WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface layer thickness

  1. Oxygen inhibition layer of composite resins: effects of layer thickness and surface layer treatment on the interlayer bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijelic-Donova, Jasmina; Garoushi, Sufyan; Lassila, Lippo V J; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2015-02-01

    An oxygen inhibition layer develops on surfaces exposed to air during polymerization of particulate filling composite. This study assessed the thickness of the oxygen inhibition layer of short-fiber-reinforced composite in comparison with conventional particulate filling composites. The effect of an oxygen inhibition layer on the shear bond strength of incrementally placed particulate filling composite layers was also evaluated. Four different restorative composites were selected: everX Posterior (a short-fiber-reinforced composite), Z250, SupremeXT, and Silorane. All composites were evaluated regarding the thickness of the oxygen inhibition layer and for shear bond strength. An equal amount of each composite was polymerized in air between two glass plates and the thickness of the oxygen inhibition layer was measured using a stereomicroscope. Cylindrical-shaped specimens were prepared for measurement of shear bond strength by placing incrementally two layers of the same composite material. Before applying the second composite layer, the first increment's bonding site was treated as follows: grinding with 1,000-grit silicon-carbide (SiC) abrasive paper, or treatment with ethanol or with water-spray. The inhibition depth was lowest (11.6 μm) for water-sprayed Silorane and greatest (22.9 μm) for the water-sprayed short-fiber-reinforced composite. The shear bond strength ranged from 5.8 MPa (ground Silorane) to 36.4 MPa (water-sprayed SupremeXT). The presence of an oxygen inhibition layer enhanced the interlayer shear bond strength of all investigated materials, but its absence resulted in cohesive and mixed failures only with the short-fiber-reinforced composite. Thus, more durable adhesion with short-fiber-reinforced composite is expected. © 2014 Eur J Oral Sci.

  2. Foam Core Particleboards with Intumescent FRT Veneer: Cone Calorimeter Testing With Varying Adhesives, Surface Layer Thicknesses, and Processing Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark A. Dietenberger; Johannes Welling; Ali Shalbafan

    2014-01-01

    Intumescent FRT Veneers adhered to the surface of foam core particleboard to provide adequate fire protection were evaluated by means of cone calorimeter tests (ASTM E1354). The foam core particleboards were prepared with variations in surface layer treatment, adhesives, surface layer thicknesses, and processing conditions. Ignitability, heat release rate profile, peak...

  3. Quantification of the effect of oil layer thickness on entrainment of surface oil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaas Dijkstra; Albertinka J. Murk; Marieke Zeinstra-Helfrich; Wierd Koops

    2015-01-01

    This study quantifies the effect of oil layer thickness on entrainment and dispersion of oil into seawater, using a plunging jet with a camera system. In contrast to what is generally assumed, we revealed that for the low viscosity “surrogate MC252 oil” we used, entrainment rate is directly

  4. A numerical study of the dependence of the surface temperature of beta-layered regions on absolute thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebey, P.S.; Asaki, T.J.; Hoffer, J.K.

    2000-01-01

    Beta-layering of deuterium-tritium (D-T) ice in spherical shell geometries is numerically and analytically considered to investigate the relationship between temperature differences that arise because of inner-surface perturbations and the absolute shell thickness. The calculations are dimensions based on a proposed design of an inertial confinement fusion target for use at the National Ignition Facility. The temperature differences are calculated within D-T ice shells of varying total thicknesses, and the temperature differences calculated in three dimensions and to the expected limits in three dimensions for long- and short-wavelength surface perturbations. The three-dimensional numeric results agree well with both the long- and short-wavelength limits; the region of crossover from short- to long-wavelength behavior is mapped out. Temperature differences due to surface perturbations are proportional to D-T layer thickness in one-dimensional systems but not in three dimensional spherical shells. In spherical shells, surface perturbations of long wavelength give rise to temperature perturbations that are approximately proportional to the total shell thickness, while for short-wavelength perturbations, the temperature differences are inversely related to total shell thickness. In contrast to the one-dimensional result, the authors find that in three dimensions there is not a general relationship between shell thickness and surface temperature differences

  5. A Numeric Study of the Dependence of the Surface Temperature of Beta-Layered Regions on Absolute Thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebey, Peter S.; Asaki, Thomas J.; Hoffer, James K.

    2000-01-01

    Beta-layering of deuterium-tritium (D-T) ice in spherical shell geometries is numerically and analytically considered to investigate the relationship between temperature differences that arise because of inner-surface perturbations and the absolute shell thickness. The calculations use dimensions based on a proposed design of an inertial confinement fusion target for use at the National Ignition Facility. The temperature differences are calculated within D-T ice shells of varying total thicknesses, and the temperature differences calculated in three dimensions are compared both to the one-dimensional results and to the expected limits in three dimensions for long- and short-wavelength surface perturbations. The three-dimensional numeric results agree well with both the long- and short-wavelength limits; the region of crossover from short- to long-wavelength behavior is mapped out. Temperature differences due to surface perturbations are proportional to D-T layer thickness in one-dimensional systems but not in three-dimensional spherical shells. In spherical shells, surface perturbations of long wavelength give rise to temperature perturbations that are approximately proportional to the total shell thickness, while for short-wavelength perturbations, the temperature differences are inversely related to total shell thickness. In contrast to the one-dimensional result, we find that in three dimensions there is not a general relationship between shell thickness and surface temperature differences

  6. Hydrophobic dielectric surface influenced active layer thickness effect on hysteresis and mobility degradation in organic field effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padma, N.

    2016-02-01

    Effect of active layer thickness, influenced by the hydrophobic dielectric surface, on the performance of copper phthalocyanine based organic field effect transistors (OFETs) was studied. While charge carrier mobility was found to be highest for an optimum thickness of 30 nm, hysteresis and threshold voltage shift were found to be minimum for 15 nm thick film which is attributed to the excess availability of photogenerated carriers, especially close to the dielectric/semiconductor interface, as this thickness is within the exciton quenching length in organic semiconductors. But prolonged bias stress resulted in larger decay in drain current for higher thickness indicating the dominant role played by the larger grain boundary density in the increased volume. These results were found to be different from that on unmodified SiO2 dielectric with higher surface energy and were suggested to be caused by the 3D growth mode of CuPc films on the hydrophobic surface. Mobility degradation at higher gate voltages also exhibited a dependence on the active layer thickness which was tuned by the hydrophobic surface induced growth mode at the dielectric/semiconductor interface.

  7. Dependence of surface distribution of self-assembled InSb nanodots on surface morphology and spacer layer thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godbole, M.; Olivier, E.J.; Coetsee, E.; Swart, H.C.; Neethling, J.H.; Botha, J.R.

    2012-01-01

    Self-assembled InSb nanodots (NDs) were grown on a GaSb (1 0 0) substrate using metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE). The effects of etching depth of the substrate and thickness of the GaSb buffer layer on the density and size distribution of single and double layer dots were studied for detector applications. The etch depth of the substrate was varied up to 30 μm. In this particular study, the dots were grown at 450 °C and the GaSb spacer thickness was varied between 50 nm and 200 nm. The optimum substrate etch depth was found to be 30 μm while the best spacer thickness was found to be 200 nm.

  8. Rapid, nondestructive estimation of surface polymer layer thickness using attenuated total reflection fourier transform infrared (ATR FT-IR) spectroscopy and synthetic spectra derived from optical principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstock, B André; Guiney, Linda M; Loose, Christopher

    2012-11-01

    We have developed a rapid, nondestructive analytical method that estimates the thickness of a surface polymer layer with high precision but unknown accuracy using a single attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR FT-IR) measurement. Because the method is rapid, nondestructive, and requires no sample preparation, it is ideal as a process analytical technique. Prior to implementation, the ATR FT-IR spectrum of the substrate layer pure component and the ATR FT-IR and real refractive index spectra of the surface layer pure component must be known. From these three input spectra a synthetic mid-infrared spectral matrix of surface layers 0 nm to 10,000 nm thick on substrate is created de novo. A minimum statistical distance match between a process sample's ATR FT-IR spectrum and the synthetic spectral matrix provides the thickness of that sample. We show that this method can be used to successfully estimate the thickness of polysulfobetaine surface modification, a hydrated polymeric surface layer covalently bonded onto a polyetherurethane substrate. A database of 1850 sample spectra was examined. Spectrochemical matrix-effect unknowns, such as the nonuniform and molecularly novel polysulfobetaine-polyetherurethane interface, were found to be minimal. A partial least squares regression analysis of the database spectra versus their thicknesses as calculated by the method described yielded an estimate of precision of ±52 nm.

  9. Modification of μm thick surface layers using keV ion energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehn, L.E.; Lam, N.Q.; Wiedersich, H.

    1983-11-01

    Root-mean-square diffusion distances for both vacancy and interstitial defects in metals can be very large at elevated temperatures, e.g. several μm's in one second at 500 0 C. Consequently, defects that escape the implanted region at elevated temperature can produce conpositional and microstructural changes to depths which are much larger than the ion range. Because of the high defect mobilities, and of the fact that diffusion processes must compete with the rate of surface recession, the effects of defect production (ballistic mixing), radiation-enhanced diffusion and radiation-induced segregation become spatially separated during ion bombardment at elevated temperature. Results of such experimental studies in a Cu-Ni alloy are presented, discussed and compared with predictions of a phenomenological model. Contributions to the subsurface compositional changes from radiation-enhanced diffusion and radiation-induced segregation are clearly identified

  10. Surface melting of deuterium hydride thick films

    OpenAIRE

    Zeppenfeld, P.; Bienfait, M.; Feng Chuan Liu,; Vilches, O.E.; Coddens, G.

    1990-01-01

    Quasi-elastic neutron scattering has been used to measure, below the bulk melting temperature, the thickness and the diffusion coefficient of the mobile surface layer of 8 and 10 layer thick films of deuterium hydride (HD) condensed on MgO(100). The measurements show that the close-packed surface of solid HD surface melts gradually, with the thickness of the melted layer increasing from 0.5 to 6 molecular layers as the temperature rises from 4 K to 0.05 K below the bulk melting temperature. T...

  11. Spatial and thickness dependence of coupling interaction of surface states and influence on transport and optical properties of few-layer Bi2Se3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhongjun; Chen, Shi; Sun, Jiuyu; Li, Xingxing; Qiu, Huaili; Yang, Jinlong

    2018-02-01

    Coupling interaction between the bottom and top surface electronic states and the influence on transport and optical properties of Bi2Se3 thin films with 1–8 quintuple layers (QLs) have been investigated by first principles calculations. Obvious spatial and thickness dependences of coupling interaction are found by analyzing hybridization of two surface states. In the thin film with a certain thickness, from the outer to inner atomic layers, the coupling interaction exhibits an increasing trend. On the other hand, as thickness increases, the coupling interaction shows a disproportionate decrease trend. Moreover, the system with 3 QLs exhibits stronger interaction than that with 2 QLs. The presence of coupling interaction would suppress destructive interference of surface states and enhance resistance in various degrees. In view of the inversely proportional relation to transport channel width, the resistance of thin films should show disproportionate thickness dependence. This prediction is qualitatively consistent with the transport measurements at low temperature. Furthermore, the optical properties also exhibit obvious thickness dependence. Especially as the thickness increases, the coupling interaction results in red and blue shifts of the multiple-peak structures in low and high energy regions of imaginary dielectric function, respectively. The red shift trend is in agreement with the recent experimental observation and the blue shift is firstly predicted by the present calculation. The present results give a concrete understanding of transport and optical properties in devices based on Bi2Se3 thin films with few QLs.

  12. Friction Surface Cladding of AA1050 on AA2024-T351; influence of clad layer thickness and tool rotation rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Shaojie; Bor, Teunis Cornelis; Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.; Akkerman, Remko

    2015-01-01

    Friction Surfacing Cladding (FSC) is a recently developed solid state process to deposit thin metallic clad layers on a substrate. The process employs a rotating tool with a central opening to supply clad material and support the distribution and bonding of the clad material to the substrate. The

  13. Effective Duration of Gas Nitriding Process on AISI 316L for the Formation of a Desired Thickness of Surface Nitrided Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Hassan R. S.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available High temperature gas nitriding performed on AISI 316L at the temperature of 1200°C. The microstructure of treated AISI 316L samples were observed to identify the formation of the microstructure of nitrided surface layer. The grain size of austenite tends to be enlarged when the nitriding time increases, but the austenite single phase structure is maintained even after the long-time solution nitriding. Using microhardness testing, the hardness values drop to the center of the samples. The increase in surface hardness is due to the high nitrogen concentration at or near the surface. At 245HV, the graph of the effective duration of nitriding process was plotted to achieve the maximum depth of nitrogen diffuse under the surface. Using Sigma Plot software best fit lines of the experimental result found and plotted to find out effective duration of nitriding equation as Y=1.9491(1-0.7947x, where Y is the thickness of nitrided layer below the surface and X is duration of nitriding process. Based on this equation, the duration of gas nitriding process can be estimated to produce desired thickness of nitrided layer.

  14. Production of high thickness implanted layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdrashitov, V.G.; Ryzhov, V.V.; Turchanovskij, I.Yu.

    1987-01-01

    The possibilities of consecutive implantation and spray-coating method (CISC) for obtaining materials with implanted addition given profile were investigated. Taking nitrogen ions implantation as example, it is shown, that it is possible to control nitrogen distribution profile configuration by spray-coating of titanium layers with different thickness and by implantation dose change. Implanted layer thickness is determined by CISC cycle number

  15. An Ultra-Wideband, Microwave Radar for Measuring Snow Thickness on Sea Ice and Mapping Near-Surface Internal Layers in Polar Firn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzer, Ben; Gomez-Garcia, Daniel; Leuschen, Carl; Paden, John; Rodriguez-Morales, Fernando; Patel, Azsa; Markus, Thorsten; Holt, Benjamin; Gogineni, Prasad

    2013-01-01

    Sea ice is generally covered with snow, which can vary in thickness from a few centimeters to >1 m. Snow cover acts as a thermal insulator modulating the heat exchange between the ocean and the atmosphere, and it impacts sea-ice growth rates and overall thickness, a key indicator of climate change in polar regions. Snow depth is required to estimate sea-ice thickness using freeboard measurements made with satellite altimeters. The snow cover also acts as a mechanical load that depresses ice freeboard (snow and ice above sea level). Freeboard depression can result in flooding of the snow/ice interface and the formation of a thick slush layer, particularly in the Antarctic sea-ice cover. The Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) has developed an ultra-wideband, microwave radar capable of operation on long-endurance aircraft to characterize the thickness of snow over sea ice. The low-power, 100mW signal is swept from 2 to 8GHz allowing the air/snow and snow/ ice interfaces to be mapped with 5 c range resolution in snow; this is an improvement over the original system that worked from 2 to 6.5 GHz. From 2009 to 2012, CReSIS successfully operated the radar on the NASA P-3B and DC-8 aircraft to collect data on snow-covered sea ice in the Arctic and Antarctic for NASA Operation IceBridge. The radar was found capable of snow depth retrievals ranging from 10cm to >1 m. We also demonstrated that this radar can be used to map near-surface internal layers in polar firn with fine range resolution. Here we describe the instrument design, characteristics and performance of the radar.

  16. Local variation of frost layer thickness and morphology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, Kaiyang; Komori, Satoru [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Jiang, Yi [Department of Building Science, School of Architecture, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2006-02-15

    Frosting is an important phenomenon encountered in the cryogenic industries in connection with gas coolers, refrigerators, heat pumps, etc. It may adversely affect the performances of those devices. This paper experimentally studied the local frost formation process on a cold surface with natural airflows or forced airflows over it. The frost layer thickness was found to increase stepwise during the frost formation process. This increase pattern was ever indicated only by one literature. The literature attributed the pattern to the melting of frost crystals at the frost surface. However, present observation of the morphology of the frost layer surface suggested that the growth of water drops or ice particles at the initial period caused the first slowly increasing of the frost layer thickness; the following growth of acerose-shaped ice crystals caused the rapidly increasing of the frost layer thickness; thereafter, the column-shaped ice crystals on the surface grew in its length and radius alternatively, which caused the frost layer thickness increasing rapidly and slowly alternatively. (authors)

  17. DETERMINATION OF THE THICKNESS OF THE COMPONENTS OF A DOUBLE-LAYER NICKEL-CHROMIUM COATING BY MAGNETIC PONDEROMOTIVE METHOD WITH UNILATERAL ACCESS TO THE CONTROLLED SURFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. V. Gnutenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of thick-layer nickel (up to 700 μm and chromium (up to 200 μm coatings has been widely used to give the combustion chamber of a liquid-propellant rocket engine the required operational properties. The main parameter that determines the ability of a coating to fulfill its function is its thickness and uniformity of its distribution. The main problem of current nondestructive methods for determining the thickness of coatings under consideration is that they can be used only at the stage of production of rocket engineering products, when there is an access to the product from the side of the inner wall of the combustion chamber before and after applying a chromium coating to the nickel sublayer. However, when an already finished product arrives at subsequent stages of assembly to another enterprise, there is often a need of incoming control of the thicknesses of coatings from nickel and chromium. In this case, it is not possible to apply existing control techniques to a finished product, or the use of these techniques leads to unacceptable errors in the results of measurements. The goal of the research was to develop a technique for nondestructive determination of the thickness of each component of the two-layer nickel-chromium coating by the magnetic ponderomotive method under conditions of unilateral access to the finished product from the side of the chromium coating.A new technique for nondestructive determination of the thicknesses of nickel and chromium coatings of the double-layer structure on a finished product without a priori data on the properties or thicknesses of these coatings or a product in general is proposed using a magnetic ponderomotive method.This newly developed technique is implemented in the thickness gauge TEP-XN1 of double-layer nickel- chromium coatings, which is successfully used by enterprises of the rocket and space industry of the Russian Federation.

  18. Surface states in thin versus thick organic quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Ba An; Hanamura, E.

    1995-08-01

    Surface states are studied in dependence on thickness or organic quantum wells within the nearest layer approximation. It is shown that there is a material-dependent critical thickness. Structures, that have thickness thinner or thicker than the critical one, exhibit qualitatively different characteristics of surface states. Criteria for existence and sign rules for location of energy levels of surface states are established which are general and contain the results of the previous works as particular cases. (author). 18 refs, 3 figs

  19. Single-layer model for surface roughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carniglia, C K; Jensen, D G

    2002-06-01

    Random roughness of an optical surface reduces its specular reflectance and transmittance by the scattering of light. The reduction in reflectance can be modeled by a homogeneous layer on the surface if the refractive index of the layer is intermediate to the indices of the media on either side of the surface. Such a layer predicts an increase in the transmittance of the surface and therefore does not provide a valid model for the effects of scatter on the transmittance. Adding a small amount of absorption to the layer provides a model that predicts a reduction in both reflectance and transmittance. The absorbing layer model agrees with the predictions of a scalar scattering theory for a layer with a thickness that is twice the rms roughness of the surface. The extinction coefficient k for the layer is proportional to the thickness of the layer.

  20. Modifing the Surface Layers of Mechanical Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Slanec

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the creation of thin surface layers prepared by the Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition Method (PACVD. Polished sample surfaces made of tool steel were used. An investigation of the dependence of layer thickness on process duration was carried out. The structure of the original surface and the structure of the coated surface were evaluated and compared. The microhardness of the surface areas was also measured.

  1. Effect of main layer thickness on the response of multi layer bonded steel butt joint under Charpy impact test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jianli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The numerical analysis of the main layer thickness on the impact response of the steel butt joint bonded by multi-layer under the Charpy impact test is investigated using the elasto-plastic finite element method (FEM. The results obtained from numerical simulation show that both the elastic strain and plastic strain occurred at the point near the upper or lower surface decreased significantly when the main layer thickness increased from 0.1 mm to 0.4 mm. The value of the normal stress Sx and the von Mises equivalent stress Seqv is increased first when the main layer thickness increased and then it decreased significantly when the main layer thickness is greater than 0.2 mm. There is a strong value fluctuation for stress Seqv at the point 0.5 mm away from the upper surface when the main layer thickness is greater than 0.2 mm.

  2. Quantification of retinal layer thickness changes in acute macular neuroretinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Marion R; Beck, Marco; Kolb, Simone

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To quantitatively evaluate retinal layer thickness changes in acute macular neuroretinopathy (AMN). METHODS: AMN areas were identified using near-infrared reflectance (NIR) images. Intraretinal layer segmentation using Heidelberg software was performed. The inbuilt ETDRS -grid was moved ...

  3. In situ determination of layer thickness and elastic moduli of asphalt pavement systems by spectral analysis of surface waves (SASW) method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Azmi Ismail; Sri Atmaja Rosyidi; Abdul Rahim Samsudin; Abdul Ghani Rafek; Khairul Anuar Mohd Nayan

    2003-01-01

    Spectral analysis of surface waves (SASW) is a non-destructive and in situ method for determining the stiffness profile of soil and pavement sites. The method consists of generation, measurement, and processing of dispersive elastic waves in layered systems. The test is performed on the pavement surface at strain level below 0.001%, where the elastic properties are considered independent of strain amplitude. During an SASW test, the surface of the medium under investigation is subject to an impact to generate energy at various frequencies. Two vertical acceleration transducers are set up near the impact source to detect the energy transmitted through the testing media. By recording signals in digitised form using a data acquisition system and processing them, surface wave velocities can be determined by constructing a dispersion curve. Through forward modeling, the shear wave velocities can be obtained, which can be related to the variation of stiffness with depth. This paper presents the results of two case studies for near?surface profiling of two different asphalt pavement sites. (Author)

  4. The proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) for the quantitative analysis of elements in thin samples, in surface layers of thick samples, and in aerosol filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waetjen, U.

    1983-01-01

    The PIXE analysis method for the determination of elements in thick samples was investigated. The text of the present thesis is arranged under the following headings: physical fundamentals and measuring equipment, quantitative analysis of thin samples, matrix effects at the PIXE analysis of thick samples, matrix correction methods, analysis of 'infinite thick' model substances, PIXE analysis of aerosol filters. (GSCH)

  5. Model castings with composite surface layer - application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szajnar

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a method of usable properties of surface layers improvement of cast carbon steel 200–450, by put directly in foundingprocess a composite surface layer on the basis of Fe-Cr-C alloy. Technology of composite surface layer guarantee mainly increase inhardness and aberasive wear resistance of cast steel castings on machine elements. This technology can be competition for generallyapplied welding technology (surfacing by welding and thermal spraying. In range of studies was made cast steel test castings withcomposite surface layer, which usability for industrial applications was estimated by criterion of hardness and aberasive wear resistance of type metal-mineral and quality of joint cast steel – (Fe-Cr-C. Based on conducted studies a thesis, that composite surface layer arise from liquid state, was formulated. Moreover, possible is control of composite layer thickness and its hardness by suitable selection of parameters i.e. thickness of insert, pouring temperature and solidification modulus of casting. Possibility of technology application of composite surface layer in manufacture of cast steel slide bush for combined cutter loader is presented.

  6. Formation of biocompatible surface layers depending on the sputtering distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasakina, E. O.; Seregin, A. V.; Baikin, A. S.; Kaplan, M. A.; Konushkin, S. V.; Sergiyenko, K. V.; Kovaleva, E. D.; Kolmakova, A. A.; Leonov, A. V.; Sevost'yanov, M. A.; Kolmakov, A. G.; Simakov, S. V.

    2017-05-01

    Nano- and micro-dimensional surface layers of silver and tantalum on flat and wire NiTi substrates by the method of magnetron sputtering in vacuum were produced. The structure and composition of the samples were determined using SEM and Auger spectroscopy. With an increase in the sputtering distance, the thickness of the surface layers decreases, and the thickness of the transition layer and the dependence of the thickness change as a whole depend on the nature of the sputtered substance.

  7. Accretion disk boundary layers in cataclysmic variables. 1: Optically thick boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popham, Robert; Narayan, Ramesh

    1995-01-01

    We develop numerical models of accretions disks in cataclysmic variables (CVs), including and emphasizing the boundary layer region where the accretion disk meets the accreting white dwarf. We confine ourselves to solutions where the boundary layer region is vertically optically thick, and find that these solutions share several common features. The angular and radial velocities of the accreting material drop rapidly in a dynamical boundary layer, which has a radial width approximately 1%-3% of the white dwarf radius. The energy dissipated in this region diffuses through the inner part of the disk and is radiated from the disk surface in a thermal boundary layer, which has a radial width comparable to the disk thickness, approximately 5%-15% of the white dwarf radius. We examine the dependence of the boundary layer structure on the mass accretion rate, the white dwarf mass and rotation rate, and the viscosity parameter alpha. We delineate the boundary between optically thick and optically thin boundary layer solutions as a function of these parameters and suggest that by means of a careful comparison with observations it may be possible to estimate alpha in CVs. We derive an expression for the total boundary layer luminosities as a function of the parameters and show that it agrees well with the luminosites of our numerical solutions. Finally, we calcuate simple blackbody continuum spectra of the boundary layer and disk emission for our solutions and compare these to soft X-ray, EUV, and He II emission-line observations of CVs. We show that, through such comparisons, it may be possible to determine the rotation rates of the accreting stars in CVs, and perhaps also the white dwarf masses and the accretion rates. The spectra are quite insensitive to alpha, so the uncertainty in this parameter does not affect such comparisons.

  8. Determination of accurate metal silicide layer thickness by RBS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchhoff, J.F.; Baumann, S.M.; Evans, C.; Ward, I.; Coveney, P.

    1995-01-01

    Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) is a proven useful analytical tool for determining compositional information of a wide variety of materials. One of the most widely utilized applications of RBS is the study of the composition of metal silicides (MSi x ), also referred to as polycides. A key quantity obtained from an analysis of a metal silicide is the ratio of silicon to metal (Si/M). Although compositional information is very reliable in these applications, determination of metal silicide layer thickness by RBS techniques can differ from true layer thicknesses by more than 40%. The cause of these differences lies in how the densities utilized in the RBS analysis are calculated. The standard RBS analysis software packages calculate layer densities by assuming each element's bulk densities weighted by the fractional atomic presence. This calculation causes large thickness discrepancies in metal silicide thicknesses because most films form into crystal structures with distinct densities. Assuming a constant layer density for a full spectrum of Si/M values for metal silicide samples improves layer thickness determination but ignores the underlying physics of the films. We will present results of RBS determination of the thickness various metal silicide films with a range of Si/M values using a physically accurate model for the calculation of layer densities. The thicknesses are compared to scanning electron microscopy (SEM) cross-section micrographs. We have also developed supporting software that incorporates these calculations into routine analyses. (orig.)

  9. The effect of Cr buffer layer thickness on voltage generation of thin-film thermoelectric modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizoshiri, Mizue; Mikami, Masashi; Ozaki, Kimihiro

    2013-01-01

    The effect of Cr buffer layer thickness on the open-circuit voltage generated by thin-film thermoelectric modules of Bi 0.5 Sb 1.5 Te 3 (p-type) and Bi 2 Te 2.7 Se 0.3 (n-type) materials was investigated. A Cr buffer layer, whose thickness generally needs to be optimized to improve adhesion depending on the substrate surface condition, such as roughness, was deposited between thermoelectric thin films and glass substrates. When the Cr buffer layer was 1 nm thick, the Seebeck coefficients and electrical conductivity of 1 µm thermoelectric thin films with the buffer layers were approximately equal to those of the thermoelectric films without the buffer layers. When the thickness of the Cr buffer layer was 1 µm, the same as the thermoelectric films, the Seebeck coefficients of the bilayer films were reduced by an electrical current flowing inside the Cr buffer layer and the generation of Cr 2 Te 3 . The open-circuit voltage of the thin-film thermoelectric modules decreased with an increase in the thickness of the Cr buffer layer, which was primarily induced by the electrical current flow. The reduction caused by the Cr 2 Te 3 generation was less than 10% of the total voltage generation of the modules without the Cr buffer layers. The voltage generation of thin-film thermoelectric modules could be controlled by the Cr buffer layer thickness. (paper)

  10. Surface Relaxation and Electronic States of Pt(111) Surface with Varying Slab Thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushal, Ashok K.; Mullick, Shanta; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2011-01-01

    Surface relaxation and electronic DOS's of Pt(111) surface have been studied with varying slab thickness using ab-initio SIESTA method. We found the expansion in the top layer and contraction in the subsurface layers of Pt(111) surface. Our results match with the experimental results. Also observing electronic density of states we found that as we increase the thickness of slab, the PDOS of Pt(111) surface goes towards the bulk density of states and Fermi energy shifts towards the bulk fermi energy.

  11. Castings Dimensions Influence on the Alloyed Layer Thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szajnar J.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of simulation of alloy layer formation process on the model casting. The first aim of this study was to determine the influence of the location of the heat center on alloy layer’s thickness with the use of computer simulation. The second aim of this study was to predict the thickness of the layer. For changes of technological parameters, the distribution of temperature in the model casting and temperature changes in the characteristic points of the casting were found for established changes of technological parameters. Numerical calculations were performed using programs NovaFlow&Solid. The process of obtaining the alloy layer with good quality and proper thickness depends on: pouring temperature, time of premould hold at the temperature above 1300°C. The obtained results of simulation were loaded to authorial program Preforma 1.1 in order to determine the predicted thickness of the alloy casting.

  12. Study of buffer layer thickness on bulk heterojunction solar cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Seunguk; Suman, C K; Lee, Donggu; Kim, Seohee; Lee, Changhee

    2010-10-01

    We studied the effect of the buffer layer (molybdenum-oxide (MoO3)) thickness on the performance of organic solar cell based on blends of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61 butyric acid methyl ester fullerene derivative (PCBM). The thickness of MoO3 was varied from 1 nm to 30 nm for optimization of device performance. The photocurrent-voltage and impedance spectroscopy were measured under dark and AM1.5G solar simulated illumination of 100 mW/cm2 for exploring the role of the buffer layer thickness on carrier collection at an anode. The MoO3 thickness of the optimized device (efficiency approximately 3.7%) was found to be in the range of 5 approximately 10 nm. The short-circuit current and the shunt resistance decrease gradually for thicker MoO3 layer over 5 nm. The device can be modeled as the combination of three RC parallel circuits (each one for the active layer, buffer layer and interface between the buffer layer and the active layer) in series with contact resistance (Rs approximately 60 ohm).

  13. Infrared active thermography for surface layer characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semerok, A.; Fomichev, S.; Farcage, D.; Sortais, C.; Courtois, X.

    2006-05-01

    Deposited layer characterization was stated as the main goal of our studies for 2006. The investigations by DRFC/SIPP/GCFP (CEA Cadarache) were performed with the procedure of surface temperature measurements based on infrared thermography with synchronous demodulation (Lock-in Thermography). It was applied to provide the temperature surface monitoring during the modulated heating by illumination. The obtained 2D-cartography revealed the zones with a weak heat transfer resulting from a low layer/surface adhesion or poor layer thermal conductivity. The obtained lock-in cartography data should be regarded only as qualitative. For deposited layers characterization (layer depth, adhesion with the substrate), the active laser pyrometer measurements with the developed experimental device were made in LILM laboratory (CEA Saclay). Active surface pyrometry with repetitive laser heating can provide both qualitative and quantitative data on the first layer and the interface with the substrate. A 3D-numerical model of graphite deposited layer heating by a pulsed high repetition rate laser beam was developed to determine the heated surface temperature with a high temporal and spatial resolution. The theoretical data obtained with 3D-numerical model for surface heating were compared with the experimental results. It was demonstrated that for the given optical and thermo-physical parameters of materials, the theoretical temperatures may be fitted with the experimental results to assess certain unknown parameters of the layer (thermal contact resistance, diffusivity, thickness, porosity, ). Based on the comparison of the obtained experimental and theoretical results, the deposited layer characterization was made. The results of the investigations on Active Laser Pyrometry and Lock-in Thermography demonstrated that the methods can provide qualitative and quantitative data on the deposited layer and on the layer/substrate interface. The correlation and cross-check of the results

  14. Inversion of potential-field data for layers with uneven thickness

    OpenAIRE

    Caratori Tontini, F.; Cocchi, L.; Carmisciano, C.; Stefanelli, P.

    2008-01-01

    AB: Inversion of large-scale potential-field anomalies, aimed at determining density or magnetization, is usually made in the Fourier domain. The commonly adopted geometry is based on a layer of constant thickness, characterized by a bottom surface at a fixed distance from the top surface.....

  15. The influence of varying layer thicknesses on the color predictability of two different composite layering concepts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khashayar, G.; Dozic, A.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Optical properties of teeth are mimicked by composite layering techniques by combining a relatively opaque layer (dentin) with more translucent layers (enamel). However, the replacing material cannot always optically imitate the tooth when applied in the same thickness as that of the

  16. Dependence of piezoelectric properties on layer thickness for multilayer actuators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, W.A.; Prijs, K.; Saeed, S.

    2010-01-01

    In general, it has been reported that the piezoelectric properties in multilayer actuators decrease for layer thicknesses below 20 microns. This has been investigated for PXE55 which is a material based on PLZT-Pb(Mg 1/2W1/2)O3 and PG01 which is a low sintering version of this material. Results show

  17. The thickness of the HI gas layer in spiral galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sicking, Floris Jan

    1997-01-01

    In the present study, in two inclined spiral galaxies, NGC 3198 and NGC 2403, the HI random velocity dispersion and layer thickness will be measured simultaneously. This will be done from the HI velocity dispersion field (the distribution on the sky of the observed HI line of sight velocity

  18. Retinal nerve fibre layer thickness values and their associations with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    approximately 1.02 µm. There was a 0.62 µm increase in. RNFL forevery dioptre change in SE towards more hy- peropia (Tables 1 and 2). Table 2: Multivariate analysis of associations between mean global retinal nerve fibre layer thickness and systemic and ocular parameters. Parameter p-value. Regression coefficient B.

  19. Localization in superlattices with randomness in layer thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Jian; Tsai Chienhua.

    1987-08-01

    The localization length for electrons in superlattices with randomness in layer thickness is studied in both the commensurate and the incommensurate cases. It is demonstrated that disorder limits the electrons to see only structures within the extent of their wave functions and to be hardly effected by any long range correlation. (author). 4 refs, 6 figs

  20. The thickness of crystal mushy layers on magma chamber floors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holness, M. B.

    2012-04-01

    Heat loss through the margins of crustal magma bodies drives crystallization and the development of crystal mushy layers. In small intrusions the bulk composition of the mushy layers is the same as that of the intruded magma, but for larger bodies there is abundant evidence that residual mush liquid is expelled from the mushy layer on the chamber floor, driving fractionation of the bulk magma. There is debate about the precise mechanism(s) by which the residual liquid is expelled, with suggestions ranging from convection within the mushy layer driven by compositionally-controlled changes in density, compaction and collapse of the crystal framework, to diffusion and primary adcumulate growth at a hard-ground. The effective operation of these different mechanisms requires specific values of physical parameters. One of these parameters is the thickness of the mushy layer. Direct measurement of the crystal mushy layer on the floor of a magma chamber is not possible. Field observations of the effects of block settling and slumping, and downwards percolation of low viscosity dense liquids point to thicknesses of the order of metres, although numerical models of compaction and compositional convection require thicknesses of order 100 m. A new parameter that may be of use in constraining erstwhile mush thickness in fully solidified mafic intrusions is the median dihedral angle subtended at clinopyroxene-plagioclase-plagioclase junctions, Θcpp. Most gabbroic rocks are not in textural equilibrium, and Θcpp is controlled by the kinetics of crystal growth, resulting in values lower than the equilibrium value of 109˚. Θcpp in dolerites is a sensitive function of crystallization rate, rising from 78˚ in rapidly cooled small sills and dykes to > 100˚ in the centres of large sills. In fractionated bodies such as layered intrusions, Θcpp falls in the same range as that observed in dolerite sills population of cpx-plag-plag junctions is created entirely within the mush zone

  1. Hydrodynamic thickness of petroleum oil adsorbed layers in the pores of reservoir rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkafeef, Saad F; Algharaib, Meshal K; Alajmi, Abdullah F

    2006-06-01

    The hydrodynamic thickness delta of adsorbed petroleum (crude) oil layers into the pores of sandstone rocks, through which the liquid flows, has been studied by Poiseuille's flow law and the evolution of (electrical) streaming current. The adsorption of petroleum oil is accompanied by a numerical reduction in the (negative) surface potential of the pore walls, eventually stabilizing at a small positive potential, attributed to the oil macromolecules themselves. After increasing to around 30% of the pore radius, the adsorbed layer thickness delta stopped growing either with time or with concentrations of asphaltene in the flowing liquid. The adsorption thickness is confirmed with the blockage value of the rock pores' area determined by the combination of streaming current and streaming potential measurements. This behavior is attributed to the effect on the disjoining pressure across the adsorbed layer, as described by Derjaguin and Churaev, of which the polymolecular adsorption films lose their stability long before their thickness has approached the radius of the rock pore.

  2. Fracture Toughness of Thick Boride Layers Estimated by the Cross-Sectioned Scratch Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Silva, I.; Flores-Jiménez, M.; Bravo-Bárcenas, D.; Rodríguez-Castro, G.; Martínez-Trinidad, J.; Meneses-Amador, A.

    2018-02-01

    New results about the fracture toughness ( K c) of thick boride layers estimated by the cross-sectioned scratch test are presented in this study. The FeB-Fe2B layers developed at the surface of borided AISI 1018 and AISI 1045 steels and the Fe2B layer formed on the borided AISI 1045 steel exposed to a diffusion annealing process (DAP) were used for this purpose. The cross-sectioned scratch tests were performed with a Vickers diamond stylus drawn across the thick boride layer under a constant load to produce a half-cone-shaped fracture near to the top surface of the borided steels. The height of the half-cone-shaped fracture as a function of the cross-sectioned scratch loads was used to determine the fracture toughness of the FeB and Fe2B layers. The results showed a fracture resistance of ˜2.8 {MPa}√ m for the FeB layer formed at the surface of borided AISI 1045 steel. Likewise, the effect of the DAP on the surface of the borided AISI 1045 steel promoted the formation of an exclusively Fe2B layer, with an increase in the fracture toughness of the whole boride layer around 5 {MPa}√ m. Finally, the principle of the technique can be used to minimize the influence of the anisotropic properties on the fracture toughness along the depth of boride layers.

  3. On determining dead layer and detector thicknesses for a position-sensitive silicon detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredi, J.; Lee, Jenny; Lynch, W. G.; Niu, C. Y.; Tsang, M. B.; Anderson, C.; Barney, J.; Brown, K. W.; Chajecki, Z.; Chan, K. P.; Chen, G.; Estee, J.; Li, Z.; Pruitt, C.; Rogers, A. M.; Sanetullaev, A.; Setiawan, H.; Showalter, R.; Tsang, C. Y.; Winkelbauer, J. R.; Xiao, Z.; Xu, Z.

    2018-04-01

    In this work, two particular properties of the position-sensitive, thick silicon detectors (known as the "E" detectors) in the High Resolution Array (HiRA) are investigated: the thickness of the dead layer on the front of the detector, and the overall thickness of the detector itself. The dead layer thickness for each E detector in HiRA is extracted using a measurement of alpha particles emitted from a 212Pb pin source placed close to the detector surface. This procedure also allows for energy calibrations of the E detectors, which are otherwise inaccessible for alpha source calibration as each one is sandwiched between two other detectors. The E detector thickness is obtained from a combination of elastically scattered protons and an energy-loss calculation method. Results from these analyses agree with values provided by the manufacturer.

  4. Layer thickness measurement using the X-ray fluorescence principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mengelkamp, B.

    1980-01-01

    Curium 244 having a gamma energy of about 15.5 keV is used as excitation emitter for contactless and continuous measuring of the thickness of metallic layers on iron strip. Soft gamma radiation is absorbed in matter according to the photo effect, so that X-ray fluorescence radiation is generated in the matter, which depends on the element and is radiated to all sides. For instance, it amounts for iron 6.4 keV and is measured with a specific ionisation chamber for this energy range. With increasing atomic number of the elements, the energy of fluorescence radiation increases and hence also the emission signal of the detector. The prerequisite for a usable measuring effect is an element distance of at least two and the thickness of the layer to be measured being in an optimum range. A signal dependent on the thickness of the layer is produced either by absorption of iron radiation (absorption method - aluminium and tin) or by build-up radiation of the material of the layer (emission method - zinc and lead). (orig./GSCH) [de

  5. CMUT Fabrication Based On A Thick Buried Oxide Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupnik, Mario; Vaithilingam, Srikant; Torashima, Kazutoshi; Wygant, Ira O; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T

    2010-10-01

    We introduce a versatile fabrication process for direct wafer-bonded CMUTs. The objective is a flexible fabrication platform for single element transducers, 1D and 2D arrays, and reconfigurable arrays. The main process features are: A low number of litho masks (five for a fully populated 2D array); a simple fabrication sequence on standard MEMS tools without complicated wafer handling (carrier wafers); an improved device reliability; a wide design space in terms of operation frequency and geometric parameters (cell diameter, gap height, effective insulation layer thickness); and a continuous front face of the transducer (CMUT plate) that is connected to ground (shielding for good SNR and human safety in medical applications). All of this is achieved by connecting the hot electrodes individually through a thick buried oxide layer, i.e. from the handle layer of an SOI substrate to silicon electrodes located in each CMUT cell built in the device layer. Vertical insulation trenches are used to isolate these silicon electrodes from the rest of the substrate. Thus, the high electric field is only present where required - in the evacuated gap region of the device and not in the insulation layer of the post region. Array elements (1D and 2D) are simply defined be etching insulation trenches into the handle wafer of the SOI substrate.

  6. Influence of water layer thickness on hard tissue ablation with pulsed CO2 laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianzeng; Zhan, Zhenlin; Liu, Haishan; Zhao, Haibin; Xie, Shusen; Ye, Qing

    2012-03-01

    The theory of hard tissue ablation reported for IR lasers is based on a process of thermomechanical interaction, which is explained by the absorption of the radiation in the water component of the tissue. The microexplosion of the water is the cause of tissue fragments being blasted from hard tissue. The aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of the interdependence of water layer thickness and incident radiant exposure on ablation performance. A total of 282 specimens of bovine shank bone were irradiated with a pulse CO2 laser. Irradiation was carried out in groups: without a water layer and with a static water layer of thickness ranging from 0.2 to 1.2 mm. Each group was subdivided into five subgroups for different radiant exposures ranging from 18 to 84 J/cm2, respectively. The incision geometry, surface morphology, and microstructure of the cut walls as well as thermal injury were examined as a function of the water layer thickness at different radiant exposures. Our results demonstrate that the additional water layer is actually a mediator of laser-tissue interaction. There exists a critical thickness of water layer for a given radiant exposure, at which the additional water layer plays multiple roles, not only acting as a cleaner to produce a clean cut but also as a coolant to prevent bone heating and reduce thermal injury, but also helping to improve the regularity of the cut shape, smooth the cut surface, and enhance ablation rate and efficiency. The results suggest that desired ablation results depend on optimal selection of both water layer thickness and radiant exposure.

  7. Thin layer thickness measurements by zero group velocity Lamb mode resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cès, Maximin; Clorennec, Dominique; Royer, Daniel; Prada, Claire

    2011-11-01

    Local and non-contact measurements of the thickness of thin layers deposited on a thick plate have been performed by using zero group velocity (ZGV) Lamb modes. It was shown that the shift of the resonance frequency is proportional to the mass loading through a factor which depends on the mechanical properties of the layer and of the substrate. In the experiments, ZGV Lamb modes were generated by a Nd:YAG pulsed laser and the displacement normal to the plate surface was measured by an optical interferometer. Measurements performed at the same point that the generation on the non-coated face of the plate demonstrated that thin gold layers of a few hundred nanometers were detected through a 1.5-mm thick Duralumin plate. The shift of the resonance frequency (1.9 MHz) of the fundamental ZGV mode is proportional to the layer thickness: typically 10 kHz per μm. Taking into account the influence of the temperature, a 240-nm gold layer was measured with a ±4% uncertainty. This thickness has been verified on the coated face with an optical profiling system.

  8. The Effect of Layer Thickness on Aerodynamic Characteristics of Wind Tunnel RP Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshmand, S.; Adelnia, R.; Aghanajafi, C.

    Nowadays, rapid prototyping (RP) methods are widely used to produce wind tunnel testing models. Layer thickness is an important parameter that affects aerodynamic characteristics of wind tunnel models. This paper describes the effects of Layer thickness, using rapid prototyping, on aerodynamic coefficients to construct wind tunnel testing models. Three models were evaluated. These models were fabricated from ABSi by fused deposition method (FDM). The layer thickness was 0.178 mm, 0.254 mm and 0.33 mm. The surface roughness for each model was 25 μm, 63 μm and 160 μm (RZ) determined by PERTHOMETER2. A wing-body-tail configuration was chosen for the actual study. Testing covered the Mach no. range of Mach 0.3 to Mach 1.2 at an angle-of-attack range of -4° to +16° at zero sideslip. Coefficients of normal force, axial force, pitching moment, and lift over drag are shown at each of these mach numbers. Results from this study show that layer thickness does have effect on the aerodynamic characteristics; in general the difference between the data extracted from three models is less than 6 percent. The layer thickness does have more effect on the aerodynamic characteristics when mach number is decreased and has the most effect on the aerodynamic characteristics of axial force and its derivative coefficients.

  9. Contact mechanics for layered materials with randomly rough surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, B N J

    2012-03-07

    The contact mechanics model of Persson is applied to layered materials. We calculate the M function, which relates the surface stress to the surface displacement, for a layered material, where the top layer (thickness d) has different elastic properties than the semi-infinite solid below. Numerical results for the contact area as a function of the magnification are presented for several cases. As an application, we calculate the fluid leak rate for laminated rubber seals.

  10. Performance of High Layer Thickness in Selective Laser Melting of Ti6Al4V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xuezhi; Ma, Shuyuan; Liu, Changmeng; Chen, Cheng; Wu, Qianru; Chen, Xianping; Lu, Jiping

    2016-12-01

    To increase building rate and save cost, the selective laser melting (SLM) of Ti6Al4V with a high layer thickness (200 μm) and low cost coarse powders (53 μm-106 μm) at a laser power of 400 W is investigated in this preliminary study. A relatively large laser beam with a diameter of 200 μm is utilized to produce a stable melt pool at high layer thickness, and the appropriate scanning track, which has a smooth surface with a shallow contact angle, can be obtained at the scanning speeds from 40 mm/s to 80 mm/s. By adjusting the hatch spacings, the density of multi-layer samples can be up to 99.99%, which is much higher than that achieved in previous studies about high layer thickness selective laser melting. Meanwhile, the building rate can be up to 7.2 mm³/s, which is about 2 times-9 times that of the commercial equipment. Besides, two kinds of defects are observed: the large un-melted defects and the small spherical micropores. The formation of the un-melted defects is mainly attributed to the inappropriate overlap rates and the unstable scanning tracks, which can be eliminated by adjusting the processing parameters. Nevertheless, the micropores cannot be completely eliminated. It is worth noting that the high layer thickness plays a key role on surface roughness rather than tensile properties during the SLM process. Although a sample with a relatively coarse surface is generated, the average values of yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, and elongation are 1050 MPa, 1140 MPa, and 7.03%, respectively, which are not obviously different than those with the thin layer thickness used in previous research; this is due to the similar metallurgical bonding and microstructure.

  11. Performance of High Layer Thickness in Selective Laser Melting of Ti6Al4V

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuezhi Shi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available To increase building rate and save cost, the selective laser melting (SLM of Ti6Al4V with a high layer thickness (200 μm and low cost coarse powders (53 μm–106 μm at a laser power of 400 W is investigated in this preliminary study. A relatively large laser beam with a diameter of 200 μm is utilized to produce a stable melt pool at high layer thickness, and the appropriate scanning track, which has a smooth surface with a shallow contact angle, can be obtained at the scanning speeds from 40 mm/s to 80 mm/s. By adjusting the hatch spacings, the density of multi-layer samples can be up to 99.99%, which is much higher than that achieved in previous studies about high layer thickness selective laser melting. Meanwhile, the building rate can be up to 7.2 mm3/s, which is about 2 times–9 times that of the commercial equipment. Besides, two kinds of defects are observed: the large un-melted defects and the small spherical micropores. The formation of the un-melted defects is mainly attributed to the inappropriate overlap rates and the unstable scanning tracks, which can be eliminated by adjusting the processing parameters. Nevertheless, the micropores cannot be completely eliminated. It is worth noting that the high layer thickness plays a key role on surface roughness rather than tensile properties during the SLM process. Although a sample with a relatively coarse surface is generated, the average values of yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, and elongation are 1050 MPa, 1140 MPa, and 7.03%, respectively, which are not obviously different than those with the thin layer thickness used in previous research; this is due to the similar metallurgical bonding and microstructure.

  12. On the Explicit Expression for Plasma Layer Thickness

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, R K

    2004-01-01

    The marginal zone theory is used to account for the observed Fahreus Linquist effect when the viscoity of blood changes with the diameter of the capillary. An attributable cause is the axial accumulation of cells. The discharge rate from Hagen Poiseulle law at steady state was derived by Haynes (1960) for the core and plasma layer and a total discharge rate was expressed as a function of the pressure drop along the capillary, quartic dependence on the radius of the capillary and quartic dependence on the dimensionless marginal zone thickness. The apparent of viscosity of the blood is expressed as a function of the ratio of the core layer viscosity and the plasma layer viscosity. In order to back out a marginal zone thickness from a given set of information, the Charm and Kurland expression (1974) for the viscosity and hematocrit variation and the temperature dependence parameter of the hematocrit alpha can be used to develop two transcendental equations and two un! knowns. This is the recommended procedure us...

  13. On a Explicit Expresion for Plasma Layer Thickness

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, R K

    2004-01-01

    The marginal zone theory is used to account for the observed Fahreus Linquist effect when the viscoity of blood changes with the diameter of the capillary. An attributable cause is the axial accumulation of cells. The discharge rate from Hagen Poiseulle law at steady state was derived by Haynes (1960) for the core and plasma layer and a total discharge rate was expressed as a function of the pressure drop along the capillary, quartic dependence on the radius of the capillary and quartic dependence on the dimensionless marginal zone thickness. The apparent of viscosity of the blood is expressed as a function of the ratio of the core layer viscosity and the plasma layer viscosity. In order to back out a marginal zone thickness from a given set of information, the Charm and Kurland expression (1974) for the viscosity and hematocrit variation and the temperature dependence parameter of the hematocrit alpha can be used to develop two transcendental equations and two un! knowns. This is the recommended procedure us...

  14. Role of experimental resolution in measurements of critical layer thickness for strained-layer epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritz, I.J.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental measurements of critical layer thicknesses (CLT's) in strained-layer epitaxy are considered. Finite experimental resolution can have a major effect on measured CLT's and can easily lead to spurious results. The theoretical approach to critical layer thicknesses of J. W. Matthews [J. Vac. Sci. Technol. 12, 126 (1975)] has been modified in a straightforward way to predict the apparent critical thickness for an experiment with finite resolution in lattice parameter. The theory has also been modified to account for the general empirical result that fewer misfit dislocations are generated than predicted by equilibrium calculation. The resulting expression is fit to recent x-ray diffraction data on InGaAs/GaAs and SiGe/Si. The results suggest that CLT's in these systems may not be significantly larger than predicted by equilibrium theory, in agreement with high-resolution measurements

  15. Power density of various light curing units through resin inlays with modified layer thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung-Ok; Oh, Yonghui; Min, Jeong-Bum; Kim, Jin-Woo; Lee, Bin-Na; Hwang, Yun-Chan; Hwang, In-Nam; Oh, Won-Mann

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to enhance curing light penetration through resin inlays by modifying the thicknesses of the dentin, enamel, and translucent layers. Materials and Methods To investigate the layer dominantly affecting the power density of light curing units, resin wafers of each layer with 0.5 mm thickness were prepared and power density through resin wafers was measured with a dental radiometer (Cure Rite, Kerr). The dentin layer, which had the dominant effect on power density reduction, was decreased in thickness from 0.5 to 0.1 mm while thickness of the enamel layer was kept unchanged at 0.5 mm and thickness of the translucent layer was increased from 0.5 to 0.9 mm and vice versa, in order to maintain the total thickness of 1.5 mm of the resin inlay. Power density of various light curing units through resin inlays was measured. Results Power density measured through 0.5 mm resin wafers decreased more significantly with the dentin layer than with the enamel and translucent layers (p inlays increased when the dentin layer thickness was reduced and the enamel or translucent layer thickness was increased. The highest power density was recorded with dentin layer thickness of 0.1 mm and increased translucent layer thickness in all light curing units. Conclusions To enhance the power density through resin inlays, reducing the dentin layer thickness and increasing the translucent layer thickness would be recommendable when fabricating resin inlays. PMID:23431061

  16. Modelling of active layer thickness evolution on James Ross Island in 2006-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrbáček, Filip; Uxa, Tomáš

    2017-04-01

    Antarctic Peninsula region has been considered as one of the most rapidly warming areas on the Earth. However, the recent studies (Turner et al., 2016; Oliva et al., 2017) showed that significant air temperature cooling began around 2000 and has continued until present days. The climate cooling led to reduction of active layer thickness in several parts of Antarctic Peninsula region during decade 2006-2015, but the information about spatiotemporal variability of active layer thickness across the region remains largely incoherent due to lack of active layer temperature data from deeper profiles. Valuable insights into active layer thickness evolution in Antarctic Peninsula region can be, however, provided by thermal modelling techniques. These have been widely used to study the active layer dynamics in different regions of Arctic since 1990s. By contrast, they have been employed much less in Antarctica. In this study, we present our first results from two equilibrium models, the Stefan and Kudryavtsev equations, that were applied to calculate the annual active layer thickness based on ground temperature data from depth of 5 cm on one site on James Ross Island, Eastern Antarctic Peninsula, in period 2006/07 to 2014/15. Study site (Abernethy Flats) is located in the central part of the major ice-free area of James Ross Island called Ulu Peninsula. Monitoring of air temperature 2 m above ground surface and ground temperature in 50 cm profile began on January 2006. The profile was extended under the permafrost table down to 75 cm in February 2012, which allowed precise determination of active layer thickness, defined as a depth of 0°C isotherm, in period 2012 to 2015. The active layer thickness in the entire observation period was reconstructed using the Stefan and Kudryavtsev models, which were driven by ground temperature data from depth of 5 cm and physical parameters of the ground obtained by laboratory analyses (moisture content and bulk density) and calculations

  17. Strain relaxation of thick (11–22) semipolar InGaN layer for long wavelength nitride-based device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jaehwan; Min, Daehong; Jang, Jongjin; Lee, Kyuseung; Chae, Sooryong; Nam, Okhyun

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the properties of thick stress-relaxed (11–22) semipolar InGaN layers were investigated. Owing to the inclination of growth orientation, misfit dislocations (MDs) occurred at the heterointerface when the strain state of the (11–22) semipolar InGaN layers reached the critical point. We found that unlike InGaN layers based on polar and nonpolar growth orientations, the surface morphologies of the stress-relaxed (11–22) semipolar InGaN layers did not differ from each other and were similar to the morphology of the underlying GaN layer. In addition, misfit strain across the whole InGaN layer was gradually relaxed by MD formation at the heterointerface. To minimize the effect of surface roughness and defects in GaN layers on the InGaN layer, we conducted further investigation on a thick (11–22) semipolar InGaN layer grown on an epitaxial lateral overgrown GaN template. We found that the lateral indium composition across the whole stress-relaxed InGaN layer was almost uniform. Therefore, thick stress-relaxed (11–22) semipolar InGaN layers are suitable candidates for use as underlying layers in long-wavelength devices, as they can be used to control strain accumulation in the heterostructure active region without additional influence of surface roughness.

  18. Formation of nickel germanides from Ni layers with thickness below 10 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jablonka, Lukas; Kubart, Tomas; Primetzhofer, Daniel; Abedin, Ahmad; Hellström, Per-Erik; Östling, Mikael; Jordan-Sweet, Jean; Lavoie, Christian; Zhang, Shi-Li; Zhang, Zhen

    2017-03-01

    The authors have studied the reaction between a Ge (100) substrate and thin layers of Ni ranging from 2 to 10 nm in thickness. The formation of metal-rich Ni5Ge3Ni5Ge3 was found to precede that of the monogermanide NiGe by means of real-time in situ x-ray diffraction during ramp-annealing and ex situ x-ray pole figure analyses for phase identification. The observed sequential growth of Ni5Ge3Ni5Ge3 and NiGe with such thin Ni layers is different from the previously reported simultaneous growth with thicker Ni layers. The phase transformation from Ni5Ge3Ni5Ge3 to NiGe was found to be nucleation-controlled for Ni thicknesses <5 nm<5 nm, which is well supported by thermodynamic considerations. Specifically, the temperature for the NiGe formation increased with decreasing Ni (rather Ni5Ge3Ni5Ge3) thickness below 5 nm. In combination with sheet resistance measurement and microscopic surface inspection of samples annealed with a standard rapid thermal processing, the temperature range for achieving morphologically stable NiGe layers was identified for this standard annealing process. As expected, it was found to be strongly dependent on the initial Ni thickness

  19. Hydromagnetic free convection currents effects on boundary layer thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwanza, J.K., E-mail: kwanzakioko@yahoo.co [Department of Pure and Applied Mathematics, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, P.O. Box 62000-00200, Nairobi (Kenya); Marigi, E.M.; Kinyanjui, M. [Department of Pure and Applied Mathematics, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, P.O. Box 62000-00200, Nairobi (Kenya)

    2010-06-15

    In this study we discuss an unsteady free convection MHD flow past semi-infinite vertical porous plate. We have considered the flow in the presence of a strong magnetic field and therefore the electromagnetic force is very large. This brings in the phenomenon of Hall and Ion-slip currents. The effects of these two parameters together with that of viscous dissipation and radiation absorption among others on velocity, temperature and concentration profiles are presented. The profiles are presented graphically. As the partial differential equations governing this problem are highly non-linear they are solved numerically by a finite difference method. It is found that in presence of heating of the plate by free convection current the velocity boundary layer thickness decreases.

  20. Hydromagnetic free convection currents effects on boundary layer thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwanza, J.K.; Marigi, E.M.; Kinyanjui, M.

    2010-01-01

    In this study we discuss an unsteady free convection MHD flow past semi-infinite vertical porous plate. We have considered the flow in the presence of a strong magnetic field and therefore the electromagnetic force is very large. This brings in the phenomenon of Hall and Ion-slip currents. The effects of these two parameters together with that of viscous dissipation and radiation absorption among others on velocity, temperature and concentration profiles are presented. The profiles are presented graphically. As the partial differential equations governing this problem are highly non-linear they are solved numerically by a finite difference method. It is found that in presence of heating of the plate by free convection current the velocity boundary layer thickness decreases.

  1. Direct measurements of the velocity and thickness of ''explosively'' propagating buried molten layers in amorphous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowndes, D.H.; Jellison, G.E. Jr.; Pennycook, S.J.; Withrow, S.P.; Mashburn, D.N.

    1986-01-01

    Simultaneous infrared (1152 nm) and visible (633 nm) reflectivity measurements with nanosecond resolution were used to study the initial formation and subsequent motion of pulsed KrF laser-induced ''explosively'' propagating buried molten layers in ion implantation-amorphized silicon. The buried layer velocity decreases with depth below the surface, but increases with KrF laser energy density; a maximum velocity of about 14 m/s was observed, implying an undercooling-velocity relationship of approx. 14 K/(m/s). Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy was used to form a direct chemical image of implanted Cu ions transported by the buried layer and showed that the final buried layer thickness was <15 nm

  2. Power density of various light curing units through resin inlays with modified layer thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Ok Hong

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The purpose of this study was to enhance curing light penetration through resin inlays by modifying the thicknesses of the dentin, enamel, and translucent layers. Materials and Methods To investigate the layer dominantly affecting the power density of light curing units, resin wafers of each layer with 0.5 mm thickness were prepared and power density through resin wafers was measured with a dental radiometer (Cure Rite, Kerr. The dentin layer, which had the dominant effect on power density reduction, was decreased in thickness from 0.5 to 0.1 mm while thickness of the enamel layer was kept unchanged at 0.5 mm and thickness of the translucent layer was increased from 0.5 to 0.9 mm and vice versa, in order to maintain the total thickness of 1.5 mm of the resin inlay. Power density of various light curing units through resin inlays was measured. Results Power density measured through 0.5 mm resin wafers decreased more significantly with the dentin layer than with the enamel and translucent layers (p < 0.05. Power density through 1.5 mm resin inlays increased when the dentin layer thickness was reduced and the enamel or translucent layer thickness was increased. The highest power density was recorded with dentin layer thickness of 0.1 mm and increased translucent layer thickness in all light curing units. Conclusions To enhance the power density through resin inlays, reducing the dentin layer thickness and increasing the translucent layer thickness would be recommendable when fabricating resin inlays.

  3. Age, ocular magnification, and circumpapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mengyu; Elze, Tobias; Li, Dian; Baniasadi, Neda; Wirkner, Kerstin; Kirsten, Toralf; Thiery, Joachim; Loeffler, Markus; Engel, Christoph; Rauscher, Franziska G.

    2017-12-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) manufacturers graphically present circumpapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (cpRNFLT) together with normative limits to support clinicians in diagnosing ophthalmic diseases. The impact of age on cpRNFLT is typically implemented by linear models. cpRNFLT is strongly location-specific, whereas previously published norms are typically restricted to coarse sectors and based on small populations. Furthermore, OCT devices neglect impacts of lens or eye size on the diameter of the cpRNFLT scan circle so that the diameter substantially varies over different eyes. We investigate the impact of age and scan diameter reported by Spectralis spectral-domain OCT on cpRNFLT in 5646 subjects with healthy eyes. We provide cpRNFLT by age and diameter at 768 angular locations. Age/diameter were significantly related to cpRNFLT on 89%/92% of the circle, respectively (pointwise linear regression), and to shifts in cpRNFLT peak locations. For subjects from age 42.1 onward but not below, increasing age significantly decreased scan diameter (r=-0.28, p<0.001), which suggests that pathological cpRNFLT thinning over time may be underestimated in elderly compared to younger subjects, as scan diameter decrease correlated with cpRNFLT increase. Our detailed numerical results may help to generate various correction models to improve diagnosing and monitoring optic neuropathies.

  4. Sodium chloride crystallization from thin liquid sheets, thick layers, and sessile drops in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Pietro; Pettit, Donald; Cristoforetti, Samantha

    2015-10-01

    Crystallization from aqueous sodium chloride solutions as thin liquid sheets, 0.2-0.7 mm thick, with two free surfaces supported by a wire frame, thick liquid layers, 4-6 mm thick, with two free surfaces supported by metal frame, and hemispherical sessile drops, 20-32 mm diameter, supported by a flat polycarbonate surface or an initially flat gelatin film, were carried out under microgravity on the International Space Station (ISS). Different crystal morphologies resulted based on the fluid geometry: tabular hoppers, hopper cubes, circular [111]-oriented crystals, and dendrites. The addition of polyethylene glycol (PEG-3350) inhibited the hopper growth resulting in flat-faced surfaces. In sessile drops, 1-4 mm tabular hopper crystals formed on the free surface and moved to the fixed contact line at the support (polycarbonate or gelatin) self-assembling into a shell. Ring formation created by sessile drop evaporation to dryness was observed but with crystals 100 times larger than particles in terrestrially formed coffee rings. No hopper pyramids formed. By choosing solution geometries offered by microgravity, we found it was possible to selectively grow crystals of preferred morphologies.

  5. Magnetic and magnetoresistance studies of nanometric electrodeposited Co films and Co/Cu layered structures: Influence of magnetic layer thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zsurzsa, S.; Péter, L.; Kiss, L.F.; Bakonyi, I.

    2017-01-01

    The magnetic properties and the magnetoresistance behavior were investigated for electrodeposited nanoscale Co films, Co/Cu/Co sandwiches and Co/Cu multilayers with individual Co layer thicknesses ranging from 1 nm to 20 nm. The measured saturation magnetization values confirmed that the nominal and actual layer thicknesses are in fairly good agreement. All three types of layered structure exhibited anisotropic magnetoresistance for thick magnetic layers whereas the Co/Cu/Co sandwiches and Co/Cu multilayers with thinner magnetic layers exhibited giant magnetoresistance (GMR), the GMR magnitude being the largest for the thinnest Co layers. The decreasing values of the relative remanence and the coercive field when reducing the Co layer thickness down to below about 3 nm indicated the presence of superparamagnetic (SPM) regions in the magnetic layers which could be more firmly evidenced for these samples by a decomposition of the magnetoresistance vs. field curves into a ferromagnetic and an SPM contribution. For thicker magnetic layers, the dependence of the coercivity (H c ) on magnetic layer thickness (d) could be described for each of the layered structure types by the usual equation H c =H co +a/d n with an exponent around n=1. The common value of n suggests a similar mechanism for the magnetization reversal by domain wall motion in all three structure types and hints also at the absence of coupling between magnetic layers in the Co/Cu/Co sandwiches and Co/Cu multilayers. - Highlights: • Electrodeposited nanoscale Co films and Co/Cu layered structures. • Co layer thickness (d) dependence of coercivity (H c ) and magnetoresistance. • H c depends on Co layer thickness according to H c =H co +a/d n with n around 1. • The common n value suggests a similar mechanism of magnetization reversal. • The common n value suggests the absence of coupling between magnetic layers.

  6. Magnetic and magnetoresistance studies of nanometric electrodeposited Co films and Co/Cu layered structures: Influence of magnetic layer thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zsurzsa, S., E-mail: zsurzsa.sandor@wigner.mta.hu; Péter, L.; Kiss, L.F.; Bakonyi, I.

