WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface jet flow

  1. FLOW VISUALIZATION OF RECTANGULAR SLOT AIR JET IMPINGEMENT ON FLAT SURFACES

    OpenAIRE

    Satheesha V *1, B. K. Muralidhra2, Abhilash N3, C. K. Umesh4

    2018-01-01

    Jet impingement near the mid-chord of the gas turbine blade is treated as a flat plate. Experimental and numerical investigations are carried out for a single slot air jet impinging on flat surface for two different rectangular slots of dimension (3mm x 65 mm) and (5mm x 65 mm). Experimentation is done to study the flow pattern topography on the flat target plate, with varying the flow rate from 20 LPM to 50 LPM by varying the nozzle to plate distance from 9 mm to 24 mm for slot jet of 3mm an...

  2. On the Surface Breakup of a Non-turbulent Round Liquid Jet in Cross-flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzad, Mohsen; Ashgriz, Nasser

    2011-11-01

    The atomization of a non-turbulent liquid jet injected into a subsonic cross-flow consists of two parts: (1) primary breakup and (2) secondary breakup. Two distinct regimes for the liquid jet primary breakup have been recognized; the so called column breakup and surface breakup. In the column breakup mode, the entire liquid jet undergoes disintegration into large liquid lumps. Quiet differently in the surface breakup regime, liquid fragments with various sizes and shapes are separated from the surface of the jet. Despite many experimental studies the mechanisms of jet surface breakup is not fully understood. Thus this study aims at providing useful observations regarding the underlying physics involving the surface breakup mechanism of a liquid jet in cross-flow, using detailed numerical simulations. The results show that a two-stage mechanism can be responsible for surface breakup. In the first stage, a sheet-like structure extrudes towards the downstream, and in the second stage it disintegrates into ligaments and droplets due to aerodynamic instability.

  3. Investigation of ALEGRA shock hydrocode algorithms using an exact free surface jet flow solution.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanks, Bradley Wright.; Robinson, Allen C

    2014-01-01

    Computational testing of the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian shock physics code, ALEGRA, is presented using an exact solution that is very similar to a shaped charge jet flow. The solution is a steady, isentropic, subsonic free surface flow with significant compression and release and is provided as a steady state initial condition. There should be no shocks and no entropy production throughout the problem. The purpose of this test problem is to present a detailed and challenging computation in order to provide evidence for algorithmic strengths and weaknesses in ALEGRA which should be examined further. The results of this work are intended to be used to guide future algorithmic improvements in the spirit of test-driven development processes.

  4. Surface wave propagation in an ideal Hall-magnetohydrodynamic plasma jet in flowing environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikka, Himanshu; Kumar, Nagendra; Zhelyazkov, Ivan

    2004-01-01

    The behavior of the Hall-magnetohydrodynamic (Hall-MHD) sausage and kink waves is studied in the presence of steady flow. The influence of the flow both inside and outside the plasma slab is taken into account. The plasma in the environment is considered to be cold and moves with the different flow velocity outside the slab. In the limit of parallel propagation, dispersion relation is derived to discuss the propagation of both the modes. Numerical results for the propagation characteristics are obtained for different Alfvenic Mach number ratios inside and outside the slab. It is found that the dispersion curves for both surface modes, namely, the sausage and kink ones in cold plasma show complexities in their behavior in terms of multivalued portions of the curves. These multivalued portions correspond to the different normalized phase velocities for the same value of Alfvenic Mach number. In contrast to the conventional MHD surface waves which are assumed to be pure surface waves or pseudosurface waves, surface waves are obtained which are bulk waves for very small dimensionless wave numbers, then turn to leaky waves and finally transform to pure surface waves for values of dimensionless wave number greater than one

  5. The morphology and surface brightness of extragalactic jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bicknell, G.V.

    1983-01-01

    The problems associated with laminar flow models are reviewed, and an analogy between laboratory jets and astrophysical jets is given. The relationship between surface brightness and the jet full width half maximum is not in general as predicted by simple magnetohydrodynamic models. An alternative turbulent model is presented

  6. Turbulent Buoyant Jets in Flowing Ambients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Hai-Bo; Larsen, Torben; Petersen, Ole

    1991-01-01

    The mean behaviour of horizontal turbulent buoyant jets in co-flowing currents is investigated experimentally and numerically, in terms of jet trajectory, dilution and centerline density deficit and velocity decay. It is demonstrated in the paper that the laboratory data on the jet trajectory and...

  7. Numerical Calculation of Interaction Between Plane Jet and Subsonic Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. O. Moskalenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper makes numerical calculation of interaction between plane jet and subsonic flow. Its aim is to determine the jet trajectory, velocity profiles, distribution of pressure coefficient on the plate surface at different jet angles, namely ωj=45°; 90°; 105° and at low blowing strengths ( ≤1.5 as well as a to make comparison with the experimental data of other authors.To simulate a two-dimensional jet in the subsonic flow the software package “CAD SolidWorks Flow Simulation” has been used. Initially, the test task was solved with its calculation results compared with experimental ones [6.8] in order to improve the convergence; the size of the computational domain and a computational grid within the k-ε turbulence model were selected. As a result of the calculation, were identified and analysed the pressure values, jet trajectories, and velocity profiles. In the graphs the solid lines show calculation results, and dots represent experimental data.From the calculation results it is seen that, with increasing intensity of the reduced mass flow ¯q in the above range, the change of the jet pressure coefficient p¯ distribution behind a slotted nozzle is almost linear and significant. Before the nozzle, with increasing ¯q the pressure coefficient increases slightly.Analysis of results has shown that blowing of jets with ωj>90ω, provides a greater perturbation of the subsonic flow. Thus, the jet penetrates into the flow deeper, forms a dead region of the greater length, and more significantly redistributes the pressure coefficient on the surface of the plate.The calculation results are in good compliance with the experimental data both for the jet axis and for the pressure coefficient distribution on the plate surface. The research results can be used in the designing the jet control of aircrafts.

  8. Simulation of Sweep-Jet Flow Control, Single Jet and Full Vertical Tail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Robert E.; Stremel, Paul M.; Garcia, Joseph A.; Heineck, James T.; Kushner, Laura K.; Storms, Bruce L.

    2016-01-01

    This work is a simulation technology demonstrator, of sweep jet flow control used to suppress boundary layer separation and increase the maximum achievable load coefficients. A sweep jet is a discrete Coanda jet that oscillates in the plane parallel to an aerodynamic surface. It injects mass and momentum in the approximate streamwise direction. It also generates turbulent eddies at the oscillation frequency, which are typically large relative to the scales of boundary layer turbulence, and which augment mixing across the boundary layer to attack flow separation. Simulations of a fluidic oscillator, the sweep jet emerging from a nozzle downstream of the oscillator, and an array of sweep jets which suppresses boundary layer separation are performed. Simulation results are compared to data from a dedicated validation experiment of a single oscillator and its sweep jet, and from a wind tunnel test of a full-scale Boeing 757 vertical tail augmented with an array of sweep jets. A critical step in the work is the development of realistic time-dependent sweep jet inflow boundary conditions, derived from the results of the single-oscillator simulations, which create the sweep jets in the full-tail simulations. Simulations were performed using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solver Overow, with high-order spatial discretization and a range of turbulence modeling. Good results were obtained for all flows simulated, when suitable turbulence modeling was used.

  9. Time resolved investigations on flow field and quasi wall shear stress of an impingement configuration with pulsating jets by means of high speed PIV and a surface hot wire array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janetzke, Timm; Nitsche, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    The effects of jet pulsation on flow field and quasi wall shear stress of an impingement configuration were investigated experimentally. The excitation Strouhal number and amplitude were varied as the most influential parameters. A line-array with three submerged air jets, and a confining plate were used. The flow field analysis by means of time resolved particle image velocimetry shows that the controlled excitation can considerably affect the near-field flow of an impinging jet array. These effects are visualized as organization of the coherent flow structures. Augmentation of the Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices in the jet shear layer depends on the Strouhal number and pulsation magnitude and can be associated with pairing of small scale vortices in the jet. A total maximum of vortex strength was observed when exciting with Sr = 0.82 and coincident high amplitudes. Time resolved interaction between impinging vortices and impingement plate boundary layer due to jet excitation was verified by using an array of 5 μm surface hot wires. Corresponding to the global flow field modification due to periodic jet pulsation, the impact of the vortex rings on the wall boundary layer is highly influenced by the above mentioned excitation parameters and reaches a maximum at Sr = 0.82.

  10. Extensional flow of low-viscosity fluids in capillary bridges formed by pulsed surface acoustic wave jetting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharjee, P K; McDonnell, A G; Prabhakar, R; Yeo, L Y; Friend, J, E-mail: james.friend@monash.edu.au [MicroNanophysics Research Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC 3800 (Australia); Melbourne Centre for Nanofabrication, Melbourne, VIC 3800 (Australia)

    2011-02-15

    Forming capillary bridges of low-viscosity ({approx}<10 mPa s) fluids is difficult, making the study of their capillary-thinning behavior and the measurement of the fluid's extensional viscosity difficult as well. Current techniques require some time to form a liquid bridge from the stretching of a droplet. Rapidly stretching a liquid bridge using these methods can cause its breakup if the viscosity is too low. Stretching more slowly allows the bridge to thin and break up before a suitable bridge geometry can be established to provide reliable and accurate rheological data. Using a pulsed surface acoustic wave to eject a jet from a sessile droplet, a capillary bridge may be formed in about 7.5 ms, about seven times quicker than current methods. With this approach, capillary bridges may be formed from Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids having much lower viscosities-water, 0.04% by weight solution of high-molecular-weight (7 MDa) polystyrene in dioctyl phthalate and 0.25% fibrinogen solution in demineralized water, for example. Details of the relatively simple system used to achieve these results are provided, as are experimental results indicating deviations from a Newtonian response by the low-viscosity non-Newtonian fluids used in our study.

  11. Extensional flow of low-viscosity fluids in capillary bridges formed by pulsed surface acoustic wave jetting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharjee, P K; McDonnell, A G; Prabhakar, R; Yeo, L Y; Friend, J

    2011-01-01

    Forming capillary bridges of low-viscosity (∼<10 mPa s) fluids is difficult, making the study of their capillary-thinning behavior and the measurement of the fluid's extensional viscosity difficult as well. Current techniques require some time to form a liquid bridge from the stretching of a droplet. Rapidly stretching a liquid bridge using these methods can cause its breakup if the viscosity is too low. Stretching more slowly allows the bridge to thin and break up before a suitable bridge geometry can be established to provide reliable and accurate rheological data. Using a pulsed surface acoustic wave to eject a jet from a sessile droplet, a capillary bridge may be formed in about 7.5 ms, about seven times quicker than current methods. With this approach, capillary bridges may be formed from Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids having much lower viscosities-water, 0.04% by weight solution of high-molecular-weight (7 MDa) polystyrene in dioctyl phthalate and 0.25% fibrinogen solution in demineralized water, for example. Details of the relatively simple system used to achieve these results are provided, as are experimental results indicating deviations from a Newtonian response by the low-viscosity non-Newtonian fluids used in our study.

  12. Marangoni flows induced by atmospheric-pressure plasma jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berendsen, C W J; Van Veldhuizen, E M; Kroesen, G M W; Darhuber, A A

    2015-01-01

    We studied the interaction of atmospheric-pressure plasma jets of Ar or air with liquid films of an aliphatic hydrocarbon on moving solid substrates. The hydrodynamic jet-liquid interaction induces a track of lower film thickness. The chemical plasma-surface interaction oxidizes the liquid, leading to a local increase of the surface tension and a self-organized redistribution of the liquid film. We developed a numerical model that qualitatively reproduces the formation, instability and coarsening of the flow patterns observed in the experiments. Monitoring the liquid flow has potential as an in-situ, spatially and temporally resolved, diagnostic tool for the plasma-liquid surface interaction. (paper)

  13. Modeling Jet Interaction of a Round Jet with a Subsonic Carrying Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. P. Korobkova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes numerical simulation of the round jet with a subsonic carrying flow. Performs calculations for different tilt angles of the jet ωj blowing and constructs the fields of velocities and pressures of the flow, jet trajectory, as well as calculates the pressure coefficients on the plate surface.To solve this problem, the CAD Solidworks Flow Simulation software was used. This package contains the solution of the Nowier-Stokes equation, which is necessary for modeling this problem.To test operation capability of the closing condition (k-th model of turbulence and proper choice of the boundaries of the computational domain, was solved a test problem forThe solution analysis has shown that the k-th model of turbulence was capable, and has a good agreement with other authors' experiment results [4]. Based on the selected conditions, further calculations were carried out for different tilt angles of jet blowing.In the course of research activities, it was revealed that the tilt angle of the jet blowing has a strong impact on redistribution of velocity and pressure in the area of the jet interaction, which allows the efficient use of such jets to control aerodynamic characteristics of the aircraft with the same power consumption for blowing out the gas. The solution of this problem is very relevant in wide application in aviation and rocket and space technology.

  14. Preliminary analyses of Li jet flows for the IFMIF target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, Mizuho; Kato, Yoshio; Nakamura, Hideo; Maekawa, Hiroshi

    1997-03-01

    The characteristics of liquid lithium (Li) plane jet flowing along a concave wall were studied using a multi-dimensional numerical code, FLOW-3D, as part of the two-year conceptual design activity (CDA) of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) that started in February 1995. The IFMIF will provide high flux, high energy (∼14MeV) neutron irradiation field by deuteron-Li reaction in the Li jet target for testing and development of low-activation and damage-resistant fusion materials. The Li jet target flow at high-velocity (≤ 20m/s) in vacuum, and should adequately remove the intense deuteron beam power (≤ 10MW). The two-dimensional analyses on the thermal and hydraulic responses of the target flow, under the conditions proposed in the IFMIF-CDA, indicated enough temperature margins to avoid significant vaporization and voiding respectively at the jet free surface and the peak temperature location in the jet by keeping the flow stability. (author)

  15. Numerical analysis of exhaust jet secondary combustion in hypersonic flow field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tian-Peng; Wang, Jiang-Feng; Zhao, Fa-Ming; Fan, Xiao-Feng; Wang, Yu-Han

    2018-05-01

    The interaction effect between jet and control surface in supersonic and hypersonic flow is one of the key problems for advanced flight control system. The flow properties of exhaust jet secondary combustion in a hypersonic compression ramp flow field were studied numerically by solving the Navier-Stokes equations with multi-species and combustion reaction effects. The analysis was focused on the flow field structure and the force amplification factor under different jet conditions. Numerical results show that a series of different secondary combustion makes the flow field structure change regularly, and the temperature increases rapidly near the jet exit.

  16. Investigation on Plasma Jet Flow Phenomena During DC Air Arc Motion in Bridge-Type Contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Guofu; Bo, Kai; Chen, Mo; Zhou, Xue; Qiao, Xinlei

    2016-05-01

    Arc plasma jet flow in the air was investigated under a bridge-type contacts in a DC 270 V resistive circuit. We characterized the arc plasma jet flow appearance at different currents by using high-speed photography, and two polished contacts were used to search for the relationship between roughness and plasma jet flow. Then, to make the nature of arc plasma jet flow phenomena clear, a simplified model based on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory was established and calculated. The simulated DC arc plasma was presented with the temperature distribution and the current density distribution. Furthermore, the calculated arc flow velocity field showed that the circular vortex was an embodiment of the arc plasma jet flow progress. The combined action of volume force and contact surface was the main reason of the arc jet flow. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51307030, 51277038)

  17. Coronal Jet Collimation by Nonlinear Induced Flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasheghani Farahani, S.; Hejazi, S. M. [Department of Physics, Tafresh University, Tafresh 39518 79611 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-08-01

    Our objective is to study the collimation of solar jets by nonlinear forces corresponding to torsional Alfvén waves together with external forces. We consider a straight, initially non-rotating, untwisted magnetic cylinder embedded in a plasma with a straight magnetic field, where a shear between the internal and external flows exists. By implementing magnetohydrodynamic theory and taking into account the second-order thin flux tube approximation, the balance between the internal nonlinear forces is visualized. The nonlinear differential equation containing the ponderomotive, magnetic tension, and centrifugal forces in the presence of the shear flow is obtained. The solution presents the scale of influence of the propagating torsional Alfvén wave on compressive perturbations. Explicit expressions for the compressive perturbations caused by the forces connected to the torsional Alfvén wave show that, in the presence of a shear flow, the magnetic tension and centrifugal forces do not cancel each other’s effects as they did in its absence. This shear flow plays in favor of the magnetic tension force, resulting in a more efficient collimation. Regarding the ponderomotive force, the shear flow has no effect. The phase relations highlight the interplay of the shear flow and the plasma- β . As the shear flow and plasma- β increase, compressive perturbation amplitudes emerge. We conclude that the jet collimation due to the torsional Alfvén wave highly depends on the location of the jet. The shear flow tightens the collimation as the jet elevates up to the solar corona.

  18. Synthetic Jet Interactions with Flows of Varying Separation Severity and Spanwise Flow Magnitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monastero, Marianne; Lindstrom, Annika; Amitay, Michael

    2017-11-01

    Flow physics associated with the interactions of synthetic jet actuators with a highly three-dimensional separated flow over a flapped airfoil were investigated experimentally and analyzed using stereo particle image velocimetry (SPIV) and surface pressure data. Increased understanding of active flow control devices in flows which are representative of airplane wings or tails can lead to actuator placement (i.e., chordwise location, spanwise spacing) with the greatest beneficial effect on performance. An array of discrete synthetic jets was located just upstream of the control surface hingeline and operated at a blowing ratio of 1 and non-dimensional frequency of 48. Detailed flowfield measurements over the control surface were conducted, where the airfoil's sweep angle and the control surface deflection angle were fixed at 20°. Focus was placed on the local and global flowfields as spanwise actuator spacing was varied. Moreover, surface pressure measurement for several sweep angles, control surface deflection angles, and angles of attack were also performed. Actuation resulted in an overall separation reduction and a dependence of local flowfield details (i.e. separation severity, spanwise flow magnitude, flow structures, and jet trajectory) on spanwise jet spacing. The Boeing Company.

  19. Jet flow and premixed jet flame control by plasma swirler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Gang, E-mail: ligang@iet.cn [Key laboratory of light duty gas turbine, Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Jiang, Xi [School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Zhao, Yujun [School of Mechanism, Electronic and Control Engineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Liu, Cunxi [Key laboratory of light duty gas turbine, Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Chen, Qi [School of Mechanism, Electronic and Control Engineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Xu, Gang; Liu, Fuqiang [Key laboratory of light duty gas turbine, Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2017-04-04

    A swirler based on dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators is designed and its effectiveness in both jet flow and premixed jet flame control is demonstrated. In contrast to traditional spanwise-oriented actuators, plasma actuators are placed along the axial direction of the injector to induce a circumferential velocity to the main flow and create a swirl flow without any insertion or moving part. In the DBD plasma swirl injector, the discharge does not ignite the mixture nor does it induce flashback. Flame visualization is obtained by cameras while velocity profiles are obtained by Laser Doppler Anemometry measurements. The results obtained indicate the effectiveness of the new design. - Highlights: • The discharge does not ignite the mixture nor does it induce flashback. • The prominent advantage of this novel plasma swirler is its swirl number adjustable without any mechanical movement. • The frequency of the plasma swirler is adjustable. • The plasma swirler can be used as an oscillator to the reactants. • The plasma swirler can be used alone or combine with other traditional swirlers.

  20. A new flow focusing technique to produce very thin jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acero, A J; Rebollo-Muñoz, N; Montanero, J M; Gañán-Calvo, A M; Vega, E J

    2013-01-01

    A new technique is proposed in this paper to produce jets, droplets, and emulsions with sizes ranging from tens of microns down to the submicrometer scale. Liquid is injected at a constant flow rate through a hypodermic needle to form a film over the needle's outer surface. This film flows toward the needle tip until a liquid ligament is steadily ejected. Both the film motion and the liquid ejection are driven by the viscous and pressure forces exerted by a coflowing fluid stream. If this stream is a high-speed gas current, the outcome is a capillary jet which breaks up into droplets due to the Rayleigh instability. Micrometer emulsions are also produced by this instability mechanism when the injected liquid is focused by a viscous liquid stream. The minimum flow rates reached with the proposed technique are two orders of magnitude lower than those of the standard flow focusing configuration. This sharp reduction of the minimum flow rate allows one to form steady jets with radii down to the submicrometer scale. The stability of this new configuration is analyzed experimentally for both gas–liquid and liquid–liquid systems. In most of the cases, the loss of stability must be attributed to the liquid source because the critical Weber (capillary) number for the gas–liquid (liquid–liquid) case was significantly greater than the value corresponding to the convective/absolute instability transition in the jet. (paper)

  1. Influence of hole imperfection on jet cross flow interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovanovic, M.B.; Lange, H.C. de; Steenhoven, A.A. van

    2006-01-01

    The influence of a small hole geometry variation on the jet cross flow interaction is investigated experimentally using particle image velocimetry and liquid crystal thermography. The flow characteristics correspond to film cooling in gas turbines. A production imperfection is represented with the small variation of the hole geometry. The experiments were conducted without and with the hole imperfection at three velocity ratios. If the imperfection is absent, the flow field is stable and clockwise vortices are detected downstream. The imperfection blocks the hole, accelerates the jet and changes the formation of large vortical structures. It produces the additional windward vortices, which influence the flow field and enhance the inflow of the cross-stream towards the cooled surface. The imperfection reduces the film cooling effectiveness

  2. Self-induced free surface oscillations caused by water jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukaya, M.; Madarame, H.; Okamoto, K.; Iida, M.; Someya, S.

    1995-01-01

    The interaction between the high speed flow and the free surfaces could induced surface oscillations. Recently, some kinds of self-induced free surface oscillations caused by water jet were discovered, e.g., a self-induced sloshing, 'Jet-Flutter' and a self-induced manometer oscillation. These oscillations have many different characteristics with each other. In this study, the similarities and differences of these oscillations are examined, and the geometrical effects on the phenomena are experimentally investigated. The self-induced sloshing and the Jet-Flutter have different dimensionless traveling times, which suggests a difference in the energy supply mechanism. When the distance between the inlet and the outlet is small in a vessel, the self-induced manometer oscillation could occur in the multi-free-surface system. (author)

  3. Flow of supersonic jets across flat plates: Implications for ground-level flow from volcanic blasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orescanin, Mara M.; Prisco, David; Austin, Joanna M.; Kieffer, Susan W.

    2014-04-01

    We report on laboratory experiments examining the interaction of a jet from an overpressurized reservoir with a canonical ground surface to simulate lateral blasts at volcanoes such as the 1980 blast at Mount St. Helens. These benchmark experiments test the application of supersonic jet models to simulate the flow of volcanic jets over a lateral topography. The internal shock structure of the free jet is modified such that the Mach disk shock is elevated above the surface. In elevation view, the width of the shock is reduced in comparison with a free jet, while in map view the dimensions are comparable. The distance of the Mach disk shock from the vent is in good agreement with free jet data and can be predicted with existing theory. The internal shock structures can interact with and penetrate the boundary layer. In the shock-boundary layer interaction, an oblique shock foot is present in the schlieren images and a distinctive ground signature is evident in surface measurements. The location of the oblique shock foot and the surface demarcation are closely correlated with the Mach disk shock location during reservoir depletion, and therefore, estimates of a ground signature in a zone devastated by a blast can be based on the calculated shock location from free jet theory. These experiments, combined with scaling arguments, suggest that the imprint of the Mach disk shock on the ground should be within the range of 4-9 km at Mount St. Helens depending on assumed reservoir pressure and vent dimensions.

  4. Heat transfer and flow structure evaluation of a synthetic jet emanating from a planar heat sink

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manning, Paul; Persoons, Tim; Murray, Darina

    2014-01-01

    Direct impinging synthetic jets are a proven method for heat transfer enhancement, and have been subject to extensive research. However, despite the vast amount of research into direct synthetic jet impingement, there has been little research investigating the effects of a synthetic jet emanating from a heated surface, this forms the basis of the current research investigation. Both single and multiple orifices are integrated into a planar heat sink forming a synthetic jet, thus allowing the heat transfer enhancement and flow structures to be assessed. The heat transfer analysis highlighted that the multiple orifice synthetic jet resulted in the greatest heat transfer enhancements. The flow structures responsible for these enhancements were identified using a combination of flow visualisation, thermal imaging and thermal boundary layer analysis. The flow structure analysis identified that the synthetic jets decreased the thermal boundary layer thickness resulting in a more effective convective heat transfer process. Flow visualisation revealed entrainment of local air adjacent to the heated surface; this occurred from vortex roll-up at the surface of the heat sink and from the highly sheared jet flow. Furthermore, a secondary entrainment was identified which created a surface impingement effect. It is proposed that all three flow features enhance the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

  5. Discharge characteristics and hydrodynamics behaviors of atmospheric plasma jets produced in various gas flow patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setsuhara, Yuichi; Uchida, Giichiro; Nakajima, Atsushi; Takenaka, Kosuke; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric nonequilibrium plasma jets have been widely employed in biomedical applications. For biomedical applications, it is an important issue to understand the complicated mechanism of interaction of the plasma jet with liquid. In this study, we present analysis of the discharge characteristics of a plasma jet impinging onto the liquid surface under various gas flow patterns such as laminar and turbulence flows. For this purpose, we analyzed gas flow patters by using a Schlieren gas-flow imaging system in detail The plasma jet impinging into the liquid surface expands along the liquid surface. The diameter of the expanded plasma increases with gas flow rate, which is well explained by an increase in the diameter of the laminar gas-flow channel. When the gas flow rate is further increased, the gas flow mode transits from laminar to turbulence in the gas flow channel, which leads to the shortening of the plasm-jet length. Our experiment demonstrated that the gas flow patterns strongly affect the discharge characteristics in the plasma-jet system. This study was partly supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Innovative Areas ``Plasma Medical Innovation'' (24108003) from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan (MEXT).

  6. Dust generation at interaction of plasma jet with surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ticos, Catalin; Toader, Dorina; Banu, Nicoleta; Scurtu, Adrian; Oane, Mihai

    2013-10-01

    Coatings of W and C with widths of a few microns will be exposed to plasma jet for studying the erosion of the surface and detachment of micron size dust particles. A coaxial plasma gun has been built inside a vacuum chamber for producing supersonic plasma jets. Its design is based on a 50 kJ coaxial plasma gun which has been successfully used for accelerating hypervelocity dust. Initial shots were carried out for a capacitor bank with C = 12 μF and charged up to 2 kV. Currents of tens of amps were measured with a Rogowsky coil and plasma flow speeds of 4 km/s were inferred from high-speed images of jet propagation. An upgrade consisting in adding capacitors in parallel will be performed in order to increase the energy up to 2 kJ. A coil will be installed at the gun muzzle to compress the plasma flow and increase the energy density of the jet on the sample surface. A CCD camera with a maximum recording speed of 100 k fps and a maximum resolution of 1024 × 1024 pixels was set for image acquisition of the plasma and dust. A laser system used to illuminate the ejected dust from the surface includes a laser diode emitting at 650 nm with a beam power of 25 mW. The authors acknowledge support from EURATOM WP13-IPH-A03-P2-02-BS22.

  7. Test for Jet Flow Induced by Steam Jet Condensation Using the GIRLS Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yeon Sik; Yoon, Y. J.; Song, C. H.

    2007-03-01

    To investigate the characteristics of the turbulent jet induced by steam jet condensation in a water tank through a single-hole sparger an experimental investigation was performed using the GIRLS facility. The experiments were conducted with respect to two cases, e.g. horizontal and vertical upward injections. For the measurements, pitot tube and thermocouples were used for turbulent flow velocity and temperatures, respectively. Overall flow shapes of the turbulent jet by the steam jet condensation are similar to those of axially symmetric turbulent jet flows. The angular coefficients of turbulent rays are quantitatively comparable between the traditional turbulent jet flows and the turbulent jet flows induced by the steam jet condensation in this work. Although the turbulent flows were induced by the horizontally injected steam jet condensation, general theory of turbulent jets was found to be applicable to the turbulent flows of this work. But for the vertically upward injection case, experimental data were quite deviated from the theoretical ones, which is considered due to the buoyancy effect

  8. Flow Mapping of a Jet in Crossflow with Stereoscopic PIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Knud Erik; Özcan, Oktay; Westergaard, C. H.

    2002-01-01

    Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) has been used to make a three-dimensional flow mapping of a jet in crossflow. The Reynolds number based on the free stream velocity and the jet diameter was nominally 2400. A jet-to-crossflow velocity ratio of 3.3 was used. Details of the formation...

  9. Isothermal and Reactive Turbulent Jets in Cross-Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmark, Ephraim; Bush, Scott; Ibrahim, Irene

    2004-11-01

    Jets in cross flow have numerous applications including vertical/short takeoff/landing (V/STOL) aircraft, cooling jets for gas turbine blades and combustion air supply inlets in gas turbine engine. The properties exhibited by these jets are dictated by complex three dimensional turbulence structures which form due to the interaction of the jet with the freestream. The isothermal tests are conducted in a wind tunnel measuring the characteristics of air jets injected perpendicular into an otherwise undisturbed air stream. Different nozzle exit geometries of the air jets were tested including circular, triangular and elongated configurations. Jets are injected in single and paired combinations with other jets to measure the effect of mutual interaction on the parameters mentioned. Quantitative velocity fields are obtained using PIV. The data obtained allows the extraction of flow parameters such as jet structure, penetration and mixing. The reacting tests include separate and combined jets of fuel/air mixture utilized to explore the stabilization of combustion at various operating conditions. Different geometrical configurations of transverse jets are tested to determine the shape and combination of jets that will optimize the jets ability to successfully stabilize a flame.

  10. DSMC simulation of feed jet flow in gas centrifuge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Dongjun; Zeng Shi

    2011-01-01

    Feed jet flow acts an important role for the counter-current in gas centrifuge. Direct simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) method was adopted to simulate the structure of the radial feed jet model. By setting the proper boundary conditions and the collision model of molecules, the flow distributions of the 2D radial feed jet were acquired under different feed conditions, including the wave structure of feed jet and the profile of the flow parameters. The analyses of the calculation results note the following flow phenomena: Near the radial outflow boundary, the obvious peaks of the flow parameters exist; higher speed of feed gas brings stronger influence on the flow field of the centrifuge; including the density, pressure and velocity of the gas, the distribution of the temperature is affected by the feed jet, at the outflow boundary, temperature to double times of the average value. (authors)

  11. Flow Characteristics of Rectangular Underexpanded Impinging Jets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minoru YAGA; Yoshio KINJO; Masumi TAMASHIRO; Kenyu OYAKAWA

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the flow fields of underexpanded impinging jet issued from rectangular nozzles of aspect ratio 1,3 and 5 are numerically and experimentally studied. Two dimensional temperature and pressure distributions are measured by using infrared camera and the combination of a pressure scanning device and a stepping motor, respectively. The variation of the stagnation pressure on the impinging plate reveals that a hystcretic phenomenon exists during the increasing and decreasing of the pressure ratio for the aspect ratio of 3.0 and 5.0. It is also found that the nozzle of aspect ratio 1.0 caused the largest total pressure loss pc/p0 = 0.27 at the pressure ratio of p0/pb, = 6.5, where pc is the stagnation center pressure on the wall, p0 the upstream stagnation pressure, pb the ambient pressure. The other two nozzles showed that the pressure loss pc / p0=0.52 and 0.55 were achieved by the nozzles of the aspect ratio 3,0 and 5.0, respectively. The comparison between the calculations and experiments is fairly good, showing the three dimensional streamlines and structures of the shock waves in the jets. However, the hysteresis of the pressure variations observed in the experiments between the pressure ratio of 3.5 and 4.5 cannot be confirmed in the calculations.

  12. Energy flow during disruptions in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paley, J.I.; Andrew, P.; Cowley, S.C.; Fundamenski, W.; Huber, A.

    2005-01-01

    Disruptions place severe limitations on the materials selected for plasma facing components in fusion devices. In a disruption, the plasma stored thermal and magnetic energy is dissipated leading to predicted power loadings in the current quench of up to 10 MW m -2 in JET. In the thermal quench very high power loads of up to 10 G Wm -2 would be expected if all the power flowed to the steady state strike points, however this is not observed. In this paper the energy balance associated with both events is investigated. The magnetic energy is found to balance well with radiated energy. Circumstantial evidence for limiter interaction during the thermal quench of plasmas in divertor configuration is presented and a possible mechanism for limiter interaction in disruptions resulting from the collapse of an internal transport barrier is discussed

  13. Helium atmospheric pressure plasma jets touching dielectric and metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norberg, Seth A.; Johnsen, Eric; Kushner, Mark J.

    2015-07-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) are being investigated in the context plasma medicine and biotechnology applications, and surface functionalization. The composition of the surface being treated ranges from plastics, liquids, and biological tissue, to metals. The dielectric constant of these materials ranges from as low as 1.5 for plastics to near 80 for liquids, and essentially infinite for metals. The electrical properties of the surface are not independent variables as the permittivity of the material being treated has an effect on the dynamics of the incident APPJ. In this paper, results are discussed from a computational investigation of the interaction of an APPJ incident onto materials of varying permittivity, and their impact on the discharge dynamics of the plasma jet. The computer model used in this investigation solves Poisson's equation, transport equations for charged and neutral species, the electron energy equation, and the Navier-Stokes equations for the neutral gas flow. The APPJ is sustained in He/O2 = 99.8/0.2 flowing into humid air, and is directed onto dielectric surfaces in contact with ground with dielectric constants ranging from 2 to 80, and a grounded metal surface. Low values of relative permittivity encourage propagation of the electric field into the treated material and formation and propagation of a surface ionization wave. High values of relative permittivity promote the restrike of the ionization wave and the formation of a conduction channel between the plasma discharge and the treated surface. The distribution of space charge surrounding the APPJ is discussed.

  14. Jets of an electroconducting fluid in rotating flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorbachev, L P; Kalyakin, A N; Potanin, E P; Tubin, A A

    1976-04-01

    A study was made of weak-intensity jets of an electroconducting incompressible fluid in rotating flows, caused by the action of a uniform axial magnetic field B and a radial electric field E =E/sub 0/r. The induced magnetic field is neglected. Hydrodynamic characteristics were obtained for flows during conservation of the jet flow rate or momentum. The presence of a counterflow in the jet and the weak dependence of the flow parameters on the linear coordinate were demonstrated. 7 references, 1 figure.

  15. Jet Dipolarity: Top Tagging with Color Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hook, Anson; Jankowiak, Martin; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Wacker, Jay G.; /SLAC

    2011-08-12

    A new jet observable, dipolarity, is introduced that can distinguish whether a pair of subjets arises from a color singlet source. This observable is incorporated into the HEPTopTagger and is shown to improve discrimination between top jets and QCD jets for moderate to high p{sub T}. The impressive resolution of the ATLAS and CMS detectors means that a typical QCD jet at the LHC deposits energy in {Omicron}(10-100) calorimeter cells. Such fine-grained calorimetry allows for jets to be studied in much greater detail than previously, with sophisticated versions of current techniques making it possible to measure more than just the bulk properties of jets (e.g. event jet multiplicities or jet masses). One goal of the LHC is to employ these techniques to extend the amount of information available from each jet, allowing for a broader probe of the properties of QCD. The past several years have seen significant progress in developing such jet substructure techniques. A number of general purpose tools have been developed, including: (i) top-tagging algorithms designed for use at both lower and higher p{sub T} as well as (ii) jet grooming techniques such as filtering, pruning, and trimming, which are designed to improve jet mass resolution. Jet substructure techniques have also been studied in the context of specific particle searches, where they have been shown to substantially extend the reach of traditional search techniques in a wide variety of scenarios, including for example boosted Higgses, neutral spin-one resonances, searches for supersymmetry, and many others. Despite these many successes, however, there is every reason to expect that there remains room for refinement of jet substructure techniques.

  16. Fluidic Vectoring of a Planar Incompressible Jet Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Miguel Alfonso; Scelzo, Maria Teresa; Enache, Adriana; Buchlin, Jean-Marie

    2018-06-01

    This paper presents an experimental, a numerical and a theoretical analysis of the performances of a fluidic vectoring device for controlling the direction of a turbulent, bi-dimensional and low Mach number (incompressible) jet flow. The investigated design is the co-flow secondary injection with Coanda surface, which allows for vectoring angles up to 25° with no need of moving mechanical parts. A simple empirical model of the vectoring process is presented and validated via experimental and numerical data. The experiments consist of flow visualization and image processing for the automatic detection of the jet centerline; the numerical simulations are carried out solving the Unsteady Reynolds Average Navier- Stokes (URANS) closed with the k - ω SST turbulence model, using the PisoFoam solver from OpenFOAM. The experimental validation on three different geometrical configurations has shown that the model is capable of providing a fast and reliable evaluation of the device performance as a function of the operating conditions.

  17. Water experiment of high-speed, free-surface, plane jet along concave wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hideo; Ida, Mizuho; Kato, Yoshio; Maekawa, Hiroshi; Itoh, Kazuhiro; Kukita, Yutaka

    1997-01-01

    In the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF), an intense 14 MeV neutron beam will be generated in the high-speed liquid lithium (Li) plane jet target flowing along concave wall in vacuum. As part of the conceptual design activity (CDA) of the IFMIF, the stability of the plane liquid jet flow was studied experimentally with water in a well-defined channel geometry for non-heating condition. A two-dimensional double-reducer nozzle being newly proposed for the IFMIF target successfully provided a high-speed (≤ 17 m/s) stable water jet with uniform velocity distribution at the nozzle exit without flow separation in the nozzle. The free surface of the jet was covered by two-dimensional and/or three-dimensional waves, the size of which did not change much over the tested jet length of ∼130 mm. The jet velocity profile changed around the nozzle exit from uniform to that of free-vortex flow where the product of the radius of stream line and local velocity is constant in the jet thickness. The jet thickness increased immediately after exiting the nozzle because of the velocity profile change. The predicted jet thickness by a modified one-dimensional momentum model agreed with the data well. (author)

  18. Analysis of screeching in a cold flow jet experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, M. E.; Slone, R. M., Jr.; Robertson, J. E.; Keefe, L.

    1975-01-01

    The screech phenomenon observed in a one-sixtieth scale model space shuttle test of the solid rocket booster exhaust flow noise has been investigated. A critical review is given of the cold flow test data representative of Space Shuttle launch configurations to define those parameters which contribute to screech generation. An acoustic feedback mechanism is found to be responsible for the generation of screech. A simple equation which permits prediction of screech frequency in terms of basic testing parameters such as the jet exhaust Mach number and the separating distance from nozzle exit to the surface of model launch pad is presented and is found in good agreement with the test data. Finally, techniques are recommended to eliminate or reduce the screech.

  19. Kinetic theory of surface waves in plasma jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shokri, B.

    2002-01-01

    The kinetic theory analysis of surface waves propagating along a semi-bounded plasma jet is presented. The frequency spectra and their damping rate are obtained in both the high and low frequency regions. Finally, the penetration of the static field in the plasma jet under the condition that the plasma jet velocity is smaller than the sound velocity is studied

  20. Singularities in Free Surface Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thete, Sumeet Suresh

    Free surface flows where the shape of the interface separating two or more phases or liquids are unknown apriori, are commonplace in industrial applications and nature. Distribution of drop sizes, coalescence rate of drops, and the behavior of thin liquid films are crucial to understanding and enhancing industrial practices such as ink-jet printing, spraying, separations of chemicals, and coating flows. When a contiguous mass of liquid such as a drop, filament or a film undergoes breakup to give rise to multiple masses, the topological transition is accompanied with a finite-time singularity . Such singularity also arises when two or more masses of liquid merge into each other or coalesce. Thus the dynamics close to singularity determines the fate of about-to-form drops or films and applications they are involved in, and therefore needs to be analyzed precisely. The primary goal of this thesis is to resolve and analyze the dynamics close to singularity when free surface flows experience a topological transition, using a combination of theory, experiments, and numerical simulations. The first problem under consideration focuses on the dynamics following flow shut-off in bottle filling applications that are relevant to pharmaceutical and consumer products industry, using numerical techniques based on Galerkin Finite Element Methods (GFEM). The second problem addresses the dual flow behavior of aqueous foams that are observed in oil and gas fields and estimates the relevant parameters that describe such flows through a series of experiments. The third problem aims at understanding the drop formation of Newtonian and Carreau fluids, computationally using GFEM. The drops are formed as a result of imposed flow rates or expanding bubbles similar to those of piezo actuated and thermal ink-jet nozzles. The focus of fourth problem is on the evolution of thinning threads of Newtonian fluids and suspensions towards singularity, using computations based on GFEM and experimental

  1. Experimental and numerical investigation of liquid jet impingement on superhydrophobic and hydrophobic convex surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kibar, Ali, E-mail: alikibar@kocaeli.edu.tr [Department of Mechanical and Material Technologies, Kocaeli University, Arslanbey Campus, 41285, Kocaeli (Turkey)

    2017-02-15

    Experiments and numerical simulations were carried out to examine the vertical impingement a round liquid jet on the edges of horizontal convex surfaces that were either superhydrophobic or hydrophobic. The experiments examine the effects on the flow behaviour of curvature, wettability, inertia of the jet, and the impingement rate. Three copper pipes with outer diameters of 15, 22, and 35 mm were investigated. The pipes were wrapped with a piece of a Brassica oleracea leaf or a smooth Teflon sheet, which have apparent contact angles of 160° and 113°. The Reynolds number ranged from 1000 to 4500, and the impingement rates of the liquid jets were varied. Numerical results show good agreement with the experimental results for explaining flow and provide detailed information about the impingement on the surfaces. The liquid jet reflected off the superhydrophobic surfaces for all conditions. However, the jet reflected or deflected off the hydrophobic surface, depending on the inertia of the jet, the curvature of the surface, and the impingement rate. The results suggest that pressure is not the main reason for the bending of the jet around the curved hydrophobic surface. (paper)

  2. Experimental and numerical investigation of liquid jet impingement on superhydrophobic and hydrophobic convex surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kibar, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations were carried out to examine the vertical impingement a round liquid jet on the edges of horizontal convex surfaces that were either superhydrophobic or hydrophobic. The experiments examine the effects on the flow behaviour of curvature, wettability, inertia of the jet, and the impingement rate. Three copper pipes with outer diameters of 15, 22, and 35 mm were investigated. The pipes were wrapped with a piece of a Brassica oleracea leaf or a smooth Teflon sheet, which have apparent contact angles of 160° and 113°. The Reynolds number ranged from 1000 to 4500, and the impingement rates of the liquid jets were varied. Numerical results show good agreement with the experimental results for explaining flow and provide detailed information about the impingement on the surfaces. The liquid jet reflected off the superhydrophobic surfaces for all conditions. However, the jet reflected or deflected off the hydrophobic surface, depending on the inertia of the jet, the curvature of the surface, and the impingement rate. The results suggest that pressure is not the main reason for the bending of the jet around the curved hydrophobic surface. (paper)

  3. Synthetic Jets Flow Control on a vertical stabilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathay, Nicholas; Boucher, Matthew; Amitay, Michael

    2011-11-01

    The vertical stabilizer on most commercial transport aircraft is much larger than required for stability and control. The tail is significantly oversized in order to maintain controllability in the event of asymmetric engine failure and meet flying qualities requirements related to dynamic motion. Using aerodynamic flow control techniques, it may be possible to reduce the size of the tail while maintaining similar control authority during inclement flight conditions. Reducing the size of the tail decreases the weight and the drag of the airplane, which results in considerable savings in fuel costs. In this work, it is shown that synthetic jet (zero-net-mass-flux) actuators are capable of reattaching the separated flow on the rudder and augmenting the performance of the stabilizer. Experiments were conducted in an open-return wind tunnel on a 1/25th scale model of a vertical stabilizer and a partial fuselage section. The surface pressure, aerodynamic loads and data acquired with a Stereo PIV system were used to investigate the effectiveness of this technology as well as provide a more detailed analysis of the flowfield and showed that the synthetic jets are capable of augmenting the side-force by up to 20%.

  4. The Effects of Sweeping Jet Actuator Parameters on Flow Separation Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koklu, Mehti

    2015-01-01

    A parametric experimental study was performed with sweeping jet actuators (fluidic oscillators) to determine their effectiveness in controlling flow separation on an adverse pressure gradient ramp. Actuator parameters that were investigated include blowing coefficients, operation mode, pitch and spreading angles, streamwise location, aspect ratio, and scale. Surface pressure measurements and surface oil flow visualization were used to characterize the effects of these parameters on the actuator performance. 2D Particle Image Velocimetry measurements of the flow field over the ramp and hot-wire measurements of the actuator's jet flow were also obtained for selective cases. In addition, the sweeping jet actuators were compared to other well-known flow control techniques such as micro-vortex generators, steady blowing, and steady vortex-generating jets. The results confirm that the sweeping jet actuators are more effective than steady blowing and steady vortex-generating jets. The results also suggest that an actuator with a larger spreading angle placed closer to the location where the flow separates provides better performance. For the cases tested, an actuator with an aspect ratio, which is the width/depth of the actuator throat, of 2 was found to be optimal. For a fixed momentum coefficient, decreasing the aspect ratio to 1 produced weaker vortices while increasing the aspect ratio to 4 reduced coverage area. Although scaling down the actuator (based on the throat dimensions) from 0.25 inch x 0.125 inch to 0.15 inch x 0.075 inch resulted in similar flow control performance, scaling down the actuator further to 0.075 inch x 0.0375 inch reduced the actuator efficiency by reducing the coverage area and the amount of mixing in the near-wall region. The results of this study provide insight that can be used to design and select the optimal sweeping jet actuator configuration for flow control applications.

  5. 5th International Conference on Jets, Wakes and Separated Flows

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This volume collects various contributions from the 5th International Conference on Jets, Wakes and Separated Flows (ICJWSF2015) that took place in Stockholm during June 2015. Researchers from all around the world presented their latest results concerning fundamental and applied aspects of fluid dynamics. With its general character, the conference embraced many aspects of fluid dynamics, such as shear flows, multiphase flows and vortex flows, for instance. The structure of the present book reflects the variety of topics treated within the conference i.e. Jets, Wakes, Separated flows, Vehicle aerodynamics, Wall-bounded and confined flows, Noise, Turbomachinery flows, Multiphase and reacting flows, Vortex dynamics, Energy-related flows and a section dedicated to Numerical analyses.

  6. RF atmospheric plasma jet surface treatment of paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlat, Joanna; Terebun, Piotr; Kwiatkowski, Michał; Diatczyk, Jaroslaw

    2016-09-01

    A radio frequency RF atmospheric pressure plasma jet was used to enhance the wettability of cellulose-based paper of 90 g m-2 and 160 g m-2 grammage as a perspective platform for antibiotic sensitivity tests. Helium and argon were the carrier gases for oxygen and nitrogen; pure water and rapeseed oil were used for goniometric tests. The influence of the flow rate and gas type, the power of the discharge, and distance from the nozzle was examined. The surface structure was observed using an optical microscope. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectra were investigated in order to determine whether cellulose degradation processes occurred. The RF plasma jet allowed us to decrease the surface contact angle without drastic changes in other features of the tested material. Experiments confirmed the significant influence of the distance between the treated sample and reactor nozzle, especially for treatment times longer than 15 s due to the greater concentration of reactive species at the surface of the sample, which decreases with distance—and their accumulation effect with time. The increase of discharge power plays an important role in decreasing the surface contact angle for times longer than 10 s. Higher power had a positive effect on the amount of generated active particles and facilitated the ignition of discharge. However, a too high value can cause a rise in temperature of the material and heat-caused damage.

  7. Excitational metamorphosis of surface flowfield under an impinging annular jet

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tesař, Václav; Trávníček, Zdeněk

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 144, č. 2 (2008), s. 312-316 ISSN 1385-8947 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/07/1499; GA AV ČR IAA200760705 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : jets * impinging jets * flow topology * annular jets * stagnation points Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 2.813, year: 2008 http://www.sciencedirect.com/

  8. Flow Channel Influence of a Collision-Based Piezoelectric Jetting Dispenser on Jet Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Zhou

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available To improve the jet performance of a bi-piezoelectric jet dispenser, mathematical and simulation models were established according to the operating principle. In order to improve the accuracy and reliability of the simulation calculation, a viscosity model of the fluid was fitted to a fifth-order function with shear rate based on rheological test data, and the needle displacement model was fitted to a nine-order function with time based on real-time displacement test data. The results show that jet performance is related to the diameter of the nozzle outlet and the cone angle of the nozzle, and the impacts of the flow channel structure were confirmed. The approach of numerical simulation is confirmed by the testing results of droplet volume. It will provide a reliable simulation platform for mechanical collision-based jet dispensing and a theoretical basis for micro jet valve design and improvement.

  9. Multiple flow patterns and heat transfer in confined jet impingement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xianchang; Gaddis, J. Leo; Wang Ting

    2005-01-01

    The flow field of a 2-D laminar confined impinging slot jet is investigated. Numerical results indicate that there exist two different solutions in some range of geometric and flow parameters. The two steady flow patterns are obtained under identical boundary conditions but only with different initial flow fields. Two different exit boundary conditions are investigated with two commercial software packages to eliminate artificial or computational effects. The different flow patterns are observed to significantly affect the heat transfer. A flow visualization experiment is carried out to verify the computational results and both flow patterns are observed. The bifurcation mechanism is interpreted and discussed

  10. Simulations of overall flow in gas centrifuge considering feed jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Liang; Jiang Dongjun; Ying Chuntong

    2010-01-01

    A coupled method for the numerical solution of the flow in rapidly rotating gas centrifuge was presented. An iteration process of DSMC and CFD was performed to analyze the overall flow in radial direction, in which DSMC was adopted to simulate the rarefied region, and CFD was adopted to the counter-current of gas centrifuge to discrete the model equations. It was applied to simulate the 2D symmetrical flow model considering the rarefied region with the feed jet flow. A series of illustrative numerical examples were given. The flow structures of the feed jet in the rarefied gas flow region were shown. The results suggest that DSMC CFD coupled method is competent to the simulations of overall flow in a gas centrifuge. (authors)

  11. Active Control of Jet Engine Inlet Flows

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rediniotis, Othon; Bowersox, Rodney; Kirk, Aaron; Kumar, Abhinav; Tichenor, Nathan

    2007-01-01

    ...), flow visualization tests, particle image velocimetry (PIV), pressure probe and wall static tap experiments at various locations, the development and evolution of the secondary flow structures were observed...

  12. Mechanism of occurrence of self-exciting sloshing in rectangular vessel by plane jet flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukaya, Masashi; Okamoto, Koji; Madarame, Haruki

    1996-01-01

    FBRs have free liquid surfaces in reactor vessels and others, and it is expected that the flow velocity of liquid sodium coolant heightens accompanying the reduction of the reactor size. In the field where free liquid surface and high velocity flow exist, there is the possibility that various unstable phenomena occur on the liquid surface by the interference of the free liquid surface and flow. One example is the self-exciting sloshing by flow. In order to elucidate the mechanism of occurrence of the phenomena in a simple system, the experimental and analytical examinations were carried out on the self-exciting sloshing of free liquid surface in a rectangular vessel by plane jet flow. The basic oscillation characteristics of self-exciting sloshing were examined, and the physical quantities that control the occurrence of self-exciting sloshing were investigated by examining the effect in the case of changing the shapes of vessels. The experiments on the self-exciting sloshing in the case of vertical, horizontal and oblique plane jet flows are reported. The model for the occurrence of oscillation, in which the interaction of sloshing and jet variation was simplified, is proposed, and the verification of the model is reported. (K.I.)

  13. Numerical analysis of high-speed Lithium jet flow under vacuum conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordeev, Sergej; Groeschel, Friedrich; Stieglitz, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The EVEDA Li test loop (ELTL) [1] is aimed at validating the hydraulic stability of the Lithium (Li) target at a velocity up to 20 m/s at vacuum (≈10 −3 Pa). The ELTL has been designed to demonstrate the feasibility of the major components providing a neutron production liquid Li target for IFMIF. The rectangular shaped Li jet (cross-section 25 mm × 100 mm) necessitates for heat removal flow velocities of 15–20 m/s along a concave shaped back wall (curvature radius 250 mm) towards the outlet pipe, where the Li jet is subjected to vacuum before it finally enters the collecting quench tank. During the validation experiments within the ELTL acoustic waves within the target outlet pipe have been recorded, indicating potential cavitation processes in the jet impinging region, which may cause premature failures. In order to identify potential cavitation phenomena in correlation with the free jet flow in the outlet pipe a numerical study has been performed. The comparison measured and simulated acoustic emissions exhibits that experimentally deduced cavitation area coincides with the location of the jet wall impingement. The simulations further reveal that a part of the fluid after striking the wall even flows opposite to the gravity vector. This reversed flow is inherently unstable and characterized by waves at first growing and then bursting into droplets. The intense generation of small droplets increases significantly the Li free surface area and lead to a production of Li vapour, which is captured by the jet flow and reintroduced in the main flow. As the static pressure is recovered downstream due to jet impact, the vapour bubbles collapse and hence cavitation likely occurs.

  14. Numerical analysis of high-speed Lithium jet flow under vacuum conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordeev, Sergej, E-mail: sergej.gordeev@kit.edu; Groeschel, Friedrich; Stieglitz, Robert

    2016-11-01

    The EVEDA Li test loop (ELTL) [1] is aimed at validating the hydraulic stability of the Lithium (Li) target at a velocity up to 20 m/s at vacuum (≈10{sup −3} Pa). The ELTL has been designed to demonstrate the feasibility of the major components providing a neutron production liquid Li target for IFMIF. The rectangular shaped Li jet (cross-section 25 mm × 100 mm) necessitates for heat removal flow velocities of 15–20 m/s along a concave shaped back wall (curvature radius 250 mm) towards the outlet pipe, where the Li jet is subjected to vacuum before it finally enters the collecting quench tank. During the validation experiments within the ELTL acoustic waves within the target outlet pipe have been recorded, indicating potential cavitation processes in the jet impinging region, which may cause premature failures. In order to identify potential cavitation phenomena in correlation with the free jet flow in the outlet pipe a numerical study has been performed. The comparison measured and simulated acoustic emissions exhibits that experimentally deduced cavitation area coincides with the location of the jet wall impingement. The simulations further reveal that a part of the fluid after striking the wall even flows opposite to the gravity vector. This reversed flow is inherently unstable and characterized by waves at first growing and then bursting into droplets. The intense generation of small droplets increases significantly the Li free surface area and lead to a production of Li vapour, which is captured by the jet flow and reintroduced in the main flow. As the static pressure is recovered downstream due to jet impact, the vapour bubbles collapse and hence cavitation likely occurs.

  15. Computational study of jet interaction flow field with and without incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asif, M.; Zahir, S.; Khan, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    The objective was to study the interaction of a side jet with the incoming supersonic flow and hypersonic flow. Qualitatively same Cp trends have been obtained as found experimentally. Also in aerodynamic coefficients side jet interaction results in additional pitching moment which is because of the high pressure region in upstream of the jet and a low pressure region in the downstream of the jet. Also jet interaction results in the rise in the lift coefficient. Whereas in the incidence case, simulation has been performed for the hypersonic flows over a biconic body with supersonic lateral jet at Mach 9.7 and incidence of 0 o to incidence of -12 o and 12 o . The results obtained were compared with the experimental and CFD code CFL3D results. PAK-3D over predicts the surface pressure as compared to the CFL3D and experimental results, whereas the qualitative trends are the same. Finally the integrated aerodynamic force coefficients were compared with CFL3D predicted results. (author)

  16. Turbulent flow field structure of initially asymmetric jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung Hoon; Kim, Bong Whan; Kim, Suk Woo

    2000-01-01

    The near field structure of round turbulent jets with initially asymmetric velocity distributions is investigated experimentally. Experiments are carried out using a constant temperature hot-wire anemomentry system to measure streamwise velocity in the jets. The measurements are undertaken across the jet at various streamwise stations in a range starting from the jet exit plane and up to a downstream location of twelve diameters. The experimental results include the distributions of mean and instantaneous velocities, vorticity field, turbulence intensity, and the Reynolds shear stresses. The asymmetry of the jet exit plane was obtained by using circular cross-section pipes with a bend upstream of the exit. Three pipes used here include a straight pipe, and 90 and 160 degree-bend pipes. Therefore, at the upstream of the pipe exit, secondary flow through the bend and mean streamwise velocity distribution could be controlled by changing the curvature of pipes. The jets into the atmosphere have two levels of initial velocity skewness in addition to an axisymmetric jet from a straight pipe. In case of the curved pipe, a six diameterlong straight pipe section follows the bend upstream of the exit. The Reynolds number based on the exit bulk velocity is 13,400. The results indicate that the near field structure is considerably modified by the skewness of an initial mean velocity distribution. As the skewness increases, the decay rate of mean velocity at the centerline also increases

  17. Measurements on Buoyant Jet Flows from a Ceiling-Mounted Slot Diffuser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.; Möller, Åke T. A.

    Ceiling-mounted slot diffusers in ventilated rooms will often generate a flow of the wall jet type. The jet follows the ceiling, entrains air from the occupied zone and generates a recirculating flow in the whole room. This paper will deal with the flow in the ceiling region. The wall jet flow...

  18. LES of turbulent jet in cross-flow: Part 1 – A numerical validation study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavar, Dalibor; Meyer, Knud Erik

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents results of a LES based numerical simulation of the turbulent jet-in-cross-flow (JICF) flowfield, with Reynolds number based on cross-flow velocity and jet diameter Re=2400 and jet-to-cross-flow velocity ratio of R=3.3. The JICF flow case has been investigated in great detail...

  19. Numerical simulation of flow characteristics of lean jet to cross-flow in safety injection of reactor cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Haijun; He Huining; Luo Yushan; Wang Weishu

    2011-01-01

    In the present work, a numerical simulation was performed to study the flow characteristics of lean jet to cross flow in a main tube in the safety injection of reactor cooling system. The influence scope and mixing characteristics of the confined lean jet in cross-flow were studied. It can be concluded that three basic flow regimes are marked, namely the attached lean jet, lift-off lean jet and impinging lean jet. The velocity ratio V R is the key factor in the flow state. The depth and region of jet to main flow are enhanced with the increase of the velocity ratio. The jet flow penetrates through the main flow with the increase of the velocity ratio. At higher velocity ratio, the jet flow strikes the main flow bottom and circumfluence happens in upriver of main flow. The vortex flow characteristics dominate the flow near region of jet to cross-flow and the mixture of jet to cross-flow. At different velocity ratio V R , the vortex grows from the same displacement, but the vortex type and the vortex is different. At higher velocity ratio, the vortex develops fleetly, wears off sharp and dies out sharp. The study is very important to the heat transfer experiments of cross-flow jet and thermal stress analysis in the designs of nuclear engineering. (authors)

  20. Turbulent flow and heat transfer from a slot jet impinging on a moving plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattopadhyay, Himadri; Saha, Sujoy K.

    2003-01-01

    The flow field due to an impinging jet over a moving surface at a moderately high Reynolds number, emanating from a rectangular slot nozzle has been computed using the large eddy simulation technique. A dynamic subgrid-scale stress model has been used for the small scales of turbulence. The velocity of the impinging surface perpendicular to the jet velocity has been varied up to two times the jet velocity at the nozzle exit. Turbulence quantities such as kinetic energy, production rate of turbulent kinetic energy and the Reynolds stresses are calculated for different surface velocities. It has been observed that, while the turbulent kinetic energy increases with increasing velocity of the impinging surface, production rate of turbulence initially increases with increasing surface velocity and then comes down. By analyzing the components of turbulent production it was found that P 33 is the dominant term up to the surface velocity of one unit and when the surface velocity is two times the jet velocity at the nozzle exit, the major contribution to turbulence production comes from P 13 and partly from P 11 . Heat transfer from the plate initially increases with non-dimensional surface velocity up to 1.2 and then comes down

  1. Modeling axisymmetric flows dynamics of films, jets, and drops

    CERN Document Server

    Middleman, Stanley

    1995-01-01

    This concise book is intended to fulfill two purposes: to provide an important supplement to classic texts by carrying fluid dynamics students on into the realm of free boundary flows; and to demonstrate the art of mathematical modeling based on knowledge, intuition, and observation. In the authors words, the overall goal is make the complex simple, without losing the essence--the virtue--of the complexity.Modeling Axisymmetric Flows: Dynamics of Films, Jets, and Drops is the first book to cover the topics of axisymmetric laminar flows; free-boundary flows; and dynamics of drops, jets, and films. The text also features comparisons of models to experiments, and it includes a large selection of problems at the end of each chapter.Key Features* Contains problems at the end of each chapter* Compares real-world experimental data to theory* Provides one of the first comprehensive examinations of axisymmetric laminar flows, free-boundary flows, and dynamics of drops, jets, and films* Includes development of basic eq...

