surface water of lakes around Izmir / Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyurum, S.; Turkozu, D. A.; Aslani, M. A. A.; Aytas, S.; Eral, M.; Kaygun, A. K.

    2006-01-01

    Radioactivity presents in surface continental waters is mainly due to the presence of radioactive elements in the earth's crust, other artificial radionuclides have appeared due to such human activities as nuclear power plants, nuclear weapons testing and manufacture and use of radioactive sources It is well known that natural radionuclides can be effective as tracers for the different processes controlling the distribution of elements among dissolved and particulate phases in aquatic systems. The detection of high radionuclide concentrations was proposed as a public health problem in several areas and consequently studies into the risks of radionuclides were started in the 2000s. Especially, these radioactive substances in groundwater are an unwanted and involuntary risk factor from natural sources, not artificial sources. These radioactive substances include uranium, radon found in uranium series, and other radioactive substances such as radium and gross alpha. Uranium present in rock, soil, and natural materials, and is found in small quantities in air, water, and food that people always contact. In this project, lake water samples were collected from three lakes around Izmir-Turkey. In surface lake water samples, pH, mV and conductivity values were measured and alkaline content was determined titrimetrically. The uranium concentrations in the lake water samples were measured using uranium analyzer. The radioactivity concentrations related to gross radium isotopes, gross-? and gross-? activities in the surface lake water were determined. The correlation among some parameters for water samples and concentrations of uranium, activity concentration of gross radium isotopes, gross alpha and gross beta radioactivity are also discussed

  7. Device to measure level in a steam drum of NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinogradov, Yu.A.

    1988-01-01

    Gravitation-hydrostatic device for measuring coolant level in a steam drum of NPP is described. The device enables to improve the accuracy and sensitivity of measuring coolant level above and below the submerged perforated sheet of the steam drum and decrease the amount of levelling vessels in the unit by 50%. 1 fig

  8. Entrance surface dose measurements in pediatric radiological examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, L.A.; Yoshimura, E.M.

    2008-01-01

    A survey of pediatric radiological examinations was carried out in a reference pediatric hospital of the city of Sao Paulo, in order to investigate the doses to children undergoing conventional X-ray examinations. The results showed that the majority of pediatric patients are below 4 years, and that about 80% of the examinations correspond to chest projections. Doses to typical radiological examinations were measured in vivo with thermoluminescent dosimeters (LiF: Mg, Ti and LiF: Mg, Cu, P) attached to the skin of the children to determine entrance surface dose (ESD). Also homogeneous phantoms were used to obtain ESD to younger children, because the technique uses a so small kVp that the dosimeters would produce an artifact image in the patient radiograph. Four kinds of pediatric examinations were investigated: three conventional examinations (chest, skull and abdomen) and a fluoroscopic procedure (barium swallow). Relevant information about kVp and mAs values used in the examinations was collected, and we discuss how these parameters can affect the ESD. The ESD values measured in this work are compared to reference levels published by the European Commission for pediatric patients. The results obtained (third-quartile of the ESD distribution) for chest AP examinations in three age groups were: 0.056 mGy (2-4 years old); 0.068 mGy (5-9 years old); 0.069 mGy (10-15 years old). All of them are below the European reference level (0.100 mGy). ESD values measured to the older age group in skull and abdomen AP radiographs (mean values 3.44 and 1.20 mGy, respectively) are above the European reference levels (1.5 mGy to skull and 1.0 mGy to abdomen). ESD values measured in the barium swallow examination reached 10 mGy in skin regions corresponding to thyroid and esophagus. It was noticed during this survey that some technicians use, improperly, X-ray fluoroscopy in conventional examinations to help them in positioning the patient. The results presented here are a

  9. Measuring evaporation from soil surfaces for environmental and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... in many aspects of environmental geotechnics and waste management. The paper describes the measurements made to assess the surface energy balance as well as its analysis, and presents the results of typical measurements. It also presents numerical values of the parameters and constants needed for the analysis.

  10. Sensitivity of surface resistance measurement of HTS thin films by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    field distribution in the resonators. The microwave surface resistance of the superconducting sample is then extracted from the measured Q value as a function of temperature. The sensitivity of the Rs measurement, that is, the relative change in the Q value with the change in the Rs value is determined for each resonator.

  11. Measurement of tendon reflexes by surface electromyography in normal subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, J.; van Crevel, H.

    1989-01-01

    A simple method for measuring the tendon reflexes was developed. A manually operated, electronic reflex hammer was applied that enabled measurement of the strength of tendon taps. Reflex responses were recorded by surface electromyography. Stimulus-response relations and latencies of tendon reflexes

  12. Maps of the topography of water surface levels in the Danube Delta, between the main branches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BONDAR Constantin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Within the project “Hydrological Monitoring of Wetland Areas Using SAR Techniques (Hydro-SAR”, concluded by the TERRASIGNA (Romania with the European Space Agency (ESA, the task of GeoEcoMar was to track and check the correlation of data provided by InSAR techniques with ground observations and measurements in the Danube Delta. Activities in the field and laboratory enabled elaboration of maps of vector fields for the water flow directions on the Danube Delta territory, based on the relief of the water surface levels at 450, 400, 350, 300, 250, 200, 150, 100, 50 and 0 cm, measured at Tulcea hydrologic station. In order to elaborate the maps of water surface levels, the altimetric stability of hydrometric gauges from the Danube Delta territorry was checked by establishing the Earth crust subsidence in each gauge location. Interpretation of recorded data shows a relative low subsidence rate for the location of the hydrometric gauge in Tulcea (observations recorded for the period 1858-2013 selected as hydrometric reference point, with the origin of the zero of the gauge situated at 0.57 m altitude relative to the Black Sea – Sulina reference system. The paper presents isoline maps of the water surface levels on the surface of the Danube Delta between the main distributaries (Chilia – Sulina – Sf. Gheorghe, for the above mentioned water surface levels.

  13. Mapping surface soil moisture with L-band radiometric measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, James R.; Shiue, James C.; Schmugge, Thomas J.; Engman, Edwin T.

    1989-01-01

    A NASA C-130 airborne remote sensing aircraft was used to obtain four-beam pushbroom microwave radiometric measurements over two small Kansas tall-grass prairie region watersheds, during a dry-down period after heavy rainfall in May and June, 1987. While one of the watersheds had been burned 2 months before these measurements, the other had not been burned for over a year. Surface soil-moisture data were collected at the time of the aircraft measurements and correlated with the corresponding radiometric measurements, establishing a relationship for surface soil-moisture mapping. Radiometric sensitivity to soil moisture variation is higher in the burned than in the unburned watershed; surface soil moisture loss is also faster in the burned watershed.

  14. Indirect measurement of near-surface velocity and pressure fields based on measurement of moving free surface profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibamoto, Yasuteru; Nakamura, Hideo

    2005-01-01

    A non-intrusive technique for measurement of the velocity and pressure fields adjacent to a moving fluid surface is developed. The technique is based on the measurement of fluid surface profile. The velocity and pressure fields are derived with use of the boundary element method (BEM) by seeking for an incompressible flow field that satisfies the kinematic boundary condition imposed by the time-dependent fluid surface profile. The proposed technique is tested by deriving the velocity and pressure fields inversely from the fluid surface profiles obtained by a forward BEM calculation of fluid surface response to externally-imposed pressure. The inverse calculation results show good agreement with the imposed pressure distribution in the forward calculation. (author)

  15. Roughness in Surface Force Measurements: Extension of DLVO Theory To Describe the Forces between Hafnia Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Namsoon; Parsons, Drew F; Craig, Vincent S J

    2017-07-06

    The interaction between colloidal particles is commonly viewed through the lens of DLVO theory, whereby the interaction is described as the sum of the electrostatic and dispersion forces. For similar materials acting across a medium at pH values remote from the isoelectric point the theory typically involves an electrostatic repulsion that is overcome by dispersion forces at very small separations. However, the dominance of the dispersion forces at short separations is generally not seen in force measurements, with the exception of the interaction between mica surfaces. The discrepancy for silica surfaces has been attributed to hydration forces, but this does not explain the situation for titania surfaces where the dispersion forces are very much larger. Here, the interaction forces between very smooth hafnia surfaces have been measured using the colloid probe technique and the forces evaluated within the DLVO framework, including both hydration forces and the influence of roughness. The measured forces across a wide range of pH at different salt concentrations are well described with a single parameter for the surface roughness. These findings show that even small degrees of surface roughness significantly alter the form of the interaction force and therefore indicate that surface roughness needs to be included in the evaluation of surface forces between all surfaces that are not ideally smooth.

  16. Adaptive fringe-pattern projection for image saturation avoidance in 3D surface-shape measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong; Kofman, Jonathan

    2014-04-21

    In fringe-projection 3D surface-shape measurement, image saturation results in incorrect intensities in captured images of fringe patterns, leading to phase and measurement errors. An adaptive fringe-pattern projection (AFPP) method was developed to adapt the maximum input gray level in projected fringe patterns to the local reflectivity of an object surface being measured. The AFPP method demonstrated improved 3D measurement accuracy by avoiding image saturation in highly-reflective surface regions while maintaining high intensity modulation across the entire surface. The AFPP method can avoid image saturation and handle varying surface reflectivity, using only two prior rounds of fringe-pattern projection and image capture to generate the adapted fringe patterns.

  17. Measuring and modeling surface sorption dynamics of organophosphate flame retardants on impervious surfaces

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The data presented in this data file is a product of a journal publication. The dataset contains measured and model predicted OPFRs gas-phase and surface-phase...

  18. Surface Moisture Measurement System Operation and Maintenance Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, G.A.; Pearce, K.L.; Stokes, T.L.

    1995-12-01

    This operations and maintenance manual addresses deployment, equipment and field hazards, operating instructions, calibration verification, removal, maintenance, and other pertinent information necessary to safely operate and store the Surface Moisture Measurement System (SMMS) and Liquid Observation Well Moisture Measurement System (LOWMMS). These systems were developed primarily in support of Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Safety Programs for moisture measurement in organic and ferrocyanide watch list tanks

  19. Plastic Deformations of Measured Object Surface in Contact with Undeformable Surface of Measuring Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowalik Marek

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Measuring errors caused by deformation (flattening of a measured object appear under the influence of pressure force and weight of the measured object. Plastic strain, arising at the contact of a measured object and an undeformable contact tip of a measuring device, can be calculated by applying the Hertz plastic solution and the hypothesis of plastic strain. In a small area of contact between two bodies pressing against one another with force F, there appears the so-called contact stress. It can sometime reach very high values, exceeding the yield point, even when the contact pressure is relatively small. In the present work, the authors describe a theoretical solution to the problem of plastic strain between two bodies. The derived relationships enable to calculate force F during measurements of a deformable object by means of an instrument with an undeformable, spherical measuring tip. By applying the τmax hypothesis, a solution was obtained for the force F in an inexplicit form. The theoretical solution was verified with the digital simulation and experimental measurement. With the FEM method, the limit length gage was modeled in interaction with the measured shaft of a diameter d larger than the nominal one of Δl value.

  20. Plastic Deformations of Measured Object Surface in Contact with Undeformable Surface of Measuring Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalik, Marek; Rucki, Mirosław; Paszta, Piotr; Gołębski, Rafał

    2016-10-01

    Measuring errors caused by deformation (flattening) of a measured object appear under the influence of pressure force and weight of the measured object. Plastic strain, arising at the contact of a measured object and an undeformable contact tip of a measuring device, can be calculated by applying the Hertz plastic solution and the hypothesis of plastic strain. In a small area of contact between two bodies pressing against one another with force F, there appears the so-called contact stress. It can sometime reach very high values, exceeding the yield point, even when the contact pressure is relatively small. In the present work, the authors describe a theoretical solution to the problem of plastic strain between two bodies. The derived relationships enable to calculate force F during measurements of a deformable object by means of an instrument with an undeformable, spherical measuring tip. By applying the τmax hypothesis, a solution was obtained for the force F in an inexplicit form. The theoretical solution was verified with the digital simulation and experimental measurement. With the FEM method, the limit length gage was modeled in interaction with the measured shaft of a diameter d larger than the nominal one of Δl value.

  1. Interferometric method for measuring high velocities of diffuse surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maron, Y.

    1978-01-01

    An interferometric method for measuring the displacement of diffuse surfaces moving with velocities of a few microsecond is presented. The method utilizes the interference between two light beams reflected from a constant area of the moving surface at two different angles. It enables the detection of high rate velocity variations. Light source of a fairly low temporal coherence and power around 100mW is needed. (author)

  2. An instrument for the measurement of road surface reflection properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corell, Dennis Dan; Sørensen, K.

    2017-01-01

    Road surface reflection data in the form of standard r-tables serve as input for design calculations of road lighting installations on traffic roads. However, in several countries the use of the standard r-tables has not been verified by measurement in a long period of time, while the types of road...... surfaces in use have changed - for instance to road surface types with less noise from wheel passages. Because of this, a co-operation between the road administrations of the Nordic countries (abbreviated NMF) decided to construct a portable instrument to be used on selections of traffic roads within...

  3. Experimental Method for Measuring Dust Load on Surfaces in Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lengweiler, Philip; Nielsen, Peter V.; Moser, Alfred

    , there is a need for better understanding of the mechanism of dust deposition and resuspension. With the presented experimental setup, the dust load on surfaces in a channel can be measured as a function of the environmental and surface conditions and the type of particles under controlled laboratory conditions.......A new experimental setup to investigate the physical process of dust deposition and resuspension on and from surfaces is introduced. Dust deposition can reduce the airborne dust concentration considerably. As a basis for developing methods to eliminate dust-related problems in rooms...

  4. Reporting central tendencies of chamber measured surface emission and oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abichou, Tarek; Clark, Jeremy; Chanton, Jeffery

    2011-05-01

    Methane emissions, concentrations, and oxidation were measured on eleven MSW landfills in eleven states spanning from California to Pennsylvania during the three year study. The flux measurements were performed using a static chamber technique. Initial concentration samples were collected immediately after placement of the flux chamber. Oxidation of the emitted methane was evaluated using stable isotope techniques. When reporting overall surface emissions and percent oxidation for a landfill cover, central tendencies are typically used to report "averages" of the collected data. The objective of this study was to determine the best way to determine and report central tendencies. Results showed that 89% of the data sets of collected surface flux have lognormal distributions, 83% of the surface concentration data sets are also lognormal. Sixty seven percent (67%) of the isotope measured percent oxidation data sets are normally distributed. The distribution of data for all eleven landfills provides insight of the central tendencies of emissions, concentrations, and percent oxidation. When reporting the "average" measurement for both flux and concentration data collected at the surface of a landfill, statistical analyses provided insight supporting the use of the geometric mean. But the arithmetic mean can accurately represent the percent oxidation, as measured with the stable isotope technique. We examined correlations between surface CH(4) emissions and surface air CH(4) concentrations. Correlation of the concentration and flux values using the geometric mean proved to be a good fit (R(2)=0.86), indicating that surface scans are a good way of identifying locations of high emissions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Inverse analysis of inner surface temperature history from outer surface temperature measurement of a pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, S; Ioka, S; Onchi, S; Matsumoto, Y

    2010-01-01

    When slug flow runs through a pipe, nonuniform and time-varying thermal stresses develop and there is a possibility that thermal fatigue occurs. Therefore it is necessary to know the temperature distributions and the stress distributions in the pipe for the integrity assessment of the pipe. It is, however, difficult to measure the inner surface temperature directly. Therefore establishment of the estimation method of the temperature history on inner surface of pipe is needed. As a basic study on the estimation method of the temperature history on the inner surface of a pipe with slug flow, this paper presents an estimation method of the temperature on the inner surface of a plate from the temperature on the outer surface. The relationship between the temperature history on the outer surface and the inner surface is obtained analytically. Using the results of the mathematical analysis, the inverse analysis method of the inner surface temperature history estimation from the outer surface temperature history is proposed. It is found that the inner surface temperature history can be estimated from the outer surface temperature history by applying the inverse analysis method, even when it is expressed by the multiple frequency components.

  6. Intelligent sampling for the measurement of structured surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J; Jiang, X; Blunt, L A; Scott, P J; Leach, R K

    2012-01-01

    Uniform sampling in metrology has known drawbacks such as coherent spectral aliasing and a lack of efficiency in terms of measuring time and data storage. The requirement for intelligent sampling strategies has been outlined over recent years, particularly where the measurement of structured surfaces is concerned. Most of the present research on intelligent sampling has focused on dimensional metrology using coordinate-measuring machines with little reported on the area of surface metrology. In the research reported here, potential intelligent sampling strategies for surface topography measurement of structured surfaces are investigated by using numerical simulation and experimental verification. The methods include the jittered uniform method, low-discrepancy pattern sampling and several adaptive methods which originate from computer graphics, coordinate metrology and previous research by the authors. By combining the use of advanced reconstruction methods and feature-based characterization techniques, the measurement performance of the sampling methods is studied using case studies. The advantages, stability and feasibility of these techniques for practical measurements are discussed. (paper)

  7. Can foot anthropometric measurements predict dynamic plantar surface contact area?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collins Natalie

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have suggested that increased plantar surface area, associated with pes planus, is a risk factor for the development of lower extremity overuse injuries. The intent of this study was to determine if a single or combination of foot anthropometric measures could be used to predict plantar surface area. Methods Six foot measurements were collected on 155 subjects (97 females, 58 males, mean age 24.5 ± 3.5 years. The measurements as well as one ratio were entered into a stepwise regression analysis to determine the optimal set of measurements associated with total plantar contact area either including or excluding the toe region. The predicted values were used to calculate plantar surface area and were compared to the actual values obtained dynamically using a pressure sensor platform. Results A three variable model was found to describe the relationship between the foot measures/ratio and total plantar contact area (R2 = 0.77, p R2 = 0.76, p Conclusion The results of this study indicate that the clinician can use a combination of simple, reliable, and time efficient foot anthropometric measurements to explain over 75% of the plantar surface contact area, either including or excluding the toe region.

  8. Accuracy and reliability of three-dimensional surface reconstruction measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizukami, Chikashi; Yamamoto, Etsuo; Ohmura, Masaki; Oiki, Hiroyuki; Tsuji, Jun; Muneta, Yuki; Tanabe, Makito; Hakuba, Nobuhiro; Azemoto, Syougo.

    1993-01-01

    We are using a new three-dimensional (3-D) surface reconstruction system to measure the temporal bones. This system offers the advantage of observation of the external aperture of the vestibular aqueduct and the porus acusticus internus in living subjects. However, its accuracy has not been confirmed. To investigate the accuracy of this new system, we measured the length of an in situ ceramic ossicular replacement prosthesis (CORP) of known length of 6.0 mm using 3-D surface reconstruction, conventional plain X-ray and polytomography. The CORP was scanned in the axial, sagittal and oblique directions. The mean measured length obtained with the 3-D surface reconstruction images was 5.94±0.21 on vertical scans, 5.91±0.27 on horizontal scans, and 6.01±0.25 on oblique scans. There were no significant differences among the measured lengths obtained in the three directions. Therefore, this 3-D surface reconstruction measurement system is considered to be reliable. Conversely, the mean measured length obtained by plain X-ray was 7.98±0.20, and by polytomography it was 7.94±0.23. These conventional methods have the inherent disadvantage of magnification of size which consequently requires correction. (author)

  9. Sound level measurements using smartphone "apps": Useful or inaccurate?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R Nast

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many recreational activities are accompanied by loud concurrent sounds and decisions regarding the hearing hazards associated with these activities depend on accurate sound measurements. Sound level meters (SLMs are designed for this purpose, but these are technical instruments that are not typically available in recreational settings and require training to use properly. Mobile technology has made such sound level measurements more feasible for even inexperienced users. Here, we assessed the accuracy of sound level measurements made using five mobile phone applications or "apps" on an Apple iPhone 4S, one of the most widely used mobile phones. Accuracy was assessed by comparing application-based measurements to measurements made using a calibrated SLM. Whereas most apps erred by reporting higher sound levels, one application measured levels within 5 dB of a calibrated SLM across all frequencies tested.

  10. Surface temperature measurement of plasma facing components in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiel, Stephane

    2014-01-01

    During this PhD, the challenges on the non-intrusive surface temperature measurements of metallic plasma facing components in tokamaks are reported. Indeed, a precise material emissivity value is needed for classical infrared methods and the environment contribution has to be known particularly for low emissivities materials. Although methods have been developed to overcome these issues, they have been implemented solely for dedicated experiments. In any case, none of these methods are suitable for surface temperature measurement in tokamaks.The active pyrometry introduced in this study allows surface temperature measurements independently of reflected flux and emissivities using pulsed and modulated photothermal effect. This method has been validated in laboratory on metallic materials with reflected fluxes for pulsed and modulated modes. This experimental validation is coupled with a surface temperature variation induced by photothermal effect and temporal signal evolvement modelling in order to optimize both the heating source characteristics and the data acquisition and treatment. The experimental results have been used to determine the application range in temperature and detection wavelengths. In this context, the design of an active pyrometry system on tokamak has been completed, based on a bicolor camera for a thermography application in metallic (or low emissivity) environment.The active pyrometry method introduced in this study is a complementary technique of classical infrared methods used for thermography in tokamak environment which allows performing local and 2D surface temperature measurements independently of reflected fluxes and emissivities. (author) [fr

  11. Direct measurement of Cu surface self-diffusion on a checked surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cousty, Jacques; Peix, Roger; Perraillon, Bernard.

    1976-01-01

    A radiotracer technique ( 64 Cu) was developed to measure surface diffusion on copper surfaces of total impurity concentration not exceeding some 10 -3 monolayers. The apparatus used consists of a slow electron diffraction device, an Auger analysis spectrometer (CMA), an ion gun and an evaporation device assembled in an ultra-vacuum chamber holding a residual pressure below 10 -10 Torr. A sample handler enables the surface studied to be positioned in front of each of these instruments. During the diffusion treatment the chemical composition of the surface is checked intermittently, and afterwards the spread of the deposit is measured outside the ultravacuum chamber. Slices several microns thick are removed and dissolved separately in dishes containing HNO 3 . The activity is then measured with a flow counter [fr

  12. Evaluation of Satellite-Based Surface Energy Budget Products with Surface Measurements Over the Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.; Loeb, N. G.; Lenters, J. D.; Spence, C.; Blanken, P.

    2017-12-01

    Earth's climate is fundamentally driven by the global energy balance. While Earth's energy budget at the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) is well understood, satellite-based estimates of the global mean surface energy budget yield an imbalance of 15-20 Wm-2. The data products used to infer the components of the surface energy budget are often based upon physical or empirical models and ancillary input data sets of varying quality. In order to make progress, comparisons between satellite-based estimates of the surface energy budget components and direct surface measurements are critically needed. This study evaluates surface radiative fluxes from NASA CERES EBAF and surface turbulent heat fluxes from OAFLUX by comparing them with surface station measurements from the Great Lakes Evaporation Network (GLEN). The GLEN measurements are collected using instruments on lighthouses in the Great Lakes, and include surface evaporation measurement via eddy covariance technique. The evaluation is performed for 3 offshore and 1 nearshore Great Lakes sites. We highlight results for Stannard Rock in Lake Superior, which is the farthest lighthouse from shore ( 40km from the nearest land). Relative to the GLEN observations, the OAFLUX underestimates latent heat flux by 12 Wm-2 (19 Wm-2) at Stannard Rock (4-station average), in part due to its weaker near surface wind speed, and overestimates sensible heat flux by 12 Wm-2 (6 Wm-2), which is partly contributed by its colder surface air temperature. The CERES EBAF-Surface overestimates the surface downward all-sky shortwave (longwave) flux by 8 Wm-2 (7 Wm-2) at Stannard Rock, and is comparable to the 4-station average. As a result, the surface estimated using EBAF-Surface and OAFLUX receives 16 Wm-2 (13 Wm-2) more than the GLEN observations at Stannard Rock (4-station average). The above surface energy flux differences will be further discussed based on a comparison between the input data sets used in the satellite-based estimates and

  13. Measuring surface flow velocity with smartphones: potential for citizen observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijs, Steven V.; Chen, Zichong; Brauchli, Tristan; Huwald, Hendrik

    2014-05-01

    Stream flow velocity is an important variable for discharge estimation and research on sediment dynamics. Given the influence of the latter on rating curves (stage-discharge relations), and the relative scarcity of direct streamflow measurements, surface velocity measurements can offer important information for, e.g., flood warning, hydropower, and hydrological science and engineering in general. With the growing amount of sensing and computing power in the hands of more outdoorsy individuals, and the advances in image processing techniques, there is now a tremendous potential to obtain hydrologically relevant data from motivated citizens. This is the main focus of the interdisciplinary "WeSenseIt" project, a citizen observatory of water. In this subproject, we investigate the feasibility of stream flow surface velocity measurements from movie clips taken by (smartphone-) cameras. First results from movie-clip derived velocity information will be shown and compared to reference measurements.

  14. Topography measurements for determining the decay factors in surface replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, J; Zheng, A; Vorburger, T V; Rubert, P

    2008-01-01

    The electro-forming technique is used at National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) for the production of standard reference material (SRM) 2461 standard casings to support nationwide ballistics measurement traceability and measurement quality control in the US. In order to ensure that the SRM casings are produced with virtually the same surface topography, it is necessary to test the decay factors of the replication process. Twenty-six replica casings are replicated from the same master casing for the decay factor tests. The NIST topography measurement system is used for measurements and correlations of surface topography. The topography decays are quantified by the cross-correlation function maximum CCF max . Based on the test, it is expected that 256 SRM casings can be replicated from the same master with CCF max values higher than 95%

  15. Measurement of surface crack length using image processing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahm, Seung Hoon; Kim, Si Cheon; Kim, Yong Il; Ryu, Dae Hyun

    2001-01-01

    The development of a new experimental method is required to easily observe the growth behavior of fatigue cracks. To satisfy the requirement, an image processing technique was introduced to fatigue testing. The length of surface fatigue crack could be successfully measured by the image processing system. At first, the image data of cracks were stored into the computer while the cyclic loading was interrupted. After testing, crack length was determined using image processing software which was developed by ourselves. Block matching method was applied to the detection of surface fatigue cracks. By comparing the data measured by image processing system with the data measured by manual measurement with a microscope, the effectiveness of the image processing system was established. If the proposed method is used to monitor and observe the crack growth behavior automatically, the time and efforts for fatigue test could be dramatically reduced

  16. Underwater and surface strategies of 200 m world level swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, Santiago; Roig, Andreu

    2016-01-01

    Pacing strategies of elite swimmers have been consistently characterised from the average lap velocities. In the present study, we examined the racing strategies of 200 m world class-level swimmers with regard to their underwater and surface lap components. The finals and semi-finals of the 200 m races at the 2013 World Swimming Championships (Barcelona, Spain) were analysed by an innovative image-processing system (InThePool® 2.0). Free swimming velocities of elite swimmers typically decreased throughout the 200 m race laps (-0.12 m · s(-1), 95% CI -0.11 to -0.14 m · s(-1), P = 0.001, η(2) = 0.81), whereas underwater velocities, which were faster than free swimming, were not meaningfully affected by the race progress (0.02 m · s(-1), -0.01 to 0.04 m · s(-1), P = 0.01, η(2) = 0.04). When swimming underwater, elite swimmers typically travelled less distance (-0.66 m, -0.83 to -0.49 m, P = 0.001, η(2) = 0.34) from the first to the third turn of the race, although underwater distances were maintained on the backstroke and butterfly races. These strategies allowed swimmers to maintain their average velocity in the last lap despite a decrease in the free swimming velocity. Elite coaches and swimmers are advised to model their racing strategies by considering both underwater and surface race components.

  17. Two-pulse rapid remote surface contamination measurement.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Headrick, Jeffrey M.; Kulp, Thomas J.; Bisson, Scott E.; Reichardt, Thomas A.; Farrow, Roger L.

    2010-11-01

    This project demonstrated the feasibility of a 'pump-probe' optical detection method for standoff sensing of chemicals on surfaces. Such a measurement uses two optical pulses - one to remove the analyte (or a fragment of it) from the surface and the second to sense the removed material. As a particular example, this project targeted photofragmentation laser-induced fluorescence (PF-LIF) to detect of surface deposits of low-volatility chemical warfare agents (LVAs). Feasibility was demonstrated for four agent surrogates on eight realistic surfaces. Its sensitivity was established for measurements on concrete and aluminum. Extrapolations were made to demonstrate relevance to the needs of outside users. Several aspects of the surface PF-LIF physical mechanism were investigated and compared to that of vapor-phase measurements. The use of PF-LIF as a rapid screening tool to 'cue' more specific sensors was recommended. Its sensitivity was compared to that of Raman spectroscopy, which is both a potential 'confirmer' of PF-LIF 'hits' and is also a competing screening technology.

  18. Electric field vector measurements in a surface ionization wave discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, Benjamin M; Adamovich, Igor V; Lempert, Walter R; Böhm, Patrick S; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    This work presents the results of time-resolved electric field vector measurements in a short pulse duration (60 ns full width at half maximum), surface ionization wave discharge in hydrogen using a picosecond four-wave mixing technique. Electric field vector components are measured separately, using pump and Stokes beams linearly polarized in the horizontal and vertical planes, and a polarizer placed in front of the infrared detector. The time-resolved electric field vector is measured at three different locations across the discharge gap, and for three different heights above the alumina ceramic dielectric surface, ∼100, 600, and 1100 μm (total of nine different locations). The results show that after breakdown, the discharge develops as an ionization wave propagating along the dielectric surface at an average speed of 1 mm ns −1 . The surface ionization wave forms near the high voltage electrode, close to the dielectric surface (∼100 μm). The wave front is characterized by significant overshoot of both vertical and horizontal electric field vector components. Behind the wave front, the vertical field component is rapidly reduced. As the wave propagates along the dielectric surface, it also extends further away from the dielectric surface, up to ∼1 mm near the grounded electrode. The horizontal field component behind the wave front remains quite significant, to sustain the electron current toward the high voltage electrode. After the wave reaches the grounded electrode, the horizontal field component experiences a secondary rise in the quasi-dc discharge, where it sustains the current along the near-surface plasma sheet. The measurement results indicate presence of a cathode layer formed near the grounded electrode with significant cathode voltage fall, ≈3 kV, due to high current density in the discharge. The peak reduced electric field in the surface ionization wave is 85–95 Td, consistent with dc breakdown field estimated from the Paschen

  19. Tooth Surface Level Caries Progression in the Primary Dentition among Preschool Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Amid I; Lim, Sungwoo; Tellez, Marisol

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to describe primary tooth surface level caries progression, over 2 years, based on the severity of the caries lesions. Data were collected from 790 low-income African-American preschool children in Detroit, Mich., USA. The caregivers of the children (aged 0-5 years) completed interviews and the dyad of child-caregiver completed dental examinations in 2002-2004 (baseline) and in 2004-2005 (follow-up). Caries were measured using the International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS). The caries status of tooth surfaces was classified into initial (ICDAS 1-2), moderate (ICDAS 3-4) and extensive (ICDAS 5-6) stages. Counts of tooth surfaces with progression, by baseline caries severity level, were used to compute rate ratios (RRs) relative to sound stages. RRs were also computed for type of tooth surfaces and frequency of intake of soda consumption at baseline. After adjusting for confounders, caries progression was more likely to occur in tooth surfaces with any baseline caries relative to sound surfaces. For surfaces with initial caries, the rate of progression to moderate caries was 9.6 times higher than that of sound surfaces. Surfaces with initial and moderate caries progressed to extensive caries 6.1 and 20.6 times, respectively, relative to sound surfaces. Baseline soda consumption was not associated with the RR of caries progression. In conclusion, the staging of caries identifies different progression risks and significant emphasis should be placed on secondary prevention of initial lesions as well as on primary prevention. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Surface Roughness Measurement on a Wing Aircraft by Speckle Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Barrientos

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The study of the damage of aeronautical materials is important because it may change the microscopic surface structure profiles. The modification of geometrical surface properties can cause small instabilities and then a displacement of the boundary layer. One of the irregularities we can often find is surface roughness. Due to an increase of roughness and other effects, there may be extra momentum losses in the boundary layer and a modification in the parasite drag. In this paper we present a speckle method for measuring the surface roughness on an actual unmanned aircraft wing. The results show an inhomogeneous roughness distribution on the wing, as expected according to the anisotropic influence of the winds over the entire wing geometry. A calculation of the uncertainty of the technique is given.

  1. Surface roughness measurement on a wing aircraft by speckle correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Félix; Barrientos, Alberto

    2013-09-05

    The study of the damage of aeronautical materials is important because it may change the microscopic surface structure profiles. The modification of geometrical surface properties can cause small instabilities and then a displacement of the boundary layer. One of the irregularities we can often find is surface roughness. Due to an increase of roughness and other effects, there may be extra momentum losses in the boundary layer and a modification in the parasite drag. In this paper we present a speckle method for measuring the surface roughness on an actual unmanned aircraft wing. The results show an inhomogeneous roughness distribution on the wing, as expected according to the anisotropic influence of the winds over the entire wing geometry. A calculation of the uncertainty of the technique is given.

  2. Surface photovoltage measurements and finite element modeling of SAW devices.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donnelly, Christine

    2012-03-01

    Over the course of a Summer 2011 internship with the MEMS department of Sandia National Laboratories, work was completed on two major projects. The first and main project of the summer involved taking surface photovoltage measurements for silicon samples, and using these measurements to determine surface recombination velocities and minority carrier diffusion lengths of the materials. The SPV method was used to fill gaps in the knowledge of material parameters that had not been determined successfully by other characterization methods. The second project involved creating a 2D finite element model of a surface acoustic wave device. A basic form of the model with the expected impedance response curve was completed, and the model is ready to be further developed for analysis of MEMS photonic resonator devices.

  3. Design parameters for measurements of local catalytic activity on surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Martin; Johannessen, Tue; Jørgensen, Jan Hoffmann

    2006-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics in combination with experiments is used to characterize a gas sampling device for measurements of the local catalytic activity on surfaces. The device basically consists of a quartz capillary mounted concentrically inside an aluminum tube. Reactant gas is blown toward...... the catalytic surface through the annulus between the tubes, and the gas is sampled close to the surface by the capillary. The influence of various design parameters on the lateral resolution and sensitivity of the measurements is investigated. It is found that the cuter diameter of the annulus sets the upper......, the limits of the range in reaction rate, which can be Studied are estimated. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  4. Freeform surface measurement and characterisation using a toolmakers microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Francis Seung-yin; Chauh, Kong-Bieng; Venuvinod, Patri K

    2014-01-01

    Current freeform surface (FFS) characterization systems mainly cover aspects related to computer-aided design/manufacture (CAD/CAM). This paper describes a new approach that extends into computer-aided inspection (CAI).The following novel features are addressed: - ◼ Feature recognition and extraction from surface data; - ◼ Characterisation of properties of the surface's M and N vectors at individual vertex; - ◼ Development of a measuring plan using a toolmakers microscope for the inspection of the FFS; - ◼ Inspection of the actual FFS produced by CNC milling; - ◼ Verification of the measurement results and comparison with the CAD design data; Tests have shown that the deviations between the CAI and CAD data were within the estimated uncertainty limits

  5. Development of measurement standards for verifying functional performance of surface texture measuring instruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, A [Life and Industrial Product Development Department Olympus Corporation, 2951 Ishikawa-machi, Hachiouji-shi, Tokyo (Japan); Suzuki, H [Industrial Marketing and Planning Department Olympus Corporation, Shinjyuku Monolith, 3-1 Nishi-Shinjyuku 2-chome, Tokyo (Japan); Yanagi, K, E-mail: a_fujii@ot.olympus.co.jp [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka-machi, Nagaoka-shi, Niigata (Japan)

    2011-08-19

    A new measurement standard is proposed for verifying overall functional performance of surface texture measuring instruments. Its surface is composed of sinusoidal surface waveforms of chirp signals along horizontal cross sections of the material measure. One of the notable features is that the amplitude of each cycle in the chirp signal form is geometrically modulated so that the maximum slope is kept constant. The maximum slope of the chirp-like signal is gradually decreased according to movement in the lateral direction. We fabricated the measurement standard by FIB processing, and it was calibrated by AFM. We tried to evaluate the functional performance of Laser Scanning Microscope by this standard in terms of amplitude response with varying slope angles. As a result, it was concluded that the proposed standard can easily evaluate the performance of surface texture measuring instruments.

  6. An instrument for the measurement of road surface reflection properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corell, Dennis Dan; Sørensen, K.

    2017-01-01

    Road surface reflection data in the form of standard r-tables serve as input for design calculations of road lighting installations on traffic roads. However, in several countries the use of the standard r-tables has not been verified by measurement in a long period of time, while the types of road...

  7. Estimation of surface area and surface area measure of three-dimensional sets from digitizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziegel, Johanna; Kiderlen, Markus

    2010-01-01

    A local method for estimating surface area and surface area measure of three-dimensional objects from discrete binary images is presented. A weight is assigned to each 2 × 2 × 2 configuration of voxels and the total surface area of an object is given by summation of the local area contributions....... The method is based on an exact asymptotic result that holds for increasing resolution of the digitization. It states that the number of occurrences of a 2 ×  2 × 2 configuration is asymptotically proportional to an integral of its “h-function” with respect to the surface area measure of the object. We find...

  8. Step-height measurements on sand surfaces: A comparison between optical scanner and coordinate measuring machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohaghegh, Kamran; Yazdanbakhsh, Seyed Alireza; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2016-01-01

    the same routine to touch the different positions on the polygonised mesh. Each measurement was repeated 5 times. The results of step height measurements on sand surfaces showed a maximum error of ± 12 µm for CMM, while scanner shows only ± 4 µm. Generally speaking, optical step height values were measured...

  9. Surface encapsulation process for managing low-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unger, S.L.; Telles, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    Current processes for low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) stabilization involve mixing contaminants with a fixative such as cement, asphalt, polyethylene, or vinyl monomers, and subsequently curing the mixtures in containers. These methods give rise to processing difficulties and yield products lacking performance to assure long-term LLRW immobilization. Mixing of LLRW into fixatives is impeded by viscous media and the curing reaction is inhibited by LLRW constituents. Product performance is affected by corrosion of the containers which ultimately expose the cured mixtures to environmental stresses. This process, termed the ''Surface Encapsulation Process,'' circumvents these problems. A thermosetting fixative is employed that mixes readily with LLRW and is highly insensitive to inhibition in curing. The agglomerated mixtures are further stabilized by encapsulation with seamless jackets of corrosion resistant plastic, such as polyethylene. In laboratory-scale investigations, feasibility of the technique was demonstrated for managing a broad spectrum of LLRW simulants including ion-exchange resins, beads, and glasses, and sodium salts. Products tested to date meet all relevant NRC and DOT regulations governing waste fixation. The high waste loadings of the products, use of commodity resins, and processing simplicity indicated our process would provide high performance LLRW stabilization at costs that are competitive to those for processes employing state-of-the-art fixatives. An economic analysis based on managing LLRW generated by commercial power plants (≅1,000 MeW) substantiates the competitive process costs advantages

  10. Application of neutron backscatter techniques to level measurement problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonardi-Cattolica, A.M.; McMillan, D.H.; Telfer, A.; Griffin, L.H.; Hunt, R.H.

    1982-01-01

    We have designed and built portable level detectors and fixed level monitors based on neutron scattering and detection principles. The main components of these devices, which we call neutron backscatter gauges, are a neutron emitting radioisotope, a neutron detector, and a ratemeter. The gauge is a good detector for hydrogen but is much less sensitive to most other materials. This allows level measurements of hydrogen bearing materials, such as hydrocarbons, to be made through the walls of metal vessels. Measurements can be made conveniently through steel walls which are a few inches thick. We have used neutron backscatter gauges in a wide variety of level measurement applications encountered in the petrochemical industry. In a number of cases, the neutron techniques have proven to be superior to conventional level measurement methods, including gamma ray methods

  11. Analysis of flame surface density measurements in turbulent premixed combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halter, Fabien [Institut PRISME, Universite d' Orleans, 45072 Orleans (France); Chauveau, Christian; Goekalp, Iskender [Institut de Combustion, Aerothermique, Reactivite et Environnement, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 45071 Orleans (France); Veynante, Denis [Laboratoire E.M2.C, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Ecole Centrale Paris, 92295 Chatenay-Malabry (France)

    2009-03-15

    In premixed turbulent combustion, reaction rates can be estimated from the flame surface density. This parameter, which measures the mean flame surface area available per unit volume, may be obtained from algebraic expressions or by solving a transport equation. In this study, detailed measurements were performed on a Bunsen-type burner fed with methane/air mixtures in order to determine the local flame surface density experimentally. This burner, located in a high-pressure combustion chamber, allows investigation of turbulent premixed flames under various flow, mixture, and pressure conditions. In the present work, equivalence ratio was varied from 0.6 to 0.8 and pressure from 0.1 to 0.9 MPa. Flame front visualizations by Mie scattering laser tomography are used to obtain experimental data on the instantaneous flame front dynamics. The exact equation given by Pope is used to obtain flame surface density maps for different flame conditions. Some assumptions are made in order to access three-dimensional information from our two-dimensional experiments. Two different methodologies are proposed and tested in term of global mass balance (what enters compared to what is burned). The detailed experimental flame surface data provided for the first time in this work should progressively allow improvement of turbulent premixed flame modeling approaches. (author)

  12. NOTE: Surface dose extrapolation measurements with radiographic film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butson, Martin J.; Cheung, Tsang; Yu, Peter K. N.; Currie, Michael

    2004-07-01

    Assessment of surface dose delivered from radiotherapy x-ray beams for optimal results should be performed both inside and outside the prescribed treatment fields. An extrapolation technique can be used with radiographic film to perform surface dose assessment for open field high energy x-ray beams. This can produce an accurate two-dimensional map of surface dose if required. Results have shown that the surface percentage dose can be estimated within ±3% of parallel plate ionization chamber results with radiographic film using a series of film layers to produce an extrapolated result. Extrapolated percentage dose assessment for 10 cm, 20 cm and 30 cm square fields was estimated to be 15% ± 2%, 29% ± 3% and 38% ± 3% at the central axis and relatively uniform across the treatment field. The corresponding parallel plate ionization chamber measurements are 16%, 27% and 37%, respectively. Surface doses are also measured outside the treatment field which are mainly due to scattered electron contamination. To achieve this result, film calibration curves must be irradiated to similar x-ray field sizes as the experimental film to minimize quantitative variations in film optical density caused by varying x-ray spectrum with field size.

  13. Key techniques for vision measurement of 3D object surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huachao; Zhang, Shubi; Guo, Guangli; Liu, Chao; Yu, Ruipeng

    2006-11-01

    Digital close-range photogrammetry system and machine vision are widely used in production control, quality inspection. The main aim is to provide accurate 3D objects or reconstruction of an object surface and give an expression to an object shape. First, the key techniques of camera calibration and target image positioning for 3D object surface vision measurement were briefly reviewed and analyzed in this paper. Then, an innovative and effect method for precise space coordinates measurements was proposed. Test research proved that the thought and methods we proposed about image segmentation, detection and positioning of circular marks were effective and valid. A propriety weight value for adding parameters, control points and orientation elements in bundle adjustment with self-calibration are advantageous to gaining high accuracy of space coordinates. The RMS error of check points is less than +/-1 mm, which can meet the requirement in industrial measurement with high accuracy.

