WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface incident photon

  1. Surface states in photonic crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojtíšek P.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Among many unusual and interesting physical properties of photonic crystals (PhC, in recent years, the propagation of surface electromagnetic waves along dielectric PhC boundaries have attracted considerable attention, also in connection to their possible applications. Such surfaces states, produced with the help of specialized defects on PhC boundaries, similarly to surfaces plasmons, are localized surfaces waves and, as such, can be used in various sensing applications. In this contribution, we present our recent studies on numerical modelling of surface states (SS for all three cases of PhC dimensionality. Simulations of these states were carried out by the use of plane wave expansion (PWE method via the MIT MPB package.

  2. Effects of a power and photon energy of incident light on near-field etching properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatsui, T.; Saito, H.; Nishioka, K.; Leuschel, B.; Soppera, O.; Nobusada, K.

    2017-12-01

    We developed a near-field etching technique for realizing an ultra-flat surfaces of various materials and structures. To elucidate the near-field etching properties, we have investigated the effects of power and the photon energy of the incident light. First, we established theoretically that an optical near-field with photon energy lower than the absorption edge of the molecules can induce molecular vibrations. We used nanodiamonds to study the power dependence of the near-field etching properties. From the topological changes of the nanodiamonds, we confirmed the linear-dependence of the etching volume with the incident power. Furthermore, we studied the photon energy dependence using TiO2 nanostriped structures, which revealed that a lower photon energy results in a lower etching rate.

  3. Photon management assisted by surface waves on photonic crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Angelini, Angelo

    2017-01-01

    This book illustrates original pathways to manipulate light at the nanoscale by means of surface electromagnetic waves (here, Bloch surface waves, BSWs) on planar dielectric multilayers, also known as one-dimensional photonic crystals. This approach is particularly valuable as it represents an effective alternative to the widely exploited surface plasmon paradigm. After a brief overview on the fundamentals of BSWs, several significant applications of BSW-sustaining structures are described. Particular consideration is given to the propagation, guiding, and diffraction of BSW-coupled radiation. Further, the interaction of organic emitters with BSWs on planar and corrugated multilayers is investigated, including fluorescence beaming in free space. To provide greater insight into sensing applications, an illustrative example of fluorescent microarray-based detection is presented. The book is intended for scientists and researchers working on photon management opportunities in fields such as biosensing, optical c...

  4. Aberrated surface soliton formation in a nonlinear 1D and 2D photonic crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A; Lysak, Tatiana M; Trykin, Evgenii M

    2018-01-01

    We discuss a novel type of surface soliton-aberrated surface soliton-appearance in a nonlinear one dimensional photonic crystal and a possibility of this surface soliton formation in two dimensional photonic crystal. An aberrated surface soliton possesses a nonlinear distribution of the wavefront. We show that, in one dimensional photonic crystal, the surface soliton is formed at the photonic crystal boundary with the ambient medium. Essentially, that it occupies several layers at the photonic crystal boundary and penetrates into the ambient medium at a distance also equal to several layers, so that one can infer about light energy localization at the lateral surface of the photonic crystal. In the one dimensional case, the surface soliton is formed from an earlier formed soliton that falls along the photonic crystal layers at an angle which differs slightly from the normal to the photonic crystal face. In the two dimensional case, the soliton can appear if an incident Gaussian beam falls on the photonic crystal face. The influence of laser radiation parameters, optical properties of photonic crystal layers and ambient medium on the one dimensional surface soliton formation is investigated. We also discuss the influence of two dimensional photonic crystal configuration on light energy localization near the photonic crystal surface. It is important that aberrated surface solitons can be created at relatively low laser pulse intensity and for close values of alternating layers dielectric permittivity which allows their experimental observation.

  5. Focus Issue on surface plasmon photonics introduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levy, Uriel; Berini, Pierre; Maier, Stefan A.

    2015-01-01

    The 7th International Conference on Surface Plasmon Photonics (SPP7) was held in Jerusalem, Israel from May 31st to June 5th, 2015. This independent series of biennial conferences is widely regarded as the premier series in the field, and the 7th edition maintained the tradition of excellence. Th...

  6. Manipulation of photons at the surface of three-dimensional photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizaki, Kenji; Noda, Susumu

    2009-07-16

    In three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystals, refractive-index variations with a periodicity comparable to the wavelength of the light passing through the crystal give rise to so-called photonic bandgaps, which are analogous to electronic bandgaps for electrons moving in the periodic electrostatic potential of a material's crystal structure. Such 3D photonic bandgap crystals are envisioned to become fundamental building blocks for the control and manipulation of photons in optical circuits. So far, such schemes have been pursued by embedding artificial defects and light emitters inside the crystals, making use of 3D bandgap directional effects. Here we show experimentally that photons can be controlled and manipulated even at the 'surface' of 3D photonic crystals, where 3D periodicity is terminated, establishing a new and versatile route for photon manipulation. By making use of an evanescent-mode coupling technique, we demonstrate that 3D photonic crystals possess two-dimensional surface states, and we map their band structure. We show that photons can be confined and propagate through these two-dimensional surface states, and we realize their localization at arbitrary surface points by designing artificial surface-defect structures through the formation of a surface-mode gap. Surprisingly, the quality factors of the surface-defect mode are the largest reported for 3D photonic crystal nanocavities (Q up to approximately 9,000). In addition to providing a new approach for photon manipulation by photonic crystals, our findings are relevant for the generation and control of plasmon-polaritons in metals and the related surface photon physics. The absorption-free nature of the 3D photonic crystal surface may enable new sensing applications and provide routes for the realization of efficient light-matter interactions.

  7. Polymer surface modification by plasmas and photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, C.-M.; Ko, T.-M.; Hiraoka, H.

    1996-05-01

    Polymers have been applied successfully in fields such as adhesion, biomaterials, protective coatings, friction and wear, composites, microelectronic devices, and thin-film technology. In general, special surface properties with regard to chemical composition, hydrophilicity, roughness, crystallinity, conductivity, lubricity, and cross-linking density are required for the success of these applications. Polymers very often do not possess the surface properties needed for these applications. However, they have excellent bulk physical and chemical properties, are inexpensive, and are easy to process. For these reasons, surface modification techniques which can transform these inexpensive materials into highly valuable finished products have become an important part of the plastics and many other industries. In recent years, many advances have been made in developing surface treatments to alter the chemical and physical properties of polymer surfaces without affecting bulk properties. Common surface modification techniques include treatments by flame, corona, plasmas, photons, electron beams, ion beams, X-rays, and γ-rays. Plasma treatment is probably the most versatile surface treatment technique. Different types of gases such as argon, oxygen, nitrogen, fluorine, carbon dioxide, and water can produce the unique surface properties required by various applications. For example, oxygen-plasma treatment can increase the surface energy of polymers, whereas fluorine-plasma treatment can decrease the surface energy and improve the chemical inertness. Cross-linking at a polymer surface can be introduced by an inert-gas plasma. Modification by plasma treatment is usually confined to the top several hundred ångströms and does not affect the bulk properties. The main disadvantage of this technique is that it requires a vacuum system, which increases the cost of operation. Thin polymer films with unique chemical and physical properties are produced by plasma polymerization

  8. Surface modes at metallic an photonic crystal interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Weitao [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    A surface mode is an electromagnetic field distribution bounded at a surface. It decays exponentially with the distance from the surface on both sides of the surface and propagates at the surface. The surface mode exists at a metal-dielectric interface as surface plasmon (1) or at a photonic crystal surface terminated properly (34; 35; 36). Besides its prominent near-filed properties, it can connect structures at its propagation surface and results in far-field effects. Extraordinary transmission (EOT) and beaming are two examples and they are the subjects I am studying in this thesis. EOT means the transmission through holes in an opaque screen can be much larger than the geometrical optics limitation. Based on our everyday experience about shadows, the transmission equals the filling ratio of the holes in geometrical optics. The conventional diffraction theory also proved that the transmission through a subwavelength circular hole in an infinitely thin perfect electric conductor (PEC) film converges to zero when the hole's dimension is much smaller than the wavelength (40). Recently it is discovered that the transmission can be much larger than the the filling ratio of the holes at some special wavelengths (41). This cannot be explained by conventional theories, so it is called extraordinary transmission. It is generally believed that surface plasmons play an important role (43; 44) in the EOT through a periodic subwavelength hole array in a metallic film. The common theories in literatures are based on these arguments. The surface plasmons cannot be excited by incident plane waves directly because of momentum mismatch. The periodicity of the hole arrays will provide addition momentum. When the momentum-matching condition of surface plasmons is satisfied, the surface plasmons will be excited. Then these surface plasmons will collect the energy along the input surface and carry them to the holes. So the transmission can be bigger than the filling ratio. Based

  9. Photonic crystal and photonic quasicrystal patterned in PDMS surfaces and their effect on LED radiation properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suslik, Lubos [Dept. of Physics, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, University of Zilina, Univerzitna 1, 010 26, Zilina (Slovakia); Pudis, Dusan, E-mail: pudis@fyzika.uniza.sk [Dept. of Physics, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, University of Zilina, Univerzitna 1, 010 26, Zilina (Slovakia); Goraus, Matej [Dept. of Physics, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, University of Zilina, Univerzitna 1, 010 26, Zilina (Slovakia); Nolte, Rainer [Fakultät für Maschinenbau FG Lichttechnik Ilmenau University of Technology, Ilmenau (Germany); Kovac, Jaroslav [Inst. of Electronics and Photonics, Slovak University of Technology, Ilkovicova 3, 812 19, Bratislava (Slovakia); Durisova, Jana; Gaso, Peter [Dept. of Physics, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, University of Zilina, Univerzitna 1, 010 26, Zilina (Slovakia); Hronec, Pavol [Inst. of Electronics and Photonics, Slovak University of Technology, Ilkovicova 3, 812 19, Bratislava (Slovakia); Schaaf, Peter [Chair Materials for Electronics, Institute of Materials Engineering and Institute of Micro- and Nanotechnologies MacroNano, TU Ilmenau, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 5, 98693 Ilmenau (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Photonic quasicrystal patterned in the surface of polydimethylsiloxane membrane (left) and radiation pattern of light emitting diode with patterned membrane applied in the surface (right). - Highlights: • We presented fabrication technique of PDMS membranes with patterned surface by photonic crystal (PhC) and photonic quasi-crystal (PQC). • Presented technique is effective for preparation PhC and PQC PDMS membranes easily implementing in the LED chip. • From the goniophotometer measurements, the membranes document effective angular emission due to the diffraction on patterned surfaces. • 12 fold symmetry PQC structure shows homogeneous radiation pattern, while the 2 fold symmetry of square PhC shows evident diffraction lobes. - Abstract: We present results of fabrication and implementation of thin polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membranes with patterned surface for the light emitting diode (LED). PDMS membranes were patterned by using the interference lithography in combination with embossing technique. Two-dimensional photonic crystal and photonic quasicrystal structures with different period were patterned in the surface of thin PDMS membranes with depth up to 550 nm. Patterned PDMS membranes placed on the LED chip effectively diffracted light and increased angular emission of LED radiation pattern. We presented effective technique for fabrication of patterned PDMS membranes, which could modify the emission properties of optoelectronic devices and can be applied directly on surface LEDs and small optical devices.

  10. Nonlinear Tamm states and surface effects in periodic photonic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kivshar, Yu S

    2008-01-01

    We present a brief overview of the basic concepts and important experimental observations of the effect of light localization near the surfaces of truncated periodic photonic structures. In particular, we discuss the formation of nonlinear localized modes and discrete surface solitons near the edges of nonlinear optical waveguide arrays and two-dimensional photonic lattices. We draw an analogy between the nonlinear surface optical modes and the surface Tamm states known in the electronic theory. We discuss the crossover between discrete solitons in the array and surface solitons at the edge of the array by analyzing the families of even and odd nonlinear localized modes located at finite distances from the edge of a waveguide array. We discuss various generalization of this concept including surface solitons in chirped lattices, multi-gap vector surface solitons, polychromatic surface states generated by a supercontinuum source, surface modes in two-dimensional photonic lattices, and spatiotemporal surface solitons. Finally, we discuss briefly several other related concepts including the enhanced beaming of light from subwavelength waveguides in photonic crystals

  11. Nonthermal Effects of Photon Illumination on Surface Diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ditchfield, R.; Llera-Rodriguez, D.; Seebauer, E.G.

    1998-01-01

    Nonthermal influences of photon illumination on surface diffusion at high temperatures have been measured experimentally for the first time. Activation energies and preexponential factors for diffusion of germanium and indium on silicon change substantially in response to illumination by photons having energies greater than the substrate band gap. Results depend on doping type. Ionization of surface vacancies by photogenerated charge carriers seems to play a key role. The results have significant implications for aspects of microelectronics fabrication governed by surface mobility. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  12. Normal Incidence for Graded Index Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khankhoje, Uday K.; Van Zyl, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    A plane wave is incident normally from vacuum (eta(sub 0) = 1) onto a smooth surface. The substrate has three layers; the top most layer has thickness d(sub 1) and permittivity epsilon(sub 1). The corresponding numbers for the next layer are d(sub 2); epsilon(sub 2), while the third layer which is semi-in nite has index eta(sub 3). The Hallikainen model [1] is used to relate volumetric soil moisture to the permittivity. Here, we consider the relation for the real part of the permittivity for a typical loam soil: acute epsilon(mv) = 2.8571 + 3.9678 x mv + 118:85 x mv(sup 2).

  13. Transfer Matrix for Obliquely Incident Electromagnetic Waves Propagating in One Dimension Plasma Photonic Crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Bin

    2009-01-01

    Based on the electromagnetic theory and by using an analytical technique-the transfer matrix method, the obliquely incident electromagnetic waves propagating in one-dimension plasma photonic crystals is studied. The dispersion relations for both the P-polarization waves and S-polarization waves, depending on the plasma density, plasma thickness and period, are discussed. (basic plasma phenomena)

  14. Photonics surface waves on metamaterials interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takayama, Osamu; Bogdanov, Andrey; Lavrinenko, Andrei V

    2017-01-01

    A surface wave (SW) in optics is a light wave, which is supported at an interface of two dissimilar media and propagates along the interface with its field amplitude exponentially decaying away from the boundary. The research on surface waves has been flourishing in last few decades thanks to the...

  15. Photonics surface waves on metamaterials interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Osamu; Bogdanov, Andrey; Lavrinenko, Andrei V

    2017-09-12

    A surface wave (SW) in optics is a light wave, which is supported at an interface of two dissimilar media and propagates along the interface with its field amplitude exponentially decaying away from the boundary. The research on surface waves has been flourishing in last few decades thanks to their unique properties of surface sensitivity and field localization. These features have resulted in applications in nano-guiding, sensing, light-trapping and imaging based on the near-field techniques, contributing to the establishment of the nanophotonics as a field of research. Up to present, a wide variety of surface waves has been investigated in numerous material and structure settings. This paper reviews the recent progress and development in the physics of SWs localized at metamaterial interfaces, as well as bulk media in order to provide broader perspectives on optical surface waves in general. For each type of the surface waves, we discuss material and structural platforms. We mainly focus on experimental realizations in the visible and near-infrared wavelength ranges. We also address existing and potential application of SWs in chemical and biological sensing, and experimental excitation and characterization methods. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  16. Incidence of Second Malignancies Among Patients Treated With Proton Versus Photon Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Christine S.; Yock, Torunn I.; Nelson, Kerrie; Xu, Yang; Keating, Nancy L.; Tarbell, Nancy J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Proton radiation, when compared with photon radiation, allows delivery of increased radiation dose to the tumor while decreasing dose to adjacent critical structures. Given the recent expansion of proton facilities in the United States, the long-term sequelae of proton therapy should be carefully assessed. The objective of this study was to compare the incidence of second cancers in patients treated with proton radiation with a population-based cohort of matched patients treated with photon radiation. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective cohort study of 558 patients treated with proton radiation from 1973 to 2001 at the Harvard Cyclotron in Cambridge, MA and 558 matched patients treated with photon therapy in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program cancer registry. Patients were matched by age at radiation treatment, sex, year of treatment, cancer histology, and site. The main outcome measure was the incidence of second malignancies after radiation. Results: We matched 558 proton patients with 558 photon patients from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry. The median duration of follow-up was 6.7 years (interquartile range, 7.4) and 6.0 years (interquartile range, 9.3) in the proton and photon cohorts, respectively. The median age at treatment was 59 years in each cohort. Second malignancies occurred in 29 proton patients (5.2%) and 42 photon patients (7.5%). After we adjusted for sex, age at treatment, primary site, and year of diagnosis, proton therapy was not associated with an increased risk of second malignancy (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.52 [95% confidence interval, 0.32-0.85]; P=.009). Conclusions: The use of proton radiation therapy was not associated with a significantly increased risk of secondary malignancies compared with photon therapy. Longer follow-up of these patients is needed to determine if there is a significant decrease in second malignancies. Given the limitations of the study

  17. Semiconductor surface diffusion: Nonthermal effects of photon illumination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ditchfield, R.; Llera-Rodriguez, D.; Seebauer, E. G.

    2000-01-01

    Nonthermal influences of photon illumination on surface diffusion at high temperatures have been measured experimentally. Activation energies and pre-exponential factors for diffusion of germanium, indium, and antimony on silicon change by up to 0.3 eV and two orders of magnitude, respectively, in response to illumination by photons having energies greater than the substrate band gap. The parameters decrease for n-type material and increase for p-type material. Aided by results from photoreflectance spectroscopy, we suggest that motion of the surface quasi-Fermi-level for minority carriers accounts for much of the effect by changing the charge states of surface vacancies. An additional adatom-vacancy complexation mechanism appears to operate on p-type substrates. The results have significant implications for aspects of microelectronics fabrication by rapid thermal processing that are governed by surface mobility. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  18. Probing the spectral density of the surface electromagnetic fields through scattering of waveguide photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guang-Yin

    2016-02-10

    The spectral density of the metal-surface electromagnetic fields will be strongly modified in the presence of a closely-spaced quantum emitter. In this work, we propose a feasible way to probe the changes of the spectral density through the scattering of the waveguide photon incident on the quantum emitter. The variances of the lineshape in the transmission spectra indicate the coherent interaction between the emitter and the pseudomode resulting from all the surface electromagnetic modes. We further investigate the quantum coherence between the emitter and the pseudomode of the metal-dielectric interface.

  19. Optical microcavities based on surface modes in two-dimensional photonic crystals and silicon-on-insulator photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Sanshui; Qiu, M.

    2007-01-01

    Surface-mode optical microcavities based on two-dimensional photonic crystals and silicon-on-insulator photonic crystals are studied. We demonstrate that a high-quality-factor microcavity can be easily realized in these structures. With an increasing of the cavity length, the quality factor...... is gradually enhanced and the resonant frequency converges to that of the corresponding surface mode in the photonic crystals. These structures have potential applications such as sensing....

  20. Label-Free Biosensor Imaging on Photonic Crystal Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Yue; Cunningham, Brian T

    2015-08-28

    We review the development and application of nanostructured photonic crystal surfaces and a hyperspectral reflectance imaging detection instrument which, when used together, represent a new form of optical microscopy that enables label-free, quantitative, and kinetic monitoring of biomaterial interaction with substrate surfaces. Photonic Crystal Enhanced Microscopy (PCEM) has been used to detect broad classes of materials which include dielectric nanoparticles, metal plasmonic nanoparticles, biomolecular layers, and live cells. Because PCEM does not require cytotoxic stains or photobleachable fluorescent dyes, it is especially useful for monitoring the long-term interactions of cells with extracellular matrix surfaces. PCEM is only sensitive to the attachment of cell components within ~200 nm of the photonic crystal surface, which may correspond to the region of most interest for adhesion processes that involve stem cell differentiation, chemotaxis, and metastasis. PCEM has also demonstrated sufficient sensitivity for sensing nanoparticle contrast agents that are roughly the same size as protein molecules, which may enable applications in "digital" diagnostics with single molecule sensing resolution. We will review PCEM's development history, operating principles, nanostructure design, and imaging modalities that enable tracking of optical scatterers, emitters, absorbers, and centers of dielectric permittivity.

  1. Photonic Crystal Biosensor Based on Optical Surface Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Dietler

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A label-free biosensor device based on registration of photonic crystal surface waves is described. Angular interrogation of the optical surface wave resonance is used to detect changes in the thickness of an adsorbed layer, while an additional simultaneous detection of the critical angle of total internal reflection provides independent data of the liquid refractive index. The abilities of the device are demonstrated by measuring of biotin molecule binding to a streptavidin monolayer, and by measuring association and dissociation kinetics of immunoglobulin G proteins. Additionally, deposition of PSS / PAH polyelectrolytes is recorded in situ resulting calculation of PSS and PAH monolayer thicknesses separately.

  2. Time-resolved two-photon photoemission from metal surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Weinelt, M

    2002-01-01

    The Rydberg-like series of image-potential states is a prototype system for loosely bound electrons at a metal surface. The electronic structure and the femtosecond dynamics of these states is studied by high-resolution energy-and time-resolved two-photon photoemission spectroscopy. The electron trapped in the image potential moves virtually freely laterally to the surface where it is subject to inelastic and quasielastic scattering processes which cause decay of population and phase relaxation. The influence of surface corrugation on these processes has been investigated for adsorbates on Cu(001) and stepped Cu(117) and Cu(119) surfaces which are vicinal to Cu(001). The dynamics depend on both the distance of the electron in front of the surface and the parallel momentum. For CO molecules on Cu(001) inelastic scattering into bulk states and adsorbate-induced resonances determine the decay rate. For small numbers of Cu adatoms on Cu(001) and the vicinal surfaces the decay rate of image-potential states is sig...

  3. Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2015-01-01

    Discusses the basic physical principles underlying thescience and technology of nanophotonics, its materials andstructures This volume presents nanophotonic structures and Materials.Nanophotonics is photonic science and technology that utilizeslight/matter interactions on the nanoscale where researchers arediscovering new phenomena and developing techniques that go wellbeyond what is possible with conventional photonics andelectronics.The topics discussed in this volume are: CavityPhotonics; Cold Atoms and Bose-Einstein Condensates; Displays;E-paper; Graphene; Integrated Photonics; Liquid Cry

  4. Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2015-01-01

    Discusses the basic physical principles underlying Biomedical Photonics, spectroscopy and microscopy This volume discusses biomedical photonics, spectroscopy and microscopy, the basic physical principles underlying the technology and its applications. The topics discussed in this volume are: Biophotonics; Fluorescence and Phosphorescence; Medical Photonics; Microscopy; Nonlinear Optics; Ophthalmic Technology; Optical Tomography; Optofluidics; Photodynamic Therapy; Image Processing; Imaging Systems; Sensors; Single Molecule Detection; Futurology in Photonics. Comprehensive and accessible cov

  5. Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2015-01-01

    This book covers modern photonics accessibly and discusses the basic physical principles underlying all the applications and technology of photonicsThis volume covers the basic physical principles underlying the technology and all applications of photonics from statistical optics to quantum optics. The topics discussed in this volume are: Photons in perspective; Coherence and Statistical Optics; Complex Light and Singular Optics; Electrodynamics of Dielectric Media; Fast and slow Light; Holography; Multiphoton Processes; Optical Angular Momentum; Optical Forces, Trapping and Manipulation; Pol

  6. Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2015-01-01

    Discusses the basic physical principles underlying the technology instrumentation of photonics This volume discusses photonics technology and instrumentation. The topics discussed in this volume are: Communication Networks; Data Buffers; Defense and Security Applications; Detectors; Fiber Optics and Amplifiers; Green Photonics; Instrumentation and Metrology; Interferometers; Light-Harvesting Materials; Logic Devices; Optical Communications; Remote Sensing; Solar Energy; Solid-State Lighting; Wavelength Conversion Comprehensive and accessible coverage of the whole of modern photonics Emphas

  7. Measurements of Pair Production Under Channelling Conditions by 70-180 GeV Photons Incident on Single Crystals

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment will use the WA69 set-up to deliver a tagged photon beam in the energy range from 15~GeV to 150~GeV with a total angular spread of about @M~0.5~mrad. The incident photon direction is known to about 35~@mrad through the direction of the emitting electron. The photon beam is incident on an about 1~mm thick Ge single crystal in order to investigate pair production in single crystals. Above a certain energy threshold photons incident along crystal axis will show strongly increased pair production yi - the so-called .us Channelling Pair Production (ChPP). The produced pairs are analyzed in the @W-spectrometer. The large spread in incident photon angles offers an excellent opportunity to investigate in one single experiment the pair production in an angular region around a crystal axes and thereby compare ChPP with coherent (CPP) and incoherent (ICPP) processes. The very abrupt onset of ChPP (around threshold) will be measured and give a crucial test of the theoretical calculations. The differential...

  8. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride photonic crystals for improved-performance surface electromagnetic wave biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinibaldi, Alberto; Descrovi, Emiliano; Giorgis, Fabrizio; Dominici, Lorenzo; Ballarini, Mirko; Mandracci, Pietro; Danz, Norbert; Michelotti, Francesco

    2012-10-01

    We exploit the properties of surface electromagnetic waves propagating at the surface of finite one dimensional photonic crystals to improve the performance of optical biosensors with respect to the standard surface plasmon resonance approach. We demonstrate that the hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride technology is a versatile platform for fabricating one dimensional photonic crystals with any desirable design and operating in a wide wavelength range, from the visible to the near infrared. We prepared sensors based on photonic crystals sustaining either guided modes or surface electromagnetic waves, also known as Bloch surface waves. We carried out for the first time a direct experimental comparison of their sensitivity and figure of merit with surface plasmon polaritons on metal layers, by making use of a commercial surface plasmon resonance instrument that was slightly adapted for the experiments. Our measurements demonstrate that the Bloch surface waves on silicon nitride photonic crystals outperform surface plasmon polaritons by a factor 1.3 in terms of figure of merit.

  9. Coherent Pair Production by Photons in the 20-170 GeV Energy Range Incident on Crystals and Birefringence

    CERN Document Server

    Apyan, A.; Badelek, B.; Ballestrero, S.; Biino, C.; Birol, I.; Cenci, P.; Connell, S.H.; Eichblatt, S.; Fonseca, T.; Freund, A.; Gorini, B.; Groess, R.; Ispirian, K.; Ketel, T.J.; Kononets, Yu.V.; Lopez, A.; Mangiarotti, A.; van Rens, B.; Sellschop, J.P.F.; Shieh, M.; Sona, P.; Strakhovenko, V.; Uggerhoj, E.; Uggerhj, Ulrik Ingerslev; Unel, G.; Velasco, M.; Vilakazi, Z.Z.; Wessely, O.; Kononets, Yu.V.

    2003-01-01

    The cross section for coherent pair production by linearly polarised photons in the 20-170 GeV energy range was measured for photon aligned incidence on ultra-high quality diamond and germanium crystals. The theoretical description of coherent bremsstrahlung and coherent pair production phenomena is an area of active theoretical debate and development. However, under our experimental conditions, the theory predicted the combined cross section and polarisation experimental observables very well indeed. In macroscopic terms, our experiment measured a birefringence effect in pair production in a crystal. This study of this effect also constituted a measurement of the energy dependent linear polarisation of photons produced by coherent bremsstrahlung in aligned crystals. New technologies for manipulating high energy photon beams can be realised based on an improved understanding of QED phenomena at these energies. In particular, this experiment demonstrates an efficient new polarimetry technique. The pair product...

  10. Investigation of photon detection probability dependence of SPADnet-I digital photon counter as a function of angle of incidence, wavelength and polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Játékos, Balázs, E-mail: jatekosb@eik.bme.hu; Ujhelyi, Ferenc; Lőrincz, Emőke; Erdei, Gábor

    2015-01-01

    SPADnet-I is a prototype, fully digital, high spatial and temporal resolution silicon photon counter, based on standard CMOS imaging technology, developed by the SPADnet consortium. Being a novel device, the exact dependence of photon detection probability (PDP) of SPADnet-I was not known as a function of angle of incidence, wavelength and polarization of the incident light. Our targeted application area of this sensor is next generation PET detector modules, where they will be used along with LYSO:Ce scintillators. Hence, we performed an extended investigation of PDP in a wide range of angle of incidence (0° to 80°), concentrating onto a 60 nm broad wavelength interval around the characteristic emission peak (λ=420 nm) of the scintillator. In the case where the sensor was optically coupled to a scintillator, our experiments showed a notable dependence of PDP on angle, polarization and wavelength. The sensor has an average PDP of approximately 30% from 0° to 60° angle of incidence, where it starts to drop rapidly. The PDP turned out not to be polarization dependent below 30°. If the sensor is used without a scintillator (i.e. the light source is in air), the polarization dependence is much less expressed, it begins only from 50°.

  11. Cleaning method of aluminium surface by argon discharge for photon factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, Hajime; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Watabe, Hiromi; Horikoshi, Gen-ichi; Mathewson, A.G.

    1978-01-01

    In the Photon Factory program of High Energy Research Laboratory, in which the electron storage ring as a photon source stores the electron beam of 2.5 GeV and 500 mA, beam intensity the probability of gas discharge from the inner surface of doughnut wall due to electron bombardment (for 100 eV electorns) must be limited to 1 x 10 -6 or less, according to the estimation by A.G. Mathewson and others. The pressure inside the ring can be maintained at 1 x 10 -9 Torr only with the above probability value. The standard surface treatment of degreasing and evacuation for 24 hours with heating at 150 deg. C can be of no practical use. Since the ion bombardment of surfaces by argon glow discharge is effective for decreasing the probability, the reduction of the probability by argon discharge cleaning was measured with the surface of aluminium, which is planned to be used as the doughnut material. Two methods were employed for the measurement; the one is analysis of gases being discharged, by introducting them to the analyzing chamber during argon discharge and the other is the measurement of the probability when bombardment with electrons of 100 eV is applied, after stopping argon introduction and evacuating after argon discharge had been performed for a definite period. As a result, the probability of approximately 2 x 10 -5 at the beginning of electron beam incidence was obtained by adding argon discharge cleaning to the standard method. This is estimated to correspondent to approximately 25 mA of beam intensity, which is equivalent to 1/20 of the planned value. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  12. Right- and left-handed rules on the transverse spin angular momentum of a surface wave of photonic crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jinbing; Xia, Tongnan; Cai, Xiaoshu; Tian, Shengnan; Guo, Hanming; Zhuang, Songlin

    2017-07-01

    By investigating the surface wave of photonic crystal, we put forward two sets of rules: the right-handed screw rule, judging the transverse spin angular momentum (SAM) directions according to the propagation direction of the surface wave; and the left-handed rule, judging the excitation direction of the surface wave in accordance to the SAM direction of incident circularly polarized light and the relative position of the dipole-like scatterer with respect to the interface where the surface wave propagates. Both right- and left-handed rules apply to the interface consisting of opposite-sign-permittivity materials. With the help of these two sets of rules, it is convenient to judge the direction of the transverse SAM and the excited surface wave, which facilitate the application involving transverse SAM of the surface wave.