  2. An investigation of bimodal jet trajectory in flow through scaled models of the human vocal tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erath, Byron D.; Plesniak, Michael W. [Purdue University, School of Mechanical Engineering, Indiana (United States)

    2006-05-15

    Pulsatile two-dimensional flow through static divergent models of the human vocal folds is investigated. Although the motivation for this study is speech production, the results are generally applicable to a variety of engineering flows involving pulsatile flow through diffusers. Model glottal divergence angles of 10, 20, and 40 represent various geometries encountered in one phonation cycle. Frequency and amplitude of the flow oscillations are scaled with physiological Reynolds and Strouhal numbers typical of human phonation. Glottal velocity trajectories are measured along the anterior-posterior midline by using phase-averaged particle image velocimetry to acquire 1,000 realizations at ten discrete instances in the phonation cycle. The angular deflection of the glottal jet from the streamwise direction (symmetric configuration) is quantified for each realization. A bimodal flow configuration is observed for divergence angles of 10 and 20 , with the flow eventually skewing and attaching to the vocal fold walls. The deflection of the flow toward the vocal fold walls occurs when the forcing function reaches maximum velocity and zero acceleration. For a divergence angle of 40 , the flow never attaches to the vocal fold walls; however, there is increased variability in the glottal jet after the forcing function reaches maximum velocity and zero acceleration. The variation in the jet trajectory as a function of divergence angle is explained by performance maps of diffuser flow regimes. The smaller angle cases are in the unstable transitory stall regime while the 40 divergent case is in the fully developed two-dimensional stall regime. Very small geometric variations in model size and surface finish significantly affect the flow behavior. The bimodal, or flip-flopping, glottal jet behavior is expected to influence the dipole contribution to sound production. (orig.)

  3. Bistable flow spectral analysis. Repercussions on jet pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavilan Moreno, C.J.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The most important thing in this paper, is the spectral characterization of the bistable flow in a Nuclear Power Plant. → This paper goes deeper in the effect of the bistable flow over the jet pump and the induced vibrations. → The jet pump frequencies are very close to natural jet pump frequencies, in the 3rd and 6th mode. - Abstract: There have been many attempts at characterizing and predicting bistable flow in boiling water reactors (BWRs). Nevertheless, in most cases the results have only managed to develop models that analytically reproduce the phenomenon (). Modeling has been forensic in all cases, while the capacity of the model focus on determining the exclusion areas on the recirculation flow map. The bistability process is known by its effects given there is no clear definition of its causal process. In the 1980s, Hitachi technicians () managed to reproduce bistable flow in the laboratory by means of pipe geometry, similar to that which is found in recirculation loops. The result was that the low flow pattern is formed by the appearance of a quasi stationary, helicoidal vortex in the recirculation collector's branches. This vortex creates greater frictional losses than regions without vortices, at the same discharge pressure. Neither the behavior nor the dynamics of these vortices were characterized in this paper. The aim of this paper is to characterize these vortices in such a way as to enable them to provide their own frequencies and their later effect on the jet pumps. The methodology used in this study is similar to the one used previously when analyzing the bistable flow in tube arrays with cross flow (). The method employed makes use of the power spectral density function. What differs is the field of application. We will analyze a Loop B with a bistable flow and compare the high and low flow situations. The same analysis will also be carried out on the loop that has not developed the bistable flow (Loop A) at the same moments

  4. Line printing solution-processable small molecules with uniform surface profile via ink-jet printer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huimin; Xu, Wei; Tan, Wanyi; Zhu, Xuhui; Wang, Jian; Peng, Junbiao; Cao, Yong

    2016-03-01

    Line printing offers a feasible approach to remove the pixel well structure which is widely used to confine the ink-jet printed solution. In the study, a uniform line is printed by an ink-jet printer. To achieve a uniform surface profile of the printed line, 10vol% low-volatile solvent DMA (3,4-Dimethylanisole) is mixed with high-volatile solvent Pxy (p-xylene) as the solvent. After a solution-processable small molecule is dissolved, the surface tension of DMA solution becomes lower than that of Pxy solution, which creates an inward Marangoni flow during the solvent evaporation. The inward Marangoni flow balances out the outward capillary flow, thereby forming a flat film surface. The line width of the printed line depends on the contact angle of the solution on the hole injection layer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Flow Field and Acoustic Predictions for Three-Stream Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Shaun Patrick; Henderson, Brenda S.; Khavaran, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics was used to analyze a three-stream nozzle parametric design space. The study varied bypass-to-core area ratio, tertiary-to-core area ratio and jet operating conditions. The flowfield solutions from the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) code Overflow 2.2e were used to pre-screen experimental models for a future test in the Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory (AAPL) at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). Flowfield solutions were considered in conjunction with the jet-noise-prediction code JeNo to screen the design concepts. A two-stream versus three-stream computation based on equal mass flow rates showed a reduction in peak turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) for the three-stream jet relative to that for the two-stream jet which resulted in reduced acoustic emission. Additional three-stream solutions were analyzed for salient flowfield features expected to impact farfield noise. As tertiary power settings were increased there was a corresponding near nozzle increase in shear rate that resulted in an increase in high frequency noise and a reduction in peak TKE. As tertiary-to-core area ratio was increased the tertiary potential core elongated and the peak TKE was reduced. The most noticeable change occurred as secondary-to-core area ratio was increased thickening the secondary potential core, elongating the primary potential core and reducing peak TKE. As forward flight Mach number was increased the jet plume region decreased and reduced peak TKE.

  6. Droplet impaction on solid surfaces exposed to impinging jet fires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazemi, Zia

    2005-12-15

    The thermal response of hot surfaces exposed to impinging jet fire and subsequent impacting water droplets is investigated. The research was done mainly experimentally by utilizing three different concepts. This included experiments on a laboratory scale steel plate and large outdoor fire tests with a quadratic steel channel and steel plates. Besides the horizontal jet flame itself was characterized in a comprehensive study. As a comparative study, the last three types of the experiment were additionally modeled by the CFD-code Kameleon FireEx for validation of results. The purpose of the experiments done on bench scale steel plate (L x W x T : 300 x 200 x 8 mm) was mainly to map data on wetting temperature, water droplet size, droplet impingement angle, and droplet velocity prior to large scale jet fire tests. The droplet release angle normal to hot surface gives best cooling effect, when the surface is oriented in upright position. The partial wetting begins at about 165 degrees C. When the surface is positioned in horizontal plane, the droplet of about 5 mm in diameter wets the hot surface partially at around 240-250 degrees C within an impaction distance of 20 cm. At about 150 degrees C, the droplet is entirely attached to the surface with almost zero contact angle, and cools down the solid at a critical heat flux equivalent to 1750 kW/m{sup 2}. The cooling effectiveness is about 8 % with a Weber number of 68. Although in the event of horizontal channel (L x W x T : 1000 x 200 x 8 mm) water droplets were not applied, however, the knowledge gained with jet fire tests gave valuable information about temperature progress in solids (steels and insulation) and their response to impinging jet fire during long duration experiments. The temperature of the insulated area of the channel keeps 200 degrees C below that of the exposed surface, as long as the insulation material remained intact. Upon long test fire durations, the insulation either burns or degrades despite

  7. Effects of pulsating water jet impact on aluminium surface

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Foldyna, Josef; Sitek, Libor; Ščučka, Jiří; Martinec, Petr; Valíček, Jan; Páleníková, K.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 2009, č. 20 (2009), s. 6174-6180 ISSN 0924-0136 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/07/1451; GA ČR GP101/07/P512 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : pulsating water jet * jet impact * material erosion * surface characteristics Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools Impact factor: 1.420, year: 2009 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science

  8. Numerical Analysis of Pelton Nozzle Jet Flow Behavior Considering Elbow Pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chongji, Zeng; Yexiang, Xiao; Wei, Xu; Tao, Wu; Jin, Zhang; Zhengwei, Wang; Yongyao, Luo

    2016-11-01

    In Pelton turbine, the dispersion of cylindrical jet have a great influence on the energy interaction of jet and buckets. This paper simulated the internal flow of nozzle and the downstream free jet flow at 3 different needle strokes. The nozzle model consists of the elbow pipe and the needle rod which supported by 4 ribs. Homogenous model and SST k-ω model were adopted to simulate the unsteady two-phase jet flow. The development of free flow, including a contraction process followed by an expansion process, was analysed detailed as well as the influence of the nozzle geometry on the jet flow pattern. The increase of nozzle opening results in a more dispersion jet, which means a higher hydraulic loss. Upstream bend and ribs induce the secondary flow in the jet and decrease the jet concentration.

  9. Swirl effect on flow structure and mixing in a turbulent jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravtsov, Z. D.; Sharaborin, D. K.; Dulin, V. M.

    2018-03-01

    The paper reports on experimental study of turbulent transport in the initial region of swirling turbulent jets. The particle image velocimetry and planar laser-induced fluorescence techniques are used to investigate the flow structure and passive scalar concentration, respectively, in free air jet with acetone vapor. Three flow cases are considered, viz., non-swirling jets and swirling jets with and without vortex breakdown and central recirculation zone. Without vortex breakdown, the swirl is shown to promote jet mixing with surrounding air and to decrease the jet core length. The vortex core breakdown further enhances mixing as the jet core disintegrates at the nozzle exit.

  10. Small-Scale Morphological Features on a Solid Surface Processed by High-Pressure Abrasive Water Jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Kang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Being subjected to a high-pressure abrasive water jet, solid samples will experience an essential variation of both internal stress and physical characteristics, which is closely associated with the kinetic energy attached to the abrasive particles involved in the jet stream. Here, experiments were performed, with particular emphasis being placed on the kinetic energy attenuation and turbulent features in the jet stream. At jet pressure of 260 MPa, mean velocity and root-mean-square (RMS velocity on two jet-stream sections were acquired by utilizing the phase Doppler anemometry (PDA technique. A jet-cutting experiment was then carried out with Al-Mg alloy samples being cut by an abrasive water jet. Morphological features and roughness on the cut surface were quantitatively examined through scanning electron microscopy (SEM and optical profiling techniques. The results indicate that the high-pressure water jet is characterized by remarkably high mean flow velocities and distinct velocity fluctuations. Those irregular pits and grooves on the cut surfaces indicate both the energy attenuation and the development of radial velocity components in the jet stream. When the sample is positioned with different distances from the nozzle outlet, the obtained quantitative surface roughness varies accordingly. A descriptive model highlighting the behaviors of abrasive particles in jet-cutting process is established in light of the experimental results and correlation analysis.

  11. Small-Scale Morphological Features on a Solid Surface Processed by High-Pressure Abrasive Water Jet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Can; Liu, Haixia

    2013-08-14

    Being subjected to a high-pressure abrasive water jet, solid samples will experience an essential variation of both internal stress and physical characteristics, which is closely associated with the kinetic energy attached to the abrasive particles involved in the jet stream. Here, experiments were performed, with particular emphasis being placed on the kinetic energy attenuation and turbulent features in the jet stream. At jet pressure of 260 MPa, mean velocity and root-mean-square (RMS) velocity on two jet-stream sections were acquired by utilizing the phase Doppler anemometry (PDA) technique. A jet-cutting experiment was then carried out with Al-Mg alloy samples being cut by an abrasive water jet. Morphological features and roughness on the cut surface were quantitatively examined through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical profiling techniques. The results indicate that the high-pressure water jet is characterized by remarkably high mean flow velocities and distinct velocity fluctuations. Those irregular pits and grooves on the cut surfaces indicate both the energy attenuation and the development of radial velocity components in the jet stream. When the sample is positioned with different distances from the nozzle outlet, the obtained quantitative surface roughness varies accordingly. A descriptive model highlighting the behaviors of abrasive particles in jet-cutting process is established in light of the experimental results and correlation analysis.

  12. Flow control in axial fan inlet guide vanes by synthetic jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wurst P.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Tested high pressure axial flow fan with hub/tip ratio of 0.70 and external diameter of 600 mm consisted of inlet guide vanes (IGV, rotor and stator blade rows. Fan peripheral velocity was 47 m/s. Air volume flow rate was changed by turning of rear part of the inlet guide vanes. At turning of 20 deg the flow was separated on the IGV profiles. The synthetic jets were introduced through radial holes in machine casing in the location before flow separation origin. Synthetic jet actuator was designed with the use of a speaker by UT AVCR. Its membrane had diameter of 63 mm. Excitation frequency was chosen in the range of 500 Hz – 700 Hz. Synthetic jets favourably influenced separated flow on the vane profiles in the distance of (5 – 12 mm from the casing surface. The reduction of flow separation area caused in the region near the casing the decrease of the profile loss coefficient approximately by 20%.

  13. Flow control in axial fan inlet guide vanes by synthetic jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyrus, V.; Trávníček, Z.; Wurst, P.; Kordík, J.

    2013-04-01

    Tested high pressure axial flow fan with hub/tip ratio of 0.70 and external diameter of 600 mm consisted of inlet guide vanes (IGV), rotor and stator blade rows. Fan peripheral velocity was 47 m/s. Air volume flow rate was changed by turning of rear part of the inlet guide vanes. At turning of 20 deg the flow was separated on the IGV profiles. The synthetic jets were introduced through radial holes in machine casing in the location before flow separation origin. Synthetic jet actuator was designed with the use of a speaker by UT AVCR. Its membrane had diameter of 63 mm. Excitation frequency was chosen in the range of 500 Hz - 700 Hz. Synthetic jets favourably influenced separated flow on the vane profiles in the distance of (5 - 12) mm from the casing surface. The reduction of flow separation area caused in the region near the casing the decrease of the profile loss coefficient approximately by 20%.

  14. An Experimental Study on Active Flow Control Using Synthetic Jet Actuators over S809 Airfoil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gul, M; Uzol, O; Akmandor, I S

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of periodic excitation from individually controlled synthetic jet actuators on the dynamics of the flow within the separation and re-attachment regions of the boundary layer over the suction surface of a 2D model wing that has S809 airfoil profile. Experiments are performed in METUWIND's C3 open-loop suction type wind tunnel that has a 1 m × 1 m cross-section test section. The synthetic jet array on the wing consists of three individually controlled actuators driven by piezoelectric diaphragms located at 28% chord location near the mid-span of the wing. In the first part of the study, surface pressure, Constant Temperature Anemometry (CTA) and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements are performed over the suction surface of the airfoil to determine the size and characteristics of the separated shear layer and the re-attachment region, i.e. the laminar separation bubble, at 2.3x10 5 Reynolds number at zero angle of attack and with no flow control as a baseline case. For the controlled case, CTA measurements are carried out under the same inlet conditions at various streamwise locations along the suction surface of the airfoil to investigate the effect of the synthetic jet on the boundary layer properties. During the controlled case experiments, the synthetic jet actuators are driven with a sinusoidal frequency of 1.45 kHz and 300Vp-p. Results of this study show that periodic excitation from the synthetic jet actuators eliminates the laminar separation bubble formed over the suction surface of the airfoil at 2.3x10 5 Reynolds number at zero angle of attack

  15. SPREADING OF A FLUID JET ON THE CORRUGATED SURFACE OF THE STRUCTURED PACKING OF WET SCRUBBERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorodilov A.A.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The new packing for wet scrubbers for cooling exhaust gases of furnaces is presented. Spreading features of the fluid jet on the corrugated surface of the proposed packing have been studied. Flow rate of the liquid flowing through slits to the opposite side of the packing element was determined. Several regimes of a fluid flow on the surface of the proposed structured packing were determined. An optimal range of rational flow rates for more intense cooling of exhaust gases is proposed. It was discovered that the range of optimum flow rates may be extended if the surface of the packing element is pre-wetted. The way of increasing the rate of effective interfacial surface area for gas-liquid contact per unit volume of the packing of the scrubber is presented.

  16. Features of round air jet flowing at low Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemanov, V. V.; Sharov, K. A.; Gorinovich, N. V.

    2018-03-01

    The laminar-turbulent transition in a round jet flowing from a cylindrical channel with the diameter of 3.2 mm was studied experimentally. In experiments, the range of Reynolds numbers determined by the mean-flow velocity was Re = Ud/ν = 700-12000. The measurements were carried out using a PIV system and one-component hot-wire anemometer. The profiles of average velocities and their pulsations in the zone of laminar-turbulent transition were obtained along with axial distributions of longitudinal velocity and pulsations of longitudinal velocity.

  17. Numerical Predictions of Enhanced Impingement Jet Cooling with Ribs and Pins in Co-Flow and Cross-Flow Configurations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. El-Jummah

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Numerical calculations relevant to gas turbine internal wall heat transfer cooling were conducted using conjugate heat transfer (CHT computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD commercial codes. The CHT CFD predictions were carried out for impingement heat transfer with different types of obstacle walls (fins on the target surfaces. A 10 × 10 row of impingement air jet holes (or hole density n of 4306 m-2 was used, which gives ten rows of holes in the cross-flow direction and only one heat transfer enhancement obstacle per impingement jet was investigated. Previously, four different shaped obstacles were investigated experimentally and were used to validate the present predictions. The obstacle walls, which were equally spaced on the centreline between each impingement jet are of the co-flow and cross-flow configurations. The impingement jet pitch X to diameter D, X/D and gap Z to diameter, Z/D ratios were kept constant at 4.66 and 3.06 for X, Z and D of 15.24, 10.00 and 3.27 mm, respectively. The obstacles investigated were ribs and rectangular pin-fins shapes, using two obstacles height H to diameter, H/D ratio of 1.38 and 2.45. Computations were carried out for three different mass flux G of 1.08, 1.48 and 1.94 kg/sm2. Relative pressure loss ∆P/P and surface average heat transfer coefficient (HTC h predictions for the range of G, showed good agreement with the experimental results. The prediction also reveals that obstacles not only increases the turbulent flows, but also takes away most of the cooling heat transfer that produces the regions with highest thermal gradients. It also reduces the impingement gap downstream cross-flow.

  18. Three electrode atmospheric pressure plasma jet in helium flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maletic, Dejan; Puac, Nevena; Malovic, Gordana; Petrovic, Zoran Lj.

    2015-09-01

    Plasma jets are widely used in various types of applications and lately more and more in the field of plasma medicine. However, it is not only their applicability that distinguishes them from other atmospheric plasma sources, but also the behavior of the plasma. It was shown that plasma plume is not continuous, but discrete set of plasma packages. Here we present iCCD images and current voltage characteristics of a three electrode plasma jet. Our plasma jet has a simple design with body made of glass tube and two transparent electrodes wrapped around it. The additional third metal tip electrode was positioned at 10 and 25 mm in front of the jet nozzle and connected to the same potential as the powered electrode. Power transmitted to the plasma was from 0.5 W to 4.0 W and the helium flow rate was kept constant at 4 slm. For the 10 mm configuration plasma is ignited on the metal tip in the whole period of the excitation signal and in the positive half cycle plasma ``bullet'' is propagating beyond the metal tip. In contrast to that, for the 25 mm configuration at the tip electrode plasma can be seen only in the minimum and maximum of the excitation signal, and there is no plasma ``bullet'' formation. This research has been supported by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Republic of Serbia, under projects ON171037 and III41011.

  19. Study on flow characteristics of chemically reacting liquid jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong Seon Dae; Okamoto, Koji; Takata, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Akira

    2004-07-01

    Tube rupture accidents in steam generators of sodium-cooled fast breeder reactors are important for safety because the rupture may propagates to neighboring tubes due to sodium-water reaction. In order to clarify the thermal-hydraulic phenomena in the accidents, the flow pattern and the interface in multi-phase flow must be investigated. The JNC cooperative research scheme on the nuclear fuel cycle with the University of Tokyo has been carried to develop a simultaneous measurement system of concentration and velocity profiles and to evaluate influence of chemical reaction on mixing phenomena. In the experiments, aqueous liquor of acetic acid and ammonium hydroxide are selected as a simulant fluid instead of liquid sodium and water vapor. The following conclusions are obtained in this research. Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) technique was adopted to measure reacting zone and pH distribution in chemically reacting liquid round free jet. As a result, it was found that the chemical reaction, which took place at the interface between the jet and outer flow, suppressed the mixing phenomenon (in 2001 research). Dynamic Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) method was developed to measure instantaneous velocity profile with high temporal resolution. In the Dynamic PIV, a high-speed video camera coupled with a high-speed laser pulse generator was implemented. A time-line trend of interfacial area in the free jet was investigated with the Dynamic PIV. This technique was also applied to a complicated geometry (in 2002 research). A new algorithms for image analysis was developed to evaluated the Dynamic PIV data in detail. The characteristics of the mixing phenomenon with reacting jet such as the turbulent kinetic energy and the Reynolds stress were estimated in a spatial and temporal spectrum (in 2003 research). (author)

  20. Numerical study of free pulsed jet flow with variable density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kriaa, Wassim [Laboratoire de Mecanique des Fluides et Thermique, Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs de Monastir, Route de Ouardanine, 5000 Monastir (Tunisia)], E-mail: kriaawass@yahoo.fr; Cheikh, Habib Ben; Mhiri, Hatem [Laboratoire de Mecanique des Fluides et Thermique, Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs de Monastir, Route de Ouardanine, 5000 Monastir (Tunisia); Le Palec, Georges; Bournot, Philippe [Institut de Mecanique de Marseille, 60 rue Juliot Curie Technopole de Chateau-Gombert 13453, Marseille Cedex 13 (France)

    2008-05-15

    In this work, we propose a numerical study of a free pulsed plane jet with variable density in unsteady and laminar modes. At the nozzle exit, the flow is characterized by a uniform temperature and submitted to a longitudinal and periodic velocity disturbance: u = u{sub 0}(1 + A sin({omega}t)). A finite difference method is performed to solve the equations governing this flow type. The discussion relates to the effect of the most significant parameters, such as the pulsation frequency and amplitude, on the flow characteristic fields. The effects of Reynolds and Galileo numbers was also examined. The results show that the pulsation affects the flow in the vicinity of the nozzle, and further, the results of the unsteady mode join those of the steady non-pulsed jet. The results state also that the Strouhal number has no influence on the flow mixture degree, whereas the amplitude of pulsation affects, in a remarkable way, the mixture and, consequently, the concentration core length.

  1. Flow pattern and cleaning performance of a stationary liquid jet operating at conditions relevant for industrial tank cleaning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldung Damkjær, N.; Adler-Nissen, Jens; Jensen, B. B. B.

    2017-01-01

    jet was studied using a 19m3 tank and settings applicable to industrial operations; nozzle internal diameters, dN, of 2–5.5mm, cleaning distances, L, of 80–2490mm, and flow rates, Q, of 0.05–3.0m3h−1. Experimental data and model predictions of the behaviour of the jet when striking an unsoiled surface...

  2. MHD Flows in Compact Astrophysical Objects Accretion, Winds and Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Beskin, Vasily S

    2010-01-01

    Accretion flows, winds and jets of compact astrophysical objects and stars are generally described within the framework of hydrodynamical and magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) flows. Analytical analysis of the problem provides profound physical insights, which are essential for interpreting and understanding the results of numerical simulations. Providing such a physical understanding of MHD Flows in Compact Astrophysical Objects is the main goal of this book, which is an updated translation of a successful Russian graduate textbook. The book provides the first detailed introduction into the method of the Grad-Shafranov equation, describing analytically the very broad class of hydrodynamical and MHD flows. It starts with the classical examples of hydrodynamical accretion onto relativistic and nonrelativistic objects. The force-free limit of the Grad-Shafranov equation allows us to analyze in detail the physics of the magnetospheres of radio pulsars and black holes, including the Blandford-Znajek process of energy e...

  3. Transient Characteristics of a Fluidic Device for Circulatory Jet Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Hoa Thanh; Dinh, Thien Xuan; Bui, Phong Nhu; Dau, Van Thanh

    2018-03-13

    In this paper, we report on the design, simulation, and experimental analysis of a miniaturized device that can generate multiple circulated jet flows. The device is actuated by a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) diaphragm. The flows in the device were studied using three-dimensional transient numerical simulation with the programmable open source OpenFOAM and was comparable to the experimental result. Each flow is verified by two hotwires mounted at two positions inside each consisting chamber. The experiment confirmed that the flow was successfully created, and it demonstrated good agreement with the simulation. In addition, a prospective application of the device as an angular rate sensor is also demonstrated. The device is robust, is minimal in size, and can contribute to the development of multi-axis fluidic inertial sensors, fluidic amplifiers, gas mixing, coupling, and analysis.

  4. Surface obstacles in pulsatile flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Ian A.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2017-11-01

    Flows past obstacles mounted on flat surfaces have been widely studied due to their ubiquity in nature and engineering. For nearly all of these studies, the freestream flow over the obstacle was steady, i.e., constant velocity, unidirectional flow. Unsteady, pulsatile flows occur frequently in biology, geophysics, biomedical engineering, etc. Our study is aimed at extending the comprehensive knowledge base that exists for steady flows to considerably more complex pulsatile flows. Characterizing the vortex and wake dynamics of flows around surface obstacles embedded in pulsatile flows can provide insights into the underlying physics in all wake and junction flows. In this study, we experimentally investigate the wake of two canonical obstacles: a cube and a circular cylinder with an aspect ratio of unity. Our previous studies of a surface-mounted hemisphere in pulsatile flow are used as a baseline for these two new, more complex geometries. Phase-averaged PIV and hot-wire anemometry are used to characterize the dynamics of coherent structures in the wake and at the windward junction of the obstacles. Complex physics occur during the deceleration phase of the pulsatile inflow. We propose a framework for understanding these physics based on self-induced vortex propagation, similar to the phenomena exhibited by vortex rings.

  5. Flow instability in laminar jet flames driven by alternating current electric fields

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Gyeong Taek

    2016-10-13

    The effect of electric fields on the instability of laminar nonpremixed jet flames was investigated experimentally by applying the alternating current (AC) to a jet nozzle. We aimed to elucidate the origin of the occurrence of twin-lifted jet flames in laminar jet flow configurations, which occurred when AC electric fields were applied. The results indicated that a twin-lifted jet flame originated from cold jet instability, caused by interactions between negative ions in the jet flow via electron attachment as O +e→O when AC electric fields were applied. This was confirmed by conducting systematic, parametric experiment, which included changing gaseous component in jets and applying different polarity of direct current (DC) to the nozzle. Using two deflection plates installed in parallel with the jet stream, we found that only negative DC on the nozzle could charge oxygen molecules negatively. Meanwhile, the cold jet instability occurred only for oxygen-containing jets. A shedding frequency of jet stream due to AC driven instability showed a good correlation with applied AC frequency exhibiting a frequency doubling. However, for the applied AC frequencies over 80Hz, the jet did not respond to the AC, indicating an existence of a minimum flow induction time in a dynamic response of negative ions to external AC fields. Detailed regime of the instability in terms of jet velocity, AC voltage and frequency was presented and discussed. Hypothesized mechanism to explain the instability was also proposed.

  6. Flow over riblet curved surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loureiro, J B R; Freire, A P Silva, E-mail: atila@mecanica.ufrj.br [Mechanical Engineering Program, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (COPPE/UFRJ), C.P. 68503, 21.941-972, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-12-22

    The present work studies the mechanics of turbulent drag reduction over curved surfaces by riblets. The effects of surface modification on flow separation over steep and smooth curved surfaces are investigated. Four types of two-dimensional surfaces are studied based on the morphometric parameters that describe the body of a blue whale. Local measurements of mean velocity and turbulence profiles are obtained through laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) and particle image velocimetry (PIV).

  7. Measurement of free-surface of liquid metal lithium jet for IFMIF target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiroo Kondo; Nobuo Yamaoka; Takuji Kanemura; Seiji Miyamoto; Hiroshi Horiike; Mizuho Ida; Hiroo Nakamura; Izuru Matsushita; Takeo Muroga

    2006-01-01

    This reports an experimental study on flow characteristics of a lithium target flow of International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF). Surface shapes of the target were tried to measure by pattern projection method that is a three dimensional image measurement method. Irregularity of the surface shape caused by surface wakes was successfully measured by the method. IFMIF liquid lithium target is formed a flat plane jet of 25 mm in depth and 260 mm in width, and flows in a flow velocity range of 10 to 20 m/s. Aim of this study is to develop measurement techniques for monitoring of the target when IFMIF is in operation. The lithium target flow is high speed jet and the temperature high is more than 500 K. Also, light is not transmitted into liquid metal lithium. Therefore, almost of all flow measurement techniques developed for water are not used for lithium flow. In this study, pattern projection method was employed to measure the surface irregularity of the target. In the method, stripe patterns are projected onto the flow surface. The projected patterns are deformed according the surface shape. Three-dimensional surface shape is measured by analyzing the deformed patterns recorded using a CCD camera. The method uses the property that lithium dose not transmit visible lights. The experiments were carried out using a lithium loop at Osaka University. In this facility, lithium plane jet of 10 mm in depth and 70 mm width is obtained in the velocity range of less than 15 m/s using a two contractions nozzle. The pattern projection method was used to measure the amplitude of surface irregularity caused by surface wakes. The surface wakes were generated from small damaged at the nozzle edge caused by erosion, and those were successfully measured by the method. The measurement results showed the amplitude of the surface wakes were approximately equal to a size of damage of a nozzle. The amplitude was decreasing with distance to down stream and with decreasing

  8. The effects of arbitrary injection angle and flow conditions on venturi-jet mixer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundararaj S.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the effect of jet injection angle, cross flow Reynolds number and velocity ratio on entrainment and mixing of jet with incompressible cross flow in venturi-jet mixer. Five different jet injection angles 45o, 60o, 90o, 125o, 135o are tested to evaluate the entrainment of jet and mixing performances of the mixer. Tracer concentration along the downstream of the jet injection, cross flow velocity, jet velocity and pressure drop across the mixer are determined experimentally to characterize the mixing performance of the mixer. The experiments show that the performance of a venturi-jet-mixer substantially improves at high injection angle and can be augmented still by increasing velocity ratio. The jet deflects much and penetrates less in the cross flow as the cross flow Reynolds number is increased. The effect could contribute substantially to the better mixing index with moderate pressure drop. Normalized jet profile, concentration decay, jet velocity profile are computed from equations of conservation of mass, momentum and concentration written in natural co-ordinate systems. The comparison between the experimental and numerical results confirms the accuracy of the simulations. Correlations for jet trajectory and entrainment ratio of the mixer are obtained by multivariate-linear regression analysis using power law.

  9. Flow characteristics and heat transfer performances of a semi-confined impinging array of jets: effect of nozzle geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dano, B.P.E.; Liburdy, J.A. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Kanokjaruvijit, Koonlaya [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2005-02-01

    The flow and heat transfer characteristics of confined jet array impingement with crossflow is investigated. Discrete impingement pressure measurements are used to obtain the jet orifice discharge flow coefficient. Digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) and flow visualization are used to determine the flow characteristics. Two thermal boundary conditions at the impinging surface are presented: an isothermal surface, and a uniform heat flux, where thermocouple and thermochromic liquid crystal methods were used, respectively, to determine the local heat transfer coefficient. Two nozzle geometries are studied, circular and cusped ellipse. Based on the interaction with the jet impingement at the surface, the crossflow is shown to influence the heat transfer results. The two thermal boundary conditions differ in overall heat transfer correlation with the jet Reynolds number. Detailed velocity data show that the flow development from the cusped ellipse nozzle affects the wall region flow more than the circular nozzle, as influenced by the crossflow interactions. The overall heat transfer for the uniform heat flux boundary condition is found to increase for the cusped ellipse orifice. (Author)

  10. Demonstration of Robust Micromachined Jet Technology and its Application to Realistic Flow Control Problems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Allen, Mark

    2000-01-01

    .... Our approaches include: (1) the development of suitable micromachined synthetic jets (microjets) as actuators, which obviate the need to physically extend micromachined structures into an external flow...

  11. Surface flow measurements from drones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauro, Flavia; Porfiri, Maurizio; Grimaldi, Salvatore

    2016-09-01

    Drones are transforming the way we sense and interact with the environment. However, despite their increased capabilities, the use of drones in geophysical sciences usually focuses on image acquisition for generating high-resolution maps. Motivated by the increasing demand for innovative and high performance geophysical observational methodologies, we posit the integration of drone technology and optical sensing toward a quantitative characterization of surface flow phenomena. We demonstrate that a recreational drone can be used to yield accurate surface flow maps of sub-meter water bodies. Specifically, drone's vibrations do not hinder surface flow observations, and velocity measurements are in agreement with traditional techniques. This first instance of quantitative water flow sensing from a flying drone paves the way to novel observations of the environment.

  12. Penetration Characteristics of Air, Carbon Dioxide and Helium Transverse Sonic Jets in Mach 5 Cross Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erinc Erdem

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available An experimental investigation of sonic air, CO2 and Helium transverse jets in Mach 5 cross flow was carried out over a flat plate. The jet to freestream momentum flux ratio, J, was kept the same for all gases. The unsteady flow topology was examined using high speed schlieren visualisation and PIV. Schlieren visualisation provided information regarding oscillating jet shear layer structures and bow shock, Mach disc and barrel shocks. Two-component PIV measurements at the centreline, provided information regarding jet penetration trajectories. Barrel shocks and Mach disc forming the jet boundary were visualised/quantified also jet penetration boundaries were determined. Even though J is kept the same for all gases, the penetration patterns were found to be remarkably different both at the nearfield and the farfield. Air and CO2 jet resulted similar nearfield and farfield penetration pattern whereas Helium jet spread minimal in the nearfield.

  13. Predictions of flow and heat transfer in multiple impinging jets with an elliptic-blending second-moment closure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thielen, L.; Hanjalić, K.; Jonker, H.; Manceau, R.

    2005-01-01

    We present numerical computations of flow and heat transfer in multiple jets impinging normally on a flat heated surface, obtained with a new second-moment turbulence closure combined with an elliptic blending model of non-viscous wall blocking effect. This model provides the mean velocity and

  14. Computational parametric study of an impinging jet in a cross-flow configuration for electronics cooling applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larraona, Gorka S.; Rivas, Alejandro; Antón, Raúl; Ramos, Juan Carlos; Pastor, Ignacio; Moshfegh, Bahram

    2013-01-01

    A parametric study based on design of experiments (DoE) techniques was carried out by computational simulation in order to evaluate the effect that design parameters have on heat transfer and pressure loss of an impinging jet in a cross-flow configuration. The main effects of each parameter and the interactions between parameters were analyzed in detail through the Response Surface Methodology (RSM). Additionally, the potential of the impinging jet in a cross-flow configuration was assessed by calculating the optimal values of the parameters and comparing the cooling efficiency of the resulting configuration with the efficiency of the conventional cross-flow configuration. It was found that the degree to which the average heat transfer coefficient is enhanced as the result of adding an impinging jet depends on the height of the cooled component. Specifically, it was found that the higher the component, the more significant the enhancement. -- Highlights: ► Five design parameters of an impinging jet in a cross-flow (IJCF) have been considered. ► Channel and jet velocities are found to be the most influential parameters. ► Significant interactions exist between some of the parameters. ► Larger cooling efficiency is achieved with the IJCF compared to the cross-flow solely. ► The enhancement obtained with the IJCF depends on the height of the component

  15. Plasma surface interactions at the JET X-point tiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinelli, A.P.; Behrisch, R.; Coad, J.P.; Kock, L. de

    1989-01-01

    Operation with a magnetic divertor, which leads to a zero poloidal field inside the volume of the discharge vessel (the X-point) has led to substantial improvements in confinement time in JET. In this mode the diverted plasma is conducted to a large number of graphite tiles (X-point tiles) near the top of the vessel. The power handling capability of these tiles limits the maximum additional heating power to the discharge. The study of the surface modifications of the X-point tiles of JET is therefore of interest both to correlate the magnetic configuration and plasma particle and energy fluxes with the surface modifications, and also to get information about the erosion and deposition at these wall areas. (author) 5 refs., 4 figs

  16. Large eddy simulations of flow and mixing in jets and swirl flows: application to a gas turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schluter, J.U.

    2000-07-01

    Large Eddy Simulations (LES) are an accepted tool in turbulence research. Most LES investigations deal with low Reynolds-number flows and have a high spatial discretization, which results in high computational costs. To make LES applicable to industrial purposes, the possibilities of LES to deliver results with low computational costs on high Reynolds-number flows have to be investigated. As an example, the cold flow through the Siemens V64.3A.HR gas turbine burner shall be examined. It is a gas turbine burner of swirl type, where the fuel is injected on the surface of vanes perpendicular to the main air flow. The flow regime of an industrial gas turbine is governed by several flow phenomena. The most important are the fuel injection in form of a jet in cross flow (JICF) and the swirl flow issuing into a combustion chamber. In order to prove the ability of LES to deal with these flow phenomena, two numerical investigations were made in order to reproduce the results of experimental studies. The first one deals with JICF. It will be shown that the reproduction of three different JICF is possible with LES on meshes with a low number of mesh points. The results are used to investigate the flow physics of the JICF, especially the merging of two adjacent JICFs. The second fundamental investigation deals with swirl flows. Here, the accuracy of an axisymmetric assumption is examined in detail by comparing it to full 3D LES computations and experimental data. Having demonstrated the ability of LES and the flow solver to deal with such complex flows with low computational efforts, the LES approach is used to examine some details of the burner. First, the investigation of the fuel injection on a vane reveals that the vane flow tends to separate. Furthermore the tendency of the fuel jets to merge is shown. Second, the swirl flow in the combustion chamber is computed. For this investigation the vanes are removed from the burner and swirl is imposed as a boundary condition. As

  17. Turbulent flow structure at a discordant river confluence: Asymmetric jet dynamics with implications for channel morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhodolov, Alexander N.; Krick, Julian; Sukhodolova, Tatiana A.; Cheng, Zhengyang; Rhoads, Bruce L.; Constantinescu, George S.

    2017-06-01

    Only a handful of field studies have examined turbulent flow structure at discordant confluences; the dynamics of flow at such confluences have mainly been examined in the laboratory. This paper reports results of a field-based investigation of turbulent flow structure at a discordant river confluence. These results support the hypothesis that flow at a discordant alluvial confluence with a velocity ratio greater than 2 exhibits jet-like characteristics. Scaling analysis shows that the dynamics of the jet core are quite similar to those of free jets but that the complex structure of flow at the confluence imposes strong effects that can locally suppress or enhance the spreading rate of the jet. This jet-like behavior of the flow has important implications for morphodynamic processes at these types of confluences. The highly energetic core of the jet at this discordant confluence is displaced away from the riverbed, thereby inhibiting scour; however, helical motion develops adjacent to the jet, particularly at high flows, which may promote scour. Numerical experiments demonstrate that the presence or absence of a depositional wedge at the mouth of the tributary can strongly influence detachment of the jet from the bed and the angle of the jet within the confluence.

  18. 2SD numerical study of feed-jet flow in gas centrifuge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Dongjun; Zeng Shi

    2008-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method was adopted to simulate the 2D symmetrical feed-jet flow-field in Iguacu gas centrifuge, in order to study the influence of feed-jet to counter-current. The data acquired from calculation were used to modify the feed boundary condition in counter-current calculation, and the stream lines distribution was got considering the effect o f the feed-jet. Finite volume method and 2-order implicit scheme were adopted to solve Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations in cylinder coordinates to simulate the feed-jet flow. Finite difference method was used to solve centrifuge fluid dynamics equations. The result s indicate that the feed-jet flow affects the countercurrent observably, the results of feed-jet flow simulation can be used to modify the conditions to calculate the counter-current in the real centrifuge. (authors)

  19. Experimental Visualization of the Flow Structure for Jet in Crossflow with a Curved Hole Passage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yu Liang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to investigate the influence of a hole curvature on the flow structure and characteristics downstream of JICF (jet in cross-Flow by means of smoke visualization and particle image velocimetry (PIV. The experiment was performed in a low speed wind tunnel with Reynolds numbers of about 480 and 1000, based on the hole diameter and main flow speed. Two geometries were tested: a circular hole with 90° curvature and a circular straight hole for comparison, under blowing ratios 0.5 and 1.0. The measurements were done in the symmetric plane and four cross-sections. The results show that the curved hole could decrease the mixing behavior of jet flow with the main flow as the hole leading edge also increases the chance of transportingthecoolant to the wall surface and the transverse coverage. The curved hole shows a high potential to increase the cooling effectiveness once it is applied to the turbine blades.

  20. Investigations on Surface Milling of Hardened AISI 4140 Steel with Pulse Jet MQL Applicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Mahmood Al; Mia, Mozammel; Dhar, Nikhil Ranjan

    2018-06-01

    In this article, an experimental investigation was performed in milling hardened AISI 4140 steel of hardness 40 HRC. The machining was performed in both dry and minimal quantity lubricant (MQL) conditions, as part of neat machining, to make a strong comparison of the undertaken machining environments. The MQL was impinged int the form of pulse jet, by using the specially developed pulse-jet-attachment, to ensure that the cutting fluid can be applied in different timed pulses and quantities at critical zones. The tool wear, cutting force and surface roughness were taken as the quality responses while cutting speed, table feed rate and flow rate of the pulse were considered as influential factors. The depth of cut was kept constant at 1.50 mm because of its less significant effects and the straight oil was adopted as cutting fluid in pulse-jet-MQL. The effects of different factors, on the quality responses, are analyzed using ANOVA. It is observed that MQL applicator system exhibits overall better performance when compared to dry milling by reducing surface roughness, cutting force and prolonging tool life but a flow rate of 150 ml/h has tremendous effects on the responses. This investigation and afterward results are expected to aid the industrial practitioner and researcher to adopt the pulse-MQL in high speed milling to prolong tool life, reduce tool wear, diminish cutting force generation and promote better surface finish.

  1. Exact partial solution to the compressible flow problems of jet formation and penetration in plane, steady flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpp, R.R.

    1984-01-01

    The particle solution of the problem of the symmetric impact of two compressible fluid stream is derived. The plane two-dimensional flow is assumed to be steady, and the inviscid compressible fluid is of the Chaplygin (tangent gas) type. The equations governing this flow are transformed to the hodograph plane where an exact, closed-form solution for the stream function is obtained. The distribution of fluid properties along the plane of symmetry and the shape of free surface streamlines are determined by transformation back to the physical plane. The problem of a compressible fluid jet penetrating an infinite target of similar material is also solved by considering a limiting case of this solution. Differences between compressible and incompressible flows of the type considered are illustrated

  2. Large Eddy simulations of jet in cross flow; Simulations aux grandes echelles: application au jet transverse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priere, C

    2005-01-15

    Nowadays, environmental and economic constraints require considerable research efforts from the gas turbine industry. Objectives aim at lowering pollutants emissions and fuel consumption. These efforts take a primary importance to satisfy a continue growth of energy production and to obey to stringent environmental legislations. Recorded progresses are linked to mixing enhancement in combustors running at lean premixed operating point. Indeed, industry shows itself to be attentive in the mixing enhancement and during the last years, efforts are concentrated on fresh and burned gas dilution. The Jet In Cross Flow (JICF), which constitutes a representative case to further the research effort. It has been to be widely studied both in experimentally and numerically, and is particularly well suited for the evaluation of Large Eddy Simulations (LES). This approach, where large scale phenomena are naturally taken into account in the governing equation while the small scales are modelled, offers the means to well-predict such flows. The main objective of this work is to gauge and to enhance the quality of the LES predictions in JICF configurations by means of numerical tools developed in the compressible AVBP code. Physical and numerical parameters considered in the JICF modelization are taken into account and strategies that are able to enhance quality of LES results are proposed. Configurations studied in this work are the following: - Influences of the boundary conditions and jet injection system on a free JICF - Study of static mixing device in an industrial gas turbine chamber. - Study of a JICF configuration represented a dilution zone in low emissions combustors. (author)

  3. Deflection of jets discharged into a reservoir with a free surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Akihiro; Ishikawa, Keizo; Mizushima, Jiro; Akinaga, Takeshi

    2011-01-01

    Deflections of jets discharged into a reservoir with a free surface are investigated numerically. The jets are known to deflect towards either side of the free surface or the bottom, whose direction is not determined uniquely in some experimental conditions, i.e. there are multiple stable states realizable in the same condition. The origin of the multiple stable states is explored by utilizing homotopy transformations in which the top boundary of the reservoir is transformed from a rigid to a free boundary and also the location of the outlet throat is continuously moved from mid-height to the top. We depicted bifurcation diagrams of the flow compiling the data of numerical simulations, from which we identified the origin as an imperfect pitchfork bifurcation, and obtained an insight into the mechanism for the direction to be determined. The parameter region where such multiple stable states are possible is also delimited.

  4. Behavior of water jet horizontally discharged from a small circular hole set on a circular pipe-surface into air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuyuki, Koji; Igarashi, Saburo; Sudo, Seiichi; Yamabe, Masahiro; Kikuchi, Akira; Oba, Risaburo

    2001-01-01

    In order to clarify the behavior of the water jet horizontally discharged from a small circular hole set on a circular pipe surface into air, in this paper, for the first step, we systematically observed the jet aspects, the efflux angle, the discharge coefficient and so on, when the hole diameter d is much smaller than the pipe diameter D. Since the upstream kinetic energy from the hole is somewhat higher than the downstream counterpart, the upstream partial jet with higher efflux angle crashes into the downstream partial jet and drives out the latter into up- and down-side, resulting in a marked pair of vortices, so that resulting in a three-dimensional spiral flow accompanying with marked surface waves. (author)

  5. The structure of a jet in cross flow at low velocity ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopalan, Shridhar; Abraham, Bruce M.; Katz, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines in detail the flow structure and associated wall pressure fluctuations caused by the injection of a round, turbulent jet into a turbulent boundary layer. The velocity ratio, r, ratio of mean jet velocity to the mean cross flow, varies from 0.5 to 2.5 and the Reynolds number based on the cross flow speed and jet diameter is 1.9x10 4 . Particle image velocimetry is used to measure the flow and flush mounted pressure sensors installed at several locations used to determine the wall pressure. The results consist of sample instantaneous flow structures, distributions of mean velocity, vorticity and turbulence intensity, as well as wall pressure spectra. The flow structure depends strongly on the velocity ratio and there are two distinctly different regions. At low velocity ratios, namely r 2, the near-wall flow behind the jet resembles a Karman vortex street and the wall-normal vortical structures contain cross flow boundary layer vorticity. Autospectra of the pressure signals show that the effect of the jet is mainly in the 15-100 Hz range. At r 2, the wall pressure levels reach a plateau demonstrating the diminishing effect of the jet on the near-wall flow. Consistent with the flow structure, the highest wall pressure fluctuations occur off the jet centerline for r 2. Also, the advection speed of near-wall vortical structures increase with r at r 2 it is a constant

  6. Noise characteristics and flow field of an impinging jet on a conical obstacle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xin; Xie, Junlong; Shu, Shuiming; Zhang, Yi, E-mail: hustxjl@163.com [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430074 (China)

    2017-12-15

    The noise characteristics and flow field of a low-speed impinging jet on a conical obstacle have been numerically simulated using the kinetic energy transport subgrid-scale model of the large-eddy simulation method. Noise measurement is carried out to validate the proposed simulation method. The effects of the impinging distance on the development, separation and diffusion of vortices on the back of the conical obstacle are investigated. The jet structure is better preserved and the vorticity value becomes larger as the impinging distance increases. Simulation results of the noise spectrums and overall sound pressure level (OASPL) agree well with the experimental data. The noise spectrums are analyzed and combined with simulation results for the flow field. When the impinging distance is small, the main acoustic sources with the broadband characteristic consist of the dipole source produced by pressure fluctuation on the surface of the obstacle, and the quadrupole source produced by vortices. As the impinging distance increases, the quadrupole source becomes the major acoustic source with low-frequency characteristics. In addition, the OASPL of the impinging jet is obtained at different impinging distances. (paper)

  7. Flowing of supersonic underexpanded micro-jets in the range of moderate Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironov, S. G.; Aniskin, V. M.; Maslov, A. A.

    2017-10-01

    The paper presents new experimental results on the simulation of supersonic underexpanded micro-jets by macro-jet in the range of moderate Reynolds numbers of air outflow from the nozzle. A correlation is shown between the variations in the Pitot pressure in the model micro-jet with variations in the length of the supersonic core of real the micro-jets. The results of experiments on the effect of humidity on the pulsation of mass flow rate in a micro-jet are presented.

  8. Development of an empirical correlation for flow characteristics of turbulent jet by steam jet condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, H. S.; Kim, Y. S.; Youn, Y. J.; Song, C. H.

    2008-01-01

    An experimental research was performed to develop an empirical correlation of the turbulent water jet induced by the steam jet through a single hole in a subcooled water pool. A moveable pitot tube including a thermal couple was used to measure a local velocity and temperature of the turbulent water jet. The experimental results show that the velocity and the temperature distributions agree well with the theory of axially symmetric turbulent jet. The correlation predicting the maximum velocity of the turbulent jet was modified from the previous correlation and a new correlation to predict the characteristic length was developed based on the test results

  9. Flow structure from a horizontal cylinder coincident with a free surface in shallow water flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahraman Ali

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vortex formation from a horizontal cylinder coincident with a free surface of a shallow water flow having a depth of 25.4 [mm] was experimentally investigated using the PIV technique. Instantaneous and time-averaged flow patterns in the wake region of the cylinder were examined for three different cylinder diameter values under the fully developed turbulent boundary layer condition. Reynolds numbers were in the range of 1124£ Re£ 3374 and Froude numbers were in the range of 0.41 £ Fr £ 0.71 based on the cylinder diameter. It was found that a jet-like flow giving rise to increasing the flow entrainment between the core and wake regions depending on the cylinder diameter was formed between the lower surface of the cylinder and bottom surface of the channel. Vorticity intensity, Reynolds stress correlations and the primary recirculating bubble lengths were grown to higher values with increasing the cylinder diameter. On the other hand, in the case of the lowest level of the jet-like flow emanating from the beneath of the smallest cylinder, the variation of flow characteristics were attenuated significantly in a shorter distance. The variation of the reattachment location of the separated flow to the free-surface is a strong function of the cylinder diameter and the Froude number.

  10. Research on Pulsed Jet Flow Control without External Energy in a Blade Cascade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Chen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available To control the flow separation in the compressors, a novel pulsed jet concept without external energy injection is proposed. The new concept designs a slot in the middle of the blade and sets a micro device to switch the slot periodically. Such a structure is expected to generate a pulsed jet by the pressure difference between the pressure side and the suction side of the blade. In order to analyze the interaction between the pulsed jet and unsteady separated flow, our numerical and experimental study is based on a specific cascade (with a flow separation inside and a pulsed jet (one of the unsteady flow control method. The experimental and numerical results both show that when the frequency of pulsed jet is approximate to that of the separation vortex, then the control tends to be more effective. Based on the numerical simulations, the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD is then used to reveal the control mechanism, extracting the different time-space structures from the original field. The results with the aid of POD show that the pulsed jet can redistribute the kinetic energy of each mode, and strengthen or weaken certain modes, particularly, while the steady jet reduces the kinetic energy of high-order modes in whole. Also, pulsed jet with proper parameters can transfer the energy from higher modes to the first flow mode (averaged flow, which is due to the conversion of the spatial vortical structures and the time evolution of the modes.

  11. Effects of external boundary layer flow on jet noise in flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarohia, V.; Massier, P. F.

    1976-01-01

    The effects on jet flow of the external boundary layer flow emanating from the trailing edge of an engine cowl in flight has been shown to be the main reason for the disparity between predicted and experimental results obtained from flight measurements. Flight simulation experiments indicate that the external boundary layer flow tends to shield the jet flow in flight. This in turn modifies the jet noise source in flight and consequently the radiated noise from aircraft in flight. Close to 90 deg angle to the intake and in the forward quadrant, this study indicates that the far field jet noise and its spectrum scales approximately with the absolute jet velocity instead of the relative velocity as has been assumed in the existing prediction models.

  12. Buoyancy effects laminar slot jet impinging on a surface with constant heat flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shokouhmand, H.; Esfahanian, V.; Masoodi, R.

    2004-01-01

    The two-dimensional laminar air jet issuing from a nozzle of half which terminates at height above a flat plate normal to the jet is numerically on the flow and thermal structure of the region near impingement. The impinging surface is maintained at a constant heat flux condition. The full Navier-Stocks and energy equations are solved by a finite difference method to evaluate the velocity profiles and temperature distribution. The governing parameters and their ranges are: Reynolds number Re, 10-50, Grashof number Gr, 0-50, Richardson number Ri=Gr/ Re 2 , Non dimensional nozzle height H,2-3. Results of the free streamline, local friction factor and heat transfer coefficient are graphically presented. It is found that enhancement of the heat transfer rate is substantial for high Richardson number conditions. Although the laminar jet impingement for isothermal condition has been already studied, however the constant heat flux has not been studied enough. the present paper will analyze a low velocity air jet, Which can be used for cooling of a simulated electronics package

  13. Blowing jets as a circulation flow control to enhancement the lift of wing or generated power of wind turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru DUMITRACHE

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is to provide a numerical flow analysis based on RANS equations in two directions: the study of augmented high-lift system for a cross-section airfoil of a wing up to transonic regime and the circulation control implemented by tangentially blowing jet over a highly curved surface due to Coanda effect on a rotor blade for a wind turbine. This study were analyzed the performance, sensitivities and limitations of the circulation control method based on blowing jet for a fixed wing as well as for a rotating wing. Directions of future research are identified and discussed.

  14. Parametric Study of Synthetic-Jet-Based Flow Control on a Vertical Tail Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monastero, Marianne; Lindstrom, Annika; Beyar, Michael; Amitay, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Separation control over the rudder of the vertical tail of a commercial airplane using synthetic-jet-based flow control can lead to a reduction in tail size, with an associated decrease in drag and increase in fuel savings. A parametric, experimental study was undertaken using an array of finite span synthetic jets to investigate the sensitivity of the enhanced vertical tail side force to jet parameters, such as jet spanwise spacing and jet momentum coefficient. A generic wind tunnel model was designed and fabricated to fundamentally study the effects of the jet parameters at varying rudder deflection and model sideslip angles. Wind tunnel results obtained from pressure measurements and tuft flow visualization in the Rensselaer Polytechnic Subsonic Wind Tunnel show a decrease in separation severity and increase in model performance in comparison to the baseline, non-actuated case. The sensitivity to various parameters will be presented.

  15. A Review on Empirical Correlations for Jet/Spray Trajectory of Liquid Jet in Uniform Cross Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Young No

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The empirical correlations for the prediction of jet/spray penetration of liquid jet in subsonic uniform crossflow are reviewed in this study. Considerable number of empirical correlations had been proposed by many investigators. It has generally known that the jet/spray trajectory of a liquid jet in a cross-flow is a function of the liquid to air momentum flux ratio and the normalized distance in the airstream direction from the injector. However, several researchers incorporated the Weber number, liquid-to-water or air viscosity ratio, pressure ratio or Reynolds number, temperature ratio in the empirical correlations. Two different classification methods of correlations, i.e. classification based on mathematic functional form and classification based on flow regime, are introduced in this study. The one classification of existing correlations based on functional form includes correlations in a power-law, logarithmic, and exponential forms, respectively. The other classification of previous correlations based on flow regime includes one, two and three regime, correlations. Correlations in a power-law functional form can be further divided into three groups such as momentum flux ratio, Weber number and other parameters forms. Correlations in logarithmic functional form can be also grouped as momentum flux ratio and Weber number forms. Most of the evaluation studies reported the significant discrepancies of predicted values by the existing correlations. The possible reasons for discrepancies will be summarized as measurement technique, assumptions made in defining terms in the liquid to air momentum flux ratio, difficulties in defining the boundaries of the liquid jets, turbulence level in the core and boundary layer of incoming jet and gas flows, nozzle/injector geometry and its position in the crossflow. However, it can be found from the several evaluation studies that the power-law functional form with momentum flux ratio and two regimes

  16. Visualization of the structure of vortex breakdown in free swirling jet flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanierschot, M.; Perçin, M.; van Oudheusden, B.W.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the three dimensional flow structures in a free annular swirling jet flow undergoing vortex breakdown. The flow field is analyzed by means of time-resolved Tomographic Particle Image Velocimetry measurements. Both time-averaged and instantaneous flow structures are

  17. Laminar and turbulent nozzle-jet flows and their acoustic near-field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bühler, Stefan; Obrist, Dominik; Kleiser, Leonhard

    2014-01-01

    We investigate numerically the effects of nozzle-exit flow conditions on the jet-flow development and the near-field sound at a diameter-based Reynolds number of Re D = 18 100 and Mach number Ma = 0.9. Our computational setup features the inclusion of a cylindrical nozzle which allows to establish a physical nozzle-exit flow and therefore well-defined initial jet-flow conditions. Within the nozzle, the flow is modeled by a potential flow core and a laminar, transitional, or developing turbulent boundary layer. The goal is to document and to compare the effects of the different jet inflows on the jet flow development and the sound radiation. For laminar and transitional boundary layers, transition to turbulence in the jet shear layer is governed by the development of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. With the turbulent nozzle boundary layer, the jet flow development is characterized by a rapid changeover to a turbulent free shear layer within about one nozzle diameter. Sound pressure levels are strongly enhanced for laminar and transitional exit conditions compared to the turbulent case. However, a frequency and frequency-wavenumber analysis of the near-field pressure indicates that the dominant sound radiation characteristics remain largely unaffected. By applying a recently developed scaling procedure, we obtain a close match of the scaled near-field sound spectra for all nozzle-exit turbulence levels and also a reasonable agreement with experimental far-field data

  18. Jet flow issuing from an axisymmetric pipe-cavity-orifice nozzle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Broučková Zuzana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An axisymmetric air jet flow is experimentally investigated under passive flow control. The jet issues from a pipe of the inner diameter and length of 10 mm and 150 mm which is equipped with an axisymmetric cavity at the pipe end. The cavity operates as a resonator creating self-sustained acoustic excitations of the jet flow. A mechanism of excitations is rather complex – in comparison with a common Helmholtz resonator. The experiments were performed using flow visualization, microphone measurements and time-mean velocity measurements by the Pitot probe. The power spectral density (PSD and the sound pressure level (SPL were evaluated from microphone measurements. The jet Reynolds number ranged Re = 1600–18 000. Distinguishable peaks in PSD indicated a function of the resonator. Because the most effective acoustic response was found at higher Re, a majority of experiments focused on higher Re regime. The results demonstrate effects of the passive control on the jet behavior. Fluid mixing and velocity decay along the axis is intensified. It causes shortening of the jet transition region. On the other hand, an inverse proportionality of the velocity decay (u ~ 1/x in the fully developed region is not changed. The momentum and kinetic energy fluxes decrease more intensively in the controlled jets in comparison with common jets.

  19. Numerical simulation of flow and mass transfer for large KDP crystal growth via solution-jet method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Huawei; Li, Mingwei; Hu, Zhitao; Zhou, Chuan; Li, Zhiwei

    2018-06-01

    A novel technique of growing large crystals of potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) named solution-jet method is proposed. The aim is to increase supersaturation on the pyramidal face, especially for crystal surface regions close to the rotation axis. The fluid flow and surface supersaturation distribution of crystals grown under different conditions were computed using the finite-volume method. Results indicate that the time-averaged supersaturation of the pyramidal face in the proposed method significantly increases and the supersaturation difference from the crystal center to edge clearly decreases compared with the rotating-crystal method. With increased jet velocity, supersaturation on the pyramidal face steadily increases. Rotation rate considerably affects the magnitude and distribution of the prismatic surface supersaturation. With increased crystal size, the mean value of surface supersaturation averaged over the pyramid gradually decreases; conversely, standard deviation increases, which is detrimental to crystal growth. Moreover, the significant roles played by natural and forced convection in the process of mass transport are discussed. Results show that further increased jet velocity to 0.6 m/s renders negligible the effects of natural convection around the pyramid. The simulation for step propagation indicates that solution-jet method can promote a steady step migration and enhance surface morphology stability, which can improve the crystal quality.

  20. Jet array impingement flow distributions and heat transfer characteristics. Effects of initial crossflow and nonuniform array geometry. [gas turbine engine component cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florschuetz, L. W.; Metzger, D. E.; Su, C. C.; Isoda, Y.; Tseng, H. H.