  14. Combined surface acoustic wave and surface plasmon resonance measurement of collagen and fibrinogen layer physical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-M. Friedt

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We use an instrument combining optical (surface plasmon resonance and acoustic (Love mode surface acoustic wave device real-time measurements on a same surface for the identification of water content in collagen and fibrinogen protein layers. After calibration of the surface acoustic wave device sensitivity by copper electrodeposition and surfactant adsorption, the bound mass and its physical properties – density and optical index – are extracted from the complementary measurement techniques and lead to thickness and water ratio values compatible with the observed signal shifts. Such results are especially usefully for protein layers with a high water content as shown here for collagen on an hydrophobic surface. We obtain the following results: collagen layers include 70±20% water and are 16±3 to 19±3 nm thick for bulk concentrations ranging from 30 to 300 μg/ml. Fibrinogen layers include 50±10% water for layer thicknesses in the 6±1.5 to 13±2 nm range when the bulk concentration is in the 46 to 460 μg/ml range. Keywords: surface acoustic wave, surface plasmon resonance, collagen, fibrinogen, density, thickness

  15. Evaluation of a method to measure long term cortisol levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manenschijn, Laura; Koper, Jan W; Lamberts, Steven W J; van Rossum, Elisabeth F C

    2011-01-01

    Elevated levels of cortisol are known to induce various symptoms and diseases, e.g. abdominal obesity, type 2 diabetes, osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease. Measuring serum, saliva and urine cortisol is limited to one time point. Measurement of cortisol in scalp hair is a recently developed method to measure long term cortisol levels. The aim of this study was to investigate whether hair cortisol is a feasible parameter to measure cortisol exposure. We collected hair samples of 195 healthy individuals, 9 hypercortisolemic and one hypocortisolemic patient and measured hair cortisol levels. Cortisol was extracted from scalp hair using methanol and cortisol levels were measured using a salivary ELISA kit. Measurement of waist and hip circumferences and blood pressure was performed in 46 healthy subjects. We found a positive correlation between hair cortisol and both waist circumference (r=0.392, p=0.007) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) (r=0.425, p=0.003). No correlations were found between hair cortisol levels and BMI, blood pressure or age. There was no decline in cortisol levels in six consecutive hair segments. Hair cortisol levels were elevated in patients with known hypercortisolism (pcortisol was positively correlated with WHR, suggesting that hair cortisol reflects cortisol exposure at tissue level, which was also supported by elevated hair cortisol levels in hypercortisolemic patients and concordance between hair cortisol levels and clinical disease course. Cortisol levels in hair are slightly influenced by hair treatment but not by natural hair colour, use of hair products, gender or age. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Development of measuring device for inner surfaces of embedded piping (Contract research)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Hirokuni [Ohyo Koken Kogyo Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Hatakeyama, Mutsuo [Radioactive Waste Management and Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Technology Center, Tokyo (Japan); Tachibana, Mitsuo; Yanagihara, Satoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    The measuring device for inner surfaces of embedded piping (MISE) was developed to evaluate low-level radiological contaminations of inner surfaces of piping. The MISE consists of a cylindrically-formed double layered type detector and a piping crawling robot, which were designed and manufactured separately. In measurements of the contaminations, an outer cylindrical detector close to the surface of piping measures {beta}-rays and {gamma}-rays and an inner cylindrical detector set after a shielding plate for shield of {beta}-rays measures {gamma}-rays. The {beta}-ray counting rates are derived by subtracting {gamma}-ray counts measured by the inner detector from {gamma}- and {beta}-ray counts measured by the outer detector. The piping crawling robot transports the cylindrically-formed double layered type detector with observing inner surfaces of piping. The detection limit for the contamination of {sup 60}Co was found to be about 0.17 Bq/cm{sup 2} with measurement time of 30 seconds. It is expected that 0.2 Bq/cm{sup 2} corresponding to clearance level of {sup 60}Co (0.4 Bq/g) can be evaluated with measurement time of 2 seconds, which is equal to measurement speed of 54 m/h. (author)

  17. An experimental method for making spectral emittance and surface temperature measurements of opaque surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, Travis J.; Jones, Matthew R.; Tree, Dale R.; Daniel Maynes, R.; Baxter, Larry L.

    2011-01-01

    An experimental procedure has been developed to make spectral emittance and temperature measurements. The spectral emittance of an object is calculated using measurements of the spectral emissive power and of the surface temperature of the object obtained using a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. A calibration procedure is described in detail which accounts for the temperature dependence of the detector. The methods used to extract the spectral emissive power and surface temperature from measured infrared spectra were validated using a blackbody radiator at known temperatures. The average error in the measured spectral emittance was 2.1% and the average difference between the temperature inferred from the recorded spectra and the temperature indicated on the blackbody radiator was 1.2%. The method was used to measure the spectral emittance of oxidized copper at various temperatures.

  18. A new surface resistance measurement method with ultrahigh sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Changnian.

    1993-01-01

    A superconducting niobium triaxial cavity has been designed and fabricated to study residual surface resistance of planar superconducting materials. The edge of a 25.4 mm or larger diameter sample in the triaxial cavity is located outside the strong field region. Therefore, the edge effects and possible losses between the thin film and the substrate have been minimized, ensuring that induced RF losses are intrinsic to the test material. The fundamental resonant frequency of the cavity is the same as the working frequency of CEBAF cavities. The cavity has a compact size compared to its TE 011 counterpart, which makes it more sensitive to the sample's loss. For even higher sensitivity, a calorimetry method has been used to measure the RF losses on the superconducting sample. At 2 K, a 2 μK temperature change can be resolved by using carbon resistor sensors. The temperature distribution caused by RF heating is measured by 16 carbon composition resistor sensors. A 0.05 μW heating power can be detected as such a resolution, which translates to a surface resistance of 0.02 nΩ at a surface magnetic field of 52 Oe. This is the most sensitive device for surface resistance measurements to date. In addition, losses due to the indium seal, coupling probes, field emission sites other than the sample, and all of the high field resonator surface, are excluded in the measurement. Surface resistance of both niobium and high-Tc superconducting thin films has been measured. A low R s of 35.2 μΩ was measured for a 25.4 mm diameter YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 thin film at 1.5 GHz and at 2 K. The measurement result is the first result for a large area epitaxially grown thin film sample at such a low RF frequency. The abrupt disappearance of multipacting between two parallel plates has been observed and monitored with the 16 temperature mapping sensors. Field emission or some field dependent anomalous RF losses on the niobium plate have also been observed

  19. Water Surface and Velocity Measurement-River and Flume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Chandler

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the flow of water in natural watercourses has become increasingly important as climate change increases the incidence of extreme rainfall events which cause flooding. Vegetation in rivers and streams reduce water conveyance and natural vegetation plays a critical role in flood events which needs to be understood more fully. A funded project at Loughborough University is therefore examining the influence of vegetation upon water flow, requiring measurement of both the 3-D water surface and flow velocities. Experimental work therefore requires the measurement of water surface morphology and velocity (i.e. speed and direction in a controlled laboratory environment using a flume but also needs to be adaptable to work in a real river. Measuring the 3D topographic characteristics and velocity field of a flowing water surface is difficult and the purpose of this paper is to describe recent experimental work to achieve this. After reviewing past work in this area, the use of close range digital photogrammetry for capturing both the 3D water surface and surface velocity is described. The selected approach uses either two or three synchronised digital SLR cameras in combination with PhotoModeler for data processing, a commercial close range photogrammetric package. One critical aspect is the selection and distribution of appropriate floating marker points, which are critical if automated and appropriate measurement methods are to be used. Two distinct targeting approaches are available: either large and distinct specific floating markers or some fine material capable of providing appropriate texture. Initial work described in this paper uses specific marker points, which also provide the potential measuring surface velocity. The paper demonstrates that a high degree of measurement and marking automation is possible in a flume environment, where lighting influences can be highly controlled. When applied to a real river it is apparent that

  20. Simultaneous measurements of top surface and its underlying film surfaces in multilayer film structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghim, Young-Sik; Rhee, Hyug-Gyo; Davies, Angela

    2017-09-19

    With the growth of 3D packaging technology and the development of flexible, transparent electrodes, the use of multilayer thin-films is steadily increasing throughout high-tech industries including semiconductor, flat panel display, and solar photovoltaic industries. Also, this in turn leads to an increase in industrial demands for inspection of internal analysis. However, there still remain many technical limitations to overcome for measurement of the internal structure of the specimen without damage. In this paper, we propose an innovative optical inspection technique for simultaneous measurements of the surface and film thickness corresponding to each layer of multilayer film structures by computing the phase and reflectance over a wide range of wavelengths. For verification of our proposed method, the sample specimen of multilayer films was fabricated via photolithography process, and the surface profile and film thickness of each layer were measured by two different techniques of a stylus profilometer and an ellipsometer, respectively. Comparison results shows that our proposed technique enables simultaneous measurements of the top surface and its underlying film surfaces with high precision, which could not be measured by conventional non-destructive methods.

  1. Hydrologic Science and Satellite Measurements of Surface Water (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsdorf, D. E.; Mognard, N. M.; Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2010-12-01

    While significant advances continue to be made for satellite measurements of surface waters, important science and application opportunities remain. Examples include the following: (1) Our current methods of measuring floodwater dynamics are either sparsely distributed or temporally inadequate. As an example, flood depths are measured by using high water marks, which capture only the peak of the flood wave, not its temporal variability. (2) Discharge is well measured at individual points along stream networks using in-situ gauges, but these do not capture within-reach hydraulic variability such as the water surface slope changes on the rising and falling limbs of flood waves. (3) Just a 1.0 mm/day error in ET over the Congo Basin translates to a 35,000 m3/s discharge error. Knowing the discharge of the Congo River and its many tributaries should significantly improve our understanding of the water balance throughout the basin. The Congo is exemplary of many other basins around the globe. (4) Arctic hydrology is punctuated by millions of unmeasured lakes. Globally, there might be as many as 30 million lakes larger than a hectare. Storage changes in these lakes are nearly unknown, but in the Arctic such changes are likely an indication of global warming. (5) Well over 100 rivers cross international boundaries, yet the sharing of water data is poor. Overcoming this helps to better manage the entire river basin while also providing a better assessment of potential water related disasters. The Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT, http://swot.jpl.nasa.gov/) mission is designed to meet these needs by providing global measurements of surface water hydrodynamics. SWOT will allow estimates of discharge in rivers wider than 100m (50m goal) and storage changes in water bodies larger than 250m by 250m (and likely as small as one hectare).

  2. Self-consistent Green’s-function technique for bulk and surface impurity calculations: Surface core-level shifts by complete screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldén, M.; Abrikosov, I. A.; Johansson, B.

    1994-01-01

    of the frozen-core and atomic-sphere approximation but, in addition, includes the dipole contribution to the intersphere potential. Within the concept of complete screening, we identify the surface core-level binding-energy shift with the surface segregation energy of a core-ionized atom and use the Green......'s-function impurity technique in a comprehensive study of the surface core-level shifts (SCLS) of the 4d and 5d transition metals. In those cases, where observed data refer to single crystals, we obtain good agreement with experiment, whereas the calculations typically underestimate the measured shift obtained from...... a polycrystalline surface. Comparison is made with independent theoretical data for the surface core-level eigenvalue shift, and the much debated role of the so-called initial-and final-state contributions to the SCLS is discussed....

  3. Measuring grinding surface roughness based on the sharpness evaluation of colour images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huaian, Y I; Jian, L I U; Enhui, L U; Peng, A O

    2016-01-01

    Current machine vision-based detection methods for metal surface roughness mainly use the grey values of images for statistical analysis but do not make full use of the colour information and ignore the subjective judgment of the human vision system. To address these problems, this paper proposes a method to measure surface roughness through the sharpness evaluation of colour images. Based on the difference in sharpness of virtual images of colour blocks that are formed on grinding surfaces with different roughness, an algorithm for evaluating the sharpness of colour images that is based on the difference of the RGB colour space was used to develop a correlation model between the sharpness and the surface roughness. The correlation model was analysed under two conditions: constant illumination and varying illumination. The effect of the surface textures of the grinding samples on the image sharpness was also considered, demonstrating the feasibility of the detection method. The results show that the sharpness is strongly correlated with the surface roughness; when the illumination and the surface texture have the same orientation, the sharpness clearly decreases with increasing surface roughness. Under varying illumination, this correlation between the sharpness and surface roughness was highly robust, and the sharpness of each virtual image increased linearly with the illumination. Relative to the detection method for surface roughness using gray level co-occurrence matrix or artificial neural network, the proposed method is convenient, highly accurate and has a wide measurement range. (paper)

  4. Measurement of Heme Synthesis Levels in Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooda, Jagmohan; Alam, Maksudul; Zhang, Li

    2015-07-09

    Heme serves as the prosthetic group for a wide variety of proteins known as hemoproteins, such as hemoglobin, myoglobin and cytochromes. It is involved in various molecular and cellular processes such as gene transcription, translation, cell differentiation and cell proliferation. The biosynthesis levels of heme vary across different tissues and cell types and is altered in diseased conditions such as anemia, neuropathy and cancer. This technique uses [4-(14)C] 5-aminolevulinic acid ([(14)C] 5-ALA), one of the early precursors in the heme biosynthesis pathway to measure the levels of heme synthesis in mammalian cells. This assay involves incubation of cells with [(14)C] 5-ALA followed by extraction of heme and measurement of the radioactivity incorporated into heme. This procedure is accurate and quick. This method measures the relative levels of heme biosynthesis rather than the total heme content. To demonstrate the use of this technique the levels of heme biosynthesis were measured in several mammalian cell lines.

  5. Instructions for 104-SX liquid level measurement field tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, R.H.

    1994-01-01

    This document provides detailed instructions for field testing a suggested solution of inserting a liner inside the 104-SX failed Liquid Observation Well to gain access for making temporary Liquid Level Measurement until a permanent solution has been provided

  6. Measurement of Acceptable Noise Level with Background Music

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Hyun-Jung; Bahng, Junghwa; Lee, Jae Hee

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Acceptable noise level (ANL) is a measure of the maximum background noise level (BNL) that a person is willing to tolerate while following a target story. Although researchers have used various sources of target sound in ANL measures, a limited type of background noise has been used. Extending the previous study of Gordon-Hickey & Moore (2007), the current study determined the effect of music genre and tempo on ANLs as possible factors affecting ANLs. We also investi...

  7. Lifetime measurement of the 8s level in francium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, E.; Sprouse, G.D.; Orozco, L.A.; Galvan, A. Perez

    2005-01-01

    We measure the lifetime of the 8s level of 210 Fr atoms on a magneto-optically trapped sample with time-correlated single-photon counting. The 7P 1/2 state serves as the resonant intermediate level for two-step excitation of the 8s level completed with a 1.3-μm laser. Analysis of the fluorescence decay through the 7P 3/2 level gives 53.30±0.44 ns for the 8s level lifetime

  8. Magnetic flux surface measurements at the Wendelstein 7-X stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otte, Matthias; Andreeva, Tamara; Biedermann, Christoph; Bozhenkov, Sergey; Geiger, Joachim; Sunn Pedersen, Thomas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Greifswald (Germany); Lazerson, Samuel [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Recently the first plasma operation phase of the Wendelstein 7-X stellarator has been started at IPP Greifswald. Wendelstein 7-X is an optimized stellarator with a complex superconducting magnet system consisting of 50 non-planar and 20 planar field coils and further 10 normal conducting control and 5 trim coils. The magnetic confinement and hence the expected plasma performance are decisively determined by the properties of the magnet system, especially by the existence and quality of the magnetic flux surfaces. Even small error fields may result in significant changes of the flux surface topology. Therefore, measurements of the vacuum magnetic flux surfaces have been performed before plasma operation. The first experimental results confirm the existence and quality of the flux surfaces to the full extend from low field up to the nominal field strength of B=2.5T. This includes the dedicated magnetic limiter configuration that is exclusively used for the first plasma operation. Furthermore, the measurements are indicating that the intrinsic error fields are within the tolerable range and can be controlled utilizing the trim coils as expected.

  9. Surface albedo measurements in Mexico City metropolitan area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, T; Mar, B; Longoria, R; Ruiz Suarez, L. G [Centro de Ciencias de la Atmosfera, UNAM, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Morales, L [Instituto de Geografia, UNAM, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2001-04-01

    Optical and thermal properties of soils are important input data for the meteorological and photochemical modules of air quality models. As development of these models increase on spatial resolution good albedo data become more important. In this paper measurements of surface albedo of UV (295-385 nm) and visible (450-550 nm) radiation are reported for different urban and rural surfaces in the vicinity of Mexico City. It was found for the downtown zone and average albedo value of 0.05 which is in very good agreement with reported values for urban surfaces. Our albedo values measured in UV region for grey cement and green grass are of 0.10 and 0.009, respectively, and quite similar to those found at the literature of 0.11 and 0.008 for those type of surfaces. [Spanish] Las propiedades opticas y termicas de suelos son datos importantes para los modulos meteorologicos y fotoquimicos de los modelos de calidad del aire. Conforme aumenta la resolucion espacial del modelo se vuelve mas importante contar con buenos datos de albedo. En este articulo se presentan mediciones de albedo superficial de radiacion Ultravioleta (295-385 nm) y visible (450-550 nm) para diferentes superficies urbanas. Los valores medidos de albedo en la region UV para cemento gris y pasto verde son de 0.10 y 0.009, respectivamente, y son muy similares a los reportados en la literatura, 0.11 y 0.008 para este tipo de superficies.

  10. Can atom-surface potential measurements test atomic structure models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonij, Vincent P A; Klauss, Catherine E; Holmgren, William F; Cronin, Alexander D

    2011-06-30

    van der Waals (vdW) atom-surface potentials can be excellent benchmarks for atomic structure calculations. This is especially true if measurements are made with two different types of atoms interacting with the same surface sample. Here we show theoretically how ratios of vdW potential strengths (e.g., C₃(K)/C₃(Na)) depend sensitively on the properties of each atom, yet these ratios are relatively insensitive to properties of the surface. We discuss how C₃ ratios depend on atomic core electrons by using a two-oscillator model to represent the contribution from atomic valence electrons and core electrons separately. We explain why certain pairs of atoms are preferable to study for future experimental tests of atomic structure calculations. A well chosen pair of atoms (e.g., K and Na) will have a C₃ ratio that is insensitive to the permittivity of the surface, whereas a poorly chosen pair (e.g., K and He) will have a ratio of C₃ values that depends more strongly on the permittivity of the surface.

  11. Measurement of Sky Surface Brightness Fluctuations at λ=4 Microns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Bock, James J.; Ganga, Ken M.; Gorjian, Varoujan; Uemizu, Kazunori; Kawada, Mitsunobu; Lange, Andrew E.; Matsumoto, Toshio; Watabe, Toyoki

    2002-12-01

    We present a measurement of faint-source confusion in deep, wide-field 4 μm images. The 1.8d×1.8d images with 17" resolution are centered about the nearby edge-on spiral galaxies NGC 4565 and NGC 5907. After removing statistical noise and gain fluctuations in the focal plane array, we measure spatial fluctuations in the sky brightness to be δνIν=2.74+/-0.14 nW m-2 sr-1, approximately 1% of the diffuse background level observed in a single pixel. The brightness fluctuations are confirmed to be associated with the sky by subtracting sequential images of the same region. An autocorrelation analysis shows the fluctuations are well described by unresolved point sources. We see no evidence for surface brightness fluctuations on larger angular scales (2'S)=1.04+0.86-0.34 nW m-2 sr-1 to the cosmic infrared background, evaluated at S=4.0×10-8 nW m-2. From the fluctuation data we can determine the integrated source counts N(>S)=1.79+0.26-0.40×107 sr-1, evaluated at S=4.0×10-8 nW m-2. The observed fluctuations are consistent with reddened K-band galaxy number counts. The number counts of extracted point sources with flux νFν>6.3×10-7 nW m-2 are dominated by stars and agree well with the Galactic stellar model of Wright & Reese. Removing the stellar contribution from DIRBE maps with zodiacal subtraction results in a residual brightness of 14.0+/-2.6 (22.2+/-5.9) nW m-2 sr-1 at 3.5 (4.9) μm for the NGC 5907 field and 24.0+/-2.7 (36.8+/-6.0) nW m-2 sr-1 at 3.5 (4.9) μm for the NGC 4565 field. The NGC 5907 residuals are consistent with tentative detections of the infrared background reported by Dwek & Arendt, Wright & Reese, and Gorjian, Wright, & Chary.

  12. Noise levels near streets, effectiveness and cost abatement measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, J.

    1980-01-01

    During the years 1975-1978, research was carried concerning the current noise levels near streets, the annoyance felt by the population, possible noise abatement measures for these streets, and the economic impact of such measures. The results of the research are summarized.

  13. Measurement of Background Gamma Radiation Levels at Two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An in-situ measurement of the background radiation level was carried out at the vicinity of three campuses of two major tertiary institutions in Minna. A portable Geiger-Mueller tube-based environmental radiation dosimeter was used for the measurement. A total of 34 point was surveyed across the three institutions for ...

  14. Measurement of environmental radiation levels and contour map ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Measurement of environmental radiation levels and contour map development for the northern zone of Adamawa state, Nigeria. ... Nigerian Journal of Physics ... Mubi North, Mubi South, Michika and Madagali, all in the northern zone of Adamawa State, Nigeria was measured using a Radiation Alert Monitor 4 solid state ...

  15. Measuring Structural Gender Equality in Mexico: A State Level Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frias, Sonia M.

    2008-01-01

    The main goal of this article is to assess the level of gender equality across the 32 Mexican states. After reviewing conceptual and methodological issues related to previous measures of structural inequality I detail the logic and methodology involved in the construction of a composite and multidimensional measure of gender equality, at the…

  16. Recent advances in measurements of the nuclear level density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, Bency

    2007-01-01

    A short review of recent advances in measurements of the nuclear level density is given. First results of the inverse level density parameter - angular momentum correlation in a number of nuclei around Z∼50 shell region at an excitation energy around 0.3 MeV/nucleon are presented. Significant variations observed over and above the expected shell corrections are discussed in context of the emerging trends in microscopic calculations of the nuclear level density. (author)

  17. Surface moisture measurement system hardware acceptance test report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, G.A., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-28

    This document summarizes the results of the hardware acceptance test for the Surface Moisture Measurement System (SMMS). This test verified that the mechanical and electrical features of the SMMS functioned as designed and that the unit is ready for field service. The bulk of hardware testing was performed at the 306E Facility in the 300 Area and the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility in the 400 Area. The SMMS was developed primarily in support of Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Safety Programs for moisture measurement in organic and ferrocyanide watch list tanks.

  18. System design description for surface moisture measurement system (SMMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargo, G.F.

    1996-09-23

    The SMMS has been developed to measure moisture in the top few centimeters of tank waste. The SMMS development was initiated by the preliminary findings of SAR-033, and does not necessarily fulfill any established DQO. After the SAR-033 is released, if no significant changes are made, moisture measurements in the organic waste tanks will rapidly become a DQO. The SMMS was designed to be installed in any 4 inch or larger riser, and to allow maximum adjustability for riser lengths, and is used to deploy a sensor package on the waste surface within a 6 foot radius about the azimuth. The first sensor package will be a neutron probe.

  19. Surface moisture measurement system hardware acceptance test procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, G.A.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this acceptance test procedure is to verify that the mechanical and electrical features of the Surface Moisture Measurement System are operating as designed and that the unit is ready for field service. This procedure will be used in conjunction with a software acceptance test procedure, which addresses testing of software and electrical features not addressed in this document. Hardware testing will be performed at the 306E Facility in the 300 Area and the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility in the 400 Area. These systems were developed primarily in support of Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Safety Programs for moisture measurement in organic and ferrocyanide watch list tanks

  20. Actual evaporation estimation from infrared measurement of soil surface temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Pognant

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Within the hydrological cycle, actual evaporation represents the second most important process in terms of volumes of water transported, second only to the precipitation phenomena. Several methods for the estimation of the Ea were proposed by researchers in scientific literature, but the estimation of the Ea from potential evapotranspiration often requires the knowledge of hard-to-find parameters (e.g.: vegetation morphology, vegetation cover, interception of rainfall by the canopy, evaporation from the canopy surface and uptake of water by plant roots and many existing database are characterized by missing or incomplete information that leads to a rough estimation of the actual evaporation amount. Starting from the above considerations, the aim of this study is to develop and validate a method for the estimation of the Ea based on two steps: i the potential evaporation estimation by using the meteorological data (i.e. Penman-Monteith; ii application of a correction factor based on the infrared soil surface temperature measurements. The dataset used in this study were collected during two measurement campaigns conducted both in a plain testing site (Grugliasco, Italy, and in a mountain South-East facing slope (Cogne, Italy. During those periods, hourly measurement of air temperature, wind speed, infrared surface temperature, soil heat flux, and soil water content were collected. Results from the dataset collected in the two testing sites show a good agreement between the proposed method and reference methods used for the Ea estimation.

  1. The role of probe oxide in local surface conductivity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, C. J.; Kryvchenkova, O.; Wilson, L. S. J.; Maffeis, T. G. G.; Kalna, K.; Cobley, R. J.

    2015-05-01

    Local probe methods can be used to measure nanoscale surface conductivity, but some techniques including nanoscale four point probe rely on at least two of the probes forming the same low resistivity non-rectifying contact to the sample. Here, the role of probe shank oxide has been examined by carrying out contact and non-contact I V measurements on GaAs when the probe oxide has been controllably reduced, both experimentally and in simulation. In contact, the barrier height is pinned but the barrier shape changes with probe shank oxide dimensions. In non-contact measurements, the oxide modifies the electrostatic interaction inducing a quantum dot that alters the tunneling behavior. For both, the contact resistance change is dependent on polarity, which violates the assumption required for four point probe to remove probe contact resistance from the measured conductivity. This has implications for all nanoscale surface probe measurements and macroscopic four point probe, both in air and vacuum, where the role of probe oxide contamination is not well understood.

  2. Holographic otoscope for nanodisplacement measurements of surfaces under dynamic excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Moreno, J M; Furlong, Cosme; Rosowski, John J; Harrington, Ellery; Cheng, Jeffrey T; Scarpino, C; Santoyo, F Mendoza

    2011-01-01

    We describe a novel holographic otoscope system for measuring nanodisplacements of objects subjected to dynamic excitation. Such measurements are necessary to quantify the mechanical deformation of surfaces in mechanics, acoustics, electronics, biology, and many other fields. In particular, we are interested in measuring the sound-induced motion of biological samples, such as an eardrum. Our holographic otoscope system consists of laser illumination delivery (IS), optical head (OH), and image processing computer (IP) systems. The IS delivers the object beam (OB) and the reference beam (RB) to the OH. The backscattered light coming from the object illuminated by the OB interferes with the RB at the camera sensor plane to be digitally recorded as a hologram. The hologram is processed by the IP using the Fresnel numerical reconstruction algorithm, where the focal plane can be selected freely. Our holographic otoscope system is currently deployed in a clinic, and is packaged in a custom design. It is mounted in a mechatronic positioning system to increase its maneuverability degrees to be conveniently positioned in front of the object to be measured. We present representative results highlighting the versatility of our system to measure deformations of complex elastic surfaces in the wavelength scale including a copper foil membrane and postmortem tympanic membrane. SCANNING 33: 342-352, 2011. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Serum levels of vitamin A, visual function and ocular surface after bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Paula Nogueira de Araújo BRANDÃO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for severe obesity, but the surgery increases the risk of developing nutritional deficiencies, such as vitamin A deficiency. In human metabolism, vitamin A plays a role in vision. OBJECTIVE To evaluate serum vitamin A, visual function and ocular surface of patients undergoing bariatric surgery. METHODS A cross-sectional and analytical study was conduced with 28 patients undergoing bariatric surgery for at least 6 months. Ophthalmologic evaluation was done through color vision test, contrast sensitivity test, ocular surface tests and confocal microscopy, as well as vitamin A serum measurement. RESULTS Vertical sleeve gastrectomy was performed in seven (25.0% patients and Roux -en-Y gastric by-pass in 21 (75.0%. Mean serum vitamin A level was 1.7±0.5 µmoL/L. Most patients (60.7% had symptoms of dry eye. Five (17.9% patients had contrast sensitivity impairment and 18 (64.3% color vision changes. In the group of patients undergoing Roux -en-Y gastric by-pass , mean vitamin A levels were 1.8±0.6 µmoL/L, whereas they were 1.7±0.5 µmoL/L in patients submitted to the restrictive technique vertical sleeve gastrectomy . The analysis of the influence of serum levels of vitamin A in the visual function and ocular surface was performed by Pearson correlation test and there was no significant correlation between any of the variables and vitamin A. CONCLUSION There was no influence of the bariatric surgery technique used on serum vitamin A levels, on the visual function or on the ocular surface. Moreover, there was no correlation between serum levels of vitamin A and the visual function or the ocular surface changes.

  4. Serum levels of vitamin A, visual function and ocular surface after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Luana Paula Nogueira de Araújo; Vilar, Lucio; Cavalcanti, Bernardo Menelau; Brandão, Pedro Henrique Amorim; Arantes, Tiago Eugênio Faria E; Campos, Josemberg Marins

    2017-01-01

    - Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for severe obesity, but the surgery increases the risk of developing nutritional deficiencies, such as vitamin A deficiency. In human metabolism, vitamin A plays a role in vision. - To evaluate serum vitamin A, visual function and ocular surface of patients undergoing bariatric surgery. - A cross-sectional and analytical study was conduced with 28 patients undergoing bariatric surgery for at least 6 months. Ophthalmologic evaluation was done through color vision test, contrast sensitivity test, ocular surface tests and confocal microscopy, as well as vitamin A serum measurement. - Vertical sleeve gastrectomy was performed in seven (25.0%) patients and Roux -en-Y gastric by-pass in 21 (75.0%). Mean serum vitamin A level was 1.7±0.5 µmoL/L. Most patients (60.7%) had symptoms of dry eye. Five (17.9%) patients had contrast sensitivity impairment and 18 (64.3%) color vision changes. In the group of patients undergoing Roux -en-Y gastric by-pass , mean vitamin A levels were 1.8±0.6 µmoL/L, whereas they were 1.7±0.5 µmoL/L in patients submitted to the restrictive technique vertical sleeve gastrectomy . The analysis of the influence of serum levels of vitamin A in the visual function and ocular surface was performed by Pearson correlation test and there was no significant correlation between any of the variables and vitamin A. - There was no influence of the bariatric surgery technique used on serum vitamin A levels, on the visual function or on the ocular surface. Moreover, there was no correlation between serum levels of vitamin A and the visual function or the ocular surface changes.

  5. Commissioning of the XENON1T liquid level measurement system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geis, Christopher [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, Mainz (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Two-phase xenon time projection chambers (TPCs) have been operated very successfully in direct detection experiments for dark matter. This kind of detector uses liquid xenon as the sensitive target and is operated in two-phase (liquid/gas) mode, where the liquid level needs to be monitored and controlled with sub-millimeter precision. We present the installation, commissioning and first measurement data of two kinds of level meters operated in the XENON1T TPC: short level meters are three-plated capacitors measuring the level of the liquid-gas interface with a measurement range h∼5 mm and a resolution of ΔC/h∼1 pF/mm. The long level meters are cylindrical double-walled capacitors, measuring the overall filling level of the XENON1T TPC at a measurement range of h=1.4 m and a resolution of ΔC/h∼0.1 pF/mm. Further, we present the design and programming of the readout electronic based on the UTI chip by Smartec, which allows to read all six levelmeters simultaneously.

  6. On the use of double differences in inversion of surface movement measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokker, P.A.; Thienen-Visser, K. van

    2015-01-01

    Surface movement data can be used in data assimilation or inversion exercises to improve the level of knowledge of a compacting reservoir. We have designed, implemented and tested a new algorithm that uses measured optical height differences directly, without having to translate them to heights with

  7. Level validity of self-report whole-family measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manders, Willeke A; Cook, William L; Oud, Johan H L; Scholte, Ron H J; Janssens, Jan M A M; De Bruyn, Eric E J

    2007-12-01

    This article introduces an approach to testing the level validity of family assessment instruments (i.e., whether a family instrument measures family functioning at the level of the system it purports to assess). Two parents and 2 adolescents in 69 families rated the warmth in each of their family relationships and in the family as a whole. Family members' ratings of whole-family warmth assessed family functioning not only at the family level (i.e., characteristics of the family as a whole) but also at the individual level of analysis (i.e., characteristics of family members as raters), indicating a lack of level validity. Evidence was provided for the level validity of a latent variable based on family members' ratings of whole-family warmth. The findings underscore the importance of assessing the level validity of individual ratings of whole-family functioning.

  8. The evaporative fraction as a measure of surface energy partitioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, W.E. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Cuenca, R.H. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)

    1990-12-31

    The evaporative fraction is a ratio that expresses the proportion of turbulent flux energy over land surfaces devoted to evaporation and transpiration (evapotranspiration). It has been used to characterize the energy partition over land surfaces and has potential for inferring daily energy balance information based on mid-day remote sensing measurements. The HAPEX-MOBILHY program`s SAMER system provided surface energy balance data over a range of agricultural crops and soil types. The databases from this large-scale field experiment was analyzed for the purpose of studying the behavior and daylight stability of the evaporative fraction in both ideal and general meteorological conditions. Strong linear relations were found to exist between the mid-day evaporative fraction and the daylight mean evaporative fraction. Statistical tests however rejected the hypothesis that the two quantities were equal. The relations between the evaporative fraction and the surface soil moisture as well as soil moisture in the complete vegetation root zone were also explored.

  9. The evaporative fraction as a measure of surface energy partitioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, W.E. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Cuenca, R.H. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States))

    1990-01-01

    The evaporative fraction is a ratio that expresses the proportion of turbulent flux energy over land surfaces devoted to evaporation and transpiration (evapotranspiration). It has been used to characterize the energy partition over land surfaces and has potential for inferring daily energy balance information based on mid-day remote sensing measurements. The HAPEX-MOBILHY program's SAMER system provided surface energy balance data over a range of agricultural crops and soil types. The databases from this large-scale field experiment was analyzed for the purpose of studying the behavior and daylight stability of the evaporative fraction in both ideal and general meteorological conditions. Strong linear relations were found to exist between the mid-day evaporative fraction and the daylight mean evaporative fraction. Statistical tests however rejected the hypothesis that the two quantities were equal. The relations between the evaporative fraction and the surface soil moisture as well as soil moisture in the complete vegetation root zone were also explored.

  10. Airborne Spectral Measurements of Surface-Atmosphere Anisotropy for Several Surfaces and Ecosystem over Southern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatebe, C. K.; King, M. D.; Tsay, S.; Arnold, G. T.; Li, J. Y.

    2001-12-01

    The Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) was flown aboard the University of Washington Convair CV-580 research aircraft and took measurements on 23 flights between August 15 and September 16. On 12 of those flights, BRF measurements were obtained over different natural surfaces and ecosystem in southern Africa. The BRF measurements were done to characterize surface anisotropy in support of SAFARI 2000 science objectives principally to validate products from NASA's EOS satellites, and to parameterize and validate BRF models. In this paper we present results of BRFs taken over two EOS validation sites: Skukuza tower, South Africa (25.0 oS, 31.5 oE) and Mongu tower, Zambia (15.4 oS, 23.3 oE). Additional sites are also considered and include, Maun tower, Botswana (20.0 oS, 23.5 oE), Sowa Pan, Botswana (20.6 oS, 26.2 oE) and Etosha Pan, Namibia (19.0 oS, 16.0 oE). The CAR is capable of measuring scattered light in fourteen spectral bands. The scan mirror, rotating at 100 rpm, directs the light into a Dall-Kirkham telescope where the beam is split into nine paths. Eight light beams pass through beam splitters, dichroics, and lenses to individual detectors (0.34-1.27 μ m), and finally are registered by eight data channels. They are sampled simultaneously and continuously. The ninth beam passes through a spinning filter wheel to an InSb detector cooled by a Stirling cycle cooler. Signals registered by the ninth data channel are selected from among six spectral channels (1.55-2.30 μ m). The filter wheel can either cycle through all six spectral bands at a prescribed interval (usually changing filter every fifth scan line), or lock onto any one of the six spectral bands and sample it continuously. To measure the BRF of the surface-atmosphere system, the University of Washington CV-580 had to bank at a comfortable roll angle of ~20 o and fly in a circle about 3 km in diameter above the surface for roughly two minutes. Replicated observations (multiple circular orbits) were

  11. Surface Current Measurements In Terra Nova Bay By Hf Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flocco, D.; Falco, P.; Wadhams, P.; Spezie, G.

    We present the preliminary results of a field experiment carried out within frame- work of the CLIMA project of the Italian National Programme for Antarctic Research (PNRA) and in cooperation with the Scott Polar Research Institute of Cambridge. Dur- ing the second period (02/12/1999-23/01/2000) of the XV Italian expedition a coastal radar was used to characterize the current field in the area of Terra Nova Bay (TNB). One of the aims of the CLIMA (Climatic Long-term Interactions for the Mass balance in Antarctica) project is to determine the role of the polynya in the sea ice mass bal- ance, water structure and local climate. The OSCR-II experiment was planned in order to provide surface current measurements in the area of TNB polynya, one of the most important coastal polynya of the Ross Sea. OSCR (Ocean Surface Current Radar) is a shore based, remote sensing system designed to measure sea surface currents in coastal waters. Two radar sites (a master and a slave) provide with radial current mea- surements; data combined from both sites yield the total current vector. Unfortunately the master and slave stations did not work together throughout the whole period of the experiment. A description of the experiment and a discussion of the results, will be proposed.

  12. Surface measurement errors using commercial scanning white light interferometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, F; Petzing, J; Coupland, J M; Leach, R K

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the performance of commercial scanning white light interferometers in a range of measurement tasks. A step height artefact is used to investigate the response of the instruments at a discontinuity, while gratings with sinusoidal and rectangular profiles are used to investigate the effects of surface gradient and spatial frequency. Results are compared with measurements made with tapping mode atomic force microscopy and discrepancies are discussed with reference to error mechanisms put forward in the published literature. As expected, it is found that most instruments report errors when used in regions close to a discontinuity or those with a surface gradient that is large compared to the acceptance angle of the objective lens. Amongst other findings, however, we report systematic errors that are observed when the surface gradient is considerably smaller. Although these errors are typically less than the mean wavelength, they are significant compared to the vertical resolution of the instrument and indicate that current scanning white light interferometers should be used with some caution if sub-wavelength accuracy is required

  13. Surface measurement errors using commercial scanning white light interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, F.; Leach, R. K.; Petzing, J.; Coupland, J. M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the performance of commercial scanning white light interferometers in a range of measurement tasks. A step height artefact is used to investigate the response of the instruments at a discontinuity, while gratings with sinusoidal and rectangular profiles are used to investigate the effects of surface gradient and spatial frequency. Results are compared with measurements made with tapping mode atomic force microscopy and discrepancies are discussed with reference to error mechanisms put forward in the published literature. As expected, it is found that most instruments report errors when used in regions close to a discontinuity or those with a surface gradient that is large compared to the acceptance angle of the objective lens. Amongst other findings, however, we report systematic errors that are observed when the surface gradient is considerably smaller. Although these errors are typically less than the mean wavelength, they are significant compared to the vertical resolution of the instrument and indicate that current scanning white light interferometers should be used with some caution if sub-wavelength accuracy is required.

  14. Surface temperature measurements of heterogeneous explosives by IR emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henson, B.F.; Funk, D.J.; Dickson, P.M.; Fugard, C.S.; Asay, B.W.

    1998-03-01

    The authors present measurements of the integrated IR emission (1--5 {micro}m) from both the heterogeneous explosive PBX 9501 and pure HMX at calibrated temperatures from 300 C to 2,500 C. The IR power emitted as a function of temperature is that expected of a black body, attenuated by a unique temperature independent constant which the authors report as the thermal emissivity. The authors have utilized this calibration of IR emission in measurements of the surface temperature from PBX 9501 subject to 1 GPa, two dimensional impact, and spontaneous ignition in unconfined cookoff. They demonstrate that the measurement of IR emission in this spectral region provides a temperature probe of sufficient sensitivity to resolve the thermal response from the solid explosive throughout the range of weak mechanical perturbation, prolonged heating to ignition, and combustion.

  15. Application of laser tracker technology for measuring optical surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobrist, Tom L.

    The pages of this dissertation detail the development of an advanced metrology instrument for measuring large optical surfaces. The system is designed to accurately guide the fabrication of the Giant Magellan Telescope and future telescopes through loose-abrasive grinding. The instrument couples a commercial laser tracker with an advanced calibration technique and a set of external references to mitigate a number of error sources. The system is also required to work as a verification test for the GMT principal optical interferometric test of the polished mirror segment to corroborate the measurements in several low-order aberrations. A set of system performance goals were developed to ensure that the system will achieve these purposes. The design, analysis, calibration results, and measurement performance of the Laser Tracker Plus system are presented in this dissertation.

  16. Measurement of steep aspheric surfaces using an anamorphic probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, Amiya; Coupland, Jeremy

    2008-01-01

    Synthetic aperture interferometry has been previously proposed as a possible in-process method to measure aspheric form (R. Tomlinson, Appl. Opt.42, 701, 2003.APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.42.000701). Preliminary demonstration utilized a scanning probe consisting of a pair of bare single mode fibers to perform source and receive functions. It was found that this probe did not have sufficient numerical aperture (NA) to measure steep surfaces and that simply increasing the NA decreases the light gathering efficiency substantially. In this paper, we introduce supplementary optics to increase the NA, and the light gathering efficiency has been increased by adopting an anamorphic design. A spherical test optic of known form is measured to demonstrate the capability of the new probe design

  17. Measurement of steep aspheric surfaces using an anamorphic probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Amiya; Coupland, Jeremy

    2008-04-01

    Synthetic aperture interferometry has been previously proposed as a possible in-process method to measure aspheric form (R. Tomlinson, Appl. Opt.42, 701, 2003.APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.42.000701). Preliminary demonstration utilized a scanning probe consisting of a pair of bare single mode fibers to perform source and receive functions. It was found that this probe did not have sufficient numerical aperture (NA) to measure steep surfaces and that simply increasing the NA decreases the light gathering efficiency substantially. In this paper, we introduce supplementary optics to increase the NA, and the light gathering efficiency has been increased by adopting an anamorphic design. A spherical test optic of known form is measured to demonstrate the capability of the new probe design.

  18. Measurements and TCAD Simulations of Bulk and Surface Radiation Damage Effects

    CERN Document Server

    F. Moscatelli; G. M. Bilei; A. Morozzi; G.-F. Dalla Betta; R. Mendicino; M. Boscardin; N. Zorzi; L. Servoli; P. Maccagnani

    2016-01-01

    In this work we propose the application of a radiation damage model based on the introduction of deep level traps/recombination centers suitable for device level numerical simulation of radiation detectors at very high fluences (e.g. 1÷2×1016 1-MeV equivalent neutrons per square centimeter) combined with a surface damage model developed by using experimental parameters extracted from measurements from gamma irradiated p-type dedicated test structures.