  13. Integral particle reflection coefficient for oblique incidence of photons as universal function in the domain of initial energies up to 300 keV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubenov Vladan L.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present the results of calculations and analyses of the integral particle reflection coefficient of photons for oblique photon incidence on planar targets, in the domain of initial photon energies from 100 keV to 300 keV. The results are based on the Monte Carlo simulations of the photon reflection from water, concrete, aluminum, iron, and copper materials, performed by the MCNP code. It has been observed that the integral particle reflection coefficient as a function of the ratio of total cross-section of photons and effective atomic number of target material shows universal behavior for all the analyzed shielding materials in the selected energy domain. Analytical formulas for different angles of photon incidence have been proposed, which describe the reflection of photons for all the materials and energies analyzed.

  14. Adaptive photonic meta-surfaces exploiting interfacial phase change in elemental gallium

    OpenAIRE

    Waters, Robin F.; MacDonald, K.F.; Hobson, P.A.; Zheludev, N.I.

    2014-01-01

    Surface-driven metallization in a nanoscale layer of elemental gallium forming the backplane of a photonic metamaterial absorber provides a mechanism for reversible all-optical and thermo-optical tuning of resonant response.

  15. Photonics of 2D gold nanolayers on sapphire surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muslimov, A. E., E-mail: amuslimov@mail.ru; Butashin, A. V.; Nabatov, B. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography, Federal Research Center “Crystallography and Photonics” (Russian Federation); Konovko, A. A.; Belov, I. V.; Gizetdinov, R. M.; Andreev, A. V. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Kanevsky, V. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography, Federal Research Center “Crystallography and Photonics” (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    Gold layers with thicknesses of up to several nanometers, including ordered and disordered 2D nanostructures of gold particles, have been formed on sapphire substrates; their morphology is described; and optical investigations are carried out. The possibility of increasing the accuracy of predicting the optical properties of gold layers and 2D nanostructures using quantum-mechanical models based on functional density theory calculation techniques is considered. The application potential of the obtained materials in photonics is estimated.

  16. The properties of photonic band gap and surface plasmon modes in the three-dimensional magnetized photonic crystals as the mixed polarized modes considered

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Liu, Shao-Bin; Jiang, Yu-Chi

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, the properties of photonic band gap (PBG) and surface plasmon modes in the three-dimensional (3D) magnetized plasma photonic crystals (MPPCs) with face-centered-cubic (fcc) lattices are theoretically investigated based on the plane wave expansion (PWE) method, in which the homogeneous magnetized plasma spheres are immersed in the homogeneous dielectric background, as the Voigt effects of magnetized plasma are considered (the incidence electromagnetic wave vector is perpendicular to the external magnetic field at any time). The dispersive properties of all of the EM modes are studied because the PBG is not only for the extraordinary and ordinary modes but also for the mixed polarized modes. The equations for PBGs also are theoretically deduced. The numerical results show that the PBG and a flatbands region can be observed. The effects of the dielectric constant of dielectric background, filling factor, plasma frequency and plasma cyclotron frequency (the external magnetic field) on the dispersive properties of all of the EM modes in such 3D MPPCs are investigated in detail, respectively. Theoretical simulations show that the PBG can be manipulated by the parameters as mentioned above. Compared to the conventional dielectric-air PCs with similar structure, the larger PBG can be obtained in such 3D MPPCs. It is also shown that the upper edge of flatbands region cannot be tuned by the filling factor and dielectric constant of dielectric background, but it can be manipulated by the plasma frequency and plasma cyclotron frequency.

  17. Accuracy validation of incident photon fluence on DQE for various measurement conditions and X-ray units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haba, Tomonobu; Kondo, Shimpei; Hayashi, Daiki; Koyama, Shuji

    2013-07-01

    Detective quantum efficiency (DQE) is widely used as a comprehensive metric for X-ray image evaluation in digital X-ray units. The incident photon fluence per air kerma (SNR²(in)) is necessary for calculating the DQE. The International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) reports the SNR²(in) under conditions of standard radiation quality, but this SNR²(in) might not be accurate as calculated from the X-ray spectra emitted by an actual X-ray tube. In this study, we evaluated the error range of the SNR²(in) presented by the IEC62220-1 report. We measured the X-ray spectra emitted by an X-ray tube under conditions of standard radiation quality of RQA5. The spectral photon fluence at each energy bin was multiplied by the photon energy and the mass energy absorption coefficient of air; then the air kerma spectrum was derived. The air kerma spectrum was integrated over the whole photon energy range to yield the total air kerma. The total photon number was then divided by the total air kerma. This value is the SNR²(in). These calculations were performed for various measurement parameters and X-ray units. The percent difference between the calculated value and the standard value of RQA5 was up to 2.9%. The error range was not negligibly small. Therefore, it is better to use the new SNR²(in) of 30694 (1/(mm(2) μGy)) than the current [Formula: see text] of 30174 (1/(mm(2) μGy)).

  18. Surface modification of nanoporous anodic alumina photonic crystals for photocatalytic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Siew Yee; Law, Cheryl Suwen; Santos, Abel

    2018-01-01

    Herein, we report on the development of a rationally designed composite photocatalyst material by combining nanoporous anodic alumina-rugate filters (NAA-RFs) with photo-active layers of titanium dioxide (TiO2). NAA-RFs are synthesised by sinusoidal pulse anodisation and subsequently functionalised with TiO2 by sol-gel method to provide the photonic structures with photocatalytic properties. We demonstrate that the characteristic photonic stopband (PSB) of the surface-modified NAA-RFs can be precisely tuned across the UV-visible-NIR spectrum to enhance the photon-toelectron conversion of TiO2 by `slow photon effect'. We systematically investigate the effect of the anodisation parameters (i.e. anodisation period and pore widening time) on the position of the PSB of NAA-RFs as well as the photocatalytic performances displayed by these photonic crystal structures. When the edges of the PSB of surfacemodified NAA-RFs are positioned closely to the absorption peak of the model organic dye (i.e. methyl orange - MO), the photocatalytic performance of the system to degrade these molecules is enhanced under simulated solar light irradiation due to slow photon effect. Our investigation also reveals that the photocatalytic activity of surface-modified NAA-RFs is independent of slow photon effect and enhances with increasing period length (i.e. increasing anodisation period) of the photonic structures when there is no overlap between the PSB and the absorption peak of MO. This study therefore provides a rationale towards the photocatalytic enhancement of photonic crystals by a rational design of the PSB, creating new opportunities for the future development of high-performance photocatalysts.

  19. Dependence of absolute photon flux on infrared absorbance alteration and surface roughness on photoresist polymers irradiated with vacuum ultraviolet photons emitted from HBr plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Takeuchi, Takuya; Ishikawa, Kenji; Hayashi, Toshio; Takeda, Keigo; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru

    2017-12-01

    The absolute fluxes of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons emitted from HBr plasma were analyzed and the effects of VUV photons on a photoresist polymer in ArF-excimer-laser (193 nm) lithography were quantitatively investigated on the basis of the infrared spectra attributed to the C=O region. The spectral peak intensity assigned to the methacrylic acid (MAA) in the photoresist drastically decreased owing to the loss of this monomer caused by the irradiation of VUV photons at dosages below 16 × 1016 photons/cm2. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy observation showed that the removed monomer moved to the surface and generated volatile products that induced a decrease in film thickness. As a consequence, the surface became rough during the early-stage irradiation at dosages lower than 16 × 1016 photons/cm2 owing to the monomer loss of MAA with volatile product formation and subsequent cross-linking reactions.

  20. Wave propagation in photonic crystals and metamaterials: Surface waves, nonlinearity and chirality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Bingnan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Photonic crystals and metamaterials, both composed of artificial structures, are two interesting areas in electromagnetism and optics. New phenomena in photonic crystals and metamaterials are being discovered, including some not found in natural materials. This thesis presents my research work in the two areas. Photonic crystals are periodically arranged artificial structures, mostly made from dielectric materials, with period on the same order of the wavelength of the working electromagnetic wave. The wave propagation in photonic crystals is determined by the Bragg scattering of the periodic structure. Photonic band-gaps can be present for a properly designed photonic crystal. Electromagnetic waves with frequency within the range of the band-gap are suppressed from propagating in the photonic crystal. With surface defects, a photonic crystal could support surface modes that are localized on the surface of the crystal, with mode frequencies within the band-gap. With line defects, a photonic crystal could allow the propagation of electromagnetic waves along the channels. The study of surface modes and waveguiding properties of a 2D photonic crystal will be presented in Chapter 1. Metamaterials are generally composed of artificial structures with sizes one order smaller than the wavelength and can be approximated as effective media. Effective macroscopic parameters such as electric permittivity ϵ, magnetic permeability μ are used to characterize the wave propagation in metamaterials. The fundamental structures of the metamaterials affect strongly their macroscopic properties. By designing the fundamental structures of the metamaterials, the effective parameters can be tuned and different electromagnetic properties can be achieved. One important aspect of metamaterial research is to get artificial magnetism. Metallic split-ring resonators (SRRs) and variants are widely used to build magnetic metamaterials with effective μ < 1 or even μ < 0. Varactor based

  1. Search for ultra-high energy photons and neutrinos using Telescope Array surface detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troitsky S.V.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We search for ultra-high energy photons by analyzing geometrical properties of shower fronts of events registered by the Telescope Array surface detector. By making use of an event-by-event statistical method, we derive upper limits on the absolute flux of primary photons with energies above 1019eV, 1019.5eV and above 1020eV based on the three years data from Telescope Array surface detector (May 2008 – May 2011. We report the results of down-going neutrino search based on the analysis of very inclined events.

  2. Manipulation of fluids in three-dimensional porous photonic structures with patterned surface properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aizenberg, Joanna; Burgess, Ian; Mishchenko, Lidiya; Hatton, Benjamin; Loncar, Marko

    2017-12-26

    A three-dimensional porous photonic structure, whose internal pore surfaces can be provided with desired surface properties in a spatially selective manner with arbitrary patterns, and methods for making the same are described. When exposed to a fluid (e.g., via immersion or wicking), the fluid can selectively penetrate the regions of the structure with compatible surface properties. Broad applications, for example in security, encryption and document authentication, as well as in areas such as simple microfluidics and diagnostics, are anticipated.

  3. Growth of nano-dots on the grazing incidence mirror surface under FEL irradiation: analytic approach to modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozhevnikov, I. V.; Buzmakov, A. V.; Siewert, F.; Tiedtke, K.; Störmer, M.; Samoylova, L.; Sinn, H.

    2017-05-01

    Simple analytic equation is deduced to explain new physical phenomenon detected experimentally: growth of nano-dots (40-55 nm diameter, 8-13 nm height, 9.4 dots/μm2 surface density) on the grazing incidence mirror surface under the three years irradiation by the free electron laser FLASH (5-45 nm wavelength, 3 degrees grazing incidence angle). The growth model is based on the assumption that the growth of nano-dots is caused by polymerization of incoming hydrocarbon molecules under the action of incident photons directly or photoelectrons knocked out from a mirror surface. The key feature of our approach consists in that we take into account the radiation intensity variation nearby a mirror surface in an explicit form, because the polymerization probability is proportional to it. We demonstrate that the simple analytic approach allows to explain all phenomena observed in experiment and to predict new effects. In particular, we show that the nano-dots growth depends crucially on the grazing angle of incoming beam and its intensity: growth of nano-dots is observed in the limited from above and below intervals of the grazing angle and the radiation intensity. Decrease in the grazing angle by 1 degree only (from 3 to 2 degree) may result in a strong suppression of nanodots growth and their total disappearing. Similarly, decrease in the radiation intensity by several times (replacement of free electron laser by synchrotron) results also in disappearing of nano-dots growth.

  4. Photonic crystals possessing multiple Weyl points and the experimental observation of robust surface states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Jie; Xiao, Meng; Chan, C. T.

    2016-01-01

    Weyl points, as monopoles of Berry curvature in momentum space, have captured much attention recently in various branches of physics. Realizing topological materials that exhibit such nodal points is challenging and indeed, Weyl points have been found experimentally in transition metal arsenide and phosphide and gyroid photonic crystal whose structure is complex. If realizing even the simplest type of single Weyl nodes with a topological charge of 1 is difficult, then making a real crystal carrying higher topological charges may seem more challenging. Here we design, and fabricate using planar fabrication technology, a photonic crystal possessing single Weyl points (including type-II nodes) and multiple Weyl points with topological charges of 2 and 3. We characterize this photonic crystal and find nontrivial 2D bulk band gaps for a fixed kz and the associated surface modes. The robustness of these surface states against kz-preserving scattering is experimentally observed for the first time. PMID:27703140

  5. Atmospheric impacts on climatic variability of surface incident solar radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. C. Wang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The Earth's climate is driven by surface incident solar radiation (Rs. Direct measurements have shown that Rs has undergone significant decadal variations. However, a large fraction of the global land surface is not covered by these observations. Satellite-derived Rs has a good global coverage but is of low accuracy in its depiction of decadal variability. This paper shows that daily to decadal variations of Rs, from both aerosols and cloud properties, can be accurately estimated using globally available measurements of Sunshine Duration (SunDu. In particular, SunDu shows that since the late 1980's Rs has brightened over Europe due to decreases in aerosols but dimmed over China due to their increases. We found that variation of cloud cover determines Rs at a monthly scale but that aerosols determine the variability of Rs at a decadal time scale, in particular, over Europe and China. Because of its global availability and long-term history, SunDu can provide an accurate and continuous proxy record of Rs, filling in values for the blank areas that are not covered by direct measurements. Compared to its direct measurement, Rs from SunDu appears to be less sensitive to instrument replacement and calibration, and shows that the widely reported sharp increase in Rs during the early 1990s in China was a result of instrument replacement. By merging direct measurements collected by Global Energy Budget Archive with those derived from SunDu, we obtained a good coverage of Rs over the Northern Hemisphere. From this data, the average increase of Rs from 1982 to 2008 is estimated to be 0.87 W m−2 per decade.

  6. Photonic bandgap structures for long-range surface plasmon polaritons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Boltasseva, Alexandra; Søndergaard, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Propagation of long-range surface plasmon polaritons (LR-SPPs) along periodically thickness-modulated metal stripes embedded in dielectric is studied both theoretically and experimentally for light wavelengths in the telecom range. We demonstrate that symmetric (with respect to the film surface) nm......-size thickness variations result in the pronounced band gap effect, and obtain very good agreement between measured and simulated (transmission and reflection) spectra. This effect is exploited to realize a compact wavelength add-drop filter with the bandwidth of -20 nm centered at 1550 nm. The possibilities...

  7. Experimental studies of photon-surface interaction dynamics in the alkali halides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haglund, R.F. Jr.; Tolk, N.H.

    1986-01-01

    We describe recent measurements which have provided, in unprecedented detail, insights into the electronic mechanisms through which energy carried into a material by photon irradiation is absorbed, localized and rechanneled to produce desorption, surface modification, erosion and damage. The specific object of these studies has been desorption induced by electronic transition in alkali halide crystals, with particular emphasis on the dynamics of changes in the surface and near-surface regions. In our experiments, the irradiating ultraviolet photons are provided by a synchrotron storage ring, and the dynamical information about desorption products is obtained from optical measurements of the quantum states, yields and velocity distributions of neutral ground-state and excited-state atoms ejected from the surface of the irradiating material. These studies have shown that the dominant exit channels in photon-induced particle emission are those producing ground-state and excited-state neutral atoms. Using dynamical information about these desorbing neutral species, obtained, for example, by laser-induced fluorescence and laser Doppler spectroscopy, we are generating an increasingly comprehensive picture of the dynamics of electronic energy flow into and out of pure crystalline surfaces in these prototypical dielectrics. We are also beginning to be able to relate desorption dynamics to specific materials properties, and to discriminate between pure surface and near-surface effects in these materials. Applications of these techniques to the problem of photon-induced surface damage and to analysis of surface dynamics in dielectric materials are discussed, and the relationships between these nearly ideal model materials and the non-crystalline, covalently bonded materials more typical of real optical elements are pointed out. 19 refs., 13 figs

  8. A selectively coated photonic crystal fiber based surface plasmon resonance sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, X; Zhang, Y.; Pan, S.S.

    2010-01-01

    We propose a novel design for a photonic crystal fiber based surface plasmonic resonance sensor. The sensor consists of selectively metal-coated air holes containing analyte channels, which enhance the phase matching between the plasmonic mode and the core-guided mode. Good refractive index sensi...

  9. Optical Effects Induced by Bloch Surface Waves in One-Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina V. Soboleva

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The review considers the influence of Bloch surface waves on the optical and magneto-optical effects observed in photonic crystals; for example, the Goos–Hänchen effect, the Faraday effect, optical trapping and so on. Prospects for using Bloch surface waves for spatial light modulation, for controlling the polarization of light, for optical trapping and control of micro-objects are discussed.

  10. Direct observation of surface mode excitation and slow light coupling in photonic crystal waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volkov, V.S.; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn

    2007-01-01

    A scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM) is used to systematically study the properties of guided modes in linear and slow-light regimes of silicon-on-insulator (SOI)-based photonic crystal waveguides (PhCWs) with different terminations of the photonic lattice. High quality SNOM images...... are obtained for light at telecom wavelengths propagating in the PhCW, demonstrating directly, for the first time to our knowledge, drastic widening of the PhCW guided mode in the slow-light regime and excitation of surface waves at the PhCW interface along with their feeding into the guided mode...

  11. Propagation of long-range surface plasmon polaritons in photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boltasseva, Alexandra; Søndergaard, Thomas; Nikolajsen, T.

    2005-01-01

    We study the interaction of long-range surface plasmon polaritons (LR-SPPs), excited at telecommunication wavelengths, with photonic crystals (PCs) formed by periodic arrays of gold bumps that are arranged in a triangular lattice and placed symmetrically on both sides of a thin gold film embedded...... structures, is rather weak, so that the photonic bandgap effect might be expected to take place only for some particular propagation directions. Preliminary experiments on LR-SPP bending and splitting at large angles are reported, and further research directions are discussed....

  12. Photonic Mach-Zehnder modulators driven by surface acoustic waves in AlGaAs technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo-Poveda, A.; Gargallo, B.; Artundo, I.; Doménech, J. D.; Muñoz, P.; Hey, R.; Biermann, K.; Tahraoui, A.; Santos, P. V.; Cantarero, A.; de Lima, M. M.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, photonic devices driven by surface acoustic waves and operating in the GHz frequency range are presented. The devices were designed and fabricated in (Al,Ga)As technology. In contrast to previously realized modulators, where part of the light transmission is lost due to destructive interference, in the present devices light only switches paths, avoiding losses. One of the devices presents two output channels with 180°-dephasing synchronization. Odd multiples of the fundamental driving frequency are enabled by adjusting the applied acoustic power. A second and more complex photonic integrated device, based on the acoustic modulation of tunable Arrayed Waveguide Gratings, is also proposed.

  13. Wakes behind surface-mounted obstacles: Impact of aspect ratio, incident angle, and surface roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Nicolas; Chamorro, Leonardo P.

    2018-03-01

    The so-called wake-moment coefficient C˜h and lateral wake deflection of three-dimensional windbreaks are explored in the near and far wake. Wind-tunnel experiments were performed to study the functional dependence of C˜h with windbreak aspect ratio, incidence angle, and the ratio of the windbreak height and surface roughness (h /z0 ). Supported with the data, we also propose basic models for the wake deflection of the windbreak in the near and far fields. The near-wake model is based on momentum conservation considering the drag on the windbreak, whereas the far-wake counterpart is based on existing models for wakes behind surface-mounted obstacles. Results show that C˜h does not change with windbreak aspect ratios of 10 or greater; however, it may be lower for an aspect ratio of 5. C˜h is found to change roughly with the cosine of the incidence angle, and to depend strongly on h /z0 . The data broadly support the proposed wake-deflection models, though better predictions could be made with improved knowledge of the windbreak drag coefficient.

  14. Incident energy dependence of scattering behavior of water molecules on Si (100) and graphite surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, G.; Kotsubo, Y.; Yoshimoto, Y.; Kinefuchi, I.; Takagi, S.

    2016-11-01

    The interaction between water molecules and solid surfaces has a great impact on water vapor flows in nanostructures. We conduct molecular beam scattering experiments covering the incident energy range corresponding to the thermal energy at room temperature to investigate the scattering behavior of water molecules on silicon and graphite surfaces. The incident energy dependence of the scattering distributions exhibits opposite trends on these surfaces. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the difference is caused by the inertia effect of the incident molecules and the surface corrugations.

  15. Terahertz surface plasmon-polaritons in one-dimensional graphene based Fibonacci photonic superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namdar, Abdolrahman; Feizollahi Onsoroudi, Rana; Khoshsima, Habib; Sahrai, Mostafa

    2018-03-01

    The surface plasmon-polaritons in one-dimensional graphene-based Fibonacci photonic superlattices in the terahertz frequency range have been theoretically investigated. Our numerical study shows that surface plasmon-polaritons can be realized in both transverse electric and transverse magnetic polarizations. It is shown that these modes are manageable by varying the quasi-periodic generation orders which play a critical role in the occurrence of surface modes. In addition, the effect of thickness of cap layer and chemical potential of graphene sheets on surface plasmon-polaritons and their electric field distribution are studied. We have verified the excitation of surface plasmon-polaritons by using the attenuated total reflection method. This inspection confirms that all the predicted surface modes in the dispersion curves are actually excitable with this method.

  16. Photonic Paint Developed with Metallic Three-Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Po; Williams, John D.

    2012-01-01

    This work details the design and simulation of an inconspicuous photonic paint that can be applied onto an object for anticounterfeit and tag, track, and locate (TTL) applications. The paint consists of three-dimensional metallic tilted woodpile photonic crystals embedded into a visible and infrared transparent polymer film, which can be applied to almost any surface. The tilted woodpile photonic crystals are designed with a specific pass band detectable at nearly all incident angles of light. When painted onto a surface, these crystals provide a unique reflective infra-red optical signature that can be easily observed and recorded to verify the location or contents of a package.

  17. RBS, PIXE and NDP study of erbium incorporation into glass surface for photonics applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macková, Anna; Havránek, Vladimír; Vacík, Jiří; Salavcová, Linda; Spirková-Hradilová, J.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 249, 1-2 (2006), s. 856-858 ISSN 0168-583X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB100480601; GA ČR GA106/03/0505; GA ČR GA106/05/0706 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505; CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : surface analyses * photonics glass * Er diffusion Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.946, year: 2006

  18. Surface dose measurements under stretched, perforated thermoplast sheets and under protective wound dressings for high energy photon radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staudenraus, J.; Christ, G.

    2000-01-01

    Patient fixation masks made of perforated thermoplast sheets are widely used in radiotherapy. These masks in particular serve to immobilize the head and neck region during radiation treatment. We placed samples made of differently stretched, perforated mask material on the surface of a white polystyrene (RW3) phantom and measured for high energy photon beams from Co-60 radiation up to 25 MV bremsstrahlung the dose increase resulting from the build-up under the hole and bridge areas. Depending on the energy of the incident beam and the thickness of the stretched mask material we observed a dose increase under the bridges at the phantom surface of 55% up to 140% compared to the dose without a layer of mask material. Under a hole the dose increase is almost half the value found under a bridge. However, deeper than 1 mm under the phantom surface this difference in dose increase under holes and bridges decreases to less than 10%. The mean dose increase under a perforated thermoplast sheet is lower than the dose increase under a homogeneous sheet made of the same material with the same mean thickness. Radiation induced skin lesions or an ulcerating tumour, respectively, may require a protective wound dressing under a patient fixation mask during radiation therapy. Choosing a thin hydrocolloid wound dressing the additional dose increase of the skin, compared to the dose increase due to the fixation mask, can be kept low. (orig.) [de

  19. Simulation of Solar Radiation Incident on Horizontal and Inclined Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA Basunia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A computer model was developed to simulate the hourly, daily and monthly average of daily solar radiation on horizontal and inclined surfaces. The measured hourly and daily solar radiation was compared with simulated radiation, and favourable agreement was observed for the measured and predicted values on clear days. The measured and simulated monthly averages of total (diffuse and beam daily solar radiation were compared and a reasonable agreement was observed for a number of stations in Japan. The simulation showed that during the rice harvesting season, September to October, there is a daily average of 14.7 MJ/m2 of solar irradiation on a horizontal surface in Matsuyama, Japan. There is a similar amount of solar radiation on a horizontal surface during the major rice harvesting season, November to December, in Bangladesh. This radiation can be effectively utilized for drying rough rice and other farm crops.

  20. Ionization by ion impact at grazing incidence on insulator surface

    CERN Document Server

    Martiarena, M L

    2003-01-01

    We have calculated the energy distribution of electrons produced by ionization of the ionic crystal electrons in grazing fast ion-insulator surface collision. The ionized electrons originate in the 2p F sup - orbital. We observe that the binary peak appears as a double change in the slope of the spectra, in the high energy region. The form of the peak is determined by the initial electron distribution and its position will be affected by the binding energy of the 2p F sup - electron in the crystal. This BEP in insulator surfaces will appear slightly shifted to the low energy side with respect the ion-atom one.

  1. The use of angle resolved electron and photon stimulated desorption for the determination of molecular structure at surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madey, T.E.; Stockbauer, R.

    1983-01-01

    A brief review of recent data related to the use of angle-resolved electron stimulated desorption and photon stimulated desorption in determining the structures of molecules at surfaces is made. Examples include a variety of structural assignments based on ESIAD (electron stimulated desorption ion angular distributions), the observation of short-range local ordering effects induced in adsorbed molecules by surface impurities, and the application of photon stimulated desorption to both ionic and covalent adsorbate systems. (Author) [pt

  2. Propagation of long-range surface plasmon polaritons in photonic band gap structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boltasseva, Alexandra; Søndergaard, Thomas; Nikolajsen, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    We study the interaction of long-range surface plasmon polaritons (LR-SPPs), excited at telecommunication wavelengths, with photonic crystals (PCs) formed by periodic arrays of gold bumps that are arranged in a triangular lattice and placed symmetrically on both sides of a thin gold fil embedded...... in polymer. Radiation is delivered to and from the PC structures with the help of LR-SPP guides that consist of 8 mm wide and 15 nm thick gold stripes attached to wide film sections (of the same thickness) covered with bumps (diameter ~300 nm, height up to 150 nm on each side of the film). We investigate......, is rather weak, so that the photonic bandgap effect might be expected to take place only for some particular propagation directions. Preliminary experiments on LR-SPP bending and splitting at large angles are reported, and further research directions are discussed....

  3. Linear systems formulation of scattering theory for rough surfaces with arbitrary incident and scattering angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krywonos, Andrey; Harvey, James E; Choi, Narak

    2011-06-01

    Scattering effects from microtopographic surface roughness are merely nonparaxial diffraction phenomena resulting from random phase variations in the reflected or transmitted wavefront. Rayleigh-Rice, Beckmann-Kirchhoff. or Harvey-Shack surface scatter theories are commonly used to predict surface scatter effects. Smooth-surface and/or paraxial approximations have severely limited the range of applicability of each of the above theoretical treatments. A recent linear systems formulation of nonparaxial scalar diffraction theory applied to surface scatter phenomena resulted first in an empirically modified Beckmann-Kirchhoff surface scatter model, then a generalized Harvey-Shack theory that produces accurate results for rougher surfaces than the Rayleigh-Rice theory and for larger incident and scattered angles than the classical Beckmann-Kirchhoff and the original Harvey-Shack theories. These new developments simplify the analysis and understanding of nonintuitive scattering behavior from rough surfaces illuminated at arbitrary incident angles.

  4. Auger decay mechanism in photon-stimulated desorption of ions from surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, C.C.

    1983-11-01

    Photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) of positive ions was studied with synchrotron radiation using an angle-integrating time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Ion yields as functions of photon energy near core levels were measured from condensed gases, alkali fluorides, and other alkali and alkaline earth halides. These results are compared to bulk photoabsorption measurements with emphasis on understanding fundamental desorption mechanisms. The applicability of the Auger decay mechanism, in which ion desorption is strictly proportional to surface absorption, is discussed in detail. The Auger decay model is developed in detail to describe Na + and F + desorption from NaF following Na(1s) excitation. The major decay pathways of the Na(1s) hole leading to desorption are described and equations for the energetics of ion desorption are developed. Ion desorption spectra of H + , Li + , and F + are compared to bulk photoabsorption near the F(2s) and Li(1s) edges of LiF. A strong photon beam exposure dependence of ion yields from alkali fluorides is revealed, which may indicate the predominance of metal ion desorption from defect sites. The large role of indirect mechanisms in ion desorption condensed N 2 -O 2 multilayers is demonstrated and discussed. Ion desorption spectra from several alkali halides and alkaline earth halides are compared to bulk photoabsorption spectra. Relative ion yields from BaF 2 and a series of alkali halides are discussed in terms of desorption mechanisms

  5. Analysis of Leaky Modes in Photonic Crystal Fibers Using the Surface Integral Equation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Sheng Chiang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A fully vectorial algorithm based on the surface integral equation method for the modelling of leaky modes in photonic crystal fibers (PCFs by solely solving the complex propagation constants of characteristic equations is presented. It can be used for calculations of the complex effective index and confinement losses of photonic crystal fibers. As complex root examination is the key technique in the solution, the new algorithm which possesses this technique can be used to solve the leaky modes of photonic crystal fibers. The leaky modes of solid-core PCFs with a hexagonal lattice of circular air-holes are reported and discussed. The simulation results indicate how the confinement loss by the imaginary part of the effective index changes with air-hole size, the number of rings of air-holes, and wavelength. Confinement loss reductions can be realized by increasing the air-hole size and the number of air-holes. The results show that the confinement loss rises with wavelength, implying that the light leaks more easily for longer wavelengths; meanwhile, the losses are decreased significantly as the air-hole size d/Λ is increased.