    1982-01-01

    Two-dimensional arrays of circular air jets impinging on a heat transfer surface parallel to the jet orifice plate are considered. The jet flow, after impingement, is constrained to exit in a single direction along the channel formed by the jet orifice plate and the heat transfer surface. The configurations considered are intended to model those of interest in current and contemplated gas turbine airfoil midchord cooling applications. The effects of an initial crossflow which approaches the array through an upstream extension of the channel are considered. Flow distributions as well as heat transfer coefficients and adiabatic wall temperatures resolved to one streamwise hole spacing were measured as a function of the initial crossflow rate and temperature relative to the jet flow rate and temperature. Both Nusselt number profiles and dimensionless adiabatic wall temperature (effectiveness) profiles are presented and discussed. Special test results which show a significant reduction of jet orifice discharge coefficients owing to the effect of a confined crossflow are also presented, along with a flow distribution model which incorporates those effects. A nonuniform array flow distribution model is developed and validated.

  1. Development of an Organosilicon-Based Superhydrophobic/Icephobic Surface Using an Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet =

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadollahi, Siavash

    the surface, and then through multiple seemingly random electric arcs on the surface. The formation of these discharges is facilitated by the near-infinite conductivity of the air plasma column. The micro-porous micro-roughened structure developed in this step is then used as the substrate for coating deposition. In the next step, first the plasma jet is slightly modified with a quartz tube surrounding the jet-head. This modification allows for ignition and maintenance of a very weak plasma while hindering the diffusion of oxygen into the plasma and thus increasing the amount of organic deposition on the surface. This is confirmed by the chemical characterization of the surfaces developed using the modified jet. Furthermore, it is shown that this modification can significantly affect surface morphology, leading to a finer surface structure with different levels of roughness. Hydrophobic materials are then deposited on the surface in the presence of HMDSO using nitrogen plasma. Several samples are prepared with different precursor flow rates, plasma generation powers and number of deposition passes. All coatings are characterized regarding their surface morphology, chemical composition, wetting behavior and icephobic characteristics. It is shown that at low precursor flow rates, coating deposition is not enough for a full coverage of the surface. On the other hand, at high flow rates coating deposition can completely cover the surface features originated from the air plasma treatment process, thus negating the effects of an important roughness level. At the median flow rate, which was identified to be 5 g/h, the coating can fully cover the surface while maintaining the pre-existing surface features. It is also shown that by increasing the number of plasma deposition passes, surface features become slightly larger while the amount of organic deposition on the surface increases. Finally, it is shown that in high plasma generation powers, the amount of oxide deposition on

  2. Numerical Study of Noise Characteristics in Overexpanded Jet Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-05

    Bourne, M., and Fisher, M. J., “The Noise from Shock Waves in Supersonic Jets,” AGARD - CP - 131, 1973, pp. 1-13. [2]. Tanna, H. K., “An Experimental Study...Journal, Volume 20, No. 1, 1982, pp. 68- 73 . [7]. Tam, C. K. W., and Tanna, H. K., “Shock Associated Noise of Supersonic Jets from Convergent

  3. Time-Accurate Simulations of Synthetic Jet-Based Flow Control for An Axisymmetric Spinning Body

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sahu, Jubaraj

    2004-01-01

    .... A time-accurate Navier-Stokes computational technique has been used to obtain numerical solutions for the unsteady jet-interaction flow field for a spinning projectile at a subsonic speed, Mach...

  4. Influence of a circular jet arrangement in a rectangular tank on flow and suspended sediment release

    OpenAIRE

    Althaus, Jenzer; Isabella, Jolanda Maria

    2011-01-01

    With the objective of high sediment release out of a rectangular tank the performance of a circular jet arrangement has been investigated. Therefore, experiments with four jets arranged in a horizontal circle placed in water with quasi homogeneous sediment concentration were conducted. The induced circulation was analysed by measuring the flow field. The influence of the flow circulation on suspension and on sediment release through the water intake was studied and discussed. The offbottom cl...

  5. Study on surface modification of polymer films by using atmospheric plasma jet source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takemura, Yuichiro; Hara, Tamio; Yamaguchi, Naohiro

    2008-01-01

    Reactive gas plasma treatments of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) and polyimide (Kapton) have been performed using an atmospheric plasmas jet source. Characteristics of surface modification have been examined by changing the distance between the plasma jet source and the treated sample, and by changing the working gas spaces. Simultaneously, each plasma jet source has been investigated by space-resolving spectroscopy in the UV/visible region. Polymer surfaces have been analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A marked improvement in the hydrophilicity of the polymer surfaces has been made by using N 2 or O 2 plasma jet source with a very short exposure time of about 0.01 s, whereas the less improvement has been obtained using on air plasma jet source because of NO x compound production. Changes in the chemical states of C of the polymer surfaces have been observed in XPS spectra after N 2 plasma jet spraying. (author)

  6. Experimental investigation of three-dimensional flow structures in annular swirling jets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Percin, M.; Vanierschot, M.; Van Oudheusden, B.W.

    2015-01-01

    Annular jet flows are of practical interest in view of their occurrence in many industrial applications in the context of bluff-body combustors [1]. They feature different complex flow characteristics despite their simple geometry: a central recirculation zone (CRZ) as a result of flow separation

  7. Double helix vortex breakdown in a turbulent swirling annular jet flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanierschot, M.; Perçin, M.; van Oudheusden, B.W.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the structure and dynamics of double helix vortex breakdown in a turbulent annular swirling jet. Double helix breakdown has been reported previously for the laminar flow regime, but this structure has rarely been observed in turbulent flow. The flow field is

  8. Analysis of the pressure fields in a swirling annular jet flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perçin, M.; Vanierschot, M.; van Oudheusden, B.W.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the flow structures and pressure fields of a free annular swirling jet flow undergoing vortex breakdown. The flow field is analyzed by means of time-resolved tomographic particle image velocimetry measurements, which enable the reconstruction of the three-dimensional

  9. Steady cone-jet mode in compound-fluidic electro-flow focusing for fabricating multicompartment microcapsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Ting; Yin, Chuansheng; Gao, Peng; Li, Guangbin; Ding, Hang; He, Xiaoming; Xie, Bin; Xu, Ronald X.

    2016-01-01

    A compound-fluidic electro-flow focusing (CEFF) process is proposed to produce multicompartment microcapsules. The central device mainly consists of a needle assembly of two parallel inner needles and one outer needle mounted in a gas chamber with their tips facing a small orifice at the bottom of the chamber. As the outer and the inner fluids flow through the needle assembly, a high-speed gas stream elongates the liquid menisci in the vicinity of the orifice entrance. An electric field is further integrated into capillary flow focusing to promote the formation of steady cone-jet mode in a wide range of operation parameters. The multiphase liquid jet is broken up into droplets due to perturbation propagation along the jet surface. To estimate the diameter of the multiphase liquid jet as a function of process parameters, a modified scaling law is derived and experimentally validated. Microcapsules of around 100 μm with an alginate shell and multiple cores at a production rate of 103-105 per second are produced. Technical feasibility of stimulation triggered coalescence and drug release is demonstrated by benchtop experiments. The proposed CEFF process can be potentially used to encapsulate therapeutic agents and biological cargos for controlled micro-reaction and drug delivery.

  10. Turbulent Boyant Jets and Plumes in Flowing Ambient Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Hai-Bo

    and the stage of plume. The stability criteria for the upstream wedge created by the submerged turbulent buoyant jet were established by applying the Bernoulli equations for a two-dimensional problem and by considering the front velocity driven by the buoyancy force for a three-dimensional problem....... The integral model was developed on the basis of the volume control method ( for jets with two-dimensional trajectories ) and the differential method ( for jets with three-dimensional trajectories ). The turbulence model adopted here was the k - ε model based on Launder and Spalding. The mathematical models...

  11. Background noise measurements from jet exit vanes designed to reduced flow pulsations in an open-jet wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoad, D. R.; Martin, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    Many open jet wind tunnels experience pulsations of the flow which are typically characterized by periodic low frequency velocity and pressure variations. One method of reducing these fluctuations is to install vanes around the perimeter of the jet exit to protrude into the flow. Although these vanes were shown to be effective in reducing the fluctuation content, they can also increase the test section background noise level. The results of an experimental acoustic program in the Langley 4- by 7-Meter Tunnel is presented which evaluates the effect on tunnel background noise of such modifications to the jet exit nozzle. Noise levels for the baseline tunnel configuration are compared with those for three jet exit nozzle modifications, including an enhanced noise reduction configuration that minimizes the effect of the vanes on the background noise. Although the noise levels for this modified vane configuration were comparable to baseline tunnel background noise levels in this facility, installation of these modified vanes in an acoustic tunnel may be of concern because the noise levels for the vanes could be well above background noise levels in a quiet facility.

  12. Jet-Surface Interaction: High Aspect Ratio Nozzle Test, Nozzle Design and Preliminary Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Clifford; Dippold, Vance

    2015-01-01

    The Jet-Surface Interaction High Aspect Ratio (JSI-HAR) nozzle test is part of an ongoing effort to measure and predict the noise created when an aircraft engine exhausts close to an airframe surface. The JSI-HAR test is focused on parameters derived from the Turbo-electric Distributed Propulsion (TeDP) concept aircraft which include a high-aspect ratio mailslot exhaust nozzle, internal septa, and an aft deck. The size and mass flow rate limits of the test rig also limited the test nozzle to a 16:1 aspect ratio, half the approximately 32:1 on the TeDP concept. Also, unlike the aircraft, the test nozzle must transition from a single round duct on the High Flow Jet Exit Rig, located in the AeroAcoustic Propulsion Laboratory at the NASA Glenn Research Center, to the rectangular shape at the nozzle exit. A parametric nozzle design method was developed to design three low noise round-to-rectangular transitions, with 8:1, 12:1, and 16: aspect ratios, that minimizes flow separations and shocks while providing a flat flow profile at the nozzle exit. These designs validated using the WIND-US CFD code. A preliminary analysis of the test data shows that the actual flow profile is close to that predicted and that the noise results appear consistent with data from previous, smaller scale, tests. The JSI-HAR test is ongoing through October 2015. The results shown in the presentation are intended to provide an overview of the test and a first look at the preliminary results.

  13. Mechanism of jet-flutter: self-induced oscillation of an upward plane jet impinging on a free surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madarame, Haruki; Iida, Masao

    1998-01-01

    An upward plane jet impinging on the free surface of a shallow rectangular tank oscillates without any external periodic force. The movement of the impinging point leaves additional fluid mass on the surface behind the point, which does not balance the momentum supplied by the jet. The imbalance generates propagating waves, and a surface level gap appears there. The level gap is flattened not by the waves but by the vertical motion of water columns. The imbalance causes lateral displacement of jet, which in turn causes the imbalance, forming a positive feedback loop. The above model explains well why the frequency corresponds to that of water column oscillation in a partitioned tank with the same water depth, and the oscillation region has a wide range above a certain velocity limit determined by the water depth. (author)

  14. Relationship Between Ureteral Jet Flow, Visual Analogue Scale, and Ureteral Stone Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongun, Sakir; Teken, Abdurrazak; Yılmaz, Orkun; Süleyman, Sakir

    2017-06-01

    To contribute to the diagnosis and treatment of ureteral stones by investigating the relationship between the ureteral jet flow measurements of patients with ureteral stones and the size of the stones and the patients' pain scores. The sample consisted of patients who presented acute renal colic between December 2014 and 2015 and from a noncontrast computed tomography were found to have a urinary stone. The ureteral jet flow velocities were determined using Doppler ultrasonography. The patients were all assessed in terms of stone size, localization and area, anteroposterior pelvis (AP) diameter, and visual analogue scale (VAS) scores. A total of 102 patients were included in the study. As the VAS score decreased, the peak jet flow velocity on the stone side increased, whereas the flow velocity on the other side, AP diameter, and stone area were reduced (P flow velocity was reduced and the AP diameter increased significantly (P flow was not observed in 17 patients on the stone side. A statistically significant difference was found between these patients and the remaining patients in terms of all parameters (P flow velocity of ureteral jet is low and with a severe level of pain or the peak flow velocity of ureteral jet cannot be measured, there is a low possibility of spontaneous passage and a high possibility of a large stone, and therefore the treatment should be started immediately. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Flow Structure and Heat Transfer of Jet Impingement on a Rib-Roughened Flat Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrahman H. Alenezi

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The jet impingement technique is an effective method to achieve a high heat transfer rate and is widely used in industry. Enhancing the heat transfer rate even minimally will improve the performance of many engineering systems and applications. In this numerical study, the convective heat transfer process between orthogonal air jet impingement on a smooth, horizontal surface and a roughened uniformly heated flat plate is studied. The roughness element takes the form of a circular rib of square cross-section positioned at different radii around the stagnation point. At each location, the effect of the roughness element on heat transfer rate was simulated for six different heights and the optimum rib location and rib dimension determined. The average Nusselt number has been evaluated within and beyond the stagnation region to better quantify the heat transfer advantages of ribbed surfaces over smooth surfaces. The results showed both flow and heat transfer features vary significantly with rib dimension and location on the heated surface. This variation in the streamwise direction included both augmentation and decrease in heat transfer rate when compared to the baseline no-rib case. The enhancement in normalized averaged Nusselt number obtained by placing the rib at the most optimum radial location R/D = 2 was 15.6% compared to the baseline case. It was also found that the maximum average Nusselt number for each location was achieved when the rib height was close to the corresponding boundary layer thickness of the smooth surface at the same rib position.

  16. Numerical Investigation of the Interaction of Counterflowing Jets and Supersonic Capsule Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatachari, Balaji Shankar; Ito, Yasushi; Cheng, Gary; Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2011-01-01

    Use of counterflowing jets ejected into supersonic freestreams as a flow control concept to modify the external flowfield has gained renewed interest with regards to potential retropropulsion applications pertinent to entry, descent, and landing investigations. This study describes numerical computations of such a concept for a scaled wind-tunnel capsule model by employing the space-time conservation element solution element viscous flow solver with unstructured meshes. Both steady-state and time-accurate computations are performed for several configurations with different counterflowing jet Mach numbers. Axisymmetric computations exploring the effect of the jet flow rate and jet Mach number on the flow stability, jet interaction with the bow shock and its subsequent impact on the aerodynamic and aerothermal loads on the capsule body are carried out. Similar to previous experimental findings, both long and short penetration modes exist at a windtunnel Mach number of 3.48. It was found that both modes exhibit non-stationary behavior and the former is much more unstable than the latter. It was also found that the unstable long penetration mode only exists in a relatively small range of the jet mass flow rate. Solution-based mesh refinement procedures are used to improve solution accuracy and provide guidelines for a more effective mesh generation procedure for parametric studies. Details of the computed flowfields also serve as a means to broaden the knowledge base for future retropropulsion design studies.

  17. Characteristics of pulsed plasma synthetic jet and its control effect on supersonic flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Jin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The plasma synthetic jet is a novel flow control approach which is currently being studied. In this paper its characteristic and control effect on supersonic flow is investigated both experimentally and numerically. In the experiment, the formation of plasma synthetic jet and its propagation velocity in quiescent air are recorded and calculated with time resolved schlieren method. The jet velocity is up to 100 m/s and no remarkable difference has been found after changing discharge parameters. When applied in Mach 2 supersonic flow, an obvious shockwave can be observed. In the modeling of electrical heating, the arc domain is not defined as an initial condition with fixed temperature or pressure, but a source term with time-varying input power density, which is expected to better describe the influence of heating process. Velocity variation with different heating efficiencies is presented and discussed and a peak velocity of 850 m/s is achieved in still air with heating power density of 5.0 × 1012 W/m3. For more details on the interaction between plasma synthetic jet and supersonic flow, the plasma synthetic jet induced shockwave and the disturbances in the boundary layer are numerically researched. All the results have demonstrated the control authority of plasma synthetic jet onto supersonic flow.

  18. Flow field characteristics of impinging sweeping jets: TR-PIV measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xin; Peng, Di; Liu, Yingzheng; Tang, Hui

    2017-11-01

    Influence of Reynolds number of sweeping jets on its impinging flow fields was extensively investigated in a water tank. Toward this end, a fluidic oscillator was specially designed to produce spatially sweeping jets which imping on a flat plate. Six Reynolds numbers were tested by controlling the supply flow rate of the fluidic oscillator. Impinging flow fields were captured by time-resolved Particle Image Velocimetry (TR-PIV) measurement. Reference signals were extracted from the flow fields for phase reconstruction. The oscillating flow fields with super-harmonic frequency at different regions were discussed in term of the phase-averaged velocity, vorticity and turbulent velocity. Dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) was used to capture the most-energetic flow patterns with distinct frequencies. By projecting the phase-averaged flow fields onto a reduced basis of DMD modes, the phase correlation between the distinct flow patterns were analyzed under different Reynolds numbers.

  19. High-frequency counter-flow plasma synthetic jet actuator and its application in suppression of supersonic flow separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongyu; Li, Jun; Jin, Di; Tang, Mengxiao; Wu, Yun; Xiao, Lianghua

    2018-01-01

    We come up with a control strategy for suppression of supersonic flow separation based on high-frequency Counter-flow Plasma Synthetic Jet Actuator (CPSJA). The main purpose of this investigation is to verify if its control authority can be enhanced by the jet/shock interaction. We use a blunt nose to generate a bow shock, a step on a flat plate to introduce a massive separation in a Mach 2 wind tunnel, and the CPSJA to generate Plasma Synthetic Jet (PSJ). In this study, pulsed capacitive discharge is provided for an array of CPSJAs, which makes the actuation (discharge) frequency f1 = 1 kHz, f2 = 2 kHz and f3 = 3 kHz. We use the high-speed schlieren imaging and fast response pressure transducers as well as a numerical simulation to investigate the quiescent PSJ properties, the interaction between the jet and bow shock, and its disturbance effect on the downstream separated region. The schlieren images show that PSJ is characterized by a succession of vortex rings; the jet strength weakens with the increase of frequency. A 4.5 mN jet thrust is found for all the frequencies. The simulation results show that jet/shock interaction produces vorticity in the vortex ring of the jet, enhancing turbulent mixing in PSJ so that a great deal of momentum is produced into the flow. We found the downstream flow is significantly disturbed by the enhanced actuation. Actuation with frequency of f2, f3 which is close to the natural frequency fn of the separation bubble suppresses the separation with the upstream laminar boundary layer being periodically attenuated, which has a better control effect than f1. The control effect is sensitive to the position where PSJ interacts with the shear layer, but the amount of energy deposited in one pulse is not crucial in a separation reduction in the experiment.

  20. Influence of mesh non-orthogonality on numerical simulation of buoyant jet flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishigaki, Masahiro; Abe, Satoshi; Sibamoto, Yasuteru; Yonomoto, Taisuke

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Influence of mesh non-orthogonality on numerical solution of buoyant jet flows. • Buoyant jet flows are simulated with hexahedral and prismatic meshes. • Jet instability with prismatic meshes may be overestimated compared to that with hexahedral meshes. • Modified solvers that can reduce the influence of mesh non-orthogonality and reduce computation time are proposed. - Abstract: In the present research, we discuss the influence of mesh non-orthogonality on numerical solution of a type of buoyant flow. Buoyant jet flows are simulated numerically with hexahedral and prismatic mesh elements in an open source Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code called “OpenFOAM”. Buoyant jet instability obtained with the prismatic meshes may be overestimated compared to that obtained with the hexahedral meshes when non-orthogonal correction is not applied in the code. Although the non-orthogonal correction method can improve the instability generated by mesh non-orthogonality, it may increase computation time required to reach a convergent solution. Thus, we propose modified solvers that can reduce the influence of mesh non-orthogonality and reduce the computation time compared to the existing solvers in OpenFOAM. It is demonstrated that calculations for a buoyant jet with a large temperature difference are performed faster by the modified solver.

  1. Influence of mesh non-orthogonality on numerical simulation of buoyant jet flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishigaki, Masahiro, E-mail: ishigaki.masahiro@jaea.go.jp; Abe, Satoshi; Sibamoto, Yasuteru; Yonomoto, Taisuke

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • Influence of mesh non-orthogonality on numerical solution of buoyant jet flows. • Buoyant jet flows are simulated with hexahedral and prismatic meshes. • Jet instability with prismatic meshes may be overestimated compared to that with hexahedral meshes. • Modified solvers that can reduce the influence of mesh non-orthogonality and reduce computation time are proposed. - Abstract: In the present research, we discuss the influence of mesh non-orthogonality on numerical solution of a type of buoyant flow. Buoyant jet flows are simulated numerically with hexahedral and prismatic mesh elements in an open source Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code called “OpenFOAM”. Buoyant jet instability obtained with the prismatic meshes may be overestimated compared to that obtained with the hexahedral meshes when non-orthogonal correction is not applied in the code. Although the non-orthogonal correction method can improve the instability generated by mesh non-orthogonality, it may increase computation time required to reach a convergent solution. Thus, we propose modified solvers that can reduce the influence of mesh non-orthogonality and reduce the computation time compared to the existing solvers in OpenFOAM. It is demonstrated that calculations for a buoyant jet with a large temperature difference are performed faster by the modified solver.

  2. Flow structure of conical distributed multiple gas jets injected into a water chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Jiajun; Yu, Yonggang [Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing (China)

    2017-04-15

    Based on an underwater gun firing project, a mock bullet with several holes on the head was designed and experimented to observe the combustion gas injected into a cylindrical water chamber through this mock bullet. The combustion gas jets contain one vertical central jet and 4 to 8 slant lateral jets. A high speed camera system was used to record the expansion of gas jets in the experimental study. In numerical simulations, the Euler two-fluid model and volume of fluid method were adopted to describe the gas-liquid flow. The results show the backflow zone in lateral jet is the main factor influencing the gas-liquid turbulent mixing in downstream. On cross sections, the gas volume fraction increased with time but the growth rate decreased. With a change of nozzle structure, the gas fraction was more affected than the shock structure.

  3. Certification of contact probe measurement of surface wave of Li jet for IFMIF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okita, Takafumi, E-mail: okita@stu.nucl.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Hoashi, Eiji; Yoshihashi, Sachiko [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Kondo, Hiroo; Kanemura, Takuji [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Higashiibaraki-gun, Ibaraki (Japan); Yamaoka, Nobuo; Horiike, Hiroshi [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • We have conducted experiments of liquid lithium free-surface flow for IFMIF. • In the experiment using electro-contact probe apparatus, a droplet of liquid Li on the middle of measurement probe was observed. • Behavior of a droplet and false detections were observed by using HSV camera. • The error of the statistical result was roughly evaluated about 1%. • From results of numerical simulations, we obtained the detailed information about the behavior of a Li droplet. - Abstract: The international fusion material irradiation facility (IFMIF) is a neutron source for developing fusion reactor materials. A liquid lithium (Li) jet with free surface is planned as a target to generate intense neutron field. It is important to obtain information on the surface wave characteristic for safety of the facility and efficient neutron generation. Surface wave characteristics experiment using the liquid Li circulation facility is carried out at Osaka University. In our studies, measurement using an electro-contact probe apparatus is conducted and many data about surface wave height were taken. In this experiment, a liquid Li droplet was observed on the probe. To see effect due to droplets on the probe needle, images near the surface of the Li jet including the Li droplet were taken by HSV camera synchronized with probe contact signals, and correlation between the behavior of the Li droplet and signals was evaluated. From the results, when the droplet on the probe contacts of the droplet with the surface, signals obviously different from the regular signal were observed. The influence on the result of frequency was estimated and is approximately <1%. Accuracy of measurement using probe could be increased by carefully deleting false signals.

  4. The entrainment of air by water jet impinging on a free surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soh, Wee King [University of Wollongong, School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronics Engineering, Northfields Ave, NSW (Australia); Khoo, Boo Cheong [National University of Singapore, Department of Mechanical and Production Engineering, 10 Kent Ridge Crescent (Singapore); Yuen, W.Y. Daniel [BlueScope Steel Research, Port Kembla, NSW (Australia)

    2005-09-01

    High-speed cine and video photographs were used to capture the flow patterns of a column of water jet impinging into a pool of water. The impact results in air entrainment into water in the form of a void with no mixing between the water in the jet and the surrounding water. Conservation of fluid momentum shows that the rate of increase of the height of the air void depends on the drag coefficient of the jet front. By neglecting the frictional losses, the application of energy conservation yields an expression that relates the maximum height of the air void with the properties of the water jet. (orig.)

  5. The influence of surface-active agents in gas mixture on the intensity of jet condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yezhov, YV; Okhotin, VS

    2017-11-01

    The report presents: the methodology of calculation of contact condensation of steam from the steam-gas mixture into the stream of water, taking into account: the mass flow of steam through the boundary phase, particularly the change in turbulent transport properties near the interface and their connection to the interface perturbations due to the surface tension of the mixture; the method of calculation of the surface tension at the interface water - a mixture of fluorocarbon vapor and water, based on the previously established analytical methods we calculate the surface tension for simple one - component liquid-vapor systems. The obtained analytical relation to calculate the surface tension of the mixture is a function of temperature and volume concentration of the fluorocarbon gas in the mixture and is true for all sizes of gas molecules. On the newly created experimental stand is made verification of experimental studies to determine the surface tension of pure substances: water, steam, C3F8 pair C3F8, produced the first experimental data on surface tension at the water - a mixture of water vapor and fluorocarbon C3F8. The obtained experimental data allow us to refine the values of the two constants used in the calculated model of the surface tension of the mixture. Experimental study of jet condensation was carried out with the flow in the zone of condensation of different gases. The condensation process was monitored by measurement of consumption of water flowing from the nozzle, and the formed condensate. When submitting C3F8, there was a noticeable, intensification condensation process compared with the condensation of pure water vapor. The calculation results are in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data on surface tension of the mixture and steam condensation from steam-gas mixture. Analysis of calculation results shows that the presence of surfactants in the condensation zone affects the partial vapor pressure on the interfacial surface, and

  6. Cavitation induced by high speed impact of a solid surface on a liquid jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, Mohamed; Tinguely, Marc; Rouvinez, Mathieu

    2009-11-01

    A solid surface may suffer from severe erosion if it impacts a liquid jet at high speed. The physics behind the erosion process remains unclear. In the present study, we have investigated the impact of a gun bullet on a laminar water jet with the help of a high speed camera. The bullet has a flat front and 11 mm diameter, which is half of jet diameter. The impact speed was varied between 200 and 500 ms-1. Immediately after the impact, a systematic shock wave and high speed jetting were observed. As the compression waves reflect on the jet boundary, a spectacular number of vapour cavities are generated within the jet. Depending on the bullet velocity, these cavities may grow and collapse violently on the bullet surface with a risk of cavitation erosion. We strongly believe that this transient cavitation is the main cause of erosion observed in many industrial applications such as Pelton turbines.

  7. Development of pulsating twin jets mechanism for mixing flow heat transfer analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitan, Ali Ahmed; Zulkifli, Rozli; Abdullah, Shahrir; Sopian, Kamaruzzaman

    2014-01-01

    Pulsating twin jets mechanism (PTJM) was developed in the present work to study the effect of pulsating twin jets mixing region on the enhancement of heat transfer. Controllable characteristics twin pulsed jets were the main objective of our design. The variable nozzle-nozzle distance was considered to study the effect of two jets interaction at the mixing region. Also, the phase change between the frequencies of twin jets was taken into account to develop PTJM. All of these factors in addition to the ability of producing high velocity pulsed jet led to more appropriate design for a comprehensive study of multijet impingement heat transfer problems. The performance of PTJM was verified by measuring the pulse profile at frequency of 20 Hz, where equal velocity peak of around 64 m/s for both jets was obtained. Moreover, the jet velocity profile at different pulsation frequencies was tested to verify system performance, so the results revealed reasonable velocity profile configuration. Furthermore, the effect of pulsation frequency on surface temperature of flat hot plate in the midpoint between twin jets was studied experimentally. Noticeable enhancement in heat transfer was obtained with the increasing of pulsation frequency.

  8. Intermonsoonal equatorial jets

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Muraleedharan, P.M.

    , respectively. Hydrographic features and transport computations favour a well developed equatorial jet during both seasons. The net surface eastward and subsurface westward flows are well balanced during the premonsoon transition period and appear...

  9. Stopped-flow technique for transit time measurement in a gas jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rengan, K.; Lin, J.; Lim, T.; Meyer, R.A.; Harrell, J.

    1985-01-01

    A 'stopped-flow' technique for the measurement of transit time of reaction products in a gas jet is described. The method involved establishing the gas flow through the jet system when the reactor is operating steadily and allowing the pressure to reach equilibrium values. The gas flow is stopped by means of electrically operated valves. The transit-time measurement is achieved by opening the valves and initiating the multiscanning of total activity simultaneously. The value obtained agrees well with the transit time measured by pulsing the reactor. The 'stopped-flow' technique allows on-line measurement of transit time in any gas jet system where the physical transportation time is the major component of the transit time. This technique is especially useful for systems installed in reactors which do not have pulsing capability. (orig.)

  10. Hydrophilic surface modification of coronary stent using an atmospheric pressure plasma jet for endothelialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Jae Won; Bae, In-Ho; Park, Dae Sung; Lee, So-Youn; Jang, Eun-Jae; Lim, Kyung-Seob; Park, Jun-Kyu; Kim, Ju Han; Jeong, Myung Ho

    2018-03-01

    The first two authors contributed equally to this study. Bioactivity and cell adhesion properties are major factors for fabricating medical devices such as coronary stents. The aim of this study was to evaluate the advantages of atmospheric-pressure plasma jet in enhancing the biocompatibility and endothelial cell-favorites. The experimental objects were divided into before and after atmospheric-pressure plasma jet treatment with the ratio of nitrogen:argon = 3:1, which is similar to air. The treated surfaces were basically characterized by means of a contact angle analyzer for the activation property on their surfaces. The effect of atmospheric-pressure plasma jet on cellular response was examined by endothelial cell adhesion and XTT analysis. It was difficult to detect any changeable morphology after atmospheric-pressure plasma jet treatment on the surface. The roughness was increased after atmospheric-pressure plasma jet treatment compared to nonatmospheric-pressure plasma jet treatment (86.781 and 7.964 nm, respectively). The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results showed that the surface concentration of the C-O groups increased slightly from 6% to 8% after plasma activation. The contact angle dramatically decreased in the atmospheric-pressure plasma jet treated group (22.6 ± 15.26°) compared to the nonatmospheric-pressure plasma jet treated group (72.4 ± 15.26°) ( n = 10, p atmospheric-pressure plasma jet on endothelial cell migration and proliferation was 85.2% ± 12.01% and 34.2% ± 2.68%, respectively, at 7 days, compared to the nonatmospheric-pressure plasma jet treated group (58.2% ± 11.44% in migration, n = 10, p atmospheric-pressure plasma jet method. Moreover, the atmospheric-pressure plasma jet might affect re-endothelialization after stenting.

  11. Newtonian liquid jet impaction on a high-speed moving surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keshavarz, B.; Green, S.I.; Davy, M.H.; Eadie, D.T.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► We studied experimentally the interaction of a liquid jet with a moving surface. ► Decreasing the Reynolds number reduced the incidence of splash. ► The Weber number had a much smaller impact on splash than the Reynolds number. ► The jet impingement angle had only a small effect on the splash. ► Increasing the surface roughness substantially decreased the splash threshold. - Abstract: In the railroad industry a friction modifying agent may be applied to the rail or wheel in the form of a liquid jet. In this mode of application the interaction between the high-speed liquid jet and a fast moving surface is important. Seven different Newtonian liquids with widely varying shear viscosities were tested to isolate the effect of viscosity from other fluid properties. Tests were also done on five surfaces of different roughness heights to investigate the effects of surface roughness. High-speed video imaging was employed to scrutinize the interaction between the impacting jet and the moving surface. For all surfaces, decreasing the Reynolds number reduced the incidence of splash and consequently enhanced the transfer efficiency. At the elevated Weber numbers of the testing, the Weber number had a much smaller impact on splash than the Reynolds number. The ratio of the surface velocity to the jet velocity has only a small effect on the splash, whereas increasing the roughness-height-to-jet-diameter ratio substantially decreased the splash threshold.

  12. Dripping and jetting in microfluidic multiphase flows applied to particle and fiber synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, J K; Tsai, S S H; Wan, J; Stone, H A

    2013-01-01

    Dripping and jetting regimes in microfluidic multiphase flows have been investigated extensively, and this review summarizes the main observations and physical understandings in this field to date for three common device geometries: coaxial, flow-focusing and T-junction. The format of the presentation allows for simple and direct comparison of the different conditions for drop and jet formation, as well as the relative ease and utility of forming either drops or jets among the three geometries. The emphasis is on the use of drops and jets as templates for microparticle and microfiber syntheses, and a description is given of the more common methods of solidification and strategies for achieving complex multicomponent microparticles and microfibers. PMID:23626378

  13. Exact partial solution to the steady-state, compressible fluid flow problems of jet formation and jet penetration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpp, R.R.

    1980-10-01

    This report treats analytically the problem of the symmetric impact of two compressible fluid streams. The flow is assumed to be steady, plane, inviscid, and subsonic and that the compressible fluid is of the Chaplygin (tangent gas) type. In the analysis, the governing equations are first transformed to the hodograph plane where an exact, closed-form solution is obtained by standard techniques. The distributions of fluid properties along the plane of symmetry as well as the shapes of the boundary streamlines are exactly determined by transforming the solution back to the physical plane. The problem of a compressible fluid jet penetrating into an infinite target of similar material is also exactly solved by considering a limiting case of this solution. This new compressible flow solution reduces to the classical result of incompressible flow theory when the sound speed of the fluid is allowed to approach infinity. Several illustrations of the differences between compressible and incompressible flows of the type considered are presented

  14. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Flow Properties of Supersonic Helium-Air Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Steven A. E.; Veltin, Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Heated high speed subsonic and supersonic jets operating on- or off-design are a source of noise that is not yet fully understood. Helium-air mixtures can be used in the correct ratio to simulate the total temperature ratio of heated air jets and hence have the potential to provide inexpensive and reliable flow and acoustic measurements. This study presents a combination of flow measurements of helium-air high speed jets and numerical simulations of similar helium-air mixture and heated air jets. Jets issuing from axisymmetric convergent and convergent-divergent nozzles are investigated, and the results show very strong similarity with heated air jet measurements found in the literature. This demonstrates the validity of simulating heated high speed jets with helium-air in the laboratory, together with the excellent agreement obtained in the presented data between the numerical predictions and the experiments. The very close match between the numerical and experimental data also validates the frozen chemistry model used in the numerical simulation.

  15. Experimental study of curvature effects on jet impingement heat transfer on concave surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Zhou

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Experimental study of the local and average heat transfer characteristics of a single round jet impinging on the concave surfaces was conducted in this work to gain in-depth knowledge of the curvature effects. The experiments were conducted by employing a piccolo tube with one single jet hole over a wide range of parameters: jet Reynolds number from 27000 to 130000, relative nozzle to surface distance from 3.3 to 30, and relative surface curvature from 0.005 to 0.030. Experimental results indicate that the surface curvature has opposite effects on heat transfer characteristics. On one hand, an increase of relative nozzle to surface distance (increasing jet diameter in fact enhances the average heat transfer around the surface for the same curved surface. On the other hand, the average Nusselt number decreases as relative nozzle to surface distance increases for a fixed jet diameter. Finally, experimental data-based correlations of the average Nusselt number over the curved surface were obtained with consideration of surface curvature effect. This work contributes to a better understanding of the curvature effects on heat transfer of a round jet impingement on concave surfaces, which is of high importance to the design of the aircraft anti-icing system.

  16. PIV study of large-scale flow organisation in slot jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shestakov, Maxim V.; Dulin, Vladimir M.; Tokarev, Mikhail P.; Sikovsky, Dmitrii Ph.; Markovich, Dmitriy M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Volumetric velocity measurements are perfumed by PIV to analyse 3D flow organisation in a slot jet. • Proper orthogonal decomposition is used to extract coherent flow motion. • Movement of quasi-two-dimensional large-scale vortices is associated with jet meandering. • Amplitude of jet meandering is found to be aperiodically modulated. • Secondary longitudinal vortex rolls are important for cross-stream mixing and momentum transfer. - Abstract: The paper reports on particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements in turbulent slot jets bounded by two solid walls with the separation distance smaller than the jet width (5–40%). In the far-field such jets are known to manifest features of quasi-two dimensional, two component turbulence. Stereoscopic and tomographic PIV systems were used to analyse local flows. Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) was applied to extract coherent modes of the velocity fluctuations. The measurements were performed both in the initial region close to the nozzle exit and in the far fields of the developed turbulent slot jets for Re ⩾ 10,000. A POD analysis in the initial region indicates a correlation between quasi-2D vortices rolled-up in the shear layer and local flows in cross-stream planes. While the near-field turbulence shows full 3D features, the wall-normal velocity fluctuations day out gradually due to strong wall-damping resulting in an almost two-component turbulence. On the other hand, the longitudinal vortex rolls take over to act as the main agents in wall-normal and spanwise mixing and momentum transfer. The quantitative analysis indicates that the jet meandering amplitude was aperiodically modulated when arrangement of the large-scale quasi-2D vortices changed between asymmetric and symmetric pattern relatively to the jet axis. The paper shows that the dynamics of turbulent slot jets are more complex than those of 2D, plane and rectangular 3D jets. In particular, the detected secondary longitudinal

  17. Turbulent jet diffusion flame length evolution with cross flows in a sub-pressure atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Qiang; Hu, Longhua; Zhang, Xiaozheng; Zhang, Xiaolei; Lu, Shouxiang; Ding, Hang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Quantifying turbulent jet diffusion flame length with cross flows. • Unique data revealed for a sub-atmospheric pressure. • Non-dimensional global correlation proposed for flame trajectory-line length. - Abstract: This paper investigates the evolution characteristics of turbulent jet diffusion flame (flame trajectory-line length, flame height in vertical jet direction) with increasing cross flows in a sub-pressure (64 kPa) atmosphere. The combined effect of cross flow and a special sub-pressure atmosphere condition is revealed, where no data is available in the literatures. Experiments are carried out with a wind tunnel built specially in Lhasa city (altitude: 3650 m; pressure: 64 kPa) and in Hefei city (altitude: 50 m; pressure: 100 kPa), using nozzles with diameter of 3 mm, 4 mm and 5 mm and propane as fuel. It is found that, as cross flow air speed increases from zero, the flame trajectory-line length firstly decreases and then becomes almost stable (for relative small nozzle, 3 mm in this study) or increases (for relative large nozzle, 4 mm and 5 mm in this study) beyond a transitional critical cross flow air speed in normal pressure, however decreases monotonically until being blown-out in the sub-pressure atmosphere. The flame height in jet direction decreases monotonically with cross air flow speed and then reaches a steady value in both pressures. For the transitional state of flame trajectory-line length with increasing cross air flow speed, the corresponding critical cross flow air speed is found to be proportional to the fuel jet velocity, meanwhile independent of nozzle diameter. Correlation models are proposed for the flame height in jet direction and the flame trajectory-line length for both ambient pressures, which are shown to be in good agreement with the experimental results.

  18. Transition to turbulence and noise radiation in heated coaxial jet flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gloor, Michael, E-mail: gloor@ifd.mavt.ethz.ch; Bühler, Stefan; Kleiser, Leonhard [Institute of Fluid Dynamics, ETH Zurich, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2016-04-15

    Laminar-turbulent transition and noise radiation of a parametrized set of subsonic coaxial jet flows with a hot primary (core) stream are investigated numerically by Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) and direct noise computation. This study extends our previous research on local linear stability of heated coaxial jet flows by analyzing the nonlinear evolution of initially laminar flows disturbed by a superposition of small-amplitude unstable eigenmodes. First, a baseline configuration is studied to shed light on the flow dynamics of coaxial jet flows. Subsequently, LESs are performed for a range of Mach and Reynolds numbers to systematically analyze the influences of the temperature and the velocity ratios between the primary and the secondary (bypass) stream. The results provide a basis for a detailed analysis of fundamental flow-acoustic phenomena in the considered heated coaxial jet flows. Increasing the primary-jet temperature leads to an increase of fluctuation levels and to an amplification of far-field noise, especially at low frequencies. Strong mixing between the cold bypass stream and the hot primary stream as well as the intermittent character of the flow field at the end of the potential core lead to a pronounced noise radiation at an aft angle of approximately 35{sup ∘}. The velocity ratio strongly affects the shear-layer development and therefore also the noise generation mechanisms. Increasing the secondary-stream velocity amplifies the dominance of outer shear-layer perturbations while the disturbance growth rates in the inner shear layer decrease. Already for r{sub mic} > 40R{sub 1}, where r{sub mic} is the distance from the end of the potential core and R{sub 1} is the core-jet radius, a perfect 1/r{sub mic} decay of the sound pressure amplitudes is observed. The potential-core length increases for higher secondary-stream velocities which leads to a shift of the center of the dominant acoustic radiation in the downstream direction.

  19. Numerical modelling of unsteady flow behaviour in the rectangular jets with oblique opening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James T. Hart

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Vortex shedding in a bank of three rectangular burner-jets was investigated using a CFD model. The jets were angled to the wall and the whole burner was recessed into a cavity in the wall; the ratio of velocities between the jets varied from 1 to 3. The model was validated against experimentally measured velocity profiles and wall pressure tapings from a physical model of the same burner geometry, and was generally found to reproduce the mean flow field faithfully. The CFD model showed that vortex shedding was induced by a combination of an adverse pressure gradient, resulting from the diffuser-like geometry of the recess, and the entrainment of fluid into the spaces separating the jets. The asymmetry of the burner, a consequence of being angled to the wall, introduced a cross-stream component into the adverse pressure gradient that forced the jets to bend away from their geometric axes, the extent of which depended upon the jet velocity. The vortex shedding was also found to occur in different jets depending on the jet velocity ratio.

  20. Jet flow analysis of liquid poison injection in a CANDU reactor using source term

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chae, Kyung Myung; Choi, Hang Bok; Rhee, Bo Wook

    2001-01-01

    For the performance analysis of Canadian deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor shutdown system number 2 (SDS2), a computational fluid dynamics model of poison jet flow has been developed to estimate the flow field and poison concentration formed inside the CANDU reactor calandria. As the ratio of calandria shell radius over injection nozzle hole diameter is so large (1055), it is impractical to develop a full-size model encompassing the whole calandria shell. In order to reduce the model to a manageable size, a quarter of one-pitch length segment of the shell was modeled using symmetric nature of the jet; and the injected jet was treated as a source term to avoid the modeling difficulty caused by the big difference of the hole sizes. For the analysis of an actual CANDU-6 SDS2 poison injection, the grid structure was determined based on the results of two-dimensional real- and source-jet simulations. The maximum injection velocity of the liquid poison is 27.8 m/s and the mass fraction of the poison is 8000 ppm (mg/kg). The simulation results have shown well-established jet flow field. In general, the jet develops narrowly at first but stretches rapidly. Then, the flow recirculates a little in r-x plane, while it recirculates largely in r-θ plane. As the time goes on, the adjacent jets contact each other and form a wavy front such that the whole jet develops in a plate form. his study has shown that the source term model can be effectively used for the analysis of the poison injection and the simulation result of the CANDU reactor is consistent with the model currently being used for the safety analysis. In the future, it is strongly recommended to analyze the transient (from helium tank to injection nozzle hole) of the poison injection by applying Bernoulli equation with real boundary conditions

  1. Effect of Jet Shape on Flow and Torque Characteristics of Pelton Turbine Runner

    OpenAIRE

    Vishal Gupta,; Dr. Vishnu Prasad

    2014-01-01

    In Pelton turbine, the energy carried by water is converted into kinetic energy by providing nozzle at the end of penstock. The shape of jet affects the force and torque on the bucket and runner of turbine. The nozzle of circular cross section is commonly used. In this paper attempt has been made to study the effect of four different jet shapes on the flow and torque characteristics of Pelton turbine runner through numerical simulation.

  2. Effects of gas flow on oxidation reaction in liquid induced by He/O{sub 2} plasma-jet irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Atsushi; Uchida, Giichiro, E-mail: uchida@jwri.osaka-u.ac.jp; Takenaka, Kosuke; Setsuhara, Yuichi [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Kawasaki, Toshiyuki [Department of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Nippon Bunri University, Oita, Oita 870-0397 (Japan); Koga, Kazunori; Sarinont, Thapanut; Amano, Takaaki; Shiratani, Masaharu [Graduate School of Information Science and Electrical Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2015-07-28

    We present here analysis of oxidation reaction in liquid by a plasma-jet irradiation under various gas flow patterns such as laminar and turbulence flows. To estimate the total amount of oxidation reaction induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) in liquid, we employ a KI-starch solution system, where the absorbance of the KI-starch solution near 600 nm behaves linear to the total amount of oxidation reaction in liquid. The laminar flow with higher gas velocity induces an increase in the ROS distribution area on the liquid surface, which results in a large amount of oxidation reaction in liquid. However, a much faster gas flow conversely results in a reduction in the total amount of oxidation reaction in liquid under the following two conditions: first condition is that the turbulence flow is triggered in a gas flow channel at a high Reynolds number of gas flow, which leads to a marked change of the spatial distribution of the ROS concentration in gas phase. Second condition is that the dimpled liquid surface is formed by strong gas flow, which prevents the ROS from being transported in radial direction along the liquid surface.

  3. Surface conductivity dependent dynamic behaviour of an ultrafine atmospheric pressure plasma jet for microscale surface processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abuzairi, Tomy [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Shizuoka University, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan); Department of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universitas Indonesia, Depok 16424 (Indonesia); Okada, Mitsuru [Department of Engineering, Shizuoka University, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan); Bhattacharjee, Sudeep [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208016 (India); Nagatsu, Masaaki, E-mail: nagatsu.masaaki@shizuoka.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Shizuoka University, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan); Department of Engineering, Shizuoka University, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan); Research Institute of Electronics, Shizuoka University, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan)

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • Spatio-temporal behaviors of capillary APPJs are studied for various substrates. • Plasma irradiation area depended on the substrate conductivity and permittivity. • Surface irradiation area was significantly broadened in polymer-like substrate. • Effect of applying a substrate bias on the APPJ irradiation area was investigated. - Abstract: An experimental study on the dynamic behaviour of microcapillary atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) with 5 μm tip size for surfaces of different conductivity is reported. Electrical and spatio-temporal characteristics of the APPJs are monitored using high voltage probe, current monitor and high speed intensified charge couple device camera. From these experimental results, we presented a simple model to understand the electrical discharge characteristics of the capillary APPJs with double electrodes, and estimated the velocity of the ionization fronts in the jet and the electron density to be 3.5–4.2 km/s and 2–7 × 10{sup 17} m{sup −3}. By analyzing the dynamics of the microcapillary APPJs for different substrate materials, it was found that the surface irradiation area strongly depended on the substrate conductivity and permittivity, especially in the case of polymer-like substrate, surface irradiation area was significantly broadened probably due to the repelling behaviour of the plasma jets from the accumulated electrical charges on the polymer surface. The effect of applying a substrate bias in the range from −900 V to +900 V on the plasma irradiation onto the substrates was also investigated. From the knowledge of the present results, it is helpful for choosing the substrate materials for microscale surface modification.

  4. Surface conductivity dependent dynamic behaviour of an ultrafine atmospheric pressure plasma jet for microscale surface processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abuzairi, Tomy; Okada, Mitsuru; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep; Nagatsu, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Spatio-temporal behaviors of capillary APPJs are studied for various substrates. • Plasma irradiation area depended on the substrate conductivity and permittivity. • Surface irradiation area was significantly broadened in polymer-like substrate. • Effect of applying a substrate bias on the APPJ irradiation area was investigated. - Abstract: An experimental study on the dynamic behaviour of microcapillary atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) with 5 μm tip size for surfaces of different conductivity is reported. Electrical and spatio-temporal characteristics of the APPJs are monitored using high voltage probe, current monitor and high speed intensified charge couple device camera. From these experimental results, we presented a simple model to understand the electrical discharge characteristics of the capillary APPJs with double electrodes, and estimated the velocity of the ionization fronts in the jet and the electron density to be 3.5–4.2 km/s and 2–7 × 10"1"7 m"−"3. By analyzing the dynamics of the microcapillary APPJs for different substrate materials, it was found that the surface irradiation area strongly depended on the substrate conductivity and permittivity, especially in the case of polymer-like substrate, surface irradiation area was significantly broadened probably due to the repelling behaviour of the plasma jets from the accumulated electrical charges on the polymer surface. The effect of applying a substrate bias in the range from −900 V to +900 V on the plasma irradiation onto the substrates was also investigated. From the knowledge of the present results, it is helpful for choosing the substrate materials for microscale surface modification.

  5. Mixing and NO(x) Emission Calculations of Confined Reacting Jet Flows in a Cylindrical Duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdeman, James D. (Technical Monitor); Oechsle, Victor L.

    2003-01-01

    Rapid mixing of cold lateral jets with hot cross-stream flows in confined configurations is of practical interest in gas turbine combustors as it strongly affects combustor exit temperature quality, and gaseous emissions in for example rich-lean combustion. It is therefore important to further improve our fundamental understanding of the important processes of dilution jet mixing especially when the injected jet mass flow rate exceeds that of the cross-stream. The results reported in this report describe some of the main flow characteristics which develop in the mixing process in a cylindrical duct. A 3-dimensional tool has been used to predict the mixing flow field characteristics and NOx emission in a quench section of an RQL combustor, Eighteen configurations have been analyzed in a circular geometry in a fully reacting environment simulating the operating condition of an actual RQL gas turbine combustion liner. The evaluation matrix was constructed by varying three parameters: 1) jet-to-mainstream momentum-flux ratio (J), 2) orifice shape or orifice aspect ratio, and 3) slot slant angle. The results indicate that the mixing flow field significantly varies with the value of the jet penetration and subsequently, slanting elongated slots generally improve the mixing uniformity at high J conditions. Round orifices produce more uniform mixing and low NO(x) emissions at low J due to the strong and adequate jet penetration. No significant correlation was found between the NO(x) production rates and the mixing deviation parameters, however, strong correlation was found between NO(x) formation and jet penetration. In the computational results, most of the NO(x) formation occurred behind the orifice starting at the orifice wake region. Additional NO(x) is formed upstream of the orifice in certain configurations with high J conditions due to the upstream recirculation.

  6. Numerical and experimental investigation of the 3D free surface flow in a model Pelton turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiereder, R; Riemann, S; Schilling, R

    2010-01-01

    This investigation focuses on the numerical and experimental analysis of the 3D free surface flow in a Pelton turbine. In particular, two typical flow conditions occurring in a full scale Pelton turbine - a configuration with a straight inlet as well as a configuration with a 90 degree elbow upstream of the nozzle - are considered. Thereby, the effect of secondary flow due to the 90 degree bending of the upstream pipe on the characteristics of the jet is explored. The hybrid flow field consists of pure liquid flow within the conduit and free surface two component flow of the liquid jet emerging out of the nozzle into air. The numerical results are validated against experimental investigations performed in the laboratory of the Institute of Fluid Mechanics (FLM). For the numerical simulation of the flow the in-house unstructured fully parallelized finite volume solver solver3D is utilized. An advanced interface capturing model based on the classic Volume of Fluid method is applied. In order to ensure sharp interface resolution an additional convection term is added to the transport equation of the volume fraction. A collocated variable arrangement is used and the set of non-linear equations, containing fluid conservation equations and model equations for turbulence and volume fraction, are solved in a segregated manner. For pressure-velocity coupling the SIMPLE and PISO algorithms are implemented. Detailed analysis of the observed flow patterns in the jet and of the jet geometry are presented.

  7. Numerical and experimental investigation of the 3D free surface flow in a model Pelton turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiereder, R; Riemann, S; Schilling, R, E-mail: fiereder@lhm.mw.tum.d [Department of Fluid Mechanics, Technische Universitaet Muenchen Bolzmannstrasse 15, Garching, 85748 (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    This investigation focuses on the numerical and experimental analysis of the 3D free surface flow in a Pelton turbine. In particular, two typical flow conditions occurring in a full scale Pelton turbine - a configuration with a straight inlet as well as a configuration with a 90 degree elbow upstream of the nozzle - are considered. Thereby, the effect of secondary flow due to the 90 degree bending of the upstream pipe on the characteristics of the jet is explored. The hybrid flow field consists of pure liquid flow within the conduit and free surface two component flow of the liquid jet emerging out of the nozzle into air. The numerical results are validated against experimental investigations performed in the laboratory of the Institute of Fluid Mechanics (FLM). For the numerical simulation of the flow the in-house unstructured fully parallelized finite volume solver solver3D is utilized. An advanced interface capturing model based on the classic Volume of Fluid method is applied. In order to ensure sharp interface resolution an additional convection term is added to the transport equation of the volume fraction. A collocated variable arrangement is used and the set of non-linear equations, containing fluid conservation equations and model equations for turbulence and volume fraction, are solved in a segregated manner. For pressure-velocity coupling the SIMPLE and PISO algorithms are implemented. Detailed analysis of the observed flow patterns in the jet and of the jet geometry are presented.

  8. Numerical and experimental investigation of the 3D free surface flow in a model Pelton turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiereder, R.; Riemann, S.; Schilling, R.

    2010-08-01

    This investigation focuses on the numerical and experimental analysis of the 3D free surface flow in a Pelton turbine. In particular, two typical flow conditions occurring in a full scale Pelton turbine - a configuration with a straight inlet as well as a configuration with a 90 degree elbow upstream of the nozzle - are considered. Thereby, the effect of secondary flow due to the 90 degree bending of the upstream pipe on the characteristics of the jet is explored. The hybrid flow field consists of pure liquid flow within the conduit and free surface two component flow of the liquid jet emerging out of the nozzle into air. The numerical results are validated against experimental investigations performed in the laboratory of the Institute of Fluid Mechanics (FLM). For the numerical simulation of the flow the in-house unstructured fully parallelized finite volume solver solver3D is utilized. An advanced interface capturing model based on the classic Volume of Fluid method is applied. In order to ensure sharp interface resolution an additional convection term is added to the transport equation of the volume fraction. A collocated variable arrangement is used and the set of non-linear equations, containing fluid conservation equations and model equations for turbulence and volume fraction, are solved in a segregated manner. For pressure-velocity coupling the SIMPLE and PISO algorithms are implemented. Detailed analysis of the observed flow patterns in the jet and of the jet geometry are presented.

  9. Numerical study of an impinging jet to a turbulent channel flow in a T-Junction configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Michail; Papalexandris, Miltiadis

    2016-11-01

    In this talk we report on Large Eddy Simulations of an impinging planar jet to a turbulent channel flow in a T-Junction configuration. Due to its capacity for mixing and heat transfer enhancement, this type of flow is encountered in various industrial applications. In particular, our work is related to the emergency cooling systems of pressurized water reactors. As is well known, this type of flow is dominated by a large separation bubble downstream the jet impingement location. Secondary regions of flow separation are predicted both upstream and downstream the impinging jet. We describe how these separation regions interact with the shear layer that is formed by the injection of the jet to the crossflow, and how they affect the mixing process. In our talk we further examine the influence of the jet's velocity to characteristic quantities of the jet, such as penetration length and expansion angle, as well as to the first and second-order statistics of the flow.

  10. Active Control Strategies to Optimize Supersonic Fuel-Air Mixing for Combustion Associated with Fully Modulated Transverse Jet in Cross Flow

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ghenai, C; Philippidis, G. P; Lin, C. X

    2005-01-01

    ... (subsonic- supersonic) combustion studies. A high-speed imaging system was used for the visualization of pure liquid jet, aerated liquid jet and pulsed aerated jet injection into a supersonic cross flow at Mach number 1.5...

  11. Low-Z material for limiters and wall surfaces in JET: beryllium and carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebut, P.H.; Hugon, M.; Booth, S.J.; Dean, J.R.; Dietz, K.J.; Sonnenberg, K.; Watkins, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    The relative merits of graphite and beryllium, as a low-Z material for limiters and wall surfaces in JET, are compared. A consideration of data on thermomechanical properties, retention of hydrogen and gettering action, indicates that beryllium offers the best prospects as a material for the JET belt limiters and walls. (U.K.)

  12. Flow characterization and patch clamp dose responses using jet microfluidics in a tubeless microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resto, Pedro J; Bhat, Abhishek; Stava, Eric; Lor, Chong; Merriam, Elliot; Diaz-Rivera, Ruben E; Pearce, Robert; Blick, Robert; Williams, Justin C

    2017-11-01

    Surface tension passive pumping is a way to actuate flow without the need for pumps, tubing or valves by using the pressure inside small drop to move liquid via a microfluidic channel. These types of tubeless devices have typically been used in cell biology. Herein we present the use of tubeless devices as a fluid exchange platform for patch clamp electrophysiology. Inertia from high-speed droplets and jets is used to create flow and perform on-the-fly mixing of solutions. These are then flowed over GABA transfected HEK cells under patch in order to perform a dose response analysis. TIRF imaging and electrical recordings are used to study the fluid exchange properties of the microfluidic device, resulting in 0-90% fluid exchange times of hundreds of milliseconds. COMSOL is used to model flow and fluid exchange within the device. Patch-clamping experiments show the ability to use high-speed passive pumping and its derivatives for studying peak dose responses, but not for studying ion channel kinetics. Our system results in fluid exchange times slower than when using a standard 12-barrel application system and is not as stable as traditional methods, but it offers a new platform with added functionality. Surface tension passive pumping and tubeless devices can be used in a limited fashion for electrophysiology. Users may obtain peak dose responses but the system, in its current form, is not capable of fluid exchange fast enough to study the kinetics of most ion channels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Investigation and prevention of droplet splashing during operation of a sodium free jet flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoppel, L.; Gordeev, S.; Wetzel, T.; Fellmoser, F.; Daubner, M.

    2010-01-01

    Many accelerator application concepts consider liquid metal as a windowless target, at which the particle beam does directly hit the liquid. One of such concepts is studied in the European project ''DIRAC-Secondary beams - Design Study''. This project is focused on the preliminary research work for construction of a new international particle accelerator - Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt. The planned accelerator is aimed to work with high-energy heavy-ions, such as U 238 . One of the key elements of the FAIR facility is a liquid-metal-target, made in the form of a rectangular shaped Lithium jet aligned with the gravity vector. In the course of preliminary investigations the theoretical and practical conditions for a stable liquid-metal-jet conforming to the FAIR-requirements have been studied in the Karlsruhe Liquid Metal Laboratory (KALLA) sodium facility. The acquired scientific and technological results can be transferred to liquid-metal targets in nuclear applications, for example, the IFMIF-Target for the study of fusion reactor materials and the Myrrah/XT-ADS target. The main goals of the KALLA-part of the project were to design and build a facility for experimental research on hydrodynamic phenomena of the free surface liquid metal flow as well as to look at technological problems influencing the hydrodynamic stability of such flows. One of such problems emerged already during the startup of the facility: Splashing of liquid metal drops in the vacuum volume of the target box. As a result of such splashing process, liquid metal droplets are accumulated on various internal constructional elements of the target box, for example, on the inspection windows. This effect prohibits long term operation with the facility. The present paper describes the methods used to reduce the splashing to a minimum. (orig.)