  19. Estimating regional methane surface fluxes: the relative importance of surface and GOSAT mole fraction measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fraser

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We use an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF, together with the GEOS-Chem chemistry transport model, to estimate regional monthly methane (CH4 fluxes for the period June 2009–December 2010 using proxy dry-air column-averaged mole fractions of methane (XCH4 from GOSAT (Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite and/or NOAA ESRL (Earth System Research Laboratory and CSIRO GASLAB (Global Atmospheric Sampling Laboratory CH4 surface mole fraction measurements. Global posterior estimates using GOSAT and/or surface measurements are between 510–516 Tg yr−1, which is less than, though within the uncertainty of, the prior global flux of 529 ± 25 Tg yr−1. We find larger differences between regional prior and posterior fluxes, with the largest changes in monthly emissions (75 Tg yr−1 occurring in Temperate Eurasia. In non-boreal regions the error reductions for inversions using the GOSAT data are at least three times larger (up to 45% than if only surface data are assimilated, a reflection of the greater spatial coverage of GOSAT, with the two exceptions of latitudes >60° associated with a data filter and over Europe where the surface network adequately describes fluxes on our model spatial and temporal grid. We use CarbonTracker and GEOS-Chem XCO2 model output to investigate model error on quantifying proxy GOSAT XCH4 (involving model XCO2 and inferring methane flux estimates from surface mole fraction data and show similar resulting fluxes, with differences reflecting initial differences in the proxy value. Using a series of observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs we characterize the posterior flux error introduced by non-uniform atmospheric sampling by GOSAT. We show that clear-sky measurements can theoretically reproduce fluxes within 10% of true values, with the exception of tropical regions where, due to a large seasonal cycle in the number of measurements because of clouds and aerosols, fluxes are within 15% of true fluxes. We evaluate our

  20. On the measurement of surface tension in binders used for moulding sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Hutera

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The surface tension of foundry binders is a very important parameter affecting the properties of a sand-binder system. Combined with other parameters, its value determines an outcome of the process of moulding sand preparation and the mechanical properties of the ready moulding composition. The problem of how to measure the surface tension of binders used in preparation of moulding sands is discussed only occasionally. Indirectly, the surface tension is characterised by the value of a contact angle, but it never means that these two parameters can be considered identical. Numerous methods are available and used at present to measure the surface tension, among others, the capillary rise method, the spinning drop method, the sessile drop method, the pendant drop method, the method of pulled out ring (or plate, or frame. There is also a rich variety of devices offered with different measuring methods. The devices are modern and represent a high level of the technical skill and art. Unfortunately, also their price is high. It is, however, possible to obtain the reliable results of the surface tension measurement using relatively simple methods, viz. the stalagmometric method and the capillary rise method. What is necessary are proper conditions of the measurement, directly related with the specific properties of binders. The present paper gives examples of the results obtained during measurement of the surface tension of some selected binders. Attention was drawn to the methods of taking measurements, and the obtained results were discussed and analysed. The possibilities of detemining the surface tension of the examined binders from the results of the contact angle measurements using the “sessile drop” and “pendant drop” methods were outlined.

  1. Measuring and interpreting X-ray fluorescence from planetary surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Alan; Beckhoff, Burkhard; Fraser, George; Kolbe, Michael; Krumrey, Michael; Mantero, Alfonso; Mantler, Michael; Peacock, Anthony; Pia, Maria-Grazia; Pullan, Derek; Schneider, Uwe G; Ulm, Gerhard

    2008-11-15

    As part of a comprehensive study of X-ray emission from planetary surfaces and in particular the planet Mercury, we have measured fluorescent radiation from a number of planetary analog rock samples using monochromatized synchrotron radiation provided by the BESSY II electron storage ring. The experiments were carried out using a purpose built X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer chamber developed by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany's national metrology institute. The XRF instrumentation is absolutely calibrated and allows for reference-free quantitation of rock sample composition, taking into account secondary photon- and electron-induced enhancement effects. The fluorescence data, in turn, have been used to validate a planetary fluorescence simulation tool based on the GEANT4 transport code. This simulation can be used as a mission analysis tool to predict the time-dependent orbital XRF spectral distributions from planetary surfaces throughout the mapping phase.

  2. Electrical properties of Titan's surface from Cassini RADAR scatterometer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wye, Lauren C.; Zebker, Howard A.; Ostro, Steven J.; West, Richard D.; Gim, Yonggyu; Lorenz, Ralph D.; The Cassini Radar Team

    2007-06-01

    albedo feature Shangri-La is best fit by a Hagfors model with a dielectric constant close to 2.4 and an rms slope near 9.5°. From the modeled backscatter curves, we find the average radar albedo in the same linear (SL) polarization to be near 0.34. We constrain the total-power albedo in order to compare the measurements with available groundbased radar results, which are typically obtained in both senses of circular polarization. We estimate an upper limit of 0.4 on the total-power albedo, a value that is significantly higher than the 0.21 total albedo value measured at 13 cm [Campbell, D., Black, G., Carter, L., Ostro, S., 2003. Science 302, 431-434]. This is consistent with a surface that has more small-scale structure and is thus more reflective at 2-cm than 13-cm. We compare results across overlapping observations and observe that the reduction and analysis are repeatable and consistent. We also confirm the strong correlations between radar and near-infrared images.

  3. Surface solar irradiance from SCIAMACHY measurements: algorithm and validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Wang

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Broadband surface solar irradiances (SSI are, for the first time, derived from SCIAMACHY (SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CartograpHY satellite measurements. The retrieval algorithm, called FRESCO (Fast REtrieval Scheme for Clouds from the Oxygen A band SSI, is similar to the Heliosat method. In contrast to the standard Heliosat method, the cloud index is replaced by the effective cloud fraction derived from the FRESCO cloud algorithm. The MAGIC (Mesoscale Atmospheric Global Irradiance Code algorithm is used to calculate clear-sky SSI. The SCIAMACHY SSI product is validated against globally distributed BSRN (Baseline Surface Radiation Network measurements and compared with ISCCP-FD (International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project Flux Dataset surface shortwave downwelling fluxes (SDF. For one year of data in 2008, the mean difference between the instantaneous SCIAMACHY SSI and the hourly mean BSRN global irradiances is −4 W m−2 (−1 % with a standard deviation of 101 W m−2 (20 %. The mean difference between the globally monthly mean SCIAMACHY SSI and ISCCP-FD SDF is less than −12 W m−2 (−2 % for every month in 2006 and the standard deviation is 62 W m−2 (12 %. The correlation coefficient is 0.93 between SCIAMACHY SSI and BSRN global irradiances and is greater than 0.96 between SCIAMACHY SSI and ISCCP-FD SDF. The evaluation results suggest that the SCIAMACHY SSI product achieves similar mean bias error and root mean square error as the surface solar irradiances derived from polar orbiting satellites with higher spatial resolution.

  4. Airborne spectral measurements of surface-atmosphere anisotropy for several surfaces and ecosystems over southern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatebe, Charles K.; King, Michael D.; Platnick, Steve; Arnold, G. Thomas; Vermote, Eric F.; Schmid, Beat

    2003-07-01

    The Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) was flown aboard the University of Washington Convair CV-580 research aircraft during the Southern Africa Regional Science Initiative 2000 (SAFARI 2000) dry season campaign and obtained measurements of bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) for a variety of natural surfaces and ecosystems in southern Africa. To measure the BRDF of the surface-atmosphere system, the University of Washington CV-580 banked at a roll angle of ˜20° and flew circles about 3 km in diameter above the surface, taking approximately 2 min. Multiple circular orbits were acquired over selected surfaces so that average BRDFs could be acquired, smoothing out small-scale surface and atmospheric inhomogeneities. In this paper, we present results of BRDFs taken over two Earth Observing System (EOS) validation sites: Skukuza tower, South Africa (25.0°S, 31.5°E) and Mongu tower, Zambia (15.4°S, 23.3°E). Additional sites are discussed and include the Maun tower, Botswana (20.0°S, 23.6°E), Sua Pan, Botswana (20.6°S, 25.9°E), Etosha Pan, Namibia (19.0°S, 16.0°E), and marine stratocumulus clouds off the west coast of Namibia (20.5°S, 13.1°E). Results clearly show anisotropy in reflected solar radiation over the various surfaces types: savanna, salt pans, and cloud. The greatest anisotropy is observed over marine stratus clouds, which exhibit strong forward scattering as well as important water cloud scattering features such as the rainbow and glory. The BRDF over savanna is characterized by a distinct backscattering peak in the principal plane and shows directional and spectral variations. Over the pans, the BRDF is more enhanced in the backscattering plane than forward scattering plane and shows little directional variation.

  5. Measurement of salivary resistin, visfatin and adiponectin levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamali, Irene; Roupas, Nikolaos D; Armeni, Anastasia K; Theodoropoulou, Anastasia; Markou, Kostas B; Georgopoulos, Neoklis A

    2012-01-01

    Hormonal determination in saliva offers several advantages. Peptides enter the salivary glands either by active transport mechanisms or are expressed and secreted by the salivary glands themselves. The collection of saliva is a noninvasive, easily repeatable and less stressful technique than blood withdrawal. The purpose of the present study was to introduce a method for measuring salivary resistin, visfatin and adiponectin levels and to evaluate their associations with serum levels. Resistin, visfatin and adiponectin levels were measured in serum and saliva of 50 healthy adult volunteers (17 male and 33 female) using commercial enzyme immunoassay kits for serum with minor modifications. The present study documented the determination of resistin and adiponectin levels in saliva and the significant correlation of salivary levels with serum levels (r=0.441, p<0.01 and r=0.347, p<0.05, respectively). Moreover, the identification of visfatin in saliva was achieved, but no significant correlation with serum visfatin levels was observed. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report the determination of resistin and visfatin in saliva and the significant correlation of salivary resistin with serum levels, while it confirmed the significant association between salivary and serum adiponectin. The introduction of salivary determinations of adipokines could contribute to the elucidation of the physiology and the role of the specific adipokines in various clinical conditions (obesity, insulin resistance, inflammation, reproduction, energy imbalance and stress response). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Importance of measuring lactate levels in children with sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anil, Nisha

    2017-10-10

    Sepsis is a major public health problem as well as one of the leading causes of preventable death in children because of failure to recognise the early signs and symptoms and to resuscitate rapidly. Blood lactate levels are used to assess the severity of sepsis and the effectiveness of resuscitation. Lactate levels are easily obtainable and should be checked in all patients admitted with suspected sepsis within six hours of presentation. The test should be repeated four and eight-hours post-diagnosis of sepsis. For the diagnosis of sepsis, patients' clinical symptoms, along with the combined analysis of partial pressure of oxygen, carbon dioxide and lactate levels, should be used. A multitude of factors can cause elevated lactate levels and so clinicians should use elevated levels cautiously by considering all other aetiologies. This article, which focuses on practice in Australia but makes reference to the UK, discusses the importance of measuring lactate levels in sepsis, the pathophysiology of lactate production, causes of elevated lactate levels, lactate measurement, nursing management of patients with elevated lactate levels, limitations of using lactate as a biomarker for diagnosing sepsis and implications for practice. ©2012 RCN Publishing Company Ltd. All rights reserved. Not to be copied, transmitted or recorded in any way, in whole or part, without prior permission of the publishers.

  7. THE LEVEL OF CUSTOMER SATISFACTION - MEASURE OF SOCIAL EFFICIENCY

    OpenAIRE

    MUNGIU-PUPĂZAN MARIANA CLAUDIA

    2014-01-01

    Pricing models for social efficiency focuses on assessing the quality, namely the comparison of the desired product to the consumer and the product received, the level of consumer satisfaction on the products and / or services will be therefore a very important component in measuring the effectiveness social. Between the two concepts there is a relationship of mutual interdependence: the level of consumer satisfaction is the result of the quality performance of products and se...

  8. Global change and the measurement of absolute sea-level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamante, John M.; Pyle, Thomas E.; Carter, William E.; Scherer, Wolfgang

    To quantify properly the long-term response of sea-level to climate change, land motions must be separated from the apparent or relative sea-level change recorded by conventional tide/sea-level gauges. Here we present a concept for global measurement of the true or “absolute” sea-level change, which combines recent advances in space-based geodetic techniques with plans for a global sea-level network under the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP). Data from initial feasibility tests show that land motion, due to global (plate tectonic), regional (glacial rebound), or local (fluid withdrawal) effects, can probably be measured to ±1cm (on a single measurement basis) by an innovative combination of Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) and Global Positioning System (GPS) tevhniques. By making repeated observations of position at a number of tide gauges using portable, economical GPS receivers in a differential mode relative to the fewer, more stable, but more expensive VLBI observatories, it will be possible to subtract land motion from the relative sea-level signal. Decadal to century scale trends at the 1-2mm y -1 level will be resolvable in the sea-level and vertical land motion time series within about a decade. Detection of subsidence or uplift at specific gauges will allow correction for land motion or deletion of bad data when computing regional or global, i.e. eustatic, sea-level changes. In addition to their applications in oceanography and climate studies, such data will test models by Peltier and other that relate mantle viscosity and deglaciation history to present rates of crustal subsidence or uplift. If the predicted crustal motions are confirmed, we can also have more confidence in the use of historical tide/sea-level gauge records in retrospective studies of sea-level change related to climate variability on decadal or longer time scales. It is concluded that as few as one-third (about 100) of the total number of tide/sea-level gauges (250

  9. [Measurements of surface ocean carbon dioxide partial pressure during WOCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the research progress of the second year of research under Measurement of Surface Ocean Carbon Dioxide Partial Pressure During WOCE'' and proposes to continue measurements of underway pCO[sub 2]. During most of the first year of this grant, our efforts to measure pCO[sub 2] on WOCE WHP legs were frustrated by ship problems. The R/V Knorr, which was originally scheduled to carry out the first work on WHP lines P19 and P16 in the southeastem Pacific during the 1990-91 austral summer, was delayed in the shipyard during her mid-life refit for more than a year. In the interim, the smaller R/V Thomas Washington, was pressed into service to carry out lower-latitude portions of WHP lines P16 and P17 during mid-1991 (TUNES Expedition). We installed and operated our underway chromatographic system on this expedition, even though space and manpower on this smaller vessel were limited and no one from our group would be aboard any of the 3 WHP expedition legs. The results for carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide are shown. A map of the cruise track is shown for each leg, marked with cumulative distance. Following each track is a figure showing the carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide results as a function of distance along this track. The results are plotted as dry-gas mole fractions (in ppm and ppb, respectively) in air and in gas equilibrated with surface seawater at a total pressure equal to the barometric pressure. The air data are plotted as a 10-point running mean, and appear as a roughly horizontal line. The seawater data are plotted as individual points, using a 5-point Gaussian smoother. Equal values Of xCO[sub 2] in air and surface seawater indicate air-sea equilibrium.

  10. The Measurement and Interpretation of Surface Wave Group Arrival Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, G.; Kane, D.; Morrow, J.; Zhou, Y.; Tromp, J.

    2005-12-01

    We have recently developed an efficient technique for measuring the relative group arrival times of surface waves by using cross-correlation and cluster analysis of waveform envelope functions. Applying the analysis to minor arc Love and Rayleigh waves in the frequency band 7 to 35 mHz for all events over magnitude 5.5 results in a dataset of over 200,000 measurements at each frequency for long period Rayleigh waves (frequency less than 25 mHz) and about 100,000 measurements at the shorter periods. Analysis of transverse components results in about half as many Love wave measurements. Simple ray theory inversions of the relative arrival times for apparent group velocity produce maps which are accurate representations of the data (often over 90% variance reduction of the relative arrival times) and which show features strongly correlated with tectonics and crustal thickness. The apparent group velocity variations can be extremely large: 30% velocity variations for 20 mHz Rayleigh waves and 40% variations for 30 mHz Rayleigh waves and can have abrupt lateral changes. This raises the concern that non-ray theory effects could be important. Indeed, a recent analysis by Dahlen and Zhou (personal communication) suggests that the group arrival times should be a functions of both the group velocity AND the phase velocity. The simplest way to test the interpretation of the measurements is to perform the analysis on synthetic seismograms computed for a realistic model of the Earth. Here, we use the SEM with a model which incorporates realistic crust and mantle structure. We are currently computing synthetics for a suite of roughly 1000 events recorded globally that extend to a period of 18 seconds. We shall present the results of applying both ray-based and finite frequency inversions to the synthetic data as well as evaluating the effects of off path propagation at short periods using surface wave ray tracing.

  11. Measuring the surface roughness of geological rock surfaces in SAR data using fractal geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafouri, Ali; Amini, Jalal; Dehmollaian, Mojtaba; Kavoosi, Mohammad Ali

    2017-05-01

    Determining surface morphology using synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data requires accurate topographic and microtopographic models. To distinguish different surface geometric patterns and to differentiate the formation of geological rock surfaces, it is necessary to model the smoothness and roughness of surfaces based on radar signal backscattering. Euclidean geometry is less able than fractal geometry to describe natural phenomena; however, in application to radar backscattering models, fractal geometry has never fully replaced Euclidean geometry. Using fractal geometry only, this paper attempts to improve the backscattering simulation generated by an Integral Equation Model to improve the description of geological rock surfaces. As the application of radar signal backscattering is a rarity in the domain of geology, the paper also discusses the efficiency of the method in improving the results of conventional geological mapping methods. The proposed method is applied to the Anaran geological formation (between Dehloran and Ilam in IRAN) using TerraSAR-X SAR data and in situ roughness measurements on pure sites with rough, intermediate, and smooth morphologies. This implementation shows fractal and diffractal behavior of geological morphologies under various conditions.

  12. Evaluation of the levels of phthalate ester plasticizers in surface ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to determine the level of phthalate ester plasticizers in Ethiope River water samples. Gas chromatography (GC) coupled with mass spectrometer (MS) was used to evaluate the levels of dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), dibuthyl phthalate (DBP), diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP), ...

  13. Measurement of atmospheric surface layer turbulence using unmanned aerial vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sean; Canter, Caleb

    2017-11-01

    We describe measurements of the turbulence within the atmospheric surface layer using highly instrumented and autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). Results from the CLOUDMAP measurement campaign in Stillwater Oklahoma are presented including turbulence statistics measured during the transition from stably stratified to convective conditions. The measurements were made using pre-fabricated fixed-wing remote-control aircraft adapted to fly autonomously and carry multi-hole pressure probes, pressure, temperature and humidity sensors. Two aircraft were flown simultaneously, with one flying a flight path intended to profile the boundary layer up to 100 m and the other flying at a constant fixed altitude of 50 m. The evolution of various turbulent statistics was determined from these flights, including Reynolds stresses, correlations, spectra and structure functions. These results were compared to those measured by a sonic anemometer located on a 7.5 m tower. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation through Grant #CBET-1351411 and by National Science Foundation award #1539070, Collaboration Leading Operational UAS Development for Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics (CLOUDMAP).

  14. CHEMICAL REACTIONS ON ADSORBING SURFACE: KINETIC LEVEL OF DESCRIPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.P.Kostrobii

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the effective Hubbard model we suggest a statistical description of reaction-diffusion processes for bimolecular chemical reactions of gas particles adsorbed on the metallic surface. The system of transport equations for description of particles diffusion as well as reactions is obtained. We carry out the analysis of the contributions of all physical processes to the formation of diffusion coefficients and chemical reactions constants.

  15. Development of measuring device for inner surfaces of embedded piping (Contract research)

    CERN Document Server

    Itoh, H; Tachibana, M; Yanagihara, S

    2003-01-01

    The measuring device for inner surfaces of embedded piping (MISE) was developed to evaluate low-level radiological contaminations of inner surfaces of piping. The MISE consists of a cylindrically-formed double layered type detector and a piping crawling robot, which were designed and manufactured separately. In measurements of the contaminations, an outer cylindrical detector close to the surface of piping measures beta-rays and gamma-rays and an inner cylindrical detector set after a shielding plate for shield of beta-rays measures gamma-rays. The beta-ray counting rates are derived by subtracting gamma-ray counts measured by the inner detector from gamma- and beta-ray counts measured by the outer detector. The piping crawling robot transports the cylindrically-formed double layered type detector with observing inner surfaces of piping. The detection limit for the contamination of sup 6 sup 0 Co was found to be about 0.17 Bq/cm sup 2 with measurement time of 30 seconds. It is expected that 0.2 Bq/cm sup 2 co...

  16. Reliability of surface EMG measurements from the suprahyoid muscle complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kothari, Mohit; Stubbs, Peter William; Pedersen, Asger Roer

    2017-01-01

    of using the suprahyoid muscle complex (SMC) using surface electromyography (sEMG) to assess changes to neural pathways by determining the reliability of measurements in healthy participants over days. Methods: Seventeen healthy participants were recruited. Measurements were performed twice with one week...... between sessions. Single pulse (at 120% and 140% of the resting motor threshold (rMT)) and paired pulse (2 ms and 15 ms paired pulse) transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) were used to elicit MEPs in the SMC which were recorded using sEMG. Results: ≈50% of participants (range: 42%-58%; depending...... on stimulus type/intensity) had significantly different MEP values between day 1 and day 2 for single pulse and paired pulse TMS. A large stimulus artefact resulted in MEP responses that could not be assessed in four participants. Conclusions: The assessment of the SMC using sEMG following TMS was poorly...

  17. Measurement of Tritium Surface Distribution on TFTR Bumper Limiter Tiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, K.; Tanabe, T.; Skinner, C.H.; Gentile, C.A.

    2004-01-01

    The tritium surface distribution on graphite tiles used in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) bumper limiter and exposed to TFTR deuterium-tritium (D-T) discharges from 1993 to 1997 was measured by the Tritium Imaging Plate Technique (TIPT). The TFTR bumper limiter shows both re-/co-deposition and erosion. The tritium images for all tiles measured are strongly correlated with erosion and deposition patterns, and long-term tritium retention was found in the re-/co-depositions and flakes. The CFC tiles located at erosion dominated areas clearly showed their woven structure in their tritium images owing to different erosion yields between fibers and matrix. Significantly high tritium retention was observed on all sides of the erosion tiles, indicating carbon transport via repetition of local erosion/deposition cycles

  18. Measuring micronutrient intakes at different levels of sugar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Measuring micronutrient intakes at different levels of sugar consumption in a population in transition: the Transition and Health during Urbanisation in South Africa (THUSA) study. ... Objective: The objective was to investigate the absolute micronutrient intake and the possibility of micronutrient dilution of added sugar in the

  19. Precision lifetime measurements of Ar II 4p doublet levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marger, D.; Schmoranzer, H.

    1990-01-01

    The lifetimes of the Ar II 4p doublet fine-structure levels 4p 2 D 0 5/2 , 4p' 2 F 0 5/2 and 4p' 2 F 0 7/2 were measured by beam-dye laser spectroscopy. The experimental uncertainty was reduced to below 1%. (orig.)

  20. Measuring Resistance to Change at the Within-Session Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonneau, Francois; Rios, Americo; Cabrera, Felipe

    2006-01-01

    Resistance to change is often studied by measuring response rate in various components of a multiple schedule. Response rate in each component is normalized (that is, divided by its baseline level) and then log-transformed. Differential resistance to change is demonstrated if the normalized, log-transformed response rate in one component decreases…

  1. Measurement of Background Gamma Radiation Levels at Two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MICHAEL

    *Dept. of Physics, Federal University of Technology, Minna, Niger state, Nigeria. **Dept. of Science Lab. Tech. ... ABSTRACT: An in-situ measurement of the background radiation level was carried out at the vicinity of three campuses of two major ... body is permanently irradiated from two ionizing radiation sources: External ...

  2. Micro-Gal level gravity measurements with cold atom interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Min-Kang; Duan Xiao-Chun; Chen Le-Le; Luo Qin; Xu Yao-Yao; Hu Zhong-Kun

    2015-01-01

    Developments of the micro-Gal level gravimeter based on atom interferometry are reviewed, and the recent progress and results of our group are also presented. Atom interferometric gravimeters have shown high resolution and accuracy for gravity measurements. This kind of quantum sensor has excited world-wide interest for both practical applications and fundamental research. (topical review)

  3. GHRSST Level 4 ODYSSEA Mediterranean Sea Regional Foundation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on an operational basis at Ifremer/CERSAT...

  4. GHRSST Level 4 G1SST Global Foundation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on an operational basis by the JPL OurOcean...

  5. GHRSST Level 4 RAMSSA Australian Regional Foundation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on an operational basis at the Australian Bureau...

  6. GHRSST Level 4 GAMSSA Global Foundation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on an operational basis at the Australian Bureau...

  7. GHRSST Level 4 AVHRR_AMSR_OI Global Blended Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) global Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on a 0.25 degree grid at the NOAA...

  8. GHRSST Level 4 EUR Mediterranean Sea Regional Foundation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily by Ifremer/CERSAT (France) using optimal...

  9. GHRSST Level 4 OSPO Global Nighttime Foundation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on an operational basis at the Office of...

  10. GHRSST Level 4 MUR North America Regional Foundation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced as a retrospective dataset at the JPL Physical...

  11. GHRSST Level 4 ODYSSEA Global Foundation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on an operational basis at Ifremer/CERSAT...

  12. GHRSST Level 4 K10_SST Global 1 meter Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on an operational basis at the Naval...

  13. GHRSST Level 4 OSTIA Global Foundation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS versions 1 and 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on an operational basis at the UK Met Office...

  14. GHRSST Level 4 OSPO Global Foundation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on an operational basis at the Office of...

  15. GHRSST Level 4 DMI_OI Global Foundation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on an operational basis by the Danish...

  16. GHRSST Level 4 ODYSSEA Eastern Central Pacific Regional Foundation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on an operational basis at Ifremer/CERSAT...

  17. GHRSST Level 4 MW_OI Global Foundation Sea Surface Temperature analysis (GDS version 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) global Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on a 0.25 degree grid at Remote Sensing...

  18. Measuring surface energy and evapotranspiration across Caribbean mangrove forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagomasino, D.; Fatoyinbo, T. E.; Price, R.

    2014-12-01

    Coastal mangroves lose large amounts of water through evapotranspiration (ET) that can be equivalent to the amount of annual rainfall in certain years. Satellite remote sensing has been used to estimate surface energy and ET variability in many forested ecosystems, yet has been widely overlooked in mangrove forests. Using a combination of long-term datasets (30-year) acquired from the NASA Landsat 5 and 7 satellite databases, the present study investigated ET and surface energy balance variability between two mangrove forest sites in the Caribbean: 1) Everglades National Park (ENP; Florida, USA) and 2) Sian Ka'an Biosphere Reserve (SKBR; Quintana Roo, Mexico). A satellite-derived surface energy balance model was used to estimate ET in tall and scrub mangroves environments at ENP and SKBR. Results identified significant differences in soil heat flux measurements and ET between the tall and scrub mangrove environments. Scrub mangroves exhibited the highest soil heat flux coincident with the lowest biophysical indices (i.e., Fractional Vegetation Cover, Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, and Soil-Adjusted Vegetation Index) and ET rates. Mangrove damage and mortality was observed on the satellite images following strong tropical storms and associated with anthropogenic modifications and resulted in low values in spectral vegetation indices, higher soil heat flux, and higher ET. Recovery of the spectral characteristics, soil heat flux and ET was within 1-2 years following hurricane disturbance while, degradation caused by human disturbance persisted for many years. Remotely sensed ET of mangrove forests can provide estimates over a few decades and provide us with some understanding of how these environments respond to disturbances to the landscape in periods where no ground data exists or in locations that are difficult to access. Moreover, relationships between energy and water balance components developed for the coastal mangroves of Florida and Mexico could be

  19. Plastic optical fiber level measurement sensor based on side holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young June; Shin, Jong-Dug; Park, Jaehee

    2014-10-01

    Plastic optical fiber level measurement sensor based on in-line side holes is investigated theoretically and experimentally. The sensor consists of a plastic optical fiber with in-line side holes spaced about 5 cm apart. The 0.9 diameter in-line side holes were fabricated by micro-drilling. An analytical expression of the sensor transmittance was obtained using a simple ray optics approach. The measurements of the sensor transmittance were performed with a 55 cm height Mass cylinder. Both results show that the sensor transmittance increases as the number of side holes filled with water increases. The research results indicate that the plastic optical fiber based on in-line side holes can be used for water level measurement.

  20. Indirect measurement of molten steel level in tundish based on laser triangulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhiqi; He, Qing; Xie, Zhi

    2016-03-01

    For real-time and precise measurement of molten steel level in tundish during continuous casting, slag level and slag thickness are needed. Among which, the problem of slag thickness measurement has been solved in our previous work. In this paper, a systematic solution for slag level measurement based on laser triangulation is proposed. Being different from traditional laser triangulation, several aspects for measuring precision and robustness have been done. First, laser line is adopted for multi-position measurement to overcome the deficiency of single point laser range finder caused by the uneven surface of the slag. Second, the key parameters, such as installing angle and minimum requirement of the laser power, are analyzed and determined based on the gray-body radiation theory to fulfill the rigorous requirement of measurement accuracy. Third, two kinds of severe noises in the acquired images, which are, respectively, caused by heat radiation and Electro-Magnetic Interference (EMI), are cleaned via morphological characteristic of the liquid slag and color difference between EMI and the laser signals, respectively. Fourth, as false target created by stationary slag usually disorders the measurement, valid signals of the slag are distinguished from the false ones to calculate the slag level. Then, molten steel level is obtained by the slag level minus the slag thickness. The measuring error of this solution is verified by the applications in steel plants, which is ±2.5 mm during steady casting and ±3.2 mm at the end of casting.

  1. The SMAP Level 4 Surface and Root-zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichle, Rolf; Crow, Wade; Koster, Randal; Kimball, John

    2010-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) mission is being developed by NASA for launch in 2013 as one of four first-tier missions recommended by the U.S. National Research Council Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space in 2007. The primary science objectives of SMAP are to enhance understanding of land surface controls on the water, energy and carbon cycles, and to determine their linkages. Moreover, the high resolution soil moisture mapping provided by SMAP has practical applications in weather and seasonal climate prediction, agriculture, human health, drought and flood decision support. In this paper we describe the assimilation of SMAP observations for the generation of the planned SMAP Level 4 Surface and Root-zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) product. The SMAP mission makes simultaneous active (radar) and passive (radiometer) measurements in the 1.26-1.43 GHz range (L-band) from a sun-synchronous low-earth orbit. Measurements will be obtained across a 1000 km wide swath using conical scanning at a constant incidence angle (40 deg). The radar resolution varies from 1-3 km over the outer 70% of the swath to about 30 km near the center of the swath. The radiometer resolution is 40 km across the entire swath. The radiometer measurements will allow high-accuracy but coarse resolution (40 km) measurements. The radar measurements will add significantly higher resolution information. The radar is however very sensitive to surface roughness and vegetation structure. The combination of the two measurements allows optimal blending of the advantages of each instrument. SMAP directly observes only surface soil moisture (in the top 5 cm of the soil column). Several of the key applications targeted by SMAP, however, require knowledge of root zone soil moisture (approximately top 1 m of the soil column), which is not directly measured by SMAP. The foremost objective of the SMAP L4_SM product is to fill this gap and provide estimates of root zone soil moisture

  2. Entrance surface dose measurements in mammography using thermoluminescence technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera, T.; Vega C, H.R.; Manzanares A, E; Azorin, J.; Gonzalez, P.R.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Of the various techniques that can be used for personnel dosimetry, thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) has emerged as a superior technique due to its manifold advantages over other methods of dose estimation. Various phosphors have been therefore investigated regarding their suitability for dosimetry. In this paper, a dosimetry system based on thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) from zirconium oxide phosphors embedded in polytetrafluorethylene (ZrO 2 +PTFE) was developed for entrance surface doses (ES) measurements in mammography. Small ZrO 2 pellets of 5 mm in diameter and 0.8 mm in thickness were used. The reproducibility of measurements and linearity of ZrO 2 were also studied. The results were compared with those obtained from LiF:Mg,Cu,P usually used for the determination of absorbed dose in mammography. Measurements both per unit air kerma and In vivo were performed using a mammography unit model DMR (General Electric). The results showed that ZrO 2 TLDs can be used for the same X-ray dosimetry applications as LiF:Mg,Cu,P, with each type having the disadvantage of a response dependent on energy, particularly at low energies. These results indicate a considerable potential for use in routine control and In vivo ES measurements in mammography. (Author)

  3. Monitoring the variability of sea level and surface circulation with satellite altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, Denis L. "Jr"

    2004-10-01

    Variability in the ocean plays an important role in determining global weather and climate conditions. The advent of satellite altimetry has significantly facilitated the study of the variability of sea level and surface circulation. Satellites provide high-quality regular and nearly global measurements enabling us to study the oceanic variability on the spatial scales from the size of an eddy to global, and on the temporal scales from weeks to interannual and longer. This thesis demonstrates how satellite altimetry measurements can be used to study the mesoscale, seasonal and interannual variability of sea level and surface circulation. Oceanic variability at these time scales is mainly induced by the variations of heat and fresh water fluxes (buoyancy fluxes) at air-sea interface, the variations of heat and salt budget due to the advection of water masses with different properties, eddy generation mechanisms due to the instability of oceanic currents, Rossby waves, etc. It is shown how the sea level in the extratropical North Atlantic Ocean was changing during the investigated time interval from 1993 to 2003. The mesoscale, seasonal and inter-annual modes of the variability are revealed, and the magnitude and relative contribution of each mode to the total variance is assessed. The inter-annual change of the sea surface height in the northern North Atlantic, measured with altimetry, is coupled with in situ observations along the transatlantic section AR7E, repeated almost every year from 1990 to 2003 in the framework of the WOCE (World Ocean Circulation Experiment) and CLIVAR (CLImate VARiability) hydrographic programs. This allowed interpreting the observed inter-annual change of sea level in terms of changes in the sea water properties and the distribution of water masses. A comparative analysis of changes observed in the extratropical North Atlantic and in the extratropical North Pacific is performed. The magnitudes, spatial patterns, and also trends of the

  4. Extracting dielectric fixed charge density on highly doped crystalline-silicon surfaces using photoconductance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, A.; Hoex, B.

    2017-11-01

    A novel method for the extraction of fixed interface charge, Qf, and the surface recombination parameters, Sn0 and Sp0, from the injection-level dependent effective minority carrier lifetime measurements is presented. Unlike conventional capacitance-voltage measurements, this technique can be applied to highly doped surfaces provided the surface carrier concentration transitions into strong depletion or inversion with increased carrier injection. By simulating the injection level dependent Auger-corrected inverse lifetime curve of symmetrically passivated and diffused samples after sequential annealing and corona charging, it was revealed that Qf, Sn0, and Sp0 have unique signatures. Therefore, these important electronic parameters, in some instances, can independently be resolved. Furthermore, it was shown that this non-linear lifetime behaviour is exhibited on both p-type and n-type diffused inverted surfaces, by demonstrating the approach with phosphorous diffused n+pn+ structures and boron diffused p+np+ structures passivated with aluminium oxide (AlOx) and silicon nitride, respectively (SiNx). The results show that the approximation of a mid-gap Shockley-Read-Hall defect level with equal capture cross sections is able to, in the samples studied in this work, reproduce the observed injection level dependent lifetime behaviour.

  5. Accurate fluid force measurement based on control surface integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentink, David

    2018-01-01

    Nonintrusive 3D fluid force measurements are still challenging to conduct accurately for freely moving animals, vehicles, and deforming objects. Two techniques, 3D particle image velocimetry (PIV) and a new technique, the aerodynamic force platform (AFP), address this. Both rely on the control volume integral for momentum; whereas PIV requires numerical integration of flow fields, the AFP performs the integration mechanically based on rigid walls that form the control surface. The accuracy of both PIV and AFP measurements based on the control surface integration is thought to hinge on determining the unsteady body force associated with the acceleration of the volume of displaced fluid. Here, I introduce a set of non-dimensional error ratios to show which fluid and body parameters make the error negligible. The unsteady body force is insignificant in all conditions where the average density of the body is much greater than the density of the fluid, e.g., in gas. Whenever a strongly deforming body experiences significant buoyancy and acceleration, the error is significant. Remarkably, this error can be entirely corrected for with an exact factor provided that the body has a sufficiently homogenous density or acceleration distribution, which is common in liquids. The correction factor for omitting the unsteady body force, {{{ {ρ f}} {1 - {ρ f} ( {{ρ b}+{ρ f}} )}.{( {{{{ρ }}b}+{ρ f}} )}}} , depends only on the fluid, {ρ f}, and body, {{ρ }}b, density. Whereas these straightforward solutions work even at the liquid-gas interface in a significant number of cases, they do not work for generalized bodies undergoing buoyancy in combination with appreciable body density inhomogeneity, volume change (PIV), or volume rate-of-change (PIV and AFP). In these less common cases, the 3D body shape needs to be measured and resolved in time and space to estimate the unsteady body force. The analysis shows that accounting for the unsteady body force is straightforward to non

  6. Evaluation of the Levels of phthalate Ester Plasticizers in Surface ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    Department of Environmental Management and Toxicology,. College of Science, Federal University of Petroleum ... Gas chromatography (GC) coupled with mass spectrometer (MS) was used to evaluate the levels of ... benefits required for the many applications such as tubing and hose products,personal care products,.

  7. Emotional responses during repeated sprint intervals performed on level, downhill and uphill surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Bertrand; Guilloux, Bertrand; Begue, Mylène; Uriac, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test emotional responses during sprint intervals performed on a level, down and up surface. Fifty trained participants performed a maximal effort during a 60-m sprint and 10 repetitions of 60 m running sprints on a level, down and up surface on a 5.9% slope. Running speeds, emotional responses and heart rate were measured. Self-selected speeds were correlated with the rating of perceived exertion, the affective balance, the desire to stop and the resources needed for the task in all conditions whereas the pleasure, the desire to continue and the capacity to realise the task were correlated with speeds only during level and uphill running. Mean values of emotional parameters were significantly different (P emotional responses was just translated, i.e. most of the slope between the evolution of emotional parameters and the repetitions were not significantly different whereas Y-intercepts were different. Consented effort is highly correlated with the resources needed for the task (P < 0.001, r(2) = 0.72). We propose that the difference in the resources needed for the task between level, downhill and uphill running (F 2, 1499 = 166.5, P < 0.001, Eta(2) = 0.18) is the most important key that explains our results.

  8. Thermocouple Rakes for Measuring Boundary Layer Flows Extremely Close to Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Danny P.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Martin, Lisa C.; Blaha, Charles A.

    2001-01-01

    Of vital interest to aerodynamic researchers is precise knowledge of the flow velocity profile next to the surface. This information is needed for turbulence model development and the calculation of viscous shear force. Though many instruments can determine the flow velocity profile near the surface, none of them can make measurements closer than approximately 0.01 in. from the surface. The thermocouple boundary-layer rake can measure much closer to the surface than conventional instruments can, such as a total pressure boundary layer rake, hot wire, or hot film. By embedding the sensors (thermocouples) in the region where the velocity is equivalent to the velocity ahead of a constant thickness strut, the boundary-layer flow profile can be obtained. The present device fabricated at the NASA Glenn Research Center microsystem clean room has a heater made of platinum and thermocouples made of platinum and gold. Equal numbers of thermocouples are placed both upstream and downstream of the heater, so that the voltage generated by each pair at the same distance from the surface is indicative of the difference in temperature between the upstream and downstream thermocouple locations. This voltage differential is a function of the flow velocity, and like the conventional total pressure rake, it can provide the velocity profile. In order to measure flow extremely close to the surface, the strut is made of fused quartz with extremely low heat conductivity. A large size thermocouple boundary layer rake is shown in the following photo. The latest medium size sensors already provide smooth velocity profiles well into the boundary layer, as close as 0.0025 in. from the surface. This is about 4 times closer to the surface than the previously used total pressure rakes. This device also has the advantage of providing the flow profile of separated flow and also it is possible to measure simultaneous turbulence levels within the boundary layer.

  9. The association between amalgam dental surfaces and urinary mercury levels in a sample of Albertans, a prevalence study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutton, Daniel J; Fyie, Ken; Faris, Peter; Brunel, Ludovic; Emery, Jc Herbert

    2013-08-29

    The objective of this study was to quantify the relationship between number of dental amalgam surfaces and urinary mercury levels. This study uses participant data from a large philanthropic chronic disease prevention program in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Urine samples were analysed for mercury levels (measured in μg/g-creatinine). T-tests were used to determine if differences in urine mercury were statistically significant between persons with no dental amalgam surfaces and one or more dental amalgam surfaces. Linear regression was used to estimate the change in urinary mercury per amalgam surface. Urinary mercury levels were statistically significantly higher in participants with amalgam surfaces, with an average difference of 0.55 μg/g-creatinine. Per amalgam surface, we estimated an expected increase of 0.04 μg/g-creatinine. Measured urinary mercury levels were also statistically significantly higher in participants with dental amalgam surfaces following the oral administration of 2,3-dimercaptopropane-l-sulfonate (DMPS) and meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) which are used to mobilize mercury from the blood and tissues. Our estimates indicate that an individual with seven or more dental amalgam surfaces has 30% to 50% higher urinary mercury levels than an individual without amalgams. This is consistent with past literature that has identified seven amalgam surfaces as an unsafe level of exposure to mercury vapor. Our analysis suggests that continued use of silver amalgam dental fillings for restorative dentistry is a non-negligible, unnecessary source of mercury exposure considering the availability of composite resin alternatives.

  10. The association between amalgam dental surfaces and urinary mercury levels in a sample of Albertans, a prevalence study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to quantify the relationship between number of dental amalgam surfaces and urinary mercury levels. Methods This study uses participant data from a large philanthropic chronic disease prevention program in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Urine samples were analysed for mercury levels (measured in μg/g-creatinine). T-tests were used to determine if differences in urine mercury were statistically significant between persons with no dental amalgam surfaces and one or more dental amalgam surfaces. Linear regression was used to estimate the change in urinary mercury per amalgam surface. Results Urinary mercury levels were statistically significantly higher in participants with amalgam surfaces, with an average difference of 0.55 μg/g-creatinine. Per amalgam surface, we estimated an expected increase of 0.04 μg/g-creatinine. Measured urinary mercury levels were also statistically significantly higher in participants with dental amalgam surfaces following the oral administration of 2,3-dimercaptopropane-l-sulfonate (DMPS) and meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) which are used to mobilize mercury from the blood and tissues. Discussion Our estimates indicate that an individual with seven or more dental amalgam surfaces has 30% to 50% higher urinary mercury levels than an individual without amalgams. This is consistent with past literature that has identified seven amalgam surfaces as an unsafe level of exposure to mercury vapor. Our analysis suggests that continued use of silver amalgam dental fillings for restorative dentistry is a non-negligible, unnecessary source of mercury exposure considering the availability of composite resin alternatives. PMID:23984857

  11. Laser surface processing with controlled nitrogen-argon concentration levels for regulated surface life time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeidi, M. Ahmed; McCarthy, E.; Brabazon, D.