    2017-01-01

    The magnetic properties and the magnetoresistance behavior were investigated for electrodeposited nanoscale Co films, Co/Cu/Co sandwiches and Co/Cu multilayers with individual Co layer thicknesses ranging from 1 nm to 20 nm. The measured saturation magnetization values confirmed that the nominal and actual layer thicknesses are in fairly good agreement. All three types of layered structure exhibited anisotropic magnetoresistance for thick magnetic layers whereas the Co/Cu/Co sandwiches and Co/Cu multilayers with thinner magnetic layers exhibited giant magnetoresistance (GMR), the GMR magnitude being the largest for the thinnest Co layers. The decreasing values of the relative remanence and the coercive field when reducing the Co layer thickness down to below about 3 nm indicated the presence of superparamagnetic (SPM) regions in the magnetic layers which could be more firmly evidenced for these samples by a decomposition of the magnetoresistance vs. field curves into a ferromagnetic and an SPM contribution. For thicker magnetic layers, the dependence of the coercivity (H{sub c}) on magnetic layer thickness (d) could be described for each of the layered structure types by the usual equation H{sub c}=H{sub co}+a/d{sup n} with an exponent around n=1. The common value of n suggests a similar mechanism for the magnetization reversal by domain wall motion in all three structure types and hints also at the absence of coupling between magnetic layers in the Co/Cu/Co sandwiches and Co/Cu multilayers. - Highlights: • Electrodeposited nanoscale Co films and Co/Cu layered structures. • Co layer thickness (d) dependence of coercivity (H{sub c}) and magnetoresistance. • H{sub c} depends on Co layer thickness according to H{sub c}=H{sub co}+a/d{sup n} with n around 1. • The common n value suggests a similar mechanism of magnetization reversal. • The common n value suggests the absence of coupling between magnetic layers.

  7. Effect of boundary layer thickness on the flow characteristics around a rectangular prism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Ho Seong; Kim, Kyung Chun

    2001-01-01

    Effect of boundary layer thickness on the flow characteristics around a rectangular prism has been investigated by using a PIV(Particle Image Velocimetry) technique. Three different boundary layers (thick, medium and thin) were generated in the atmospheric boundary layer wind tunnel at Pusan National University. The thick boundary layer having 670mm thickness was generated by using spires and roughness elements. The medium thickness of boundary layer(δ=270mm) was the natural turbulent boundary layer at the test section with fully long developing length(18m). The thin boundary layer with 36.5mm thickness was generated by on a smooth panel elevated 70cm from the wind tunnel floor. The Reynolds number based on the free stream velocity and the height of the model was 7.9X10 3 . The mean velocity vector fields and turbulent kinetic energy distribution were measured and compared. The effect of boundary layer thickness is clearly observed not only in the length of separation bubble but also in the reattachment points. The thinner boundary layer thickness, the higher turbulent kinetic energy peak around the model roof. It is strongly recommended that the height ratio between model and approaching boundary layer thickness should be a major parameter

  8. Combined surface acoustic wave and surface plasmon resonance measurement of collagen and fibrinogen layer physical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-M. Friedt

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We use an instrument combining optical (surface plasmon resonance and acoustic (Love mode surface acoustic wave device real-time measurements on a same surface for the identification of water content in collagen and fibrinogen protein layers. After calibration of the surface acoustic wave device sensitivity by copper electrodeposition and surfactant adsorption, the bound mass and its physical properties – density and optical index – are extracted from the complementary measurement techniques and lead to thickness and water ratio values compatible with the observed signal shifts. Such results are especially usefully for protein layers with a high water content as shown here for collagen on an hydrophobic surface. We obtain the following results: collagen layers include 70±20% water and are 16±3 to 19±3 nm thick for bulk concentrations ranging from 30 to 300 μg/ml. Fibrinogen layers include 50±10% water for layer thicknesses in the 6±1.5 to 13±2 nm range when the bulk concentration is in the 46 to 460 μg/ml range. Keywords: surface acoustic wave, surface plasmon resonance, collagen, fibrinogen, density, thickness

  9. Superficial hardened layer of cut surface by turning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Croitoru Sorin Mihai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available One of research methods in metal cutting process is to measure hardness in the contact zone between cutting tool and workpiece. The objective of the performed research was to determine thickness and hardness of the superficial layer of cut surface due to cutting process, both orthogonal and complex cutting. The most important finding was that thickness of the superficial hardened layer is very thin under considered conditions, less than 0.01 … 0.02 mm. This research should be continued.

  10. Structural characterization of thick (11 anti 22) GaN layers grown by HVPE on m-plane sapphire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usikov, Alexander; Soukhoveev, Vitali; Shapovalov, Lisa; Syrkin, Alexander; Ivantsov, Vladimir; Scanlan, Bernard [Technologies and Devices International, Oxford Instruments Company, 12214 Plum Orchard Dr., Silver Spring, MD 20852 (United States); Nikiforov, Alexey [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Boston University, 8 Saint Mary' s Street, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Strittmatter, Andre; Johnson, Noble [Palo Alto Research Center, 3333 Coyote Hill Road, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Zheng, Jian-Guo [Materials Characterization Center, LEXI/Calit2, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Spiberg, Philippe; El-Ghoroury, Hussein [Ostendo Technologies, Inc., 6185 Paseo del Norte, Ste. 200, Carlsbad, CA 92011 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    This paper reports structural characterization of thick (11 anti 22)-oriented GaN layers by means of XRD, TEM, and micro- CL. The semi-polar (11 anti 22) GaN layers were grown on m-plane sapphire substrates by HVPE. Their structural quality improved with thickness. Threading dislocation density of 3 x 10{sup 8} cm{sup -2} and stacking faults density of 4 x 10{sup 4} cm{sup -1} were measured at the surface of 20 {mu}m thick (11 anti 22) GaN layers. The semi-polar GaN layers were used as template substrates to grow InGaN/GaN MQW heterostructures by MOCVD that demonstrated optically pumped lasing at 500 nm wavelength. The results demonstrate the longest wavelength yet reported for a photo-pumped laser on template substrates. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  11. Layer thickness evaluation for transuranic transmutation in a fusion–fission system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velasquez, Carlos E., E-mail: carlosvelcab@eng-nucl.mest.ufmg.br [Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear—Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antonio Carlos, 6627 Campus UFMG, 31.270-90, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia de Reatores Nucleares Inovadores/CNPq, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rede Nacional de Fusão (FINEP/CNPq), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Pereira, Claubia, E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br [Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear—Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antonio Carlos, 6627 Campus UFMG, 31.270-90, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia de Reatores Nucleares Inovadores/CNPq, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rede Nacional de Fusão (FINEP/CNPq), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Veloso, Maria Auxiliadora F., E-mail: dora@nuclear.ufmg.br [Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear—Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antonio Carlos, 6627 Campus UFMG, 31.270-90, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia de Reatores Nucleares Inovadores/CNPq, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rede Nacional de Fusão (FINEP/CNPq), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Costa, Antonella L., E-mail: antonella@nuclear.ufmg.br [Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear—Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antonio Carlos, 6627 Campus UFMG, 31.270-90, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia de Reatores Nucleares Inovadores/CNPq, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rede Nacional de Fusão (FINEP/CNPq), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Layer thickness for transmutation in a fusion–fission system was evaluated. • The calculations were performed using MONTEBURNS code. • The results indicate the best thickness and volume ratio to induce transmutation. - Abstract: Layer thickness for transuranic transmutation in a fusion–fission system was evaluated using two different ways. In the first one, transmutation layer thicknesses were designed maintaining the fuel rod radius constant; in the second part, while the transmutation layer thickness increases, the fuel rod radius decreases maintaining k{sub s} (source-multiplication factor) ≈0.95. Spent fuel reprocessed by UREX+ method and then spiked with thorium and uranium composes the transmutation layer. The calculations were performed using MONTEBURNS code (MCNP5 and ORIGEN 2.1). The results indicate the best thickness and the volume ratio between the coolant and the fuel composition to induce transmutation.

  12. How thick should cover layer be for waste disposal facility?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dody, Avraham; Rosenzweig, Ravid; Calvo, Rani; Eisenberg, Omer; Shalev, Eyal

    2016-01-01

    Near-surface waste disposal facilities are sensitive to natural processes, yet they are required to contain the waste for long time and to reduce any migration of contaminants to the biosphere. Engineered Barrier systems (EBs) are used by many countries to isolate the waste from the biosphere. The longevity of EBs is limited with respect to the risk to future generations, and is a function of: climate (rain amount and intensity); geology and type of host rock (porosity, fractures, faults, volcanic activity); and geomorphology. Therefore, site characterization is a primary concern when choosing a waste disposal site necessitating the operators to know and learn the relevant natural processes affecting the site. At this paper we focused on two processes: a. the erosion rate of the cover layer above the waste disposal facility and; b. the vertical movement of water driven by gravity and capillary forces. As water is the main agent for contaminants, either in solution or as particles, the unsaturated and saturated zones, understanding water flow dynamics is crucial for evaluation of the EBs performance

  13. Effect of Lamina Thickness of Prepreg on the Surface Accuracy of Carbon Fiber Composite Space Mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhiyong; Tang, Zhanwen; Xie, Yongjie; Shi, Hanqiao; Zhang, Boming; Guo, Hongjun

    2018-02-01

    Composite space mirror can completely replicate the high-precision surface of mould by replication process, but the actual surface accuracy of the replication composite mirror always decreases. Lamina thickness of prepreg affects the layers and layup sequence of composite space mirror, and which would affect surface accuracy of space mirror. In our research, two groups of contrasting cases through finite element analyses (FEA) and comparative experiments were studied; the effect of different lamina thicknesses of prepreg and corresponding lay-up sequences was focused as well. We describe a special analysis model, validated process and result analysis. The simulated and measured surface figures both get the same conclusion. Reducing lamina thickness of prepreg used in replicating composite space mirror is propitious to optimal design of layup sequence for fabricating composite mirror, and could improve its surface accuracy.

  14. Analyses of layer-thickness effects in bilayered dental ceramics subjected to thermal stresses and ring-on-ring tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsueh, Chun-Hway [ORNL; Thompson, G. A. [U.S. Army Dental and Trauma Research Detachment, Greak Lakes; Jadaan, Osama M. [University of Wisconsin, Platteville; Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL; Becher, Paul F [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    Objectives. The purpose of this study was to analyze the stress distribution through the thickness of bilayered dental ceramics subjected to both thermal stresses and ring-on-ring tests and to systematically examine how the individual layer thickness influences this stress distribution and the failure origin. Methods. Ring-on-ring tests were performed on In-Ceram Alumina/Vitadur Alpha porcelain bilayered disks with porcelain in the tensile side, and In-Ceram Alumina to porcelain layer thickness ratios of 1:2, 1:1, and 2:1 were used to characterize the failure origins as either surface or interface. Based on the thermomechanical properties and thickness of each layer, the cooling temperature from glass transition temperature, and the ring-on-ring loading configuration, the stress distribution through the thickness of the bilayer was calculated using closed-form solutions. Finite element analyses were also performed to verify the analytical results. Results. The calculated stress distributions showed that the location of maximum tension during testing shifted from the porcelain surface to the In-Ceram Alumina/porcelain interface when the relative layer thickness ratio changed from 1:2 to 1:1 and to 2:1. This trend is in agreement with the experimental observations of the failure origins. Significance. For bilayered dental ceramics subjected to ring-on-ring tests, the location of maximum tension can shift from the surface to the interface depending upon the layer thickness ratio. The closed-form solutions for bilayers subjected to both thermal stresses and ring-on-ring tests are explicitly formulated which allow the biaxial strength of the bilayer to be evaluated.

  15. Optimization of an organic photovoltaic device via modulation of thickness of photoactive and optical spacer layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Yoon, Won Jung; Ju, Heongkyu

    2014-01-01

    We examine the modulation effects of thicknesses of both a photoactive layer (a bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) of poly(3-hexylthiophene) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PCBM)) and an optical spacer of a transparent metal oxide, for power conversion efficiency optimization of organic photovoltaic devices. The redistribution of the optical intensity at the photoactive layer via the thickness modulation of both layers is taken into account, to produce three-dimensional (3D) plots as a function of both layer thicknesses of 0 to 400 nm range (5 nm step), for the device efficiency optimization. The modulation pattern of absorption is produced in the 3D plot as scanning the thicknesses of both layers as a result of modulation of interference between incoming and reflected light, which can be secured by changing the effective optical path length between two electrodes of a photovoltaic device. It is also seen that the case of inserting the spacer of the higher refractive index demands finer adjustment of the spacer layer thickness to achieve the optimum device efficiency. In addition, the series resistance of the photoactive layer of the thickness range of 0 to 70 nm is taken into account to provide the 3D plots as a function of the scanned thicknesses of both layers. Inclusion of the series resistance of the photoactive layer, which is also the function of its thickness, in the simulation, indicates that the series resistance can influence qualitatively the dependence of power conversion efficiency (PCE) on the thicknesses of both layers. We also find that minimization of series resistance, e.g., by device annealing, allows not only the relevant voltage to increase but also the optimum thickness of the photoactive layer to increase, leading to more absorption of light.

  16. The roles of buffer layer thickness on the properties of the ZnO epitaxial films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Kun, E-mail: ktang@nju.edu.cn [Nanjing National Laboratory of Microstructures and School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Huang, Shimin [Nanjing National Laboratory of Microstructures and School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Gu, Shulin, E-mail: slgu@nju.edu.cn [Nanjing National Laboratory of Microstructures and School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Zhu, Shunming [Nanjing National Laboratory of Microstructures and School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Ye, Jiandong [Nanjing National Laboratory of Microstructures and School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Nanjing University Institute of Optoelectronics at Yangzhou, Yangzhou 225009 (China); Xu, Zhonghua; Zheng, Youdou [Nanjing National Laboratory of Microstructures and School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • The growth mechanism has been revealed for the ZnO buffers with different thickness. • The surface morphology has been determined as the key factor to affect the epitaxial growth. • The relation between the hexagonal pits from buffers and epi-films has been established. • The hexagonal pits formed in the epi-films have been attributed to the V-shaped defects inheriting from the dislocations in the buffers. • The structural and electrical properties of the V-defects have been presented and analyzed. - Abstract: In this article, the authors have investigated the optimization of the buffer thickness for obtaining high-quality ZnO epi-films on sapphire substrates. The growth mechanism of the buffers with different thickness has been clearly revealed, including the initial nucleation and vertical growth, the subsequent lateral growth with small grain coalescence, and the final vertical growth along the existing larger grains. Overall, the quality of the buffer improves with increasing thickness except the deformed surface morphology. However, by a full-scale evaluation of the properties for the epi-layers, the quality of the epi-film is briefly determined by the surface morphology of the buffer, rather than the structural, optical, or electrical properties of it. The best quality epi-layer has been grown on the buffer with a smooth surface and well-coalescent grains. Meanwhile, due to the huge lattice mismatch between sapphire and ZnO, dislocations are inevitably formed during the growth of buffers. More importantly, as the film grows thicker, the dislocations may attracting other smaller dislocations and defects to reduce the total line energy and thus result in the formation of V-shape defects, which are connected with the bottom of the threading dislocations in the buffers. The V-defects appear as deep and large hexagonal pits from top view and they may act as electron traps which would affect the free carrier concentration of the epi-layers.

  17. The roles of buffer layer thickness on the properties of the ZnO epitaxial films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Kun; Huang, Shimin; Gu, Shulin; Zhu, Shunming; Ye, Jiandong; Xu, Zhonghua; Zheng, Youdou

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The growth mechanism has been revealed for the ZnO buffers with different thickness. • The surface morphology has been determined as the key factor to affect the epitaxial growth. • The relation between the hexagonal pits from buffers and epi-films has been established. • The hexagonal pits formed in the epi-films have been attributed to the V-shaped defects inheriting from the dislocations in the buffers. • The structural and electrical properties of the V-defects have been presented and analyzed. - Abstract: In this article, the authors have investigated the optimization of the buffer thickness for obtaining high-quality ZnO epi-films on sapphire substrates. The growth mechanism of the buffers with different thickness has been clearly revealed, including the initial nucleation and vertical growth, the subsequent lateral growth with small grain coalescence, and the final vertical growth along the existing larger grains. Overall, the quality of the buffer improves with increasing thickness except the deformed surface morphology. However, by a full-scale evaluation of the properties for the epi-layers, the quality of the epi-film is briefly determined by the surface morphology of the buffer, rather than the structural, optical, or electrical properties of it. The best quality epi-layer has been grown on the buffer with a smooth surface and well-coalescent grains. Meanwhile, due to the huge lattice mismatch between sapphire and ZnO, dislocations are inevitably formed during the growth of buffers. More importantly, as the film grows thicker, the dislocations may attracting other smaller dislocations and defects to reduce the total line energy and thus result in the formation of V-shape defects, which are connected with the bottom of the threading dislocations in the buffers. The V-defects appear as deep and large hexagonal pits from top view and they may act as electron traps which would affect the free carrier concentration of the epi-layers.

  18. Study of ion beam sputtered Fe/Si interfaces as a function of Si layer thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anil; Brajpuriya, Ranjeet; Singh, Priti

    2018-01-01

    The exchange interaction in metal/semiconductor interfaces is far from being completely understood. Therefore, in this paper, we have investigated the nature of silicon on the Fe interface in the ion beam deposited Fe/Si/Fe trilayers keeping the thickness of the Fe layers fixed at 3 nm and varying the thickness of the silicon sandwich layer from 1.5 nm to 4 nm. Grazing incidence x-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy techniques were used, respectively, to study the structural and morphological changes in the deposited films as a function of layer thickness. The structural studies show silicide formation at the interfaces during deposition and better crystalline structure of Fe layers at a lower spacer layer thickness. The magnetization behavior was investigated using magneto-optical Kerr effect, which clearly shows that coupling between the ferromagnetic layers is highly influenced by the semiconductor spacer layer thickness. A strong antiferromagnetic coupling was observed for a value of tSi = 2.5 nm but above this value an unexpected behavior of hysteresis loop (step like) with two coercivity values is recorded. For spacer layer thickness greater than 2.5 nm, an elemental amorphous Si layer starts to appear in the spacer layer in addition to the silicide layer at the interfaces. It is observed that in the trilayer structure, Fe layers consist of various stacks, viz., Si doped Fe layers, ferromagnetic silicide layer, and nonmagnetic silicide layer at the interfaces. The two phase hysteresis loop is explained on the basis of magnetization reversal of two ferromagnetic layers, independent of each other, with different coercivities. X-ray photo electron spectroscopy technique was also used to study interfaces characteristics as a function of tSi.

  19. The effect of electron density fluctuations on critical temperature in layered superconductors with arbitrary thickness of conducting layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askerzade, I. N.

    2018-04-01

    In this work, we analyse the effect of electron density fluctuations of in layered superconductors on the transition temperature Tc. Primarily, we consider the effect of thickness of conducting layer in modelling of superconducting compounds. It is observed that increasing the thickness of conducting layers increases the transition temperature Tc. Also it is shown that, the fluctuations of electron density has negligible character in the case layers with highly different dielectric constants. Obtained results are applicable to Bi2 Sr2 Can - 1 CunO2 n + 4 + δ compounds with n = 1,2,3.

  20. Seismic Wave Propagation from Underground Chemical Explosions: Sensitivity to Velocity and Thickness of a Weathered Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirakawa, E. T.; Ezzedine, S. M.

    2017-12-01

    Recorded motions from underground chemical explosions are complicated by long duration seismic coda as well as motion in the tangential direction. The inability to distinguish the origins of these complexities as either source or path effects comprises a limitation to effective monitoring of underground chemical explosions. With numerical models, it is possible to conduct rigorous sensitivity analyses for chemical explosive sources and their resulting ground motions under the influence of many attributes, including but not limited to complex velocity structure, topography, and non-linear source characteristics. Previously we found that topography can cause significant scattering in the direct wave but leads to relatively little motion in the coda. Here, we aim to investigate the contribution from the low-velocity weathered layer that exists in the shallow subsurface apart from and in combination with surface topography. We use SW4, an anelastic anisotropic fourth order finite difference code to simulate chemical explosive source in a 1D velocity structure consisting of a single weathered layer over a half space. A range of velocity magnitudes are used for the upper weathered layer with the velocities always being lower than that of the granitic underlaying layer. We find that for lower weathered layer velocities, the wave train is highly dispersed and causes a large percentage of energy to be contained in the coda in relation to the entire time series. The percentage of energy contained in the coda grows with distance from the source but saturates at a certain distance that depends on weathered layer velocity and thickness. The saturation onset distance increases with decreasing layer thickness and increasing velocity of the upper layer. Measurements of relative coda energy and coda saturation onset distance from real recordings can provide an additional constraint on the properties of the weathered layer in remote sites as well as test sites like the Nevada

  1. Underwater Superoleophobicity Induced by the Thickness of the Thermally Grown Porous Oxide Layer on C84400 Copper Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniedi Nyong

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The underwater contact angle behavior on oxide layers of varying thicknesses was studied. These oxide layers were grown by thermally oxidizing C84400 copper alloys in N2-0.75 wt.% O2 and N2-5 wt.% O2 gas mixtures at 650 °C. Characterization of the oxidized specimens was effected using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope (SEM and contact angle goniometer. The results from the X-ray diffraction analyses confirmed the formation of CuO, ZnO and PbO. The average sizes of the oxide granules were in the range of 70 nm to 750 nm, with the average thickness of the oxide layer increasing with the increase in the weight percent of oxygen in the N2-O2 gas mixtures. The results showed that the oxide layer growth followed the parabolic law. The underwater oil contact angles increased, due to the change in the surface morphology and porosity of the oxide layer. The small sizes and irregular packing of the oxide granules cause hierarchical rough surface layers with pores. The estimated pore sizes, in the range of 88 ± 40 to 280 ± 76, were predominant on the oxide layers of the samples processed in the N2-5 wt.% O2 gas mixture. The presence of these pores caused an increase in the porosities as the thickness of the oxide layers increased. At oxide layer thickness above 25 microns, the measured contact angle exceeded 150° as underwater superoleophobicity was recorded.

  2. Formation and investigation of multilayer nanostructured coatings TiN/MoN for different layers thicknesses with c-pvd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pogrebnyak, A.D.; Bondar, O.V.; Postol'nyj, B.A.; Andreev, A.A.; Abadias, G.; Beresnev, V.M.; Sobol', O.B.

    2013-01-01

    Multilayer coatings based on TiN/MoN were obtained using the vacuum arc evaporation cathode method (C-PVD). Multilayers thickness was in the range 6,7 ÷ 8,7 μm and monolayers thickness was 2, 10, 20 and 40 nm. Vacuum-arc unit Bulat 6 was used for depositions. For the analysis of multilayer structures and properties of nanostructured coatings XRD analysis method was used (D8 ADVANCE, Bruker). For elemental composition and morphology investigation of the surface layers and multilayered coatings SEM (JEOL-7001F) with EDX attachment was used. Also HRTEM method was used to analyze the phase composition. In addition, this article provides investigation of hardness by Micro-Hardness Tester CSM (Switzerland). AFM was used for additional analysis of the topography and surface roughness of these coatings. This investigation have revealed the relationship between the layers thicknesses, substrate potential, the annealing process, physical and mechanical properties of samples. (authors)

  3. Vision-based surface defect inspection for thick steel plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jong Pil; Kim, Dongseob; Kim, KyuHwan; Lee, Sang Jun; Park, Chang Hyun; Kim, Sang Woo

    2017-05-01

    There are several types of steel products, such as wire rods, cold-rolled coils, hot-rolled coils, thick plates, and electrical sheets. Surface stains on cold-rolled coils are considered defects. However, surface stains on thick plates are not considered defects. A conventional optical structure is composed of a camera and lighting module. A defect inspection system that uses a dual lighting structure to distinguish uneven defects and color changes by surface noise is proposed. In addition, an image processing algorithm that can be used to detect defects is presented in this paper. The algorithm consists of a Gabor filter that detects the switching pattern and employs the binarization method to extract the shape of the defect. The optics module and detection algorithm optimized using a simulator were installed at a real plant, and the experimental results conducted on thick steel plate images obtained from the steel production line show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  4. Active layer thickness and ground temperatures, Svea, Svalbard, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Snow and soil temperature records for January 1988 - May 1996 are presented. Included are snow depth and weight measurements, snow density (calculated), active layer...

  5. On the homogeneity of a thick layer of mixed granules in optical quality inspection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.C.M.; Xia, H.

    2016-01-01

    Optical inspection of a thick layer of granules for foreign particles does not directly reveal their true number and the more so if the layer is not homogenous. This raises questions such as “how do I know if the layer is homogenous?” and “what is the relation between the observable particles and

  6. Producing of multicomponent and composite surface layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wierzchon, T.; Bielinski, P.; Michalski, A.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents a new method of producing multicomponent and composite layers on steel substrate. The combination of nickel plating with glow-discharge bordering or impulse-plasma deposition method gives an opportunity to obtain good properties of surface layers. The results of examinations of carbon 45 (0.45%C) steel, nickel plated and then borided under glow discharge conditions or covered with TiN layers are presented. The corrosion and friction wear resistance of such layers are markedly higher than for layer produced on non nickel plated substrates. (author). 19 refs, 5 figs

  7. Enface Thickness Mapping and Reflectance Imaging of Retinal Layers in Diabetic Retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Andrew W; Wanek, Justin; Lim, Jennifer I; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2015-01-01

    To present a method for image segmentation and generation of enface thickness maps and reflectance images of retinal layers in healthy and diabetic retinopathy (DR) subjects. High density spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) images were acquired in 10 healthy and 4 DR subjects. Customized image analysis software identified 5 retinal cell layer interfaces and generated thickness maps and reflectance images of the total retina (TR), inner retina (IR), outer retina (OR), and the inner segment ellipsoid (ISe) band. Thickness maps in DR subjects were compared to those of healthy subjects by generating deviation maps which displayed retinal locations with thickness below, within, and above the normal 95% confidence interval. In healthy subjects, TR and IR thickness maps displayed the foveal depression and increased thickness in the parafoveal region. OR and ISe thickness maps showed increased thickness at the fovea, consistent with normal retinal anatomy. In DR subjects, thickening and thinning in localized regions were demonstrated on TR, IR, OR, and ISe thickness maps, corresponding to retinal edema and atrophy, respectively. TR and OR reflectance images showed reduced reflectivity in regions of increased thickness. Hard exudates appeared as hyper-reflective spots in IR reflectance images and casted shadows on the deeper OR and ISe reflectance images. The ISe reflectance image clearly showed the presence of focal laser scars. Enface thickness mapping and reflectance imaging of retinal layers is a potentially useful method for quantifying the spatial and axial extent of pathologies due to DR.

  8. Optimization of intrinsic layer thickness, dopant layer thickness and concentration for a-SiC/a-SiGe multilayer solar cell efficiency performance using Silvaco software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yuan Wong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Solar cell is expanding as green renewable alternative to conventional fossil fuel electricity generation, but compared to other land-used electrical generators, it is a comparative beginner. Many applications covered by solar cells starting from low power mobile devices, terrestrial, satellites and many more. To date, the highest efficiency solar cell is given by GaAs based multilayer solar cell. However, this material is very expensive in fabrication and material costs compared to silicon which is cheaper due to the abundance of supply. Thus, this research is devoted to develop multilayer solar cell by combining two different layers of P-I-N structures with silicon carbide and silicon germanium. This research focused on optimising the intrinsic layer thickness, p-doped layer thickness and concentration, n-doped layer thickness and concentration in achieving the highest efficiency. As a result, both single layer a-SiC and a-SiGe showed positive efficiency improvement with the record of 27.19% and 9.07% respectively via parametric optimization. The optimized parameters is then applied on both SiC and SiGe P-I-N layers and resulted the convincing efficiency of 33.80%.

  9. Optimization of intrinsic layer thickness, dopant layer thickness and concentration for a-SiC/a-SiGe multilayer solar cell efficiency performance using Silvaco software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Wong Wei; Natashah Norizan, Mohd; Salwani Mohamad, Ili; Jamalullail, Nurnaeimah; Hidayah Saad, Nor

    2017-11-01

    Solar cell is expanding as green renewable alternative to conventional fossil fuel electricity generation, but compared to other land-used electrical generators, it is a comparative beginner. Many applications covered by solar cells starting from low power mobile devices, terrestrial, satellites and many more. To date, the highest efficiency solar cell is given by GaAs based multilayer solar cell. However, this material is very expensive in fabrication and material costs compared to silicon which is cheaper due to the abundance of supply. Thus, this research is devoted to develop multilayer solar cell by combining two different layers of P-I-N structures with silicon carbide and silicon germanium. This research focused on optimising the intrinsic layer thickness, p-doped layer thickness and concentration, n-doped layer thickness and concentration in achieving the highest efficiency. As a result, both single layer a-SiC and a-SiGe showed positive efficiency improvement with the record of 27.19% and 9.07% respectively via parametric optimization. The optimized parameters is then applied on both SiC and SiGe P-I-N layers and resulted the convincing efficiency of 33.80%.

  10. Remotely Sensed Active Layer Thickness (ReSALT at Barrow, Alaska Using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Schaefer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Active layer thickness (ALT is a critical parameter for monitoring the status of permafrost that is typically measured at specific locations using probing, in situ temperature sensors, or other ground-based observations. Here we evaluated the Remotely Sensed Active Layer Thickness (ReSALT product that uses the Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar technique to measure seasonal surface subsidence and infer ALT around Barrow, Alaska. We compared ReSALT with ground-based ALT obtained using probing and calibrated, 500 MHz Ground Penetrating Radar at multiple sites around Barrow. ReSALT accurately reproduced observed ALT within uncertainty of the GPR and probing data in ~76% of the study area. However, ReSALT was less than observed ALT in ~22% of the study area with well-drained soils and in ~1% of the area where soils contained gravel. ReSALT was greater than observed ALT in some drained thermokarst lake basins representing ~1% of the area. These results indicate remote sensing techniques based on InSAR could be an effective way to measure and monitor ALT over large areas on the Arctic coastal plain.

  11. Effects of metal electrode reflection and layer thicknesses on the performance of inverted organic solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Yongbing [Department of Optical Electronics, School of Applied Physics and Material Engineering, WuYi University, Jiangmen 529020 (China)

    2010-05-15

    Optical simulations based on transfer matrix method (TMM) have been performed to investigate the performance of inverted organic solar cells (IOSCs). The upper limit to photocurrent generation (J{sub sc}{sup max}) has been calculated with the assumption that all photons absorbed by the active layer contribute to currents. The dependence of J{sub sc}{sup max} on metal electrode reflections and thicknesses of hole transport layer (HTL), and electron transport layer (ETL) is investigated. The investigations indicate that metal electrode reflections and thicknesses of HTL and ETL strongly affect the J{sub sc}{sup max} for IOSC devices with active layer of thickness below 60 nm, but these effects are weak for devices with active layer of thickness above 200 nm. Furthermore, the HTL inserted between the active layer and the metal electrode acts as an optical spacer and significantly improves J{sub sc}{sup max} in thin active layers (<60 nm). In particular, the improvement of J{sub sc}{sup max} is weaker in devices with an Ag electrode than those with an Al electrode. Finally, optimization of the power conversion efficiency is carried out by tailoring the layer thicknesses of HTL and ETL. (author)

  12. Asymmetric transmission of acoustic waves in a layer thickness distribution gradient structure using metamaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-San Chen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This research presents an innovative asymmetric transmission design using alternate layers of water and metamaterial with complex mass density. The directional transmission behavior of acoustic waves is observed numerically inside the composite structure with gradient layer thickness distribution and the rectifying performance of the present design is evaluated. The layer thickness distributions with arithmetic and geometric gradients are considered and the effect of gradient thickness on asymmetric wave propagation is systematically investigated using finite element simulation. The numerical results indicate that the maximum pressure density and transmission through the proposed structure are significantly influenced by the wave propagation direction over a wide range of audible frequencies. Tailoring the thickness of the layered structure enables the manipulation of asymmetric wave propagation within the desired frequency range. In conclusion, the proposed design offers a new possibility for developing directional-dependent acoustic devices.

  13. Average Annual Layer Thickness of the WAIS Divide Ice Core from Visual Stratigraphy, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes ~50 m averaged annual layer thicknesses down to 3403 m depth at the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) Divide ice core as observed visually using...

  14. Pre-ABoVE: Remotely Sensed Active Layer Thickness, Barrow, Alaska, 2006-2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Active layer thickness (ALT) is a critical parameter for monitoring the status of permafrost that is typically measured at specific locations using probing, in situ...

  15. Pre-ABoVE: Remotely Sensed Active Layer Thickness, Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, 1992-2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Active layer thickness (ALT) is a critical parameter for monitoring the status of permafrost that is typically measured at specific locations using probing, in situ...

  16. Study of the Variation of Material layer Compotition and Thickness Related Neutron Flux and Gamma Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirmalasari, Yuliana Dian; Suparmi; Sardjono, Y.

    2017-11-01

    Optimation of simulation design of collimator is corresponding to 30 MeV cyclotron generator. The simulation has used the variation of the thickness materials layers that was applied at treatment room’s door. The purpose of the variation and thickness of the material in this simulation to obtain optimum results for the shielding design in the irradiation chamber. The layers that we used are Pb-Fe and Pb-SS312. Simulation on cancer treatment is used with monte carlo simaulation MCNPX. The spesifications that we used for cyclotron is the spesification of the HM-30 Proton Cyclotron from Sumitomo Heavy Industries Ltd. The variation of the thickness materials layers that was applied at treatment room’s door are Pb remains 4cm while Fe and SS312 varies between 2 cm, 4 cm, 6 cm respectively. This simulation of Fe layer on Pb was give good result in measurement simulation at 4 cm thickness.

  17. Ice Thickness and Internal Layer Depth Along the 2001 and 2002 US ITASE Traverses, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ice thickness and internal layer depth data were collected with a ground-based, ice-penetrating radar study as part of the US International Trans-Antarctic...

  18. Pre-ABoVE: Active Layer Thickness and Soil Water Content, Barrow, Alaska, 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides estimates of Active Layer Thickness (ALT) determined with ground-based measurements, and calculated soil volumetric water content (VWC) at...

  19. Measurements of the Stiffness and Thickness of the Pavement Asphalt Layer Using the Enhanced Resonance Search Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Mustakiza Zakaria

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced resonance search (ERS is a nondestructive testing method that has been created to evaluate the quality of a pavement by means of a special instrument called the pavement integrity scanner (PiScanner. This technique can be used to assess the thickness of the road pavement structure and the profile of shear wave velocity by using the principle of surface wave and body wave propagation. In this study, the ERS technique was used to determine the actual thickness of the asphaltic pavement surface layer, while the shear wave velocities obtained were used to determine its dynamic elastic modulus. A total of fifteen locations were identified and the results were then compared with the specifications of the Malaysian PWD, MDD UKM, and IKRAM. It was found that the value of the elastic modulus of materials is between 3929 MPa and 17726 MPa. A comparison of the average thickness of the samples with the design thickness of MDD UKM showed a difference of 20 to 60%. Thickness of the asphalt surface layer followed the specifications of Malaysian PWD and MDD UKM, while some of the values of stiffness obtained are higher than the standard.

  20. Electro-Physical Technique for Post-Fabrication Measurements of CMOS Process Layer Thicknesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Janet C; Vernier, P Thomas

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a combined physical and electrical post-fabrication method for determining the thicknesses of the various layers in a commercial 1.5 μm complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) foundry process available through MOSIS. Forty-two thickness values are obtained from physical step-height measurements performed on thickness test structures and from electrical measurements of capacitances, sheet resistances, and resistivities. Appropriate expressions, numeric values, and uncertainties for each layer of thickness are presented, along with a systematic nomenclature for interconnect and dielectric thicknesses. However, apparent inconsistencies between several of the physical and electrical results for film thickness suggest that further uncertainty analysis is required and the effects of several assumptions need to be quantified.

  1. Top layer's thickness dependence on total electron-yield X-ray standing-wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ejima, Takeo; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Banse, Takanori; Hatano, Tadashi

    2005-01-01

    A Mo single-layer film with a stepwise thickness distribution was fabricated on the same Mo/Si reflection multilayer film. Total electron-yield X-ray standing-wave (TEY-XSW) spectra of the aperiodic multilayer were measured with reflection spectra. The peak positions of the standing waves in the TEY-XSW spectra changed as the film thickness of the top Mo-layer increased

  2. Aqueous Solution Processed Photoconductive Cathode Interlayer for High Performance Polymer Solar Cells with Thick Interlayer and Thick Active Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nian, Li; Chen, Zhenhui; Herbst, Stefanie; Li, Qingyuan; Yu, Chengzhuo; Jiang, Xiaofang; Dong, Huanli; Li, Fenghong; Liu, Linlin; Würthner, Frank; Chen, Junwu; Xie, Zengqi; Ma, Yuguang

    2016-09-01

    An aqueous-solution-processed photoconductive cathode interlayer is developed, in which the photoinduced charge transfer brings multiple advantages such as increased conductivity and electron mobility, as well as reduced work function. Average power conversion efficiency over 10% is achieved even when the thickness of the cathode interlayer and active layer is up to 100 and 300 nm, respectively. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Detection of charged particles in thick hydrogenated amorphous silicon layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujieda, I.; Cho, G.; Kaplan, S.N.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Qureshi, S.; Ward, W.; Street, R.A.

    1988-03-01

    We show our results in detecting particles of various linear energy transfer, including minimum ionizing electrons from a Sr-90 source with 5 to 12 micron thick n-i-p and p-i-n diodes. We measured W ( average energy to produce one electron-hole pair) using 17keV filtered xray pulses with a result W = 6.0 /+-/ 0.2eV. This is consistent with the expected value for a semiconductor with band gap of 1.7 to 1.9eV. With heavily ionizing particles such as 6 MeV alphas and 1 to 2 MeV protons, there was some loss of signal due to recombination in the particle track. The minimum ionizing electrons showed no sign of recombination. Applications to pixel and strip detectors for physics experiments and medical imaging will be discussed. 7 refs., 8 figs

  4. Measuring Spatiotemporal Features of Land Subsidence, Groundwater Drawdown, and Compressible Layer Thickness in Beijing Plain, China

    OpenAIRE

    Yongyong Li; Huili Gong; Lin Zhu; Xiaojuan Li

    2017-01-01

    Beijing is located on multiple alluvial-pluvial fans with thick Quaternary unconsolidated sediments. It has suffered serious groundwater drawdown and land subsidence due to groundwater exploitation. This study aimed to introduce geographical distribution measure methods into land subsidence research characterizing, geographically, land subsidence, groundwater drawdown, and compressible layer thickness. Therefore, we used gravity center analysis and standard deviational ellipse (SDE) methods i...

  5. Effects of particles thickness and veneer reiforced layer in the properties of oriented strand boards OSB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setsuo Iwakiri

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This work evaluated the effects of particle thickness and veneer reinforced layer on the physical and mechanicalproperties of OSB made of Pinus taeda L. The boards were manufactured with particle thickness of 0.4, 0.7 and 1.0 mm and phenolformaldehyderesin in the proportion of 6% of solid content. To the veneer reinforced layer was used veneer from Pinus taeda with 2.0mm of thickness. The increase in the slenderness (length/thickness ratio of thins particles, results in the higher values of MOE andMOR in the cross direction. The increase in the particles thickness contributed to higher values of the board internal bond. Thedifferent particles thickness did not clearly affected on the physical properties of OSB. The veneer reinforced layer results in the higheraverage values of MOE and MOR in the cross direction. All of the results of MOE and MOR obtained for boards with differentthickness attend tominimum values required per CSA 0437 (CSA, 1993. For the internal bond, the results were satisfactory to boardsmanufactured with particles thickness of 0.7 and 1.0 mm. According to the results the main conclusions were: (i The increase in theparticles thickness contributed to lower values of MOE and MOR, and higher values of the board internal bond; (ii the veneerreinforced layer increased MOE and MOR values in the cross direction.

  6. Relationship between age and peripapillary retinal nerve fibre layer thickness: an optical coherence tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, I Y H; Wong, A C M; Chan, C W N

    2010-08-01

    To evaluate the relationship between age and peripapillary retinal nerve fibre layer thickness in healthy Chinese subjects. Cross-sectional study. Regional hospital, Hong Kong. Healthy volunteers (n=218) of Chinese ethnicity with spherical equivalent of -6 to +4 dioptres were recruited for study from October 2001 to March 2003. Ocular examination was carried out and measurements of peripapillary retinal nerve fibre layer thickness were performed using optical coherence tomography (Carl Zeiss Humphrey OCT 2 machine), in a circular pattern of 3.4 mm diameter, centred on the optic disc. Mean retinal nerve fibre layer thickness and age. The mean age was 40 (standard deviation, 17; range, 11-69) years. The mean peripapillary retinal nerve fibre layer thickness was 111.6 (standard deviation, 18.5; range, 52.0-155.0) micrometres. Age correlated significantly with peripapillary retinal nerve fibre layer thickness (r= -0.28, Pfibre layer thickness (based on optical coherence tomography) correlates negatively with age, which can interfere with the assessment and monitoring of glaucoma patients. An age-adjusted normogram may be necessary to interpret results.

  7. The Final Stage of Gravitationally Collapsed Thick Matter Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero Nicolini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the presence of a minimal length, physical objects cannot collapse to an infinite density, singular, matter point. In this paper, we consider the possible final stage of the gravitational collapse of “thick” matter layers. The energy momentum tensor we choose to model these shell-like objects is a proper modification of the source for “noncommutative geometry inspired,” regular black holes. By using higher momenta of Gaussian distribution to localize matter at finite distance from the origin, we obtain new solutions of the Einstein equation which smoothly interpolates between Minkowski’s geometry near the center of the shell and Schwarzschild’s spacetime far away from the matter layer. The metric is curvature singularity free. Black hole type solutions exist only for “heavy” shells; that is, M ≥Me, where Me is the mass of the extremal configuration. We determine the Hawking temperature and a modified area law taking into account the extended nature of the source.

  8. An Analysis of ZnS:Cu Phosphor Layer Thickness Influence on Electroluminescence Device Performances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pakpoom Chansri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Electroluminescence (EL device is a new technology; its thickness is within micrometer range which can bend more easily and emit light. However, the thickness of ZnS:Cu phosphor layer may affect the light intensity, so we have analyzed the thickness of ZnS:Cu phosphor layer on EL device. The EL devices consist of ITO:PET/ZnS:Cu phosphor/insulator (BaTiO3/Ag electrode. The EL devices were fabricated in changing thickness 10 μm, 30 μm, and 50 μm. At 100 V 400 Hz, the luminance of EL devices was 51.22 cd/m2 for thickness 30 μm more than that of 45.78 cd/m2 (thickness: 10 μm and 42.58 cd/m2 (thickness: 50 μm. However, the peak light intensity was achieved at wavelength of 507 nm which was not influenced by the thickness of the ZnS:Cu phosphor. The use of the ZnS:Cu phosphor layer at thickness 30 μm in the EL device significantly improves the luminescence performance.

  9. Analysis of Surface Waves in Saturated Layered Poroelastic Half-Spaces Using the Thin Layer Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Huayou; Cui, Yujun; Zhang, Dianji

    2018-03-01

    There are multiple modes of surface waves in saturated layered poroelastic half-spaces. The phase velocity and the attenuation of the modes are frequency dependent. The frequency behaviour of the modes can be studied using the layer transfer, stiffness and the transmission/reflection matrix methods. However, it is very difficult to find the complex roots of the determinants because the entries of the matrices involve the complex exponential functions of the wavenumber and the thickness of layer. To overcome this difficulty, the entries in the matrix are expressed in the form of algebraic functions using the thin layer method. Thus, the eigenvalues and eigenvectors can be easily solved using the matrix decomposition techniques instead of the root-searching ones. Some of the eigenvalues correspond to the wavenumbers of the surface waves, and can be picked out based on the characteristics of the surface waves. The frequency behaviour, variations of the pore pressure and the skeleton's displacements with the depth can be then investigated from the corresponding eigenvalues and eigenvectors, respectively. The method is verified by comparing the analytical and the discrete results in the saturated poroelastic half-space with the permeable surface. The method is applied to appreciate the effects of an impermeable surface on Rayleigh waves (R-waves) and the existence of Stoneley waves in the poroelastic half-space. The frequency behaviour of Rayleigh waves in three typical layered poroelastic half-spaces is also analyzed.

  10. Surface-layer gusts for aircraft operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Young, G.S.; Kristensen, L.

    1992-01-01

    We use Monin-Obukhov similarity theory to extend the Kristensen et al. (1991) aviation gust estimation technique from the neutral to the diabatic surface layer. Example calculations demonstrate the importance of this correction. Simple stability class methods using only standard aviation surface ...

  11. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and visual hallucinations in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jee-Young; Kim, Jae Min; Ahn, Jeeyun; Kim, Han-Joon; Jeon, Beom S; Kim, Tae Wan

    2014-01-01

    Defective visual information processing from both central and peripheral pathways is one of the suggested mechanisms of visual hallucination in Parkinson's disease (PD). To investigate the role of retinal thinning for visual hallucination in PD, we conducted a case-control study using spectral domain optical coherence tomography. We examined a representative sample of 61 patients with PD and 30 healthy controls who had no history of ophthalmic diseases. General ophthalmologic examinations and optical coherence tomography scans were performed in each participant. Total macular thickness and the thickness of each retinal layer on horizontal scans through the fovea were compared between the groups. In a comparison between patients with PD and healthy controls, there was significant parafoveal inner nuclear layer thinning, whereas other retinal layers, including the retinal nerve fiber layer, as well as total macular thicknesses were not different. In terms of visual hallucinations among the PD subgroups, only retinal nerve fiber layer thickness differed significantly, whereas total macular thickness and the thickness of other retinal layers did not differ. The retinal nerve fiber layer was thinnest in the group that had hallucinations without dementia, followed by the group that had hallucinations with dementia, and the group that had no hallucinations and no dementia. General ophthalmologic examinations did not reveal any significant correlation with hallucinations. There were no significant correlations between retinal thicknesses and duration or severity of PD and medication dosages. The results indicate that retinal nerve fiber layer thinning may be related to visual hallucination in nondemented patients with PD. Replication studies as well as further studies to elucidate the mechanism of thinning are warranted. Copyright © 2013 Movement Disorder Society.

  12. Variations of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer thickness according to the torsion direction of optic disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang Hoon; Kim, Chan Yun; Kim, Na Rae

    2014-02-20

    To examine the relationship between the optic disc torsion and peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness through a comparison with the macular ganglion cell inner plexiform layer complex (GCIPL) thickness measured by Cirrus optical coherence tomography (OCT). Ninety-four eyes of 94 subjects with optic disc torsion and 114 eyes of 114 subjects without optic disc torsion were enrolled prospectively. The participants underwent fundus photography and OCT imaging in peripapillary RNFL mode and macular GCIPL mode. The participants were divided into groups according to the presence or absence of optic disc torsion. The eyes with optic disc torsion were further divided into supranasal torsion and inferotemporal torsion groups according to the direction of optic disc torsion. The mean RNFL and GCIPL thicknesses for the quadrants and subsectors were compared. The superior and inferior peak locations of the RNFL were also measured according to the torsion direction. The temporal RNFL thickness was significantly thicker in inferotemporal torsion, whereas the GCIPL thickness at all segments was unaffected. The inferotemporal optic torsion had more temporally positioned superior peak locations of the RNFL than the nontorsion and supranasal-torted optic disc. Thickening of the temporal RNFL with a temporal shift in the superior peak within the eyes with inferotemporal optic disc torsion can lead to interpretation errors. The ganglion cell analysis algorithm can assist in differentiating eyes with optic disc torsion.

  13. [Determination of film thickness, component and content based on glass surface by using XRF spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Yan; Ma, Mi-Xia; Nie, Zuo-Ren

    2013-12-01

    Film thickness, component and content based on glass surface were determined by using XRF technic, measure condition and instrument work condition in every layer were set and adjusted for the best measure effect for every element. Background fundamental parameter (BG-FP) method was built up. Measure results with this method were consistent with the actual preparation course and the method could fit to production application.

  14. Effect of layer thickness on device response of silicon heavily supersaturated with sulfur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, David; Mathews, Jay; Sullivan, Joseph T.; Akey, Austin; Aziz, Michael J.; Buonassisi, Tonio; Persans, Peter; Warrender, Jeffrey M.

    2016-05-01

    We report on a simple experiment in which the thickness of a hyperdoped silicon layer, supersaturated with sulfur by ion implantation followed by pulsed laser melting and rapid solidification, is systematically varied at constant average sulfur concentration, by varying the implantation energy, dose, and laser fluence. Contacts are deposited and the external quantum efficiency (EQE) is measured for visible wavelengths. We posit that the sulfur layer primarily absorbs light but contributes negligible photocurrent, and we seek to support this by analyzing the EQE data for the different layer thicknesses in two interlocking ways. In the first, we use the measured concentration depth profiles to obtain the approximate layer thicknesses, and, for each wavelength, fit the EQE vs. layer thickness curve to obtain the absorption coefficient of hyperdoped silicon for that wavelength. Comparison to literature values for the hyperdoped silicon absorption coefficients [S.H. Pan et al. Applied Physics Letters 98, 121913 (2011)] shows good agreement. Next, we essentially run this process in reverse; we fit with Beer's law the curves of EQE vs. hyperdoped silicon absorption coefficient for those wavelengths that are primarily absorbed in the hyperdoped silicon layer, and find that the layer thicknesses obtained from the fit are in good agreement with the original values obtained from the depth profiles. We conclude that the data support our interpretation of the hyperdoped silicon layer as providing negligible photocurrent at high S concentrations. This work validates the absorption data of Pan et al. [Applied Physics Letters 98, 121913 (2011)], and is consistent with reports of short mobility-lifetime products in hyperdoped layers. It suggests that for optoelectronic devices containing hyperdoped layers, the most important contribution to the above band gap photoresponse may be due to photons absorbed below the hyperdoped layer.

  15. Effect of layer thickness on device response of silicon heavily supersaturated with sulfur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchinson, David; Mathews, Jay; Sullivan, Joseph T.; Buonassisi, Tonio; Akey, Austin; Aziz, Michael J.; Persans, Peter; Warrender, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    We report on a simple experiment in which the thickness of a hyperdoped silicon layer, supersaturated with sulfur by ion implantation followed by pulsed laser melting and rapid solidification, is systematically varied at constant average sulfur concentration, by varying the implantation energy, dose, and laser fluence. Contacts are deposited and the external quantum efficiency (EQE) is measured for visible wavelengths. We posit that the sulfur layer primarily absorbs light but contributes negligible photocurrent, and we seek to support this by analyzing the EQE data for the different layer thicknesses in two interlocking ways. In the first, we use the measured concentration depth profiles to obtain the approximate layer thicknesses, and, for each wavelength, fit the EQE vs. layer thickness curve to obtain the absorption coefficient of hyperdoped silicon for that wavelength. Comparison to literature values for the hyperdoped silicon absorption coefficients [S.H. Pan et al. Applied Physics Letters 98, 121913 (2011)] shows good agreement. Next, we essentially run this process in reverse; we fit with Beer’s law the curves of EQE vs. hyperdoped silicon absorption coefficient for those wavelengths that are primarily absorbed in the hyperdoped silicon layer, and find that the layer thicknesses obtained from the fit are in good agreement with the original values obtained from the depth profiles. We conclude that the data support our interpretation of the hyperdoped silicon layer as providing negligible photocurrent at high S concentrations. This work validates the absorption data of Pan et al. [Applied Physics Letters 98, 121913 (2011)], and is consistent with reports of short mobility-lifetime products in hyperdoped layers. It suggests that for optoelectronic devices containing hyperdoped layers, the most important contribution to the above band gap photoresponse may be due to photons absorbed below the hyperdoped layer.

  16. Effect of layer thickness on device response of silicon heavily supersaturated with sulfur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchinson, David [Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy NY 12180 (United States); Department of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, United States Military Academy, West Point NY 10996 (United States); Mathews, Jay [US Army ARDEC – Benét Laboratories, Watervliet NY 12189 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Dayton, Dayton, OH 45469 (United States); Sullivan, Joseph T.; Buonassisi, Tonio [School of Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge MA 02139 (United States); Akey, Austin [School of Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge MA 02139 (United States); Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Cambridge MA 02138 (United States); Aziz, Michael J. [Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Cambridge MA 02138 (United States); Persans, Peter [Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy NY 12180 (United States); Warrender, Jeffrey M., E-mail: jwarrend@post.harvard.edu [US Army ARDEC – Benét Laboratories, Watervliet NY 12189 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    We report on a simple experiment in which the thickness of a hyperdoped silicon layer, supersaturated with sulfur by ion implantation followed by pulsed laser melting and rapid solidification, is systematically varied at constant average sulfur concentration, by varying the implantation energy, dose, and laser fluence. Contacts are deposited and the external quantum efficiency (EQE) is measured for visible wavelengths. We posit that the sulfur layer primarily absorbs light but contributes negligible photocurrent, and we seek to support this by analyzing the EQE data for the different layer thicknesses in two interlocking ways. In the first, we use the measured concentration depth profiles to obtain the approximate layer thicknesses, and, for each wavelength, fit the EQE vs. layer thickness curve to obtain the absorption coefficient of hyperdoped silicon for that wavelength. Comparison to literature values for the hyperdoped silicon absorption coefficients [S.H. Pan et al. Applied Physics Letters 98, 121913 (2011)] shows good agreement. Next, we essentially run this process in reverse; we fit with Beer’s law the curves of EQE vs. hyperdoped silicon absorption coefficient for those wavelengths that are primarily absorbed in the hyperdoped silicon layer, and find that the layer thicknesses obtained from the fit are in good agreement with the original values obtained from the depth profiles. We conclude that the data support our interpretation of the hyperdoped silicon layer as providing negligible photocurrent at high S concentrations. This work validates the absorption data of Pan et al. [Applied Physics Letters 98, 121913 (2011)], and is consistent with reports of short mobility-lifetime products in hyperdoped layers. It suggests that for optoelectronic devices containing hyperdoped layers, the most important contribution to the above band gap photoresponse may be due to photons absorbed below the hyperdoped layer.

  17. The Influence of Irradiation Time and Layer Thickness on Elution of Triethylene Glycol Dimethacrylate from SDR® Bulk-Fill Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryta Łagocka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study aimed to evaluate triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA elution from SDR bulk-fill composite. Methods. Three groups of samples were prepared, including samples polymerized in a 4 mm layer for 20 s, in a 4 mm layer for 40 s, and in a 2 mm layer for 20 s. Elution of TEGDMA into 100% ethanol, a 75% ethanol/water solution, and distilled water was studied. The TEGDMA concentration was measured using HPLC. Results. The TEGDMA concentration decreased in the following order: 100% ethanol > 75% ethanol > distilled water. Doubling the energy delivered to the 4 mm thick sample caused decrease (p<0.05 in TEGDMA elution to distilled water. In ethanol solutions, the energy increase had no influence on TEGDMA elution. Decreasing the sample thickness resulted in decrease (p<0.05 in TEGDMA elution for all the solutions. Conclusions. The concentration of eluted TEGDMA and the elution time were both strongly affected by the hydrophobicity of the solvent. Doubling the energy delivered to the 4 mm thick sample did not decrease the elution of TEGDMA but did decrease the amount of the monomer available to less aggressive solvents. Elution of TEGDMA was also correlated with the exposed sample surface area. Clinical Relevance. Decreasing the SDR layer thickness decreases TEGDMA elution.

  18. Inter-Layer Energy Transfer through Wetting-Layer States in Bi-layer InGaAs/GaAs Quantum-Dot Structures with Thick Barriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Zhang-Cheng; Zhang, Ya-Ting; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2009-01-01

    The inter-layer energy transfer in a bi-layer InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot structure with a thick GaAs barrier is studied using temperature-dependent photoluminescence. The abnormal enhancement of the photoluminescence of the QDs in the layer with a larger amount of coverage at 110K is observed, which...... can be explained by considering the resonant F¨orster energy transfer between the wetting layer states at elevated temperatures....

  19. Surface layer effects on waste glass corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, X.

    1993-01-01

    Water contact subjects waste glass to chemical attack that results in the formation of surface alteration layers. Two principal hypotheses have been advanced concerning the effect of surface alteration layers on continued glass corrosion: (1) they act as a mass transport barrier and (2) they influence the chemical affinity of the glass reaction. In general, transport barrier effects have been found to be less important than affinity effects in the corrosion of most high-level nuclear waste glasses. However, they can be important under some circumstances, for example, in a very alkaline solution, in leachants containing Mg ions, or under conditions where the matrix dissolution rate is very low. The latter suggests that physical barrier effect may affect the long-term glass dissolution rate. Surface layers influence glass reaction affinity through the effects of the altered glass and secondary phases on the solution chemistry. The reaction affinity may be controlled by various precipitates and crystalline phases, amorphous silica phases, gel layer, or all the components of the glass. The surface alteration layers influence radionuclide release mainly through colloid formation, crystalline phase incorporation, and gel layer retention. This paper reviews current understanding and uncertainties

  20. Optical coherence tomography assisted retinal nerve fibre layer thickness profile in high myopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malakar, Mousumi; Askari, Syed Nasir; Ashraf, Humayun; Waris, Abdul; Ahuja, Anupam; Asghar, Adil

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the association of high myopia with retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) thickness by Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FD OCT). Fifty highly myopic eyes (25 patients) and forty emmetropic eyes (20 Normal subject) were randomly selected after excluding concomitant ophthalmic disorder and RNFL thickness measured using the Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FD OCT). The overall mean RNFL thickness in the myopic groups and control were 87.89 μm and 111.64 μm respectively. The mean retinal nerve fibre thickness was significantly less in myopic eyes as compared to control group (p =0.0001). Retinal nerve fibre layer thickness shows topographic double hump pattern in both the groups (myopes and emmetropes). Retinal nerve fibre thickness was significantly less in myopic eyes as compared to emmetropic eyes. The retinal nerve fibre layer thinning in high myopes may be confused with open angle glaucoma, a disease also prevalent in high myopes. There is therefore a need to have retinal nerve fibre layer thickness normogram for high myopes of a given population group to avoid wrong interpretation.

  1. Physical Limitations of Phosphor layer thickness and concentration for White LEDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Cher Ming; Singh, Preetpal; Zhao, Wenyu; Kuo, Hao-Chung

    2018-02-05

    Increasing phosphor layer thickness and concentration can enhance the lumen flux of white LED (W-LED). In this work, we found that increasing the phosphor layer thickness and concentration can increase its temperature, and there is also a maximum thickness and concentration beyond which their increase will not lead to lumen increase, but only temperature increase. Higher thickness and higher concentration also results in warm light instead of White light. The maximum thickness and concentration are found to be limited by the scattering of light rays with higher % decrease of blue light rays than the yellow light rays. The results obtained in this work can also be used to compute the temperature and thermo-mechanical stress distribution of an encapsulated LED, demonstrating its usefulness to the design of encapsulated LED packages. Simulation software like ANSYS and TracePro are used extensively to verify the root cause mechanisms.

  2. Determination of crystallization as a function of Mo layer thickness in Mo/Si multilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdali, Salim; Gerward, Leif; Yakshin, A.E.

    2002-01-01

    information on the crystalline phases, average size and crystallite formation. Comparison of these parameters for the samples examined provided novel results, especially regarding the in-plane and in-depth average sizes of the crystallites. The most important result is that crystallization takes place already......Mo/Si multilayer samples with different Mo layer thickness were deposited by electron beam evaporation, while Kr+ ions (300 eV) were used for polishing the Si layers. Crystallization as a function of the Mo layer thickness deposited was investigated by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, giving...

  3. Enhanced photocurrent density in graphene/Si based solar cell (GSSC) by optimizing active layer thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosikhin, Ahmad; Hidayat, Aulia Fikri; Syuhada, Ibnu; Winata, Toto

    2015-01-01

    Thickness dependent photocurrent density in active layer of graphene/Si based solar cell has been investigated via analytical – simulation study. This report is a preliminary comparison of experimental and analytical investigation of graphene/Si based solar cell. Graphene sheet was interfaced with Si thin film forming heterojunction solar cell that was treated as a device model for photocurrent generator. Such current can be enhanced by optimizing active layer thickness and involving metal oxide as supporting layer to shift photons absorption. In this case there are two type of devices model with and without TiO 2 in which the silicon thickness varied at 20 – 100 nm. All of them have examined and also compared with each other to obtain an optimum value. From this calculation it found that generated currents almost linear with thickness but there are saturated conditions that no more enhancements will be achieved. Furthermore TiO 2 layer is effectively increases photon absorption but reducing device stability, maximum current is fluctuates enough. This may caused by the disturbance of excitons diffusion and resistivity inside each layer. Finally by controlling active layer thickness, it is quite useful to estimate optimization in order to develop the next solar cell devices

  4. Strong Effect of Azodye Layer Thickness on RM-Stabilized Photoalignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-21

    Strong Effect of Azodye Layer Thickness on RM-Stabilized Photoalignment Colin McGinty*, Valerie Finnemeyer**, Robert Reich**, Harry Clark...vertical alignment on these substrates. For the thinner BY layers, we do not see this strong evidence of out of plane reorientation. The out of...In this report we show the surprising effect that thin azodye layers demonstrate improved stability over those that are thicker. Figure 6

  5. Changes in the relative thickness of individual subcutaneous adipose tissue layers in growing pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McEvoy, Fintan; Strathe, Anders Bjerring; Madsen, Mads T.

    2007-01-01

    change in body weight in normal growing pigs. Methods: A group of nine pigs was examined using 14 MHz linear array transducer on three A group of nine pigs was examined using 14 MHz linear array transducer on three separate occasions. The average weight was 51, 94 and 124 kg for each successive scan...... longevity and finally to assist in the calculation of payments to producers that allow for general adiposity. Currently for reasons of tradition and ease, total adipose thickness measurements are made at one or multiple sites although it has been long recognized that up to three well defined layers (outer...... (L1), middle (L2), and inner (L3)) may be present to make up the total. Various features and properties of these layers have been described. This paper examines the contribution of each layer to total adipose thickness at three time points and describes the change in thickness of each layer per unit...

  6. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and neuropsychiatric manifestations in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, S; Shorer, R; Wollman, J; Dotan, G; Paran, D

    2017-11-01

    Background Cognitive impairment is frequent in systemic lupus erythematosus. Atrophy of the corpus callosum and hippocampus have been reported in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, and diffusion tensor imaging studies have shown impaired white matter integrity, suggesting that white matter damage in systemic lupus erythematosus may underlie the cognitive impairment as well as other neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus manifestations. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, as assessed by optical coherence tomography, has been suggested as a biomarker for white matter damage in neurologic disorders such as multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Retinal nerve fiber layer thinning may occur early, even in patients with mild clinical symptoms. Aim The objective of this study was to assess the association of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, as a biomarker of white matter damage in systemic lupus erythematosus patients, with neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus manifestations, including cognitive impairment. Methods Twenty-one consecutive patients with systemic lupus erythematosus underwent neuropsychological testing using a validated computerized battery of tests as well as the Rey-Auditory verbal learning test. All 21 patients, as well as 11 healthy, age matched controls, underwent optical coherence tomography testing to assess retinal nerve fiber layer thickness. Correlations between retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and results in eight cognitive domains assessed by the computerized battery of tests as well as the Rey-Auditory verbal learning test were assessed in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, with and without neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus, and compared to retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in healthy controls. Results No statistically significant correlation was found between retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus as compared to healthy

  7. Elastic layer under axisymmetric indentation and surface energy effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intarit, Pong-in; Senjuntichai, Teerapong; Rungamornrat, Jaroon

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, a continuum-based approach is adopted to investigate the contact problem of an elastic layer with finite thickness and rigid base subjected to axisymmetric indentation with the consideration of surface energy effects. A complete Gurtin-Murdoch surface elasticity is employed to consider the influence of surface stresses. The indentation problem of a rigid frictionless punch with arbitrary axisymmetric profiles is formulated by employing the displacement Green's functions, derived with the aid of Hankel integral transform technique. The problem is solved by assuming the contact pressure distribution in terms of a linear combination of admissible functions and undetermined coefficients. Those coefficients are then obtained by employing a collocation technique and an efficient numerical quadrature scheme. The accuracy of proposed solution technique is verified by comparing with existing solutions for rigid indentation on an elastic half-space. Selected numerical results for the indenters with flat-ended cylindrical and paraboloidal punch profiles are presented to portray the influence of surface energy effects on elastic fields of the finite layer. It is found that the presence of surface stresses renders the layer stiffer, and the size-dependent behavior of elastic fields is observed in the present solutions. In addition, the surface energy effects become more pronounced with smaller contact area; thus, the influence of surface energy cannot be ignored in the analysis of indentation problem especially when the indenter size is very small such as in the case of nanoindentation.

  8. Generation of Bessel Surface Plasmon Polaritons in a Finite-Thickness Metal Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Kurilkina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A theory of generation of low- and high-index Bessel surface plasmon polaritons and their superposition in a metal film of a finite thickness is developed. Correct analytical expressions are obtained for the field of two families of Bessel surface plasmon polariton modes formed inside and outside the metal layer. The intensity distribution near the boundary of the layer has been calculated and analyzed. A scheme for the experimental realization of a superposition of Bessel surface plasmon polaritons is suggested. Our study demonstrates that it is feasible to use the superposition of Bessel surface plasmon polaritons as a virtual tip for near-field optical microscopy with a nanoscale resolution.

  9. Models of bedrock surface and overburden thickness over Olkiluoto island and nearby sea area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moenkkoenen, H. [WSP Finland Oy, Helsinki (Finland)

    2012-04-15

    In this report, a model of bedrock surface and a model of overburden thickness over the Olkiluoto Island and the nearby sea area are presented. Also in purpose to produce material for biosphere and radionuclide transport modelling, stratigraphy models of different sediment layers were created at two priority areas north and south of the Olkiluoto Island. The work concentrated on the collection and description of available data of bedrock surface and overburden thickness. Because the information on the bedrock surface and overburden is collected from different sources and is based on a number of types of data the quality and applicability of data sets varies. Consequently also the reliability in different parts of the models varies. Input data for the bedrock surface and overburden thickness models include 2928 single points and additional outcrops observations (611 polygons) in the modelled area. In addition, the input data include 173 seismic refraction lines (6534 points) and acousticseismic sounding lines (26655 points from which 13721 points are located in model area) in the Olkiluoto offshore area. The average elevation of bedrock surface in area is 2.1 metres above the sea level. The average thickness of overburden is 2.5 metres varying typically between 2 - 4 metres. Thickest overburden covers (approximately 16 metres) of terrestrial area are located at the western end of the Olkiluoto Island and in sea basin south of the island. (orig.)