  14. Cold and hot model investigation of flow and mixing in a multi-jet flare

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagot, P.R. [Petrobras Petroleo Brasileiro S.A., Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Sobiesiak, A. [Windsor Univ., ON (Canada); Grandmaison, E.W. [Queen' s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada). Centre for Advanced Gas Combustion Technology

    2003-07-01

    The oil and gas industry commonly disposes of hydrocarbon wastes by flaring. This study simulated several features of industrial offshore flares in a multi-jet burner. Cold and hot flow experiments were performed. Twenty-four nozzles mounted on radial arms originating from a central fuel plenum were used in the burner design. In an effort to improve the mixing and radiation characteristics of this type of burner, an examination of the effect of various mixing-altering devices on the nozzle exit ports was performed. Flow visualization studies of the cold and hot flow systems were presented, along with details concerning temperature, gas composition and radiation levels from the burner models. The complex flow pattern resulting when multiple jets are injected into a cross flow stream were demonstrated with the flow visualization studies from the cold model. The trajectory followed by the leading edge jet for the reference case and the ring attachments was higher but similar to the simple round jet in a cross flow. The precessing jets and the cone attachments were more strongly deflected by the cross flow with a higher degree of mixing between the jets in the nozzle region. For different firing rates, flow visualization, gas temperature, gas composition and radiative heat flux measurements were performed in the hot model studies. Flame trajectories, projected side view areas and volumes increased with firing rates for all nozzle configurations and the ring attachment flare had the smallest flame volume. The gas temperatures reached maximum values at close to 30 per cent of the flame length and the lowest gas temperature was observed for the flare model with precessing jets. For the reference case nozzle, nitrogen oxide (NOx) concentrations were in the 30 to 45 parts per million (ppm) range. The precessing jet model yielded NOx concentrations in the 22 to 24 ppm range, the lowest obtained. There was a linear dependence between the radiative heat flux from the flames

  15. Anisotropic turbulence and zonal jets in rotating flows with a β-effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Galperin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical studies of small-scale forced, two-dimensional turbulent flows on the surface of a rotating sphere have revealed strong large-scale anisotropization that culminates in the emergence of quasi-steady sets of alternating zonal jets, or zonation. The kinetic energy spectrum of such flows also becomes strongly anisotropic. For the zonal modes, a steep spectral distribution, E(n=CZ (Ω/R2 n-5, is established, where CZ=O(1 is a non-dimensional coefficient, Ω is the angular velocity, and R is the radius of the sphere, respectively. For other, non-zonal modes, the classical, Kolmogorov-Batchelor-Kraichnan, spectral law is preserved. This flow regime, referred to as a zonostrophic regime, appears to have wide applicability to large-scale planetary and terrestrial circulations as long as those are characterized by strong rotation, vertically stable stratification and small Burger numbers. The well-known manifestations of this regime are the banded disks of the outer planets of our Solar System. Relatively less known examples are systems of narrow, subsurface, alternating zonal jets throughout all major oceans discovered in state-of-the-art, eddy-permitting simulations of the general oceanic circulation. Furthermore, laboratory experiments recently conducted using the Coriolis turntable have basically confirmed that the lateral gradient of ''planetary vorticity'' (emulated via the topographic β-effect is the primary cause of the zonation and that the latter is entwined with the development of the strongly anisotropic kinetic energy spectrum that tends to attain the same zonal and non-zonal distributions, −5 and , respectively, in both the slope and the magnitude, as the corresponding spectra in other environmental conditions. The non-dimensional coefficient CZ in the −5 spectral law appears to be invariant, , in a variety of simulated and natural flows. This paper provides a brief review of the zonostrophic regime. The review includes the

  16. Numerical analysis of high-speed liquid lithium free-surface flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordeev, Sergej; Heinzel, Volker; Stieglitz, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The free surface behavior of a high speed lithium jet is investigated by means of a CFD LES analysis. ► The study is aiming to validate adequate LES technique. ► The Osaka University experiments with liquid lithium jet have been simulated. ► Four cases with jet flow velocities of 4, 9, 13 and 15 m/s are analyzed. ► Calculation results show a good qualitative and a quantitative agreement with the experimental data. - Abstract: The free-surface stability of the target of the International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is one of the crucial issues, since the spatio-temporal behavior of the free-surface determines the neutron flux to be generated. This article investigates the relation between the evolution of a wall boundary layer in a convergent nozzle and the free surface shape of a high speed lithium jet by means of a CFD LES analysis using the Osaka University experiments. The study is aiming to validate adequate LES technique to analyze the individual flow phenomena observed. Four cases with jet flow velocities of 4, 9, 13 and 15 m/s are analyzed. First analyses of calculation results show that the simulation exhibits a good qualitative and a quantitative agreement with the experimental data, which allows in the future a more realistic prediction of the IFMIF target behavior.

  17. Estimation of Flow Channel Parameters for Flowing Gas Mixed with Air in Atmospheric-pressure Plasma Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Saito, Hidetoshi

    2017-12-01

    When the working gas of an atmospheric-pressure non-equilibrium (cold) plasma flows into free space, the diameter of the resulting flow channel changes continuously. The shape of the channel is observed through the light emitted by the working gas of the atmospheric-pressure plasma. When the plasma jet forms a conical shape, the diameter of the cylindrical shape, which approximates the conical shape, defines the diameter of the flow channel. When the working gas flows into the atmosphere from the inside of a quartz tube, the gas mixes with air. The molar ratio of the working gas and air is estimated from the corresponding volume ratio through the relationship between the diameter of the cylindrical plasma channel and the inner diameter of the quartz tube. The Reynolds number is calculated from the kinematic viscosity of the mixed gas and the molar ratio. The gas flow rates for the upper limit of laminar flow and the lower limit of turbulent flow are determined by the corresponding Reynolds numbers estimated from the molar ratio. It is confirmed that the plasma jet length and the internal plasma length associated with strong light emission increase with the increasing gas flow rate until the rate for the upper limit of laminar flow and the lower limit of turbulent flow, respectively. Thus, we are able to explain the increasing trend in the plasma lengths with the diameter of the flow channel and the molar ratio by using the cylindrical approximation.

  18. Simulation of gas compressible flow by free surface water flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altafini, C.R.; Silva Ferreira, R.T. da

    1981-01-01

    The analogy between the water flow with a free surface and the compressible fluid flow, commonly called hydraulic analogy, is analyzed and its limitations are identified. The water table is the equipment used for this simulation, which allows the quatitative analysis of subsonic and supersonic flow with a low cost apparatus. The hydraulic analogy is applied to subsonic flow around circular cylinders and supersonic flow around cones. The results are compared with available theoretical and experimental data and a good agreement is achieved. (Author) [pt

  19. Propagation of atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet into ambient air at laminar gas flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinchuk, M; Kurakina, N; Spodobin, V; Stepanova, O

    2017-01-01

    The formation of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) in a gas flow passing through the discharge gap depends on both gas-dynamic properties and electrophysical parameters of the plasma jet generator. The paper presents the results of experimental and numerical study of the propagation of the APPJ in a laminar flow of helium. A dielectric-barrier discharge (DBD) generated inside a quartz tube equipped with a coaxial electrode system, which provided gas passing through it, served as a plasma source. The transition of the laminar regime of gas flow into turbulent one was controlled by the photography of a formed plasma jet. The corresponding gas outlet velocity and Reynolds numbers were revealed experimentally and were used to simulate gas dynamics with OpenFOAM software. The data of the numerical simulation suggest that the length of plasma jet at the unvarying electrophysical parameters of DBD strongly depends on the mole fraction of ambient air in a helium flow, which is established along the direction of gas flow. (paper)

  20. Propagation of atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet into ambient air at laminar gas flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinchuk, M.; Stepanova, O.; Kurakina, N.; Spodobin, V.

    2017-05-01

    The formation of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) in a gas flow passing through the discharge gap depends on both gas-dynamic properties and electrophysical parameters of the plasma jet generator. The paper presents the results of experimental and numerical study of the propagation of the APPJ in a laminar flow of helium. A dielectric-barrier discharge (DBD) generated inside a quartz tube equipped with a coaxial electrode system, which provided gas passing through it, served as a plasma source. The transition of the laminar regime of gas flow into turbulent one was controlled by the photography of a formed plasma jet. The corresponding gas outlet velocity and Reynolds numbers were revealed experimentally and were used to simulate gas dynamics with OpenFOAM software. The data of the numerical simulation suggest that the length of plasma jet at the unvarying electrophysical parameters of DBD strongly depends on the mole fraction of ambient air in a helium flow, which is established along the direction of gas flow.

  1. Surface integrity analysis of abrasive water jet-cut surfaces of friction stir welded joints

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kumar, R.; Chattopadhyaya, S.; Dixit, A. R.; Bora, B.; Zeleňák, Michal; Foldyna, Josef; Hloch, Sergej; Hlaváček, Petr; Ščučka, Jiří; Klich, Jiří; Sitek, Libor; Vilaca, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 5 (2017), s. 1687-1701 ISSN 0268-3768 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1406; GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : friction stir welding (FSW) * abrasive water jet (AWJ) * optical profilometer * topography * surface roughness Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools OBOR OECD: Mechanical engineering Impact factor: 2.209, year: 2016 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00170-016-8776-0

  2. Blow-out limits of nonpremixed turbulent jet flames in a cross flow at atmospheric and sub-atmospheric pressures

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Qiang; Hu, Longhua; Yoon, Sung Hwan; Lu, Shouxiang; Delichatsios, Michael; Chung, Suk-Ho

    2015-01-01

    The blow-out limits of nonpremixed turbulent jet flames in cross flows were studied, especially concerning the effect of ambient pressure, by conducting experiments at atmospheric and sub-atmospheric pressures. The combined effects of air flow

  3. Electric field measurements in a kHz-driven He jet - The influence of the gas flow speed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sobota, A.; Guaitella, O.; Sretenović, G.B.; Krstić, I.B.; Kovačević, V.V.; Obrusník, A.; Nguyen, Y.N.; Zajíčková, L.; Obradović, B.M.; Kuraica, M.M.

    2016-01-01

    This report focuses on the dependence of electric field strength in the effluent of a vertically downwards-operated plasma jet freely expanding into room air as a function of the gas flow speed. A 30 kHz AC-driven He jet was used in a coaxial geometry, with an amplitude of 2 kV and gas flow between

  4. Jet reconstruction and performance using particle flow with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aaboud, Morad; ATLAS Collaboration; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abeloos, Baptiste; Abidi, Syed Haider; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abraham, Nicola; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adachi, Shunsuke; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adelman, Jahred; Adersberger, Michael; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Agheorghiesei, Catalin; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akatsuka, Shunichi; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Ali, Babar; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allen, Benjamin William; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Alshehri, Azzah Aziz; Alstaty, Mahmoud; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antel, Claire; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antrim, Daniel Joseph; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Araujo Ferraz, Victor; Arce, Ayana; Ardell, Rose Elisabeth; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Armitage, Lewis James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Artz, Sebastian; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Augsten, Kamil; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baas, Alessandra; Baca, Matthew John; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahrasemani, Sina; Baines, John; Bajic, Milena; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baldin, Evgenii; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Balunas, William Keaton; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisits, Martin-Stefan; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska-Blenessy, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barranco Navarro, Laura; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans~Peter; Becker, Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bedognetti, Matteo; Bee, Christopher; Beermann, Thomas; Begalli, Marcia; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Bell, Andrew Stuart; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Belyaev, Nikita; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez, Jose; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Beringer, Jürg; Berlendis, Simon; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernardi, Gregorio; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertram, Iain Alexander; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethani, Agni; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Biebel, Otmar; Biedermann, Dustin; Bielski, Rafal; Biesuz, Nicolo Vladi; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Billoud, Thomas Remy Victor; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biondi, Silvia; Bisanz, Tobias; Bittrich, Carsten; Bjergaard, David Martin; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blue, Andrew; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Blunier, Sylvain; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boehler, Michael; Boerner, Daniela; Bogavac, Danijela; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bokan, Petar; Bold, Tomasz; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortoletto, Daniela; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Bossio Sola, Jonathan David; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Boutle, Sarah Kate; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Breaden Madden, William Dmitri; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Lydia; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Briglin, Daniel Lawrence; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Britzger, Daniel; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Broughton, James; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruni, Lucrezia Stella; Brunt, Benjamin; Bruschi, Marco; Bruscino, Nello; Bryant, Patrick; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Buchholz, Peter; Buckley, Andrew; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bullock, Daniel; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgard, Carsten Daniel; Burger, Angela Maria; Burghgrave, Blake; Burka, Klaudia; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Burr, Jonathan Thomas Peter; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Buzykaev, Aleksey; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cairo, Valentina; Cakir, Orhan; Calace, Noemi; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Callea, Giuseppe; Caloba, Luiz; Calvente Lopez, Sergio; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Calvet, Thomas Philippe; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Camincher, Clement; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Camplani, Alessandra; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Carbone, Ryne Michael; Cardarelli, Roberto; Cardillo, Fabio; Carli, Ina; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carlson, Benjamin Taylor; Carminati, Leonardo; Carney, Rebecca; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Casper, David William; Castelijn, Remco; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Caudron, Julien; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavallaro, Emanuele; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Celebi, Emre; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerda Alberich, Leonor; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chan, Stephen Kam-wah; Chan, Wing Sheung; Chan, Yat Long; Chang, Philip; Chapman, John Derek; Charlton, Dave; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Che, Siinn; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Shion; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Huajie; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cheremushkina, Evgenia; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chitan, Adrian; Chiu, Yu Him Justin; Chizhov, Mihail; Choi, Kyungeon; Chomont, Arthur Rene; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Christodoulou, Valentinos; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming Chung; Chudoba, Jiri; Chuinard, Annabelle Julia; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Cioara, Irina Antonela; Ciocca, Claudia; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirotto, Francesco; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Brian Lee; Clark, Michael; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Colasurdo, Luca; Cole, Brian; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cormier, Felix; Cormier, Kyle James Read; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Crawley, Samuel Joseph; Creager, Rachael; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cueto, Ana; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cukierman, Aviv Ruben; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cúth, Jakub; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; D'amen, Gabriele; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dado, Tomas; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dandoy, Jeffrey; Dang, Nguyen Phuong; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Dann, Nicholas Stuart; Danninger, Matthias; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Daubney, Thomas; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Peter; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Benedetti, Abraham; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Maria, Antonio; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vasconcelos Corga, Kevin; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dedovich, Dmitri; Dehghanian, Nooshin; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Gaudio, Michela; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delgove, David; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delporte, Charles; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; DeMarco, David; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Denysiuk, Denys; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Dette, Karola; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Clemente, William Kennedy; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Petrillo, Karri Folan; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Diaconu, Cristinel; Diamond, Miriam; Dias, Flavia; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Díez Cornell, Sergio; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Djuvsland, Julia Isabell; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Dobos, Daniel; Dobre, Monica; Doglioni, Caterina; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Drechsler, Eric; Dris, Manolis; Du, Yanyan; Duarte-Campderros, Jorge; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducourthial, Audrey; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudder, Andreas Christian; Duffield, Emily Marie; Duflot, Laurent; Dührssen, Michael; Dumancic, Mirta; Dumitriu, Ana Elena; Duncan, Anna Kathryn; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Duschinger, Dirk; Dutta, Baishali; Dyndal, Mateusz; Eckardt, Christoph; Ecker, Katharina Maria; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; El Kosseifi, Rima; Ellajosyula, Venugopal; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Elliot, Alison; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Ennis, Joseph Stanford; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Michael; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Estrada Pastor, Oscar; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Fabbri, Federica; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farina, Christian; Farina, Edoardo Maria; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Faucci Giannelli, Michele; Favareto, Andrea; Fawcett, William James; Fayard, Louis; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Feremenga, Last; Fernandez Martinez, Patricia; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Fischer, Adam; Fischer, Cora; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Flaschel, Nils; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Rob Roy MacGregor; Flick, Tobias; Flierl, Bernhard Matthias; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Forcolin, Giulio Tiziano; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Foster, Andrew Geoffrey; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Franconi, Laura; Franklin, Melissa; Frate, Meghan; Fraternali, Marco; Freeborn, David; Fressard-Batraneanu, Silvia; Freund, Benjamin; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fusayasu, Takahiro; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gach, Grzegorz; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Louis Guillaume; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Ganguly, Sanmay; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yanyan; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gascon Bravo, Alberto; Gasnikova, Ksenia; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudiello, Andrea; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Gee, Norman; Geisen, Marc; Geisler, Manuel Patrice; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Geng, Cong; Gentile, Simonetta; Gentsos, Christos; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghasemi, Sara; Ghneimat, Mazuza; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giannetti, Paola; Gibson, Stephen; Gignac, Matthew; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giromini, Paolo; Giugni, Danilo; Giuli, Francesco; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gkougkousis, Evangelos Leonidas; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Godlewski, Jan; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Gama, Rafael; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Giulia; Gonella, Laura; Gongadze, Alexi; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Goudet, Christophe Raymond; Goujdami, Driss; Goussiou, Anna; Govender, Nicolin; Gozani, Eitan; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Gradin, Per Olov Joakim; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gravila, Paul Mircea; Gray, Chloe; Gray, Heather; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Grefe, Christian; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Grevtsov, Kirill; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Groh, Sabrina; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Grout, Zara Jane; Grummer, Aidan; Guan, Liang; Guan, Wen; Guenther, Jaroslav; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Gui, Bin; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Guo, Jun; Guo, Wen; Guo, Yicheng; Gupta, Ruchi; Gupta, Shaun; Gustavino, Giuliano; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guyot, Claude; Guzik, Marcin Pawel; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Hadef, Asma; Hageböck, Stephan; Hagihara, Mutsuto; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Haley, Joseph; Halladjian, Garabed; Hallewell, Gregory David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Han, Shuo; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Haney, Bijan; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Maike Christina; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harrington, Robert; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hartmann, Nikolai Marcel; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, Ahmed; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauser, Reiner; Hauswald, Lorenz; Havener, Laura Brittany; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hayakawa, Daiki; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hays, Jonathan Michael; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heidegger, Kim Katrin; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Jochen Jens; Heinrich, Lukas; Heinz, Christian; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Held, Alexander; Hellman, Sten; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Henkelmann, Steffen; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Herde, Hannah; Herget, Verena; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Herwig, Theodor Christian; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hetherly, Jeffrey Wayne; Higashino, Satoshi; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hiti, Bojan; Hladik, Ondrej; Hoad, Xanthe; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hohn, David; Holmes, Tova Ray; Homann, Michael; Honda, Shunsuke; Honda, Takuya; Hong, Tae Min; Hooberman, Benjamin Henry; Hopkins, Walter; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horton, Arthur James; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howarth, James; Hoya, Joaquin; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hrynevich, Aliaksei; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Qipeng; Hu, Shuyang; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Huo, Peng; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Yuriy; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Introzzi, Gianluca; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Ishijima, Naoki; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ito, Fumiaki; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jabbar, Samina; Jackson, Paul; Jain, Vivek; Jakobi, Katharina Bianca; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansky, Roland; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Janus, Piotr Andrzej; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Javurkova, Martina; Jeanneau, Fabien; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jelinskas, Adomas; Jenni, Peter; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Hai; Jiang, Yi; Jiang, Zihao; Jiggins, Stephen; Jimenez Pena, Javier; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Jivan, Harshna; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Johnson, Christian; Johnson, William Joseph; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Roger; Jones, Sarah; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Köhler, Markus Konrad; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kahn, Sebastien Jonathan; Kaji, Toshiaki; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kaluza, Adam; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneti, Steven; Kanjir, Luka; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kaplan, Laser Seymour; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karentzos, Efstathios; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kasahara, Kota; Kashif, Lashkar; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Kato, Chikuma; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kawade, Kentaro; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kay, Ellis; Kazanin, Vassili; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Keyes, Robert; Khader, Mazin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khanov, Alexander; Kharlamov, Alexey; Kharlamova, Tatyana; Khodinov, Alexander; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kido, Shogo; Kilby, Callum; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Shinhong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver Maria; King, Barry; Kirchmeier, David; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kivernyk, Oleh; Kladiva, Eduard; Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, Thorwald; Klein, Matthew Henry; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klingl, Tobias; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Knapik, Joanna; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Aine; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Köhler, Nicolas Maximilian; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolb, Mathis; Koletsou, Iro; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kosek, Tomas; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Koulouris, Aimilianos; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, Athina; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kourlitis, Evangelos; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Kowalewska, Anna Bozena; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozakai, Chihiro; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitrii; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Krauss, Dominik; Kravchenko, Anton; Kremer, Jakub Andrzej; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Krizka, Karol; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Jiri; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumnack, Nils; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kucuk, Hilal; Kuday, Sinan; Kuechler, Jan Thomas; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuger, Fabian; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kukla, Romain; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kulinich, Yakov Petrovich; Kuna, Marine; Kunigo, Takuto; Kupco, Alexander; Kuprash, Oleg; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurchaninov, Leonid; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kurth, Matthew Glenn; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwan, Tony; Kyriazopoulos, Dimitrios; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rosa Navarro, Jose Luis; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Lammers, Sabine; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lanfermann, Marie Christine; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, J örn Christian; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Lapertosa, Alessandro; Laplace, Sandrine; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lasagni Manghi, Federico; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Lazovich, Tomo; Lazzaroni, Massimo; Le, Brian; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Quilleuc, Eloi; LeBlanc, Matthew Edgar; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Graham Richard; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Benoit; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Lerner, Giuseppe; Leroy, Claude; Lesage, Arthur; Lester, Christopher; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Dave; Li, Bing; Li, Changqiao; Li, Haifeng; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Qi; Li, Shu; Li, Xingguo; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liberti, Barbara; Liblong, Aaron; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Lionti, Anthony Eric; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Hao; Liu, Hongbin; Liu, Jesse Kar Kee; Liu, Jian; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanlin; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo, Cheuk Yee; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina Maria; Loch, Peter; Loebinger, Fred; Loew, Kevin Michael; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan David; Long, Robin Eamonn; Longo, Luigi; Looper, Kristina Anne; Lopez, Jorge; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lopez Solis, Alvaro; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Lösel, Philipp Jonathan; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lu, Haonan; Lu, Nan; Lu, Yun-Ju; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luedtke, Christian; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Luzi, Pierre Marc; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Lyubushkin, Vladimir; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Ma, Yanhui; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Macdonald, Calum Michael; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeda, Junpei; Maeland, Steffen; Maeno, Tadashi; Maevskiy, Artem; Magradze, Erekle; Mahlstedt, Joern; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maier, Thomas; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Claire; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mancini, Giada; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Maneira, José; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany; Mann, Alexander; Manousos, Athanasios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mansour, Jason Dhia; Mantifel, Rodger; Mantoani, Matteo; Manzoni, Stefano; Mapelli, Livio; Marceca, Gino; March, Luis; Marchese, Luigi; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marjanovic, Marija; Marley, Daniel; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Martensson, Mikael; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Christopher Blake; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martoiu, Victor Sorin; Martyniuk, Alex; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Lorenzo; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Maznas, Ioannis; Mazza, Simone Michele; Mc Fadden, Neil Christopher; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McClymont, Laurie; McDonald, Emily; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McNamara, Peter Charles; McPherson, Robert; Meehan, Samuel; Megy, Theo Jean; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meideck, Thomas; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Melini, Davide; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Melo, Matej; Meloni, Federico; Menary, Stephen Burns; Meng, Lingxin; Meng, Xiangting; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer Zu Theenhausen, Hanno; Miano, Fabrizio; Middleton, Robin; Miglioranzi, Silvia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milesi, Marco; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Minaenko, Andrey; Minami, Yuto; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Minegishi, Yuji; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mistry, Khilesh; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mizukami, Atsushi; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Mlynarikova, Michaela; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mogg, Philipp; Mohapatra, Soumya; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Monden, Ryutaro; Mondragon, Matthew Craig; Mönig, Klaus; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montalbano, Alyssa; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Stefanie; Mori, Daniel; Mori, Tatsuya; Morii, Masahiro; Morinaga, Masahiro; Morisbak, Vanja; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moschovakos, Paris; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Harry James; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Ralph Soeren Peter; Muenstermann, Daniel; Mullen, Paul; Mullier, Geoffrey; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Muškinja, Miha; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nachman, Benjamin Philip; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagata, Kazuki; Nagel, Martin; Nagy, Elemer; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Naranjo Garcia, Roger Felipe; Narayan, Rohin; Narrias Villar, Daniel Isaac; Naryshkin, Iouri; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Negri, Andrea; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nellist, Clara; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Michael Edward; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Newman, Paul; Ng, Tsz Yu; Nguyen Manh, Tuan; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nielsen, Jason; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Jon Kerr; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nishu, Nishu; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Noguchi, Yohei; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nomura, Marcelo Ayumu; Nooney, Tamsin; Nordberg, Markus; Norjoharuddeen, Nurfikri; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'connor, Kelsey; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Rourke, Abigail Alexandra; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Oide, Hideyuki; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onogi, Kouta; Onyisi, Peter; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Owen, Mark; Owen, Rhys Edward; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Pacheco Rodriguez, Laura; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganini, Michela; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Palacino, Gabriel; Palazzo, Serena; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panagoulias, Ilias; Pandini, Carlo Enrico; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Adam Jackson; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parker, Kerry Ann; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pascuzzi, Vincent; Pasner, Jacob Martin; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Pastore, Francesca; Pataraia, Sophio; Pater, Joleen; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pearson, Benjamin; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Penc, Ondrej; Peng, Cong; Peng, Haiping; Penwell, John; Peralva, Bernardo; Perego, Marta Maria; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrella, Sabrina; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petroff, Pierre; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrov, Mariyan; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Peyaud, Alan; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Pickering, Mark Andrew; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pin, Arnaud Willy J; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinfold, James; Pirumov, Hayk; Pitt, Michael; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Pluth, Daniel; Podberezko, Pavel; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggi, Riccardo; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Polesello, Giacomo; Poley, Anne-luise; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Ponomarenko, Daniil; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Poppleton, Alan; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozo Astigarraga, Mikel Eukeni; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Primavera, Margherita; Prince, Sebastien; Proklova, Nadezda; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Puddu, Daniele; Puri, Akshat; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Raddum, Silje; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Raine, John Andrew; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Ratti, Maria Giulia; Rauch, Daniel; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Stefan; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Ravinovich, Ilia; Rawling, Jacob Henry; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Reale, Marilea; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reed, Robert; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reichert, Joseph; Reiss, Andreas; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Resseguie, Elodie Deborah; Rettie, Sebastien; Reynolds, Elliot; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter, Stefan; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ricken, Oliver; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Riegel, Christian Johann; Rieger, Julia; Rifki, Othmane; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rimoldi, Marco; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ristić, Branislav; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Rizzi, Chiara; Roberts, Rhys Thomas; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Rodina, Yulia; Rodriguez Perez, Andrea; Rodriguez Rodriguez, Daniel; Roe, Shaun; Rogan, Christopher Sean; Røhne, Ole; Roloff, Jennifer; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romano Saez, Silvestre Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roos, Lydia; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Peyton; Rosien, Nils-Arne; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Jonatan; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Russell, Heather; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryu, Soo; Ryzhov, Andrey; Rzehorz, Gerhard Ferdinand; Saavedra, Aldo; Sabato, Gabriele; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Saha, Puja; Sahinsoy, Merve; Saimpert, Matthias; Saito, Masahiko; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salazar Loyola, Javier Esteban; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sammel, Dirk; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sanchez Pineda, Arturo Rodolfo; Sandaker, Heidi; Sandbach, Ruth Laura; Sander, Christian Oliver; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Carlos; Sankey, Dave; Sannino, Mario; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sasaki, Osamu; Sato, Koji; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savage, Graham; Savard, Pierre; Savic, Natascha; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Scarfone, Valerio; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schachtner, Balthasar Maria; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Leigh; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaeffer, Jan; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Schiavi, Carlo; Schier, Sheena; Schildgen, Lara Katharina; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, Korbinian Ralf; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Stefan; Schmitz, Simon; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schopf, Elisabeth; Schott, Matthias; Schouwenberg, Jeroen; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schramm, Steven; Schuh, Natascha; Schulte, Alexandra; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwarz, Thomas Andrew; Schweiger, Hansdieter; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Sciandra, Andrea; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Seema, Pienpen; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekhon, Karishma; Sekula, Stephen; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Sessa, Marco; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfiligoj, Tina; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shaikh, Nabila Wahab; Shan, Lianyou; Shang, Ruo-yu; Shank, James; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Shaw, Savanna Marie; Shcherbakova, Anna; Shehu, Ciwake Yusufu; Shen, Yu-Ting; Sherwood, Peter; Shi, Liaoshan; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shirabe, Shohei; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shlomi, Jonathan; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shoaleh Saadi, Diane; Shochet, Mel; Shojaii, Seyed Ruhollah; Shope, David Richard; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sickles, Anne Marie; Sidebo, Per Edvin; Sideras Haddad, Elias; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simon, Manuel; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sioli, Maximiliano; Siragusa, Giovanni; Siral, Ismet; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Skinner, Malcolm Bruce; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Slawinska, Magdalena; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Slovak, Radim; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smiesko, Juraj; Smirnov, Nikita; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Joshua Wyatt; Smith, Matthew; Smith, Russell; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snyder, Ian Michael; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Sokhrannyi, Grygorii; Solans Sanchez, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solodkov, Alexander; Soloshenko, Alexei; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Son, Hyungsuk; Song, Hong Ye; Sopczak, Andre; Sorin, Veronica; Sosa, David; Sotiropoulou, Calliope Louisa; Soualah, Rachik; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Sowden, Benjamin; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spalla, Margherita; Spangenberg, Martin; Spanò, Francesco; Sperlich, Dennis; Spettel, Fabian; Spieker, Thomas Malte; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiller, Laurence Anthony; Spousta, Martin; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stabile, Alberto; Stamen, Rainer; Stamm, Soren; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Giordon; Stark, Jan; Stark, Simon Holm; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Stärz, Steffen; Staszewski, Rafal; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strubig, Antonia; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Suchek, Stanislav; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Siyuan; Sun, Xiaohu; Suruliz, Kerim; Suster, Carl; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Shota; Svatos, Michal; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Swift, Stewart Patrick; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Masahiro; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanioka, Ryo; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tapia Araya, Sebastian; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Aaron; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Pierre Thor Elliot; Taylor, Wendy; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temple, Darren; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Tepel, Fabian-Phillipp; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Tibbetts, Mark James; Ticse Torres, Royer Edson; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todome, Kazuki; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tolley, Emma; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tong, Baojia(Tony); Tornambe, Peter; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Treado, Colleen Jennifer; Trefzger, Thomas; Tresoldi, Fabio; Tricoli, Alessandro; 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Zeng, Jian Cong; Zeng, Qi; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Guangyi; Zhang, Huijun; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Liqing; Zhang, Matt; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Xiandong; Zhao, Yongke; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Chen; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Maosen; Zhou, Mingliang; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Zinser, Markus; Ziolkowski, Michael; Živković, Lidija; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; Zou, Rui; zur Nedden, Martin; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2017-07-13

    This paper describes the implementation and performance of a particle flow algorithm applied to 20.2 fb$^-1$ of ATLAS data from 8 TeV proton-proton collisions in Run 1 of the LHC. The algorithm removes calorimeter energy deposits due to charged hadrons from consideration during jet reconstruction, instead using measurements of their momenta from the inner tracker. This improves the accuracy of the charged-hadron measurement, while retaining the calorimeter measurements of neutral-particle energies. The paper places emphasis on how this is achieved, while minimising double-counting of charged-hadron signals between the inner tracker and calorimeter. The performance of particle flow jets, formed from the ensemble of signals from the calorimeter and the inner tracker, is compared to that of jets reconstructed from calorimeter energy deposits alone, demonstrating improvements in resolution and pile-up stability.

  5. Jet reconstruction and performance using particle flow with the ATLAS Detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

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Zhou, N; Zhu, C G; Zhu, H; Zhu, J; Zhu, Y; Zhuang, X; Zhukov, K; Zibell, A; Zieminska, D; Zimine, N I; Zimmermann, C; Zimmermann, S; Zinonos, Z; Zinser, M; Ziolkowski, M; Živković, L; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; Zou, R; Nedden, M Zur; Zwalinski, L

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation and performance of a particle flow algorithm applied to 20.2 fb[Formula: see text] of ATLAS data from 8 TeV proton-proton collisions in Run 1 of the LHC. The algorithm removes calorimeter energy deposits due to charged hadrons from consideration during jet reconstruction, instead using measurements of their momenta from the inner tracker. This improves the accuracy of the charged-hadron measurement, while retaining the calorimeter measurements of neutral-particle energies. The paper places emphasis on how this is achieved, while minimising double-counting of charged-hadron signals between the inner tracker and calorimeter. The performance of particle flow jets, formed from the ensemble of signals from the calorimeter and the inner tracker, is compared to that of jets reconstructed from calorimeter energy deposits alone, demonstrating improvements in resolution and pile-up stability.

  6. Jet reconstruction and performance using particle flow with the ATLAS Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaboud, M. [Univ. Mohamed Premier et LPTPM, Oujda (Morocco). Faculte des Sciences; Aad, G. [CPPM, Aix-Marseille Univ. et CNRS/IN2P3, Marseille (France); Abbott, B. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States). Homer L. Dodge Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Collaboration: ATLAS Collaboration; and others

    2017-07-15

    This paper describes the implementation and performance of a particle flow algorithm applied to 20.2 fb{sup -1} of ATLAS data from 8 TeV proton-proton collisions in Run 1 of the LHC. The algorithm removes calorimeter energy deposits due to charged hadrons from consideration during jet reconstruction, instead using measurements of their momenta from the inner tracker. This improves the accuracy of the charged-hadron measurement, while retaining the calorimeter measurements of neutral-particle energies. The paper places emphasis on how this is achieved, while minimising double-counting of charged-hadron signals between the inner tracker and calorimeter. The performance of particle flow jets, formed from the ensemble of signals from the calorimeter and the inner tracker, is compared to that of jets reconstructed from calorimeter energy deposits alone, demonstrating improvements in resolution and pile-up stability. (orig.)

  7. Jet-Surface Interaction - High Aspect Ratio Nozzle Test: Test Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Clifford A.

    2016-01-01

    The Jet-Surface Interaction High Aspect Ratio Nozzle Test was conducted in the Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory at the NASA Glenn Research Center in the fall of 2015. There were four primary goals specified for this test: (1) extend the current noise database for rectangular nozzles to higher aspect ratios, (2) verify data previously acquired at small-scale with data from a larger model, (3) acquired jet-surface interaction noise data suitable for creating verifying empirical noise models and (4) investigate the effect of nozzle septa on the jet-mixing and jet-surface interaction noise. These slides give a summary of the test with representative results for each goal.

  8. Study of the parabolic and elliptic approaches validities for a turbulent co-flowing jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Houda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An axisymmetric turbulent jet discharged in a co-flowing stream was studied with the aid of parabolic and elliptic approaches. The simulations were performed with two in-house codes. Detailed comparisons of data show good agreement with the corresponding experiments; and different behaviors of jet dilution were found in initial region at different ranges of velocities ratios. It has been found that the two approaches give practically the same results for the velocities ratios Ru ≤ 1.5. Further from this value, the elliptic approach highlights the appearance of the fall velocity zone and that’s due to the presence of a trough low pressure. This fall velocity has not been detected by the parabolic approach and that’s due to the jet entrainment by the ambient flow. The intensity of this entrainment is directly related to the difference between the primary (jet and the secondary flow (co-flow. In fact, by increasing the velocities ratios Ru, the sucked flux by the outer stream becomes more important; the fall velocity intensifies and changes into a recirculation zone for Ru ≥ 5.

  9. Determination of vibration frequency depending on abrasive mass flow rate during abrasive water jet cutting

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hreha, P.; Radvanská, A.; Hloch, Sergej; Peržel, V.; Krolczyk, G.; Monková, K.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 77, 1-4 (2014), s. 763-774 ISSN 0268-3768 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : Abrasive water jet * Abrasive mass flow rate * Vibration Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools Impact factor: 1.458, year: 2014 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00170-014-6497-9#page-1

  10. 3D flow organization and dynamics in subsonic jets : Aeroacoustic source analysis by tomographic PIV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Violato, D.V.

    2013-01-01

    To meet the increasingly stringent noise regulation, aircraft manufacturers are searching for solutions to jet noise. This, which constitutes a significant amount of the total noise emitted by civil aircrafts, is generated by the mixing processes between the exhaust flow leaving the engine and the

  11. Vorticity and circulation aspects of twin jets in cross-flow for an oblique nozzle arrangement

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolář, Václav; Savory, E.; Takao, H.; Todoroki, T.; Okamoto, S.; Toy, N.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 220, č. 4 (2006), s. 247-252 ISSN 0954-4100 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA2060302 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : twin jets in cross-flow * vorticity * circulation Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 0.143, year: 2006

  12. Application of PIV to the Measurement of High Speed Jet Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenco, L.

    1999-01-01

    The Particle Image Velocimetry, PIV, has been implemented for the investigation of high-speed jet flows at the NASA Langley Research Center. In this approach the velocity (displacement) is found as the location of a peak in the correlation map of particle images acquired in quick succession. In the study, the technique for the correct seeding of the flow field were developed and implemented and the operational parameters influencing the accuracy of the measurement have been optimized.

  13. A Study of a Powder Coating Gun near Field: A Case of Staggered Concentric Jet Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Grandmaison

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines, experimentally and numerically, an isothermal coaxial air jet, created by an innovative nozzle design for an air propane torch, used for the thermal deposition of polymers. This design includes staggering the origins of the central and annular jets and creating an annular air jet with an inward radial velocity component. The experimental work used a Pitot tube to measure axial velocity on the jet centerline and in the fully developed flow. The static gauge pressure in the near field was also measured and found to be positive, an unexpected result. The numerical work used Gambit and Fluent. An extensive grid sensitivity study was conducted and it was found that results from a relatively coarse mesh were substantially the same as results from a mesh with almost 11 times the number of control volumes. A thorough evaluation of all of the RANS models in Fluent 6.3.26 found that the flow fields they calculated showed at most partial agreement with the experimental results. The greatest difference between numerical and experimental results was the incorrect prediction by all RANS models of a recirculation zone in the near field on the jet axis. Experimental work showed it did not exist.

  14. Flow-induced vibration characteristics of the BWR/5-201 jet pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaCroix, L.V.

    1982-09-01

    A General Electric boiling water reactor BWR/5-201 jet pump was tested for flow-induced vibration (FIV) characteristics in the Large Steam Water Test Facility at Moss Landing, CA, during the period June-July 1978. High level periodic FIV were observed at reactor operating conditions (1027 psia, 532 0 F and prototypical flow rates) for the specific single jet pump assembly tested. High level FIV of similar amplitude and character have been shown capable of damaging jet pump components and associated support hardware if allowed to continue unchecked. High level FIV were effectively suppressed in two special cases tested: (1) lateral load (>500 lb) at the mixer to diffuser slip joint; and (2) a labyrinth seal (5 small, circumferential grooves) on the mixer at the slip joint. Stability criteria for the particular jet pump tested were developed from test data. A cause-effect relationship between the dynamic pressure within the slip joint and the jet pump vibration was established

  15. Surface Intermediate Zone of Submerged Turbulent Buoyant Jet in Current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, H. B.; Larsen, Torben

    1995-01-01

    This paper deals with the intermediate zone between the jet and plume stages of a submerged buoyant discharge from sea outfall in current. The stability criteria, plume width and height after the intermediate zone and the dilution within the intermediate region have been studied theoretically and...

  16. Analysis of the flow structure of a turbulent thermal plasma jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spores, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    The goal of this research project is to attain a better understanding of the fluid mechanics associated with the high temperature jet of a thermal plasma torch. The analysis of a plasma, which has the ability to vaporize anything placed inside it without proper cooling, presents a unique research challenge. Several types of non-intrusive diagnostic techniques has been used to examine the jet from different perspectives. To actually map out the mean gas velocities and turbulence intensities throughout the jet, laser Doppler anemometry has been employed. The plasma gas and entrained air him been seeded separately in order to conditionally sample the two fluids and attain information about the gas mixing process. Both radial and axial turbulence levels have been measured in order to analyze the non-isotropic nature of the jet. A parabolic numerical code has been modified and compared with the obtained experimental results. A new diagnostic technique for plasma torches, which involves the spectral analysis of voltage, optical (temperature), and acoustical (pressure) fluctuations, has been implemented. The acoustical spectrum can provide information about the existence of coherent structures in the flow while the cross correlation of the acoustical signal with the voltage fluctuations can tell one to what extent perturbations of the internal arc affect the external flow. Since temperature is a scalar that is dependent on the flow field, observing temperature fluctuations can likewise help one to understand the mechanics of the flow. Flow visualization of the plasma jet using a high speed video camera has also been undertaken in order to better understand the entrainment process

  17. INVESTIGATION RESULTS PERTAINING TO DETERMINATION OF REVERSE FLOW PRESSURE ON TREATED FLAT SURFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Zhuk

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The executed investigations have shown that it is possible to prepare sheet-like material for laser cutting economically viable and with small amount of power expenditure while using reverse jet cleaning for surface treatment. As compared to conventional jet cleaning technologies efficiency of the reverse jet cleaning is attributed to significant pressure increase (by 25–50 % when the jet is interacting with the treated surface. The paper proposes a mathematical model on the basis of approximate energy method (upper-bound method and the model is used for calculation of fracture pressure due to action of the reverse jet on the treated surface which consists of a corrosion deposit layer. A variational problem was solved within a framework of the developed model and the problem solution has made it possible to obtain a theoretical dependence for calculation of minimum fracture pressure value pmin in the point reverse jet impact with a barrier oretical dependence and it has taken into account yielding point of the deformed material ss, density of fractured material med material r, jet velocity uстр and parameter of reverse flowingjet reduction ratio l. Comparison theoretical data and experimental ones (experimental data have been obtained while using a differential pressure transducer ЭДП-30 and a spring dynamometer with measuring limits 25 and 80 MPa, respectively has shown difference by 4–15 %. Determined insignificant difference between a theory and an experiment demonstrates that the obtained theoretical dependence is considered as a quite correct one and it can be used in engineering practice for prediction of power and kinematics parameters which are necessary for selection of the required pump equipment designed for realization of reverse-jet cleaning process.

  18. Enhanced fuel efficiency on tractor-trailers using synthetic jet-based active flow control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amitay, Michael; Menicovich, David; Gallardo, Daniele

    2016-04-01

    The application of piezo-electrically-driven synthetic-jet-based active flow control to reduce drag on tractor-trailers was explored experimentally in wind tunnel testing as well as full-scale road tests. Aerodynamic drag accounts for more than 50% of the usable energy at highway speeds, a problem that applies primarily to trailer trucks. Therefore, a reduction in aerodynamic drag results in large saving of fuel and reduction in CO2 emissions. The active flow control technique that is being used relies on a modular system comprised of distributed, small, highly efficient actuators. These actuators, called synthetic jets, are jets that are synthesized at the edge of an orifice by a periodic motion of a piezoelectric diaphragm(s) mounted on one (or more) walls of a sealed cavity. The synthetic jet is zero net mass flux (ZNMF), but it allows momentum transfer to flow. It is typically driven near diaphragm and/or cavity resonance, and therefore, small electric input [O(10W)] is required. Another advantage of this actuator is that no plumbing is required. The system doesn't require changes to the body of the truck, can be easily reconfigured to various types of vehicles, and consumes small amounts of electrical power from the existing electrical system of the truck. Preliminary wind tunnel results showed up to 18% reduction in fuel consumption, whereas road tests also showed very promising results.

  19. Particle image velocimetry measurements of the flow in the converging region of two parallel jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Huhu, E-mail: huhuwang@tamu.edu; Lee, Saya, E-mail: sayalee@tamu.edu; Hassan, Yassin A., E-mail: y-hassan@tamu.edu

    2016-09-15

    Highlights: • The flow behaviors in the converging region were non-intrusively investigated using PIV. • The PIV results using two measuring scales and LDV data matched very well. • Significant momentum transfer was observed in the merging region right after the merging point. • Instantaneous vector field revealed characteristic interacting patterns of the jets. - Abstract: The interaction between parallel jets plays a critical role in determining the characteristics of the momentum and heat transfer in the flow. Specifically for next generation VHTR, the output temperature will be about 900 °C, and any thermal oscillations will create safety issues. The mixing variations of the coolants in the reactor core may influence these power oscillations. Numerous numerical tools such as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations have been used to support the reactor design. The validation of CFD method is important to ensure the fidelity of the calculations. This requires high-fidelity, qualified benchmark data. Particle image velocimetry (PIV), a non-intrusive measuring technique, was used to provide benchmark data for resolving a simultaneous flow field in the converging region of two submerged parallel jets issued from rectangular channels. The jets studied in this work had an equal discharge velocity at room temperature. The turbulent characteristics including the distributions of mean velocities, turbulence intensities, Reynolds stresses and z-component vorticity were studied. The streamwise mean velocity measured by PIV and LDV were compared, and they agreed very well.

  20. Preferential Flow Paths and Recirculation-Disrupting Jets in the Leeside of Self-Forming Coarse-Grained Laboratory Bedforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtner, D.; Christensen, K. T.; Best, J.; Blois, G.

    2014-12-01

    Exchange of fluid in the near-subsurface of a streambed is influenced by turbulence in the free flow, as well as by bed topography and permeability. Macro-roughness elements such as bedforms are known to produce pressure gradients that drive fluid into the streambed on their stoss sides and out of the bed on their lee sides. To study the modification of the near-bed flow field by self-forming permeable bedforms, laboratory experiments were conducted in a 5 mm wide flume filled with 1.3 mm glass beads. The narrow width of the flume permitted detailed examination of the fluid exiting the bed immediately downstream of a bedform. Dense 2-D velocity field measurements were gathered using particle image velocimetry (PIV). In up to 8% of instantaneous PIV realizations, the flow at the near-bed presented a component perpendicular to the streambed, indicating flow across the interface. At the downstream side of the bedform, such flow disrupted the mean recirculation pattern that is typically observed in finer sediment beds. It is hypothesized that the coarse grain size and the resulting high bed permeability promote such near-surface jet events. A qualitative analysis of raw image frames indicated that an in-place jostling of sediment is associated with these jets thus suggesting that subsurface flow may be characterized by impulsive events. These observations are relevant to hyporheic exchange rates in coarse sediments and can have strong morphodynamic implications as they can explain the lack of ripples and characteristics of dunes in high permeability gravels. Overall, further study of the flow structure over highly permeable streambeds is needed to understand subsurface exchange and bedform initiation.

  1. Physical modeling of the impingement of an air jet on a water surface; Modelado fisico de la incidencia de un chorro de aire sobre una superficie de agua

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solorzano-Lopez, J.; Ramirez-Argaez, M.A.; Zenit, R.

    2010-07-01

    The use of gas jets (oxygen) plays a key role in several steelmaking processes as in the Basic Oxygen Furnace (BOF) or in the Electric Arc Furnace (EAF). Those jets improve heat, mass and momentum transfer in the liquid metal, mixing of chemical species enhancing and govern the formation of foaming slag. In this work experimental measurements were performed to determine the dimensions of the cavity formed at the liquid free surface caused by a gas jet impinging on it; also velocities vectors were measured in the zone affected by the gas jet. avities were measured from images from high speed camera and the vector maps were obtained with a Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique. Both velocities and cavities were determined as a function of the main process variables: gas flow rate, distance of the nozzle from the free surface and lance angle. Cavity dimensions were statistically processed treated as a function of the process variables and also as a function of the proper dimensionless numbers that govern these phenomena. It was found that Weber and Froude numbers govern the cavity geometry. Liquid flow driven by the jet is mainly affected by the air flow rate, lance height and angle. (Author).

  2. Development of dynamic PIV for droplet jet flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, K.; Hong, S. D.; Bi, W. T.; Sugii, Y.; Madarame, H.; Hayami, H.

    2003-01-01

    The Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) can capture velocity vector fields with high spatial resolution. In this study, the Dynamic PIV system up to 10kHz temporal resolution was developed with combining the High-speed camera and high speed Laser with Double pulse option. The 1024 x 1024 pixel images with frame straddling were captured in 2kHz. Also, PIV data were measured in 512 x 256 pixel in 10kHz. The system had been applied to capture the water droplet flow. The transient characteristics of the droplet flow can be clearly captured using the developed Dynamic PIV System

  3. Radionuclide transfer onto ground surface in surface water flow, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukai, Masayuki; Takebe, Shinichi; Komiya, Tomokazu; Kamiyama, Hideo

    1991-07-01

    Radionuclides migration in ground surface water flow is considered to be one of the important path way in the scenario for environmental migration of radionuclides leaked from low level radioactive waste repository. Simulating the slightly sloped surface on which contaminated solution is flowing downward, testing for radionuclide migration on ground surface had been started. As it's first step, an experiment was carried out under the condition of restricted infiltration in order to elucidate the adsorption behavior of radionuclides onto the loamy soil surface in related with hydraulic conditions. Radionuclides concentration change in effluent solution with time and a concentration distribution of radionuclides adsorbed on the ground surface were obtained from several experimental conditions combining the rate and the duration time of the water flow. The radionuclides concentration in the effluent solution was nearly constant during each experimental period, and was reduced under the condition of lower flow rate. The surface distribution of radionuclides concentration showed two distinctive regions. The one was near the inlet vessel where the concentration was promptly reducing, and the other was following the former where the concentration was nearly constant. The characteristic surface distribution of radionuclides concentration can be explained by a two dimensional diffusion model with a first order adsorption reaction, based on the advection of flow rate distribution in perpendicular direction. (author)

  4. Investigating the Feedback Path in a Jet-Surface Resonant Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Khairul; Fagan, Amy; Bridges, James; Brown, Cliff

    2015-01-01

    A resonant interaction between an 8:1 aspect ratio rectangular jet and flat-plates, placed parallel to the jet, is addressed in this study. For certain relative locations of the plates, the resonance takes place with accompanying audible tones. Even when the tone is not audible the sound pressure level spectra is often marked by conspicuous peaks. The frequencies of the spectral peaks, as functions of the streamwise length of the plate and its relative location to the jet as well as the jet Mach number, are explored in an effort of understand the flow mechanism. It is demonstrated that the tones are not due to a simple feedback between the plates trailing edge and the nozzle exit; the leading edge also comes into play in determining the frequency. An acoustic feedback path, involving diffraction from the leading edge, appears to explain the frequencies of some of the spectral peaks.

  5. Visualization of high speed liquid jet impaction on a moving surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuchen; Green, Sheldon

    2015-04-17

    Two apparatuses for examining liquid jet impingement on a high-speed moving surface are described: an air cannon device (for examining surface speeds between 0 and 25 m/sec) and a spinning disk device (for examining surface speeds between 15 and 100 m/sec). The air cannon linear traverse is a pneumatic energy-powered system that is designed to accelerate a metal rail surface mounted on top of a wooden projectile. A pressurized cylinder fitted with a solenoid valve rapidly releases pressurized air into the barrel, forcing the projectile down the cannon barrel. The projectile travels beneath a spray nozzle, which impinges a liquid jet onto its metal upper surface, and the projectile then hits a stopping mechanism. A camera records the jet impingement, and a pressure transducer records the spray nozzle backpressure. The spinning disk set-up consists of a steel disk that reaches speeds of 500 to 3,000 rpm via a variable frequency drive (VFD) motor. A spray system similar to that of the air cannon generates a liquid jet that impinges onto the spinning disc, and cameras placed at several optical access points record the jet impingement. Video recordings of jet impingement processes are recorded and examined to determine whether the outcome of impingement is splash, splatter, or deposition. The apparatuses are the first that involve the high speed impingement of low-Reynolds-number liquid jets on high speed moving surfaces. In addition to its rail industry applications, the described technique may be used for technical and industrial purposes such as steelmaking and may be relevant to high-speed 3D printing.

  6. Free surface flows: coalescence, spreading and dewetting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hernandez Sanchez, J.F.

    2015-01-01

    Capillary and wetting phenomena are an essential part of nature. Its presence is noticed in many circumstances where solid and liquid surfaces come into contact. In this thesis different types of capillary free surface flows are studied. The topics discussed are mainly the coalescence of viscous

  7. Nanocapillary Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet: A Tool for Ultrafine Maskless Surface Modification at Atmospheric Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motrescu, Iuliana; Nagatsu, Masaaki

    2016-05-18

    With respect to microsized surface functionalization techniques we proposed the use of a maskless, versatile, simple tool, represented by a nano- or microcapillary atmospheric pressure plasma jet for producing microsized controlled etching, chemical vapor deposition, and chemical modification patterns on polymeric surfaces. In this work we show the possibility of size-controlled surface amination, and we discuss it as a function of different processing parameters. Moreover, we prove the successful connection of labeled sugar chains on the functionalized microscale patterns, indicating the possibility to use ultrafine capillary atmospheric pressure plasma jets as versatile tools for biosensing, tissue engineering, and related biomedical applications.

  8. Review of Constructed Subsurface Flow vs. Surface Flow Wetlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HALVERSON, NANCY

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to use existing documentation to review the effectiveness of subsurface flow and surface flow constructed wetlands in treating wastewater and to demonstrate the viability of treating effluent from Savannah River Site outfalls H-02 and H-04 with a subsurface flow constructed wetland to lower copper, lead and zinc concentrations to within National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permit limits. Constructed treatment wetlands are engineered systems that have been designed and constructed to use the natural functions of wetlands for wastewater treatment. Constructed wetlands have significantly lower total lifetime costs and often lower capital costs than conventional treatment systems. The two main types of constructed wetlands are surface flow and subsurface flow. In surface flow constructed wetlands, water flows above ground. Subsurface flow constructed wetlands are designed to keep the water level below the top of the rock or gravel media, thus minimizing human and ecological exposure. Subsurface flow wetlands demonstrate higher rates of contaminant removal per unit of land than surface flow (free water surface) wetlands, therefore subsurface flow wetlands can be smaller while achieving the same level of contaminant removal. Wetlands remove metals using a variety of processes including filtration of solids, sorption onto organic matter, oxidation and hydrolysis, formation of carbonates, formation of insoluble sulfides, binding to iron and manganese oxides, reduction to immobile forms by bacterial activity, and uptake by plants and bacteria. Metal removal rates in both subsurface flow and surface flow wetlands can be high, but can vary greatly depending upon the influent concentrations and the mass loading rate. Removal rates of greater than 90 per cent for copper, lead and zinc have been demonstrated in operating surface flow and subsurface flow wetlands. The constituents that exceed NPDES limits at outfalls H-02 a nd H

  9. Dynamic Stall Control on the Wind Turbine Airfoil via a Co-Flow Jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He-Yong Xu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic stall control of a S809 airfoil is numerically investigated by implementing a co-flow jet (CFJ. The numerical methods of the solver are validated by comparing results with the baseline experiment as well as a NACA 6415-based CFJ experiment, showing good agreement in both static and dynamic characteristics. The CFJ airfoil with inactive jet is simulated to study the impact that the jet channel imposes upon the dynamic characteristics. It is shown that the presence of a long jet channel could cause a negative effect of decreasing lift and increasing drag, leading to fluctuating extreme loads in terms of drag and moment. The main focus of the present research is the investigation of the dynamic characteristics of the CFJ airfoil with three different jet momentum coefficients, which are compared with the baseline, giving encouraging results. Dynamic stall can be greatly suppressed, showing a very good control performance of significantly increased lift and reduced drag and moment. Analysis of the amplitude of variation in the aerodynamic coefficients indicates that the fluctuating extreme aerodynamic loads are significantly alleviated, which is conducive to structural reliability and improved life cycle. The energy consumption analysis shows that the CFJ concept is applicable and economical in controlling dynamic stall.

  10. Oscillations of the fluid flow and the free surface in a cavity with a submerged bifurcated nozzle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalter, R.; Tummers, M.J.; Kenjereš, S.; Righolt, B.W.; Kleijn, C.R.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Self-sustained oscillations in a thin cavity with submerged nozzle were observed. • Three flow regimes are detected depending on nozzle depth and inlet velocity. • The three flow regimes have been summarized in a flow regime map. • PIV measurements are performed to link free surface behavior to the bulk-flow. • We report a close correlation between jet-behavior and free surface dynamics. -- Abstract: The free surface dynamics and sub-surface flow behavior in a thin (height and width much larger than thickness), liquid filled, rectangular cavity with a submerged bifurcated nozzle were investigated using free surface visualization and particle image velocimetry (PIV). Three regimes in the free surface behavior were identified, depending on nozzle depth and inlet velocity. For small nozzle depths, an irregular free surface is observed without clear periodicities. For intermediate nozzle depths and sufficiently high inlet velocities, natural mode oscillations consistent with gravity waves are present, while at large nozzle depths long term self-sustained asymmetric oscillations occur. For the latter case, time-resolved PIV measurements of the flow below the free surface indicated a strong oscillation of the direction with which each of the two jets issue from the nozzle. The frequency of the jet oscillation is identical to the free surface oscillation frequency. The two jets oscillate in anti-phase, causing the asymmetric free surface oscillation. The jets interact through a cross-flow in the gaps between the inlet channel and the front and back walls of the cavity

  11. Optical micro-metrology of structured surfaces micro-machined by jet-ECM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quagliotti, Danilo; Tosello, Guido; Islam, Aminul

    2015-01-01

    A procedure for statistical analysis and uncertainty evaluation is presented with regards to measurements of step height and surface texture. Measurements have been performed with a focus-variation microscope over jet electrochemical micro-machined surfaces. Traceability has been achieved using a...

  12. Unsteady Flow Simulation of a Sweeping Jet Actuator Using a Lattice-Boltzmann Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, B.; Wessels, M.; Fares, E.; Vatsa, V.

    2016-01-01

    Active flow control technology is increasingly used in aerospace applications to control flow separation and to improve aerodynamic performance. In this paper, PowerFLOW is used to simulate the flow through a sweeping jet actuator at two different pressure ratios. The lower pressure ratio leads to a high subsonic flow, whereas the high pressure ratio produces a choked flow condition. Comparison of numerical results with experimental data is shown, which includes qualitatively good agreement of pressure histories and spectra. PIV measurements are also available but the simulation overestimates mean and fluctuation quantities outside the actuator. If supply pressure is matched at one point inside the mixing chamber a good qualitative agreement is achieved at all other monitor points.

  13. Experimentally obtained values of electric field of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet impinging on a dielectric surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sobota, A.; Guaitella, O.; Garcia-Caurel, E.

    2013-01-01

    We report on experimentally obtained values of the electric field magnitude on a dielectric surface induced by an impinging atmospheric pressure plasma jet. The plasma plume was striking the dielectric surface at an angle of 45¿, at 5mm from the surface measured at the axis of the jet. The results

  14. Wear Resistance of Steel 20MnCr5 After Surfacing with Micro-jet Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarasiuk W.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results of experimental research concerning the impact of an innovative method of micro-jet cooling on the padding weld performed with MIG welding. Micro-jet cooling is a novel method patented in 2011. It enables to steer the parameters of weld cooling in a precise manner. In addition, various elements which may e.g. enhance hardness or alter tribological properties can be entered into its top surface, depending on the applied cooling gas. The material under study was steel 20MnCr5, which was subject to the welding process with micro-jet cooling and without cooling. Nitrogen was used as a cooling gas. The main parameter of weld assessment was wear intensity. The tests were conducted in a tribological pin-on-disc type position. The following results exhibit growth at approximately 5% in wear resistance of padding welds with micro-jet cooling.

  15. Modular jet impingement assemblies with passive and active flow control for electronics cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Feng; Dede, Ercan Mehmet; Joshi, Shailesh

    2016-09-13

    Power electronics modules having modular jet impingement assembly utilized to cool heat generating devices are disclosed. The modular jet impingement assemblies include a modular manifold having a distribution recess, one or more angled inlet connection tubes positioned at an inlet end of the modular manifold that fluidly couple the inlet tube to the distribution recess and one or more outlet connection tubes positioned at an outlet end of the modular manifold that fluidly coupling the outlet tube to the distribution recess. The modular jet impingement assemblies include a manifold insert removably positioned within the distribution recess and include one or more inlet branch channels each including an impinging slot and one or more outlet branch channels each including a collecting slot. Further a heat transfer plate coupled to the modular manifold, the heat transfer plate comprising an impingement surface including an array of fins that extend toward the manifold insert.

  16. Numerical modeling of turbulent jet diffusion flames in the atmospheric surface layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hernández, J.; Crespo, A.; Duijm, N.J.

    1995-01-01

    The evolution of turbulent jet diffusion flames of natural gas in air is predicted using a finite-volume procedure for solving the flow equations. The model is three dimensional, elliptic and based on the conserved-scalar approach and the laminar flamelet concept. A laminar flamelet prescription for

  17. Analysis of the pressure fields in a swirling annular jet flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percin, M.; Vanierschot, M.; Oudheusden, B. W. van

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate the flow structures and pressure fields of a free annular swirling jet flow undergoing vortex breakdown. The flow field is analyzed by means of time-resolved tomographic particle image velocimetry measurements, which enable the reconstruction of the three-dimensional time-resolved pressure fields using the governing flow equations. Both time-averaged and instantaneous flow structures are discussed, including a characterization of the first- and second-order statistical moments. A Reynolds decomposition of the flow field shows that the time-averaged flow is axisymmetric with regions of high anisotropic Reynolds stresses. Two recirculation zones exist that are surrounded by regions of very intense mixing. Notwithstanding the axisymmetric nature of the time-averaged flow, a non-axisymmetric structure of the instantaneous flow is revealed, comprising a central vortex core which breaks up into a precessing vortex core. The winding sense of this helical structure is opposite to the swirl direction and it is wrapped around the vortex breakdown bubble. It precesses around the central axis of the flow at a frequency corresponding to a Strouhal number of 0.27. The precessing vortex core is associated with a low-pressure region along the central axis of the jet and the maximum pressure fluctuations occur upstream of the vortex breakdown location, where the azimuthal velocity component also reaches peak values as a result of the inward motion of the fluid and the conservation of angular momentum. The POD analysis of the pressure fields suggests that the precessing helical vortex formation is the dominant coherent structure in the instantaneous flow.