    2018-03-01

    Laser surface modification can be used to enhance the mechanical properties of a material, such as hardness, toughness, fatigue strength, and corrosion resistance. Surface nitriding is a widely used thermochemical method of surface modification, in which nitrogen is introduced into a metal or other material at an elevated temperature within a furnace. It is used on parts where there is a need for increased wear resistance, corrosion resistance, fatigue life, and hardness. Laser nitriding is a novel method of nitriding where the surface is heated locally by a laser, either in an atmosphere of nitrogen or with a jet of nitrogen delivered to the laser heated site. It combines the benefits of laser modification with those of nitriding. Recent work on high toughness tool steel samples has shown promising results due to the increased nitrogen gas impingement onto the laser heated region. Increased surface activity and nitrogen adsorption was achieved which resulted in a deeper and harder surface compared to conventional hardening methods. In this work, the effects of the laser power, pulse repetition frequency, and overlap percentage on laser surface treatment of 316 L SST steel samples with an argon-nitrogen jet will be presented. Resulting microstructure, phase type, microhardness, and wear resistance are presented.

  12. Response Surface Methods For Spatially-Resolved Optical Measurement Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danehy, P. M.; Dorrington, A. A.; Cutler, A. D.; DeLoach, R.

    2003-01-01

    Response surface methods (or methodology), RSM, have been applied to improve data quality for two vastly different spatially-resolved optical measurement techniques. In the first application, modern design of experiments (MDOE) methods, including RSM, are employed to map the temperature field in a direct-connect supersonic combustion test facility at NASA Langley Research Center. The laser-based measurement technique known as coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is used to measure temperature at various locations in the combustor. RSM is then used to develop temperature maps of the flow. Even though the temperature fluctuations at a single point in the flowfield have a standard deviation on the order of 300 K, RSM provides analytic fits to the data having 95% confidence interval half width uncertainties in the fit as low as +/- 30 K. Methods of optimizing future CARS experiments are explored. The second application of RSM is to quantify the shape of a 5-meter diameter, ultra-lightweight, inflatable space antenna at NASA Langley Research Center. Photogrammetry is used to simultaneously measure the shape of the antenna at approximately 500 discrete spatial locations. RSM allows an analytic model to be developed that describes the shape of the majority of the antenna with an uncertainty of 0.4 mm, with 95% confidence. This model would allow a quantitative comparison between the actual shape of the antenna and the original design shape. Accurately determining this shape also allows confident interpolation between the measured points. Such a model could, for example, be used for ray tracing of radio-frequency waves up to 95 GHz. to predict the performance of the antenna.

  13. Colour measurements of surfaces to evaluate the restoration materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Monaco, Angela; Marabelli, Maurizio; Pelosi, Claudia; Picchio, Rodolfo

    2011-06-01

    In this paper two case studies on the application of colour measurements for the evaluation of some restoration materials are discussed. The materials related to the research are: watercolours employed in restoration of wall paintings and preservative/consolidants for wood artifacts. Commercial watercolours, supplied by Maimeri, Windsor&Newton and Talens factories have been tested. Colour measurements have been performed by means of a reflectance spectrophotometer (RS) before and after accelerated ageing of watercolours at 92% relative humidity (RH) and in a Solar Box chamber. The experimental results show that watercolours based on natural earths and artificial ultramarine undergo the main colour changes, expressed as L*, a* and b* variations and total colour difference (▵E*). In the other cases colour differences depend on both watercolour typology and suppliers. The other example concerns the evaluation of colour change due to surface treatment of Poplar (Populus sp.) and chestnut (Castanea sativa L.) wood samples. The wooden samples have been treated with a novel organic preservative/consolidant product that has been tested also in a real case as comparison. The treated samples have been artificially aged in Solar Box chamber equipped with a 280 nm UV filter. Colour has been measured before and after the artificial ageing by means of a RS. Colour changes have been determined also for the main door of an historical mansion in Viterbo, made of chestnut wood, and exposed outdoors.

  14. Study on dynamic deformation synchronized measurement technology of double-layer liquid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Huiying; Dong, Huimin; Liu, Zhanwei

    2017-11-01

    Accurate measurement of the dynamic deformation of double-layer liquid surfaces plays an important role in many fields, such as fluid mechanics, biomechanics, petrochemical industry and aerospace engineering. It is difficult to measure dynamic deformation of double-layer liquid surfaces synchronously for traditional methods. In this paper, a novel and effective method for full-field static and dynamic deformation measurement of double-layer liquid surfaces has been developed, that is wavefront distortion of double-wavelength transmission light with geometric phase analysis (GPA) method. Double wavelength lattice patterns used here are produced by two techniques, one is by double wavelength laser, and the other is by liquid crystal display (LCD). The techniques combine the characteristics such as high transparency, low reflectivity and fluidity of liquid. Two color lattice patterns produced by laser and LCD were adjusted at a certain angle through the tested double-layer liquid surfaces simultaneously. On the basis of the refractive indexes difference of two transmitted lights, the double-layer liquid surfaces were decoupled with GPA method. Combined with the derived relationship between phase variation of transmission-lattice patterns and out-of plane heights of two surfaces, as well as considering the height curves of the liquid level, the double-layer liquid surfaces can be reconstructed successfully. Compared with the traditional measurement method, the developed method not only has the common advantages of the optical measurement methods, such as high-precision, full-field and non-contact, but also simple, low cost and easy to set up.

  15. Reduction of Fermi level pinning and recombination at polycrystalline CdTe surfaces by laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonds, Brian J.; Kheraj, Vipul; Palekis, Vasilios; Ferekides, Christos; Scarpulla, Michael A.

    2015-06-01

    Laser processing of polycrystalline CdTe is a promising approach that could potentially increase module manufacturing throughput while reducing capital expenditure costs. For these benefits to be realized, the basic effects of laser irradiation on CdTe must be ascertained. In this study, we utilize surface photovoltage spectroscopy (SPS) to investigate the changes to the electronic properties of the surface of polycrystalline CdTe solar cell stacks induced by continuous-wave laser annealing. The experimental data explained within a model consisting of two space charge regions, one at the CdTe/air interface and one at the CdTe/CdS junction, are used to interpret our SPS results. The frequency dependence and phase spectra of the SPS signal are also discussed. To support the SPS findings, low-temperature spectrally-resolved photoluminescence and time-resolved photoluminescence were also measured. The data show that a modest laser treatment of 250 W/cm2 with a dwell time of 20 s is sufficient to reduce the effects of Fermi level pinning at the surface due to surface defects.

  16. Reduction of Fermi level pinning and recombination at polycrystalline CdTe surfaces by laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonds, Brian J. [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Kheraj, Vipul [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Department of Applied Physics, S. V. National Institute of Technology, Surat 395 007 (India); Palekis, Vasilios; Ferekides, Christos [Electrical Engineering, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620 (United States); Scarpulla, Michael A., E-mail: scarpulla@eng.utah.edu [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States)

    2015-06-14

    Laser processing of polycrystalline CdTe is a promising approach that could potentially increase module manufacturing throughput while reducing capital expenditure costs. For these benefits to be realized, the basic effects of laser irradiation on CdTe must be ascertained. In this study, we utilize surface photovoltage spectroscopy (SPS) to investigate the changes to the electronic properties of the surface of polycrystalline CdTe solar cell stacks induced by continuous-wave laser annealing. The experimental data explained within a model consisting of two space charge regions, one at the CdTe/air interface and one at the CdTe/CdS junction, are used to interpret our SPS results. The frequency dependence and phase spectra of the SPS signal are also discussed. To support the SPS findings, low-temperature spectrally-resolved photoluminescence and time-resolved photoluminescence were also measured. The data show that a modest laser treatment of 250 W/cm{sup 2} with a dwell time of 20 s is sufficient to reduce the effects of Fermi level pinning at the surface due to surface defects.

  17. Exceptionally crystalline and conducting acid doped polyaniline films by level surface assisted solution casting approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puthirath, Anand B.; Varma, Sreekanth J.; Jayalekshmi, S., E-mail: jayalekshmi@cusat.ac.in [Division for Research in Advanced Materials, Department of Physics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin, Kerala 682022 (India); Methattel Raman, Shijeesh [Nanophotonic and Optoelectronic Devices Laboratory, Department of Physics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin, Kerala 682022 (India)

    2016-04-18

    Emeraldine salt form of polyaniline (PANI) was synthesized by chemical oxidative polymerisation method using ammonium persulfate as oxidant. Resultant emeraldine salt form of PANI was dedoped using ammonia solution and then re-doped with camphor sulphonic acid (CSA), naphthaline sulphonic acid (NSA), hydrochloric acid (HCl), and m-cresol. Thin films of these doped PANI samples were deposited on glass substrates using solution casting method with m-cresol as solvent. A level surface was employed to get homogeneous thin films of uniform thickness. Detailed X-ray diffraction studies have shown that the films are exceptionally crystalline. The crystalline peaks observed in the XRD spectra can be indexed to simple monoclinic structure. FTIR and Raman spectroscopy studies provide convincing explanation for the exceptional crystallinity observed in these polymer films. FESEM and AFM images give better details of surface morphology of doped PANI films. The DC electrical conductivity of the samples was measured using four point probe technique. It is seen that the samples also exhibit quite high DC electrical conductivity, about 287 S/cm for CSA doped PANI, 67 S/cm for NSA doped PANI 65 S/cm for HCl doped PANI, and just below 1 S/cm for m-cresol doped PANI. Effect of using the level surface for solution casting is studied and correlated with the observed crystallinity.

  18. Advanced metrology of surface defects measurement for aluminum die casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Myszka

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The scientific objective of the research is to develop a strategy to build computer based vision systems for inspection of surface defects inproducts, especially discontinuities which appear in castings after machining. In addition to the proposed vision inspection method theauthors demonstrates the development of the advanced computer techniques based on the methods of scanning to measure topography ofsurface defect in offline process control. This method allow to identify a mechanism responsible for the formation of casting defects. Also,the method allow investigating if the, developed vision inspection system for identification of surface defects have been correctlyimplemented for an online inspection. Finally, in order to make casting samples with gas and shrinkage porosity defects type, the LGT gas meter was used . For this task a special camera for a semi-quantitative assessment of the gas content in aluminum alloy melts, using a Straube-Pfeiffer method was used. The results demonstrate that applied solution is excellent tool in preparing for various aluminum alloysthe reference porosity samples, identified next by the computer inspection system.

  19. Surface Acoustic Wave Vibration Sensors for Measuring Aircraft Flutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, William C.; Moore, Jason P.; Juarez, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Under NASA's Advanced Air Vehicles Program the Advanced Air Transport Technology (AATT) Project is investigating flutter effects on aeroelastic wings. To support that work a new method for measuring vibrations due to flutter has been developed. The method employs low power Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensors. To demonstrate the ability of the SAW sensor to detect flutter vibrations the sensors were attached to a Carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite panel which was vibrated at six frequencies from 1Hz to 50Hz. The SAW data was compared to accelerometer data and was found to resemble sine waves and match each other closely. The SAW module design and results from the tests are presented here.

  20. Measuring Moisture Levels in Graphite Epoxy Composite Sandwich Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurge, Mark; Youngquist, Robert; Starr, Stanley

    2011-01-01

    Graphite epoxy composite (GEC) materials are used in the construction of rocket fairings, nose cones, interstage adapters, and heat shields due to their high strength and light weight. However, they absorb moisture depending on the environmental conditions they are exposed to prior to launch. Too much moisture absorption can become a problem when temperature and pressure changes experienced during launch cause the water to vaporize. The rapid state change of the water can result in structural failure of the material. In addition, heat and moisture combine to weaken GEC structures. Diffusion models that predict the total accumulated moisture content based on the environmental conditions are one accepted method of determining if the material strength has been reduced to an unacceptable level. However, there currently doesn t exist any field measurement technique to estimate the actual moisture content of a composite structure. A multi-layer diffusion model was constructed with Mathematica to predict moisture absorption and desorption from the GEC sandwich structure. This model is used in conjunction with relative humidity/temperature sensors both on the inside and outside of the material to determine the moisture levels in the structure. Because the core materials have much higher diffusivity than the face sheets, a single relative humidity measurement will accurately reflect the moisture levels in the core. When combined with an external relative humidity measurement, the model can be used to determine the moisture levels in the face sheets. Since diffusion is temperaturedependent, the temperature measurements are used to determine the diffusivity of the face sheets for the model computations.

  1. Interpreting Changes in Surface EMG Amplitude During High-Level Fatiguing Contractions of the Brachioradialis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lowery, M

    2001-01-01

    ... to estimate muscle fatigue. In this paper, theoretical relationships between surface EMG amplitude measures and mean motor unit firing rates and muscle fiber conduction velocity (MFCV) are established...

  2. A Pilot Study on Measuring Customer’s Satisfaction Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vide Boltez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available RQ: Determine the level of customer satisfaction of a company’s products and services to obtain information on needed improvements.Purpose: The purpose of measuring customer’s satisfaction level is to obtain information directly from the final buyer that bought our product. The next step is to analyze the information obtained and to take the results into consideration to improve the working process in production and in other departments of the company.Method: The method used for the pilot study to measure customer satisfaction was a short questionnaire that was given to 10 customers of our product and 10 completed questionnaires were obtained.Results: The results showed the level of satisfaction of final buyers of roof tiles and roofs that the company has achieved through their products and services. The results facilitate the production, logistics, purchasing and sales department to obtain information on positive satisfaction levels and areas that need change. At the same time, the final buyer was identified (i.e., name, surname, address, and so forth, which up until now had not been.Organization: The organization will save time and money in the future, because it will continuously measure customer satisfaction to improve production and other departments in the organization towards creating satisfied customers.Society: Final buyers of roofs are, and will be, more satisfied with their decisions, because the organization carries out after-sales satisfaction levels.Originality: The research was original, because up to this date the organization has not conducted research in such a manner.Limitations: The pilot study used 10 completed questionnaires that represent a very small sample to make any generalizations.

  3. THE LEVEL OF CUSTOMER SATISFACTION - MEASURE OF SOCIAL EFFICIENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUNGIU-PUPĂZAN MARIANA CLAUDIA

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Pricing models for social efficiency focuses on assessing the quality, namely the comparison of the desired product to the consumer and the product received, the level of consumer satisfaction on the products and / or services will be therefore a very important component in measuring the effectiveness social. Between the two concepts there is a relationship of mutual interdependence: the level of consumer satisfaction is the result of the quality performance of products and services and high quality products and services is reflected in consumer satisfaction. From the theoretical point of view, according to the marketing strategy, it is necessary to bring to a common level of perceived benefit to consumer expectations. Customer satisfaction is actually the result of a complex information processing.

  4. Channel Storage change: a new remote sensed surface water measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coss, S. P.; Durand, M. T.; Yi, Y.; Guo, Q.; Shum, C. K.; Allen, G. H.; Pavelsky, T.

    2017-12-01

    Here we present river channel storage change (CSC) measurements for 17 major world rivers from 2002-2016. We combined interpolated daily 1 km resolution Global River Radar Altimeter Time Series (GRRATS) river surface elevation data with static widths from the global river Global River Widths from Landsat (GRWL) dataset, to generate preliminary channel storage measurements. CSC is a previously unmeasured component of the terrestrial water balance It is a fundamental Earth science quantity with global bearing on floodplains, ecology, and geochemistry. CSC calculations require only remote sensed data, making them an ideal tool for studying remote regions where hydrological data is not easily accessible. CSC is uniquely suited to determine the role of hydrologic and hydraulic controls in basins with strong seasonal cycles (freeze-up and break-up). The cumulative CSC anomaly can impart spatial details that discharge measurements cannot. With this new measurement, we may be able to determine critical hydrological and hydraulic controls on rapidly changing systems like Arctic rivers. Results for Mississippi River indicate that peak CSC anomaly was the highest in 2011 (12.6 km3) and minimum CSC anomaly was in 2012 (-12.2 km3). Peak CSC has most frequently occurs in May (5 years), but has come as late in the year as July, and as early as January. Results for the Yukon River indicate that peak CSC anomaly was the highest in 2013 (13.9 km3) and minimum CSC anomaly was in 2010 (-14.2 km3). Peak CSC has most frequently come in early to mid-June (4-18), but has occurred in May (19-31) four years in the study period (three of the last 6 years) and once on April 30th.

  5. Measuring sea surface height with a GNSS-Wave Glider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Maqueda, Miguel Angel; Penna, Nigel T.; Foden, Peter R.; Martin, Ian; Cipollini, Paolo; Williams, Simon D.; Pugh, Jeff P.

    2017-04-01

    A GNSS-Wave Glider is a novel technique to measure sea surface height autonomously using the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). It consists of an unmanned surface vehicle manufactured by Liquid Robotics, a Wave Glider, and a geodetic-grade GNSS antenna-receiver system, with the antenna installed on a mast on the vehicle's deck. The Wave Glider uses the differential wave motion through the water column for propulsion, thus guaranteeing an, in principle, indefinite autonomy. Solar energy is collected to power all on-board instrumentation, including the GNSS system. The GNSS-Wave Glider was first tested in Loch Ness in 2013, demonstrating that the technology is capable of mapping geoid heights within the loch with an accuracy of a few centimetres. The trial in Loch Ness did not conclusively confirm the reliability of the technique because, during the tests, the state of the water surface was much more benign than would normally be expect in the open ocean. We now report on a first deployment of a GNSS-Wave Glider in the North Sea. The deployment took place in August 2016 and lasted thirteen days, during which the vehicle covered a distance of about 350 nautical miles in the north western North Sea off Great Britain. During the experiment, the GNSS-Wave Glider experienced sea states between 1 (0-0.1 m wave heights) and 5 (2.5-4 m wave heights). The GNSS-Wave Glider data, recorded at 5 Hz frequency, were analysed using a post-processed kinematic GPS-GLONASS precise point positioning (PPP) approach, which were quality controlled using double difference GPS kinematic processing with respect to onshore reference stations. Filtered with a 900 s moving-average window, the PPP heights reveal geoid patterns in the survey area that are very similar to the EGM2008 geoid model, thus demonstrating the potential use of a GNSS-Wave Glider for marine geoid determination. The residual of subtracting the modelled or measured marine geoid from the PPP signal combines information

  6. Measuring surface temperature of isolated neutron stars and related problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teter, Marcus Alton

    New and exciting results for measuring neutron star surface temperatures began with the successful launch of the Chandra X-ray observatory. Among these results are new detections of neutron star surface temperatures which have made it possible to seriously test neutron star thermal evolution theories. The important new temperature determination of the Vela pulsar (Pavlov, et al., 2001a) requires a non-standard cooling scenario to explain it. Apart from this result, we have measured PSR B1055-52's surface temperature in this thesis, determining that it can be explained by standard cooling with heating. Our spectral fit of the combined data from ROSAT and Chandra have shown that a three component model, two thermal blackbodies and an non-thermal power-law, is required to explain the data. Furthermore, our phase resolved spectroscopy has begun to shed light on the geometry of the hot spot on PSR B1055-52's surface as well as the structure of the magnetospheric radiation. Also, there is strong evidence for a thermal distribution over its surface. Most importantly, the fact that PSR B1055-52 does not have a hydrogen atmosphere has been firmly established. To reconcile these two key observations, on the Vela pulsar and PSR B1055-52, we tested neutron star cooling with neutrino processes including the Cooper pair neutrino emission process. Overall, it has been found that a phase change associated with pions being present in the cores of more massive neutron stars explains all current of the data. A transition from neutron matter to pion condensates in the central stellar core explains the difference between standard and non-standard cooling scenarios, because the superfluid suppression of pion cooling will reduce the emissivity of the pion direct URCA process substantially. A neutron star with a mass of [Special characters omitted.] with a medium stiffness equation of state and a T72 type neutron superfluid models the standard cooling case well. A neutron star of [Special

  7. Sleep Duration, Activity Levels, and Measures of Obesity in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Betty L; Ammar, Erica M; Pile, Debra

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate sleep and activity as they relate to obesity measures of body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) in adults. Findings from recent studies have linked physical inactivity and short sleep with obesity. A total of 337 subjects were collected from the 2009-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). The sample was evaluated to determine if a relationship existed between sleep duration, activity levels, and measures of obesity. Pearson r correlation revealed a significant positive relationship between WC and sedentary activity, r(318) = .168, p = .003. Analysis also showed a significant inverse association between sleep duration and WC, r(319) = -.113, p = .043. No statistical significance was found using BMI as the measure of obesity in relation to duration of sleep or activity level. In support of recent literature, this study found duration of sleep and sedentary activity in adults may relate to the development of obesity as measured by WC. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Deposition of corrosion products from dowels on human dental root surfaces measured with proton microprobe technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brune, D.; Brunell, G.; Lindh, U.

    1982-06-01

    Distribution of copper, mercury and zinc on human teeth root surfaces adjacent to dowels of gold alloy or brass as well as dowels of brass in conjunction with an amalgam crown has been measured with a proton microprobe using PIXE techniques. Upper limits of the contents of gold and silver on the root surfaces were established. Pronounced concentration profiles of copper and zinc were observed on the root surfaces of teeth prepared with dowels of brass. The dowel of gold alloy revealed only zinc deposition. The major part of copper on the root surfaces is assumed to arise from corrosion of the dowels, and has been transported to the surface by diffusion through the dential tubuli. Zinc in the volume analysed is a constituent of dentin tissue as well as a corrosion product of the brass dowel. Part of the zinc level could also be ascribed to erosion of the zinc phosphate cement matrix. The volumes analysed were (25×25×25)μm 3. The levels of copper, mercury and zinc on the tooth root surfaces attained values up to about 200, 20 and 600 ppm, respectively.

  9. The Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA): A database for the worldwide measured surface energy fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Martin; Ohmura, Atsumu; Schär, Christoph; Müller, Guido; Hakuba, Maria Z.; Mystakidis, Stefanos; Arsenovic, Pavle; Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo

    2017-02-01

    The Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA) is a database for the worldwide measured energy fluxes at the Earth's surface. GEBA is maintained at ETH Zurich (Switzerland) and has been founded in the 1980s by Prof. Atsumu Ohmura. It has continuously been updated and currently contains around 2500 stations with 500`000 monthly mean entries of various surface energy balance components. Many of the records extend over several decades. The most widely measured quantity available in GEBA is the solar radiation incident at the Earth's surface ("global radiation"). The data sources include, in addition to the World Radiation Data Centre (WRDC) in St. Petersburg, data reports from National Weather Services, data from different research networks (BSRN, ARM, SURFRAD), data published in peer-reviewed publications and data obtained through personal communications. Different quality checks are applied to check for gross errors in the dataset. GEBA is used in various research applications, such as for the quantification of the global energy balance and its spatiotemporal variation, or for the estimation of long-term trends in the surface fluxes, which enabled the detection of multi-decadal variations in surface solar radiation, known as "global dimming" and "brightening". GEBA is further extensively used for the evaluation of climate models and satellite-derived surface flux products. On a more applied level, GEBA provides the basis for engineering applications in the context of solar power generation, water management, agricultural production and tourism. GEBA is publicly accessible over the internet via www.geba.ethz.ch.

  10. The surface elevation table: marker horizon method for measuring wetland accretion and elevation dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaway, John C.; Cahoon, Donald R.; Lynch, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Tidal wetlands are highly sensitive to processes that affect their elevation relative to sea level. The surface elevation table–marker horizon (SET–MH) method has been used to successfully measure these processes, including sediment accretion, changes in relative elevation, and shallow soil processes (subsidence and expansion due to root production). The SET–MH method is capable of measuring changes at very high resolution (±millimeters) and has been used worldwide both in natural wetlands and under experimental conditions. Marker horizons are typically deployed using feldspar over 50- by 50-cm plots, with replicate plots at each sampling location. Plots are sampled using a liquid N2 cryocorer that freezes a small sample, allowing the handling and measurement of soft and easily compressed soils with minimal compaction. The SET instrument is a portable device that is attached to a permanent benchmark to make high-precision measurements of wetland surface elevation. The SET instrument has evolved substantially in recent decades, and the current rod SET (RSET) is widely used. For the RSET, a 15-mm-diameter stainless steel rod is pounded into the ground until substantial resistance is achieved to establish a benchmark. The SET instrument is attached to the benchmark and leveled such that it reoccupies the same reference plane in space, and pins lowered from the instrument repeatedly measure the same point on the soil surface. Changes in the height of the lowered pins reflect changes in the soil surface. Permanent or temporary platforms provide access to SET and MH locations without disturbing the wetland surface.

  11. Microassay for measurement of binding of radiolabelled ligands to cell surface molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woof, J.M.; Burton, D.R.

    1988-01-01

    An improved technique for measuring the binding of radiolabelled ligands to cell surface molecules has been developed by modification of a procedure using centrifugation through a water-immiscible oil to separate free and cell-bound ligand. It maximises the percentage of ligand bound since cell-bound and free ligand can be separated easily and reproducibly even when very small reaction volumes are used. This permits low levels of ligand radiolabelling and relatively low numbers of cells to be used

  12. Feedback on Measured Dust Concentrations Reduces Exposure Levels Among Farmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basinas, Ioannis; Sigsgaard, Torben; Bønløkke, Jakob Hjort; Andersen, Nils Testrup; Omland, Øyvind; Kromhout, Hans; Schlünssen, Vivi

    2016-08-01

    The high burden of exposure to organic dust among livestock farmers warrants the establishment of effective preventive and exposure control strategies for these workers. The number of intervention studies exploring the effectiveness of exposure reduction strategies through the use of objective measurements has been limited. To examine whether dust exposure can be reduced by providing feedback to the farmers concerning measurements of the exposure to dust in their farm. The personal dust levels of farmers in 54 pig and 26 dairy cattle farms were evaluated in two measurement series performed approximately 6 months apart. Detailed information on work tasks and farm characteristics during the measurements were registered. Participating farms were randomized a priori to a control (n = 40) and an intervention group (n = 40). Shortly after the first visit, owners of intervention farms only received a letter with information on the measured dust concentrations in the farm together with some general advises on exposure reduction strategies (e.g. use of respirators during certain tasks). Relationships between measured dust concentrations and intervention status were quantified by means of linear mixed effect analysis with farm and worker id as random effects. Season, type of farming, and work tasks were treated as fixed effects. Changes in exposure over time were explored primarily at a farm level in models combined, as well as separate for pig and cattle farmers. After adjustment for fixed effects, an overall reduction of 23% in personal dust exposures was estimated as a result of the intervention (P = 0.02). Exposure reductions attributable to the intervention were similar across pig and cattle farmers, but statistically significant only for pig farmers. Intervention effects among pig farmers did not depend on the individuals' information status; but among cattle farmers a significant 48% reduction in exposure was found only among individuals that reported to have been

  13. Measurement of Acceptable Noise Level with Background Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Hyun-Jung; Bahng, Junghwa; Lee, Jae Hee

    2015-09-01

    Acceptable noise level (ANL) is a measure of the maximum background noise level (BNL) that a person is willing to tolerate while following a target story. Although researchers have used various sources of target sound in ANL measures, a limited type of background noise has been used. Extending the previous study of Gordon-Hickey & Moore (2007), the current study determined the effect of music genre and tempo on ANLs as possible factors affecting ANLs. We also investigated the relationships between individual ANLs and the familiarity of music samples and between music ANLs and subjective preference. Forty-one participants were seperated into two groups according to their ANLs, 29 low-ANL listeners and 12 high-ANL listeners. Using Korean ANL material, the individual ANLs were measured based on the listeners' most comfortable listening level and BNL. The ANLs were measured in six conditions, with different music tempo (fast, slow) and genre (K-pop, pop, classical) in a counterbalanced order. Overall, ANLs did not differ by the tempo of background music, but music genre significantly affected individual ANLs. We observed relatively higher ANLs with K-pop music and relatively lower ANLs with classical music. This tendency was similar in both low-ANL and high-ANL groups. However, the subjective ratings of music familiarity and preference affected ANLs differently for low-ANL and high-ANL groups. In contrast to the low-ANL listeners, the ANLs of the high-ANL listeners were significantly affected by music familiarity and preference. The genre of background music affected ANLs obtained using background music. The degree of music familiarity and preference appears to be associated with individual susceptibility to background music only for listeners who are greatly annoyed by background noise (high-ANL listeners).

  14. Measurement of Acceptable Noise Level with Background Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Hyun-Jung; Bahng, Junghwa

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Acceptable noise level (ANL) is a measure of the maximum background noise level (BNL) that a person is willing to tolerate while following a target story. Although researchers have used various sources of target sound in ANL measures, a limited type of background noise has been used. Extending the previous study of Gordon-Hickey & Moore (2007), the current study determined the effect of music genre and tempo on ANLs as possible factors affecting ANLs. We also investigated the relationships between individual ANLs and the familiarity of music samples and between music ANLs and subjective preference. Subjects and Methods Forty-one participants were seperated into two groups according to their ANLs, 29 low-ANL listeners and 12 high-ANL listeners. Using Korean ANL material, the individual ANLs were measured based on the listeners' most comfortable listening level and BNL. The ANLs were measured in six conditions, with different music tempo (fast, slow) and genre (K-pop, pop, classical) in a counterbalanced order. Results Overall, ANLs did not differ by the tempo of background music, but music genre significantly affected individual ANLs. We observed relatively higher ANLs with K-pop music and relatively lower ANLs with classical music. This tendency was similar in both low-ANL and high-ANL groups. However, the subjective ratings of music familiarity and preference affected ANLs differently for low-ANL and high-ANL groups. In contrast to the low-ANL listeners, the ANLs of the high-ANL listeners were significantly affected by music familiarity and preference. Conclusions The genre of background music affected ANLs obtained using background music. The degree of music familiarity and preference appears to be associated with individual susceptibility to background music only for listeners who are greatly annoyed by background noise (high-ANL listeners). PMID:26413573

  15. A surface defects inspection method based on multidirectional gray-level fluctuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunpeng Ma

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Machine vision inspection technology provides an efficient tool for surface defects inspection. However, because of the multiformity of surface defects, the existing machine vision methods for surface defects inspection are limited by application scenarios. In order to improve the versatility of algorithms, and to process various kinds of images more accurately, we propose a new adaptive method for surface defect detection, named neighborhood gray-level difference method using the multidirectional gray-level fluctuation. This method changes thresholds and step values by extracting gray-level-fluctuating condition of images, and then it uses the neighborhood gray-level difference to segment defects from background. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method for inspecting different surface defects. Compared with other methods, the proposed method can be applied to inspect various surface defects, and it can provide more accurate defect segmentation results.

  16. GPS water level measurements for Indonesia's Tsunami Early Warning System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Schöne

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available On Boxing Day 2004, a severe tsunami was generated by a strong earthquake in Northern Sumatra causing a large number of casualties. At this time, neither an offshore buoy network was in place to measure tsunami waves, nor a system to disseminate tsunami warnings to local governmental entities. Since then, buoys have been developed by Indonesia and Germany, complemented by NOAA's Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis (DART buoys, and have been moored offshore Sumatra and Java. The suite of sensors for offshore tsunami detection in Indonesia has been advanced by adding GPS technology for water level measurements.

    The usage of GPS buoys in tsunami warning systems is a relatively new approach. The concept of the German Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System (GITEWS (Rudloff et al., 2009 combines GPS technology and ocean bottom pressure (OBP measurements. Especially for near-field installations where the seismic noise may deteriorate the OBP data, GPS-derived sea level heights provide additional information.

    The GPS buoy technology is precise enough to detect medium to large tsunamis of amplitudes larger than 10 cm. The analysis presented here suggests that for about 68% of the time, tsunamis larger than 5 cm may be detectable.

  17. Measuring surface current velocities in the Agulhas region with ASAR

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rouault, MJ

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface current information collected over the Agulhas Current region and derived from the Doppler centroid anomalies of the Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) are examined. The sources of errors and potential use of the radar surface...

  18. Airborne lidar measurements of surface ozone depletion over Arctic sea ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Seabrook

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A differential absorption lidar (DIAL for measurement of atmospheric ozone concentration was operated aboard the Polar 5 research aircraft in order to study the depletion of ozone over Arctic sea ice. The lidar measurements during a flight over the sea ice north of Barrow, Alaska, on 3 April 2011 found a surface boundary layer depletion of ozone over a range of 300 km. The photochemical destruction of surface level ozone was strongest at the most northern point of the flight, and steadily decreased towards land. All the observed ozone-depleted air throughout the flight occurred within 300 m of the sea ice surface. A back-trajectory analysis of the air measured throughout the flight indicated that the ozone-depleted air originated from over the ice. Air at the surface that was not depleted in ozone had originated from over land. An investigation into the altitude history of the ozone-depleted air suggests a strong inverse correlation between measured ozone concentration and the amount of time the air directly interacted with the sea ice.

  19. ROUGHNESS ON WOOD SURFACES AND ROUGHNESS MEASUREMENT METHODS

    OpenAIRE

    İsmail Aydın; Gürsel Çolakoğlu

    2003-01-01

    Some visual characteristics of wood such as color, pattern and texture determine the quality of manufactured products. Surface properties of wood material are important both in production and marketing after production. Initial studies related to the roughness of wood surface were begun in early 1950’s. However, no general agreed standardization can not have been developed for wood surfaces. Surface roughness of wood is function of the production process, product type and the natural anatomic...

  20. Measuring evaporation from soil surfaces for environmental and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There are many reasons for the need to assess rates and quantities of evaporation or evapotranspiration from natural soil surfaces, the surfaces of deposits of mine or industrial waste, or soil-covered waste surfaces. These include assessing water balances for nearsurface soil strata, landfills, tailings dams and waste dumps ...

  1. Effects of drop size and measuring condition on static contact angle measurement on a superhydrophobic surface with goniometric technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Kwangseok; Kim, Minyoung; Kim, Do Hyun; Ahn, Jeong Keun

    2015-01-01

    It is not a simple task to measure a contact angle of a water drop on a superhydrophobic surface with sessile drop method, because a roll-off angle is very low. Usually contact angle of a water drop on a superhydrophobic surface is measured by fixing a drop with intentional defects on the surface or a needle. We examined the effects of drop size and measuring condition such as the use of a needle or defects on the static contact angle measurement on superhydrophobic surface. Results showed that the contact angles on a superhydrophobic surface remain almost constant within intrinsic measurement errors unless there is a wetting transition during the measurement. We expect that this study will provide a deeper understanding on the nature of the contact angle and convenient measurement of the contact angle on the superhydrophobic surface.

  2. MEASURING INSTRUMENT CONSTRUCTION AND VALIDATION IN ESTIMATING UNICYCLING SKILL LEVEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Granić

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Riding the unicycle presupposes the knowledge of the set of elements which describe motoric skill, or just part of that set with which we could measure the level of that knowledge. Testing and evaluation of the elements is time consuming. In order to design a unique, composite measuring instrument, to facilitate the evaluation of the initial level of unicycling skill, we tested 17 recreative subjects who were learning to ride the unicycle in 15 hours of training, without any previous knowledge or experience what was measured before the beginning of the training. At the beginning and at the end of the training they were tested with the set of the 12 riding elements test that was carried out to record only successful attempts, followed by unique SLALOM test which include previously tested elements. It was found that the unique SLALOM test has good metric features and a high regression coefficient showed that the SLALOM could be used instead of the 12 elements of unicycle riding skill, and it could be used as a uniform test to evaluate learned or existing knowledge. Because of its simplicity in terms of action and simultaneous testing of more subjects, the newly constructed test could be used in evaluating the unicycling recreational level, but also for monitoring and programming transformation processes to develop the motor skills of riding of unicycle. Because of its advantages, it is desirable to include unicycling in the educational processes of learning new motor skills, which can be evaluated by the results of this research. The obtained results indicate that the unicycle should be seriously consider as a training equipment to “refresh” or expand the recreational programs, without any fear that it is just for special people. Namely, it was shown that the previously learned motor skills (skiing, roller-skating, and cycling had no effect on the results of final testing.

  3. Influence and modelling of view angles and microrelief on surface temperature measurements of bare agricultural soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbrugghe, Michel; Cierniewski, Jerzy

    The exploitation of remote sensing instruments with large fields of view necessarily implies the analysis of instruments acquired over a wide variety of viewing geometries. The purpose of this study is to underline the effects of view angles and microrelief on the directional surface temperature measurements of cultivated bare soils. A campaign of measurements was carried out at Poznan (Poland) in April 1995. The directional temperatures were measured on a furrowed sandy soil. The measurements were acquired at ground level with a radiothermometer in the 8-14 μm band. The radiothermometer was fixed on a special goniometric support 2.1 m above the soil surface and was directed at the soil with view zenith angles varying from -60° to +60° by steps of 10°. The data were collected for solar zenith angles ranging from 40.2° to 62.3°. In the experiment, for a given sun position, the difference between oblique and nadir measurements could reach 6°C. A model aimed at explaining the variations of the surface temperature measurements of furrowed soil in relation to its viewing conditions is presented. This model requires the precise soil microrelief geometry configuration, the illumination and viewing conditions of the surface and the radiative temperatures of the shaded and sunlit soil facets. The results show a good correlation between the predicted and the measured data. This type of modelling can be used to correct radiative temperature measurements of soils from view angles and soil microrelief geometry effects.

  4. Muscle thickness measurements to estimate gluteus medius and minimus activity levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieterich, Angela V; Pickard, Christine M; Strauss, Geoffrey R; Deshon, Louise E; Gibson, William; McKay, Janice

    2014-10-01

    The clinical assessment of gluteus medius and minimus force sharing requires non-invasive measurements of individual activity levels. Do ultrasound measurements of change of muscle thickness substitute invasive electromyography (EMG)? Isometric hip abduction in 20-80% maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) was measured using dynamometry, M-mode ultrasound for gluteus medius and minimus thickness and EMG using (1) surface electrodes on gluteus medius, n = 15, (2) fine-wire electrodes in deep gluteus medius and minimus, n = 6. Gluteus medius thickened by 5.0 (SD 2.5) mm at 80% MVIC while gluteus minimus thickness was constant in the surface EMG study and decreased by 1.6 (SD 1.6) mm at the more ventral location in the fine-wire EMG study. Thickness change of gluteus medius enabled prediction of torque (r(2) 0.66) and of surface EMG amplitude (r(2) 0.57). Surface EMG enabled higher torque prediction (r(2) 0.84) than thickness change. Thickness change of gluteus minimus did not enable a practically relevant estimation of torque production. Ultrasound examination revealed a differential thickening behaviour of gluteus medius and minimus which enabled estimation of isometric torque production only for gluteus medius but with lower precision than surface EMG. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Low level alpha activity measurements with pulse shape discrimination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, Masayasu; Satoh, Kaneaki; Higuchi, Hideo.

    1984-01-01

    Pulse shape discrimination of α and β rays with liquid scintillation counting was investigated for the purpose of low level α activity measurements. Various liquid scintillators for pulse shape discrimination were examined by means of pulse rise time analysis. A new scintillator of low cost and of superior characteristics was found. The figure of merits better than 3.5 in risetime spectrum and the energy resolution better than 9% were obtained for carefully prepared samples. The background counting rate for a sample of 10 ml was reduced to 0.013 cpm/MeV in the range of α ray energy 5 to 7 MeV. (author)

  6. MEASURING THE LEVEL OF TOURIST SATISFACTION. CASE STUDY BRASOV COUNTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Bratucu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to measure the satisfaction level of Romanian and foreign tourists visiting Brașov. In order to achieve the above mentioned objective, a survey was carried out on a sample of 1,119 visitors to Brașov County. This quantitative research is part of a project entitled Destination Intelligent Management for Sustainable Tourism, won following a national competition. These findings can be used by businesses and the local managing authorities in establishing the strategies for the sustainable development of tourism in the in the region.

  7. Apparatus to measure low level helium for neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, Shuji; Takao, Yoshiyuki; Muramasu, Masatomo; Hida, Tomoya; Sou, Hirofumi; Nakashima, Hideki; Kanda, Yukinori

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus to measure low level helium in a solid sample for neutron dosimetry in the practical use such as area monitoring in the long-term and reactor surveillance was reported. In our previous work, the helium atoms measurement system (HAMS) was developed. A sample was evaporated in the furnace and the released gas from the sample was analyzed with the mass spectrometer of the system to determine the amount of helium contained in it. The system has been improved to advance the lower helium measurement limit in a solid sample for its application to an area monitoring system. The mass of a solid is up to 100mg. Two important points should be considered to advance the lower limit. One was to produce a high quality vacuum in the system chamber for suppressing background gases during the sample measurement. The other important point was to detect very small output from the mass spectrometer. A pulse counting system was used to get high sensitivity in the mass 4 analyzing. (author)

  8. Apparatus to measure low level helium for neutron dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozaki, Shuji; Takao, Yoshiyuki; Muramasu, Masatomo; Hida, Tomoya; Sou, Hirofumi; Nakashima, Hideki [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Kanda, Yukinori

    1998-03-01

    An apparatus to measure low level helium in a solid sample for neutron dosimetry in the practical use such as area monitoring in the long-term and reactor surveillance was reported. In our previous work, the helium atoms measurement system (HAMS) was developed. A sample was evaporated in the furnace and the released gas from the sample was analyzed with the mass spectrometer of the system to determine the amount of helium contained in it. The system has been improved to advance the lower helium measurement limit in a solid sample for its application to an area monitoring system. The mass of a solid is up to 100mg. Two important points should be considered to advance the lower limit. One was to produce a high quality vacuum in the system chamber for suppressing background gases during the sample measurement. The other important point was to detect very small output from the mass spectrometer. A pulse counting system was used to get high sensitivity in the mass 4 analyzing. (author)

  9. A case study on biomass burning aerosols: effects on aerosol optical properties and surface radiation levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Arola

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available In spring 2006, biomass burning aerosols from eastern Europe were transported extensively to Finland, and to other parts of northern Europe. They were observed as far as in the European Arctic. In the first part of this paper, temporal and spatial evolution and transport of these biomass burning aerosols are monitored with MODIS retrieved aerosol optical depth (AOD imagery at visible wavelengths (0.55 μm. Comparison of MODIS and AERONET AOD is conducted at Tõravere, Estonia. Then trajectory analyses, as well as MODIS Fire Mapper products are used to better understand the type and origin of the air masses. During the studied four-week period AOD values ranged from near zero up to 1.2 at 0.55 μm and the linear correlation between MODIS and AERONET was very high (~0.97. Temporal variability observed within this four-week period was also rather well explained by the trajectory analysis in conjunction with the fire detections produced by the MODIS Rapid Response System. In the second part of our study, the surface measurements of global and UV radiation at Jokioinen, Finland are used to study the effect of this haze episode on the levels of surface radiation. We found reductions up to 35% in noon-time surface UV irradiance (at 340 nm as compared to typical aerosol conditions. For global (total solar radiation, the reduction was always smaller, in line with the expected wavelength dependence of the aerosol effect.

  10. UAV BASED BRDF-MEASUREMENTS OF AGRICULTURAL SURFACES WITH PFIFFIKUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. J. Grenzdörffer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available BRDF is a common problem in remote sensing and also in oblique photogrammetry. Common approaches of BRDF-measurement with a field goniometer are costly and rather cumbersome. UAVs may offer an interesting alternative by using a special flight pattern of oblique and converging images. The main part of this paper is the description of a photogrammetric workflow in order to determine the anisotropic reflection properties of a given surface. Due to the relatively low flying heights standard procedures from close range photogrammetry were adopted for outdoor usage. The photogrammetric processing delivered automatic and highly accurate orientation information with the aid of coded targets. The interior orientation of the consumer grade camera is more or less stable. The radiometrically corrected oblique images are converted into ortho photos. The azimuth and elevation angle of every point may then be computed. The calculated anisotropy of a winter wheat plot is shown. A system four diagonally-looking cameras (Four Vision and an additional nadir looking camera is under development. The multi camera system especially designed for a Micro- UAV with a payload of min 1 kg. The system is composed of five industrial digital frame cameras (1.3 Mpix CCD-chips, 15 fp/s with fixed lenses. Also special problems with the construction of a light weight housing of the multi camera solution are covered in the paper.