  6. Control of single photon emitters in semiconductor nanowires by surface acoustic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazić, S.; Hernández-Mínguez, A.; Santos, P. V.

    2017-08-01

    We report on an experimental study into the effects of surface acoustic waves on the optical emission of dot-in-a-nanowire heterostructures in III-V material systems. Under direct optical excitation, the excitonic energy levels in III-nitride dot-in-a-nanowire heterostructures oscillate at the acoustic frequency, producing a characteristic splitting of the emission lines in the time-integrated photoluminescence spectra. This acoustically induced periodic tuning of the excitonic transition energies is combined with spectral detection filtering and employed as a tool to regulate the temporal output of anti-bunched photons emitted from these nanowire quantum dots. In addition, the acoustic transport of electrons and holes along a III-arsenide nanowire injects the electric charges into an ensemble of quantum dot-like recombination centers that are spatially separated from the optical excitation area. The acoustic population and depopulation mechanism determines the number of carrier recombination events taking place simultaneously in the ensemble, thus allowing control of the anti-bunching degree of the emitted photons. The results presented are relevant for the dynamic control of single photon emission in III-V semiconductor heterostructures.

  7. Design of photonic crystal surface emitting lasers with indium-tin-oxide top claddings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shen-Che; Hong, Kuo-Bin; Chiu, Han-Lun; Lan, Shao-Wun; Chang, Tsu-Chi; Li, Heng; Lu, Tien-Chang

    2018-02-01

    Electrically pumped GaAs-based photonic crystal surface emitting lasers were fabricated using a simple fabrication process by directly capping the indium-tin-oxide transparent conducting thin film as the top cladding layer upon a photonic crystal layer. Optimization of the separate-confinement heterostructures of a laser structure is crucial to improving characteristics by providing advantageous optical confinements. The turn-on voltage, series resistance, threshold current, and slope efficiency of the laser with a 100 × 100 μm2 photonic crystal area operated at room temperature were 1.3 V, 1.5 Ω, 121 mA, and 0.2 W/A, respectively. Furthermore, we demonstrated a single-lobed lasing wavelength of 928.6 nm at 200 mA and a wavelength redshift rate of 0.05 nm/K in temperature-dependent measurements. The device exhibited the maximum output power of approximately 400 mW at an injection current of 2 A; moreover, divergence angles of less than 1° for the unpolarized circular-shaped laser beam were measured at various injection currents. Overall, the low threshold current, excellent beam quality, small divergence, high output power, and high-operating-temperature (up to 343 K) of our devices indicate that they can potentially fill the requirements for next-generation light sources and optoelectronic devices.

  8. C60 interactions with surfaces, gaseous species and photons: An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruen, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    The behavior of C 60 in collisions with surfaces, with other gaseous species, and with photons is discussed. The focus is on the processes leading to fragmentation of the molecule, the identification of fragmentation products, and the mechanism of fragmentation. The nature of the fragmentation process of C 60 is of considerable interest in itself and needs to be understood in detail if C 60 cluster ion beams are to be fully exploited technologically. In addition, one may anticipate that an understanding of C 60 fragmentation will contribute mutatis mutandis to an elucidation of the elementary steps leading to the assembly of C 60 from smaller carbon clusters

  9. Surface plasmon resonance fiber optic biosensor-based graphene and photonic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Kai; Guo, Jia; Dang, Peng; Wang, Meiyu; Wang, Fucheng; Zhang, Yungang; Wang, Meiting

    2018-02-01

    A new sensor — transverse electric (TE) polarized excite surface plasmon resonance (SPR) fiber optic biosensor is proposed. The graphene is the plasma layer. The transfer matrix method and the finite difference time domain method are applied to conduct the numerical simulation of the four layers (fiber core/photonic crystals/graphene/sample) of fiber optic biosensor. The results show that the relationship between refractive index and resonant wavelength is linear and the sensitivity of the fiber optic biosensor reaches 1942 nm/RIU.

  10. Controllable spiking patterns in long-wavelength vertical cavity surface emitting lasers for neuromorphic photonics systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurtado, Antonio, E-mail: antonio.hurtado@strath.ac.uk [Institute of Photonics, SUPA Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, TIC Centre, 99 George Street, Glasgow G1 1RD (United Kingdom); Javaloyes, Julien [Departament de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, c/Valldemossa km 7.5, 07122 Mallorca (Spain)

    2015-12-14

    Multiple controllable spiking patterns are achieved in a 1310 nm Vertical-Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VCSEL) in response to induced perturbations and for two different cases of polarized optical injection, namely, parallel and orthogonal. Furthermore, reproducible spiking responses are demonstrated experimentally at sub-nanosecond speed resolution and with a controlled number of spikes fired. This work opens therefore exciting research avenues for the use of VCSELs in ultrafast neuromorphic photonic systems for non-traditional computing applications, such as all-optical binary-to-spiking format conversion and spiking information encoding.

  11. Propagation of long-range surface plasmon polaritons in photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boltasseva, Alexandra; Søndergaard, Thomas; Nikolajsen, T.

    2005-01-01

    We study the interaction of long-range surface plasmon polaritons (LR-SPPs), excited at telecommunication wavelengths, with photonic crystals (PCs) formed by periodic arrays of gold bumps that are arranged in a triangular lattice and placed symmetrically on both sides of a thin gold film embedded......) into the investigated PC structures. Using a self-consistent description based on the Green'S function formalism, we simulate numerically the LR-SPP transmission through and reflection from finite-size PC structures consisting of finite-size scatterers, as well as the LR-SPP guiding along line defects...

  12. Pulsed CO2 laser interaction with a metal surface at oblique incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, J. A.; Schriempf, J. T.; Cronburg, T. L.; Eninger, J. E.; Woodroffe, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    Thermal fluence deposition and surface pressure generation produced by a CO2 laser pulse have been measured as a function of angle of incidence theta on sheet aluminum in air. The paper finds that air plasma ignition depends on the laser beam intensity I sub 0 only, not on the surface-normal flux (I sub 0)(cos theta). Conversely, the fluence deposition and surface pressure depend only on the product (I sub 0)(cos theta), and obey the square-root and two-thirds-power dependences observed with simple I sub 0 variation at normal incidence.

  13. Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation as a cause of transition radiation anomalous intensity in case of electron grazing incidence on the silver surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zrelov, V.P.; Ruzicka, J.

    1979-01-01

    On the basis of the Vavilov-Cherenkov effect the anomaly in the transition radiation (TR) spectrum is explained which has been first observed by Boersch for grazing particle incidence on the silver surface. The contribution of the Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation to the angle distribution of photons of the TR is estimated. Special attention is drawn to a possibility of the nonthreshold character of Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation in such a medium as silver, and to a necessity of creating a complete theory of Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation for absorbing media

  14. Photonic Hypercrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgenii E. Narimanov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a new “universality class” of artificial optical media—photonic hypercrystals. These hyperbolic metamaterials, with periodic spatial variation of dielectric permittivity on subwavelength scale, combine the features of optical metamaterials and photonic crystals. In particular, surface waves supported by a hypercrystal possess the properties of both the optical Tamm states in photonic crystals and surface-plasmon polaritons at the metal-dielectric interface.

  15. Newly designed double surface bimorph mirror for BL-15A of the photon factory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igarashi, Noriyuki, E-mail: noriyuki.igarashi@kek.jp; Nitani, Hiroaki; Takeichi, Yasuo; Niwa, Yasuhiro; Abe, Hitoshi; Kimura, Masao; Mori, Takeharu; Nagatani, Yasuko; Kosuge, Takashi; Kamijo, Ai; Koyama, Atsushi; Shimizu, Nobutaka [Photon Factory, Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Ohta, Hiromasa [Mitsubishi Electric System & Service Co., Ltd. 20F Carrot Tower 4-1-1 Taishido, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 154-8520 (Japan)

    2016-07-27

    BL-15A is a new x-ray undulator beamline at the Photon Factory. It will be dedicated to two independent research activities, simultaneous XAFS/XRF/XRD experiments, and SAXS/WAXS/GI-SAXS studies. In order to supply a choice of micro-focus, low-divergence and collimated beams, a double surface bimorph mirror was recently developed. To achieve further mirror surface optimization, the pencil beam scanning method was applied for “in-situ” beam inspection and the Inverse Matrix method was used for determination of optimal voltages on the piezoelectric actuators. The corrected beam profiles at every focal spot gave good agreement with the theoretical values and the resultant beam performance is promising for both techniques. Quick and stable switching between highly focused and intense collimated beams was established using this new mirror with the simple motorized stages.

  16. Auger decay mechanism in photon-stimulated desorption of ions from surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parks, C.C.

    1983-11-01

    Photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) of positive ions was studied with synchrotron radiation using an angle-integrating time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Ion yields as functions of photon energy near core levels were measured from condensed gases, alkali fluorides, and other alkali and alkaline earth halides. These results are compared to bulk photoabsorption measurements with emphasis on understanding fundamental desorption mechanisms. The applicability of the Auger decay mechanism, in which ion desorption is strictly proportional to surface absorption, is discussed in detail. The Auger decay model is developed in detail to describe Na/sup +/ and F/sup +/ desorption from NaF following Na(1s) excitation. The major decay pathways of the Na(1s) hole leading to desorption are described and equations for the energetics of ion desorption are developed. Ion desorption spectra of H/sup +/, Li/sup +/, and F/sup +/ are compared to bulk photoabsorption near the F(2s) and Li(1s) edges of LiF. A strong photon beam exposure dependence of ion yields from alkali fluorides is revealed, which may indicate the predominance of metal ion desorption from defect sites. The large role of indirect mechanisms in ion desorption condensed N/sub 2/-O/sub 2/ multilayers is demonstrated and discussed. Ion desorption spectra from several alkali halides and alkaline earth halides are compared to bulk photoabsorption spectra. Relative ion yields from BaF/sub 2/ and a series of alkali halides are discussed in terms of desorption mechanisms.

  17. Continuity Evaluation of Surface Retrieval Algorithms for ICESat-2/ATLAS Photon-Counting Laser Altimetry Data Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, H. W.; Magruder, L. A.

    2016-12-01

    The Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2) mission team is developing algorithms to produce along-track and gridded science data products for a variety of surface types, including land ice, sea ice, land, and ocean. The ATL03 data product will contain geolocated photons for each of the six beams, and will incorporate geophysical corrections as well as preliminary photon classifications (signal vs. background). Higher level along-track and gridded data products for various surface types are processed using the ATL03 geolocated photons. The data processing schemes developed for each of the surface types rely on independent surface finding algorithms optimized to identify ground, canopy, water, or ice surfaces, as appropriate for a particular geographical location. In such cases where multiple surface types are present in close proximity to one another (e.g. land-ocean interface), multiple surface finding algorithms may be employed to extract surfaces along the same segment of a lidar profile. This study examines the effects on continuity of the various surface finding algorithms, specifically for littoral/coastal areas. These areas are important to the cryospheric, hydrologic, and biospheric communities in that continuity between the respective surface elevation products is required to fully utilize the information provided by ICESat-2 and its Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS) instrument.

  18. Biosensors based on Bloch surface waves in one-dimensional photonic crystal with graphene nanolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghbadorani, H Kaviani; Barvestani, J; Entezar, S Roshan

    2017-01-20

    In biosensors research, much effort has been made to achieve high sensitivity to detect lower concentrations of analyte in a solution by testing different kinds of materials. In this paper, we present a biosensor based on Bloch surface waves made of photonic crystal (PhC) including graphene nanolayers under the Kretschmann configuration. The band structures, surface modes, reflectivity, and sensitivity of the PhC biosensor are calculated by the transfer matrix method and results are compared with those of the structure without graphene layers. Our investigations show that the angular sensitivity of the biosensor considerably increases in the presence of the graphene layers. Moreover, we study the effect of the number of the graphene layers placed on the surface of the biosensor on the performance of our proposed biosensor. The results reveal that the sensitivity of the biosensor is enhanced by increasing the number of graphene layers on the surface due to the π-stacking interactions between graphene's honeycomb cells and the carbon rings in biomolecules. Furthermore, our results show that the phase sensitivity is higher than the angular sensitivity, which can promote the accuracy of the calculations.

  19. Nanotag-enabled photonic crystal fiber as quantitative surface-enhanced Raman scattering optofluidic platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinkhasova, Polina; Chen, Hui; Du, Henry, E-mail: hdu@stevens.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, New Jersey 07030 (United States); Kanka, Jiri [Institute of Photonics and Electronics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Chaberska 57, 182 31 Prague (Czech Republic); Mergo, Pawel [Department of Optical Fibres Technology, Maria Curie-Sklodovska University, PI. M. Currie-Sklodowskiej 5, 20-031 Lublin (Poland)

    2015-02-16

    Core-shell nanotags that are active in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and entrapped with thiocyanate (SCN) label molecules were immobilized in the air channels of suspended-core photonic crystal fiber (PCF) to impart quantitative capacity to SERS-based PCF optofluidic sensing platform. The Raman intensity of Rhodamine 6G increases with concentration, whereas the intensity of SCN remains constant when measured using this platform. The signal from the SCN label can be used as an internal reference to establish calibration for quantitative measurements of analytes of unknown concentrations. The long optical path-length PCF optofluidic platform integrated with SERS-active core-shell nanotags holds significant promise for sensitive quantitative chem/bio measurements with the added benefit of small sampling volume. The dependence of SERS intensity on the nanotag coverage density and PCF length was interpreted based on numerical-analytical simulations.

  20. Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensor Based on Polymer Photonic Crystal Fibers with Metal Nanolayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Quan Yao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A large-mode-area polymer photonic crystal fiber made of polymethyl methacrylate with the cladding having only one layer of air holes near the edge of the fiber is designed and proposed to be used in surface plasmon resonance sensors. In such sensor, a nanoscale metal film and analyte can be deposited on the outer side of the fiber instead of coating or filling in the holes of the conventional PCF, which make the real time detection with high sensitivity easily to realize. Moreover, it is relatively stable to changes of the amount and the diameter of air holes, which is very beneficial for sensor fabrication and sensing applications. Numerical simulation results show that under the conditions of the similar spectral and intensity sensitivity of 8.3 × 10−5–9.4 × 10−5 RIU, the confinement loss can be increased dramatically.

  1. A selectively coated photonic crystal fiber based surface plasmon resonance sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Xia; Zhang, Ying; Pan, Shanshan; Shum, Ping; Yan, Min; Leviatan, Yehuda; Li, Changming

    2010-01-01

    We propose a novel design for a photonic crystal fiber based surface plasmonic resonance sensor. The sensor consists of selectively metal-coated air holes containing analyte channels, which enhance the phase matching between the plasmonic mode and the core-guided mode. Good refractive index sensitivity as high as 5500 nm/RIU (refractive index unit) can be achieved in the proposed structure. Compared with the entirely coated structure, the selectively coated sensor design demonstrates narrower resonance spectral width. Moreover, the greater resonance depth can improve the sensing performance in terms of signal to noise ratio (SNR). The improvements in spectral width and SNR can both contribute to a better detection limit for this refractive index sensor

  2. Photonic crystal structures on nonflat surfaces fabricated by dry lift-off soft UV nanoimprint lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Tangyou; Xu, Zhimou; Xu, Haifeng; Zhao, Wenning; Wu, Xinghui; Liu, Sisi; Ma, Zhichao; He, Jian; Liu, Shiyuan; Peng, Jing

    2013-01-01

    The surface nonflatness induced from the material itself or the production atmosphere can lead to serious non-uniformity consequences in nanoimprint lithography (NIL) which is used for providing a low cost and high throughput nano-fabrication process. In this paper, soft UV NIL (SUNIL) processes are used for photonic crystal (PC) pattern transfer of a GaN-based light-emitting diode (LED) with patterned sapphire substrate (PSS). The results reveal a significant incompatibility between the conventional SUNIL and the nonflat p-GaN surface. Ellipse-shaped rather than circle-shaped PC structure is obtained on the p-GaN surface due the deformation of the soft mold in nonflat NIL. A dry lift-off (DLO) SUNIL is proposed to overcome the non-uniformity issue in nonflat NIL as well as the collapse problem of the free-standing pillar-shaped resist in wet lift-off. The photoluminescence enhancements of the LED fabricated by the DLO SUNIL method compared to those with conventional SUNIL and unpatterned LED are 1.41 fold and 3.48 fold, respectively. Further study shows that the DLO SUNIL is applicable in the fabrication of the PC structure with tunable duty cycle via one single initial PC mold. (paper)

  3. Nanophotonic force microscopy: characterizing particle-surface interactions using near-field photonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schein, Perry; Kang, Pilgyu; O'Dell, Dakota; Erickson, David

    2015-02-11

    Direct measurements of particle-surface interactions are important for characterizing the stability and behavior of colloidal and nanoparticle suspensions. Current techniques are limited in their ability to measure pico-Newton scale interaction forces on submicrometer particles due to signal detection limits and thermal noise. Here we present a new technique for making measurements in this regime, which we refer to as nanophotonic force microscopy. Using a photonic crystal resonator, we generate a strongly localized region of exponentially decaying, near-field light that allows us to confine small particles close to a surface. From the statistical distribution of the light intensity scattered by the particle we are able to map out the potential well of the trap and directly quantify the repulsive force between the nanoparticle and the surface. As shown in this Letter, our technique is not limited by thermal noise, and therefore, we are able to resolve interaction forces smaller than 1 pN on dielectric particles as small as 100 nm in diameter.

  4. Electron emission induced by resonant coherent ion-surface interaction at grazing incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia de Abajo, F.J.; Ponce, V.H.; Echenique, P.M.

    1992-01-01

    A new spectroscopy based on the resonant coherently induced electron loss to the continuum in ion-surface scattering under grazing incidence is proposed. A series of peaks, corresponding to the energy differences determined by the resonant interaction with the rows of atoms in the surface, is predicted to appear in the energy distribution of electrons emitted from electronic states bound to the probe. Calculations for MeV He + ions scattered at a W(001) surface along the left-angle 100 right-angle direction with a glancing angle of 0--2 mrad show a total yield close to 1

  5. Role of volume and surface spontaneous parametric down-conversion in the generation of photon pairs in layered media

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Javůrek, D.; Peřina ml., Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 95, č. 4 (2017), s. 1-13, č. článku 043828. ISSN 2469-9926 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : surface spontaneous * parametric down-conversion * photon pairs * layered media Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 2.925, year: 2016

  6. Arrays of surface-normal electroabsorption modulators for the generation and signal processing of microwave photonics signals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noharet, Bertrand; Wang, Qin; Platt, Duncan; Junique, Stéphane; Marpaung, D.A.I.; Roeloffzen, C.G.H.

    2011-01-01

    The development of an array of 16 surface-normal electroabsorption modulators operating at 1550nm is presented. The modulator array is dedicated to the generation and processing of microwave photonics signals, targeting a modulation bandwidth in excess of 5GHz. The hybrid integration of the

  7. One Dimensional Polymeric Organic Photonic Crystals for DFB Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Scotognella

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a very simple method to realize a one-dimensional photonic crystal (1D PC, consisting of a dye-doped polymeric multilayer. Due to the high photonic density of states at the edges of the photonic band-gap (PBG, a surface emitting distributed feedback (DFB laser is obtained with this structure. Furthermore, the incidence angle dependence of the PBG of the polymeric multilayer is reported.

  8. Surface photovoltage investigation of gold chains on Si(111) by two-photon photoemission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otto, Sebastian; Biedermann, Kerstin; Fauster, Thomas [Lehrstuhl fuer Festkoerperphysik, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Staudtstr. 7, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    We present surface photovoltage measurements on Si(111)-(7 x 7) with monoatomic gold chains. The gold coverage was varied between zero and 0.6 ML, where the Si(111)-(5 x 2)-Au reconstruction covers the surface completely. During the two-photon photoemission experiments the p- or n-doped samples were illuminated by infrared (IR, E{sub IR}=1.55 eV) and ultraviolet (UV, E{sub UV}=4.65 eV) laser pulses. For all coverages the photovoltage was determined for sample temperatures of 90 K and 300 K by variation of the IR and UV laser power. P-doped as well as n-doped Si(111) wafers show a linear dependence of the photovoltage on gold coverage. This stands in contrast to scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements, which show a coverage-independent photovoltage over a wide coverage range for n-doped wafers. While for p-doped wafers our experimentally determined photovoltage is in agreement with previous reports, for n-doped wafers the observed values are lower than expected.

  9. Ultracompact 1×4 TM-polarized beam splitter based on photonic crystal surface mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bin; Zhang, Yejin; Wang, Yufei; Liu, Anjin; Zheng, Wanhua

    2012-05-01

    We provide an improved surface-mode photonic crystal (PhC) T-junction waveguide, combine it with an improved PhC bandgap T-junction waveguide, and then provide an ultracompact 1×4 TM-polarized beam splitter. The energy is split equally into the four output waveguides. The maximal transmission ratio of each output waveguide branch equals 24.7%, and the corresponding total transmission ratio of the ultracompact 1×4 beam splitter equals 98.8%. The normalized frequency of maximal transmission ratio is 0.397(2πc/a), and the bandwidth of the ultracompact 1×4 TM-polarized beam splitter is 0.0106(2πc/a). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time such a high-efficiency 1×4 beam splitter exploiting the nonradiative surface mode as a guided mode has been proposed. Although we only employed a 1×4 beam splitter, our design can easily be extended to other 1×n beam splitters.

  10. Discriminating electromagnetic radiation based on angle of incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamam, Rafif E.; Bermel, Peter; Celanovic, Ivan; Soljacic, Marin; Yeng, Adrian Y. X.; Ghebrebrhan, Michael; Joannopoulos, John D.

    2015-06-16

    The present invention provides systems, articles, and methods for discriminating electromagnetic radiation based upon the angle of incidence of the electromagnetic radiation. In some cases, the materials and systems described herein can be capable of inhibiting reflection of electromagnetic radiation (e.g., the materials and systems can be capable of transmitting and/or absorbing electromagnetic radiation) within a given range of angles of incidence at a first incident surface, while substantially reflecting electromagnetic radiation outside the range of angles of incidence at a second incident surface (which can be the same as or different from the first incident surface). A photonic material comprising a plurality of periodically occurring separate domains can be used, in some cases, to selectively transmit and/or selectively absorb one portion of incoming electromagnetic radiation while reflecting another portion of incoming electromagnetic radiation, based upon the angle of incidence. In some embodiments, one domain of the photonic material can include an isotropic dielectric function, while another domain of the photonic material can include an anisotropic dielectric function. In some instances, one domain of the photonic material can include an isotropic magnetic permeability, while another domain of the photonic material can include an anisotropic magnetic permeability. In some embodiments, non-photonic materials (e.g., materials with relatively large scale features) can be used to selectively absorb incoming electromagnetic radiation based on angle of incidence.

  11. Absorptivity modulation on wavy molten steel surfaces: The influence of laser wavelength and angle of incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, A. F. H.

    2012-10-01

    The modulation of the angle-dependent Fresnel absorptivity across wavy molten steel surfaces during laser materials processing, like drilling, cutting, or welding, has been calculated. The absorptivity is strongly altered by the grazing angle of incidence of the laser beam on the processing front. Owing to its specific Brewster-peak characteristics, the 10.64 μm wavelength CO2-laser shows an opposite trend with respect to roughness and angle-of-incidence compared to lasers in the wavelength range of 532-1070 nm. Plateaus or rings of Brewster-peak absorptivity can lead to hot spots on a wavy surface, often in close proximity to cold spots caused by shadow domains.

  12. Surface damage through grazing incidence ions investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redinger, Alex

    2009-07-10

    Surface damage, caused by grazing incidence ions, is investigated with variable temperature scanning tunneling microscopy. The experiments are carried out on a Pt(111) crystal. The kinetic energy of noble gas ions is varied between 1-15 keV and the angle of incidence can be adjusted between {theta} = 78.5 and {theta} = 90 measured with respect to the surface normal. The damage patterns of single ion impacts, on flat terraces and at step edges of monoatomic height, are investigated at low surface temperatures. Ions hitting a flat terrace are usually specular reflected. The energy transfer from the ion to the crystal atoms is small and only little damage is produced. In contrast, at ascending step edges, which are illuminated by the ion beam, large angle scattering events occur. Sputtering, adatom and vacancy production is induced. However, a significant fraction of the ions, which hit step edges, enter the crystal and are guided in between two atomic layers parallel to the surface via small angle binary collisions. This steering process is denoted as subsurface channeling. The energy loss per length scale of the channeled particles is low, which results in long ion trajectories (up to 1000A). During the steering process, the ions produce surface damage. Depending on the ion species and the ion energy, adatom and vacancies or surface vacancy trenches of monoatomic width are observed. The surface damage can be used to track the path of the ion. This makes the whole trajectory of single ions with keV energy visible. The number of sputtered atoms per incident ion at ascending step edges, i.e. the step edge sputtering yield, is measured experimentally for different irradiation conditions. For {theta} = 86 , the sputtering yield is determined from the fluence dependent retraction of pre-existing illuminated step edges. An alternative method for the step edge sputtering yield determination, is the analysis of the concentration of ascending steps and of the removed amount

  13. Surface damage through grazing incidence ions investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redinger, Alex

    2009-01-01

    Surface damage, caused by grazing incidence ions, is investigated with variable temperature scanning tunneling microscopy. The experiments are carried out on a Pt(111) crystal. The kinetic energy of noble gas ions is varied between 1-15 keV and the angle of incidence can be adjusted between θ = 78.5 and θ = 90 measured with respect to the surface normal. The damage patterns of single ion impacts, on flat terraces and at step edges of monoatomic height, are investigated at low surface temperatures. Ions hitting a flat terrace are usually specular reflected. The energy transfer from the ion to the crystal atoms is small and only little damage is produced. In contrast, at ascending step edges, which are illuminated by the ion beam, large angle scattering events occur. Sputtering, adatom and vacancy production is induced. However, a significant fraction of the ions, which hit step edges, enter the crystal and are guided in between two atomic layers parallel to the surface via small angle binary collisions. This steering process is denoted as subsurface channeling. The energy loss per length scale of the channeled particles is low, which results in long ion trajectories (up to 1000A). During the steering process, the ions produce surface damage. Depending on the ion species and the ion energy, adatom and vacancies or surface vacancy trenches of monoatomic width are observed. The surface damage can be used to track the path of the ion. This makes the whole trajectory of single ions with keV energy visible. The number of sputtered atoms per incident ion at ascending step edges, i.e. the step edge sputtering yield, is measured experimentally for different irradiation conditions. For θ = 86 , the sputtering yield is determined from the fluence dependent retraction of pre-existing illuminated step edges. An alternative method for the step edge sputtering yield determination, is the analysis of the concentration of ascending steps and of the removed amount of material as a

  14. The role of the surfaces in the photon absorption in Ge nanoclusters embedded in silica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicotra Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The usage of semiconductor nanostructures is highly promising for boosting the energy conversion efficiency in photovoltaics technology, but still some of the underlying mechanisms are not well understood at the nanoscale length. Ge quantum dots (QDs should have a larger absorption and a more efficient quantum confinement effect than Si ones, thus they are good candidate for third-generation solar cells. In this work, Ge QDs embedded in silica matrix have been synthesized through magnetron sputtering deposition and annealing up to 800°C. The thermal evolution of the QD size (2 to 10 nm has been followed by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques, evidencing an Ostwald ripening mechanism with a concomitant amorphous-crystalline transition. The optical absorption of Ge nanoclusters has been measured by spectrophotometry analyses, evidencing an optical bandgap of 1.6 eV, unexpectedly independent of the QDs size or of the solid phase (amorphous or crystalline. A simple modeling, based on the Tauc law, shows that the photon absorption has a much larger extent in smaller Ge QDs, being related to the surface extent rather than to the volume. These data are presented and discussed also considering the outcomes for application of Ge nanostructures in photovoltaics. PACS: 81.07.Ta; 78.67.Hc; 68.65.-k

  15. Square array photonic crystal fiber-based surface plasmon resonance refractive index sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Yang, Xu; Zhao, Bingyue; Hou, Jingyun; Shum, Ping

    2017-12-01

    Based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR), a novel refractive index (RI) sensor comprising a square photonic crystal fiber (PCF) is proposed to realize the detection of the annular analyte. Instead of hexagon structure, four large air-holes in a square array are introduced to enhance the sensitivity by allowing two polarization directions of the core mode to be more sensitive. The gold is used as the only plasmonic material. The design purpose is to reduce the difficulty in gold deposition and enhance the RI sensitivity. The guiding properties and the effects of the parameters on the performance of the sensor are numerically investigated by the Finite Element Method (FEM). By optimizing the structure, the sensor can exhibit remarkable sensitivity up to 7250 nm/RIU and resolution of 1.0638 × 10‑5 RIU with only one plasmonic material, which is very competitive compared with the other reported externally coated and single-layer coated PCF-based SPR (PCF-SPR) sensors, to our best knowledge.

  16. A Highly Sensitive Gold-Coated Photonic Crystal Fiber Biosensor Based on Surface Plasmon Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Rabiul Hasan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we numerically demonstrate a two-layer circular lattice photonic crystal fiber (PCF biosensor based on the principle of surface plasmon resonance (SPR. The finite element method (FEM with circular perfectly matched layer (PML boundary condition is applied to evaluate the performance of the proposed sensor. A thin gold layer is deposited outside the PCF structure, which acts as the plasmonic material for this design. The sensing layer (analyte is implemented in the outermost layer, which permits easy and more practical fabrication process compared to analyte is put inside the air holes. It is demonstrated that, at gold layer thickness of 40 nm, the proposed sensor shows maximum sensitivity of 2200 nm/RIU using the wavelength interrogation method in the sensing range between 1.33–1.36. Besides, using an amplitude interrogation method, a maximum sensitivity of 266 RIU−1 and a maximum sensor resolution of 3.75 × 10−5 RIU are obtained. We also discuss how phase matching points are varied with different fiber parameters. Owing to high sensitivity and simple design, the proposed sensor may find important applications in biochemical and biological analyte detection.