  18. Impacts of a jet's exit flow pattern on mixing and combustion performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nathan, G.J.; Mi, J.; Newbold, G.J.R.; Nobes, D.S. [Turbulence, Energy and Combustion Group, School of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia); Alwahabi, Z.T. [Turbulence, Energy and Combustion Group, Chemical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia)

    2006-09-15

    The influence of modifying a jet's exit flow pattern on both the near and far-field turbulent mixing processes and on the resulting combustion performance, is explored. This reveals that, in contradiction to some common assumptions, increasing the coherence of large-scale motions can decrease molecular mixing rates, and yet can still be beneficial in some applications. Even relatively minor changes to the exit flow pattern of a non-reacting round jet, through changes to the nozzle profile are found to propagate downstream into the far field, apparently through the underlying turbulent structure. Importantly, while a jet from a smoothly contracting nozzle is found to have higher rates of entrainment, mean spread and mean decay of the scalar field than does a long pipe jet, it has a lower rate of molecular mixing. That is, increased large-scale mixing does not necessarily result in increased fine-scale mixing. A range of devices are reviewed which enhance, or stimulate the large-scale, coherent motions in an emerging jet using acoustic, mechanical or fluidic methods. The available evidence suggests that those methods which induce instantaneously asymmetric flow structure are more effective at increasing the near-field spreading than are those which induce instantaneously axisymmetric flow structure. Only limited data are available of the effects of such near-field changes on the far-field properties. Nevertheless, the available data reveal a clear trend that this near-field flow undergoes a transition to a far-field state whose spread and decay is comparable with that of a steady jet, albeit being indelibly altered by the near-field excitation. It also suggests that 'self-exciting' devices (i.e. that are not externally forced), cause a net reduction in the total entrainment relative to the unexcited jet, due to the losses induced by the device itself. Nevertheless, the changes which they can impart to the flow, such as redistributing the turbulent

  19. Impacts of a jet's exit flow pattern on mixing and combustion performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nathan, G J; Mi, J; Newbold, G J.R.; Nobes, D S [Turbulence, Energy and Combustion Group, School of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia); Alwahabi, Z T [Turbulence, Energy and Combustion Group, Chemical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia)

    2006-09-15

    The influence of modifying a jet's exit flow pattern on both the near and far-field turbulent mixing processes and on the resulting combustion performance, is explored. This reveals that, in contradiction to some common assumptions, increasing the coherence of large-scale motions can decrease molecular mixing rates, and yet can still be beneficial in some applications. Even relatively minor changes to the exit flow pattern of a non-reacting round jet, through changes to the nozzle profile are found to propagate downstream into the far field, apparently through the underlying turbulent structure. Importantly, while a jet from a smoothly contracting nozzle is found to have higher rates of entrainment, mean spread and mean decay of the scalar field than does a long pipe jet, it has a lower rate of molecular mixing. That is, increased large-scale mixing does not necessarily result in increased fine-scale mixing. A range of devices are reviewed which enhance, or stimulate the large-scale, coherent motions in an emerging jet using acoustic, mechanical or fluidic methods. The available evidence suggests that those methods which induce instantaneously asymmetric flow structure are more effective at increasing the near-field spreading than are those which induce instantaneously axisymmetric flow structure. Only limited data are available of the effects of such near-field changes on the far-field properties. Nevertheless, the available data reveal a clear trend that this near-field flow undergoes a transition to a far-field state whose spread and decay is comparable with that of a steady jet, albeit being indelibly altered by the near-field excitation. It also suggests that 'self-exciting' devices (i.e. that are not externally forced), cause a net reduction in the total entrainment relative to the unexcited jet, due to the losses induced by the device itself. Nevertheless, the changes which they can impart to the flow, such as redistributing the turbulent energy from the

  20. Heat and mass transfer caused by a laminar channel flow equipped with a synthetic jet array

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trávníček, Zdeněk; Dančová, Petra; Kordík, Jozef; Vít, Tomáš; Pavelka, Miroslav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 4 (2011), 041006-041006 ISSN 1948-5085 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA200760801; GA ČR(CZ) GA101/09/1959 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : synthetic jet * flow control * naphthalene sublimation Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics http://scitation.aip.org/getabs/servlet/GetabsServlet?prog=normal&id=JTSEBV000002000004041006000001&idtype=cvips&gifs=yes

  1. Polygon formation and surface flow on a rotating fluid surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmann, Raymond; Tophøj, Laust Emil Hjerrild; Homan, T. A. M.

    2011-01-01

    We present a study of polygons forming on the free surface of a water flow confined to a stationary cylinder and driven by a rotating bottom plate as described by Jansson et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett., vol. 96, 2006, 174502). In particular, we study the case of a triangular structure, either completely...... there the symmetry breaking proceeds like a low-dimensional linear instability. We show that the circular state and the unstable manifold connecting it with the polygon solution are universal in the sense that very different initial conditions lead to the same circular state and unstable manifold. For a wet triangle......, we measure the surface flows by particle image velocimetry (PIV) and show that there are three vortices present, but that the strength of these vortices is far too weak to account for the rotation velocity of the polygon. We show that partial blocking of the surface flow destroys the polygons and re...

  2. Pengaruh Variasi Lip Thickness pada Nozzle Terpancung terhadap Karakteristik Api Pembakaran Difusi Concentric Jet Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elka Faizal

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Nozzle shape greatly influence turbulence between the fuel, air and formation of flow recirculation zone to produce a homogeneous mixing and get a near-perfect combustion. The recirculation zone is area that caused by flow rate breakdown, causing vortex and backflow around the end of nozzle. This backflow that hold up while lowering the flame so the flow rate of fuel and air mixture maintained lower or equal with flame speed. This study used variation of lip thickness of truncated nozzle 0, 4, 8, 12, and 16 mm.To obtain flame stability, fuel velocity and air velocity were variated. Thermocouples were used to measure flame temperature and its distribution. The results showed that stability of concentric jet diffusion flame flow increased with narrow lip thickness on a truncated nozzle. The wider stability area obtained in 4 mm lip thickness. In addition, temperature on diffusion flames concentric jet flow also more evenly distributed evenly with size of the nozzle lip thickness. The highest temperature and temperature distribution in the horizontal direction were occured in in the nozzle with lip thickness of 0 mm. A shadowgrapgh visualization was also used to identify phenomena of the nozzle exit flow.

  3. Conversion Method of the Balance Test Results in Open Jet Tunnel on the Free Flow Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. T. Bui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers a problem of sizing a model and converting the balance test results in the low speed open-jet wind tunnel to free-flow conditions. The ANSYS Fluent commercial code performs flow model calculations in the test section and in the free flow, and the ANSYS ICEM CFD module is used to provide grid generation. A structured grid is generated in the free flow and an unstructured one is provided in the test section. The changes of aerodynamic coefficients are determined at the different values of the blockage factor for the segmental-conical and hemisphere cylinder-cone shapes of the model. The blockage factor values are found at which the interference of the test section – model is neglected. The paper presents a technique to convert the wind tunnel test results to the free flow conditions.

  4. Turbulent heat mixing of a heavy liquid metal flow in the MEGAPIE target geometry-The heated jet experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stieglitz, Robert; Daubner, Markus; Batta, A.; Lefhalm, C.-H.

    2007-01-01

    The MEGAPIE target installed at the Paul-Scherrer Institute is an example of a spallation target using eutectic liquid lead-bismuth (Pb 45 Bi 55 ) both as coolant and neutron source. An adequate cooling of the target requires a conditioning of the flow, which is realized by a main flow transported in an annular gap downwards, u-turned at a hemispherical shell into a cylindrical riser tube. In order to avoid a stagnation point close to the lowest part of the shell a jet flow is superimposed to the main flow, which is directed towards to the stagnation point and flows tangentially along the shell. The heated jet experiment conducted in the THEADES loop of the KALLA laboratory is nearly 1:1 representation of the lower part of the MEGAPIE target. It is aimed to study the cooling capability of this specific geometry in dependence on the flow rate ratio (Q main /Q jet ) of the main flow (Q main ) to the jet flow (Q jet ). Here, a heated jet is injected into a cold main flow at MEGAPIE relevant flow rate ratios. The liquid metal experiment is accompanied by a water experiment in almost the same geometry to study the momentum field as well as a three-dimensional turbulent numerical fluid dynamic simulation (CFD). Besides a detailed study of the envisaged nominal operation of the MEGAPIE target with Q main /Q jet = 15 deviations from this mode are investigated in the range from 7.5 ≤ Q main /Q jet ≤ 20 in order to give an estimate on the safe operational threshold of the target. The experiment shows that, the flow pattern establishing in this specific design and the turbulence intensity distribution essentially depends on the flow rate ratio (Q main /Q jet ). All Q main /Q jet -ratios investigated exhibit an unstable time dependent behavior. The MEGAPIE design is highly sensitive against changes of this ratio. Mainly three completely different flow patterns were identified. A sufficient cooling of the lower target shell, however, is only ensured if Q main /Q jet ≤ 12

  5. Use of Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma Jet for Polymer Surface Modification: An Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuettner, Lindsey A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-16

    Atmospheric-pressure plasma jets (APPJs) are playing an increasingly important role in materials processing procedures. Plasma treatment is a useful tool to modify surface properties of materials, especially polymers. Plasma reacts with polymer surfaces in numerous ways thus the type of process gas and plasma conditions must be explored for chosen substrates and materials to maximize desired properties. This report discusses plasma treatments and looks further into atmospheric-pressure plasma jets and the effects of gases and plasma conditions. Following the short literature review, a general overview of the future work and research at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is discussed.

  6. Influence of Gloss and Surface Roughness of Coated Ink Jet Papers on Print Uniformity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Jurič

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The final print quality depends on the quality of the digital image as well as the properties of the printing system, the inks and the paper used. One of the most widely used digital printing technologies is ink jet, where ink is ejected directly onto a substrate from a jet device driven by an electronic signal. Most ink jet inks have low viscosity and low surface tension, which pose high demands upon the surface properties of the paper. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of paper properties of commercially available papers suitable for ink jet printing on print mottle, non-uniformity. We used two high glossy, one glossy, one semi-glossy and two matte papers. For the assessment of the surface properties, we measured surface roughness with the portable Roughness Tester TR 200. We also measured surface gloss with QIP Glossmaster. To characterise the print mottle we used the image analysis method – Gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM. Print mottle was estimated according to five GLCM parameters: Contrast, Correlation, Entropy, Energy and Homogeneity. Results obtained in this paper showed that the surface properties of paper are not in any direct relation with print uniformity.

  7. Comparative study of turbulent mixing in jet in cross-flow configurations using LES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wegner, B.; Huai, Y.; Sadiki, A.

    2004-01-01

    Mixing processes in turbulent fluid motion are of fundamental interest in many situations in engineering practice. Due to its practical importance in a vast number of applications, the generic configuration of the jet in cross-flow has been studied extensively in the past. Recently, the question has received a lot of attention, whether the unsteady behavior of the jet in cross-flow can be influenced by either active or passive means in order to control and enhance the mixing process. In the present paper, we use the large eddy simulation (LES) methodology to investigate how turbulent mixing can be enhanced by varying the angle between the jet and the oncoming cross-flow. After validating the computations against measurements by Andreopoulos and Rodi, we analyze qualitatively and quantitatively the mixing process for three configurations with different angles. It is shown that the inclination influences the characteristics of vortical structures and secondary motion which in turn have an effect on the mixing process. Besides a PDF of the passive scalar and a scalar energy spectrum, a mixedness parameter is used to provide information with respect to the quality and rate of mixing

  8. Waste Field Characteristics, Ultimate Mixing and Dilution in Surface Discharge of Dense Jets into Stagnant Water Bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Direct discharges of municipal and industrial waste waters into water bodies through marine outfalls are considered as a common way to dispose the generated waste in coastal zones. Marine discharge, intensifying flow mixing and entrainment, decrease the concentration of polutant up to accepted concentration and meet the guideline values and to make possible continues discharge of flow into matine environment. During last years due to quick development of coastal desalination plants, surface discharge of preduced salty water into seas and oceans has increased significantly. In this study, releases of dense jets from surface rectangular channel into stagnant bodies are experimentally studied. The location of flow plunge point, impact point and discharge ultimate dilution were drown out by a digital video technology. In addition, using some conductivity probes located in ambient floor, waste filed dilution in flow impact point and discharge ultimate dilution were identified. Finally the obtained results were plotted and explained along with some diagrams to show flow non-dimensional behavior. The results showed that the properties of flow are changing directly with ambient water depth and discharge initial fluxes.

  9. Free molecule flow analysis of the interaction of skimming hardware components and background gas with free jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghuraman, P.; Bossel, U.

    1974-01-01

    Under conditions typical for the extraction of nozzle beams from free jets the rarefied flow pattern in the expansion chamber containing skimming hardware components and background gas is studied using a free molecule solution to the Boltzmann equation

  10. Numerical simulation of heat transfer and fluid flow of an impinging round jet of plasma into confined walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezato, Koichiro; Shimizu, Akihiko; Kunugi, Tomoaki.

    1995-01-01

    Numerical simulations are presented on the flow and heat transfer characteristics of an impinging round jet of argon plasma with atmospheric pressure. The target slab with finite thickness upon which plasma jet impinges is assumed to be as SiC which is a candidate material for plasma facing material of fusion reactor. The plasma jet is treated by use of a magnetohydrodynamics model that takes its two-temperature non-equilibrium state into account. The rear side of the target slab is assumed to be cooled by a gas-solid suspension impinging round jet. The result shows that the plasma is in non-equilibrium state in which the electron temperature is higher than the heavy particle in the outer region of plasma jet core and that the heat flux to the target slab is over 8 MW/m 2 in the region of the plasma jet core contacts. (author)

  11. Electromagnetic flow control of a bifurcated jet in a rectangular cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalter, R.; Tummers, M.J.; Kenjereš, S.; Righolt, B.W.; Kleijn, C.R.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Self-sustained oscillations in a thin cavity with submerged nozzle were observed. • The self-sustained oscillations were influenced by applying a Lorentz force. • A POD was applied to study the distribution of kinetic energy. • The large scale fluctuations can be enhanced or suppressed by the Lorentz force. • The turbulence fluctuations are not affected by the Lorentz force. - Abstract: The effect of Lorentz forcing on self-sustained oscillations of turbulent jets (Re = 3.1 × 10 3 ) issuing from a submerged bifurcated nozzle into a thin rectangular liquid filled cavity was investigated using free surface visualization and time-resolved particle image velocimetry (PIV). A Lorentz force is produced by applying an electrical current across the width of the cavity in conjunction with a magnetic field. As a working fluid a saline solution is used. The Lorentz force can be directed downward (F L L >0), to weaken or strengthen the self-sustained jet oscillations. The low frequency self-sustained jet oscillations induce a free surface oscillation. When F L L >0 the free surface oscillation amplitude is enhanced by a factor of 1.5. A large fraction of the turbulence kinetic energy k=1/2 u i ′ u i ′‾ is due to the self-sustained jet oscillations. A triple decomposition of the instantaneous velocity was used to divide the turbulence kinetic energy into a part originating from the self-sustained jet oscillation k osc and a part originating from the higher frequency turbulent fluctuations k turb . It follows that the Lorentz force does not influence k turb in the measurement plane, but the distribution of k osc can be altered significantly. The amount of energy contained in the self-sustained oscillation is three times lower when F L L >0

  12. Measurement of pressure distributions and velocity fields of water jet intake flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Eun Ho; Yoon, Sang Youl; Kwon, Seong Hoon; Chun, Ho Hwan; Kim, Mun Chan; Kim, Kyung Chun

    2002-01-01

    Waterjet propulsion system can avoid cavitation problem which is being arised conventional propeller propulsion system. The main issue of designing waterjet system is the boundary layer separation at ramp and lib of water inlet. The flow characteristics are highly depended on Jet to Velocity Ratio(JVR) as well as the intake geometry. The present study is conducted in a wind tunnel to provide accurate pressure destribution at the inlet wall and velocity field of the inlet and exit planes. Particle image velocimetry technique is used to obtain detail velocity fields. Pressure distributions and velocity field are discussed with accelerating and deaccelerating flow zones and the effect of JVR

  13. Microturbulence and Flow Shear in High-performance JET ITB Plasma; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R.V. Budny; A. Andre; A. Bicoulet; C. Challis; G.D. Conway; W. Dorland; D.R. Ernst; T.S. Hahm; T.C. Hender; D. McCune; G. Rewoldt; S.E. Sharapov

    2001-01-01

    The transport, flow shear, and linear growth rates of microturbulence are studied for a Joint European Torus (JET) plasma with high central q in which an internal transport barrier (ITB) forms and grows to a large radius. The linear microturbulence growth rates of the fastest growing (most unstable) toroidal modes with high toroidal mode number are calculated using the GS2 and FULL gyrokinetic codes. These linear growth rates, gamma (subscript lin) are large, but the flow-shearing rates, gamma (subscript ExB) (dominated by the toroidal rotation contribution) are also comparably large when and where the ITB exists

  14. Flow-Field Characteristics of High-Temperature Annular Buoyant Jets and Their Development Laws Influenced by Ventilation System

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yi; Huang, Yanqiu; Liu, Jiaping; Wang, Hai; Liu, Qiuhan

    2013-01-01

    The flow-field characteristics of high-temperature annular buoyant jets as well as the development laws influenced by ventilation system were studied using numerical methods to eliminate the pollutants effectively in this paper. The development laws of high-temperature annular buoyant jets were analyzed and compared with previous studies, including radial velocity distribution, axial velocity and temperature decay, reattachment position, cross-section diameter, volumetric flow rate, and veloc...

  15. Surface Damage and Treatment by Impact of a Low Temperature Nitrogen Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laribou, Hicham; Fressengeas, Claude; Entemeyer, Denis; Jeanclaude, Véronique; Tazibt, Abdel

    2011-01-01

    Nitrogen jets under high pressure and low temperature have been introduced recently. The process consists in projecting onto a surface a low temperature jet obtained from releasing the liquid nitrogen stored in a high pressure tank (e.g. 3000 bars) through a nozzle. It can be used in a range of industrial applications, including surface treatment or material removal through cutting, drilling, striping and cleaning. The process does not generate waste other than the removed matter, and it only releases neutral gas into the atmosphere. This work is aimed at understanding the mechanisms of the interaction between the jet and the material surface. Depending on the impacted material, the thermo-mechanical shock and blast effect induced by the jet can activate a wide range of damage mechanisms, including cleavage, crack nucleation and spalling, as well as void expansion and localized ductile failure. The test parameters (standoff distance, dwell time, operating pressure) play a role in selecting the dominant damage mechanism, but combinations of these various modes are usually present. Surface treatment through phase transformation or grain fragmentation in a layer below the surface can also be obtained by adequate tuning of the process parameters. In the current study, work is undertaken to map the damage mechanisms in metallic materials as well as the influence of the test parameters on damage, along with measurements of the thermo-mechanical conditions (impact force, temperature) in the impacted area.

  16. Proto-jet configurations in RADs orbiting a Kerr SMBH: symmetries and limiting surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugliese, D.; Stuchlík, Z.

    2018-05-01

    Ringed accretion disks (RADs) are agglomerations of perfect-fluid tori orbiting around a single central attractor that could arise during complex matter inflows in active galactic nuclei. We focus our analysis to axi-symmetric accretion tori orbiting in the equatorial plane of a supermassive Kerr black hole; equilibrium configurations, possible instabilities, and evolutionary sequences of RADs were discussed in our previous works. In the present work we discuss special instabilities related to open equipotential surfaces governing the material funnels emerging at various regions of the RADs, being located between two or more individual toroidal configurations of the agglomerate. These open structures could be associated to proto-jets. Boundary limiting surfaces are highlighted, connecting the emergency of the jet-like instabilities with the black hole dimensionless spin. These instabilities are observationally significant for active galactic nuclei, being related to outflows of matter in jets emerging from more than one torus of RADs orbiting around supermassive black holes.

  17. Blazar Variability from Turbulence in Jets Launched by Magnetically Arrested Accretion Flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riordan, Michael O’; Pe’er, Asaf [Physics Department, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); McKinney, Jonathan C., E-mail: michael_oriordan@umail.ucc.ie [Department of Physics and Joint Space-Science Institute, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2017-07-10

    Blazars show variability on timescales ranging from minutes to years, the former being comparable to and in some cases even shorter than the light-crossing time of the central black hole. The observed γ -ray light curves can be described by a power-law power density spectrum (PDS), with a similar index for both BL Lacs and flat-spectrum radio quasars. We show that this variability can be produced by turbulence in relativistic jets launched by magnetically arrested accretion flows (MADs). We perform radiative transport calculations on the turbulent, highly magnetized jet launching region of a MAD with a rapidly rotating supermassive black hole. The resulting synchrotron and synchrotron self-Compton emission, originating from close to the black hole horizon, is highly variable. This variability is characterized by PDS, which is remarkably similar to the observed power-law spectrum at frequencies less than a few per day. Furthermore, turbulence in the jet launching region naturally produces fluctuations in the plasma on scales much smaller than the horizon radius. We speculate that similar turbulent processes, operating in the jet at large radii (and therefore a high bulk Lorentz factor), are responsible for blazar variability over many decades in frequency, including on minute timescales.

  18. Blazar Variability from Turbulence in Jets Launched by Magnetically Arrested Accretion Flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riordan, Michael O’; Pe’er, Asaf; McKinney, Jonathan C.

    2017-01-01

    Blazars show variability on timescales ranging from minutes to years, the former being comparable to and in some cases even shorter than the light-crossing time of the central black hole. The observed γ -ray light curves can be described by a power-law power density spectrum (PDS), with a similar index for both BL Lacs and flat-spectrum radio quasars. We show that this variability can be produced by turbulence in relativistic jets launched by magnetically arrested accretion flows (MADs). We perform radiative transport calculations on the turbulent, highly magnetized jet launching region of a MAD with a rapidly rotating supermassive black hole. The resulting synchrotron and synchrotron self-Compton emission, originating from close to the black hole horizon, is highly variable. This variability is characterized by PDS, which is remarkably similar to the observed power-law spectrum at frequencies less than a few per day. Furthermore, turbulence in the jet launching region naturally produces fluctuations in the plasma on scales much smaller than the horizon radius. We speculate that similar turbulent processes, operating in the jet at large radii (and therefore a high bulk Lorentz factor), are responsible for blazar variability over many decades in frequency, including on minute timescales.

  19. Large-eddy simulation of cavitating nozzle flow and primary jet break-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Örley, F., E-mail: felix.oerley@aer.mw.tum.de; Trummler, T.; Mihatsch, M. S.; Schmidt, S. J.; Adams, N. A. [Institute of Aerodynamics and Fluid Mechanics, Technische Universität München, Boltzmannstr. 15, 85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Hickel, S. [Institute of Aerodynamics and Fluid Mechanics, Technische Universität München, Boltzmannstr. 15, 85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Chair of Computational Aerodynamics, Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, TU Delft, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS Delft (Netherlands)

    2015-08-15

    We employ a barotropic two-phase/two-fluid model to study the primary break-up of cavitating liquid jets emanating from a rectangular nozzle, which resembles a high aspect-ratio slot flow. All components (i.e., gas, liquid, and vapor) are represented by a homogeneous mixture approach. The cavitating fluid model is based on a thermodynamic-equilibrium assumption. Compressibility of all phases enables full resolution of collapse-induced pressure wave dynamics. The thermodynamic model is embedded into an implicit large-eddy simulation (LES) environment. The considered configuration follows the general setup of a reference experiment and is a generic reproduction of a scaled-up fuel injector or control valve as found in an automotive engine. Due to the experimental conditions, it operates, however, at significantly lower pressures. LES results are compared to the experimental reference for validation. Three different operating points are studied, which differ in terms of the development of cavitation regions and the jet break-up characteristics. Observed differences between experimental and numerical data in some of the investigated cases can be caused by uncertainties in meeting nominal parameters by the experiment. The investigation reveals that three main mechanisms promote primary jet break-up: collapse-induced turbulent fluctuations near the outlet, entrainment of free gas into the nozzle, and collapse events inside the jet near the liquid-gas interface.

  20. Surface roughness effects on turbulent Couette flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Mo; Lee, Jae Hwa

    2017-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation of a turbulent Couette flow with two-dimensional (2-D) rod roughness is performed to examine the effects of the surface roughness. The Reynolds number based on the channel centerline laminar velocity (Uco) and channel half height (h) is Re =7200. The 2-D rods are periodically arranged with a streamwise pitch of λ = 8 k on the bottom wall, and the roughness height is k = 0.12 h. It is shown that the wall-normal extent for the logarithmic layer is significantly shortened in the rough-wall turbulent Couette flow, compared to a turbulent Couette flow with smooth wall. Although the Reynolds stresses are increased in a turbulent channel flow with surface roughness in the outer layer due to large-scale ejection motions produced by the 2-D rods, those of the rough-wall Couette flow are decreased. Isosurfaces of the u-structures averaged in time suggest that the decrease of the turbulent activity near the centerline is associated with weakened large-scale counter-rotating roll modes by the surface roughness. This research was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (NRF-2017R1D1A1A09000537) and the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning (NRF-2017R1A5A1015311).

  1. Investigation of co-flow jet flow control and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Alexis M.

    This thesis investigates the performance of co-flow jet (CFJ) flow control and its applications using experimental testing and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. For a stationary airfoil and wing, CFJ increases the lift coefficient (CL), reduces the drag and may produce thrust at a low angle of attack (AoA). The maximum lift coefficient is substantially increased for a 2D CFJ airfoil and reaches a value of 4.8 at Cmicro = 0.30. The power consumption of the CFJ pump, measured by the power coefficient (Pc), is influenced by a variety of parameters, including the momentum coefficient (C micro ), the AoA, the injection slot location, and the internal cavity configuration. A low Cmicro of 0.04 produces a rather small Pc in the range of 0.01--0.02 while a higher Cmicro rapidly increases the Pc. Due to the stronger leading edge suction effect, increasing the AoA decreases the Pc. That is until the flow is near separation, within about 2°--3° of the stall AoA. An injection slot location within 2%--5% chord from the leading edge very effectively reduces the power coefficient. An internal cavity design with no separation is crucial to minimize the CFJ power consumption. Overall, the CFJ effectiveness is enhanced with an increasing Mach number as long as the flow remains subsonic, typically with free stream Mach number less than 0.4. Two pitching airfoil oscillations with dynamic stall are studied in this thesis, namely the mild dynamic stall and the deep dynamic stall. At Mach 0.3, the CFJ with a relatively low Cmicro of 0.08 removes the mild dynamic stall. Thereby, the time-averaged lift is increased by 32% and the time-averaged drag is decreased by 80%. The resulting time-averaged aerodynamic (L/D)ave, which does not take the pumping power into account, reaches 118.3. When C micro is increased, the time-averaged drag becomes negative, which demonstrates the feasibility of a CFJ to propel helicopter blades using its pump as the only source of power. The deep

  2. Mixing and NOx Emission Calculations of Confined Reacting Jet Flows in Cylindrical and Annular Ducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oechsle, Victor L.; Connor, Christopher H.; Holdeman, James D. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Rapid mixing of cold lateral jets with hot cross-stream flows in confined configurations is of practical interest in gas turbine combustors as it strongly affects combustor exit temperature quality, and gaseous emissions in for example rich-lean combustion. It is therefore important to further improve our fundamental understanding of the important processes of dilution jet mixing especially when the injected jet mass flow rate exceeds that of the cross-stream. The results reported in this report describe some of the main flow characteristics which develop in the mixing process in a cylindrical duct. A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code has been used to predict the mixing flow field characteristics and NOx emission in a quench section of a rich-burn/quick-mix/lean-burn (RQL) combustor. Sixty configurations have been analyzed in both circular and annular geometries in a fully reacting environment simulating the operating condition of an actual RQL gas turbine combustion liner. The evaluation matrix was constructed by varying the number of orifices per row and orifice shape. Other parameters such as J (momentum-flux ratio), MR (mass flowrate ratio), DR (density ratio), and mixer sector orifice ACd (effective orifice area) were maintained constant throughout the entire study. The results indicate that the mixing flow field can be correlated with the NOx production if they are referenced with the stoichiometric equivalence ratio value and not the equilibrium value. The mixing flowfields in both circular and annular mixers are different. The penetration of equal jets in both annular and circular geometries is vastly different which significantly affects the performance of the mixing section. In the computational results with the circular mixer, most of the NOx formation occurred behind the orifice starting at the orifice wake region. General trends have been observed in the NOx production as the number of orifices is changed and this appears to be

  3. Double helix vortex breakdown in a turbulent swirling annular jet flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanierschot, M.; Percin, M.; van Oudheusden, B. W.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we report on the structure and dynamics of double helix vortex breakdown in a turbulent annular swirling jet. Double helix breakdown has been reported previously for the laminar flow regime, but this structure has rarely been observed in turbulent flow. The flow field is investigated experimentally by means of time-resolved tomographic particle image velocimetry. Notwithstanding the axisymmetric nature of the time-averaged flow, analysis of the instantaneous three-dimensional (3D) vortical structures shows the existence of a vortex core along the central axis which breaks up into a double helix downstream. The winding sense of this double helix is opposite to the swirl direction (m =-2 ) and it is wrapped around a central vortex breakdown bubble. This structure is quite different from double helix breakdown found in laminar flows where the helix is formed in the wake of the bubble and not upstream. The double helix precesses around the central axis of the jet with a precessing frequency corresponding to a Strouhal number of 0.27.

  4. Residual stress improved by water jet peening using cavitation for small-diameter pipe inner surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuo, Nakamura; Toshizo, Ohya; Koji, Okimura

    2001-01-01

    As one of degradation conditions on components used in water, the overlapping effect of environment, material and stress might cause stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Especially, for the tensile residual stress produced by welding, it is particularly effective to reduce the tensile residual stress on the material surface to prevent SCC. In this paper, the residual stress improvement method using cavitation impact generated by a water jet, called Water Jet Peening (WJP), has been developed as the maintenance technology for the inner surfaces of small-diameter Ni-Cr-Fe alloy (Alloy 600) pipes. As the results, by WJP for the inner surface of Alloy 600 pipe (inner diameter; approximately 10-15 mm), we confirmed that the compressive stress generated within the range from the surface to the inner part about 0.5 mm deep and took a maximum value about 350 MPa on the surface. (author)

  5. Scale-adaptive simulation of a hot jet in cross flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duda, B M; Esteve, M-J [AIRBUS Operations S.A.S., Toulouse (France); Menter, F R; Hansen, T, E-mail: benjamin.duda@airbus.com [ANSYS Germany GmbH, Otterfing (Germany)

    2011-12-22

    The simulation of a hot jet in cross flow is of crucial interest for the aircraft industry as it directly impacts aircraft safety and global performance. Due to the highly transient and turbulent character of this flow, simulation strategies are necessary that resolve at least a part of the turbulence spectrum. The high Reynolds numbers for realistic aircraft applications do not permit the use of pure Large Eddy Simulations as the spatial and temporal resolution requirements for wall bounded flows are prohibitive in an industrial design process. For this reason, the hybrid approach of the Scale-Adaptive Simulation is employed, which retains attached boundary layers in well-established RANS regime and allows the resolution of turbulent fluctuations in areas with sufficient flow instabilities and grid refinement. To evaluate the influence of the underlying numerical grid, three meshing strategies are investigated and the results are validated against experimental data.

  6. Scale-adaptive simulation of a hot jet in cross flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duda, B M; Esteve, M-J; Menter, F R; Hansen, T

    2011-01-01

    The simulation of a hot jet in cross flow is of crucial interest for the aircraft industry as it directly impacts aircraft safety and global performance. Due to the highly transient and turbulent character of this flow, simulation strategies are necessary that resolve at least a part of the turbulence spectrum. The high Reynolds numbers for realistic aircraft applications do not permit the use of pure Large Eddy Simulations as the spatial and temporal resolution requirements for wall bounded flows are prohibitive in an industrial design process. For this reason, the hybrid approach of the Scale-Adaptive Simulation is employed, which retains attached boundary layers in well-established RANS regime and allows the resolution of turbulent fluctuations in areas with sufficient flow instabilities and grid refinement. To evaluate the influence of the underlying numerical grid, three meshing strategies are investigated and the results are validated against experimental data.

  7. NASA Jet Noise Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Brenda

    2016-01-01

    The presentation highlights NASA's jet noise research for 2016. Jet-noise modeling efforts, jet-surface interactions results, acoustic characteristics of multi-stream jets, and N+2 Supersonic Aircraft system studies are presented.

  8. Application to cleaning of waste plastic surfaces using atmospheric non-thermal plasma jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araya, Masayuki [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Yuji, Toshifumi [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)]. E-mail: t-yuji@hiroshima-cmt.ac.jp; Watanabe, Takayuki [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Kashihara, Junzou [SHARP corporation, 1-9-2 Nakase, Mihama-Ku, Chiba 261-8520 (Japan); Sumida, Yoshitake [SHARP corporation, 2613-1 Ichinomoto-cho, Tenri 632-8567 (Japan)

    2007-03-12

    The removal of paint on the surface of waste plastics is difficult by the conventional process; in this research, a new cleaning mechanism using atmospheric plasmas was examined through optical emission spectroscopy, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, and scanning electron microscopy. Results indicate that an increase of pulse frequency enables for a short processing time for the removal of the paint film, signifying that the production of radicals in plasma, especially oxygen radicals, can be controlled by pulse frequency. Plasma jets were generated under the experimental conditions of an input power of 250 W to 400 W, a pulse frequency of 2 kHz to 12 kHz, and a plasma gas flow rate of 30 L/min. Examination of the intensity ratio of the reactive species, as measured by emission spectroscopy, showed that the O/N value increased with an increase in pulse frequency. Results of analysis with electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis show that nitrogen atoms and molybdenum in only the paint film decreased through plasma processing.

  9. Application to cleaning of waste plastic surfaces using atmospheric non-thermal plasma jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araya, Masayuki; Yuji, Toshifumi; Watanabe, Takayuki; Kashihara, Junzou; Sumida, Yoshitake

    2007-01-01

    The removal of paint on the surface of waste plastics is difficult by the conventional process; in this research, a new cleaning mechanism using atmospheric plasmas was examined through optical emission spectroscopy, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, and scanning electron microscopy. Results indicate that an increase of pulse frequency enables for a short processing time for the removal of the paint film, signifying that the production of radicals in plasma, especially oxygen radicals, can be controlled by pulse frequency. Plasma jets were generated under the experimental conditions of an input power of 250 W to 400 W, a pulse frequency of 2 kHz to 12 kHz, and a plasma gas flow rate of 30 L/min. Examination of the intensity ratio of the reactive species, as measured by emission spectroscopy, showed that the O/N value increased with an increase in pulse frequency. Results of analysis with electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis show that nitrogen atoms and molybdenum in only the paint film decreased through plasma processing

  10. Surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) flow sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Shrinivas G.

    1991-03-01

    The use of a surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) device to measure the rate of gas flow is described. A SAW oscillator heated to a suitable temperature above ambient is placed in the path of a flowing gas. Convective cooling caused by the gas flow results in a change in the oscillator frequency. A 73-MHz oscillator fabricated on 128 deg rotated Y-cut lithium niobate substrate and heated to 55 C above ambient shows a frequency variation greater than 142 kHz for flow-rate variation from 0 to 1000 cu cm/min. The output of the sensor can be calibrated to provide a measurement of volume flow rate, pressure differential across channel ports, or mass flow rate. High sensitivity, wide dynamic range, and direct digital output are among the attractive features of this sensor. Theoretical expressions for the sensitivity and response time of the sensor are derived. It is shown that by using ultrasonic Lamb waves propagating in thin membranes, a flow sensor with faster response than a SAW sensor can be realized.

  11. Flow Physics and Scaling for Discrete Jet Forcing on a Wall-Mounted Hump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Christopher; Tewes, Philipp; Little, Jesse

    2017-11-01

    An experimental study is conducted to explore flow physics and scaling parameters (e.g., aspect ratio, exit area, spacing) for steady jets and fluidic oscillators in support of the development of active flow control technology. Various actuation modules are designed, built and tested on an existing model of the NASA hump geometry. Experiments are carried out at a Reynolds numbers of 1.0 .106 (Ma = 0.09). Time-averaged pressure measurements are conducted along both the chord and span of the model. Stereo PIV is performed downstream of the actuation location to investigate the underlying control mechanisms in more detail. Separation control using spatially distributed steady round jet forcing was applied successfully for a spacing of Δz / c = 1.14 % for Cμ > 0.9 % . A larger spacing (Δz / c = 2.27 %) did not allow for full reattachment and led to 3D behavior in the separated region and also slightly upstream of the actuation. Fluidic oscillators showed control authority for Cμ >= 0.6 % for both presented spacings (Δz / c = 2.27 % and Δz / c = 4.54 %). In contrast to the 3D effects observed with steady jets, the fluidic oscillators provided a more uniform reduction in separation at a significantly lower Cμ even for larger spacing.

  12. Rational surfaces, ExB sheared flows and transport interplay in fusion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidalgo, C.; Pedrosa, M.A.; Erents, K.

    2002-01-01

    Experimental evidence of a strong interplay between magnetic topology (rational surfaces) and the generation of ExB sheared flows has been observed in the plasma edge region of stellarator (TJ-II) and tokamak (JET) devices. Both constant and varying in time ExB sheared flows are close to the critical value to trigger the transition to improved confinement regimes, but below the power threshold to trigger the formation of transport barriers. Flows driven by fluctuations are candidates to explain these experimental results. (author)

  13. Rational surfaces, ExB sheared flows and transport interplay in fusion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidalgo, Carlos; Pedrosa, Maria A.; Erents, Kevin

    2001-01-01

    Experimental evidence of a strong interplay between magnetic topology (rational surfaces) and the generation of ExB sheared flows has been observed in the plasma edge region of stellarator (TJ-II) and tokamak (JET) devices. Constant and varying in time ExB sheared flows are close to the critical value to trigger the transition to improved confinement regimes. The plasma conditions where this has been observed are clearly below the power threshold to trigger the formation of transport barriers. Flows driven by fluctuations are candidates to explain these experimental results. (author)

  14. On the link between ExB sheared flows and rational surfaces in fusion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidalgo, C.; Erents, K.; Matthews, G.

    2000-11-01

    Experimental evidence of flattening in plasma profiles has been observed in the edge region of the JET tokamak. This observation has been interpreted in terms of the influence of rational surfaces on plasma profiles. In the framework of this interpretation, significant ExB sheared flows linked to rational surfaces have been identified. These ExB sheared flows are close to the critical value to trigger the transition to improved confinement regimes. These results can explain the link between the magnetic topology and the generation of transport barriers reported in fusion devices. (author)

  15. Aircraft dual-shaft jet engine with indirect action fuel flow controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudosie, Alexandru-Nicolae

    2017-06-01

    The paper deals with an aircraft single-jet engine's control system, based on a fuel flow controller. Considering the engine as controlled object and its thrust the most important operation effect, from the multitude of engine's parameters only its rotational speed n is measurable and proportional to its thrust, so engine's speed has become the most important controlled parameter. Engine's control system is based on fuel injection Qi dosage, while the output is engine's speed n. Based on embedded system's main parts' mathematical models, the author has described the system by its block diagram with transfer functions; furthermore, some Simulink-Matlab simulations are performed, concerning embedded system quality (its output parameters time behavior) and, meanwhile, some conclusions concerning engine's parameters mutual influences are revealed. Quantitative determinations are based on author's previous research results and contributions, as well as on existing models (taken from technical literature). The method can be extended for any multi-spool engine, single- or twin-jet.

  16. Experimental demonstration of Martian soil simulant removal from a surface using a pulsed plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ticoş, C. M.; Scurtu, A.; Toader, D.; Banu, N.

    2015-03-01

    A plasma jet produced in a small coaxial plasma gun operated at voltages up to 2 kV and working in pure carbon dioxide (CO2) at a few Torr is used to remove Martian soil simulant from a surface. A capacitor with 0.5 mF is charged up from a high voltage source and supplies the power to the coaxial electrodes. The muzzle of the coaxial plasma gun is placed at a few millimeters near the dusty surface and the jet is fired parallel with the surface. Removal of dust is imaged in real time with a high speed camera. Mars regolith simulant JSC-Mars-1A with particle sizes up to 5 mm is used on different types of surfaces made of aluminium, cotton fabric, polyethylene, cardboard, and phenolic.

  17. Experimental demonstration of Martian soil simulant removal from a surface using a pulsed plasma jet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ticoş, C M; Scurtu, A; Toader, D; Banu, N

    2015-03-01

    A plasma jet produced in a small coaxial plasma gun operated at voltages up to 2 kV and working in pure carbon dioxide (CO2) at a few Torr is used to remove Martian soil simulant from a surface. A capacitor with 0.5 mF is charged up from a high voltage source and supplies the power to the coaxial electrodes. The muzzle of the coaxial plasma gun is placed at a few millimeters near the dusty surface and the jet is fired parallel with the surface. Removal of dust is imaged in real time with a high speed camera. Mars regolith simulant JSC-Mars-1A with particle sizes up to 5 mm is used on different types of surfaces made of aluminium, cotton fabric, polyethylene, cardboard, and phenolic.

  18. 零净质量射流的数值模拟%Numerical simulation of the zero mass jet flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石清; 李桦

    2011-01-01

    对零净质量射流致动器的流场和有零净质量射流时翼型的绕流流场进行了数值模拟,分析了动网格与几何守恒率、边界条件、湍流模型对零净质量射流致动器流场计算的影响,分析了零净质量射流的速度幅值和驱动频率对翼型增升效果的影响.研究结果表明,在复杂计算中可以对能动部件的边界作赋值处理;随着射流速度幅值的增加,翼型的平均升力系数和阻力系数都要增加;射流频率对升力的影响呈非线性.%Numerical simulation methods are used to investigate the actuator of zero mass jet flow and the flow around airfoil with zero mass jet flow.The effects on the actuator of zero mass jet flow are analysed about dynamic grid,geometry conservation law, numerical boundary conditions, and turbulence mode.And the effects on increasing lift are analysed also, including the jet flow velocity and frequency.The results indicate that numerical boundary conditions of the actuator of zero mass jet flow can be treated with given numerical value for complicated calculation, both the average lift coefficient and the average drag coefficient are added with the increase of the jet flow velocity, and the effects of the jet flow frequency on lift are non - linear.

  19. Atmospheric-pressure plasma jets: Effect of gas flow, active species, and snake-like bullet propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, S.; Wang, Z.; Huang, Q.; Tan, X.; Lu, X. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Ostrikov, K. [CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, PO Box 218, Lindfield NSW 2070 (Australia); School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney NSW 2006 (Australia); State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China)

    2013-02-15

    Cold atmospheric-pressure plasma jets have recently attracted enormous interest owing to numerous applications in plasma biology, health care, medicine, and nanotechnology. A dedicated study of the interaction between the upstream and downstream plasma plumes revealed that the active species (electrons, ions, excited OH, metastable Ar, and nitrogen-related species) generated by the upstream plasma plume enhance the propagation of the downstream plasma plume. At gas flows exceeding 2 l/min, the downstream plasma plume is longer than the upstream plasma plume. Detailed plasma diagnostics and discharge species analysis suggest that this effect is due to the electrons and ions that are generated by the upstream plasma and flow into the downstream plume. This in turn leads to the relatively higher electron density in the downstream plasma. Moreover, high-speed photography reveals a highly unusual behavior of the plasma bullets, which propagate in snake-like motions, very differently from the previous reports. This behavior is related to the hydrodynamic instability of the gas flow, which results in non-uniform distributions of long-lifetime active species in the discharge tube and of surface charges on the inner surface of the tube.

  20. Comparison of Tomo-PIV Versus Dual Plane PIV on a Synthetic Jet Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernet, Mark P.

    2017-01-01

    Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) is a planar velocity measurement technique that has found widespread use across a wide class of engineering disciplines. Tomographic PIV (tomoPIV) is an extension of the traditional PIV technique whereby the velocity across a volume of fluid is measured. TomoPIV provides additional fluid mechanical properties of the flow due to the adjacent planes of velocity information that are extracted. Dual Plane PIV is another approach for providing cross-plane flow field properties. Dual Plane PIV and tomoPIV provide all of the same flow properties, albeit through very different routes with significantly different levels of effort, hence a comparison of their application and performance would prove beneficial in a well-known, highly three dimensional flow field. A synthetic jet flow which has a wide range of flow field features including high velocity gradients and regions of high vorticity was used as a rigorous test bed to determine the capabilities limitations of the Dual Plane PIV and tomoPIV techniques. The results show that compressing 3D particle field information down to a limited number of views does not permit the accurate reconstruction of the flow field. The traditional thin sheet techniques are the best approach for accurate flow field measurements.

  1. Blow-out limits of nonpremixed turbulent jet flames in a cross flow at atmospheric and sub-atmospheric pressures

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Qiang

    2015-07-22

    The blow-out limits of nonpremixed turbulent jet flames in cross flows were studied, especially concerning the effect of ambient pressure, by conducting experiments at atmospheric and sub-atmospheric pressures. The combined effects of air flow and pressure were investigated by a series of experiments conducted in an especially built wind tunnel in Lhasa, a city on the Tibetan plateau where the altitude is 3650 m and the atmospheric pressure condition is naturally low (64 kPa). These results were compared with results obtained from a wind tunnel at standard atmospheric pressure (100 kPa) in Hefei city (altitude 50 m). The size of the fuel nozzles used in the experiments ranged from 3 to 8 mm in diameter and propane was used as the fuel. It was found that the blow-out limit of the air speed of the cross flow first increased (“cross flow dominant” regime) and then decreased (“fuel jet dominant” regime) as the fuel jet velocity increased in both pressures; however, the blow-out limit of the air speed of the cross flow was much lower at sub-atmospheric pressure than that at standard atmospheric pressure whereas the domain of the blow-out limit curve (in a plot of the air speed of the cross flow versus the fuel jet velocity) shrank as the pressure decreased. A theoretical model was developed to characterize the blow-out limit of nonpremixed jet flames in a cross flow based on a Damköhler number, defined as the ratio between the mixing time and the characteristic reaction time. A satisfactory correlation was obtained at relative strong cross flow conditions (“cross flow dominant” regime) that included the effects of the air speed of the cross flow, fuel jet velocity, nozzle diameter and pressure.

  2. Metal-mesh based transparent electrode on a 3-D curved surface by electrohydrodynamic jet printing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seong, Baekhoon; Yoo, Hyunwoong; Jang, Yonghee; Ryu, Changkook; Byun, Doyoung; Nguyen, Vu Dat

    2014-01-01

    Invisible Ag mesh transparent electrodes (TEs), with a width of 7 μm, were prepared on a curved glass surface by electrohydrodynamic (EHD) jet printing. With a 100 μm pitch, the EHD jet printed the Ag mesh on the convex glass which had a sheet resistance of 1.49 Ω/□. The printing speed was 30 cm s −1 using Ag ink, which had a 10 000 cPs viscosity and a 70 wt% Ag nanoparticle concentration. We further showed the performance of a 3-D transparent heater using the Ag mesh transparent electrode. The EHD jet printed an invisible Ag grid transparent electrode with good electrical and optical properties with promising applications on printed optoelectronic devices. (technical note)

  3. Numerical simulation of unsteady free surface flow and dynamic performance for a Pelton turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Y X; Wang, Z W; Yan, Z G; Cui, T

    2012-01-01

    Different from the reaction turbines, the hydraulic performance of the Pelton turbine is dynamic due to the unsteady free surface flow in the rotating buckets in time and space. This paper aims to present the results of investigations conducted on the free surface flow in a Pelton turbine rotating buckets. The unsteady numerical simulations were performed with the CFX code by using the Realizable k-ε turbulence model coupling the two-phase flow volume of fluid method. The unsteady free surface flow patterns and torque varying with the bucket rotating were analysed. The predicted relative performance at five operating conditions was compared with the field test results. The study was also conducted the interactions between the bucket rear and the water jet.

  4. Numerical simulation of unsteady free surface flow and dynamic performance for a Pelton turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Y. X.; Cui, T.; Wang, Z. W.; Yan, Z. G.

    2012-11-01

    Different from the reaction turbines, the hydraulic performance of the Pelton turbine is dynamic due to the unsteady free surface flow in the rotating buckets in time and space. This paper aims to present the results of investigations conducted on the free surface flow in a Pelton turbine rotating buckets. The unsteady numerical simulations were performed with the CFX code by using the Realizable k-ε turbulence model coupling the two-phase flow volume of fluid method. The unsteady free surface flow patterns and torque varying with the bucket rotating were analysed. The predicted relative performance at five operating conditions was compared with the field test results. The study was also conducted the interactions between the bucket rear and the water jet.

  5. Experimental investigation of the effects of heat release on mixing processes and flow structure in a high-speed subsonic turbulent H{sub 2} jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theron, M.; Bellenoue, M. [Laboratoire de Combustion et de Detonique, CNRS UPR 9028, Poitiers (France)

    2006-06-15

    In this paper, we explore the effects of heat release on mixing and flow structure in a high-speed subsonic turbulent H{sub 2} jet in an air coflow. Heat release effects are determined from the comparison of nonreacting and reacting jet behavior, boundary conditions being identical in both cases. Experiments are performed in a wind tunnel specifically designed for this purpose. Planar laser induced fluorescence on OH radicals and on acetone (seeded in the hydrogen jet) are used to characterize the cartography of scalars, and laser Doppler velocimetry is used to characterize velocity profiles in the far field of the H{sub 2} jet. Results show significant effects of heat release on mixing and flow structure, indicating an overall reduction of mixing and entrainment in the reacting jet compared to the nonreacting jet. First, a change is observed in the orientation of coherent structures originating from Kelvin-Helmholtz type instabilities, and responsible for air entrainment within the jet, which appear 'flatter' in the jet flame. Then, the flame length is increased over what would be predicted from the intersection of the mean stoichiometric contour with the centerline of the nonreacting jet. And finally, the longitudinal average velocity decrease along the jet axis is quicker in the nonreacting jet, and nondimensional transverse velocity fluctuations are about half as high in the reacting jet as in the nonreacting jet, indicating a reduction of the turbulence intensity of the flow in this direction in the jet flame. (author)

  6. Are atmospheric surface layer flows ergodic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Chad W.; Katul, Gabriel G.; Froidevaux, Martin; Simeonov, Valentin; Parlange, Marc B.

    2013-06-01

    The transposition of atmospheric turbulence statistics from the time domain, as conventionally sampled in field experiments, is explained by the so-called ergodic hypothesis. In micrometeorology, this hypothesis assumes that the time average of a measured flow variable represents an ensemble of independent realizations from similar meteorological states and boundary conditions. That is, the averaging duration must be sufficiently long to include a large number of independent realizations of the sampled flow variable so as to represent the ensemble. While the validity of the ergodic hypothesis for turbulence has been confirmed in laboratory experiments, and numerical simulations for idealized conditions, evidence for its validity in the atmospheric surface layer (ASL), especially for nonideal conditions, continues to defy experimental efforts. There is some urgency to make progress on this problem given the proliferation of tall tower scalar concentration networks aimed at constraining climate models yet are impacted by nonideal conditions at the land surface. Recent advancements in water vapor concentration lidar measurements that simultaneously sample spatial and temporal series in the ASL are used to investigate the validity of the ergodic hypothesis for the first time. It is shown that ergodicity is valid in a strict sense above uniform surfaces away from abrupt surface transitions. Surprisingly, ergodicity may be used to infer the ensemble concentration statistics of a composite grass-lake system using only water vapor concentration measurements collected above the sharp transition delineating the lake from the grass surface.

  7. Numerical Analysis on the Compressible Flow Characteristics of Supersonic Jet Caused by High-Pressure Pipe Rupture Using CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Jong-Kil; Yoon, Jun-Kyu [Gachon Univ., Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwang-Chu [KEPCO-E& C, Kimchun (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-10-15

    A rupture in a high-pressure pipe causes the fluid in the pipe to be discharged in the atmosphere at a high speed resulting in a supersonic jet that generates the compressible flow. This supersonic jet may display complicated and unsteady behavior in general . In this study, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed to investigate the compressible flow generated by a supersonic jet ejected from a high-pressure pipe. A Shear Stress Transport (SST) turbulence model was selected to analyze the unsteady nature of the flow, which depends upon the various gases as well as the diameter of the pipe. In the CFD analysis, the basic boundary conditions were assumed to be as follows: pipe of diameter 10 cm, jet pressure ratio of 5, and an inlet gas temperature of 300 K. During the analysis, the behavior of the shockwave generated by a supersonic jet was observed and it was found that the blast wave was generated indirectly. The pressure wave characteristics of hydrogen gas, which possesses the smallest molecular mass, showed the shortest distance to the safety zone. There were no significant difference observed for nitrogen gas, air, and oxygen gas, which have similar molecular mass. In addition, an increase in the diameter of the pipe resulted in the ejected impact caused by the increased flow rate to become larger and the zone of jet influence to extend further.

  8. Validation Analysis for the Calculation of a Turbulent Free Jet in Water Using CFDS-FLOW 3-D and FLUENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimenna, R.A.; Lee, S.Y.

    1995-05-01

    The application of computational fluid dynamics methods to the analysis of mixing in the high level waste tanks at the Savannah River Site requires a demonstration that the computer codes can properly represent the behavior of fluids in the tanks. The motive force for mixing the tanks is a set of jet pumps taking suction from the tank fluid and discharging turbulent jets near the bottom of the tank. The work described here focuses on the free turbulent jet in water as the simplest case of jet behavior for which data could be found in the open literature. Calculations performed with both CFDS-FLOW3D and FLUENT were compared with data as well as classical jet theory. Results showed both codes agreed reasonably well with each other and with the data, but that results were sensitive to the computational mesh and, to a lesser degree, the selection of turbulence models

  9. Validation Analysis for the Calculation of a Turbulent Free Jet in Water Using CFDS-FLOW 3-D and FLUENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimenna, R.A.; Lee, S.Y.

    1995-05-01

    The application of computational fluid dynamics methods to the analysis of mixing in the high level waste tanks at the Savannah River Site requires a demonstration that the computer codes can properly represent the behavior of fluids in the tanks. The motive force for mixing the tanks is a set of jet pumps taking suction from the tank fluid and discharging turbulent jets near the bottom of the tank. The work described here focuses on the free turbulent jet in water as the simplest case of jet behavior for which data could be found in the open literature. Calculations performed with both CFDS-FLOW3D and FLUENT were compared with data as well as classical jet theory. Results showed both codes agreed reasonably well with each other and with the data, but that results were sensitive to the computational mesh and, to a lesser degree, the selection of turbulence models.

  10. Hybrid RANS/LES of flow and heat transfer in round impinging jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubacki, Slawomir; Dick, Erik

    2011-01-01

    Fluid flow and convective heat transfer predictions are presented of round impinging jets for several combinations of nozzle-plate distances H/D = 2, 6 and 13.5 (where D is the nozzle diameter) and Reynolds numbers Re = 5000, 23,000 and 70,000 with the newest version of the k-ω model of and three hybrid RANS/LES models. In the RANS mode of the hybrid RANS/LES models, the k-ω model is recovered. Three formulations are considered to activate the LES mode. The first model is similar to the hybrid models of and . The turbulent length scale is replaced by the grid size in the destruction term of the k-equation and in the definition of the RANS eddy viscosity. As grid size, a maximum measure of the hexahedral grid cell is used. The second model has the same k-equation, but the eddy viscosity is the minimum of the k-ω eddy viscosity and the Smagorinsky eddy viscosity, following a proposal by . The Smagorinsky eddy viscosity is formed with the cube root of the cell volume. The third model has, again, the same k-equation, but has an eddy viscosity which is an intermediate between the eddy viscosities of the first and second models. This is reached by using the cube root of the cell volume in the eddy viscosity formula of the first model. The simulation results are compared with experimental data for the high Reynolds number cases Re = 23,000 and Re = 70,000 and LES data for the low-Reynolds number case Re = 5000. The Reynolds numbers are defined with the nozzle diameter and the bulk velocity at nozzle outlet. At low nozzle-plate distance (the impingement plate is in the core of the jet), turbulent kinetic energy is overpredicted by RANS in the stagnation flow region. This leads to overprediction of the heat transfer rate along the impingement plate in the impact zone. At high nozzle-plate distance (the impingement plate is in the mixed-out region of the jet), the turbulence mixing is underpredicted by RANS in the shear layer of the jet which gives a too high length of

  11. The influence of surface roughness on cloud cavitation flow around hydrofoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Jiafeng; Zhang, Mindi; Huang, Xu

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate experimentally the effect of surface roughness on cloud cavitation around Clark-Y hydrofoils. High-speed video and particle image velocimetry (PIV) were used to obtain cavitation patterns images (Prog. Aerosp. Sci. 37: 551-581, 2001), as well as velocity and vorticity fields. Results are presented for cloud cavitating conditions around a Clark-Y hydrofoil fixed at angle of attack of α =8{°} for moderate Reynolds number of Re=5.6 × 105. The results show that roughness had a great influence on the pattern, velocity and vorticity distribution of cloud cavitation. For cavitating flow around a smooth hydrofoil (A) and a rough hydrofoil (B), cloud cavitation occurred in the form of finger-like cavities and attached subulate cavities, respectively. The period of cloud cavitation around hydrofoil A was shorter than for hydrofoil B. Surface roughness had a great influence on the process of cloud cavitation. The development of cloud cavitation around hydrofoil A consisted of two stages: (1) Attached cavities developed along the surface to the trailing edge; (2) A reentrant jet developed, resulting in shedding and collapse of cluster bubbles or vortex structure. Meanwhile, its development for hydrofoil B included three stages: (1) Attached cavities developed along the surface to the trailing edge, with accumulation and rotation of bubbles at the trailing edge of the hydrofoil affecting the flow field; (2) Development of a reentrant jet resulted in the first shedding of cavities. Interaction and movement of flows from the pressure side and suction side brought liquid water from the pressure side to the suction side of the hydrofoil, finally forming a reentrant jet. The jet kept moving along the surface to the leading edge of the hydrofoil, resulting in large-scale shedding of cloud bubbles. Several vortices appeared and dissipated during the process; (3) Cavities grew and shed again.

  12. Assessment of three turbulence model performances in predicting water jet flow plunging into a liquid pool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zidouni Kendil Faiza

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of the current study is to numerically investigate, through computational fluid dynamics modeling, a water jet injected vertically downward through a straight circular pipe into a water bath. The study also aims to obtain a better understanding of jet behavior, air entrainment and the dispersion of bubbles in the developing flow region. For these purposes, three dimensional air and water flows were modeled using the volume of fluid technique. The equations in question were formulated using the density and viscosity of a 'gas-liquid mixture', described in terms of the phase volume fraction. Three turbulence models with a high Reynolds number have been considered i. e. the standard k-e model, realizable k-e model, and Reynolds stress model. The predicted flow patterns for the realizable k-e model match well with experimental measurements found in available literature. Nevertheless, some discrepancies regarding velocity relaxation and turbulent momentum distribution in the pool are still observed for both the standard k-e and the Reynolds stress model.

  13. Numerical Study of Controlling Jet Flow and Noise using Pores on Nozzle Inner Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jian; Shi, Zhixiao; Lai, Huanxin

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, the feasibility of controlling the subsonic jet flow and its noise using pores of blind holes added on the nozzle inner wall is explored numerically. These pores are intended to introduce disturbances to the shear layer so as to change the flow mixing. This passive strategy has not been attempted so far. A convergent nozzle with a cylindrical extension is selected as the baseline case. Three nozzles with pores on the inner wall are set up. Validations of the numerical settings are carried out, then the compressible turbulent jets at the exit Mach number M j = 0.6 in the four nozzles are calculated by large eddy simulations (LES), while the radiated sounds are predicted by the FW-H acoustic analogy. The results show that the blind holes have produced some effects on weakening the turbulence intensity in the shear layer. Comparison reveals that both temporal and spatial correlations of the turbulent fluctuations in the modified cases are suppressed to some extent. Meanwhile, the porous nozzles are shown to suppress the pairing of vortices and enhance the flow mixing, and therefore, the development of shear layer and the fragmentation of large scale vortices are accelerated.