  11. Ultra Low Level Environmental Neutron Measurements Using Superheated Droplet Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, A.C. [Centro de Ciencias e Tecnologias Nucleares, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Estrada Nacional 10 - km 139.7, 2695-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal); Centro de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade de Lisboa. Av. Prof. Gama Pinto, 2, 1649- 003 Lisboa (Portugal); Felizardo, M.; Girard, T.A.; Kling, A.; Ramos, A.R. [Centro de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade de Lisboa. Av. Prof. Gama Pinto, 2, 1649- 003 Lisboa (Portugal); Marques, J.G.; Prudencio, M.I.; Marques, R.; Carvalho, F.P. [Centro de Ciencias e Tecnologias Nucleares, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Estrada Nacional 10 - km 139.7, 2695-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal)

    2015-07-01

    Through the application of superheated droplet detectors (SDDs), the SIMPLE project for the direct search for dark matter (DM) reached the most restrictive limits on the spin-dependent sector to date. The experiment is based on the detection of recoils following WIMP-nuclei interaction, mimicking those from neutron scattering. The thermodynamic operation conditions yield the SDDs intrinsically insensitive to radiations with linear energy transfer below ∼150 keVμm{sup -1} such as photons, electrons, muons and neutrons with energies below ∼40 keV. Underground facilities are increasingly employed for measurements in a low-level radiation background (DM search, gamma-spectroscopy, intrinsic soft-error rate measurements, etc.), where the rock overburden shields against cosmic radiation. In this environment the SDDs are sensitive only to α-particles and neutrons naturally emitted from the surrounding materials. Recently developed signal analysis techniques allow discrimination between neutron and α-induced signals. SDDs are therefore a promising instrument for low-level neutron and α measurements, namely environmental neutron measurements and α-contamination assays. In this work neutron measurements performed in the challenging conditions of the latest SIMPLE experiment (1500 mwe depth with 50-75 cm water shield) are reported. The results are compared with those obtained by detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the neutron background induced by {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th traces in the facility, shielding and detector materials. Calculations of the neutron energy distribution yield the following neutron fluence rates (in 10{sup -8} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}): thermal (<0.5 eV): 2.5; epithermal (0.5 eV-100 keV): 2.2; fast (>1 MeV): 3.9. Signal rates were derived using standard cross sections and codes routinely employed in reactor dosimetry. The measured and calculated neutron count rates per unit of active mass were 0.15 ct/kgd and 0.33 ct/kg-d respectively. As the major

  12. Surface Water Connectivity, Flow Pathways and Water Level Fluctuation in a Cold Region Deltaic Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, D. L.; Niemann, O.; Skelly, R.; Monk, W. A.; Baird, D. J.

    2017-12-01

    The Peace-Athabasca Delta (PAD) is a 6000 km2 deltaic floodplain ecosystem of international importance (Wood Buffalo National Park, Ramsar Convention, UNESCO World Heritage, and SWOT satellite water level calibration/validation site). The low-relief floodplain formed at the confluence of the Peace, Athabasca and Birch rivers with Lake Athabasca. More than 1000 wetland and lake basins have varying degrees of connectivity to the main flow system. Hydroperiod and water storage is influenced by ice-jam and open-water inundations and prevailing semi-arid climate that control water drawdown. Prior studies have identified pathways of river-to-wetland floodwater connection and historical water level fluctuation/trends as a key knowledge gaps, limiting our knowledge of deltaic ecosystem status and potential hydroecological responses to climate change and upstream water alterations to flow contributions. To address this knowledge gap, surface elevation mapping of the PAD has been conducted since 2012 using aerial remote sensing Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR), plus thousands of ground based surface and bathymetric survey points tied to Global Positioning System (GPS) were obtained. The elevation information was used to develop a high resolution digital terrain model to simulate and investigate surface water connectivity. Importantly, the surveyed areas contain a set of wetland monitoring sites where ground-based surface water connectivity, water level/depth, water quality, and aquatic ecology (eg, vegetation, macroinvertebrate and muskrat) have been examined. The goal of this presentation is to present an assessment of: i) surface water fluctuation and connectivity for PAD wetland sites; ii) 40+ year inter-annual hydroperiod reconstruction for a perched basin using a combination of field measurements, remote sensing estimates, and historical documents; and iii) outline an approach to integrate newly available hydro-bio-geophysical information into a novel, multi

  13. A computerized system to measure interproximal alveolar bone levels in epidemiologic, radiographic investigations. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wouters, F.R.; Frithiof, L.; Soeder, P.Oe.; Hellden, L.; Lavstedt, S.; Salonen, L.

    1988-01-01

    The study was aimed at analyzing intra- and inter-examiner variations in computerized measurement and in non-measurability of alveolar bone level in a cross-sectional, epidemiologic material. At each interproximal tooth surface, alveolar bone height in percentage of root length (B/R) and tooth length (B/T) were determined twice by one examiner and once by a second examiner from X5-magnified periapical radiographs. The overall intra- and inter-examiner variations in measurement were 2.85% and 3.84% of root length and 1.97% and 2.82% of tooth length, respectively. The varations were different for different tooth groups and for different degrees of severity of marginal periodontitis. The overall proportions on non-measurable tooth surfaces varied with examiner from 32% to 39% and from 43% to 48% of the available interproximal tooth surfaces for B/R and B/T, respectively. With regard to the level of reliability, the computerized method reported is appropriate to cross-sectional, epidemiologic investigations from radiographs

  14. Azimuth selection for sea level measurements using geodetic GPS receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaolei; Zhang, Qin; Zhang, Shuangcheng

    2018-03-01

    Based on analysis of Global Positioning System (GPS) multipath signals recorded by a geodetic GPS receiver, GPS Reflectometry (GPS-R) has demonstrated unique advantages in relation to sea level monitoring. Founded on multipath reflectometry theory, sea level changes can be measured by GPS-R through spectral analysis of recorded signal-to-noise ratio data. However, prior to estimating multipath parameters, it is necessary to define azimuth and elevation angle mask to ensure the reflecting zones are on water. Here, a method is presented to address azimuth selection, a topic currently under active development in the field of GPS-R. Data from three test sites: the Kachemak Bay GPS site PBAY in Alaska (USA), Friday Harbor GPS site SC02 in the San Juan Islands (USA), and Brest Harbor GPS site BRST in Brest (France) are analyzed. These sites are located in different multipath environments, from a rural coastal area to a busy harbor, and they experience different tidal ranges. Estimates by the GPS tide gauges at azimuths selected by the presented method are compared with measurements from physical tide gauges and acceptable correspondence found for all three sites.

  15. Sea level and turbidity controls on mangrove soil surface elevation change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelock, Catherine E.; Fernanda Adame, Maria; Bennion, Vicki; Hayes, Matthew; Reef, Ruth; Santini, Nadia; Cahoon, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    Increases in sea level are a threat to seaward fringing mangrove forests if levels of inundation exceed the physiological tolerance of the trees; however, tidal wetlands can keep pace with sea level rise if soil surface elevations can increase at the same pace as sea level rise. Sediment accretion on the soil surface and belowground production of roots are proposed to increase with increasing sea level, enabling intertidal habitats to maintain their position relative to mean sea level, but there are few tests of these predictions in mangrove forests. Here we used variation in sea level and the availability of sediments caused by seasonal and inter-annual variation in the intensity of La Nina-El Nino to assess the effects of increasing sea level on surface elevation gains and contributing processes (accretion on the surface, subsidence and root growth) in mangrove forests. We found that soil surface elevation increased with mean sea level (which varied over 250 mm during the study) and with turbidity at sites where fine sediment in the water column is abundant. In contrast, where sediments were sandy, rates of surface elevation gain were high, but not significantly related to variation in turbidity, and were likely to be influenced by other factors that deliver sand to the mangrove forest. Root growth was not linked to soil surface elevation gains, although it was associated with reduced shallow subsidence, and therefore may contribute to the capacity of mangroves to keep pace with sea level rise. Our results indicate both surface (sedimentation) and subsurface (root growth) processes can influence mangrove capacity to keep pace with sea level rise within the same geographic location, and that current models of tidal marsh responses to sea level rise capture the major feature of the response of mangroves where fine, but not coarse, sediments are abundant.

  16. Sea level and turbidity controls on mangrove soil surface elevation change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelock, Catherine E.; Adame, Maria Fernanda; Bennion, Vicki; Hayes, Matthew; Reef, Ruth; Santini, Nadia; Cahoon, Donald R.

    2015-02-01

    Increases in sea level are a threat to seaward fringing mangrove forests if levels of inundation exceed the physiological tolerance of the trees; however, tidal wetlands can keep pace with sea level rise if soil surface elevations can increase at the same pace as sea level rise. Sediment accretion on the soil surface and belowground production of roots are proposed to increase with increasing sea level, enabling intertidal habitats to maintain their position relative to mean sea level, but there are few tests of these predictions in mangrove forests. Here we used variation in sea level and the availability of sediments caused by seasonal and inter-annual variation in the intensity of La Nina-El Nino to assess the effects of increasing sea level on surface elevation gains and contributing processes (accretion on the surface, subsidence and root growth) in mangrove forests. We found that soil surface elevation increased with mean sea level (which varied over 250 mm during the study) and with turbidity at sites where fine sediment in the water column is abundant. In contrast, where sediments were sandy, rates of surface elevation gain were high, but not significantly related to variation in turbidity, and were likely to be influenced by other factors that deliver sand to the mangrove forest. Root growth was not linked to soil surface elevation gains, although it was associated with reduced shallow subsidence, and therefore may contribute to the capacity of mangroves to keep pace with sea level rise. Our results indicate both surface (sedimentation) and subsurface (root growth) processes can influence mangrove capacity to keep pace with sea level rise within the same geographic location, and that current models of tidal marsh responses to sea level rise capture the major feature of the response of mangroves where fine, but not coarse, sediments are abundant.

  17. Adhesion and friction in polymer films on solid substrates: conformal sites analysis and corresponding surface measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Rong; Huang, Liangliang; Mineart, Kenneth P; Dong, Yihui; Spontak, Richard J; Gubbins, Keith E

    2017-05-21

    In this work, we present a statistical mechanical analysis to elucidate the molecular-level factors responsible for the static and dynamic properties of polymer films. This analysis, which we term conformal sites theory, establishes that three dimensionless parameters play important roles in determining differences from bulk behavior for thin polymer films near to surfaces: a microscopic wetting parameter, α wx , defined as the ratio of polymer-substrate interaction to polymer-polymer interaction; a dimensionless film thickness, H*; and dimensionless temperature, T*. The parameter α wx introduced here provides a more fundamental measure of wetting than previous metrics, since it is defined in terms of intermolecular forces and the atomic structure of the substrate, and so is valid at the nanoscale for gas, liquid or solid films. To test this theoretical analysis, we also report atomic force microscopy measurements of the friction coefficient (μ), adhesion force (F A ) and glass transition temperature (T g ) for thin films of two polymers, poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and polystyrene (PS), on two planar substrates, graphite and silica. Both the friction coefficient and the glass transition temperature are found to increase as the film thickness decreases, and this increase is more pronounced for the graphite than for the silica surface. The adhesion force is also greater for the graphite surface. The larger effects encountered for the graphite surface are attributed to the fact that the microscopic wetting parameter, α wx , is larger for graphite than for silica, indicating stronger attraction of polymer chains to the graphite surface.

  18. Fabrication of Surface Level Cu/Si Cp Nano composites by Friction Stir Processing Route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, R. C.; Karunanithi, M.

    2015-01-01

    Friction stir processing (FSP) technique has been successfully employed as low energy consumption route to prepare copper based surface level nano composites reinforced with nano sized silicon carbide particles (Si Cp). The effect of FSP parameters such as tool rotational speed, processing speed, and tool tilt angle on microstructure and microhardness was investigated. Single pass FSP was performed based on Box-Behnken design at three factors in three levels. A cluster of blind holes 2 mm in diameter and 3 mm in depth was used as particulate deposition technique in order to reduce the agglomeration problem during composite fabrication. K-type thermocouples were used to measure temperature histories during FSP. The results suggest that the heat generation during FSP plays a significant role in deciding the microstructure and microhardness of the surface composites. Microstructural observations revealed a uniform dispersion of nano sized Si Cp without any agglomeration problem and well bonded with copper matrix at different process parameter combinations. X-ray diffraction study shows that no intermetallic compound was produced after processing. The microhardness of nano composites was remarkably enhanced and about 95% more than that of copper matrix

  19. Fabrication of Surface Level Cu/SiCp Nanocomposites by Friction Stir Processing Route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cartigueyen Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir processing (FSP technique has been successfully employed as low energy consumption route to prepare copper based surface level nanocomposites reinforced with nanosized silicon carbide particles (SiCp. The effect of FSP parameters such as tool rotational speed, processing speed, and tool tilt angle on microstructure and microhardness was investigated. Single pass FSP was performed based on Box-Behnken design at three factors in three levels. A cluster of blind holes 2 mm in diameter and 3 mm in depth was used as particulate deposition technique in order to reduce the agglomeration problem during composite fabrication. K-type thermocouples were used to measure temperature histories during FSP. The results suggest that the heat generation during FSP plays a significant role in deciding the microstructure and microhardness of the surface composites. Microstructural observations revealed a uniform dispersion of nanosized SiCp without any agglomeration problem and well bonded with copper matrix at different process parameter combinations. X-ray diffraction study shows that no intermetallic compound was produced after processing. The microhardness of nanocomposites was remarkably enhanced and about 95% more than that of copper matrix.

  20. Assessment of surface contamination level in an operating uranium ore processing facility of Jaduguda, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meena, J.S.; Patnaik, R.L.; Jha, V.N.; Sahoo, S.K.; Ravi, P.M.; Tripathi, R.M.

    2014-01-01

    Radiological concern of the occupational workers and the area is given priority over other safety issue in confirmation with the stipulated guideline of national regulatory agency (AERB/FEFCF/SG-2, 2007). The key concern from the radiological hazard evaluation point of view is air activity, external gamma level and surface contamination. Present investigations was carried out to ascertain the surface contamination level of uranium ore processing facility at Jaduguda, Jharkhand. For a low grade uranium ore processing industry surface contamination is a major concern in product precipitation and recovery section. In view of this, the ore processing plant can broadly be classified into three areas i.e. ion exchange area, precipitation and product recovery section and other areas. The monitoring results incorporate the level of surface contamination of the plant during the last five years. The geometric mean activity of surface contamination level was 31.1, 34.5 and 9.8 Bq dm -2 in ion exchange, product precipitation and recovery and other areas with GSD of 2, 2.5 and 1.9. In most of the cases the surface contamination level was well within the recommended limit of 100 Bq dm -2 for M class uranium compound. Occasional cases of surface contamination levels exceeding the recommended limit were addressed and areas were decontaminated. Based on the study, modification in the design feature of the surface of the finished product section was also suggested so that the decontamination procedure can be more effectively implemented

  1. On the measurement of the surface energy budget over a land ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The measurement of surface energy balance over a land surface in an open area in Bangalore is reported. Measurements of all variables needed to calculate the surface energy balance on time scales longer than a week are made. Components of radiative fluxes are measured while sensible and latent heat fluxes are ...

  2. Measurement of plasma 11-deoxycorticosterone levels by radioimmunoassay in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuchi, Soitsu; Nakajima, Katsuo; Takenouchi, Takahiko; Nishisato, Koji

    1974-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay procedure has been developed to measure 11-deoxycorticosterone (DOC) in human peripheral plasma. DOC-oxime was coupled with porcine gamma globulin and antibodies produced in rabbits. One to 3 ml of plasma, with 1, 2 3 H-DOC added for recovery, was extracted with dichloromethane and purification achieved by a silica gel column and by one paper chromatograph. After overnight incubation of the antibody-steroid mixture at 4 0 C, bound and free fractions were separated using ammonium sulfate. The mean recovery of 3 H-DOC, after extraction and chromatography, was 84.6 +- 7.4%. The method showed adequate specificity, precision and accuracy. Normal plasma DOC levels were found to be 4.4 +- 2.5 ng/100 ml (n=8). Plasma DOC levels were almost normal (0.3 - 26.8 ng/100 ml) in fifteen patients with benign essential hypertension. The mean level of 8.1 +- 8.2 ng/100 ml obtained in hypertensive patients with suppressed plasma renin activity, was not significantly different from normal. Plasma DOC showed a high level, 3.0 - 30.5 (11.4 +- 7.5) ng/100 ml, in 9 patients with primary aldosteronism. Four out of 8 patients with Cushing's syndrome were found to have elevated plasma DOC levels. Higher levels of 21.2 +- 15.8 ng/100 ml were found in 5 patients with adrenal hyperplasia than those of 12.3 +- 8.0 ng/100 ml in 3 with adrenal adenoma. Plasma DOC levels were high, 113 - 176 ng/100 ml, in 2 patients with 17α-hydroxylase deficiency. ACTH administered to 5 subjects produced a mean increase in plasma DOC from 4.8 to 25.8 ng/100 ml. Angiotensin II infused at a rate of 10 ng/kg/min for 30 min into 4 subjects did not increase mean plasma DOC. Similarly, dietary sodium restriction or postural change did not increase plasma DOC. (auth.)

  3. The measurement of carbon dioxide levels in a city canyon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Jenny; Budinov, Daniel; Robinson, Iain; Jack, James

    2016-10-01

    Cities today have two major environmental concerns - carbon emissions and air quality. Global carbon levels are increasing and cities require to show plans to tackle and reduce the amount of carbon which they are emitting. At present carbon emissions in urban areas are calculated rather than measured. In some cities where industrial activity is not carbon intensive, the major contributors are the burning of fuel for heating and the emissions from vehicles. Air quality levels have a direct impact on human health and cities are under increased pressure to demonstrate plans to control and reduce levels of air pollution. Of great importance is the way in which emissions, both carbon rich emissions and pollutants, disperse in a city environment. Little work has been reported on the movement of CO2 in the urban environment and the effect the structure of the environment exerts on the movement and dispersion. This paper describes an investigation into the dispersion of CO2 within an urban environment in the Old Town of the City of Edinburgh, using a hand carried low cost portable CO2 sensor.

  4. Automated Measurement for Sensitivity Analysis of Runoff-Sediment Load at Varying Surface Gradients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imanogor P.A.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Direct measurement of surface runoff is often associated with errors and inaccuracies which results to unreliable hydrological data. An automatic Runoff-meter using tipping buckets arrangement calibrated to tip 0.14 liter of runoff water per tip with an accuracy of ± 0.001 litre was used to measure surface runoff from a steel bounded soil tray of dimension (1200 mm X 900 mm X 260 mm filled with sand loamy to the depth of 130 mm and inclined at angle (0 0 , 5 0 ,12 0 and 15 0 horizontal to the instrument. The effect of varying angles of inclination on runoff intensity, sediment loss rate and sediment loss is significant at 5 % confidence level, while surface runoff is not significant at 5 % confidence level. Total highest sediment loss of 458.2 g and 313.4 g were observed at angle 15 0 and 12 0 respectively. Total surface runoff of 361.5 mm and 445.8 mm were generated at inclined angle of 0 0 and 5 0 , while at angle 12 0 and 15 0 , 564.3 mm and 590.0 mm of surface runoff were generated. In addition, runoff intensity and sediment loss rate were highest at angle 15 0 , while the lowest values of 1.5mm/min and 5.43 g/min were obtained at angle of inclination 5 0 . The results showed that strong relationship existed among the hydrological variables as a result of subjecting the steel bounded soil tray to different angles of inclination. Such results would provide useful data for the running of physics-based deterministic model of surface runoff and erosion which will be useful for the design of hydrological structures, land use planning and management.

  5. Direct measurements of meltwater runoff on the Greenland ice sheet surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Laurence C.; Yang, Kang; Pitcher, Lincoln H.; Overstreet, Brandon T.; Chu, Vena W.; Rennermalm, Åsa K.; Ryan, Jonathan C.; Cooper, Matthew G.; Gleason, Colin J.; Tedesco, Marco; Jeyaratnam, Jeyavinoth; van As, Dirk; van den Broeke, Michiel R.; van de Berg, Willem Jan; Noël, Brice; Langen, Peter L.; Cullather, Richard I.; Zhao, Bin; Willis, Michael J.; Hubbard, Alun; Box, Jason E.; Jenner, Brittany A.; Behar, Alberto E.

    2017-12-01

    Meltwater runoff from the Greenland ice sheet surface influences surface mass balance (SMB), ice dynamics, and global sea level rise, but is estimated with climate models and thus difficult to validate. We present a way to measure ice surface runoff directly, from hourly in situ supraglacial river discharge measurements and simultaneous high-resolution satellite/drone remote sensing of upstream fluvial catchment area. A first 72-h trial for a 63.1-km2 moulin-terminating internally drained catchment (IDC) on Greenland's midelevation (1,207–1,381 m above sea level) ablation zone is compared with melt and runoff simulations from HIRHAM5, MAR3.6, RACMO2.3, MERRA-2, and SEB climate/SMB models. Current models cannot reproduce peak discharges or timing of runoff entering moulins but are improved using synthetic unit hydrograph (SUH) theory. Retroactive SUH applications to two older field studies reproduce their findings, signifying that remotely sensed IDC area, shape, and supraglacial river length are useful for predicting delays in peak runoff delivery to moulins. Applying SUH to HIRHAM5, MAR3.6, and RACMO2.3 gridded melt products for 799 surrounding IDCs suggests their terminal moulins receive lower peak discharges, less diurnal variability, and asynchronous runoff timing relative to climate/SMB model output alone. Conversely, large IDCs produce high moulin discharges, even at high elevations where melt rates are low. During this particular field experiment, models overestimated runoff by +21 to +58%, linked to overestimated surface ablation and possible meltwater retention in bare, porous, low-density ice. Direct measurements of ice surface runoff will improve climate/SMB models, and incorporating remotely sensed IDCs will aid coupling of SMB with ice dynamics and subglacial systems.

  6. 3D Surface Temperature Measurement of Plant Canopies Using Photogrammetry Techniques From A UAV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, M.; Lagouarde, J. P.

    2017-12-01

    Surface temperature of plant canopies and within canopies results from the coupling of radiative and energy exchanges processes which govern the fluxes at the interface soil-plant-atmosphere. As a key parameter, surface temperature permits the estimation of canopy exchanges using processes based modeling methods. However detailed 3D surface temperature measurements or even profile surface temperature measurements are rarely made as they have inherent difficulties. Such measurements would greatly improve multi-level canopy models such as NOAH (Chen and Dudhia 2001) or MuSICA (Ogée and Brunet 2002, Ogée et al 2003) where key surface temperature estimations, at present, are not tested. Additionally, at larger scales, canopy structure greatly influences satellite based surface temperature measurements as the structure impacts the observations which are intrinsically made at varying satellite viewing angles and solar heights. In order to account for these differences, again accurate modeling is required such as through the above mentioned multi-layer models or with several source type models such as SCOPE (Van der Tol 2009) in order to standardize observations. As before, in order to validate these models, detailed field observations are required. With the need for detailed surface temperature observations in mind we have planned a series of experiments over non-dense plant canopies to investigate the use of photogrammetry techniques. Photogrammetry is normally used for visible wavelengths to produce 3D images using cloud point reconstruction of aerial images (for example Dandois and Ellis, 2010, 2013 over a forest). From these cloud point models it should be possible to establish 3D plant surface temperature images when using thermal infrared array sensors. In order to do this our experiments are based on the use of a thermal Infrared camera embarked on a UAV. We adapt standard photogrammetry to account for limits imposed by thermal imaginary, especially the low

  7. High frequency electric field levels: An example of determination of measurement uncertainty for broadband measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vulević Branislav

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Determining high frequency electromagnetic field levels in urban areas represents a very complex task, having in mind the exponential growth of the number of sources embodied in public cellular telephony systems in the past twenty years. The main goal of this paper is a representation of a practical solution in the evaluation of measurement uncertainty for in-situ measurements in the case of spatial averaging. An example of the estimation of the uncertainty for electric field strength broadband measurements in the frequency range from 3 MHz to 18 GHz is presented.

  8. Modelling of Lunar Dust and Electrical Field for Future Lunar Surface Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yunlong

    Modelling of the lunar dust and electrical field is important to future human and robotic activities on the surface of the moon. Apollo astronauts had witnessed the maintaining of micron- and millimeter sized moon dust up to meters level while walked on the surface of the moon. The characterizations of the moon dust would enhance not only the scientific understanding of the history of the moon but also the future technology development for the surface operations on the moon. It has been proposed that the maintaining and/or settlement of the small-sized dry dust are related to the size and weight of the dust particles, the level of the surface electrical fields on the moon, and the impaction and interaction between lunar regolith and the solar particles. The moon dust distributions and settlements obviously affected the safety of long term operations of future lunar facilities. For the modelling of the lunar dust and the electrical field, we analyzed the imaging of the legs of the moon lander, the cover and the footwear of the space suits, and the envelope of the lunar mobiles, and estimated the size and charges associated with the small moon dust particles, the gravity and charging effects to them along with the lunar surface environment. We also did numerical simulation of the surface electrical fields due to the impaction of the solar winds in several conditions. The results showed that the maintaining of meters height of the micron size of moon dust is well related to the electrical field and the solar angle variations, as expected. These results could be verified and validated through future on site and/or remote sensing measurements and observations of the moon dust and the surface electrical field.

  9. An instrument for the measurement of road surface reflection properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corell, Dennis Dan; Sørensen, K.

    2017-01-01

    surfaces in use have changed - for instance to road surface types with less noise from wheel passages. Because of this, a co-operation between the road administrations of the Nordic countries (abbreviated NMF) decided to construct a portable instrument to be used on selections of traffic roads within...

  10. State background-radiation levels: results of measurements taken during 1975-1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myrick, T.E.; Berven, B.A.; Haywood, F.F.

    1981-11-01

    Background radiation levels across the United States have been measured by the Off-Site Pollutant Measurements Group of the Health and Safety Research Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These measurements have been conducted as part of the ORNL program of radiological surveillance at inactive uranium mills and sites formerly utilized during Manhattan Engineer District and early Atomic Energy Commission projects. The measurements included determination of /sup 226/Ra, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 238/U concentrations in surface soil samples and measurement of external gamma-ray exposure rates at 1 m above the ground surface at the location of soil sampling. This information is being utilized for comparative purposes to determine the extent of contamination present at the survey sites and surrounding off-site areas. The sampling program to date has provided background information at 356 locations in 33 states. External gamma-ray exposure rates were found to range from less than 1 to 34 ..mu..R/h, with an US average of 8.5 ..mu..R/h. The nationwide average concentrations of /sup 226/Ra, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 238/U in surface soil were determined to be 1.1, 0.98, and 1.0 pCi/g, respectively.

  11. Proceedings of the international symposium on safety related measurements in PWRs: Topic of the first meeting: 'Temperature and level measurements'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-09-01

    Numerous teams of experts from several countries deal with theme of measurement important for safety operation of WWER reactors. These special teams have a need to meet at various opportunities to change their experience. As an example I can mention meeting of experts from Russia , Germany, France and Slovakia at completion and reconstruction of Slovak NPP, at modernisation of Russian and Bulgarian NPP. Mentioned meetings have invoked an idea of participants to organise a common action aimed at measurement important for safety operation of WWER, that participants can change their experience from mentioned area at welcome environment of symposium. Therefore, at meeting of experts from Siemens, INCOR and VUJE at the end of the year 2000 participants agreed on realisation of such common action. Participants have taken orientation at all safety measurements for very deep topic. Therefore, they have decided in respect of this first meeting of symposium to give consideration to only some special measurements in particular to temperature and surface. In case of interest there is possible to take focus at other type of measurements. Slovakia has been chosen for the first meeting place on basis of economic reasons and also because a number of improvements of standard reactor temperature measuring procedures have been implemented here that over passed its frontiers. In addition the first fail-safe level measuring in reactor pressure vessel has been effectuated in Slovakia

  12. Measuring water level in rivers and lakes from lightweight Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandini, Filippo; Jakobsen, Jakob; Olesen, Daniel; Reyna-Gutierrez, Jose Antonio; Bauer-Gottwein, Peter

    2017-05-01

    The assessment of hydrologic dynamics in rivers, lakes, reservoirs and wetlands requires measurements of water level, its temporal and spatial derivatives, and the extent and dynamics of open water surfaces. Motivated by the declining number of ground-based measurement stations, research efforts have been devoted to the retrieval of these hydraulic properties from spaceborne platforms in the past few decades. However, due to coarse spatial and temporal resolutions, spaceborne missions have several limitations when assessing the water level of terrestrial surface water bodies and determining complex water dynamics. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) can fill the gap between spaceborne and ground-based observations, and provide high spatial resolution and dense temporal coverage data, in quick turn-around time, using flexible payload design. This study focused on categorizing and testing sensors, which comply with the weight constraint of small UAVs (around 1.5 kg), capable of measuring the range to water surface. Subtracting the measured range from the vertical position retrieved by the onboard Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receiver, we can determine the water level (orthometric height). Three different ranging payloads, which consisted of a radar, a sonar and an in-house developed camera-based laser distance sensor (CLDS), have been evaluated in terms of accuracy, precision, maximum ranging distance and beam divergence. After numerous flights, the relative accuracy of the overall system was estimated. A ranging accuracy better than 0.5% of the range and a maximum ranging distance of 60 m were achieved with the radar. The CLDS showed the lowest beam divergence, which is required to avoid contamination of the signal from interfering surroundings for narrow fields of view. With the GNSS system delivering a relative vertical accuracy better than 3-5 cm, water level can be retrieved with an overall accuracy better than 5-7 cm.

  13. Measuring Integrin Conformational Change on the Cell Surface with Super-Resolution Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Travis I; Aaron, Jesse; Chew, Teng-Leong; Springer, Timothy A

    2018-02-13

    We use super-resolution interferometric photoactivation and localization microscopy (iPALM) and a constrained photoactivatable fluorescent protein integrin fusion to measure the displacement of the head of integrin lymphocyte function-associated 1 (LFA-1) resulting from integrin conformational change on the cell surface. We demonstrate that the distance of the LFA-1 head increases substantially between basal and ligand-engaged conformations, which can only be explained at the molecular level by integrin extension. We further demonstrate that one class of integrin antagonist maintains the bent conformation, while another antagonist class induces extension. Our molecular scale measurements on cell-surface LFA-1 are in excellent agreement with distances derived from crystallographic and electron microscopy structures of bent and extended integrins. Our distance measurements are also in excellent agreement with a previous model of LFA-1 bound to ICAM-1 derived from the orientation of LFA-1 on the cell surface measured using fluorescence polarization microscopy. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Energy Levels, wavelengths and hyperfine structure measurements of Sc II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hala, Fnu; Nave, Gillian

    2018-01-01

    Lines of singly ionized Scandium (Sc II) along with other Iron group elements have been observed [1] in the region surrounding the massive star Eta Carinae [2,3] called the strontium filament (SrF). The last extensive analysis of Sc II was the four-decade old work of Johansson & Litzen [4], using low-resolution grating spectroscopy. To update and extend the Sc II spectra, we have made observation of Sc/Ar, Sc/Ne and Sc/Ge/Ar hollow cathode emission spectrum on the NIST high resolution FT700 UV/Vis and 2 m UV/Vis/IR Fourier transform spectrometers (FTS). More than 850 Sc II lines have been measured in the wavelength range of 187 nm to 3.2 μm. connecting a total of 152 energy levels. The present work also focuses to resolve hyperfine structure (HFS) in Sc II lines. We aim to obtain accurate transition wavelengths, improved energy levels and HFS constants of Sc II. The latest results from work in progress will be presented.Reference[1] Hartman H, Gull T, Johansson S and Smith N 2004 Astron. Astrophys. 419 215[2] Smith N, Morse J A and Gull T R 2004 Astrophys. J. 605 405[3] Davidson K and Humphreys R M 1997 Annu. Rev. Astron. Astrophys. 35[4] Johansson S and Litzén U 1980 Phys. Scr. 22 49

  15. Hydrostatic levelling systems: Measuring at the system limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Edi; Geiger, Alain; Ingensand, Hilmar; Licht, Hans; Limpach, Philippe; Steiger, Andreas; Zwyssig, Roger

    2010-09-01

    Three hydrostatic displacement monitoring system applications in Switzerland are discussed; the first concerns experience gained monitoring the foundation of the Albigna dam, the second relating to the underground stability of the Swiss Light Source synchrotron and the third concerning the deformation of a bridge near the city of Lucerne. Two different principles were applied, the Hydrostatic Levelling System (HLS) using the “half-filled pipe principle” developed by the Paul Scherrer Institute and the Large Area Settlement System (LAS) using the “differential pressure principle”. With both systems ground deformations induced by tidal forces can be seen. However, high accuracy of single sensors is not sufficient. A well-designed configuration of the complete system is equally important. On the other hand there are also limits imposed by installation logistics and by the environmental conditions. An example is the bridge monitoring application, where the acceleration along the bridge due to the passage of heavy trucks limits the feasibility of using hydrostatic levelling measurements.

  16. Measurement of magnetic surfaces on the Compact Auburn Torsatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, M.A.; Gandy, R.F.; Hanson, J.D.; Knowlton, S.F.; Swanson, D.G.

    1992-01-01

    The magnetic flux surfaces of the Compact Auburn Torsatron have been experimentally mapped in a variety of magnetic configurations. The magnetic surface mapping was done using the phosphor screen technique. The results are compared with an extensive computer model in order to validate the design coil structure and determine what modifications are needed to correct any minor winding errors. In initial field mapping experiments, a large up--down asymmetry was identified in the vacuum magnetic surfaces. A set of mapping studies was used to characterize the error through addition of terms to the coil winding law. The error was corrected with the use of a radial trim coil

  17. Heavy metals levels in surface waters and sediments in an oilfield in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Heavy metal levels in the surface waters and sediments from five sampling stations of the Bukuma oilfield, in the Niger Delta, Nigeria were investigated using the AAS technique after standard procedures of storage and extraction. Mean range (mg/l) in the surface waters varied from Zn (0.19 0.64); Pb (ND 0.60); Cd (ND ...

  18. SMEX03 Surface and Soil Temperature Measurements: Alabama

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains land surface temperature and soil temperature data at depths of 1 cm, 5 cm, and 10 cm collected during the Soil Moisture Experiment 2003...

  19. Electron mobility on the surface of liquid Helium: influence of surface level atoms and depopulation of lowest subbands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigoriev, P. D.; Dyugaev, A. M.; Lebedeva, E. V.

    2008-01-01

    The temperature dependence of electron mobility is examined. We calculate the contribution to the electron scattering rate from the surface level atoms (SLAs), proposed in [10]. This contribution is substantial at low temperatures T < 0.5, when the He vapor concentration is exponentially small. We also study the effect of depopulation of the lowest energy subband, which leads to an increase in the electron mobility at high temperature. The results explain certain long-standing discrepancies between the existing theory and experiment on electron mobility on the surface of liquid helium

  20. An Experimental Comparison of Similarity Assessment Measures for 3D Models on Constrained Surface Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Lulin; Yang, Zhixin

    2010-05-01

    To address the issues in the area of design customization, this paper expressed the specification and application of the constrained surface deformation, and reported the experimental performance comparison of three prevail effective similarity assessment algorithms on constrained surface deformation domain. Constrained surface deformation becomes a promising method that supports for various downstream applications of customized design. Similarity assessment is regarded as the key technology for inspecting the success of new design via measuring the difference level between the deformed new design and the initial sample model, and indicating whether the difference level is within the limitation. According to our theoretical analysis and pre-experiments, three similarity assessment algorithms are suitable for this domain, including shape histogram based method, skeleton based method, and U system moment based method. We analyze their basic functions and implementation methodologies in detail, and do a series of experiments on various situations to test their accuracy and efficiency using precision-recall diagram. Shoe model is chosen as an industrial example for the experiments. It shows that shape histogram based method gained an optimal performance in comparison. Based on the result, we proposed a novel approach that integrating surface constrains and shape histogram description with adaptive weighting method, which emphasize the role of constrains during the assessment. The limited initial experimental result demonstrated that our algorithm outperforms other three algorithms. A clear direction for future development is also drawn at the end of the paper.

  1. Measuring the surface-heating of medical ultrasonic probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kollmann, Chr; Vacariu, G; Fialka-Moser, V; Bergmann, H

    2004-01-01

    Due to converting losses the probe's surface itself is heated up, especially when emitting into air. Possible temperature increases in an ensemble of 15 different diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasound probes from 7 manufacturers in the frequency range between 0.05-7.5 MHz have been examined. Surface temperatures were detected by means of a calibrated IR-thermographic camera using a scheme of various power and pulse settings, as well as different imaging modalitites as used in clinical routine. Depending on the setup and the output power, the absolute surface temperatures of some of the probes emitting in air can be beyond 43 deg. C within 5-7 min.; a maximum surface temperature of 84 deg. C has been detected. Continuous mode or high pulse repetition frequencies on the therapeutic system side, small focused Doppler modes on the diagnostic system side combined with increased emitted acoustic intensities result in high surface temperatures. Within a worst case scenario a potential risk of negative skin changes (heat damage) or non-optimal therapeutic effects seems to be possible if a therapeutic system is used very often and if its emission continues unintentionally. In general the user should be aware that low emission intensities of e.g. 50 mW cm -2 could already produce hot surfaces

  2. Open charcoal chamber method for mass measurements of radon exhalation rate from soil surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsapalov, Andrey; Kovler, Konstantin; Miklyaev, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Radon exhalation rate from the soil surface can serve as an important criterion in the evaluation of radon hazard of the land. Recently published international standard ISO 11665-7 (2012) is based on the accumulation of radon gas in a closed container. At the same time since 1998 in Russia, as a part of engineering and environmental studies for the construction, radon flux measurements are made using an open charcoal chamber for a sampling duration of 3–5 h. This method has a well-defined metrological justification and was tested in both favorable and unfavorable conditions. The article describes the characteristics of the method, as well as the means of sampling and measurement of the activity of radon absorbed. The results of the metrological study suggest that regardless of the sampling conditions (weather, the mechanism and rate of radon transport in the soil, soil properties and conditions), uncertainty of method does not exceed 20%, while the combined standard uncertainty of radon exhalation rate measured from the soil surface does not exceed 30%. The results of the daily measurements of radon exhalation rate from the soil surface at the experimental site during one year are reported. - Highlights: • Radon exhalation rate from the soil surface area of 32 cm 2 can be measured at level of 10 mBq/(m 2 s) at the uncertainty ≤30%. • The method has a metrological justification. • No need to consider climate conditions, soil properties and conditions, mechanism and rate of radon transport in the soil.

  3. Core-level spectroscopic study of the evolution of the sulfur-passivated InP(001) surface during annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Z.; Dharma-wardana, M.W.; Lu, Z.H.; Cao, R.; Lewis, L.J.

    1997-01-01

    Core-level photoemission spectroscopy and theoretical predictions of structure and spectra are used to study the fully S-covered InP(001) surface and its evolution during annealing. The theory predicts a number of stable structures besides the lowest-energy ground state which is the fully S-covered (2x2)-reconstructed structure, where the surface has two types of S atoms. On annealing, a fascinating sequence of structures unfolds from the fully S-covered ground state as the other stable structures become energetically accessible. The surface S atoms exchange with bulk P atoms on annealing, forming new strong S endash P bonds while dissociating preexisting S endash S dimers. The S endash P bonds are tilted with the P atoms just above the surface and there is only one type of S atom in the structure. The measured excitation energies and spectra agree with theoretical predictions of the core-level spectra for the (2x2) reconstruction and its evolution to partial S coverages. We conclude that the annealed surface around 700 K is most likely to be a (2x2) reconstructed surface with the surface cell containing two S endash P bonds, with just one type of S atom. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  4. Quantitative Measurement of Serum Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Using an Immunoradiometric Assay in Chronic Hepatitis B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Hyun Woo; Lee, Ho Young; Kim, Seog Gyun; Kim, Won; Jung, Wong Jin; Kang, Keon Wook; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul; Lee, Dong Soo [Seoul National Univ. Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    Measurement of serum hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) levels is important for the management of chronic hepatitis D patients in terms of monitoring response to antiviral therapy. This study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic performance of a new diagnostic kit, which quantitatively measures serum HBsAg level using an immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) based method. Measurements were compared with those obtained using a chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay (CMIA) based method. The blood samples of 96 patients with chronic hepatitis B were used in this study. Copy numbers of serum hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA were determined in 23 of these samples. The correlation between and the concordance of IRMA and CMIA results were determined using Pearson's correlation coefficients. P values of 0.05 were considered to be statistically significant throughout. Laboratory diagnoses based on CMIA. Furthermors, serum HBsAg levels by IRMA were found to be highly correlated with those determined by CMIA (correlation coefficient R{sup 2=}0.838, P<0.001). Serum HBsAg level and serum HBV DNA copies were found to be linearly related by both methods (R{sup 2=}0.067, P=0.316 by IRMA, and R{sup 2=}0.101, P=0.215 by CMIA). The diagnostic performance of the investigated IRMA method of determining HBsAg levels was found to be comparable with that of a CMIA based method in chronic hepatitis B patients.

  5. Inversion of double-difference measurements from optical levelling for the Groningen gas field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Fokker

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hydrocarbon extraction lead to compaction of the gas reservoir which is visible as subsidence on the surface. Subsidence measurements can therefore be used to better estimate reservoir parameters. Total subsidence is derived from the result of the measurement of height differences between optical benchmarks. The procedure from optical height difference measurements to absolute subsidence is an inversion, and the result is often used as an input for consequent inversions on the reservoir. We have used the difference measurements directly to invert for compaction of the Groningen gas reservoir in the Netherlands. We have used a linear inversion exercise to update an already existing reservoir compaction model of the field. This procedure yielded areas of increased and decreased levels of compaction compared to the existing compaction model in agreement with observed discrepancies in porosity and aquifer activity.

  6. Removal of Surface-Reflected Light for the Measurement of Remote-Sensing Reflectance from an Above-Surface Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-06

    REPORT DATE IDD-MM- YYYY) 14-02-2011 2. REPORT TYPE Journal Article 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Removal of Surface...impossible to obtain Rr, from measurements of vertical profiles of Lu and Elt [6]. During the experiment, the surface was calm [see Fig. 8(a)] and

  7. Cheap and fast measuring roughness on big surfaces with an imprint method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopf, C.; Liebl, J.; Rascher, R.