  17. Detection of amino acid neurotransmitters by surface enhanced Raman scattering and hollow core photonic crystal fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Vidhu S.; Khetani, Altaf; Monfared, Ali Momenpour T.; Smith, Brett; Anis, Hanan; Trudeau, Vance L.

    2012-03-01

    The present work explores the feasibility of using surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for detecting the neurotransmitters such as glutamate (GLU) and gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA). These amino acid neurotransmitters that respectively mediate fast excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in the brain, are important for neuroendocrine control, and upsets in their synthesis are also linked to epilepsy. Our SERS-based detection scheme enabled the detection of low amounts of GLU (10-7 M) and GABA (10-4 M). It may complement existing techniques for characterizing such kinds of neurotransmitters that include high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) or mass spectrography (MS). This is mainly because SERS has other advantages such as ease of sample preparation, molecular specificity and sensitivity, thus making it potentially applicable to characterization of experimental brain extracts or clinical diagnostic samples of cerebrospinal fluid and saliva. Using hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF) further enhanced the Raman signal relative to that in a standard cuvette providing sensitive detection of GLU and GABA in micro-litre volume of aqueous solutions.

  18. Comprehensive analysis of photonic nanojets in 3D dielectric cuboids excited by surface plasmons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacheco-Pena, Victor [Antennas Group - TERALAB, Universidad Publica de Navarra, Campus Arrosadia, 31006, Pamplona (Spain); Minin, Igor V.; Minin, Oleg V. [National Research Tomsk State University, Lenina Ave., 36, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Beruete, Miguel [Antennas Group - TERALAB, Universidad Publica de Navarra, Campus Arrosadia, 31006, Pamplona (Spain); Institute of Smart Cities, Public University of Navarra, 31006, Pamplona (Spain)

    2016-10-15

    In this paper we study the excitation of photonic nanojets (PNJ) in 3D dielectric cuboids by surface plasmons at telecommunication wavelengths. The analysis is done using the effective refractive index approach. It is shown that the refractive index contrast between the regions with and without cuboid should be roughly less than 2 in order to generate jets at the output of the cuboid. The best performance at λ{sub 0} = 1550 nm is obtained when the height of the cuboid is 160 nm producing a jet just at the output interface with a subwavelength resolution of 0.68λ{sub 0} and a high intensity enhancement (x 5) at the focus. The multi-wavelength response is also studied demonstrating that it is possible to use the proposed structure at different wavelengths. Finally, the backscattering enhancement is numerically evaluated by inserting a metal particle within the PNJ region, demonstrating a maximum value of ∝2.44 dB for a gold sphere of radius 0.1λ{sub 0}. (copyright 2016 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Electron emission induced by resonant coherent interaction in ion-surface scattering at grazing incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia de Abajo, F.J.; Ponce, V.H.; Echenique, P.M.

    1994-01-01

    The resonant coherent interaction of an ion with an oriented crystal surface, under grazing-incidence conditions with respect to a special direction of the crystal, gives rise to electron loss to the continuum from electronic bound states of the ion. The calculations presented below predict large probabilities for electron emission due to this mechanism. The electrons are emitted with well defined energies, expressed in terms of the condition of resonance. Furthermore, the emission takes place around certain preferential directions, which are determined by both the latter condition and the symmetry of the surface lattice. Our calculations for MeV He + ions scattered at a W(001) surface along the left-angle 100 right-angle direction with glancing angle of 0--2 mrad indicate a yield of emission close to 1. Using heavier projectiles, one obtains smaller yields, but still large enough to be measurable in some cases (e.g., ∼0.9 for 53 MeV B 4+ and an angle of incidence of 1 mrad). Besides, the initial bound state is energy shifted due to the interaction with both the crystal potential and the velocity-dependent image potential. This results in a slight shift of the peaks of emission, which suggests a possible spectroscopy for analyzing the dynamical interaction of electronic bound states with solid surfaces

  20. [Application of means of surfaces with nonhomogeneity in estimating the incidence of pneumoconiosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, C X; Zhang, J; Hao, S B; Zhang, J; Xu, P; Can, Y W; Zhao, J Q; Li, J G

    2017-01-20

    Objective: To investigate the value of means of surfaces with nonhomogeneity (MSN) in esti-mating the incidence of pneumoconiosis. Methods: Based on the principal component analysis, all counties (districts) of Hebei Province, China, were divided into three categories according to the degree of pneumoconiosis hazards and the MSN model was used to estimate the incidence rate of pneumoconiosis and the number of pneu-moconiosis cases using the data of the incidence of pneumoconiosis in 2010. Results: With reference to the appli-cation requirements of the MSN model, results of the principal component analysis, and expert experience, the 172 counties (districts) in Hebei Province were divided into three categories with mild, moderate, and severe pneumoconiosis hazards. There were 74, 61, and 49 counties in the above categories, respectively, and 12, 12, and 25 counties were selected from them, respectively. The estimated number of pneumoconiosis cases in Hebei Province was 2105, and the incidence rate was 261.5 per hundred thousand, with a standard error of esti-mation of 389.9 per hundred thousand. Conclusion: The MSN model provides a new thought and method for es-timating the number of pneumoconiosis cases.

  1. Evaluation of the Reanalysis Surface Incident Shortwave Radiation Products from NCEP, ECMWF, GSFC, and JMA Using Satellite and Surface Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaotong Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Solar radiation incident at the Earth’s surface (Rs is an essential component of the total energy exchange between the atmosphere and the surface. Reanalysis data have been widely used, but a comprehensive validation using surface measurements is still highly needed. In this study, we evaluated the Rs estimates from six current representative global reanalyses (NCEP–NCAR, NCEP-DOE; CFSR; ERA-Interim; MERRA; and JRA-55 using surface measurements from different observation networks [GEBA; BSRN; GC-NET; Buoy; and CMA] (674 sites in total and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System (CERES EBAF product from 2001 to 2009. The global mean biases between the reanalysis Rs and surface measurements at all sites ranged from 11.25 W/m2 to 49.80 W/m2. Comparing with the CERES-EBAF Rs product, all the reanalyses overestimate Rs, except for ERA-Interim, with the biases ranging from −2.98 W/m2 to 21.97 W/m2 over the globe. It was also found that the biases of cloud fraction (CF in the reanalyses caused the overestimation of Rs. After removing the averaged bias of CERES-EBAF, weighted by the area of the latitudinal band, a global annual mean Rs values of 184.6 W/m2, 180.0 W/m2, and 182.9 W/m2 were obtained over land, ocean, and the globe, respectively.

  2. Near-surface electron acceleration during intense laser-solid interaction in the grazing incidence regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebryakov, D. A.; Nerush, E. N.; Kostyukov, I. Yu.

    2017-12-01

    When a relativistically intense p-polarized laser pulse is grazingly incident onto a planar solid-state target, a slightly superluminal field structure is formed near the target surface due to the incident and reflected waves superposition. This field structure can both extract the electrons from the target and accelerate them. It is theoretically shown that the acceleration is possible and stable for a wide range of electron initial conditions. Particle-in-cell simulations confirm that this mechanism can actually take place for realistic parameters. As a result, the electron bunches with a charge of tens of nC and GeV-level energy can be produced using a laser intensity 1021-1022 W/cm2. It is also shown that the presence of a preplasma can improve acceleration, which becomes possible because of more efficient electron injection into the accelerating field structure.

  3. Variation of energy absorption and exposure buildup factors with incident photon energy and penetration depth for boro-tellurite (B2O3-TeO2) glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayyed, M. I.; Elhouichet, H.

    2017-01-01

    The gamma ray energy absorption (EABF) and exposure buildup factors (EBF) of (100-x)TeO2-xB2O3 glass systems (where x=5, 10, 15, 20, 22.5 and 25 mol%) have been calculated in the energy region 0.015-15 MeV up to a penetration depth of 40 mfp (mean free path). The five parameters (G-P) fitting method has been used to estimate both EABF and EBF values. Variations of EABF and EBF with incident photon energy and penetration depth have been studied. It was found that EABF and EBF values were higher in the intermediate energy region, for all the glass systems. Furthermore, boro-tellurite glass with 5 mol% B2O3, was found to present the lowest EABF and EBF values, hence it is superior gamma-ray shielding material. The results indicate that the boro-tellurite glasses can be used as radiation shielding materials.

  4. Study of the grazing-incidence X-ray scattering of strongly disturbed fractal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roshchin, B. S., E-mail: ross@crys.ras.ru; Chukhovsky, F. N.; Pavlyuk, M. D.; Opolchentsev, A. M.; Asadchikov, V. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography, Federal Research Centre “Crystallography and Photonics” (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    The applicability of different approaches to the description of hard X-ray scattering from rough surfaces is generally limited by a maximum surface roughness height of no more than 1 nm. Meanwhile, this value is several times larger for the surfaces of different materials subjected to treatment, especially in the initial treatment stages. To control the roughness parameters in all stages of surface treatment, a new approach has been developed, which is based on a series expansion of wavefield over the plane eigenstate-function waves describing the small-angle scattering of incident X-rays in terms of plane q-waves propagating through the interface between two media with a random function of relief heights. To determine the amplitudes of reflected and transmitted plane q-waves, a system of two linked integral equations was derived. The solutions to these equations correspond (in zero order) to the well-known Fresnel expressions for a smooth plane interface. Based on these solutions, a statistical fractal model of an isotropic rough interface is built in terms of root-mean-square roughness σ, two-point correlation length l, and fractal surface index h. The model is used to interpret X-ray scattering data for polished surfaces of single-crystal cadmium telluride samples.

  5. UV Filtering of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells: The Effects of Varying the UV Cut-Off upon Cell Performance and Incident Photon-to-Electron Conversion Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Carnie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available With current technology, UV filters are essential to ensure long-term dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC stability. Blocking photons, however, will have an obvious effect on device performance and upon its incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency (IPCE. Filters have been applied to DSC devices with a range of cut-off wavelengths in order to assess how different levels of filtering affect the performance and IPCE of devices made with three different dyes, namely N719, Z907, and N749. It is shown that dyes that extend their IPCE further into the NIR region suffer lesser relative efficiency losses due to UV filtering than dyes with narrower action spectra. Furthermore, the results are encouraging to those working towards the industrialisation of DSC technology. From the results presented it can be estimated that filtering at a level intended to prevent direct band gap excitation of the TiO2 semiconductor should cause a relative drop in cell efficiency of no more than 10% in forward illuminated devices and no more than 2% in reverse illuminated devices.

  6. On application of ion-photon emission method in spectral analysis of surface of different materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazhin, A.I.; Buravlev, Yu.M.; Ryzhov, V.N.

    1983-01-01

    Possibilities of application of ion-photom emission (IPE) method for determining element composition of the aluminium bronzes surface and profiles of distribution of hydrogen and helium implanted in metals (Mon Wn Cun Aln OKh18N10T steel) by ion bombardment have been studied. As ion source duoplasmatron which permits to obtain ions of inert (helium, argon) and active (hydrogenn oxygen) gases with current density 0.1-1 mA/cm 2 in the beam and energy from 5 to 25 keV has been applied. The photomultiplier PEM-79 has been used as a detector of optical radiation arising in the course of ion bombardment of the sample. For spectra recording the two-coordinate recorder has been used. Calibration charts which permit to determine the concentration of the investigated elements with 3-5% accuracy are obtained. The method sensitivity depends on excitation energy of transition observed in the spectrum. By known volumetric element concentration in the sample one can determine its concentration on a sUrface without resorting to a calibration chart in the coUrse of target sputtering. It has been found that the target impurity sputtering coefficient becomes nonselective to their relatiVe content. At wide incidence angles of ion beam. In contrast to other excitation methods (arc, spark) the IPE method possesses locality which constitutes 1 μm at a quite simple method of ion beam focussing (single lens)

  7. Photonic bandgap structures for guiding of long-range surface plasmon polaritons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leosson, K.; Nikolajsen, T.; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2003-01-01

    We present the first observations of long-range plasmon polariton guiding in photonic bandgap structures. The transmission of waveguide structures is characterized at telecommunication wavelengths and a propagation loss below 4 dB/mm is determined.......We present the first observations of long-range plasmon polariton guiding in photonic bandgap structures. The transmission of waveguide structures is characterized at telecommunication wavelengths and a propagation loss below 4 dB/mm is determined....

  8. Plasmonic Photonic-Crystal Slabs: Visualization of the Bloch Surface Wave Resonance for an Ultrasensitive, Robust and Reusable Optical Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Baryshev

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A one-dimensional photonic crystal (PhC with termination by a metal film—a plasmonic photonic-crystal slab—has been theoretically analyzed for its optical response at a variation of the dielectric permittivity of an analyte and at a condition simulating the molecular binding event. Visualization of the Bloch surface wave resonance (SWR was done with the aid of plasmon absorption in a dielectric/metal/dielectric sandwich terminating a PhC. An SWR peak in spectra of such a plasmonic photonic crystal (PPhC slab comprising a noble or base metal layer was shown to be sensitive to a negligible variation of refractive index of a medium adjoining to the slab. As a consequence, the considered PPhC-based optical sensors exhibited an enhanced sensitivity and a good robustness in comparison with the conventional surface-plasmon and Bloch surface wave sensors. The PPhC biosensors can be of practical importance because the metal layer is protected by a capping dielectric layer from contact with analytes and, consequently, from deterioration.

  9. A new optical method for measuring surface temperature at large incident probe angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, A. S.; Norris, P. M.

    1997-02-01

    A novel thermoreflectance technique has been developed for noncontact temperature measurements using laser light incident at large angles on solid materials and devices. The method involves measuring the differential reflectance from a polarization modulated laser beam. The polarization differential reflectance technique is demonstrated on single-crystal Si wafers and on a polycrystalline carbon thin film over a temperature range of 20-60 °C. The method is shown to be an extremely sensitive temperature probe for near grazing angle measurements, which could be useful for monitoring the surface temperature of closely stacked silicon wafers used in batch processing in the microelectronics industry.

  10. Characterization of surface Ag nanoparticles in nanocomposite a-C:Ag coatings by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction at sub-critical angles of incidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manninen, N.K.; Oliveira, J.C.; Cavaleiro, A. [University of Coimbra, SEG-CEMUC, Mechanical Engineering Department, Coimbra (Portugal); Carvalho, S. [University of Minho, GRF-CFUM, Physics Department, Guimaraes (Portugal)

    2016-03-15

    Silver diffusion within nanocomposite films and/or toward the film surface is often observed during annealing of the silver-based nanocomposite films. In order to control and/or minimize this process, it is crucial to characterize the aggregated silver nanoparticles on the films surface. In this paper grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) with both sub-critical and supra-critical angles of incidence is used to characterize the Ag nanoparticles distribution, shape and structure both inside the matrix and on the nanocomposite film surface. The nanocomposite carbon coating containing Ag nanoparticles (a-C:Ag) was deposited by dc magnetron sputtering. The coatings were analyzed by GIXRD using fixed incident angles both below and above the critical angle for total reflection. By using sub-critical angles it was possible to eliminate diffraction from the bulk material allowing to estimate the size distribution of the nanoparticles sitting on the surface. The results obtained by GIXRD analysis were checked through comparison with the observations made by both TEM and SEM analysis. The proposed methodology can be used to characterized nanoparticles deposition on a surface and/or island formation during film growth as long an adequate substrate with high critical angle for total reflection is used. (orig.)

  11. Photon diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, John

    2009-11-01

    In current light models, a particle-like model of light is inconsistent with diffraction observations. A model of light is proposed wherein photon inferences are combined with the cosmological scalar potential model (SPM). That the photon is a surface with zero surface area in the travel direction is inferred from the Michelson-Morley experiment. That the photons in slits are mathematically treated as a linear antenna array (LAA) is inferred from the comparison of the transmission grating interference pattern and the single slit diffraction pattern. That photons induce a LAA wave into the plenum is inferred from the fractal model. Similarly, the component of the photon (the hod) is treated as a single antenna radiating a potential wave into the plenum. That photons are guided by action on the surface of the hod is inferred from the SPM. The plenum potential waves are a real field (not complex) that forms valleys, consistent with the pilot waves of the Bohm interpretation of quantum mechanics. Therefore, the Afshar experiment result is explained, supports Bohm, and falsifies Copenhagen. The papers may be viewed at http://web.citcom.net/˜scjh/.

  12. X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy Study on Dynamics of the Free Surface in Entangled Polystyrene Melt Films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koga, Tadanori; Li Chunhua; Endoh, Maya K; Narayanan, Suresh; Lurio, Laurence; Sinha, Sunil K

    2011-01-01

    The dynamics of polymer chains near the surface of a melt and within thin films remains a subject of inquiry along with the nature of the glass transition in these systems. Recent studies show that the properties of the free surface region are crucial in determining the anomalous glass transition temperature (T g ) reduction of polymer thin films. In this study, by embedding 'dilute' gold nanoparticles in polystyrene (PS) thin films as 'markers', we could successfully probe the diffusive Brownian motion which tracks the local viscosity both at the free surface and within the rest of the single PS thin film far above bulk T g . The technique used was X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy with resonance-enhanced X-rays that allows us to independently measure the motion in the regions of interest at the nanometer scale. We found the presence of the surface reduced viscosity layer in entangled PS thin films at T>>T g .

  13. In vivo, label-free, three-dimensional quantitative imaging of liver surface using multi-photon microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuo, Shuangmu; Yan, Jie; Kang, Yuzhan; Xu, Shuoyu; Peng, Qiwen

    2014-01-01

    Various structural features on the liver surface reflect functional changes in the liver. The visualization of these surface features with molecular specificity is of particular relevance to understanding the physiology and diseases of the liver. Using multi-photon microscopy (MPM), we have developed a label-free, three-dimensional quantitative and sensitive method to visualize various structural features of liver surface in living rat. MPM could quantitatively image the microstructural features of liver surface with respect to the sinuosity of collagen fiber, the elastic fiber structure, the ratio between elastin and collagen, collagen content, and the metabolic state of the hepatocytes that are correlative with the pathophysiologically induced changes in the regions of interest. This study highlights the potential of this technique as a useful tool for pathophysiological studies and possible diagnosis of the liver diseases with further development.

  14. Structure fits the purpose: photonic crystal fibers for evanescent-field surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Oo, M. K .K.; Han, Y.; Kaňka, Jiří; Sukhishvili, S.; Du, H.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 4 (2010), s. 466-468 ISSN 0146-9592 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/08/1719 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : Photonic crystal fiber * Raman spectroscopy * Fiber - optic evanescent sensor Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 3.316, year: 2010

  15. Nanotag-enabled photonic crystal fiber as quantitative surface-enhanced Raman scattering optofluidic platform

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pinkhasova, P.; Chen, H.; Kaňka, Jiří; Mergo, P.; Du, H.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 106, č. 7 (2015), 0711061-0711064 ISSN 0003-6951 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH11038 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Photonic crystal fibers * Raman scattering * Crystal whiskers Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 3.142, year: 2015

  16. Pressure-Redistributing Support Surface Use and Pressure Ulcer Incidence in Elderly Hip Fracture Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Shayna E.; Shardell, Michelle; Hawkes, William G.; Margolis, David J.; Amr, Sania; Miller, Ram; Baumgarten, Mona

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To evaluate the association between pressure-redistributing support surface (PRSS) use and incident pressure ulcers in older adults with hip fracture. DESIGN Secondary analysis of data from prospective cohort with assessments performed as soon as possible after hospital admission and on alternating days for 21 days. SETTING Nine hospitals in the Baltimore Hip Studies network and 105 postacute facilities to which participants were discharged. PARTICIPANTS Six hundred fifty-eight people aged 65 and older who underwent surgery for hip fracture. MEASUREMENTS Full-body examination for pressure ulcers; bedbound status; and PRSS use, recorded as none, powered (alternating pressure mattresses, low-air-loss mattresses, and alternating pressure overlays), or nonpowered (high-density foam, static air, or gel-filled mattresses or pressure-redistributing overlays except for alternating pressure overlays). RESULTS Incident pressure ulcers (IPUs), Stage 2 or higher, were observed at 4.2% (195/4,638) of visits after no PRSS use, 4.5% (28/623) of visits after powered PRSS use, and 3.6% (54/1,496) of visits after nonpowered PRSS use. The rate of IPU per person-day of follow-up did not differ significantly between participants using powered PRSSs and those not using PRSSs. The rate also did not differ significantly between participants using nonpowered PRSSs and those not using PRSSs, except in the subset of bedbound participants (incidence rate ratio = 0.3, 95% confidence interval = 0.1–0.7). CONCLUSION PRSS use was not associated with a lower IPU rate. Clinical guidelines may need revision for the limited effect of PRSS use, and it may be appropriate to target PRSS use to bedbound patients at risk of pressure ulcers. PMID:21649630

  17. Molecular dynamics study of the interactions of incident N or Ti atoms with the TiN(001) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhenhai [National Key Laboratory for Precision Hot Processing of Metals & School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Centre for Precision Manufacturing, Department of Design, Manufacture and Engineering Management, The University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G1 1XJ (United Kingdom); Zeng, Quanren [Centre for Precision Manufacturing, Department of Design, Manufacture and Engineering Management, The University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G1 1XJ (United Kingdom); Yuan, Lin [National Key Laboratory for Precision Hot Processing of Metals & School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Qin, Yi [Centre for Precision Manufacturing, Department of Design, Manufacture and Engineering Management, The University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G1 1XJ (United Kingdom); Chen, Mingjun [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Shan, Debin, E-mail: d.b.shan@gmail.com [National Key Laboratory for Precision Hot Processing of Metals & School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Interactions of incident N or Ti atoms with TiN(001) surface are studied by CMD. • The impact position of incident N on the surface determines the interaction modes. • Adsorption could occur due to the atomic exchange process. • Resputtering and reflection may simultaneously occur. • The initial sticking coefficient of N on TiN(001) is much smaller than that of Ti. - Abstract: The interaction processes between incident N or Ti atoms and the TiN(001) surface are simulated by classical molecular dynamics based on the second nearest-neighbor modified embedded-atom method potentials. The simulations are carried out for substrate temperatures between 300 and 700 K and kinetic energies of the incident atoms within the range of 0.5–10 eV. When N atoms impact against the surface, adsorption, resputtering and reflection of particles are observed; several unique atomic mechanisms are identified to account for these interactions, in which the adsorption could occur due to the atomic exchange process while the resputtering and reflection may simultaneously occur. The impact position of incident N atoms on the surface plays an important role in determining the interaction modes. Their occurrence probabilities are dependent on the kinetic energy of incident N atoms but independent on the substrate temperature. When Ti atoms are the incident particles, adsorption is the predominant interaction mode between particles and the surface. This results in the much smaller initial sticking coefficient of N atoms on the TiN(001) surface compared with that of Ti atoms. Stoichiometric TiN is promoted by N/Ti flux ratios larger than one.

  18. Treating Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma with Highly Irregular Surfaces with Photon Irradiation Using Rice as Tissue Compensator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lonika eMajithia

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL is known to have an excellent response to radiotherapy, an important treatment modality for this disease. In patients with extremity and digit involvement, the irregular surface and depth variations create difficulty in delivering a homogenous dose using electrons. We sought to evaluate photon irradiation with rice packing as tissue equivalence and determine clinical tolerance and response. Materials and Methods: Three consecutive CTCL patients with extensive lower extremity involvement including the digits were treated using external beam photon therapy with rice packing for tissue compensation. The entire foot was treated to 30-40 Gy in 2-3 Gy per fraction using 6 MV photons prescribed to the mid-plane of an indexed box filled with rice in which the foot was placed. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeter (OSLD was used for dose measurement to determine the dose deposition to the skin surface. Treatment tolerance and response were monitored with clinical evaluation. Results: All patients tolerated the treatment without treatment breaks. Toxicities included grade 3 erythema and desquamation with resolution within 4 weeks. No late toxicities were observed. All four treated sites had partial response (PR by the end of the treatment course. All patients reported improved functionality after treatment, with less pain, drainage, or swelling. No local recurrence has been observed in these patients with a median follow-up time of 14 months. Conclusion: Tissue compensation with rice packing offers a convenient, inexpensive and reproducible method for the treatment of CTCL with highly irregular surfaces.

  19. Theoretical modeling and design of photonic structures in zeolite nanocomposites for gas sensing. Part I: surface relief gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, D; Naydenova, I

    2017-12-01

    The suitability of holographic structures fabricated in zeolite nanoparticle-polymer composite materials for gas sensing applications has been investigated. Theoretical modeling of the sensor response (i.e., change in hologram readout due to a change in refractive index modulation or thickness as a result of gas adsorption) of different sensor designs was carried out using Raman-Nath theory and Kogelnik's coupled wave theory. The influence of a range of parameters on the sensor response of holographically recorded surface and volume photonic grating structures has been studied, namely the phase difference between the diffracted and probe beam introduced by the grating, grating geometry, thickness, spatial frequency, reconstruction wavelength, and zeolite nanoparticle refractive index. From this, the optimum fabrication conditions for both surface and volume holographic gas sensor designs have been identified. Here, in part I, results from theoretical modeling of the influence of design on the sensor response of holographically inscribed surface relief structures for gas sensing applications is reported.

  20. Automated Monte Carlo biasing for photon-generated electrons near surfaces.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franke, Brian Claude; Crawford, Martin James; Kensek, Ronald Patrick

    2009-09-01

    This report describes efforts to automate the biasing of coupled electron-photon Monte Carlo particle transport calculations. The approach was based on weight-windows biasing. Weight-window settings were determined using adjoint-flux Monte Carlo calculations. A variety of algorithms were investigated for adaptivity of the Monte Carlo tallies. Tree data structures were used to investigate spatial partitioning. Functional-expansion tallies were used to investigate higher-order spatial representations.

  1. Strongly-Refractive One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Prisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    One-dimensional (1D) photonic crystal prisms can separate a beam of polychromatic electromagnetic waves into constituent wavelength components and can utilize unconventional refraction properties for wavelength dispersion over significant portions of an entire photonic band rather than just near the band edges outside the photonic band gaps. Using a ID photonic crystal simplifies the design and fabrication process and allows the use of larger feature sizes. The prism geometry broadens the useful wavelength range, enables better optical transmission, and exhibits angular dependence on wavelength with reduced non-linearity. The properties of the 1 D photonic crystal prism can be tuned by varying design parameters such as incidence angle, exit surface angle, and layer widths. The ID photonic crystal prism can be fabricated in a planar process, and can be used as optical integrated circuit elements.

  2. Incidence of the enterococcal surface protein (esp) gene in human and animal fecal sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, R.L.; Przybyla-Kelly, K.; Shively, D.A.; Byappanahalli, M.N.

    2007-01-01

    The occurrence of the enterococcal surface protein (esp) gene in the opportunistic pathogens Enterococcus faecalis and E. faecium is well-documented in clinical research. Recently, the esp gene has been proposed as a marker of human pollution in environmental waters; however, information on its relative incidence in various human and animal fecal sources is limited. We have determined the occurrence of the esp gene in enterococci from human (n = 64) and animal (n = 233) fecal samples by polymerase chain reaction using two primer sets: one presumably specific for E. faecium (espfm) and the other for both E. faecalis and E. faecium (espfs/fm). We believe that this research is the first to explore the use of espfs/fm for the detection of human waste in natural environmental settings. The incidence in human sources was 93.1% espfm and 100% espfs/fm in raw sewage influent; 30% for both espfm and espfs/fm in septic waste; and 0% espfm and 80% espfs/fm in active pit toilets. The overall occurrence of the gene in animal feces was 7.7% (espfs/fm) and 4.7% (espfm); animal types with positive results included dogs (9/43, all espfm), gulls (10/34, espfs/fm; 2/34, espfm), mice (3/22, all espfs/fm), and songbirds (5/55, all espfs/fm). The esp gene was not detected in cat (0/34), deer (0/4), goose (0/18), or raccoon (0/23) feces. The inconsistent occurrence, especially in septic and pit toilet sewage, suggests a low statistical power of discrimination between animal and human sources, which means a large number of replicates should be collected. Both espfm and espfs/fm were common in raw sewage, but neither one efficiently differentiated between animal and other human sources.

  3. Diamond photonic crystal slab: leaky modes and modified photoluminescence emission of surface-deposited quantum dots

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ondič, Lukáš; Babchenko, Oleg; Varga, Marián; Kromka, Alexander; Čtyroký, Jiří; Pelant, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 2, Dec (2012), s. 1-6 ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/0794; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA101120804; GA AV ČR KJB100100903; GA ČR(CZ) GAP205/10/0046 Grant - others:AVČR(CZ) M100100902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521; CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : photonic crystal * diamond * photoluminescence Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.927, year: 2012 http://www.nature.com/srep/2012/121203/srep00914/full/srep00914.html

  4. Normal incidence sound transmission loss evaluation by upstream surface impedance measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panneton, Raymond

    2009-03-01

    A method is developed to obtain the normal incidence sound transmission loss of noise control elements used in piping systems from upstream surface impedance measurements only. The noise control element may be a small material specimen in an impedance tube, a sealing part in an automotive hollow body network, an expansion chamber, a resonator, or a muffler. The developments are based on a transfer matrix (four-pole) representation of the noise control element and on the assumption that only plane waves propagate upstream and downstream the element. No assumptions are made on its boundary conditions, dimensions, shape, and material properties (i.e., the element may be symmetrical or not along its thickness, homogeneous or not, isotropic or not). One-load and two-load procedures are also proposed to identify the transfer matrix coefficients needed to obtain the true transmission loss of the tested element. The method can be used with a classical two-microphone impedance tube setup (i.e., no additional downstream tube and downstream acoustical measurements). The method is tested on three different noise control elements: two impedance tube multilayered specimens and one expansion chamber. The results found using the developed method are validated using numerical simulations.