  14. Shear Flow Instabilities and Droplet Size Effects on Aerosol Jet Printing Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guang; Gu, Yuan; Hines, Daniel; Das, Siddhartha; LaboratoryPhysical Science Collaboration; Soft Matter, Interfaces, Energy Laboratory Collaboration

    2017-11-01

    Aerosol Jet printing (AJP) is an additive technology utilizing aerodynamic focusing to produce fine feature down to 10 micrometers that can be used in the manufacture of wearable electronics and biosensors. The main concern of the current technology is related to unstable printing resolution, which is usually assessed by effective line width, edge smoothness, overspray and connectivity. In this work, we perform a 3D CFD model to study the aerodynamic instabilities induced by the annular shear flow (sheath gas flow or ShGF) trapped with the aerosol jet (carried gas flow or CGF) with ink droplets. Extensive experiments on line morphology have shown that by increasing ShGF, one can first obtain thinner line width, and then massive overspray is witnessed at very large ShGF/ CGF ratio. Besides the fact that shear-layer instabilities usually trigger eddy currents at comparatively low Reynolds number 600, the tolerance of deposition components assembling will also propagate large offsets of the deposited feather. We also carried out detailed analysis on droplet size and deposition range on the printing resolution. This study is intended to come up with a solution on controlling the operating parameters for finer printed features, and offer an improvement strategy on next generation.

  15. A simplified analog for a rotorcraft-in-ground-effect flow using a forced impinging jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiser, Jayson; Kiger, Ken

    2010-11-01

    The phenomenon of rotorcraft brown-out is defined as the intense suspension and re-ingestion of sand during the take-off and landing of a rotor-lifted aircraft. To mitigate the problem of rotorcraft brown-out, the non-equilibrium sediment suspension process that occurs within a typical rotorcraft wake must be understood. We attempt to understand the most basic aspects of this complex flow through the use of an axisymmetric forced impinging jet. While this flow neglects the swirl component associated with a rotorcraft, it does reproduce the typical coherent vortex structures, and permits their repeatable generation within an axisymmetric mean stagnation flow. The goal of the current work is to determine the forcing conditions that produce isolated, but intense and repeatable structures that can be followed through their interaction with the wall boundary. Stereo PIV imaging is applied to detail the breakdown of a vortex ring in the wall jet zone. The secondary vortex generation and decay are observed experimentally with 3-D vector fields, and their results are interpreted with respect to their significance in the context of sediment mobilization.

  16. Studies on Impingement Effects of Low Density Jets on Surfaces — Determination of Shear Stress and Normal Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathian, Sarith. P.; Kurian, Job

    2005-05-01

    This paper presents the results of the Laser Reflection Method (LRM) for the determination of shear stress due to impingement of low-density free jets on flat plate. For thin oil film moving under the action of aerodynamic boundary layer the shear stress at the air-oil interface is equal to the shear stress between the surface and air. A direct and dynamic measurement of the oil film slope is measured using a position sensing detector (PSD). The thinning rate of oil film is directly measured which is the major advantage of the LRM over LISF method. From the oil film slope history, direct calculation of the shear stress is done using a three-point formula. For the full range of experiment conditions Knudsen numbers varied till the continuum limit of the transition regime. The shear stress values for low-density flows in the transition regime are thus obtained using LRM and the measured values of shear show fair agreement with those obtained by other methods. Results of the normal pressure measurements on a flat plate in low-density jets by using thermistors as pressure sensors are also presented in the paper. The normal pressure profiles obtained show the characteristic features of Newtonian impact theory for hypersonic flows.

  17. Effect of high surface area activated carbon on thermal degradation of jet fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gergova, K.; Eser, S.; Arumugam, R.; Schobert, H.H. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Different solid carbons added to jet fuel during thermal stressing cause substantial changes in pyrolytic degradation reactions. Activated carbons, especially high surface area activated carbons were found to be very effective in suppressing solid deposition on metal reactor walls during stressing at high temperatures (425 and 450{degrees}C). The high surface area activated carbon PX-21 prevented solid deposition on reactor walls even after 5h at 450{degrees}C. The differences seen in the liquid product composition when activated carbon is added indicated that the carbon surfaces affect the degradation reactions. Thermal stressing experiments were carried out on commercial petroleum-derived JPTS jet fuel. We also used n-octane and n-dodecane as model compounds in order to simplify the study of the chemical changes which take place upon activated carbon addition. In separate experiments, the presence of a hydrogen donor, decalin, together with PX-21 was also studied.

  18. Influences of the cold atmospheric plasma jet treatment on the properties of the demineralized dentin surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaoming, ZHU; Heng, GUO; Jianfeng, ZHOU; Xiaofei, ZHANG; Jian, CHEN; Jing, LI; Heping, LI; Jianguo, TAN

    2018-04-01

    Improvement of the bonding strength and durability between the dentin surface and the composite resin is a challenging job in dentistry. In this paper, a radio-frequency atmospheric-pressure glow discharge (RF-APGD) plasma jet is employed for the treatment of the acid-etched dentin surfaces used for the composite restoration. The properties of the plasma treated dentin surfaces and the resin-dentin interfaces are analyzed using the x-ray photoemission spectroscopy, contact angle goniometer, scanning electron microscope and microtensile tester. The experimental results show that, due to the abundant chemically reactive species existing in the RF-APGD plasma jet under a stable and low energy input operating mode, the contact angle of the plasma-treated dentin surfaces decreases to a stable level with the increase of the atomic percentage of oxygen in the specimens; the formation of the long resin tags in the scattered clusters and the hybrid layers at the resin-dentin interfaces significantly improve the bonding strength and durability. These results indicate that the RF-APGD plasma jet is an effective tool for modifying the chemical properties of the dentin surfaces, and for improving the immediate bonding strength and the durability of the resin-dentin bonding in dentistry.

  19. Spatial distribution of cavitation-shock-pressure around a jet-flow gate-valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oba, Risaburo; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Ito, Yukio; Miyakura, Hideto; Nozaki, Satoru; Ishige, Tadashi; Sonoda, Shuji; Sakamoto, Kenji.

    1987-01-01

    To make clear the mechanism of cavitation erosion, the spatial distribution of cavitation shock pressures were quantitatively measured by a pressure sensitive sheet in the 1/10 scale model of a jet-flow gate-valve, for various valve-openings and cavitation numbers. The dynamic pressure response of the sheet was corrected by the shock wave generated from detonation explosives. It is made clear that the erosive shock pressures are distributed in a limited part of the whole cavitation region, and the safety region without the fatal cavitation erosion is defined. (author)

  20. Surface Dielectric Barrier Discharge Jet for Skin Disinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creyghton, Yves; Meijer, Rogier; Verweij, Paul; van der Zanden, Frank; Leenders, Paul

    A consortium consisting of the research institute TNO, the medical ­university and hospital St Radboud and two industrial enterprises is working on a non-thermal plasma treatment method for hand disinfection. The group is seeking for cooperation, in particular in the field of validation methods and potential ­standardization for plasma based disinfection procedures. The present paper describes technical progress in plasma source development together with initial microbiological data. Particular properties of the sheet shaped plasma volume are the possibility of treating large irregular surfaces in a short period of time, effective plasma produced species transfer to the surface together with high controllability of the nature of plasma species by means of temperature conditioning.

  1. Thermal analysis of protruding surfaces in the JET divertor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Corre, Y.; Bunting, P.; Coenen, J.W.; Gaspar, J.; Iglesias, D.; Matthews, G.F.; Balboa, I.; Coffey, I.; Dejarnac, Renaud; Firdaouss, M.; Gauthier, E.; Jachmich, S.; Krieger, K.; Pitts, R.A.; Rack, M.; Silburn, S.A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 6 (2017), č. článku 066009. ISSN 0029-5515 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 633053 - EUROfusion Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : IR thermography * heat flux * tungsten melting Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 3.307, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1741-4326/aa687e/meta

  2. Study of parameters and entrainment of a jet in cross-flow arrangement with transition at two low Reynolds numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas, Camilo [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Chemical Technology and Polymer Chemistry, Karlsruhe (Germany); Convenio Andres Bello, Instituto Internacional de Investigaciones Educativas para la Integracion, La Paz (Bolivia); Denev, Jordan A.; Bockhorn, Henning [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Engler-Bunte-Institute, Combustion Division, Karlsruhe (Germany); Suntz, Rainer [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Chemical Technology and Polymer Chemistry, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    Investigation of the mixing process is one of the main issues in chemical engineering and combustion and the configuration of a jet into a cross-flow (JCF) is often employed for this purpose. Experimental data are gained for the symmetry plane in a JCF-arrangement of an air flow using a combination of particle image velocimetry (PIV) with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The experimental data with thoroughly measured boundary conditions are complemented with direct numerical simulations, which are based on idealized boundary conditions. Two similar cases are studied with a fixed jet-to-cross-flow velocity ratio of 3.5 and variable cross-flow Reynolds numbers equal to 4,120 and 8,240; in both cases the jet issues from the pipe at laminar conditions. This leads to a laminar-to-turbulent transition, which depends on the Reynolds number and occurs quicker for the case with higher Reynolds number in both experiments and simulations as well. It was found that the Reynolds number only slightly affects the jet trajectory, which in the case with the higher Reynolds number is slightly deeper. It is attributed to the changed boundary layer shape of the cross-flow. Leeward streamlines bend toward the jet and are responsible for the strong entrainment of cross-flow fluid into the jet. Velocity components are compared for the two Reynolds numbers at the leeward side at positions where strongest entrainment is present and a pressure minimum near the jet trajectory is found. The numerical simulations showed that entrainment is higher for the case with the higher Reynolds number. The latter is attributed to the earlier transition in this case. Fluid entrainment of the jet in cross-flow is more than twice stronger than for a similar flow of a jet issuing into a co-flowing stream. This comparison is made along the trajectory of the two jets at a distance of 5.5 jet diameters downstream and is based on the results from the direct numerical simulations and recently published

  3. Free surface flows under compensated gravity conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Dreyer, Miachel E

    2007-01-01

    This book considers the behavior of fluids in a low-gravity environment with special emphasis on application in PMD (propellant management device) systems . In the compensated gravity environment of a spacecraft, the hydrostatic pressure decreases to very low values depending on the residual acceleration, and surface tension forces become dominant. Consequently, surface tension can be used to transport and position liquids if the residual acceleration and the resulting hydrostatic pressure are small compared to the capillary pressure. One prominent application is the use of PMDs in surface-tension satellite tanks. PMDs must ensure that the tank outlet is covered with liquid whenever outflow is demanded. Furthermore, PMDs are used to ensure expulsion and refilling of tanks for liquids and gases for life support, reactants, and experiment supplies. Since most of the PMD designs are not testable on ground and thus rely on analytical or numerical concepts, this book treats three different flow problems with analy...

  4. Effect of jet nozzle geometry on flow and heat transfer performance of vortex cooling for gas turbine blade leading edge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Changhe; Li, Liang; Wu, Xin; Feng, Zhenping

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We establish a suitable vortex chamber model for gas turbine blade leading edge. • Mechanism of vortex cooling is further discussed and presented. • Influences of jet nozzle geometry on vortex cooling characteristics are researched. • This paper focuses on assessment of flow field and thermal performance for different jet nozzle aspect ratio and area. - Abstract: In this paper, 3D viscous steady Reynolds Averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) equations are utilized to investigate the influence of jet nozzle geometry on flow and thermal behavior of vortex cooling for gas turbine blades. Comparison between calculation with different turbulence models and the experimental data is conducted, and results show that the standard k-ω model provides the best accuracy. The grid independence analysis is performed to obtain the proper mesh number. First, the mechanism of vortex cooling is further discussed, and the pronounced impact of kinetic turbulence intensity, thin thermal boundary layer, violent radial convection and complex vortices on enhanced heat transfer performance is confirmed. Then, seven jet nozzle aspect ratios and seven jet nozzle to chamber cross section area ratios are selected to research the flow field and thermal characteristics of vortex cooling focusing on the streamline, static pressure ratio, total pressure loss ratio and Nusselt number. It is presented that the jet nozzle aspect ratio and jet nozzle to chamber cross section area ratio both impose a significant effect on the flow and thermal parameters. The averaged Nusselt number decreases at first and then increases with the increasing jet nozzle aspect ratio, reaching highest when aspect ratio equals to 1. The effect of area ratio on averaged Nusselt number is complex. Finally, the heat transfer results in this study are compared with other previous works. Results indicate that good agreement with previous data is achieved, and the enhanced thermal behavior may be acquired by

  5. Deformations of free jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paruchuri, Srinivas

    This thesis studies three different problems. First we demonstrate that a flowing liquid jet can be controllably split into two separate subfilaments through the applications of a sufficiently strong tangential stress to the surface of the jet. In contrast, normal stresses can never split a liquid jet. We apply these results to observations of uncontrolled splitting of jets in electric fields. The experimental realization of controllable jet splitting would provide an entirely novel route for producing small polymeric fibers. In the second chapter we present an analytical model for the bending of liquid jets and sheets from temperature gradients, as recently observed by Chwalek et al. [Phys. Fluids, 14, L37 (2002)]. The bending arises from a local couple caused by Marangoni forces. The dependence of the bending angle on experimental parameters is presented, in qualitative agreement with reported experiments. The methodology gives a simple framework for understanding the mechanisms for jet and sheet bending. In chapter 4 we address the discrepancy between hydrodynamic theory of liquid jets, and the snap-off of narrow liquid jets observed in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations [23]. This has been previously attributed to the significant role of thermal fluctuations in nanofluidic systems. We argue that hydrodynamic description of such systems should include corrections to the Laplace pressure which result from the failure of the sharp interface assumption when the jet diameter becomes small enough. We show that this effect can in principle give rise to jet shapes similar to those observed in MD simulations, even when thermal fluctuations are completely neglected. Finally we summarize an algorithm developed to simulate droplet impact on a smooth surface.

  6. Experimental and analytical studies on high-speed plane jet along concave wall simulating IFMIF Li target flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, H.; Ida, M.; Kato, Y.; Maekawa, H.; Katsuta, H.; Itoh, K.; Kukita, Y.

    1998-01-01

    As part of the conceptual design activity (CDA) of the international fusion materials irradiation facility (IFMIF), the characteristics of the high-speed liquid lithium (Li) plane jet target flow have been studied by water experiments and numerical analyses for both heating and non-heating conditions. The simulated prototypal-size water flows were stable over the entire length of ∝130 mm at the average velocity up to 17 m/s. The jet flow had a specific radial velocity profile, close to that of free-vortex flow, because of a static pressure distribution in the jet thickness due to centrifugal force. Detailed velocity measurement revealed that this flow condition is penetrating into the upstream reducer nozzle up to a distance ∼ the jet thickness. The numerical analyses using a two-dimensional Cartesian-coordinate model were successful to predict the velocity profile transient around the nozzle exit, though underestimated the development of the velocity profile and the jet thickness. (orig.)

  7. Surface Effects on Nanoscale Gas Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beskok, Ali; Barisik, Murat

    2010-11-01

    3D MD simulations of linear Couette flow of argon gas confined within nano-scale channels are performed in the slip, transition and free molecular flow regimes. The velocity and density profiles show deviations from the kinetic theory based predictions in the near wall region that typically extends three molecular diameters (s) from each surface. Utilizing the Irwin-Kirkwood theorem, stress tensor components for argon gas confined in nano-channels are investigated. Outside the 3s region, three normal stress components are identical, and equal to pressure predicted using the ideal gas law, while the shear stress is a constant. Within the 3s region, the normal stresses become anisotropic and the shear stress shows deviations from its bulk value due to the surface virial effects. Utilizing the kinetic theory and MD predicted shear stress values, the tangential momentum accommodation coefficient for argon gas interacting with FCC structured walls (100) plane facing the fluid is calculated to be 0.75; this value is independent of the Knudsen number. Results show emergence of the 3s region as an additional characteristic length scale in nano-confined gas flows.

  8. Free Surface Flows and Extensional Rheology of Polymer Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinic, Jelena; Jimenez, Leidy Nallely; Biagioli, Madeleine; Estrada, Alexandro; Sharma, Vivek

    Free-surface flows - jetting, spraying, atomization during fuel injection, roller-coating, gravure printing, several microfluidic drop/particle formation techniques, and screen-printing - all involve the formation of axisymmetric fluid elements that spontaneously break into droplets by a surface-tension-driven instability. The growth of the capillary-driven instability and pinch-off dynamics are dictated by a complex interplay of inertial, viscous and capillary stresses for simple fluids. Additional contributions by elasticity, extensibility and extensional viscosity play a role for complex fluids. We show that visualization and analysis of capillary-driven thinning and pinch-off dynamics of the columnar neck in an asymmetric liquid bridge created by dripping-onto-substrate (DoS) can be used for characterizing the extensional rheology of complex fluids. Using a wide variety of complex fluids, we show the measurement of the extensional relaxation time, extensional viscosity, power-law index and shear viscosity. Lastly, we elucidate how polymer composition, flexibility, and molecular weight determine the thinning and pinch-off dynamics of polymeric complex fluids.

  9. Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma Jet Surface Treatment for Use in Improving Adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuettner, Lindsey Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-06

    Atmospheric-pressure plasma jets (APPJs) are a method of plasma treatment that plays an important role in material processing and modifying surface properties of materials, especially polymers. Gas plasmas react with polymer surfaces in numerous ways such as oxidation, radical formation, degradation, and promotion of cross-linking. Because of this, gas and plasma conditions can be explored for chosen processes to maximize desired properties. The purpose of this study is to investigate plasma parameters in order to modify surface properties for improved adhesion between aluminum and epoxy substrates using two types of adhesives. The background, results to date, and future work will be discussed.

  10. Simulation of the flow obstruction of a jet pump in a BWR reactor with the code RELAP/SCDAPSIM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas V, J.; Filio L, C.

    2016-09-01

    This work simulates the flow obstruction of a jet pump in one of the recirculation loops of a nuclear power plant with a reactor of type BWR at 100% of operating power, in order to analyze the behavior of the total flow of the refrigerant passing through the reactor core, the total flow in each recirculation loop of the reactor, together with the 10 jet pumps of each loop. The behavior of the power and the reactivity insertion due to the change of the refrigerant flow pattern is also analyzed. The simulation was carried out using the RELAP/SCDAPSIM version 3.5 code, using a reactor model with 10 jet pumps in each recirculation loop and a core consisting of 6 radial zones and 25 axial zones. The scenario postulates the flow obstruction in a jet pump in a recirculation loop A when the reactor operates at 100% rated power, causing a change in the total flow of refrigerant in the reactor core, leading to a decrease in power. Once the reactor conditions are established to its new power, the operator tries to recover the nominal power using the flow control valve of the recirculation loop A, opening stepwise as a strategy to safely recover the reactor power. In this analysis is assumed that the intention of the nuclear plant operator is to maintain the operation of the reactor during the established cycle. (Author)

  11. Experimental Flow Performance Evaluation of novel miniaturized Advanced Piezoelectric Dual Cooling Jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Bock, H P J; Whalen, B P; Chamarthy, P; Jackson, J L

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, electronics systems have significantly reduced in size at maintained or increased functionality. This trend has led to an increased demand for smaller and more capable thermal management. However, miniaturization of conventional fan and heat sink cooling systems introduce significant size, weight and efficiency challenges. In this study the flow performance of a novel alternative thin form-factor cooling solution, the advanced piezoelectric dual cooling jet(DCJ), is evaluated. A DCJ is a system where two piezoelectric actuators are excited to produce air flow. The total height of the device is about 1mm. The design of the experimental method for evaluating the equivalent fan-curve of the DCJ device is described in detail. Experimental results in comparison to conventional fan solutions are provided. The DCJ is expected to be a good candidate for thermal management in next generation thin profile consumer electronics.

  12. Genesis and bifurcations of unstable periodic orbits in a jet flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uleysky, M Yu; Budyansky, M V; Prants, S V

    2008-01-01

    We study the origin and bifurcations of typical classes of unstable periodic orbits in a jet flow that was introduced before as a kinematic model of chaotic advection, transport and mixing of passive scalars in meandering oceanic and atmospheric currents. A method to detect and locate the unstable periodic orbits and classify them by the origin and bifurcations is developed. We consider in detail period-1 and period-4 orbits playing an important role in chaotic advection. We introduce five classes of period-4 orbits: western and eastern ballistic ones, whose origin is associated with ballistic resonances of the fourth-order, rotational ones, associated with rotational resonances of the second and fourth orders and rotational-ballistic ones associated with a rotational-ballistic resonance. It is a new kind of unstable periodic orbits that may appear in a chaotic flow with jets and/or circulation cells. Varying the perturbation amplitude, we track out the origin and bifurcations of the orbits for each class

  13. Synthetic jets based on micro magneto mechanical systems for aerodynamic flow control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimeno, L; Merlen, A; Talbi, A; Viard, R; Pernod, P; Preobrazhensky, V

    2010-01-01

    A magneto-mechanical micro-actuator providing an axisymmetric synthetic microjet for active flow control was designed, fabricated and characterized. The micro-actuator consists of an enclosed cavity with a small orifice in one face and a high flexible elastomeric (PDMS) membrane in the opposite one. The membrane vibration is achieved using a magnetic actuation chosen for its capacity for providing large out of plane displacements and forces necessary for the performances aimed for. The paper presents first numerical simulations of the flow performed during the design process in order to identify a general jet formation criterion and optimize the device's performances. The fabrication process of this micro-magneto-mechanical system (MMMS) is then briefly described. The full size of the device, including packaging and actuation, does not exceed 1 cm 3 . The evaluation of the performances of the synthetic jet with 600 µm orifice was performed. The results show that the optimum working point is in the frequency range 400–700 Hz which is in accordance with the frequency response of the magnet-membrane mechanical resonator. In this frequency range, the microjet reaches maximum speeds ranging from 25 m s −1 to 55 m s −1 for an electromagnetic power consumption of 500 mW. Finally the axial velocity transient and stream-wise behaviours in the near and far fields are reported and discussed.

  14. Demonstration of robust micromachined jet technology and its application to realistic flow control problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Sung Pil [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-04-15

    This paper describes the demonstration of successful fabrication and initial characterization of micromachined pressure sensors and micromachined jets (microjets) fabricated for use in macro flow control and other applications. In this work, the microfabrication technology was investigated to create a micromachined fluidic control system with a goal of application in practical fluids problems, such as UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle)-scale aerodynamic control. Approaches of this work include : (1) the development of suitable micromachined synthetic jets (microjets) as actuators, which obviate the need to physically extend micromachined structures into an external flow ; and (2) a non-silicon alternative micromachining fabrication technology based on metallic substrates and lamination (in addition to traditional MEMS technologies) which will allow the realization of larger scale, more robust structures and larger array active areas for fluidic systems. As an initial study, an array of MEMS pressure sensors and an array of MEMS modulators for orifice-based control of microjets have been fabricated, and characterized. Both pressure sensors and modulators have been built using stainless steel as a substrate and a combination of lamination and traditional micromachining processes as fabrication technologies.

  15. Demonstration of robust micromachined jet technology and its application to realistic flow control problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Sung Pil

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the demonstration of successful fabrication and initial characterization of micromachined pressure sensors and micromachined jets (microjets) fabricated for use in macro flow control and other applications. In this work, the microfabrication technology was investigated to create a micromachined fluidic control system with a goal of application in practical fluids problems, such as UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle)-scale aerodynamic control. Approaches of this work include : (1) the development of suitable micromachined synthetic jets (microjets) as actuators, which obviate the need to physically extend micromachined structures into an external flow ; and (2) a non-silicon alternative micromachining fabrication technology based on metallic substrates and lamination (in addition to traditional MEMS technologies) which will allow the realization of larger scale, more robust structures and larger array active areas for fluidic systems. As an initial study, an array of MEMS pressure sensors and an array of MEMS modulators for orifice-based control of microjets have been fabricated, and characterized. Both pressure sensors and modulators have been built using stainless steel as a substrate and a combination of lamination and traditional micromachining processes as fabrication technologies

  16. Numerical analysis of non-stationary free surface flow in a Pelton bucket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hana, Morten

    1999-07-01

    Computation and analysis of flow in Pelton buckets have been carried out. First a graphical method is investigated and partially improved. In order to decide whether to improve the method further or disregard it in favour of commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes, a study on numerical methods for free surface flow was carried out. This part of this work concentrates on the theoretical background for different numerical methods, and describes some practical considerations. Although small programs were created based on the literature survey, but only one reported herein, it was soon found that commonly available numerical codes were favourable in use. A code, RIPPLE, was acquired to study the Volume of Fluid (VOF) method in detail. The commercial codes used were Flow-3D and CFX-4. These programs were used in three different cases. First, a simplified 2-dimensional case was verified experimentally. Next, a 3-dimensional fixed jet calculation was carried out. Finally, numerical calculations with relative motion between the jet and buckets were carried out with CFX-4. The conclusion is that commercial CFD codes can replace the graphical method. But careful implementation is needed in order to resolve the special features of Pelton turbines, which are the free surface, the complex geometry and the relative motion between the jet and the bucket.

  17. CFD predictions of wake-stabilised jet flames in a cross-flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawal, Mohammed S.; Fairweather, Michael; Gogolek, Peter; Ingham, Derek B.; Ma, Lin; Pourkashanian, Mohamed; Williams, Alan

    2013-01-01

    This study describes an investigation into predicting the major flow properties in wake-stabilised jet flames in a cross flow of air using first- and second-order turbulence models, applied within a RANS (Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes) modelling framework. Standard and RNG (re-normalisation group) versions of the k-ε turbulence model were employed at the first-order level and the results compared with a second-moment closure, or RSM (Reynolds stress model). The combustion process was modelled using the laminar flamelet approach together with a thermal radiation model using the discrete ordinate method. The ability of the various turbulence models to reproduce experimentally established flame appearance, profiles of velocity and turbulence intensity, as well as the combustion efficiency of such flames is reported. The results show that all the turbulence models predict similar velocity profiles over the majority of the flow domain considered, except in the wake region, where the predictions of the RSM and RNG k-ε models are in closer agreement with experimental data. In contrast, the standard k-ε model over-predicts the peak turbulence intensity. Also, it is found that the RSM provides superior predictions of the planar recirculation and flame zones attached to the release pipe in the wake region. - Highlights: ► We investigated the prediction of the major properties in wake-stabilised methane jet flames in a cross flow. ► The ability of the various turbulence models to reproduce experimentally established flame parameters is reported. ► All the turbulence models considered predict similar velocity profiles, except in the wake region

  18. Magnetohydrodynamic simulation study of plasma jets and plasma-surface contact in coaxial plasma accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Vivek; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2017-06-01

    Recent experiments by Loebner et al. [IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 44, 1534 (2016)] studied the effect of a hypervelocity jet emanating from a coaxial plasma accelerator incident on target surfaces in an effort to mimic the transient loading created during edge localized mode disruption events in fusion plasmas. In this paper, we present a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical model to simulate plasma jet formation and plasma-surface contact in this coaxial plasma accelerator experiment. The MHD system of equations is spatially discretized using a cell-centered finite volume formulation. The temporal discretization is performed using a fully implicit backward Euler scheme and the resultant stiff system of nonlinear equations is solved using the Newton method. The numerical model is employed to obtain some key insights into the physical processes responsible for the generation of extreme stagnation conditions on the target surfaces. Simulations of the plume (without the target plate) are performed to isolate and study phenomena such as the magnetic pinch effect that is responsible for launching pressure pulses into the jet free stream. The simulations also yield insights into the incipient conditions responsible for producing the pinch, such as the formation of conductive channels. The jet-target impact studies indicate the existence of two distinct stages involved in the plasma-surface interaction. A fast transient stage characterized by a thin normal shock transitions into a pseudo-steady stage that exhibits an extended oblique shock structure. A quadratic scaling of the pinch and stagnation conditions with the total current discharged between the electrodes is in qualitative agreement with the results obtained in the experiments. This also illustrates the dominant contribution of the magnetic pressure term in determining the magnitude of the quantities of interest.

  19. Study of the Effect of Material Machinability on Quality of Surface Created by Abrasive Water Jet

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klichová, Dagmar; Klich, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 149, č. 149 (2016), s. 177-182 E-ISSN 1877-7058. [International Conference on Manufacturing Engineering and Materials, ICMEM 2016. Nový Smokovec, 06.06.2016-10.06.2016] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1406 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : machinability * surface roughness * abrasive water jet * study of quality * aluminium alloy * optical profilometer Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1877705816311614

  20. The research into the quality of rock surfaces obtained by abrasive water jet cutting

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Młynarczuk, M.; Skiba, M.; Sitek, Libor; Hlaváček, Petr; Kožušníková, Alena

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 4 (2014), s. 925-940 ISSN 0860-7001 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082; GA ČR GAP104/12/1988 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : water jet * rock cutting * surface quality * roughness * variogram Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools Impact factor: 0.608, year: 2013 http://mining.archives.pl

  1. The flow structure of jets from transient sources and implications for modeling short-duration explosive volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojnicki, K. N.; Clarke, A. B.; Adrian, R. J.; Phillips, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    We used laboratory experiments to examine the rise process in neutrally buoyant jets that resulted from an unsteady supply of momentum, a condition that defines plumes from discrete Vulcanian and Strombolian-style eruptions. We simultaneously measured the analog-jet discharge rate (the supply rate of momentum) and the analog-jet internal velocity distribution (a consequence of momentum transport and dilution). Then, we examined the changes in the analog-jet velocity distribution over time to assess the impact of the supply-rate variations on the momentum-driven rise dynamics. We found that the analog-jet velocity distribution changes significantly and quickly as the supply rate varied, such that the whole-field distribution at any instant differed considerably from the time average. We also found that entrainment varied in space and over time with instantaneous entrainment coefficient values ranging from 0 to 0.93 in an individual unsteady jet. Consequently, we conclude that supply-rate variations exert first-order control over jet dynamics, and therefore cannot be neglected in models without compromising their capability to predict large-scale eruption behavior. These findings emphasize the fundamental differences between unsteady and steady jet dynamics, and show clearly that: (i) variations in source momentum flux directly control the dynamics of the resulting flow; (ii) impulsive flows driven by sources of varying flux cannot reasonably be approximated by quasi-steady flow models. New modeling approaches capable of describing the time-dependent properties of transient volcanic eruption plumes are needed before their trajectory, dilution, and stability can be reliably computed for hazards management.

  2. Effects of initial conditions on self-similarity in a co-flowing axi-symmetric round jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uddin, M.; Pollard, A.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of initial conditions of a spatially developing coflowing jet is investigated using an LES at Re D = 7,300. A co-flow velocity to initial jet centerline velocity ratio of 1:11 and a co-flow to initial jet diameter ratio of 35:1 are used to match the flow cases of Reference 11. The 35D x 135D simulation volume is divided into 1024 x 256 x 128 control volumes in the longitudinal, radial and azimuthal directions respectively. Time averaged results of the effect of initial conditions on mean flow, the decay of jet centreline velocity, growth of the jet and the distribution of Reynolds stresses in the near, and far field of the shear layer is presented. These quantities show good agreement with the measurements of Reference 11. Our results suggest that the first order moments, e.g., decay of centreline velocity excess, the radial mean velocity profiles, have little dependence on the initial conditions. As well, the Reynolds shear stress appears to have lesser sensitivity to the variation of initial velocity profiles. However, initial conditions have pronounced effect on the self-similarity of normal stresses. Additionally, the computations indicate little Reynolds number dependency, which is consistent with Townsend's school of thought. (author)

  3. Simulation for scale-up of a confined jet mixer for continuous hydrothermal flow synthesis of nanomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, CY; Liu, JJ; Zhang, Y; Wang, XZ

    2015-01-01

    Reactor performance of confined jet mixers for continuous hydrothermal flow synthesis of nanomaterials is investigated for the purpose of scale-up from laboratory scale to pilot-plant scale. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models were applied to simulate hydrothermal fluid flow, mixing and heat transfer behaviours in the reactors at different volumetric scale-up ratios (up to 26 times). The distributions of flow and heat transfer variables were obtained using ANSYS Fluent with the tracer c...

  4. Specific grinding energy and surface roughness of nanoparticle jet minimum quantity lubrication in grinding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Dongkun

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles with the anti-wear and friction reducing features were applied as cooling lubricant in the grinding fluid. Dry grinding, flood grinding, minimal quantity of lubrication (MQL, and nanoparticle jet MQL were used in the grinding experiments. The specific grinding energy of dry grinding, flood grinding and MQL were 84, 29.8, 45.5 J/mm3, respectively. The specific grinding energy significantly decreased to 32.7 J/mm3 in nanoparticle MQL. Compared with dry grinding, the surface roughness values of flood grinding, MQL, and nanoparticle jet MQL were significantly reduced with the surface topography profile values reduced by 11%, 2.5%, and 10%, respectively, and the ten point height of microcosmic unflatness values reduced by 1.5%, 0.5%, and 1.3%, respectively. These results verified the satisfactory lubrication effects of nanoparticle MQL. MoS2, carbon nanotube (CNT, and ZrO2 nanoparticles were also added in the grinding fluid of nanoparticle jet MQL to analyze their grinding surface lubrication effects. The specific grinding energy of MoS2 nanoparticle was only 32.7 J/mm3, which was 8.22% and 10.39% lower than those of the other two nanoparticles. Moreover, the surface roughness of workpiece was also smaller with MoS2 nanoparticle, which indicated its remarkable lubrication effects. Furthermore, the role of MoS2 particles in the grinding surface lubrication at different nanoparticle volume concentrations was analyzed. MoS2 volume concentrations of 1%, 2%, and 3% were used. Experimental results revealed that the specific grinding energy and the workpiece surface roughness initially increased and then decreased as MoS2 nanoparticle volume concentration increased. Satisfactory grinding surface lubrication effects were obtained with 2% MoS2 nanoparticle volume concentration.

  5. Gas and plasma dynamics of RF discharge jet of low pressure in a vacuum chamber with flat electrodes and inside tube, influence of RF discharge on the steel surface parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khristoliubova, V. I.; Kashapov, N. F.; Shaekhov, M. F.

    2016-06-01

    Researches results of the characteristics of the RF discharge jet of low pressure and the discharge influence on the surface modification of high speed and structural steels are introduced in the article. Gas dynamics, power and energy parameters of the RF low pressure discharge flow in the discharge chamber and the electrode gap are studied in the presence of the materials. Plasma flow rate, discharge power, the concentration of electrons, the density of RF power, the ion current density, and the energy of the ions bombarding the surface materials are considered for the definition of basic properties crucial for the process of surface modification of materials as they were put in the plasma jet. The influence of the workpiece and effect of products complex configuration on the RF discharge jet of low pressure is defined. The correlation of the input parameters of the plasma unit on the characteristics of the discharge is established.

  6. Analysis on oscillating actuator frequency influence of the fluid flow characterization for 2D contractile water jet thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaari, M. F.; Abu Bakar, H.; Nordin, N.; Saw, S. K.; Samad, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Contractile body is an alternative mechanism instead of rotating blade propeller to generate water jet for locomotion. The oscillating motion of the actuator at different frequencies varies the pressure and volume of the pressure chamber in time to draw in and jet out the water at a certain mass flow rate. The aim of this research was to analyze the influence of the actuating frequency of the fluid flow in the pressure chamber of the thruster during this inflation-deflation process. A 70mm × 70mm × 18mm (L × W × T) 2D water jet thruster was fabricated for this purpose. The contractile function was driven using two lateral pneumatic actuators where the fluid flow analysis was focused on the X-Y plane vector. Observation was carried out using a video camera and Matlab image measurement technique to determine the volume of the flowing mass. The result demonstrated that the greater actuating frequency decreases the fluid flow rate and the Reynolds number. This observation shows that the higher frequency would give a higher mass flow rate during water jet generation.

  7. Analysis of reactor material experiments investigating oxide fuel crust stability and heat transfer in jet impingement flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

    1985-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the crust stability and heat transfer behavior in the CSTI-1, CSTI-3, and CWTI-11 reactor material experiments in which a jet of molten oxide fuel at approx. 160 0 K above its freezing temperature was impinged normally upon stainless steel plates initially at 300 and 385 K. The major issue is the existence of nonexistence of a stable solidified layer of fuel, or crust, interstitial to the flowing hot fuel and the steel substrate, tending to insulate the steel from the hot molten fuel. A computer model was developed to predict the heatup of thermocouples imbedded immediately beneath the surface of the plate for both of the cases in which a stable crust is assumed to be either present or absent during the impingement phase. Comparison of the model calculations with the measured thermocouple temperatures indicates that a protective crust was present over nearly all of the plate surface area throughout the impingement process precluding major melting of the plate steel. However, the experiments also show evidence for very localized and isolated steel melting as revealed by localized and isolated pitting of the steel surface and the response of thermocouples located within the pitted region

  8. Low temperature atmospheric microplasma jet array for uniform treatment of polymer surface for flexible electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Xiaolin; Yang, Bin; Chen, Xiang; Yang, Chunsheng; Liu, Jingquan

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the uniformity of polymer film etching by an atmospheric pressure He/O2 microplasma jet array (μPJA) is first investigated with different applied voltage. Plasma characteristics of μPJA were recorded by optical discharge images. Morphologies and chemical compositions of polymer film etched by μPJA were analyzed by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). By increasing the applied voltage from 8.5 kV to 16.4 kV, the non-uniformity of the luminous intensity of the plasma jets increases. It is interesting that the plasma treated regions are actually composed of an etched region and modification region, with distinct morphologies and chemical compositions. The diameters of the etched parylene-C film show the increase of non-uniformity with higher applied voltage. SEM results show that the non-uniformity of surface morphologies of both the modification regions and etched regions increases with the increase of applied voltage. EDS and XPS results also present the significant effect of higher applied voltage on the non-uniformity of surface chemical compositions of both modification and etched regions. The Coulomb interaction of the streamer heads and the hydrodynamic interaction between the plasma jets and the surrounding air are considered to be responsible for this phenomenon. The results shown in this work can help improve the processing quality of polymer film etched by an atmospheric pressure microplasma jet array and two applications are demonstrated to illustrate the uniform downstream surface treatment.

  9. Theoretical study on instability mechanism of jet-induced sloshing. Model development using Orr-Sommerfeld equation generalized for non-parallel flow; Funryu reiki sloshing gensho no hassei kiko ni kansuru rironteki kenkyu. Hiheiko nagare ni ippankashita Orr-Sommerfeld hoteishiki wo mochiita model ka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eguchi, Y. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-07-25

    A theoretical model was developed to study the mechanism of free surface sloshing in a vessel induced by a steady vertical jet flow. In the model, jet deflection is calculated with eigen values of the generalized Orr-Sommerfeld equation which is applicable to slightly non-parallel jet. Instability criteria employed in the model are (1) resonace condition between sloshing and jet frequencies and (2) {pi} phase relation between jet displacement at an inlet and global jet deflection. Numerical results of the mathematical model have shown good agreement with experimental ones, which justifies that the inherent instability of free jet itself and edge tone feedback are the main causes of the self-excited sloshing. 9 refs., 10 figs.

  10. Simulation of buoyancy-induced turbulent flow from a hot horizontal jet

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2014-02-01

    Experimental visualizations and numerical simulations of a horizontal hot water jet entering cold water into a rectangular storage tank are described. Three different temperature differences and their corresponding Reynolds numbers are considered. Both experimental visualization and numerical computations are carried out for the same flow and thermal conditions. The realizable k - ε model is used for modeling the turbulent flow while the buoyancy is modeled using the Boussinesq approximation. Polynomial approximations of the water properties are used to compare with the Boussinesq approximation. Numerical solutions are obtained for unsteady flow while pressure, velocity, temperature and turbulence distributions inside the water tank as well as the Froude number are analyzed. The experimental visualizations are performed at intervals of five seconds for all different cases. The simulated results are compared with the visualized results, and both of them show the stratification phenomena and buoyancy force effects due to temperature difference and density variation. After certain times, depending on the case condition, the flow tends to reach a steady state. © 2014 Publishing House for Journal of Hydrodynamics.

  11. Overlayer structure of subphthalocyanine derivative deposited on Au (111) surface by a spray-jet technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hitoshi; Yamada, Toshiki; Miki, Hideki; Mashiko, Shinro

    2006-01-01

    A new spray-jet technique was used to deposit subphthalocyanine derivative (chloro[tri-tert-butyl subphthalocyaninato]boron (TBSubPc)) on Au (111) surface in an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) chamber. The deposited molecular overlayer was observed with UHV scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) at 77 K. The STM images showed that TBSubPc molecules formed a stripe pattern with regular spacing, indicating that they preferentially adsorbed along the herringbone structure of the Au (111) surface. This behavior was very similar to that of TBSubPc molecules deposited by thermal evaporation

  12. Analysis of Flow Evolution and Thermal Instabilities in the Near-Nozzle Region of a Free Plane Laminar Jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector Barrios-Piña

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work focuses on the evolution of a free plane laminar jet in the near-nozzle region. The jet is buoyant because it is driven by a continuous addition of both buoyancy and momentum at the source. Buoyancy is given by a temperature difference between the jet and the environment. To study the jet evolution, numerical simulations were performed for two Richardson numbers: the one corresponding to a temperature difference slightly near the validity of the Boussinesq approximation and the other one corresponding to a higher temperature difference. For this purpose, a time dependent numerical model is used to solve the fully dimensional Navier-Stokes equations. Density variations are given by the ideal gas law and flow properties as dynamic viscosity and thermal conductivity are considered nonconstant. Particular attention was paid to the implementation of the boundary conditions to ensure jet stability and flow rates control. The numerical simulations were also reproduced by using the Boussinesq approximation to find out more about its pertinence for this kind of flows. Finally, a stability diagram is also obtained to identify the onset of the unsteady state in the near-nozzle region by varying control parameters of momentum and buoyancy. It is found that, at the onset of the unsteady state, momentum effects decrease almost linearly when buoyancy effects increase.

  13. Numerical simulation of cavitation flow characteristic on Pelton turbine bucket surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, C. J.; Xiao, Y. X.; Zhu, W.; Yao, Y. Y.; Wang, Z. W.

    2015-01-01

    The internal flow in the rotating bucket of Pelton turbine is free water sheet flow with moving boundary. The runner operates under atmospheric and the cavitation in the bucket is still a controversial problem. While more and more field practice proved that there exists cavitation in the Pelton turbine bucket and the cavitation erosion may occur at the worst which will damage the bucket. So a well prediction about the cavitation flow on the bucket surface of Pelton turbine and the followed cavitation erosion characteristic can effectively guide the optimization of Pelton runner bucket and the stable operation of unit. This paper will investigate the appropriate numerical model and method for the unsteady 3D water-air-vapour multiphase cavitation flow which may occur on the Pelton bucket surface. The computational domain will include the nozzle pipe flow, semi-free surface jet and runner domain. Via comparing the numerical results of different turbulence, cavity and multiphase models, this paper will determine the suitable numerical model and method for the simulation of cavitation on the Pelton bucket surface. In order to investigate the conditions corresponding to the cavitation phenomena on the bucket surface, this paper will adopt the suitable model to simulate the various operational conditions of different water head and needle travel. Then, the characteristics of cavitation flow the development process of cavitation will be analysed in in great detail.

  14. Numerical simulation of cavitation flow characteristic on Pelton turbine bucket surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, C J; Xiao, Y X; Zhu, W; Yao, Y Y; Wang, Z W

    2015-01-01

    The internal flow in the rotating bucket of Pelton turbine is free water sheet flow with moving boundary. The runner operates under atmospheric and the cavitation in the bucket is still a controversial problem. While more and more field practice proved that there exists cavitation in the Pelton turbine bucket and the cavitation erosion may occur at the worst which will damage the bucket. So a well prediction about the cavitation flow on the bucket surface of Pelton turbine and the followed cavitation erosion characteristic can effectively guide the optimization of Pelton runner bucket and the stable operation of unit. This paper will investigate the appropriate numerical model and method for the unsteady 3D water-air-vapour multiphase cavitation flow which may occur on the Pelton bucket surface. The computational domain will include the nozzle pipe flow, semi-free surface jet and runner domain. Via comparing the numerical results of different turbulence, cavity and multiphase models, this paper will determine the suitable numerical model and method for the simulation of cavitation on the Pelton bucket surface. In order to investigate the conditions corresponding to the cavitation phenomena on the bucket surface, this paper will adopt the suitable model to simulate the various operational conditions of different water head and needle travel. Then, the characteristics of cavitation flow the development process of cavitation will be analysed in in great detail

  15. Evaluation of surface integrity of WEDM processed inconel 718 for jet engine application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Priyaranjan; Tripathy, Ashis; Sahoo, Narayan

    2018-03-01

    A unique superalloy, Inconel 718 has been serving for aerospace industries since last two decades. Due to its attractive properties such as high strength at elevated temperature, improved corrosion and oxidation resistance, it is widely employed in the manufacturing of jet engine components. These components require complex shape without affecting the parent material properties. Traditional machining methods seem to be ineffective to fulfil the demand of aircraft industries. Therefore, an advanced feature of wire electrical discharge machining (WEDM) has been utilized to improve the surface features of the jet engine components. With the help of trim-offset technology, it became possible to achieve considerable amount of residual stresses, lower peak to valley height, reduced density of craters and micro globules, minimum hardness alteration and negligible recast layer formation.

  16. Cracks and nanodroplets produced on tungsten surface samples by dense plasma jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ticoş, C. M.; Galaţanu, M.; Galaţanu, A.; Luculescu, C.; Scurtu, A.; Udrea, N.; Ticoş, D.; Dumitru, M.

    2018-03-01

    Small samples of 12.5 mm in diameter made from pure tungsten were exposed to a dense plasma jet produced by a coaxial plasma gun operated at 2 kJ. The surface of the samples was analyzed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) before and after applying consecutive plasma shots. Cracks and craters were produced in the surface due to surface tensions during plasma heating. Nanodroplets and micron size droplets could be observed on the samples surface. An energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analysis revealed that the composition of these droplets coincided with that of the gun electrode material. Four types of samples were prepared by spark plasma sintering from powders with the average particle size ranging from 70 nanometers up to 80 μm. The plasma power load to the sample surface was estimated to be ≈4.7 MJ m-2 s-1/2 per shot. The electron temperature and density in the plasma jet had peak values 17 eV and 1.6 × 1022 m-3, respectively.

  17. Jets/MET Performance with the combination of Particle flow algorithm and SoftKiller

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, Kohei

    2017-01-01

    The main purpose of my work is to study the performance of the combination of Particle flow algorithm(PFlow) and SoftKiller(SK), “PF+SK”. ATLAS experiment currently employes Topological clusters(Topo) for jet reconstruction, but we want to replace it with more effective one, PFlow. PFlow provides us with another method to reconstruct jets[1]. With this algorithm, we combine the energy deposits in calorimeters with the measurement in ID tracker. This strategy enables us to claim these consistent measurements in a detector come from same particles and avoid double counting. SK is a simple and effective way of suppressing pile-up[2]. This way, we divide rapidity-azimuthal plane into square patches and eliminate particles lower than the threshold "#$%, which is derived from each ",' so that the median of " density becomes zero. Practically, this is equal to gradually increasing "#$% till exactly half of patches becomes empty. Because there is no official calibration on PF+SK so far, we have t...

  18. Mathematical model of an indirect action fuel flow controller for aircraft jet engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudosie, Alexandru-Nicolae

    2017-06-01

    The paper deals with a fuel mass flow rate controller with indirect action for aircraft jet engines. The author has identified fuel controller's main parts and its operation mode, then, based on these observations, one has determined motion equations of each main part, which have built system's non-linear mathematical model. In order to realize a better study this model was linearised (using the finite differences method) and then adimensionalized. Based on this new form of the mathematical model, after applying Laplace transformation, the embedded system (controller+engine) was described by the block diagram with transfer functions. Some Simulink-Matlab simulations were performed, concerning system's time behavior for step input, which lead to some useful conclusions and extension possibilities.

  19. Design & Development of a High Mass Flow Piston Synthetic Jet Actuator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Hamad Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The idea of having a device that is capable of working in a systematic process allowing control of the boundary layer by means of operated on high-frequency, small-scale, and low energy actuators has caught the interest of the aerodynamicist community. With an eye on the available data and potential flow control advantages, our research team set out to manufacture a compact SJA (Synthetic Jet Actuator of its own, which would be capable of being installed inside an airfoil. It consists of components such as a single piston cylinder, with variable exit geometry along with the control system that has an electrical actuator which can be regulated in order for it to be capable of producing various operating frequencies. This paper consists of a study into the design of a single piston device SJA and will present all significant data both theoretical and computational regarding its design and performance.

  20. A numerical study of a turbulent axisymmetric jet emerging in a co-flowing stream

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoud, Houda, E-mail: mahhouda2003@yahoo.f [Unite de thermique et thermodynamique des procedes industriels, Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs de Monastir, route de Ouardanine, 5020 Monastir (Tunisia); Kriaa, Wassim; Mhiri, Hatem [Unite de thermique et thermodynamique des procedes industriels, Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs de Monastir, route de Ouardanine, 5020 Monastir (Tunisia); Palec, Georges Le; Bournot, Philippe [IUSTI, UMR CNRS 6595, 5 Rue Enrico Fermi, Technopole de Chateau-Gombert, 13013 Marseille (France)

    2010-11-15

    In this work, we propose a numerical study of an axisymmetric turbulent jet discharging into co-flowing stream with different velocities ratios ranging between 0 and {infinity}. The standard k-{epsilon} model and the RSM model were applied in this study. The numerical resolution of the governing equations was carried out using two computed codes: the first is a personal code and the second is a commercial CFD code FLUENT 6.2. These two codes are based on a finite volume method. The present predictions are compared with the experimental data. The results show that the two turbulence models are valid to predict the average and turbulent flow sizes. Also, the effect of the velocities ratios on the flow structure was examined. For R{sub u} > 1, it is noted the appearance of the fall velocity zone due to the presence of a trough low pressure. This fall velocity becomes increasingly intense according to R{sub u} and changes into a recirculation zone for R{sub u} {>=} 4.5. This zone is larger and approaches more the nozzle injection when R{sub u} increases.

  1. Fault-tolerant control with mixed aerodynamic surfaces and RCS jets for hypersonic reentry vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing He

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a fault-tolerant strategy for hypersonic reentry vehicles with mixed aerodynamic surfaces and reaction control systems (RCS under external disturbances and subject to actuator faults. Aerodynamic surfaces are treated as the primary actuator in normal situations, and they are driven by a continuous quadratic programming (QP allocator to generate torque commanded by a nonlinear adaptive feedback control law. When aerodynamic surfaces encounter faults, they may not be able to provide sufficient torque as commanded, and RCS jets are activated to augment the aerodynamic surfaces to compensate for insufficient torque. Partial loss of effectiveness and stuck faults are considered in this paper, and observers are designed to detect and identify the faults. Based on the fault identification results, an RCS control allocator using integer linear programming (ILP techniques is designed to determine the optimal combination of activated RCS jets. By treating the RCS control allocator as a quantization element, closed-loop stability with both continuous and quantized inputs is analyzed. Simulation results verify the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  2. Flow-Field Characteristics of High-Temperature Annular Buoyant Jets and Their Development Laws Influenced by Ventilation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The flow-field characteristics of high-temperature annular buoyant jets as well as the development laws influenced by ventilation system were studied using numerical methods to eliminate the pollutants effectively in this paper. The development laws of high-temperature annular buoyant jets were analyzed and compared with previous studies, including radial velocity distribution, axial velocity and temperature decay, reattachment position, cross-section diameter, volumetric flow rate, and velocity field characteristics with different pressures at the exhaust hood inlet. The results showed that when the ratio of outer diameter to inner diameter of the annulus was smaller than 5/2, the flow-field characteristics had significant difference compared to circular buoyant jets with the same outer diameter. For similar diameter ratios, reattachment in this paper occurred further downstream in contrast to previous study. Besides, the development laws of volumetric flow rate and cross-section diameter were given with different initial parameters. In addition, through analyzing air distribution characteristics under the coupling effect of high-temperature annular buoyant jets and ventilation system, it could be found that the position where maximum axial velocity occurred was changing gradually when the pressure at the exhaust hood inlet changed from 0 Pa to −5 Pa.

  3. Flow-field characteristics of high-temperature annular buoyant jets and their development laws influenced by ventilation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Huang, Yanqiu; Liu, Jiaping; Wang, Hai; Liu, Qiuhan

    2013-01-01

    The flow-field characteristics of high-temperature annular buoyant jets as well as the development laws influenced by ventilation system were studied using numerical methods to eliminate the pollutants effectively in this paper. The development laws of high-temperature annular buoyant jets were analyzed and compared with previous studies, including radial velocity distribution, axial velocity and temperature decay, reattachment position, cross-section diameter, volumetric flow rate, and velocity field characteristics with different pressures at the exhaust hood inlet. The results showed that when the ratio of outer diameter to inner diameter of the annulus was smaller than 5/2, the flow-field characteristics had significant difference compared to circular buoyant jets with the same outer diameter. For similar diameter ratios, reattachment in this paper occurred further downstream in contrast to previous study. Besides, the development laws of volumetric flow rate and cross-section diameter were given with different initial parameters. In addition, through analyzing air distribution characteristics under the coupling effect of high-temperature annular buoyant jets and ventilation system, it could be found that the position where maximum axial velocity occurred was changing gradually when the pressure at the exhaust hood inlet changed from 0 Pa to -5 Pa.

  4. Mixing by rotary jet heads: Indications of the benefits of head rotation under turbulent and transitional flow conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordkvist, Mikkel; Vognsen, Marie; Nienow, Alfred W.

    2008-01-01

    Mixing times were obtained by the iodine-thiosulphate decolorization technique using rotary jet heads (RJH) for mixing in a Perspex tank with an inner diameter of 0.75 m and an aspect ratio of 2.5 using both water (turbulent flow) and shear-thinning, carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) solutions...

  5. Blob/hole formation and zonal-flow generation in the edge plasma of the JET tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, G.S.; Naulin, Volker; Fundamenski, W.

    2009-01-01

    The first experimental evidence showing the connection between blob/hole formation and zonal-flow generation was obtained in the edge plasma of the JET tokamak. Holes as well as blobs are observed to be born in the edge shear layer, where zonal-flows shear off meso-scale coherent structures......, leading to disconnection of positive and negative pressure perturbations. The newly formed blobs transport azimuthal momentum up the gradient of the azimuthal flow and drive the zonal-flow shear while moving outwards. During this process energy is transferred from the meso-scale coherent structures...

  6. Flow instability in laminar jet flames driven by alternating current electric fields

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Gyeong Taek; Park, Daegeun; Cha, Min; Park, Jeong; Chung, Suk-Ho

    2016-01-01

    The effect of electric fields on the instability of laminar nonpremixed jet flames was investigated experimentally by applying the alternating current (AC) to a jet nozzle. We aimed to elucidate the origin of the occurrence of twin-lifted jet flames

  7. Influence of Variously Modified Surface of Aluminium Alloy on the Effect of Pulsating Water Jet

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klich, Jiří; Klichová, Dagmar; Foldyna, Vladimír; Hlaváček, Petr; Foldyna, Josef

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 10 (2017), s. 577-582 ISSN 0039-2480 R&D Projects: GA MPO(CZ) FV10446; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1406; GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : pulsating water jet * surface topography * material erosion Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools OBOR OECD: Mechanical engineering Impact factor: 0.914, year: 2016 http://ojs.sv-jme.eu/index.php/sv-jme/ article /view/sv-jme.2017.4356

  8. Creation of subsonic macro-and microjets facilities and automated measuring system (AMS-2) for the spatial - temporal hot - wire anemometric visualization of jet flow field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, A. M.; Grek, G. R.; Gilev, V. M.; Zverkov, I. D.

    2017-10-01

    Macro-and microjets facilities for generation of the round and plane subsonic jets are designed and fabricated. Automated measuring system (AMS - 2) for the spatial - temporal hot - wire anemometric visualization of jet flow field is designed and fabricated. Coordinate device and unit of the measurement, collecting, storage and processing of hot - wire anemometric information were integrated in the AMS. Coordinate device is intended for precision movement of the hot - wire probe in jet flow field according to the computer program. At the same time accuracy of the hot - wire probe movement is 5 microns on all three coordinates (x, y, z). Unit of measurement, collecting, storage and processing of hot - wire anemometric information is intended for the hot - wire anemometric measurement of the jet flow field parameters (registration of the mean - U and fluctuation - u' characteristics of jet flow velocity), their accumulation and preservation in the computer memory, and also carries out their processing according to certain programms.

  9. LES of turbulent jet in cross flow: Part 2 – POD analysis and identification of coherent structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavar, Dalibor; Meyer, Knud Erik

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents results of a Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) investigation of the LES based numerical simulation of the jet-in-crossflow (JICF) flowfield with Reynolds number based on the cross flow velocity and jet diameter Re=2400 and the velocity ratio of R=3.3. LES results are valida......The paper presents results of a Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) investigation of the LES based numerical simulation of the jet-in-crossflow (JICF) flowfield with Reynolds number based on the cross flow velocity and jet diameter Re=2400 and the velocity ratio of R=3.3. LES results...... results are directly compared and found to be in close agreement with results of a Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) based planar (2D) snapshot POD analysis by Meyer et al. (JFM 583, p. 199–227, 2007), indicating that LES is able to predict the same large scale flow dynamics as that captured by PIV. Some...... for the creation of wake vortices and that the wake vortex originates from the hanging vortex, but grows quickly by “sucking up” the wall boundary layer fluid and vorticity....

  10. Surface roughness influences on the behaviour of flow inside microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, M. H.; Castro, C. S.; Garcia, D. A.; Henrique, J. S.

    2018-03-01

    This work discusses influence of the surface roughness on the behavior of liquids flowing inside microchannels. By measuring the flow profile using the micro-PIV technique, the flow of water inside two rectangular microchannels of different wall roughness and in a circular smooth microchannel was studied. Comparisons were made among the experimental results, showing that a metrological approach concerning surface characteristics of microdevices is required to ensure reliability of the measurements for flow analyses in microfluidic processes.

  11. Reynolds averaged modelling of low momentum propane jet diffusion flames in cross flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majeski, A.J.; Chui, E.H. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). CANMET Energy Technology Centre; Kostiuk, L.W. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2003-07-01

    It is common practice to use continuous low flow rate flares to dispose of unwanted or by-product combustible gases resulting from the manufacturing process or oil recovery operations. This study evaluates the usefulness of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling in the context of low momentum flux reacting jets. The experimental data was gathered at the University of Alberta's Combustion Wind Tunnel. This data was used to compare data obtained from the CFD simulations. Only a small subset of the experimental conditions was used for the computational model. No attempt was made to fine tune any of the individual models. They were all part of the commercial CFD software package CFX-TASC flow, by ANSYS Inc. Flame length and angle results compared favourably with experiments. The shape of the plume changed significantly in the far field. This could be explained by distortion caused by the turbulence model used. A flame front model was incorporated in an effort to estimate combustion efficiency. The results obtained were not conclusive. 20 refs., 4 figs.

  12. An Arduino microcontroller based digitalization of a vertical traversing mechanism used for the analysis of jet flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, S. M. Rakibur; Roshid, S. M. Al Mamun Or; Nishan, Ishtiaque Ahmed

    2017-12-01

    This paper deals with the design of a drive system of traversing mechanism used to position the pitot tube in desired position of the jet flow field. In this system a stepper motor is driven by a `dual H bridge' motor driver and programmed Arduino microcontroller. The stepper motor is made to move in precise steps to obtain desired movement of the traversing mechanism. The jet flow is characterized in three distinct zones - initial zone, transition zone and developed zone. Each zone can be divided into required number of segments based on variation of velocity. By assigning number of segments, step range and number of steps in each segment as inputs, it is possible to collect data in all the flow zones according to our programmed schedule. The system will allow taking a large number of readings automatically.

  13. Free stream turbulence and density ratio effects on the interaction region of a jet in a cross flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wark, C. E.; Foss, J. F.