    2017-10-01

    Roughness, shape and structure of a surface offer information on the state, shape and surface characteristics of a component. Particularly the roughness of the surface dictates the subsequent polishing of the optical surface. The roughness is usually measured by a white light interferometer, which is limited by the size of the components. Using a moulding method of surfaces that are difficult to reach, an imprint is taken and analysed regarding to roughness and structure. This moulding compound method is successfully used in dental technology. In optical production, the moulding compound method is advantageous in roughness determination in inaccessible spots or on large components (astrological optics). The "replica method" has been around in metal analysis and processing. Film is used in order to take an impression of a surface. Then, it is analysed for structures. In optical production, compound moulding seems advantageous in roughness determination in inaccessible spots or on large components (astrological optics). In preliminary trials, different glass samples with different roughness levels were manufactured. Imprints were taken from these samples (based on DIN 54150 "Abdruckverfahren für die Oberflächenprüfung"). The objective of these feasibility tests was to determine the limits of this method (smallest roughness determinable / highest roughness). The roughness of the imprint was compared with the roughness of the glass samples. By comparing the results, the uncertainty of the measuring method was determined. The spectrum for the trials ranged from rough grind (0.8 μm rms), over finishing grind (0.6 μm rms) to polishing (0.1 μm rms).

  8. Assessing recent smoking status by measuring exhaled carbon monoxide levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AnnSofi Sandberg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cigarette smoke causes both acute and chronic changes of the immune system. Excluding recent smoking is therefore important in clinical studies with chronic inflammation as primary focus. In this context, it is common to ask the study subjects to refrain from smoking within a certain time frame prior to sampling. The duration of the smoking cessation is typically from midnight the evening before, i.e. 8 hours from sampling. As it has been shown that a proportion of current smokers underestimates or denies smoking, objective assessment of recent smoking status is of great importance. Our aim was to extend the use of exhaled carbon monoxide (CO(breath, a well-established method for separating smokers from non-smokers, to assessment of recent smoking status. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The time course of CO(breath decline was investigated by hourly measurements during one day on non-symptomatic smokers and non-smokers (6+7, as well as by measurements on three separate occasions on non-smokers (n = 29, smokers with normal lung function (n = 38 and smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n = 19 participating in a clinical study. We used regression analysis to model the decay, and receiver operator characteristics analysis for evaluation of model performance. The decline was described as a mono-exponential decay (r(2 = 0.7 with a half-life of 4.5 hours. CO decline rate depends on initial CO levels, and by necessity a generic cut-off is therefore crude as initial CO(breath varies a lot between individuals. However, a cut-off level of 12 ppm could classify recent smokers from smokers having refrained from smoking during the past 8 hours with a specificity of 94% and a sensitivity of 90%. CONCLUSIONS: We hereby describe a method for classifying recent smokers from smokers having refrained from smoking for >8 hours that is easy to implement in a clinical setting.

  9. An AFM-based pit-measuring method for indirect measurements of cell-surface membrane vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xiaojun; Chen, Yuan; Chen, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Air drying induced the transformation of cell-surface membrane vesicles into pits. • An AFM-based pit-measuring method was developed to measure cell-surface vesicles. • Our method detected at least two populations of cell-surface membrane vesicles. - Abstract: Circulating membrane vesicles, which are shed from many cell types, have multiple functions and have been correlated with many diseases. Although circulating membrane vesicles have been extensively characterized, the status of cell-surface membrane vesicles prior to their release is less understood due to the lack of effective measurement methods. Recently, as a powerful, micro- or nano-scale imaging tool, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been applied in measuring circulating membrane vesicles. However, it seems very difficult for AFM to directly image/identify and measure cell-bound membrane vesicles due to the similarity of surface morphology between membrane vesicles and cell surfaces. Therefore, until now no AFM studies on cell-surface membrane vesicles have been reported. In this study, we found that air drying can induce the transformation of most cell-surface membrane vesicles into pits that are more readily detectable by AFM. Based on this, we developed an AFM-based pit-measuring method and, for the first time, used AFM to indirectly measure cell-surface membrane vesicles on cultured endothelial cells. Using this approach, we observed and quantitatively measured at least two populations of cell-surface membrane vesicles, a nanoscale population (<500 nm in diameter peaking at ∼250 nm) and a microscale population (from 500 nm to ∼2 μm peaking at ∼0.8 μm), whereas confocal microscopy only detected the microscale population. The AFM-based pit-measuring method is potentially useful for studying cell-surface membrane vesicles and for investigating the mechanisms of membrane vesicle formation/release

  10. The Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA) version 2017: a database for worldwide measured surface energy fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Martin; Ohmura, Atsumu; Schär, Christoph; Müller, Guido; Folini, Doris; Schwarz, Matthias; Zyta Hakuba, Maria; Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo

    2017-08-01

    The Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA) is a database for the central storage of the worldwide measured energy fluxes at the Earth's surface, maintained at ETH Zurich (Switzerland). This paper documents the status of the GEBA version 2017 dataset, presents the new web interface and user access, and reviews the scientific impact that GEBA data had in various applications. GEBA has continuously been expanded and updated and contains in its 2017 version around 500 000 monthly mean entries of various surface energy balance components measured at 2500 locations. The database contains observations from 15 surface energy flux components, with the most widely measured quantity available in GEBA being the shortwave radiation incident at the Earth's surface (global radiation). Many of the historic records extend over several decades. GEBA contains monthly data from a variety of sources, namely from the World Radiation Data Centre (WRDC) in St. Petersburg, from national weather services, from different research networks (BSRN, ARM, SURFRAD), from peer-reviewed publications, project and data reports, and from personal communications. Quality checks are applied to test for gross errors in the dataset. GEBA has played a key role in various research applications, such as in the quantification of the global energy balance, in the discussion of the anomalous atmospheric shortwave absorption, and in the detection of multi-decadal variations in global radiation, known as global dimming and brightening. GEBA is further extensively used for the evaluation of climate models and satellite-derived surface flux products. On a more applied level, GEBA provides the basis for engineering applications in the context of solar power generation, water management, agricultural production and tourism. GEBA is publicly accessible through the internet via http://www.geba.ethz.ch. Supplementary data are available at https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.873078.

  11. Measuring the role of seagrasses in regulating sediment surface elevation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potouroglou, Maria; Bull, James C; Krauss, Ken W; Kennedy, Hilary A; Fusi, Marco; Daffonchio, Daniele; Mangora, Mwita M; Githaiga, Michael N; Diele, Karen; Huxham, Mark

    2017-09-20

    Seagrass meadows provide numerous ecosystem services and their rapid global loss may reduce human welfare as well as ecological integrity. In common with the other 'blue carbon' habitats (mangroves and tidal marshes) seagrasses are thought to provide coastal defence and encourage sediment stabilisation and surface elevation. A sophisticated understanding of sediment elevation dynamics in mangroves and tidal marshes has been gained by monitoring a wide range of different sites, located in varying hydrogeomorphological conditions over long periods. In contrast, similar evidence for seagrasses is sparse; the present study is a contribution towards filling this gap. Surface elevation change pins were deployed in four locations, Scotland, Kenya, Tanzania and Saudi Arabia, in both seagrass and unvegetated control plots in the low intertidal and shallow subtidal zone. The presence of seagrass had a highly significant, positive impact on surface elevation at all sites. Combined data from the current work and the literature show an average difference of 31 mm per year in elevation rates between vegetated and unvegetated areas, which emphasizes the important contribution of seagrass in facilitating sediment surface elevation and reducing erosion. This paper presents the first multi-site study for sediment surface elevation in seagrasses in different settings and species.

  12. Measuring the role of seagrasses in regulating sediment surface elevation

    KAUST Repository

    Potouroglou, Maria

    2017-09-13

    Seagrass meadows provide numerous ecosystem services and their rapid global loss may reduce human welfare as well as ecological integrity. In common with the other \\'blue carbon\\' habitats (mangroves and tidal marshes) seagrasses are thought to provide coastal defence and encourage sediment stabilisation and surface elevation. A sophisticated understanding of sediment elevation dynamics in mangroves and tidal marshes has been gained by monitoring a wide range of different sites, located in varying hydrogeomorphological conditions over long periods. In contrast, similar evidence for seagrasses is sparse; the present study is a contribution towards filling this gap. Surface elevation change pins were deployed in four locations, Scotland, Kenya, Tanzania and Saudi Arabia, in both seagrass and unvegetated control plots in the low intertidal and shallow subtidal zone. The presence of seagrass had a highly significant, positive impact on surface elevation at all sites. Combined data from the current work and the literature show an average difference of 31 mm per year in elevation rates between vegetated and unvegetated areas, which emphasizes the important contribution of seagrass in facilitating sediment surface elevation and reducing erosion. This paper presents the first multi-site study for sediment surface elevation in seagrasses in different settings and species.

  13. Developing an optical chopper-modulated capacitive probe for measuring surface charge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugolini, D; McKinney, R; Harry, G M

    2007-04-01

    Gravitational-wave observatories such as Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) use suspended optics in a Michelson interferometer configuration to measure strains in space between 10 Hz and 3 kHz. One potential noise source in this frequency range is the buildup and motion of surface charge on the optics, which can generate fluctuating electric fields, interfere with position control, and reduce reflectance by attracting dust to the optical surface. We have developed a capacitive probe to measure the magnitude and relaxation time of surface charge deposited on smaller test optics in high vacuum ( approximately 10(-5) Torr). Our device modulates capacitance with a tuning-fork optical chopper between probe and sample, chosen for vacuum compatibility and minimal cost. We have found that the probe has a resolution of (3.5+/-0.5)x10(5) e(-)cm(2) in air, on the order of charging levels that could contribute noise to Advanced LIGO, and sufficient for measuring relaxation times on test optics.

  14. Optical Roughness Measuring Instrument For Fine-Machined Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodmann, Rainer; Gerstorfer, Oskar; Thurn, Gerd

    1985-06-01

    The roughness measuring instrument described is based on light scattering and is suitable in a wide range of applications, especially in micro-machining. The most important properties are the sensitivity in the measuring range from below 0.005 i.im up to 2µm (Ra value), the independence of the reflection coefficient due to normalization, and the larger tolerance of measur-ing distance of +/-2 mm.

  15. Calculation of the surface potential and surface charge density by measurement of the three-phase contact angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, H; Nikolov, A; Wasan, D T

    2012-11-01

    The silica/silicon wafer is widely used in the semiconductor industry in the manufacture of electronic devices, so it is essential to understand its physical chemistry and determine the surface potential at the silica wafer/water interface. However, it is difficult to measure the surface potential of a silica/silicon wafer directly due to its high electric resistance. In the present study, the three-phase contact angle (TPCA) on silica is measured as a function of the pH. The surface potential and surface charge density at the silica/water surface are calculated by a model based on the Young-Lippmann equation in conjunction with the Gouy-Chapman model for the electric double layer. In measurements of the TPCA on silica, two distinct regions were identified with a boundary at pH 9.5-showing a dominance of the surface ionization of silanol groups below pH 9.5 and a dominance of the dissolution of silica into the aqueous solution above pH 9.5. Since the surface chemistry changes above pH 9.5, the model is applied to solutions below pH 9.5 (ionization dominant) for the calculation of the surface potential and surface charge density at the silica/aqueous interface. In order to evaluate the model, a galvanic mica cell was made of a mica sheet and the surface potential was measured directly at the mica/water interface. The model results are also validated by experimental data from the literature, as well as the results obtained by the potentiometric titration method and the electro-kinetic measurements. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Measuring of noise and wearing of quiet surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Raitanen, Nina

    2005-01-01

    When using surfaces with special qualities, there is a need for tools to assess these qualities. Two methods, SPB (Statistical Pass-by) and CPX (Close Proximity), have been used for testing the noise properties of the surfaces in the other countries. Both of these methods had to be modified to suit the Finnish environment. SPBmod-method adheres to the ISO-standard quite closely. It was decided that heavy vehicles are not included in the test, as stipulated in the standard. The normalisation s...

  17. A Level Set Discontinuous Galerkin Method for Free Surface Flows - and Water-Wave Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grooss, Jesper

    2005-01-01

    We present a discontinuous Galerkin method on a fully unstructured grid for the modeling of unsteady incompressible fluid flows with free surfaces. The surface is modeled by a level set technique. We describe the discontinuous Galerkin method in general, and its application to the flow equations...... equations in time are discussed. We investigate theory of di erential algebraic equations, and connect the theory to current methods for solving the unsteady fluid flow equations. We explore the use of a semi-implicit spectral deferred correction method having potential to achieve high temporal order....... The deferred correction method is applied on the fluid flow equations and show good results in periodic domains. We describe the design of a level set method for the free surface modeling. The level set utilize the high order accurate discontinuous Galerkin method fully and represent smooth surfaces very...

  18. The accuracy of surface-contamination measurements; survey of UK hospitals, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    In response to a number of concerns expressed at both national and international levels, the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) conducted a survey of UK hospitals and associated Regional Radiation Protection Services. Sources of surface contamination were distributed and participants were requested to measure these and interpret the relevant responses in terms of emission and activity per unit area. The analysis of the returns demonstrates that the vast majority of results was significantly in error and that the quality of radiation protection may be impaired. (author)

  19. Surface Catalysis and Oxidation on Stagnation Point Heat Flux Measurements in High Enthalpy Arc Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Anuscheh; Driver, David M.; Terrazas-Salinas

    2013-01-01

    Heat flux sensors are routinely used in arc jet facilities to determine heat transfer rates from plasma plume. The goal of this study is to assess the impact of surface composition changes on these heat flux sensors. Surface compositions can change due to oxidation and material deposition from the arc jet. Systematic surface analyses of the sensors were conducted before and after exposure to plasma. Currently copper is commonly used as surface material. Other surface materials were studied including nickel, constantan gold, platinum and silicon dioxide. The surfaces were exposed to plasma between 0.3 seconds and 3 seconds. Surface changes due to oxidation as well as copper deposition from the arc jets were observed. Results from changes in measured heat flux as a function of surface catalycity is given, along with a first assessment of enthalpy for these measurements. The use of cupric oxide is recommended for future heat flux measurements, due to its consistent surface composition arc jets.

  20. Surface adhesion and its dependence on surface roughness and humidity measured with a flat AFM tip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colak, A.; Wormeester, Herbert; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.; Poelsema, Bene

    2012-01-01

    The adhesion force between a surface and the tip of an atomic force microscope cantilever has been determined by recording force–distance curves with an atomic force microscope. Flat tips with a diameter of 2 μm were used to mimic the adhesion between two parallel surfaces. In such a configuration,

  1. Oxidation of clean silicon surfaces studied by four-point probe surface conductance measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Christian Leth; Grey, Francois; Aono, M.

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated how the conductance of Si(100)-(2 x 1) and Si(111)-(7 x 7) surfaces change during exposure to molecular oxygen. A monotonic decrease in conductance is seen as the (100) surfaces oxidizes. In contract to a prior study, we propose that this change is caused by a decrease in sur...

  2. Leidenfrost drops cooling surfaces: theory and interferometric measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Limbeek, Michiel A. J.; Klein Schaarsberg, Martin H.; Sobac, Benjamin; Rednikov, Alexey; Sun, Chao; Colinet, Pierre; Lohse, Detlef

    2017-01-01

    When a liquid drop is placed on a highly superheated surface, it can be levitated by its own vapour. This remarkable phenomenon is referred to as the Leidenfrost effect. The thermally insulating vapour film results in a severe reduction of the heat transfer rate compared to experiments at lower

  3. Measurement of grassland evaporation using a surface-layer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A dual-beam surface-layer scintillometer (SLS) was used to estimate sensible heat flux (H) every 2 min for a path length of either 50 or 101 m, for more than 30 months in a mesic grassland in eastern South Africa. The SLS method relies on Monin-Obukhov similarity theory, the correlation between the laser beam signal ...

  4. Surface and Flow Field Measurements on the FAITH Hill Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, James H.; Heineck, James T.; Zilliac, Gregory; Mehta, Rabindra D.; Long, Kurtis R.

    2012-01-01

    A series of experimental tests, using both qualitative and quantitative techniques, were conducted to characterize both surface and off-surface flow characteristics of an axisymmetric, modified-cosine-shaped, wall-mounted hill named "FAITH" (Fundamental Aero Investigates The Hill). Two separate models were employed: a 6" high, 18" base diameter machined aluminum model that was used for wind tunnel tests and a smaller scale (2" high, 6" base diameter) sintered nylon version that was used in the water channel facility. Wind tunnel and water channel tests were conducted at mean test section speeds of 165 fps (Reynolds Number based on height = 500,000) and 0.1 fps (Reynolds Number of 1000), respectively. The ratio of model height to boundary later height was approximately 3 for both tests. Qualitative techniques that were employed to characterize the complex flow included surface oil flow visualization for the wind tunnel tests, and dye injection for the water channel tests. Quantitative techniques that were employed to characterize the flow included Cobra Probe to determine point-wise steady and unsteady 3D velocities, Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) to determine 3D velocities and turbulence statistics along specified planes, Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) to determine mean surface pressures, and Fringe Imaging Skin Friction (FISF) to determine surface skin friction (magnitude and direction). This initial report summarizes the experimental set-up, techniques used, data acquired and describes some details of the dataset that is being constructed for use by other researchers, especially the CFD community. Subsequent reports will discuss the data and their interpretation in more detail

  5. Monitoring sea level and sea surface temperature trends from ERS satellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Knudsen, Per; Beckley, B.

    2002-01-01

    Data from the two ESA satellites ERS-1 and ERS-2 are used in global and regional analysis of sea level and sea surface temperature trends over the last, 7.8 years. T he ERS satellites and in the future the ENVISAT satellite provide unique opportunity for monitoring both changes in sea level and s...

  6. Biofilter odour reduction level, measurements; Luktreduceringsgrad hos biofilter, faeltmaetningar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arrhenius, Karine; Rosell, Lars; Tsetsilas, Sakis (SP, Boraas (Sweden)); Loevenklev, Maria; Blomqvist, Marie; Hall, Gunnar; Sverken, Anna; Widen, Helene (SIK, Goeteborg (Sweden)); Holmgren, Magnus Andreas (Vattenfall Power Consultants (Sweden))

    2010-07-01

    Biofilter is today the most common odour reduction method for biological treatment. A biofilter consists of a bed of organic material often made of compost together with another material which increases the porosity of the bed. Microorganisms in the compost use odorous compounds as nutrient by decomposing them. Resulting products are mainly carbon dioxide and water, mineral salts, other organic compounds and more microorganisms. In this project, seven biofilters implemented in Sweden have been tested in order to describe their status and function. A number of physical, chemical, microbiological and odour related parameters have be measured in the pipe which leads to the biofilter as well as on the surface of the biofilter in order to determine biofilters status and their effectiveness. Values from plants have been compared to published optimal values for each parameter. The goal of the project is to optimize biofilters function och prevent risks for performance disturbances. Results from the project can also be used as reference for plants which are planning process modifications as an increase of waste to be treated, substrate/material changes etc. Each plant has been visited during two days in August/September 2009. The following parameters have been measured: 1) physical parameters such as relative humidity, temperature, and pH, 2) chemical parameters such as incoming and out coming gas composition, gas composition variation with time, access to nutriments, 3) microbiological parameters such as the total number of microorganisms and the dominating microflora i respective biofilter and 4) odour related parameters through an evaluation of the contribution of individual compounds to the total out coming odour and in some cases, through a evaluation by olfactometry. All these parameters have been subsequently interpreted and treated in order to evaluate the status of the biofilter: description of the biofilter, its environment, the microbiological status, which flow

  7. A Continuous Liquid-Level Sensor for Fuel Tanks Based on Surface Plasmon Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio M. Pozo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A standard problem in large tanks at oil refineries and petrol stations is that water and fuel usually occupy the same tank. This is undesirable and causes problems such as corrosion in the tanks. Normally, the water level in tanks is unknown, with the problems that this entails. We propose herein a method based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR to detect in real time the interfaces in a tank which can simultaneously contain water, gasoline (or diesel and air. The plasmonic sensor is composed of a hemispherical glass prism, a magnesium fluoride layer, and a gold layer. We have optimized the structural parameters of the sensor from the theoretical modeling of the reflectance curve. The sensor detects water-fuel and fuel-air interfaces and measures the level of each liquid in real time. This sensor is recommended for inflammable liquids because inside the tank there are no electrical or electronic signals which could cause explosions. The sensor proposed has a sensitivity of between 1.2 and 3.5 RIU−1 and a resolution of between 5.7 × 10−4 and 16.5 × 10−4 RIU.

  8. Investigation of siting parameters for near surface disposal of low-level nuclear waste. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schell, W.R.; Sanchez, A.L.; Thomas, E.D.

    1985-01-01

    A study was initiated in April 1984 to evaluate actual problems associated with and to recommend improvements for near surface disposal of low-level radioactive wastes in the State of Pennsylvania and the humid Northeast. The results of field measurements showed some vertical transport of 137 Cs and other fallout radionuclides in 210 Pb dated peat cores from the unsaturated zone. Under the natural acid rain conditions (pH 4.0), the most mobile radionuclide, 137 Cs, gave diffusion coefficients of 10 -7 to 10 -9 cm 2 /sec in the different organic rich soils. Both the upward and downward migration of radionuclides resulted from the hydrological cycle of evapotranspiration and precipitation which gave diffusive mixing of mobile radionuclides. The distribution coefficient, K/sub d/ values, for several radionuclides in the organic rich soils were found to be equal to or greater than those measured previously for inorganic clay and sediment matrices. To insure that radionuclides do not enter water supplies in the humid Northeast where pH 4.0 rain is encountered, a peat liner should be considered in the multibarrier design of repositories. 32 refs., 16 figs., 8 tabs

  9. Origin of Fermi-level pinning at GaAs surfaces and interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colleoni, Davide; Miceli, Giacomo; Pasquarello, Alfredo

    2014-12-01

    Through first-principles simulation methods, we assign the origin of Fermi-level pinning at GaAs surfaces and interfaces to the bistability between the As-As dimer and two As dangling bonds, which transform into each other upon charge trapping. This defect is shown to be naturally formed both at GaAs surfaces upon oxygen deposition and in the near-interface substoichiometric oxide. Using electron-counting arguments, we infer that the identified defect occurs in opposite charge states. The Fermi-level pinning then results from the amphoteric nature of this defect which drives the Fermi level to its defect level. These results account for the experimental characterization at both GaAs surfaces and interfaces within a unified picture, wherein the role of As antisites is elucidated.

  10. Peptide Level Turnover Measurements Enable the Study of Proteoform Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zecha, Jana; Meng, Chen; Zolg, Daniel Paul; Samaras, Patroklos; Wilhelm, Mathias; Kuster, Bernhard

    2018-05-01

    The coordination of protein synthesis and degradation regulating protein abundance is a fundamental process in cellular homeostasis. Today, mass spectrometry-based technologies allow determination of endogenous protein turnover on a proteome-wide scale. However, standard dynamic SILAC (Stable Isotope Labeling in Cell Culture) approaches can suffer from missing data across pulse time-points limiting the accuracy of such analysis. This issue is of particular relevance when studying protein stability at the level of proteoforms because often only single peptides distinguish between different protein products of the same gene. To address this shortcoming, we evaluated the merits of combining dynamic SILAC and tandem mass tag (TMT)-labeling of ten pulse time-points in a single experiment. Although the comparison to the standard dynamic SILAC method showed a high concordance of protein turnover rates, the pulsed SILAC-TMT approach yielded more comprehensive data (6000 proteins on average) without missing values. Replicate analysis further established that the same reproducibility of turnover rate determination can be obtained for peptides and proteins facilitating proteoform resolved investigation of protein stability. We provide several examples of differentially turned over splice variants and show that post-translational modifications can affect cellular protein half-lives. For example, N-terminally processed peptides exhibited both faster and slower turnover behavior compared with other peptides of the same protein. In addition, the suspected proteolytic processing of the fusion protein FAU was substantiated by measuring vastly different stabilities of the cleavage products. Furthermore, differential peptide turnover suggested a previously unknown mechanism of activity regulation by post-translational destabilization of cathepsin D as well as the DNA helicase BLM. Finally, our comprehensive data set facilitated a detailed evaluation of the impact of protein

  11. [Measurement of effective energy and entrance surface dose using fluorescent glass dosimeter in interventional radiology procedures: make of half-value layer measurement instrument and IVR-phantom].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Hiroji; Noto, Kimiya; Takata, Tadanori; Chabatake, Mitsuhiro; Yamamoto, Tomoyuki

    2010-05-20

    In interventional radiology (IVR) procedures, automatic brightness control (ABC) is helpful in maintaining good image quality by adjusting kV and/or mA based on the subject's thickness. However, it was difficult to measure effective energy using half-value layer (HVL). We investigated the usefulness of measuring effective energy and entrance surface dose using a fluorescent glass dosimeter in IVR procedures, and we made an HVL folder and IVR-phantom for that purpose. Effective energy measured using the HVL folder correlated well with reference ionization dosimeter (y=0.992x, r=0.963). The result indicated that the present method using an HVL folder and IVR-phantom provides accurate measurements of effective energy and entrance surface dose in IVR procedures. In conclusion, the present measurement method may be useful for quality control of IVR equipment. In addition, the development of this measurement technique may be useful for comparisons of exposure levels in different hospitals.

  12. Surface-source modeling and estimation using biomagnetic measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yetik, Imam Samil; Nehorai, Arye; Muravchik, Carlos H; Haueisen, Jens; Eiselt, Michael

    2006-10-01

    We propose a number of electric source models that are spatially distributed on an unknown surface for biomagnetism. These can be useful to model, e.g., patches of electrical activity on the cortex. We use a realistic head (or another organ) model and discuss the special case of a spherical head model with radial sensors resulting in more efficient computations of the estimates for magnetoencephalography. We derive forward solutions, maximum likelihood (ML) estimates, and Cramér-Rao bound (CRB) expressions for the unknown source parameters. A model selection method is applied to decide on the most appropriate model. We also present numerical examples to compare the performances and computational costs of the different models and illustrate when it is possible to distinguish between surface and focal sources or line sources. Finally, we apply our methods to real biomagnetic data of phantom human torso and demonstrate the applicability of them.

  13. Measurement noise of a point autofocus surface topography instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Xiaobing; Quagliotti, Danilo; Maculotti, Giacomo

    Optical instruments for areal topography measurement can be especially sensitive to noise when scanning is required. Such noise has different sources, including those internally generated and external sources from the environment.......Optical instruments for areal topography measurement can be especially sensitive to noise when scanning is required. Such noise has different sources, including those internally generated and external sources from the environment....

  14. Microarray analysis of genes associated with cell surface NIS protein levels in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Sasha J; Zhang, Xiaoli; Jimenez, Rafael E; Lee, Mei-Ling T; Richardson, Andrea L; Huang, Kun; Jhiang, Sissy M

    2011-10-11

    Na+/I- symporter (NIS)-mediated iodide uptake allows radioiodine therapy for thyroid cancer. NIS is also expressed in breast tumors, raising potential for radionuclide therapy of breast cancer. However, NIS expression in most breast cancers is low and may not be sufficient for radionuclide therapy. We aimed to identify biomarkers associated with NIS expression such that mechanisms underlying NIS modulation in human breast tumors may be elucidated. Published oligonucleotide microarray data within the National Center for Biotechnology Information Gene Expression Omnibus database were analyzed to identify gene expression tightly correlated with NIS mRNA level among human breast tumors. NIS immunostaining was performed in a tissue microarray composed of 28 human breast tumors which had corresponding oligonucleotide microarray data available for each tumor such that gene expression associated with cell surface NIS protein level could be identified. NIS mRNA levels do not vary among breast tumors or when compared to normal breast tissues when detected by Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarray platforms. Cell surface NIS protein levels are much more variable than their corresponding NIS mRNA levels. Despite a limited number of breast tumors examined, our analysis identified cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase as a biomarker that is highly associated with cell surface NIS protein levels in the ER-positive breast cancer subtype. Further investigation on genes associated with cell surface NIS protein levels within each breast cancer molecular subtype may lead to novel targets for selectively increasing NIS expression/function in a subset of breast cancers patients.

  15. The effect of scattered light sensor orientation on roughness measurement of curved polished surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilny, Lukas; Bissacco, Giuliano; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Light scattering is a method for surface roughness measurements well suitable for use in a production environment thanks to its fast measurement rate, insensitivity to vibrations and to small misalignments. The method is however affected by several other factors. In this paper, the effect of angu...... of angular orientation of a commercial scattered light sensor on roughness measurements of polished cylindrical surfaces with crossed surface lay is investigated to document the robustness of the method....

  16. Measurement of the surface susceptibility and the surface conductivity of atomically thin by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    KAUST Repository

    Jayaswal, Gaurav

    2017-10-01

    We show how to correctly extract from the ellipsometric data the surface susceptibility and the surface conductivity that describe the optical properties of monolayer $\\ m MoS_2$. Theoretically, these parameters stem from modelling a single-layer two-dimensional crystal as a surface current, a truly two-dimensional model. Currently experimental practice is to consider this model equivalent to a homogeneous slab with an effective thickness given by the interlayer spacing of the exfoliating bulk material. We prove that the error in the evaluation of the surface susceptibility of monolayer $\\ m MoS_2$, owing to the use of the slab model, is at least 10% or greater, a significant discrepancy in the determination of the optical properties of this material.

  17. Precision level measurement based on time-domain reflection (TDR measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gerding

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A system for a high precision multi target level measurement based on guided microwave pulses is presented. A wide-band technique based on time-domain reflectometry (TDR in combination with a TEM-waveguide as the probe fulfils the requirements of mm-precision level measurements in tanks. The coaxial waveguide provides very low dispersion for wide-band signals. Inside the coaxial waveguide the different fluids with their specific dielectric constants influence the waveguide’s characteristic impedance, so that reflections take place at each discontinuity and separating layer respectively. A second very important requirement of the system is a high resolution. Thin layers (< 10 mm should be measured reliably. For that reason the pulse width must be sufficiently small. In this case a pulse width about 100 ps is suitable. It is obvious, that a high bandwidth of the whole system is necessary to provide the precision and the resolution. One further requirement is a nearly jitter free generation of two pulse trains with slightly different pulse repetition rates. These pulse trains are used for sequential sampling. The following analog to digital conversion of the received signal occurs at a relatively slow rate, in order to allow an A/D conversion with a high resolution.

  18. Commencement measurements giving fundamental surface tension determinations in tensiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbery, D; Morrin, D; O'Rourke, B; McMillan, N D; O'Neill, M; Riedel, S; Pringuet, P; Smith, S R P

    2011-01-01

    This study provides experimental testing of a ray-tracing model of the tensiotrace that explores the measurement potential of a well-defined optical position in the tensiotrace signal known as the 'commencement'. This point is defined as the first measureable optical coupling in the fiber drophead between source and collector fibers for light injected inside a growing drop. Tensiotrace ray-tracing model is briefly introduced. Empirical relationships of commencement measures from a wide-ranging study are presented. A number of conclusions can be drawn from the successful linking of computer predictions to these experimental relationships.

  19. Surface preparation for residual stress measurement of an accelerated corrosion tested welded marine steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Bilal; Fitzpatrick, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Residual stress measurement is often required for the assessment of structural integrity of components. Measurement of residual stress in corrosion tested specimens is challenging owing to the difficulty of accessing the surface because of the rust layer. This study explored the potential methods for the surface preparation of an ultrasonically-peened and accelerated corrosion tested DH36 marine steel fillet welded specimen to ease the way for subsequent residual stress measurement using neutron diffraction and the contour method. We find that hydroblasting introduces compressive residual stress at the surface that will alter the surface stress to be measured

  20. Surface roughness: A review of its measurement at micro-/nano-scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yuxuan; Xu, Jian; Buchanan, Relva C.

    2018-01-01

    The measurement of surface roughness at micro-/nano-scale is of great importance to metrological, manufacturing, engineering, and scientific applications given the critical roles of roughness in physical and chemical phenomena. The surface roughness of materials can significantly change the way of how they interact with light, phonons, molecules, and so forth, thus surface roughness ultimately determines the functionality and property of materials. In this short review, the techniques of measuring micro-/nano-scale surface roughness are discussed with special focus on the limitations and capabilities of each technique. In addition, the calculations of surface roughness and their theoretical background are discussed to offer readers a better understanding of the importance of post-measurement analysis. Recent progress on fractal analysis of surface roughness is discussed to shed light on the future efforts in surface roughness measurement.

  1. Validation of meter-scale surface faulting offset measurements from high-resolution topographic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury, Barrett; Haddad, D.E.; Rockwell, T.K.; Arrowsmith, R.; Madugo, C.; Zielke, O.; Scharer, Katherine M.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of active fault zones have flourished with the availability of high-resolution topographic data, particularly where airborne light detection and ranging (lidar) and structure from motion (SfM) data sets provide a means to remotely analyze submeter-scale fault geomorphology. To determine surface offset at a point along a strike-slip earthquake rupture, geomorphic features (e.g., stream channels) are measured days to centuries after the event. Analysis of these and cumulatively offset features produces offset distributions for successive earthquakes that are used to understand earthquake rupture behavior. As researchers expand studies to more varied terrain types, climates, and vegetation regimes, there is an increasing need to standardize and uniformly validate measurements of tectonically displaced geomorphic features. A recently compiled catalog of nearly 5000 earthquake offsets across a range of measurement and reporting styles provides insight into quality rating and uncertainty trends from which we formulate best-practice and reporting recommendations for remote studies. In addition, a series of public and beginner-level studies validate the remote methodology for a number of tools and emphasize considerations to enhance measurement accuracy and precision for beginners and professionals. Our investigation revealed that (1) standardizing remote measurement methods and reporting quality rating schemes is essential for the utility and repeatability of fault-offset measurements; (2) measurement discrepancies often involve misinterpretation of the offset geomorphic feature and are a function of the investigator’s experience; (3) comparison of measurements made by a single investigator in different climatic regions reveals systematic differences in measurement uncertainties attributable to variation in feature preservation; (4) measuring more components of a displaced geomorphic landform produces more consistently repeatable estimates of offset; and (5

  2. Validation of meter-scale surface faulting offset measurements from high-resolution topographic data

    KAUST Repository

    Salisbury, J. Barrett

    2015-10-24

    Studies of active fault zones have flourished with the availability of high-resolution topographic data, particularly where airborne light detection and ranging (lidar) and structure from motion (SfM) data sets provide a means to remotely analyze submeter- scale fault geomorphology. To determine surface offset at a point along a strike-slip earthquake rupture, geomorphic features (e.g., stream channels) are measured days to centuries after the event. Analysis of these and cumulatively offset features produces offset distributions for successive earthquakes that are used to understand earthquake rupture behavior. As researchers expand studies to more varied terrain types, climates, and vegetation regimes, there is an increasing need to standardize and uniformly validate measurements of tectonically displaced geomorphic features. A recently compiled catalog of nearly 5000 earthquake offsets across a range of measurement and reporting styles provides insight into quality rating and uncertainty trends from which we formulate best-practice and reporting recommendations for remote studies. In addition, a series of public and beginner-level studies validate the remote methodology for a number of tools and emphasize considerations to enhance measurement accuracy and precision for beginners and professionals. Our investigation revealed that (1) standardizing remote measurement methods and reporting quality rating schemes is essential for the utility and repeatability of fault-offset measurements; (2) measurement discrepancies often involve misinterpretation of the offset geomorphic feature and are a function of the investigator\\'s experience; (3) comparison of measurements made by a single investigator in different climatic regions reveals systematic differences in measurement uncertainties attributable to variation in feature preservation; (4) measuring more components of a displaced geomorphic landform produces more consistently repeatable estimates of offset; and (5

  3. Manufacturing microsystems-on-a-chip with 5-level surface micromachining technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sniegowski, J.; Rodgers, M.S.

    1998-05-01

    An agile microsystem manufacturing technology has been developed that provides unprecedented 5 levels of independent polysilicon surface-micromachine films for the designer. Typical surface-micromachining processes offer a maximum of 3 levels, making this the most complex surface-micromachining process technology developed to date. Leveraged from the extensive infrastructure present in the microelectronics industry, the manufacturing method of polysilicon surface-micromachining offers similar advantages of high-volume, high-reliability, and batch-fabrication to microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) as has been accomplished with integrated circuits (ICs). These systems, comprised of microscopic-sized mechanical elements, are laying the foundation for a rapidly expanding, multi-billion dollar industry 2 which impacts the automotive, consumer product, and medical industries to name only a few.

  4. Time-Resolved Surface Temperature Measurement for Pulsed Ablative Thrusters

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Antonsen, Erik

    2003-01-01

    .... The diagnostic draws on heritage from the experimental dynamic crack propagation community which has used photovoltaic infrared detectors to measure temperature rise in materials in the process of fracture...

  5. Earth System Research Laboratory Long-Term Surface Aerosol Measurements

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Aerosol measurements began at the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) Global Monitoring Division (GMD) baseline observatories in the mid-1970's with the...

  6. Measurements of the spatial distribution of tritium in air above a chronically contaminated surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Workman, W.J.G.; Davis, P.A.; Wood, M.J.; Barry, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    Tritium in air (HTO) concentrations were measured over a 13 month period above a surface that is chronically contaminated by tritium-bearing groundwater from a waste management area. The measurements were made using passive diffusion samplers, which were sited at six locations (about 100 m apart) at 0.15, 0.9, and 1.8 m above ground level. The diffusion samplers were compact, sampled at a known rate, and required no external power source. They are ideal for remote locations and require a minimum of effort to collect and analyze the data. HTO-in-air concentration peaked in the summer at 500-1500 Bq.m -3 and decreased in the winter to 1-120 Bq.m -3 . In general, concentration decreased with height above ground level, implying that HTO is being lost from the surface to the atmosphere. The flux of tritium to the atmosphere must, therefore, be taken into account to estimate the tritium mass balance for a contaminated area. (Author) 3 figs., 5 tabs., 10 refs

  7. Non-additivity of molecule-surface van der Waals potentials from force measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Christian; Fournier, Norman; Ruiz, Victor G.; Li, Chen; Müllen, Klaus; Rohlfing, Michael; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Temirov, Ruslan; Tautz, F. Stefan

    2014-11-01

    Van der Waals (vdW) forces act ubiquitously in condensed matter. Despite being weak on an atomic level, they substantially influence molecular and biological systems due to their long range and system-size scaling. The difficulty to isolate and measure vdW forces on a single-molecule level causes our present understanding to be strongly theory based. Here we show measurements of the attractive potential between differently sized organic molecules and a metal surface using an atomic force microscope. Our choice of molecules and the large molecule-surface separation cause this attraction to be purely of vdW type. The experiment allows testing the asymptotic vdW force law and its validity range. We find a superlinear growth of the vdW attraction with molecular size, originating from the increased deconfinement of electrons in the molecules. Because such non-additive vdW contributions are not accounted for in most first-principles or empirical calculations, we suggest further development in that direction.

  8. Non-additivity of molecule-surface van der Waals potentials from force measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Christian; Fournier, Norman; Ruiz, Victor G; Li, Chen; Müllen, Klaus; Rohlfing, Michael; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Temirov, Ruslan; Tautz, F Stefan

    2014-11-26

    Van der Waals (vdW) forces act ubiquitously in condensed matter. Despite being weak on an atomic level, they substantially influence molecular and biological systems due to their long range and system-size scaling. The difficulty to isolate and measure vdW forces on a single-molecule level causes our present understanding to be strongly theory based. Here we show measurements of the attractive potential between differently sized organic molecules and a metal surface using an atomic force microscope. Our choice of molecules and the large molecule-surface separation cause this attraction to be purely of vdW type. The experiment allows testing the asymptotic vdW force law and its validity range. We find a superlinear growth of the vdW attraction with molecular size, originating from the increased deconfinement of electrons in the molecules. Because such non-additive vdW contributions are not accounted for in most first-principles or empirical calculations, we suggest further development in that direction.

  9. Effects of Barometric Fluctuations on Well Water-Level Measurements and Aquifer Test Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FA Spane, Jr.

    1999-12-16

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, as part of the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project, examines the potential for offsite migration of contamination within underlying aquifer systems. Well water-level elevation measurements from selected wells within these aquifer systems commonly form the basis for delineating groundwater-flow patterns (i.e., flow direction and hydraulic gradient). In addition, the analysis of water-level responses obtained in wells during hydrologic tests provides estimates of hydraulic properties that are important for evaluating groundwater-flow velocity and transport characteristics. Barometric pressure fluctuations, however, can have a discernible impact on well water-level measurements. These barometric effects may lead to erroneous indications of hydraulic head within the aquifer. Total hydraulic head (i.e., sum of the water-table elevation and the atmospheric pressure at the water-table surface) within the aquifer, not well water-level elevation, is the hydrologic parameter for determining groundwater-flow direction and hydraulic gradient conditions. Temporal variations in barometric pressure may also adversely affect well water-level responses obtained during hydrologic tests. If significant, adjustments or removal of these barometric effects from the test-response record may be required for quantitative hydraulic property determination. This report examines the effects of barometric fluctuations on well water-level measurements and evaluates adjustment and removal methods for determining areal aquifer head conditions and aquifer test analysis. Two examples of Hanford Site unconfined aquifer tests are examined that demonstrate barometric response analysis and illustrate the predictive/removal capabilities of various methods for well water-level and aquifer total head values. Good predictive/removal characteristics were demonstrated with best corrective results provided by multiple-regression deconvolution methods.

  10. Performance verification of focus variation and confocal microscopes measuring tilted ultra-fine surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quagliotti, Danilo; Baruffi, Federico; Tosello, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The behaviour of two optical instruments, scilicet a laser scanning confocal microscope and a focus-variation microscope, was investigated considering measurements of tilted surfaces. The measured samples were twelve steel artefacts for mould surface finish reference, covering Sa roughness...... parameter in the range (101—103) nm. The 3D surface texture parameters considered were Sa, Sq and Sdq. The small working distance of the confocal microscope objectives influenced the measurement setup, preventing from selecting a high tilting angle. The investigation was carried out comparing measurements...... of flat surfaces (0° tilt) with measurements of 12.5° tilted surfaces. The confocal microscope results showed a high sensitivity to tilting due to the laser beam reflection on the metal surfaces. The focus variation microscope results were more robust with respect to the considered angular variation...

  11. Endotoxin level measurement in hemodialysis biofilm using "the whole blood assay".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion-Ferey, Karine; Leid, Jeff G; Bouvier, Ghislaine; Pasmore, Mark; Husson, Gilles; Vilagines, Rolland

    2005-06-01

    Biofilms have been found on the inner surface of silicone tubing inside dialysis machines. Endotoxin releasing from those biofilms increases the bioincompatibility of dialysis liquids and leads to long-term inflammatory complications among dialysis patients. Endotoxin measurement is recommended for the control of dialysis liquids. This article describes the use of a new method, the Whole Blood Assay (WBA), for endotoxin quantification in dialysis biofilms. Biofilms were suspended in sterile water by scraping the tubing samples. Diluted blood samples from healthy donors were stimulated overnight with the contaminated suspension. Stimulated mononuclear cells released IL-1beta in response to endotoxins. IL-1beta level was then measured using an ultrasensitive ELISA method. We demonstrated a semilogarithmic model in which the optical densities measured after the ELISA assay increases linearly with the levels of endotoxin. This model allowed the determination of the amount of endotoxins in biofilm samples with a detection limit of 0.032 EU/mL. Most of the time, the amounts of endotoxin measured by the WBA were higher than those measured by the Limulus Amoebocyte Lysate (LAL) assay. This study suggested the presence of "endotoxin-like" compounds different from the lipopolysaccharides that are not detected by the LAL assay. We concluded that the LAL is necessary but insufficient to have a representative quantification of endotoxins that could be hazardous to patient health.