  5. The equivalent incidence angle for porous absorbers backed by a hard surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Brunskog, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    experiment using a free-field absorption measurement technique with a source at the equivalent angle. This study investigates the equivalent angle for locally and extendedly reacting porous media mainly by a numerical approach: Numerical minimizations of a cost function that is the difference between...... coefficients by free-field techniques, a broad incidence angle range can be suggested: 20 hi65 for extended reaction and hi65 for locally reacting porous absorbers, if an average difference of 0.05 is allowed.......An equivalent incidence angle is defined as the incidence angle at which the oblique incidence absorption coefficient best approximates the random incidence absorption coefficient. Once the equivalent angle is known, the random incidence absorption coefficient can be estimated by a single...

  6. Hollow core photonic crystal fiber for monitoring leukemia cells using surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khetani, Altaf; Momenpour, Ali; Alarcon, Emilio I; Anis, Hanan

    2015-11-01

    The present paper demonstrates an antibody-free, robust, fast, and portable platform for detection of leukemia cells using Raman spectroscopy with a 785-nm laser diode coupled to a hollow core photonic crystal (HC-PCF) containing silver nanoparticles. Acute myeloid leukemia is one of the most common bone marrow cancers in children and youths. Clinical studies suggest that early diagnosis and remission evaluation of myoblasts in the bone marrow are pivotal for improving patient survival. However, the current protocols for leukemic cells detection involve the use of expensive antibodies and flow cytometers. Thus, we have developed a new technology for detection of leukemia cells up to 300 cells/ml using a compact fiber HC-PCF, which offers a novel alternative to existing clinical standards. Furthermore, we were also able to accurately distinguish live, apoptotic and necrotic leukemic cells.

  7. Coupled-wave analysis for photonic-crystal surface-emitting lasers on air holes with arbitrary sidewalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Chao; Liang, Yong; Sakai, Kyosuke; Iwahashi, Seita; Noda, Susumu

    2011-11-21

    The coupled-wave theory (CWT) is extended to a photonic crystal structure with arbitrary sidewalls, and a simple, fast, and effective model for the quantitatively analysis of the radiative characteristics of two-dimensional (2D) photonic-crystal surface-emitting lasers (PC-SELs) has been developed. For illustrating complicated coupling effects accurately, sufficient numbers of waves are included in the formulation, by considering their vertical field profiles. The radiation of band-edge modes is analyzed for two in-plane air-hole geometries, in the case of two types of sidewalls: i.e. "tapered case" and "tilted case." The results of CWT analysis agree well with the results of finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) numerical simulation. From the analytical solutions of the CWT, the symmetry properties of the band-edge modes are investigated. In-plane asymmetry of the air holes is crucial for achieving high output power because it causes partial constructive interference. Asymmetric air holes and tilted sidewalls help in inducing in-plane asymmetries. By breaking the symmetries with respect to the two orthogonal symmetric axes of the band-edge modes, the two factors can be tuned independently, so that the radiation power is enhanced while preserving the mode selectivity performance. Finally, top-down reactive ion etching (RIE) approach is suggested for the fabrication of such a structure. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  8. Photonic Crystal Fiber-Based Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensor with Selective Analyte Channels and Graphene-Silver Deposited Core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmmed A. Rifat

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose a surface plasmon resonance (SPR sensor based on photonic crystal fiber (PCF with selectively filled analyte channels. Silver is used as the plasmonic material to accurately detect the analytes and is coated with a thin graphene layer to prevent oxidation. The liquid-filled cores are placed near to the metallic channel for easy excitation of free electrons to produce surface plasmon waves (SPWs. Surface plasmons along the metal surface are excited with a leaky Gaussian-like core guided mode. Numerical investigations of the fiber’s properties and sensing performance are performed using the finite element method (FEM. The proposed sensor shows maximum amplitude sensitivity of 418 Refractive Index Units (RIU−1 with resolution as high as 2.4 × 10−5 RIU. Using the wavelength interrogation method, a maximum refractive index (RI sensitivity of 3000 nm/RIU in the sensing range of 1.46–1.49 is achieved. The proposed sensor is suitable for detecting various high RI chemicals, biochemical and organic chemical analytes. Additionally, the effects of fiber structural parameters on the properties of plasmonic excitation are investigated and optimized for sensing performance as well as reducing the sensor’s footprint.

  9. Photonic crystal fiber-based surface plasmon resonance sensor with selective analyte channels and graphene-silver deposited core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifat, Ahmmed A; Mahdiraji, G Amouzad; Chow, Desmond M; Shee, Yu Gang; Ahmed, Rajib; Adikan, Faisal Rafiq Mahamd

    2015-05-19

    We propose a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor based on photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with selectively filled analyte channels. Silver is used as the plasmonic material to accurately detect the analytes and is coated with a thin graphene layer to prevent oxidation. The liquid-filled cores are placed near to the metallic channel for easy excitation of free electrons to produce surface plasmon waves (SPWs). Surface plasmons along the metal surface are excited with a leaky Gaussian-like core guided mode. Numerical investigations of the fiber's properties and sensing performance are performed using the finite element method (FEM). The proposed sensor shows maximum amplitude sensitivity of 418 Refractive Index Units (RIU-1) with resolution as high as 2.4 × 10(-5) RIU. Using the wavelength interrogation method, a maximum refractive index (RI) sensitivity of 3000 nm/RIU in the sensing range of 1.46-1.49 is achieved. The proposed sensor is suitable for detecting various high RI chemicals, biochemical and organic chemical analytes. Additionally, the effects of fiber structural parameters on the properties of plasmonic excitation are investigated and optimized for sensing performance as well as reducing the sensor's footprint.

  10. Estimation of infarct size by three-dimensional surface display method of myocardial single photon emission CT with 201Tl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Masahiro; Tsuda, Takatoshi; Akiba, Hidenari; Morita, Kazuo; Hosoba, Minoru; Ban, Ryuichi; Hirano, Takako.

    1987-01-01

    To estimate infarct size, we devised three-dimensional (3D) surface display method of 201 Tl myocardial single photon emission CT (SPECT). The method was performed with maximum-count circumferential profiles (CPs) of short axis views of 201 Tl myocardial SPECT. The counts of maximum-count CP were put into a pixel line with the calculated left ventricular circumferential length on each short axis slice. A 3D-surface display map was created by arrangement of these pixel lines from apex to base of left ventricle in order. The sizes of defects in myocardial phantom were calculated by this method. There was a high correlation between the real defect sizes and the calculated defect sizes. In 6 patients with anterior myocardial infarction, the infarct sizes were calculated by this method. The extent of abnormality was identified by automatic computer comparison of each patient's profiles with corresponding lower limits of normal profiles. The infarct sizes calculated by 3D-surface display method were closely correlated not only with the infarct sizes calculated by summation of defect sizes in short axis views, but also with left ventricular ejection fractions. We concluded that the 3D-surface display method of 201 Tl myocardial SPECT is effective for noninvasive assessment of the extent of myocardial infarction. (author)

  11. Real-Time Fluorescence Detection in Aqueous Systems by Combined and Enhanced Photonic and Surface Effects in Patterned Hollow Sphere Colloidal Photonic Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Kuo; Wang, Ling; Li, Jiaqi; Van Cleuvenbergen, Stijn; Bartic, Carmen; Song, Kai; Clays, Koen

    2017-05-16

    Hollow sphere colloidal photonic crystals (HSCPCs) exhibit the ability to maintain a high refractive index contrast after infiltration of water, leading to extremely high-quality photonic band gap effects, even in an aqueous (physiological) environment. Superhydrophilic pinning centers in a superhydrophobic environment can be used to strongly confine and concentrate water-soluble analytes. We report a strategy to realize real-time ultrasensitive fluorescence detection in patterned HSCPCs based on strongly enhanced fluorescence due to the photonic band-edge effect combined with wettability differentiation in the superhydrophobic/superhydrophilic pattern. The orthogonal nature of the two strategies allows for a multiplicative effect, resulting in an increase of two orders of magnitude in fluorescence.

  12. Use of surface water in drinking water production associated with municipal Legionnaires' disease incidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Boer, J. W.; Coutinho, R. A.; Yzerman, E. P. F.; van der Sande, M. A. B.

    2008-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: Given an observed geographical variation in Legionnaires' disease incidence in The Netherlands, the aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that the type of drinking water production was an independent determinant of the incidence of Legionnaires' disease. DESIGN: For the

  13. ESTIMATION OF TOTAL SOLAR RADIATION INCIDENT ON AN INCLINED SURFACE OF A SOUTH-FACING GREENHOUSE ROOF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RONOH E.K.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Solar radiation is the driving force for the surface energy balance in buildings such as greenhouses. Greenhouses are generally tilted towards the sun in order to maximize the solar irradiance on the surfaces. Precise computation of the solar radiation received on these surfaces assumes an important role in the energy simulation. It is practical to calculate the total solar irradiance on inclined surfaces based on the solar global and diffuse radiation intensities on horizontal surfaces. This study focused on estimating the total solar radiation incident on inclined greenhouse roof surfaces. In this work, a south-facing thermal box inclined at 26.5° from the horizontal was used for solar radiation measurements. Additionally, recorded solar radiation data were retrieved for the study location and used to develop an empirical correlation. The conversion factors for the beam, the diffuse and the reflected solar radiation components were essential in the prediction of the total solar radiation incident on the tilted surface. The measured solar radiation data were then compared with the simulated data. The model performance was assessed using both graphical and statistical methods. Overall, locally calibrated data led to a satisfactory improvement in estimation of the total solar radiation on an inclined surface.

  14. Characteristics of surface sound pressure and absorption of a finite impedance strip for a grazing incident plane wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sum, K S; Pan, J

    2007-07-01

    Distributions of sound pressure and intensity on the surface of a flat impedance strip flush-mounted on a rigid baffle are studied for a grazing incident plane wave. The distributions are obtained by superimposing the unperturbed wave (the specularly reflected wave as if the strip is rigid plus the incident wave) with the radiated wave from the surface vibration of the strip excited by the unperturbed pressure. The radiated pressure interferes with the unperturbed pressure and distorts the propagating plane wave. When the plane wave propagates in the baffle-strip-baffle direction, it encounters discontinuities in acoustical impedance at the baffle-strip and strip-baffle interfaces. The radiated pressure is highest around the baffle-strip interface, but decreases toward the strip-baffle interface where the plane wave distortion reduces accordingly. As the unperturbed and radiated waves have different magnitudes and superimpose out of phase, the surface pressure and intensity increase across the strip in the plane wave propagation direction. Therefore, the surface absorption of the strip is nonzero and nonuniform. This paper provides an understanding of the surface pressure and intensity behaviors of a finite impedance strip for a grazing incident plane wave, and of how the distributed intensity determines the sound absorption coefficient of the strip.

  15. High-directional light source using photon recycling with a retro-reflective Dome incorporated with a textured LED die surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ching-Cherng; Chung, Shuang-Chao; Yang, Shuang-Hao; Yu, Yeh-Wei; Chien, Wei-Ting; Chen, Huang-Kuen; Chen, Shih-Peng

    2013-07-29

    This paper demonstrates a novel retro-reflective dome that enhances the directionality of a light emitting diode (LED) by recycling photons reflected by a textured LED die surface. A simulation model is developed to describe both the photon recycling process within the dome and the role of specific pyramid patterns on the top surface of the LED die. Advanced simulations showed that a perfectly polished surface with 100% reflectivity potentially enhances the directionality of the dome by 340%, 250%, and 240% using reflective domes with 10°, 20°, and 30° light cones, respectively. In the experiment, the directionality of the domes exhibiting surface imperfections is enhanced by approximately 160%, 150%, and 130% using 10°, 20°, and 30° light cones, respectively. By incorporating a textured top surface on the LED die, the proposed dome effectively increases the directionality of the LED light source.

  16. Photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haissinski, J.

    1986-06-01

    The discussions presented in this paper deal with the following points: distinctive features of gamma-gamma collisions; related processes; photon-photon elastic scattering in the continuum and γγ →gg; total cross section; γγ → V 1 V 2 (V=vector meson); radiative width measurements and light meson spectroscopy; exclusive channels at large /t/; jets and inclusive particle distribution in γγ collisions; and, the photon structure function F γ 2

  17. Photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, D.L.

    1982-10-01

    Studies of photon-photon collisions are reviewed with particular emphasis on new results reported to this conference. These include results on light meson spectroscopy and deep inelastic e#betta# scattering. Considerable work has now been accumulated on resonance production by #betta##betta# collisions. Preliminary high statistics studies of the photon structure function F 2 /sup #betta#/(x,Q 2 ) are given and comments are made on the problems that remain to be solved

  18. Photon-photon colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sessler, A.M.

    1995-04-01

    Since the seminal work by Ginsburg, et at., the subject of giving the Next Linear Collider photon-photon capability, as well as electron-positron capability, has drawn much attention. A 1990 article by V.I. Teinov describes the situation at that time. In March 1994, the first workshop on this subject was held. This report briefly reviews the physics that can be achieved through the photon-photon channel and then focuses on the means of achieving such a collider. Also reviewed is the spectrum of backscattered Compton photons -- the best way of obtaining photons. We emphasize the spectrum actually obtained in a collider with both polarized electrons and photons (peaked at high energy and very different from a Compton spectrum). Luminosity is estimated for the presently considered colliders, and interaction and conversion-point geometries are described. Also specified are laser requirements (such as wavelength, peak power, and average power) and the lasers that might be employed. These include conventional and free-electron lasers. Finally, we describe the R&D necessary to make either of these approaches viable and explore the use of the SLC as a test bed for a photon-photon collider of very high energy.

  19. Technical Note: On the impact of the incident electron beam energy on the primary dose component of flattening filter free photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuess, Peter; Georg, Dietmar; Palmans, Hugo; Lechner, Wolfgang

    2016-08-01

    For commercially available linear accelerators (Linacs), the electron energies of flattening filter free (FFF) and flattened (FF) beams are either identical or the electron energy of the FFF beam is increased to match the percentage depth dose curve (PDD) of the FF beam (in reference geometry). This study focuses on the primary dose components of FFF beams for both kinds of settings, studied on the same Linac. The measurements were conducted on a VersaHD Linac (Elekta, Crawley, UK) for both FF and FFF beams with nominal energies of 6 and 10 MV. In the clinical setting of the VersaHD, the energy of FFFM (Matched) beams is set to match the PDDs of the FF beams. In contrast the incident electron beam of the FFFU beam was set to the same energy as for the FF beam. Half value layers (HVLs) and a dual parameter beam quality specifier (DPBQS) were determined. For the 6 MV FFFM beam, HVL and DPBQS values were very similar compared to those of the 6 MV FF beam, while for the 10 MV FFFM and FF beams, only %dd(10)x and HVL values were comparable (differences below 1.5%). This shows that matching the PDD at one depth does not guarantee other beam quality dependent parameters to be matched. For FFFU beams, all investigated beam quality specifiers were significantly different compared to those for FF beams of the same nominal accelerator potential. The DPBQS of the 6 MV FF and FFFM beams was equal within the measurement uncertainty and was comparable to published data of a machine with similar TPR20,10 and %dd(10)x. In contrast to that, the DPBQS's two parameters of the 10 MV FFFM beam were substantially higher compared to those for the 10 MV FF beam. PDD-matched FF and FFF beams of both nominal accelerator potentials were observed to have similar HVL values, indicating similarity of their primary dose components. Using the DPBQS revealed that the mean attenuation coefficient was found to be the same within the uncertainty of 0.8% for 6 MV FF and 6 MV FFFM beams, while for 10 MV

  20. Technical Note: On the impact of the incident electron beam energy on the primary dose component of flattening filter free photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuess, Peter; Georg, Dietmar; Lechner, Wolfgang; Palmans, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: For commercially available linear accelerators (Linacs), the electron energies of flattening filter free (FFF) and flattened (FF) beams are either identical or the electron energy of the FFF beam is increased to match the percentage depth dose curve (PDD) of the FF beam (in reference geometry). This study focuses on the primary dose components of FFF beams for both kinds of settings, studied on the same Linac. Methods: The measurements were conducted on a VersaHD Linac (Elekta, Crawley, UK) for both FF and FFF beams with nominal energies of 6 and 10 MV. In the clinical setting of the VersaHD, the energy of FFF M (Matched) beams is set to match the PDDs of the FF beams. In contrast the incident electron beam of the FFF U beam was set to the same energy as for the FF beam. Half value layers (HVLs) and a dual parameter beam quality specifier (DPBQS) were determined. Results: For the 6 MV FFF M beam, HVL and DPBQS values were very similar compared to those of the 6 MV FF beam, while for the 10 MV FFF M and FF beams, only %dd(10) x and HVL values were comparable (differences below 1.5%). This shows that matching the PDD at one depth does not guarantee other beam quality dependent parameters to be matched. For FFF U beams, all investigated beam quality specifiers were significantly different compared to those for FF beams of the same nominal accelerator potential. The DPBQS of the 6 MV FF and FFF M beams was equal within the measurement uncertainty and was comparable to published data of a machine with similar TPR 20,10 and %dd(10) x . In contrast to that, the DPBQS’s two parameters of the 10 MV FFF M beam were substantially higher compared to those for the 10 MV FF beam. Conclusions: PDD-matched FF and FFF beams of both nominal accelerator potentials were observed to have similar HVL values, indicating similarity of their primary dose components. Using the DPBQS revealed that the mean attenuation coefficient was found to be the same within the uncertainty of

  1. Photonic integrated single-sideband modulator / frequency shifter based on surface acoustic waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barretto, Elaine Cristina Saraiva; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2010-01-01

    Optical frequency shifters are essential components of many systems. In this paper, a compact integrated optical frequency shifter is designed making use of the combination of surface acoustic waves and Mach-Zehnder interferometers. It has a very simple operation setup and can be fabricated in st...

  2. Ion-beam method characterization of erbium incorporation into glass surface for photonics applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macková, Anna; Peřina, Vratislav; Havránek, Vladimír; Třešnáková-Nebolová, P.; Špirková, J.; Telezhniková, O.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 566, č. 1 (2004), s. 111-114 ISSN 0039-6028 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP102/01/D069 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1048901 Keywords : lanthanides * glass surfaces * X-ray emission Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 2.168, year: 2004

  3. Design and synthesis of nanomaterials for surface-enhanced Raman scattering, fuel cell technology, and photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Pedro Henrique Cury

    blocks to obtain 3D photonic crystals via self-assembly. Moreover, superparagametic properties could be obtained via the incorporation of Fe3O4 nanoparticles into the a-Se cores. Taken together, this represents a versatile approach to the synthesis of magnetoactive spheres with similar dimensions but a variety of compositions and properties.

  4. PLZT Electrooptic Ceramic Photonic Devices for Surface-Normal Operation in Trenches Cut Across Arrays of Optical Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirabayashi, Katsuhiko

    2005-03-01

    Simple Pb_1-x La_x(Zr_y Ti_z)_1-x/4 O3 (PLZT) electrooptic ceramic photonic device arrays for surface-normal operation have been developed for application to polarization-controller arrays and Fabry-Pérot tunable filter arrays. These arrays are inserted in trenches cut across fiber arrays. Each element of the arrayed structure corresponds to one optical beam and takes the form of a cell. Each sidewall of the cell (width: 50-80 μm) is coated to form an electrode. The arrays have 16 elements at a pitch of 250 μm. The phase modulator has about 1 dB of loss and a half-wavelength voltage of 120 V. A cascade of two PLZT phase modulators (thickness: 300 μm), with each attached to a polyimide lambda/2 plate (thickness:15 μm), is capable of converting an arbitrary polarization to the transverse-electric (TE) or transverse-magnetic (TM) polarization. The response time is 1 μs. The Fabry-Pérot tunable filters have a thickness of 50 μm . The front and back surfaces of each cell are coated by 99%-reflective mirror. The free spectral range (FSR) of the filters is about 10 nm, tunable range is about 10 nm, loss is 2.2 dB, and finesse is 150. The tuning speed of these devices is high, taking only 1 μs.

  5. Influence of standard RF coil materials on surface and buildup dose from a 6 MV photon beam in magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghila, A; Fallone, B G; Rathee, S

    2016-11-01

    Magnetic resonance guided teletherapy systems aspire to image the patient concurrently with the radiation delivery. Thus, the radiofrequency (RF) coils used for magnetic resonance imaging, placed on or close to patient skin and in close proximity to the treatment volume, would be irradiated leading to modifications of radiation dose to the skin and in the buildup region. The purpose of this work is to measure and assess these dose modifications due to standard off-the-shelf RF coil materials. A typical surface coil was approximated as layered sheets of polycarbonate, copper tape, and Teflon to emulate the base, conductor, and cover, respectively. A separate investigation used additional coil materials, such as copper pipe, plastic coil housing, a typical coil padding material, and a thin copper conductor. The materials were placed in the path of a 6 MV photon beam at various distances from polystyrene phantoms in which the surface and buildup doses were measured. The experiments were performed on a clinical Varian linac with no magnetic field and with a 0.21 T electromagnet producing a magnetic field parallel to the beam central axis. The authors repeated similar experiments in the presence of a 0.22 T magnetic field oriented perpendicular to the beam central axis using an earlier linac-MR prototype, with a biplanar permanent magnet. The radiation detectors used for the measurements were two different parallel plate ion chambers and GAFChromic films. A typical open beam surface dose of 20% (relative to open beam D max ) was increased to 63% by the coil padding material and to >74% by all other materials when placed in direct contact with the phantom, irrespective of magnetic field presence or orientation. Without a magnetic field, the surface dose decreased as the test materials were moved away from the phantom surface toward the radiation source, reaching between 30% and 40% at 10 cm gap between the phantom and the test materials. In the presence of the transverse

  6. Photon-photon collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1988-07-01

    Highlights of the VIIIth International Workshop on Photon-Photon Collisions are reviewed. New experimental and theoretical results were reported in virtually every area of ..gamma gamma.. physics, particularly in exotic resonance production and tests of quantum chromodynamics where asymptotic freedom and factorization theorems provide predictions for both inclusive and exclusive ..gamma gamma.. reactions at high momentum transfer. 73 refs., 12 figs.

  7. Anti-corrosion treatment of metal surfaces based on photonics methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzankina, J. S.; Vasiliev, O. S.; Parfenov, V. A.

    2017-11-01

    Metal corrosion protection is the main problem of all metal structures. Estimated to NASA, the loss of metal around the world is about of 2.5 trillion dollars, equivalent to 3.4% of global GDP. In our work we used a CW fiber laser with the wavelength of 1064 nm and a power up to 18, 4 W for laser irradiation of metal surfaces. We report on the optimal treatment of the metal corrosion with laser power density in the range from 7*104 to 9*104 W/cm2. After the process of laser treatment of steel surface we observe decreased roughness of steel and a small change in its chemical composition.

  8. Tight control of light trapping in surface addressable photonic crystal membranes: application to spectrally and spatially selective optical devices (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letartre, Xavier; Blanchard, Cédric; Grillet, Christian; Jamois, Cécile; Leclercq, Jean-Louis; Viktorovitch, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Surface addressable Photonic Crystal Membranes (PCM) are 1D or 2D photonic crystals formed in a slab waveguides where Bloch modes located above the light line are exploited. These modes are responsible for resonances in the reflection spectrum whose bandwidth can be adjusted at will. These resonances result from the coupling between a guided mode of the membrane and a free-space mode through the pattern of the photonic crystal. If broadband, these structures represent an ideal mirror to form compact vertical microcavity with 3D confinement of photons and polarization selectivity. Among numerous devices, low threshold VCSELs with remarkable and tunable modal properties have been demonstrated. Narrow band PCMs (or high Q resonators) have also been extensively used for surface addressable optoelectronic devices where an active material is embedded into the membrane, leading to the demonstration of low threshold surface emitting lasers, nonlinear bistables, optical traps... In this presentation, we will describe the main physical rules which govern the lifetime of photons in these resonant modes. More specifically, it will be emphasized that the Q factor of the PCM is determined, to the first order, by the integral overlap between the electromagnetic field distributions of the guided and free space modes and of the dielectric periodic perturbation which is applied to the homogeneous membrane to get the photonic crystal. It turns out that the symmetries of these distributions are of prime importance for the strength of the resonance. It will be shown that, by molding in-plane or vertical symmetries of Bloch modes, spectrally and spatially selective light absorbers or emitters can be designed. First proof of concept devices will be also presented.

  9. Investigation of surface and sub-surface damage in high quality synthetic diamonds by X-ray reflectivity and grazing incidence in-plane diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bussone, Genziana; Lafford, Tamzin A.; Masiello, Fabio; Carbone, Gerardina; Schuelli, Tobias U.; Rommeveaux, Amparo Vivo; Haertwig, Juergen [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6, Rue Jules Horowitz, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Gibaud, Alain [Laboratoire PEC, Universite du Maine le Mans, Avenue Olivier Messiaen, 72 085 Le Mans (France); Connell, Simon H. [University of Johannesburg, cnr Kingsway Ave and University Rd, Auckland Park, 2006, Johannesburg (South Africa); Wormington, Matthew [Jordan Valley Semiconductors Inc., 8601 Cross Park Drive, Suite 200, Austin, TX 78754-4578 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    High quality single-crystal synthetic diamond is the most suitable material for selected X-ray optical applications in the latest generation X-ray light sources. Excellent heat handling properties, as well as low absorption, coupled with high perfection in the crystal bulk and very good surface quality, are crucial for such applications. In recent years, some progress has been made in the fields of surface treatments and growth techniques. Conventional scaife polishing is largely ineffective on the diamond (111) surface. To overcome this disadvantage, one possibility is to use the Hot Metal polishing technique. An investigation of surface and sub-surface damage of Hot Metal polished and cleaved surfaces, has been carried out using depth-sensitive non-destructive X-ray techniques. The near surface crystalline quality was studied as a function of depth using in-plane grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. Additionally, X-ray reflectivity was used to investigate the density, thickness and roughness of near-surface layers. The measurements enable us to estimate the thickness of the affected sub-surface layer. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Tamm-plasmon and surface-plasmon hybrid-mode based refractometry in photonic bandgap structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Ritwick; Srivastava, Triranjita; Jha, Rajan

    2014-02-15

    The transverse magnetic (TM) polarized hybrid modes formed as a consequence of coupling between Tamm plasmon polariton (TM-TPP) mode and surface plasmon polariton (SPP) mode exhibit interesting dispersive features for realizing a highly sensitive and accurate surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor. We found that the TM-TPP modes, formed at the interface of distributed Bragg reflector and metal, are strongly dispersive as compared to SPP modes at optical frequencies. This causes an appreciably narrow interaction bandwidth between TM-TPP and SPP modes, which leads to highly accurate sensing. In addition, appropriate tailoring of dispersion characteristics of TM-TPP as well as SPP modes could ensure high sensitivity of a novel SPR platform. By suitably designing the Au/TiO₂/SiO₂-based geometry, we propose a TM-TPP/SPP hybrid-mode sensor and achieve a sensitivity ≥900  nm/RIU with high detection accuracy (≥30  μm⁻¹) for analyte refractive indices varying between 1.330 and 1.345 in 600-700 nm wavelength range. The possibility to achieve desired dispersive behavior in any spectral band makes the sensing configuration an extremely attractive candidate to design sensors depending on the availability of optical sources.

  11. Estimation of surface impedance at oblique incidence based on sparse array processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richard, Antoine Philippe André; Fernandez Grande, Efren; Brunskog, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    on spherical array measurements. The sound field measured by the array is mainly composed of an incident and a reflected wave, so it can be represented as a spatially sparse problem. This makes it possible to use compressive sensing in order to enhance the resolution and the quality of the estimation...

  12. Effect of photonic crystal and frequency selective surface implementation on gain enhancement in the microstrip patch antenna at terahertz frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejati, Ameneh; Sadeghzadeh, Ramezan Ali; Geran, Fatemeh

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, microstrip patch antenna with frequency selective surface (FSS) and photonic band gap (PBG) structures in the frequency range of 0.5-0.7 THz is presented for wireless communications. Proposed patch antenna is designed on a substrate with uniform and non-uniform PBG structures. Here, the effects of substrate thickness, various radii and arrangement of holes on antenna resonance in both PBG forms are studied. Near zero characteristic on uniform and non-uniform PBG substrate is compared and the results show that along with increase in hole radius, antenna operating frequency and bandwidth are increased. Also, the FSS structure is designed as a perfect absorber. Finally, by using FSS and PBG structures simultaneously, gain enhancement, increase in directivity and pattern shaping are studied at THz field. The antenna gain in final structure is increased by 2 dBi (32%) in comparison to simple form and Half-Power beam width is reduced from 100°×80° in simple form to 72°×48° by using FSS and PBG. All simulations and designs are done by Ansoft HFSS and CST Microwave Studio simulation tools with different full wave methods.

  13. Phase modulation and structural effects in a D-shaped all-solid photonic crystal fiber surface plasmon resonance sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhixin; Hao, Xin; Shao, Yonghong; Chen, Yuzhi; Li, Xuejin; Fan, Ping

    2014-06-16

    We numerically investigate a D-shaped fiber surface plasmon resonance sensor based on all-solid photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with finite element method. In the side-polished PCF sensor, field leakage is guided to penetrate through the gap between the rods, causing a pronounced phase modulation in the deep polishing case. Taking advantage of these amplified phase shifts, a high-performance fiber sensor design is proposed. The significant enhancements arising from this new sensor design should lift the performance of the fiber SPR sensor into the range capable of detecting a wide range of biochemical interactions, which makes it especially attractive for many in vivo and in situ bioanalysis applications. Several parameters which influence the field leakage, such as the polishing position, the pitch of the PCF, and the rod diameter, are inspected to evaluate their impacts. Furthermore, we develop a mathematical model to describe the effects of varying the structural parameters of a D-shaped PCF sensor on the evanescent field and the sensor performance.