    1984-01-01

    Jets of low temperature air are introduced into the aft sections of gas turbine combustors for the purpose of cooling the high temperature gases and quenching the combustion reactions. Research studies, motivated by this complex flow field, have been executed by introducing a heated jet into the cross stream of a wind tunnel. The investigation by Kamotani and Greber stands as a prime example of such investigations and it serves as the principal reference for the present study. The low disturbance level of the cross stream, in their study and in similar research investigations, is compatible with an interest in identifying the basic features of this flow field. The influence of the prototypes' strongly disturbed cross flow is not, however, made apparent in these prior investigations.

  14. Effects of confinement, geometry, inlet velocity profile, and Reynolds number on the asymmetry of opposed-jet flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Abtin; Chen, Kevin K.; Burrell, Robert R.; Egolfopoulos, Fokion N.

    2018-04-01

    The opposed-jet counterflow configuration is widely used to measure fundamental flame properties that are essential targets for validating chemical kinetic models. The main and key assumption of the counterflow configuration in laminar flame experiments is that the flow field is steady and quasi-one-dimensional. In this study, experiments and numerical simulations were carried out to investigate the behavior and controlling parameters of counterflowing isothermal air jets for various nozzle designs, Reynolds numbers, and surrounding geometries. The flow field in the jets' impingement region was analyzed in search of instabilities, asymmetries, and two-dimensional effects that can introduce errors when the data are compared with results of quasi-one-dimensional simulations. The modeling involved transient axisymmetric numerical simulations along with bifurcation analysis, which revealed that when the flow field is confined between walls, local bifurcation occurs, which in turn results in asymmetry, deviation from the one-dimensional assumption, and sensitivity of the flow field structure to boundary conditions and surrounding geometry. Particle image velocimetry was utilized and results revealed that for jets of equal momenta at low Reynolds numbers of the order of 300, the flow field is asymmetric with respect to the middle plane between the nozzles even in the absence of confining walls. The asymmetry was traced to the asymmetric nozzle exit velocity profiles caused by unavoidable imperfections in the nozzle assembly. The asymmetry was not detectable at high Reynolds numbers of the order of 1000 due to the reduced sensitivity of the flow field to boundary conditions. The cases investigated computationally covered a wide range of Reynolds numbers to identify designs that are minimally affected by errors in the experimental procedures or manufacturing imperfections, and the simulations results were used to identify conditions that best conform to the assumptions of

  15. Viscous flows stretching and shrinking of surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Mehmood, Ahmer

    2017-01-01

    This authored monograph provides a detailed discussion of the boundary layer flow due to a moving plate. The topical focus lies on the 2- and 3-dimensional case, considering axially symmetric and unsteady flows. The author derives a criterion for the self-similar and non-similar flow, and the turbulent flow due to a stretching or shrinking sheet is also discussed. The target audience primarily comprises research experts in the field of boundary layer flow, but the book will also be beneficial for graduate students.

  16. Atmospheric pressure plasma jets : properties of plasma bullets and the dynamics of the interaction with dielectric surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sobota, A.; Slikboer, E.; Guaitella, O.Y.N.

    2015-01-01

    Cold atmospheric pressure plasma jets, although mostly researched for applications in surface treatment, are rarely investigated in the presence of a surface. This paper presents the properties of plasma bullets formed in the capillary as well as the dynamics of the propagation of the plasma on

  17. Surface flow in severe plastic deformation of metals by sliding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahato, A; Yeung, H; Chandrasekar, S; Guo, Y

    2014-01-01

    An in situ study of flow in severe plastic deformation (SPD) of surfaces by sliding is described. The model system – a hard wedge sliding against a metal surface – is representative of surface conditioning processes typical of manufacturing, and sliding wear. By combining high speed imaging and image analysis, important characteristics of unconstrained plastic flow inherent to this system are highlighted. These characteristics include development of large plastic strains on the surface and in the subsurface by laminar type flow, unusual fluid-like flow with vortex formation and surface folding, and defect and particle generation. Preferred conditions, as well as undesirable regimes, for surface SPD are demarcated. Implications for surface conditioning in manufacturing, modeling of surface deformation and wear are discussed

  18. Analytical and experimental study of the acoustics and the flow field characteristics of cavitating self-resonating water jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chahine, G.L.; Genoux, P.F.; Johnson, V.E. Jr.; Frederick, G.S.

    1984-09-01

    Waterjet nozzles (STRATOJETS) have been developed which achieve passive structuring of cavitating submerged jets into discrete ring vortices, and which possess cavitation incipient numbers six times higher than obtained with conventional cavitating jet nozzles. In this study we developed analytical and numerical techniques and conducted experimental work to gain an understanding of the basic phenomena involved. The achievements are: (1) a thorough analysis of the acoustic dynamics of the feed pipe to the nozzle; (2) a theory for bubble ring growth and collapse; (3) a numerical model for jet simulation; (4) an experimental observation and analysis of candidate second-generation low-sigma STRATOJETS. From this study we can conclude that intensification of bubble ring collapse and design of highly resonant feed tubes can lead to improved drilling rates. The models here described are excellent tools to analyze the various parameters needed for STRATOJET optimizations. Further analysis is needed to introduce such important factors as viscosity, nozzle-jet interaction, and ring-target interaction, and to develop the jet simulation model to describe the important fine details of the flow field at the nozzle exit.

  19. A study of performance parameters on drag and heat flux reduction efficiency of combinational novel cavity and opposing jet concept in hypersonic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xi-wan; Guo, Zhen-yun; Huang, Wei; Li, Shi-bin; Yan, Li

    2017-02-01

    The drag reduction and thermal protection system applied to hypersonic re-entry vehicles have attracted an increasing attention, and several novel concepts have been proposed by researchers. In the current study, the influences of performance parameters on drag and heat reduction efficiency of combinational novel cavity and opposing jet concept has been investigated numerically. The Reynolds-average Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations coupled with the SST k-ω turbulence model have been employed to calculate its surrounding flowfields, and the first-order spatially accurate upwind scheme appears to be more suitable for three-dimensional flowfields after grid independent analysis. Different cases of performance parameters, namely jet operating conditions, freestream angle of attack and physical dimensions, are simulated based on the verification of numerical method, and the effects on shock stand-off distance, drag force coefficient, surface pressure and heat flux distributions have been analyzed. This is the basic study for drag reduction and thermal protection by multi-objective optimization of the combinational novel cavity and opposing jet concept in hypersonic flows in the future.

  20. New advection schemes for free surface flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavan, Sara

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to build higher order and less diffusive schemes for pollutant transport in shallow water flows or 3D free surface flows. We want robust schemes which respect the main mathematical properties of the advection equation with relatively low numerical diffusion and apply them to environmental industrial applications. Two techniques are tested in this work: a classical finite volume method and a residual distribution technique combined with a finite element method. For both methods we propose a decoupled approach since it is the most advantageous in terms of accuracy and CPU time. Concerning the first technique, a vertex-centred finite volume method is used to solve the augmented shallow water system where the numerical flux is computed through an Harten-Lax-Van Leer-Contact Riemann solver. Starting from this solution, a decoupled approach is formulated and is preferred since it allows to compute with a larger time step the advection of a tracer. This idea was inspired by Audusse, E. and Bristeau, M.O. [13]. The Monotonic Upwind Scheme for Conservation Law, combined with the decoupled approach, is then used for the second order extension in space. The wetting and drying problem is also analysed and a possible solution is presented. In the second case, the shallow water system is entirely solved using the finite element technique and the residual distribution method is applied to the solution of the tracer equation, focusing on the case of time-dependent problems. However, for consistency reasons the resolution of the continuity equation must be considered in the numerical discretization of the tracer. In order to get second order schemes for unsteady cases a predictor-corrector scheme is used in this work. A first order but less diffusive version of the predictor-corrector scheme is also introduced. Moreover, we also present a new locally semi-implicit version of the residual distribution method which, in addition to good properties in

  1. Inverse determination of convective heat transfer between an impinging jet and a continuously moving flat surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mobtil, Mohammed; Bougeard, Daniel; Solliec, Camille

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A new method for convective heat flux determination on a moving wall is proposed. • An inverse technique is used for retrieving the heat flux from IR measurements. • Heat flux distribution determination in the slot jet impingement area is performed. • The accuracy of the method is examined using CFD Based simulated experiments. • The inversion quality is tested according to several parameters of the experiments. - Abstract: In this study an inverse method is developed to determine the heat flux distribution on a moving plane wall. The method uses a thin layer of material (the measurement medium) glued on the conveyor belt. The heat flux distribution on the moving wall is then determined by an inverse method based on the temperature measurement by infrared thermography on the upper surface of the measurement medium. A finite element based inverse algorithm of a steady state heat conduction advection in the Eulerian frame is performed. The algorithm entails the use of the Tikhonov regularization method, along with the L-curve method to select an optimal regularization parameter. Both the direct solution of moving boundary problem and the inverse design formulation are presented. The accuracy of the inverse method is examined by simulating the exact and noisy data with four different values of the surface-to-jet velocity ratio, and two different materials (PVC and Aluminum) for the measurement medium. The results show a greater sensitivity to the convective heat flux allowing a better estimation of heat flux distribution for the PVC layer. An alternative underdetermined inverse scheme is also studied. This configuration allows a different extend between the retrieval heat flux surface and the measurement temperature surface

  2. hydrodynamic behavior of particles in a Jet flow of a gas fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirmomen, L.; Alavi, M.

    2005-01-01

    Numerous investigations have been devoted towards understanding the hydrodynamics of gas jets in fluidized beds. However, most of them address the problem from macroscopic point of view, which does not reveal the true behavior in the jet region at the single particle level. The present work aims to understand the jet behavior from a more fundamental level, i.e. the individual particle level. A thin rectangular gas fluidized bed, constructed from acrylic glass, with a vertical jet nozzle located at the center of the distributor was used in the work. A high speed camera with a speed up to 10,000 frames per second was used to observe the jet behavior . Analysis of large quantity of images allowed determination of solids flux, solids Velocity and solids concentration in the jet region . The model present in this work has shown better agreement with the experimental data in compare with the previous models presented in the literature

  3. A Level Set Discontinuous Galerkin Method for Free Surface Flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grooss, Jesper; Hesthaven, Jan

    2006-01-01

    We present a discontinuous Galerkin method on a fully unstructured grid for the modeling of unsteady incompressible fluid flows with free surfaces. The surface is modeled by embedding and represented by a levelset. We discuss the discretization of the flow equations and the level set equation...

  4. Local grid refinement for free-surface flow simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Plas, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The principal goal of the current study is to explore and investigate the potential of local grid refinement for increasing the numerical efficiency of free-surface flow simulations in a practical context. In this thesis we propose a method for local grid refinement in the free-surface flow model

  5. Hydrophilic film polymerized on the inner surface of PMMA tube by an atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Mengmeng; Huang, Jun; Yu, Jinsong; Chen, Guangliang; Qu, Shanqing

    2017-07-01

    Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) tube is widely used in biomedical and mechanical engineering fields. However, it is hampered for some special applications as the inner surface of PMMA tube exhibts a hydrophobic characteristic. The aim of this work is to explore the hydrophilic modification of the inner surface of the PMMA tubes using an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) system that incorporates the acylic acid monomer (AA). Polar groups were grafted onto the inner surface of PMMA tube via the reactive radicals (•OH, •H, •O) generated in the Ar/O2/AA plasma, which were observed by the optical emission spectroscopy (OES). The deposition of the PAA thin layer on the PMMA surface was verified through the ATR-FTIR spectra, which clearly showed the strengthened stretching vibration of the carbonyl group (C=O) at 1700 cm-1. The XPS data show that the carbon ratios of C-OH/R and COOH/R groups increased from 9.50% and 0.07% to 13.49% and 17.07% respectively when a discharge power of 50 W was used in the APPJ system. As a result, the static water contat angle (WCA) of the modified inner surface of PMMA tube decreased from 100° to 48°. Furthermore, the biocompatibility of the APP modified PMMA tubes was illustrated by the study of the adhesion of the cultured MC3T3-E1 osteocyte cells, which exhibted a significantly enhanced adhesion density.

  6. Controlling the Adhesion of Superhydrophobic Surfaces Using Electrolyte Jet Machining Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaolong; Liu, Xin; Lu, Yao; Zhou, Shining; Gao, Mingqian; Song, Jinlong; Xu, Wenji

    2016-01-01

    Patterns with controllable adhesion on superhydrophobic areas have various biomedical and chemical applications. Electrolyte jet machining technique (EJM), an electrochemical machining method, was firstly exploited in constructing dimples with various profiles on the superhydrophobic Al alloy surface using different processing parameters. Sliding angles of water droplets on those dimples firstly increased and then stabilized at a certain value with the increase of the processing time or the applied voltages of the EJM, indicating that surfaces with different adhesion force could be obtained by regulating the processing parameters. The contact angle hysteresis and the adhesion force that restricts the droplet from sliding off were investigated through experiments. The results show that the adhesion force could be well described using the classical Furmidge equation. On account of this controllable adhesion force, water droplets could either be firmly pinned to the surface, forming various patterns or slide off at designed tilting angles at specified positions on a superhydrophobic surface. Such dimples on superhydrophopbic surfaces can be applied in water harvesting, biochemical analysis and lab-on-chip devices. PMID:27046771

  7. Multi-objective design optimization of the transverse gaseous jet in supersonic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Yang, Jun; Yan, Li

    2014-01-01

    The mixing process between the injectant and the supersonic crossflow is one of the important issues for the design of the scramjet engine, and the efficiency mixing has a great impact on the improvement of the combustion efficiency. A hovering vortex is formed between the separation region and the barrel shock wave, and this may be induced by the large negative density gradient. The separation region provides a good mixing area for the injectant and the subsonic boundary layer. In the current study, the transverse injection flow field with a freestream Mach number of 3.5 has been optimized by the non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm (NSGA II) coupled with the Kriging surrogate model; and the variance analysis method and the extreme difference analysis method have been employed to evaluate the values of the objective functions. The obtained results show that the jet-to-crossflow pressure ratio is the most important design variable for the transverse injection flow field, and the injectant molecular weight and the slot width should be considered for the mixing process between the injectant and the supersonic crossflow. There exists an optimal penetration height for the mixing efficiency, and its value is about 14.3 mm in the range considered in the current study. The larger penetration height provides a larger total pressure loss, and there must be a tradeoff between these two objection functions. In addition, this study demonstrates that the multi-objective design optimization method with the data mining technique can be used efficiently to explore the relationship between the design variables and the objective functions.

  8. An accurate quantification of the flow structure along the acoustic signal cycle in a forced two-phase jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calvo Bernad Esteban

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an experimental study of an acoustically forced two-phase air jet generated by a convergent nozzle. The used particles are transparent glass spheres with diameters between 2 and 50 μm (which gives Stokes number of order 1 and the selected forcing frequency (f=400 Hz induces a powerful nearly periodic flow pattern. Measurements were done by a two-colour Phase-Doppler Anemometer. The experimental setup is computer-controlled to provide an accurate control with a high long-term stability. Measurements cover the whole forcing signal cycle. Raw measurements were carefully post-processed to avoid bias induced by the forcing and the instrument setup, as well as obtain right mean values of the dispersed flow. The effect of the forcing and the particle load allows authors to establish the effect of the acoustic forcing and the particle load on the jet.

  9. Transient disturbance growth in flows over convex surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Michael; Hack, M. J. Philipp

    2017-11-01

    Flows over curved surfaces occur in a wide range of applications including airfoils, compressor and turbine vanes as well as aerial, naval and ground vehicles. In most of these applications the surface has convex curvature, while concave surfaces are less common. Since monotonic boundary-layer flows over convex surfaces are exponentially stable, they have received considerably less attention than flows over concave walls which are destabilized by centrifugal forces. Non-modal mechanisms may nonetheless enable significant disturbance growth which can make the flow susceptible to secondary instabilities. A parametric investigation of the transient growth and secondary instability of flows over convex surfaces is performed. The specific conditions yielding the maximal transient growth and strongest instability are identified. The effect of wall-normal and spanwise inflection points on the instability process is discussed. Finally, the role and significance of additional parameters, such as the geometry and pressure gradient, is analyzed.

  10. The evolution of the flame surface in turbulent premixed jet flames at high Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luca, Stefano; Attili, Antonio; Bisetti, Fabrizio

    2017-11-01

    A set of direct numerical simulations of turbulent premixed flames in a spatially developing turbulent slot burner at four Reynolds number is presented. This configuration is of interest since it displays turbulent production by mean shear as in real combustion devices. The gas phase hydrodynamics are modeled with the reactive, unsteady Navier-Stokes equations in the low Mach number limit, with finite-rate chemistry consisting of 16 species and 73 reactions. For the highest jet Reynolds number of 22 ×103, 22 Billion grid points are employed. The jet consists of a lean methane/air mixture at 4 atm and preheated to 800 K. The analysis of stretch statistics shows that the mean total stretch is close to zero. Mean stretch decreases moving downstream from positive to negative values, suggesting a formation of surface area in the near field and destruction at the tip of the flame; the mean contribution of the tangential strain term is positive, while the mean contribution of the propagative term is always negative. Positive values of stretch are due to the tangential strain rate term, while large negative values are associated with the propagative term. Increasing Reynolds number is found to decrease the correlation between stretch and the single contributions.

  11. Effect of corona discharge plasma jet on surface-borne microorganisms and sprouting of broccoli seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Je-Wook; Puligundla, Pradeep; Mok, Chulkyoon

    2017-01-01

    Different pathogenic microorganisms have been reported to cause sprouts-associated outbreaks. In order to sterilise and enhance the germination of seeds, non-thermal plasma has been increasingly investigated in the field of agricultural science as an alternative to the traditional pre-sowing seed treatments. This work aimed to evaluate the effect of corona discharge plasma jet (CDPJ) on disinfection of the natural bio-contaminants of broccoli seed and also studied the plasma effect on sprout seed germination rate and physico-chemical properties of sprouts. Aerobic bacteria, moulds and yeasts, B. cereus, E. coli, Salmonella spp. were detected on the broccoli seed surface. After 0-3 min treatment using CDPJ, the detected microorganisms were reduced in the range of 1.2-2.3 log units. Inactivation patterns were better explained using pseudo-first-order kinetics. The plasma treatment of seeds up to 2 min exhibited a positive effect on germination rate, seedling growth. The physico-chemical and sensory characteristics of sprouts were unaffected due to the CDPJ treatment of their respective seeds. Corona discharge plasma jet can potentially be used for microbial decontamination of broccoli seeds. In addition, the plasma treatment of broccoli sprout seeds has enabled a significant enhancement in their germination rate and seedling growth without compromising physico-chemical and sensory characteristics of their corresponding sprouts. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Influence of slip-surface geometry on earth-flow deformation, Montaguto earth flow, southern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerriero, L.; Coe, Jeffrey A.; Revellio, P.; Grelle, G.; Pinto, F.; Guadagno, F.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated relations between slip-surface geometry and deformational structures and hydrologic features at the Montaguto earth flow in southern Italy between 1954 and 2010. We used 25 boreholes, 15 static cone-penetration tests, and 22 shallow-seismic profiles to define the geometry of basal- and lateral-slip surfaces; and 9 multitemporal maps to quantify the spatial and temporal distribution of normal faults, thrust faults, back-tilted surfaces, strike-slip faults, flank ridges, folds, ponds, and springs. We infer that the slip surface is a repeating series of steeply sloping surfaces (risers) and gently sloping surfaces (treads). Stretching of earth-flow material created normal faults at risers, and shortening of earth-flow material created thrust faults, back-tilted surfaces, and ponds at treads. Individual pairs of risers and treads formed quasi-discrete kinematic zones within the earth flow that operated in unison to transmit pulses of sediment along the length of the flow. The locations of strike-slip faults, flank ridges, and folds were not controlled by basal-slip surface topography but were instead dependent on earth-flow volume and lateral changes in the direction of the earth-flow travel path. The earth-flow travel path was strongly influenced by inactive earth-flow deposits and pre-earth-flow drainages whose positions were determined by tectonic structures. The implications of our results that may be applicable to other earth flows are that structures with strikes normal to the direction of earth-flow motion (e.g., normal faults and thrust faults) can be used as a guide to the geometry of basal-slip surfaces, but that depths to the slip surface (i.e., the thickness of an earth flow) will vary as sediment pulses are transmitted through a flow.

  13. In vitro characterization of two different atmospheric plasma jet chemical functionalizations of titanium surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mussano, F., E-mail: federico.mussano@unito.it [CIR Dental School, Department of Surgical Sciences UNITO, via Nizza 230, 10126, Turin (Italy); Genova, T. [CIR Dental School, Department of Surgical Sciences UNITO, via Nizza 230, 10126, Turin (Italy); Department of Life Sciences and Systems Biology, UNITO, via Accademia Albertina 13, 10123, Turin (Italy); Verga Falzacappa, E. [Department of Molecular Science and Nanosystems, UNIVE, Via Torino 155, 30170, Venezia (Italy); Nadir srl, Via Torino 155, 30170 Venezia (Italy); Scopece, P. [Nadir srl, Via Torino 155, 30170 Venezia (Italy); Munaron, L. [Department of Life Sciences and Systems Biology, UNITO, via Accademia Albertina 13, 10123, Turin (Italy); Centre for Nanostructured Interfaces and Surfaces (NIS) (Italy); Rivolo, P.; Mandracci, P. [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Applied Science and Technology, Materials and Microsoystems Laboratory (ChiLab), Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129, Torino (Italy); Benedetti, A. [Department of Molecular Science and Nanosystems, UNIVE, Via Torino 155, 30170, Venezia (Italy); Carossa, S. [CIR Dental School, Department of Surgical Sciences UNITO, via Nizza 230, 10126, Turin (Italy); Patelli, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UNIPD, via Marzolo 8, 35122 Padova (Italy)

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • NH{sub 2}-Ti and COOH/R-Ti obtained via atmospheric plasma jet RF-APPJ portable equipment. • Higher quantity of adsorbed proteins and improved cell adhesion on treated surfaces. • More tapered and elongated cells on NH{sub 2}-Ti compared to COOH/R-Ti. • Higher osteocalcin expression on NH{sub 2}-Ti. - Abstract: Plasma surface activation and plasma polymers deposition are promising technologies capable to modulate biologically relevant surface features of biomaterials. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biological effects of two different surface modifications, i.e. amine (NH{sub 2}-Ti) and carboxylic/esteric (COOH/R-Ti) functionalities obtained from 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (3-APTES) and methylmethacrylate (MMA) precursors, respectively, through an atmospheric plasma jet RF-APPJ portable equipment. The coatings were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy, XPS and surface energy calculations. Stability in water and after UV sterilization were also verified. The pre-osteoblastic murine cell line MC3T3-E1 was used to perform the in-vitro tests. The treated samples showed a higher quantity of adsorbed proteins and improved osteoblast cells adhesion on the surfaces compared to the pristine titanium, in particular the COOH/R-Ti led to a nearly two-fold improvement. Cell proliferation on coated samples was initially (at 24 h) lower than on titanium control, while, at 48 h, COOH/R-Ti reached the proliferation rate of pristine titanium. Cells grown on NH{sub 2}-Ti were more tapered and elongated in shape with lower areas than on COOH/R-Ti enriched surfaces. Finally, NH{sub 2}-Ti significantly enhanced osteocalcin production, starting from 14 days, while COOH/R-Ti had this effect only from 21 days. Notably, NH{sub 2}-Ti was more efficient than COOH/R-Ti at 21 days. The amine functionality elicited the most relevant osteogenic effect in terms of osteocalcin expression, thus establishing an interesting correlation

  14. Heat Transfer Characteristics of a Focused Surface Acoustic Wave (F-SAW Device for Interfacial Droplet Jetting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghwi Lee

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigate the interfacial droplet jetting characteristics and thermal stability of a focused surface acoustic wave device (F-SAW. An F-SAW device capable of generating a 20 MHz surface acoustic wave by applying sufficient radio frequency power (2–19 W on a 128°-rotated YX-cut piezoelectric lithium niobate substrate for interfacial droplet jetting is proposed. The interfacial droplet jetting characteristics were visualized by a shadowgraph method using a high-speed camera, and a heat transfer experiment was conducted using K-type thermocouples. The interfacial droplet jetting characteristics (jet angle and height were analyzed for two different cases by applying a single interdigital transducer and two opposite interdigital transducers. Surface temperature variations were analyzed with radio frequency input power increases to evaluate the thermal stability of the F-SAW device in air and water environments. We demonstrate that the maximum temperature increase of the F-SAW device in the water was 1/20 of that in the air, owing to the very high convective heat transfer coefficient of the water, resulting in prevention of the performance degradation of the focused acoustic wave device.

  15. Modelling of arc jet plasma flow in transitional regime by Navier Stokes and state-to-state coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandrova, T.; Izrar, B.; Lino da Silva, M.; Dudeck, M.

    2005-01-01

    The combination of 2D Navier-Stokes and state-to-state approaches has been used to describe the air plasma flow in an arc-jet. The gas dynamic parameters were calculated in Navier-Stokes approximation in a steady state description without chemical reaction and vibrational exchanges. And then, the set of equations of vibrational level densities and atomic species densities was locally solved. Experimental validations have been performed

  16. The influence of pool geometry and induced flow patterns in rock scour by high-velocity plunging jets

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida Manso, Pedro Filipe de; Schleiss, Anton

    2007-01-01

    The dissipation of energy of flood discharges from water releasing structures of dams is often done by plunging jets diffusing in water and impacting on the riverbed downstream. The construction of expensive concrete structures for energy dissipation can be avoided but the assessment of the scour evolution is mandatory for dam safety. The scour growth rate and shape depend on the riverbed geology. The geometry of scour may influence the turbulent flow pattern in the pool, the dynamic loadings...

  17. The effect of surface tension on the contraction coefficient of a jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasmi, A; Mekias, H

    2003-01-01

    Two-dimensional free surface potential flow issued from an opening of a container is considered. The flow is assumed to be inviscid and incompressible. The mathematical problem, which is characterized by the nonlinear boundary condition on the free surface of an unknown equation, is solved via a series truncation. We computed solutions for all Weber numbers. Our problem is an extension of the work done by Ackerberg and Liu (1987 Phys. Fluids 30 289-96), the results confirm and extend their results

  18. Liquid flow along a solid surface reversibly alters interfacial chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lis, Dan; Backus, Ellen H G; Hunger, Johannes; Parekh, Sapun H; Bonn, Mischa

    2014-06-06

    In nature, aqueous solutions often move collectively along solid surfaces (for example, raindrops falling on the ground and rivers flowing through riverbeds). However, the influence of such motion on water-surface interfacial chemistry is unclear. In this work, we combine surface-specific sum frequency generation spectroscopy and microfluidics to show that at immersed calcium fluoride and fused silica surfaces, flow leads to a reversible modification of the surface charge and subsequent realignment of the interfacial water molecules. Obtaining equivalent effects under static conditions requires a substantial change in bulk solution pH (up to 2 pH units), demonstrating the coupling between flow and chemistry. These marked flow-induced variations in interfacial chemistry should substantially affect our understanding and modeling of chemical processes at immersed surfaces. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  19. Analysis of the interaction between a submerged jet and a receiver-diffuser in a reverse-flow diverter. Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.V.; Counce, R.M.

    1983-01-01

    Two mathematical models of the interaction between a submerged jet emanating from the nozzle of a reverse flow diverter (RFD) and a receiver-diffuser of a venturi-like reverse flow diverter are presented and compared with experimental data. Both models predict the output characteristics fairly accurately, although the experimentally measured flow is observed to saturate at higher values of jet dynamic pressure and at lower values of output load impedances. An analysis based on the inviscid flow model indicates cavitation as the likely cause of the flow saturation

  20. Fluctuation characteristics of arc voltage and jet flow in a non-transferred dc plasma generated at reduced pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, W X; Guo, Z Y; Meng, X; Huang, H J; Wu, C K

    2009-01-01

    A torch with a set of inter-electrode inserts between the cathode and the anode/nozzle with a wide nozzle exit was designed to generate plasma jets at chamber pressures of 500-10 000 Pa. The variation of the arc voltage was examined with the change in working parameters such as gas flow rate and chamber pressure. The fluctuation in the arc voltage was recorded with an oscilloscope, and the plasma jet fluctuation near the torch exit was observed with a high-speed video camera and detected with a double-electrostatic probe. Results show that the 300 Hz wave originated from the tri-phase rectified power supply was always detected under all generating conditions. Helmholtz oscillations over 3000 Hz was detected superposed on the 300 Hz wave at gas flow rates higher than 8.8 slm with a peak to valley amplitude lower than 5% of the average voltage value. No appreciable voltage fluctuation caused by the irregular arc root movement is detected, and mechanisms for the arc voltage and jet flow fluctuations are discussed.

  1. Water Entry and Exit of Horizontal Cylinder in Free Surface Flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafsia, Zouhaier; Maalel, Khlifa; Mnasri, Chokri; Mohamed, Omri

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes two-dimensional numerical simulations of the water entry and exit of horizontal circular cylinder at constant velocity. The deformation of free surface is described by Navier-Stokes (N S) equations of incompressible and viscous fluid with additional transport equation of the volume-of-fluid (VOF). The motion of the cylinder is modeled by the associated momentum source term implemented in the Phoenicis (Parabolic Hyperbolic Or Elliptic Numerical Integration Code Series) code. The domain is discretized by a fixed Cartesian grid using a finite volume method and the cylinder is represented and cut cell method. The simulated results are compared with the numerical results of Lin (2007). This comparison shows good agreement in terms of free surface evolution for water exit and sinking. However, for water entry, the jet flow simulated by Lin is not reproduced. The free surface deformation around the cylinder in downward direction is accurately predicted

  2. Zonal surface wind jets across the Red Sea due to mountain gap forcing along both sides of the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Jiang, Houshuo

    2009-01-01

    [1] Mesoscale atmospheric modeling over the Red Sea, validated by in-situ meteorological buoy data, identifies two types of coastal mountain gap wind jets that frequently blow across the longitudinal axis of the Red Sea: (1) an eastward-blowing summer daily wind jet originating from the Tokar Gap on the Sudanese Red Sea coast, and (2) wintertime westward-blowing wind-jet bands along the northwestern Saudi Arabian coast, which occur every 10-20 days and can last for several days when occurring. Both wind jets can attain wind speeds over 15 m s-1 and contribute significantly to monthly mean surface wind stress, especially in the cross-axis components, which could be of importance to ocean eddy formation in the Red Sea. The wintertime wind jets can cause significant evaporation and ocean heat loss along the northeastern Red Sea coast and may potentially drive deep convection in that region. An initial characterization of these wind jets is presented. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Jet impinging onto a laser drilled tapered hole: Influence of tapper location on heat transfer and skin friction at hole surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuja, S. Z.; Yilbas, B. S.

    2013-02-01

    Jet emerging from a conical nozzle and impinging onto a tapered hole in relation to laser drilling is investigated and the influence taper location on the heat transfer and skin friction at the hole wall surface is examined. The study is extended to include four different gases as working fluid. The Reynolds stress model is incorporated to account for the turbulence effect in the flow field. The hole wall surface temperature is kept at 1500 K to resemble the laser drilled hole. It is found that the location of tapering in the hole influences the heat transfer rates and skin friction at the hole wall surface. The maximum skin friction coefficient increases for taper location of 0.25 H, where H is the thickness of the workpiece, while Nusselt number is higher in the hole for taper location of 0.75 H.

  4. Experimental and numerical investigations of the impingement of an oblique liquid jet onto a superhydrophobic surface: energy transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kibar, Ali, E-mail: alikibar@kocaeli.edu.tr [Department of Mechanical and Material Technologies, Kocaeli University, 41285, Arslanbey Campus, Kocaeli (Turkey)

    2016-02-15

    This study presents the theory of impinging an oblique liquid jet onto a vertical superhydrophobic surface based on both experimental and numerical results. A Brassica oleracea leaf with a 160° apparent contact angle was used for the superhydrophobic surface. Distilled water was sent onto the vertical superhydrophobic surface in the range of 1750–3050 Reynolds number, with an inclination angle of 20°−40°, using a circular glass tube with a 1.75 mm inner diameter. The impinging liquid jet spread onto the surface governed by the inertia of the liquid and then reflected off the superhydrophobic surface due to the surface energy of the spreading liquid. Two different energy approaches, which have time-scale and per-unit length, were performed to determine transformation of the energy. The kinetic energy of the impinging liquid jet was transformed into the surface energy with an increasing interfacial surface area between the liquid and air during spreading. Afterwards, this surface energy of the spreading liquid was transformed into the reflection kinetic energy. (paper)

  5. The instability of nonlinear surface waves in an electrified liquid jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moatimid, Galal M

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the weakly nonlinear stability of surface waves of a liquid jet. In this work, the liquids are uniformly streaming through two porous media and the gravitational effects are neglected. The system is acted upon by a uniform tangential electric field, that is parallel to the jet axis. The equations of motion are linearly treated and solved in the light of nonlinear boundary conditions. Therefore, the boundary-value problem leads to a nonlinear characteristic second-order differential equation. This characterized equation has a complex nature. The nonlinearity is kept up to the third degree. It is used to judge the behavior of the surface evolution. According to the linear stability theory, we derive the dispersion relation that accounts for the growth waves. The stability criterion is discussed analytically and a stability picture is identified for a chosen sample system. Several special cases are recovered upon appropriate data choices. In order to derive the Ginsburg-Landau equation for the general case, in the nonlinear approach, we used the method of multiple timescales with the aid of the Taylor expansion. This equation describes the competition between nonlinearity and the linear dispersion relation. As a special case for non-porous media where there is no streaming, we obtained the well-known nonlinear Schroedinger equation as it has been derived by others. The stability criteria are expressed theoretically in terms of various parameters of the problem. Stability diagrams are obtained for a set of physical parameters. We found new instability regions in the parameter space. These regions are due to the nonlinear effects.

  6. Side Flow Effect on Surface Generation in Nano Cutting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feifei; Fang, Fengzhou; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2017-12-01

    The side flow of material in nano cutting is one of the most important factors that deteriorate the machined surface quality. The effects of the crystallographic orientation, feed, and the cutting tool geometry, including tool edge radius, rake angle and inclination angle, on the side flow are investigated employing molecular dynamics simulation. The results show that the stagnation region is formed in front of tool edge and it is characterized by the stagnation radius R s and stagnation height h s . The side flow is formed because the material at or under the stagnation region is extruded by the tool edge to flow to the side of the tool edge. Higher stagnation height would increase the size of the side flow. The anisotropic nature of the material which partly determines the stagnation region also influences the side flow due to the different deformation mechanism under the action of the tool edge. At different cutting directions, the size of the side flow has a great difference which would finally affect the machined surface quality. The cutting directions of {100} , {110} , and {110}  are beneficial to obtain a better surface quality with small side flow. Besides that, the side flow could be suppressed by reducing the feed and optimizing the cutting tool geometry. Cutting tool with small edge radius, large positive rake angle, and inclination angle would decrease the side flow and consequently improve the machined surface quality.

  7. Fluorescence Imaging Study of Impinging Underexpanded Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inman, Jennifer A.; Danehy, Paul M.; Nowak, Robert J.; Alderfer, David W.

    2008-01-01

    An experiment was designed to create a simplified simulation of the flow through a hole in the surface of a hypersonic aerospace vehicle and the subsequent impingement of the flow on internal structures. In addition to planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) flow visualization, pressure measurements were recorded on the surface of an impingement target. The PLIF images themselves provide quantitative spatial information about structure of the impinging jets. The images also help in the interpretation of impingement surface pressure profiles by highlighting the flow structures corresponding to distinctive features of these pressure profiles. The shape of the pressure distribution along the impingement surface was found to be double-peaked in cases with a sufficiently high jet-exit-to-ambient pressure ratio so as to have a Mach disk, as well as in cases where a flow feature called a recirculation bubble formed at the impingement surface. The formation of a recirculation bubble was in turn found to depend very sensitively upon the jet-exit-to-ambient pressure ratio. The pressure measured at the surface was typically less than half the nozzle plenum pressure at low jet pressure ratios and decreased with increasing jet pressure ratios. Angled impingement cases showed that impingement at a 60deg angle resulted in up to a factor of three increase in maximum pressure at the plate compared to normal incidence.

  8. Effects of wind on the dynamics of the central jet during drop impact onto a deep-water surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinan; Wang, An; Wang, Shuang; Dai, Dejun

    2018-05-01

    The cavity and central jet generated by the impact of a single water drop on a deep-water surface in a wind field are experimentally studied. Different experiments are performed by varying the impacting drop diameter and wind speed. The contour profile histories of the cavity (also called crater) and central jet (also called stalk) are measured in detail with a backlit cinematic shadowgraph technique. The results show that shortly after the drop hits the water surface an asymmetrical cavity appears along the wind direction, with a train of capillary waves on the cavity wall. This is followed by the formation of an inclined central jet at the location of the drop impact. It is found that the wind has little effect on the penetration depth of the cavity at the early stage of the cavity expansion, but markedly changes the capillary waves during the retraction of the cavity. The capillary waves in turn shift the position of the central jet formation leeward. The dynamics of the central jet are dominated by two mechanisms: (i) the oblique drop impact produced by the wind and (ii) the wind drag force directly acting on the jet. The maximum height of the central jet, called the stalk height, is drastically affected by the wind, and the nondimensional stalk height H /D decreases with increasing θ Re-1 , where D is the drop diameter, θ is the impingement angle of drop impact, and Re=ρaUwD /μa is the Reynolds number with air density ρa, wind speed Uw, and air viscosity μa.

  9. Enhancement of aerodynamic performance of a heaving airfoil using synthetic-jet based active flow control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenglei; Tang, Hui

    2018-05-25

    In this study, we explore the use of synthetic jet (SJ) in manipulating the vortices around a rigid heaving airfoil, so as to enhance its aerodynamic performance. The airfoil heaves at two fixed pitching angles, with the Strouhal number, reduced frequency and Reynolds number chosen as St  =  0.3, k  =  0.25 and Re  =  100, respectively, all falling in the ranges for natural flyers. As such, the vortex force plays a dominant role in determining the airfoil's aerodynamic performance. A pair of in-phase SJs is implemented on the airfoil's upper and lower surfaces, operating with the same strength but in opposite directions. Such a fluid-structure interaction problem is numerically solved using a lattice Boltzmann method based numerical framework. It is found that, as the airfoil heaves with zero pitching angle, its lift and drag can be improved concurrently when the SJ phase angle [Formula: see text] relative to the heave motion varies between [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]. But this concurrent improvement does not occur as the airfoil heaves with [Formula: see text] pitching angle. Detailed inspection of the vortex evolution and fluid stress over the airfoil surface reveals that, if at good timing, the suction and blowing strokes of the SJ pair can effectively delay or promote the shedding of leading edge vortices, and mitigate or even eliminate the generation of trailing edge vortices, so as to enhance the airfoil's aerodynamic performance. Based on these understandings, an intermittent operation of the SJ pair is then proposed to realize concurrent lift and drag improvement for the heaving airfoil with [Formula: see text] pitching angle.

  10. Jet Engine Fan Response to Inlet Distortions Generated by Ingesting Boundary Layer Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliani, James Edward

    Future civil transport designs may incorporate engines integrated into the body of the aircraft to take advantage of efficiency increases due to weight and drag reduction. Additional increases in engine efficiency are predicted if the inlets ingest the lower momentum boundary layer flow that develops along the surface of the aircraft. Previous studies have shown, however, that the efficiency benefits of Boundary Layer Ingesting (BLI) inlets are very sensitive to the magnitude of fan and duct losses, and blade structural response to the non-uniform flow field that results from a BLI inlet has not been studied in-depth. This project represents an effort to extend the modeling capabilities of TURBO, an existing rotating turbomachinery unsteady analysis code, to include the ability to solve the external and internal flow fields of a BLI inlet. The TURBO code has been a successful tool in evaluating fan response to flow distortions for traditional engine/inlet integrations. Extending TURBO to simulate the external and inlet flow field upstream of the fan will allow accurate pressure distortions that result from BLI inlet configurations to be computed and used to analyze fan aerodynamics and structural response. To validate the modifications for the BLI inlet flow field, an experimental NASA project to study flush-mounted S-duct inlets with large amounts of boundary layer ingestion was modeled. Results for the flow upstream and in the inlet are presented and compared to experimental data for several high Reynolds number flows to validate the modifications to the solver. Once the inlet modifications were validated, a hypothetical compressor fan was connected to the inlet, matching the inlet operating conditions so that the effect on the distortion could be evaluated. Although the total pressure distortion upstream of the fan was symmetrical for this geometry, the pressure rise generated by the fan blades was not, because of the velocity non-uniformity of the distortion

  11. Planetary gyre, time-dependent eddies, torsional waves, and equatorial jets at the Earth's core surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillet, N.; Jault, D.; Finlay, Chris

    2015-01-01

    between the magnetic field and subdecadal nonzonal motions within the fluid outer core. Both the zonal and the more energetic nonzonal interannual motions were particularly intense close to the equator (below 10∘ latitude) between 1995 and 2010. We revise down the amplitude of the decade fluctuations......We report a calculation of time-dependent quasi-geostrophic core flows for 1940–2010. Inverting recursively for an ensemble of solutions, we evaluate the main source of uncertainties, namely, the model errors arising from interactions between unresolved core surface motions and magnetic fields....... Temporal correlations of these uncertainties are accounted for. The covariance matrix for the flow coefficients is also obtained recursively from the dispersion of an ensemble of solutions. Maps of the flow at the core surface show, upon a planetary-scale gyre, time-dependent large-scale eddies...

  12. On the computation of the turbulent flow near rough surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveev, S. K.; Jaychibekov, N. Zh.; Shalabayeva, B. S.

    2018-05-01

    One of the problems in constructing mathematical models of turbulence is a description of the flows near a rough surface. An experimental study of such flows is also difficult because of the impossibility of measuring "inside" the roughness. The theoretical calculation is difficult because of the lack of equations describing the flow in this zone. In this paper, a new turbulence model based on the differential equation of turbulent viscosity balance was used to describe a turbulent flow near a rough surface. The difference between the new turbulence model and the previously known consists in the choice of constants and functions that determine the generation, dissipation and diffusion of viscosity.

  13. Analysis of a Free Surface Film from a Controlled Liquid Impinging Jet over a Rotating Disk Including Conjugate Effects, with and without Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, Subramanian (Technical Monitor); Rice, Jeremy; Faghri, Amir; Cetegen, Baki M.

    2005-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the liquid film characteristics and the accompanying heat transfer of a free surface controlled liquid impinging jet onto a rotating disk are presented. The computations were run on a two-dimensional axi-symmetric Eulerian mesh while the free surface was calculated with the volume of fluid method. Flow rates between 3 and 15 1pm with rotational speeds between 50 and 200 rpm are analyzed. The effects of inlet temperature on the film thickness and heat transfer are characterized as well as evaporative effects. The conjugate heating effect is modeled, and was found to effect the heat transfer results the most at both the inner and outer edges of the heated surface. The heat transfer was enhanced with both increasing flow rate and increasing rotational speeds. When evaporative effects were modeled, the evaporation was found to increase the heat transfer at the lower flow rates the most because of a fully developed thermal field that was achieved. The evaporative effects did not significantly enhance the heat transfer at the higher flow rates.

  14. Aqueous electrolyte surfaces in strong electric fields: molecular insight into nanoscale jets and bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirsák, Jan; Moučka, Filip; Škvor, Jiří; Nezbeda, Ivo

    2015-04-01

    Exposing aqueous surfaces to a strong electric field gives rise to interesting phenomena, such as formation of a floating water bridge or an eruption of a jet in electrospinning. In an effort to account for the phenomena at the molecular level, we performed molecular dynamics simulations using several protocols on both pure water and aqueous solutions of sodium chloride subjected to an electrostatic field. All simulations consistently point to the same mechanisms which govern the rearrangement of the originally planar surface. The results show that the phenomena are primarily governed by an orientational reordering of the water molecules driven by the applied field. It is demonstrated that, for pure water, a sufficiently strong field yields a columnar structure parallel to the field with an anisotropic arrangement of the water molecules with their dipole moments aligned along the applied field not only in the surface layer but over the entire cross section of the column. Nonetheless, the number of hydrogen bonds per molecule does not seem to be affected by the field regardless of its strength and molecule's orientation. In the electrolyte solutions, the ionic charge is able to overcome the effect of the external field tending to arrange the water molecules radially in the first coordination shell of an ion. The ion-water interaction interferes thus with the water-electric field interaction, and the competition between these two forces (i.e., strength of the field versus concentration) provides the key mechanism determining the stability of the observed structures.

  15. Numerical investigation of thermal-hydraulic performance of channel with protrusions by turbulent cross flow jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, M. K.; Pandey, K. M.; Chatterjee, S.

    2018-05-01

    In this two dimensional numerical investigation, small rectangular channel with right angled triangular protrusions in the bottom wall of test section is considered. A slot nozzle is placed at the middle of top wall of channel which impinges air normal to the protruded surface. A duct flow and nozzle flow combined to form cross flow which is investigated for heat transfer enhancement of protruded channel. The governing equations for continuity, momentum, energy along with SST k-ω turbulence model are solved with finite volume based Computational fluid dynamics code ANSYS FLUENT 14.0. The range of duct Reynolds number considered for this analysis is 8357 to 51760. The ratios of pitch of protrusion to height of duct considered are 0.5, 0.64 and 0.82. The ratios of height of protrusion to height of duct considered are 0.14, 0.23 and 0.29. The effect of duct Reynolds number, pitch and height of protrusion on thermal-hydraulic performance is studied under cross flow condition. It is found that heat transfer rate is more at relatively larger pitch and small pressure drop is found in case of low height of protrusion.

  16. Hydrogen-enriched non-premixed jet flames : analysis of the flame surface, flame normal, flame index and Wobbe index

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ranga Dinesh, K.K.J.; Jiang, X.; Oijen, van J.A.

    2014-01-01

    A non-premixed impinging jet flame is studied using three-dimensional direct numerical simulation with detailed chemical kinetics in order to investigate the influence of fuel variability on flame surface, flame normal, flame index and Wobbe index for hydrogen-enriched combustion. Analyses indicate

  17. Simulation of the flow obstruction of a jet pump in a BWR reactor with the code RELAP/SCDAPSIM; Simulacion de la obstruccion de flujo de una bomba jet en un reactor BWR con el codigo RELAP/SCDAPSIM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas V, J.; Filio L, C., E-mail: jaime.cardenas@cnsns.gob.mx [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias, Dr. Jose M. Barragan 779, Col. Narvarte, 03020 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    This work simulates the flow obstruction of a jet pump in one of the recirculation loops of a nuclear power plant with a reactor of type BWR at 100% of operating power, in order to analyze the behavior of the total flow of the refrigerant passing through the reactor core, the total flow in each recirculation loop of the reactor, together with the 10 jet pumps of each loop. The behavior of the power and the reactivity insertion due to the change of the refrigerant flow pattern is also analyzed. The simulation was carried out using the RELAP/SCDAPSIM version 3.5 code, using a reactor model with 10 jet pumps in each recirculation loop and a core consisting of 6 radial zones and 25 axial zones. The scenario postulates the flow obstruction in a jet pump in a recirculation loop A when the reactor operates at 100% rated power, causing a change in the total flow of refrigerant in the reactor core, leading to a decrease in power. Once the reactor conditions are established to its new power, the operator tries to recover the nominal power using the flow control valve of the recirculation loop A, opening stepwise as a strategy to safely recover the reactor power. In this analysis is assumed that the intention of the nuclear plant operator is to maintain the operation of the reactor during the established cycle. (Author)

  18. Surface roughness effects on heat transfer in Couette flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elia, G.G.

    1981-01-01

    A cell theory for viscous flow with rough surfaces is applied to two basic illustrative heat transfer problems which occur in Couette flow. Couette flow between one adiabatic surface and one isothermal surface exhibits roughness effects on the adiabatic wall temperature. Two types of rough cell adiabatic surfaces are studied: (1) perfectly insulating (the temperature gradient vanishes at the boundary of each cell); (2) average insulating (each cell may gain or lose heat but the total heat flow at the wall is zero). The results for the roughness on a surface in motion are postulated to occur because of fluid entrainment in the asperities on the moving surface. The symmetry of the roughness effects on thermal-viscous dissipation is discussed in detail. Explicit effects of the roughness on each surface, including combinations of roughness values, are presented to enable the case where the two surfaces may be from different materials to be studied. The fluid bulk temperature rise is also calculated for Couette flow with two ideal adiabatic surfaces. The effect of roughness on thermal-viscous dissipation concurs with the viscous hydrodynamic effect. The results are illustrated by an application to lubrication. (Auth.)

  19. Temporally resolved ozone distribution of a time modulated RF atmospheric pressure argon plasma jet: flow, chemical reaction, and transient vortex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, S; Sobota, A; Van Veldhuizen, E M; Bruggeman, P J

    2015-01-01

    The ozone density distribution in the effluent of a time modulated RF atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is investigated by time and spatially resolved by UV absorption spectroscopy. The plasma jet is operated with an averaged dissipated power of 6.5 W and gas flow rate 2 slm argon  +2% O 2 . The modulation frequency of the RF power is 50 Hz with a duty cycle of 50%. To investigate the production and destruction mechanism of ozone in the plasma effluent, the atomic oxygen and gas temperature is also obtained by TALIF and Rayleigh scattering, respectively. A temporal increase in ozone density is observed close to the quartz tube exit when the plasma is switched off due to the decrease in O density and gas temperature. Ozone absorption at different axial positions indicates that the ozone distribution is dominated by the convection induced by the gas flow and allows estimating the on-axis local gas velocity in the jet effluent. Transient vortex structures occurring during the switch on and off of the RF power also significantly affect the ozone density in the far effluent. (paper)

  20. Colliding-Jet Fluidic Actuators for Active Flow Control, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a novel method of producing sweeping jets using a simplified geometry that is very short in stream-wise length and no feedback channels inside. This...

  1. Direct Computation of Sound Radiation by Jet Flow Using Large-scale Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankbadi, R. R.; Shih, S. H.; Hixon, D. R.; Povinelli, L. A.

    1995-01-01

    Jet noise is directly predicted using large-scale equations. The computational domain is extended in order to directly capture the radiated field. As in conventional large-eddy-simulations, the effect of the unresolved scales on the resolved ones is accounted for. Special attention is given to boundary treatment to avoid spurious modes that can render the computed fluctuations totally unacceptable. Results are presented for a supersonic jet at Mach number 2.1.

  2. Active Control of Supersonic Impinging Jets Using Supersonic Microjets

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alvi, Farrukh

    2005-01-01

    .... Supersonic impinging jets occur in many applications including in STOVL aircraft where they lead to a highly oscillatory flow with very high unsteady loads on the nearby aircraft structures and the landing surfaces...

  3. Pitot pressure measurements in flow fields behind circular-arc nozzles with exhaust jets at subsonic free-stream Mach numbers. [langley 16 foot transonic tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, M. L.; Putnam, L. E.

    1979-01-01

    The flow field behind a circular arc nozzle with exhaust jet was studied at subsonic free stream Mach numbers. A conical probe was used to measure the pitot pressure in the jet and free stream regions. Pressure data were recorded for two nozzle configurations at nozzle pressure ratios of 2.0, 2.9, and 5.0. At each set of test conditions, the probe was traversed from the jet center line into the free stream region at seven data acquisition stations. The survey began at the nozzle exit and extended downstream at intervals. The pitot pressure data may be applied to the evaluation of computational flow field models, as illustrated by a comparison of the flow field data with results of inviscid jet plume theory.

  4. Development of liquid-lithium film jet-flow for the target of (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reactions for BNCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Tooru; Miura, Kuniaki; Hayashizaki, Noriyosu; Aritomi, Masanori

    2014-06-01

    A feasibility study on liquid lithium target in the form of a flowing film was performed to evaluate its potential use as a neutron generation target of (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction in BNCT. The target is a windowless-type flowing film on a concave wall. Its configuration was adapted for a proton beam which is 30mm in diameter and with energy and current of up to 3MeV and 20mA, respectively. The flowing film of liquid lithium was 0.6mm in thickness, 50mm in width and 50mm in length. The shapes of the nozzle and concave back wall, which create a stable flowing film jet, were decided based on water experiments. A lithium hydrodynamic experiment was performed to observe the stability of liquid lithium flow behavior. The flowing film of liquid lithium was found to be feasible at temperatures below the liquid lithium boiling saturation of 342°C at the surface pressure of 1×10(-3)Pa. Using a proto-type liquid lithium-circulating loop for BNCT, the stability of the film flow was confirmed for velocities up to 30m/s at 220°C and 250°C in vacuum at a pressure lower than 10(-3) Pa. It is expected that for practical use, a flowing liquid lithium target of a windowless type can solve the problem of radiation damage and target cooling. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Experimental study of the turbulent flow around a single wall-mounted cube exposed to a cross-flow and an impinging jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masip, Yunesky; Rivas, Alejandro; Larraona, Gorka S.; Anton, Raúl; Ramos, Juan Carlos; Moshfegh, Bahram

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We measured the instantaneous flow velocity using 2D-Particle Image Velocimetry. ► Recirculation bubbles, vortices, detachment and reattachment zones are showed. ► The influence of the Re H and Re j /Re H was studied. ► The Re j /Re H determines the effects produced around the component. - Abstract: The air flow around a cubic obstacle mounted on one wall of a rectangular channel was studied experimentally. The obstacle represents an electronic component and the channel the space between two parallel printed circuit boards (PCBs). The flow was produced by the combination of a channel stream and a jet which issued from a circular nozzle placed at the wall opposite from where the component is mounted. With this aim, a test rig was designed and built to carry out experiments with both the above mentioned configurations and other cooling arrangements. Planar Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was employed to measure the instantaneous flow velocity on several planes covering the space around the component. The mean velocity and the Reynolds stresses were obtained from averaging the instantaneous velocity, and the mean flow showed a complex pattern with different features such as recirculation bubbles, vortices, detachment and reattachment zones. The influence of two parameters, namely the channel Reynolds number and the jet-to-channel Reynolds number ratio, on these flow features was studied considering nine cases that combined three values of the channel Reynolds number (3410, 5752 and 8880) and three values of the ratio (0.5, 1.0 and 1.5). The results show that the Reynolds number ratio determines the drag produced on the jet and the deflection from its geometric axis due to the channel stream. In all the cases corresponding to the lowest value of the ratio, the jet was dragged and did not impact the component. This fact accounts for the non-existence of the Upper Horseshoe Vortex and changes in the flow characteristics at the region over the

  6. Flow Structure and Surface Topology on a UCAV Planform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkhoury, Michel; Yavuz, Metin; Rockwell, Donald

    2003-11-01

    Flow past a X-45 UCAV planform involves the complex generation and interaction of vortices, their breakdown and occurrence of surface separation and stall. A cinema technique of high-image-density particle image velocimetry, in conjunction with dye visualization, allows characterization of the time-averaged and instantaneous states of the flow, in terms of critical points of the near-surface streamlines. These features are related to patterns of surface normal vorticity and velocity fluctuation. Spectral analysis of the naturally occurring unsteadiness of the flow allows definition of the most effective frequencies for small-amplitude perturbation of the wing, which leads to substantial alterations of the aforementioned patterns of flow structure and topology adjacent to the surface.

  7. Free-surface viscous flow solution methods for ship hydrodynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wackers, J.; Koren, B.; Raven, H.C.; Ploeg, van der A.; Starke, A.R.; Deng, G.; Queutey, P.; Visonneau, M.; Hino, T.; Ohashi, K.

    2011-01-01

    The simulation of viscous free-surface water flow is a subject that has reached a certain maturity and is nowadays used in industrial applications, like the simulation of the flow around ships. While almost all methods used are based on the Navier-Stokes equations, the discretisation methods for the

  8. Lubricant jet flow phenomena in spur and helical gears with modified addendums - For radially directed individual jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, L. S.; Townsend, D. P.

    1989-01-01

    This paper develops the mathematical relations for the Virtual Kinetic Model as an improvement over the vectorial model developed earlier. The model solution described provides the most energy efficient means of cooling gears, i.e., it requires the least pressure or pumping power to distribute the coolant onto the tooth surface. Further, this nozzle orientation allows impingement to the root of the tooth if needed and provides the most cooling control when compared to into-mesh and out-of-mesh cooling.

  9. Lubricant Jet Flow Phenomena in Spur and Helical Gears with Modified Addendums; for Radially Directed Individual Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, Lee S.; Townsend, Dennis P.

    1989-01-01

    This paper develops the mathematical relations for the Virtual Kinetic Model as an improvement over the vectorial model developed earlier. The model solution described provides the most energy efficient means of cooling gears, i.e., it requires the least pressure or pumping power to distribute the coolant onto the tooth surface. Further, this nozzle orientation allows impingement to the root of the tooth if needed and provides the most cooling control when compared to into-mesh and out-of-mesh cooling.

  10. Surface pretreatment of plastics with an atmospheric pressure plasma jet - Influence of generator power and kinematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moritzer, E.; Leister, C.

    2014-01-01

    The industrial use of atmospheric pressure plasmas in the plastics processing industry has increased significantly in recent years. Users of this treatment process have the possibility to influence the target values (e.g. bond strength or surface energy) with the help of kinematic and electrical parameters. Until now, systematic procedures have been used with which the parameters can be adapted to the process or product requirements but only by very time-consuming methods. For this reason, the relationship between influencing values and target values will be examined based on the example of a pretreatment in the bonding process with the help of statistical experimental design. Because of the large number of parameters involved, the analysis is restricted to the kinematic and electrical parameters. In the experimental tests, the following factors are taken as parameters: gap between nozzle and substrate, treatment velocity (kinematic data), voltage and duty cycle (electrical data). The statistical evaluation shows significant relationships between the parameters and surface energy in the case of polypropylene. An increase in the voltage and duty cycle increases the polar proportion of the surface energy, while a larger gap and higher velocity leads to lower energy levels. The bond strength of the overlapping bond is also significantly influenced by the voltage, velocity and gap. The direction of their effects is identical with those of the surface energy. In addition to the kinematic influences of the motion of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet, it is therefore especially important that the parameters for the plasma production are taken into account when designing the pretreatment processes

  11. Vapor condensation on the surface of a liquid blanket jet in an inertial-confinement fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Minoru; Inoue, Akira; Fujinuma, Hajime; Tsukui, Jun.

    1991-01-01

    As the fundamental study on lithium jet cooling of an inertial-confinement fusion reactor, the experiment was performed to investigate for the steady condensation of saturated steam on a vertical downward water jet. The experimental parameters were the nozzle diameter of 3 and 5 mm, the jet length of 60∼316 mm, the outlet velocity of 2∼12 m/s, the outlet temperature of 30∼70degC, and the pressure of 0.03∼0.44 MPa, which corresponds to the Reynolds number of 1.35 x 10 4 ∼2.71 x 10 5 and the Prandtl number of 1.0∼5.2. As the Reynolds number or the jet length is increased, the Stanton number decreases and then increases again. As the steam pressure is increased, it increases monotonously. These characteristics of condensation heat transfer have been classical into four regions based on the criteria for jet break-up and surface disturbance, or entrainment. The empirical correlations for the Stanton number have been obtained for these regions, and the validity was confirmed by comparing them with the previous correlations. (author)

  12. Flow transition criteria of a liquid jet into a liquid pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Shimpei, E-mail: s1630195@u.tsukuba.ac.jp [Graduate School of Systems and Information Engineering, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Abe, Yutaka [Faculty of Engineering, Information and Systems, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Koyama, Kazuya [Reactor Core and Safety Design Department, Mitsubishi FBR Systems, Inc., 2-34-17 Jingumae, Shibuya, Tokyo 150-0001 (Japan)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Jet breakup and droplet formation in immiscible liquid-liquid systems was studied experimentally. • The observed jet breakup behavior was classified into characteristic regimes. • The droplet size distribution was analyzed using image processing. • The variation of droplet size was compared with available melt-jet experiments. • Extrapolation to the expected SFR conditions implied that most of the hydrodynamic conditions would be the atomization regime. - Abstract: To better understand the fundamental interactions between melt jet and coolant during a core-disruptive accident at a sodium-cooled fast reactor, the jet breakup and droplet formation in immiscible liquid-liquid systems were studied experimentally. Experiments using two different pairs of test fluids were carried out at isothermal conditions. The observed jet breakup behavior was classified into characteristic regimes based on the classical Ohnesorge classification in liquid-gas systems. The variation in breakup length obtained in the present liquid-liquid system was similar to that in a liquid-gas system. The droplet size distribution in each breakup regime was analyzed using image processing and droplet formation via pinch-off, satellite formation, and entrainment was observed. The measured droplet size was compared with those available from melt jet experiments. Based on the observation and analysis results, the breakup regimes were organized on a dimensionless operating diagram, with the derived correlations representing the criteria for regime boundaries of a liquid-liquid system. Finally, the experimental data were extrapolated to the expected conditions of a sodium-cooled fast reactor. From this, it was implied that most of the hydrodynamic conditions during an accident would be close to the atomization regime, in which entrainment is the dominant process for droplet formation.