  12. Measurement of farm level efficiency of home gardens in Uyo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To investigate the farm level efficiency of home vegetable gardens in Uyo, a stochastic production function which incorporates a model for the technical inefficiency effects was used. Using farm-level data from 80 home gardeners obtained through structured questionnaire, the parameters were estimated simultaneously with ...

  13. Carotenoid levels in human lymphocytes, measured by Raman microspectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramanauskaite, R.; Ramanauskaite, Regina B.; Segers-Nolten, Gezina M.J.; de Grauw, C.J.; de Grauw, Kees J.; Sijtsema, N.M.; van der Maas, Louis; Greve, Jan; Otto, Cornelis; Figdor, Carl

    1997-01-01

    Carotenoid levels in lymphocytes obtained from peripheral blood of healthy people have been investigated by Raman microspectroscopy. We observed that carotenoids are concentrated in so-called “Gall bodies”. The level of carotenoids in living human lymphocytes was found to be age-dependent and to

  14. Carotenoid levels in human lymphocytes, measured by Raman microspectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramanauskaite, R B; SegersNolten, IGMJ; DeGrauw, K J; Sijtsema, N M; VanderMaas, L; Greve, J; Otto, C; Figdor, C G

    1997-01-01

    Carotenoid levels in lymphocytes obtained from peripheral blood of healthy people have been investigated by Raman microspectroscopy. We observed that carotenoids are concentrated in so-called ''Gall bodies''. The level of carotenoids in living human lymphocytes was found to be age-dependent and to

  15. Gait Characteristics Associated with Trip-Induced Falls on Level and Sloped Irregular Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Merryweather

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Same level falls continue to contribute to an alarming number of slip/trip/fall injuries in the mining workforce. The objective of this study was to investigate how walking on different surface types and transverse slopes influences gait parameters that may be associated with a trip event. Gait analysis was performed for ten subjects on two orientations (level and sloped on smooth, hard surface (control and irregular (gravel, larger rocks surfaces. Walking on irregular surfaces significantly increased toe clearance compared to walking on the smooth surface. There was a significant (p < 0.05 decrease in cadence (steps/min, stride length (m, and speed (m/s from control to gravel to larger rocks. Significant changes in external rotation and increased knee flexion while walking on irregular surfaces were observed. Toe and heel clearance requirements increased on irregular surfaces, which may provide an explanation for trip-induced falls; however, the gait alterations observed in the experienced workers used as subjects would likely improve stability and recovery from a trip.

  16. Probability distribution for the Gaussian curvature of the zero level surface of a random function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannay, J. H.

    2018-04-01

    A rather natural construction for a smooth random surface in space is the level surface of value zero, or ‘nodal’ surface f(x,y,z)  =  0, of a (real) random function f; the interface between positive and negative regions of the function. A physically significant local attribute at a point of a curved surface is its Gaussian curvature (the product of its principal curvatures) because, when integrated over the surface it gives the Euler characteristic. Here the probability distribution for the Gaussian curvature at a random point on the nodal surface f  =  0 is calculated for a statistically homogeneous (‘stationary’) and isotropic zero mean Gaussian random function f. Capitalizing on the isotropy, a ‘fixer’ device for axes supplies the probability distribution directly as a multiple integral. Its evaluation yields an explicit algebraic function with a simple average. Indeed, this average Gaussian curvature has long been known. For a non-zero level surface instead of the nodal one, the probability distribution is not fully tractable, but is supplied as an integral expression.

  17. Measurement of the interaction between the flow and the free surface of a liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, Koji [Univ. of Tokyo, Ibaraki (Japan); Schmidl, W.D.; Philip, O.G. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The interaction between the flow and free surface was evaluated measuring the velocity distribution and surface movement simultaneously. The test section was a rectangular tank having a free surface. A rectangular nozzle was set near the free surface, causing the wavy free surface condition. The flow under the free surface was visualized by a laser light sheet and small tracer particles. With image processing techniques, the movement of the free surface and the movement of the particles were simultaneously measured from the recorded images, resulting in the velocity distributions and surface locations. Then, the interactions between the flow and free surface were evaluated using the form of turbulent energy and surface-related turbulent values. By increasing the turbulent energy near the free surface, the fluctuations of the free surface height and the inclination of the free surface were increased. The higher fluctuation of horizontal velocity was related to the higher surface position and negative inclination. The image processing technique is found to be very useful to evaluate the interaction between free surface and flow.

  18. High-speed 3D surface measurement with mechanical projector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Jae-Sang; Zhang, Song

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents a method to overcome the light spectral range limitation of using digital-light-processing (DLP) projector for 3D shape measurement by developing a mechanical projector. The mechanical projector enables much broader spectral range of light than that the DLP projector allows. The rapidly spinning disk with binary structures can generate desired sinusoidal patterns at a frequency of 10 kHz or higher with a single DC motor. By precisely synchronizing the camera with the projector, phase-shifted fringe patterns can be accurately captured for high-accuracy 3D shape measurement. We further employed a computational framework that could enable absolute phase and thus absolute 3D shape measurement. We developed such prototype system that experimentally demonstrated the success of the proposed method.

  19. Spatially-varying surface roughness and ground-level air quality in an operational dispersion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, M.J.; Brade, T.K.; MacKenzie, A.R.; Whyatt, J.D.; Carruthers, D.J.; Stocker, J.; Cai, X.; Hewitt, C.N.

    2014-01-01

    Urban form controls the overall aerodynamic roughness of a city, and hence plays a significant role in how air flow interacts with the urban landscape. This paper reports improved model performance resulting from the introduction of variable surface roughness in the operational air-quality model ADMS-Urban (v3.1). We then assess to what extent pollutant concentrations can be reduced solely through local reductions in roughness. The model results suggest that reducing surface roughness in a city centre can increase ground-level pollutant concentrations, both locally in the area of reduced roughness and downwind of that area. The unexpected simulation of increased ground-level pollutant concentrations implies that this type of modelling should be used with caution for urban planning and design studies looking at ventilation of pollution. We expect the results from this study to be relevant for all atmospheric dispersion models with urban-surface parameterisations based on roughness. -- Highlights: • Spatially variable roughness improved performance of an operational model. • Scenario modelling explored effect of reduced roughness on air pollution. • Reducing surface roughness can increase modelled ground-level pollution. • Damped vertical mixing outweighs increased horizontal advection in model study. • Result should hold for any model with a land-surface coupling based on roughness. -- Spatially varying roughness improves model simulations of urban air pollutant dispersion. Reducing roughness does not always decrease ground-level pollution concentrations

  20. Tire-to-Surface Friction-Coefficient Measurements with a C-123B Airplane on Various Runway Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Richard H.; Kolnick, Joseph J.

    1959-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to obtain information on the tire-to-surface friction coefficients available in aircraft braking during the landing run. The tests were made with a C-123B airplane on both wet and dry concrete and bituminous pavements and on snow-covered and ice surfaces at speeds from 12 to 115 knots. Measurements were made of the maximum (incipient skidding) friction coefficient, the full-skidding (locked wheel) friction coefficient, and the wheel slip ratio during braking.

  1. Effect of surface fissure on apparent resistivity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailhac, P.; Gance, J.; Malet, J.

    2013-12-01

    Fissures are features of interest, prone to create preferential flow path, modifying locally the soil hydrogeological behavior. Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) is a suitable tool to monitor such preferential flow path. However, this technique is not efficient in the presence of surface fissure, due to a bad resistivity recovering around the fissure vicinity during the inversion process. Therefore, we propose a description of fissure effect on raw apparent resistivity on three resistivity arrays. The purposes of the study are multiple. First, we aim at making ERT users aware of surface fissure effect, and propose a first help to interpret basically resistivity pseudo sections. Second, we propose to ERT users to automatically conduct a surface fissure survey on the studied profile, in order to consider each fissure in a forward DC model and to suppress their effect. Finally, this study is only a first step toward 2D fissure shape inversion, and time-lapse monitoring of fissure drying and filling. In this study, we create a fissure model based on different geomorphological descriptors. After describing the FEM-DC forward modeling strategy, we investigate the fissure effect on pseudo section of apparent resistivity for a Wenner-Schlumberger (WS), a dipole-dipole (DD) and a gradient (GRAD) array. We determine a fissure detectability threshold for each array and perform a sensitivity analysis on the different fissure parameters (position, width, depth, dip angles...). The crack filling or drying effect is also investigated. The possibility to remove fissure effect and to propose a first interpretation of time-lapse data is illustrated on real data. This study show again the higher sensitivity of the DD array compared to the GRAD and WS arrays. Not only the maximal amplitude in the pseudo section is higher for the DD array, but also the anomaly pattern created by the fissure is much larger for this acquisition geometry. The minimal depth detectable for the DD

  2. Measurement of adhesion properties between topcoat paint and metallized/galvanized steel with surface energy measurement equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The objectives of this research project are: (1) Compare the adhesion properties of NEPCOAT-approved topcoat paint over : metallized or galvanized steel. Use surface-energy measuring technique to characterize the wetting properties of the liqui...

  3. Heat capacity mapping mission. [satellite for earth surface temperature measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    A Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM), part of a series of Applications Explorers Missions, is designed to provide data on surface heating as a response to solar energy input. The data is obtained by a two channel scanning radiometer, with one channel covering the visible and near-IR band between 0.5 and 1.1 micrometers, and the other covering the thermal-IR between 10.5 and 12.5 micrometers. The temperature range covered lies between 260 and 340 K, in 0.3 deg steps, with an accuracy at 280 K of plus or minus 0.5 K. Nominal altitude is 620 km, with a ground swath 700 km wide.

  4. High-frequency Surface Wave Measurements of Micro-tunamis generated by Glacier Calving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minowa, Masahiro; Sugiyama, Shin; Sakakibara, Daiki; Podolskiy, Evgeny; Ohashi, Yoshihiko; Skvarca, Pedro

    2016-04-01

    Calving plays a key role in recent rapid retreat of glaciers in Greenland, Alaska and Patagonia. However, processes related to calving are poorly understood since direct observations are difficult. When calving occurred at the glacier front, ice hits water surface and generates surface wave or micro-tsunami. Because characteristics of the micro-tsunami are dependent on the impact on water, it is expected that analysis of the wave provides useful information on the size and type of calving. To study the calving processes from surface wave, we performed field observations at Glaciar Perito Moreno, a freshwater calving glacier in the Southern Patagonia Icefield. We measured the surface level by recording water pressure every 2 s (0.5 Hz), using a sensor installed in a lake 300 m from the calving front. Spectral and statistical analyses were performed on the wave data. We also carried out time-lapse photography, ice speed and water temperature measurements. The time-lapse photographs were used to identify the types of observed calving events (1. Subaqueous, 2. Topple, 3. Drop, 4. Small serac failure). During summer (15 December 2013-4 January 2014) and spring (6-20 October 2014) field campaigns, 640 (30 events d-1) and 195 (12 events d-1) calving events were recorded by the pressure sensor, respectively. The number of calving events varied in time (from 0 to 6 events h-1) and this variation correlates well with lakewater temperature. Subaqueous calving account for only 2.4 % of calving events recorded during the field campaigns (7 out of 364 events). These results imply importance of melting at/under water surface as a triggering mechanism of calving. Waves generated by subaerial calving events (type 2, 3 and 4) showed similar frequency spectrums, whereas those by subaqueous calving had smaller power in frequency range between 0.12-0.25 Hz. The amplitude of the surface waves increased with size of calving, which was quantified by the time-lapse photographs. Our results

  5. Canonical measures on the moduli spaces of compact Riemann surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nag, S.

    1988-08-01

    We first study some explicit relations between the canonical line bundle and the Hodge bundle over moduli spaces for low genus. This leads to a natural measure on the moduli space of every genus which is related to the Siegel symplectic metric on Siegel upper half-space as well as to the Hodge metric on the Hodge bundle. (author). 9 refs

  6. Direct measurement of surface-state conductance by microscopic four-point probe method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasegawa, S.; Shiraki, I.; Tanikawa, T.

    2002-01-01

    For in situ measurements of local electrical conductivity of well defined crystal surfaces in ultrahigh vacuum, we have developed microscopic four-point probes with a probe spacing of several micrometres, installed in a scanning-electron - microscope/electron-diffraction chamber. The probe...... is precisely positioned on targeted areas of the sample surface by using piezoactuators. This apparatus enables conductivity measurement with extremely high surface sensitivity, resulting in direct access to surface-state conductivity of the surface superstructures, and clarifying the influence of atomic steps...

  7. Artificial Heads for High-Level Impulse Sound Measurement

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Buck, K

    1999-01-01

    If the Insertion Loss (IL) of hearing protectors has to be determined with very high impulse or continuous noise levels, the acoustic insulation of the Artificial Test Fixture has to exceed at least the Insertion Loss (IL...

  8. Arctic summertime measurements of ammonia in the near-surface atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moravek, A.; Murphy, J. G.; Wentworth, G.; Croft, B.; Martin, R.

    2016-12-01

    Measurements of gas-phase ammonia (NH3) in the summertime Arctic are rare, despite the impact NH3 can have on new particle formation rates and nitrogen deposition. The presence of NH3 can also increase the ratio of particulate-phase ammonium (NH4+) to non-sea salt sulphate (nss-SO42-) which decreases particle acidity. Known regional sources of NH3in the Arctic summertime include migratory seabird colonies and northern wildfires, whereas the Arctic Ocean is a net sink. In the summer of 2016, high time resolution measurements were collected in the Arctic to improve our understanding of the sources, sinks and impacts of ammonia in this remote region. A four week study was conducted at Alert, Canada (82.5º N, 62.3 º W) from June 23 to July 19, 2016 to examine the magnitude and sources of NH3 and SO42-. The Ambient Ion Monitor-Ion Chromatography system (AIM-IC) provided on-line, hourly averaged measurements of NH3, NH4+, SO42- and Na+. Measurements of NH3 ranged between 50 and 700 pptv (campaign mean of 240 pptv), consistent with previous studies in the summertime Arctic boundary layer. Levels of NH4+ and nss-SO42- were near or below detection limits ( 20 ng m-3) for the majority of the study. Tundra and lake samples were collected to investigate whether these could be important local sources of NH3 at Alert. These surface samples were analyzed for NH4+, pH and temperature and a compensation point (χ) for each sample was calculated to determine if these surface reservoirs can act as net NH3 sources. Precipitation samples were also collected throughout the study to better constrain our understanding of wet NH4+deposition in the summertime Arctic. From mid-July through August, 2016, NH3 was measured continuously using a laser spectroscopy technique onboard the Canadian Coast Guard Ship Amundsen in the eastern Arctic Ocean. Ocean-atmosphere exchange of NH3 was quantified using measurements of sea surface marine NH4+ concentrations. In addition, wet deposition of

  9. Comparison of diffusion charging and mobility-based methods for measurement of aerosol agglomerate surface area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Bon Ki; Kulkarni, Pramod

    2012-05-01

    We compare different approaches to measure surface area of aerosol agglomerates. The objective was to compare field methods, such as mobility and diffusion charging based approaches, with laboratory approach, such as Brunauer, Emmett, Teller (BET) method used for bulk powder samples. To allow intercomparison of various surface area measurements, we defined 'geometric surface area' of agglomerates (assuming agglomerates are made up of ideal spheres), and compared various surface area measurements to the geometric surface area. Four different approaches for measuring surface area of agglomerate particles in the size range of 60-350 nm were compared using (i) diffusion charging-based sensors from three different manufacturers, (ii) mobility diameter of an agglomerate, (iii) mobility diameter of an agglomerate assuming a linear chain morphology with uniform primary particle size, and (iv) surface area estimation based on tandem mobility-mass measurement and microscopy. Our results indicate that the tandem mobility-mass measurement, which can be applied directly to airborne particles unlike the BET method, agrees well with the BET method. It was also shown that the three diffusion charging-based surface area measurements of silver agglomerates were similar within a factor of 2 and were lower than those obtained from the tandem mobility-mass and microscopy method by a factor of 3-10 in the size range studied. Surface area estimated using the mobility diameter depended on the structure or morphology of the agglomerate with significant underestimation at high fractal dimensions approaching 3.

  10. Exterior sound level measurements of snowcoaches at Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    Sounds associated with oversnow vehicles, such as snowmobiles and snowcoaches, are an important management concern at Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks. The John A. Volpe National Transportation Systems Centers Environmental Measurement a...

  11. Quality assurance for radionuclide measurements at environmental levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisenne, I.M.; Welford, G.A.

    1980-01-01

    The Environmental Measurements Laboratory administers and participates in two quality control programs. The first is the intralaboratory program for evaluation of staff and Environmental Measurement Laboratory's contractor results obtained for environmental samples. The second Quality Assurance Program is operated for the US Department of Energy (DOE), Division of Operational and Environmental Safety. The Quality Assurance Program is an interlaboratory program designed for major DOE contractors reporting environmental radionuclide data. The problems associated with the data evaluation process under both programs are contrasted

  12. Measurement of the specific surface area of loose copper deposit by electrochemical methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Dolmatova

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the work the surface area of the electrode with dispersed copper deposit obtained within 30 seconds was evaluated by techniques of chronopotentiometry (CPM and impedance spectroscopy. In method CPM the electrode surface available for measurement depends on the value of the polarizing current. At high currents during the transition time there is a change of surface relief that can not determine the full surface of loose deposit. The electrochemical impedance method is devoid of this shortcoming since the measurements are carried out in indifferent electrolyte in the absence of current. The area measured by the impedance is tens of times higher than the value obtained by chronopotentiometry. It is found that from a solution containing sulfuric acid the deposits form with a high specific surface area. Based on these data it was concluded that the method of impedance spectroscopy can be used to measure in situ the surface area of the dispersed copper deposits.

  13. Surface topography measurement by frequency sweeping digital holography.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lédl, Vít; Psota, Pavel; Kaván, František; Matoušek, Ondřej; Mokrý, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 28 (2017), s. 7808-7814 ISSN 1559-128X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1206; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-11965S Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Wavelenght Scanning Interferometry * Shape measurement * Profilomerty Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering OBOR OECD: Electrical and electronic engineering Impact factor: 1.650, year: 2016 https:// doi . org /10.1364/AO.56.007808

  14. Radioisotope tracer application in surface and groundwater flow measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monev, E.

    1983-01-01

    The ''peak to peak'' method for measurement of water flow with the use of radioactive tracer was investigated. The theoretical basis for this method has been established. The experiments in the open channel have shown the applicability of the method. Groundwater flow was studied by injection of radioactive tracer into the bore-hole followed by gamma-logging in three different time intervals. Interpretation of gamma lows in terms of filtration velocity in various depths proved to be possible

  15. Measurement system for special surface mapping using miniature displacement sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zowade Martyna

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work was to design a special system for measurements of elements with repetitive geometry or assemblies with repeating components, set in a linear patterns. The main focus was based on developing a computer program for signal analysis from variable number of miniature displacement sensors. It was set that the response for displacement of measuring tip from each sensor was a 0-5 V voltage signal with possibility of using different type of sensors. Requirements were determined based on projected measurement method. A special design of sensor was made for testing the computer program. If the characteristics of the sensor is known, it is possible to compute the type A evaluation of uncertainty. The results are presented in XY chart on computer screen. The program allows the user to choose any number of the sensors and determine the distance between them. Also, the possibility of calibration of sensors’ set was provided. The test were conducted on a prototype handle for sensors, made on a 3D printer.

  16. Influence of sampling points on inspection accuracy of free-form surfaces using coordinate measuring machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Mengmin; Chen, Yueping; Zhang, Anshe; Fang, Rui

    2018-03-01

    The inspection accuracy of free-form surfaces is mainly affected by the processing, the number of sampling points, the distribution of sampling points, the measurement equipment and other factors. This paper focuses on the influence of sampling points on inspection accuracy of free-form surfaces, and isoparametric distribution was used in sample point distribution. Different sampling points number was compared on a same surface and a probe, the measurement data were analyzed and the optimal sampling points number was obtained.

  17. Measuring Water Level Fluctuations of two Connected Wetlands in the Dominican Republic Using InSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichardo Marcano, M. D.; Liu, L.; Zebker, H. A.

    2012-12-01

    Wetlands are ecosystems of high endemism and great biodiversity. Using the double-reflected radar waves off the water surface and trunks of inundated vegetation, Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is capable of measuring water level fluctuations from space at a cm-level accuracy in these ecosystems with emergent vegetation. InSAR can provide a high spatial resolution over a large area that the more traditional terrestrial-based methods lack. In this study, we applied InSAR to study the seasonal variations in water level of the wetlands near two lakes in the southwest of the Dominican Republic: Lake Enriquillo, a highly saline lake designated as a Wetland of International Importance under the Ramsar Convention in 2002, and Laguna del Limon. Both lake-wetland systems are located in the Jaragua-Bahoruco-Enriquillo Biosphere Reserve. Since 2003 the water level of Lake Enriquillo has increased drastically and caused the evacuation of many farmers from nearby villages. Lake level changes also affected the habitats of several native and migratory species. We used the data acquired by the Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) sensor on board of the Japanese Advanced Land Observation Satellite (ALOS) from October 2008 to January 2011. For the smaller lake, Laguna del Limon, we found a seasonal variation of 10-15 centimeters. This result was confirmed using two different satellite paths. For Lake Enriquillo we found a net decrease of about 20 centimeters in the water level from September 2009 to January 2011. This result agrees with an independent estimation based on lake hydrodynamics model predictions. In addition, our InSAR-based time series of lake level fluctuations revealed distinct behaviors of the two wetlands. For the Lake Enriquillo we found a continuous decrease in the water level throughout 2010 with a brief increase of the water level during the summer months, while for Laguna del Limon during the summer months the water level

  18. Measuring level of friendliness of smart city: a perceptual study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sani Roychansyah, Muhammad; Felasari, Sushardjanti

    2018-03-01

    Currently the concept of smart city comes not only at the level of discussion, but some cities have stepped in the stage of implementation. Many of promised benefits will be met for the needs of urban residents if the city applies this concept. Conversely, many professionals and scholars are still in doubt about readiness of a city in the application of this concept. Dimension of friendliness of the real city certainly will have some limitations in a smart city that relies more on interactions with information and communication technology (ICT). This new paradigm becomes background of this paper in viewing the friendliness dimension of a smart city based on city residents’ perceptions. This paper uses case of 2 cities that have different level of readiness in the application of smart city. They are Yogyakarta City and Magelang City, both are located in Central Java. The method applied in this paper is quantitative method based on perceptual answer of respondents structured in a Likert Scale. Importance Performance Analysis (IPA) is then used to look at the attributes of smart city’s dimension which will show the relationship of the level of city friendliness and the level of city readiness in an application of smart city. The result briefly shows that the level of city sensitivity in the application of smart city is very influential in viewing the friendliness of the city. The city that is better equipped to meet the needs of its population according to the dimensions of the smart city based on its existing characteristics has higher friendliness. Time period of applying a smart city concept as the City of Yogyakarta has done longer before Magelang City, is not a guarantee that the city then has a better level of friendliness. The urban citizens have appropriate affective aspect to articulate between what they need and what the city has provided.

  19. Torsional ultrasonic technique for reactor vessel liquid level measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dress, W.B.

    1983-01-01

    We have undertaken a detailed study of an ultrasonic waveguide employed as a level, density, and temperature sensor. The purpose of this study was to show how such a device might be used in the nuclear power industry to provide reliable level information with a multifunction sensor, thus overcomming several of the errors that led to the accident at Three Mile Island. Some additional work is needed to answer the questions raised by the current study, most noticably the damping effects of flowing water

  20. Surface radiological investigations of Trench 6 and low-level waste Line Leak Site 7. 4b at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uziel, M.S.; Tiner, P.F.; Williams, J.K.

    1991-08-01

    A surface radiological investigation of Trench 6 and low-level radioactive waste (LLW) Line Leak Site 7.4b was conducted in July and August 1989 and January 1990 by the Measurement Applications and Development Group, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The purposes of this survey were (1) to determine the presence, nature, and extent of surface radiological contamination and (2) to recommend interim corrective action to limit human exposures to radioactivity and minimize the potential for contaminant dispersion. Highest surface gamma levels encountered during the survey (39 mR/h) were found just south of the asphalt covering LLW Line Leak Site 7.4b. Elevated surface gamma levels (measuring 28 to 560 {mu}R/h) extended from this area to a width of 100 ft, westward 250 ft, and beyond the survey boundary. Beta-gamma levels up to 17 mrad/h measured on contact with the trunks of trees growing in the area southwest of Trench 6 suggest that three roots are reaching contamination deep within the ground. Since no gamma activity is associated with the trees or their leaves, the elevated beta levels are probably due to the uptake of residual {sup 90}Sr originating from the documented seepage at the Trench 6/Leak Site 7.4b area. Beta activity present in the leaf litter and surface soil indicate that decaying leaves are depositing measurable contaminants on the ground surface. Recommendations for corrective actions are included. 7 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. MEASURING LEVEL OF ACCEPTANCE OF PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIESAND THEIR FAMILIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HARAZ Svetlana

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The group of persons with disabilities represents a group at immediate risk of social exclusion. Different researchers offer us analyses of the phenomenon of exclusion of different groups of population, but we can find very few studies regarding the measurement of social distance towards the groups at risk of exclusion. We set the goal to measure the Indices of Social Distance (ISD towards the following groups: family that cares the child with disabilities; adult person with disabilities and the child with disabilities. The measurement was performed using the instrument – Bogardus Scale. According to this technique, we have: if the distance is bigger, than the social group is lesser accepted. The minimum ISD counted for our researched groups: the family caring child/ children with disabilities; adult persons with disabilities and children/adolescents with disabilities, confirms the fact that the social distance expressed by people towards these groups is minimal respectively the groups are accepted.

  2. Surface Pressure Measurements of Atmospheric Tides Using Smartphones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Colin; Maor, Ron

    2017-04-01

    Similar to the oceans, the atmosphere also has tides that are measured in variations of atmospheric pressure. However, unlike the gravitational tides in the oceans, the atmospheric tides are caused primarily in the troposphere and stratosphere when the atmosphere is periodically heated by the sun, due to tropospheric absorption by water vapor and stratospheric absorption by ozone. Due to the forcing being always on the day side of the globe, the tides migrate around the globe following the sun (migrating tides) with a dominant periodicity of 12 hours (and less so at 24 hours). In recent years smartphones have been equipped with sensitive, cheap and reliable pressure sensors that can easily detect these atmospheric tides. By 2020 it is expected that there will be more than 6 billion smartphones globally, each measuring continuously atmospheric pressure at 1Hz temporal resolution. In this presentation we will present some control experiments we have performed with smartphones to monitor atmospheric tides, while also using random pressure data from more than 50,000 daily users via the WeatherSignal application. We conclude that smartphones are a useful tool for studying atmospheric tides on local and global scales.

  3. Bayesian Compressed Sensing with Unknown Measurement Noise Level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Lundgaard; Jørgensen, Peter Bjørn; Pedersen, Niels Lovmand

    2013-01-01

    In sparse Bayesian learning (SBL) approximate Bayesian inference is applied to find sparse estimates from observations corrupted by additive noise. Current literature only vaguely considers the case where the noise level is unknown a priori. We show that for most state-of-the-art reconstruction a...

  4. The diagnostic value of thrombopoietin level measurements in thrombocytopenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Porcelijn, L.; Folman, C. C.; Bossers, B.; Huiskes, E.; Overbeeke, M. A.; van der Schoot, C. E.; de Haas, M.; von dem Borne, A. E.

    1998-01-01

    It has been reported that blood trombopoietin (TPO) levels can discriminate between thrombocytopenia due to increased platelet destruction and decreased platelet production. With our TPO ELISA and a glycocalicin ELISA we analysed a large group of patients in detail and could confirm and amplify the

  5. Low level air radioactivity measurements in Prague, Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rulík, P.; Malá, H.; Bečková, V.; Hölgye, Z.; Schlesingerová, E.; Světlík, Ivo; Škrkal, J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 67, - (2009), s. 969-973 ISSN 0969-8043 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : atmospheric radionuclides * monitoring * low level activities Subject RIV: DL - Nuclear Waste, Radioactive Pollution ; Quality Impact factor: 1.094, year: 2009

  6. Deep layer-resolved core-level shifts in the beryllium surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldén, Magnus; Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Johansson, Börje

    1993-01-01

    Core-level energy shifts for the beryllium surface region are calculated by means of a Green’s function technique within the tight-binding linear muffin-tin orbitals method. Both initial- and final-state effects in the core-ionization process are fully accounted for. Anomalously large energy shifts...

  7. Surface shift of the occupied and unoccupied 4f levels of the rare-earth metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldén, Magnus; Johansson, Börje; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1995-01-01

    The surface energy shifts of the occupied and unoccupied 4f levels for the lanthanide metals have been calculated from first principles by means of a Green’s-function technique within the tight-binding linear muffin-tin orbitals method. We use the concept of complete screening to identify the occ...

  8. A comparative study of the phosphate levels in some surface and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The levels of total phosphate in selected surface water and groundwater bodies from Manzini and Lubombo regions of Swaziland were determined using UV spectroscopic method. Samples were collected from three rivers (upstream and downstream of each), three industrial effluents, one reservoir, one pond, one tap water ...

  9. Monitoring the variability of sea level and surface circulation with satellite altimetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volkov, Denis L. "Jr"

    2004-01-01

    Variability in the ocean plays an important role in determining global weather and climate conditions. The advent of satellite altimetry has significantly facilitated the study of the variability of sea level and surface circulation. Satellites provide high-quality regular and nearly global

  10. Levels of Cd, Hg and Zn in some surface waters from the Eastern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Total trace metals levels - Cd, Hg and Zn, which may affect human health and the "health" of the aquatic ecosystem, were determined in the Umtata, Buffalo, Keiskamma and Tyume Rivers and in the Sandile and Umtata Dams. These elements were also determined in sediment samples from some of these surface waters.

  11. Severity of MIH findings at tooth surface level among German school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrou, M A; Giraki, M; Bissar, A-R; Wempe, C; Schäfer, M; Schiffner, U; Beikler, T; Schulte, A G; Splieth, C H

    2015-06-01

    This study was to investigate the distribution and clinical characteristics of teeth diagnosed with MIH at surface and defect type level in a cohort of German children. The study cohort included 242 children diagnosed with MIH which had been recorded during the compulsory dental school examinations of 20 German primary schools. The subjects had been enrolled by cluster sampling. All children attended the second to fourth grade (age 7-10 years, mean 8.1 ± 0.8). The children were examined by five calibrated examiners (kappa = 0.9) after tooth brushing. The recording comprised teeth, surfaces, type and severity of MIH defects and was conducted using a portable light, mirrors and cotton rolls. MIH was registered according to the EAPD criteria. Defects teeth were first permanent molars (71.4 %) followed by the maxillary central incisors (15.6 %). The most common defects were demarcated opacities (82.2 %), while the remaining 17.8 % of the affected teeth exhibited severe enamel defects. The most frequently affected surface in molars was the occlusal surface (72.4 %); in incisors, it was the buccal surface (73.5 %). There were no atypical restorations in the affected incisors. Different types of MIH defects at various surfaces of the same tooth were common. The number of affected tooth surfaces was positively correlated with the severity of MIH at child (p teeth. The knowledge of the intra-oral distribution and severity of MIH findings at the enamel surface level is important for assessing the treatment needs.

  12. Remedial measures against high levels of radioisotopes in aquatic ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voitsekhovitch, O.; Haakanson, L.

    2000-01-01

    This Annex has been prepared within the framework of the Aquatic Working Group of the co-ordinated Research Programme on Validation of the Environmental Model Predictions (VAMP). The main objectives of this Annex are: (1) To provide an outline of a broad set of remedial measures and strategies tested and suggested for aquatic systems to speed up the recovery after the nuclear accident at Chernobyl in April 1986. This Report covers case studies from rivers and lakes and includes results from field and laboratory experiments, as well as measures directed at reducing radioisotopes in food by different food preparation procedures in the home. (2) To provide results from selected case studies, focusing on general, strategic results rather than site-specific details. (3) To provide conclusions which specifically address practical matters concerning how to select remedial measures in different situations, how to avoid inefficient measures, and to suggest important areas for future research. (4) To provide an analysis of the concept of lake sensitivity using both empirical and modelled data. One and the same fallout may give rise to very different radionuclide concentrations in water and biota depending on the characteristics of the lake and its catchment

  13. Out-door radiation level measurement in Abeokuta, Nigeria, by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... measurements of terrestrial radiation dose in a previous survey, the mean dose rate from extraterrestrial (cosmic) radiation has been estimated to be about 0.18 mSv/y in Abeokut Keywords: Environmental radiation, thermoluminescent dosimetry, Abeokuta, outdoor Radiation exposure. Nigerian Journal of Physics Vol.

  14. The measurement of radiation levels in Australian zircon milling plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, B M

    2001-01-01

    The processing of zircon often involves grinding it to a fine powder known as zircon flour. As the resulting particles are small they may be inhaled if they become airborne and, since they contain some uranium and thorium, deliver radiation doses to workers. Theoretical estimates and measured radiation exposure in Australian zircon milling plants are reported in this paper. Theoretical doses, calculated in this work, indicate a potential maximum dose to workers of 5.5 mSv y(-1). Measured doses, based on normal work practices, vary in different plants from 0.66 mSv to 1.03 mSv y(-1) and suggest that in the dustiest Australian zircon milling plants the maximum dose would be of the order of 1 mSv y(-1). Measurements, which focused on the dustiest operations, indicate an upper limit of dose of about 3 mSv y(-1). Based on the theoretical and measured doses not exceeding 6 mSv y(-1), workers would not be designated as Category A workers, and probably would not be designated Category B workers, exceeding 1 mSv y(-1), under the guidelines of a EURATOM Directive.

  15. Measurement of brix level of Malaysian local oranges at resonance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    production, a non-destructive method by using monopole antenna is used in this study. The reflection coefficient is measured at range operating frequency of 8MHz to 5 GHz. The relationship between dielectric constant and S11 is determined. The other variables are compared during S11 at resonance.S11 of oranges is the ...

  16. Measurement of radio frequency radiation (RFR) power levels from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With the upsurge in the number of network providers and the attendant increase in the installation of mast in Nigeria, the environment is being inundated with radiofrequency radiation (RFR). There is, therefore, increasing concern about the health implications of this development. In this study measurements of RFR output ...

  17. Verification of Geosat sea surface topography in the Gulf Stream extension with surface drifting buoys and hydrographic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willebrand, J.; KäSe, R. H.; Stammer, D.; Hinrichsen, H.-H.; Krauss, W.

    1990-03-01

    Altimeter data from Geosat have been analyzed in the Gulf Stream extension area. Horizontal maps of the sea surface height anomaly relative to an annual mean for various 17-day intervals were constructed using an objective mapping procedure. The mean sea level was approximated by the dynamic topography from climatological hydrographic data. Geostrophic surface velocities derived from the composite maps (mean plus anomaly) are significantly correlated with surface drifter velocities observed during an oceanographie experiment in the spring of 1987. The drifter velocities contain much energy on scales less than 100 km which are not resolved in the altimetric maps. It is shown that the composite sea surface height also agrees well with ground verification from hydrographic data along sections in a triangle between the Azores, Newfoundland, and Bermuda, except in regions of high mean gradients.

  18. Automatic centroid detection and surface measurement with a digital Shack–Hartmann wavefront sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Xiaoming; Zhao, Liping; Li, Xiang; Fang, Zhongping

    2010-01-01

    With the breakthrough of manufacturing technologies, the measurement of surface profiles is becoming a big issue. A Shack–Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWS) provides a promising technology for non-contact surface measurement with a number of advantages over interferometry. The SHWS splits the incident wavefront into many subsections and transfers the distorted wavefront detection into the centroid measurement. So the accuracy of the centroid measurement determines the accuracy of the SHWS. In this paper, we have presented a new centroid measurement algorithm based on an adaptive thresholding and dynamic windowing method by utilizing image-processing techniques. Based on this centroid detection method, we have developed a digital SHWS system which can automatically detect centroids of focal spots, reconstruct the wavefront and measure the 3D profile of the surface. The system has been tested with various simulated and real surfaces such as flat surfaces, spherical and aspherical surfaces as well as deformable surfaces. The experimental results demonstrate that the system has good accuracy, repeatability and immunity to optical misalignment. The system is also suitable for on-line applications of surface measurement

  19. Microarray analysis of genes associated with cell surface NIS protein levels in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richardson Andrea L

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Na+/I- symporter (NIS-mediated iodide uptake allows radioiodine therapy for thyroid cancer. NIS is also expressed in breast tumors, raising potential for radionuclide therapy of breast cancer. However, NIS expression in most breast cancers is low and may not be sufficient for radionuclide therapy. We aimed to identify biomarkers associated with NIS expression such that mechanisms underlying NIS modulation in human breast tumors may be elucidated. Methods Published oligonucleotide microarray data within the National Center for Biotechnology Information Gene Expression Omnibus database were analyzed to identify gene expression tightly correlated with NIS mRNA level among human breast tumors. NIS immunostaining was performed in a tissue microarray composed of 28 human breast tumors which had corresponding oligonucleotide microarray data available for each tumor such that gene expression associated with cell surface NIS protein level could be identified. Results and Discussion NIS mRNA levels do not vary among breast tumors or when compared to normal breast tissues when detected by Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarray platforms. Cell surface NIS protein levels are much more variable than their corresponding NIS mRNA levels. Despite a limited number of breast tumors examined, our analysis identified cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase as a biomarker that is highly associated with cell surface NIS protein levels in the ER-positive breast cancer subtype. Conclusions Further investigation on genes associated with cell surface NIS protein levels within each breast cancer molecular subtype may lead to novel targets for selectively increasing NIS expression/function in a subset of breast cancers patients.

  20. Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor for Rapid Label-Free Detection of Microribonucleic Acid at Subfemtomole Level

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šípová, Hana; Zhang, S.-Ch.; Dudley, A.M.; Galas, D.; Wang, K.; Homola, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 24 (2010), s. 10110-10115 ISSN 0003-2700 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200670701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : surface plasmon resonance * microRNA * cancer diagnostics * biosensor Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 5.874, year: 2010

  1. Measuring vessel dimensions in oak wood (Quercus sp.) on macroscopic level with image analysis system - Lucia G

    OpenAIRE

    Merela, Maks; Oven, Primož; Čufar, Katarina

    2005-01-01

    System for image analysis Lucia G was used for measuring vessel dimensions of oak wood (Quercus sp.) on macroscopic level. We present the problem of sample preparation as well as capturing and processing of images for automatic measurements of diameters, areas and perimeters of early wood vessels. After testing various methods of sample preparation we found out that the best results were obtained when the samples were sanded with paper of granulation 320 and the surface stained with black alc...

  2. Statistical analysis of global surface temperature and sea level using cointegration methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Torben; Johansen, Søren; Thejll, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Global sea levels are rising which is widely understood as a consequence of thermal expansion and melting of glaciers and land-based ice caps. Due to the lack of representation of ice-sheet dynamics in present-day physically-based climate models being unable to simulate observed sea level trends......, semi-empirical models have been applied as an alternative for projecting of future sea levels. There is in this, however, potential pitfalls due to the trending nature of the time series. We apply a statistical method called cointegration analysis to observed global sea level and land-ocean surface air...... temperature, capable of handling such peculiarities. We find a relationship between sea level and temperature and find that temperature causally depends on the sea level, which can be understood as a consequence of the large heat capacity of the ocean. We further find that the warming episode in the 1940s...

  3. Are Preschool Children Active Enough? Objectively Measured Physical Activity Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardon, Greet M.; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse M. M.

    2008-01-01

    The present study aimed to describe accelerometer-based physical activity levels in 4- and 5-year-old children (N = 76) on 2 weekdays and 2 weekend days. The children were sedentary for 9.6 hr (85%) daily, while they engaged in moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) for 34 min (5%). Only 7% of the children engaged in MVPA for 60 min per…

  4. Surface ozone exposures measured at clean locations around the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefohn, A S; Krupa, S V; Winstanley, D

    1990-01-01

    For assessing the effects of air pollution on vegetation, some researchers have used control chambers as the basis of comparison between crops and trees grown in contemporary polluted rural locations and those grown in a clean environment. There has been some concern whether the arbitrary ozone level of 0.025 ppm and below, often used in charcoal-filtration chambers to simulate the natural background concentration of ozone, is appropriate. Because of the many complex and man-made factors that influence ozone levels, it is difficult to determine natural background. To identify a range of ozone exposures that occur at 'clean' sites, we have calculated ozone exposures observed at a number of 'clean' monitoring sites located in the United States and Canada. We do not claim that these sites are totally free from human influence, but rather than the ozone concentrations observed at these 'clean' sites may be appropriate for use by vegetation researchers in control chambers as pragmatic and defensible surrogates for natural background. For comparison, we have also calculated ozone exposures observed at four 'clean' remote sites in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres and at two remote sites (Whiteface Mountain, NY and Hohenpeissenberg, FRG) that are considered to be more polluted. Exposure indices relevant for describing the relationship between ozone and vegetation effects were applied. For studying the effects of ozone on vegetation, the higher concentrations are of interest. The sigmoidally-weighted index appeared to best separate those sites that experienced frequent high concentration exposures from those that experienced few high concentrations. Although there was a consistent seasonal pattern for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Geophysical Monitoring for Climate Change (GMCC) sites indicating a winter/spring maximum, this was not the case for the other remote sites. Some sites in the continental United States and southern Canada

  5. Intervention levels for protective measures in nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedemann Jensen, P.

    1992-12-01

    A radiation protection philosophy for exposure situations following an accident has been developed by international organisations such as the ICRP, IAEA, NES/OECD, FAO/WHO, and the CEC during the last decade. After the Chernobyl accident, the application of radiation protection principles for intervention situations such as exposure from accidental contamination or radon in dwellings were further developed and this work is still in progress. The present intervention policy recommended by the international organisations as well as by the Nordic radiation protection authorities is reviewed. The Nordic Intervention levels for foodstuff restrictions, both for the Chernobyl and post-Chernobyl periods, have been based on dose limits and they are therefore in conflict with international intervention policy. Illustrative examples on intervention level setting for relocation and foodstuff restrictions are derived for Nordic conditions from the optimisation principle recommended by the international organisations. Optimised Generic Intervention Levels have been determined to be about 10 mSv x month -1 for relocation/return and 5,000-30,000 Bqxkg -1 for restrictions on various foodstuffs contaminated with 137 Cs and 131 I. (au) (14 tabs., 1 ill., 16 refs.)

  6. Forces due to surface water measured by force microscopy. Consequences for anchoring biological cells to surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schilcher, K.