  14. Highly charged ions impinging on a stepped metal surface under grazing incidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robin, A; Niemann, D; Stolterfoht, N; Heiland, W

    We report on energy loss measurements and charge state distributions for 60 keV N6+ and 75 keV N5+ ions scattered off a Pt(110)(1x2) single crystal surface. In particular, the influence of surface steps on the energy loss and the outgoing charge states is discussed. The scattering angle and the

  15. Effects of Irradiation with Ions and Photons in Ultraviolet-Vacuum Ultraviolet Regions on Nano-Surface Properties of Polymers Exposed to Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Ken; Takenaka, Kosuke; Setsuhara, Yuichi; Shiratani, Masaharu; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru

    2012-01-01

    The interactions of ions and photons in ultraviolet (UV) and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) regions from argon plasmas with polymer surfaces were investigated by of depth analysis of chemical bonding states in the nano-surface layer of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) films via conventional X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HXPES). The PET films were exposed to argon plasmas by covering the PET films with MgF2 and quartz windows as optical filters to compare the irradiation effects with ions and photons. The conventional XPS results indicated that oxygen functionalities (the C-O bond and the O=C-O bond) were degraded by ion bombardment in the shallower region up to about 10 nm from the surface, whereas the effect of photoirradiation in the UV and VUV regions was insignificant. The HXPES analysis showed that irradiation with ions and photons did not cause serious damage in chemical bonding states in the deeper region up to about 50 nm from the surface.

  16. PHOENIX MARS SURFACE STEREO IMAGER 5 INCID OVER FLX SCI V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) experiment on the Mars Phoenix Lander consists of one instrument component plus command electronics. This SSI Imaging Science RDR...

  17. Enhanced Etching, Surface Damage Recovery, and Submicron Patterning of Hybrid Perovskites using a Chemically Gas-Assisted Focused-Ion Beam for Subwavelength Grating Photonic Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Alias, Mohd Sharizal

    2015-12-22

    The high optical gain and absorption of organic–inorganic hybrid perovskites have attracted attention for photonic device applications. However, owing to the sensitivity of organic moieties to solvents and temperature, device processing is challenging, particularly for patterning. Here, we report the direct patterning of perovskites using chemically gas-assisted focused-ion beam (GAFIB) etching with XeF2 and I2 precursors. We demonstrate etching enhancement in addition to controllability and marginal surface damage compared to focused-ion beam (FIB) etching without precursors. Utilizing the GAFIB etching, we fabricated a uniform and periodic submicron perovskite subwavelength grating (SWG) absorber with broadband absorption and nanoscale precision. Our results demonstrate the use of FIB as a submicron patterning tool and a means of providing surface treatment (after FIB patterning to minimize optical loss) for perovskite photonic nanostructures. The SWG absorber can be patterned on perovskite solar cells to enhance the device efficiency through increasing light trapping and absorption.

  18. Photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    The current status, both theoretical and experimental, of two photon collision physics is reviewed with special emphasis on recent experimental results from e + e - storage rings. After a complete presentation of the helicity amplitude formalism for the general process e + e - → Xe + e - , various approximations (transverse photon, Weisaecker Williams) are discussed. Beam polarisation effects and radiative corrections are also briefly considered. A number of specific processes, for which experimental results are now available, are then described. In each case existing theoretical prediction are confronted with experimental results. The processes described include single resonance production, lepton and hadron pair production, the structure functions of the photon, the production of high Psub(T) jets and the total photon photon cross section. In the last part of the review the current status of the subject is summarised and some comments are made on future prospects. These include both extrapolations of current research to higher energy machines (LEP, HERA) as well as a brief mention of both the technical realisation and the physics interest of the real γγ and eγ collisions which may be possible using linear electron colliders in the 1 TeV energy range

  19. Photon-photon collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    The study of photon-photon collisions has progressed enormously, stimulated by new data and new calculational tools for QCD. In the future we can expect precise determinations of ..cap alpha../sub s/ and ..lambda../sup ms/ from the ..gamma..*..gamma.. ..-->.. ..pi../sup 0/ form factor and the photon structure function, as well as detailed checks of QCD, determination of the shape of the hadron distribution amplitudes from ..gamma gamma.. ..-->.. H anti H, reconstruction of sigma/sub ..gamma gamma../ from exclusive channels at low W/sub ..gamma gamma../, definitive studies of high p/sub T/ hadron and jet production, and studies of threshold production of charmed systems. Photon-photon collisions, along with radiative decays of the psi and UPSILON, are ideal for the study of multiquark and gluonic resonances. We have emphasized the potential for resonance formation near threshold in virtually every hadronic exclusive channel, including heavy quark states c anti c c anti c, c anti c u anti u, etc. At higher energies SLC, LEP, ...) parity-violating electroweak effects and Higgs production due to equivalent Z/sup 0/ and W/sup + -/ beams from e ..-->.. eZ/sup 0/ and e ..-->.. nu W will become important. 44 references.

  20. Photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    The study of photon-photon collisions has progressed enormously, stimulated by new data and new calculational tools for QCD. In the future we can expect precise determinations of α/sub s/ and Λ/sup ms/ from the γ*γ → π 0 form factor and the photon structure function, as well as detailed checks of QCD, determination of the shape of the hadron distribution amplitudes from γγ → H anti H, reconstruction of sigma/sub γγ/ from exclusive channels at low W/sub γγ/, definitive studies of high p/sub T/ hadron and jet production, and studies of threshold production of charmed systems. Photon-photon collisions, along with radiative decays of the psi and UPSILON, are ideal for the study of multiquark and gluonic resonances. We have emphasized the potential for resonance formation near threshold in virtually every hadronic exclusive channel, including heavy quark states c anti c c anti c, c anti c u anti u, etc. At higher energies SLC, LEP, ...) parity-violating electroweak effects and Higgs production due to equivalent Z 0 and W +- beams from e → eZ 0 and e → nu W will become important. 44 references

  1. High-beam-quality, efficient operation of passively Q-switched Yb:YAG/Cr:YAG laser pumped by photonic-crystal surface-emitting laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaoyang; Tokita, Shigeki; Fujioka, Kana; Nishida, Hiro; Hirose, Kazuyoshi; Sugiyama, Takahiro; Watanabe, Akiyoshi; Ishizaki, Kenji; Noda, Susumu; Miyanaga, Noriaki; Kawanaka, Junji

    2017-07-01

    A passively Q-switched Yb:YAG/Cr:YAG laser pumped by a photonic-crystal surface-emitting laser (PCSEL) was developed. Yb:YAG crystal was cryogenically cooled by liquid nitrogen at 77 K. Excellent Gaussian beam profile ( M 2 = 1.02) and high slope efficiency of 58% were demonstrated without using a coupling optics between a laser material and PCSEL.

  2. Effects of Electronic Quantum Interference, Photonic-Crystal Cavity, Longitudinal Field and Surface-Plasmon- Polariton for Optical Amplification

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cardimona, David A; Alsing, Paul M; Huang, Danhong

    2008-01-01

    ... by a coupling laser field in a three-level system, field enhancement through the cavity confinement of a radiation field in a photonic crystal and field concentration seen in a transmitted near field...

  3. Multifunctional superparamagnetic nanoshells: combining two-photon luminescence imaging, surface-enhanced Raman scattering and magnetic separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiulong; Li, Haiyan; Wang, Shanshan; Kong, Ni; Xu, Hong; Fu, Qihua; Gu, Hongchen; Ye, Jian

    2014-11-01

    With the increasing need for multi-purpose analysis in the biomedical field, traditional single diagnosis methods cannot meet the requirements. Therefore new multifunctional technologies and materials for the integration of sample collection, sensing and imaging are in great demand. Core-shell nanoparticles offer a unique platform to combine multifunctions in a single particle. In this work, we have constructed a novel type of core-shell superparamagnetic nanoshell (Fe3O4@SiO2@Au), composed of a Fe3O4 cluster core, a thin Au shell and a SiO2 layer in between. The obtained multifunctional nanoparticles combine the magnetic properties and plasmonic optical properties effectively, which were well investigated by a number of experimental characterization methods and theoretical simulations. We have demonstrated that Fe3O4@SiO2@Au nanoparticles can be utilized for two-photon luminescence (TPL) imaging, near-infrared surface-enhanced Raman scattering (NIR SERS) and cell collection by magnetic separation. The TPL intensity could be further greatly enhanced through the plasmon coupling effect in the self-assembled nanoparticle chains, which were triggered by an external magnetic field. In addition, Fe3O4@SiO2@Au nanoparticles may have great potential applications such as enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and photo-thermotherapy. Successful combination of multifunctions including magnetic response, biosensing and bioimaging in single nanoparticles allows further manipulation, real-time tracking, and intracellular molecule analysis of live cells at a single-cell level.With the increasing need for multi-purpose analysis in the biomedical field, traditional single diagnosis methods cannot meet the requirements. Therefore new multifunctional technologies and materials for the integration of sample collection, sensing and imaging are in great demand. Core-shell nanoparticles offer a unique platform to combine multifunctions in a single particle. In this work, we have

  4. Exploring surface landscapes with molecules: rotationally induced diffraction of H2on LiF(001) under fast grazing incidence conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Cueto, M; Muzas, A S; Somers, M F; Kroes, G J; Díaz, C; Martín, F

    2017-06-28

    Atomic diffraction by surfaces under fast grazing incidence conditions has been used for almost a decade to characterize surface properties with more accuracy than with more traditional atomic diffraction methods. From six-dimensional solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, we show that diffraction of H 2 molecules under fast grazing incidence conditions could be even more informative for the characterization of ionic surfaces, due to the large anisotropic electrostatic interaction between the quadrupole moment of the molecule and the electric field created by the ionic crystal. Using the LiF(001) surface as a benchmark, we show that fast grazing incidence diffraction of H 2 strongly depends on the initial rotational state of the molecule, while rotationally inelastic processes are irrelevant. We demonstrate that, as a result of the anisotropy of the impinging projectile, initial rotational excitation leads to an increase in intensity of high-order diffraction peaks at incidence directions that satisfy precise symmetry constraints, thus providing a more detailed information on the surface characteristics than that obtained from low-order atomic diffraction peaks under fast grazing incidence conditions. As quadrupole-ion surface potentials are expected to accurately represent the interaction between H 2 and any surface with a marked ionic character, our analysis should be of general applicability to any of such surfaces. Finally, we show that a density functional theory description of the molecule-ion surface potential catches the main features observed experimentally.

  5. Photon upconversion towards applications in energy conversion and bioimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qi-C.; Ding, Yuchen C.; Sagar, Dodderi M.; Nagpal, Prashant

    2017-12-01

    The field of plasmonics can play an important role in developing novel devices for application in energy and healthcare. In this review article, we consider the progress made in design and fabrication of upconverting nanoparticles and metal nanostructures for precisely manipulating light photons, with a wavelength of several hundred nanometers, at nanometer length scales, and describe how to tailor their interactions with molecules and surfaces so that two or more lower energy photons can be used to generate a single higher energy photon in a process called photon upconversion. This review begins by introducing the current state-of-the-art in upconverting nanoparticle synthesis and achievements in color tuning and upconversion enhancement. Through understanding and tailoring physical processes, color tuning and strong upconversion enhancement have been demonstrated by coupling with surface plasmon polariton waves, especially for low intensity or diffuse infrared radiation. Since more than 30% of incident sunlight is not utilized in most photovoltaic cells, this photon upconversion is one of the promising approaches to break the so-called Shockley-Queisser thermodynamic limit for a single junction solar cell. Furthermore, since the low energy photons typically cover the biological window of optical transparency, this approach can also be particularly beneficial for novel biosensing and bioimaging techniques. Taken together, the recent research boosts the applications of photon upconversion using designed metal nanostructures and nanoparticles for green energy, bioimaging, and therapy.

  6. The effect of playing surface on the incidence of ACL injuries in National Collegiate Athletic Association American Football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragoo, Jason L; Braun, Hillary J; Harris, Alex H S

    2013-06-01

    Artificial playing surfaces are widely used for American football practice and competition and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are common. This study analyzed the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Injury Surveillance System (ISS) men's football ACL injury database from 2004-2005 through 2008-2009 to determine the effect of playing surface on ACL injury in NCAA football athletes. This database was reviewed from the 2004-2005 through 2008-2009 seasons using the specific injury code, "Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) complete tear." The injury rate was computed for competition and practice exposures. Ninety-five percent confidence intervals were calculated using assumptions of a Poisson distribution. Pair-wise, two-sample tests of equality of proportions with a continuity correction were used to estimate the associations of risk factors. There was an incidence rate of 1.73 ACL injuries per 10,000 athlete-exposures (A-Es) (95% CI 1.47-2.0) on artificial playing surfaces compared with a rate of 1.24 per 10,000 A-Es (1.05-1.45, pinjuries occurred more frequently on artificial turf surfaces (44.29%) than on natural grass (36.12%). NCAA football players experience a greater number of ACL injuries when playing on artificial surfaces. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The impact of airport characteristics on airport surface accidents and incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, Sabine; Majumdar, Arnab; Ochieng, Washington Y

    2015-06-01

    Airport surface safety and in particular runway and taxiway safety is acknowledged globally as one of aviation's greatest challenges. To improve this key area of aviation safety, it is necessary to identify and understand the causal and contributing factors on safety occurrences. While the contribution of human factors, operations, and procedures has been researched extensively, the impact of the airport and its associated characteristics itself has received little or no attention. This paper introduces a novel methodology for risk and hazard assessment of airport surface operations, and models the relationships between airport characteristics, and (a) the rate of occurrences, (b) the severity of occurrences, and (c) the causal factors underlying occurrences. The results show for the first time how the characteristics of airports, and in particular its infrastructure and operations, influence the safety of surface operations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. and National Safety Council. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Mirror and grating surface figure requirements for grazing incidence synchrotron radiation beamlines: Power loading effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulbert, S.L.; Sharma, S.

    1987-01-01

    At present, grazing incidence mirrors are used almost exclusively as the first optical element in VUV and soft x-ray synchrotron radiation beamlines. The performance of these mirrors is determined by thermal and mechanical stress-induced figure errors as well as by figure errors remaining from the grinding and polishing process. With the advent of VUV and soft x-ray undulators and wigglers has come a new set of thermal stress problems related to both the magnitude and the spatial distribution of power from these devices. In many cases the power load on the entrance slits and gratings in these beamlines is no longer negligible. The dependence of thermally-induced front-end mirror figure errors on various storage ring and insertion device parameters (especially those at the National Synchrotron Light Source) and the effects of these figure errors on two classes of soft x-ray beamlines are presented.

  9. Differential Deposition for Surface Figure Corrections in Grazing Incidence X-Ray Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Brian D.; Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Atkins, Carolyn; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Broadway, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Differential deposition corrects the low- and mid- spatial-frequency deviations in the axial figure of Wolter-type grazing incidence X-ray optics. Figure deviations is one of the major contributors to the achievable angular resolution. Minimizing figure errors can significantly improve the imaging quality of X-ray optics. Material of varying thickness is selectively deposited, using DC magnetron sputtering, along the length of optic to minimize figure deviations. Custom vacuum chambers are built that can incorporate full-shell and segmented Xray optics. Metrology data of preliminary corrections on a single meridian of full-shell x-ray optics show an improvement of mid-spatial frequencies from 6.7 to 1.8 arc secs HPD. Efforts are in progress to correct a full-shell and segmented optics and to verify angular-resolution improvement with X-ray testing.

  10. Excitation of a surface wave by an s-polarized electromagnetic wave incident upon a boundary of a dense magnetoactive plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragila, R.; Vukovic, S.

    1988-01-01

    The properties of surfave waves that are associated with a boundary between a rare plasma and a dense magnetoactive plasma and that propagate along a dc magnetic field are investigated. It is shown that the presence of the magnetic field introduces symmetry in terms of the polarization of the incident electromagnetic wave that excites the surface waves. A surface wave excited by an incident p-polarized (s-polarized) electromagnetic wave leaks in the form of an s-polarized (p-polarized) electromagnetic wave. The rate of rotation of polarization is independent of the polarization of the incident wave. Because a surface wave can leak in the form of an s-polarized electromagnetic wave, it can also be pumped by such a wave, and conditions were found for excitation of a surface wave by an s-polarized incident electromagnetic wave

  11. Surface Collisions of Small Cluster Ions at Incident Energies 10-102 eV

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Herman, Zdeněk

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 233, - (2004), s. 361-371 ISSN 1387-3806 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 561 Grant - others:XE(CZ) EURATOM-IPP.CR Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : surface collisions * cluster ions * unimolecular dissociation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.235, year: 2004

  12. Zooplankton incidence in abnormally high sea surface temperature in the Eastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Goswami, S.C.

    and internal waves may cause zooplankton abundance. Average biomass values in high sea surface temperature areas were higher (0.30 ml.m/3) than at the other stations (0.07 ml.m/3). Crustacean eggs, fish eggs and mysids clustered in pockets of abnormally high...

  13. Skin dose estimation for various beam modifiers and source-to-surface distances for 6MV photons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav Girigesh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to learn the skin dose estimation for various beam modifiers at various source-to-surface distances (SSDs for a 6 MV photon. Surface and buildup region doses were measured with an acrylic slab phantom and Markus 0.055 cc parallel plate (PP ionization chamber. Measurements were carried out for open fields, motorized wedge fields, acrylic block tray fields ranging from 3 x 3 cm 2 to 30 x 30 cm 2 . Twenty-five percent of the field was blocked with a cerrobend block and a Multileaf collimator (MLC. The effect of the blocks on the skin dose was measured for a 20 x 20 cm 2 field size, at 80 cm, 100 cm and 120 cm SSD. During the use of isocentric treatments, whereby the tumor is positioned at 100 cm from the source, depending on the depth of the tumor and size of the patient, the SSD can vary from 80 cm to 100 cm. To achieve a larger field size, the SSD can also be extended up to 120 cm at times. The skin dose increased as field size increased. The skin dose for the open 10 x10 cm 2 field was 15.5%, 14.8% and 15.5% at 80 cm, 100 cm and 120 cm SSDs, respectively. The skin dose due to a motorized 60 0 wedge for the 10 x 10 cm 2 field was 9.9%, 9.5%, and 9.5% at 80 cm, 100 cm and 120 cm SSDs. The skin dose due to acrylic block tray, of thickness 1.0 cm for a 10 x 10 cm 2 field was 27.0%, 17.2% and 16.1% at 80, 100 and 120 cm SSD respectively. Due to the use of an acrylic block tray, the surface dose was increased for all field sizes at the above three SSDs and the percentage skin dose was more dominant at the lower SSD and larger field size. The skin dose for a 30 x 30 cm 2 field size at 80 cm SSD was 38.3% and it was 70.4% for the open and acrylic block tray fields, respectively. The skin doses for motorized wedge fields were lower than for open fields. The effect of SSDs on the surface dose for motorized 60° wedge fields was not significant for a small field size (difference was less than 1% up to a 15 x 15 cm 2 field size

  14. Metallic dielectric photonic crystals and methods of fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Jeffrey Brian; Kim, Sang-Gook

    2016-12-20

    A metallic-dielectric photonic crystal is formed with a periodic structure defining a plurality of resonant cavities to selectively absorb incident radiation. A metal layer is deposited on the inner surfaces of the resonant cavities and a dielectric material fills inside the resonant cavities. This photonic crystal can be used to selectively absorb broadband solar radiation and then reemit absorbed radiation in a wavelength band that matches the absorption band of a photovoltaic cell. The photonic crystal can be fabricated by patterning a sacrificial layer with a plurality of holes, into which is deposited a supporting material. Removing the rest of the sacrificial layer creates a supporting structure, on which a layer of metal is deposited to define resonant cavities. A dielectric material then fills the cavities to form the photonic crystal.

  15. Metallic dielectric photonic crystals and methods of fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Jeffrey Brian; Kim, Sang-Gook

    2017-12-05

    A metallic-dielectric photonic crystal is formed with a periodic structure defining a plurality of resonant cavities to selectively absorb incident radiation. A metal layer is deposited on the inner surfaces of the resonant cavities and a dielectric material fills inside the resonant cavities. This photonic crystal can be used to selectively absorb broadband solar radiation and then reemit absorbed radiation in a wavelength band that matches the absorption band of a photovoltaic cell. The photonic crystal can be fabricated by patterning a sacrificial layer with a plurality of holes, into which is deposited a supporting material. Removing the rest of the sacrificial layer creates a supporting structure, on which a layer of metal is deposited to define resonant cavities. A dielectric material then fills the cavities to form the photonic crystal.

  16. Photon beam position monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzay, Tuncer M.; Shu, Deming

    1995-01-01

    A photon beam position monitor for use in the front end of a beamline of a high heat flux and high energy photon source such as a synchrotron radiation storage ring detects and measures the position and, when a pair of such monitors are used in tandem, the slope of a photon beam emanating from an insertion device such as a wiggler or an undulator inserted in the straight sections of the ring. The photon beam position monitor includes a plurality of spaced blades for precisely locating the photon beam, with each blade comprised of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond with an outer metal coating of a photon sensitive metal such as tungsten, molybdenum, etc., which combination emits electrons when a high energy photon beam is incident upon the blade. Two such monitors are contemplated for use in the front end of the beamline, with the two monitors having vertically and horizontally offset detector blades to avoid blade "shadowing". Provision is made for aligning the detector blades with the photon beam and limiting detector blade temperature during operation.

  17. Multi-step surface functionalization of polyimide based evanescent wave photonic biosensors and application for DNA hybridization by Mach-Zehnder interferometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melnik, Eva [Health and Environment Department, Nano Systems, AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Donau-City-Strasse 1, 1220 Vienna (Austria); Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringer Strasse 38, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Bruck, Roman [Health and Environment Department, Nano Systems, AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Donau-City-Strasse 1, 1220 Vienna (Austria); Hainberger, Rainer, E-mail: rainer.hainberger@ait.ac.at [Health and Environment Department, Nano Systems, AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Donau-City-Strasse 1, 1220 Vienna (Austria); Laemmerhofer, Michael, E-mail: michael.laemmerhofer@univie.ac.at [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringer Strasse 38, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} We realize a biosensing platform for polyimide evanescent photonic wave sensors. {yields} We show that the surface functionalization via silanisation and biotinylation followed by streptavidin immobilization do not destroy or damage the thin polyimide film. {yields} A highly dense streptavidin layer enables the immobilisation of biotinylated ligands such as biotinylated ssDNA for the selective measurement of DNA hybridization. - Abstract: The process of surface functionalization involving silanization, biotinylation and streptavidin bonding as platform for biospecific ligand immobilization was optimized for thin film polyimide spin-coated silicon wafers, of which the polyimide film serves as a wave guiding layer in evanescent wave photonic biosensors. This type of optical sensors make great demands on the materials involved as well as on the layer properties, such as the optical quality, the layer thickness and the surface roughness. In this work we realized the binding of a 3-mercaptopropyl trimethoxysilane on an oxygen plasma activated polyimide surface followed by subsequent derivatization of the reactive thiol groups with maleimide-PEG{sub 2}-biotin and immobilization of streptavidin. The progress of the functionalization was monitored by using different fluorescence labels for optimization of the chemical derivatization steps. Further, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy were utilized for the characterization of the modified surface. These established analytical methods allowed to derive information like chemical composition of the surface, surface coverage with immobilized streptavidin, as well as parameters of the surface roughness. The proposed functionalization protocol furnished a surface density of 144 fmol mm{sup -2} streptavidin with good reproducibility (13.9% RSD, n = 10) and without inflicted damage to the surface. This surface modification was applied to polyimide based Mach-Zehnder interferometer

  18. Neutralization and equilibration of highly charged argon ions at grazing incidence on a graphite surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winecki, S.; Cocke, C.L.; Stoeckli, M.P.; Fry, D.

    1996-01-01

    Final charge state distributions of argon ions, scattered grazingly from a smooth highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface, have been measured as a function of initial charge state (q=4-17) and impact velocity (v=0.15-0.62 a.u.). The final charge state distribution changes strongly with the impact velocity, but is almost independent of the initial charge state. The neutralization during grazing-angle scattering is compared to the charge state equilibration experienced by ions passing through a solid (carbon foil), and these two processes seem to have common properties. A K x-ray spectrum from the K-shell vacancy decay of 51 keV Ar 17+ projectiles was obtained as a function of the angle between the ion beam and the surface. First measurements of x-ray spectra in coincidence with grazingly scattered ions are reported. A simple model for argon neutralization near and below the surface is proposed. The model assumes a direct side-feeding into the Ar M-shell followed by Auger and radiative L and K-shell filling

  19. Measurement of UO2 surface oxidation using grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction: Implications for nuclear forensics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Cameron L.; Chen, Chien-Hung; Park, Sulgiye; Davisson, M. Lee; Ewing, Rodney C.

    2018-04-01

    Nuclear forensics involves determination of the origin and history of interdicted nuclear materials based on the detection of signatures associated with their production and trafficking. The surface oxidation undergone by UO2 when exposed to air is a potential signature of its atmospheric exposure during handling and transport. To assess the sensitivity of this oxidation to atmospheric parameters, surface sensitive grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXRD) measurements were performed on UO2 samples exposed to air of varying relative humidity (34%, 56%, and 95% RH) and temperature (room temperature, 50 °C, and 100 °C). Near-surface unit cell contraction was observed following exposure, indicating oxidation of the surface and accompanying reduction of the uranium cation ionic radii. The extent of unit cell contraction provides a measure of the extent of oxidation, allowing for comparison of the effects of various exposure conditions. No clear influence of relative humidity on the extent of oxidation was observed, with samples exhibiting similar degrees of unit cell contraction at all relative humidities investigated. In contrast, the thickness of the oxidized layers increased substantially with increasing temperature, such that differences on the order of 10 °C yielded readily observable crystallographic signatures of the exposure conditions.

  20. Dependence of secondary electron emission on the incident angle and the energy of primary electrons bombarding bowl-structured beryllium surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawata, Jun; Ohya, Kaoru.

    1994-01-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation of the secondary electron emission from beryllium is combined with a model of bowl structure for surface roughness, for analyzing the difference between the electron emissions for normal and oblique incidences. At normal incidence, with increasing the roughness parameter H/W, the primary energy E pm at which the maximum electron yield occurs becomes higher, and at more than the E pm , the decrease in the yield is slower; where H and W are the depth and width of the bowl structure, respectively. The dispersion of incident angle to the microscopic surface causes a small increase in the yield at oblique incidence, whereas the blocking of primary electrons from bombarding the bottom of the structure causes an opposite trend. The strong anisotropy in the polar angular distribution with respect to the azimuthal angle is calculated at oblique incidence. (author)

  1. Prevalence of Candida spp. in Healthy Oral Mucosa Surfaces with Higher Incidence of Chronic Hyperplastic Candidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruda, Claúdia; Artico, Gabriela; Freitas, Roseli; Filho, Antônio; Migliari, Dante

    2016-08-01

    Predisposing factors in chronic hyperplastic candidosis (CHC) have been poorly recognized. This study aimed at assessing the prevalence of Candida spp. in areas of the oral mucosa showing greater prevalent rate of CHC, such as the retrocomissural area, the lateral borders of the tongue, and the hard-palate mucosa in four groups of individuals presenting predisposing factors as follows: Smoking habits (group I); patients with low salivary flow rate (SFR) (hyposalivation - group II); patients with loss of vertical dimension of occlusion (LVDO -group III); and control subjects (group IV). A total of 44 individuals (age 4090 years, mean: 55.8 years) were divided into four groups: Group I (11 smokers); group II (10 hyposalivation patients); group III (10 LVDO patients); and group IV (control, 13 healthy subjects). All individuals were tested for Candida-pseudohyphae form by direct examination and for Candida spp. culture growth in samples obtained from the retrocomissural, tongue's lateral border, and hard-soft palatal mucosa. Direct examination showed a statistically significant prevalence rate for pseudohyphae (p < 0.05) on the retrocomissural and on tongue's lateral borders of individuals with LVDO. A statistically significant (p < 0.05) culture growth for Candida spp. was found on the retrocomissural areas of those with hyposalivation and with LVDO, and on the palate mucosa and on the tongue's lateral borders in the smokers and in the individuals with LVDO when compared with those of the control group. While direct examination is effective for detecting pseudohyphae, LVDO and tobacco smoking seem to be factors of relevance to the development of CHC. Since CHC has been linked to a high rate of malignant transformation, this study analyzes some clinical (and exogenous) factors that may contribute to the development of CHC and addresses some preventive measures to reduce its incidence.

  2. CONFERENCE: Photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    Despite being difficult to observe, photon-photon collisions have opened up a range of physics difficult, or even impossible, to access by other methods. The progress which has been made in this field was evident at the fifth international workshop on photon-photon collisions, held in Aachen from 13-16 April and attended by some 120 physicists

  3. Photon technology. Hard photon technology; Photon technology. Hard photon gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Research results of hard photon technology have been summarized as a part of novel technology development highly utilizing the quantum nature of photon. Hard photon technology refers to photon beam technologies which use photon in the 0.1 to 200 nm wavelength region. Hard photon has not been used in industry due to the lack of suitable photon sources and optical devices. However, hard photon in this wavelength region is expected to bring about innovations in such areas as ultrafine processing and material synthesis due to its atom selective reaction, inner shell excitation reaction, and spatially high resolution. Then, technological themes and possibility have been surveyed. Although there are principle proposes and their verification of individual technologies for the technologies of hard photon generation, regulation and utilization, they are still far from the practical applications. For the photon source technology, the laser diode pumped driver laser technology, laser plasma photon source technology, synchrotron radiation photon source technology, and vacuum ultraviolet photon source technology are presented. For the optical device technology, the multi-layer film technology for beam mirrors and the non-spherical lens processing technology are introduced. Also are described the reduction lithography technology, hard photon excitation process, and methods of analysis and measurement. 430 refs., 165 figs., 23 tabs.