  10. Thermal stability of double-ceramic-layer thermal barrier coatings with various coating thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Hui; Zhong Xinghua; Li Jiayan; Zhang Yanfei; Meng Jian; Cao Xueqiang

    2006-01-01

    Double-ceramic-layer (DCL) coatings with various thickness ratios composed of YSZ (6-8 wt.% Y 2 O 3 + ZrO 2 ) and lanthanum zirconate (LZ, La 2 Zr 2 O 7 ) were produced by the atmospheric plasma spraying. Chemical stability of LZ in contact with YSZ in DCL coatings was investigated by calcining powder blends at different temperatures. No obvious reaction was observed when the calcination temperature was lower than 1250 deg. C, implying that LZ and YSZ had good chemical applicability for producing DCL coating. The thermal cycling test indicate that the cycling lives of the DCL coatings are strongly dependent on the thickness ratio of LZ and YSZ, and the coatings with YSZ thickness between 150 and 200 μm have even longer lives than the single-layer YSZ coating. When the YSZ layer is thinner than 100 μm, the DCL coatings failed in the LZ layer close to the interface of YSZ layer and LZ layer. For the coatings with the YSZ thickness above 150 μm, the failure mainly occurs at the interface of the YSZ layer and the bond coat

  11. Study on coated layer material performance of coated particle fuel FBR (2). High temperature property and capability of coating to thick layer of TiN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naganuma, Masayuki; Mizuno, Tomoyasu

    2002-08-01

    'Helium Gas Cooled Coated Particle Fuel FBR' is one of attractive core concepts in the Feasibility Study on Commercialized Fast Reactor Cycle System in Japan, and the design study is presently proceeded. As one of key technologies of this concept, the coated layer material is important, and ceramics is considered to be a candidate material because of the superior refractory. Based on existing knowledge, TiN is regarded to be a possible candidate material, to which some property tests and evaluations have been conducted. In this study, preliminary tests about the high temperature property and the capability of thick layer coating of TiN have been conducted. Results of these tests come to the following conclusions. Heating tests of two kinds of TiN layer specimens coated by PVD (Physical Vapor Deposition) and CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) were conducted. As a result, as for CVD coating specimens, remarkable charge was not observed on the layer up to 2,000degC, therefore we concluded that the layer by CVD had applicability up to high temperature of actual operation level. On the other hand, as for PVD coating specimens, an unstable behavior that the layer changed to a mesh like texture was observed on a 2,000degC heated specimen, therefore the applied PVD method is not considered to be promising as the coating technique. The surface conditions of some parts inside CVD device were investigated in order to evaluate possibility of TiN thick coating (∼100 μm). As a result, around 500 μm of TiN coating layer was observed on the condition of multilayer. Therefore, we conclude that CVD has capability of coating up to thick layer in actual coated particle fuel fabrication. (author)

  12. Electron Scattering at Surfaces of Epitaxial Metal Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Jasmeet Singh

    In the field of electron transport in metal films and wires, the 'size effect' refers to the increase in the resistivity of the films and wires as their critical dimensions (thickness of film, width and height of wires) approach or become less than the electron mean free path lambda, which is, for example, 39 nm for bulk copper at room temperature. This size-effect is currently of great concern to the semiconductor industry because the continued downscaling of feature sizes has already lead to Cu interconnect wires in this size effect regime, with a reported 2.5 times higher resistivity for 40 nm wide Cu wires than for bulk Cu. Silver is a possible alternate material for interconnect wires and titanium nitride is proposed as a gate metal in novel field-effect-transistors. Therefore, it is important to develop an understanding of how the growth, the surface morphology, and the microstructure of ultrathin (few nanometers) Cu, Ag and TiN layers affect their electrical properties. This dissertation aims to advance the scientific knowledge of electron scattering at surfaces (external surfaces and grain boundaries), that are, the primary reasons for the size-effect in metal conductors. The effect of surface and grain boundary scattering on the resistivity of Cu thin films and nanowires is separately quantified using (i) in situ transport measurements on single-crystal, atomically smooth Cu(001) layers, (ii) textured polycrystalline Cu(111) layers and patterned wires with independently varying grain size, thickness and line width, and (iii) in situ grown interfaces including Cu-Ta, Cu-MgO, Cu-vacuum and Cu-oxygen. In addition, the electron surface scattering is also measured in situ for single-crystal Ag(001), (111) twinned epitaxial Ag(001), and single-crystal TiN(001) layers. Cu(001), Ag(001), and TiN(001) layers with a minimum continuous thickness of 4, 3.5 and 1.8 nm, respectively, are grown by ultra-high vacuum magnetron sputter deposition on MgO(001) substrates with

  13. Whisker Formation On Galvanic Tin Surface Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radanyi A.L.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work reports the effect of substrate composition, thickness of the tin electroplate and its morphology on pressure-induced tin whisker formation. Pure tin deposits of different thickness were obtained on a copper and brass substrates using methane sulfonic industrial bath. The deposits were compressed by a steel bearing ball forming imprint on the surface. The microstructure of tin whiskers obtained at the boundary of each imprint, their length and number were studied using both light and scanning electron microscopy. It was shown that the most intensive formation and growth of whiskers was observed in the first two hours. In general, brass substrate was shown to be more prone to whisker formation than copper independently of the tin coating thickness. The results have been compared with industrial bright tin finish on control unit socket leads and proposals have been made as to modification of the production process in order to minimize the risk of whiskering.

  14. The surface roughness and planetary boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telford, James W.

    1980-03-01

    Applications of the entrainment process to layers at the boundary, which meet the self similarity requirements of the logarithmic profile, have been studied. By accepting that turbulence has dominating scales related in scale length to the height above the surface, a layer structure is postulated wherein exchange is rapid enough to keep the layers internally uniform. The diffusion rate is then controlled by entrainment between layers. It has been shown that theoretical relationships derived on the basis of using a single layer of this type give quantitatively correct factors relating the turbulence, wind and shear stress for very rough surface conditions. For less rough surfaces, the surface boundary layer can be divided into several layers interacting by entrainment across each interface. This analysis leads to the following quantitatively correct formula compared to published measurements. 1 24_2004_Article_BF00877766_TeX2GIFE1.gif {σ _w }/{u^* } = ( {2/{9Aa}} )^{{1/4}} ( {1 - 3^{{1/2}{ a/k{d_n }/z{σ _w }/{u^* }z/L} )^{{1/4}} = 1.28(1 - 0.945({{σ _w }/{u^* }}}) {{z/L}})^{{1/4 where u^* = ( {{tau/ρ}}^{{1/2}}, σ w is the standard deviation of the vertical velocity, z is the height and L is the Obukhov scale lenght. The constants a, A, k and d n are the entrainment constant, the turbulence decay constant, Von Karman's constant, and the layer depth derived from the theory. Of these, a and A, are universal constants and not empirically determined for the boundary layer. Thus the turbulence needed for the plume model of convection, which resides above these layers and reaches to the inversion, is determined by the shear stress and the heat flux in the surface layers. This model applies to convection in cool air over a warm sea. The whole field is now determined except for the temperature of the air relative to the water, and the wind, which need a further parameter describing sea surface roughness. As a first stop to describing a surface where roughness elements

  15. Retinal nerve fibre layer thickness measurements in normal Indian population by optical coherence tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakrishnan R

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To obtain retinal nerve fibre layer thickness measurements by optical coherence tomography (OCT in normal Indian population. Materials and Methods: Total of 118 randomly selected eyes of 118 normal Indian subjects of both sex and various age groups underwent retinal nerve fiber layer thickness analysis by Stratus OCT 3000 V 4.0.1. The results were evaluated and compared to determine the normal retinal nerve fiber layer thickness measurements and its variations with sex and age. Results: Mean + standard deviation retinal nerve fiber layer thickness for various quadrants of superior, inferior, nasal, temporal, and along the entire circumference around the optic nerve head were 138.2 + 21.74, 129.1 + 25.67, 85.71 + 21, 66.38 + 17.37, and 104.8 + 38.81 µm, respectively. There was no significant difference in the measurements between males and females, and no significant correlation with respect to age. Conclusion: Our results provide the normal retinal nerve fiber layer thickness measurements and its variations with age and sex in Indian population.

  16. Surface shear rheology of saponin adsorption layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golemanov, Konstantin; Tcholakova, Slavka; Denkov, Nikolai; Pelan, Edward; Stoyanov, Simeon D

    2012-08-21

    Saponins are a wide class of natural surfactants, with molecules containing a rigid hydrophobic group (triterpenoid or steroid), connected via glycoside bonds to hydrophilic oligosaccharide chains. These surfactants are very good foam stabiliziers and emulsifiers, and show a range of nontrivial biological activities. The molecular mechanisms behind these unusual properties are unknown, and, therefore, the saponins have attracted significant research interest in recent years. In our previous study (Stanimirova et al. Langmuir 2011, 27, 12486-12498), we showed that the triterpenoid saponins extracted from Quillaja saponaria plant (Quillaja saponins) formed adsorption layers with unusually high surface dilatational elasticity, 280 ± 30 mN/m. In this Article, we study the shear rheological properties of the adsorption layers of Quillaja saponins. In addition, we study the surface shear rheological properties of Yucca saponins, which are of steroid type. The experimental results show that the adsorption layers of Yucca saponins exhibit purely viscous rheological response, even at the lowest shear stress applied, whereas the adsorption layers of Quillaja saponins behave like a viscoelastic two-dimensional body. For Quillaja saponins, a single master curve describes the data for the viscoelastic creep compliance versus deformation time, up to a certain critical value of the applied shear stress. Above this value, the layer compliance increases, and the adsorption layers eventually transform into viscous ones. The experimental creep-recovery curves for the viscoelastic layers are fitted very well by compound Voigt rheological model. The obtained results are discussed from the viewpoint of the layer structure and the possible molecular mechanisms, governing the rheological response of the saponin adsorption layers.

  17. Distribution and landscape controls of organic layer thickness and carbon within the Alaskan Yukon River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastick, Neal J.; Rigge, Matthew B.; Wylie, Bruce K.; Jorgenson, M. Torre; Rose, Joshua R.; Johnson, Kristofer D.; Ji, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Understanding of the organic layer thickness (OLT) and organic layer carbon (OLC) stocks in subarctic ecosystems is critical due to their importance in the global carbon cycle. Moreover, post-fire OLT provides an indicator of long-term successional trajectories and permafrost susceptibility to thaw. To these ends, we 1) mapped OLT and associated uncertainty at 30 m resolution in the Yukon River Basin (YRB), Alaska, employing decision tree models linking remotely sensed imagery with field and ancillary data, 2) converted OLT to OLC using a non-linear regression, 3) evaluate landscape controls on OLT and OLC, and 4) quantified the post-fire recovery of OLT and OLC. Areas of shallow (2 = 0.68; OLC: R2 = 0.66), where an average of 16 cm OLT and 5.3 kg/m2 OLC were consumed by fires. Strong predictors of OLT included climate, topography, near-surface permafrost distributions, soil wetness, and spectral information. Our modeling approach enabled us to produce regional maps of OLT and OLC, which will be useful in understanding risks and feedbacks associated with fires and climate feedbacks.

  18. Simple electrodepositing of CoFe/Cu multilayers: Effect of ferromagnetic layer thicknesses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tekgül, Atakan, E-mail: atakantekgul@gmail.com [Akdeniz University, Physics Department, Science Faculty, TR-07058 Antalya (Turkey); Uludag University, Physics Department, Science and Literature Faculty, TR-16059 Bursa (Turkey); Alper, Mürsel [Uludag University, Physics Department, Science and Literature Faculty, TR-16059 Bursa (Turkey); Kockar, Hakan [Balikesir University, Physics Department, Science and Literature Faculty, TR-10145 Balikesir (Turkey)

    2017-01-01

    The CoFe/Cu magnetic multilayers were produced by changing CoFe ferromagnetic layers from 3 nm to 10 nm using electrodeposition. By now, the thinnest Cu (0.5 nm) layer thicknesses were used to see whether the GMR effect in the multilayers can be obtained or not since the pinning of non-magnetic layer between the ferromagnetic layers is required. For the proper depositions, the cyclic voltammograms was used, and the current–time transients were obtained. The Cu and CoFe layers were deposited at a cathode potential of −0.3 and −1.5 V with respect to saturated calomel electrode, respectively. From the XRD patterns, the multilayers were shown to be fcc crystal structures. For the magnetization measurements, saturation magnetization increases from 160 to 600 kA/m from 3 to 8 nm ferromagnetic layer thicknesses. And, the coercivity values increase until the 8 nm of the CoFe layer thickness. It is seen that the thin Cu layer (fixed at 0.5 nm) and pinholes support the random magnetization orientation and thus all multilayers exhibited the giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect, and the highest GMR value was observed about 5.5%. And, the variation of GMR field sensitivity was calculated. The results show that the GMR and GMR sensitivity are compatible among the multilayers. The CoFe/Cu magnetic multilayers having GMR properties are used in GMR sensors and hard disk drive of the nano-technological devices. - Highlights: • The much thinner (0.5 nm) Cu layer was used to obtain the GMR effect on the electrodeposited CoFe/Cu multilayers. • All samples exhibited GMR and the maximum GMR value was 5.5%. • The M{sub s} and the H{sub c} changed with increasing magnetic layer thickness.

  19. Effect of electrolyte temperature on the thickness of anodic aluminium oxide (AAO layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Michal

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Effect of electrolyte temperature on the thickness of resulting oxide layer has been studied. Unlike previous published studies this article was aimed to monitor the relationship between electrolyte temperature and resulting AAO layer thickness in interaction with other input factors affecting during anodizing process under special process condition, i.e. lower concentration of sulphuric acid, oxalic acid, boric acid and sodium chloride. According to Design of Experiments (DOE 80 individual test runs of experiment were carried out. Using statistical analysis and artificial intelligence for evaluation, the computational model predicting the thickness of oxide layer in the range from 5 / μm to 15 / μm with tolerance ± 0,5 / μm was developed.

  20. Prediction of Layer Thickness in Molten Borax Bath with Genetic Evolutionary Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylan, Fatih

    2011-04-01

    In this study, the vanadium carbide coating in molten borax bath process is modeled by evolutionary genetic programming (GEP) with bath composition (borax percentage, ferro vanadium (Fe-V) percentage, boric acid percentage), bath temperature, immersion time, and layer thickness data. Five inputs and one output data exist in the model. The percentage of borax, Fe-V, and boric acid, temperature, and immersion time parameters are used as input data and the layer thickness value is used as output data. For selected bath components, immersion time, and temperature variables, the layer thicknesses are derived from the mathematical expression. The results of the mathematical expressions are compared to that of experimental data; it is determined that the derived mathematical expression has an accuracy of 89%.

  1. A method of detection to the grinding wheel layer thickness based on computer vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yuchen; Fu, Luhua; Yang, Dujuan; Wang, Lei; Liu, Changjie; Wang, Zhong

    2018-01-01

    This paper proposed a method of detection to the grinding wheel layer thickness based on computer vision. A camera is used to capture images of grinding wheel layer on the whole circle. Forward lighting and back lighting are used to enables a clear image to be acquired. Image processing is then executed on the images captured, which consists of image preprocessing, binarization and subpixel subdivision. The aim of binarization is to help the location of a chord and the corresponding ring width. After subpixel subdivision, the thickness of the grinding layer can be calculated finally. Compared with methods usually used to detect grinding wheel wear, method in this paper can directly and quickly get the information of thickness. Also, the eccentric error and the error of pixel equivalent are discussed in this paper.

  2. Using ground-penetrating radar, topography and classification of vegetation to model the sediment and active layer thickness in a periglacial lake catchment, western Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrone, Johannes; Sohlenius, Gustav; Johansson, Emma; Lindborg, Tobias; Näslund, Jens-Ove; Strömgren, Mårten; Brydsten, Lars

    2016-11-01

    The geometries of a catchment constitute the basis for distributed physically based numerical modeling of different geoscientific disciplines. In this paper results from ground-penetrating radar (GPR) measurements, in terms of a 3-D model of total sediment thickness and active layer thickness in a periglacial catchment in western Greenland, are presented. Using the topography, the thickness and distribution of sediments are calculated. Vegetation classification and GPR measurements are used to scale active layer thickness from local measurements to catchment-scale models. Annual maximum active layer thickness varies from 0.3 m in wetlands to 2.0 m in barren areas and areas of exposed bedrock. Maximum sediment thickness is estimated to be 12.3 m in the major valleys of the catchment. A method to correlate surface vegetation with active layer thickness is also presented. By using relatively simple methods, such as probing and vegetation classification, it is possible to upscale local point measurements to catchment-scale models, in areas where the upper subsurface is relatively homogeneous. The resulting spatial model of active layer thickness can be used in combination with the sediment model as a geometrical input to further studies of subsurface mass transport and hydrological flow paths in the periglacial catchment through numerical modeling. The data set is available for all users via the PANGAEA database, doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.845258.

  3. Influence of changes in surface layer properties on tire/pavement noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, M.; Van Keulen, W.; Ceylan, H.; Van de Ven, M.F.C.; Molenaar, A.A.A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates changes in tire/pavement noise caused by variations in the road surface characteristics. This research is based on the analysis of noise and surface characteristics collected from sections with 25 mm thickness thin layer surfacings in the Netherlands. Investigations are first

  4. Partially coherent light propagation in stratified media containing an optically thick anisotropic layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Shane M.; Arteaga, Oriol; Martin, Alexander T.; Kahr, Bart

    2017-11-01

    Methods used to compute the reflection or transmission Mueller matrix of stratified media assume light is a monochromatic plane wave, but measurements with spectroscopic devices invariably involve a finite distribution of wavelengths and incidence angles. Consequently, there can be stark disagreement between calculation and experiment, especially when the specimen includes a thick non-opaque layer. To accurately model specimens with a thick layer, it is sometimes necessary to explicitly include the coherence of the light in models. For anisotropic and/or optically active media, we distinguish between five regimes of coherence. Algebraic expressions valid for all regimes are given. Experimental data spanning multiple regimes is modeled.

  5. The Bending Strength, Internal Bonding and Thickness Swelling of a Five Layer Sandwiched Bamboo Particleboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamaludin, M. A.; Bahari, S. A.; Nordin, K.; Soh, T. F. T.

    2010-03-01

    The demand for wood based material is increasing but the supply is decreasing. Therefore the price of these raw materials has increased. Bamboo provides an economically feasible alternative raw material for the wood based industry. Its properties are comparable to wood. It is also compatible with the existing processing technology. Bamboo is in abundance, easy to propagate and of short maturation period. Bamboo provides a cheaper alternative resource for the wood based industry. The development of new structural components from bamboo will widen its area of application from handicrafts to furniture and building components. In this study, five layer sandwiched bamboo particleboard were manufactured. The sandwiched Bamboo PB consists of a bamboo PB core, oil palm middle veneers and thin meranti surface veneers. The physical and mechanical properties of the bamboo sandwiched particleboards were tested in accordance to the BS-EN 317:1993 [1] and BS-EN 310:1993 [2], respectively. All the samples passed the standards. The modulus of elasticity was about 352% higher than the value specified in the BS standard, BS-EN 312-4:1996 [3]. The Internal bonding was about 23% higher than the general requirements specified in the standard. On the other hand, the thickness swelling was about 6% lower than the standard. No glue line failure was observed in the strength tests. Critical failures in the IB tests were observed in the particleboards. Tension failures were observed in the surface veneers in the bending tests. The five layer sandwiched bamboo particleboard can be used for light weight construction such as furniture, and wall and door panels in buildings.

  6. Versatile technique for assessing thickness of 2D layered materials by XPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemlyanov, Dmitry Y.; Jespersen, Michael; Zakharov, Dmitry N.; Hu, Jianjun; Paul, Rajib; Kumar, Anurag; Pacley, Shanee; Glavin, Nicholas; Saenz, David; Smith, Kyle C.; Fisher, Timothy S.; Voevodin, Andrey A.

    2018-03-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has been utilized as a versatile method for thickness characterization of various two-dimensional (2D) films. Accurate thickness can be measured simultaneously while acquiring XPS data for chemical characterization of 2D films having thickness up to approximately 10 nm. For validating the developed technique, thicknesses of few-layer graphene (FLG), MoS2 and amorphous boron nitride (a-BN) layer, produced by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD), plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), and pulsed laser deposition (PLD) respectively, were accurately measured. The intensity ratio between photoemission peaks recorded for the films (C 1s, Mo 3d, B 1s) and the substrates (Cu 2p, Al 2p, Si 2p) is the primary input parameter for thickness calculation, in addition to the atomic densities of the substrate and the film, and the corresponding electron attenuation length (EAL). The XPS data was used with a proposed model for thickness calculations, which was verified by cross-sectional transmission electron microscope (TEM) measurement of thickness for all the films. The XPS method determines thickness values averaged over an analysis area which is orders of magnitude larger than the typical area in cross-sectional TEM imaging, hence provides an advanced approach for thickness measurement over large areas of 2D materials. The study confirms that the versatile XPS method allows rapid and reliable assessment of the 2D material thickness and this method can facilitate in tailoring growth conditions for producing very thin 2D materials effectively over a large area. Furthermore, the XPS measurement for a typical 2D material is non-destructive and does not require special sample preparation. Therefore, after XPS analysis, exactly the same sample can undergo further processing or utilization.

  7. The Use of Hot-Film Technique for Boundary Layer Studies on a 21% Thick Airfoil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-01

    Marsters Laboratoire d’aerodynamique a hautes vitesses Director/Directeur 4 Q31, SUMMARY A heat transfer method of studying boundary layer flows over...boundary layer, the heat transfer response from the films, positioned carefully on the model surface, can be studied to determine the boundary layer...6tudier la rdponse thermique des films, soigneusement plac6s i la surface de la maquette, pour determiner les carac- tdristiques de la couche limite

  8. Survey of Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness in Anisometropic and Strabismic Amblyopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Soltani Moghaddam

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available . To investigate the effect of anisometropic and strabismic amblyopia on the nerve fiber layer thickness. This cross-sectional study was done on 54 amblyopic subjects, equally in both strabismic and anisometropic groups. The thickness otonerve fiber layer measured in superior, inferior, nasal, temporal quadrants and as a whole in both eyes of both groups. The means of thickness were compared in amblyopic and sound eyes. In strabismus group, the average nerve fiber layer thickness of the sound eye , in superior, inferior, nasal and temporal quadrants and as a whole were 113.23±14, 117.37±25, 68.96±6, 69.55±14 and 93.40±8 microns respectively. In amblyopic eyes of the same group, these measurements were 103.11±18, 67.74±11, and 69.59±16 and 89.59±12 microns in superior, inferior, nasal, temporal quadrants and as whole respectively. In anisometropic groups, the sound eye measurements were as 130.96±22, 129.07±29, 80.62±12, and 83.88±20 and 107.7±13 microns in superior, inferior, nasal and temporal quadrants and as a whole orderly. In amblyopic eyes of this group the mean thicknesses were 115.63±29, 133.15±25, 78.8±15, 80.2±16 and 109.17±21 microns in superior, inferior, nasal, temporal quadrants and as a whole respectively. Statistically, there were no significant differences between amblyopic and sound eyes (P>0.5. Our study did not support any significant change in a nerve fiber layer thickness of amblyopic patients; however, decreased thickness in superior and nasal quadrants of strabismic amblyopia and except inferior quadrant and as a whole. These measurements may be a clue for management and prognosis of amblyopia in old age.

  9. Survey of Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness in Anisometropic and Strabismic Amblyopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani Moghaddam, Reza; Medghalchi, Abdolreza; Alizadeh, Yousef

    2017-01-01

    . To investigate the effect of anisometropic and strabismic amblyopia on the nerve fiber layer thickness. This cross-sectional study was done on 54 amblyopic subjects, equally in both strabismic and anisometropic groups. The thickness otonerve fiber layer measured in superior, inferior, nasal, temporal quadrants and as a whole in both eyes of both groups. The means of thickness were compared in amblyopic and sound eyes. In strabismus group, the average nerve fiber layer thickness of the sound eye , in superior, inferior, nasal and temporal quadrants and as a whole were 113.23±14, 117.37±25, 68.96±6, 69.55±14 and 93.40±8 microns respectively. In amblyopic eyes of the same group, these measurements were 103.11±18, 67.74±11, and 69.59±16 and 89.59±12 microns in superior, inferior, nasal, temporal quadrants and as whole respectively. In anisometropic groups, the sound eye measurements were as 130.96±22, 129.07±29, 80.62±12, and 83.88±20 and 107.7±13 microns in superior, inferior, nasal and temporal quadrants and as a whole orderly. In amblyopic eyes of this group the mean thicknesses were 115.63±29, 133.15±25, 78.8±15, 80.2±16 and 109.17±21 microns in superior, inferior, nasal, temporal quadrants and as a whole respectively. Statistically, there were no significant differences between amblyopic and sound eyes (P>0.5). Our study did not support any significant change in a nerve fiber layer thickness of amblyopic patients; however, decreased thickness in superior and nasal quadrants of strabismic amblyopia and except inferior quadrant and as a whole. These measurements may be a clue for management and prognosis of amblyopia in old age.

  10. Large Frequency Change with Thickness in Interlayer Breathing Mode—Significant Interlayer Interactions in Few Layer Black Phosphorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xin; Lu, Xin; Koon, Gavin Kok Wai; Castro Neto, Antonio H.; Özyilmaz, Barbaros; Xiong, Qihua; Quek, Su Ying

    2015-06-01

    Bulk black phosphorus (BP) consists of puckered layers of phosphorus atoms. Few-layer BP, obtained from bulk BP by exfoliation, is an emerging candidate as a channel material in post-silicon electronics. A deep understanding of its physical properties and its full range of applications are still being uncovered. In this paper, we present a theoretical and experimental investigation of phonon properties in few-layer BP, focusing on the low-frequency regime corresponding to interlayer vibrational modes. We show that the interlayer breathing mode A3g shows a large redshift with increasing thickness; the experimental and theoretical results agreeing well. This thickness dependence is two times larger than that in the chalcogenide materials such as few-layer MoS2 and WSe2, because of the significantly larger interlayer force constant and smaller atomic mass in BP. The derived interlayer out-of-plane force constant is about 50% larger than that in graphene and MoS2. We show that this large interlayer force constant arises from the sizable covalent interaction between phosphorus atoms in adjacent layers, and that interlayer interactions are not merely of the weak van der Waals type. These significant interlayer interactions are consistent with the known surface reactivity of BP, and have been shown to be important for electric-field induced formation of Dirac cones in thin film BP.

  11. Large Frequency Change with Thickness in Interlayer Breathing Mode--Significant Interlayer Interactions in Few Layer Black Phosphorus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xin; Lu, Xin; Koon, Gavin Kok Wai; Castro Neto, Antonio H; Özyilmaz, Barbaros; Xiong, Qihua; Quek, Su Ying

    2015-06-10

    Bulk black phosphorus (BP) consists of puckered layers of phosphorus atoms. Few-layer BP, obtained from bulk BP by exfoliation, is an emerging candidate as a channel material in post-silicon electronics. A deep understanding of its physical properties and its full range of applications are still being uncovered. In this paper, we present a theoretical and experimental investigation of phonon properties in few-layer BP, focusing on the low-frequency regime corresponding to interlayer vibrational modes. We show that the interlayer breathing mode A(3)g shows a large redshift with increasing thickness; the experimental and theoretical results agree well. This thickness dependence is two times larger than that in the chalcogenide materials, such as few-layer MoS2 and WSe2, because of the significantly larger interlayer force constant and smaller atomic mass in BP. The derived interlayer out-of-plane force constant is about 50% larger than that of graphene and MoS2. We show that this large interlayer force constant arises from the sizable covalent interaction between phosphorus atoms in adjacent layers and that interlayer interactions are not merely of the weak van der Waals type. These significant interlayer interactions are consistent with the known surface reactivity of BP and have been shown to be important for electric-field induced formation of Dirac cones in thin film BP.

  12. Physiological variation of retinal layer thickness is not caused by hydration: a randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balk, Lisanne J; Oberwahrenbrock, Timm; Uitdehaag, Bernard M J; Petzold, Axel

    2014-09-15

    There is evidence for physiological variation of retinal thicknesses as determined by optical coherence tomography (OCT). We tested if such changes could be explained by hydration and would exceed what may be expected from normal ageing. Subjects (n=26) of a previous study were re-assessed and were randomised to 3 groups of a hydration escalation trial (no hydration, 1× hydration, 2× hydration). Automated retinal layer segmentations were performed for the macular retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL), ganglion cell layer (GCL), inner plexiform layer (IPL), inner nuclear layer (INL), outer plexiform layer (OPL) and outer nuclear layer (ONL). The averaged volumes were calculated for the central foveola, 3 mm and 6 mm circles of the ETDRS grid. Following oral hydration there were no significant differences of retinal layer thicknesses between the three randomised groups in any of the ETDRS regions at any time-point. Ageing related changes were significant over an 18 month period for the GCL. The negative outcome of this trial implies that, until the causes for the observed variation are resolved, investigators may need to accept, and include into trial power calculations, a small degree of variation (physiology or instrument/software related factors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Exchange bias variations of the seed and top NiFe layers in NiFe/FeMn/NiFe trilayer as a function of seed layer thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankaranarayanan, V.K.; Yoon, S.M.; Kim, C.G.; Kim, C.O.

    2005-01-01

    Development of exchange bias at the seed and top NiFe layers in the NiFe (t nm)/FeMn(10 nm)/NiFe(5 nm) trilayer structure is investigated as a function of seed layer thickness, in the range of 2-20 nm. The seed NiFe layer shows maximum exchange bias at 4 nm seed layer thickness. The bias shows inverse thickness dependence with increasing thickness. The top NiFe layer on the other hand shows only half the bias of the seed layer which is retained even after the sharp fall in seed layer bias. The much smaller bias for the top NiFe layer is related to the difference in crystalline texture and spin orientations at the top FeMn/NiFe interface, in comparison to the bottom NiFe/FeMn interface which grows on a saturated NiFe layer with (1 1 1) orientation

  14. EM Bias-Correction for Ice Thickness and Surface Roughness Retrievals over Rough Deformed Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L.; Gaiser, P. W.; Allard, R.; Posey, P. G.; Hebert, D. A.; Richter-Menge, J.; Polashenski, C. M.

    2016-12-01

    The very rough ridge sea ice accounts for significant percentage of total ice areas and even larger percentage of total volume. The commonly used Radar altimeter surface detection techniques are empirical in nature and work well only over level/smooth sea ice. Rough sea ice surfaces can modify the return waveforms, resulting in significant Electromagnetic (EM) bias in the estimated surface elevations, and thus large errors in the ice thickness retrievals. To understand and quantify such sea ice surface roughness effects, a combined EM rough surface and volume scattering model was developed to simulate radar returns from the rough sea ice `layer cake' structure. A waveform matching technique was also developed to fit observed waveforms to a physically-based waveform model and subsequently correct the roughness induced EM bias in the estimated freeboard. This new EM Bias Corrected (EMBC) algorithm was able to better retrieve surface elevations and estimate the surface roughness parameter simultaneously. In situ data from multi-instrument airborne and ground campaigns were used to validate the ice thickness and surface roughness retrievals. For the surface roughness retrievals, we applied this EMBC algorithm to co-incident LiDAR/Radar measurements collected during a Cryosat-2 under-flight by the NASA IceBridge missions. Results show that not only does the waveform model fit very well to the measured radar waveform, but also the roughness parameters derived independently from the LiDAR and radar data agree very well for both level and deformed sea ice. For sea ice thickness retrievals, validation based on in-situ data from the coordinated CRREL/NRL field campaign demonstrates that the physically-based EMBC algorithm performs fundamentally better than the empirical algorithm over very rough deformed sea ice, suggesting that sea ice surface roughness effects can be modeled and corrected based solely on the radar return waveforms.

  15. Indirect restorations for severe tooth wear: Fracture risk and layer thickness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamburger, J.T.; Opdam, N.J.M.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This in vitro study investigated static failure risk related to restoration layer thickness for different indirect materials and compare them to direct composites. METHODS: Two ceramics (IPS e-max CAD, EmpressCAD (Ivoclar Vivadent)), two indirect composites (Estenia (Kuraray), Sinfony

  16. Investigation of Top/bottom Electrode and Diffusion Barrier Layer for PZT thick film MEMS Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Thomas; Hindrichsen, Christian Carstensen; Lou-Møller, R.

    2007-01-01

    In this work screen printed piezoelectric Ferroperm PZ26 lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thick film is used for two MEMS devices. A test structure is used to investigate several aspects regarding bottom and top electrodes. 450 nm ZrO2 thin film is found to be an insufficient diffusion barrier layer...

  17. Microthermal Instrument for Measuring Surface Layer Seeing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue-Bao; Zheng, Yan-Fang; Deng, Lin Hua; Xu, Guang

    2012-02-01

    Microthermal fluctuations are introduced by atmospheric turbulence very near the ground. In order to detect microthermal fluctuations at Fuxian Solar Observatory (FSO), a microthermal instrument has been developed. The microthermal instrument consists of a microthermal sensor, which is based on a Wheatstone bridge circuit and uses fine tungsten filaments as resistance temperature detectors, an associated signal processing unit, and a data collection, & communication subsystem. In this paper, after a brief introduction to surface layer seeing, we discuss the instrumentation behind the microthermal detector we have developed and then present the results obtained. The results of the evaluation indicate that the effect of the turbulent surface boundary layer to astronomical seeing would become sufficiently small when installing a telescope at a height of 16m or higher from the ground at FSO.

  18. Vanishing stick-slip friction in few-layer graphenes: the thickness effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liang; Ma, Tian-Bao; Hu, Yuan-Zhong; Wang, Hui

    2011-07-15

    We report the thickness dependence of intrinsic friction in few-layer graphenes, adopting molecular dynamics simulations. The friction force drops dramatically with decreasing number of layers and finally approaches zero with two or three layers. The results, which are robust over a wide range of temperature, shear velocity, and pressure are quantitatively explained by a theoretical model with regard to lateral stiffness, slip length, and maximum lateral force, which could provide a new conceptual framework for understanding stick-slip friction. The results reveal the crucial role of the dimensional effect in nanoscale friction, and could be helpful in the design of graphene-based nanodevices.

  19. INFLUENCE OF VARIATIONS OF THE CONDUCTIVITY OF UPPER LAYER OF TWO-LAYER SAMPLE ON OF PHASE INTRODUCED ELECTROMOTIVE FORCE OF SUPERIMPOSED TRANSDUCER OF EDDY CURRENT THICKNESS METER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Chernyshev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In carrying out eddy current thickness measurement of two-layer conductive objects one from the interfering factors is the presence of variations in the value of the electrical conductivity of the material of the upper layer (coating when moving from point to point on the surface of object of control or when passing from one object of control to another. The aim of this work is to evaluate the accuracy of determining the thickness of the conductive coating disposed on a conducting ferromagnetic basis, using the phase method of eddy current testing. The reason of the error is variation of the electrical conductivity of the material of coating.Determination of the error is based on calculations using known analytical expressions for the loop with current of sinusoidal form arranged over the infinite half space with a covering as a thin layer. Selected in calculating electromagnetic parameters of coating and substrate approximately correspond to the case -chromium layer on a nickel base. Calculations are performed for different frequencies of current passed through coil.It is shown that at reduction of frequency of the current passes through the coil the error is reduced. The value of the lowest possible operating frequency of the excitation current is determined by the condition of absence influence on the phase introduced into the superimposed transducer emf variations in the thickness of the basis.To reduce the indicated error it is proposed to determine, on the basis of phase method at a relatively high frequency transducer current excitation, conductivity of the material of coating. After this, at a low frequency excitation current and using phase method, the coating thickness is determined, taking into consideration the previously determined value of the conductivity of coating. Also discussed ways to improve the accuracy of phase measurements in the MHz region of the excitation current frequency. 

  20. Nanoscale Structuring of Surfaces by Using Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, Nicolas; Hess, Christian

    2015-12-07

    Controlled structuring of surfaces is interesting for a wide variety of areas, including microelectronic device fabrication, optical devices, bio(sensing), (electro-, photo)catalysis, batteries, solar cells, fuel cells, and sorption. A unique feature of atomic layer deposition (ALD) is the possibility to form conformal uniform coatings on arbitrarily shaped materials with controlled atomic-scale thickness. In this Minireview, we discuss the potential of ALD for the nanoscale structuring of surfaces, highlighting its versatile application to structuring both planar substrates and powder materials. Recent progress in the application of ALD to porous substrates has even made the nanoscale structuring of high-surface-area materials now feasible, thereby enabling novel applications, such as those in the fields of catalysis and alternative energy. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Dynamic air layer on textured superhydrophobic surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2013-09-03

    We provide an experimental demonstration that a novel macroscopic, dynamic continuous air layer or plastron can be sustained indefinitely on textured superhydrophobic surfaces in air-supersaturated water by a natural gas influx mechanism. This type of plastron is an intermediate state between Leidenfrost vapor layers on superheated surfaces and the equilibrium Cassie-Baxter wetting state on textured superhydrophobic surfaces. We show that such a plastron can be sustained on the surface of a centimeter-sized superhydrophobic sphere immersed in heated water and variations of its dynamic behavior with air saturation of the water can be regulated by rapid changes of the water temperature. The simple experimental setup allows for quantification of the air flux into the plastron and identification of the air transport model of the plastron growth. Both the observed growth dynamics of such plastrons and millimeter-sized air bubbles seeded on the hydrophilic surface under identical air-supersaturated solution conditions are consistent with the predictions of a well-mixed gas transport model. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  2. Ultrasound-based measurement of liquid-layer thickness: A novel time-domain approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praher, Bernhard; Steinbichler, Georg

    2017-01-01

    Measuring the thickness of a thin liquid layer between two solid materials is important when the adequate separation of metallic parts by a lubricant film (e.g., in bearings or mechanical seals) is to be assessed. The challenge in using ultrasound-based systems for such measurements is that the signal from the liquid layer is a superposition of multiple reflections. We have developed an algorithm for reconstructing this superimposed signal in the time domain. By comparing simulated and measured signals, the time-of-flight of the ultrasonic pulse in a layer can be estimated. With the longitudinal sound velocity known, the layer thickness can then be calculated. In laboratory measurements, we validate successfully (maximum relative error 4.9%) our algorithm for layer thicknesses ranging from 30 μm to 200 μm. Furthermore, we tested our method in the high-temperature environment of polymer processing by measuring the clearance between screw and barrel in the plasticisation unit of an injection moulding machine. The results of such measurements can indicate (i) the wear status of the tribo-mechanical screw-barrel system and (ii) unsuitable process conditions.

  3. Measuring Spatiotemporal Features of Land Subsidence, Groundwater Drawdown, and Compressible Layer Thickness in Beijing Plain, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongyong Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Beijing is located on multiple alluvial-pluvial fans with thick Quaternary unconsolidated sediments. It has suffered serious groundwater drawdown and land subsidence due to groundwater exploitation. This study aimed to introduce geographical distribution measure methods into land subsidence research characterizing, geographically, land subsidence, groundwater drawdown, and compressible layer thickness. Therefore, we used gravity center analysis and standard deviational ellipse (SDE methods in GIS to statistically analyze their concentration tendency, principle orientation, dispersion trend, and distribution differences in 1995 (1999, 2007, 2009, 2011, and 2013. Results show that they were all concentrated in Chaoyang District of Urban Beijing. The concentration trend of land subsidence was consistent with that of groundwater drawdown. The principle orientation of land subsidence was SW–NE, which was more similar with that of the static spatial distribution of the compressible layer. The dispersion tendency of land subsidence got closer to that of the compressible layer with its increasing intensity. The spatial distribution difference between land subsidence and groundwater drawdown was about 0.2, and that between land subsidence and compressible layer thickness it decreased from 0.22 to 0.07, reflecting that the spatial distribution pattern of land subsidence was increasingly close to that of the compressible layer. Results of this study are useful for assessing the distribution of land subsidence development and managing groundwater resources.

  4. Human Chorioretinal Layer Thicknesses Measured in Macula-wide, High-Resolution Histologic Sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messinger, Jeffrey D.; Sloan, Kenneth R.; Mitra, Arnab; McGwin, Gerald; Spaide, Richard F.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To provide a comprehensive description of chorioretinal layer thicknesses in the normal human macula, including two-layer pairs that can produce a combined signal in some optical coherence tomography (OCT) devices (ganglion cell [GCL] and inner plexiform [IPL] layers and outer plexiform [OPL] and outer nuclear [ONL] layers). Methods. In 0.8-μm-thick, macula-wide sections through the foveola of 18 donors (age range, 40–92 years), 21 layers were measured at 25 locations by a trained observer and validated by a second observer. Tissue volume changes were assessed by comparing total retinal thickness in ex vivo OCT and in sections. Results. Median tissue shrinkage was 14.5% overall and 29% in the fovea. Histologic laminar boundaries resembled those in SD-OCT scans, but the shapes of the foveolar OPL and ONL differed. Histologic GCL, IPL, and OPLHenle were thickest at 0.8. to 1, 1.5, and 0.4 mm eccentricity, respectively. ONL was thickest in an inward bulge at the foveal center. At 1 mm eccentricity, GCL, INL, and OPLHenle represented 17.3% to 21.1%, 18.0% to 18.5%, and 14.2% to 16.6% of total retinal thickness, respectively. In donors ≥70 years of age, the RPE and choroid were 17.1% and 29.6% thinner and OPLHenle was 20.8% thicker than in donors macula were generated. Newer OCT systems can separate GCL from IPL and OPLHenle from ONL, with good agreement for the proportion of retinal thickness occupied by OPLHenle in OCT and histology. The thickening of OPLHenle in older eyes may reflect Müller cell hypertrophy associated with rod loss. PMID:21421869

  5. Comparison of visual evoked potentials and retinal nerve fibre layer thickness in Alzheimer‘s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eKromer

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionAlzheimer‘s disease is a long term progressive neurodegenerative disease and might affect the retinal nerve fibre layer thickness of the eye. There is increasing evidence that visual evoked potentials, which are an objective way to indicate visual field loss, might be affected by the disease as well.Material and Methods22 patients (mean age: 75.9 ± 6.1 years; 14 women with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer‘s disease and 22 sex-matched healthy patients were examined. We compared the use of visual evoked potentials and retinal nerve fibre layer thickness using latest high-resolution spectral domain optical coherence tomography with eye-tracking capabilities for optimised peripapillary scan centring for the first time in Alzheimer‘s disease patients.ResultsThe mean MMSE score was 22.59 ± 5.47 in the Alzheimer‘s disease group, and did not significantly correlate with the visual evoked potentials latencies. We found no significant difference between the visual evoked potentials latencies of the Alzheimer‘s disease patients and those of the control patients. No peripapillary sector of the retina had a retinal nerve fibre layer thickness significantly correlated with the visual evoked potentials latencies.DiscussionWe demonstrated that pattern visual evoked potentials did not show any significant correlation despite subtle loss in retinal nerve fibre layer thickness. It remains open whether additional flash visual evoked potentials combined with retinal nerve fibre layer thickness analysis may be useful in diagnosing Alzheimer‘s disease, particularly for mild-to-moderate stages of the disease.

  6. [Interrelation between parameters of thickness of cornea in its optical part and thickness of nerve fibre layer of amphiblestrodes in case of primary open angle glaucoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroedov, A V; Ogorodnikova, V Iu; Gorodnichiĭ, V V; Aleksandrov, A S; Diordiĭchuk, S V; Sol'nov, N M; Kushim, Z P; Kuznetsov, K V

    2012-04-01

    61 patient was checked-up (113 eyes) with the help of optical coherence tomography for the purpose of determination of the interrelation between thickness of cornea in its optical part and thickness of nerve fibre layer of amphiblestrodes in case of primary open angle glaucoma. The average age of patients was 63,9 +/- 10,4 years. Direct moderate interrelation between parameters of thickness of cornea in its central zone and thickness of nerve fibre layer of amphiblestrodes in its temporal part discus nervi optici (r=0,46 u r=0,26, pfibre layer of amphiblestrodes in its upper part of discus nervi optici (r=0,35 u r=0,43, pfibre layer of amphiblestrodes (r=0,25, poptic neuropathy in patients with progressive glaucoma.

  7. Electrical resistivity tomography determines the spatial distribution of clay layer thickness and aquifer vulnerability, Kandal Province, Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlemann, Sebastian; Kuras, Oliver; Richards, Laura A.; Naden, Emma; Polya, David A.

    2017-10-01

    Despite being rich in water resources, many areas of South East Asia face difficulties in securing clean water supply. This is particularly problematic in regions with a rapidly growing population. In this study, the spatial variability of the thickness of a clay layer, controlling surface - groundwater interactions that affect aquifer vulnerability, was investigated using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). Data were acquired along two transects, showing significant differences in the imaged resistivities. Borehole samples were analyzed regarding particle density and composition, and linked to their resistivity. The obtained relationships were used to translate the field electrical resistivities into lithologies. Those revealed considerable variations in the thickness of the clay layer, ranging from 0 m up to 25 m. Geochemical data, highlighting zones of increased ingress of surface water into the groundwater, confirmed areas of discontinuities in the clay layer, which act as preferential flow paths. The results may guide urban planning of the Phnom Penh city expansion, in order to supply the growing population with safe water. The presented approach of using geophysics to estimate groundwater availability, accessibility, and vulnerability is not only applicable to Kandal Province, Cambodia, but also to many other areas of fast urbanization in South East Asia and beyond.

  8. Study of surface plasmon resonance of Au nanoparticles coated with dielectric layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jia-Yu; Huang, Chan-yan; Dai, Ning; Zhu, Da-ming

    2011-08-01

    In this work, atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used to deposit different thickness layers of Al2O3 on Au nanoparticles fabricated by thermal annealing of Au thin films. The effects of the Au-coated Al2O3 layer thickness variation to local surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) in gold (Au) nanoparticles was investigated using transmission surface plasmon resonance (T-SPR) spectroscopy. Thermal annealing of ultrathin films of Au sputtered on transparent substrates can get a dispersed metal particles system which exhibit transmission spectra showing an extinction band attributed to localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). The particles prepared by thermal annealing are much more like elliptical rather than sphere. The dielectric medium layer Al2O3 was deposited on these Au particles with the thickness from few nanometers to tens of nanometers by ALD. We found that All the LSPR peak positions of particles on different substrates red shifted as the thickness of deposition layer increase, but the LSPR red-shift effect of particles on alumina substrate was much more remarkable than particles on glass substrate. The results in this paper show that it is a very continent method to manipulate LSPR position which is a profound useful effect in solar cell application by controlling the deposition layer thickness on particles prepared by thermal annealing on suitable substrate.

  9. Optimization of SnS active layer thickness for solar cell application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Yashika; Arun, P.

    2017-11-01

    This work presents a comparative study of n-SnS and p-SnS active layers for increased solar cell efficiency. Tin sulphide thin films of various thicknesses having p-type and n-type conductivity were fabricated by thermal evaporation. Both type of films had the same (113) orientation of the crystal planes with a constant tensile strain of ~ 0.003 and ~ 0.011, respectively. The persistent photocurrent was observed in all n-SnS and p-SnS samples with the current’s time decay constant decreasing with increasing film thickness. Hole mobility of thicker p-SnS films was found to be greater than the electron mobility in n-SnS samples, with mobility (both hole and electron) showing an increasing trend with film thickness. The optimum absorber layer thickness for both p- and n-SnS layers should have a high value of diffusion length for a given absorption coefficient and band-gap.

  10. Surface passivation of GaAs nanowires by the atomic layer deposition of AlN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shtrom, I. V., E-mail: igorstrohm@mail.ru; Bouravleuv, A. D. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Samsonenko, Yu. B.; Khrebtov, A. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg National Research Academic University—Nanotechnology Research and Education Center (Russian Federation); Soshnikov, I. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Reznik, R. R.; Cirlin, G. E., E-mail: cirlin@beam.ioffe.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg National Research Academic University—Nanotechnology Research and Education Center (Russian Federation); Dhaka, V.; Perros, A.; Lipsanen, H. [Aalto University (Finland)

    2016-12-15

    It is shown that the atomic layer deposition of thin AlN layers can be used to passivate the surface states of GaAs nanowires synthesized by molecular-beam epitaxy. Studies of the optical properties of samples by low-temperature photoluminescence measurements shows that the photoluminescence-signal intensity can be increased by a factor of up to five by passivating the nanowires with a 25-Å-thick AlN layer.

  11. The Influence of an EPS Concrete Buffer Layer Thickness on Debris Dams Impacted by Massive Stones in the Debris Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianbin Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The failure of debris dams impacted by the massive stones in a debris flow represents a difficult design problem. Reasonable materials selection and structural design can effectively improve the resistance impact performance of debris dams. Based on the cushioning properties of expanded polystyrene (EPS concrete, EPS concrete as a buffer layer poured on the surface of a rigid debris dam was proposed. A three-dimensional numerical calculation model of an EPS concrete buffer layer/rigid debris dam was established. The single-factor theory revealed change rules for the thickness of the buffer layer concerning the maximal impact force of the rigid debris dam surface through numerical simulation. Moreover, the impact force-time/history curves under different calculation conditions for the rigid debris dam surface were compared. Simulation results showed that the EPS concrete buffer layer can not only effectively extend the impact time of massive stones affecting the debris dam but also reduce the impact force of the rigid debris dam caused by massive stones in the debris flow. The research results provide theoretical guidance for transferring the energy of the massive stone impact, creating a structural design and optimizing debris dams.

  12. Gold nanoparticle plasmon resonance in near-field coupled Au NPs layer/Al film nanostructure: Dependence on metal film thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeshchenko, Oleg A.; Kozachenko, Viktor V.; Naumenko, Antonina P.; Berezovska, Nataliya I.; Kutsevol, Nataliya V.; Chumachenko, Vasyl A.; Haftel, Michael; Pinchuk, Anatoliy O.

    2018-05-01

    We study the effects of coupling between plasmonic metal nanoparticles and a thin metal film by using light extinction spectroscopy. A planar monolayer of gold nanoparticles located near an aluminum thin film (thicknesses within the range of 0-62 nm) was used to analyze the coupling between the monolayer and the thin metal film. SPR peak area increase for polymer coated Au NPs, non-monotonical behavior of the peak area for bare Au NPs, as well as red shift and broadening of SPR at the increase of the Al film thickness have been observed. These effects are rationalized as a result of coupling of the layer of Au NPs with Al film through the field of localized surface plasmons in Au NPs that causes the excitation of collective plasmonic gap mode in the nanostructure. An additional mechanism for bare Au NPs is the non-radiative damping of SPR that is caused by the electrical contact between metal NPs and film.

  13. Comparison of two retinal nerve fibre layer thickness measurement patterns of RTvue optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuning; Wang, Xiaozhen; Wu, Gewei; Fu, Jing; Li, Songfeng; Wan, Xiuhua; Wang, Ningli

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate the agreement and repeatability between operator-dependent centring and automatic centring retinal nerve fibre layer thickness measurement patterns (RNFL3.45 and NHM4) of RTvue optical coherence tomography in normal and glaucomatous eyes.   Cross-sectional observational study. A total of 153 eyes from 149 normal subjects and subjects with glaucoma were analysed.   The retinal nerve fibre layer thickness was measured using RNFL3.45 and NHM4 three times on the same day to determine the repeatability and agreement between the two scan patterns. Student's paired t-testing, intra-class correlation coefficient, coefficient of variation, test-retest viability, Pearson's correlation coefficient and Bland-Altman analysis of retinal nerve fibre layer thickness measurements. The difference between RNFL3.45 and NHM4 measurements was statistically significant by paired t-testing (P=0.003) only in severe glaucoma group. The Pearson's correlation test showed a high degree of correlation of the mean retinal nerve fibre layer thickness (r=0.949). Bland-Altman plots showed that the differences between RNFL3.45 and NHM4 were smaller at thicker retinal nerve fibre layer values, but larger at thinner retinal nerve fibre layer values. The intra-class correlation coefficient for RNFL3.45 (and lower 95% confidence interval) in normal and glaucomatous eyes was 0.990 (0.985 confidence interval) and 0.997 (0.995 confidence interval), respectively. The intra-class correlation coefficient for NHM4 in normal and glaucomatous eyes was 0.989 (0.983 confidence interval) and 0.995 (0.992 confidence interval), respectively. The test-retest variability for RNFL3.45 and NHM4 ranged from 3.98 to 9.75µm in normal eyes, and from 4.10 to 13.34µm in glaucomatous eyes. Measurements of retinal nerve fibre layer thickness by RNFL3.45 and NHM4 are in good agreement. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology © 2011 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of

  14. Macular and peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in children with hyperopic anisometropic amblyopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang-Qing Wu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To compare the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL thickness and macular thickness in the amblyopic eye with that in the sound eye of children with hyperopic anisometropic amblyopia using optical coherence tomography (OCT.METHODS: A prospective, nonrandom, intraindividual comparative cohort study includes 72 children with hyperopic anisometropic amblyopia in a single center. Macular thickness, macular foveola thickness, and peripapillary RNFL thickness were compared between the amblyopia eyes and the contralateral sound eyes.RESULTS:There were 38 male and 34 female patients, with a mean age as 9.7±1.9 years (range, 5–16 years. Hyperopic was +3.62±1.16D (range +2.00D to +6.50D in the amblyopic eyes, which was significantly higher in the control eyes with +0.76±0.90D (range 0D to +2.00D (P P = 0.02. The mean macular foveola thickness was significantly thicker in the amblyopic eyes than the contralateral sound eyes (181.4±14.2µm vs 175.2±13.3µm, P CONCLUSION:Eyes with hyperopic anisometropic amblyopia are found thicker macular foveola and peripapillary RNFL than the contralateral eyes in children.

  15. Channel layer thickness dependence of In-Ti-Zn-O thin-film transistors fabricated using pulsed laser deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Q.; Shan, F. K.; Liu, G. X.; Liu, A.; Lee, W. J.; Shin, B. C.

    2014-01-01

    Amorphous indium-titanium-zinc-oxide (ITZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) with various channel thicknesses were fabricated at room temperature by using pulsed laser deposition. The channel layer thickness (CLT) dependence of the TFTs was investigated. All the ITZO thin films were amorphous, and the surface roughnesses decreased slightly first and then increased with increasing CLT. With increasing CLT from 35 to 140 nm, the on/off current ratio and the field-effect mobility increased, and the subthreshold swing decreased. The TFT with a CLT of 210 nm exhibited the worst performance, while the ITZO TFT with a CLT of 140 nm exhibited the best performance with a subthreshold voltage of 2.86 V, a mobility of 53.9 cm 2 V -1 s -1 , a subthreshold swing of 0.29 V/decade and an on/off current ratio of 10 9 .

  16. On the Fundamental Mode Love Wave in Devices Incorporating Thick Viscoelastic Layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jian-Sheng; Wang Li-Jun; He Shi-Tang

    2015-01-01

    A detailed investigation is presented for Love waves (LWs) with thick viscoelastic guiding layers. A theoretical calculation and an experiment are carried out for LW devices incorporating an SU-8 guiding layer, an ST-90° X quartz substrate and two 28-μm periodic interdigital transducers. Both the calculated and the measured results show an increase in propagation velocity when h/λ > 0.05. The measured insertion loss of LWs is consistent with the calculated propagation loss. The insertion loss of bulk waves is also measured and is compared with that of LWs. (paper)

  17. Retinal nerve fibre layer thickness measurements by optical coherence tomography in patients with sleep apnoea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagiv, Oded; Fishelson-Arev, Tagil; Buckman, Gila; Mathalone, Nurit; Wolfson, Julia; Segev, Eitan; Peled, Ron; Lavi, Idit; Geyer, Orna

    2014-03-01

    The study aims to investigate whether retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) abnormalities can be detected in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome with normally appearing optic disc. This is an observational case-control study. One hundred and eight consecutive patients with moderate or severe obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS) as determined by overnight polysomnography and normal looking discs and 108 age-matched healthy controls were included in the study. All patients underwent RNFL examinations by optical coherence tomography using fast retinal nerve fibre layer thickness scan. The main outcome measure was RNFL thickness. Multivariate regression analysis results showed that the RNFL was thinner for a patient with OSAHS than that of a normal control in the average by 4.20 μm (P optic nerves will eventually lead to glaucoma. © 2013 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  18. Macular Ganglion Cell Inner Plexiform Layer Thickness in Glaucomatous Eyes with Localized Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunwei Zhang

    Full Text Available To investigate macular ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer (mGCIPL thickness in glaucomatous eyes with visible localized retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL defects on stereophotographs.112 healthy and 149 glaucomatous eyes from the Diagnostic Innovations in Glaucoma Study (DIGS and the African Descent and Glaucoma Evaluation Study (ADAGES subjects had standard automated perimetry (SAP, optical coherence tomography (OCT imaging of the macula and optic nerve head, and stereoscopic optic disc photography. Masked observers identified localized RNFL defects by grading of stereophotographs.47 eyes had visible localized RNFL defects on stereophotographs. Eyes with visible localized RNFL defects had significantly thinner mGCIPL thickness compared to healthy eyes (68.3 ± 11.4 μm versus 79.2 ± 6.6 μm respectively, P<0.001 and similar mGCIPL thickness to glaucomatous eyes without localized RNFL defects (68.6 ± 11.2 μm, P = 1.000. The average mGCIPL thickness in eyes with RNFL defects was 14% less than similarly aged healthy controls. For 29 eyes with a visible RNFL defect in just one hemiretina (superior or inferior mGCIPL was thinnest in the same hemiretina in 26 eyes (90%. Eyes with inferior-temporal RNFL defects also had significantly thinner inferior-temporal mGCIPL (P<0.001 and inferior mGCIPL (P = 0.030 compared to glaucomatous eyes without a visible RNFL defect.The current study indicates that presence of a localized RNFL defect is likely to indicate significant macular damage, particularly in the region of the macular that topographically corresponds to the location of the RNFL defect.

  19. The influence of vegetation and soil characteristics on active-layer thickness of permafrost soils in boreal forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, James P; Estop-Aragonés, Cristian; Thierry, Aaron; Charman, Dan J; Wolfe, Stephen A; Hartley, Iain P; Murton, Julian B; Williams, Mathew; Phoenix, Gareth K

    2016-09-01

    Carbon release from thawing permafrost soils could significantly exacerbate global warming as the active-layer deepens, exposing more carbon to decay. Plant community and soil properties provide a major control on this by influencing the maximum depth of thaw each summer (active-layer thickness; ALT), but a quantitative understanding of the relative importance of plant and soil characteristics, and their interactions in determine ALTs, is currently lacking. To address this, we undertook an extensive survey of multiple vegetation and edaphic characteristics and ALTs across multiple plots in four field sites within boreal forest in the discontinuous permafrost zone (NWT, Canada). Our sites included mature black spruce, burned black spruce and paper birch, allowing us to determine vegetation and edaphic drivers that emerge as the most important and broadly applicable across these key vegetation and disturbance gradients, as well as providing insight into site-specific differences. Across sites, the most important vegetation characteristics limiting thaw (shallower ALTs) were tree leaf area index (LAI), moss layer thickness and understory LAI in that order. Thicker soil organic layers also reduced ALTs, though were less influential than moss thickness. Surface moisture (0-6 cm) promoted increased ALTs, whereas deeper soil moisture (11-16 cm) acted to modify the impact of the vegetation, in particular increasing the importance of understory or tree canopy shading in reducing thaw. These direct and indirect effects of moisture indicate that future changes in precipitation and evapotranspiration may have large influences on ALTs. Our work also suggests that forest fires cause greater ALTs by simultaneously decreasing multiple ecosystem characteristics which otherwise protect permafrost. Given that vegetation and edaphic characteristics have such clear and large influences on ALTs, our data provide a key benchmark against which to evaluate process models used to predict

  20. Hard Surface Layers by Pack Boriding and Gaseous Thermo-Reactive Deposition and Diffusion Treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Bottoli, Federico; Dahl, Kristian Vinter

    2017-01-01

    subjected to TRD (chromizing and titanizing) and boriding treatments. For the steels with low carbon content, chromizing results in surface alloying with chromium, i.e., formation of a (soft) “stainless” surface zone. Steels containing higher levels of carbon form chromium carbide (viz. Cr23C6, Cr7C3......) layers with hardnesses up to 1800 HV. Titanizing of ARNE tool steel results in a surface layer consisting of TiC with a hardness of approximately 4000 HV. Duplex treatments, where boriding is combined with subsequent (TRD) titanizing, result in formation of hard TiB2 on top of a thick layer of Fe...

  1. Thick layer radioluminescent screen, its fabrication process and device for the operation of the process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonzom, J.; Roy, N.; Thomas, G.

    1986-01-01

    The screen allows X-ray and γ ray conversion into luminous photons. It includes a thick layer of a material deposited on a support and made of Gd 2 O 2 S doped with a rare earth type, an organic polymer allowing the doped material to be thickened and having a good resistance to radiations together with a good transparency to the emission light of the doped material [fr

  2. Relation between active-layer thickness and power conversion efficiency in P3HT:PCBM inverted organic photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakami, S.; Narioka, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Nagase, T.; Naito, H.

    2017-11-01

    The dependence of active-layer thickness on the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of inverted organic photovoltaics (OPVs) based on poly(3-hexylthiphene) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester was investigated. When PCEs were measured immediately after device fabrication, the optimum thickness was ~100 nm. It was, however, found that thick OPVs exhibit higher PCEs a few months later, whereas thin OPVs simply degraded with time. Consequently, the optimum thickness changed with time. Considering this fact, we discuss the relationship between the active-layer thickness and PCE.

  3. Thickness optimization of the ZnO based TCO layer in a CZTSSe solar cell. Evolution of its performance with thickness when external temperature changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadel, Meriem; Moustafa Bouzaki, Mohammed; Chadel, Asma; Aillerie, Michel; Benyoucef, Boumediene

    2017-07-01

    The influence of the thickness of a Zinc Oxide (ZnO) transparent conductive oxide (TCO) layer on the performance of the CZTSSe solar cell is shown in detail. In a photovoltaic cell, the thickness of each layer largely influence the performance of the solar cell and optimization of each layer constitutes a complete work. Here, using the Solar Cell Capacitance Simulation (SCAPS) software, we present simulation results obtained in the analyze of the influence of the TCO layer thickness on the performance of a CZTSSe solar cell, starting from performance of a CZTSSe solar cell commercialized in 2014 with an initial efficiency equal to 12.6%. In simulation, the temperature was considered as a functioning parameter and the evolution of tthe performance of the cell for various thickness of the TCO layer when the external temperature changes is simulated and discussed. The best efficiency of the solar cell based in CZTSSe is obtained with a ZnO thickness equal to 50 nm and low temperature. Based on the considered marketed cell, we show a technological possible increase of the global efficiency achieving 13% by optimization of ZnO based TCO layer.

  4. CANDU fuel sheath integrity and oxide layer thickness determination by Eddy current technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gheorghe, Gabriela; Man, Ion; Parvan, Marcel; Valeca, Serban

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents results concerning the integrity assessment of the fuel elements cladding and measurements of the oxide layer on sheaths, using the eddy current technique. Flaw detection using eddy current provides information about the integrity of fuel element sheath or presence of defects in the sheath produced by irradiation. The control equipment consists of a flaw detector with eddy currents, operable in the frequency range 10 Hz to 10 MHz, and a differential probe. The calibration of the flaw detector is done using artificial defects (longitudinal, transversal, external and internal notches, bored and unbored holes) obtained on Zircaloy-4 tubes identical to those out of which the sheath of the CANDU fuel element is manufactured (having a diameter of 13.08 mm and a wall thickness of 0.4 mm). When analyzing the behavior of the fuel elements' cladding facing the corrosion is important to know the thickness of the zirconium oxide layer. The calibration of the device measuring the thickness of the oxide layer is done using a Zircaloy-4 tube identical to that which the cladding of the CANDU fuel element is manufactured of, and calibration foils, as well. (authors)

  5. Film Thickness Estimation for the Oil Applied to the Inner Surface of Slim Tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Svetlík

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the approximation of the results of experimental measurement of coating of the inner surface of slim pipes with special oil, using a dispersion oil fraction. The reason for such treatment of the inner surface of the tubes is the anti-corrosion protection or various other requirements. The oil manufacturer prescribes the minimum required layer to guarantee the anti-corrosion protection parameters. Therefore, it is advisable to know the most exact coating parameters for different pipe diameters. The measured results give us an assumption of how much oil is sufficient to coat the inside of a pipe. The main idea lies in the correct estimation of coefficients in the three-parameter exponential dependence. For the initial estimates, Nelder–Mead’s minimization method was used. The condition for meeting the lower estimate of the minimum thickness of the oil layer was determined. Following graphic processing of minimization of individual pipe diameters, in some cases, the coefficients were adjusted manually. The result is that the oil thickness depends on the distance of the investigated point from the beginning of the tube, or on the point of entry of the dispersion oil fraction.

  6. Amorphous surface layers in Ti-implanted Fe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, J.A.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Picraux, S.T.

    1979-01-01

    Implanting Ti into high-purity Fe results in an amorphous surface layer which is composed of not only Fe and Ti, but also C. Implantations were carried out at room temperature over the energy range 90 to 190 keV and fluence range 1 to 2 x 10/sup 16/ at/cm/sup 2/. The Ti-implanted Fe system has been characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ion backscattering and channeling analysis, and (d,p) nuclear reaction analysis. The amorphous layer was observed to form at the surface and grow inward with increasing Ti fluence. For an implant of 1 x 10/sup 17/ Ti/cm/sup 2/ at 180 keV the layer thickness was 150 A, while the measured range of the implanted Ti was approx. 550 A. This difference is due to the incorporation of C into the amorphous alloy by C being deposited on the surface during implantation and subsequently diffusing into the solid. Our results indicate that C is an essential constituent of the amorphous phase for Ti concentrations less than or equal to 10 at. %. For the 1 x 10/sup 17/ Ti/cm/sup 2/ implant, the concentration of C in the amorphous phase was approx. 25 at. %, while that of Ti was only approx. 3 at. %. A higher fluence implant of 2 x 10/sup 17/ Ti/cm/sup 2/ produced an amorphous layer with a lower C concentration of approx. 10 at. % and a Ti concentration of approx. 20 at. %.