    1997-05-01

    Interaction forces in 'Scanning Force Microscopy' (SFM). Force curves revealed exponentially decaying, attractive forces between silicon tip and silicon sample in aqueous media. Replacing the silicon sample by a sheet of mica, the interaction forces had both, an attractive and a repulsive component. Addition of salts generally reduced the forces. At 500 mM salt concentration, the attractive force became quantized with a residual force value of 23 pN. The attractive force is attributed to the gain in energy of water molecules which are released from surface water into free water during tip-sample approach. This conclusion is supported by a statistical model. The repulsive force contribution in the case of mica, is caused by hydration forces due to the spatial organization of crystalline water on the mica surface. Anchoring of biological cells. Molecular resolution of cell surfaces by SFM requires cell anchoring without interference with cell physiology. For this a novel strategy, 'hydrophobic anchoring' was designed. It avoids strong attractive forces between cell and by using a flexible spacer molecule. It establishes anchoring by a lipid (bound to the spacer), which weakly interacts with the hydrophobic core of the cell membrane. The method was subjected to tests using RBL-2H3, CH0 αβ and HEK-293 cells. The strength of cell anchoring was assayed by shear forces. In all cases 'hydrophobic anchoring' via a spacer caused elective anchoring much beyond controls. Such cell anchoring was employed for the imaging of RBL-2H3 cells by SFM. Images showed considerable finer details than images of loosely adsorbed cells. With about 50 rim resolution, SFM succeeded in imaging microvilli, filopodia, single cytoskeletal fibers (microtubules, microfilaments) and vesicles. In addition, as a consequence of cell stimulation upon ionomycin treatment, lamellae formation and the appearance of secretory granules on top of them were observed which indicates the viability of anchored

  7. The effect of scattered light sensor orientation on roughness measurement of curved polished surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilny, Lukas; Bissacco, Giuliano; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    with crossed surface lay to document the robustness of the method. The instrument area-integrating measuring principle (figure 1) is based on a non-coherent light beam of ∅ 0.9 mm and 670 nm wavelength illuminating the measured surface, reflection of the incident light from the surface slopes in spatial......The effect of angular orientation of a scattered light sensor with respect to main curvature and surface lay on roughness measurements is evaluated. A commercial scattered light sensor OS 500-32 from Optosurf GmbH was used. The investigation was performed on polished cylindrical surfaces...... directions, and its acquisition within ± 16º angular range with a linear detector array. From the distribution of the acquired scattered light intensity, a number of statistical parameters describing the surface texture are calculated, where the Aq parameter (variance of the scattered light distribution...

  8. Application of CAMAC in low-level activity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loessner, V.

    1980-01-01

    A description is given of the measuring and data processing facilities designed for use in the bioassay laboratory which is now under construction in the SAAS. The detector units, especially alpha and quantum spectrometers, are linked to a PDP11/34 based CAMAC system enabling fully-automatic data acquisition and processing operations to be made by making use of an event-driven technique via CAMAC interrupts. (author)

  9. Protocol of source shielding maintenance in a level measurement systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzales, E.; Figueroa, J.

    1996-01-01

    Maintenance labor of the source shielding and locking system is not performed in many Venezuelan enterprises that employ radioactive level gauge in large container. The lack of maintenance and the ambient long lasting action have produced impairment of many devices and their given parts rise to economical and radiological protection problems. In order to help to solve the mentioned problems, principally to reduce the unjustified dose to workers, the IVIC Health Physics Service worked out a protocol to perform, in a safety way, the maintenance of source shielding and its locking system. This protocol is presented in this paper. (authors)

  10. Experimental measurements of surface stiffness on water-saturated porous solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, P.B.; Blaho, G. (Department of Welding Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States))

    1994-02-01

    The surface impedance of a fluid/fluid-saturated porous solid interface is defined as the ratio of the pressure difference between the fluids on the two sides of the interface and the volume velocity of the fluid through the surface pores. In most cases, the surface pores are inherently open'' and the surface impedance is negligible when the sample is fully submerged in fluid. On the other hand, due to surface tension, practically closed-pore boundary conditions can prevail at an interface between a nonwetting fluid (e.g., air) and a porous solid saturated with a wetting fluid (e.g., water). This effect is caused by the high stiffness of the microscopic fluid membranes extended by capillary forces over the otherwise open surface pores. We have determined the quasistatic surface stiffness of different water-saturated porous materials by changing the hydrostatic pressure and directly measuring the average surface displacement by an acoustical sensor. Generally, the surface stiffness is proportional to the surface tension of the wetting fluid and inversely proportional to the static permeability of the specimen. For cylindrical pores, the measured surface stiffness is in good agreement with theoretical predictions. For more irregular geometries, such as consolidated spherical beads, the surface stiffness is still inversely proportional to the static permeability but its value is orders of magnitudes lower than for cylindrical pores of comparable permeability.

  11. Impact of measurement and evaluation on innovation level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Henning Sejer; Gertsen, Frank; Goduscheit, René Chester

    This article explores the situation in which an innovation project fails to achieve its full potential because the goal is lowered during the process. When the gap between measured/perceived progress and goals/aspirations of an innovation project becomes too large, the goals will be lowered...... and opportunities will be lost. The hypothetical explanation suggested here, is that the progress is often perceived to be linear whereas the actual progress is often exponential and that this makes the gap between actual achievement and expected progress much larger. The hypothesis is explored by means of a single...

  12. Low level optical absorption measurements on organic semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stella, M.; Rojas, F.; Escarre, J.; Asensi, J.M.; Bertomeu, J.; Andreu, J. [Dept. de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona. Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Voz, C.; Puigdollers, J.; Fonrodona, M. [Micro and Nano Technology Group (MNT), Dept. d' Enginyeria Electronica, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, C/Jordi Girona 1-3, Campus Nord - Modul C4, 08034 Barcelona (Spain)

    2006-06-15

    The optical absorption of n-type (C{sub 60} and PTCDA) and p-type (CuPc and pentacene) organic semiconductors is investigated by optical transmission and photothermal deflection spectroscopy. The usual absorption bands related to HOMO-LUMO transitions are observed in the high absorption region of transmission spectra. Photothermal deflection spectroscopy also evidences exponential absorption shoulders with characteristic energies 47meV for CuPc, 38meV for pentacene, 50 meV for PTCDA and 87meV for C{sub 60}. In addition, broad bands in the low absorption level are observed for C{sub 60} and PTCDA. These bands have been attributed to contamination due to air exposure. On the other hand, in CuPc a clear absorption peak at 1.12eV is observed with smaller features at 1.04eV, 1.20eV and 1.33eV. These peaks are attributed to transitions between the Pc levels of CuPc ions. Finally, the optical absorption expected in blends of organic semiconductors is estimated by an effective media approximation. (author)

  13. Measurement of empathy levels in undergraduate paramedic students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brett; Boyle, Mal; Earl, Tracy

    2013-04-01

    Paramedics rely on establishing a health provider-patient relationship with patients that promotes two-way communication, patient satisfaction, and facilitates appropriate patient assessment and treatment. Paramedics also must have an ability to empathize with patients and their family members in order to develop a successful health provider-patient relationship. The objective of this study was to assess paramedics' empathy and attitudes toward patients with specific conditions. This was a cross-sectional study using a convenience sample of first-, second-, and third-year, Australian undergraduate paramedic students. Student empathy levels were assessed using two standardized self-reporting instruments: the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy (JSPE) Health Professional (HP) version and the Medical Condition Regard Scale (MCRS). A total of 94 paramedic students participated in the study. The JSPE demonstrated that male paramedic students had higher mean empathy scores than did female paramedic students (113.25 and 107.5, respectively; P = .042). The JSPE empathy level scores were lowest among first-year paramedic students (mean = 107.53); age was not found to be a significant variable on empathy scores. The Medical Condition Regard Scale revealed lowest scores in compassion towards substance abuse (mean = 46.42). The results of this study provide the discipline of paramedic health care with useful data, and provide students, academics, and other educators with important information regarding the improvement of the health provider-patient relationship and paramedic education curriculum development.

  14. Investigation of Surface Pre-Treatment Methods for Wafer-Level Cu-Cu Thermo-Compression Bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koki Tanaka

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available To increase the yield of the wafer-level Cu-Cu thermo-compression bonding method, certain surface pre-treatment methods for Cu are studied which can be exposed to the atmosphere before bonding. To inhibit re-oxidation under atmospheric conditions, the reduced pure Cu surface is treated by H2/Ar plasma, NH3 plasma and thiol solution, respectively, and is covered by Cu hydride, Cu nitride and a self-assembled monolayer (SAM accordingly. A pair of the treated wafers is then bonded by the thermo-compression bonding method, and evaluated by the tensile test. Results show that the bond strengths of the wafers treated by NH3 plasma and SAM are not sufficient due to the remaining surface protection layers such as Cu nitride and SAMs resulting from the pre-treatment. In contrast, the H2/Ar plasma–treated wafer showed the same strength as the one with formic acid vapor treatment, even when exposed to the atmosphere for 30 min. In the thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS measurement of the H2/Ar plasma–treated Cu sample, the total number of the detected H2 was 3.1 times more than the citric acid–treated one. Results of the TDS measurement indicate that the modified Cu surface is terminated by chemisorbed hydrogen atoms, which leads to high bonding strength.

  15. Surface energy balance measurements in the Mexico City: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tejeda Martinez, A. [Universidad Veracruzana, Xalapa, Veracruz (Mexico); Jauregui Ostos, E. [Centro de Ciencias de la Atmosfera, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, UNAM, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-01-01

    During the last decade of the 20th Century, diverse campaigns for measuring the atmospheric energy balance were performed in downtown Mexico City (School of Mines and Preparatory School No. 7), in the southern suburbs (University Reserve) and in the surrounding rural areas (Plan Texcoco), in addition to a campaign carried out in 1985 in the Tacubaya district, a suburban western peripheral site. The objective was to obtain data for a better understanding of the climatic alterations due to urbanization, particularly to describe the role that the modification of the natural ground cover has played as a result of paving and the construction of urban canyons. In this paper, a review of these campaigns is presented. Energy partitioning in some areas (Tacubaya and Preparatory School No.7) is similar to that observed in urban centers of middle latitudes, whereas the major contrast was observed between Texcoco, with maximum energy consumption through evaporation, and School of Mines, where the latent heat is as low as in a desert. From the values of the correlations among the different components of energy balance, it may be possible to attempt the modeling of the diverse components of energy balance by means of regression equations starting from the net radiation. Those same coefficients distinguish the type of environment: urban, suburban or rural. [Spanish] Las primeras mediciones de balance energetico en la Ciudad de Mexico se realizaron en 1985 en un suburbio al poniente de la ciudad (el observatorio de Tacubaya). Ya en la decada de los anos noventa del siglo XX, dichas observaciones se multiplicaron tanto en el centro historico (antigua Escuela de Minas y en el edificio de la Preparatoria No. 7), como en otros sitios al sur (en terrenos de Ciudad Universitaria) y en la periferia rural (Plan Texcoco). El proposito de estas mediciones ha sido tener un mejor entendimiento de las alteraciones climaticas debidas a la urbanizacion. En este trabajo se presenta una revision

  16. Low-level radon measurements by nuclear track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koksal, E. M.; Goksel, S. A.; Alkan, H.

    1985-01-01

    In the work to be described here we have developed a passive nuclear track dosimeter to measure the integrated value of indoor radon (Rn-222) over a long period of time. Passive radon dosimeter which we have developed in our laboratories makes use of two small pieces of CR-39 plastic (Allyl diglycol carbonate) as detectors for registering tracks of alpha particles emitted by radon. These CR-39 plastic detectors are fixed on the inside bottom of a cup-shaped polystrene enclosure which is closed at the top by a tissue permeable for gases only. CR-39 detectors exposed to radon gas in the indoor air for a period of six months then are removed and chemically etched to make the alpha particle tracks visible under the microscope. The counts of tracks are evaluated to determine the radon concentration in the air in comparison with the number of tracks produced by a known concentration of radon gas. By using the passive dosimeters developed and the chemical etching procedure descriped here, measurements of indoor radon concentrations were carried out in 45 houses in different districts of the city of Istanbul. In this pilot experiment mean radon concentrations between 0.7 and 3.5 pCi/l have been found in these houses. In order to improve the counting of alpha tracks produced on the detectors a prototype electrochemical etching system in addition to chemical etching, is being developed. (author)

  17. Mapping Hydrophobicity on the Protein Molecular Surface at Atom-Level Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolau Jr., Dan V.; Paszek, Ewa; Fulga, Florin; Nicolau, Dan V.

    2014-01-01

    A precise representation of the spatial distribution of hydrophobicity, hydrophilicity and charges on the molecular surface of proteins is critical for the understanding of the interaction with small molecules and larger systems. The representation of hydrophobicity is rarely done at atom-level, as this property is generally assigned to residues. A new methodology for the derivation of atomic hydrophobicity from any amino acid-based hydrophobicity scale was used to derive 8 sets of atomic hydrophobicities, one of which was used to generate the molecular surfaces for 35 proteins with convex structures, 5 of which, i.e., lysozyme, ribonuclease, hemoglobin, albumin and IgG, have been analyzed in more detail. Sets of the molecular surfaces of the model proteins have been constructed using spherical probes with increasingly large radii, from 1.4 to 20 Å, followed by the quantification of (i) the surface hydrophobicity; (ii) their respective molecular surface areas, i.e., total, hydrophilic and hydrophobic area; and (iii) their relative densities, i.e., divided by the total molecular area; or specific densities, i.e., divided by property-specific area. Compared with the amino acid-based formalism, the atom-level description reveals molecular surfaces which (i) present an approximately two times more hydrophilic areas; with (ii) less extended, but between 2 to 5 times more intense hydrophilic patches; and (iii) 3 to 20 times more extended hydrophobic areas. The hydrophobic areas are also approximately 2 times more hydrophobicity-intense. This, more pronounced “leopard skin”-like, design of the protein molecular surface has been confirmed by comparing the results for a restricted set of homologous proteins, i.e., hemoglobins diverging by only one residue (Trp37). These results suggest that the representation of hydrophobicity on the protein molecular surfaces at atom-level resolution, coupled with the probing of the molecular surface at different geometric resolutions

  18. Vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties over central Illinois and comparison with surface and satellite measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, P. J.; Andrews, E.; Ogren, J. A.; Tackett, J. L.; Winker, D. M.

    2012-12-01

    Between June 2006 and September 2009, an instrumented light aircraft measured over 400 vertical profiles of aerosol and trace gas properties over eastern and central Illinois. The primary objectives of this program were to (1) measure the in situ aerosol properties and determine their vertical and temporal variability and (2) relate these aircraft measurements to concurrent surface and satellite measurements. The primary profile location was within 15 km of the NOAA/ESRL surface aerosol monitoring station near Bondville, Illinois. Identical instruments at the surface and on the aircraft ensured that the data from both platforms would be directly comparable and permitted a determination of how representative surface aerosol properties were of the lower column. Aircraft profiles were also conducted occasionally at two other nearby locations to increase the frequency of A-Train satellite underflights for the purpose of comparing in situ and satellite-retrieved aerosol data. Measurements of aerosol properties conducted at low relative humidity over the Bondville site compare well with the analogous surface aerosol data and do not indicate any major sampling issues or that the aerosol is radically different at the surface compared with the lowest flyby altitude of ~ 240 m above ground level. Statistical analyses of the in situ vertical profile data indicate that aerosol light scattering and absorption (related to aerosol amount) decreases substantially with increasing altitude. Parameters related to the nature of the aerosol (e.g., single-scattering albedo, Ångström exponent, etc.), however, are relatively constant throughout the mixed layer, and do not vary as much as the aerosol amount throughout the profile. While individual profiles often showed more variability, the median in situ single-scattering albedo was 0.93-0.95 for all sampled altitudes. Several parameters (e.g., submicrometer scattering fraction, hemispheric backscattering fraction, and scattering

  19. Vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties over central Illinois and comparison with surface and satellite measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Sheridan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Between June 2006 and September 2009, an instrumented light aircraft measured over 400 vertical profiles of aerosol and trace gas properties over eastern and central Illinois. The primary objectives of this program were to (1 measure the in situ aerosol properties and determine their vertical and temporal variability and (2 relate these aircraft measurements to concurrent surface and satellite measurements. The primary profile location was within 15 km of the NOAA/ESRL surface aerosol monitoring station near Bondville, Illinois. Identical instruments at the surface and on the aircraft ensured that the data from both platforms would be directly comparable and permitted a determination of how representative surface aerosol properties were of the lower column. Aircraft profiles were also conducted occasionally at two other nearby locations to increase the frequency of A-Train satellite underflights for the purpose of comparing in situ and satellite-retrieved aerosol data. Measurements of aerosol properties conducted at low relative humidity over the Bondville site compare well with the analogous surface aerosol data and do not indicate any major sampling issues or that the aerosol is radically different at the surface compared with the lowest flyby altitude of ~ 240 m above ground level. Statistical analyses of the in situ vertical profile data indicate that aerosol light scattering and absorption (related to aerosol amount decreases substantially with increasing altitude. Parameters related to the nature of the aerosol (e.g., single-scattering albedo, Ångström exponent, etc., however, are relatively constant throughout the mixed layer, and do not vary as much as the aerosol amount throughout the profile. While individual profiles often showed more variability, the median in situ single-scattering albedo was 0.93–0.95 for all sampled altitudes. Several parameters (e.g., submicrometer scattering fraction, hemispheric backscattering fraction, and

  20. Statistical analysis of global surface air temperature and sea level using cointegration methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmith, Torben; Johansen, Søren; Thejll, Peter

    Global sea levels are rising which is widely understood as a consequence of thermal expansion and melting of glaciers and land-based ice caps. Due to physically-based models being unable to simulate observed sea level trends, semi-empirical models have been applied as an alternative for projecting...... radiative forcing as an explanatory variable, but unexpectedly find that the sea level does not depend on the forcing. We hypothesize that this is due to a long adjustment time scale of the ocean and show that the number of years of data needed to build statistical models that have the relationship expected...... of future sea levels. There is in this, however, potential pitfalls due to the trending nature of the time series. We apply a statistical method called cointegration analysis to observed global sea level and surface air temperature, capable of handling such peculiarities. We find a relationship between sea...

  1. Non-destructive plasma frequency measurement for a semiconductor thin film using broadband surface plasmon polaritons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tao; Ge, Jia-cheng; Li, Xing-ao; Stantchev, Rayko Ivanov; Zhu, Yong-yuan; Zhou, Yuan; Huang, Wei

    2018-03-01

    Measurement of the plasma frequency of a semiconductor film using broadband surface plasmon is demonstrated in this paper. We theoretically deduce a formula about the relation between plasma frequency and characteristic surface plasmon frequency. The characteristic surface plasmon frequency can be captured from the cut-off frequency of the transmission spectra of the broadband surface plasmon, which is used to measure the plasma frequency indirectly. The plasma frequencies of an intrinsic indium antimonide with and without optical illuminance are measured with a THz time-domain spectrometer at room temperature. The experimental measured plasma frequencies fit well with theoretical and simulation results. Compared with other methods, the proposed method has a special advantage on measuring the plasma frequency for a thin semiconductor film coated on other materials.

  2. Estimation of surface UV levels based on Meteor-3/TOMS ozone data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borisov, Y.A. [Central Aerological Observatory, Moscow (Russian Federation); Geogdzhaev, I.V. [Moscow Inst. of Physics and Technology, Moscow (Russian Federation); Khattatov, V.U. [Central Aerological Observatory, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    The major consequence of ozone layer depletion for the environment is an increase of harmful ultraviolet (UV) radiation on the Earth surface and in the upper ocean. This implies the importance of environmental UV monitoring. Since the direct global monitoring is not currently possible, indirect estimations of surface UV levels may be used based on satellite ozone data (Madronich, S. 1992). Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) on board the METEOR-3 satellite provided regular set of data for such estimates. During the time of its operation (August, 1991 - December, 1994) the instrument registered several ozone hole events over Antarctica, when ozone levels dropped by as much as 60 % from their unperturbed values. Probably even more alarming ozone depletions were observed over highly populated regions of middle latitudes of northern hemisphere. Radiative transfer modeling was used to convert METEOR-3/TOMS daily ozone values into regional and global maps of biologically active UV. Calculations demonstrate the effect on surface UV levels produced by ozone hole over Antarctica and ozone depletions over the territory of Russia (March, 1994). UV contour lines deviate from the normal appearance which is determined by growing southward solar elevation. UV contour lines are almost perpendicular to the ozone ones in the ozone depletions areas. The 30 % ozone depletion, over Siberia caused more than 30 % increase in noontime erythemal UV levels, which is equivalent to 10-15 degrees southward latitude displacement. Higher UV radiation increases were found in ozone hole over South America (October 1992) equivalent to about 20 degrees southward displacement

  3. Two Surface-Tension Formulations For The Level Set Interface-Tracking Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepel, S.V.; Smith, B.L.

    2005-01-01

    The paper describes a comparative study of two surface-tension models for the Level Set interface tracking method. In both models, the surface tension is represented as a body force, concentrated near the interface, but the technical implementation of the two options is different. The first is based on a traditional Level Set approach, in which the surface tension is distributed over a narrow band around the interface using a smoothed Delta function. In the second model, which is based on the integral form of the fluid-flow equations, the force is imposed only in those computational cells through which the interface passes. Both models have been incorporated into the Finite-Element/Finite-Volume Level Set method, previously implemented into the commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code CFX-4. A critical evaluation of the two models, undertaken in the context of four standard Level Set benchmark problems, shows that the first model, based on the smoothed Delta function approach, is the more general, and more robust, of the two. (author)

  4. Examining the Level of Career maturity among Foreign Asian Students by measuring Academic Level

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa Tekke; Faiz Bin Adam Ghani

    2013-01-01

    The Asian individuals are dependent and collectivist compared with the western individuals that are independent and individualistic. Foreign Asian students choosing similar courses with their country friends do not reveal their career maturity and also lead to negative effect on their choices.  This study aims at examining the level of career maturity of foreign Asian students in Malaysia based on academic level by using the Career Maturity Inventory. Two hundred and twenty nine ( Male=106, ...

  5. GHRSST Level 4 RTO Terra MODIS-AMSRE Night North America Regional Blended Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on an operational basis at the JPL Physical...

  6. GHRSST Level 4 ODYSSEA North-Western Europe Regional Foundation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on an operational basis at Ifremer/CERSAT...

  7. GHRSST Level 4 MUR Global Foundation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (v4.1) (GDS versions 1 and 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced as a retrospective dataset (four day latency) and...

  8. GHRSST Level 4 REMO_OI_SST_5km Regional Foundation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature (SST) analysis produced daily on an operational basis by the...

  9. GHRSST Level 4 CMC0.2deg Global Foundation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature (SST) analysis produced daily on an operational basis at the Canadian...

  10. GHRSST Level 4 DMI_OI North Sea and Baltic Sea Regional Foundation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on an operational basis by the Danish...

  11. GHRSST Level 4 RTO Aqua MODIS-AMSRE Night North America Regional Blended Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on an operational basis at the JPL Physical...

  12. GHRSST Level 4 RTO Terra MODIS-AMSRE Day North America Regional Blended Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on an operational basis at the JPL Physical...

  13. GHRSST Level 4 CMC0.1deg Global Foundation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature (SST) analysis produced daily on an operational basis at the Canadian...

  14. GHRSST Level 4 MW_IR_OI Global Foundation Sea Surface Temperature analysis (GDS versions 1 and 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) global Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on a 0.81 degree grid at Remote Sensing...

  15. GHRSST Level 4 RTO Aqua MODIS-AMSRE Day North America Regional Blended Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on an operational basis at the JPL Physical...

  16. LOWRAD 96. Methods and applications of low-level radioactivity measurements. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fietz, J.

    1997-03-01

    The newest developments in the field of low-level radioactivity measurements and new applications for existing and low-level measuring facilities are presented. The contributions mostly were devoted to basic physical aspects and applications of low-level counting. Papers on chemical separation and preparation techniques and on low-level radiation dose determinations were also presented. (DG)

  17. Surface roughness characterization of Al-doped zinc oxide thin films using rapid optical measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chil-Chyuan

    2011-07-01

    Transparent conductive oxide thin films have been widely investigated in photoelectric devices such as flat panel display (FPD) and solar cells. Al-doped zinc oxide (AZO) thin films have been widely employed in FPD. Measuring the surface roughness of AZO thin films is important before the manufacturing of photoelectric device using AZO thin films because surface roughness of AZO thin films will significantly affect the performance of photoelectric device. Traditional methods to measure surface roughness of AZO thin films are scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The disadvantages of these approaches include long lead time and slow measurement speed. To solve this problem, an optical inspection system for rapid measurement of the surface roughness of AZO thin films is developed in this study. It is found that the incident angle of 60° is a good candidate to measure the surface roughness of AZO thin films. Based on the trend equation y=-3.6483 x+2.1409, the surface roughness of AZO thin films ( y) can be directly deduced from the peak power density ( x) using the optical inspection system developed. The maximum measurement-error rate of the optical inspection system developed is less than 8.7%.The saving in inspection time of the surface roughness of AZO thin films is up to 83%.

  18. Background compensated GM counter for the measurement of low level #betta#-activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, C.; Kumanomido, H.; Watanabe, T.

    1983-01-01

    When low level activity of a #betta#-ray source or surface contamination is to be measured with a GM counter, it is desirable to obtain a net count without background count through a single measurement. An end-window GM counter for such a purpose was constructed. The counter has a diaphragm to divide it into two parts. The front part, the window side, can detect #betta#-rays and background radiations, while the rear part only detects background, since #betta#-rays coming through the front are absorbed by the diaphragm. In the counter type I, the sensitive volumes of the two parts are the same and the anode wire of the front is connected to that of the rear through an electric resistor which leads to yielding different pulse heights and rise times. The net count of #betta#-rays can be obtained through a single measurement by subtracting the count in the rear part from that in the front part. In the counter type II, the lengths of the anode wires of the two parts are different, which gives rise to different pulse heights. With a background compensated GM counter, it is possible to shorten the measuring time, keeping nearly the same accuracy compared with a conventional GM counter. (orig.)

  19. High-resolution hot-film measurement of surface heat flux to an impinging jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donovan, T. S.; Persoons, T.; Murray, D. B.

    2011-10-01

    To investigate the complex coupling between surface heat transfer and local fluid velocity in convective heat transfer, advanced techniques are required to measure the surface heat flux at high spatial and temporal resolution. Several established flow velocity techniques such as laser Doppler anemometry, particle image velocimetry and hot wire anemometry can measure fluid velocities at high spatial resolution (µm) and have a high-frequency response (up to 100 kHz) characteristic. Equivalent advanced surface heat transfer measurement techniques, however, are not available; even the latest advances in high speed thermal imaging do not offer equivalent data capture rates. The current research presents a method of measuring point surface heat flux with a hot film that is flush mounted on a heated flat surface. The film works in conjunction with a constant temperature anemometer which has a bandwidth of 100 kHz. The bandwidth of this technique therefore is likely to be in excess of more established surface heat flux measurement techniques. Although the frequency response of the sensor is not reported here, it is expected to be significantly less than 100 kHz due to its physical size and capacitance. To demonstrate the efficacy of the technique, a cooling impinging air jet is directed at the heated surface, and the power required to maintain the hot-film temperature is related to the local heat flux to the fluid air flow. The technique is validated experimentally using a more established surface heat flux measurement technique. The thermal performance of the sensor is also investigated numerically. It has been shown that, with some limitations, the measurement technique accurately measures the surface heat transfer to an impinging air jet with improved spatial resolution for a wide range of experimental parameters.

  20. Effects of in-office and home bleaching gels on the surface mercury levels of dental amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskoee, Parnian Alizadeh; Kahnamoui, Mahdi Abed; Oskoee, Siavash Savadi; Zadfattah, Firooz; Pournaghi-Azar, Fatemeh

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different in-office and home bleaching gels on the surface mercury levels of dental amalgam. Sixty disk-shaped amalgam specimens (GS-80, SDI- Australia) were prepared and randomly divided into the following treatment groups: 1. Distilled water (control); 2. 15% home-bleach carbamide peroxide (Opalescence PF, Ultra dent, USA) applied for 6 h/day for 3 weeks; and 3. 35% in-office bleach carbamide peroxide (Opalescence Quick, Ultradent) applied for 30 min/week for 3 weeks. Levels of mercury were measured as weight percentages using an energy dispersive x-ray micro-analyzer detector connected to an electron microscope. Data was analyzed using one-way ANOVA and a post hoc Tukey tests (PP=0.71). However, both materials yielded significantly more mercury levels than that of the control group (Pamalgam in vitro.

  1. A review of uncertainty in in situ measurements and data sets of sea surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, John J.

    2014-03-01

    Archives of in situ sea surface temperature (SST) measurements extend back more than 160 years. Quality of the measurements is variable, and the area of the oceans they sample is limited, especially early in the record and during the two world wars. Measurements of SST and the gridded data sets that are based on them are used in many applications so understanding and estimating the uncertainties are vital. The aim of this review is to give an overview of the various components that contribute to the overall uncertainty of SST measurements made in situ and of the data sets that are derived from them. In doing so, it also aims to identify current gaps in understanding. Uncertainties arise at the level of individual measurements with both systematic and random effects and, although these have been extensively studied, refinement of the error models continues. Recent improvements have been made in the understanding of the pervasive systematic errors that affect the assessment of long-term trends and variability. However, the adjustments applied to minimize these systematic errors are uncertain and these uncertainties are higher before the 1970s and particularly large in the period surrounding the Second World War owing to a lack of reliable metadata. The uncertainties associated with the choice of statistical methods used to create globally complete SST data sets have been explored using different analysis techniques, but they do not incorporate the latest understanding of measurement errors, and they want for a fair benchmark against which their skill can be objectively assessed. These problems can be addressed by the creation of new end-to-end SST analyses and by the recovery and digitization of data and metadata from ship log books and other contemporary literature.

  2. Optical microscope for three-dimensional surface displacement and shape measurements at the microscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Shuman; Pan, Zhipeng; Zhang, Jingwen

    2014-07-15

    We report a novel optical microscope for full-field, noncontact measurements of three-dimensional (3D) surface deformation and topography at the microscale. The microscope system is based on a seamless integration of the diffraction-assisted image correlation (DAIC) method with fluorescent microscopy. We experimentally demonstrate the microscope's capability for 3D measurements with submicrometer spatial resolution and subpixel measurement accuracy.

  3. Body Surface Contamination Levels of Residents under Different Evacuation Scenarios after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohba, Takashi; Hasegawa, Arifumi; Kohayagawa, Yoshitaka; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Suzuki, Gen

    2017-09-01

    Body surface contamination levels should be correlated with inhaled actual thyroid doses during evacuation following the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP) accident. Evacuees and residents were screened for body surface contamination using a Geiger-Mueller survey meter. The authors obtained 7,539 individual screening data sheets as well as gamma-spectrometry data from measurements made on clothing of two subjects by using a germanium spectrometer. Body surface contamination levels were analyzed in four residential groups during two different periods: 12-14 and 15-17 March 2011. Contamination levels during 12-14 March in the Tomioka/Okuma/Futaba/Naraha group were very low, indicating that residents evacuated before the radioactive plume reached their towns on 12 March. In contrast, levels in the Namie and Minamisoma groups were higher than those in the other groups in both periods, indicating that these residents were exposed to plumes twice on 12 and 15-16 March. The plume on 12 March was enriched with short-lived radionuclides: averaged proportions of radioactivity (relative to I) from Te, I, and Cs measured in clothing from two subjects were 2.3, 1.1, and 0.1, respectively, after correction for physical decay by 12:00 on 12 March. These proportions are similar to those (relative to I) from Te and Cs in dust sampled by a high-volume air sampler in the zone 20 km from the FDNPP on 12 March: 1.9 and 0.1, respectively. These data indicate that the relative contribution to inhaled thyroid dose of short-lived radionuclides in radioactive plumes released on 12 March could be as much as 37.5% in 1-y-old children.

  4. Digital Moiré based transient interferometry and its application in optical surface measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Qun; Tan, Yifeng; Wang, Shaopu; Hu, Yao

    2017-10-01

    Digital Moiré based transient interferometry (DMTI) is an effective non-contact testing methods for optical surfaces. In DMTI system, only one frame of real interferogram is experimentally captured for the transient measurement of the surface under test (SUT). When combined with partial compensation interferometry (PCI), DMTI is especially appropriate for the measurement of aspheres with large apertures, large asphericity or different surface parameters. Residual wavefront is allowed in PCI, so the same partial compensator can be applied to the detection of multiple SUTs. Excessive residual wavefront aberration results in spectrum aliasing, and the dynamic range of DMTI is limited. In order to solve this problem, a method based on wavelet transform is proposed to extract phase from the fringe pattern with spectrum aliasing. Results of simulation demonstrate the validity of this method. The dynamic range of Digital Moiré technology is effectively expanded, which makes DMTI prospective in surface figure error measurement for intelligent fabrication of aspheric surfaces.

  5. 6430.1A Compliance Matrix for 241-SY-101 Surface Level Rise Remediation Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ERHART, M.F.

    1999-01-01

    Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101) has recently exhibited a steady waste surface level growth. A path forward to mitigate the SY-101 surface level growth issue has been developed. The project has been directed to install the necessary equipment to transfer 380-570m 3 (100,000-150,000 gallons) of waste from SY-101 to SY-102 before the waste elevation reached the region of the tank where the transition from a double to a single shell tank occurs. The purpose of this document is to record the design attributes of the RAPID mitigation system which fulfill the requirements specified in DOE order 6430.1A as it relates to the 241-SY-101 RAPID Mitigation System

  6. Locating karst depressed columns by means of Rn measurement on the surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Daimao; Liu Hongfu; Duan Hongjie; Duan Lindi; Sui Haichen

    1999-01-01

    The coal mining and the related surface projects are extremely harassed by the underground karst depressed columns. The author discussed the surface Rn concentration's abnormality caused by the karst depressed columns. It is concluded that different kinds of karst depressed column can cause different Rn concentration's abnormality. The α-cup Rn measuring instrument was used for detecting Rn abnormality on the surface in order to locate the underground karst depressed columns

  7. Measurement of Fine Grain Copper Surface Texture Created by Abrasive Water Jet Cutting

    OpenAIRE

    HLAVÁČEK, Petr; VALÍČEK, Jan; HLOCH, Sergej; GREGER, Miroslav; FOLDYNA, Josef; IVANDIĆ, Željko; SITEK, Libor; KUŠNEROVÁ, Milena; ZELEŃÁK, Michal

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents results of experiments performed on copper with commercial purity to determine the influence of material grain size on both mechanical properties and texture of surface machined by abrasive water jet. An Equal Channel Angular Extrusion technology was used for creation of fine-grain copper samples. Hardness and grain size of fine-grain copper were measured, and, subsequently, surface of prepared copper samples was machined by abrasive water jet technology. Surface irregul...

  8. Three-dimensional measuring technique for surface topography using a light-sectioning microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Linglin; Chen, Peifeng; Wang, Ying; Zhou, Le; Luo, Xi

    2012-03-10

    Three-dimensional (3D) surface topographic analysis, measurement, and assessment techniques have raised great interest not only among researchers but also among industrial users. Many industrial processes and applications are directly influenced by the small-scale roughness of surface finishes. This paper describes the development and implementation of a noncontact, three-dimensional, microtopography measuring system. The instrument is formed by combining a modified light-sectioning microscope subsystem with a computer subsystem. In particular, optical system characteristics of the light-sectioning microscope are investigated, and a textured steel sheet is measured to demonstrate good practical outcomes. Details of measuring processes and image processing algorithms are provided, such as procedures for measurement, image edge extraction, and 3D topography reconstruction. After the 3D topography of the measured surface has been reconstructed, the topography field description parameters are calculated. A standard roughness block was used for calibration of the surface microtopography measuring system. Results obtained showed the measurement method output has good agreement with the actual asperity (unevenness or roughness) of the surface. The computer subsystem is used to process and control asperity measurements and image generation, and for image acquisition and presentation.

  9. Site characterization field manual for near surface geologic disposal of low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCray, J.G.; Nowatzki, E.A.

    1985-01-01

    This field manual has been developed to aid states and regions to do a detailed characterization of a proposed near-surface low-level waste disposal site. The field manual is directed at planners, staff personnel and experts in one discipline to acquaint them with the requirements of other disciplines involved in site characterization. While it can provide a good review, it is not designed to tell experts how to do their job within their own discipline

  10. Development and Test of an Infrastructure Free Real-Time Water Level Measurement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuer, E. R.; Heitsenrether, R.; Hensley, W., III; Krug, W.; Wolcott, D.

    2016-02-01

    NOAA's Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS) is responsible for developing and maintaining the National Water Level Observation Network (NWLON). NWLON consists of over 200 long term observatories that provide near real-time, 6 minute average, water level observations from locations throughout all U.S. coasts. CO-OPS continually analyzes state-of-the-art and emerging technologies to identify potential improvements in data quality and operating efficiency. NOAA, recognizing the changing conditions, anticipates a critical need for real time oceanographic and meteorological observations where traditional approaches are less feasible. CO-OPS is working on the design, development and testing of a real-time tidal measurement system, "The Hermit," for use in coastal regions. The latest prototype has recently completed a successful 3 month field test deployment in the St Andrews Sound region of Georgia, a location where relatively few long term water level records have been collected to date. The test location provided unique challenges such as having a very limited coastal infrastructure and experiencing a 7-8 foot tidal range. The Hermit consists of a bottom mounted pressure/conductivity/temperature sensor (Seabird SBE 26+) and a surface communications buoy which are linked via acoustic modems (Link Quest). The surface buoy relays data back to the CO-OPS database in near-real time using an Iridium satellite based communication system. Additionally, the buoy includes an AirMar all-in-one meteorological sensor. In addition to The Hermit deployment, three test GPS bench marks and a tide staff were installed on a nearby coastline to vertically reference water level measurements. During this deployment, The Hermit successfully provided near real-time measurements of bottom pressure, water conductivity and temperature, wind speed and direction, air temperature, and barometric pressure over the 3 month deployment. During the test period, several

  11. Measurements of mercury in the near-surface layer of the atmosphere of the Russian Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubeva, N; Burtseva, L; Matishov, G

    2003-05-01

    A series of measurements of gaseous elemental mercury concentrations in near-surface air of the Russian Arctic Region were carried out from 1994 to 1997. The measurements were conducted in Murmansk at a stationary site in April-May 1994, on a cruise in Motovsky Bay and Kola Bay during May-June 1996, and along the Russian Northern Sea Route in April-May 1997 on board the nuclear icebreaker 'Soviet Union'. Silver absorption was used for trapping of mercury and the mass of mercury was determined by cold vapour atomic absorption spectrophotometery. Detection limits were approximately 0.3 ng/m(3) (+/- error 46%). Sixty samples were selected and analysed. Sample volumes were 2.2 m(3) ashore, and up to 6.6 m(3) over water. The meteorological conditions, including a wind speed and direction, during the sampling period were typical of the spring-summer period of year, and therefore the concentrations of atmospheric mercury are regarded as representative for this season. The mean concentrations of mercury ranged from 2.2 ng/m(3) for Murmansk city, 1.7 ng/m(3) for Kola Bay, 1.6 ng/m(3) for Motovsky Bay, 1.1 ng/m(3) for the eastern part of the Barents Sea and 0.7 ng/m(3) for the western part of the Kara Sea. The levels of mercury in Murmansk, and over Kola and Motovsky Bays were associated with a primary direction of a near-surface wind from the nearest sources of mercury emission located in the Russian North region. These are the non-ferrous metallurgical plants in Nickel in the case of Motovsky Bay and Murmansk garbage-disposal plant, for sampling points in Murmansk and over Kola Bay. These concentrations of mercury, measured in the spring-summer season, in near-surface air of the Russian North, are more than two-fold lower than the concentrations that are typical of continental background regions in western Russia, and are comparable to the concentrations measured in the Arctic regions of other countries.

  12. Ag coated microneedle based surface enhanced Raman scattering probe for intradermal measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Clement; Liu, Quan

    2013-06-01

    We propose a silver coated microneedle to detect test molecules, including R6G and glucose, positioned at a depth of more than 700 μm below a skin phantom surface for mimicking intradermal surface-enhanced Raman scattering measurements.

  13. Measuring and modeling the effect of surface moisture on the spectral reflectance of coastal beach sand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nolet, Corjan; Poortinga, Ate; Roosjen, Peter; Bartholomeus, Harm; Ruessink, Gerben|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/169093360

    2014-01-01

    Surface moisture is an important supply limiting factor for aeolian sand transport, which is the primary driver of coastal dune development. As such, it is critical to account for the control of surface moisture on available sand for dune building. Optical remote sensing has the potential to measure

  14. Effective aerodynamic roughness estimated from airborne laser altimeter measurements of surface features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vries, AC; Kustas, WP; Ritchie, JC; Klaassen, W; Menenti, M; Rango, A; Prueger, JH

    2003-01-01

    Aerodynamic roughness length (z(0)) and displacement height (d(0)) are important surface parameters for estimating surface fluxes in numerical models. These parameters are generally determined from wind flow characteristics using logarithmic wind profiles measured at a meteorological tower or by

  15. On the measurement of the surface energy budget over a land ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    e-mail: bhat@caos.iisc.ernet.in. The measurement of surface energy balance over a land surface in an open area in Bangalore is .... Sensors used in the present experimental setup and their specifications. These instruments were procured .... the value of the scalar at the roughness height zos. ψm and ψs are the M–O ...

  16. Calibration of a distributed hydrology and land surface model using energy flux measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Morten Andreas Dahl; Refsgaard, Jens Christian; Jensen, Karsten H.

    2016-01-01

    In this study we develop and test a calibration approach on a spatially distributed groundwater-surface water catchment model (MIKE SHE) coupled to a land surface model component with particular focus on the water and energy fluxes. The model is calibrated against time series of eddy flux measure...

  17. Examining the Level of Career maturity among Foreign Asian Students by measuring Academic Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Tekke

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The Asian individuals are dependent and collectivist compared with the western individuals that are independent and individualistic. Foreign Asian students choosing similar courses with their country friends do not reveal their career maturity and also lead to negative effect on their choices.  This study aims at examining the level of career maturity of foreign Asian students in Malaysia based on academic level by using the Career Maturity Inventory. Two hundred and twenty nine ( Male=106, Female= 123 international students studying in various semesters completed the Career Maturity Inventory and it was reported that there were no significant differences between respondents of different academic semesters with regard to level of career maturity, this might reflect an educational level bias in the construction of the career decision-making. The findings of the current study are not consistent with theoretical expectations and prior research that international undergraduate senior students would be having higher career maturity than international undergraduate fresh students. Research emphasizes the reason behind might result from dependent and collectivist Asian culture that leading to fresh international students are higher career maturity compared to senior international students.

  18. Development of a laser-based sensor to measure true road surface deflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    The high-speed measurement of accurate pavement surface deflections under a moving wheel at a networklevel : still remains a challenge in pavement engineering. This goal cannot be accomplished with stationary deflectionmeasuring : devices. Engineers ...

  19. Comparison of two methods of surface profile extraction from multiple ultrasonic range measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barshan, B; Baskent, D

    Two novel methods for surface profile extraction based on multiple ultrasonic range measurements are described and compared. One of the methods employs morphological processing techniques, whereas the other employs a spatial voting scheme followed by simple thresholding. Morphological processing

  20. Surface-Borne Time-of-Reception Measurements (STORM), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Invocon proposes the Surface-borne Time-Of-Reception Measurements (STORM) system as a method to locate the position of lightning strikes on aerospace vehicles....