  13. Effect of surface wettability on flow patterns in vertical gas-liquid two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, D.

    2005-01-01

    To examine the effect of the surface characteristics on the flow regime in two-phase flow, visualization study was performed using three test pipes, namely a no-coating pipe, a water-attracting coating pipe, a water-shedding coating pipe. Three flow regime maps were obtained based on the visual observation in the three pipes. In the water-attracting coating pipe, the slug flow-to-churn flow transition boundary was shifted to higher gas velocity at a given liquid velocity, whereas the churn flow-to-annular flow transition boundary was shifted to lower gas velocity at a given liquid velocity. In the water shedding coating pipe, the inverted-churn flow regime was observed in the region where the churn flow regime was to be observed in a no-coating pipe, whereas the droplet flow regime was observed in the region where the annular flow regime was to be observed in a no-coating pipe. The criteria for the slug flow-to-inverted-churn flow transition and the inverted-churn flow-to-droplet flow transition were modeled by force balance approaches. The modeled transition criteria could predict the observed flow transition boundaries reasonably well. (authors)

  14. Integrated Surface/subsurface flow modeling in PFLOTRAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Painter, Scott L [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Understanding soil water, groundwater, and shallow surface water dynamics as an integrated hydrological system is critical for understanding the Earth’s critical zone, the thin outer layer at our planet’s surface where vegetation, soil, rock, and gases interact to regulate the environment. Computational tools that take this view of soil moisture and shallow surface flows as a single integrated system are typically referred to as integrated surface/subsurface hydrology models. We extend the open-source, highly parallel, subsurface flow and reactive transport simulator PFLOTRAN to accommodate surface flows. In contrast to most previous implementations, we do not represent a distinct surface system. Instead, the vertical gradient in hydraulic head at the land surface is neglected, which allows the surface flow system to be eliminated and incorporated directly into the subsurface system. This tight coupling approach leads to a robust capability and also greatly simplifies implementation in existing subsurface simulators such as PFLOTRAN. Successful comparisons to independent numerical solutions build confidence in the approximation and implementation. Example simulations of the Walker Branch and East Fork Poplar Creek watersheds near Oak Ridge, Tennessee demonstrate the robustness of the approach in geometrically complex applications. The lack of a robust integrated surface/subsurface hydrology capability had been a barrier to PFLOTRAN’s use in critical zone studies. This work addresses that capability gap, thus enabling PFLOTRAN as a community platform for building integrated models of the critical zone.

  15. Two-phase jet impingement cooling for high heat flux wide band-gap devices using multi-scale porous surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Shailesh N.; Dede, Ercan M.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Jet impingement with phase change on multi-scale porous surfaces is investigated. • Porous coated flat, pin-fin, open tunnel, and closed tunnel structures are studied. • Boiling curve, heat transfer coefficient, and pressure drop metrics are reported. • Flow visualization shows vapor removal from the surface is a key aspect of design. • The porous coated pin-fin surface exhibits superior two-phase cooling performance. - Abstract: In the future, wide band-gap (WBG) devices such as silicon carbide and gallium nitride will be widely used in automotive power electronics due to performance advantages over silicon-based devices. The high heat fluxes dissipated by WBG devices pose extreme cooling challenges that demand the use of advanced thermal management technologies such as two-phase cooling. In this light, we describe the performance of a submerged two-phase jet impingement cooler in combination with porous coated heat spreaders and multi-jet orifices. The cooling performance of four different porous coated structures was evaluated using R-245fa as the coolant at sub-cooling of 5 K. The results show that the boiling performance of a pin-fin heat spreader is the highest followed by that for an open tunnel (OPT), closed tunnel (CLT), and flat heat spreader. Furthermore, the flat heat spreader demonstrated the lowest critical heat flux (CHF), while the pin-fin surface sustained a heat flux of 218 W/cm 2 without reaching CHF. The CHF values of the OPT and CLT surfaces were 202 W/cm 2 and 194 W/cm 2 , respectively. The pin-fin heat spreader has the highest two-phase heat transfer coefficient of 97,800 W/m 2 K, while the CLT surface has the lowest heat transfer coefficient of 69,300 W/m 2 K, both at a heat flux of 165 W/cm 2 . The variation of the pressure drop of all surfaces is similar for the entire range of heat fluxes tested. The flat heat spreader exhibited the least pressure drop, 1.73 kPa, while the CLT surface had the highest, 2.17 kPa at a

  16. The Research into the Quality of Rock Surfaces Obtained by Abrasive Water Jet Cutting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Młynarczuk, Mariusz; Skiba, Marta; Sitek, Libor; Hlaváček, Petr; Kožušníková, Alena

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, water jet cutting technology has been being used more and more often, in various domains of human activity. Its numerous applications include cutting different materials - among them, rock materials. The present paper discusses the results of the research that aimed at determining - in a quantitative manner - the way in which the water jet cutting parameters (such as the traverse speed of the head, and the distance between the high-pressure inlet of the water jet and the cut material) influence the quality of the processed surface. Additionally, the impact of these parameters on the surface of various materials was investigated. The materials used were three granites differing with respect to the size of grains. In the course of the research, the standard parameters defined by the ISO norms were analyzed. It was also proposed that variograms be used to analyze the quality of the cut surface. Technologia cięcia strumieniem wodnym staje się w ostatnich latach coraz intensywniej wykorzystywana w różnych dziedzinach działalności człowieka. Jest ona wykorzystywana do obróbki różnorodnych materiałów, również materiałów skalnych. W ramach badań analizowano trzy granity różniące się m.in. wielkościami ziarn, które były przecinane przy różnych prędkościach przesuwu głowicy z wlotem strumienia wodnego. Analizowano standardowe parametry zdefiniowane w normach ISO jak również zaproponowano wykorzystanie wariogramów do analizy jakości wyciętej powierzchni. W pracy opisano w sposób ilościowy zmiany jakości powierzchni skał ciętych strumieniem wodnym ze ścierniwem w zależności od prędkości przesuwu głowicy, jak również w zależności od odległości przecinanego fragmentu powierzchni od wlotu strumienia wodnego do materiału. Wyniki uzyskane w pomiarach wskazują też na wpływ wielkości uziarnienia skały na jakość otrzymanej powierzchni. Jest to szczególnie widoczne dla najmniej optymalnych parametrów ci

  17. Analysis of energy flow during playground surface impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Peter L; Wilson, Suzanne J; Chalmers, David J; Wilson, Barry D; Eager, David; McIntosh, Andrew S

    2013-10-01

    The amount of energy dissipated away from or returned to a child falling onto a surface will influence fracture risk but is not considered in current standards for playground impact-attenuating surfaces. A two-mass rheological computer simulation was used to model energy flow within the wrist and surface during hand impact with playground surfaces, and the potential of this approach to provide insights into such impacts and predict injury risk examined. Acceleration data collected on-site from typical playground surfaces and previously obtained data from children performing an exercise involving freefalling with a fully extended arm provided input. The model identified differences in energy flow properties between playground surfaces and two potentially harmful surface characteristics: more energy was absorbed by (work done on) the wrist during both impact and rebound on rubber surfaces than on bark, and rubber surfaces started to rebound (return energy to the wrist) while the upper limb was still moving downward. Energy flow analysis thus provides information on playground surface characteristics and the impact process, and has the potential to identify fracture risks, inform the development of safer impact-attenuating surfaces, and contribute to development of new energy-based arm fracture injury criteria and tests for use in conjunction with current methods.

  18. The Influence of Slope Breaks on Lava Flow Surface Disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaze, Lori S.; Baloga, Stephen M.; Fagents, Sarah A.; Wright, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Changes in the underlying slope of a lava flow impart a significant fraction of rotational energy beyond the slope break. The eddies, circulation and vortices caused by this rotational energy can disrupt the flow surface, having a significant impact on heat loss and thus the distance the flow can travel. A basic mechanics model is used to compute the rotational energy caused by a slope change. The gain in rotational energy is deposited into an eddy of radius R whose energy is dissipated as it travels downstream. A model of eddy friction with the ambient lava is used to compute the time-rate of energy dissipation. The key parameter of the dissipation rate is shown to be rho R(sup 2/)mu, where ? is the lava density and mu is the viscosity, which can vary by orders of magnitude for different flows. The potential spatial disruption of the lava flow surface is investigated by introducing steady-state models for the main flow beyond the steepening slope break. One model applies to slow-moving flows with both gravity and pressure as the driving forces. The other model applies to fast-moving, low-viscosity, turbulent flows. These models provide the flow velocity that establishes the downstream transport distance of disrupting eddies before they dissipate. The potential influence of slope breaks is discussed in connection with field studies of lava flows from the 1801 Hualalai and 1823 Keaiwa Kilauea, Hawaii, and 2004 Etna eruptions.

  19. Energy Flow and Rapidity Gaps Between Jets in Photoproduction at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Adloff, C.; Andrieu, B.; Anthonis, T.; Arkadov, V.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Bahr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Bate, P.; Becker, J.; Beglarian, A.; Behnke, O.; Beier, C.; Belousov, A.; Benisch, T.; Berger, C.; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J.C.; Boehme, J.; Boudry, V.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Broker, H.B.; Brown, D.P.; Bruckner, W.; Bruncko, D.; Burger, J.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Burrage, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cao, Jun; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Clarke, D.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J.G.; Coppens, Y.R.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cousinou, M.C.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; Davidsson, M.; Delcourt, B.; Delerue, N.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dingfelder, J.; Dixon, P.; Dodonov, V.; Dowell, J.D.; Droutskoi, A.; Dubak, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, D.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Ferron, S.; Fleischer, M.; Fleming, Y.H.; Flugge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formanek, J.; Franke, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garvey, J.; Gassner, J.; Gayler, Joerg; Gerhards, R.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Grab, C.; Grassler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Hadig, T.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haller, J.; Haynes, W.J.; Heinemann, B.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hengstmann, S.; Henschel, H.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hilgers, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hladky, J.; Hoting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hurling, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Issever, C .; Jacquet, M.; Jaffre, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, C.; Johnson, D.P.; Jones, M.A.S.; Jung, H.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Karschnick, O.; Keil, F.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kermiche, S.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Kjellberg, P.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Koblitz, B.; Kolya, S.D.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S.K.; Koutouev, R.; Koutov, A.; Krehbiel, H.; Kroseberg, J.; Kruger, K.; Kupper, A.; Kuhr, T.; Kurca, T.; Lamb, D.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebailly, E.; Lebedev, A.; Leissner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindstroem, M.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Loginov, A.; Loktionova, N.; Lubimov, V.; Luders, S.; Luke, D.; Lytkin, L.; Mahlke-Kruger, H.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Malinovski, I.; Maracek, R.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martyn, H.U.; Martyniak, J.; Maxfield, S.J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, P.O.; Mikocki, S.; Milstead, D.; Mkrtchyan, T.; Mohr, R.; Mohrdieck, S.; Mondragon, M.N.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, T.; Nellen, G.; Newman, Paul R.; Nicholls, T.C.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nix, O.; Nowak, G.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Panassik, V.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Phillips, J.P.; Pitzl, D.; Poschl, R.; Potachnikova, I.; Povh, B.; Radel, G.; Rauschenberger, J.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Reyna, D.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Schatzel, S.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, M.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schorner, T.; Schroder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Chekelian, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Straumann, U.; Swart, M.; Tasevsky, M.; Tchetchelnitski, S.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tobien, N.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Turney, J.E.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Udluft, S.; Urban, Marcel; Usik, A.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vassiliev, S.; Vazdik, Y.; Vichnevski, A.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, J.; Wallny, R.; Waugh, B.; Weber, G.; Weber, M.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, M.; Werner, N.; Wessels, M.; White, G.; Wiesand, S.; Wilksen, T.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.G.; Wissing, C.; Wobisch, M.; Woehrling, E.E.; Wunsch, E.; Wyatt, A.C.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zomer, F.; zur Nedden, M.

    2002-01-01

    Dijet events in photon-proton collisions in which there is a large pseudorapidity separation Delta eta > 2.5 between the two highest E_T jets are studied with the H1 detector at HERA. The inclusive dijet cross sections are measured as functions of the longitudinal momentum fractions of the proton and photon which participate in the production of the jets, x_pjet and x_gjet respectively, Delta eta, the pseudorapidity separation between the two highest E_T jets, and E_T^gap, the total summed transverse energy between the jets. Rapidity gap events are defined as events in which E_T^gap is less than E_T^cut, for E_T^cut varied between 0.5 and 2.0 GeV. The fraction of dijet events with a rapidity gap is measured differentially in Delta eta, x_pjet and x_gjet. An excess of events with rapidity gaps at low values of E_T^cut is observed above the expectation from standard photoproduction processes. This excess can be explained by the exchange of a strongly interacting colour singlet object between the jets.

  20. Measuring hadronic jets at the ILC. From particle flow calorimetry to the Higgs self-coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermberg, Benjamin

    2015-10-01

    This work deals with the development of a technical prototype of a highly segmented hadron calorimeter for precision measurements at the future International Linear Collider (ILC). The precision measurements at the ILC pose special challenges for both the detector technology as well as for the reconstruction methods. In this thesis two aspects to hadronic final states are examined. The first part deals with a prototype of a highly segmented hadronic calorimeter and the second part with kinematic Fits for the determination of the Higgs self-coupling in decays of the Higgs boson into b quarks. The challenge for the examined prototype of the hadronic calorimeter is the demonstration of the technical feasibility of a real detector. The ILC is pursuing the Particle Flow concept, as a consequence, it follows for the calorimeter a high granularity and an integrated readout electronics. Two important aspects of the calorimeter prototype are the channel-wise adjustable trigger threshold and the power-pulsing functionality to minimize the power consumption. In this work it could be shown that with the current readout chip generation, the use of the channel-wise threshold adjustment leads to a shift of the global trigger threshold. Despite of the functionality of the power pulsing, the total current consumption is 30 times above the desired power consumption of 25 μW/channel. In the data of a test beam campaign at CERN 2012 the pedestal was determined, the stability analyzed and specific features of the pedestal identified. In order to achieve the accuracy for the measurement of the Higgs self-coupling, this work examines the applicability of kinematic fits within the framework of the Higgs self-coupling analysis. Basis of the analysis is the lepton channel ZHH→l anti lb anti bb anti b.It could be shown that the use of kinematic fits improves the mass resolution, thus the uncertainty of the cross section is reduced by 18%. The use of a modified fit processor improves the

  1. Turbulent buoyant jets and plumes

    CERN Document Server

    Rodi, Wolfgang

    The Science & Applications of Heat and Mass Transfer: Reports, Reviews, & Computer Programs, Volume 6: Turbulent Buoyant Jets and Plumes focuses on the formation, properties, characteristics, and reactions of turbulent jets and plumes. The selection first offers information on the mechanics of turbulent buoyant jets and plumes and turbulent buoyant jets in shallow fluid layers. Discussions focus on submerged buoyant jets into shallow fluid, horizontal surface or interface jets into shallow layers, fundamental considerations, and turbulent buoyant jets (forced plumes). The manuscript then exami

  2. Influence of the Reynolds number on the instant flow evolution of a turbulent rectangular free jet of air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gori, Fabio; Petracci, Ivano; Angelino, Matteo

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Flow with Negligible Disturbances, or first type, with length L ND = L 1 . • Flow with Small Disturbances, or second type, with length L SD . • Total length, L ND + L SD = L 2 , is in agreement with average Undisturbed flow, L U . • Flow with Coherent Vortices, or third type, with length L CV . • Total length, L ND + L SD + L CV = L 3 , is in agreement with average Potential core, L P . - Abstract: The paper is aimed at investigating the influence of the Reynolds number on the instant flow evolution of a rectangular free jet of air in the range of Reynolds numbers from Re = 35,300 to Re = 2,200, where the Reynolds number, Re, is defined according to the hydraulic diameter, D, of a rectangular slot of height H, equal to about D = 2H. The Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique allows obtaining the instant PIV visualizations on the central symmetry section of the rectangular jet. The visual inspection of the instant frames with one and two vortices, except for Re = 35,300 where only one vortex images are detected, shows that after the jet exit is present the Flow with Constant Instant Height, with a length L CIH which increases with the decrease of the Reynolds number, from a ratio L CIH /H equal to L CIH /H = 0.9 at Re = 35,300 to L CIH /H = 4.0 at Re = 2,200. The instant PIV measurements, carried out at several distances from the jet exit, show that the variations of the ratio U/U ‾ 0 of the centerline instant velocity, U, to the exit average velocity, U ‾ 0 , remain below ±4% for a length L CIV , defining the Flow with Constant Instant Velocity on the centerline. The ratio L CIV /H increases from L CIV /H = 1.1 at Re = 35,300 to L CIV /H = 4.1 at Re = 2,200 and is quite similar to L CIH /H. The instant PIV measurements of the centerline turbulence intensity, Tu, show that its variations remain below ±4% for a length L CIT , defining the Flow with Constant Instant Turbulence on the centerline. The ratio L CIT /H is equal to L CIV /H

  3. Properties of Supersonic Impinging Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvi, F. S.; Iyer, K. G.; Ladd, J.

    1999-11-01

    A detailed study examining the behavior of axisymmetric supersonic jets impinging on a ground plane is described. Our objective is to better understand the aeroacoustics governing this complex flowfield which commonly occurs in the vicinity of STOVL aircraft. Flow issuing through a Mach 1.5 C-D and a converging sonic nozzle is examined over a wide parametric range. For some cases a large diameter circular 'lift' plate, with an annular hole through which the jet is issued, is attached at the nozzle exit to simulate a generic airframe. The impinging jet flowfield was examined using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), which provides the velocity field for the entire region and shadowgraph visualization techniques. Near-field acoustic, as well as, mean and unsteady pressure measurements on the ground and lift plate surfaces were also obtained. The velocity field data, together with the surface flow measurements have resulted in a much better understanding of this flow from a fundamental standpoint while also identifying critical regions of interest for practical applications. Some of these findings include the presence of a stagnation bubble with recirculating flow; a very high speed (transonic/supersonic) radial wall jet; presence of large, spatially coherent turbulent structures in the primary jet and wall jet and high unsteady loads on the ground plane and lift plates. The results of a companion CFD investigation and its comparison to the experimental data will also be presented. Very good agreement has been found between the computational and experimental results thus providing confidence in the development of computational tools for the study of such flows.

  4. Local mesh refinement for incompressible fluid flow with free surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terasaka, H.; Kajiwara, H.; Ogura, K. [Tokyo Electric Power Company (Japan)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    A new local mesh refinement (LMR) technique has been developed and applied to incompressible fluid flows with free surface boundaries. The LMR method embeds patches of fine grid in arbitrary regions of interest. Hence, more accurate solutions can be obtained with a lower number of computational cells. This method is very suitable for the simulation of free surface movements because free surface flow problems generally require a finer computational grid to obtain adequate results. By using this technique, one can place finer grids only near the surfaces, and therefore greatly reduce the total number of cells and computational costs. This paper introduces LMR3D, a three-dimensional incompressible flow analysis code. Numerical examples calculated with the code demonstrate well the advantages of the LMR method.

  5. Heat Flow In Cylindrical Bodies During Laser Surface Transformation Hardening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandven, Ole A.

    1980-01-01

    A mathematical model for the transient heat flow in cylindrical specimens is presented. The model predicts the temperature distribution in the vicinity of a moving ring-shaped laser spot around the periphery of the outer surface of a cylinder, or the inner surface of a hollow cylinder. It can be used to predict the depth of case in laser surface transformation hardening. The validity of the model is tested against experimental results obtained on SAE 4140 steel.

  6. Assembling surface mounted components on ink-jet printed double sided paper circuit board

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Henrik A; Manuilskiy, Anatoliy; Haller, Stefan; Sidén, Johan; Nilsson, Hans-Erik; Hummelgård, Magnus; Olin, Håkan; Hummelgård, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Printed electronics is a rapidly developing field where many components can already be manufactured on flexible substrates by printing or by other high speed manufacturing methods. However, the functionality of even the most inexpensive microcontroller or other integrated circuit is, at the present time and for the foreseeable future, out of reach by means of fully printed components. Therefore, it is of interest to investigate hybrid printed electronics, where regular electrical components are mounted on flexible substrates to achieve high functionality at a low cost. Moreover, the use of paper as a substrate for printed electronics is of growing interest because it is an environmentally friendly and renewable material and is, additionally, the main material used for many packages in which electronics functionalities could be integrated. One of the challenges for such hybrid printed electronics is the mounting of the components and the interconnection between layers on flexible substrates with printed conductive tracks that should provide as low a resistance as possible while still being able to be used in a high speed manufacturing process. In this article, several conductive adhesives are evaluated as well as soldering for mounting surface mounted components on a paper circuit board with ink-jet printed tracks and, in addition, a double sided Arduino compatible circuit board is manufactured and programmed. (paper)

  7. Assembling surface mounted components on ink-jet printed double sided paper circuit board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Henrik A; Manuilskiy, Anatoliy; Haller, Stefan; Hummelgård, Magnus; Sidén, Johan; Hummelgård, Christine; Olin, Håkan; Nilsson, Hans-Erik

    2014-03-07

    Printed electronics is a rapidly developing field where many components can already be manufactured on flexible substrates by printing or by other high speed manufacturing methods. However, the functionality of even the most inexpensive microcontroller or other integrated circuit is, at the present time and for the foreseeable future, out of reach by means of fully printed components. Therefore, it is of interest to investigate hybrid printed electronics, where regular electrical components are mounted on flexible substrates to achieve high functionality at a low cost. Moreover, the use of paper as a substrate for printed electronics is of growing interest because it is an environmentally friendly and renewable material and is, additionally, the main material used for many packages in which electronics functionalities could be integrated. One of the challenges for such hybrid printed electronics is the mounting of the components and the interconnection between layers on flexible substrates with printed conductive tracks that should provide as low a resistance as possible while still being able to be used in a high speed manufacturing process. In this article, several conductive adhesives are evaluated as well as soldering for mounting surface mounted components on a paper circuit board with ink-jet printed tracks and, in addition, a double sided Arduino compatible circuit board is manufactured and programmed.

  8. Assembling surface mounted components on ink-jet printed double sided paper circuit board

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Henrik A; Manuilskiy, Anatoliy; Haller, Stefan; Sidén, Johan; Nilsson, Hans-Erik [Department of Electronics Design, Mid Sweden University, SE-851 70 Sundsvall (Sweden); Hummelgård, Magnus; Olin, Håkan [Department of Natural Science, Mid Sweden University, SE-851 70 Sundsvall (Sweden); Hummelgård, Christine [Acreo Swedish ICT AB, Håstaholmen 4, SE-824 42 Hudiksvall (Sweden)

    2014-03-07

    Printed electronics is a rapidly developing field where many components can already be manufactured on flexible substrates by printing or by other high speed manufacturing methods. However, the functionality of even the most inexpensive microcontroller or other integrated circuit is, at the present time and for the foreseeable future, out of reach by means of fully printed components. Therefore, it is of interest to investigate hybrid printed electronics, where regular electrical components are mounted on flexible substrates to achieve high functionality at a low cost. Moreover, the use of paper as a substrate for printed electronics is of growing interest because it is an environmentally friendly and renewable material and is, additionally, the main material used for many packages in which electronics functionalities could be integrated. One of the challenges for such hybrid printed electronics is the mounting of the components and the interconnection between layers on flexible substrates with printed conductive tracks that should provide as low a resistance as possible while still being able to be used in a high speed manufacturing process. In this article, several conductive adhesives are evaluated as well as soldering for mounting surface mounted components on a paper circuit board with ink-jet printed tracks and, in addition, a double sided Arduino compatible circuit board is manufactured and programmed. (paper)

  9. Backward flow in a surface tension driven micropump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, Jongil; Park, Joong Yull; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Kyung Chun; Kim, Hyundong; Berthier, Erwin; Beebe, David J

    2008-01-01

    A surface tension driven micropump harnessing the pressure difference generated by drops of different curvature radii proves to be a simple and attractive passive method to drive fluid flow in microdevices. Here we observed the appearance of backward flow when the initial sizes of the droplets at the inlet and outlet ports are similar. To explain this phenomenon several hypotheses have been investigated. Consideration of the inertia of the fluid in the channel revealed that it alone is insufficient to explain the observed backward flow. We discovered that rotational flow inside the outlet droplet could be a source of inertia, explaining the generation of the backward flow. In addition, we have experimentally determined that the ratio of the volumes of the initial outlet drop and inlet drop correlates with the occurrence of the backward flow. (note)

  10. Core surface flow modelling from high-resolution secular variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holme, R.; Olsen, Nils

    2006-01-01

    -flux hypothesis, but the spectrum of the SV implies that a conclusive test of frozen-flux is not possible. We parametrize the effects of diffusion as an expected misfit in the flow prediction due to departure from the frozen-flux hypothesis; at low spherical harmonic degrees, this contribution dominates...... the expected departure of the SV predictions from flow to the observed SV, while at high degrees the SV model uncertainty is dominant. We construct fine-scale core surface flows to model the SV. Flow non-uniqueness is a serious problem because the flows are sufficiently small scale to allow flow around non......-series of magnetic data and better parametrization of the external magnetic field....

  11. Study on surface wave characteristics of free surface flow of liquid metal lithium for IFMIF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoashi, Eiji; Sugiura, Hirokazu; Yoshihashi-Suzuki, Sachiko; Yamaoka, Nobuo; Horiike, Hiroshi; Kanemura, Takuji; Kondo, Hiroo

    2011-01-01

    The international fusion materials irradiation facility (IFMIF) presents an intense neutron source to develop fusion reactor materials. The free surface flow of a liquid metal Lithium (Li) is planned as a target irradiated by two deuteron beams to generate intense neutrons and it is thus important to obtain knowledge of the surface wave characteristic for the safety and the efficiency of system in the IFMIF. We have been studying on surface wave characteristics experimentally using the liquid metal Li circulation facility at Osaka University and numerically using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, FLUENT. This paper reports the results of the surface fluctuation, the wave height and the surface velocity in the free surface flow of the liquid metal Li examined experimentally and numerically. In the experiment, an electro-contact probe apparatus was used to obtain the surface fluctuation and the wave height, and a high speed video was used to measure the surface velocity. We resulted in knowledge of the surface wave growth mechanism. On the other hand, a CFD simulation was also conducted to obtain information on the relation of the free surface with the inner flow. In the simulation, the model included from a two-staged contraction nozzle to a flow channel with a free surface flow region and simulation results were compared with the experimental data. (author)

  12. Study on the Fluid Flow Characteristics of Coherent Jets with CO2 and O2 Mixed Injection in Electric Arc Furnace Steelmaking Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Guangsheng; Zhu, Rong; Wu, Xuetao; Yang, Lingzhi; Dong, Kai; Cheng, Ting; Tang, Tianping

    2018-06-01

    As an efficient oxygen supplying technology, coherent jets are widely applied in electric arc furnace (EAF) steelmaking processes to strengthen chemical energy input, speed up smelting rhythm, and promote the uniformity of molten bath temperature and compositions. Recently, the coherent jet with CO2 and O2 mixed injection (COMI) was proposed and demonstrated great application potentiality in reducing the dust production in EAF steelmaking. In the present study, based on the eddy dissipation concept model, a computational fluid dynamics model of coherent jets with COMI was built with the overall and detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms (GRI-Mech 3.0). Compared with one-step combustion reaction, GRI-Mech 3.0 consists of 325 elementary reactions with 53 components and can predict more accurate results. The numerical simulation results were validated by the combustion experiment data. The jet behavior and the fluid flow characteristics of coherent jets with COMI under 298 K and 1700 K (25 °C and 1427 °C) were studied and the results showed that for coherent jets with COMI, the chemical effect of CO2 significantly weakened the shrouding combustion reactions of CH4 and the relative importance of the chemical effect of CO2 increases with CO2 concentration increasing. The potential core length of coherent jet decreases with the volume fraction of CO2 increasing. Moreover, it also can be found that the potential core length of coherent jets was prolonged with higher ambient temperature.

  13. Study on the Fluid Flow Characteristics of Coherent Jets with CO2 and O2 Mixed Injection in Electric Arc Furnace Steelmaking Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Guangsheng; Zhu, Rong; Wu, Xuetao; Yang, Lingzhi; Dong, Kai; Cheng, Ting; Tang, Tianping

    2018-03-01

    As an efficient oxygen supplying technology, coherent jets are widely applied in electric arc furnace (EAF) steelmaking processes to strengthen chemical energy input, speed up smelting rhythm, and promote the uniformity of molten bath temperature and compositions. Recently, the coherent jet with CO2 and O2 mixed injection (COMI) was proposed and demonstrated great application potentiality in reducing the dust production in EAF steelmaking. In the present study, based on the eddy dissipation concept model, a computational fluid dynamics model of coherent jets with COMI was built with the overall and detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms (GRI-Mech 3.0). Compared with one-step combustion reaction, GRI-Mech 3.0 consists of 325 elementary reactions with 53 components and can predict more accurate results. The numerical simulation results were validated by the combustion experiment data. The jet behavior and the fluid flow characteristics of coherent jets with COMI under 298 K and 1700 K (25 °C and 1427 °C) were studied and the results showed that for coherent jets with COMI, the chemical effect of CO2 significantly weakened the shrouding combustion reactions of CH4 and the relative importance of the chemical effect of CO2 increases with CO2 concentration increasing. The potential core length of coherent jet decreases with the volume fraction of CO2 increasing. Moreover, it also can be found that the potential core length of coherent jets was prolonged with higher ambient temperature.

  14. Paradox of flow reversal caused by protective wall jet in a pipe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tesař, Václav

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 128, 2-3 (2006), s. 141-154 ISSN 1385-8947 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : protective fluid film * wall jet * recirculation Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 1.594, year: 2006

  15. Water Spray Flow Characteristics Under Synthetic Jet Driven By a Piezoelectric Actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchitto, L.; Valentino, G.; Chiatto, M.; de Luca, L.

    2017-01-01

    Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA) have been applied to investigate the droplets size and velocity distribution of a water spray, under the control of a piezo-element driven synthetic jet (SJ). Tests were carried out under atmospheric conditions within a chamber test rig equipped with optical accesses at two injection pressures, namely 5 and 10 MPa, exploring the variation of the main spray parameters caused by the synthetic jet perturbations. The SJ orifice has been placed at 45° with respect to the water spray axis; the nozzle body has been moved on its own axis and three different nozzle quotes were tested. PIV measurements have been averaged on 300 trials whereas about 105 samples have been acquired for the PDA tests. For each operative condition, the influence region of the SJ device on the spray has been computed through a T-Test algorithm. The synthetic jet locally interacts with the spray, energizing the region downstream the impact. The effect of the actuator decreases at higher injection pressures and moving the impact region upwards. Droplets coalescence can be detected along the synthetic jet axis, while no significant variations are observed along a direction orthogonal to it.

  16. Robust Detection and Visualization of Jet-Stream Core Lines in Atmospheric Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Michael; Hewson, Tim; Sadlo, Filip; Westermann, Rudiger; Rautenhaus, Marc

    2018-01-01

    Jet-streams, their core lines and their role in atmospheric dynamics have been subject to considerable meteorological research since the first half of the twentieth century. Yet, until today no consistent automated feature detection approach has been proposed to identify jet-stream core lines from 3D wind fields. Such 3D core lines can facilitate meteorological analyses previously not possible. Although jet-stream cores can be manually analyzed by meteorologists in 2D as height ridges in the wind speed field, to the best of our knowledge no automated ridge detection approach has been applied to jet-stream core detection. In this work, we -a team of visualization scientists and meteorologists-propose a method that exploits directional information in the wind field to extract core lines in a robust and numerically less involved manner than traditional 3D ridge detection. For the first time, we apply the extracted 3D core lines to meteorological analysis, considering real-world case studies and demonstrating our method's benefits for weather forecasting and meteorological research.

  17. Measurements of the near-surface flow over a hill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosper, S. B.; Mobbs, S. D.; Gardiner, B. A.

    2002-10-01

    The near-surface flow over a hill with moderate slope and height comparable with the boundary-layer depth is investigated through field measurements of the mean flow (at 2 m), surface pressure, and turbulent momentum flux divergence between 8 and 15 m. The measurements were made along an east-west transect across the hill Tighvein (height 458 m, approximate width 8 km) on the Isle of Arran, south-west Scotland, during two separate periods, each of around three-weeks duration. Radiosonde ascents are used to determine the variation of a Froude number, FL = U/NL, where U is the wind speed at the middle-layer height, hm, N is the mean Brunt-Väisälä frequency below this height and L is a hill length-scale. Measurements show that for moderately stratified flows (for which FL 0.25) a minimum in the hill-induced surface-pressure perturbation occurs across the summit and this is accompanied by a maximum in the near-surface wind speed. In the more strongly stratified case (FL 0.25) the pressure field is more asymmetric and the lee-slope flow is generally stronger than on the windward slope. Such a flow pattern is qualitatively consistent with that predicted by stratified linear boundary-layer and gravity-wave theories. The near-surface momentum budget is analysed by evaluating the dominant terms in a Bernoulli equation suitable for turbulent flow. Measurements during periods of westerly flow are used to evaluate the dominant terms, and the equation is shown to hold to a reasonable approximation on the upwind slope of the hill and also on the downwind slope, away from the summit. Immediately downwind of the summit, however, the Bernoulli equation does not hold. Possible reasons for this, such as non-separated sheltering and flow separation, are discussed.

  18. Tidally-driven Surface Flow in a Georgia Estuarine Saltmarsh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, D.; Bruder, B. L.; Haas, K. A.; Webster, D. R.

    2016-02-01

    Estuarine saltmarshes are diverse, valuable, and productive ecosystems. Vegetation dampens wave and current energy, thereby allowing the estuaries to serve as a nursery habitat for shellfish and fish species. Tidally-driven flow transports nutrients into and out of the estuary, nourishing inshore and offshore vegetation and animals. The effects of vegetation on the marsh hydrodynamics and on the estuary creek and channel flow are, unfortunately, poorly understood, and the knowledge that does exist primarily originates from modeling studies. Field studies addressing marsh surface flows are limited due to the difficulty of accurately measuring the water surface elevation and acquiring concurrent velocity measurements in the dense marsh vegetation. This study partially bridges the gap between the model observations of marsh flow driven by water surface elevation gradients and flume studies of flow through vegetation. Three current meters and three pressure transducers were deployed for three days along a transect perpendicular to the main channel (Little Ogeechee River) in a saltmarsh adjacent to Rose Dhu Island (Savannah, Georgia, USA). The pressure transducer locations were surveyed daily with static GPS yielding highly accurate water surface elevation data. During flood and ebb tide, water surface elevation differences between the marsh and Little Ogeechee River were observed up to 15 cm and pressure gradients were observed up to 0.0017 m of water surface elevation drop per m of linear distance. The resulting channel-to-saltmarsh pressure gradients substantially affected tidal currents at all current meters. At one current meter, the velocity was nearly perpendicular to the Little Ogeechee River bank. The velocity at this location was effectively modeled as a balance between the pressure gradient and marsh vegetation-induced drag force using the Darcy-Weisbach/Lindner's equations developed for flow-through-vegetation analysis in open channel flow.

  19. Hydraulic investigation on free surface flow of windowless target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Chen; Gu Hanyang

    2015-01-01

    The formation and control of free surface are the most essential parts in the studies of windowless target in ACCELERATOR-DRIVEN sub-critical system (ADS). Water model experiments and 360° full scale three dimensional simulations were conducted. The experimental study demonstrates that the free surface is significantly affected by the inlet flow velocity and outlet pressure. The length of free surface decreases in the second order with the increase of inlet flow velocity, while it decreases linearly with the outlet pressure. The structure and feature of flow field were investigated. The results show that the free surface is vulnerable to the vortex movement. Transient simulations were performed with volume of fluid (VOF) method, large eddy simulation (LES) and the pressure implicit with splitting of operators (PISO) algorithm. The simulation results agree qualitatively well with the experimental data related to both free surface flow and flow field. These simulation models and methods are proved to be applicable in the hydraulic simulations of liquid heavy metal target. (authors)

  20. Instability of flow of liquid film over a heated surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sha, W.T.

    1994-01-01

    Fundamental concepts and basic equations of a flowing thin liquid film cooling a heated surfaced by its vaporization and the effect of dry patches were treated. Stable film flow prior to the appearance of dry patches on the heated surface is maintained by a balance of various forces due to surface tension, shear stress, heat and mass transfer, and gravity. Film splitting at a critical film thickness produces dry patches due to perturbation by waves on a perfect surface, and often by surface imperfection and uneven heating. This work is primarily motivated by the design of next-generation nuclear reactors, which employ many novel passive heat-removal systems via natural circulation. These systems are design to prevent damage to the reactor core and containment without action by the reactor operators during or after a design basis accident such as a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) or a main steam-line break (MSLB) accident

  1. Fluid flow near the surface of earth's outer core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloxham, Jeremy; Jackson, Andrew

    1991-01-01

    This review examines the recent attempts at extracting information on the pattern of fluid flow near the surface of the outer core from the geomagnetic secular variation. Maps of the fluid flow at the core surface are important as they may provide some insight into the process of the geodynamo and may place useful constraints on geodynamo models. In contrast to the case of mantle convection, only very small lateral variations in core density are necessary to drive the flow; these density variations are, by several orders of magnitude, too small to be imaged seismically; therefore, the geomagnetic secular variation is utilized to infer the flow. As substantial differences exist between maps developed by different researchers, the possible underlying reasons for these differences are examined with particular attention given to the inherent problems of nonuniqueness.

  2. Experiments and theory in non-linear thermal transport, heat flow instabilities and plasma jet formation in inertial confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haines, M.G.; Bond, D.J.; Chuaqui, H.H.

    1983-01-01

    The paper reports experimental and theoretical contributions to the understanding of non-linear heat flow and the phenomenon of jet-like filamentary structures in inertial-confinement fusion. When lateral heat flow is minimized, through applying more carefully a radially symmetric irradiation at 1.05 and 0.53 μm on a spherical target, it is found that a heat flux in excess of 10% of the free-streaming limit is consistent with simulations and experimental measurements with particle and X-ray diagnostics. A similar result has been found in a scaled experiment in a plasma of electron density 4x10 16 cm - 3 when the condition Tsub(e) approx.=Tsub(i) is satisfied. These results are in marked contrast to earlier assertions, mainly from plane-target measurements, that the flux limiter is 3%, but in agreement with theoretical calculations of steady non-linear heat flow using a discrete-ordinate method. Thus, no anomalous inhibition of heat flow is found, consistent with theoretical predictions that ion-acoustic turbulence is of no importance in dense (n>=10 21 cm - 3 , T approx.= 1 keV) plasmas. However, in the low-density scaled experiment, under conditions where Tsub(e)>>Tsub(i) is found that ion-acoustic turbulence is present, and the flux limiter is 4%. By using shadowgraphic and schlieren techniques with an optical diagnostic probe, fine-scale jet-like structures have been observed on a scale-length of approx. 10 μm on spherical targets. They occur even outside the laser-irradiated region, and are not connected with irregularities in the laser beam; they are more pronounced with higher-Z materials and with shorter-wavelength lasers, and have megagauss magnetic fields associated with them. Electromagnetic instabilities driven by heat flow are the probable cause of the jets, and of the three known modes the thermal instability, enhanced by radiation loss, agrees more closely with the experiments than the Weibel and thermomagnetic modes, since the latter only occur

  3. Flow Characteristics of Multi-circular Jet Plate in Premix Chamber of Air-Assist Atomizer for Burner System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirnordin Shahrin Hisham

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The flow characteristics of multi-circular jet (MCJ plate in the premix chamber of an atomizer were investigated using Computational Fluid Dynamics. Multiphase volume of fluid behavior inside the chamber was determined via steady simulations. The Eulerian–Eulerian two-fluid approach was used for execution mixing of diesel fuel and air. Spray simulation using the discrete phase with injection was generated from the nozzle hole into the ambient atmosphere. The behavior of three MCJ plates in the premix chamber was studied numerically. Results illustrated that plate open area, Ae, influenced the turbulence inside the chamber. MCJ 3, which had the lowest open area, generated the highest flow velocity and turbulence kinetic energy compared with MCJ 1 and 2. The MCJ plates could increase the turbulence in the premix chamber and contribute to the combustion efficiency.

  4. Modelling of SOL flows and target asymmetries in JET field reversal experiments with EDGE2D code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chankin, A.; Coad, J.; Corrigan, G.

    1999-11-01

    The EDGE2D code with drifts can reproduce the main trends of target asymmetries observed in field reversal experiments. It also re-produces qualitatively the main feature of recent JET results obtained with double-sided reciprocating Langmuir probes introduced near the top of the torus: the reversal of parallel plasma flow with toroidal field reversal. The code results suggest that the major contributor to the observed target asymmetries is the co-current toroidal momentum generated inside the scrape-off layer (SOL) by j r xB forces due to the presence of large up-down pressure asymmetries. Contrary to previous expectations of the predominant role of ExB drifts in creating target asymmetries, ∇B and centrifugal drifts were found to be mainly responsible for both parallel flows and target asymmetries. (author)

  5. Wind-type flows in astrophysical jets. III. Temporal evolution of perturbations and the formation of shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trussoni, E.; Ferrari, A.; Rosner, R.; Tsinganos, K.

    1988-01-01

    The temporal evolution of disturbances in a spherically symmetric polytropic wind from a central object is studied. Such disturbances may be due to localized momentum addition/subtraction, as, for example, by MHD waves, heating/cooling mechanisms in the outflow, or localized deviations from spherical symmetric expansion. The evolution of an initial perturbed state to a continuous or discontinuous final equilibrium state, as predicted by previous analytic calculations for stationary flows, is followed. It is shown that some of the predicted discontinuous equilibrium states are not physically accessible, while the attainment of the remaining equilibrium states depends on both the temporal and the spatial parameters characterizing the perturbation. The results are derived for solar conditions, but in fact can be applied to outflows in other astrophysical systems. In particular, applications to the solar wind and flows in astrophysical jets are discussed. 32 references

  6. Near-kHz 3D tracer-based LIF imaging of a co-flow jet using toluene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, V A; Troutman, V A; Hanson, R K

    2014-01-01

    This work demonstrates tracer-based, high-repetition-rate planar (15 kHz) and three-dimensional (940 Hz) laser-induced fluorescence imaging. An off-the-shelf, pulsed, frequency-quadrupled Nd:YAG laser at 266 nm is used as the excitation light source, and a high-frame-rate intensified relay optic with a slow P46 phosphor coupled to a CMOS camera is used to image the fluorescence. Four different tracers are investigated (3-pentanone, acetone, anisole, and toluene) and relative signal levels are measured in the potential core of a laminar co-flow jet. Resulting SNR values range from 6 to 44 for the different tracers, and relative signal levels and SNR for each tracer are provided as an engineering-basis for tracer-based imaging diagnostic design. It was found that signal levels from anisole (relative to toluene) are about ten times less than suggested by other literature, owing to uncertainty in the reported absorption cross sections. Using toluene as a tracer and a custom-made piezo-actuated steering optic to scan the laser sheet, 3D LIF imaging at 940 Hz is demonstrated by visualizing a co-flow jet mixing with ambient air. (paper)

  7. Dynamic surface-pressure instrumentation for rods in parallel flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulcahy, T.M.; Lawrence, W.

    1979-01-01

    Methods employed and experience gained in measuring random fluid boundary layer pressures on the surface of a small diameter cylindrical rod subject to dense, nonhomogeneous, turbulent, parallel flow in a relatively noise-contaminated flow loop are described. Emphasis is placed on identification of instrumentation problems; description of transducer construction, mounting, and waterproofing; and the pretest calibration required to achieve instrumentation capable of reliable data acquisition

  8. Dynamics and Instabilities of Free Surface and Vortex Flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tophøj, Laust Emil Hjerrild

    2012-01-01

    This PhD thesis consists of two main parts. The first part describes the dynamics of an ideal fluid on a stationary free surface of a given shape. It turns out that one can formulate a set of self-contained equations of momentum conservation for the tangential flow, with no reference to the flow ......)]. Finally, an experimental work on elastic collisions of wet spheres is briefly discussed....

  9. Prophy-Jet: Effect on Surface Roughness and Plaque Accumulation on Restorative Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    that, considering the advantages, the Prophy-Jet might be the preferred treatment, especially for orthodontic patients. Mishkin et al.(23) compared the...a problem, since aerosols of these two substances were created by the abrasive action, initiated a resorptive response with 20 an associated slight...prophylaxis on orthodontic patients and caused no significant damage to wires or brackets. They recommended the Prophy-Jet for cleaning of occlusal pits

  10. Micro-/nano-characterization of the surface structures on the divertor tiles from JET ITER-like wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokitani, M., E-mail: tokitani.masayuki@LHD.nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Miyamoto, M. [Shimane University, Matsue, Shimane 690-8504 (Japan); Masuzaki, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Fujii, Y. [Shimane University, Matsue, Shimane 690-8504 (Japan); Sakamoto, R. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Oya, Y. [Shizuoka University, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan); Hatano, Y. [University of Toyama, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Otsuka, T. [Kindai University, Higashi-Osaka, Osaka, 577-8502 (Japan); Oyaidzu, M.; Kurotaki, H.; Suzuki, T.; Hamaguchi, D.; Isobe, K.; Asakura, N. [National Institute for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology (QST), Rokkasho Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Widdowson, A. [EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Rubel, M. [Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Micro-/nano-characterization of the surface structures on the divertor tiles from JET ITER-like wall were studied. • The stratified mixed-material deposition layer composed by W, C, O, Mo and Be with the thickness of ∼1.5 μm was formed on the apron of Tile 1. • The study revealed the micro- and nano-scale modification of the inner tile surface of the JET ILW. - Abstract: Micro-/nano-characterization of the surface structures on the divertor tiles used in the first campaign (2011–2012) of the JET tokamak with the ITER-like wall (JET ILW) were studied. The analyzed tiles were a single poloidal section of the tile numbers of 1, 3 and 4, i.e., upper, vertical and horizontal targets, respectively. A sample from the apron of Tile 1 was deposition-dominated. Stratified mixed-material layers composed of Be, W, Ni, O and C were deposited on the original W-coating. Their total thickness was ∼1.5 μm. By means of transmission electron microscopy, nano-size bubble-like structures with a size of more than 100 nm were identified in that layer. They could be related to deuterium retention in the layer dominated by Be. The surface microstructure of the sample from Tile 4 also showed deposition: a stratified mixed-material layer with the total thickness of 200–300 nm. The electron diffraction pattern obtained with transmission electron microscope indicated Be was included in the layer. No bubble-like structures have been identified. The surface of Tile 3, originally coated by Mo, was identified as the erosion zone. This is consistent with the fact that the strike point was often located on that tile during the plasma operation. The study revealed the micro- and nano-scale modification of the inner tile surface of the JET ILW. In particular, a complex mixed-material deposition layer could affect hydrogen isotope retention and dust formation.

  11. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet's characterization and surface wettability driven by neon transformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfa, R. R.; Nafarizal, N.; Ahmad, M. K.; Sahdan, M. Z.; Soon, C. F.

    2017-03-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma driven by Neon transformer power supply argon is presented in this paper. Atmospheric pressure plasma system has attracted researcher interest over low pressure plasma as it provides a flexibility process, cost-efficient, portable device and vacuum-free device. Besides, another golden key of this system is the wide promising application in the field of work cover from industrial and engineering to medical. However, there are still numbers of fundamental investigation that are necessary such as device configuration, gas configuration and its effect. Dielectric barrier discharge which is also known as atmospheric pressure plasma discharge is created when there is gas ionization process occur which enhance the movement of atom and electron and provide energetic particles. These energetic particles can provide modification and cleaning property to the sample surface due to the bombardment of the high reactive ion and radicals to the sample surface. In order to develop atmospheric pressure plasma discharge, a high voltage and high frequency power supply is needed. In this work, we used a neon transformer power supply as the power supply. The flow of the Ar is feed into 10 mm cylinder quartz tube with different treatment time in order to investigate the effect of the plasma discharge. The analysis of each treatment time is presented by optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and water contact angle (WCA) measurement. The increase of gas treatment time shows increases intensity of reactive Ar and reduces the angle of water droplets in water contact angle. Treatment time of 20 s microslide glass surface shows that the plasma needle discharges have modified the sample surface from hydrophilic surface to superhydrophilic surface. Thus, this leads to another interesting application in reducing sample surface adhesion to optimize productivity in the industry of paintings, semiconductor and more.

  12. Radionuclide transfer onto ground surface in surface water flow. 2. Undisturbed tuff rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukai, Masayuki; Takebe, Shinichi; Komiya, Tomokazu

    1994-09-01

    Radionuclide migration with ground surface water flow is considered to be one of path ways in the scenario for environmental migration of the radionuclide leaked from LLRW depository. To study the radionuclide migration demonstratively, a ground surface radionuclide migration test was carried out by simulating radioactive solution flowing on the sloped tuff rock surface. Tuff rock sample of 240 cm in length taken from the Shimokita district was used to test the transfer of 60 Co, 85 Sr and 137 Cs onto the sample surface from the flowing radioactive solution under restricted infiltration condition at flow rates of 25, 80, 160ml/min and duration of 56h. The concentration change of the radionuclides in effluent was nearly constant as a function of elapsed time during the experimental period, but decreased with lower flow rates. Among the three radionuclides, 137 Cs was greatly decreased its concentration to 30% of the inflow. Adsorbed distribution of the radionuclides concentration on the ground surface decreased gradually with the distance from the inlet, and showed greater gradient at lower flow rate. Analyzing the result by the migration model, where a vertical advection distribution and two-dimensional diffusion in surface water are adopted with a first order adsorption reaction, value of migration parameters was obtained relating to the radionuclide adsorption and the surface water flow, and the measured distribution could be well simulated by adopting the value to the model. By comparing the values with the case of loamy soil layer, all values of the migration parameters showed not so great difference between two samples for 60 Co and 85 Sr. For 137 Cs, reflecting a few larger value of adsorption to the tuff rock, larger ability to reduce the concentration of flowing radioactive solution could be indicated than that to the loamy soil surface by estimation for long flowed distance. (author)

  13. Experimental investigation on effect of inlet velocity ratios for 3-D temperature fluctuation caused by coaxial-jet flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Qiong; Lu Daogang; Zhang Pan; Shi Wenbo; Tian Lu

    2012-01-01

    An experiment was performed to study the effect of inlet velocity ratios for 3-D temperature fluctuation caused by coaxial-jet flows based on the 3-D temperature and 2-D velocity fields. The experiment results show that the mixing behavior is completed at the bottom of test section in R<1 condition. The averaged temperatures at the bottom of the flow field are asymmetric in R1 condition, the intensities of temperature fluctuations are less than those in R≤1 conditions. The strong temperature fluctuations occur in the regions between the hot and cold flow, as well as between the hot flow and environmental flow in this case. The frequencies of temperature fluctuations are less than 7 Hz. (authors)

  14. Understanding jet noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabasov, S A

    2010-08-13

    Jets are one of the most fascinating topics in fluid mechanics. For aeronautics, turbulent jet-noise modelling is particularly challenging, not only because of the poor understanding of high Reynolds number turbulence, but also because of the extremely low acoustic efficiency of high-speed jets. Turbulent jet-noise models starting from the classical Lighthill acoustic analogy to state-of-the art models were considered. No attempt was made to present any complete overview of jet-noise theories. Instead, the aim was to emphasize the importance of sound generation and mean-flow propagation effects, as well as their interference, for the understanding and prediction of jet noise.

  15. Near-surface flow of volcanic gases on Io

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.W.; Thomas, P.C.

    1980-01-01

    Significant near-surface flow of gas several hundred kilometers from Pele (Plume 1) on Io is indicated by a series of bright, elongate albedo markings. Particles produced at small, local vents are apparently carried as much as 70 km farther 'downwind' from Pele. The gas densities and velocities necessary to suspend 0.1 to 10 micron particles at such a distance imply mass flow rates of 10 to the 7th - 10 to the 9th g/sec. Such flow rates are consistent with other estimates of mass transport by the plume. The large flow rates so far from the source allow an estimate of the rate of resurfacing of Io by lava flows and pyroclastics that is independent of estimates based on meteorite flux or on the amount of solids carried within the plumes themselves

  16. Flow of viscous fluid along an exponentially stretching curved surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.F. Okechi

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present the boundary layer analysis of flow induced by rapidly stretching curved surface with exponential velocity. The governing boundary value problem is reduced into self-similar form using a new similarity transformation. The resulting equations are solved numerically using shooting and Runge-Kutta methods. The numerical results depicts that the fluid velocity as well as the skin friction coefficient increases with the surface curvature, similar trend is also observed for the pressure. The dimensionless wall shear stress defined for this problem is greater than that of a linearly stretching curved surface, but becomes comparably less for a surface stretching with a power-law velocity. In addition, the result for the plane surface is a special case of this study when the radius of curvature of the surface is sufficiently large. The numerical investigations presented in terms of the graphs are interpreted with the help of underlying physics of the fluid flow and the consequences arising from the curved geometry. Keywords: Boundary layer flow, Curved surface, Exponential stretching, Curvature

  17. Surface Runoff in Watershed Modeling—Turbulent or Laminar Flows?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark E. Grismer

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Determination of overland sheet flow depths, velocities and celerities across the hillslope in watershed modeling is important towards estimation of surface storage, travel times to streams and soil detachment rates. It requires careful characterization of the flow processes. Similarly, determination of the temporal variation of hillslope-riparian-stream hydrologic connectivity requires estimation of the shallow subsurface soil hydraulic conductivity and soil-water retention (i.e., drainable porosities parameters. Field rainfall and runoff simulation studies provide considerable information and insight into these processes; in particular, that sheet flows are likely laminar and that shallow hydraulic conductivities and storage can be determined from the plot studies. Here, using a 1 m by 2 m long runoff simulation flume, we found that for overland flow rates per unit width of roughly 30–60 mm2/s and bedslopes of 10%–66% with varying sand roughness depths that all flow depths were predicted by laminar flow equations alone and that equivalent Manning’s n values were depth dependent and quite small relative to those used in watershed modeling studies. Even for overland flow rates greater than those typically measured or modeled and using Manning’s n values of 0.30–0.35, often assumed in physical watershed model applications for relatively smooth surface conditions, the laminar flow velocities were 4–5 times greater, while the laminar flow depths were 4–5 times smaller. This observation suggests that travel times, surface storage volumes and surface shear stresses associated with erosion across the landscape would be poorly predicted using turbulent flow assumptions. Filling the flume with fine sand and conducting runoff studies, we were unable to produce sheet flow, but found that subsurface flows were onflow rate, soil depth and slope dependent and drainable porosities were only soil depth and slope dependent. Moreover, both the sand

  18. Flow profiling of a surface-acoustic-wave nanopump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttenberg, Z.; Rathgeber, A.; Keller, S.; Rädler, J. O.; Wixforth, A.; Kostur, M.; Schindler, M.; Talkner, P.

    2004-11-01

    The flow profile in a capillary gap and the pumping efficiency of an acoustic micropump employing surface acoustic waves is investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Ultrasonic surface waves on a piezoelectric substrate strongly couple to a thin liquid layer and generate a quadrupolar streaming pattern within the fluid. We use fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy as complementary tools to investigate the resulting flow profile. The velocity was found to depend on the applied power approximately linearly and to decrease with the inverse third power of the distance from the ultrasound generator on the chip. The found properties reveal acoustic streaming as a promising tool for the controlled agitation during microarray hybridization.

  19. A direct numerical simulation investigation of the synthetic jet frequency effects on separation control of low-Re flow past an airfoil

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Wei

    2015-05-05

    We present results of direct numerical simulations of a synthetic jet (SJ) based separation control of flow past a NACA-0018 (National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics) airfoil, at 10° angle of attack and Reynolds number 104 based on the airfoil chord length C and uniform inflow velocity U 0. The actuator of the SJ is modeled as a spanwise slot on the airfoil leeward surface and is placed just upstream of the leading edge separation position of the uncontrolled flow. The momentum coefficient of the SJ is chosen at a small value 2.13 × 10−4 normalized by that of the inflow. Three forcing frequencies are chosen for the present investigation: the low frequency (LF) F + = feC/U 0 = 0.5, the medium frequency (MF) F + = 1.0, and the high frequency (HF) F + = 4.0. We quantify the effects of forcing frequency for each case on the separation control and related vortex dynamics patterns. The simulations are performed using an energy conservative fourth-order parallel code. Numerical results reveal that the geometric variation introduced by the actuator has negligible effects on the mean flow field and the leading edge separation pattern; thus, the separation control effects are attributed to the SJ. The aerodynamic performances of the airfoil, characterized by lift and lift-to-drag ratio, are improved for all controlled cases, with the F + = 1.0 case being the optimal one. The flow in the shear layer close to the actuator is locked to the jet, while in the wake this lock-in is maintained for the MF case but suppressed by the increasing turbulent fluctuations in the LF and HF cases. The vortex evolution downstream of the actuator presents two modes depending on the frequency: the vortex fragmentation and merging mode in the LF case where the vortex formed due to the SJ breaks up into several vortices and the latter merge as convecting downstream; the discrete vortices mode in the HF case where discrete vortices form and convect downstream without any fragmentation and

  20. A direct numerical simulation investigation of the synthetic jet frequency effects on separation control of low-Re flow past an airfoil

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Wei; Samtaney, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    We present results of direct numerical simulations of a synthetic jet (SJ) based separation control of flow past a NACA-0018 (National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics) airfoil, at 10° angle of attack and Reynolds number 104 based on the airfoil chord length C and uniform inflow velocity U 0. The actuator of the SJ is modeled as a spanwise slot on the airfoil leeward surface and is placed just upstream of the leading edge separation position of the uncontrolled flow. The momentum coefficient of the SJ is chosen at a small value 2.13 × 10−4 normalized by that of the inflow. Three forcing frequencies are chosen for the present investigation: the low frequency (LF) F + = feC/U 0 = 0.5, the medium frequency (MF) F + = 1.0, and the high frequency (HF) F + = 4.0. We quantify the effects of forcing frequency for each case on the separation control and related vortex dynamics patterns. The simulations are performed using an energy conservative fourth-order parallel code. Numerical results reveal that the geometric variation introduced by the actuator has negligible effects on the mean flow field and the leading edge separation pattern; thus, the separation control effects are attributed to the SJ. The aerodynamic performances of the airfoil, characterized by lift and lift-to-drag ratio, are improved for all controlled cases, with the F + = 1.0 case being the optimal one. The flow in the shear layer close to the actuator is locked to the jet, while in the wake this lock-in is maintained for the MF case but suppressed by the increasing turbulent fluctuations in the LF and HF cases. The vortex evolution downstream of the actuator presents two modes depending on the frequency: the vortex fragmentation and merging mode in the LF case where the vortex formed due to the SJ breaks up into several vortices and the latter merge as convecting downstream; the discrete vortices mode in the HF case where discrete vortices form and convect downstream without any fragmentation and

  1. Biomolecular Nano-Flow-Sensor to Measure Near-Surface Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noji Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have proposed and experimentally demonstrated that the measurement of the near-surface flow at the interface between a liquid and solid using a 10 nm-sized biomolecular motor of F1-ATPase as a nano-flow-sensor. For this purpose, we developed a microfluidic test-bed chip to precisely control the liquid flow acting on the F1-ATPase. In order to visualize the rotation of F1-ATPase, several hundreds nanometer-sized particle was immobilized at the rotational axis of F1-ATPase to enhance the rotation to be detected by optical microscopy. The rotational motion of F1-ATPase, which was immobilized on an inner surface of the test-bed chip, was measured to obtain the correlation between the near-surface flow and the rotation speed of F1-ATPase. As a result, we obtained the relationship that the rotation speed of F1-ATPase was linearly decelerated with increasi