  7. Effects of the inlet boundary layer thickness on the flow in an axial compressor (I) : hub corner stall and tip leakage flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Min Suk; Baek, Je Hyun; Park, Jun Young

    2005-01-01

    A three-dimensional computation was conducted to understand effects of the inlet boundary layer thickness on the internal flow in a low-speed axial compressor operating at the design condition(φ=85%) and near stall condition(φ=65%). At the design condition, the flows in the axial compressor show, independent of the inlet boundary layer thickness, similar characteristics such as the pressure distribution, size of the hub corner-stall, tip leakage flow trajectory, limiting streamlines on the blade suction surface, etc. However, as the load is increased, the hub corner-stall grows to make a large separation region at the junction of the hub and suction surface for the inlet condition with thick boundary layers at the hub and casing. Moreover, the tip leakage flow is more vortical than that observed in case of the thin inlet boundary layer and has the critical point where the trajectory of the tip leakage flow is abruptly turned into the downstream. For the inlet condition with thin boundary layers, the hub corner-stall is diminished so it is indistinguishable from the wake. The tip leakage flow leans to the leading edge more than at the design condition but has no critical point. In addition to these, the severe reverse flow, induced by both boundary layer on the blade surface and the tip leakage flow, can be found to act as the blockage of flows near the casing, resulting in heavy loss

  8. SDOCT Thickness Measurements of Various Retinal Layers in Patients with Autosomal Dominant Optic Atrophy due to OPA1 Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea M. Schild

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To specify thickness values of various retinal layers on macular spectral domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SDOCT scans in patients with autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA compared to healthy controls. Methods. SDOCT volume scans of 7 patients with ADOA (OPA-1 mutation and 14 healthy controls were quantitatively analyzed using manual grading software. Mean thickness values for the ETDRS grid subfields 5–8 were calculated for the spaces neurosensory retina, retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL, ganglion cell layer (GCL, a combined space of inner plexiform layer/outer plexiform layer/inner nuclear layer (IPL+INL+OPL, and a combined space of outer nuclear layer/photoreceptor layers (ONL+PL. Results. ADOA patients showed statistically significant lower retinal thickness values than controls (. RNFL ( and GCL thicknesses ( were significantly lower in ADOA patients. There was no difference in IPL+INL+OPL and in ONL+PL thickness. Conclusion. Manual subanalysis of macular SDOCT volume scans allowed detailed subanalysis of various retinal layers. Not only RNFL but also GCL thicknesses are reduced in the macular area of ADOA patients whereas subjacent layers are not involved. Together with clinical findings, macular SDOCT helps to identify patients with suspicion for hereditary optic neuropathy before genetic analysis confirms the diagnosis.

  9. Stagnation-point flow of second grade nanofluid towards a nonlinear stretching surface with variable thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rai Sajjad Saif

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the stagnation point flow of second grade nanomaterial towards a nonlinear stretching surface subject to variable surface thickness. The process of heat transfer is examined through the melting heat and mixed convection effects. Further novel features regarding Brownian motion and thermophoresis are present. Boundary-layer approximation is employed in the problem formulation. Momentum, energy and concentration equations are converted into the non-linear ordinary differential system through the appropriate transformations. Convergent solutions for resulting problem are computed. Behaviors of various sundry variables on temperature and concentration are studied in detail. The skin friction coefficient and heat and mass transfer rates are also computed and analyzed. Our results indicate that the temperature and concentration distributions are enhanced for larger values of thermophoresis parameter. Further the present work is hoped to be useful in improving the performance of heat transfer of base fluid. Keywords: Stagnation-point flow, Second grade fluid, Nanoparticles, Melting heat process, Nonlinear stretching surface, Variable surface thickness

  10. Mapping bound plasmon propagation on a nanoscale stripe waveguide using quantum dots: influence of spacer layer thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chamanei S. Perera

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we image the highly confined long range plasmons of a nanoscale metal stripe waveguide using quantum emitters. Plasmons were excited using a highly focused 633 nm laser beam and a specially designed grating structure to provide stronger incoupling to the desired mode. A homogeneous thin layer of quantum dots was used to image the near field intensity of the propagating plasmons on the waveguide. We observed that the photoluminescence is quenched when the QD to metal surface distance is less than 10 nm. The optimised spacer layer thickness for the stripe waveguides was found to be around 20 nm. Authors believe that the findings of this paper prove beneficial for the development of plasmonic devices utilising stripe waveguides.

  11. CHARACTERIZING SURFACE LAYERS IN NITINOL USING X-RAY PHOTOELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopfel, R.; Mehta, A.

    2008-01-01

    Nitinol is a shape memory alloy whose properties allow for large reversible deformations and a return to its original geometry. This nickel-titanium (NiTi) alloy has become a material used widely in the biomedical fi eld as a stent to open up collapsed arteries. Both ambient and biological conditions cause surface oxidation in these devices which in turn change its biocompatibility. The thickness of oxidized layers can cause fractures in the material if too large and can allow for penetration if too thin. Depending on the type and abundance of the chemical species on or near the surface, highly toxic metal ions can leak into the body causing cell damage or even cell death. Thus, biocompatibility of such devices is crucial. By using highly surface sensitive x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to probe the surface of these structures, it is possible to decipher both layer composition and layer thickness. Two samples, both of which were mechanically polished, were investigated. Of the two samples, one was then exposed to a phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution to mimic the chemical properties of blood, while the other remained unexposed. Although both samples were found to have oxide layers of appropriate thickness (on the order of a few nm), it was found that the sample exposed to the saline solution had a slightly thicker oxide layer and more signifi cantly, a phosphate layer very near the surface suggesting toxic metal components are well contained within the sample. These are considerable indications of a biocompatible device.

  12. Effect of layer thickness on the high temperature mechanical properties of Al/SiC nanolaminates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotfian, S.; Mayer, C.; Chawla, N.; Llorca, J.; Misra, A.; Baldwin, J.K.; Molina-Aldareguía, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Composite laminates on the nanoscale have shown superior hardness and toughness, but little is known about their high temperature behavior. The mechanical properties (elastic modulus and hardness) were measured as a function of temperature by means of nanoindentation in Al/SiC nanolaminates, a model metal–ceramic nanolaminate fabricated by physical vapor deposition. The influence of the Al and SiC volume fraction and layer thicknesses was determined between room temperature and 150 °C and, the deformation modes were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy, using a focused ion beam to prepare cross-sections through selected indents. It was found that ambient temperature deformation was controlled by the plastic flow of the Al layers, constrained by the SiC, and the elastic bending of the SiC layers. The reduction in hardness with temperature showed evidence of the development of interface-mediated deformation mechanisms, which led to a clear influence of layer thickness on the hardness. - Highlights: • The mechanical behavior of Al/SiC nanolaminates was measured between 28 °C and 150 °C. • Room temperature hardness was controlled by the volume fraction of the constituents. • The hardness of all the nanolaminates decreased rapidly with temperature. • Reduction of hardness with temperature increased as the interface density increased

  13. New appliance for in vivo determination of the thickness of the horny layer. Principle of the method, apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaschka, F; Lottermoser, A; Mühlenberg, D

    1977-12-27

    An electronically guided mechanism permits the "unbloody" measurement of the horny layer (HL) thickness in vivo. If a steel needle is driven by a constant speed electrode through the HL from the exterior, it is possible to measure and catalogue specific resistance variations by means of synchronic recording following derivation from the alternating current circuit against an indifferent electrode per needle electrode through the HL, i.e. from the point of skin surface contact to that of the living "ell layer of the epidermis. The mechanical construction consists of a hydraulic trust with a measuring head which is affixed by subpressure to the skin surface. The electronic device of plug-in design constains: 1. a constant voltage generator for the analogous and digital electronic, 2. a high Ohm test amplifier as well as threshold value switch, and measuring area transformer, 3. a digital measuring value indicator, hydraulic-guidance logistics, inclusive of respective operational parts. Measuring values, made available by electronic output, are being transmitted numerically via code transformer to a teletypewriter and simultaneously transferred on an electronic data processing tape. Presented are measuring data for the calibration of the device as well as a series of results of HL-thickness measurements. Methodological errors are being discussed, just as the applicability of the device for research and practical usage.

  14. Energy and angular distribution of electrons after transmission of thick layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreyling, H.

    1975-01-01

    In this work, the behaviour of electrons going through material-layers is studied. For a layer-thickness where the theories of multiple-scattering are no longer valid, a Monte-Carlo-method is presented for the calculation of energy distributions as a function of scattering-angle. Plastic-scintillator-material (NE 102 A produced by Nuclear Enterprises Ltd.) was bombarded by electrons with energies between 0.5 and 2.0 MeV and the energy-distributions of the electrons, scatterd in the layer, were measured as a function of the scattering-angle. With the aid of the Monte-Carlo-method developed in this paper, energy distributions were calculated as a function of scattering-angle for the two absorber materials aluminium (single-element material) and NE 102 A (chemical compound of C, N, H, O). (orig./WL) [de

  15. Organic light emitting diode with surface modification layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basil, John D.; Bhandari, Abhinav; Buhay, Harry; Arbab, Mehran; Marietti, Gary J.

    2017-09-12

    An organic light emitting diode (10) includes a substrate (12) having a first surface (14) and a second surface (16), a first electrode (32), and a second electrode (38). An emissive layer (36) is located between the first electrode (32) and the second electrode (38). The organic light emitting diode (10) further includes a surface modification layer (18). The surface modification layer (18) includes a non-planar surface (30, 52).

  16. Laminar boundary layer response to rotation of a finite diameter surface patch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klewicki, J.C.; Hill, R.B.

    2003-01-01

    The responses of the flat plate laminar boundary layer to perturbations generated by rotating a finite patch of the bounding surface are explored experimentally. The size of the surface patch was of the same order as the boundary layer thickness. The displacement thickness Reynolds number range of the boundary layers explored was 72-527. The rotation rates of the surface patch ranged from 2.14 to 62.8 s-1. Qualitative flow visualizations and quantitative molecular tagging velocimetry measurements revealed that rotation of a finite surface patch generates an asymmetric loop-like vortex. Significant features of this vortex include that, (i) the sign of the vorticity in the vortex head is opposite that of the boundary layer vorticity regardless of the sign of the input rotation, (ii) one leg of the vortex exhibits motion akin to solid body rotation while the other leg is best characterized as a spanwise shear layer, (iii) the vortex leg exhibiting near solid body rotation lifts more rapidly from the surface than the leg more like a shear layer, and (iv) the vortex leg exhibiting near solid body rotation always occurs on the side of the surface patch experiencing downstream motion. These asymmetries switch sides depending on the sign of the input rotation. The present results are interpreted and discussed relative to analytical solutions for infinite geometries. By way of analogy, plausible connections are drawn between the present results and the influences of wall normal vortices in turbulent boundary layer flows

  17. System for removing contaminated surface layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Kozo.

    1987-04-01

    The object of the present invention is to offer a new type of useful decontamination system, with which the contaminated surface layers can be removed effectively by injection of such solid microparticles. Liquid carbon dioxide is passed from a liquid carbon dioxide tank via the carbon dioxide supply line into the system for injecting solid carbon dioxide particles. Part of the liquid carbon dioxide introduced into the system is converted to solid carbon dioxide particles by the temperature drop resulting from adiabatic expansion in the carbon dioxide expansion space of the injection system. The solid carbon dioxide particles reach the injection nozzle, which is connected through the expansion space. The carbon dioxide microparticles are further cooled and accelerated by nitrogen gas injected from the nitrogen gas nozzle at the tip of the nitrogen gas supply line, which is connected to a liquid nitrogen tank. The cooled and accelerated solid carbon dioxide microparticles are injected from the injection nozzle for the solid carbon dioxide and directed against the contaminated surface to be cleaned, and, as a result, the surface contamination is removed

  18. Surface passivation investigation on ultra-thin atomic layer deposited aluminum oxide layers for their potential application to form tunnel layer passivated contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Zheng; Ling, Zhi Peng; Nandakumar, Naomi; Kaur, Gurleen; Ke, Cangming; Liao, Baochen; Aberle, Armin G.; Stangl, Rolf

    2017-08-01

    The surface passivation performance of atomic layer deposited ultra-thin aluminium oxide layers with different thickness in the tunnel layer regime, i.e., ranging from one atomic cycle (∼0.13 nm) to 11 atomic cycles (∼1.5 nm) on n-type silicon wafers is studied. The effect of thickness and thermal activation on passivation performance is investigated with corona-voltage metrology to measure the interface defect density D it(E) and the total interface charge Q tot. Furthermore, the bonding configuration variation of the AlO x films under various post-deposition thermal activation conditions is analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Additionally, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(styrene sulfonate) is used as capping layer on ultra-thin AlO x tunneling layers to further reduce the surface recombination current density to values as low as 42 fA/cm2. This work is a useful reference for using ultra-thin ALD AlO x layers as tunnel layers in order to form hole selective passivated contacts for silicon solar cells.

  19. Research on High Layer Thickness Fabricated of 316L by Selective Laser Melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuo; Liu, Yude; Shi, Wentian; Qi, Bin; Yang, Jin; Zhang, Feifei; Han, Dong; Ma, Yingyi

    2017-09-08

    Selective laser melting (SLM) is a potential additive manufacturing (AM) technology. However, the application of SLM was confined due to low efficiency. To improve efficiency, SLM fabrication with a high layer thickness and fine powder was systematically researched, and the void areas and hollow powders can be reduced by using fine powder. Single-track experiments were used to narrow down process parameter windows. Multi-layer fabrication relative density can be reached 99.99% at the exposure time-point distance-hatch space of 120 μs-40 μm-240 μm. Also, the building rate can be up to 12 mm³/s, which is about 3-10 times higher than the previous studies. Three typical defects were found by studying deeply, including the un-melted defect between the molten pools, the micro-pore defect within the molten pool, and the irregular distribution of the splashing phenomenon. Moreover, the microstructure is mostly equiaxed crystals and a small amount of columnar crystals. The averages of ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, and elongation are 625 MPa, 525 MPa, and 39.9%, respectively. As exposure time increased from 80 μs to 200 μs, the grain size is gradually grown up from 0.98 μm to 2.23 μm, the grain aspect ratio is close to 1, and the tensile properties are shown as a downward trend. The tensile properties of high layer thickness fabricated are not significantly different than those with a coarse-powder layer thickness of low in previous research.

  20. Research on High Layer Thickness Fabricated of 316L by Selective Laser Melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Wang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Selective laser melting (SLM is a potential additive manufacturing (AM technology. However, the application of SLM was confined due to low efficiency. To improve efficiency, SLM fabrication with a high layer thickness and fine powder was systematically researched, and the void areas and hollow powders can be reduced by using fine powder. Single-track experiments were used to narrow down process parameter windows. Multi-layer fabrication relative density can be reached 99.99% at the exposure time-point distance-hatch space of 120 μs-40 μm-240 μm. Also, the building rate can be up to 12 mm3/s, which is about 3–10 times higher than the previous studies. Three typical defects were found by studying deeply, including the un-melted defect between the molten pools, the micro-pore defect within the molten pool, and the irregular distribution of the splashing phenomenon. Moreover, the microstructure is mostly equiaxed crystals and a small amount of columnar crystals. The averages of ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, and elongation are 625 MPa, 525 MPa, and 39.9%, respectively. As exposure time increased from 80 μs to 200 μs, the grain size is gradually grown up from 0.98 μm to 2.23 μm, the grain aspect ratio is close to 1, and the tensile properties are shown as a downward trend. The tensile properties of high layer thickness fabricated are not significantly different than those with a coarse-powder layer thickness of low in previous research.

  1. Thickness-dependent electron mobility of single and few-layer MoS2 thin-film transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Heon Kim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the dependence of electron mobility on the thickness of MoS2 nanosheets by fabricating bottom-gate single and few-layer MoS2 thin-film transistors with SiO2 gate dielectrics and Au electrodes. All the fabricated MoS2 transistors showed on/off-current ratio of ∼107 and saturated output characteristics without high-k capping layers. As the MoS2 thickness increased from 1 to 6 layers, the field-effect mobility of the fabricated MoS2 transistors increased from ∼10 to ∼18 cm2V−1s−1. The increased subthreshold swing of the fabricated transistors with MoS2 thickness suggests that the increase of MoS2 mobility with thickness may be related to the dependence of the contact resistance and the dielectric constant of MoS2 layer on its thickness.

  2. System-on-Package Platform with Thick Benzocyclobutene Layer for Millimeter-Wave Antenna Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Namcheol; Kim, Youngmin; Min, Ilhong; Ryoo, Yeon-mi; Seo, Kwang-Seok

    2012-02-01

    Integrated antennas operating at millimeter-wave (mm-wave) frequency have been implemented on a benzocyclobutene (BCB)-based system-on-package (SOP) substrate. A novel BCB-based SOP substrate with a Si bump and a Si cavity was proposed to increase the BCB thickness, thus enhancing the gain of the microstrip patch array antenna and reducing the transfer loss of the transmission line. The mechanical issues of adhesion and stress of BCB are studied. The adhesion between gold and BCB was improved significantly by the insertion of a layer of Si oxide (SiO2) by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). SiO2 can also reduce the wafer bow by stress compensation. Wafer bow of whole structure was decreased from 79.3 to 55.2 µm by the insertion of a 1-µm-thick SiO2 layer. A series-fed 1 ×8 linear array antenna is impedance matched well at 77 GHz. The process flow including BCB chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) was described. The proposed SOP substrate can be a candidate for overcoming the constraint of BCB thickness.

  3. Effect of the thickness of flowable composite as intermediate layer to reduce microleakage on gingival wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natasha, V.; Suprastiwi, E.

    2017-08-01

    Microleakage of composite restoration in proximal composite restoration often occurs on the gingival wall. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the influence of flowable composite as an intermediate layer to reduce microleakage on the gingival wall. Thirty whole,extracted, upper premolars were divided into three groups. Within box-like cavities, the first group was restored with packable composite only. Group 2 was restored with flowable composite of a1mm thickness and then was restored with incrementally packable composite. Group 3 was restored similarly to group 2, however with a flowable composite thickness of 2mm. After thermocycling, the penetration of 1% methylene blue was investigated along the gingival wall. There were significant differences between group 1 and groups 2 and 3. No significant differences were found between groups 2 and 3. Flowable composite, as an intermediate layer, reduces microleakage of the gingival wall of proximal composite restorations. Nonetheless, the thickness of the flowable composite has no influence on the amount of microleakage observed.

  4. The role of surface preparation in corrosion protection of copper with nanometer-thick ALD alumina coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirhashemihaghighi, Shadi; Światowska, Jolanta [PSL Research University, CNRS – Chimie ParisTech, Institut de Recherche de Chimie Paris (IRCP), 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Maurice, Vincent, E-mail: vincent.maurice@chimie-paristech.fr [PSL Research University, CNRS – Chimie ParisTech, Institut de Recherche de Chimie Paris (IRCP), 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Seyeux, Antoine; Klein, Lorena H. [PSL Research University, CNRS – Chimie ParisTech, Institut de Recherche de Chimie Paris (IRCP), 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Salmi, Emma; Ritala, Mikko [Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 55, FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Marcus, Philippe [PSL Research University, CNRS – Chimie ParisTech, Institut de Recherche de Chimie Paris (IRCP), 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • 10–50 nm thick alumina coatings were grown on copper by atomic layer deposition. • Surface smoothening by substrate annealing was studied as pre-deposition treatment. • Corrosion protection is promoted by pre-treatment for 10 nm but not for thicker films. • Local adhesion failure is assigned to the stresses accumulated in the thicker films. • Surface smoothening decreases the interfacial strength bearing the film stresses. - Abstract: Surface smoothening by substrate annealing was studied as a pre-treatment for improving the corrosion protection provided to copper by 10, 20 and 50 nm thick alumina coatings deposited by atomic layer deposition. The interplay between substrate surface state and deposited film thickness for controlling the corrosion protection provided by ultrathin barrier films is demonstrated. Pre-annealing at 750 °C heals out the dispersed surface heterogeneities left by electropolishing and reduces the surface roughness to less than 2 nm independently of the deposited film thickness. For 10 nm coatings, substrate surface smoothening promotes the corrosion resistance. However, for 20 and 50 nm coatings, it is detrimental to the corrosion protection due to local detachment of the deposited films. The weaker adherence of the thicker coatings is assigned to the stresses accumulated in the films with increasing deposited thickness. Healing out the local heterogeneities on the substrate surface diminishes the interfacial strength that is bearing the stresses of the deposited films, thereby increasing adhesion failure for the thicker films. Pitting corrosion occurs at the local sites of adhesion failure. Intergranular corrosion occurs at the initially well coated substrate grain boundaries because of the growth of a more defective and permeable coating at grain boundaries.

  5. Evaluation of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness profile in thyroid ophthalmopathy without optic nerve dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumari Mugdha

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL thickness profile in patients of thyroid ophthalmopathy with no clinical signs of optic nerve dysfunction. METHODS: A prospective, case-control, observational study conducted at a tertiary care centre. Inclusion criteria consisted of patients with eyelid retraction in association with any one of: biochemical thyroid dysfunction, exophthalmos, or extraocular muscle involvement; or thyroid dysfunction in association with either exophthalmos or extra-ocular muscle involvement; or a clinical activity score (CAS>3/7. Two measurements of RNFL thickness were done for each eye, by Cirrus HD-optical coherence tomography 6mo apart. RESULTS: Mean age of the sample was 38.75y (range 13-70y with 18 males and 22 females. Average RNFL thickness at first visit was 92.06±12.44 µm, significantly lower than control group (101.28±6.64 µm (P=0.0001. Thickness of inferior quadrant decreased from 118.2±21.27 µm to 115.0±22.27 µm after 6mo (P=0.02. There was no correlation between the change in CAS and RNFL thickness. CONCLUSION: Decreased RNFL thickness is an important feature of thyroid orbitopathy, which is an inherent outcome of compressive optic neuropathy of any etiology. Subclinical RNFL damage continues in the absence of clinical activity of the disease. RNFL evaluation is essential in Grave’s disease and active intervention may be warranted in the presence of significant damage.

  6. Optical and structural characteristics of high indium content InGaN/GaN multi-quantum wells with varying GaN cap layer thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, J.; Zhao, D. G., E-mail: dgzhao@red.semi.ac.cn; Jiang, D. S.; Chen, P.; Zhu, J. J.; Liu, Z. S.; Le, L. C.; Li, X. J.; He, X. G. [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China); Liu, J. P. [Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou 215123 (China); Yang, H. [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China); Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou 215123 (China); Zhang, Y. T.; Du, G. T. [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China)

    2015-02-07

    The optical and structural properties of InGaN/GaN multi-quantum wells (MQWs) with different thicknesses of low temperature grown GaN cap layers are investigated. It is found that the MQW emission energy red-shifts and the peak intensity decreases with increasing GaN cap layer thickness, which may be partly caused by increased floating indium atoms accumulated at quantum well (QW) surface. They will result in the increased interface roughness, higher defect density, and even lead to a thermal degradation of QW layers. An extra growth interruption introduced before the growth of GaN cap layer can help with evaporating the floating indium atoms, and therefore is an effective method to improve the optical properties of high indium content InGaN/GaN MQWs.

  7. Interocular symmetry of retinal nerve fibre layer thickness in healthy eyes: a spectral-domain optical coherence tomographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Young Hoon; Song, Miryoung; Kim, Yong Yeon; Yeom, Dong Ju; Lee, Joo Hwa

    2014-11-01

    This study was performed to investigate the interocular symmetry of peripapillary retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) thickness, as measured by Cirrus high-definition spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT), in healthy eyes. A wide range of subject ages and refractive errors was examined. The retinal nerve fibre layer thickness was measured in 1,234 healthy eyes from 617 subjects using OCT. Interocular differences (right eye minus left eye) in global area and quadrant nerve fibre layer thicknesses were measured. The effect of age and refractive error on interocular nerve fibre layer thickness difference was also examined. Means (and standard deviations) of subjects' ages and average subject refractive errors were 36.4 ± 19.8 years (range: five to 80 years) and -2.67 ± 2.91 D (range: -14.13 to +5.75 D), respectively. Cutoff limits for normal interocular nerve fibre layer thickness differences (2.5th and 97.5th percentiles of normative data) in the global area and in the superior, nasal, inferior and temporal quadrants were 9.5, 23.0, 15.6, 20.0 and 22.6 μm, respectively. Mean interocular retinal nerve fibre layer thickness differences in global area and in superior, nasal, inferior and temporal quadrants were 0.7 (p fibre layer thickness differences were not significantly correlated with age or refractive error (average of right and left eyes, both p > 0.05). Significant interocular differences in peripapillary retinal nerve fibre layer thickness exist in healthy eyes, particularly in the superior quadrant. This finding should be considered when comparing retinal nerve fibre layer thickness between right and left eyes. © 2014 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Optometry © 2014 Optometrists Association Australia.

  8. Tuning the thickness of electrochemically grafted layers in large area molecular junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fluteau, T.; Bessis, C.; Barraud, C., E-mail: clement.barraud@univ-paris-diderot.fr; Della Rocca, M. L.; Lafarge, P. [Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, MPQ, UMR 7162, CNRS, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Martin, P.; Lacroix, J.-C. [Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, ITODYS, UMR 7086, CNRS, 15 rue J.-A. de Baïf, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France)

    2014-09-21

    We have investigated the thickness, the surface roughness, and the transport properties of oligo(1-(2-bisthienyl)benzene) (BTB) thin films grafted on evaporated Au electrodes, thanks to a diazonium-based electro-reduction process. The thickness of the organic film is tuned by varying the number of electrochemical cycles during the growth process. Atomic force microscopy measurements reveal the evolution of the thickness in the range of 2–27 nm. Its variation displays a linear dependence with the number of cycles followed by a saturation attributed to the insulating behavior of the organic films. Both ultrathin (2 nm) and thin (12 and 27 nm) large area BTB-based junctions have then been fabricated using standard CMOS processes and finally electrically characterized. The electronic responses are fully consistent with a tunneling barrier in case of ultrathin BTB film whereas a pronounced rectifying behavior is reported for thicker molecular films.

  9. Investigation of the electrochemical deposition of thick layers of cadmium telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousset, J.

    2007-04-01

    This research thesis deals with the problem of electrochemical deposition of thick layers of cadmium telluride (CdTe) meeting the requirements of high energy radiation detection. The author first recalls the physicochemical properties of CdTe and the basic principles of radiology. He details the different criteria which define a material for X ray detection. He describes the experimental conditions, the nature and preparation of substrates, and the different electrochemical systems used in this research. He studies the impact of the applied potential on the material properties, and compares previously obtained results available in the literature with those obtained in the chosen pool conditions. He discusses the synthesis of CdTe thick layers for which different methods are tested: static in potential, static in intensity, pulsed. The coatings obtained with a given potential and then with a given current are investigated. Finally, the influence of a thermal treatment in presence or absence of a sintering agent on the morphology, the chemical composition, and the crystalline and electric properties of the deposited material is discussed, and the results of the behaviour under X rays of a electrodeposited layer are presented

  10. Experimental Investigation of Surface Layer Properties of High Thermal Conductivity Tool Steel after Electrical Discharge Machining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał Świercz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available New materials require the use of advanced technology in manufacturing complex shape parts. One of the modern materials widely used in the tool industry for injection molds or hot stamping dies is high conductivity tool steel (HTCS 150. Due to its hardness (55 HRC and thermal conductivity at 66 W/mK, this material is difficult to machine by conventional treatment and is being increasingly manufactured by nonconventional technology such as electrical discharge machining (EDM. In the EDM process, material is removed from the workpiece by a series of electrical discharges that cause changes to the surface layers properties. The final state of the surface layer directly influences the durability of the produced elements. This paper presents the influence of EDM process parameters: discharge current Ic and the pulse time ton on surface layer properties. The experimental investigation was carried out with an experimental methodology design. Surface layers properties including roughness 3D parameters, the thickness of the white layer, heat affected zone, tempered layer and occurring micro cracks were investigated and described. The influence of the response surface methodology (RSM of discharge current Ic and the pulse time ton on the thickness of the white layer and roughness parameters Sa, Sds and Ssc were described and established.

  11. Thickness-Dependent Dielectric Constant of Few-Layer In 2 Se 3 Nanoflakes

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Di

    2015-11-17

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. The dielectric constant or relative permittivity (εr) of a dielectric material, which describes how the net electric field in the medium is reduced with respect to the external field, is a parameter of critical importance for charging and screening in electronic devices. Such a fundamental material property is intimately related to not only the polarizability of individual atoms but also the specific atomic arrangement in the crystal lattice. In this Letter, we present both experimental and theoretical investigations on the dielectric constant of few-layer In2Se3 nanoflakes grown on mica substrates by van der Waals epitaxy. A nondestructive microwave impedance microscope is employed to simultaneously quantify the number of layers and local electrical properties. The measured εr increases monotonically as a function of the thickness and saturates to the bulk value at around 6-8 quintuple layers. The same trend of layer-dependent dielectric constant is also revealed by first-principles calculations. Our results of the dielectric response, being ubiquitously applicable to layered 2D semiconductors, are expected to be significant for this vibrant research field.

  12. Fabrication of CIS Absorber Layers with Different Thicknesses Using A Non-Vacuum Spray Coating Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Chen Diao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a new thin-film deposition process, spray coating method (SPM, was investigated to deposit the high-densified CuInSe2 absorber layers. The spray coating method developed in this study was a non-vacuum process, based on dispersed nano-scale CuInSe2 precursor and could offer a simple, inexpensive, and alternative formation technology for CuInSe2 absorber layers. After spraying on Mo/glass substrates, the CuInSe2 thin films were annealed at 550 °C by changing the annealing time from 5 min to 30 min in a selenization furnace, using N2 as atmosphere. When the CuInSe2 thin films were annealed, without extra Se or H2Se gas used as the compensation source during the annealing process. The aim of this project was to investigate the influence of annealing time on the densification and crystallization of the CuInSe2 absorber layers to optimize the quality for cost effective solar cell production. The thickness of the CuInSe2 absorber layers could be controlled as the volume of used dispersed CuInSe2-isopropyl alcohol solution was controlled. In this work, X-ray diffraction patterns, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and Hall parameter measurements were performed in order to verify the quality of the CuInSe2 absorber layers obtained by the Spray Coating Method.

  13. The effect of cigarette smoking on retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in patients with migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, Seden; Gunes, Alime; Demirci, Serpil; Kutluhan, Suleyman; Tok, Levent; Tok, Ozlem

    2016-03-01

    Migraine is a frequent and disabling chronic neurological condition with complex pathophysiology. Both cigarette smoking and migraine may cause damage to the optic nerve. The primary objective of this study was to investigate the effect of cigarette smoking on retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness in patients with migraine. Eighty-four consecutive patients diagnosed with migraine (34 smokers and 50 nonsmokers) and 66 age- and gender-matched healthy non-smoker controls were enrolled for this observational cross-sectional study. RNFL thickness was measured using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) and then RNFL thickness in patients with migraine who smoke was compared to nonsmoking patients with migraine and healthy subjects. The average, superior, nasal and inferior RNFL thicknesses were significantly thinner in patients with migraine compared to the control group (p smoking may cause significant RNFL thinning in patients with migraine. OCT may be a feasible technique for determination of smoking-induced ocular damage in patients with migraine.

  14. Effect of Catalytic Layer Thickness on Diameter of Vertically Aligned Individual Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Kyung Jung

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of catalytic thin film thickness on the diameter control of individual carbon nanotubes grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition was investigated. Individual carbon nanotubes were grown on catalytic nanodot arrays, which were fabricated by e-beam lithography and e-beam evaporation. During e-beam evaporation of the nanodot pattern, more catalytic metal was deposited at the edge of the nanodots than the desired catalyst thickness. Because of this phenomenon, carbon atoms diffused faster near the center of the dots than at the edge of the dots. The carbon atoms, which were gathered at the interface between the catalytic nanodot and the diffusion barrier, accumulated near the center of the dot and lifted the catalyst off. From the experiments, an individual carbon nanotube with the same diameter as that of the catalytic nanodot was obtained from a 5 nm thick catalytic nanodot; however, an individual carbon nanotube with a smaller diameter (~40% reduction was obtained from a 50 nm thick nanodot. We found that the thicker the catalytic layer, the greater the reduction in diameter of the carbon nanotubes. The diameter-controlled carbon nanotubes could have applications in bio- and nanomaterial scanning and as a contrast medium for magnetic resonance imaging.

  15. Polymerisation shrinkage versus layer thickness of a dentine bonding resin: Method development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafarzadeh T

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Dentine bonding systems are usually unfilled, and so their shrinkage may be significant. High"nshrinkage may cause internal stress at the interface between resin-composite restoration and the dentine"nsubstrate. Failure of the adhesive interface may be observed due to the interna! stress. The aims of this"nstudy were:"nA To obtain a suitable method for measuring the kinetics of polymerisation shrinkage in unfilled resm at different thicknesses, particularly for thin films."nB Consideraing the effect of thickness on shrinkage."nScotchbond Multipurpose (3M adhesive bond resin was used. To overcome the particular challenges presented by thin films, a filled-ring measurement procedure was used. Also, a non-contact laser analogue displacement sensor system was developed and applied to measure polymerisation shrinkage. Regression analysis was performed on a complete data set. Non-linear regression analysis established a logarithmic relationship between polymerisation shrinkage and layer thickness. The method applied in this study was found to be sensitive and accurate procedure for determining photo-polymerisation shrinkage of thin films. Polymerisation shrinkage increased with logarithmic of the adhesive thickness.

  16. Acoustic tomography in the atmospheric surface layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ziemann

    Full Text Available Acoustic tomography is presented as a technique for remote monitoring of meteorological quantities. This method and a special algorithm of analysis can directly produce area-averaged values of meteorological parameters. As a result consistent data will be obtained for validation of numerical atmospheric micro-scale models. Such a measuring system can complement conventional point measurements over different surfaces. The procedure of acoustic tomography uses the horizontal propagation of sound waves in the atmospheric surface layer. Therefore, to provide a general overview of sound propagation under various atmospheric conditions a two-dimensional ray-tracing model according to a modified version of Snell's law is used. The state of the crossed atmosphere can be estimated from measurements of acoustic travel time between sources and receivers at different points. Derivation of area-averaged values of the sound speed and furthermore of air temperature results from the inversion of travel time values for all acoustic paths. Thereby, the applied straight ray two-dimensional tomographic model using SIRT (simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique is characterised as a method with small computational requirements, satisfactory convergence and stability properties as well as simple handling, especially, during online evaluation.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (turbulence; instruments and techniques.

  17. THE THICKNESS DEPENDENCE OF OXYGEN PERMEABILITY IN SOL-GEL DERIVED CGO-COFE2O4 THIN FILMS ON POROUS CERAMIC SUBSTRATES: A SPUTTERED BLOCKING LAYER FOR THICKNESS CONTROL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkman, K

    2009-01-08

    Mixed conductive oxides are a topic of interest for applications in oxygen separation membranes as well as use in producing hydrogen fuel through the partial oxidation of methane. The oxygen flux through the membrane is governed both by the oxygen ionic conductivity as well as the material's electronic conductivity; composite membranes like Ce{sub 0.8}Gd{sub 0.2}O{sub 2-{delta}} (CGO)-CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (CFO) use gadolinium doped ceria oxides as the ionic conducting material combined with cobalt iron spinel which serves as the electronic conductor. In this study we employ {approx} 50 nm sputtered CeO{sub 2} layers on the surface of porous CGO ceramic substrates which serve as solution 'blocking' layers during the thin film fabrication process facilitating the control of film thickness. Films with thickness of {approx} 2 and 4 microns were prepared by depositing 40 and 95 separate sol-gel layers respectively. Oxygen flux measurements indicated that the permeation increased with decreasing membrane thickness; thin film membrane with thickness on the micron level showed flux values an order of magnitude greater (0.03 {micro}mol/cm{sup 2} s) at 800 C as compared to 1mm thick bulk ceramic membranes (0.003 {micro}mol/cm{sup 2}).

  18. Highly accurate thickness measurement of multi-layered automotive paints using terahertz technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krimi, Soufiene; Klier, Jens; Jonuscheit, Joachim; von Freymann, Georg; Urbansky, Ralph; Beigang, René

    2016-07-01

    In this contribution, we present a highly accurate approach for thickness measurements of multi-layered automotive paints using terahertz time domain spectroscopy in reflection geometry. The proposed method combines the benefits of a model-based material parameters extraction method to calibrate the paint coatings, a generalized Rouard's method to simulate the terahertz radiation behavior within arbitrary thin films, and the robustness of a powerful evolutionary optimization algorithm to increase the sensitivity of the minimum thickness measurement limit. Within the framework of this work, a self-calibration model is introduced, which takes into consideration the real industrial challenges such as the effect of wet-on-wet spray in the painting process.

  19. Highly accurate thickness measurement of multi-layered automotive paints using terahertz technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krimi, Soufiene; Beigang, René; Klier, Jens; Jonuscheit, Joachim; Freymann, Georg von; Urbansky, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    In this contribution, we present a highly accurate approach for thickness measurements of multi-layered automotive paints using terahertz time domain spectroscopy in reflection geometry. The proposed method combines the benefits of a model-based material parameters extraction method to calibrate the paint coatings, a generalized Rouard's method to simulate the terahertz radiation behavior within arbitrary thin films, and the robustness of a powerful evolutionary optimization algorithm to increase the sensitivity of the minimum thickness measurement limit. Within the framework of this work, a self-calibration model is introduced, which takes into consideration the real industrial challenges such as the effect of wet-on-wet spray in the painting process.

  20. Improve oxidation resistance at high temperature by nanocrystalline surface layer

    OpenAIRE

    Xia, Z. X.; Zhang, C.; Huang, X. F.; Liu, W. B.; Yang, Z. G.

    2015-01-01

    An interesting change of scale sequence occurred during oxidation of nanocrystalline surface layer by means of a surface mechanical attrition treatment. The three-layer oxide structure from the surface towards the matrix is Fe3O4, spinel FeCr2O4 and corundum (Fe,Cr)2O3, which is different from the typical two-layer scale consisted of an Fe3O4 outer layer and an FeCr2O4 inner layer in conventional P91 steel. The diffusivity of Cr, Fe and O is enhanced concurrently in the nanocrystalline surfac...

  1. Exploring Scintillometry in the Stable Atmospheric Surface Layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartogensis, O.K.

    2006-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is to investigate observation methods of heat and momentum exchange and key variables that characterise turbulence in the atmospheric stable surface layer (SSL), a layer defined as the lower part of the stable boundary layer (SBL) where surface fluxes do not change

  2. Effect of AlSb buffer layer thickness on heteroepitaxial growth of InSb films on a Si(001) substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, M. [Nano and Functional Material Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, University of TOYAMA, Gofuku 3190, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan)], E-mail: morimasa@eng.u-toyama.ac.jp; Murata, K.; Fujimoto, N.; Tatsuyama, C.; Tambo, T. [Nano and Functional Material Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, University of TOYAMA, Gofuku 3190, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan)

    2007-07-31

    Aluminum antimonide (AlSb) layers with various thickness ranged from about 8 to 250 nm were grown at 520 deg. C as the buffer layer for the heteroepitaxial growth of InSb films on Si(001) substrates. InSb films were grown at 400 deg. C on the AlSb/Si(001), and were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscope, as a function of the thickness of the AlSb layer. The XRD patterns of the InSb films grown on the AlSb layers show that even if the AlSb buffer layer, whose surface consists of many islands, is as thin as 8 nm, it is effective for the heteroepitaxial growth of InSb film on a Si(001) substrate, and the AlSb layer of about 40 nm is thick enough to grow heteroepitaxial InSb films on the Si(001) substrate. The results of the {phi} scan patterns of the films show that InSb films on a Si(001) substrate with AlSb buffer layer were heteroepitaxially grown without any rotation in the growth plane.

  3. Effect of AlSb buffer layer thickness on heteroepitaxial growth of InSb films on a Si(001) substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, M.; Murata, K.; Fujimoto, N.; Tatsuyama, C.; Tambo, T.

    2007-01-01

    Aluminum antimonide (AlSb) layers with various thickness ranged from about 8 to 250 nm were grown at 520 deg. C as the buffer layer for the heteroepitaxial growth of InSb films on Si(001) substrates. InSb films were grown at 400 deg. C on the AlSb/Si(001), and were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscope, as a function of the thickness of the AlSb layer. The XRD patterns of the InSb films grown on the AlSb layers show that even if the AlSb buffer layer, whose surface consists of many islands, is as thin as 8 nm, it is effective for the heteroepitaxial growth of InSb film on a Si(001) substrate, and the AlSb layer of about 40 nm is thick enough to grow heteroepitaxial InSb films on the Si(001) substrate. The results of the φ scan patterns of the films show that InSb films on a Si(001) substrate with AlSb buffer layer were heteroepitaxially grown without any rotation in the growth plane

  4. Surface plasmon resonance image sensor module of spin-coated silver film with polymer layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Jung-Han; Lee, Dong Hun; Cho, Yong-Jin; Lee, Myung-Hyun

    2013-11-01

    Prism modules of 20 nm-, 40 nm-, and 60 nm-thick spin-coated silver films both without and with an upper 100 nm-thick spin-coated polymer layer were fabricated for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) image sensor applications. The prism modules were applied to an SPR image sensor system. The coefficients of determination (R2s) for the 20 nm-, 40 nm- and 60 nm-thick silver films without the polymer layer were 0.9231, 0.9901, and 0.9889, respectively, and with the polymer layer 0.9228, 0.9951, and 0.9880, respectively when standard ethanol solutions with 0.1% intervals in the range of 20.0% to 20.5% were applied. The upper polymer layer has no effect on the R2. The prism modules of the 40-nm-thick spin-coated silver films had the highest R2 value of approximately 0.99. The durability of the 40 nm-thick spin-coated silver film with the 100 nm-thick polymer layer is much better than that without the upper low-loss polymer layer. The developed SPR image sensor module of the 40 nm-thick spin-coated silver film with the upper 100 nm-thick low-loss polymer film is expected to be a very cost-effective and robust solution because the films are formed at low temperatures in a short period of time without requiring a vacuum system and are very durable.

  5. On the possibility of thin layers thickness determination with low energy proton scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgadaryan, D.; Kurnaev, V.; Sinelnikov, D.; Efimov, N.

    2017-12-01

    The analysis of erosion and redeposition processes plays an important role in the physics of fusion devices. In this work we present the results of computer simulation of plasma-facing materials surface analysis by use of the keV-energy proton scattering spectroscopy. It is shown that this technique can be used for the non-destructive analysis of thin surface layers. Energy spectra that correspond to different scattering and target parameters are presented.

  6. Anatomy and Physiology of the Thick-tufted Layer 5 Pyramidal Neuron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srikanth eRamaswamy

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The thick-tufted layer 5 (TTL5 pyramidal neuron is one of the most extensively studied neuron types in the mammalian neocortex and has become a benchmark for understanding information processing in excitatory neurons. By virtue of having the widest local axonal and dendritic arborization, the TTL5 neuron encompasses various local neocortical neurons and thereby defines the dimensions of neocortical microcircuitry. The TTL5 neuron integrates input across all neocortical layers and is the principal output pathway funneling information flow to subcortical structures. Several studies over the past decades have investigated the anatomy, physiology, synaptology, and pathophysiology of the TTL5 neuron. This review summarizes key discoveries and identifies potential avenues of research to facilitate an integrated and unifying understanding on the role of a central neuron in the neocortex.

  7. Anatomy and physiology of the thick-tufted layer 5 pyramidal neuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswamy, Srikanth; Markram, Henry

    2015-01-01

    The thick-tufted layer 5 (TTL5) pyramidal neuron is one of the most extensively studied neuron types in the mammalian neocortex and has become a benchmark for understanding information processing in excitatory neurons. By virtue of having the widest local axonal and dendritic arborization, the TTL5 neuron encompasses various local neocortical neurons and thereby defines the dimensions of neocortical microcircuitry. The TTL5 neuron integrates input across all neocortical layers and is the principal output pathway funneling information flow to subcortical structures. Several studies over the past decades have investigated the anatomy, physiology, synaptology, and pathophysiology of the TTL5 neuron. This review summarizes key discoveries and identifies potential avenues of research to facilitate an integrated and unifying understanding on the role of a central neuron in the neocortex.

  8. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness is associated with lesion length in acute optic neuritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallenbach, K; Simonsen, Helle Juhl; Sander, B

    2010-01-01

    included 41 patients with unilateral optic neuritis and 19 healthy volunteers. All patients were evaluated and examined within 28 days of onset of symptoms. The peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT), an objective quantitative measure of optic nerve head edema, was measured by optical...... coherence tomography and the length and location of the inflammatory optic nerve lesion were evaluated using MRI. RESULTS: Ophthalmoscopically, 34% of the patients had papillitis. The retinal nerve fiber layer in affected eyes (mean 123.1 microm) was higher during the acute phase than that of fellow eyes......BACKGROUND: Acute optic neuritis occurs with and without papillitis. The presence of papillitis has previously been thought to imply an anterior location of the neuritis, but imaging studies seeking to test this hypothesis have been inconclusive. METHODS: This prospective observational cohort study...

  9. E2CAV, Pavement layer thickness estimation system based on image texture operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brayan Barrios Arcila

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Public roads are an essential part of economic progress in any country; they are fundamental for increasing the efficiency on transportation of goods and are a remarkable source of employment. For its part, Colombia has few statistics on the condition of its roads; according with INVIAS the state of the roads in Colombia can be classified as “Very Good” (21.1%, “Good” (34.7%, and “Regular” or “Bad” (43.46%. Thus, from the point of view of pavement rehabilitation, it is worth securing the quality of those roads classified as “Regular” or “Bad”. Objective: In this paper we propose a system to estimate the thickness of the pavement layer using image segmentation methods. The pavement thickness is currently estimated using radars of terrestrial penetration, extraction of cores or making pips; and it is part of structural parameters in the systems of evaluation of pavement. Method: The proposed system is composed of a vertical movement control unit, which introduces a video scope into a small hole in the pavement, then the images are obtained and unified in a laptop. Finally, this mosaic is processed through texture operators to estimate the thickness of the pavement. Users can select between the Otsu method and Gabor filters to process the image data. Results: The results include laboratory and field tests; these tests show errors of 5.03% and 11.3%, respectively, in the thickness of the pavement. Conclusion: The proposed system is an attractive option for local estimation of pavement thickness, with minimal structural damage and less impact on mobility and number of operators.

  10. Expansible apparatus for removing the surface layer from a concrete object

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, C.H.

    1979-01-01

    A method and apparatus for removing the surface layer from a concrete object are described. The method consists of providing a hole having a circular wall in the surface layer of the object, the hole being at least as deep as the thickness of the surface layer to be removed, and applying an outward wedging pressure on the wall of the hole sufficient to spall the surface layer around the hole. By the proper spacing of an appropriate number of holes, it is possible to remove the entire surface layer. The apparatus consists of an elongated tubular-shaped body having a relatively short handle with a solid wall at one end. The wall of the remainder of the body contains a plurality of evenly spaced longitudinal cuts to form a relatively long expandable section. The outer end of the expandable section has an expandable, wedge-shaped spalling edge extending from the outer surface of the wall, perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the body, and expanding means in the body for outwardly expanding the expandable section and forcing the spalling edge into the wall of a hole with sufficient outward pressure to spall away the surface layer of concrete. The method and apparatus are particularly suitable for removing surface layers of concrete which are radioactively contaminated

  11. Properties of PZT thick film made on LTCC substrates with dielectric intermediate layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    DÄ browski, Arkadiusz; Golonka, Leszek

    2016-11-01

    Results of experiments on application of various interlayers between LTCC (Low Temperature Cofired Ceramics) substrate and thick-film PZT (Lead Zirconate - Titanate) are described in this work. Thick-film intermediate layers were based on several dielectric materials: TiN, Al2O3, SiC, TiO2, SiC, YSZ, BN. Seven screen printable pastes were prepared on the base of powders of mentioned materials with addition of glass and organic vehicle. The substrates were made of 951 (DuPont), CeramTapeGC (CeramTec) and HL2000 (Heraeus) LTCC tapes. Sandwich type transducers, consisting of barrier layer, gold bottom electrode, PZT layer and silver top electrode were prepared and characterized. Basic piezoelectric parameters - permittivity, effective charge constant (d33(eff)) and remanent polarization were determined. The best properties were obtained for substrates made of 951. In general, interlayers based on TiO2, SiC and Al2O3 improved permittivity and charge constant comparing to bare substrates. For example, for 951 substrate the PZT layer exhibited d33(eff) equal to 160, 215, 250 and 230 pC/N for bare substrate, TiO2 interlayer, SiC interlayer and Al2O3 interlayer, respectively. In case of CeramTape GC substrates determined permittivity was equal to 215, 245, 235 and 275 for bare substrate, TiO2 interlayer, SiC interlayer and Al2O3 interlayer, respectively. In case of TiN and BN materials the parameters were considerably deteriorated.

  12. Diagnostic Ability of Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness Deviation Map for Localized and Diffuse Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joong Won Shin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate the diagnostic ability of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL deviation map for glaucoma with localized or diffuse RNFL defects. Methods. Eyes of 139 glaucoma patients and 165 healthy subjects were enrolled. All participants were imaged with Cirrus HD-OCT (Carl Zeiss Meditec, Dublin, CA, USA. A RNFL defect was defined as at least 10 contiguous red (<1% level superpixels in RNFL deviation map. The area, location, and angular width of RNFL defects were automatically measured. We compared sensitivities, specificities, and area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs of RNFL deviation map and circumpapillary RNFL thickness for localized and diffuse RNFL defects. Subgroup analysis was performed according to the severity of glaucoma. Results. For localized defects, the area of RNFL defects (AUC, 0.991; sensitivity, 97%; specificity, 90% in deviation map showed a higher diagnostic performance (p=0.002 than the best circumpapillary RNFL parameter (inferior RNFL thickness; AUC, 0.914; sensitivity, 79%; specificity, 92%. For diffuse defects, there was no significant difference between the RNFL deviation map and circumpapillary RNFL parameters. In mild glaucoma with localized defect, RNFL deviation map showed a better diagnostic performance than circumpapillary RNFL measurement. Conclusions. RNFL deviation map is a useful tool for evaluating glaucoma regardless of localized or diffuse defect type and has advantages over circumpapillary RNFL measurement for detecting localized RNFL defects.

  13. Effect of Substrate Permittivity and Thickness on Performance of Single-Layer, Wideband, U-Slot Antennas on Microwave Substrates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Natarajan, V; Chatterjee, D

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents effects of substrate permittivity and thickness on the performance characteristics like impedance bandwidth, radiation efficiency and gain of a single-layer, wideband, U-slot antenna...

  14. Surface crack formation on rails at grinding induced martensite white etching layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Carsten Jørn; Fæster, Søren; Dhar, Somrita

    2017-01-01

    The connection between profile grinding of rails, martensite surface layers and crack initiation has been investigated using visual inspection, optical microscopy and 3D X-ray computerized tomography. Newly grinded rails were extracted and found to be covered by a continuous surface layer...... of martensite with varying thickness formed by the grinding process. Worn R350HT and R200 rails were extracted from the Danish rail network as they had transverse bands resembling grinding marks on the running surface. The transverse bands were shown to consist of martensite which had extensive crack formation...

  15. Thickness scaling effect on interfacial barrier and electrical contact to two-dimensional MoS2 layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Song-Lin; Komatsu, Katsuyoshi; Nakaharai, Shu; Lin, Yen-Fu; Yamamoto, Mahito; Duan, Xiangfeng; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito

    2014-12-23

    Understanding the interfacial electrical properties between metallic electrodes and low-dimensional semiconductors is essential for both fundamental science and practical applications. Here we report the observation of thickness reduction induced crossover of electrical contact at Au/MoS2 interfaces. For MoS2 thicker than 5 layers, the contact resistivity slightly decreases with reducing MoS2 thickness. By contrast, the contact resistivity sharply increases with reducing MoS2 thickness below 5 layers, mainly governed by the quantum confinement effect. We find that the interfacial potential barrier can be finely tailored from 0.3 to 0.6 eV by merely varying MoS2 thickness. A full evolution diagram of energy level alignment is also drawn to elucidate the thickness scaling effect. The finding of tailoring interfacial properties with channel thickness represents a useful approach controlling the metal/semiconductor interfaces which may result in conceptually innovative functionalities.

  16. Reliability of thickness of oxide layer of stainless steels with chromium using cellular automaton model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lan, K. C.; Chen, Y.; Yu, G. P.; Hung, T. C.

    2012-01-01

    A cellular automaton (CA) model based on the stochastic approach was proposed to simulate the process of oxidation and corrosion of stainless steels with different contents of chromium in-flowing lead bismuth eutectic (LBE). Chromium is a crucial alloying element added in stainless steels and nickel based alloys which have been proposed to be used in advanced nuclear reactors to improve resistance of the oxidation and corrosion. To verify the reliability of the thickness of the oxide layer by CA model, the influence of the stochastic character on the simulating results was investigated as changing parameter of chromium content of structure material in this study. Ten independent simulations were run for each specific environment. A stable and reasonable results were obtained according to the chi-square of goodness-of-fit test, the chi-square of the thickness of oxide layer for each case were significant smaller than critical chi-square value with a confidence level of 95% (Χ 2 α, v = Χ 2 0.05,9 = 16.92). (authors)

  17. Hypervelocity impacts into ice-topped layered targets: Investigating the effects of ice crust thickness and subsurface density on crater morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harriss, Kathryn H.; Burchell, Mark J.

    2017-07-01

    Many bodies in the outer solar system are theorized to have an ice shell with a different subsurface material below, be it chondritic, regolith, or a subsurface ocean. This layering can have a significant influence on the morphology of impact craters. Accordingly, we have undertaken laboratory hypervelocity impact experiments on a range of multilayered targets, with interiors of water, sand, and basalt. Impact experiments were undertaken using impact speeds in the range of 0.8-5.3 km s-1, a 1.5 mm Al ball bearing projectile, and an impact incidence of 45°. The surface ice crust had a thickness between 5 and 50 mm, i.e., some 3-30 times the projectile diameter. The thickness of the ice crust as well as the nature of the subsurface layer (liquid, well consolidated, etc.) have a marked effect on the morphology of the resulting impact crater, with thicker ice producing a larger crater diameter (at a given impact velocity), and the crater diameter scaling with impact speed to the power 0.72 for semi-infinite ice, but with 0.37 for thin ice. The density of the subsurface material changes the structure of the crater, with flat crater floors if there is a dense, well-consolidated subsurface layer (basalt) or steep, narrow craters if there is a less cohesive subsurface (sand). The associated faulting in the ice surface is also dependent on ice thickness and the substrate material. We find that the ice layer (in impacts at 5 km s-1) is effectively semi-infinite if its thickness is more than 15.5 times the projectile diameter. Below this, the crater diameter is reduced by 4% for each reduction in ice layer thickness equal to the impactor diameter. Crater depth is also affected. In the ice thickness region, 7-15.5 times the projectile diameter, the crater shape in the ice is modified even when the subsurface layer is not penetrated. For ice thicknesses, <7 times the projectile diameter, the ice layer is breached, but the nature of the resulting crater depends heavily on the

  18. Clinical analysis of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and macular fovea in hyperopia children with anisometropia amblyopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei-Fei Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To analyze the clinical significance of axial length, diopter and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in hyperopia children with anisometropia amblyopia. METHODS: From January 2015 to January 2017 in our hospital for treatment, 103 cases, all unilateral, were diagnosed as hyperopia anisometropia amblyopia. The eyes with amblyopia were as experimental group(103 eyes, another normal eye as control group(103 eyes. We took the detection with axial length, refraction, foveal thickness, corrected visual acuity, diopter and the average thickness of retinal nerve fiber layer. RESULTS: Differences in axial length and diopter and corrected visual acuity were statistically significant between the two groups(PP>0.05. There was statistical significance difference on the foveal thickness(PP>0.05. The positive correlation between diopter with nerve fiber layer thickness of foveal and around the optic disc were no statistically significant difference(P>0.05. CONCLUSION: Retinal thickness of the fovea in the eye with hyperopic anisometropia amblyopia were thicker than those in normal eyes; the nerve fiber layer of around the optic disc was not significantly different between the amblyopic eyes and contralateral eyes. The refraction and axial length had no significant correlation with optic nerve fiber layer and macular foveal thickness.

  19. Signal processing and analysis for copper layer thickness measurement within a large variation range in the CMP process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongkai; Zhao, Qian; Lu, Xinchun; Luo, Jianbin

    2017-11-01

    In the copper (Cu) chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) process, accurate determination of a process reaching the end point is of great importance. Based on the eddy current technology, the in situ thickness measurement of the Cu layer is feasible. Previous research studies focus on the application of the eddy current method to the metal layer thickness measurement or endpoint detection. In this paper, an in situ measurement system, which is independently developed by using the eddy current method, is applied to the actual Cu CMP process. A series of experiments are done for further analyzing the dynamic response characteristic of the output signal within different thickness variation ranges. In this study, the voltage difference of the output signal is used to represent the thickness of the Cu layer, and we can extract the voltage difference variations from the output signal fast by using the proposed data processing algorithm. The results show that the voltage difference decreases as thickness decreases in the conventional measurement range and the sensitivity increases at the same time. However, it is also found that there exists a thickness threshold, and the correlation is negative, when the thickness is more than the threshold. Furthermore, it is possible that the in situ measurement system can be used within a larger Cu layer thickness variation range by creating two calibration tables.

  20. Influences of layer thickness on the compatibility and physical properties of polycarbonate/polystyrene multilayered film via nanolayer coextrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Junfeng; Chen, Zhiru; Zhou, Jiaqi; Cao, Zheng; Wu, Dun; Liu, Chunlin; Pu, Hongting

    2018-05-01

    The effects of layer thickness on the compatibility between polycarbonate (PC) and polystyrene (PS) and physical properties of PC/PS multilayered film via nanolayer coextrusion are studied. The morphology of multilayered structure is observed using a scanning electron microscope. This multilayered structure may have a negative impact on the transparency, but it can improve the water resistance and heat resistance of film. To characterize the compatibility between PC and PS, differential scanning calorimetry is used to measure the glass transition temperature. The compatibility is found to be improved with the decrease of layer thickness. Therefore, the viscosity of multilayered film is also reduced with the decrease of layer thickness. In addition, the multilayered structure can improve the tensile strength with the increase of layer numbers. Because of the complete and continuous layer structure of PC, the PC/PS multilayered film can retain its mechanical strength at the temperature above Tg of PS.

  1. Changes in Thickness and Surface Area of the Human Cortex and Their Relationship with Intelligence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schnack, Hugo G.; Van Haren, Neeltje E M; Brouwer, Rachel M.; Evans, Alan; Durston, Sarah; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Kahn, René S.; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in cortical thickness over time have been related to intelligence, but whether changes in cortical surface area are related to general cognitive functioning is unknown. We therefore examined the relationship between intelligence quotient (IQ) and changes in cortical thickness and surface

  2. Directional Emission from Metal-Dielectric-Metal Structures: Effect of Mixed Metal Layers, Dye Location and Dielectric Thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Sharmistha Dutta; Badugu, Ramachandram; Ray, Krishanu; Lakowicz, Joseph R

    2015-02-12

    Metal-dielectric-metal (MDM) structures provide directional emission close to the surface normal, which offers opportunities for new design formats in fluorescence based applications. The directional emission arises due to near-field coupling of fluorophores with the optical modes present in the MDM substrate. Reflectivity simulations and dispersion diagrams provide a basic understanding of the mode profiles and the factors that affect the coupling efficiency and the spatial distribution of the coupled emission. This work reveals that the composition of the metal layers, the location of the dye in the MDM substrate and the dielectric thickness are important parameters that can be chosen to tune the color of the emission wavelength, the angle of observation, the angular divergence of the emission and the polarization of the emitted light. These features are valuable for displays and optical signage.

  3. Normative data of outer photoreceptor layer thickness obtained by software image enhancing based on Stratus optical coherence tomography images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, U.C.; Krøyer, K.; Thomadsen, Jakob

    2008-01-01

    backscattered light within the outer nuclear layer (ONL) in the fovea was registered and compared with backscattered light within the ONL in the peripheral part of the macula (I-ratio-ONL). Results: The mean RPE-OScomplex thickness in the foveal centre was 77.2 mu m (SD = 3.95). The RPE-OScomplex thickness...... in the superior macula 0.5-3 mm of the centre was significantly increased as compared with the corresponding inferior retina. In healthy subjects, the I-ratio-ONL was 1.06. Conclusions: Contrast-enhanced OCT images enable quantification of outer photoreceptor layer thickness, and normative values may help...

  4. Effects of the insertion of a thick sp2 buffer layer on the adhesion of cBN-rich film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, S.F.; Ong, C.W.; Pang, G.K.H.; Baba-Kishi, K.Z.; Lau, W.M.

    2004-01-01

    A method was proposed and examined to deposit thick cubic boron nitride (cBN)-rich layer of good adhesion to silicon substrate. The method combined (i) the insertion of a thick sp 2 buffer layer, and (ii) the use of an appropriate assist ion beam energy for the growth of the cBN-rich top layer. The sp 2 -bonded boron nitride buffer layer was deposited under irradiation of ions with energies in the range of 200-360 eV. The buffer layer was found to contain curled graphitic basal planes, and so was supposed to be relatively deformable, and facilitate the relaxation of stresses in the cBN-rich top layer. The ion assist introduced during the growth of the cBN-rich layer was supposed to both create and annihilate defects, and so resulted in the generation and relaxation of internal stresses. Results showed that the insertion of a 492 nm sp 2 buffer layer, and the use of a beam energy of 450 eV for assisting the growth of the top layer can produce a 643-nm-thick cBN-rich top layer with satisfactory adhesion, a high cBN content of 87 vol %, a hardness of 57 GPa, and an elastic modulus of 612 GPa

  5. Tuning the ultrafast photodissociation dynamics of CH3Br on ultrathin MgO films by reducing the layer thickness to the 2D limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaida, Mihai E.; Bernhardt, Thorsten M.

    2017-11-01

    The femtosecond-laser induced photodissociation of CH3Br adsorbed at sub-monolayer coverage on a solid surface was investigated by time-resolved pump-probe mass spectrometry. To tune the interaction of the CH3Br molecules with the substrate, an Mo(1 0 0) surface was covered with ultrathin insulating MgO layers of variable thickness. By gradually decreasing the magnesia layer thickness to the 2D limit the photodissociation dynamics observed by detection of the methyl fragment indicates an energetic lowering of the relevant methyl bromide excited states due to the increasing spatial proximity of the metallic support. Potential orientational effects of the methyl bromide adsorption geometry are also considered.

  6. Runoff and soil loss characteristics on loess slopes covered with aeolian sand layers of different thicknesses under simulated rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, F. B.; Bai, Y. J.; Xie, L. Y.; Yang, M. Y.; Li, Z. B.; Wu, X. R.

    2017-06-01

    In the Wind-Water Erosion Crisscross Region of the northern Loess Plateau, parts of loess slopes have been covered by layers of aeolian sand of different thicknesses. Knowledge of soil erosion processes and magnitudes on these slopes is essential to understanding the coupled water-wind erosion processes and to address the resulting downstream coarse sediment problems in the Yellow River. Simulated rainfall (intensity 90 mm h-1) was performed to explore the effects of sand layer thickness on runoff and soil loss from loess slopes covered with different sand layer thicknesses (0, 0.5, 2, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 cm). Initial runoff time increased with increasing sand layer thickness, with greater changes occurring for the increases in the thinner (0-5 cm) than for the thicker layers (5-25 cm). Total runoff yield from the sand-covered loess slopes was 18%-55% lower than from the uncovered loess slope and decreased with increasing sand layer thickness. In contrast, total sediment yield was up to 14 times greater from the sand-covered loess slopes than from the uncovered loess slope and rapidly increased with increasing sand layer thickness. During the rainstorm, runoff and soil loss rates exhibited unimodal distributions, and they were related by a positive linear function, both before and after the maximum soil loss rate, that had a high determination coefficient (R2 > 0.8, p soil loss rates tended to occur simultaneously and increased abruptly with increasing sand layer thickness. During the rainstorms, some runoff rates on the loess slopes with thicker sand layers were higher than the rainfall intensity due to rainwater combining with water emerging from the saturated sand, which could never occur on the uncovered loess slope. The critical sand layer thickness, which produced a qualitative change in runoff and sediment production modes, appeared to be in the range of 5-10 cm. These results indicated that the thickness of the sand layer on the loess slope significantly

  7. Electromagnetic fields due to a horizontal electric dipole antenna laid on the surface of a two-layer medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, L.; Kong, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    With applications to geophysical subsurface probings, electromagnetic fields due to a horizontal electric dipole laid on the surface of a two-layer medium are solved by a combination of analytic and numerical methods. Interference patterns are calculated for various layer thickness. The results are interpreted in terms of normal modes, and the accuracies of the methods are discussed.

  8. Thin surface layers of SiO2 obtained from tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) in electric discharges stabilized by a dielectric barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt-Szalowski, K.; Fabianowski, W.; Rzanek-Boroch, Z.; Gutkowski, R.

    1998-01-01

    The reported research was devoted to the process of thin layer deposition in a discharge at atmospheric pressure stabilized by a dielectric barrier. Thin surface layers composed mainly of silicon dioxide were produced by polycondensation of tetraethoxysilane vapor in mixtures with helium gas with a small amount of oxygen. The influence was studied of the voltage applied and of the time elapsed in the deposition process, on the thickness of the layer, as were the changes of composition of the deposited layers during and after storage. It is shown that good passivating pinhole-free silicon oxide layers can be produced in surface barrier discharges. (J.U.)

  9. Measuring the Thickness and Potential Profiles of the Space-Charge Layer at Organic/Organic Interfaces under Illumination and in the Dark by Scanning Kelvin Probe Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Geoffrey A; Wu, Yanfei; Haugstad, Greg; Frisbie, C Daniel

    2016-03-09

    Scanning Kelvin probe microscopy was used to measure band-bending at the model donor/acceptor heterojunction poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT)/fullerene (C60). Specifically, we measured the variation in the surface potential of C60 films with increasing thicknesses grown on P3HT to produce a surface potential profile normal to the substrate both in the dark and under illumination. The results confirm a space-charge carrier region with a thickness of 10 nm, consistent with previous observations. We discuss the possibility that the domain size in bulk heterojunction organic solar cells, which is comparable to the space-charge layer thickness, is actually partly responsible for less than expected electron/hole recombination rates.