  4. Element sensitive reconstruction of nanostructured surfaces with finite elements and grazing incidence soft X-ray fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltwisch, Victor; Hönicke, Philipp; Kayser, Yves; Eilbracht, Janis; Probst, Jürgen; Scholze, Frank; Beckhoff, Burkhard

    2018-03-29

    The geometry of a Si3N4 lamellar grating was investigated experimentally with reference-free grazing-incidence X-ray fluorescence analysis. While simple layered systems are usually treated with the matrix formalism to determine the X-ray standing-wave field, this approach fails for laterally structured surfaces. Maxwell solvers based on finite elements are often used to model electrical field strengths for any 2D or 3D structures in the optical spectral range. We show that this approach can also be applied in the field of X-rays. The electrical field distribution obtained with the Maxwell solver can subsequently be used to calculate the fluorescence intensities in full analogy to the X-ray standing-wave field obtained by the matrix formalism. Only the effective 1D integration for the layer system has to be replaced by a 2D integration of the finite elements, taking into account the local excitation conditions. We will show that this approach is capable of reconstructing the geometric line shape of a structured surface with high elemental sensitivity. This combination of GIXRF and finite-element simulations paves the way for a versatile characterization of nanoscale-structured surfaces.

  5. Surface/Interface Carrier-Transport Modulation for Constructing Photon-Alternative Ultraviolet Detectors Based on Self-Bending-Assembled ZnO Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhen; Zhou, Lianqun; Tang, Yuguo; Li, Lin; Zhang, Zhiqi; Yang, Hongbo; Ma, Hanbin; Nathan, Arokia; Zhao, Dongxu

    2017-09-13

    Surface/interface charge-carrier generation, diffusion, and recombination/transport modulation are especially important in the construction of photodetectors with high efficiency in the field of nanoscience. In the paper, a kind of ultraviolet (UV) detector is designed based on ZnO nanostructures considering photon-trapping, surface plasmonic resonance (SPR), piezophototronic effects, interface carrier-trapping/transport control, and collection. Through carefully optimized surface/interface carrier-transport modulation, a designed device with detectivity as high as 1.69 × 10 16 /1.71 × 10 16 cm·Hz 1/2 /W irradiating with 380 nm photons under ultralow bias of 0.2 V is realized by alternating nanoparticle/nanowire active layers, respectively, and the designed UV photodetectors show fast and slow recovery processes of 0.27 and 4.52 ms, respectively, which well-satisfy practical needs. Further, it is observed that UV photodetection could be performed within an alternative response by varying correlated key parameters, through efficient surface/interface carrier-transport modulation, spectrally resolved photoresponse of the detector revealing controlled detection in the UV region based on the ZnO nanomaterial, photodetection allowed or limited by varying the active layers, irradiation distance from one of the electrodes, standing states, or electric field. The detailed carrier generation, diffusion, and recombination/transport processes are well illustrated to explain charge-carrier dynamics contributing to the photoresponse behavior.

  6. Incidence of Heterotopic Ossification after Surface and Conventional Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Comparative Study Using Anterolateral Approach and Indomethacin Prophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Regis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and severity of heterotopic ossification (HO in two homogeneous groups of patients that received surface replacement arthroplasty (SRA and conventional total hip arthroplasty (THA were evaluated retrospectively. Thirty-nine patients undergoing 42 hip resurfacing procedures and 41 primary cementless THAs through an anterolateral approach received a 10-day course of 150 mg/die of indomethacin postoperatively. The median surgical time was 190 minutes and 156 minutes, respectively (. At a minimum 1-year followup, the development of HO was assessed on standard X-ray using Brooker grading. Ectopic bone formation was detected in five cases (11.9%, two Brooker grade I and three grade II in the SRA group and in 14 hips (34.1%, 12 grade I and two grade II treated with conventional THA, but the difference was not significant (. No clinically relevant periprosthetic ossification (Brooker III or IV occurred in both groups. Although the difference was not statistically significant, the incidence of HO after SRA was lower than conventional THA. More extensive soft tissue trauma, bone debris, and longer operative time in hip resurfacing are not likely to be absolute risk factors for HO. Further investigations including larger patient populations are needed to confirm these findings.

  7. Incidence of loss of heterozygosity at p53 and BRCA1 loci in serous surface carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quezado, M M; Moskaluk, C A; Bryant, B; Mills, S E; Merino, M J

    1999-02-01

    Serous surface carcinoma (SSC) is a neoplasm histologically indistinguishable from typical serous carcinomas that arise from the ovary but has a distinct clinical presentation. It is characterized by widespread peritoneal dissemination at presentation, but the ovaries are grossly normal in size and shape. If the carcinoma involves the ovaries microscopically, the tumor is confined to the surface or is minimally invasive. The recognition of this entity is important, because in some studies it appears to have a poorer prognosis than stage-matched serous cancers of the ovary. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of the p53 (17p) and BRCA1 (17q) tumor suppressor genes has been frequently identified in sporadic ovarian carcinomas. Although 17p LOH is correlated with common p53 gene mutations, inactivating mutations of the BRCA1 gene are uncommon in sporadic ovarian cases. In contrast, germline BRCA1 mutations are responsible for some hereditary forms of ovarian cancer, where it has been suggested that germline BRCA1 mutations confer a more favorable prognosis. In this study, 12 sporadic SSC were assessed for the presence of allelic deletions on the p53 and BRCA1 gene loci. DNA from both tumor and normal cells was obtained for LOH studies using tissue microdissection. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification was performed with the polymorphic DNA markers TP53 (17p13.1/p53 gene) and D17S579 (17q/BRCA1 gene). LOH in the p53 and BRCA1 loci was detected in 62.5% and 66.6% of the cases, respectively. In 50% of tumors informative for both markers, it is possible that an entire chromosome may be lost. In conclusion, we have shown that LOH of the p53 and BRCA1 loci is a frequent event in sporadic SSC, similar to what has been described in the usual form of serous ovarian carcinoma. Mutational analysis will be necessary to determine the exact role of these genes in this group of tumors.

  8. Obstructive carotid and/or intracranial artery disease rarely affects the incidence of haemodynamic ischaemic stroke during cardiac surgery: a study on brain perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography with acetazolamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imasaka, Ken-ichi; Yasaka, Masahiro; Tayama, Eiki; Tomita, Yukihiro

    2015-11-01

    Ischaemic stroke is a major complication of cardiac surgery. The optimal strategies for operating on patients with obstructive carotid and/or intracranial artery disease (CIAD) are controversial. We aimed to clarify whether single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with acetazolamide, to quantify the cerebral perfusion reserve, could predict the risk of haemodynamic ischaemic stroke during cardiac surgery. The incidence of stroke related to obstructive CIAD and the corresponding autoregulatory reserve were prospectively assessed in 514 consecutive patients who underwent elective cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (n = 484) and off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (n = 30) between 2009 and 2013. Preoperative cerebral blood flow and its reactivity to acetazolamide were quantitatively determined in patients (n = 88) with obstructive CIAD, diagnosed by carotid ultrasonography and/or magnetic resonance angiography. An impaired cerebral perfusion reserve was identified in 1 (1.1%) of the 88 patients. This patient underwent prophylactic superficial temporal artery to middle cerebral artery anastomosis 1 month before coronary artery bypass surgery. Subsequently, the patient underwent conventional coronary artery bypass surgery, without experiencing perioperative stroke. Seven (1.4%) patients died in-hospital mortality and 5 (1.0%) experienced perioperative stroke. However, no patients experienced perioperative haemodynamic ischaemic stroke. It is unusual for CIAD to affect the incidence of haemodynamic ischaemic stroke during cardiac surgery. Brain perfusion SPECT with acetazolamide is effective for narrowing down patients at high risk of ischaemic stroke during cardiac surgery. Meanwhile, the application of brain perfusion single-photon emission tomography should be confined only to patients with obstructive CIAD because it is an expensive examination tool. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association

  9. Interfacing Superconducting Qubits and Single Optical Photons Using Molecules in Waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sumanta; Elfving, Vincent E.; Faez, Sanli; Sørensen, Anders S.

    2017-04-01

    We propose an efficient light-matter interface at optical frequencies between a single photon and a superconducting qubit. The desired interface is based on a hybrid architecture composed of an organic molecule embedded inside an optical waveguide and electrically coupled to a superconducting qubit placed near the outside surface of the waveguide. We show that high fidelity, photon-mediated, entanglement between distant superconducting qubits can be achieved with incident pulses at the single photon level. Such a low light level is highly desirable for achieving a coherent optical interface with superconducting qubit, since it minimizes decoherence arising from the absorption of light.

  10. Direct Writing of Photonic Structures by Two-Photon Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Single-mode dielectric-loaded surface plasmon-polariton nanowaveguides with strong mode confinement at excitation wavelength of 830 nm and high-Q polymer whispering gallery mode microcavities with surface roughness less than 12 nm have been directly written by two-photon polymerization, which pave the way to fabricate 3D plasmonic photonic structures by direct laser writing.

  11. Surprising phenomena at the surface of solids: complex molecule emission after impact of ions or of energetic photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Beyec, Y.

    1990-01-01

    The vanishing of large mass molecules, by particle or photon impact is an unexpected behavior of the matter which allows to study the medium answer to the interaction. This phenomenon has several applications and gives rise development of analysis scientific instrumentation for non volatile compounds as the time of flight mass spectrometers. - In this report, the point is made about the induced desorption by rapid heavy ions [fr

  12. Physics of photonic devices

    CERN Document Server

    Chuang, Shun Lien

    2009-01-01

    The most up-to-date book available on the physics of photonic devices This new edition of Physics of Photonic Devices incorporates significant advancements in the field of photonics that have occurred since publication of the first edition (Physics of Optoelectronic Devices). New topics covered include a brief history of the invention of semiconductor lasers, the Lorentz dipole method and metal plasmas, matrix optics, surface plasma waveguides, optical ring resonators, integrated electroabsorption modulator-lasers, and solar cells. It also introduces exciting new fields of research such as:

  13. Workplace photon radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgess, P.H.; Bartlett, D.T.; Ambrosi, P.

    1999-01-01

    The knowledge of workplace radiation fields is essential for measures in radiation protection. Information about the energy and directional distribution of the incident photon radiation was obtained by several devices developed by the National Radiation Protection Board, United Kingdom, by the Statens Stralskyddsinstitut, Sweden, together with EURADOS and by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany. The devices are described and some results obtained at workplaces in nuclear industry, medicine and science in the photon energy range from 20 keV to 7 MeV are given. (author)

  14. Spiraling contaminant electrons increase doses to surfaces outside the photon beam of an MRI-linac with a perpendicular magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, Sara L; van Asselen, Bram; Wolthaus, Jochem W H; Bluemink, J J; Ishakoglu, Kübra; Kok, Jan G M; Lagendijk, Jan J W; Raaymakers, Bas W

    2018-03-29

    The transverse magnetic field of an MRI-linac sweeps contaminant electrons away from the radiation beam. Films oriented perpendicular to the magnetic field and 5cm from the radiation beam edge show a projection of the divergent beam, indicating that contaminant electrons spiral along magnetic field lines and deposit dose on surfaces outside the primary beam perpendicular to the magnetic field. These spiraling contaminant electrons (SCE) could increase skin doses to protruding regions of the patient along the cranio-caudal axis. This study investigated doses from SCE for an MRI-linac comprising a 7MV linac and a 1.5T MRI scanner. Surface doses to films perpendicular to the magnetic field and 5cm from the radiation beam edge showed increased dose within the projection of the primary beam, whereas films parallel to the magnetic field and 5cm from the beam edge showed no region of increased dose. However, the dose from contaminant electrons is absorbed within a few millimeters. For large fields, the SCE dose is within the same order of magnitude as doses from scattered and leakage photons. Doses for both SCE and scattered photons decrease rapidly with decreasing beam size and increasing distance from the beam edge. © 2018 Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine.

  15. Development of glancing-incidence and glancing-take-off X-ray fluorescence apparatus for surface and thin-film analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Kouichi; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki; Yamada, Takashi; Utaka, Tadashi

    1997-01-01

    We have studied X-ray fluorescence analysis under glancing incidence and glancing take-off conditions. Recently, we have developed a third apparatus for detecting glancing-incidence and take-off X-ray fluorescence, which makes it possible to measure the incident-angle dependence, the take-off-angle dependence. X-ray reflectivity, and X-ray diffraction. Primarily, we have measured the take-off angular dependence of X-ray fluorescence using this apparatus. Glancing take-off X-ray fluorescence has some advantages in comparison with glancing-incidence X-ray fluorescence. The surface density and the absolute angles were determined by analysing the take-off angle dependence of the fluorescent X-rays emitted from identical atoms with the aid of the reciprocity theorem. (Author)

  16. Quantitative determination of the lateral density and intermolecular correlation between proteins anchored on the membrane surfaces using grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering and grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuillan, Wasim; Vorobiev, Alexei; Hartel, Andreas; Jones, Nicola G; Engstler, Markus; Tanaka, Motomu

    2012-11-28

    As a physical model of the surface of cells coated with densely packed, non-crystalline proteins coupled to lipid anchors, we functionalized the surface of phospholipid membranes by coupling of neutravidin to biotinylated lipid anchors. After the characterization of fine structures perpendicular to the plane of membrane using specular X-ray reflectivity, the same membrane was characterized by grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS). Within the framework of distorted wave Born approximation and two-dimensional Percus-Yevick function, we can analyze the form and structure factors of the non-crystalline, membrane-anchored proteins for the first time. As a new experimental technique to quantify the surface density of proteins on the membrane surface, we utilized grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence (GIXF). Here, the mean intermolecular distance between proteins from the sulfur peak intensities can be calculated by applying Abelé's matrix formalism. The characteristic correlation distance between non-crystalline neutravidin obtained by the GISAXS analysis agrees well with the intermolecular distance calculated by GIXF, suggesting a large potential of the combination of GISAXS and GIXF in probing the lateral density and correlation of non-crystalline proteins displayed on the membrane surface.

  17. Training of an incidence of radiation on surfaces by vectorial representation; Didactica del analisis de la incidencia de radiacion solar mediante una representacion vectorial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luis, F. J. de; Perez-Garcia, M.; Barbero, F. J.; Batlles, F. J.

    2004-07-01

    This work gathers and it exposes a set of educational contents extracted from the general bibliography and from the own experience in Engineering studies and courses on the application of a vector representation to the description of the apparent movement of the sun, the shading evaluation and the incidence of radiation on surfaces. (Author)

  18. Microwave photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Chi H

    2006-01-01

    Wireless, optical, and electronic networks continue to converge, prompting heavy research into the interface between microwave electronics, ultrafast optics, and photonic technologies. New developments arrive nearly as fast as the photons under investigation, and their commercial impact depends on the ability to stay abreast of new findings, techniques, and technologies. Presenting a broad yet in-depth survey, Microwave Photonics examines the major advances that are affecting new applications in this rapidly expanding field.This book reviews important achievements made in microwave photonics o

  19. Polychromatic photons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Ole

    2002-01-01

    A review is given of the space-time wave mechanics of single photons, a subject with an almost century long history. The Landau-Peierls photon wave function, which is related nonlocally to the electromagnetic field is first described, and thereafter the so-called energy wave function, based...... on the positive-frequency Riemann-Silberstein vectors, is discussed. Recent attempts to understand the birth process of a photon emerging from a single atom are summarized. The polychromatic photon concept is introduced, and it is indicated how the wave mechanics of polychromatic photons can be upgraded to wave...... in a hyperfine spin transition shows an exponential falloff with the distance from the atomic nucleus. The length parameter in this falloff is the Bohr radius....

  20. Polarization-dependent transverse-stress sensing characters of the gold-coated and liquid crystal filled photonic crystal fiber based on Surface Plasmon Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hai; Zhu, Chenghao; Wang, Yan; Tan, Ce; Li, Hongwei

    2018-03-01

    A transverse-stress sensor with enhanced sensitivity based on nematic liquid crystal (NLC) filled photonic crystal fiber (PCF) is proposed and analyzed by using the finite element method (FEM). The central hole of the PCF is infiltrated with NLC material with an adjustable rotation angle to achieve the polarization-dependent wavelength-selective sensing. And the combined use of side-hole structure and Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) technology enhanced the transverse-stress sensitivity enormously. Results reveal that the sensor can achieve a high sensitivity based on the polarization filter characteristic at special wavelengths. Besides that, the temperature and the transverse-stress in either direction can be effectively discriminated through dual-parameter demodulation method by adjusting the rotation angle of the NLC to introduce a new degree of freedom for sensing.

  1. Theoretical study on photon-phonon coupling at (001)-(2 x 1) surfaces of Ge and {alpha}-Sn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Sanchez, F.L. [Escuela de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma ' ' Benito Juarez' ' de Oaxaca, Av. Universidad S/N, Ex-Hacienda de Cinco Senores, Ciudad Universitaria, Oaxaca de Juarez, Oax., 68120 (Mexico); Perez-Rodriguez, F. [Instituto de Fisica, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Apdo. Post. J-48, Puebla, Pue. 72570 (Mexico)

    2011-06-15

    We present a study of the far-infrared reflectance anisotropy spectra for (001) surfaces of Ge and {alpha}-Sn in the (2 x 1) asymmetric dimer geometry, which exhibit a resonance structure associated with the excitation of surface phonon modes. We have employed a theoretical formalism, based on the adiabatic bond-charge model (ABCM), for computing the far-infrared reflectance anisotropy spectra. In comparison with previous theoretical results for silicon and diamond surfaces, the resonance structure in the reflectance anisotropy spectrum for Ge(001)-(2 x 1) turns out to be similar to that observed in the spectrum for the Si(001)-(2 x 1) surface, whereas the spectrum for {alpha}-Sn(001)-(2 x 1) surface is noticeably different from the others. We have established a trend of far-infrared reflectance anisotropy spectra for IV(001) surfaces: the weaker dimer strength, the stronger resonances of low-frequency surface phonons. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Reconfigurable topological photonic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalaev, Mikhail I.; Desnavi, Sameerah; Walasik, Wiktor; Litchinitser, Natalia M.

    2018-02-01

    Topological insulators are materials that conduct on the surface and insulate in their interior due to non-trivial topology of the band structure. The edge states on the interface between topological (non-trivial) and conventional (trivial) insulators are topologically protected from scattering due to structural defects and disorders. Recently, it was shown that photonic crystals (PCs) can serve as a platform for realizing a scatter-free propagation of light waves. In conventional PCs, imperfections, structural disorders, and surface roughness lead to significant losses. The breakthrough in overcoming these problems is likely to come from the synergy of the topological PCs and silicon-based photonics technology that enables high integration density, lossless propagation, and immunity to fabrication imperfections. For many applications, reconfigurability and capability to control the propagation of these non-trivial photonic edge states is essential. One way to facilitate such dynamic control is to use liquid crystals (LCs), which allow to modify the refractive index with external electric field. Here, we demonstrate dynamic control of topological edge states by modifying the refractive index of a LC background medium. Background index is changed depending on the orientation of a LC, while preserving the topology of the system. This results in a change of the spectral position of the photonic bandgap and the topological edge states. The proposed concept might be implemented using conventional semiconductor technology, and can be used for robust energy transport in integrated photonic devices, all-optical circuity, and optical communication systems.

  3. A study of the point-like interactions of the photon using energy-flows in photo- and hadro-production for incident energies between 65 and 170 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apsimon, R. J.; Atkinson, M.; Baake, M.; Bagdasarian, L. S.; Barberis, D.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Brook, N.; Charity, T.; Clegg, A. B.; Coyle, P.; Danaher, S.; Danagulian, S.; Davenport, M.; Dickinson, B.; Diekmann, B.; Donnachie, A.; Doyle, A. T.; Eades, J.; Ellison, R. J.; Flower, P. S.; Foster, J. M.; Galbraith, W.; Galumian, P. I.; Gapp, C.; Gebert, F.; Hallewell, G.; Heinloth, K.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Hickman, M. T.; Hoeger, C.; Holzkamp, A.; Holzkamp, S.; Hughes-Jones, R. E.; Ibbotson, M.; Jakob, H. P.; Joseph, D.; Keemer, N. R.; Kingler, J.; Koersgen, G.; Kolya, S. D.; Lafferty, G. D.; McCann, H.; McClatchey, R.; McManus, C.; Mercer, D.; Morris, J. A. G.; Morris, J. V.; Newton, D.; O'Connor, A.; Oedingen, R.; Oganesian, A. G.; Ottewell, P. J.; Paterson, C. N.; Paul, E.; Reid, D.; Rotscheidt, H.; Sharp, P. H.; Soeldner-Rembold, S.; Thacker, N. A.; Thompson, L.; Thompson, R. J.; Waterhouse, J.; Weigend, A. S.; Wilson, G. W.

    1990-03-01

    Energy-flow distributions for charged hadrons from interactions of photons, pions and kaons on hydrogen are presented as functions of Σ p {T/2} in the event plane. Data cover the range 0.0<Σ p {/T in 2}<10.0(GeV/c)2 and 0.0< x F <1.0 for beam momenta from 65 to 170 GeV/c. The comparisons between photon-and hadron-induced data show an excess of events with larger Σ p {/T in 2} for the photon-induced data. Using the hadron-induced data to parameterise the hadronic behaviour of the photon, the differences between cross sections are used to measure the contribution of the point-like photon interactions. Quantitative calculations of the point-like photon interactions using the Lund Monte-Carlo program LUCIFER, based on QCD, are in agreement with the data.

  4. Grafting polymer coatings onto the surfaces of carbon nanotube forests and yarns via a photon irradiation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Fei; Rujisamphan, N.; Liu Chang; Ismat Shah, S.; Ni Chaoying; Maezono, Yoshinari; Hawkins, Stephen C.; Huynh, Chi P.

    2012-01-01

    Surface activation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as forests and yarns, depolytmerization of candidate polymers, and uniform deposition and re-polymerization onto the activated CNTs are simultaneously achieved by exposing CNTs and polymer targets to light with a narrow wavelength distribution from a vacuum ultraviolet lamp. Both polystyrene and poly (methyl methacrylate) are deposited onto the surface of CNTs in the CNT-forest and yarn in a N 2 environment for 30 min during which the polymer uniformly coats the carbon nanotubes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data reveal that covalent bonding occurs at the CNT-polymer interface.

  5. Increased fluorescence of PbS quantum dots in photonic crystals by excitation enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Carlo; Roder, Sebastian; Brodoceanu, Daniel; Kraus, Tobias; Hammerschmidt, Martin; Burger, Sven; Becker, Christiane

    2017-07-01

    We report on the enhanced fluorescence of lead sulfide quantum dots interacting with leaky modes of slab-type silicon photonic crystals. The photonic crystal slabs were fabricated, supporting leaky modes in the near infrared wavelength range. Lead sulfite quantum dots which are resonant in the same spectral range were prepared in a thin layer above the slab. We selectively excited the leaky modes by tuning the wavelength and angle of incidence of the laser source and measured distinct resonances of enhanced fluorescence. By an appropriate experiment design, we ruled out directional light extraction effects and determined the impact of enhanced excitation. Three-dimensional numerical simulations consistently explain the experimental findings by strong near-field enhancements in the vicinity of the photonic crystal surface. Our study provides a basis for systematic tailoring of photonic crystals used in biological applications such as biosensing and single molecule detection, as well as quantum dot solar cells and spectral conversion applications.

  6. Hallo photons calls photon; Allo photon appelle photon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1997-09-01

    When a pair of photons is created, it seems that these 2 photons are bound together by a mysterious link. This phenomenon has been discovered at the beginning of the seventies. In this new experiment the 2 photons are separated and have to follow different ways through optic cables until they face a quantum gate. At this point they have to chose between a short and a long itinerary. Statistically they have the same probability to take either. In all cases the 2 photons agree to do the same choice even if the 2 quantum gates are distant of about 10 kilometers. Some applications in ciphering and coding of messages are expected. (A.C.)

  7. NanoData Landscape Compilation. Photonics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allan, J.E.M.; Buist, H.E.; Chapman, A.; Flament, G.; Hartmann, C.; Jawad, I.; Kuijpers, L.T.; Kuittinen, H.; Noyons, E.; Giessen, A.M. van der; Yegros, A.

    2017-01-01

    Photonics emerged in the 1960s and 1970s from work on semiconductor light emitters, lasers and optical fibres. Nanoscale effects impact on photonics, e.g. in the surface quality of waveguides and optical fibres. The focus here remains as closely as possible on photonics as it relates to

  8. Analytic approximation to the scattering of antiplane shear waves by free surfaces of arbitrary shape via superposition of incident, reflected and diffracted rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Juan; Gomez, Juan; Saenz, Mario; Vergara, Juan

    2013-03-01

    The scattering induced by surface topographies of arbitrary shapes, submitted to horizontally polarized shear waves (SH) is studied analytically. In particular, we propose an analysis technique based on a representation of the scattered field like the superposition of incident, reflected and diffracted rays. The diffraction contribution is the result of the interaction of the incident and reflected waves, with the geometric singularities present in the surface topography. This splitting of the solution into different terms, makes the difference between our method and alternative numerical/analytical approaches, where the complete field is described by a single term. The contribution from the incident and reflected fields is considered using standard techniques, while the diffracted field is obtained using the idea of a ray as was introduced by the geometrical theory of diffraction. Our final solution however, is an approximation in the sense that, surface-diffracted rays are neglected while we retain the contribution from corner-diffracted rays and its further diffraction. These surface rays are only present when the problem has smooth boundaries combined with shadow zones, which is far from being the typical scenario in far-field earthquake engineering. The proposed technique was tested in the study of a combined hill-canyon topography and the results were compared with those of a boundary element algorithm. After considering only secondary sources of diffraction, a difference of 0.09 per cent (with respect to the incident field amplitude) was observed. The proposed analysis technique can be used in the interpretation of numerical and experimental results and in the preliminary prediction of the response in complex topographies.

  9. Microwave photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Chi H

    2013-01-01

    Microwave photonics continues to see rapid growth. The integration of optical fiber and wireless networks has become a commercial reality and is becoming increasingly pervasive. Such hybrid technology will lead to many innovative applications, including backhaul solutions for mobile networks and ultrabroadband wireless networks that can provide users with very high bandwidth services. Microwave Photonics, Second Edition systematically introduces important technologies and applications in this emerging field. It also reviews recent advances in micro- and millimeter-wavelength and terahertz-freq

  10. Generation of H-, H2(v double-prime), and H atoms by H2+ and H3+ ions incident upon barium surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiskes, J.R.; Karo, A.M.

    1989-01-01

    The generation of vibrationally excited molecules by electron excitation collisions and the subsequent generation of negative ions by dissociative attachment to these molecules has become a standard model for volume source operation. These processes have been supplemented recently by the demonstration of atom-surface recombination to form vibrationally excited molecules, and enhanced negative ion formation by protons incident upon barium electrodes. In this paper we consider the additional processes of molecular vibrational excitation generated by recombination of molecular ions on the electrode surfaces, and negative ion formation by vibrationally excited molecules rebounding from low work-function electrodes. 10 refs., 4 figs

  11. Structural coloration of chitosan-cationized cotton fabric using photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuz, G.; Zille, A.; Seventekin, N.; Souto, A. P.

    2017-10-01

    In this work, poly (styrene-methyl methacrylate-acrylic acid) P(St-MMA-AA) composite nanospheres were deposited onto chitosan-cationized woven cotton fabrics followed by a second layer of chitosan. The deposited photonic crystals (PCs) on the fabrics were evaluated for coating efficiency and resistance, chemical analysis and color variation by optical and SEM microscopy, ATR-FTIR, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and washing fastness. Chitosan deposition on cotton fabric provided cationic groups on the fiber surface promoting electrostatic interaction with photonic crystals. SEM images of the washed samples indicate that the PCs are firmly coated on the cotton surface only in the chitosan treated sample. The photonic nanospheres show an average diameter of 280 nm and display a face-centered cubic closepacking structure with an average thickness of 10 μm. A further chitosan post-treatment enhances color yield of the samples due to the chitosan transparent covering layer that induce bright reflections where the angles of incidence and reflection are the same. After washing, no photonic crystal can be detected on control fabric surface. However, the sample that received a chitosan post-treatment showed a good washing fastness maintaining a reasonable degree of iridescence. Chitosan fills the spaces between the polymer spheres in the matrix stabilizing the photonic structure. Sizeable variations in lattice spacing will allow color variations using more flexible non-close-packed photonic crystal arrays in chitosan hydrogels matrices.

  12. Number Albedo of Low-Energy Photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljubenov, V.; Simovic, R.; Markovic, S.

    2007-01-01

    Number albedo of water, aluminum and iron for incident photons in energy range from 20 keV to 100 keV is presented in this paper. Results are obtained through the Monte Carlo simulations of photon reflection by using the MCNP, FOTELP and PENELOPE computer codes. Calculated values are compared with the classical data published by B. P. Bulatov and his collaborators. Influence of the fluorescence yield to the photon number albedo of iron target is analyzed in detail. (author)

  13. Photon collider beam simulation with CAIN

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the laser pulse and the beam–beam interaction, is presented in figure 1. Energy flow obtained from the simulation was scaled to the average beam power. After the. Compton scattering, most of the incident electron beam power is transfered to the photon beam. However, the high-energy photons are very well-collimated ...