  10. Diffusion of C and Cr During Creation of Surface Layer on Cast Steel Casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szajnar J.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In paper a method of improvement in utility properties of unalloyed cast steel casting in result of diffusion of C and Cr in process of creation of surface layer is presented. The aim of paper was determination of diffusion range of basic elements of alloyed surface layer. Moreover a quantitative analysis of carbides phase strengthens alloyed surface layer of casting was carried out. The results of studies shown that important factors of surface layer creation are maximal temperature Tmax on granular insert – cast steel boundary dependent of pouring temperature, granularity Zw of Fe-Cr-C alloy insert and thickness of casting wall gśo. On the basis of obtained results was affirmed that with increase of thickness of casting wall increases range of diffusion in solid state in Fe-Cr-C grains and in liquid state. Moreover the range of Tmax = 13001500oC favours creation of the proper alloyed surface layers on cast steel.

  11. Relevance of sub-surface chip layers for the lifetime of magnetically trapped atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, H. B.; Henkel, C; Haller, E.

    2005-01-01

    on the thickness of that layer, as long as the layers below have a much smaller conductivity; essentially the same magnetic noise would be obtained with a metallic membrane suspended in vacuum. Based on our theory we give general scaling laws of how to reduce the effect of surface magnetic noise on the trapped...... measurements where the center of a side guide trap is laterally shifted with respect to the current carrying wire using additional bias fields. Comparing the experiment to theory, we find a fair agreement and demonstrate that for a chip whose topmost layer is metallic, the magnetic noise depends essentially...

  12. Neutron skin thickness in neutron-rich nuclei: bulk and surface contributions and shell effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinas, X.; Centelles, M.; Warda, M.; Roca-Maza, X.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze theoretically the neutron skin thickness in nuclei and its correlation with the symmetry energy by using semiclassical and mean field approaches together with nuclear effective interactions. Semiclassical approaches reveal that the neutron skin thickness in nuclei is formed by a combination of bulk and surface contributions. To investigate the neutron skin thickness predicted by mean field models, we fit the corresponding densities by two-parameter Fermi distributions. Using these parametrized densities, we study the neutron skin thickness as well as its bulk and surface contributions in 208 Pb and in Zr isotopes, where the influence of shell effects along the isotopic chain is discussed. (author)

  13. A novel liquid template corrosion approach for layered silica with various morphologies and different nanolayer thicknesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wanliang; Li, Baoshan

    2014-01-01

    A novel liquid template corrosion (LTC) method has been developed for the synthesis of layered silica materials with a variety of morphologies, including hollow nanospheres, trilobite-like nanoparticles, spherical particles and a film resembling the van Gogh painting `Starry Night'. Lamellar micelles and microemulsion droplets are first formed in an oil-water (O/W) mixture of ethyl acetate (EA), cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and water. After adding aqueous ammonia the EA becomes hydrolyzed, which results in corrosion of microemulsion droplets. These droplets subsequently act as templates for the synthesis of silica formed by hydrolysis of tetraethyl orthosilicate. The morphological evolution of silica can be tuned by varying the concentration of aqueous ammonia which controls the degree of corrosion of the microemulsion droplet templates. A possible mechanism is proposed to explain why the LTC approach affords layered silica nanostructured materials with various morphologies and nanolayer thickness (2.6-4.5 nm), rather than the usual ordered mesostructures formed in the absence of EA. Our method provides a simple way to fabricate a variety of building blocks for assembling nanomaterials with novel structures and functionality, which are not available using conventional template methods.A novel liquid template corrosion (LTC) method has been developed for the synthesis of layered silica materials with a variety of morphologies, including hollow nanospheres, trilobite-like nanoparticles, spherical particles and a film resembling the van Gogh painting `Starry Night'. Lamellar micelles and microemulsion droplets are first formed in an oil-water (O/W) mixture of ethyl acetate (EA), cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and water. After adding aqueous ammonia the EA becomes hydrolyzed, which results in corrosion of microemulsion droplets. These droplets subsequently act as templates for the synthesis of silica formed by hydrolysis of tetraethyl orthosilicate. The

  14. Eddy current NDT: a suitable tool to measure oxide layer thickness in PWR fuel rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alencar, Donizete A.; Silva Junior, Silverio F. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: daa@cdtn.br, e-mail: silvasf@cdtn.br; Vieira, Andre L.P.S. [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB S.A.), Resende, RJ (Brazil). Fabrica de Combustivel Nuclear], e-mail: andre@inb.gov.br; Soares, Adolpho [Technotest Consultoria e Acessoria Ltda., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: adolpho@technotest.com.br

    2009-07-01

    Eddy current is a nondestructive test (NDT) widely used in industry to support integrity analysis of components and equipment. In the nuclear area it is frequently applied to inspect tubes installed in tube exchangers, such as steam generators and condensers in PWR plants, as well as turbine blades. Adequately assisted by means of robotic devices, that inspection method has been pointed as a suitable tool to perform accurate oxide layer thickness measurements in PWR fuel rods. This paper shows some theoretical aspects and physical operating principles of the inspection method, as well as test probes construction details, and the calibration reference standards fabrication processes. Furthermore, some data, experimentally obtained at INB laboratories and other technical information obtained from TECNATOM S.A. are presented, showing the accuracy and efficacy of such NDT method. (author)

  15. Eddy current NDT: a suitable tool to measure oxide layer thickness in PWR fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alencar, Donizete A.; Silva Junior, Silverio F.; Vieira, Andre L.P.S.

    2009-01-01

    Eddy current is a nondestructive test (NDT) widely used in industry to support integrity analysis of components and equipment. In the nuclear area it is frequently applied to inspect tubes installed in tube exchangers, such as steam generators and condensers in PWR plants, as well as turbine blades. Adequately assisted by means of robotic devices, that inspection method has been pointed as a suitable tool to perform accurate oxide layer thickness measurements in PWR fuel rods. This paper shows some theoretical aspects and physical operating principles of the inspection method, as well as test probes construction details, and the calibration reference standards fabrication processes. Furthermore, some data, experimentally obtained at INB laboratories and other technical information obtained from TECNATOM S.A. are presented, showing the accuracy and efficacy of such NDT method. (author)

  16. Thick Escaping Magnetospheric Ion Layer in Magnetopause Reconnection with MMS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, T.; Kitamura, N.; Hasagawa, H.; Shinohara, I.; Yokota, S.; Saito, Y.; Nakamura, R.; Giles, B. L.; Pollock, C.; Moore, T. E.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The structure of asymmetric magnetopause reconnection is explored with multiple point and high-time-resolution ion velocity distribution observations from the Magnetospheric Multiscale mission. On 9 September 2015, reconnection took place at the magnetopause, which separated the magnetosheath and the magnetosphere with a density ratio of 25:2. The magnetic field intensity was rather constant, even higher in the asymptotic magnetosheath. The reconnected field line region had a width of approximately 540 km. In this region, streaming and gyrating ions are discriminated. The large extension of the reconnected field line region toward the magnetosheath can be identified where a thick layer of escaping magnetospheric ions was formed. The scale of the magnetosheath side of the reconnected field line region relative to the scale of its magnetospheric side was 4.5:1.

  17. Observations of the atmospheric surface layer parameters over a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    1999-08-11

    Aug 11, 1999 ... This paper discusses the observations of the Atmospheric Surface Layer (ASL) parameters dur- ing the solar eclipse of August 11th, 1999. Intensive surface layer experiments were conducted at. Ahmedabad (23◦21 N, 72◦36 E), the western part of India, which was close to the totality path. This rare event ...

  18. Effect of Organic Layer Thickness on Black Spruce Aging Mistakes in Canadian Boreal Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Laamrani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Boreal black spruce (Picea mariana forests are prone to developing thick organic layers (paludification. Black spruce is adapted to this environment by the continuous development of adventitious roots, masking the root collar and making it difficult to age trees. Ring counts above the root collar underestimate age of trees, but the magnitude of age underestimation of trees in relation to organic layer thickness (OLT is unknown. This age underestimation is required to produce appropriate age-correction tools to be used in land resource management. The goal of this study was to assess aging errors that are done with standard ring counts of trees growing in sites with different degrees of paludification (OLT; 0–25 cm, 26–65 cm, >65 cm. Age of 81 trees sampled at three geographical locations was determined by ring counts at ground level and at 1 m height, and real age of trees was determined by cross-dating growth rings down to the root collar (root/shoot interface. Ring counts at 1 m height underestimated age of trees by a mean of 22 years (range 13–49 and 52 years (range 14–112 in null to low vs. moderately to highly paludified stands, respectively. The percentage of aging-error explained by our linear model was relatively high (R2adj = 0.71 and showed that OLT class and age at 0-m could be used to predict total aging-error while neither DBH nor geographic location could. The resulting model has important implications for forest management to accurately estimate productivity of these forests.

  19. Estimating 3D Variation in Active-Layer Thickness Beneath Arctic Streams Using Ground- Penetrating Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosten, T. R.; Bradford, J. H.; McNamara, J. P.; Zarnetske, J. P.; Gooseff, M. N.; Bowden, W. B.; Johnston, M. J.

    2007-12-01

    Our earlier ground-penetrating radar (GPR) investigations beneath arctic streams revealed greater active layer thicknesses beneath stream channels than beneath the adjacent terrestrial tundra. Presented here are results from 3D GPR data sets which were gathered over three sites to measure the active layer thickness variation within local streambed morphology. Three sites were selected based on their geomorphic differences. The first site is a high-energy water flow reach with a cobble to gravel streambed lining and riffle-pool morphology (alluvial stream). The second site is a deeply incised low-energy water flow reach with a beaded morphology and organic streambed lining (peat stream). The last site features a beaded morphology but with alluvial material lining the pool areas. GPR data were acquired using a pulsed radar system with a high-powered 1000V transmitter. The transmitting and receiving 200 MHz antennas were placed at the bottom of a small rubber boat for data acquisition. Profiles were gathered by pulling the boat across the stream from bank-to-bank while triggering at a constant time interval. Lines were collected at ~30cm intervals and continued upstream until a riffle-pool sequence was covered. Precise spatial data were collected using DGPS in conjunction with the GPR data. In addition, temperature data were recorded using thermocouples placed at varying substream depths located within or near the study sites to aid and verify GPR interpretations and numerical heat flow models. Results from the alluvial stream site illustrates greater thaw depths beneath riffle and gravel bar features compared to the neighboring pool areas while the beaded stream sites indicate the opposite, greater thaw depths beneath pools and thinner thaws beneath the connecting runs.

  20. The thickness of odontoblast-like cell layer after induced by propolis extract and calcium hydroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan Dwiandhono

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Propolis is a substance made from resin collected by bees (Apis mellifera from variety of plants, mixed with its saliva and various enzymes to build a nest. Propolis has potential antimicrobial and antiinflammatory agents with some advantages over calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH2. Ca(OH2 has been considered as the “gold standard” of direct pulp-capping materials, but there are still some weakness of its application. First, it can induce pulp inflammation which last up to 3 months. Second, the tissue response to Ca(OH2 is not always predictable. Third, the tunnel defect can probably formed in dentinal bridge with possible bacterial invasion in that gap. Purpose: This study was aimed to determine and compare the thickness of odontoblast-like cells layer after induced by propolis extract and Ca(OH2 in rat’s pulp tissue. Method: Class 1 preparation was done in maxillary first molar tooth of wistar mice until the pulp opened. The Ca(OH2 and propolis extract was applied to induce the formation of odontoblast-like cells, the cavity was filled with RMGIC. The teeth were extracted (after 14 and 28 days of induction. The samples were then processed for histological evaluation. Result: There were significant differences between the thickness of odontoblast-like cells after induced by propolis extract and Ca(OH2. Conclusion: The propolis extract as the direct pulp capping agent produces thicker odontoblast-like cell layer compared to Ca(OH2.

  1. Time-resolved PIV measurements of the atmospheric boundary layer over wind-driven surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markfort, Corey; Stegmeir, Matt

    2017-11-01

    Complex interactions at the air-water interface result in two-way coupling between wind-driven surface waves and the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). Turbulence generated at the surface plays an important role in aquatic ecology and biogeochemistry, exchange of gases such as oxygen and carbon dioxide, and it is important for the transfer of energy and controlling evaporation. Energy transferred from the ABL promotes the generation and maintenance of waves. A fraction of the energy is transferred to the surface mixed layer through the generation of turbulence. Energy is also transferred back to the ABL by waves. There is a need to quantify the details of the coupled boundary layers of the air-water system to better understand how turbulence plays a role in the interactions. We employ time-resolved PIV to measure the detailed structure of the air and water boundary layers under varying wind and wave conditions in the newly developed IIHR Boundary-Layer Wind-Wave Tunnel. The facility combines a 30-m long recirculating water channel with an open-return boundary layer wind tunnel. A thick turbulent boundary layer is developed in the 1 m high air channel, over the water surface, allowing for the study of boundary layer turbulence interacting with a wind-driven wave field.

  2. Use of a Soluble Anode in Electrodeposition of Thick Bismuth Telluride Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, M.; Diliberto, S.; de Vaulx, C.; Azzouz, K.; Boulanger, C.

    2014-10-01

    Integration of thermoelectric devices within an automotive heat exchanger could enable conversion of lost heat into electrical energy, contributing to improved total output from the engine. For this purpose, synthesis of thick bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) films is required. Bismuth telluride has been produced by an electrochemical method in nitric acid with a sacrificial bismuth telluride anode as the source of cations. The binary layer grows on the working electrode while the counter-electrode, a Bi2Te3 disk obtained by high frequency melting, is oxidized to BiIII and TeIV. This process leads to auto-regeneration of the solution without modification of its composition. The thickness of films deposited by use of the Bi2Te3 anode was approximately 10 times that without. To demonstrate the utility of a soluble anode in electrochemical deposition, we report characterization of the composition and morphology of the films obtained under different experimental conditions. Perfectly dense and regular Bi2Te3 films (˜400 μm) with low internal stress and uniform composition across the cross-section were prepared. Their thermoelectric properties were assessed.

  3. Laser-induced surface recrystallization of polycrystalline PbI2 thick films for X-ray detector application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hui; Zhao, Beijun; Zhu, Xinghua; Zhu, Shifu; Yang, Dingyu; Wangyang, Peihua; Gao, Xiuyin

    2018-01-01

    In this work, laser-induced surface recrystallization process was developed to improve the surface properties and device performance of the polycrystalline PbI2 thick films prepared by using close space vapor deposition method. A continuous polycrystalline PbI2 recrystallized layer with a better mechanical strength and reflectivity improved from 2% to 4%-6% was obtained by this recrystallization process for the films with mechanical pretreatment. Other polytypes is absent in the recrystallized layer with the 2H-polytype remaining before and after treatment and obtaining improved electrical and X-ray photoelectric response performance. The pretreatment such as mechanical cutting/polishing and hydrogenation is necessary to lower the non-wetting crystallization behavior during the recrystallization process due to the rough surface state and oxygen contamination.

  4. Thermographic analysis of plasma facing components covered by carbon surface layer in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardarein, Jean-Laurent

    2007-01-01

    Tokamaks are reactors based on the thermonuclear fusion energy with magnetic confinement of the plasma. In theses machines, several MW are coupled to the plasma for about 10 s. A large part of this power is directed towards plasma facing components (PFC). For better understanding and control the heat flux transfer from the plasma to the surrounding wall, it is very important to measure the surface temperature of the PFC and to estimate the imposed heat flux. In most of tokamaks using carbon PFC, the eroded carbon is circulating in the plasma and redeposited elsewhere. During the plasma operations, this leads at some locations to the formation of thin or thick carbon layers usually poorly attached to the PFC. These surface layers with unknown thermal properties complicate the calculation of the heat flux from IR surface temperature measurements. To solve this problem, we develop first, inverse method to estimate the heat flux using thermocouple (not sensitive to the carbon surface layers) temperature measurements. Then, we propose a front face pulsed photothermal method allowing an estimation of layers thermal diffusivity, conductivity, effusivity and the thermal contact resistance between the layer and the tile. The principle is to study with an infrared sensor, the cooling of the layer surface after heating by a short laser pulse, this cooling depending on the thermal properties of the successive layers. (author) [fr

  5. Application on the thickness of nerve fiber layer of the optic disc in pathologic myopia eyes by OCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Cheng Shi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To analyze the application on frequency domain optical coherence tomography(OCTtechnology of pathologic myopia optic disc neurosensory retinal thickness changes and its relationship with axis oculi, sex and age, and help for the early diagnosis of pathological myopia and primary open angle glaucoma.METHODS: Collected 96 eyes of normal eyes(axis oculi 23-24mmand 153 eyes of pathologic myopia eyes(axis oculi 25-27mm 80 eyes, >27mm 73 eyes. We measured the thickness of nerve fiber layer of the optic disc by OCT and analyzed their relationship with axis oculi, sex and age with multiple linear regression analysis.RESULTS: The observation group showed significant smaller average thickness of peripapillary, superior, inferior, nasal than the control group(PP>0.05; The partial correlation coefficient of peripapillary average thickness of nerve fiber layer and axis oculi was -1.31, gender was 5.21, age was -0.12.CONCLUSION: The thickness of nerve fiber layer of the optic disc in the pathologic myopia eyes are decreased than normal eyes, axis oculi, sex and age are influenced factors. The pathologic myopia patients should use different index combined with optic nerve fiber layer thickness decreased to help for the diagnosis of early primary open angle glaucoma.

  6. The Effect of the Thickness of the Sensitive Layer on the Performance of the Accumulating NOx Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Groß

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A novel and promising method to measure low levels of NOx utilizes the accumulating sensor principle. During an integration cycle, incoming NOx molecules are stored in a sensitive layer based on an automotive lean NOx trap (LNT material that changes its electrical resistivity proportional to the amount of stored NOx, making the sensor suitable for long-term detection of low levels of NOx. In this study, the influence of the thickness of the sensitive layer, prepared by multiple screen-printing, is investigated. All samples show good accumulating sensing properties for both NO and NO2. In accordance to a simplified model, the base resistance of the sensitive layer and the sensitivity to NOx decrease with increasing thickness. Contrarily, the sensor response time increases. The linear measurement range of all samples ends at a sensor response of about 30% resulting in an increase of the linearly detectable amount with the thickness. Hence, the variation of the thickness of the sensitive layer is a powerful tool to adapt the linear measurement range (proportional to the thickness as well as the sensitivity (proportional to the inverse thickness to the application requirements. Calculations combining the sensor model with the measurement results indicate that for operation in the linear range, about 3% of the LNT material is converted to nitrate.

  7. Assessment of WRF Surface Layer Formulations Over a Complex Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, P.; Sharan, M.

    2017-12-01

    The accurate and efficient estimation of surface turbulent fluxes is crucial to predict an adequate atmospheric evolution by atmospheric models. The Monin-Obukhov similarity theory, which is used to compute these fluxes in numerical models, utilizes the empirical stability correction functions. In the present study, impact of various functional forms of similarity functions on the computation of the surface fluxes under both unstable and stable stratification is analyzed. In addition, this study compares two surface layer parametrization schemes in the Weather Research and Forecasting model over Ranchi (India). The model is run with three nested domains at a high resolution (1 Km) for `five' 4-day periods covering 15 days of Premonsoon season. The two surface layer schemes chosen for the analysis includes MM5 surface layer scheme having Businger-Dyer similarity functions, and revised MM5 scheme utilizing the functions those are valid for full ranges of atmospheric stabilities. The five planetary boundary layer (PBL) schemes are selected to assess the influence of the surface layer schemes on the structure of the boundary layer. The schemes are- Asymmetric Convective Model Version 2 (ACM2), Bougeault-Lacarrere (Boulac), Medium Range Forecast (MRF), Mellor-Yamada-Nakanishi-Niino (MYNN), and Yonsei University (YSU) PBL schemes. The impact of surface layer parametrizations on the near surface diagnostic variables is analyzed and results are compared with the observations.The bias in the 2 m temperature (T2) and 10 m wind speed (U) across the PBL schemes is very small and each PBL scheme is able to reproduce the diurnal variation of T2 irrespective of the surface layer scheme used for the simulations. A relatively higher value nocturnal T2 is predicted with the revised MM5 surface layer scheme as compared to that obtained with the old MM5 scheme, while both the surface layer schemes reproduce almost similar T2 during convective conditions. However, compare to the

  8. Single versus double-layer uterine closure at cesarean: impact on lower uterine segment thickness at next pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachon-Marceau, Chantale; Demers, Suzanne; Bujold, Emmanuel; Roberge, Stephanie; Gauthier, Robert J; Pasquier, Jean-Charles; Girard, Mario; Chaillet, Nils; Boulvain, Michel; Jastrow, Nicole

    2017-07-01

    Uterine rupture is a potential life-threatening complication during a trial of labor after cesarean delivery. Single-layer closure of the uterus at cesarean delivery has been associated with an increased risk of uterine rupture compared with double-layer closure. Lower uterine segment thickness measurement by ultrasound has been used to evaluate the quality of the uterine scar after cesarean delivery and is associated with the risk of uterine rupture. To estimate the impact of previous uterine closure on lower uterine segment thickness. Women with a previous single low-transverse cesarean delivery were recruited at 34-38 weeks' gestation. Transabdominal and transvaginal ultrasound evaluation of the lower uterine segment thickness was performed by a sonographer blinded to clinical data. Previous operative reports were reviewed to obtain the type of previous uterine closure. Third-trimester lower uterine segment thickness at the next pregnancy was compared according to the number of layers sutured and according to the type of thread for uterine closure, using weighted mean differences and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Of 1613 women recruited, with operative reports available, 495 (31%) had a single-layer and 1118 (69%) had a double-layer closure. The mean third-trimester lower uterine segment thickness was 3.3 ± 1.3 mm and the proportion with lower uterine segment thickness cesarean delivery is associated with a thicker third-trimester lower uterine segment and a reduced risk of lower uterine segment thickness <2.0 mm in the next pregnancy. The type of thread for uterine closure has no significant impact on lower uterine segment thickness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of High-Speed Milling Parameters on Surface Metamorphic Layer of TC17 Titanium Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TAN Liang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to provide the relatively accurate experimental basis for optimizing parameters and controlling surface metamorphic layer, ball end high-speed milling experiments of TC17 titanium alloy were carried out utilizing one of experimental design techniques based on the response surface methodology. The surface roughness prediction model was built, variance analyses were applied to check the significances of surface roughness model and input parameters, the effect of parameters on surface roughness was analyzed. Meanwhile, the residual stress, microhardness and microstructure under the condition of high, medium and low level of parameters were investigated. Results indicate that the model can predict the surface roughness effectively and feed per tooth and radial depth of cut have an obvious effect on surface roughness. Compressive residual stresses are detected on all milled surfaces and surface residual stresses are increased with the increase of the level of the milling parameters. The compressive residual stress layer is approximately 20 μm regardless of milling parameters level used. The process of thermal softening, then work hardening, and finally tending to stabilize are observed in the microhardness profiles. Grains of the surface layer are broken and bent, the thickness of plastic deformation layer is approximately 10 μm.

  10. Optimization of Surface Roughness and Wall Thickness in Dieless Incremental Forming Of Aluminum Sheet Using Taguchi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamedon, Zamzuri; Kuang, Shea Cheng; Jaafar, Hasnulhadi; Azhari, Azmir

    2018-03-01

    Incremental sheet forming is a versatile sheet metal forming process where a sheet metal is formed into its final shape by a series of localized deformation without a specialised die. However, it still has many shortcomings that need to be overcome such as geometric accuracy, surface roughness, formability, forming speed, and so on. This project focus on minimising the surface roughness of aluminium sheet and improving its thickness uniformity in incremental sheet forming via optimisation of wall angle, feed rate, and step size. Besides, the effect of wall angle, feed rate, and step size to the surface roughness and thickness uniformity of aluminium sheet was investigated in this project. From the results, it was observed that surface roughness and thickness uniformity were inversely varied due to the formation of surface waviness. Increase in feed rate and decrease in step size will produce a lower surface roughness, while uniform thickness reduction was obtained by reducing the wall angle and step size. By using Taguchi analysis, the optimum parameters for minimum surface roughness and uniform thickness reduction of aluminium sheet were determined. The finding of this project helps to reduce the time in optimising the surface roughness and thickness uniformity in incremental sheet forming.

  11. Magnetic properties of Pr-Fe-B thick-film magnets deposited on Si substrates with glass buffer layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, M.; Kurosaki, A.; Kondo, H.; Shimizu, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamashita, A.; Yanai, T.; Fukunaga, H.

    2018-05-01

    In order to improve the magnetic properties of PLD-made Pr-Fe-B thick-film magnets deposited on Si substrates, an adoption of a glass buffer layer was carried out. The glass layer could be fabricated under the deposition rate of approximately 70 μm/h on a Si substrate using a Nd-YAG pulse laser in the vacuum atmosphere. The use of the layer enabled us to reduce the Pr content without a mechanical destruction and enhance (BH)max value by approximately 20 kJ/m3 compared with the average value of non-buffer layered Pr-Fe-B films with almost the same thickness. It is also considered that the layer is also effective to apply a micro magnetization to the films deposited on Si ones.

  12. Influence of Clinical Factors and Magnification Correction on Normal Thickness Profiles of Macular Retinal Layers Using Optical Coherence Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashide, Tomomi; Ohkubo, Shinji; Hangai, Masanori; Ito, Yasuki; Shimada, Noriaki; Ohno-Matsui, Kyoko; Terasaki, Hiroko; Sugiyama, Kazuhisa; Chew, Paul; Li, Kenneth K. W.; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To identify the factors which significantly contribute to the thickness variabilities in macular retinal layers measured by optical coherence tomography with or without magnification correction of analytical areas in normal subjects. Methods The thickness of retinal layers {retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL), ganglion cell layer plus inner plexiform layer (GCLIPL), RNFL plus GCLIPL (ganglion cell complex, GCC), total retina, total retina minus GCC (outer retina)} were measured by macular scans (RS-3000, NIDEK) in 202 eyes of 202 normal Asian subjects aged 20 to 60 years. The analytical areas were defined by three concentric circles (1-, 3- and 6-mm nominal diameters) with or without magnification correction. For each layer thickness, a semipartial correlation (sr) was calculated for explanatory variables including age, gender, axial length, corneal curvature, and signal strength index. Results Outer retinal thickness was significantly thinner in females than in males (sr2, 0.07 to 0.13) regardless of analytical areas or magnification correction. Without magnification correction, axial length had a significant positive sr with RNFL (sr2, 0.12 to 0.33) and a negative sr with GCLIPL (sr2, 0.22 to 0.31), GCC (sr2, 0.03 to 0.17), total retina (sr2, 0.07 to 0.17) and outer retina (sr2, 0.16 to 0.29) in multiple analytical areas. The significant sr in RNFL, GCLIPL and GCC became mostly insignificant following magnification correction. Conclusions The strong correlation between the thickness of inner retinal layers and axial length appeared to result from magnification effects. Outer retinal thickness may differ by gender and axial length independently of magnification correction. PMID:26814541

  13. Non-Toxic Buffer Layers in Flexible Cu(In,GaSe2 Photovoltaic Cell Applications with Optimized Absorber Thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Asaduzzaman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Absorber layer thickness gradient in Cu(In1−xGaxSe2 (CIGS based solar cells and several substitutes for typical cadmium sulfide (CdS buffer layers, such as ZnS, ZnO, ZnS(O,OH, Zn1−xSnxOy (ZTO, ZnSe, and In2S3, have been analyzed by a device emulation program and tool (ADEPT 2.1 to determine optimum efficiency. As a reference type, the CIGS cell with CdS buffer provides a theoretical efficiency of 23.23% when the optimum absorber layer thickness was determined as 1.6 μm. It is also observed that this highly efficient CIGS cell would have an absorber layer thickness between 1 μm and 2 μm whereas the optimum buffer layer thickness would be within the range of 0.04–0.06 μm. Among all the cells with various buffer layers, the best energy conversion efficiency of 24.62% has been achieved for the ZnO buffer layer based cell. The simulation results with ZnS and ZnO based buffer layer materials instead of using CdS indicate that the cell performance would be better than that of the CdS buffer layer based cell. Although the cells with ZnS(O,OH, ZTO, ZnSe, and In2S3 buffer layers provide slightly lower efficiencies than that of the CdS buffer based cell, the use of these materials would not be deleterious for the environment because of their non-carcinogenic and non-toxic nature.

  14. Optoelectric Properties of GaInP p-i-n Solar Cells with Different i-Layer Thicknesses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung-Shine Ko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The optoelectric properties of GaInP p-i-n solar cells with different intrinsic layer (i-layer thicknesses from 0.25 to 1 μm were studied. Both emission intensity and full width at half maximum features of the photoluminescence spectrum indicate that the optimum i-layer thickness would be between 0.5 and 0.75 μm. The integrated current results of photocurrent experiment also point out that the samples with 0.5 to 0.75 μm i-layer thicknesses have optimum value around 156 nA. Electroreflectance measurements reveal that the built-in electric field strength of the sample gradually deviates from the theoretical value larger when i-layer thickness of the sample is thicker than 0.75 μm. I-V measurements also confirm crystal quality for whole samples by obtaining the information about short currents of photovoltaic performances. A series of experiments reflect that thicker i-layer structure would induce more defects generation lowering crystal quality.

  15. Evolution of damping in ferromagnetic/nonmagnetic thin film bilayers as a function of nonmagnetic layer thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzawi, S.; Ganguly, A.; Tokaç, M.; Rowan-Robinson, R. M.; Sinha, J.; Hindmarch, A. T.; Barman, A.; Atkinson, D.

    2016-02-01

    The evolution of damping in Co/Pt, Co/Au, and Ni81Fe19 /Pt bilayers was studied with increasing nonmagnetic (NM) heavy-metal layer thicknesses in the range 0.2 nm ≤tNM≤10 nm , where tNM is the NM layer thickness. Magnetization precession was measured in the time domain using time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect magnetometry. Fitting of the data with a damped sinusoidal function was undertaken in order to extract the phenomenological Gilbert damping coefficient α . For Pt-capped Co and Ni81Fe19 layers a large and complex dependence of α on the Pt layer thickness was observed, while for Au capping no significant dependence was observed. It is suggested that this difference is related to the different localized spin-orbit interaction related to intermixing and to d -d hybridization of Pt and Au at the interface with Co or Ni81Fe19 . Also it was shown that damping is affected by the crystal structure differences in FM thin films and at the interface, which can modify the spin-diffusion length and the effective spin-mixing conductance. In addition to the intrinsic damping an extrinsic contribution plays an important role in the enhancement of damping when the Pt capping layer is discontinuous. The dependence of damping on the nonmagnetic layer thickness is complex but shows qualitative agreement with recent theoretical predictions.

  16. Preservation of Archaeal Surface Layer Structure During Mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kish, Adrienne; Miot, Jennyfer; Lombard, Carine; Guigner, Jean-Michel; Bernard, Sylvain; Zirah, Séverine; Guyot, François

    2016-05-01

    Proteinaceous surface layers (S-layers) are highly ordered, crystalline structures commonly found in prokaryotic cell envelopes that augment their structural stability and modify interactions with metals in the environment. While mineral formation associated with S-layers has previously been noted, the mechanisms were unconstrained. Using Sulfolobus acidocaldarius a hyperthermophilic archaeon native to metal-enriched environments and possessing a cell envelope composed only of a S-layer and a lipid cell membrane, we describe a passive process of iron phosphate nucleation and growth within the S-layer of cells and cell-free S-layer “ghosts” during incubation in a Fe-rich medium, independently of metabolic activity. This process followed five steps: (1) initial formation of mineral patches associated with S-layer; (2) patch expansion; (3) patch connection; (4) formation of a continuous mineral encrusted layer at the cell surface; (5) early stages of S-layer fossilization via growth of the extracellular mineralized layer and the mineralization of cytosolic face of the cell membrane. At more advanced stages of encrustation, encrusted outer membrane vesicles are formed, likely in an attempt to remove damaged S-layer proteins. The S-layer structure remains strikingly well preserved even upon the final step of encrustation, offering potential biosignatures to be looked for in the fossil record.

  17. Preservation of Archaeal Surface Layer Structure During Mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kish, Adrienne; Miot, Jennyfer; Lombard, Carine; Guigner, Jean-Michel; Bernard, Sylvain; Zirah, Séverine; Guyot, François

    2016-01-01

    Proteinaceous surface layers (S-layers) are highly ordered, crystalline structures commonly found in prokaryotic cell envelopes that augment their structural stability and modify interactions with metals in the environment. While mineral formation associated with S-layers has previously been noted, the mechanisms were unconstrained. Using Sulfolobus acidocaldarius a hyperthermophilic archaeon native to metal-enriched environments and possessing a cell envelope composed only of a S-layer and a lipid cell membrane, we describe a passive process of iron phosphate nucleation and growth within the S-layer of cells and cell-free S-layer “ghosts” during incubation in a Fe-rich medium, independently of metabolic activity. This process followed five steps: (1) initial formation of mineral patches associated with S-layer; (2) patch expansion; (3) patch connection; (4) formation of a continuous mineral encrusted layer at the cell surface; (5) early stages of S-layer fossilization via growth of the extracellular mineralized layer and the mineralization of cytosolic face of the cell membrane. At more advanced stages of encrustation, encrusted outer membrane vesicles are formed, likely in an attempt to remove damaged S-layer proteins. The S-layer structure remains strikingly well preserved even upon the final step of encrustation, offering potential biosignatures to be looked for in the fossil record. PMID:27221593

  18. Fractal-like thickness and topography of the salt layer in a pillows province of the southern North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez Maya, K.; Mitchell, N. C.; Huuse, M.

    2017-12-01

    Salt topography and thickness variations are important for testing theories of how halokinetic deformation proceeds. The ability to predict thickness variations of salt at small scale is also important for reservoir evaluations, as breach of the salt layer can lead to loss of petroleum fluids and can be difficult to evaluate from seismic reflection data. Relevant to these issues, we here report analysis of data on salt layer topography and thickness from the southern North Sea, where the salt is organized into pillows. These data were derived by the Geological Survey of the Netherlands (TNO) from industry 3D seismic reflection data combined with a dense network of well information. Highs and lows in the topography of the upper salt interface occur spaced over a variety of lengthscales. Power spectral analysis of the interface topography reveals a simple inverse power law relationship between power spectral density and spatial wave number. The relationship suggests that the interface is a self-affine fractal with a fractal dimension of 2.85. A similar analysis of the salt layer thickness also suggests a fractal-like power law. Whereas the layer thickness power law is unsurprising as the underlying basement topography dominates the thickness and it also has a fractal-like power spectrum, the salt topography is not so easily explained as not all the basement faults are overlaid by salt pillows, instead some areas of the dataset salt thinning overlies faults. We consider instead whether a spatially varied loading of the salt layer may have caused this fractal-like geometry. Varied density and thickness of overburdening layers seem unlikely causes, as thicknesses of layers and their reflectivities do not vary sympathetically with the topography of the interface. The composition of the salt layer varies with the relative proportions of halite and denser anhydrite and other minerals. Although limited in scope and representing the mobilized salt layer, the information from

  19. Surface Elevation and Ice Thickness, Western Marie Byrd Land, Antarctica, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides surface elevation and ice thickness data for a portion of the Marie Byrd Land sector of West Antarctica, including the Ford Ranges, the...

  20. Spatial representation of organic carbon and active-layer thickness of high latitude soils in CMIP5 earth system models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Umakant; Drewniak, Beth; Jastrow, Julie D.; Matamala, Roser M.; Vitharana, U. W. A.

    2017-08-01

    Soil properties such as soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks and active-layer thickness are used in earth system models (F.SMs) to predict anthropogenic and climatic impacts on soil carbon dynamics, future changes in atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations, and associated climate changes in the permafrost regions. Accurate representation of spatial and vertical distribution of these soil properties in ESMs is a prerequisite for redudng existing uncertainty in predicting carbon-climate feedbacks. We compared the spatial representation of SOC stocks and active-layer thicknesses predicted by the coupled Modellntercomparison Project Phase 5 { CMIP5) ESMs with those predicted from geospatial predictions, based on observation data for the state of Alaska, USA. For the geospatial modeling. we used soil profile observations {585 for SOC stocks and 153 for active-layer thickness) and environmental variables (climate, topography, land cover, and surficial geology types) and generated fine-resolution (50-m spatial resolution) predictions of SOC stocks (to 1-m depth) and active-layer thickness across Alaska. We found large inter-quartile range (2.5-5.5 m) in predicted active-layer thickness of CMIP5 modeled results and small inter-quartile range (11.5-22 kg m-2) in predicted SOC stocks. The spatial coefficient of variability of active-layer thickness and SOC stocks were lower in CMIP5 predictions compared to our geospatial estimates when gridded at similar spatial resolutions (24.7 compared to 30% and 29 compared to 38%, respectively). However, prediction errors. when calculated for independent validation sites, were several times larger in ESM predictions compared to geospatial predictions. Primaly factors leading to observed differences were ( 1) lack of spatial heterogeneity in ESM predictions, (2) differences in assumptions concerning environmental controls, and (3) the absence of pedogenic processes in ESM model structures. Our results suggest that efforts to incorporate

  1. SURFACE LAYER ACCRETION IN CONVENTIONAL AND TRANSITIONAL DISKS DRIVEN BY FAR-ULTRAVIOLET IONIZATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Becker, Daniel; Chiang, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    Whether protoplanetary disks accrete at observationally significant rates by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) depends on how well ionized they are. Disk surface layers ionized by stellar X-rays are susceptible to charge neutralization by small condensates, ranging from ∼0.01 μm sized grains to angstrom-sized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Ion densities in X-ray-irradiated surfaces are so low that ambipolar diffusion weakens the MRI. Here we show that ionization by stellar far-ultraviolet (FUV) radiation enables full-blown MRI turbulence in disk surface layers. Far-UV ionization of atomic carbon and sulfur produces a plasma so dense that it is immune to ion recombination on grains and PAHs. The FUV-ionized layer, of thickness 0.01-0.1 g cm -2 , behaves in the ideal magnetohydrodynamic limit and can accrete at observationally significant rates at radii ∼> 1-10 AU. Surface layer accretion driven by FUV ionization can reproduce the trend of increasing accretion rate with increasing hole size seen in transitional disks. At radii ∼<1-10 AU, FUV-ionized surface layers cannot sustain the accretion rates generated at larger distance, and unless turbulent mixing of plasma can thicken the MRI-active layer, an additional means of transport is needed. In the case of transitional disks, it could be provided by planets.

  2. The properties of thickness-twist (TT) wave modes in a rotated Y-cut quartz plate with a functionally graded material top layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Qian, Zhenghua; Li, Nian; Sarraf, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    We propose the use of thickness-twist (TT) wave modes of an AT-cut quartz crystal plate resonator for measurement of material parameters, such as stiffness, density and material gradient, of a functionally graded material (FGM) layer on its surface, whose material property varies exponentially in thickness direction. A theoretical analysis of dispersion relations for TT waves is presented using Mindlin's plate theory, with displacement mode shapes plotted, and the existence of face-shear (FS) wave modes discussed. Through numerical examples, the effects of material parameters (stiffness, density and material gradient) on dispersion curves, cutoff frequencies and mode shapes are thoroughly examined, which can act as a theoretical reference for measurements of unknown properties of FGM layer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Shell Layer Thickness-Dependent Photocatalytic Activity of Sputtering Synthesized Hexagonally Structured ZnO-ZnS Composite Nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yuan-Chang; Lo, Ya-Ru; Wang, Chein-Chung; Xu, Nian-Cih

    2018-01-07

    ZnO-ZnS core-shell nanorods are synthesized by combining the hydrothermal method and vacuum sputtering. The core-shell nanorods with variable ZnS shell thickness (7-46 nm) are synthesized by varying ZnS sputtering duration. Structural analyses demonstrated that the as-grown ZnS shell layers are well crystallized with preferring growth direction of ZnS (002). The sputtering-assisted synthesized ZnO-ZnS core-shell nanorods are in a wurtzite structure. Moreover, photoluminance spectral analysis indicated that the introduction of a ZnS shell layer improved the photoexcited electron and hole separation efficiency of the ZnO nanorods. A strong correlation between effective charge separation and the shell thickness aids the photocatalytic behavior of the nanorods and improves their photoresponsive nature. The results of comparative degradation efficiency toward methylene blue showed that the ZnO-ZnS nanorods with the shell thickness of approximately 17 nm have the highest photocatalytic performance than the ZnO-ZnS nanorods with other shell layer thicknesses. The highly reusable catalytic efficiency and superior photocatalytic performance of the ZnO-ZnS nanorods with 17 nm-thick ZnS shell layer supports their potential for environmental applications.

  4. The effect of capped layer thickness on switching behavior in perpendicular CoCrPt based coupled granular/continuous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, W.M.; Lim, W.K.; Shi, J.Z.; Ding, J.

    2013-01-01

    A systematic investigation of magnetic switching behavior of CoCrPt based capped media (perpendicularly coupled granular/continuous (CGC) media consisting of granular CoCrPt:SiO 2 TiO 2 Ta 2 O 5 /capped CoCrPt(B)) is performed by varying the thickness of the capped layer from 0 to 9 nm. The microscopic structures of CGC media with different thickness of capped layer are examined by transmission electron microscope. We find out that CoCrPt magnetic grains are separated by nonmagnetic oxide grain boundaries. Grain size and grain boundary are about 8.9 nm and 2 nm, respectively. The nonmagnetic oxide grain boundaries in the granular layer do not disappear immediately at the interface between the granular and capped layers. The amorphous grain boundary phase in the granular layer propagates to the top surface of the capped layer. After capping with the CoCrPt(B) layer, the grain size at the surface of CGC structure increases and the grain boundary decreases. Both coercivity and intergranular exchange coupling of the CGC media are investigated by Polar magneto-optic Kerr effect magnetometer and alternating gradient force magnetometer. Although H c apparently decreases at thicker capped layer, no obvious variation of macroscopic switching field distribution (SFD/H c ) is observed. We separate intrinsic switching field distribution from intergranular interactions. The investigation of reduced intrinsic SFD/H c and increased hysteresis loop slope at coercivity, suggests that improvement of absolute switching field distribution (SFD) is caused by both strong intergranular exchange coupling and uniform grain size. Micromagnetic simulation results further verify our conclusion that the capped layer in CGC media is not uniformly continuous but has some granular nature. However, grains in the CoCrPt(B) capped layer is not absolutely isolated, strong exchange coupling exists between grains. - Highlights: • In CGC media, CoCrPt magnetic grains are separated by nonmagnetic oxide

  5. Nanomechanical properties of thick porous silicon layers grown on p- and p+-type bulk crystalline Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charitidis, C.A.; Skarmoutsou, A.; Nassiopoulou, A.G.; Dragoneas, A.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The nanomechanical properties of bulk crystalline Si. → The nanomechanical properties of porous Si. → The elastic-plastic deformation of porous Si compared to bulk crystalline quantified by nanoindentation data analysis. - Abstract: The nanomechanical properties and the nanoscale deformation of thick porous Si (PSi) layers of two different morphologies, grown electrochemically on p-type and p+-type Si wafers were investigated by the depth-sensing nanoindentation technique over a small range of loads using a Berkovich indenter and were compared with those of bulk crystalline Si. The microstructure of the thick PSi layers was characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy. PSi layers on p+-type Si show an anisotropic mesoporous structure with straight vertical pores of diameter in the range of 30-50 nm, while those on p-type Si show a sponge like mesoporous structure. The effect of the microstructure on the mechanical properties of the layers is discussed. It is shown that the hardness and Young's modulus of the PSi layers exhibit a strong dependence on their microstructure. In particular, PSi layers with the anisotropic straight vertical pores show higher hardness and elastic modulus values than sponge-like layers. However, sponge-like PSi layers reveal less plastic deformation and higher wear resistance compared with layers with straight vertical pores.

  6. Change of Surface Roughness and Planetary Boundary Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Otto

    1978-01-01

    The ratio between upstream and far downstream surface friction velocities relative to a change in surface roughness is given on the basis of results from surface Rossby number similarity theory. By simple theories for the internal boundary layer, which are found to compare quite well with recent ...

  7. Pigments analysis and gold layer thickness evaluation of polychromy on wood objects by PXRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blonski, M.S.; Appoloni, C.R.

    2014-01-01

    The X-ray fluorescence technique by energy dispersion (EDXRF), being a multi elemental and non-destructive technique, has been widely used in the analysis of artworks and archeometry. An X-ray fluorescence portable equipment from the Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Physics of the State University of Londrina (LFNA/UEL) was used for the measurement of pigments in golden parts of a Gilding Preparation Standard Plaque and also pigments measurement on the Wood Adornment of the High Altar Column of the Side Pulpit of the Immaculate Conception Church Parish Sao Paulo-SP. The portable X-ray fluorescence PXRF-LFNA-02 consists of an X-ray tube with Ag anode, a Si-PIN detector (FWHM=221 eV for Mn line at 5.9 keV), a chain of electronics nuclear standard of X-ray spectrometer, a multichannel 8 K, a notebook and a mechanical system designed for the positioning of detector and X-ray tube, which allows movements with two degrees of freedom from the system of excitation–detection. The excitation–detection time of each measurement was 100 and 500 s, respectively. The presence of elements Ti, Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn and Au was found in the golden area of the Altar Column ornament. On the other hand, analysis of the ratios for the intensities of K α /K β lines measured in the areas made it possible to explore the possibility of measuring the stratigraphies of the layers of pigments and to estimate the thickness of the same. - Highlights: • The X-ray fluorescence technique by energy dispersion (EDXRF) and an X-ray fluorescence portable equipment are used for measurement of pigments. • Analysis of the ratios for the intensities of K α /K β lines measured in the areas made it possible to explore the possibility of measuring the stratigraphies of the layers of pigments and to estimate the thickness of the same. • The result of pigment analysis performed on these objects indicates that they are of the twentieth century

  8. Film Thickness Formation in Nanoscale due to Effects of Elastohydrodynamic, Electrostatic and Surface force of Solvation and Van der Waals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.F. Abd Al-Samieh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of oil film with a thickness in the nanoscale is discussed in this paper. A polar lubricant of propylene carbonate is used as the intervening liquid between contiguous bodies in concentrated contacts. A pressure caused by the hydrodynamic viscous action in addition to double layer electrostatic force, Van der Waals inter-molecular forces, and solvation pressure due to inter-surface forces is considered in calculating the ultrathin lubricating films. The numerical solution has been carried out, using the Newton-Raphson iteration technique, applied for the convergence of the hydrodynamic pressure. The results show that, at separations beyond about five molecular diameters of the intervening liquid, the formation of a lubricant film thickness is governed by combined effects of viscous action and surface force of an attractive Van der Waals force and a repulsive double layer force. At smaller separations below about five molecular diameters of the intervening liquid, the effect of solvation force is dominant in determining the oil film thickness

  9. Evaluating the Critical Thickness of TiO 2 Layer on Insulating Mesoporous Templates for Efficient Current Collection in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Chandiran, Aravind Kumar

    2013-01-15

    In this paper, a way of utilizing thin and conformal overlayer of titanium dioxide on an insulating mesoporous template as a photoanode for dye-sensitized solar cells is presented. Different thicknesses of TiO2 ranging from 1 to 15 nm are deposited on the surface of the template by atomic layer deposition. This systematic study helps unraveling the minimum critical thickness of the TiO2 overlayer required to transport the photogenerated electrons efficiently. A merely 6-nm-thick TiO2 film on a 3-μm mesoporous insulating substrate is shown to transport 8 mA/cm 2 of photocurrent density along with ≈900 mV of open-circuit potential when using our standard donor-π-acceptor sensitizer and Co(bipyridine) redox mediator. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Growth of thick La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} buffer layers for coated conductors by polymer-assisted chemical solution deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xin, E-mail: xzhang@my.swjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Levitation Technologies and Maglev Trains, Ministry of Education of China, Superconductivity and New Energy Center (SNEC), Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); School of Electrical Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Zhao, Yong, E-mail: yzhao@swjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Levitation Technologies and Maglev Trains, Ministry of Education of China, Superconductivity and New Energy Center (SNEC), Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, 2052 NSW (Australia); Xia, Yudong [State Key Lab of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Guo, Chunsheng [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Levitation Technologies and Maglev Trains, Ministry of Education of China, Superconductivity and New Energy Center (SNEC), Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Cheng, C.H. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, 2052 NSW (Australia); Zhang, Yong [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Levitation Technologies and Maglev Trains, Ministry of Education of China, Superconductivity and New Energy Center (SNEC), Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Zhang, Han [Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • We develops a low-cost and high-efficient technology of fabricating LZO buffer layers. • Sufficient thickness LZO buffer layers have been obtained on NiW (2 0 0) alloy substrate. • Highly biaxially textured YBCO thin film has been deposited on LZO/NiW. - Abstract: La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} (LZO) epitaxial films have been deposited on LaAlO{sub 3} (LAO) (1 0 0) single-crystal surface and bi-axially textured NiW (2 0 0) alloy substrate by polymer-assisted chemical solution deposition, and afterwards studied with XRD, SEM and AFM approaches. Highly in-plane and out-of-plane oriented, dense, smooth, crack free and with a sufficient thickness (>240 nm) LZO buffer layers have been obtained on LAO (1 0 0) single-crystal surface; The films deposited on NiW (2 0 0) alloy substrate are also found with high degree in-plane and out-of-plane texturing, good density with pin-hole-free, micro-crack-free nature and a thickness of 300 nm. Highly epitaxial 500 nm thick YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7−x} (YBCO) thin film exhibits the self-field critical current density (Jc) reached 1.3 MA/cm{sup 2} at 77 K .These results demonstrate the LZO epi-films obtained with current techniques have potential to be a buffer layer for REBCO coated conductors.

  11. The Influence of Irradiation Time and Layer Thickness on Elution of Triethylene Glycol Dimethacrylate from SDR® Bulk-Fill Composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łagocka, Ryta; Jakubowska, Katarzyna; Chlubek, Dariusz; Buczkowska-Radlińska, Jadwiga

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This study aimed to evaluate triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) elution from SDR bulk-fill composite. Methods. Three groups of samples were prepared, including samples polymerized in a 4 mm layer for 20 s, in a 4 mm layer for 40 s, and in a 2 mm layer for 20 s. Elution of TEGDMA into 100% ethanol, a 75% ethanol/water solution, and distilled water was studied. The TEGDMA concentration was measured using HPLC. Results. The TEGDMA concentration decreased in the following order: 100% ethanol > 75% ethanol > distilled water. Doubling the energy delivered to the 4 mm thick sample caused decrease (p SDR layer thickness decreases TEGDMA elution.

  12. Relation between the Atmospheric Boundary Layer and Impact Factors under Severe Surface Thermal Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinhuan Ao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reported a comprehensive analysis on the diurnal variation of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL in summer of Badain Jaran Desert and discussed deeply the effect of surface thermal to ABL, including the Difference in Surface-Air Temperature (DSAT, net radiation, and sensible heat, based on limited GPS radiosonde and surface observation data during two intense observation periods of experiments. The results showed that (1 affected by topography of the Tibetan Plateau, the climate provided favorable external conditions for the development of Convective Boundary Layer (CBL, (2 deep CBL showed a diurnal variation of three- to five-layer structure in clear days and five-layer ABL structure often occurred about sunset or sunrise, (3 the diurnal variation of DSAT influenced thickness of ABL through changes of turbulent heat flux, (4 integral value of sensible heat which rapidly converted by surface net radiation had a significant influence on the growth of CBL throughout daytime. The cumulative effect of thick RML dominated the role after CBL got through SBL in the development stage, especially in late summer, and (5 the development of CBL was promoted and accelerated by the variation of wind field and distribution of warm advection in high and low altitude.

  13. TiN films by Atomic Layer Deposition: Growth and electrical characterization down to sub-nm thickness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hao, B.; Wolters, Robertus A.M.; Kovalgin, Alexeij Y.

    2012-01-01

    This study reports on the growth and characterization of TiN thib films obtained by atomic layer deposition at 350-425 ◦C. We observe a growth of the continuous layers from the very beginning of the process, i.e. for a thickness of 0.65 nm, which is equivalent to 3 monolayers of TiN. The film growth

  14. Thermal analysis of silicon carbide coating on a nickel based superalloy substrate and thickness measurement of top layers by lock-in infrared thermography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranjit, Shrestha; Kim, Won Tae [Kongju National University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    In this paper, we investigate the capacity of the lock-in infrared thermography technique for the evaluation of non-uniform top layers of a silicon carbide coating with a nickel based superalloy sample. The method utilized a multilayer heat transfer model to analyze the surface temperature response. The modelling of the sample was done in ANSYS. The sample consists of three layers, namely, the metal substrate, bond coat and top coat. A sinusoidal heating at different excitation frequencies was imposed upon the top layer of the sample according to the experimental procedures. The thermal response of the excited surface was recorded, and the phase angle image was computed by Fourier transform using the image processing software, MATLAB and Thermofit Pro. The correlation between the coating thickness and phase angle was established for each excitation frequency. The most appropriate excitation frequency was found to be 0.05 Hz. The method demonstrated potential in the evaluation of coating thickness and it was successfully applied to measure the non-uniform top layers ranging from 0.05 mm to 1 mm with an accuracy of 0.000002 mm to 0.045 mm.

  15. Surface plasmon polariton modulator with optimized active layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babicheva, Viktoriia; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    A multilayered waveguide, which supports surface plasmon polaritons, is considered as an absorption modulator. The waveguide core consists of a silicon nitride layer and ultrathin layer with the varied carrier density embedded between two silver plates, which also serve as electrodes. Under apply...

  16. 2nd international conference on ion beam surface layer analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The papers of this conference are concerned with the fundamental aspects and with the application of surface layer analysis. It is reported amongst others about backscattering analysis, Auger electron spectroscopy, channelling and microprobe. (HPOE) [de

  17. The creep of multi-layered moderately thick shells of revolution under asymmetrical loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takezono, S.; Migita, K.

    1987-01-01

    In the present paper the authors study the creep deformation of the multi-layered thick shells of revolution under asymmetrical loads. The equations of equilibrium and the strain-displacement relations are derived from the Reissner-Naghdi theory (1941, 1957) for elastic shells where a consideration on the effect of shear deformation is given. In the theory of creep it is assumed that in a given increment of time the total strain increments are composed of an elastic part and a part due to creep. The elastic strains are proportional to the stresses by Hooke's law. For the constitutive equations in the creep range, McVetty's equation modified by Arrhenius' equation for thermal effect is employed. The basic differential equations on the creep problems derived for the incremental values with respect to time are numerically solved by a finite difference method and the solutions at any time are obtained by summation of the incremental values. Resultant forces and resultant moments are given from numerical integration of the stresses by Simpson's 1/3 rules. (orig./GL)

  18. Experimental investigation on the effect of high Z front layer on saturation thickness for radiation shielding materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purkayastha, Biswajit

    Measurement of number and energy albedo of backscattered gamma rays has wide applications in the design of gamma ray shield involving the use of nuclear radiations. In these applications the characteristic parameter which gives an integral measurement of gamma ray scattering is the albedo of the material involved. Albedo measurements were initiated at the end of the fifth decade of the present century, just after the 2nd World War. Large number of workers worked in different fields such as (i) measurement of angular and energy distributions of backscattered in photons by applying Monte Carlo technique, (ii) experimental investigations of backscattering gamma rays by scintillation spectrometer, Uniform Sensitivity Photon Counter, Proportional Response Photon Counter etc. However, the literature on the effect of high atomic number (Z) front layer on the saturation thickness of a gamma radiation shield is almost nil. In view of the above discussions attempts have been made in the present investigation to extend the scope for optimisation of saturation thickness of a radiation shield by placing a high Z front layer material of varying thickness. Measurements of energy albedo for a homogeneous shield with and without a front layer of different high Z material of varying thickness for two energies namely 662 keV and 1250 keV have been carried out and a careful analysis is presented in the present investigation. From a detailed analysis of the present investigation the following conclusions can be drawn : (i) Anisotroplc distributions of photons as function of emerging angle. (ii) Total energy albedo values of different shielding materials decrease when high Z material is used in front of the shielding material. (iii) Saturation thickness of scattering combinations depends on Z values of the front layer. (iv) The total energy albedo values decrease exponentially as the increase in thickness of the high Z material of the front layer. (v) This experiment not only throws

  19. Dynamic and Steady Characteristics of Polymer-Ceramic Pressure-Sensitive Paint with Variation in Layer Thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Tatsunori; Sakaue, Hirotaka

    2017-05-15

    Polymer-ceramic pressure-sensitive paint (PC-PSP) has been investigated as a surface-pressure sensor for unsteady aerodynamics and short duration measurements. This PSP provides a fast response to a change in pressures with a spray-coating ability. Because it is sprayed onto an aerodynamic surface, the thickness of PC-PSP may play an important role in determining the performance of this sensor. The thickness of other fast PSPs, such as anodized aluminum pressure-sensitive paint, is a major factor in determining its performance. We vary the thickness of PC-PSP from 10 to 240 μm in order to study its effects on PSP measurement characteristics including time response, signal level, pressure sensitivity, and temperature dependency. It is found that the thickness does affect these characteristics. However, a thickness over 80 μm provides uniform performance in these characteristics.

  20. Effect of the thickness of the anode electrode catalyst layers on the performance in direct methanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Dean E.; Olah, George A.; Prakash, G. K. Surya

    2017-06-01

    For the large scale fuel cell manufacture, the catalyst loading and layer thickness are critical factors affecting the performance and cost of membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs). The influence of catalyst layer thicknesses at the anode of a PEM based direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) has been investigated. Catalysts were applied with the drawdown method with varied thicknesses ranging from 1 mil to 8 mils (1 mil = 25.4 μm) with a Pt/Ru anode loading of 0.25 mg cm-2 to 2.0 mg cm-2. The MEAs with the thicker individual layers (8 mils and 4 mils) performed better overall compared to the those with the thinner layers (1 mil and painted). The peak power densities for the different loading levels followed an exponential decrease of Pt/Ru utilization at the higher loading levels. The highest power density achieved was 49 mW cm-2 with the 4 mil layers at 2.0 mg cm-2 catalyst loading whereas the highest normalized power density was 116 mW mg-1 with the 8 mil layers at 0.25 mg cm-2 loading. The 8 mil drawdowns displayed a 50% and 23% increase in normalized power density compared to the 1 mil drawdowns at 0.25 mg cm-2 and 0.5 mg cm-2 loadings, respectively.

  1. Quantitative plasma-fuel and impurity profiling in thick plasma-deposited layers by means of micro ion beam analysis and SIMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bykov, Igor, E-mail: igor.bykov@ee.kth.se [Fusion Pasma Physics, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Teknikringen 31, Stockholm 10044 (Sweden); Bergsåker, Henric; Petersson, Per [Fusion Pasma Physics, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Teknikringen 31, Stockholm 10044 (Sweden); Likonen, Jari [VTT, Association EURATOM-TEKES, P.O. Box 1000, Otaniemi 02044 (Finland); Possnert, Göran [Tandem Laboratory (Association EURATOM-VR), Uppsala Universitet, Box 256, Uppsala 75105 (Sweden)

    2014-08-01

    The operation of the Joint European Torus (JET) with full-carbon wall during the last decades has proven the importance of material re-deposition processes in remote areas of the tokamak. The thickness of the deposits in shadowed areas can reach 1 mm. The main constituent is carbon, with little inclusion of Inconel components. Atomic fractions Be/C and D/C can locally reach 1. Three methods were used to study thick deposits on JET divertor surfaces: (i) NRA analysis with a 15 μm wide, 3 MeV {sup 3}He ion microbeam on a polished cross section of the layer to determine the concentration distribution of D, Be and C and the distribution of Ni by particle induced X-ray emission; (ii) elastic proton scattering (EPS) from the top of the layers with a broad proton beam at 3.5 and 4.6 MeV. These methods were absolutely calibrated using thick elemental targets. (iii) Depth profiling of D, Be and Ni was done with secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), sputtering the layers from the surface. The three methods are complementary. The thickest layers are accessible only by microbeam mapping of the cross sections, albeit with limited spatial resolution. The SIMS has the best depth resolution, but is difficult for absolute quantification and is limited in accessible depth. The probed depth with proton backscattering is limited to about 30 μm. The combination of all three methods provided a coherent picture of the layer composition. It was possible to correlate the SIMS profiling results to quantitative data obtained by the microbeam method.

  2. An analytical model of evaporation efficiency for unsaturated soil surfaces with an arbitrary thickness

    OpenAIRE

    Merlin, Olivier; Al Bitar, Ahmad; Rivalland, Vincent; Béziat, Pierre; Ceschia, Eric; Dedieu, Gérard

    2010-01-01

    doi: 10.1175/2010JAMC2418.1; Analytical expressions of evaporative efficiency over bare soil (defined as the ratio of actual to potential soil evaporation) have been limited to soil layers with a fixed depth and/or to specific atmospheric conditions. To fill the gap, a new analytical model is developed for arbitrary soil thicknesses and varying boundary layer conditions. The soil evaporative efficiency is written [0.5 – 0.5 cos(πθL/ θmax)]^P with θL being the water content in the soil layer o...

  3. The Effect of LASIK Procedure on Peripapillary Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer and Macular Ganglion Cell-Inner Plexiform Layer Thickness in Myopic Eyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Zivkovic

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate the effect of applied suction during microkeratome-assisted laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK procedure on peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL thickness as well as macular ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer (GC-IPL thickness. Methods. 89 patients (124 eyes with established myopia range from −3.0 to −8.0 diopters and no associated ocular diseases were included in this study. RNFL and GC-IPL thickness measurements were performed by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD OCT one day before LASIK and at 1 and 6 months postoperatively. Results. Mean RNFL thickness prior to LASIK was 93.86±12.17 μm while the first month and the sixth month postoperatively were 94.01±12.04 μm and 94.46±12.27 μm, respectively. Comparing results, there is no significant difference between baseline, one month, and six months postoperatively for mean RNFL (p>0.05. Mean GC-IPL thickness was 81.70±7.47 μm preoperatively with no significant difference during the follow-up period (82.03±7.69 μm versus 81.84±7.64 μm; p>0.05. Conclusion. RNFL and GC-IPL complex thickness remained unaffected following LASIK intervention.

  4. A dual response surface optimization methodology for achieving uniform coating thickness in powder coating process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boby John

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The powder coating is an economic, technologically superior and environment friendly painting technique compared with other conventional painting methods. However large variation in coating thickness can reduce the attractiveness of powder coated products. The coating thickness variation can also adversely affect the surface appearance and corrosion resistivity of the product. This can eventually lead to customer dissatisfaction and loss of market share. In this paper, the author discusses a dual response surface optimization methodology to minimize the thickness variation around the target value of powder coated industrial enclosures. The industrial enclosures are cabinets used for mounting the electrical and electronic equipment. The proposed methodology consists of establishing the relationship between the coating thickness & the powder coating process parameters and developing models for the mean and variance of coating thickness. Then the powder coating process is optimized by minimizing the standard deviation of coating thickness subject to the constraint that the thickness mean would be very close to the target. The study resulted in achieving a coating thickness mean of 80.0199 microns for industrial enclosures, which is very close to the target value of 80 microns. A comparison of the results of the proposed approach with that of existing methodologies showed that the suggested method is equally good or even better than the existing methodologies. The result of the study is also validated with a new batch of industrial enclosures.

  5. Magnetic and magnetoresistance studies of the evolution of the magnetic layer structure with Co layer thickness in electrodeposited Co-Cu/Cu multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Subir Kumar, E-mail: sghosh@barc.gov.in [Materials Processing Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai-400085 (India); Chowdhury, Prashanta [Surface Engineering Division, National Aerospace Laboratories, Bangalore-560 017 (India); Dogra, Anjana [Superconductivity and Cryogenics Division, National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi-110012 (India)

    2013-02-15

    The structural transformation of electrochemically deposited Co-Cu/Cu multilayers with magnetic layer thickness was monitored via measurements of magnetization and magnetoresistance. For this, electrodeposition of [Co (t{sub Co} nm)/Cu (4 nm)]{sub 50} multilayers were carried out by varying the Co-layer thickness (t{sub Co}) down to 0.2 nm from a sulfate based single solution electrolyte. Magnetization measurements showed the appearance of anisotropy, increase in remanence magnetization and coercivity with systematic increase of t{sub Co} from 0.2 to 1 nm. Magnetic field direction dependent magnetoresistance (MR) measurements revealed that the isotropy in MR changes with t{sub Co} from tridimensional at 0.2 nm to in-plane at 0.4 nm to fully anisotropic at 1.0 nm. This illustrated that a fully granular magnetic Co-layer structure (t{sub Co}=0.2 nm) transforms into discontinuous layered one (t{sub Co}=0.4 nm) due to coalescence of suparparamagnetic regions to a continuous ferromagnetic layer (t{sub Co}=1 nm). - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This paper shows magnetic field orientation dependent MR measurement is a valuable tool. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Directional MR measurements can probe magnetic layer structure in magnetic multilayers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Granular SPM to isolated in plane island to fully covered FM layer is identified.

  6. Making Nonsticky Surfaces of Sticky Materials: Self-Organized Microtexturing of Viscoelastic Elastomeric Layers by Tearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Sandip; Deshpande, Tushar; Chaudhari, Nayantika; Singh, Yogesh R G; Raut, Janhavi; Joshi, Yogesh M; Sharma, Ashutosh

    2018-03-27

    Fabrication of large area, multiscale microtextured surfaces engineered for antiadhesion properties remains a challenge. Compared to an elastic surface, viscoelastic solids show much higher surface stickiness, tack, and adhesion owing to the increased contact area and energy dissipation. Here, we show a simple, low cost, large-area and high throughput method with roll-to-roll compatibility to fabricate multiscale, rough microstructures resistant to adhesion in a viscoelastic layer by controlled tearing of viscous film. Even a high adhesive strength viscoelastic solid layer, such as partially cured PDMS, is made nonsticky simply by its controlled tearing. The torn surface shows a fracture induced, self-organized leaflike micropattern resistant to sticking. The topography and adhesion strength of these structures are readily tuned by changing the tearing speed and the film thickness. The microtexture displays a springlike recovery, low adhesive strength, and easy release properties even under the high applied loads.

  7. Surface layer temperature inversion in the Arabian Sea during winter

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pankajakshan, T.; Ghosh, A.K.

    picture of the actual inversion phenomena occurring in this area. Figure 1 illustrates the procedure adopted in finding the inversion stations. If the temperature difference (Del T) obtained from (T U –T L ) is greater than 0.2°C, then the station... is more or less consistent. Figure 3-A shows the frequency distribution of temperature difference of the inversion layer (Del T). Figure 3-B shows the frequency distribution of the thickness of the inversion layers in meters (Di). Del T is distributed over...

  8. The physical structure of the oceanic surface-layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorov, K.N.

    1981-01-01

    A study is presented of the structure of the near-surface layer of the ocean under various hydrometeorological conditions. Such a study allows the isolation of border measures for a four characteristic regime for the top ocean layer: 1) intensive wind-wave mixing; 2) Langmuir circulation; 3) intense solar heating during still and calm weather (with and without internal wave modulations); 4) a pressing-out of surface sediment. It is demonstrated that the spatial temperature change in the ocean surface, the thermal structure, and the heat attainment in the top layer have various characteristics during different regimes and this must be considered during the measuring of the ocean surface temperature with the contact method as well as during the comparison of contact and satallite data on the ocean surface temperature. The necessity for more research in this area is underscored.

  9. Analysis of macular and nerve fiber layer thickness in multiple sclerosis patients according to severity level and optic neuritis episodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler García, A; Padilla Parrado, F; Figueroa-Ortiz, L C; González Gómez, A; García-Ben, A; García-Ben, E; García-Campos, J M

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of macular and nerve fibre layer thickness in multiple sclerosis patients with regard to expanded disability status scale (EDSS) and presence or absence of previous optic neuritis episodes. We recruited 62 patients with multiple sclerosis (53 relapsing-remitting and 9 secondary progressive) and 12 disease-free controls. All patients underwent an ophthalmological examination, including quantitative analysis of the nerve fibre layer and macular thickness using optical coherence tomography. Patients were classified according to EDSS as A (lower than 1.5), B (between 1.5 and 3.5), and C (above 3.5). Mean nerve fibre layer thickness in control, A, B, and C groups was 103.35±12.62, 99.04±14.35, 93.59±15.41, and 87.36±18.75μm respectively, with statistically significant differences (Pmultiple sclerosis patients is related to the EDSS level. Patients with previous optic neuritis episodes have a thinner retinal nerve fibre layer than patients with no history of these episodes. Mean macular thickness is not correlated to EDSS level. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. The Thickness of the Mushy Layer on the Floor of the Skaergaard Magma Chamber at Apatite Saturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holness, Marian B.; Tegner, Christian; Nielsen, Troels F. D.

    2017-01-01

    We present a novel way of constraining the thickness of the crystal mush in fractionated layered intrusions using detailed microstructural analysis. The results are combined with geochemical data to create a snapshot of the crystal mush on the floor of the Skaergaard magma chamber in the period i...

  11. Modeling and simulation of stamp deflections in nanoimprint lithography: Exploiting backside grooves to enhance residual layer thickness uniformity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor, Hayden; Smistrup, Kristian; Boning, Duane

    2011-01-01

    We describe a model for the compliance of a nanoimprint stamp etched with a grid of backside grooves. We integrate the model with a fast simulation technique that we have previously demonstrated, to show how etched grooves help reduce the systematic residual layer thickness (RLT) variations...

  12. Microstructure and thermoelectric properties of screen-printed thick-films of misfit-layered cobalt oxides with Ag addition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Nong, Ngo; Samson, Alfred Junio; Pryds, Nini

    2012-01-01

    Thermoelectric properties of thick (~60 μm) films prepared by a screen-printing technique using p-type misfit-layered cobalt oxide Ca3Co4O9+δ with Ag addition have been studied. The screen-printed films were sintered in air at various temperatures ranging from 973 K to 1223 K. After each sintering...

  13. Normative spectral domain optical coherence tomography data on macular and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in Indians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindu Appukuttan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To provide the normative data of macular and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL thickness in Indians using spectral domain OCT (Spectralis OCT, Heidelberg Engineering, Germany and to evaluate the effects of age, gender, and refraction on these parameters. Design: Observational, cross-sectional study. Materials and Methods: The eyes of 105 healthy patients aged between 20-75 years, with no ocular disease and best corrected visual acuity of 20/20, were scanned using standard scanning protocols by a single examiner. Exclusion criteria included glaucoma, retinal diseases, diabetes, history of prior intraocular surgery or laser treatment. The mean macular and RNFL thickness were recorded, and the effects of age, gender, and refraction on these parameters were evaluated. This data was compared with published literature on Caucasians to assess the ethnic variations of these parameters. Results: The normal central foveal thickness in healthy Indian eyes measured using Spectralis OCT was 260.1 ± 18.19 ΅m. The nasal inner quadrant showed maximum retinal thickness (338.88 ± 18.17 ΅m.The mean RNFL thickness was 101.43 ± 8.63 ΅m with maximum thickness in the inferior quadrant. The central foveal thickness showed a gender-based difference (P = 0.005 but did not correlate significantly with age (P = 0.134, whereas the parafoveal, perifoveal thickness, macular volume, and RNFL thickness showed significant negative correlation with age. Conclusions: Our study provides the normative database for Indians on Spectralis OCT. It also suggests that age should be considered while interpreting the macular thickness and RNFL, whereas gender should also be given consideration in central foveal thickness.

  14. Surface-layer lattices as patterning element for multimeric extremozymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferner-Ortner-Bleckmann, Judith; Gelbmann, Nicola; Tesarz, Manfred; Egelseer, Eva M; Sleytr, Uwe B

    2013-11-25

    A promising new approach for the production of biocatalysts comprises the use of surface-layer (S-layer) lattices that present functional multimeric enzymes on their surface, thereby guaranteeing most accurate spatial distribution and orientation, as well as maximal effectiveness and stability of these enzymes. For proof of concept, a tetrameric and a trimeric extremozyme are chosen for the construction of S-layer/extremozyme fusion proteins. By using a flexible peptide linker, either one monomer of the tetrameric xylose isomerase XylA from the thermophilic Thermoanaerobacterium strain JW/SL-YS 489 or, in another approach, one monomer of the trimeric carbonic anhydrase from the methanogenic archaeon Methanosarcina thermophila are genetically linked to one monomer of the S-layer protein SbpA of Lysinibacillus sphaericus CCM 2177. After isolation and purification, the self-assembly properties of both S-layer fusion proteins as well as the specific activity of the fused enzymes are confirmed, thus indicating that the S-layer protein moiety does not influence the nature of the multimeric enzymes and vice versa. By recrystallization of the S-layer/extremozyme fusion proteins on solid supports, the active enzyme multimers are exposed on the surface of the square S-layer lattice with 13.1 nm spacing. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Correlation between glycemic control and peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in Saudi type II diabetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahmy RM

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Rania M Fahmy,1,2 Ramesa S Bhat,3 Manar Al-Mutairi,4 Feda S Aljaser,5 Afaf El-Ansary4 1Department of Optometry, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Giza, Egypt; 3Biochemistry Department, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 4Central Laboratory, Female Center for Medical Studies and Scientific Section, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 5Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Objective: To evaluate the effect of diabetes mellitus (DM, diabetic retinopathy, and degree of glycemic control (glycosylated hemoglobin [HbA1c] on peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT using optical coherence tomography.Methods: The study included 126 eyes of healthy controls (n=32 and diabetics patients (n=31, whose ages ranged from 40 to 70 years. The diabetic group was divided into: Subgroup 1: with HbA1c <7% and Subgroup 2: with HbA1c ≥7%. All patients underwent full ophthalmic examination. HbA1c level was obtained with the A1cNow+ system and the peripapillary RNFLT was measured using 3D-OCT 2000 Topcon (360-degree circular scan with 3.4 mm diameter centered on optic disc.Results: The obtained data demonstrates significant decrease in peripapillary RNFLT in superior and inferior quadrants of the right eye (p=0.000 and p=0.039, respectively, and in superior quadrant of the left eye (p=0.002 with impairment of glycemic control. Pearson’s correlation test showed significant negative correlation of RNFLT with HbA1c in the superior quadrant in both eyes.Conclusion: Impairment of glycemic control affects the peripapillary RNFLT mainly in the superior quadrant. This thickness also tends to decrease with long-standing DM, use of DM medications, and development of diabetic retinopathy. The measurement of peripapillary RNFLT

  16. The relationship between contrast sensitivity and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in patients with glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amanullah, Sarah; Okudolo, Joseph; Rahmatnejad, Kamran; Lin, Shuai-Chun; Wizov, Sheryl S; Manzi Muhire, Remy S; Hark, Lisa A; Zheng, Cindy X; Zhan, Tingting; Spaeth, George L

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the correlation between contrast sensitivity (CS) and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) in different areas of vision. This report is a sub-analysis of a prospective, observational cohort study investigating changes in performance-based assessment, vision-related quality of life, and clinical measures in patients with moderate to advanced glaucoma. The study included 161 participants with at least a 2-year history of glaucoma who underwent annual testing for 4 years. Contrast sensitivity was measured using the Spaeth/Richman contrast sensitivity (SPARCS) test, while RNFL thickness (RNFLT) was measured using Cirrus optical coherence tomography (OCT). Statistical analyses were performed to determine correlations between CS and RNFLT; the correlations were calculated for each annual visit, totaling four correlation coefficients for each patient over the course of 4 years. The SPARCS score in the left upper area of vision correlated the most strongly with the RNFLT of the inferior quadrant for both eyes at each annual visit, specifically in the seven o'clock sector for the left eye and the six o'clock sector for the right eye (p < 0.05). There were no discernible trends for the correlations between the other areas of CS and RNFL quadrants or clock hours over the 4 years of the study. Linear regression between the SPARCS total score and average RNFLT showed a significant direct correlation at each visit (p < 0.01). Contrast sensitivity in the left upper area of vision for both eyes correlated most strongly with the thickness of the inferior quadrant of the RNFL. These fibers project to the temporal portion of the right occipital lobe, implying a potential center for contrast perception in this area. The longitudinal nature of the study suggests that CS may be a predictive tool for changes in RNFL in patients with glaucoma. Despite this finding, retinal damage and its relationship to CS was diffuse. In addition, SPARCS was shown to predict RNFLT. Further

  17. Polar orientation of a pendant anionic chromophore in thick layer-by-layer self-assembled polymeric films

    OpenAIRE

    Garg, Akhilesh; Davis, Richey M.; Durak, Cemil; Heflin, James R.; Gibson, Harry W.

    2008-01-01

    Multilayer films with up to 600 bilayers and 740 nm thickness were fabricated using the alternating deposition of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) and poly{1-[p-(3'-carboxy-4'-hydroxyphenylazo)benzenesulfonamido]-1,2-ethand iyl} on glass substrates. Linear relationships for absorbance, thickness, and the square root of the second harmonic intensity versus the number of bilayers demonstrates that the films have long range polar order and optical homogeneity. The deposition conditions (i.e., pH o...

  18. LONGITUDINAL CHANGES IN THICKNESSES OF THE MACULA, GANGLION CELL-INNER PLEXIFORM LAYER, AND RETINAL NERVE FIBER LAYER AFTER VITRECTOMY: A 12-Month Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hyung-Bin; Lee, Min-Woo; Kwak, Baek-Soo; Jo, Young-Joon; Kim, Jung-Yeul

    2018-01-01

    To analyze longitudinal changes in the thicknesses of the macula, ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer (GC-IPL), and peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) after vitrectomy. Thirty-eight patients diagnosed with intraocular lens (IOL) dislocation without evidence of other vitreoretinal diseases were included. They underwent conventional vitrectomy and IOL transscleral fixation, with a follow-up of 12 months. Using spectral domain optical coherence tomography, the thicknesses of the macula, GC-IPL, and peripapillary RNFL in the vitrectomized and fellow control eyes were measured. Various optic nerve head parameters were also determined. Optical coherence tomography showed that there were no significant differences in postoperative central macular thickness compared with baseline values. The average GC-IPL thickness increased 1 month after surgery from baseline (P = 0.038). The average RNFL thickness increased from baseline at 1 month (P = 0.001) and 3 months (P = 0.011) after vitrectomy. The mean foveal, GC-IPL, and RNFL thicknesses of the study eyes compared with the fellow control eyes increased at 1 month (P = 0.034), 1 month (P = 0.048), and 1 month (P = 0.013) to 3 months (P = 0.038), respectively, after surgery. However, no significant differences were found in intraocular pressure or optic nerve head parameters between the study and fellow control eyes at 12 months after surgery. Transient increases in the thickness of the macula and GC-IPL were observed at 1 month after vitrectomy, and the postoperative RNFL thickness increased until 3 months after surgery, after which it returned to preoperative levels. There was no significant change in intraocular pressure or optic nerve head parameters before and after surgery.

  19. Determination of thickness of thin turbid painted over-layers using micro-scale spatially offset Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Claudia; Realini, Marco; Colombo, Chiara; Botteon, Alessandra; Bertasa, Moira; Striova, Jana; Barucci, Marco; Matousek, Pavel

    2016-12-01

    We present a method for estimating the thickness of thin turbid layers using defocusing micro-spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (micro-SORS). The approach, applicable to highly turbid systems, enables one to predict depths in excess of those accessible with conventional Raman microscopy. The technique can be used, for example, to establish the paint layer thickness on cultural heritage objects, such as panel canvases, mural paintings, painted statues and decorated objects. Other applications include analysis in polymer, biological and biomedical disciplines, catalytic and forensics sciences where highly turbid overlayers are often present and where invasive probing may not be possible or is undesirable. The method comprises two stages: (i) a calibration step for training the method on a well characterized sample set with a known thickness, and (ii) a prediction step where the prediction of layer thickness is carried out non-invasively on samples of unknown thickness of the same chemical and physical make up as the calibration set. An illustrative example of a practical deployment of this method is the analysis of larger areas of paintings. In this case, first, a calibration would be performed on a fragment of painting of a known thickness (e.g. derived from cross-sectional analysis) and subsequently the analysis of thickness across larger areas of painting could then be carried out non-invasively. The performance of the method is compared with that of the more established optical coherence tomography (OCT) technique on identical sample set. This article is part of the themed issue "Raman spectroscopy in art and archaeology".

  20. Coexistence of several structural phases in MOCVD TiO{sub 2} layers: evolution from nanometre to micrometre thick films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brevet, A; Marco de Lucas, M C; Potin, V; Chassagnon, R; Imhoff, L; Domenichini, B; Bourgeois, S, E-mail: delucas@u-bourgogne.f [Institut Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 5209 CNRS-Universite de Bourgogne, 9 Av. A. Savary, BP 47 870, F-21078 DIJON Cedex (France)

    2009-09-07

    The morphology and the structure of TiO{sub 2} films, grown on Si (1 0 0) substrates by metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) was investigated in 5-500 nm thick films. It was shown that the TiO{sub 2} layer is mainly amorphous at the first stages of deposition. The growth of nanocrystallites begins inside the amorphous TiO{sub 2} layer, and it continues at the expense of the amorphous phase until the crystallized grains occupy the whole layer. Then, the film growth continues with a columnar structure. The coexistence of anatase and rutile phases was evidenced from the beginning of the growth by high resolution transmission electron microscopy and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction. However, the anatase growth overcomes that of rutile, leading to an inhomogeneous phase distribution as a function of the film thickness.

  1. Design, fabrication and installation of measuring device for oxide-layer thickness of irradiated PWR fuel rod clad in hot-cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Kwang Jun

    1996-06-01

    It has been known that water-side corrosion of fuel rods in nuclear reactor is accompanied with the loss of metallic wall thickness and pickup of hydrogen. This corrosion is one of the important limiting factors in the operating life of fuel rods. In this connection, a device of measuring the water-side oxide layer thickness by means of the eddy-current method without destructing the fuel rod has been developed by KAERI. A feasibility study for employing the device in hot-cell has been carried out prior to the design and fabrication. As a result, it was found that a method of using the eddy current testing unit equipped already in hot-cell could be shared with. Intensive review was made to design the apparatus, because its dimension should be limited within the size of the eddy current testing device, namely width and height. This apparatus installed in the NDT hot-cell was connected with the data acquisition/processing unit in the working area in due consideration of the radiation shielding. Wiring in the hot-cell was done by connecting a special-design connector by the manipulator from the working area. A calibration of the oxide layer measuring system has been performed for the standard rod with thin plastic films on its surface, whose thickness were predetermined. By using this calibration result to the unknown sample, it was revealed that the device developed in this work is reliable to measure the oxide layer thickness. Therefore, the oxide layer measuring device will be used to evaluate the performance of irradiated fuels with other testing devices such as X-ray radiographic instrument, gamma-ray spectrometer, and dimensional profilometer. 1 tab., 27 figs., 2 refs. (Author) .new

  2. Surface Layer Turbulence and Aerosol Profiles During MAPTIP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davidson, K.L.; Frederickson, P.A.; Leeuw, G. de

    1995-01-01

    The Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) and the TNO Physics and Electronics Laboratory (TNO-FEL) deployed in situ sensors near and on Meetpost Noordwijk (MPN) during MAPTIP to describe the surface layer processes and also to evaluate models for near-surface aerosol profiles. Vertical profiles of aerosol

  3. Growth of thick p-type SiC epitaxial layers by halide chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanton, M. A.; Weiland, B. E.; Redwing, J. M.

    2008-08-01

    The halide chemical vapor deposition process for single-crystal SiC achieves growth rates over 200 μm/h at temperatures approaching 2000 °C. This work examines the conditions required to produce 80-100-μm-thick heavily p-type doped layers on 4H-SiC substrates by using boron trichloride and trimethylaluminum at high growth temperatures. Dopant incorporation as a function of the dopant concentration in the growth ambient was evaluated by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The maximum Al and B concentrations achieved were 5×10 17 and 4×10 19 atoms/cm 3, respectively. Low Al incorporation efficiency was attributed to the high growth temperature and reaction of Al with Cl to form volatile chloride species. Aluminum incorporation was consistent with incorporation as a simple solid solution, while B incorporation exhibited a much stronger interaction with the SiC matrix. Aluminum incorporation was found to be an order of magnitude higher on the Si-face of the substrate, while B incorporation was essentially the same on both the Si-face and C-face. Aluminum incorporation was increased by a factor of five as the C/Si ratio increased from 0.42 to 0.86, while boron incorporation showed no sensitivity to the C/Si ratio. The B concentrations measured by SIMS were of the same magnitude as the net acceptor concentrations estimated from capacitance-voltage measurements, indicating a significant fraction of the B dopant was activated.

  4. Pigments analysis and gold layer thickness evaluation of polychromy on wood objects by PXRF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blonski, M S; Appoloni, C R

    2014-07-01

    The X-ray fluorescence technique by energy dispersion (EDXRF), being a multi elemental and non-destructive technique, has been widely used in the analysis of artworks and archeometry. An X-ray fluorescence portable equipment from the Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Physics of the State University of Londrina (LFNA/UEL) was used for the measurement of pigments in golden parts of a Gilding Preparation Standard Plaque and also pigments measurement on the Wood Adornment of the High Altar Column of the Side Pulpit of the Immaculate Conception Church Parish Sao Paulo-SP. The portable X-ray fluorescence PXRF-LFNA-02 consists of an X-ray tube with Ag anode, a Si-PIN detector (FWHM=221 eV for Mn line at 5.9 keV), a chain of electronics nuclear standard of X-ray spectrometer, a multichannel 8K, a notebook and a mechanical system designed for the positioning of detector and X-ray tube, which allows movements with two degrees of freedom from the system of excitation-detection. The excitation-detection time of each measurement was 100 and 500 s, respectively. The presence of elements Ti, Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn and Au was found in the golden area of the Altar Column ornament. On the other hand, analysis of the ratios for the intensities of Kα/Kβ lines measured in the areas made it possible to explore the possibility of measuring the stratigraphies of the layers of pigments and to estimate the thickness of the same. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Changes in retinal oxygen saturation, choroidal thickness, and retinal nerve fibre layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Shaolin; Gao, Xinbo; Zhang, Xiulan; Wang, Jiawei; Huang, Wenbin; Zhou, Minwen; Wang, Wei; Li, Xingyi; Zhang, Yichi; Lam, Dennis S C

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the changes of retinal oxygen saturation (Sat O2) concentrations, choroidal thickness (CT), and retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) in eyes with trabeculectomy-required acute primary angle closure (APAC). Prospective, longitudinal study. Twenty-three eyes with trabeculectomy-required APAC were recruited. Retinal oximetry was performed at postoperative day one and again at approximately 1 month. CT and the RNFL were tested on the same day. A paired t test and Pearson correlation were used for analysis. Mean Sat O2 increased in retinal arterioles from 88.74% ± 14.36% at postoperative day 1 to 96.61% ± 18.42% at 1 month (p = 0.049). The mean diameter of the arterioles was statistically different between postoperative day 1 and 1 month (p = 0.044), as was the mean diameter of the venules (p = 0.027). APAC eyes at postoperative 1 month had a thinner mean CT, compared with day 1 (p = 0.002). No significant difference was found in the RNFL between postoperative day 1 and 1 month (p > 0.05). The Sat O2 in retinal arterioles correlated with the mean diameter of the arterioles at postoperative day 1 (r = -0.482, p = 0.020) and at 1 month (r = -0.463, p = 0.026). No significant correlation was found between retinal Sat O2 and other parameters. Increased Sat O2 in retinal arterioles, changed vessel diameter, and thinner CT from postoperative day 1 to 1 month suggest gradual recovery from APAC. However, the different pathophysiologies for APAC still need further study to prove. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Ophthalmological Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Energy level and thickness control on PEDOT:PSS layer for efficient planar heterojunction perovskite cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunhua; Zhang, Chujun; Tong, Sichao; Xia, Huayan; Wang, Lijuan; Xie, Haipeng; Gao, Yongli; Yang, Junliang

    2018-01-01

    Efficient planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells (PHJ-PSCs) with an architecture of ITO/PEDOT:PSS/CH3NH3PbI3/PCBM/Al were fabricated by controlling the energy level and thickness of the PEDOT:PSS layer, where the PEDOT:PSS precursor was diluted with deionized water (H2O) and isopropyl alcohol (IPA), i.e. W-PEDOT:PSS and I-PEDOT:PSS. The performance parameters of the PHJ-PSCs showed soaring enhancement after employing W-PEDOT:PSS or I-PEDOT:PSS instead of pristine PEDOT:PSS (P-PEDOT:PSS), resulting in an increase of the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of W-PEDOT:PSS-based PHJ-PSCs to 15.60% from 11.95% for P-PEDOT:PSS-based PHJ-PSCs. The performance improvement results from two aspects. On the one hand, as compared to P-PEDOT:PSS, the occupied molecular orbital energy (HOMO) level of dilute PEDOT:PSS showed an impressive decrease and can well match the valence band of CH3NH3PbI3 film, resulting in less energy loss and a significant improvement in the open-circuit voltage (V oc). On the other hand, the dilute PEDOT:PSS could produce a thinner film as compared with the P-PEDOT:PSS, which also played an important role in the performance of the PHJ-PSCs. Furthermore, the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) results indicated that the interface between perovskite and PEDOT:PSS was greatly improved by employing W-PEDOT:PSS or I-PEDOT:PSS, leading to an obvious decrease in the series resistance (R s) and an increase in the recombination resistance (R rec). The research demonstrated that diluting PEDOT:PSS with a common solvent, such as H2O and IPA, is a feasible low-temperature way of achieving efficient PHJ-PSCs.

  7. Thermocouple Rakes for Measuring Boundary Layer Flows Extremely Close to Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Danny P.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Martin, Lisa C.; Blaha, Charles A.

    2001-01-01

    Of vital interest to aerodynamic researchers is precise knowledge of the flow velocity profile next to the surface. This information is needed for turbulence model development and the calculation of viscous shear force. Though many instruments can determine the flow velocity profile near the surface, none of them can make measurements closer than approximately 0.01 in. from the surface. The thermocouple boundary-layer rake can measure much closer to the surface than conventional instruments can, such as a total pressure boundary layer rake, hot wire, or hot film. By embedding the sensors (thermocouples) in the region where the velocity is equivalent to the velocity ahead of a constant thickness strut, the boundary-layer flow profile can be obtained. The present device fabricated at the NASA Glenn Research Center microsystem clean room has a heater made of platinum and thermocouples made of platinum and gold. Equal numbers of thermocouples are placed both upstream and downstream of the heater, so that the voltage generated by each pair at the same distance from the surface is indicative of the difference in temperature between the upstream and downstream thermocouple locations. This voltage differential is a function of the flow velocity, and like the conventional total pressure rake, it can provide the velocity profile. In order to measure flow extremely close to the surface, the strut is made of fused quartz with extremely low heat conductivity. A large size thermocouple boundary layer rake is shown in the following photo. The latest medium size sensors already provide smooth velocity profiles well into the boundary layer, as close as 0.0025 in. from the surface. This is about 4 times closer to the surface than the previously used total pressure rakes. This device also has the advantage of providing the flow profile of separated flow and also it is possible to measure simultaneous turbulence levels within the boundary layer.

  8. Multi-layer enhancement to polysilicon surface-micromachining technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sniegowski, J.J.; Rodgers, M.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Intelligent Micromachine Dept.

    1997-10-01

    A multi-level polysilicon surface-micromachining technology consisting of 5 layers of polysilicon is presented. Surface topography and film mechanical stress are the major impediments encountered in the development of a multilayer surface-micromachining process. However, excellent mechanical film characteristics have been obtained through the use of chemical-mechanical polishing for planarization of topography and by proper sequencing of film deposition with thermal anneals. Examples of operating microactuators, geared power-transfer mechanisms, and optical elements demonstrate the mechanical advantages of construction with 5 polysilicon layers.

  9. Growth of micrometric oxide layers to explore laser decontamination of metallic surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho Luisa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear industry produces a wide range of radioactive waste in terms of hazard level, contaminants and material. For metallic equipment like steam generators, the radioactivity is mainly located in the oxide surface. In order to study and develop safe techniques for dismantling and for decontamination, it is important to have access to oxide layers with a representative distribution of non-radioactive contaminants. In this paper we propose a method for the creation of oxide layers on stainless steel 304L with europium (Eu as contaminant. This technique consists in spraying an Eu-solution on stainless steel samples. The specimens are firstly treated with a pulsed nanosecond laser after which the steel samples are placed in a 873 K furnace for various durations in order to grow an oxide layer. The oxide structure and in-depth distribution of Eu in the oxide layer were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy coupled to an energy-dispersive X-ray microanalyzer, as well as by glow discharge optical emission or mass spectrometry. The oxide layers were grown to thicknesses in the range of 200 nm–4.5 μm depending on the laser treatment parameters and the heating duration. These contaminated oxides had a ‘duplex structure’ with a mean concentration of the order of 6 × 1016 atoms/cm2 (15 μg/cm2 of europium in the volume of the oxide layer. It appears that europium implementation prevented the oxide growth in the furnace. Nevertheless, the presence of the contamination had no impact on the thickness of the oxide layers obtained by preliminary laser treatment. These oxide layers were used to study the decontamination of metallic surfaces such as stainless steel 304L using a nanosecond pulsed laser.

  10. Non-destructive prediction of enteric coating layer thickness and drug dissolution rate by near-infrared spectroscopy and X-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariyasu, Aoi; Hattori, Yusuke; Otsuka, Makoto

    2017-06-15

    The coating layer thickness of enteric-coated tablets is a key factor that determines the drug dissolution rate from the tablet. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) enables non-destructive and quick measurement of the coating layer thickness, and thus allows the investigation of the relation between enteric coating layer thickness and drug dissolution rate. Two marketed products of aspirin enteric-coated tablets were used in this study, and the correlation between the predicted coating layer thickness and the obtained drug dissolution rate was investigated. Our results showed correlation for one product; the drug dissolution rate decreased with the increase in enteric coating layer thickness, whereas, there was no correlation for the other product. Additional examination of the distribution of coating layer thickness by X-ray computed tomography (CT) showed homogenous distribution of coating layer thickness for the former product, whereas the latter product exhibited heterogeneous distribution within the tablet, as well as inconsistent trend in the thickness distribution between the tablets. It was suggested that this heterogeneity and inconsistent trend in layer thickness distribution contributed to the absence of correlation between the layer thickness of the face and side regions of the tablets, which resulted in the loss of correlation between the coating layer thickness and drug dissolution rate. Therefore, the predictability of drug dissolution rate from enteric-coated tablets depended on the homogeneity of the coating layer thickness. In addition, the importance of micro analysis, X-ray CT in this study, was suggested even if the macro analysis, NIRS in this study, are finally applied for the measurement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Controlling the Performance of P-type Cu2O/SnO Bilayer Thin-Film Transistors by Adjusting the Thickness of the Copper Oxide Layer

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Jawhari, Hala A.

    2014-11-11

    The effect of copper oxide layer thickness on the performance of Cu2O/SnO bilayer thin-film transistors was investigated. By using sputtered Cu2O films produced at an oxygen partial pressure, Opp, of 10% as the upper layer and 3% Opp SnO films as the lower layer we built a matrix of bottom-gate Cu2O/SnO bilayer thin-film transistors of different thickness. We found that the thickness of the Cu2O layer is of major importance in oxidation of the SnO layer underneath. The thicker the Cu2O layer, the more the underlying SnO layer is oxidized, and, hence, the more transistor mobility is enhanced at a specific temperature. Both device performance and the annealing temperature required could be adjusted by controlling the thickness of each layer of Cu2O/SnO bilayer thin-film transistors.

  12. Impact of the density of the mould powder on thickness of the layer of liquid slag in the continuous caster mould

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kania

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of measurements of the thickness of liquid slag layer in concast mould for pulverized, granulated or formed mould powder. The thickest layer of liquid slag was obtained for formed powders.

  13. Double Charged Surface Layers in Lead Halide Perovskite Crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Sarmah, Smritakshi P.

    2017-02-01

    Understanding defect chemistry, particularly ion migration, and its significant effect on the surface’s optical and electronic properties is one of the major challenges impeding the development of hybrid perovskite-based devices. Here, using both experimental and theoretical approaches, we demonstrated that the surface layers of the perovskite crystals may acquire a high concentration of positively charged vacancies with the complementary negatively charged halide ions pushed to the surface. This charge separation near the surface generates an electric field that can induce an increase of optical band gap in the surface layers relative to the bulk. We found that the charge separation, electric field, and the amplitude of shift in the bandgap strongly depend on the halides and organic moieties of perovskite crystals. Our findings reveal the peculiarity of surface effects that are currently limiting the applications of perovskite crystals and more importantly explain their origins, thus enabling viable surface passivation strategies to remediate them.

  14. Boundary layers of aqueous surfactant and block copolymer solutions against hydrophobic and hydrophilic solid surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steitz, Roland; Schemmel, Sebastian; Shi Hongwei; Findenegg, Gerhard H

    2005-01-01

    The boundary layer of aqueous surfactants and amphiphilic triblock copolymers against flat solid surfaces of different degrees of hydrophobicity was investigated by neutron reflectometry (NR), grazing incidence small angle neutron scattering (GISANS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Solid substrates of different hydrophobicities were prepared by appropriate surface treatment or by coating silicon wafers with polymer films of different chemical natures. For substrates coated with thin films (20-30 nm) of deuterated poly(styrene) (water contact angle θ w ∼ 90), neutron reflectivity measurements on the polymer/water interface revealed a water depleted liquid boundary layer of 2-3 nm thickness and a density about 90% of the bulk water density. No pronounced depletion layer was found at the interface of water against a less hydrophobic polyelectrolyte coating (θ w ∼ 63). It is believed that the observed depletion layer at the hydrophobic polymer/water interface is a precursor of the nanobubbles which have been observed by AFM at this interface. Decoration of the polymer coatings by adsorbed layers of nonionic C m E n surfactants improves their wettability by the aqueous phase at surfactant concentrations well below the critical micellar concentration (CMC) of the surfactant. Here, GISANS experiments conducted on the system SiO 2 /C 8 E 4 /D 2 O reveal that there is no preferred lateral organization of the C 8 E 4 adsorption layers. For amphiphilic triblock copolymers (PEO-PPO-PEO) it is found that under equilibrium conditions they form solvent-swollen brushes both at the air/water and the solid/water interface. In the latter case, the brushes transform to uniform, dense layers after extensive rinsing with water and subsequent solvent evaporation. The primary adsorption layers maintain properties of the precursor brushes. In particular, their thickness scales with the number of ethylene oxide units (EO) of the block copolymer. In the case of dip-coating without

  15. Thickness of the Macula, Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer, and Ganglion Cell Layer in the Epiretinal Membrane: The Repeatability Study of Optical Coherence Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Haeng-Jin; Kim, Min-Su; Jo, Young-Joon; Kim, Jung-Yeul

    2015-07-01

    To analyze the repeatability of measurements of the thicknesses of the macula, retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL), and ganglion cell inner plexiform layer (GCIPL) using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) in the epiretinal membrane (ERM). The prospective study analyzed patients who visited our retinal clinic from June 2013 to January 2014. An experienced examiner measured the thicknesses twice using macular cube 512 × 128 and optic disc cube 200 × 200 scans. The repeatability of the thicknesses of the macula, RNFL, and GCIPL were compared using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of two groups based on the central macular thickness (group A, ≤ 450 μm; group B, > 450 μm). A total of 88 patients were analyzed. The average thicknesses of the central macula, RNFL, and GCIPL were 256.5, 96.6, and 84.4 μm, respectively, in the normal fellow eye and 412.3, 94.6, and 56.7 μm in the affected eye. The ICCs of the central macula, RNFL, and GCIPL were 0.995, 0.994, and 0.996, respectively, for the normal fellow eye and 0.991, 0.973, and 0.881 for the affected eye. The average thicknesses of the central macula, RNFL, and GCIPL in group A were 360.9, 93.5, and 63.4 μm, respectively, and the ICCs were 0.997, 0.987, and 0.995. The thicknesses in group B were 489.5, 96.2, and 46.6 μm, respectively, and the ICCs were 0.910, 0.942, and 0.603, significantly lower repeatability compared with group A (P macula.

  16. Thickness dependence of polydopamine thin films on detection sensitivity of surface plasmon-enhanced fluorescence biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toma, Mana; Tawa, Keiko

    2018-03-01

    A bioinspired polydopamine (PDA) coating is a good candidate for the rapid and cheap chemical modification of biosensor surfaces. Herein, we report the effect of PDA thickness on the detection sensitivity of a fluorescence biosensor utilizing surface plasmon-enhanced fluorescence. The thickness of PDA films was tuned by the incubation time of the dopamine solution and varied from 1 to 17 nm. The detection sensitivity was evaluated as the limit of detection (LOD) of a fluorescently labelled target analyte by a model immunoassay. The LOD was determined to be 1.6 pM for the thickest PDA film and was improved to 1.0 pM by reducing the thickness to the range from 1 to 5 nm, corresponding to the incubation time of 10 to 60 min. The experimental results indicate that the PDA coating is suitable for the surface functionalization of biosensors in mass production as it does not require precise control of the incubation time.

  17. Atomic and molecular layer deposition for surface modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vähä-Nissi, Mika; Sievänen, Jenni; Salo, Erkki; Heikkilä, Pirjo; Kenttä, Eija; Johansson, Leena-Sisko; Koskinen, Jorma T.; Harlin, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Atomic and molecular layer deposition (ALD and MLD, respectively) techniques are based on repeated cycles of gas–solid surface reactions. A partial monolayer of atoms or molecules is deposited to the surface during a single deposition cycle, enabling tailored film composition in principle down to molecular resolution on ideal surfaces. Typically ALD/MLD has been used for applications where uniform and pinhole free thin film is a necessity even on 3D surfaces. However, thin – even non-uniform – atomic and molecular deposited layers can also be used to tailor the surface characteristics of different non-ideal substrates. For example, print quality of inkjet printing on polymer films and penetration of water into porous nonwovens can be adjusted with low-temperature deposited metal oxide. In addition, adhesion of extrusion coated biopolymer to inorganic oxides can be improved with a hybrid layer based on lactic acid. - Graphical abstract: Print quality of a polylactide film surface modified with atomic layer deposition prior to inkjet printing (360 dpi) with an aqueous ink. Number of printed dots illustrated as a function of 0, 5, 15 and 25 deposition cycles of trimethylaluminum and water. - Highlights: • ALD/MLD can be used to adjust surface characteristics of films and fiber materials. • Hydrophobicity after few deposition cycles of Al 2 O 3 due to e.g. complex formation. • Same effect on cellulosic fabrics observed with low temperature deposited TiO 2 . • Different film growth and oxidation potential with different precursors. • Hybrid layer on inorganic layer can be used to improve adhesion of polymer melt

  18. Atomic and molecular layer deposition for surface modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vähä-Nissi, Mika, E-mail: mika.vaha-nissi@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, PO Box 1000, FI‐02044 VTT (Finland); Sievänen, Jenni; Salo, Erkki; Heikkilä, Pirjo; Kenttä, Eija [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, PO Box 1000, FI‐02044 VTT (Finland); Johansson, Leena-Sisko, E-mail: leena-sisko.johansson@aalto.fi [Aalto University, School of Chemical Technology, Department of Forest Products Technology, PO Box 16100, FI‐00076 AALTO (Finland); Koskinen, Jorma T.; Harlin, Ali [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, PO Box 1000, FI‐02044 VTT (Finland)

    2014-06-01

    Atomic and molecular layer deposition (ALD and MLD, respectively) techniques are based on repeated cycles of gas–solid surface reactions. A partial monolayer of atoms or molecules is deposited to the surface during a single deposition cycle, enabling tailored film composition in principle down to molecular resolution on ideal surfaces. Typically ALD/MLD has been used for applications where uniform and pinhole free thin film is a necessity even on 3D surfaces. However, thin – even non-uniform – atomic and molecular deposited layers can also be used to tailor the surface characteristics of different non-ideal substrates. For example, print quality of inkjet printing on polymer films and penetration of water into porous nonwovens can be adjusted with low-temperature deposited metal oxide. In addition, adhesion of extrusion coated biopolymer to inorganic oxides can be improved with a hybrid layer based on lactic acid. - Graphical abstract: Print quality of a polylactide film surface modified with atomic layer deposition prior to inkjet printing (360 dpi) with an aqueous ink. Number of printed dots illustrated as a function of 0, 5, 15 and 25 deposition cycles of trimethylaluminum and water. - Highlights: • ALD/MLD can be used to adjust surface characteristics of films and fiber materials. • Hydrophobicity after few deposition cycles of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} due to e.g. complex formation. • Same effect on cellulosic fabrics observed with low temperature deposited TiO{sub 2}. • Different film growth and oxidation potential with different precursors. • Hybrid layer on inorganic layer can be used to improve adhesion of polymer melt.

  19. The Effect of Wire Dimension, Type and Thickness of Coating Layer on Friction of Coated Stainless-Steel Arch Wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Abdulhussain Abbas

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Purpose: Esthetic coated arch wires are the desired types to match esthetic brackets in the clinical orthodontics, but the presence of coating layer is greatly affect friction during sliding mechanics. The aims of this study were to evaluate the effect of total wire dimension with the type and thickness of coating layer on friction of coated stainless-steel wires. Methods: The sample of this study consisted of 140 segments of coated stainless-steel arch wires involving two wire dimensions (0.016 × 0.022 inch and 0.019 × 0.025 inch. The samples were supplied from seven companies (DB, RMO, TP, DANY, G&H, Highland and Hubit and the uncoated control samples were supplied from IOS company. Wire dimensions and thickness of coating layer were measured by the metallurgical light incident microscope and the static frictional force was measured using pulling the wire through set of ceramic brackets by the universal testing machine. The data were then statistically analyzed using ANOVA tests. Results: Generally measured wire dimensions do not match the stated dimensions by the manufacturer. The frictional forces of coated wires differ from uncoated control being higher in the labially coated wires and lesser in the fully Teflon coated wires owing to differences in the wire dimension, thickness of coating layer, and physical properties of coating materials. Conclusion: when tested in vitro, Teflon fully coated wires produce the least amount of friction.

  20. Application on the thickness of nerve fiber layer of the optic disc in pathologic myopia eyes by OCT

    OpenAIRE

    Zhi-Cheng Shi; Xiao-Liu Luo; Yu-Ai Liu

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the application on frequency domain optical coherence tomography(OCT)technology of pathologic myopia optic disc neurosensory retinal thickness changes and its relationship with axis oculi, sex and age, and help for the early diagnosis of pathological myopia and primary open angle glaucoma.METHODS: Collected 96 eyes of normal eyes(axis oculi 23-24mm)and 153 eyes of pathologic myopia eyes(axis oculi 25-27mm 80 eyes, >27mm 73 eyes). We measured the thickness of nerve fiber layer ...

  1. Potentialities of the sol-gel route to develop cathode and electrolyte thick layers Application to SOFC systems

    OpenAIRE

    Lenormand, Pascal; Rieu, Mathilde; Cienfuegos, René Fabian; Julbe, Anne; Castillo, Simone; Ansart, Florence

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we report the potential of sol–gel process to prepare cathode and electrolyte thin and thick layers on anodic NiO-YSZ supports which were also made from powders prepared by sol–gel route. YSZ and La2 − xNiO4 + δ, La4Ni3O10 were synthesized as electrolyte and cathode materials for SOFC applications. For electrolyte shaping, yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ, 8% Y2O3) thick films were cast onto porous NiO-YSZ composite substrates by a dip-coating process using a new suspension formu...

  2. Investigation of Top/Bottom electrode and Diffusion Barrier Layer for PZT Thick Film MEMS Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hindrichsen, Christian Carstensen; Pedersen, Thomas; Thomsen, Erik Vilain

    2008-01-01

    Top and bottom electrodes for screen printed piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate, Pb(ZrxTi1 - x)O3 (PZT) thick film are investigated with respect to future MEMS devices. Down to 100 nm thick E-beam evaporated Al and Pt films are patterned as top electrodes on the PZT using a lift-off process...

  3. Thickness and structure of the water film deposited from vapour on calcite surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Jakob; Wogelius, Roy A.; Morris, Peter M.

    2010-01-01

    Synchrotron X-ray reflectivity (SXR) was used to measure the thickness of the water film that adsorbs on a {10¯14} cleavage surface of calcite (CaCO3) in a sample chamber where relative humidity could be controlled within the range from......Synchrotron X-ray reflectivity (SXR) was used to measure the thickness of the water film that adsorbs on a {10¯14} cleavage surface of calcite (CaCO3) in a sample chamber where relative humidity could be controlled within the range from...

  4. High-efficiency green phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes with double-emission layer and thick N-doped electron transport layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobuki, Shunichiro, E-mail: shunichiro.nobuki.nb@hitachi.com [Hitachi Research Laboratory, Hitachi Ltd., 7-1-1 Omika-cho, Hitachi-city, Ibaraki 319-1292 (Japan); Wakana, Hironori; Ishihara, Shingo [Hitachi Research Laboratory, Hitachi Ltd., 7-1-1 Omika-cho, Hitachi-city, Ibaraki 319-1292 (Japan); Mikami, Akiyoshi [Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Kanazawa Institute of Technology, 7-1 Ohgigaoka, Nonoichimachi, Ishikawa 921-8501 (Japan)

    2014-03-03

    We have developed green phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with high external quantum efficiency of 59.7% and power efficiency of 243 lm/W at 2.73 V at 0.053 mA/cm{sup 2}. A double emission layer and a thick n-doped electron transport layer were adopted to improve the exciton recombination factor. A high refractive index hemispherical lens was attached to a high refractive index substrate for extracting light trapped inside the substrate and the multiple-layers of OLEDs to air. Additionally, we analyzed an energy loss mechanism to clarify room for the improvement of our OLEDs including the charge balance factor. - Highlights: • We developed high efficiency green phosphorescent organic light-emitting diode (OLED). • Our OLED had external quantum efficiency of 59.7% and power efficiency of 243 lm/W. • A double emission layer and thick n-doped electron transport layer were adopted. • High refractive index media (hemispherical lens and substrate) were also used. • We analyzed an energy loss mechanism to clarify the charge balance factor of our OLED.

  5. Seasonality in onshore normalized wind profiles above the surface layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Jesper Nielsen; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    2010-01-01

    This work aims to study the seasonal difference in normalized wind speed above the surface layer as it is observed at the 160 m high mast at the coastal site Høvsøre at winds from the sea (westerly). Normalized and stability averaged wind speeds above the surface layer are observed to be 20 to 50......% larger in the winter/spring seasons compared to the summer/autumn seasons at winds from west within the same atmospheric stability class. A method combining the mesoscale model, COAMPS, and observations of the surface stability of the marine boundary layer is presented. The objective of the method...... is to reconstruct the seasonal signal in normalized wind speed and identify the physical process behind. The method proved reasonably successful in capturing the relative difference in wind speed between seasons, indicating that the simulated physical processes are likely candidates to the observed seasonal signal...

  6. Effect of oral Colchicine on Peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in patients with familial Mediterranean fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanyıldız, Burak; Tezcan, Mehmet Engin; Kandemir, Baran; Günaydın, Nesrin Tutaş; Göktaş, Eren; Tangılntız, Aise; Arsan, Aysu Karatay

    2018-02-05

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether oral colchicine has an effect on peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (pRNFL) thickness of familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) patients. We conducted a cross sectional study by comparing pRNFL thickness of FMF patients on colchicine (treated group), newly diagnosed colchicine naïve FMF patients (untreated group) and healthy controls. The study included 66 FMF patients and 32 healthy control subjects. Treated FMF patients were grouped according to colchicine use, duration of use and dosage. pRNFL thickness of the patients and controls were measured by using optical coherence tomography and the measurements were compared. No statistically significant difference was found between the pRNFL thickness in untreated group, treated group and the healthy control group (all p > 0.05). No statistically significant difference was found between pRNFL thickness in the healthy control group and FMF patients grouped according to duration or dosage of colchicine use (all p > 0.05). According to our study, FMF and oral colchicine use had no statistically significant effect on pRNFL thickness.

  7. Thickness alterations of retinal nerve fiber layer in children with sleep-disordered breathing due to adenotonsillar hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinici, Emine; Tatar, Arzu

    2015-08-01

    This study is designed to assess whether hypoxia which is caused by apnea and hypopnea episodes, has an effect on retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness, using optical coherence tomography (OCT) in pediatric patients with Adenotonsillar hypertrophy (ATH). Fifty-seven children patient with AHT, and 31 healthy non-AHT children (between 6 and 12 ages) were enrolled in this study. Obstructive symptoms of the patients with ATH were assessed by using OSA-18 survey. The patients were divided into 2 groups as mild (>60 and 80) OSAS patients, according to OSA-18 survey total scores. RNFL thickness, in the four quadrants (superior, nasal, inferior and temporal) patient's both eyes, was measured by optical coherence tomography. RNFL parameters of control and patient groups were compared. Correlation between OSA survey scores and RNFL thickness of the patient groups were examined. A positive correlation was found between ages and RNLF thickness of all subjects enrolled in this study (r=+0.107, p0.05). No statistically significant alteration in RNFL thickness was found between the patient and control groups (p>0.05). Age range (6-12) of the patients with ATH in our study considers that possible OSAS time was not long enough to affect RNLF thickness. Remembering the risk of optic injury development in children with ATH (in a long term), tonsillectomy and/or adenoidectomy operations shouldn't be delayed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Controlled amino-functionalization by electrochemical reduction of bromo and nitro azobenzene layers bound to Si(111) surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ullien, D.; Thüne, P.C.; Jager, W.F.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.; De Smet, L.C.P.M.

    2014-01-01

    4-Nitrobenzenediazonium (4-NBD) and 4-bromobenzenediazonium (4-BBD) salts were grafted electrochemically onto H-terminated, p-doped silicon (Si) surfaces. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and ellipsometry experiments clearly showed layer thicknesses of 2–7 nm, which indicate multilayer formation.

  9. Surface tension in plasmas related to double layer formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popescu, Sebastian; Lozneanu, Erzilia [Al. I. Cuza University, Dept. of Plasma Physics, Iasi (Romania)

    2001-07-01

    Self-organized space charge configurations bordered by electric double layers appear in plasma as the result of the transition into a state characterized by local minimum of the free energy. Considering the self-assemblage process of such a complex well-confined space-charge configuration in plasma, known by the name of ball of fire, as a nucleation process, it becomes possible to define an equivalent surface tension for the double layer that covers the core of the ball of fire and to make some predictions for its surface tension coefficient and capacitance. (author)

  10. Reduced retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness in ALS patients: a window to disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohani, Mohammad; Meysamie, Alipasha; Zamani, Babak; Sowlat, Mohammad Mahdi; Akhoundi, Fahimeh Haji

    2018-04-30

    To assess RNFL thickness in ALS patients and compare it to healthy controls, and to detect possible correlations between RNFL thickness in ALS patients and disease severity and duration. Study population consisted of ALS patients and age- and sex-matched controls. We used the revised ALS functional rating scale (ALSFRS-R) as a measure of disease severity. RNFL thickness in the four quadrants were measured with a spectral domain OCT (Topcon 3D, 2015). We evaluated 20 ALS patients (40 eyes) and 25 healthy matched controls. Average RNFL thickness in ALS patients was significantly reduced compared to controls (102.57 ± 13.46 compared to 97.11 ± 10.76, p 0.04). There was a significant positive correlation between the functional abilities of the patients based on the ALSFRS-R and average RNFL thickness and also RNFL thickness in most quadrants. A linear regression analysis proved that this correlation was independent of age. In ALS patients, RNFL thickness in the nasal quadrant of the left eyes was significantly reduced compared to the corresponding quadrant in the right eyes even after adjustment for multiplicity (85.80 ± 23.20 compared to 96.80 ± 16.96, p = 0.008). RNFL thickness in ALS patients is reduced compared to healthy controls. OCT probably could serve as a marker of neurodegeneration and progression of the disease in ALS patients. RNFL thickness is different among the right and left eyes of ALS patients pointing to the fact that asymmetric CNS involvement in ALS is not confined to the motor system.

  11. Macular Ganglion Cell Layer and Peripapillary Retinal Nerve Fibre Layer Thickness in Patients with Unilateral Posterior Cerebral Artery Ischaemic Lesion: An Optical Coherence Tomography Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjos, Rita; Vieira, Luisa; Costa, Livio; Vicente, André; Santos, Arnaldo; Alves, Nuno; Amado, Duarte; Ferreira, Joana; Cunha, João Paulo

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the macular ganglion cell layer (GCL) and peripapillary retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) thickness in patients with unilateral posterior cerebral artery (PCA) ischaemic lesions using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). A prospective, case-control study of patients with unilateral PCA lesion was conducted in the neuro-ophthalmology clinic of Centro Hospitalar Lisboa Central. Macular and peripapillary SD-OCT scans were performed in both eyes of each patient. Twelve patients with PCA lesions (stroke group) and 12 healthy normal controls were included in this study. Peripapillary RNFL comparison between both eyes of the same subject in the stroke group found a thinning in the superior-temporal ( p = 0.008) and inferior-temporal ( p = 0.023) sectors of the ipsilateral eye and nasal sector ( p = 0.003) of the contralateral eye. Macular GCL thickness comparison showed a reduction temporally in the ipsilateral eye ( p = 0.004) and nasally in the contralateral eye ( p = 0.002). Peripapillary RNFL thickness was significantly reduced in both eyes of patients with PCA compared with controls, affecting all sectors in the contralateral eye and predominantly temporal sectors in the ipsilateral eye. A statistically significant decrease in macular GCL thickness was found in both hemiretinas of both eyes of stroke patients when compared with controls ( p < 0.05). This study shows that TRD may play a role in the physiopathology of lesions of the posterior visual pathway.

  12. Evaluation of retinal nerve fibre layer, ganglion cell layer and choroidal thickness with optical coherence tomography in migraine patients: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunes, Aygül; Karadag, Ayse Sevgi; Yazgan, Serpil; Celik, Haci Ugur; Simsek, Ali

    2018-01-01

    Evaluation of retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL), ganglion cell layer (GCL) and choroidal thickness (CT) with optical coherence tomography (OCT) in chronic migraine patients, to compare with healthy controls. Ninety-four eyes of 47 chronic migraine patients (Group 1) and 68 eyes of 34 healthy individuals (Group 2) were included in this prospective case-control study. The right and left eyes were separately evaluated. Mean peripapillary RNFL thicknesses, mean GCL measured from superior and inferior quadrants, and mean CT were measured at three different regions (central, 500 μm nasal and temporal region of the fovea). There was no statistically significant differences in RNFL between the two groups (p > 0.05), while CT values were significantly higher and GCL values were significantly lower in chronic migraine groups (p 0.05). In this study, we observed chronic migraine disease does not have any effect on peripapillary RNFL thickness; however, increases in CT and decreases in GCL thickness were observed in migraine patients. © 2017 Optometry Australia.

  13. SH surface acoustic wave propagation in a cylindrically layered piezomagnetic/piezoelectric structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jianke; Xian, Kai; Wang, Ji

    2009-01-01

    SH surface acoustic wave (SH-SAW) propagation in a cylindrically layered magneto-electro-elastic structure is investigated analytically, where a piezomagnetic (or piezoelectric) material layer is bonded to a piezoelectric (or piezomagnetic) substrate. By means of transformation, the governing equations of the coupled waves are reduced to Bessel equation and Laplace equation. The boundary conditions imply that the displacements, shear stresses, electric potential, and electric displacements are continuous across the interface between the layer and the substrate together with the traction free at the surface of the layer. The magneto-electrically open and shorted conditions at cylindrical surface are taken to solve the problem. The phase velocity is numerically calculated for different thickness of the layer and wavenumber for piezomagnetic ceramics CoFe(2)O(4) and piezoelectric ceramics BaTiO(3). The effects of magnetic permeability on propagation properties of SH-SAW are discussed in detail. The distributions of displacement, magnetic potential and magneto-electromechanical coupling factor are also figured and discussed.

  14. Surface effects on the electroelastic responses of a thin piezoelectric plate with nanoscale thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Zhi; Jiang Liying

    2012-01-01

    This work aims to investigate the electroelastic responses of a thin piezoelectric plate under mechanical and electrical loads with the consideration of surface effects. Surface effects, including surface elasticity, residual surface stress and surface piezoelectricity, are incorporated into the conventional Kirchhoff plate theory for a piezoelectric plate via the surface piezoelectricity model and the generalized Young-Laplace equations. Different from the results predicted by the conventional plate theory ignoring the surface effects, the proposed model predicts size-dependent behaviours of the piezoelectric thin plate with nanoscale thickness. It is found that surface effects have significant influence on the electroelastic responses of the piezoelectric nanoplate. This work is expected to provide more accurate predictions on characterizing nanofilm or nanoribbon based piezoelectric devices in nanoelectromechanical systems. (paper)

  15. Trends in (LaMnO3)n/(SrTiO3)m superlattices with varying layer thicknesses

    KAUST Repository

    Jilili, J.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the thickness dependence of the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of (LaMnO3)n/(SrTiO3)m (n, m = 2, 4, 6, 8) superlattices using density functional theory. The electronic structure turns out to be highly sensitive to the onsite Coulomb interaction. In contrast to bulk SrTiO3, strongly distorted O octahedra are observed in the SrTiO3 layers with a systematic off centering of the Ti atoms. The systems favour ferromagnetic spin ordering rather than the antiferromagnetic spin ordering of bulk LaMnO3 and all show half-metallicity, while a systematic reduction of the minority spin band gaps as a function of the LaMnO3 and SrTiO3 layer thicknesses originates from modifications of the Ti dxy states.

  16. Modulation of spin-orbit torque efficiency by thickness control of heavy metal layers in Co/Pt multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sethi, P.; Krishnia, S.; Li, S.H.; Lew, W.S., E-mail: wensiang@ntu.edu.sg

    2017-03-15

    We investigate and quantify spin-orbit torque (SOT) strength by current induced effective in-plane magnetic fields and spin Hall angle (SHA) using AC harmonic Hall voltage measurements techniques on Ta/Pt/Co/Pt/Co/Ta thin film structures. The proposed Co/Pt thin film double stack gives property enhancement on thermal stability and perpendicular magnetization anisotropy strength over the single stack Pt/Co/Ta. In the proposed Co/Pt double stack we observed that increasing the Ta capping thickness to three times enhances the SHA in similar order, consistent with larger spin injection efficiency. Doubling the Pt spacer layer thickness reduces the SHA by nearly 1.4 times, due to partial cancellation of SOT by bottom layer Pt, negating the increase from the top Co/Pt interface. The in-plane current threshold for magnetization switching is lower with the increase of the SHA.

  17. Modification of surfaces and surface layers by non equilibrium processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beamson, G.; Brennan, W.J.; Clark, D.T.; Howard, J.

    1988-01-01

    Plasmas are examples of non-equilibrium phenomena which are being used increasingly for the synthesis and modification of materials impossible by conventional routes. This paper introduces methods available by describing the construction and characteristics of some equipment used for the production of different types of plasmas and other non-equilibrium phenomena. This includes high energy ion beams. The special features, advantages and disadvantages of the techniques will be described. There are a multitude of potential application relevant to electronic, metallic, ceramic, and polymeric materials. However, scale-up from the laboratory to production equipment depends on establishing a better understanding of both the physics and chemistry of plasma as well as plasma-solid interactions. Examples are given of how such an understanding can be gained. The chemical analysis of polymer surfaces undergoing modification by inert gas, hydrogen or oxygen plasmas is shown to give physical information regarding the relative roles of diffusion of active species, and direct and radiative energy transfer from the plasma. Surface modification by plasma depositing a new material onto an existing substrate is discussed with particular reference to the deposition of amorphous carbon films. Applications of the unique properties of these films are outlined together with our current understanding of these properties based on chemical and physical methods of analysis of both the films and the plasmas producing them. Finally, surface modification by ion beams is briefly illustrated using examples from the electronics and metals industries where the modification has had a largely physical rather than chemical effect on the starting material. (orig.)

  18. Interfacial layer thickness dependent electrical characteristics of Au/(Zn-doped PVA)/n-4H-SiC (MPS) structures at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapa, Havva Elif; Kökce, Ali; Al-Dharob, Mohammed; Orak, İkram; Özdemir, Ahmet Faruk; Altındal, Semsettin

    2017-10-01

    Au/(Zn-doped PVA)/n-4H-SiC metal/polymer/semiconductor (MPS) structures with different interfacial layer thickness values (50, 150, 500 nm) were fabricated and their electrical characteristics were compared. Their electrical parameters (i.e. reverse-bias saturation current (Io), ideality factor (n), zero-bias barrier height (BH) (Φbo), series and shunt resistances (Rs, Rsh)) were calculated from the forward bias current-voltage (IF-VF) data whereas other parameters (i.e. Fermi energy level (EF), BH (Vb) and donor concentration (Nd)) were calculated from the linear part of C-2-V characteristics at room temperature. Obtained results confirmed that the values of n, Φbo, Rs and Rsh increase with increasing interlayer thickness, and linear correlation between n and Φbo was observed. The high values of n for three structures can be ascribed to the presence of an interlayer, surface states (Nss) and barrier inhomogeneities. The energy density distribution profile of Nss was obtained from the IF-VF data by taking into account voltage-dependent effective BH (Ve) and n for each structure. The Ri vs V plot for these structures was obtained using both Ohm's law and Nicollian-Brews method. All these experimental results show that the interfacial layer and its thickness play an important role in main electric parameters of these structures.

  19. Evaluation of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in vernal keratoconjunctivitis patients under long-term topical corticosteroid therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cingu, Abdullah Kursat; Cinar, Yasin; Turkcu, Fatih Mehmet; Sahinoglu-Keskek, Nedime; Sahin, Alparslan; Sahin, Muhammed; Yuksel, Harun; Caca, Ihsan

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness in vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC) patients who were under long-term topical corticosteroid therapy. Thirty-six eyes of 36 VKC patients with clear cornea and normal videokeratography and 40 eyes of 40 age- and gender-matched normal children were included in the study. Clinical and demographic characteristics of the patients were noted and detailed ophthalmological examination was performed. Visual acuity (VA), spherical equivalent (SE), axial length (AL) and RNFL thickness measurements were compared between the groups. To correct ocular magnification effect on RNFL, we used Littmann's formula. All VKC patients had history of topical corticosteroid use and the mean duration of the topical corticosteroid use was 23.8 ± 9.09 months. There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of intraocular pressure (IOP). VKC group had significantly worse VA, greater SE and AL and thinner mean global, superior and inferior RNFL thickness. There were significant negative correlations between the duration of topical corticosteroid use and the mean global, superior and temporal RNFL thickness in VKC group. After correction of magnification effect, VKC group still had thinner mean global, superior and inferior RNFL thickness, and significant difference between the groups in inferior RNFL thickness did not disappear. Significant RNFL thickness difference between the groups suggests a possible effect of long-term corticosteroid use in VKC patients. Because visual field (VF) analysis in pediatric patients is difficult to perform and IOP may be illusive, RNFL thickness measurements in addition to routine examinations in VKC patients may help clinicians in their practice.

  20. The structure of alteration layers on cast glass surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oversby, V.M.; Phinney, D.L.

    1991-11-01

    Alteration layers developed on SRL-165 simulated waste glasses in dilute sodium silicate/bicarbonate leaching solutions have been examined by Secondary Ionization Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) using fine-scale, multiple-element depth profiling. Selected samples were examined with an imaging detector system, which demonstrated the horizontal homogeneity of the layer development at all depths within the layer. After 1 day of reaction at 90 degrees C the reaction layer shows depletion of glass elements to a depth of 0.2 μm. The surface of the layer in contact with the solution shows enrichment of Si, Al, and alkali elements even at this short reaction time, suggesting the early stages of development of secondary aluminosilicate phases. With increased reaction time, the layer thickens to about 1.3 μm at 91 days, while the evidence for aluminosilicate development at the surface of the layer becomes more prominent. Penetration of hydrogen into the ''unreacted'' glass proceeds to a depth of about 0.5 μm deeper than the alkali depletion zone. This suggests the mechanism of initial reaction of the glass is by attack of the silicate structure by molecular water or hydroxide ion rather than by alkali-hydrogen ion exchange. The simple structure of the layers developed in the silicate solution is in contrast to the complexity of layer structure found when glasses are reacted in deionized water. Since the conditions for geologic disposal will be closer to those used in the silicate leaching experiments, these results hold promise for the ability to model the system to predict long-term performance after disposal in a repository

  1. Pd Layer Thickness Dependence of Tunnel Magnetoresistance Properties in CoFeB/MgO-Based Magnetic Tunnel Junctions with Perpendicular Anisotropy CoFe/Pd Multilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizunuma, Kotaro; Yamanouchi, Michihiko; Ikeda, Shoji; Sato, Hideo; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Gan, Hua-Dong; Miura, Katsuya; Hayakawa, Jun; Matsukura, Fumihiro; Ohno, Hideo

    2011-02-01

    The authors investigated tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) properties in [CoFe/Pd]-multilayer/CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB/[Pd/CoFe]-multilayer magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) having two different Pd layer thicknesses. By reducing the Pd layer thickness from 1.2 to 0.2 nm, the TMR ratio was enhanced from 7 to 101% at the annealing temperature (Ta) of 300 °C. The thin Pd layers resulted in high residual B concentration in the CoFeB layer after high-Ta annealing and in the suppression of crystallization of the CoFeB layer from the fcc(111)-Pd layer side.

  2. Changes in retinal nerve fiber layer thickness after spinal surgery in the prone position: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baran Gencer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Changes in ocular perfusion play an important role in the pathogenesis of ischemic optic neuropathy. Ocular perfusion pressure is equal to mean arterial pressure minus intraocular pressure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in the intraocular pressure and the retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in patients undergoing spinal surgery in the prone position. METHODS: This prospective study included 30 patients undergoing spinal surgery. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness were measured one day before and after the surgery by using optical coherence tomography. Intraocular pressure was measured by tonopen six times at different position and time-duration: supine position (baseline; 10 min after intubation (Supine 1; 10 (Prone 1, 60 (Prone 2, 120 (Prone 3 min after prone position; and just after postoperative supine position (Supine 2. RESULTS: Our study involved 10 male and 20 female patients with the median age of 57 years. When postoperative retinal nerve fiber layer thickness measurements were compared with preoperative values, a statistically significant thinning was observed in inferior and nasal quadrants (p = 0.009 and p = 0.003, respectively. We observed a statistically significant intraocular pressure decrease in Supine 1 and an increase in both Prone 2 and Prone 3 when compared to the baseline. Mean arterial pressure and ocular perfusion pressure were found to be significantly lower in Prone 1, Prone 2 and Prone 3, when compared with the baseline. CONCLUSIONS: Our study has shown increase in intraocular pressure during spinal surgery in prone position. A statistically significant retinal nerve fiber layer thickness thinning was seen in inferior and nasal quadrants one day after the spinal surgery.

  3. Vibrations of microemulsion droplets and vesicles with compressible surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisy, V.; Brutovsky, B.; Zatovsky, A. V.

    1998-12-01

    The surface vibration spectra of liquid droplets with flexible interfaces, like microemulsion droplets or vesicles, are studied. As distinct from the previous theories, we proceed with exact solutions of hydrodynamic equations for incompressible bulk fluids inside and outside the droplet. The dynamical equations for the interface are those obtained by Lebedev and Muratov [JETP 68, 1011 (1989)] but with the improved continuity equation for the surface layer. Within the Helfrich's concept of the interfacial elasticity and taking into account the compressibility of the surface layer, the exact equation is obtained for the frequencies of the droplet vibrations. The equation describes uniformly a broad region of frequencies from the lowest, almost purely relaxation modes, up to the modes determined mainly by the change of the area per molecule of the layer. The dispersion laws for some of the modes are obtained analytically in the limits of large and small penetration depths of the corresponding waves. Our analysis corrects the previous results concerning the relaxation modes, the capillary wave frequency and the frequency of the mode connected with the fluctuations of molecules in the surface layer. An additional mode of this kind is obtained for almost incompressible layers. In the region corresponding to large penetration depths, a couple of modes exist with frequencies depending both on the surface elasticity and compressibility. In the limit of infinite compressibility of the layer, the lower of the two modes disappears. The conditions necessary for the existence of all the modes were specified. Some representative numerical solutions of the obtained equation are presented as depending on various values of the model parameters including those for realistic microemulsion systems.

  4. Surface microhardness of three thicknesses of mineral trioxide aggregate in different setting conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noushin Shokouhinejad

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives This study aimed to compare the surface microhardness of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA samples having different thicknesses and exposed to human blood from one side and with or without a moist cotton pellet on the other side. Materials and Methods Ninety cylindrical molds with three heights of 2, 4, and 6 mm were fabricated. In group 1 (dry condition, molds with heights of 2, 4, and 6 mm (10 molds of each were filled with ProRoot MTA (Dentsply Tulsa Dental, and the upper surface of the material was not exposed to any additional moisture. In groups 2 and 3, a distilled water- or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS-moistened cotton pellet was placed on the upper side of MTA, respectively. The lower side of the molds in all the groups was in contact with human blood-wetted foams. After 4 day, the Vickers microhardness of the upper surface of MTA was measured. Results In the dry condition, the 4 and 6 mm-thick MTA samples showed significantly lower microhardness than the 2 mm-thick samples (p = 0.003 and p = 0.001, respectively. However, when a distilled water- or PBS-moistened cotton pellet was placed over the MTA, no significant difference was found between the surface microhardness of samples having the abovementioned three thicknesses of the material (p = 0.210 and p = 0.112, respectively. Conclusions It could be concluded that a moist cotton pellet must be placed over the 4 to 6 mm-thick MTA for better hydration of the material. However, this might not be necessary when 2 mm-thick MTA is used.

  5. Influence of cloud optical thickness on surface diffuse light and carbon uptake in forests and croplands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, S. J.; Steiner, A. L.; Nadelhoffer, K. J.

    2014-12-01

    Accurately modeling atmospheric CO2 removal by terrestrial ecosystems requires an understanding of how atmospheric conditions change the rate of photosynthesis across major vegetation types. Diffuse light, which is created from interactions between incident solar radiation and atmospheric aerosols and clouds, has been postulated to increase carbon uptake in terrestrial ecosystems. To determine how cloud conditions affect carbon uptake through its influence on diffuse light, we quantify the relationship between cloud optical thickness, which indicates surface light attenuation by clouds, and surface diffuse light. We then examine the relationship between cloud optical thickness and gross primary productivity (GPP) to determine whether cloud properties could modulate GPP in temperate ecosystems. Surface diffuse light and GPP data are obtained from publically available Ameriflux data (Mead Crop sites, University of Michigan Biological Station, Morgan Monroe, and Howland Forest) and cloud optical thickness data over the Ameriflux sites are retrieved from NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spetroradiometer. We compare the response of GPP to cloud optical thickness between croplands and forests, as well as within ecosystem types to determine ecosystem-specific responses and the role of plant community composition on ecosystem-level GPP under varying cloud conditions. By linking atmospheric cloud properties to surface light conditions and ecosystem carbon fluxes, we refine understanding of land-atmosphere carbon cycling and how changes in atmospheric cloud conditions may influence the future of the land carbon sink.

  6. Bedmap2: improved ice bed, surface and thickness datasets for Antarctica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fretwell, P.; Pritchard, H. D.; Vaughan, D

    2013-01-01

    We present Bedmap2, a new suite of gridded products describing surface elevation, ice-thickness and the seafloor and subglacial bed elevation of the Antarctic south of 60° S. We derived these products using data from a variety of sources, including many substantial surveys completed since the ori...

  7. Development of cortical thickness and surface area in autism spectrum disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent T. Mensen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorder (ASD is a neurodevelopmental disorder often associated with changes in cortical volume. The constituents of cortical volume – cortical thickness and surface area – have separable developmental trajectories and are related to different neurobiological processes. However, little is known about the developmental trajectories of cortical thickness and surface area in ASD. In this magnetic resonance imaging (MRI study, we used an accelerated longitudinal design to investigate the cortical development in 90 individuals with ASD and 90 typically developing controls, aged 9 to 20 years. We quantified cortical measures using the FreeSurfer software package, and then used linear mixed model analyses to estimate the developmental trajectories for each cortical measure. Our primary finding was that the development of surface area follows a linear trajectory in ASD that differs from typically developing controls. In typical development, we found a decline in cortical surface area between the ages of 9 and 20 that was absent in ASD. We found this pattern in all regions where developmental trajectories for surface area differed between groups. When we applied a more stringent correction that takes the interdependency of measures into account, this effect on cortical surface area retained significance for left banks of superior temporal sulcus, postcentral area, and right supramarginal area. These areas have previously been implicated in ASD and are involved in the interpretation and processing of audiovisual social stimuli and distinction between self and others. Although some differences in cortical volume and thickness were found, none survived the more stringent correction for multiple testing. This study underscores the importance of distinguishing between cortical surface area and thickness in investigating cortical development, and suggests the development of cortical surface area is of importance to ASD.

  8. Tensile strength of oxygen plasma-created surface layer of PDMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohishi, Taiki; Noda, Haruka; Matsui, Tsubasa S.; Jile, Huge; Deguchi, Shinji

    2017-01-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is a commonly used silicone elastomer with broad applications. Particularly for bioengineering use, PDMS is treated with oxygen plasma with which its surface is oxidized to allow positive interaction with water and live cells. In exchange for the acquisition of hydrophilicity, the oxidized PDMS becomes mechanically brittle so that resulting formation of cracks affects the system in various ways. However, tensile strength (TS), which is an inherent capacity of a material to withstand tensile loads before breaking and is thus a key parameter limiting the use of the material, remains unclear regarding oxidized PDMS. Here we determine the TS of oxide layers created on the surface of PDMS based on micro-stretch experiments using a custom-made device. We show that the surface layer displays cracks upon tensile loading of small strains of within 10% to have a TS of ~10-100 kPa, which is approximately two orders of magnitude lower than that of unmodified PDMS. We further show that the TS sharply decreases with oxidation duration to become highly brittle, while the thickness of the resulting oxide layer finally reaches a plateau even with prolonged plasma treatment. Consequently, we suggest that gradual surface modification of PDMS takes place only within a finite region even with prolonged plasma treatment, as distinct from previously held assumptions. These quantitative data provide critical design information for the oxide layer of plasma-hydrophilized PDMS.

  9. Synthesis of the Thickness Profile of the Waveguide Layer of the Thin Film Generalized Waveguide Luneburg Lens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayryan E.A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A local variation in the thickness of the waveguide layer of integrated optics waveguide causes a local decrease of phase velocity, and hence bending of rays and of the wave front. The relationship of the waveguide layer thickness profile h (y, z with the distribution of the effective refractive index of the waveguide β (y, z is described in terms of a particular model of waveguide solutions of the Maxwell equations. In the model of comparison waveguides the support of the thickness irregularity of the waveguide layer Δh coincides with the support of inhomogeneity of the effective refractive index Δβ. A more adequate but more cumbersome model of the adiabatic waveguide modes allows them to mismatch supp Δh ⊃ supp Δβ. In this paper, we solve the problem of the Δh reconstruction on the base of given Δβ of the thin film generalized waveguide Luneburg lens in a model of adiabatic waveguide modes. The solution is found in the form of a linear combination of Gaussian exponential functions and in the form of a cubic spline for the cylindrically symmetric Δh (r and in the form of a cubic spline for Δβ (r.

  10. Perpendicular Giant Magnetoresistance and Magnetic Properties of Co/Cu Nanowire Arrays Affected by Period Number and Copper Layer Thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Han

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One-dimensional magnetic nanowires have attracted much attention in the last decades due to their unique physical properties and potential applications in magnetic recording and spintronics. In this work, ordered arrays of Co/Cu multilayered nanowires which can be exploited to develop magnetoresistive sensors were successfully prepared using porous anodic alumina (PAA templates. The structure and morphology of the multilayered nanowire arrays were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The nanowire arrays are highly ordered and the average diameter is about 50 nm, which is controlled by the pore diameter of the PAA templates. The influences of period number and Cu layer thickness on the magnetic and the giant magnetoresistance (GMR properties were investigated. The coercivity and remanence ratio increase first and then gradually tend to be stable with the increase of period number and the Cu layer thickness, while the GMR ratio increases first and then decreases with the increase of the period number accompanied by an oscillatory behavior of GMR as the Cu layer thickness changes, which are ascribed to the spin dependence electron scattering in the multilayers. The optimum GMR of −13% appears at Co (50 nm/Cu (5 nm with 200 deposition cycles in our experimental conditions.

  11. Protective capping and surface passivation of III-V nanowires by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhaka, Veer, E-mail: veer.dhaka@aalto.fi; Perros, Alexander; Kakko, Joona-Pekko; Haggren, Tuomas; Lipsanen, Harri [Department of Micro- and Nanosciences, Micronova, Aalto University, P.O. Box 13500, FI-00076 (Finland); Naureen, Shagufta; Shahid, Naeem [Research School of Physics & Engineering, Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 2601 (Australia); Jiang, Hua; Kauppinen, Esko [Department of Applied Physics and Nanomicroscopy Center, Aalto University, P.O. Box 15100, FI-00076 (Finland); Srinivasan, Anand [School of Information and Communication Technology, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Electrum 229, S-164 40 Kista (Sweden)

    2016-01-15

    Low temperature (∼200 °C) grown atomic layer deposition (ALD) films of AlN, TiN, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, GaN, and TiO{sub 2} were tested for protective capping and surface passivation of bottom-up grown III-V (GaAs and InP) nanowires (NWs), and top-down fabricated InP nanopillars. For as-grown GaAs NWs, only the AlN material passivated the GaAs surface as measured by photoluminescence (PL) at low temperatures (15K), and the best passivation was achieved with a few monolayer thick (2Å) film. For InP NWs, the best passivation (∼2x enhancement in room-temperature PL) was achieved with a capping of 2nm thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. All other ALD capping layers resulted in a de-passivation effect and possible damage to the InP surface. Top-down fabricated InP nanopillars show similar passivation effects as InP NWs. In particular, capping with a 2 nm thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer increased the carrier decay time from 251 ps (as-etched nanopillars) to about 525 ps. Tests after six months ageing reveal that the capped nanostructures retain their optical properties. Overall, capping of GaAs and InP NWs with high-k dielectrics AlN and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} provides moderate surface passivation as well as long term protection from oxidation and environmental attack.

  12. Protective capping and surface passivation of III-V nanowires by atomic layer deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veer Dhaka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Low temperature (∼200 °C grown atomic layer deposition (ALD films of AlN, TiN, Al2O3, GaN, and TiO2 were tested for protective capping and surface passivation of bottom-up grown III-V (GaAs and InP nanowires (NWs, and top-down fabricated InP nanopillars. For as-grown GaAs NWs, only the AlN material passivated the GaAs surface as measured by photoluminescence (PL at low temperatures (15K, and the best passivation was achieved with a few monolayer thick (2Å film. For InP NWs, the best passivation (∼2x enhancement in room-temperature PL was achieved with a capping of 2nm thick Al2O3. All other ALD capping layers resulted in a de-passivation effect and possible damage to the InP surface. Top-down fabricated InP nanopillars show similar passivation effects as InP NWs. In particular, capping with a 2 nm thick Al2O3 layer increased the carrier decay time from 251 ps (as-etched nanopillars to about 525 ps. Tests after six months ageing reveal that the capped nanostructures retain their optical properties. Overall, capping of GaAs and InP NWs with high-k dielectrics AlN and Al2O3 provides moderate surface passivation as well as long term protection from oxidation and environmental attack.

  13. Structure and stability of surface passivation layers on semiconductor materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluth, George Jonathan

    The structure and stability of passivating layers on silicon surfaces have been examined on the molecular level using the methods of surface science. Hydrogen-terminated surfaces were prepared through wet chemical treatment with ammonium fluoride. The oxidation of these surfaces was studied using high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS), which showed that oxidation occurred through oxygen insertion in silicon backbonds, while the hydrogen termination remained intact. Oxygen was observed in both the surface layer and bulk layers, suggesting that initial oxidation was not restricted to layer-by-layer growth. Because the surface did oxidize with time, other passivating treatments, specifically self-assembled monolayers, were examined. The thermal stability of alkylsiloxane monolayers on oxidized Si(100) was studied in vacuum. Using HREELS it was found that the monolayers were stable up to 740 K. Above that temperature, they began to decompose through cleavage of C-C bonds, resulting in a reduction in chain length. The thermal stability of alkyl monolayers, which form directly on silicon without requiring an oxide layer, was also examined. These monolayers were stable to 620 K, significantly lower than the alkylsiloxane monolayers. Desorption was accompanied by the appearance of Si-H bonds, suggesting that desorption took place through a hydrogen elimination reaction. The thermal behavior of these two different monolayers highlighted the importance of bonding between the surface and the chains. The bonding of alkylsiloxane monolayers was examined in more detail by forming them on both SiOsb2 and Sisb3Nsb4. It was found that cross linking between adjacent head groups was critical to the formation of high quality monolayers. Bonding between the chains and the surface was of secondary importance, but played a key role in the initial stages of growth, when nucleation occurred. The chemical stability of alkylsiloxane monolayers on oxidized silicon was also

  14. Effect of water vapor on evolution of a thick Pt-layer modified oxide on the NiCoCrAl alloy at high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Peng; He, Xuan; Xiong, Xiping; Ma, Hongqing; Song, Qunling; Lü, Jianguo; Lu, Jiansheng

    2018-03-01

    To investigate the effect of water vapor on the novel Pt-containing oxide growth behavior, Pt-addition within the oxide layer on the surface of NiCoCrAl coating and furnace cycle tests were carried out at 1050 °C in air and air plus water vapor. The thick Pt-containing oxide layer on NiCoCrAl exhibits a different oxidation growth behavior compared to the conventional Pt-diffusion metallic coatings. The Pt-containing oxide after oxidation in air plus water vapor showed a much thicker oxide layer compare to the ones without Pt addition, and also presented a much better coating adhesion. During the oxidation process in air, Pt promotes the spinel (NiCr2O4) formation. However, the Cr2O3 formed in air with water vapor and fixed Pt within the complex oxide layer. The water vapor promoted the Ni and Co outer-diffusion, and combined with Pt to form CoPt compounds on the surface of the NiCoCrAl coating system.

  15. Numerical Investigation of a Two-Phase Nanofluid Model for Boundary Layer Flow Past a Variable Thickness Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunyan; Zheng, Liancun; Lin, Ping; Pan, Mingyang; Liu, Fawang

    2018-02-01

    This paper investigates heat and mass transfer of nanofluid over a stretching sheet with variable thickness. The techniques of similarity transformation and homotopy analysis method are used to find solutions. Velocity, temperature, and concentration fields are examined with the variations of governing parameters. Local Nusselt number and Sherwood number are compared for different values of variable thickness parameter. The results show that there exists a critical value of thickness parameter βc (βc≈0.7) where the Sherwood number achieves its maximum at the critical value βc. For β>βc, the distribution of nanoparticle volume fraction decreases near the surface but exhibits an opposite trend far from the surface.

  16. Toward an understanding of surface layer formation, growth, and transformation at the glass-fluid interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopf, J.; Eskelsen, J. R.; Chiu, M.; Ievlev, A. V.; Ovchinnikova, O. S.; Leonard, D.; Pierce, E. M.

    2018-05-01

    Silicate glass is a metastable and durable solid that has application to a number of energy and environmental challenges (e.g., microelectronics, fiber optics, and nuclear waste storage). If allowed to react with water over time silicate glass develops an altered layer at the solid-fluid interface. In this study, we used borosilicate glass (LAWB45) as a model material to develop a robust understanding of altered layer formation (i.e., amorphous hydrated surface layer and crystalline reaction products). Experiments were conducted at high surface area-to-volume ratio (∼200,000 m-1) and 90 °C in the pressurized unsaturated flow (PUF) apparatus for 1.5-years to facilitate the formation of thick altered layers and allow for the effluent solution chemistry to be monitored continuously. A variety of microscopy techniques were used to characterize reacted grains and suggest the average altered layer thickness is 13.2 ± 8.3 μm with the hydrated and clay layer representing 74.8% and 25.2% of the total altered layer, respectively. The estimate of hydrated layer thickness is within the experimental error of the value estimated from the B release rate data (∼10 ± 1 μm/yr) over the 1.5-year duration. PeakForce® quantitative nanomechanical mapping results suggest the hydrated layer has a modulus that ranges between ∼20 and 40 GPa, which is in the range of porous silica that contains from ∼20 to ∼50% porosity, yet significantly lower than dense silica (∼70-80 GPa). Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) images confirm the presence of pores and an analysis of a higher resolution image provides a qualitative estimate of ≥22% porosity in the hydrated layer with variations in void volume with increasing distance from the unaltered glass. Chemical composition analyses, based on a combination of time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), scanning electron microscopy with X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and STEM-EDS, clearly show

  17. Auto-assembly of nanometer thick, water soluble layers of plasmid DNA complexed with diamines and basic amino acids on graphite: Greatest DNA protection is obtained with arginine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, T T; Boulanouar, O; Heintz, O; Fromm, M

    2017-02-01

    We have investigated the ability of diamines as well as basic amino acids to condense DNA onto highly ordered pyrolytic graphite with minimum damage after re-dissolution in water. Based on a bibliographic survey we briefly summarize DNA binding properties with diamines as compared to basic amino acids. Thus, solutions of DNA complexed with these linkers were drop-cast in order to deposit ultra-thin layers on the surface of HOPG in the absence or presence of Tris buffer. Atomic Force Microscopy analyses showed that, at a fixed ligand-DNA mixing ratio of 16, the mean thickness of the layers can be statistically predicted to lie in the range 0-50nm with a maximum standard deviation ±6nm, using a simple linear law depending on the DNA concentration. The morphology of the layers appears to be ligand-dependent. While the layers containing diamines present holes, those formed in the presence of basic amino acids, except for lysine, are much more compact and dense. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy measurements provide compositional information indicating that, compared to the maximum number of DNA sites to which the ligands may bind, the basic amino acids Arg and His are present in large excess. Conservation of the supercoiled topology of the DNA plasmids was studied after recovery of the complex layers in water. Remarkably, arginine has the best protection capabilities whether Tris was present or not in the initial solution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Quantized layer growth at liquid-crystal surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ocko, B. M.; Braslau, A.; Pershan, P. S.

    1986-01-01

    of the specular reflectivity is consistent with a sinusoidal density modulation, starting at the surface and terminating abruptly, after an integral number of bilayers. As the transition is approached the number of layers increases in quantized steps from zero to five before the bulk undergoes a first...

  19. Whirlwinds and hairpins in the atmospheric surface layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oncley, Steven P.; Hartogensis, O.K.; Tong, Chenning

    2016-01-01

    Vortices in the atmospheric surface layer are characterized using observations at unprecedented resolution from a fixed array of 31 turbulence sensors. During the day, these vortices likely are dust devils, though no visual observations are available for confirmation. At night, hairpin vortices

  20. Measurement of grassland evaporation using a surface-layer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A dual-beam surface-layer scintillometer (SLS) was used to estimate sensible heat flux (H) every 2 min for a path length of either 50 or 101 m, for more than 30 months in a mesic grassland in eastern South Africa. The SLS method relies on Monin-Obukhov similarity theory, the correlation between the laser beam signal ...

  1. Body surface adaptations to boundary-layer dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Videler, J.J.

    1995-01-01

    Evolutionary processes have adapted nektonic animals to interact efficiently with the water that surrounds them. Not all these adaptations serve the same purpose. This paper concentrates on reduction of drag due to friction in the boundary layer close to the body surface. Mucus, compliant skins,

  2. The determination of turbulent structures in the atmospheric surface layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schols, J.L.J.

    1984-01-01

    The turbulent flow in the atmospheric surface layer (ASL) contains turbulent structures, which are defined as spatially coherent, organized flow motions. 'Organized' means that characteristic patterns, observed at a point in space, occur almost simultaneously in more than one turbulence signal and

  3. DESIGN AND CALCULATION OF AERODROMECOAING WITH HEATED SURFACE LAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim G. Piskunov

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available  The developed constructions with heated by surface layers for aerodromes and auto roads when developed composition of electroconductive concrete reinforced with chemical electrical conductive fibres being used was researched. The experimentally obtained characteristics of ended conductive concrete reinforced with fibers were presented. Calculation by developed heated construction of shell was made.

  4. A means to estimate thermal and kinetic parameters of coal dust layer from hot surface ignition tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Haejun; Rangwala, Ali S; Dembsey, Nicholas A

    2009-08-30

    A method to estimate thermal and kinetic parameters of Pittsburgh seam coal subject to thermal runaway is presented using the standard ASTM E 2021 hot surface ignition test apparatus. Parameters include thermal conductivity (k), activation energy (E), coupled term (QA) of heat of reaction (Q) and pre-exponential factor (A) which are required, but rarely known input values to determine the thermal runaway propensity of a dust material. Four different dust layer thicknesses: 6.4, 12.7, 19.1 and 25.4mm, are tested, and among them, a single steady state dust layer temperature profile of 12.7 mm thick dust layer is used to estimate k, E and QA. k is calculated by equating heat flux from the hot surface layer and heat loss rate on the boundary assuming negligible heat generation in the coal dust layer at a low hot surface temperature. E and QA are calculated by optimizing a numerically estimated steady state dust layer temperature distribution to the experimentally obtained temperature profile of a 12.7 mm thick dust layer. Two unknowns, E and QA, are reduced to one from the correlation of E and QA obtained at criticality of thermal runaway. The estimated k is 0.1 W/mK matching the previously reported value. E ranges from 61.7 to 83.1 kJ/mol, and the corresponding QA ranges from 1.7 x 10(9) to 4.8 x 10(11)J/kg s. The mean values of E (72.4 kJ/mol) and QA (2.8 x 10(10)J/kg s) are used to predict the critical hot surface temperatures for other thicknesses, and good agreement is observed between measured and experimental values. Also, the estimated E and QA ranges match the corresponding ranges calculated from the multiple tests method and values reported in previous research.

  5. Extrapolating active layer thickness measurements across Arctic polygonal terrain using LiDAR and NDVI data sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangodagamage, Chandana; Rowland, Joel C; Hubbard, Susan S; Brumby, Steven P; Liljedahl, Anna K; Wainwright, Haruko; Wilson, Cathy J; Altmann, Garrett L; Dafflon, Baptiste; Peterson, John; Ulrich, Craig; Tweedie, Craig E; Wullschleger, Stan D

    2014-08-01

    Landscape attributes that vary with microtopography, such as active layer thickness ( ALT ), are labor intensive and difficult to document effectively through in situ methods at kilometer spatial extents, thus rendering remotely sensed methods desirable. Spatially explicit estimates of ALT can provide critically needed data for parameterization, initialization, and evaluation of Arctic terrestrial models. In this work, we demonstrate a new approach using high-resolution remotely sensed data for estimating centimeter-scale ALT in a 5 km 2 area of ice-wedge polygon terrain in Barrow, Alaska. We use a simple regression-based, machine learning data-fusion algorithm that uses topographic and spectral metrics derived from multisensor data (LiDAR and WorldView-2) to estimate ALT (2 m spatial resolution) across the study area. Comparison of the ALT estimates with ground-based measurements, indicates the accuracy (r 2  = 0.76, RMSE ±4.4 cm) of the approach. While it is generally accepted that broad climatic variability associated with increasing air temperature will govern the regional averages of ALT , consistent with prior studies, our findings using high-resolution LiDAR and WorldView-2 data, show that smaller-scale variability in ALT is controlled by local eco-hydro-geomorphic factors. This work demonstrates a path forward for mapping ALT at high spatial resolution and across sufficiently large regions for improved understanding and predictions of coupled dynamics among permafrost, hydrology, and land-surface processes from readily available remote sensing data.

  6. Extrapolating active layer thickness measurements across Arctic polygonal terrain using LiDAR and NDVI data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangodagamage, Chandana; Rowland, Joel C; Hubbard, Susan S; Brumby, Steven P; Liljedahl, Anna K; Wainwright, Haruko; Wilson, Cathy J; Altmann, Garrett L; Dafflon, Baptiste; Peterson, John; Ulrich, Craig; Tweedie, Craig E; Wullschleger, Stan D

    2014-01-01

    Landscape attributes that vary with microtopography, such as active layer thickness (ALT), are labor intensive and difficult to document effectively through in situ methods at kilometer spatial extents, thus rendering remotely sensed methods desirable. Spatially explicit estimates of ALT can provide critically needed data for parameterization, initialization, and evaluation of Arctic terrestrial models. In this work, we demonstrate a new approach using high-resolution remotely sensed data for estimating centimeter-scale ALT in a 5 km2 area of ice-wedge polygon terrain in Barrow, Alaska. We use a simple regression-based, machine learning data-fusion algorithm that uses topographic and spectral metrics derived from multisensor data (LiDAR and WorldView-2) to estimate ALT (2 m spatial resolution) across the study area. Comparison of the ALT estimates with ground-based measurements, indicates the accuracy (r2 = 0.76, RMSE ±4.4 cm) of the approach. While it is generally accepted that broad climatic variability associated with increasing air temperature will govern the regional averages of ALT, consistent with prior studies, our findings using high-resolution LiDAR and WorldView-2 data, show that smaller-scale variability in ALT is controlled by local eco-hydro-geomorphic factors. This work demonstrates a path forward for mapping ALT at high spatial resolution and across sufficiently large regions for improved understanding and predictions of coupled dynamics among permafrost, hydrology, and land-surface processes from readily available remote sensing data. PMID:25558114

  7. Novel method for the measurement of liquid film thickness during fuel spray impingement on surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkel, S; Beyrau, F; Hardalupas, Y; Taylor, A M K P

    2016-02-08

    This paper describes the development and application of a novel optical technique for the measurement of liquid film thickness formed on surfaces during the impingement of automotive fuel sprays. The technique makes use of the change of the light scattering characteristics of a metal surface with known roughness, when liquid is deposited. Important advantages of the technique over previously established methods are the ability to measure the time-dependent spatial distribution of the liquid film without a need to add a fluorescent tracer to the liquid, while the measurement principle is not influenced by changes of the pressure and temperature of the liquid or the surrounding gas phase. Also, there is no need for non-fluorescing surrogate fuels. However, an in situ calibration of the dependence of signal intensity on liquid film thickness is required. The developed method can be applied to measure the time-dependent and two-dimensional distribution of the liquid fuel film thickness on the piston or the liner of gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines. The applicability of this technique was evaluated with impinging sprays of several linear alkanes and alcohols with different thermo-physical properties. The surface temperature of the impingement plate was controlled to simulate the range of piston surface temperatures inside a GDI engine. Two sets of liquid film thickness measurements were obtained. During the first set, the surface temperature of the plate was kept constant, while the spray of different fuels interacted with the surface. In the second set, the plate temperature was adjusted to match the boiling temperature of each fuel. In this way, the influence of the surface temperature on the liquid film created by the spray of different fuels and their evaporation characteristics could be demonstrated.

  8. A peculiar mode of formation of the surface lining layer in the lungs of Salamandra salamandra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goniakowska-Witalińska, L

    1980-01-01

    The pneumocytes of the larva of Salamandra salamandra contain numerous lamellar bodies and their precursors: electron-dense bodies at various stages of development. Both lamellar bodies and electron-dense bodies occur inside the fluid-filled lung. The former are spherical or bell-shaped and possess concentrically arranged smooth membranes, 8 nm thicks; the latter have paracrystalline cores composed of alternatively oriented clear and dark striations (3 . 6--3 . 9 nm and 2 . 6--3 . 6 nm, respectively). On all sides such cores separate membranes, which assume a concentric orientation. No tubular myelin was observed in any phase of the transformation of lamellar bodies and electron-dense bodies into the surface lining layer. Fixation of the lungs of adult individuals with tannic acid-containing fixative visualized the surface lining layer, but not tubular myelin.

  9. Electrical double layer interactions between dissimilar oxide surfaces with charge regulation and Stern-Grahame layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Derek Y C; Healy, Thomas W; Supasiti, Tharatorn; Usui, S

    2006-04-01

    Models of surfaces with intrinsic ionisable amphoteric surface sites governed by the dissociation of acid-base potential determining ion species together with the capacity for the adsorption of anion and cations of the supporting electrolyte are required to describe both the results of electrokinetic and titration measurements of inorganic oxides. The Gouy-Chapman-Stern-Grahame (CGSG) model is one such model that has been widely used in the literature. The electrical double layer interaction between two dissimilar CGSG surfaces has been studied by Usui recently [S. Usui, J. Colloid Interface Sci. 280 (2004) 113] where erroneous discontinuities in the slope of the pressure-separation relation were observed. We revisit this calculation and provide a simple general methodology to analyse the electrical double layer interaction between dissimilar ionisable surfaces with ion adsorption.

  10. Influence of processing parameters on the characteristics of surface layers of low temperature plasma nitrocarburized AISI 630 martensitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Insup

    2017-11-01

    Plasma nitrocarburizing was performed on solution-treated AISI 630 martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steel samples with a gas mixture of H2, N2, and CH4 with changing temperature, discharge voltage and amount of CH4. When nitrocarburized with increasing temperature from 380 °C to 430 °C at fixed 25% N2 and 6% CH4, the thickness of expanded martensite (α'N) layer and surface hardness increased up to 10 μm and 1323 HV0.05, respectively but the corrosion resistance decreased. Though the increase of discharge voltage from 400 V to 600 V increased α'N layer thickness and surface hardness (up to 13 μm and 1491 HV0.05, respectively), the treated samples still showed very poor corrosion behavior. Thus, to further improve the corrosion resistance, the influence of variation of the amount of CH4 in the nitrocarburizing process was investigated. Increasing the CH4 percentage aided higher corrosion resistance, although it decreased the α'N layer thickness. The most appropriate conditions for moderate α'N layer thickness, high surface hardness and better corrosion resistance than the solution-treated bare sample were established, which is plasma nitrocarburizing at 400 °C with 400 V discharge voltage and containing 25% N2 and 4% CH4.

  11. Dynamic change in the surface and layer structures during epitaxial growth of Si on a Si(111)-7x7 surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukaya, Y.; Shigeta, Y.; Maki, K.

    2000-01-01

    In order to investigate the dynamic process during growth of a Si layer on the Si(111)-7x7 surface held at 380 deg. C, the rocking curve of reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) is continuously measured at 0.5 deg. to 6 deg. at intervals of 0.05 deg. to the glancing angle of the incident electron beam which takes 18 sec. At the initial growth stage, the multilayer islands are grown on the native 7x7 surface with broader Bragg peaks in the rocking curve than those from the native surface. The sharpness of the Bragg peak is subsequently recovered after the thickness of the Si layer reaches 3 BL (1 BL=0.31 nm), at which the growth transforms to layer-by-layer growth. The comparison of the measured rocking curve with the calculated one based on the dynamical theory of RHEED intensity is also performed by optimizing each atomic position in the growing layer so as to minimize the difference between both curves. The space of the double layer of the (111) plane in the multilayer islands expands and is restored to the normal spacing after the growth mode transforms to the layer-by-layer mode. The broadening of the Bragg peaks at the initial growth stage relates to the rearrangement process of a stacking-fault layer in the 7x7 structure on the substrate surface

  12. Stabilization of Leidenfrost vapour layer by textured superhydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakarelski, Ivan U; Patankar, Neelesh A; Marston, Jeremy O; Chan, Derek Y C; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2012-09-13

    In 1756, Leidenfrost observed that water drops skittered on a sufficiently hot skillet, owing to levitation by an evaporative vapour film. Such films are stable only when the hot surface is above a critical temperature, and are a central phenomenon in boiling. In this so-called Leidenfrost regime, the low thermal conductivity of the vapour layer inhibits heat transfer between the hot surface and the liquid. When the temperature of the cooling surface drops below the critical temperature, the vapour film collapses and the system enters a nucleate-boiling regime, which can result in vapour explosions that are particularly detrimental in certain contexts, such as in nuclear power plants. The presence of these vapour films can also reduce liquid-solid drag. Here we show how vapour film collapse can be completely suppressed at textured superhydrophobic surfaces. At a smooth hydrophobic surface, the vapour film still collapses on cooling, albeit at a reduced critical temperature, and the system switches explosively to nucleate boiling. In contrast, at textured, superhydrophobic surfaces, the vapour layer gradually relaxes until the surface is completely cooled, without exhibiting a nucleate-boiling phase. This result demonstrates that topological texture on superhydrophobic materials is critical in stabilizing the vapour layer and thus in controlling--by heat transfer--the liquid-gas phase transition at hot surfaces. This concept can potentially be applied to control other phase transitions, such as ice or frost formation, and to the design of low-drag surfaces at which the vapour phase is stabilized in the grooves of textures without heating.

  13. Stabilization of Leidenfrost vapour layer by textured superhydrophobic surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2012-09-12

    In 1756, Leidenfrost observed that water drops skittered on a sufficiently hot skillet, owing to levitation by an evaporative vapour film. Such films are stable only when the hot surface is above a critical temperature, and are a central phenomenon in boiling. In this so-called Leidenfrost regime, the low thermal conductivity of the vapour layer inhibits heat transfer between the hot surface and the liquid. When the temperature of the cooling surface drops below the critical temperature, the vapour film collapses and the system enters a nucleate-boiling regime, which can result in vapour explosions that are particularly detrimental in certain contexts, such as in nuclear power plants. The presence of these vapour films can also reduce liquid-solid drag. Here we show how vapour film collapse can be completely suppressed at textured superhydrophobic surfaces. At a smooth hydrophobic surface, the vapour film still collapses on cooling, albeit at a reduced critical temperature, and the system switches explosively to nucleate boiling. In contrast, at textured, superhydrophobic surfaces, the vapour layer gradually relaxes until the surface is completely cooled, without exhibiting a nucleate-boiling phase. This result demonstrates that topological texture on superhydrophobic materials is critical in stabilizing the vapour layer and thus in controlling-by heat transfer-the liquid-gas phase transition at hot surfaces. This concept can potentially be applied to control other phase transitions, such as ice or frost formation, and to the design of low-drag surfaces at which the vapour phase is stabilized in the grooves of textures without heating. © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  14. Zirconium titanate thin film prepared by surface sol-gel process and effects of thickness on dielectric property

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, C H

    2002-01-01

    Single phase of multicomponent oxide ZrTiO sub 4 film could be prepared through surface sol-gel route simply by coating the mixture of 100mM zirconium butoxide and titanium butoxide on Pt/Ti/SiO sub 2 /Si(100) substrate, following pyrolysis at 450 .deg. C, and annealing it at 770 .deg. C. The dielectric constant of the film was reduced as the film thickness decreased due to of the interfacial effects caused by layer/electrode and a few voids inside the multilayer. However, the dielectric property was independent of applied dc bias sweeps voltage (-2 to +2 V). The dielectric constant of bulk film, 31.9, estimated using series-connected capacitor model was independent of film thickness and frequency in the measurement range, but theoretical interfacial thickness, t sub i , was dependent on the frequency. It reached a saturated t sub i value, 6.9 A, at high frequency by extraction of some capacitance component formed at low frequency range. The dielectric constant of bulk ZrTiO sub 4 pellet-shaped material was 3...

  15. Multi-layer Thick Gas Electron Multiplier (M-THGEM) Simulations at Low Pressure for High-Gain Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsch, Adam; Cortesi, Marco; Mittig, Wolfgang

    2017-09-01

    The Multi-layer Thick Gaseous Electron Multiplier (M-THGEM) is a novel hole-type gaseous electron multiplier produced by multi-layer printed circuit board technology; it consists of a densely perforated assembly of multiple insulating substrate sheets sandwiched between thin metallic-electrode layers. The electron avalanche processes occur along the successive multiplication stages within the M-THGEM holes, under the action of strong dipole fields resulting from the application of suitable potential differences between the electrodes. Using ANSYS Maxwell and Garfield, Monte Carlo simulations have been performed to find geometries that maximize the achievable gain, electron collection efficiency, ion feedback, energy resolution of M-THGEM devices at low pressure with pure gases. Comparisons of the calculations with measurements of a prototype device are ongoing. Preliminary results will be presented.

  16. Surface treatment to form a dispersed Y2O3 layer on Zircaloy-4 tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yang-Il; Kim, Hyun-Gil; Guim, Hwan-Uk; Lim, Yoon-Soo; Park, Jung-Hwan; Park, Dong-Jun; Yang, Jae-Ho

    2018-01-01

    Zircaloy-4 is a traditional zirconium-based alloy developed for application in nuclear fuel cladding tubes. The surfaces of Zircaloy-4 tubes were treated using a laser beam to increase their mechanical strength. Laser beam scanning of a tube coated with yttrium oxide (Y2O3) resulted in the formation of a dispersed oxide layer in the tube's surface region. Y2O3 particles penetrated the Zircaloy-4 during the laser treatment and were distributed uniformly in the surface region. The thickness of the dispersed oxide layer varied from 50 to 140 μm depending on the laser beam trajectory. The laser treatment also modified the texture of the tube. The preferred basal orientation along the normal to the tube surface disappeared, and a random structure appeared after laser processing. The most obvious result was an increase in the mechanical strength. The tensile strength of Zircaloy-4 increased by 10-20% with the formation of the dispersed oxide layer. The compressive yield stress also increased, by more than 15%. Brittle fracture was observed in the surface-treated samples during tensile and compressive deformation at room temperature; however, the fracture behavior was changed in ductile at elevated temperatures.

  17. Surface layer temperature inversion in the Bay of Bengal: Main characteristics and related mechanisms

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pankajakshan, T.; Suresh, I.; Gautham, S.; PrasannaKumar, S.; Lengaigne, M.; Rao, R.R; Neetu, S.; Hegde, A

    Surface layer temperature inversion (SLTI), a warm layer sandwiched between surface and subsurface colder waters, has been reported to frequently occur in conjunction with barrier layers in the Bay of Bengal (BoB), with potentially commensurable...

  18. THz detectors using surface Josephson plasma waves in layered superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savel'ev, Sergey; Yampol'skii, Valery; Nori, Franco

    2006-01-01

    We describe a proposal for THz detectors based on the excitation of surface waves, in layered superconductors, at frequencies lower than the Josephson plasma frequency ω J . These waves propagate along the vacuum-superconductor interface and are attenuated in both transverse directions out of the surface (i.e., towards the superconductor and towards the vacuum). The surface Josephson plasma waves are also important for the complete suppression of the specular reflection from a sample (Wood's anomalies, used for gratings) and produce a huge enhancement of the wave absorption, which can be used for the detection of THz waves

  19. Double layer of platinum electrodes: Non-monotonic surface charging phenomena and negative double layer capacitance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jun; Zhou, Tao; Zhang, Jianbo; Eikerling, Michael

    2018-01-01

    In this study, a refined double layer model of platinum electrodes accounting for chemisorbed oxygen species, oriented interfacial water molecules, and ion size effects in solution is presented. It results in a non-monotonic surface charging relation and a peculiar capacitance vs. potential curve with a maximum and possibly negative values in the potential regime of oxide-formation.

  20. Growth mechanism, surface and optical properties of ZnO nanostructures deposited on various Au-seeded thickness obtained by mist-atomization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afaah, A. N., E-mail: afaahabdullah@yahoo.com; Aadila, A., E-mail: aadilaazizali@gmail.com; Asib, N. A. M., E-mail: amierahasib@yahoo.com; Khusaimi, Z., E-mail: zurai142@salam.uitm.edu.my [NANO-SciTech Centre (NST), Institute of Science, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Mohamed, R., E-mail: ruzianamohd@pahang.uitm.edu.my [NANO-Electronic Centre (NET), Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Rusop, M., E-mail: nanouitm@gmail.com [NANO-SciTech Centre (NST), Institute of Science, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); NANO-Electronic Centre (NET), Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2016-07-06

    In this paper, growth mechanisms of ZnO nanostructures on non-seeded glass, 6 nm and 12 nm Au seed layer obtained by mist-atomization was proposed. ZnO films were successfully deposited on glass substrate with different thickness of Au seed layer i.e. 6 nm and 12 nm. The surface and optical properties of the prepared samples were investigated using Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and photoluminescence (PL). FESEM micrograph show that ZnO nanostructure deposited on 6 nm Au seed layer has uniform formation and well distributed. From PL spectroscopy, the UV emission shows that ZnO deposited on 6 nm Au seed layer has the more intense UV intensity which proved that high crystal quality of nanostructured ZnO deposited on 6 nm Au seed layer.

  1. Correlation between peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and fundus autofluorescence in primary open-angle glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reznicek L

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Lukas Reznicek,* Florian Seidensticker,* Thomas Mann, Irene Hübert, Alexandra Buerger, Christos Haritoglou, Aljoscha S Neubauer, Anselm Kampik, Christoph Hirneiss, Marcus Kernt Department of Ophthalmology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, Germany *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: To investigate the relationship between retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL thickness and retinal pigment epithelium alterations in patients with advanced glaucomatous visual field defects. Methods: A consecutive, prospective series of 82 study eyes with primary open-angle glaucoma and advanced glaucomatous visual field defects were included in this study. All study participants underwent a full ophthalmic examination followed by visual field testing with standard automated perimetry as well as spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT for peripapillary RNFL thickness and Optos wide-field fundus autofluorescence (FAF images. A pattern grid with corresponding locations between functional visual field sectors and structural peripapillary RNFL thickness was aligned to the FAF images at corresponding location. Mean FAF intensity (range: 0 = black and 255 = white of each evaluated sector (superotemporal, temporal, inferotemporal, inferonasal, nasal, superonasal was correlated with the corresponding peripapillary RNFL thickness obtained with SD-OCT. Results: Correlation analyses between sectoral RNFL thickness and standardized FAF intensity in the corresponding topographic retina segments revealed partly significant correlations with correlation coefficients ranging between 0.004 and 0.376 and were statistically significant in the temporal inferior central field (r = 0.324, P = 0.036 and the nasal field (r = 0.376, P = 0.014. Conclusion: Retinal pigment epithelium abnormalities correlate with corresponding peripapillary RNFL damage, especially in the temporal inferior sector of patients with advanced glaucomatous visual field defects. A

  2. Native SrTiO3 (001) surface layer from resonant Ti L2,3 reflectance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valvidares, Manuel; Huijben, Mark; Yu, Pu; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Kortright, Jeffrey

    2010-11-03

    We quantitatively model resonant Ti L2,3 reflectivity Rs,p(q, hn) from several SrTiO3 (001) single crystals having different initial surface preparations and stored in ambient conditions before and between measurements. All samples exhibit unexpected 300 K Rs(hn) - Rp(hn) anisotropy corresponding to weak linear dichroism and tetragonal distortion of the TiO6 octahedra indicating a surface layer with properties different from cubic SrTiO3. Oscillations in Rs(q) confirm a ubiquitous surface layer 2-3 nm thick that evolves over a range of time scales. Resonant optical constant spectra derived from Rs,p(hn) assuming a uniform sample are refined using a single surface layer to fit measured Rs(q). Differences in surface layer and bulk optical properties indicate that the surface is significantly depleted in Sr and enriched in Ti and O. While consistent with the tendency of SrTiO3 surfaces toward non-stoichiometry, this layer does not conform simply to existing models for the near surface region and apparently forms via room temperature surface reactions with the ambient. This new quantitative spectral modeling approach is generally applicable and has potential to study near-surface properties of a variety of systems with unique chemical and electronic sensitivities.

  3. Anomalous electron transport in metal/carbon multijunction devices by engineering of the carbon thickness and selecting metal layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Neeraj; Dhand, Chetna; Rawal, Ishpal; Kumar, Sushil; Malik, Hitendra K.; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani

    2017-06-01

    A longstanding concern in the research of amorphous carbon films is their poor electrical conductivity at room temperature which constitutes a major barrier for the development of cost effective electronic and optoelectronic devices. Here, we propose metal/carbon hybrid multijunction devices as a promising facile way to overcome room temperature electron transport issues in amorphous carbon films. By the tuning of carbon thickness and swapping metal layers, we observe giant (upto ˜7 orders) reduction of electrical resistance in metal/carbon multijunction devices with respect to monolithic amorphous carbon device. We engineer the maximum current (electrical resistance) from about 10-7 to 10-3 A (˜107 to 103 Ω) in metal (Cu or Ti)/carbon hybrid multijunction devices with a total number of 10 junctions. The introduction of thin metal layers breaks the continuity of relatively higher resistance carbon layer as well as promotes the nanostructuring of carbon. These contribute to low electrical resistance of metal/carbon hybrid multijunction devices, with respect to monolithic carbon device, which is further reduced by decreasing the thickness of carbon layers. We also propose and discuss equivalent circuit model to explain electrical resistance in monolithic carbon and metal/carbon multijunction devices. Cu/carbon multijunction devices display relatively better electrical transport than Ti/carbon devices owing to low affinity of Cu with carbon that restricts carbide formation. We also observe that in metal/carbon multijunction devices, the transport mechanism changes from Poole-Frenkel/Schottky model to the hopping model with a decrease in carbon thickness. Our approach opens a new route to develop carbon-based inexpensive electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  4. Estimation of the barrier layer thickness in the Indian Ocean using Aquarius Salinity.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Felton, C.S.; Subrahmanyam, B.; Murty, V.S.N; Shriver, J.F.

    , as well as the advantages and disadvantages of the current model are discussed. BLT estimations using HYCOM simulations display large errors that are related to model layer structure and the selected BLT methodology....

  5. The effect of using waste newspaper in surface layers on physical and mechanical properties of three-layer particleboard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    vahid vaziri

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, physical and mechanical properties of particleboard made from recycled newspaper in the surface layers were investigated. Coarse and fine wood chips and recycled newspaper with dimension of 0.5 × 4 cm2 were used. The variable in this research were the ratio of recycled newspaper to wood chips (at five levels; 0:100, 15:85, 30:70, 45:55, 60:40. Urea formaldehyde resin used at 10% content on dry weight basis of the wood particles and newspaper and ammonium chloride was used as a catalyst to 2% of the dry weight of adhesive. Physical and mechanical properties of panels measured according to EN Standard. The results showed that panels containing recycled newspapers at the level of 45% had the highest bending strength and modulus of elasticity. Internal bonding and screw holding strength decreased with increasing of recycled newspaper and control sample had the highest strength. Water absorption and thickness swelling increased with increasing of recycled newspaper portion. On the basis of results of this study can be concluded that particleboard containing recycled newspapers in the surface layers up to the level of 30% can be used for general purpose boards and interior fitments (including furniture for use in dry conditions.

  6. Characterization of anisotropic UF-membranes: top layer thickness and pore structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuperus, F.P.; Cuperus, F.P.; Bargeman, D.; Bargeman, D.; Smolders, C.A.; Smolders, C.A.

    1991-01-01

    Anisotropic poly(2,6-dimethyl-, 1,4-phenylene oxide) (PPO) ultrafiltration membranes are characterized by means of two techniques. A new method for the determination of skin thicknesses, the gold sol method, is introduced and applied to these membranes. The membranes appeared to have a well-defined

  7. Physiological variation of retinal layer thickness is not caused by hydration: A randomised trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balk, L.J.; Oberwahrenbrock, T.; Uitdehaag, B.M.J.; Petzold, A.F.S.

    2014-01-01

    There is evidence for physiological variation of retinal thicknesses as determined by optical coherence tomography (OCT). We tested if such changes could be explained by hydration and would exceed what may be expected from normal ageing. Subjects (n = 26) of a previous study were re-assessed and

  8. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in glaucomatous Nepalese eyes and its relation with visual field sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safal Khanal

    2014-10-01

    Conclusion: The RNFL thickness measurements with SD-OCT are lower in glaucomatous eyes as compared to age-matched GS and normal eyes in the Nepalese population. A high resolution SD-OCT could aid significantly in the early diagnosis of glaucoma in Nepal.

  9. Dependence of the structure of ion-modified NiTi single crystal layers on the orientation of irradiated surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletika, T. M.; Meisner, L. L.; Girsova, S. L.; Tverdokhlebova, A. V.; Meisner, S. N.

    2017-07-01

    The composition and structure of Si layers implanted into titanium nickelide single crystals with different orientations relative to the ion beam propagation direction have been studied using Auger electron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The role of the "soft" [111]B2 and "hard" [001]B2 NiTi orientations in the formation of the structure of ion-modified surface layer, as well as the defect structure of the surface layers of the single crystals, has been revealed. Orientation effects of selective sputtering and channeling of ions, which control the composition and thickness of the oxide and amorphous layers being formed, ion and impurity penetration depth, as well as the concentration profile of the Ni distribution over the surface, have been detected.

  10. Retinal nerve fibre layer thickness of black and Indian myopic students at the University of KwaZulu-Natal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanel Murugan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To compare retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL thickness in black and Indian myopic students at the University of KwaZulu-Natal. Method: Eighty (40 black and 40 Indian participants of both genders and aged between 19 and 24 years (mean and standard deviation: 21 ± 1.7 years were included in the study. Refractive errors were assessed with the Nidek AR-310A auto-refractor and via subjective refraction. RNFL thicknesses were then measured using the iVue-100 optical coherence tomography device. Axial lengths were measured with the Nidek US-500 A-scan ultrasound device. Data were analysed by descriptive statistics, t-tests, Pearson’s correlation coefficients and regression analysis. Results: The mean myopic spherical equivalent was significantly more negative amongst the Indian (-2.42 D ± 2.22 D than amongst the black (-1.48 D ± 1.13 D (p = 0.02 participants.The mean axial length was greater amongst the black (23.35 mm ± 0.74 mm than amongst the Indian (23.18 mm ± 0.87 mm participants but the difference was not significant. In the total sample (n = 80, the average global RNFL thickness ranged from 87 μm to 123 μm (105 μm ±9 μm. Mean global RNFL thickness was slightly greater amongst black (108 μm ± 7 μm than amongst Indian (102 μm ± 9 μm (p = 0.00 participants. Mean global RNFL thickness was similar for male (106 μm ± 7 μm and female (105 μm ± 10 μm (p = 0.79 participants.A positive and significant association between myopic spherical equivalent and global RNFL thickness was found for the total sample (r = 0.36, p = 0.00 and for Indians (r = 0.33, p = 0.04but not for the black (r = 0.25, p = 0.13 participants. There was a negative and significant correlation between axial length and global RNFL thickness amongst the Indian participants (r = -0.34, p = 0.03 but not amongst the total sample (r = -0.12, p = 0.30 or the black (r = 0.06, p = 0.73 participants. Conclusion: The findings suggest that racial differences in RNFL

  11. Surface roughness effects on the hypersonic turbulent boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, D.E.

    1977-09-01

    An experimental investigation of the response of a hypersonic turbulent boundary layer to a step change in surface roughness has been performed. The boundary layer on a flat nozzle wall of a Mach 6 wind tunnel was subjected to abrupt changes in surface roughness and its adjustment to the new surface conditions was examined. Both mean and fluctuating flow properties were acquired for smooth-to-rough and rough-to-smooth surface configurations. The boundary layer was found to respond gradually and to attain new equilibrium profiles, for both the mean and the fluctuating properties, some 10 to 25 delta downstream of the step change. Mean flow self-similarity was the first to establish itself, followed by the mass flux fluctuations, followed in turn by the total temperature fluctuations. Use of a modified Van Driest transformation resulted in good correlations of smooth and rough wall data in the form of the incompressible law of the wall. This is true even in the nonequilibrium vicinity of the step for small roughness heights. The present data are found to correlate well with previously published roughness effect data from low and high speed flows when the roughnesses are characterized by an equivalent sand grain roughness height.

  12. Full-thickness skin wound healing using autologous keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts with fibrin: bilayered versus single-layered substitute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrus, Ruszymah Bt Hj; Rameli, Mohd Adha bin P; Low, Kiat Cheong; Law, Jia Xian; Chua, Kien Hui; Latiff, Mazlyzam Bin Abdul; Saim, Aminuddin Bin

    2014-04-01

    Split-skin grafting (SSG) is the gold standard treatment for full-thickness skin defects. For certain patients, however, an extensive skin lesion resulted in inadequacies of the donor site. Tissue engineering offers an alternative approach by using a very small portion of an individual's skin to harvest cells for propagation and biomaterials to support the cells for implantation. The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of autologous bilayered tissue-engineered skin (BTES) and single-layer tissue-engineered skin composed of only keratinocytes (SLTES-K) or fibroblasts (SLTES-F) as alternatives for full-thickness wound healing in a sheep model. Full-thickness skin biopsies were harvested from adult sheep. Isolated fibroblasts were cultured using medium Ham's F12: Dulbecco modified Eagle medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum, whereas the keratinocytes were cultured using Define Keratinocytes Serum Free Medium. The BTES, SLTES-K, and SLTES-F were constructed using autologous fibrin as a biomaterial. Eight full-thickness wounds were created on the dorsum of the body of the sheep. On 4 wounds, polyvinyl chloride rings were used as chambers to prevent cell migration at the edge. The wounds were observed at days 7, 14, and 21. After 3 weeks of implantation, the sheep were euthanized and the skins were harvested. The excised tissues were fixed in formalin for histological examination via hematoxylin-eosin, Masson trichrome, and elastin van Gieson staining. The results showed that BTES, SLTES-K, and SLTES-F promote wound healing in nonchambered and chambered wounds, and BTES demonstrated the best healing potential. In conclusion, BTES proved to be an effective tissue-engineered construct that can promote the healing of full-thickness skin lesions. With the support of further clinical trials, this procedure could be an alternative to SSG for patients with partial- and full-thickness burns.

  13. Segmentation error in spectral domain optical coherence tomography measures of the retinal nerve fibre layer thickness in idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aojula, Anuriti; Mollan, Susan P; Horsburgh, John; Yiangou, Andreas; Markey, Kiera A; Mitchell, James L; Scotton, William J; Keane, Pearse A; Sinclair, Alexandra J

    2018-01-04

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) imaging is being increasingly used in clinical practice for the monitoring of papilloedema. The aim is to characterise the extent and location of the Retinal Nerve Fibre Layer (RNFL) Thickness automated segmentation error (SegE) by manual refinement, in a cohort of Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (IIH) patients with papilloedema and compare this to controls. Baseline Spectral Domain OCT (SDOCT) scans from patients with IIH, and controls with no retinal or optic nerve pathology, were examined. The internal limiting membrane and RNFL thickness of the most severely affected eye was examined for SegE and re-segmented. Using ImageJ, the total area of the RNFL thickness was calculated pre and post re-segmentation and the percentage change was determined. The distribution of RNFL thickness error was qualitatively assessed. Significantly greater SegE (p = 0.009) was present in RNFL thickness total area, assessed using ImageJ, in IIH patients (n = 46, 5% ± 0-58%) compared to controls (n = 14, 1% ± 0-6%). This was particularly evident in moderate to severe optic disc swelling (n = 23, 10% ± 0-58%, p < 0.001). RNFL thickness was unable to be quantified using SDOCT in patients with severe papilloedema. SegE remain a concern for clinicians using SDOCT to monitor papilloedema in IIH, particularly in the assessment of eyes with moderate to severe oedema. Systematic assessment and manual refinement of SegE is therefore important to ensure the accuracy in longitudinal monitoring of patients.

  14. Effect of cataract surgery on retinal nerve fiber layer thickness parameters using scanning laser polarimetry (GDxVCC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dada, Tanuj; Behera, Geeta; Agarwal, Anand; Kumar, Sanjeev; Sihota, Ramanjit; Panda, Anita

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To study the effect of cataract extraction on the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness, and assessment by scanning laser polarimetry (SLP), with variable corneal compensation (GDx VCC), at the glaucoma service of a tertiary care center in North India. Materials and Methods: Thirty-two eyes of 32 subjects were enrolled in the study. The subjects underwent RNFL analysis by SLP (GDx VCC) before undergoing phacoemulsification cataract extraction with intraocular lens (IOL) implantation (Acrysof SA 60 AT) four weeks following cataract surgery. The RNFL thickness parameters evaluated both before and after surgery included temporal, superior, nasal, inferior, temporal (TSNIT) average, superior average, inferior average, and nerve fiber index (NFI). Results: The mean age of subjects was 57.6 ± 11.7 years (18 males, 14 females). Mean TSNIT average thickness (μm) pre- and post-cataract surgery was 49.2 ± 14.1 and 56.5 ± 7.6 (P = 0.001). There was a statistically significant increase in RNFL thickness parameters (TSNIT average, superior average, and inferior average) and decrease in NFI post-cataract surgery as compared to the baseline values. Mean NFI pre- and post-cataract surgery was 41.3 ± 15.3 and 21.6 ± 11.8 (P = 0.001). Conclusions: Measurement of RNFL thickness parameters by scanning laser polarimetry is significantly altered following cataract surgery. Post the cataract surgery, a new baseline needs to be established for assessing the longitudinal follow-up of a glaucoma patient. The presence of cataract may lead to an underestimation of the RNFL thickness, and this should be taken into account when analyzing progression in a glaucoma patient. PMID:20689193

  15. Structure and properties of titanium surface layers after electron beam alloying with powder mixtures containing carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenivtseva, O.G.; Bataev, I.A.; Golkovskii, M.G.; Bataev, A.A.; Samoilenko, V.V.; Plotnikova, N.V.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Wear resistant coatings up to 2 mm thick were clad on titanium by an electron beam in air. • The microhardness of the alloys was increased from 2 to 8 GPa due to the formation of TiC particles. • Alloying of titanium increased the abrasive wear resistance of the alloy by a factor of 9.3. - Abstract: The structure and tribological properties of commercially pure titanium (cp-Ti) samples after non-vacuum electron beam surface alloying with carbon were studied. Two types of powders were used to introduce carbon in surface layer of cp-Ti: titanium carbide (TiC) and mixture of pure titanium and graphite (“Ti + C”). Single layer and multilayer coatings were studied. Application of electron beam for alloying provided cladding rate of 4.5 m 2 /h. The thickness of the clad coatings was 1.6–2.0 mm. The main phases received after “Ti + C” powder cladding were α-titanium, TiC, and retained graphite. In the samples obtained by cladding of TiC, graphite was not observed. A factor determining the microhardness and tribological properties of the cladded layer was the volume fraction of TiC. Maximum coating microhardness of 8 GPa was obtained by cladding of single layer of TiC powder or two layers of the “Ti + C” mixture. Two types of tests were carried out to evaluate the wear resistance of the samples. In friction tests against loose abrasive particles, the wear rate of the best samples was 9.3 times lower than that of cp-Ti. In wear tests using fixed abrasive particles, the relative wear resistance of the best samples was 2.3 times higher than that of cp-Ti.

  16. Relation between film thickness and surface doping of MoS2 based field effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockhart de la Rosa, César J.; Arutchelvan, Goutham; Leonhardt, Alessandra; Huyghebaert, Cedric; Radu, Iuliana; Heyns, Marc; De Gendt, Stefan

    2018-05-01

    Ultra-thin MoS2 film doping through surface functionalization with physically adsorbed species is of great interest due to its ability to dope the film without reduction in the carrier mobility. However, there is a need for understanding how the thickness of the MoS2 film is related to the induced surface doping for improved electrical performance. In this work, we report on the relation of MoS2 film thickness with the doping effect induced by the n-dopant adsorbate poly(vinyl-alcohol). Field effect transistors built using MoS2 films of different thicknesses were electrically characterized, and it was observed that the ION/OFF ratio after doping in thin films is more than four orders of magnitudes greater when compared with thick films. Additionally, a semi-classical model tuned with the experimental devices was used to understand the spatial distribution of charge in the channel and explain the observed behavior. From the simulation results, it was revealed that the two-dimensional carrier density induced by the adsorbate is distributed rather uniformly along the complete channel for thin films (<5.2 nm) contrary to what happens for thicker films.

  17. Comparative study of the retinal nerve fibre layer thickness performed with optical coherence tomography and GDx scanning laser polarimetry in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasyluk, Jaromir T; Jankowska-Lech, Irmina; Terelak-Borys, Barbara; Grabska-Liberek, Iwona

    2012-03-01

    We compared the parameters of retinal nerve fibre layer in patients with advanced glaucoma with the use of different OCT (Optical Coherence Tomograph) devices in relation to analogical measurements performed with GDx VCC (Nerve Fiber Analyzer with Variable Corneal Compensation) scanning laser polarimetry. Study subjects had advanced primary open-angle glaucoma, previously treated conservatively, diagnosed and confirmed by additional examinations (visual field, ophthalmoscopy of optic nerve, gonioscopy), A total of 10 patients were enrolled (9 women and 1 man), aged 18-70 years of age. Nineteen eyes with advanced glaucomatous neuropathy were examined. 1) Performing a threshold perimetry Octopus, G2 strategy and ophthalmoscopy of optic nerve to confirm the presence of advanced primary open-angle glaucoma; 2) performing a GDx VCC scanning laser polarimetry of retinal nerve fibre layer; 3) measuring the retinal nerve fibre layer thickness with 3 different optical coherence tomographs. The parameters of the retinal nerve fibre layer thickness are highly correlated between the GDx and OCT Stratus and 3D OCT-1000 devices in mean retinal nerve fibre layer thickness, retinal nerve fibre layer thickness in the upper sector, and correlation of NFI (GDx) with mean retinal nerve fibre layer thickness in OCT examinations. Absolute values of the retinal nerve fibre layer thickness (measured in µm) differ significantly between GDx and all OCT devices. Examination with OCT devices is a sensitive diagnostic method of glaucoma, with good correlation with the results of GDx scanning laser polarimetry of the patients.

  18. Boundary layer for non-newtonian fluids on curved surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenger, N.

    1981-04-01

    By using the basic equation of fluid motion (conservation of mass and momentum) the boundary layer parameters for a Non-Newtonian, incompressible and laminar fluid flow, has been evaluated. As a test, the flat plate boundary layer is first analized and afterwards, a case with pressure gradient, allowing separation, is studied. In the case of curved surfaces, the problem is first developed in general and afterwards particularized to a circular cylinder. Finally suction and slip in the flow interface are examined. The power law model is used to represent the stress strain relationship in Non-Newtonian flow. By varying the fluid exponent one can then, have an idea of how the Non-Newtonian behavior of the flow influences the parameters of the boundary layer. Two equations, in an appropriate coordinate system have been obtained after an order of magnitude analysis of the terms in the equations of motion is performed. (Author) [pt

  19. 3-D mapping with ellipsometrically determined physical thickness ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The gel layer thus formed transformed to oxide layer on heating to 450°C for ~ 30 min. The physical thickness and the refractive index of the layer were measured ellipsometrically (Rudolph Auto EL II) at 632⋅8 nm. About 10 × 10 mm surface area of the silica layer was chosen for evaluation of thickness and refractive index.

  20. Interaction of water with faceted NiO(1 1 1) surface tuned by films thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lixia; Wang, Shuai; Liu, Shuming; Guo, Qinlin; Guo, Jiandong

    2018-01-01

    The interaction of water with the polar surface of NiO(1 1 1) films has been investigated using various in situ surface analytical techniques, as well as ex situ scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The {1 0 0} facets are formed on NiO(1 1 1) films upon annealing. The boundary between {1 0 0} facet and bare (1 1 1) face and the corner on the facet can facilitate dissociation of water. The total boundary length and the number of corner sites vary with film thickness. The dissociated hydroxyls are thermally stable up to 700 K on the thinner films. Consequently the activity of water dissociation can be tuned by adjusting the film thickness.

  1. Experimental studies of the stress state of the surface layer of detailat treatment with submerged jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Олександр Олександрович Анділахай

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the instrument and electrical industry was the use of the method of abrasive machining submerged jet, which is the most promising method for abrasive blasting of small parts of low stiffness. This method eliminates the main drawback сhip plants - abrasion channel nozzles or injection nozzles, but the state of the surface layer of machined parts are poorly understood and to make maximum use of the potential to provide the required quality parameters. The study of the state of the surfaces of parts resulting from abrasive blasting traditional methods, dedicated work, which define quality indicators: microhardness depth residual stress, as well as their nature (compressive, tensile. However, known from the literature values correspond to the conditions of surface treatment of parts in a fixed state with an abrasive material through the feed nozzle, and therefore the dynamics of the interaction of a single abrasive grain and significantly different parts. The process in question, and different modes of processing characteristics of the abrasive grains. In the paper, a series of experimental studies designed to assess the state of machined surfaces of parts as a result of abrasion submerged jets. It is established that during the treatment the non-oriented disorderly traces overlay the abrasive grains on the treated surface, thereby forming a tight skin layer thickness of 4 - 5 micrometers. Processed surface gets cold working, as evidenced by the study of microhardness before and after abrasive machining in a free state submerged jets

  2. Thickness-dependent electroforming behavior of ultra-thin Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} resistance switching layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Tae Hyung; Song, Seul Ji; Kim, Hae Jin; Hwang, Cheol Seong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Inter-university Semiconductor Research Center, Seoul National University, 151-744, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Soo Gil; Chung, Suock; Kim, Beom Yong; Lee, Kee Jeung [SK Hynix Inc., 2091 Gyeongchung-daero, Bubal-eub, Icheon-si, 467-734, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyung Min [Hewlett-Packard Laboratories, Hewlett-Packard Company, Palo Alto, California, 94304 (United States); Choi, Byung Joon [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University of Science and Technology, Seoul, 139-743 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Electroforming behaviours of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} resistance switching memory cell with a diameter of 28 nm and different thickness (0.5-2.0 nm) of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} layer have been examined. The devices showed a constant forming electric field of 0.54 V/nm regardless of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} thickness. The electroforming with negative bias to top TiN electrode was ascribed to electric field- driven migration of oxygen vacancies, originally residing near the bottom interface, toward the top electrode interface and formation of conducting filaments. The estimated electroforming energy (0.094-0.14 eV) was favourably compared with the hopping energy of electrons from the V{sub O} site to a nearby Ta site. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Influence of ice thickness and surface properties on light transmission through Arctic sea ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katlein, Christian; Arndt, Stefanie; Nicolaus, Marcel; Perovich, Donald K; Jakuba, Michael V; Suman, Stefano; Elliott, Stephen; Whitcomb, Louis L; McFarland, Christopher J; Gerdes, Rüdiger; Boetius, Antje; German, Christopher R

    2015-09-01

    The observed changes in physical properties of sea ice such as decreased thickness and increased melt pond cover severely impact the energy budget of Arctic sea ice. Increased light transmission leads to increased deposition of solar energy in the upper ocean and thus plays a crucial role for amount and timing of sea-ice-melt and under-ice primary production. Recent developments in underwater technology provide new opportunities to study light transmission below the largely inaccessible underside of sea ice. We measured spectral under-ice radiance and irradiance using the new Nereid Under-Ice (NUI) underwater robotic vehicle, during a cruise of the R/V Polarstern to 83°N 6°W in the Arctic Ocean in July 2014. NUI is a next generation hybrid remotely operated vehicle (H-ROV) designed for both remotely piloted and autonomous surveys underneath land-fast and moving sea ice. Here we present results from one of the first comprehensive scientific dives of NUI employing its interdisciplinary sensor suite. We combine under-ice optical measurements with three dimensional under-ice topography (multibeam sonar) and aerial images of the surface conditions. We investigate the influence of spatially varying ice-thickness and surface properties on the spatial variability of light transmittance during summer. Our results show that surface properties such as melt ponds dominate the spatial distribution of the under-ice light field on small scales (<1000 m 2 ), while sea ice-thickness is the most important predictor for light transmission on larger scales. In addition, we propose the use of an algorithm to obtain histograms of light transmission from distributions of sea ice thickness and surface albedo.

  4. Surfactant-induced layered growth in homoepitaxy of Fe on Fe(100)-c(2 x 2)O reconstruction surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiko, Masao; Mizuno, Hiroyuki; Chihaya, Hiroaki; Xu, Junhua; Kojima, Isao; Yamamoto, Ryoichi

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the effects of several surfactants (Pb, Bi, and Ag) on the homoepitaxial growth of Fe(100) were studied and compared. The reflection high-energy electron diffraction measurements clearly reveal that these surfactants enhance the layer-by-layer growth of Fe on an Fe(100)-c(2 x 2)O reconstruction surface. The dependence of growth on the surfactant layer thickness suggests that there exists a suitable amount of surfactant layer that induces a smoother layer-by-layer growth. Comparisons between the atomic force microscopy images reveal that the root-mean-square surface roughness of Fe films mediated by Pb and Bi surfactants are considerably smaller than those of the films mediated by Ag surfactant. The Auger electron spectra show that Pb and Bi segregate at the top of the surface. It has been concluded that Pb and Bi are effective surfactants for enhancing layer-by-layer growth in Fe homoepitaxy. Ag has the same effect, but it is less efficient due to the weak surface segregation of Ag

  5. The studies of scale surface produced on outer diffusion layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Augustyn-Pieniążek

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study at attempt was made to examine the scale formed on ferritic-austenitic duplex type steel subjected to previous thermochemical treatment. The treatment consisted in diffusion aluminising in a metallising mixture composed of Fe-Al powder. As an activator, ammonium chloride (NH4Cl added in an amount of 2 wt.% was used. Then, both the base material and samples with the diffusiondeposited surface layers were oxidised at 1000°C in the air. Thus formed scales were identified by light microscopy, SEM and X-ray phase analysis. The aim of the oxidation tests carried out under isothermal conditions was to compare the scale morphology when obtained on untreated substrate material and on the surface layers rich in aluminium.

  6. A comparative study of the influence of nickel oxide layer on the FTO surface of organic light emitting diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikia, Dhrubajyoti; Sarma, Ranjit

    2018-03-01

    The influence of thin layer of nickel oxide (NiO) over the fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) surface on the performance of Organic light-emitting diode (OLED) is reported. With an optimal thickness of NiO (10 nm), the luminance efficiency is found to be increased as compared to the single FTO OLED. The performance of OLED is studied by depositing NiO films at different thicknesses on the FTO surface and analyzed their J-V and L-V characteristics. Further analysis is carried out by measuring sheet resistance and optical transmittance. The surface morphology is studied with the help of FE-SEM images. Our results indicate that NiO (10 nm) buffer layer is an excellent choice to increase the efficiency of FTO based OLED devices within the charge tunneling region. The maximum value of current efficiency is found to be 7.32 Cd/A.

  7. Cortical Surface Thickness in the Middle-Aged Brain with White Matter Hyperintense Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Zhuang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Previous voxel-based morphometry (VBM studies have suggested that cortical atrophy is regionally distributed in middle-aged subjects with white matter hyperintense (WMH lesions. However, few studies have assessed cortical thickness in middle-aged WMH subjects. In this study, we examined cortical thickness as well as cortical morphometry associated with the presence of WMH lesion load in middle-aged subjects.Participants and methods: Thirty-six middle-aged subjects with WMH lesions (WMH group and without clinical cognitive impairment, and 34 demographically matched healthy control subjects (HCS group participated in the study. Cortical thickness was estimated using an automated Computational Anatomy Toolbox (CAT12 as the distance between the gray-white matter border and the pial surface. Individual WMH lesions were manually segmented, and WMH loads were measured. Statistical cortical maps were created to estimate differences in cortical thickness between groups based on this cortex-wide analysis. The relationship between WMH lesion loads and cerebral cortical thickness was also analyzed in CAT12.Results: Cortical thickness was significantly lower in the WMH group than in the controls in multimodal integration regions, including the right and left dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC, right and left frontal operculum (fO, right and left operculum parietale (OP, right and left middle temporal gyrus (MTG, and left superior temporal gyrus (STG; P < 0.01, family-wise error (FWE-corrected. Additionally, cortical thickness was also lower in the recognition regions that contained the right temporal pole (TP, the right and left fusiform gyrus, and the left rolandic operculum (RO; P < 0.01, FWE-corrected. The results revealed that in the left superior parietal lobule (SPL, cortical thickness was higher in the WMH group than in the HCS group (P < 0.01, FWE-corrected. A voxel-wise negative correlation was found between cortical

  8. Modeling Turbulence Generation in the Atmospheric Surface and Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    ZT ). The initial acceleration of the rising buoyant air will be a = g∆T/TA. This is simply Archimedes ’ principle applied to the buoyant air. The... applications . 1 Various rules are employed to model C2n in the surface layer, but a key question is how to extend this estimation technique into the lower...in terms of wind turbulence the structure of the fluctuations produces a Reynolds stress tensor whose principle axes are not equal, meaning that at the

  9. Surface layer softing in mechanically polished molybdenum monocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivashchenko, R.K.; Kostyuchenko, V.G.; Lotsko, D.V.; Lukinov, I.V.; Mil'man, Yu.V.; Novikov, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    Softening of the surface layer together with growth of dislocation density is found in molybdenum single crystals mechanically polished with diamond suspension in water solution of CuSO 4 . The penetration of small amount of copper into molybdenum is observed by SIMS. A supposition has been made about molybdenum solid solution softening influenced by copper penetrating into molybdenum by means of a dynamic dislocation mechanism

  10. A reliability study on influence of the geosphere thickness over the activity release from a near surface radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguiar, Lais Alencar de; Damaso, Vinicius Correa

    2013-01-01

    Infiltration of water into a waste disposal facility and into the waste region is the main factor inducing the release of radionuclides from a disposal facility. Since infiltrating water flow is dependent on the natural percolation at the site and the performance of engineered barriers, its prediction requires modelling of unsaturated water flow through intact or partially/completely failed components of engineered barriers and through the rock layer of the geosphere on which the repository is constructed. The engineered barriers include the cover systems, concrete vault, backfill, waste forms, and overpacks. This paper aims to carry out a performance study regarding a near surface repository in terms of reliability engineering. It is assumed that surface water infiltrates through the barriers reaching the matrix where radionuclides are contained, thus releasing them into the environment. The repository consists of a set of barriers which are considered saturated porous medium. As results, this paper presents the relation between the thickness of the geosphere layer and the radionuclide release rate in terms of activity. Such results represent a useful information for choosing the repository sites in order to keep the released activity in acceptable levels over time. (author)

  11. Growth of micrometric oxide layers for the study of metallic surfaces decontamination by laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Luisa; Pacquentin, Wilfried; Tabarant, Michel; Maskrot, Hicham; Semerok, Alexandre

    2017-09-01

    The nuclear industry produces a wide range of radioactive waste in term of level of hazard, contaminants and material. For metallic equipment like steam generators, the radioactivity is mainly located in the oxide surface. In order to study and develop techniques for dismantling and for decontamination in a safe way, it is important to have access to oxide layers with a representative distribution of non-radioactive contaminants. We propose a method of formation of oxide layer on stainless steel 304L with europium (Eu) as contaminant marker. In this method, an Eu-solution is sprayed on the stainless steel samples. The specimen are firstly treated with a pulsed nanosecond laser and secondly the steel samples are exposed to a 600°C furnace for various durations in order to grow an oxide layer. The oxide structure and in-depth distribution of Eu in the oxide layer are analysed by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray microanalyzer, and by glow discharge optical emission or mass spectrometry. The oxide layers were grown to thicknesses in the range of 200 nm to 4.5 μm regarding to the laser treatment parameters and the heating duration. These contaminated oxides have a `duplex structure' with a mean weight percentage of 0.5% of europium in the volume of the oxide layer. It appears that europium implementation prevents the oxide growth by furnace but has no impact on laser heating. These oxide layers are used to study the decontamination of metallic surfaces such as stainless steel 304L using a nanosecond pulsed laser.

  12. Growth of micrometric oxide layers for the study of metallic surfaces decontamination by laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho Luisa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear industry produces a wide range of radioactive waste in term of level of hazard, contaminants and material. For metallic equipment like steam generators, the radioactivity is mainly located in the oxide surface. In order to study and develop techniques for dismantling and for decontamination in a safe way, it is important to have access to oxide layers with a representative distribution of non-radioactive contaminants. We propose a method of formation of oxide layer on stainless steel 304L with europium (Eu as contaminant marker. In this method, an Eu-solution is sprayed on the stainless steel samples. The specimen are firstly treated with a pulsed nanosecond laser and secondly the steel samples are exposed to a 600°C furnace for various durations in order to grow an oxide layer. The oxide structure and in-depth distribution of Eu in the oxide layer are analysed by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray microanalyzer, and by glow discharge optical emission or mass spectrometry. The oxide layers were grown to thicknesses in the range of 200 nm to 4.5 μm regarding to the laser treatment parameters and the heating duration. These contaminated oxides have a ‘duplex structure’ with a mean weight percentage of 0.5% of europium in the volume of the oxide layer. It appears that europium implementation prevents the oxide growth by furnace but has no impact on laser heating. These oxide layers are used to study the decontamination of metallic surfaces such as stainless steel 304L using a nanosecond pulsed laser.

  13. Silicon surface passivation using thin HfO2 films by atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gope, Jhuma; Vandana; Batra, Neha; Panigrahi, Jagannath; Singh, Rajbir; Maurya, K.K.; Srivastava, Ritu; Singh, P.K.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • HfO 2 films using thermal ALD are studied for silicon surface passivation. • As-deposited thin film (∼8 nm) shows better passivation with surface recombination velocity (SRV) <100 cm/s. • Annealing improves passivation quality with SRV ∼20 cm/s for ∼8 nm film. - Abstract: Hafnium oxide (HfO 2 ) is a potential material for equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) scaling in microelectronics; however, its surface passivation properties particularly on silicon are not well explored. This paper reports investigation on passivation properties of thermally deposited thin HfO 2 films by atomic layer deposition system (ALD) on silicon surface. As-deposited pristine film (∼8 nm) shows better passivation with <100 cm/s surface recombination velocity (SRV) vis-à-vis thicker films. Further improvement in passivation quality is achieved with annealing at 400 °C for 10 min where the SRV reduces to ∼20 cm/s. Conductance measurements show that the interface defect density (D it ) increases with film thickness whereas its value decreases after annealing. XRR data corroborate with the observations made by FTIR and SRV data.

  14. Power factor of very thin thermoelectric layers of different thickness prepared by laser ablation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zeipl, Radek; Walachová, Jarmila; Pavelka, Martin; Jelínek, Miroslav; Studnička, Václav; Kocourek, Tomáš

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 93, č. 3 (2008), 663-667 ISSN 0947-8396 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520; CEZ:AV0Z20670512; CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : thermoelectric layers * thin films * PLD * power factor * BiTe Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Laser s Impact factor: 1.884, year: 2008

  15. The Thermal And Hydrodynamic Behavior of Thick, Rough-Wall, Turbulent Boundary Layers,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-08-01

    34match point") and then extrap - olating to x = 0, the virtual origin of the hydrodynamic flow field. The values of L for the artificially thickened...boundary layers developing over rough sur- faces is important for the design of many engineering components, including reentry vehicles, nuclear reactors

  16. Retinal vessel diameters decrease with macular ganglion cell layer thickness in autosomal dominant optic atrophy and in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rönnbäck, Cecilia; Grønskov, Karen; Larsen, Michael

    2014-01-01

    diameters (central retinal artery equivalent, CRAE, and central retinal vein equivalent, CRVE). Statistical analysis was corrected for age, gender, spherical equivalent refraction, axial length and mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) in a mixed model analysis. RESULTS: Retinal arteries and veins were...... ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer (GC-IPL) thickness (p = 0.0017 and p = 0.0057, respectively). CONCLUSION: Narrow retinal arteries and veins were associated not only with the severity of ADOA but with ganglion cell volume in patients with ADOA and in healthy subjects. This suggests that narrow vessels...

  17. Surface alloys as interfacial layers between quasicrystalline and periodic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duguet, T.; Ledieu, J.; Dubois, J. M.; Fournée, V.

    2008-08-01

    Low adhesion with normal metals is an intrinsic property of many quasicrystalline surfaces. Although this property could be useful to develop low friction or non-stick coatings, it is also responsible for the poor adhesion of quasicrystalline coatings on metal substrates. Here we investigate the possibility of using complex metallic surface alloys as interface layers to enhance the adhesion between quasicrystals and simple metal substrates. We first review some examples where such complex phases are formed as an overlayer. Then we study the formation of such surface alloys in a controlled way by annealing a thin film deposited on a quasicrystalline substrate. We demonstrate that a coherent buffer layer consisting of the γ-Al4Cu9 approximant can be grown between pure Al and the i-Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystal. The interfacial relationships between the different layers are defined by [111]_{\\mathrm {Al}}\\parallel [110]_{\\mathrm {Al_4Cu_9}}\\parallel [5\\mathrm {f}]_{i\\mbox {-}\\mathrm {Al\\mbox {--}Cu \\mbox {--}Fe}} .

  18. Surface alloys as interfacial layers between quasicrystalline and periodic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duguet, T; Ledieu, J; Dubois, J M; Fournee, V [Laboratoire de Science et Genie des Materiaux et de Metallurgie, UMR 7584 CNRS-Nancy Universite, Ecole des Mines de Nancy, Parc de Saurupt, F-54042 Nancy (France)], E-mail: fournee@lsg2m.org

    2008-08-06

    Low adhesion with normal metals is an intrinsic property of many quasicrystalline surfaces. Although this property could be useful to develop low friction or non-stick coatings, it is also responsible for the poor adhesion of quasicrystalline coatings on metal substrates. Here we investigate the possibility of using complex metallic surface alloys as interface layers to enhance the adhesion between quasicrystals and simple metal substrates. We first review some examples where such complex phases are formed as an overlayer. Then we study the formation of such surface alloys in a controlled way by annealing a thin film deposited on a quasicrystalline substrate. We demonstrate that a coherent buffer layer consisting of the {gamma}-Al{sub 4}Cu{sub 9} approximant can be grown between pure Al and the i-Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystal. The interfacial relationships between the different layers are defined by [111]{sub Al} parallel [110]{sub Al4Cu9} parallel [5f]{sub i-Al-}C{sub u-Fe}.

  19. Growth, surface treatment and characterization of polycrystalline lead iodide thick films prepared using close space deposition technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Xinghua; Sun, Hui; Yang, Dingyu; Zheng, Xiaolin

    2012-01-01

    Lead iodide (PbI 2 ) polycrystalline thick films were fabricated on glass substrates with a conductive indium–tin-oxide layer using a close space deposition technique. The morphology of the as-deposited PbI 2 films is typically and highly oriented polycrystalline structure, made up of microcrystal platelets upright on the substrate plane. Two techniques including the surface mechanical cutting and after-growth cadmium telluride coating were employed to improve the films′ surface properties. It was shown that both of the film surface treatment methods markedly decreased the dark current of PbI 2 films. The photo-to-dark current ratio of about 2.05 under 241 Am γ-ray source with activity of 2.78 μCi irradiation was obtained from the film treated using both surface cutting and after-growth CdTe coating. Charge transport characteristics of these films were measured and the hole mobility 7.7×10 −2 –1.67×10 −1 cm 2 /V s was estimated.

  20. Changes in thickness and surface area of the human cortex and their relationship with intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnack, Hugo G; van Haren, Neeltje E M; Brouwer, Rachel M; Evans, Alan; Durston, Sarah; Boomsma, Dorret I; Kahn, René S; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E

    2015-06-01

    Changes in cortical thickness over time have been related to intelligence, but whether changes in cortical surface area are related to general cognitive functioning is unknown. We therefore examined the relationship between intelligence quotient (IQ) and changes in cortical thickness and surface over time in 504 healthy subjects. At 10 years of age, more intelligent children have a slightly thinner cortex than children with a lower IQ. This relationship becomes more pronounced with increasing age: with higher IQ, a faster thinning of the cortex is found over time. In the more intelligent young adults, this relationship reverses so that by the age of 42 a thicker cortex is associated with higher intelligence. In contrast, cortical surface is larger in more intelligent children at the age of 10. The cortical surface is still expanding, reaching its maximum area during adolescence. With higher IQ, cortical expansion is completed at a younger age; and once completed, surface area decreases at a higher rate. These findings suggest that intelligence may be more related to the magnitude and timing of changes in brain structure during development than to brain structure per se, and that the cortex is never completed but shows continuing intelligence-dependent development. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. The effect of different thickness alumina capping layers on the final morphology of dewet thin Ni films

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Benjamin C.; Behbahanian, Amir; Stoker, T. McKay; Fowlkes, Jason D.; Hartnett, Chris; Rack, Phillip D.; Roberts, Nicholas A.

    2018-03-01

    Nanoparticles on a substrate have numerous applications in nanotechnology, from enhancements to solar cell efficiency to improvements in carbon nanotube growth. Producing nanoparticles in a cost effective fashion with control over size and spacing is desired, but difficult to do. This work presents a scalable method for altering the radius and pitch distributions of nickel nanoparticles. The introduction of alumina capping layers to thin nickel films during a pulsed laser-induced dewetting process has yielded reductions in the mean and standard deviation of radii and pitch for dewet nanoparticles with no noticeable difference in final morphology with increased capping layer thickness. The differences in carbon nanotube mats grown, on the uncapped sample and one of the capped samples, is also presented here, with a more dense mat being present for the capped case.

  2. Novel sensing approach for LPG leakage detection: Part II: Effects of particle size, composition and coating layer thickness

    KAUST Repository

    Mukhopadhyay, Subhas

    2015-10-30

    Prominent research has been going on to develop a low-cost, efficient gas sensing system. The paper presents a continuation of our earlier research work done to develop a new sensing approach for gas detection at ambient conditions. The work exhibits the optimization of the response time of the sensor by inhabiting characteristic changes like variation in the concentration of the dispersion medium, thickness of the coating and the size of the dispersed medium. Different concentrations of the dispersion medium in the coated suspension were tested to determine the optimal composition required to achieve the highest sensitivity of the tin oxide (SnO2) layer towards the tested gas. The control over adsorption and desorption of the gas molecules in the coated layer was achieved by investigating the particle size of the dispersed medium. The response time of the coated sensor was encouraging and owns a promising potential to the development of a more efficient gas sensing system.

  3. In vivo sweat film layer thickness measured with Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jonathan, E

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available s Centre form the f th s pr t fi d id Keywords: Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography; Human sweat secretion; Sweat gland; Sweat duct; Hyperhidrosis growing list of triggers include cancer, glucose control disorder, mental stress, social..., that is, the gland, duct and pore(s). However, due to a slow imaging time, COCT is largely restricted to morphometry of human tissue and thickness measurement of biologic and biologic samples [12,13]. ARTICLE IN PRESS Fourier-domain optical coherence...

  4. XRF intermediate thickness layer technique for analysis of residue of hard to dissolve materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mzyk, Z.; Mzyk, J.; Buzek, L.; Baranowska, I.

    1998-01-01

    This work presents a quick method for lead and silver determination in materials, such as slags from silver metallurgy and slimes from copper electrorefining, which are very difficult to dissolve, even using a microwave technique. The idea was to dissolve the possibly greatest amount of the sample using acids. Insoluble deposit was filtered out. Silver content in the solution was analysed by potentiometric titration or AAS, lead content by XRS, while sediment deposit on filter - by XRF intermediate thickness technique. The results of silver and lead analysis obtained by this method were compared with those obtained by classical method, i.e. melting the residue with sodium peroxide. (author)

  5. Pattern Visual Evoked Potential, Pattern Electroretinogram, and Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness in Patients with Migraine during and after Aura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shazly, Amany Abd El-Fattah; Farweez, Yousra Ahmed; Hamdi, Momen Mahmoud; El-Sherbiny, Noha Ezzat

    2017-09-01

    To study pattern visual evoked potential (PVEP), pattern electroretinogram (PERG), and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness in patients with migraine during and after aura. We included 60 eyes of 60 patients with migraine (Group 1) and 30 healthy volunteers (30 eyes) as controls (Group 2). Group 1 was studied twice, during a visual aura (1-a) and in between attacks (1-b). All participants underwent full ophthalmological examination, PVEP, PERG, and optical coherence tomographyOCT imaging of the RNFL thickness for each patient. RNFL thickness was found to be thinner in patients during the aura compared to controls. It increased significantly post-aura but remained lower than the controls. Prolonged P100 latency and decreased amplitude were found in patients during aura compared to controls with significant change in between attacks to values comparable to the controls. We found prolonged N95 latency and decreased amplitude in patients during aura compared to controls with significant change post-aura to values comparable to the controls. There was positive correlation between average RNFL thicknesses and VA and spherical equivalent; but it showed negative correlation with duration of migraine, attack duration, and aura duration. Multiple regression analysis showed that the most important determinants of average RNFL thickness in patients of migraine were attack and aura duration (beta = -0.21 and -0.26 and p = 0.03 and 0.04, respectively). Migraine attacks impose both functional and structural retinal changes. The functional changes are fully reversible after the aura but not the structural ones. So, vigorous prevention of migraine attacks would be protective for retina.

  6. Surface treatment systems for concrete in marine environment: Effect of concrete cover thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Henrique Farias de Medeiros

    Full Text Available Abstract There are some ways to extend the service life of a reinforced concrete structure. This paper focuses on the extension of the service life by treating the surface of reinforced concrete, specifically on the effect of the concrete cover thickness on the surface treatment system efficacy. Thus, chloride migration tests were performed and diffusion chloride coefficients were calculated. The service life of each case (treated or non-treated concrete was estimated using these data and Fick's second law of diffusion. Results indicated that the thicker the concrete cover is, the greater the efficacy of the concrete surface treatment system will be. The dissemination of this information is important, since it is almost intuitive to think that the effect of a surface treatment system depends only on itself and this study shows the opposite.

  7. Virtual ellipsometry on layered micro-facet surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chi; Wilkie, Alexander; Harcuba, Petr; Novosad, Lukas

    2017-09-18

    Microfacet-based BRDF models are a common tool to describe light scattering from glossy surfaces. Apart from their wide-ranging applications in optics, such models also play a significant role in computer graphics for photorealistic rendering purposes. In this paper, we mainly investigate the computer graphics aspect of this technology, and present a polarisation-aware brute force simulation of light interaction with both single and multiple layered micro-facet surfaces. Such surface models are commonly used in computer graphics, but the resulting BRDF is ultimately often only approximated. Recently, there has been work to try to make these approximations more accurate, and to better understand the behaviour of existing analytical models. However, these brute force verification attempts still emitted the polarisation state of light and, as we found out, this renders them prone to mis-estimating the shape of the resulting BRDF lobe for some particular material types, such as smooth layered dielectric surfaces. For these materials, non-polarising computations can mis-estimate some areas of the resulting BRDF shape by up to 23%. But we also identified some other material types, such as dielectric layers over rough conductors, for which the difference turned out to be almost negligible. The main contribution of our work is to clearly demonstrate that the effect of polarisation is important for accurate simulation of certain material types, and that there are also other common materials for which it can apparently be ignored. As this required a BRDF simulator that we could rely on, a secondary contribution is that we went to considerable lengths to validate our software. We compare it against a state-of-art model from graphics, a library from optics, and also against ellipsometric measurements of real surface samples.

  8. Effect of impurities in the description of surface nanobubbles: Role of nonidealities in the surface layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, S.

    2011-01-01

    In a recent study [ S. Das, J. H. Snoeijer and D. Lohse Phys. Rev. E 82 056310 (2010)], we provided quantitative demonstration of the conjecture [ W. A. Ducker Langmuir 25 8907 (2009)] that the presence of impurities at the surface layer (or the air-water interface) of surface nanobubbles can

  9. Improved performance of organic light-emitting diode with vanadium pentoxide layer on the FTO surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikia, D.; Sarma, R.

    2017-06-01

    Vanadium pentoxide layer deposited on the fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) anode by vacuum deposition has been investigated in organic light-emitting diode (OLED). With 12 nm optimal thickness of V2O5, the luminance efficiency is increased by 1.66 times compared to the single FTO-based OLED. The improvement of current efficiency implies that there is a better charge injection and better controlling of hole current. To investigate the performance of OLED by the buffer layer, V2O5 films of different thicknesses were deposited on the FTO anode and their J- V and L- V characteristics were studied. Further analysis was carried out by measuring sheet resistance, optical transmittance and surface morphology with the FE-SEM images. This result indicates that the V2O5 (12 nm) buffer layer is a good choice for increasing the efficiency of FTO-based OLED devices within the tunnelling region. Here the maximum value of current efficiency is found to be 2.83 cd / A.

  10. Sensitivity enhancement of a surface plasmon resonance sensor using porous metamaterial layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherifi, Abdellatif; Bouhafs, Benamar

    2017-12-01

    In this work, the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) device with two porous left handed metamaterial (LHM) layers separated by an insulator gap, is investigated. The effect of the insulator gap thickness and its refractive index (RI) on the angular response of the device is analyzed. The results show that the sensitivity of the SPR sensor is enhanced compared to the standard SPR sensors. Here, the multilayer structure is probed with 738 nm-wavelength, and electromagnetic properties of active porous LHM layers are described from the effective medium theory (EMT). Furthermore, in the increase of the porosity from 0 to 0.6, the designed nanocavity exhibits a fundamental SPR mode long-range (LR) type and it can be of interest in high-performance SPR sensing.

  11. Surface photovoltage method for the quality control of silicon epitaxial layers on sapphire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaremchuk, A. F.; Starkov, A. V.; Zaikin, A. V., E-mail: lynch0000@gmail.com [National Rsearch University MIET (Russian Federation); Alekseev, A. V. [ZAO “Telekom-STV” (Russian Federation); Sokolov, E. M. [ZAO “Epiel” (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-15

    The surface photovoltage method is used to study “silicon-on-sapphire” epitaxial layers with a thickness of 0.3–0.6 μm, which are used to fabricate p-channel MOS (metal—oxide-semiconductor) transistors with improved radiation hardness. It is shown that the manner in which the photoconductivity of the epitaxial layer decays after the end of a light pulse generated by a light-emitting diode (wavelength ∼400 nm) strongly depends on the density of structural defects in the bulk of the structure. This enables control over how a “silicon-on-sapphire” structure is formed to provide the manufacturing of MOS structures with optimal operating characteristics.

  12. Structure and nano-mechanical characteristics of surface oxide layers on a metallic glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, A; Qin, C L; Gu, L; González, S; Shluger, A; Fecht, H-J; Louzguine-Luzgin, D V; Inoue, A

    2011-03-04

    Owing to their low elastic moduli, high specific strength and excellent processing characteristics in the undercooled liquid state, metallic glasses are promising materials for applications in micromechanical systems. With miniaturization of metallic mechanical components down to the micrometer scale, the importance of a native oxide layer on a glass surface is increasing. In this work we use TEM and XPS to characterize the structure and properties of the native oxide layer grown on Ni(62)Nb(38) metallic glass and their evolution after annealing in air. The thickness of the oxide layer almost doubled after annealing. In both cases the oxide layer is amorphous and consists predominantly of Nb oxide. We investigate the friction behavior at low loads and in ambient conditions (i.e. at T = 295 K and 60% air humidity) of both as-cast and annealed samples by friction force microscopy. After annealing the friction coefficient is found to have significantly increased. We attribute this effect to the increase of the mechanical stability of the oxide layer upon annealing.

  13. The Influences of Thickness on the Optical and Electrical Properties of Dual-Ion-Beam Sputtering-Deposited Molybdenum-Doped Zinc Oxide Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Chiuan Kuo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The thickness of transparent conductive oxide (TCO layer significantly affects not only the optical and electrical properties, but also its mechanical durability. To evaluate these influences on the molybdenum-doped zinc oxide layer deposited on a flexible polyethersulfone (PES substrate by using a dual-ion-beam sputtering system, films with various thicknesses were prepared at a same condition and their optical and electrical performances have been compared. The results show that all the deposited films present a crystalline wurtzite structure, but the preferred orientation changes from (002 to (100 with increasing the film thickness. Thicker layer contains a relative higher carrier concentration, but the consequently accumulated higher internal stress might crack the film and retard the carrier mobility. The competition of these two opposite trends for carrier concentration and carrier mobility results in that the electrical resistivity of molybdenum-doped zinc oxide first decreases with the thickness but suddenly rises when a critical thickness is reached.

  14. [Epidemiologic study of tear film lipid layer thickness measurement in the population of Taishitun Community in Beijing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Q F; Du, X H; Su, Y D; Wang, N L; Wei, Z J; Labbé, Antoine

    2017-07-11

    Objective: To investigate the distribution of tear film lipid layer thickness (LLT) and the relationship between symptoms and signs of dry eye and tear film LLT in the population of Taishitun Community in Beijing. Methods: A cross-sectional study. From May 2016 to August 2016, three streets of Taishitun Community were randomly selected as survey districts and 540 persons were taken as investigation subjects. Every participant completed 6 items of dry eye examinations as follows: questionnaire (Ocular Surface Disease Index, OSDI), measurement of tear film LLT, tear film break-up time (TBUT), corneal and conjunctival staining, SchirmerⅠtest and the infrared meibomian photography. According to their age, all participants were divided into four groups: junior group (analysis and multivariate Logistic regression analysis, distribution of the variables of LLT and the relationship between dry eye symptoms and LLT were studied. Results: A total of 473 residents finally participated in this study, and the response ratio was 87.6%. The values of LLT were normally distributed. The average LLT was (59.87±18.50) nm [(60.16±19.15) nm in males and (59.67±18.57) nm in females], and the comparison of LLT with different genders was not statistically significant ( t= 0.198, P= 0.843). The tear film LLT of four different age groups had statistical significance ( F= 15.092, P0.05. F= 0.538, P >0.05). In the OSDI symptom questionnaire, only blurred vision and decreased visual acuity were related to the tear film LLT ( Pfilm LLT ( P> 0.05). Conclusions: In Taishitun Community of Beijing, the values of tear film LLT had a normal distribution. The LLT was positively correlated with age, but inversely correlated with the severity of the symptoms of dry eye. There was no significant correlation between the LLT and the TBUT, SchirmerⅠtest result and meibomian gland loss rate. (Chin J Ophthalmol, 2017, 53: 495-501) .

  15. Assessment of iris surface features and their relationship with iris thickness in Asian eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhartha, Elizabeth; Gupta, Preeti; Liao, Jiemin; Tham, Yih-Chung; Cheung, Carol Y; He, Mingguang; Wong, Tien Y; Aung, Tin; Cheng, Ching-Yu

    2014-05-01

    To assess iris surface features in Asian eyes and examine their associations with iris thickness measured by anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS OCT). Cross-sectional study. We recruited 250 subjects from the Singapore Malay Eye Study. We obtained standardized slit-lamp photographs and developed a grading system assessing iris crypts (by number and size), furrows (by number and circumferential extent), and color (higher grade denoting darker iris). Vertical and horizontal cross-sections of the anterior chamber were imaged using AS OCT. Intragrader and intergrader agreements in the grading of iris surface were assessed by weighted κ (κ(w)) statistic. Associations of the average iris thickness with the grade of iris features were assessed using linear regression analysis. Frequency and size of iris crypts, furrows, and color; iris thickness at 750 μm (IT750) and 2000 μm (IT2000) from the scleral spur; and maximum iris thickness (ITM) averaged from the 4 quarters. Three hundred sixty-four eyes had complete and gradable data for crypts and color; 330 eyes were graded for furrows. The grading scheme showed good intragrader (crypt κ(w) = 0.919, furrow κ(w) =0.901, color κ(w) = 0.925) and intergrader (crypt κ(w) = 0.775, furrow κ(w) = 0.836, color κ(w) = 0.718) agreements. Higher crypt grade was associated independently with thinner IT750 (β [change in iris thickness per grade higher] = -0.007; P = 0.029), IT2000 (β = -0.018; P iris was also associated with thicker IT750 (β = 0.014; P = 0.001). Iris surface features, assessed and measured from slit-lamp photographs, correlate well with iris thickness. Irises with more crypts are thinner; irises with more extensive furrows and darker color are thicker peripherally. These findings may provide another means to assess angle closure risk based on iris features. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Study on microstructure and properties of Mg-alloy surface alloying layer fabricated by EPC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Dongfeng

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available AZ91D surface alloying was investigated through evaporative pattern casting (EPC technology. Aluminum powder (0.074 to 0.104 mm was used as the alloying element in the experiment. An alloying coating with excellent properties was fabricated, which mainly consisted of adhesive, co-solvent, suspending agent and other ingredients according to desired proportion. Mg-alloy melt was poured under certain temperature and the degree of negative pressure. The microstructure of the surface layer was examined by means of scanning electron microscopy. It has been found that a large volume fraction of network new phases were formed on the Mg-alloy surface, the thickness of the alloying surface layer increased with the alloying coating increasing from 0.3 mm to 0.5 mm, and the microstructure became compact. Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX analysis was used to determine the chemical composition of the new phases. It showed that the new phases mainly consist of β-Mg17Al12, in addition to a small quantity of inter-metallic compounds and oxides. A micro-hardness test and a corrosion experiment to simulate the effect of sea water were performed. The result indicated that the highest micro-hardness of the surface reaches three times that of the matrix. The corrosion rate of alloying samples declines to about a fifth of that of the as-cast AZ91D specimen.

  17. Soil surface organic layers in Arctic Alaska: spatial distribution, rates of formation, and microclimatic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baughman, Carson A.; Mann, Daniel H.; Verbyla, David L.; Kunz, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Organic layers of living and dead vegetation cover the ground surface in many permafrost landscapes and play important roles in ecosystem processes. These soil surface organic layers (SSOLs) store large amounts of carbon and buffer the underlying permafrost and its contained carbon from changes in aboveground climate. Understanding the dynamics of SSOLs is a prerequisite for predicting how permafrost and carbon stocks will respond to warming climate. Here we ask three questions about SSOLs in a representative area of the Arctic Foothills region of northern Alaska: (1) What environmental factors control the thickness of SSOLs and the carbon they store? (2) How long do SSOLs take to develop on newly stabilized point bars? (3) How do SSOLs affect temperature in the underlying ground? Results show that SSOL thickness and distribution correlate with elevation, drainage area, vegetation productivity, and incoming solar radiation. A multiple regression model based on these correlations can simulate spatial distribution of SSOLs and estimate the organic carbon stored there. SSOLs develop within a few decades after a new, sandy, geomorphic surface stabilizes but require 500–700 years to reach steady state thickness. Mature SSOLs lower the growing season temperature and mean annual temperature of the underlying mineral soil by 8 and 3°C, respectively. We suggest that the proximate effects of warming climate on permafrost landscapes now covered by SSOLs will occur indirectly via climate's effects on the frequency, extent, and severity of disturbances like fires and landslides that disrupt the SSOLs and interfere with their protection of the underlying permafrost.

  18. Experimental study on the membrane electrode assembly of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell: effects of microporous layer, membrane thickness and gas diffusion layer hydrophobic treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Rui B.; Falcão, D.S.; Oliveira, V.B.; Pinto, A.M.F.R.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • EIS is employed to investigate the MEA design of a PEM fuel cell. • Effects of MPL, membrane thickness and GDL hydrophobic treatment are studied. • MPL increases cell output at low to medium currents but reduces it at high currents. • Better results are obtained when employing a thinner Nafion membrane. • GDL hydrophobic treatment improves the cell performance. - Abstract: In this study, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is employed to analyze the influence of microporous layer (MPL), membrane thickness and gas diffusion layer (GDL) hydrophobic treatment in the performance of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. Results show that adding a MPL increases cell performance at low to medium current densities. Because lower ohmic losses are observed when applying a MPL, such improvement is attributed to a better hydration state of the membrane. The MPL creates a pressure barrier for water produced at the cathode, forcing it to travel to the anode side, therefore increasing the water content in the membrane. However, at high currents, this same phenomenon seems to have intensified liquid water flooding in the anode gas channels, increasing mass transfer losses and reducing the cell performance. Decreasing membrane thickness results into considerably higher performances, due to a decrease in ohmic resistance. Moreover, at low air humidity operation, a rapid recovery from dehydration is observed when a thinner membrane is employed. The GDL hydrophobic treatment significantly improves the cell performance. Untreated GDLs appear to act as water-traps that not only hamper reactants transport to the reactive sites but also impede the proper humidification of the cell. From the different designs tested, the highest maximum power density is obtained from that containing a MPL, a thinner membrane and treated GDLs.

  19. Application of various surface passivation layers in solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ji Youn; Lee, Soo Hong

    2004-01-01

    In this work, we have used different techniques for surface passivation: conventional thermal oxidation (CTO), rapid thermal oxidation (RTO), and plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD). The surface passivation qualities of eight different single and combined double layers have been investigated both on phosphorus non-diffused p-type Float Zone (FZ) silicon wafers and on diffused emitters (100 Ω/□ and 40 Ω/□). CTO/SiN 1 passivates very well not only on a non-diffused surface (τ eff = 1361 μs) but also on an emitter (τ eff = 414 μs). However, we concluded that RTO/SiN 1 and RTO/SiN 2 stacks were more suitable than CTO/SiN stacks for surface passivation in solar cells since those stacks had relatively good passivation qualities and suitable optical reflections. RTO/SiN 1 for rear-surface passivation and RTO/SiN 2 for front-surface passivation were applied to the fabrication of solar cells. We achieved efficiencies of 18.5 % and 18.8 % on 0.5 Ω-cm (FZ) silicon with planar and textured front surfaces, respectively. An excellent open circuit voltage (V oc ) of 675.6 mV was obtained for the planar cell.

  20. Surface plasmon resonance investigation of optical detection in plasma-modified phospholipid layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Byoungchoo; Cho, Chanyoun; Choi, Kyoungho; Jeon, Honggoo [Kwangwoon University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    We herein report on a study of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) in thin gold (Au) films coated with thin layers of phospholipid material, which had been exposed to an atmospheric pressure (AP) plasma containing both pure Ar and Ar mixed with O{sub 2} (Ar/O{sub 2}, 0.8%). The phospholipid material that we used for the SPR experiments was lecithin, and the AP plasma system was applied in air by means of a radio-frequency (RF) plasma generator. A thin (∼60 nm) film of Au and a thin (∼15 nm) layer of lecithin were deposited and attached to the face of a prism, and surface plasmon modes were excited along the interfaces of the prism-Au-lecithin-air system by means of prism coupling using a He-Ne Laser (632.8 nm). The experimental SPR reflectance curves of the Au-lecithin-air modes were found to be shifted towards those of the Au-air mode with increasing applications of AP RF plasma treatment. From the shifts in the SPR curves, we found that the estimated thickness of the lecithin layer treated with a pure Ar plasma showed a linear decrease with etching rate of about 3 nm per treatment while the thickness of the lecithin layer treated with a mixed Ar/O{sub 2} plasma showed a tendency to saturate following a large initial decrease (ca. 14 nm). All these results demonstrate that the use of SPR sensing could facilitate the detection of extremely small variations in plasma-treated films of biomaterials.

  1. Theoretical analysis and coating thickness determination of a dual layer metal coated FBG sensor for sensitivity enhancement at cryogenic temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalingam, Rajinikumar; Atrey, M. D.

    2017-12-01

    Use of Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensor is very appealing for sensing low temperature and strain in superconducting magnets because of their miniature size and the possibility of accommodating many sensors in a single fiber. The main drawback is their low intrinsic thermal sensitivity at low temperatures below 120 K. Approaching cryogenic temperatures, temperature changes lower than a few degrees Kelvin cannot be resolved, since they do not cause an appreciable shift of the wavelength diffracted by a bare FBG sensor. To improve the thermal sensitivity and thermal inertia below 77 K, the Bare FBG (BFBG) sensor can be coated with high thermal expansion coefficient materials. In this work, different metal were considered for coating the FBG sensor. For theoretical investigation, a double layered circular thick wall tube model has been considered to study the effect on sensitivity due to the mechanical properties like Young’s modulus, Thermal expansion coefficient, Poisson’s ratio of selected materials at a various cryogenic temperatures. The primary and the secondary coating thickness for a dual layer metal coated FBG sensor have been determined from the above study. The sensor was then fabricated and tested at cryogenic temperature range from 4-300 K. The cryogenic temperature characteristics of the tested sensors are reported.

  2. Effect of fixed aqueous layer thickness of polymeric stabilizers on zeta potential and stability of aripiprazole nanosuspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelbary, Aly A; Li, Xiaoling; El-Nabarawi, Mohamed; Elassasy, Abdelhalim; Jasti, Bhaskara

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the thickness of adsorbed polymer layer (also known as Fixed Aqueous Layer Thickness, FALT) of polymeric stabilizers on zeta potential and stability of nanoparticles in a suspension. Aripiprazole, a poorly water soluble drug was used as a model drug to evaluate rationale for increased FALT and to understand the effect of hydrophilicity and hydrophobicity of polymeric stabilizers on FALT of aripiprazole nanosuspensions. The nanosuspensions were prepared by media milling and Pluronic F68, Pluronic F127, Hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) and Hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) were used as polymeric stabilizers. The particle size (immediately after preparation and after 1 week of storage at 25°C) and zeta potential of aripiprazole nanosuspensions were determined. For Pluronics, FALT was determined theoretically whereas for HPMC and HPC it was calculated as Debye Huckel parameter from the zeta potential dependence on the ionic strength. An increase in FALT resulted in reduced zeta potential. With an increase in FALT of polymers used, the stability of nanosuspensions showed improvement. Furthermore, a linear correlation was shown to exist between the FALT and length of hydrophilic chains in Pluronics.

  3. Influence of Surface Energy Effects on Elastic Fields of a Layered Elastic Medium under Surface Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supakorn Tirapat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the analysis of a layered elastic half space under the action of axisymmetric surface loading and the influence of the surface energy effects. The boundary value problems for the bulk and the surface are formulated based on classical linear elasticity and a complete Gurtin-Murdoch constitutive relation. An analytical technique using Love’s representation and the Hankel integral transform is employed to derive an integral-form solution for both displacement and stress fields. An efficient numerical quadrature is then applied to accurately evaluate all involved integrals. Selected numerical results are presented to portray the influence of various parameters on elastic fields. Numerical results indicate that the surface stress displays a significant influence on both displacement and stress fields. It is also found that the layered half space becomes stiffer with the presence of surface stresses. In addition, unlike the classical elasticity solution, size-dependent behavior of elastic fields is noted. The present analytical solutions provide fundamental understanding of the influence of surface energy on layered elastic materials. It can also be used as a benchmark solution for the development of numerical techniques such as FEM and BEM, for analysis of more complex problems involving a layered medium under the influence of surface energy effects.

  4. Durable superhydrophobic surfaces made by intensely connecting a bipolar top layer to the substrate with a middle connecting layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Jinghui; Zhang, Li-Zhi

    2017-08-30

    This study reported a simple fabrication method for a durable superhydrophobic surface. The superhydrophobic top layer of the durable superhydrophobic surface was connected intensely to the substrate through a middle connecting layer. Glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (KH-560) after hydrolysis was used to obtain a hydrophilic middle connecting layer. It could be adhered to the hydrophilic substrate by covalent bonds. Ring-open reaction with octadecylamine let the KH-560 middle layer form a net-like structure. The net-like sturcture would then encompass and station the silica particles that were used to form the coarse micro structures, intensely to increase the durability. The top hydrophobic layer with nano-structures was formed on the KH-560 middle layer. It was obtained by a bipolar nano-silica solution modified by hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS). This layer was connected to the middle layer intensely by the polar Si hydroxy groups, while the non-polar methyl groups on the surface, accompanied by the micro and nano structures, made the surface rather hydrophobic. The covalently interfacial interactions between the substrate and the middle layer, and between the middle layer and the top layer, strengthened the durability of the superhydrophobic surface. The abrasion test results showed that the superhydrophobic surface could bear 180 abrasion cycles on 1200 CW sandpaper under 2 kPa applied pressure.

  5. Inadequate thickness of the weight-bearing surface of claws in ruminants : clinical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Shakespeare

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The term 'thin soles' refers to the suboptimal thickness of the weight-bearing surface of claws in ruminants. These palmar / plantar surfaces of the claws support the weight of the animal and consist of the distal wall horn, the sole proper, the heel and the minute white line area. The sole should normally only bear weight on uneven or undulating surfaces. A decrease in the thickness of the weight-bearing claw surface will decrease the protective function of this structure and may alter the proportion of weight-bearing by each section with possible detrimental effects on hoof function. Horn tissue readily absorbs water and becomes softer which can lead to increased wear rates. Growth rates normally match wear rates but, unlike the latter, time is needed for the growth rate response to adapt to changes in wear rate. Concrete surfaces can be abrasive and dairy cows that spend their lactation cycle on these floors should be let out to pasture in the dry period so that their claws can recoup lost horn. Frictional coefficient is a measure of the 'slipperiness' of hooves on various surfaces. Newly laid or fresh concrete is not only abrasive but the thin surface suspension of calcium hydroxide that forms has a very alkaline pH which causes keratin degradation and is mostly responsible for the excessive claw wear that occurs. Four case studies are used to illustrate the importance of the distal wall horn, the dangers of over-trimming and the effects of disease and concrete on horn growth and wear rates.

  6. Densification of ∼5 nm-thick SiO{sub 2} layers by nitric acid oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jaeyoung [Department of Energy Engineering, Dankook University, Cheonan 311-16 (Korea, Republic of); Joo, Soyeong [Institute for Advanced Engineering (IAE), Advanced Materials & Processing Center, Youngin 449-863 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Tae Joo [Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Hanyang University, Ansan 15588 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woo-Byoung, E-mail: woo7838@dankook.ac.kr [Department of Energy Engineering, Dankook University, Cheonan 311-16 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    Highlights: • Leakage current density of the commercial PECVD grown ∼5 nm SiO{sub 2} layer has been decreased about three orders of magnitude by densification. • The densification of SiO{sub 2} layer is achieved by high oxidation ability of O·. • Densities of suboxide, fixed charge (N{sub f}) and defect state (N{sub d}) in SiO{sub 2}/Si interface are decreased by NAOS and PMA. • Tunneling barrier height (Φ{sub t}) is increased because of the increase of atomic density in SiO{sub 2} layer. - Abstract: Low-temperature nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) oxidation of Si (NAOS) has been used to improve the interface and electrical properties of ∼5 nm-thick SiO{sub 2}/Si layers produced by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Investigations of the physical properties and electrical characteristics of these thin films revealed that although their thickness is not changed by NAOS, the leakage current density at a gate bias voltage of −1 V decreases by about two orders of magnitude from 1.868 × 10{sup −5} A/cm{sup 2}. This leakage current density was further reduced by post-metallization annealing (PMA) at 250 °C for 10 min in a 5 vol.% hydrogen atmosphere, eventually reaching a level (5.2 × 10{sup −8} A/cm{sup 2}) approximately three orders of magnitude less than the as-grown SiO{sub 2} layer. This improvement is attributed to a decrease in the concentration of suboxide species (Si{sup 1+}, Si{sup 2+} and Si{sup 3+}) in the SiO{sub 2}/Si interface, as well as a decrease in the equilibrium density of defect sites (N{sub d}) and fixed charge density (N{sub f}). The barrier height (Φ{sub t}) generated by a Poole-Frenkel mechanism also increased from 0.205 to 0.371 eV after NAOS and PMA. The decrease in leakage current density is therefore attributed to a densification of the SiO{sub 2} layer in combination with the removal of OH species and increase in interfacial properties at the SiO{sub 2}/Si interface.

  7. Surface energy absorbing layers produced by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurarie, V.N.

    1997-01-01

    Single crystals of magnesia have been ion implanted with 80 keV Si and Cr ions at variable doses and then subjected to testing in a shock plasma. The peak surface temperature has been calibrated by measuring the size and temperature deformation of the fragments formed by multiple microcracking during thermal shock. the crack density curves for MgO crystals demonstrate that in a wide range of thermal shock intensity the ion implanted crystals develop a system of microcracks of a considerably higher density than the unimplanted ones. The high density of cracks nucleated in the ion implanted samples results in the formation of a surface energy absorbing layer which effectively absorbs elastic strain energy induced by thermal shock. As a consequence the depth of crack penetration in the layer and hence the degree of fracture damage are decreased. the results indicate that a Si implant decreases the temperature threshold of cracking and simultaneously increases the crack density in MgO crystals. However, in MgO crystals implanted with Cr a substantial increase in the crack density is achieved without a noticeable decrease in the temperature threshold of fracture. This effect is interpreted in terms of different Cr and Si implantation conditions and damage. The mechanical properties of the energy-absorbing layer and the relation to implantation-induced lattice damage are discussed. 11 refs., 4 figs

  8. Influence of Alveolar Bone Loss and Cement Layer Thickness on the Biomechanical Behavior of Endodontically Treated Maxillary Incisors: A 3-dimensional Finite Element Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Piva, Amanda Maria de Oliveira; Tribst, João Paulo Mendes; Souza, Rodrigo Othávio de Assunção E; Borges, Alexandre Luiz Souto

    2017-05-01

    In order to understand the mechanical behavior of a weakened incisor, this study aimed to evaluate the stress distribution caused by different alveolar bone heights and cement layer thickness. A finite element analysis was conducted for this investigation. An intact maxillary central incisor was initially modeled, and the bone of the models was modified in order to simulate 4 levels of bone height: BL0 (no bone loss), BL1 (1/3 bone loss), BL2 (1/2 bone loss), and BL3 (2/3 bone loss). These teeth models were remodeled with a fiber post at 2 different cement thicknesses and restored with a ceramic crown; "A" refers to the well-adapted fiber post (0.3 mm) and "B" to the nonadapted fiber post (1 mm), resulting in 12 models. RelyX ARC (3M ESPE, St Paul, MN) cement was simulated for the cementation of the crowns and fiber posts for all groups. Numeric models received a load of 100 N on the lingual surface. All materials and structures were considered linear elastic, homogeneous, and isotropic. Numeric models were plotted and meshed with isoparametric elements, and results were expressed in maximum principal stress. For fiberglass posts, cement, and dentin, the highest stress concentration occurred in the groups with increased bone loss. For cortical bone, the highest values were for the groups with 1/3 bone loss. A greater thickness of cement layer concentrates more stress. More bone loss and greater CLT were the influential factors in concentrating the stress. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Thick amorphous silicon layers suitable for the realization of radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Wan-Shick; Drewery, J.S.; Jing, Tao; Lee, Hyong-Koo; Perez-Mendez, V.; Petrova-Koch, V.

    1995-04-01

    Thick silicon films with good electronic quality have been prepared by glow discharge of He-diluted SiH 4 at a substrate temperature ∼ 150 degree C and subsequent annealing at 160 degree C for about 100 hours. The stress in the films obtained this way decreased to ∼ 100 MPa compared to the 350 MPa in conventional a-Si:H. The post-annealing helped to reduce the ionized dangling bond density from 2.5 x 10 15 cm -3 to 7 x 10 14 cm -3 without changing the internal stress. IR spectroscopy and hydrogen effusion measurements implied the existence of microvoids and tiny crystallites in the material showing satisfactory electronic properties. P-I-N diodes for radiation detection applications have been realized out of the new material

  10. Association between retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and magnetic resonance imaging findings and intelligence in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashtari, Fereshteh; Emami, Parisa; Akbari, Mojtaba

    2015-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a neurological disease in which demyelination and axonal loss leads to progressive disability. Cognition impairment is among the most common complication. Studying axonal loss in the retina is a new marker for MS. The main goal of our study is to search for correlations between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness at the macula and head of the optic nerve and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R) Scores that assess multiple domains of intelligence, and to explore the relationship between changes in the RNFL thickness with intellectual and cognitive dysfunction. A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted at the University Hospital of Kashani, Isfahan, Iran, from September to December 2013. All patients were assessed with a full-scale intelligence quotient (IQ) on the WAIS-R. An optical coherence tomography study and brain MRI were performed in the same week for all the patients. Statistical analysis was conducted by using a bivariate correlation, by utilizing SPSS 20.0. A P value ≤ 0.05 was the threshold of statistical significance. Examination of a 100 patients showed a significant correlation between the average RNFL thickness of the macula and the verbal IQ (P value = 0.01) and full IQ (P value = 0.01). There was a significant correlation between brain atrophy and verbal IQ. The RNFL loss was correlated with verbal IQ and full IQ.

  11. Glaucoma Diagnostic Ability of the New Circumpapillary Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness Analysis Based on Bruch's Membrane Opening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun Ji; Lee, Kyoung Min; Kim, Hyunjoong; Kim, Tae-Woo

    2016-08-01

    To compare the diagnostic ability of the new spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) algorithm for measuring circumpapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness centered on Bruch's membrane opening (BMO), with the conventional circumpapillary RNFL thickness measurement centered on the optic disc. In 75 eyes with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and 71 healthy control eyes, circumpapillary RNFL thickness was measured with SD-OCT, first by centering the scan circle on the optic disc (RNFLDi), and then on the BMO (RNFLBMO). Difference between the topographic profiles of RNFLDi and RNFLBMO was compared and factors influencing any discrepancies between methods were investigated. Glaucoma diagnostic abilities of each method were assessed using the areas under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUCs). Axial length did not differ between POAG and healthy eyes. A longer axial length and larger width of externally oblique border tissue (BT) associated with tilted optic disc were the two major factors influencing discrepancies between RNFLBMO and RNFLDi (both P 250 μm) of externally oblique BT (AUC = 0.933 vs. 0.843, respectively, P = 0.027). The new circumpapillary RNFL scanning algorithm centered on BMO may provide a more reliable RNFL profile in eyes with tilted optic discs, with a largely comparable glaucoma diagnostic ability to the conventional algorithm.

  12. Highly efficient computer algorithm for identifying layer thickness of atomically thin 2D materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jekwan; Cho, Seungwan; Park, Soohyun; Bae, Hyemin; Noh, Minji; Kim, Beom; In, Chihun; Yang, Seunghoon; Lee, Sooun; Seo, Seung Young; Kim, Jehyun; Lee, Chul-Ho; Shim, Woo-Young; Jo, Moon-Ho; Kim, Dohun; Choi, Hyunyong

    2018-03-01

    The fields of layered material research, such as transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), have demonstrated that the optical, electrical and mechanical properties strongly depend on the layer number N. Thus, efficient and accurate determination of N is the most crucial step before the associated device fabrication. An existing experimental technique using an optical microscope is the most widely used one to identify N. However, a critical drawback of this approach is that it relies on extensive laboratory experiences to estimate N; it requires a very time-consuming image-searching task assisted by human eyes and secondary measurements such as atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, which are necessary to ensure N. In this work, we introduce a computer algorithm based on the image analysis of a quantized optical contrast. We show that our algorithm can apply to a wide variety of layered materials, including graphene, MoS2, and WS2 regardless of substrates. The algorithm largely consists of two parts. First, it sets up an appropriate boundary between target flakes and substrate. Second, to compute N, it automatically calculates the optical contrast using an adaptive RGB estimation process between each target, which results in a matrix with different integer Ns and returns a matrix map of Ns onto the target flake position. Using a conventional desktop computational power, the time taken to display the final N matrix was 1.8 s on average for the image size of 1280 pixels by 960 pixels and obtained a high accuracy of 90% (six estimation errors among 62 samples) when compared to the other methods. To show the effectiveness of our algorithm, we also apply it to TMD flakes transferred on optically transparent c-axis sapphire substrates and obtain a similar result of the accuracy of 94% (two estimation errors among 34 samples).

  13. Specific Features of Chip Making and Work-piece Surface Layer Formation in Machining Thermal Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Yaroslavtsev

    2016-01-01

    of chip element formation are cycled. Fluctuations of the cutting force components completely repeat all the stages of local destruction and formation of individual chip elements. Studies have shown that with increased thickness of the cut-off layer the main crack develops below the cut-off line thus significantly affecting the quality of the machined surface: emerging cracks, cavities, chips, and other defects that significantly reduce the product performance.In machining the plasma-sprayed coatings, their high tendency to strengthening and rehardening because of the cutting action has a great impact on the surface quality. This is evident as a loss of the elastic equilibrium state stability and as a destruction of the work-piece surface layer (chipping, peeling, flaking. With increasing curvature of the machined surface (e.g., decreasing radius of cylindrical billet the surface layer is increasingly prone to destruction.Specific problems are cutting fluids used in grinding the plasma-sprayed coatings. Machining in this case comes with saturated liquid vapours formed in the surface layer of a billet under high pressure. With a pressure drop on the tool-side in cutting there is such an intensity of vaporization that micro- and macro-fractures of the machined work-piece surface can be initiated.

  14. A novel surface cleaning method for chemical removal of fouling lead layer from chromium surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholivand, Kh.; Khosravi, M.; Hosseini, S. G.; Fathollahi, M.

    2010-10-01

    Most products especially metallic surfaces require cleaning treatment to remove surface contaminations that remain after processing or usage. Lead fouling is a general problem which arises from lead fouling on the chromium surfaces of bores and other interior parts of systems which have interaction with metallic lead in high temperatures and pressures. In this study, a novel chemical solution was introduced as a cleaner reagent for removing metallic lead pollution, as a fouling metal, from chromium surfaces. The cleaner aqueous solution contains hydrogen peroxide (H 2O 2) as oxidizing agent of lead layer on the chromium surface and acetic acid (CH 3COOH) as chelating agent of lead ions. The effect of some experimental parameters such as acetic acid concentration, hydrogen peroxide concentration and temperature of the cleaner solution during the operation on the efficiency of lead cleaning procedure was investigated. The results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that using this procedure, the lead pollution layer could be completely removed from real chromium surfaces without corrosion of the original surface. Finally, the optimum conditions for the complete and fast removing of lead pollution layer from chromium surfaces were proposed. The experimental results showed that at the optimum condition (acetic acid concentration 28% (V/V), hydrogen peroxide 8% (V/V) and temperature 35 °C), only 15-min time is needed for complete removal of 3 g fouling lead from a chromium surface.

  15. Measure Guideline: Incorporating Thick Layers of Exterior Rigid Insulation on Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lstiburek, Joseph [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States); Baker, Peter [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States)

    2015-04-01

    This measure guideline provides information about the design and construction of wall assemblies that use layers of rigid exterior insulation thicker than 1-½ inches and that require a secondary cladding attachment location exterior to the insulation. The guideline is separated into several distinct sections that cover: fundamental building science principles relating to the use of exterior insulation on wall assemblies; design principles for tailoring this use to the specific project goals and requirements; and construction detailing to increase understanding about implementing the various design elements.

  16. Measure Guideline. Incorporating Thick Layers of Exterior Rigid Insulation on Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lstiburek, Joseph [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States); Baker, Peter [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States)

    2015-04-09

    This measure guideline, written by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Building America team Building Science Corporation, provides information about the design and construction of wall assemblies that use layers of rigid exterior insulation thicker than 1-½ in. and that require a secondary cladding attachment location exterior to the insulation. The guideline is separated into several distinct sections that cover: (1) fundamental building science principles relating to the use of exterior insulation on wall assemblies; (2) design principles for tailoring this use to the specific project goals and requirements; and (3) construction detailing to increase understanding about implementing the various design elements.

  17. A parametric study of a thick, incompressible flow over a curved surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriu DRAGAN

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to investigate the lift phenomenon produced by the Coanda effect when a fluid flows over a curved surface. A secondary goal was to quantify and to integrate it on super circulation wing aircraft configurations. Therefore we have conducted a series of CFD studies, varying the fluid velocity and measuring the pressure gradient over the super circulated curved ramp. The results showed that thick jets provide the anticipated lift force which is proportional to the flow velocity. Although in this case the ratio between the Coanda lift and the thrust of the jet itself is less than 10% on average. The immediate interpretation is that, by using thick jets we can increase the lift generated by the SCW aircraft bearing in mind that the main lift is not generated by this effect but rather by diversion of the jet downwards.

  18. Hierarchical Composite Membranes with Robust Omniphobic Surface Using Layer-By-Layer Assembly Technique

    KAUST Repository

    Woo, Yun Chul

    2018-01-17

    In this study, composite membranes were fabricated via layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly of negatively-charged silica aerogel (SiA) and 1H, 1H, 2H, 2H – Perfluorodecyltriethoxysilane (FTCS) on a polyvinylidene fluoride phase inversion membrane, and interconnecting them with positively-charged poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) via electrostatic interaction. The results showed that the PDDA-SiA-FTCS coated membrane had significantly enhanced the membrane structure and properties. New trifluoromethyl and tetrafluoroethylene bonds appeared at the surface of the coated membrane, which led to lower surface free energy of the composite membrane. Additionally, the LBL membrane showed increased surface roughness. The improved structure and property gave the LBL membrane an omniphobic property, as indicated by its good wetting resistance. The membrane performed a stable air gap membrane distillation (AGMD) flux of 11.22 L/m2h with very high salt rejection using reverse osmosis brine from coal seam gas produced water as feed with the addition of up to 0.5 mM SDS solution. This performance was much better compared to those of the neat membrane. The present study suggests that the enhanced membrane properties with good omniphobicity via LBL assembly make the porous membranes suitable for long-term AGMD operation with stable permeation flux when treating challenging saline wastewater containing low surface tension organic contaminants.

  19. Graphene Coatings: Probing the Limits of the One Atom Thick Protection Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Louis; Andersen, Mie; Balog, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The limitations of graphene as an effective corrosion-inhibiting coating on metal surfaces, here exemplified by the hex-reconstructed Pt(100) surface, are probed by scanning tunneling microscopy measurements and density functional theory calculations. While exposure of small molecules directly onto...... these extreme conditions for a limited amount of time, after substantial exposure, the Pt(100) reconstruction is lifted. Annealing experiments and density functional theory calculations demonstrate that the basal plane of the graphene stays intact and point to a graphene-mediated mechanism for the H...

  20. Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness and Characteristics Associated with Glaucoma in Community Living Older Adults: Prelude to a Screening Trial?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Barbara E K; Johnson, Chris A; Meuer, Stacy M; Lee, Kyungmoo; Wahle, Andreas; Lee, Kristine E; Kulkarni, Amruta; Sonka, Milan; Abràmoff, Michael D; Klein, Ronald

    2017-04-01

    To examine the associations of nerve fiber layer (NFL) thickness with other ocular characteristics in older adults. Participants in the Beaver Dam Eye Study (2008-2010) underwent spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) scans of the optic nerve head, imaging of optic discs, frequency doubling technology (FDT) perimetry, measurement of intraocular pressure (IOP), and an interview concerning their history of glaucoma and use of drops to lower eye pressure. Self-reported histories of glaucoma and the use of drops to lower eye pressure were obtained at follow-up examinations (2014-2016). NFL thickness measured on OCTs varied by location around the optic nerve. Age was associated with mean NFL thickness. Mean NFL was thinnest in eyes with larger cup/disc (C/D) ratios. Horizontal hemifield defects or other optic nerve-field defects were associated with thinner NFL. NFL in persons who reported taking eye drops for high intraocular pressure was thinner compared to those not taking drops. After accounting for the presence of high intraocular pressure, large C/D ratios or hemifield defects, eyes with thinner NFL in the arcades were more likely (OR = 2.3 for 30 micron thinner NFL, p = 0.04) to have incident glaucoma at examination 5 years later. Retinal NFL thickness was associated with a new history of self-reported glaucoma 5 years later. A trial testing the usefulness of NFL as part of a screening battery for predicting glaucoma in those previously undiagnosed might lead to improved case finding and, ultimately, to diminishing the risk of visual field loss.

  1. Abnormal retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and macula lutea in patients with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, LiYan; Liu, Ying; Li, XiaoHong; Bai, QuanHao; Liu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    We investigated possible abnormalities in the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) and macula lutea of patients diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and tested for any correlation with the severity of dementia. A total of 72 subjects, comprising 25 AD patients, 26 MCI patients and 21 healthy individuals (controls) were enrolled in this study. The thickness of the RNFL and volume of the macula lutea was determined using optical coherence tomography (OCT). When compared with controls, we found statistically significant thinning of the RNFL in AD patients at all clock-hour positions except 12:00, and nasal quadrant, 2:00, 3:00 and 4:00. After adjusting several risk factors, the average thickness of the RNFL was reduced in MCI patients compared to AD patients, with specific reductions at inferior quadrant, 5:00 and 6:00. Compared to controls, MCI patients showed a significant decrease in RNFL thickness only in the temporal quadrant, 8:00, 9:00 and 10:00. We found significant reduction in the volume of the macula lutea both in AD and MCI patients. Finally, we could not establish any correlation between patient Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores (an estimation of the severity of cognitive impairment) and any OCT parameter. Retinal degeneration in AD and MCI patients results in decreased thickness of the RNFL, and reduced macular volume in AD and MCI patients. However, there seems to be no correlation between these changes and the severity of dementia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Correlation in retinal nerve fibre layer thickness in uveitis and healthy eyes using scanning laser polarimetry and optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellocq, David; Maucort-Boulch, Delphine; Kodjikian, Laurent; Denis, Philippe

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the correlation of retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) thickness measured using spectral domain optical coherence tomo