  14. Photonic Floquet topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechtsman, Mikael C.; Zeuner, Julia M.; Plotnik, Yonatan; Lumer, Yaakov; Podolsky, Daniel; Dreisow, Felix; Nolte, Stefan; Segev, Mordechai; Szameit, Alexander

    2013-09-01

    Topological insulators are a new phase of matter, with the striking property that conduction of electrons occurs only on the surface. In two dimensions, surface electrons in topological insulators do not scatter despite defects and disorder, providing robustness akin to superconductors. Topological insulators are predicted to have wideranging applications in fault-tolerant quantum computing and spintronics. Recently, large theoretical efforts were directed towards achieving topological insulation for electromagnetic waves. One-dimensional systems with topological edge states have been demonstrated, but these states are zero-dimensional, and therefore exhibit no transport properties. Topological protection of microwaves has been observed using a mechanism similar to the quantum Hall effect, by placing a gyromagnetic photonic crystal in an external magnetic field. However, since magnetic effects are very weak at optical frequencies, realizing photonic topological insulators with scatterfree edge states requires a fundamentally different mechanism - one that is free of magnetic fields. Recently, a number of proposals for photonic topological transport have been put forward. Specifically, one suggested temporally modulating a photonic crystal, thus breaking time-reversal symmetry and inducing one-way edge states. This is in the spirit of the proposed Floquet topological insulators, where temporal variations in solidstate systems induce topological edge states. Here, we propose and experimentally demonstrate the first external field-free photonic topological insulator with scatter-free edge transport: a photonic lattice exhibiting topologically protected transport of visible light on the lattice edges. Our system is composed of an array of evanescently coupled helical waveguides arranged in a graphene-like honeycomb lattice. Paraxial diffraction of light is described by a Schrödinger equation where the propagation coordinate acts as `time'. Thus the waveguides

  15. Near unity photon-to-electron conversion efficiency of photoelectrochemical cells built on cationic water-soluble porphyrins electrostatically decorated onto thin-film nanocrystalline SnO₂ surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbaiyan, Navaneetha K; Maligaspe, Eranda; D'Souza, Francis

    2011-07-01

    Thin transparent SnO(2) films have been surface modified with cationic water-soluble porphyrins for photoelectrochemical investigations. Free-base and zinc(II) derivatives of three types of cationic water-soluble porphyrins, (P)M, viz., tetrakis(N-methylpyridyl)porphyrin chloride, (TMPyP)M, tetrakis(trimethylanilinium)porphyrin chloride, (TAP)M, and tetrakis(4'-N-methylimidazolyl-phenyl)porphyrin iodide, (TMIP)M, (M = 2H or Zn) are employed. The negative surface charge and the porous structure of SnO(2) facilitated binding of positively charged porphyrins via electrostatic interactions, in addition to strong electronic interactions in the case of (TMPyP)M binding to nanocrystalline SnO(2). The SnO(2)-porphyrin binding in solution was probed by absorption spectroscopy which yielded apparent binding constants in the range of 1.5-2.6 × 10(4) M(-1). Both steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence studies revealed quenching of porphyrin emission upon binding to SnO(2) in water suggesting electron injection from singlet excited porphyrin to SnO(2) conduction band. Addition of LiClO(4) weakened the ion-paired porphyrin-SnO(2) binding as revealed by reversible emission changes. Over 80% of the quenched fluorescence was recovered in the case of (TMPyP)M and (TAP)M compounds but not for (TMIP)M suggesting stronger binding of the latter to SnO(2) surface. Photoelectrochemical studies performed on FTO/SnO(2)/(P)M electrodes revealed incident photon-to-current conversion efficiencies (IPCE) up to 91% at the peak maxima for the SnO(2)-dye modified electrodes, with very good on-off switchability. The high IPCE values have been attributed to the strong electrostatic and electronic interactions between the dye, (TMPyP)M and SnO(2) nanoparticles that would facilitate better charge injection from the excited porphyrin to the conduction band of the semiconductor. Electrochemical impedance spectral measurements of electron recombination resistance calculations were supportive of this

  16. Ion desorption phenomena induced by various types of multiply charged projectiles and by photons on solid surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyec, Y. Le.

    1991-01-01

    Ion desorption experiments are described in two regions of primary ion velocities corresponding to two distinct classes of interaction mechanism. At low speeds, atomic collisions take place, at higher speeds than the electron velocity, electronic collisions occur. Experiments with fast ions above 0.2 MeV/u are described, using 32 S and 235 U ions obtained in a cyclotron and a linear accelerator. Emission of H + ions from solid surfaces is measured and analyzed, and applied to the determination of the charge state of a fast ion in a solid. Experiments using single atomic and polyatomic, keV ions, and organic and CsI cluster ions as projectiles are also presented. Finally, laser desorption is discussed. (R.P.) 81 refs., 27 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Quantum photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Pearsall, Thomas P

    2017-01-01

    This textbook employs a pedagogical approach that facilitates access to the fundamentals of Quantum Photonics. It contains an introductory description of the quantum properties of photons through the second quantization of the electromagnetic field, introducing stimulated and spontaneous emission of photons at the quantum level. Schrödinger’s equation is used to describe the behavior of electrons in a one-dimensional potential. Tunneling through a barrier is used to introduce the concept of non­locality of an electron at the quantum level, which is closely-related to quantum confinement tunneling, resonant tunneling, and the origin of energy bands in both periodic (crystalline) and aperiodic (non-crystalline) materials. Introducing the concepts of reciprocal space, Brillouin zones, and Bloch’s theorem, the determination of electronic band structure using the pseudopotential method is presented, allowing direct computation of the band structures of most group IV, group III-V, and group II-VI semiconducto...

  18. Green photonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quan, Frederic

    2012-01-01

    Photonics, the broad merger of electronics with the optical sciences, encompasses such a wide swath of technology that its impact is almost universal in our everyday lives. This is a broad overview of some aspects of the industry and their contribution to the ‘green’ or environmental movement. The rationale for energy conservation is briefly discussed and the impact of photonics on our everyday lives and certain industries is described. Some opinions from industry are presented along with market estimates. References are provided to some of the most recent research in these areas. (review article)

  19. Photon Scattering and Reflection in Diagnostic Energy Domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simovic, R.; Markovic, S.; Ljubenov, V.; Ilic, R. D.

    2008-01-01

    Dependence of reflected photons angular and energy distributions on the parameter c' - probability for large angle scattering, is treated in this paper. Simulation of photon reflection was performed by the FOTELP code for a normal incidence of photons into infinite slabs of common shielding materials. (author)

  20. High-Efficiency and High-Color-Rendering-Index Semitransparent Polymer Solar Cells Induced by Photonic Crystals and Surface Plasmon Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ping; Wang, Guoxin; Kang, Bonan; Guo, Wenbin; Shen, Liang

    2018-02-21

    Semitransparent polymer solar cells (ST-PSCs) show attractive potential in power-generating windows or building-integrated photovoltaics. However, the development of ST-PSCs is lagging behind opaque PSCs because of the contradiction between device efficiency and transmission. Herein, Ag/Au alloy nanoparticles and photonic crystals (PCs) were simultaneously introduced into ST-PSCs, acting compatibly as localized surface plasmon resonances and distributed Bragg reflectors to enhance light absorption and transmission. As a result, ST-PSCs based on a hybrid PTB7-Th:PC 71 BM active layer contribute an efficiency as high as 7.13 ± 0.15% and an average visible transmission beyond 20%, which are superior to most of the reported results. Furthermore, PCs can partly compensate valley range of transmission by balancing reflection and transmission regions, yielding a high color rendering index of 95. We believe that the idea of two light management methods compatibly enhancing the performance of ST-PSCs can offer a promising path to develop photovoltaic applications.

  1. Different emissive states in the bulk and at the surface of methylammonium lead bromide perovskite revealed by two-photon micro-spectroscopy and lifetime measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadga Jung Karki

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Two photon photoluminescence (2PPL from single crystals of methyl ammonium lead bromide (CH3NH3PbBr3, MAPbBr3 is studied. We observe two components in the 2PPL spectra, which we assign to the photoluminescence (PL from the carrier recombination at the band edge and the recombination due to self-trapping of excitons. The PL Stokes shift of self-trapped excitons is about 100 meV from the band-gap energy. Our measurements show that about 15% of the total PL from regions about 40 μm deep inside the crystal is due to the emission from self-trapped exciton. This contribution increases to about 20% in the PL from the regions close to the surface. Time resolved measurements of 2PPL show that the PL due to band-edge recombination has a life time of about 8 ns while the PL lifetime of self-trapped excitons is in the order of 100 ns. Quantification of self-trapped excitons in the materials used in photovoltaics is important as such excitons hinder charge separation. As our results also show that an appreciable fraction of photo-generated carriers get trapped, the results are important in rational design of photovoltaics. On the other hand, our results also show that the self-trapped excitons broaden the emission spectrum, which may be useful in designing broadband light emitting devices.

  2. Polarization filtering in the visible wavelength range using surface plasmon resonance and a sunflower-type photonic quasi-crystal fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Bei; Wang, Anran; Liu, Exian; Tan, Wei; Xie, Jianlan; Ge, Rui; Liu, Jianjun

    2018-04-01

    A novel polarization filter based on a sunflower-type photonic quasi-crystal fiber (PQF) is proposed in this paper. We also discuss different methods to tune the filter wavelength. The proposed filter can efficiently produce polarized light with visible wavelengths by using the resonance between the second-order surface plasmon polariton mode and the core mode of the PQF. The filtered wavelength can be tuned between 0.55 µm and 0.68 µm by adjusting the thickness of the gold film. When the thickness of the gold film is 25.3 nm, the resonance loss in the y-polarized direction reaches 11707 dB m‑1 for a wavelength of 0.6326 µm, and the full width at half maximum is only 5 nm. Due to the flexible design and absence of both polarization coupling and polarization dispersion, this polarization filter can be used in devices that require narrow-band filtering.

  3. Bottom-up Fabrication of Multilayer Stacks of 3D Photonic Crystals from Titanium Dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubrin, Roman; Pasquarelli, Robert M; Waleczek, Martin; Lee, Hooi Sing; Zierold, Robert; do Rosário, Jefferson J; Dyachenko, Pavel N; Montero Moreno, Josep M; Petrov, Alexander Yu; Janssen, Rolf; Eich, Manfred; Nielsch, Kornelius; Schneider, Gerold A

    2016-04-27

    A strategy for stacking multiple ceramic 3D photonic crystals is developed. Periodically structured porous films are produced by vertical convective self-assembly of polystyrene (PS) microspheres. After infiltration of the opaline templates by atomic layer deposition (ALD) of titania and thermal decomposition of the polystyrene matrix, a ceramic 3D photonic crystal is formed. Further layers with different sizes of pores are deposited subsequently by repetition of the process. The influence of process parameters on morphology and photonic properties of double and triple stacks is systematically studied. Prolonged contact of amorphous titania films with warm water during self-assembly of the successive templates is found to result in exaggerated roughness of the surfaces re-exposed to ALD. Random scattering on rough internal surfaces disrupts ballistic transport of incident photons into deeper layers of the multistacks. Substantially smoother interfaces are obtained by calcination of the structure after each infiltration, which converts amorphous titania into the crystalline anatase before resuming the ALD infiltration. High quality triple stacks consisting of anatase inverse opals with different pore sizes are demonstrated for the first time. The elaborated fabrication method shows promise for various applications demanding broadband dielectric reflectors or titania photonic crystals with a long mean free path of photons.

  4. Photon Differentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjøth, Lars; Frisvad, Jeppe Revall; Erleben, Kenny

    2007-01-01

    illumination features. This is often not desirable as these may lose clarity or vanish altogether. We present an accurate method for reconstruction of indirect illumination with photon mapping. Instead of reconstructing illumination using classic density estimation on finite points, we use the correlation...

  5. Photon Rao

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Volume 2 Issue 5 May 1997 pp 69-72 Feature Article. Molecule of the Month Molecular–Chameleon: Solvatochromism at its Iridescent Best! Photon Rao · More Details Fulltext PDF. Volume 16 Issue 12 December 2011 pp 1303-1306. Molecule of the Month - Molecular-Chameleon: Solvatochromism at its Iridescent Best!

  6. The gaseous plasmonic response of a one-dimensional photonic crystal composed of striated plasma layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B.; Righetti, F.; Cappelli, M. A.

    2018-03-01

    We present simulations of the response of a one-dimensional striated plasma slab to incident electromagnetic waves that span regions both above and below the plasma frequency, ωp. Photonic bandgap modes are present throughout these regions, and volume and surface plasmon modes facilitate the response below ωp, where the dielectric constant, ɛp application of these structures as ultra-narrow tunable microwave transmission filters.

  7. Heuristic approximations for sound fields produced by spherical waves incident on locally and non-locally reacting planar surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai Ming; Tao, Hongdan

    2014-01-01

    The classic Weyl-van der Pol (WVDP) formula is a well-known asymptotic solution for accurately predicting sound fields above a locally reacting ground surface. However, the form of the WVDP formula is inadequate for predicting sound fields in the vicinity of non-locally reacting surfaces; a correction term is often required in the formula to provide accurate numerical solutions. Even with this correction, there is a singularity in the diffraction wave term when the source is located directly above or below the receiver. This paper explores a heuristic method to remove this singularity and suggests an analytical form comparable to the WVDP formula. This improved formula offers a physically interpretable solution and allows for accurate predictions of the total sound field above locally and non-locally reacting surfaces for all geometrical configurations.

  8. Reciprocal space XRD mapping with varied incident angle as a probe of structure variation within surface depth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Qiguang [Norfolk State University; Williams, Frances [Norfolk State University; Zhao, Xin [JLAB; Reece, Charles E. [JLAB; Krishnan, Mahadevan [AASC, San Leandro, California

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we used a differential-depth X-Ray diffraction Reciprocal Spacing Mapping (XRD RSM) technique to investigate the crystal quality of a variety of SRF-relevant Nb film and bulk materials. By choosing different X-ray probing depths, the RSM study successfully revealed evolution the of materials microstructure after different materials processes, such as energetic condensation or surface polishing. The RSM data clearly measured the materials crystal quality at different thickness. Through a novel differential-depth RSM technique, this study found: I. for a heteroepitaxy Nb film Nb(100)/MgO(100), the film thickening process, via a cathodic arc-discharge Nb ion deposition, created a near-perfect single crystal Nb on the surfaces top-layer; II. for a mechanically polished single-crystal bulk Nb material, the microstructure on the top surface layer is more disordered than that in-grain.

  9. Photon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Va'vra, J.

    1995-10-01

    J. Seguinot and T. Ypsilantis have recently described the theory and history of Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors. In this paper, I will expand on these excellent review papers, by covering the various photon detector designs in greater detail, and by including discussion of mistakes made, and detector problems encountered, along the way. Photon detectors are among the most difficult devices used in physics experiments, because they must achieve high efficiency for photon transport and for the detection of single photo-electrons. For gaseous devices, this requires the correct choice of gas gain in order to prevent breakdown and wire aging, together with the use of low noise electronics having the maximum possible amplification. In addition, the detector must be constructed of materials which resist corrosion due to photosensitive materials such as, the detector enclosure must be tightly sealed in order to prevent oxygen leaks, etc. The most critical step is the selection of the photocathode material. Typically, a choice must be made between a solid (CsI) or gaseous photocathode (TMAE, TEA). A conservative approach favors a gaseous photocathode, since it is continuously being replaced by flushing, and permits the photon detectors to be easily serviced (the air sensitive photocathode can be removed at any time). In addition, it can be argued that we now know how to handle TMAE, which, as is generally accepted, is the best photocathode material available as far as quantum efficiency is concerned. However, it is a very fragile molecule, and therefore its use may result in relatively fast wire aging. A possible alternative is TEA, which, in the early days, was rejected because it requires expensive CaF 2 windows, which could be contaminated easily in the region of 8.3 eV and thus lose their UV transmission

  10. Propagation length enhancement of surface plasmon polaritons in gold nano-/micro-waveguides by the interference with photonic modes in the surrounding active dielectrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suárez Isaac

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the unique optical properties of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs, i.e. subwavelength confinement or strong electric field concentration, are exploited to demonstrate the propagation of light signal at 600 nm along distances in the range from 17 to 150 μm for Au nanostripes 500 nm down to 100 nm wide (30 nm of height, respectively, both theoretically and experimentally. A low power laser is coupled into an optical fiber tip that is used to locally excite the photoluminescence of colloidal quantum dots (QDs dispersed in their surroundings. Emitted light from these QDs is generating the SPPs that propagate along the metal waveguides. Then, the above-referred propagation lengths were directly extracted from this novel experimental technique by studying the intensity of light decoupled at the output edge of the waveguide. Furthermore, an enhancement of the propagation length up to 0.4 mm is measured for the 500-nm-wide metal nanostripe, for which this effect is maximum. For this purpose, a simultaneous excitation of the same QDs dispersed in poly(methyl methacrylate waveguides integrated with the metal nanostructures is performed by end-fire coupling an excitation laser energy as low as 1 KW/cm2. The proposed mechanism to explain such enhancement is a non-linear interference effect between dielectric and plasmonic (supermodes propagating in the metal-dielectric structure, which can be apparently seen as an effective amplification or compensation effect of the gain material (QDs over the SPPs, as previously reported in literature. The proposed system and the method to create propagating SPPs in metal waveguides can be of interest for the application field of sensors and optical communications at visible wavelengths, among other applications, using plasmonic interconnects to reduce the dimensions of photonic chips.

  11. An Exact Method to Determine the Photonic Resonances of Quasicrystals Based on Discrete Fourier Harmonics of Higher-Dimensional Atomic Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad A. Namin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A rigorous method for obtaining the diffraction patterns of quasicrystals is presented. Diffraction patterns are an essential analytical tool in the study of quasicrystals, since they can be used to determine their photonic resonances. Previous methods for approximating the diffraction patterns of quasicrystals have relied on evaluating the Fourier transform of finite-sized super-lattices. Our approach, on the other hand, is exact in the sense that it is based on a technique that embeds quasicrystals into higher dimensional periodic hyper-lattices, thereby completely capturing the properties of the infinite structure. The periodicity of the unit cell in the higher dimensional space can be exploited to obtain the Fourier series expansion in closed-form of the corresponding atomic surfaces. The utility of the method is demonstrated by applying it to one-dimensional Fibonacci and two-dimensional Penrose quasicrystals. The results are verified by comparing them to those obtained by using the conventional super-lattice method. It is shown that the conventional super-cell approach can lead to inaccurate results due to the continuous nature of the Fourier transform, since quasicrystals have a discrete spectrum, whereas the approach introduced in this paper generates discrete Fourier harmonics. Furthermore, the conventional approach requires very large super-cells and high-resolution sampling of the reciprocal space in order to produce accurate results leading to a very large computational burden, whereas the proposed method generates accurate results with a relatively small number of terms. Finally, we propose how this approach can be generalized from the vertex model, which assumes identical particles at all vertices, to a more realistic case where the quasicrystal is composed of different atoms.

  12. Fully reflective photon sieve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenbo; Hu, Yongxiang; MacDonnell, David G.; Kim, Hyun Jung; Weimer, Carl; Baize, Rosemary R.

    2018-02-01

    Photon sieves (PS) have many applications and various designs in focusing light. However, a traditional PS only has a light transmissivity up to ∼25% and a focusing efficiency up to ∼7%, which hinder the application of them in many fields, especially for satellite remote sensing. To overcome these inherent drawbacks of traditional PSs, a concept of reflective photon sieve is developed in this work. This reflective photon sieve is based on a transparent membrane backed by a mirror. The transparent membrane is optimally a fully transparent material sheet with given refractive index and designed geometric thickness which has an optical thickness of a quarter incident wavelength (i.e. an anti-reflective coating). The PS-patterned pinholes are made on the transparent membrane. The design makes the light reflected from pinholes and that from zones of membrane material have 180° phase difference. Thus, light incident on this optical device is reflected and focused on its focal point. This device can have a reflectivity of ∼100% and a focusing efficiency of ∼50% based on numerical simulation. This device functions similar to a concave focusing mirror but can preserve the phase feature of light (such as that for the light with orbital angular momentum). It also has excellent wavelength-dependent property, which can exclude most of the undesired light from the focal point. A thin sheet of this component can perform the joint function of lenses and gratings/etalons in the optical path of a remote sensing system, thus is suitable for controling/filtering light in compact instruments such as satellite sensors. This concept is validated by the finite-difference time domain (FDTD) modeling and a lab prototype in this study.

  13. Measured and Monte Carlo simulated surface dose reduction for superficial X-rays incident on tissue with underlying air or bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baines, John; Zawlodzka, Sylwia; Markwell, Tim; Chan, Millicent

    2018-02-01

    Measurement of surface dose reduction effects for superficial x-rays incident on tissue with underlying air or bone and comparison with Monte Carlo simulations of such effects. Further to investigate the correlation between surface dose reduction and changes in Compton backscatter spectra with tissue-bone separation. An Advanced Markus chamber with entrance window facing downstream on the surface of a solid water phantom was used to investigate changes in surface dose with an underlying air or bone interface located at various depths below the surface. Chamber readings were obtained for interface depths ranging from 1 to 100 mm using the 50 kV, 100 kV and 150 kV beams of an Xstrahl 150 x-ray unit, with field diameters (ϕ) = 2.5 cm and 5 cm. For each beam quality and field size the dose correction factor, DCF(t), namely the ratio of measured dose (t) to dose (t = 100 mm) was determined. Monte Carlo simulations of DCF(t) for air and bone interfaces in tissue are used to validate corresponding measured data. For a given beam and field size, the difference between simulated spectra with an air or bone interface at t = 3 mm was used to determine the Compton backscatter from bone at the surface. For air, DCF(t tube potentials corresponding factors, ϕ = 2.5 cm, for air(bone) are 0.94(0.96) and 0.92(0.99). Calculated DCF(t) based on Monte Carlo simulations are consistent with experimental observations to within 2%. Monte Carlo simulations of x-ray spectra demonstrate the presence of Compton backscatter from underlying bone in tissue. With bone at 3 mm depth calculated backscatter spectra at the tissue surface suggest that surface dose is influenced by the proximity of bone and that this effect depends on beam quality. This work demonstrates the feasibility of using an Advanced Markus chamber with entrance window facing downstream to investigate surface dose reduction with underlying air or bone in tissue. As the field size decreases and beam quality increases surface

  14. Nonlinear photonic quasicrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freedman, B.; Bartal, G.; Segev, M.; Lifshitz, R.; Christodoulides, D.; Fleischer, J.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text:Quasicrystals are structures with long-range order and no periodicity, whose unique structural and physical properties have intrigued scientists ever since their discovery and initial theoretical analysis more than two decades ago. The lack of periodicity excludes the use of well-established theoretical and experimental tools for the analysis of quasicrystals, including such notions as the Brillouin zone and Bloch theorem. Instead, the quasiperiodic atomic arrangement gives rise to unique properties such as a hierarchy of effective Brillouin (or Jones) zones, yielding a fractal-like band structure, and the existence of unique phason degrees of freedom. Generally, in atomic quasicrystals it is very difficult to directly observe the evolution of electronic wave-packets propagating through the structure, or the dynamics of the structure itself. Photonic quasicrystals, on the other hand, are macroscopic objects and hence their internal wave dynamics can be locally excited and directly imaged. Here, we employ optical induction to create 2D photonic quasicrystals, and explore wave transport phenomena in quasicrystals in ways that were impossible until now. We demonstrate linear tunneling-transport of light initiated at different crystal sites, and observe the formation of lattice solitons when the light is made sufficiently intense. We experiment with dynamical photonic quasicrystals, in which crystal sites interact with one another, and directly observe dislocation dynamics: creation, healing, and local structural rearrangement due to phason flips. Our experiments show that photonic quasicrystals are an excellent model system through which one can study the universal features of wave dynamics in quasiperiodic structures, that should apply not only to photonics, but also to other systems such as matter waves in quasiperiodic traps, generic pattern-forming systems as in parametrically-excited surface waves, liquid quasicrystals, as well as the more familiar

  15. Characterization of the absolute photon sensitivity of gold cathode photoelectric detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dozier, C.M.; Freitag, R.K.; Fehl, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    The responses of gold cathode photoelectric detectors to photons in the 3 to 7.5 keV energy band have been measured using synchrotron radiation. The photoelectron detectors under study have cathodes with a conical configurations. Their sensitivities with respect to position on the cathode are nearly uniform (within 30 percent) over approximately 65 percent of the cone surface. The responses fall rapidly near the outer edges. Sensitivities with respect to the photon angle of incidence are proportional to (sin θ)/sup -1/. In the photon energy band covered, the measured response of the detectors are approximately 20 percent lower than the responses measured with conventional x-ray sources. These differences are due to differences in the geometries of the two calibrations

  16. Photon factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, J.; Huke, K.; Chikawa, J.

    1985-01-01

    The Photon Factory (PF) was established on April 1, 1978 at KEK. The PF is a synchrotron radiation facility, which has a 2.5 GeV electron storage ring fully dedicated to the SR usage and a 2.5 GeV electron linac supplying electrons and positrons to the PF ring and the accumulation ring of TRISTAN (30 GeV electron-positron colliding machine). The PF consists of three departments, injector linac, light source, and instrumentation department. The facility is described

  17. Incidence, mechanisms, and severity of match-related collegiate women's soccer injuries on FieldTurf and natural grass surfaces: a 5-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Michael C

    2013-10-01

    Numerous injuries have been attributed to playing on artificial turf. Over the past 2 decades, however, newer generations of synthetic turf have been developed to duplicate the playing characteristics of natural grass. Although synthetic turf has been determined to be safer than natural grass in some studies, few long-term studies have been conducted comparing match-related collegiate soccer injuries between the 2 playing surfaces. Collegiate female soccer athletes do not experience any difference in the incidence, mechanisms, and severity of match-related injuries on FieldTurf and on natural grass. Cohort study: Level of evidence, 2. Female soccer athletes from 13 universities were evaluated over 5 competitive seasons for injury incidence, injury category, time of injury, injury time loss, player position, injury mechanism and situation, primary type of injury, injury grade and anatomic location, field location at the time of injury, injury severity, head and lower extremity trauma, cleat design, turf age, and environmental factors. In sum, 797 collegiate games were evaluated for match-related soccer injuries sustained on FieldTurf or natural grass during 5 seasons. Overall, 355 team games (44.5%) were played on FieldTurf versus 442 team games (55.5%) on natural grass. A total of 693 injuries were documented, with 272 (39.2%) occurring during play on FieldTurf and 421 (60.8%) on natural grass. Multivariate analysis per 10 team games indicated a significant playing surface effect: F₂,₆₉₀ = 6.435, P = .002, n-β = .904. A significantly lower total injury incidence rate (IIR) of 7.7 (95% confidence interval [CI], 7.2-8.1) versus 9.5 (95% CI, 9.3-9.7) (P = .0001) and lower rate of substantial injuries, 0.7 (95% CI, 0.5-1.0) versus 1.5 (95% CI, 1.2-1.9) (P = .001), were documented on FieldTurf versus natural grass, respectively. Analyses also indicated significantly less trauma on FieldTurf when comparing injury time loss, player position, injury grade

  18. Measurement of the Nuclear Dependence of Direct Photon and Neutral Meson Production at High Transverse Momentum by Negative 515-GeV/c Pions Incident on Beryllium and Copper Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorrell, Lee Ronald [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    1995-01-01

    The nuclear dependence of inclusive direct photon production and inclusive neutral meson production by a 515 GeV/c $\\pi^-$ beam has been measured using data collected by the E706 experiment during the 19.90 fixed, target run at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The experiment utilized a finely segmented liquid argon calorimeter and a high precision charged particle spectrometer to make precision measurements of inclusive direct photon, neutral pion, and $\\eta$ production in the rapidity interval from -0.75 < $y$ < 0.75. The $\\pi^0$ data is reported for the $P_T$ range from 0.6 GeV /c to 12 GeV /c, while the $\\eta$ data is reported for the range from 3.5 GeV /c to 7.0 GeV /c. The direct photon nuclear dependence results are reported for the range from approxlmately 4.0 GeV/c to 8.5 GeV/c. The data from the beryllium and copper targets have been fit using the parameterization $\\sigma_A$ = $\\sigma_0$ x $A^{\\alpha}$. The neutral meson results are in good agreement with previous charged meson results. The direct photon results are consistent with no anomalous enhancement.

  19. Computational Study and Analysis of Structural Imperfections in 1D and 2D Photonic Crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maskaly, Karlene Rosera [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2005-06-01

    Dielectric reflectors that are periodic in one or two dimensions, also known as 1D and 2D photonic crystals, have been widely studied for many potential applications due to the presence of wavelength-tunable photonic bandgaps. However, the unique optical behavior of photonic crystals is based on theoretical models of perfect analogues. Little is known about the practical effects of dielectric imperfections on their technologically useful optical properties. In order to address this issue, a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) code is employed to study the effect of three specific dielectric imperfections in 1D and 2D photonic crystals. The first imperfection investigated is dielectric interfacial roughness in quarter-wave tuned 1D photonic crystals at normal incidence. This study reveals that the reflectivity of some roughened photonic crystal configurations can change up to 50% at the center of the bandgap for RMS roughness values around 20% of the characteristic periodicity of the crystal. However, this reflectivity change can be mitigated by increasing the index contrast and/or the number of bilayers in the crystal. In order to explain these results, the homogenization approximation, which is usually applied to single rough surfaces, is applied to the quarter-wave stacks. The results of the homogenization approximation match the FDTD results extremely well, suggesting that the main role of the roughness features is to grade the refractive index profile of the interfaces in the photonic crystal rather than diffusely scatter the incoming light. This result also implies that the amount of incoherent reflection from the roughened quarterwave stacks is extremely small. This is confirmed through direct extraction of the amount of incoherent power from the FDTD calculations. Further FDTD studies are done on the entire normal incidence bandgap of roughened 1D photonic crystals. These results reveal a narrowing and red-shifting of the normal incidence bandgap with

  20. Full-spectrum photon management of solar cell structures for photovoltaic–thermoelectric hybrid systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Yuanpei; Xuan, Yimin; Yang, Lili

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel photon management method is proposed for hybrid photovoltaic–thermoelectric systems. • Composite structured surfaces enable creditable ultra-broadband anti-reflection property. • Incorporation of anti-reflection and light-trapping brings spectral absorption and transmission. • The efficient photon management of the structured surface is also omnidirectional. - Abstract: In this paper, a novel ultra-broadband photon management structure is proposed for crystalline silicon thin-film solar cells used in the photovoltaic–thermoelectric hybrid system. Nanostructures are employed on both front and back side. Optical behavior of the structure in ultra-broadband (300–2500 nm) are investigated through the Finite Difference Time Domain method. By combing moth-eye and inverted-parabolic surface, a new composite surface structure is proposed for anti-reflection in the ultra-broadband wavelengths. Front metallic nanoparticles, plasmonic back reflector and metallic gratings are studied for light-trapping and the effect of plasmonic back reflector is validated by the experimental data of the external quantum efficiency. The effects of incident angle are discussed for metallic gratings. Numerical computation shows that the incorporation of anti-reflection and light-trapping can obtain high absorption in the solar cell and ensure the rest incident light transmits to the thermoelectric generator efficiently. This work shows potential full-spectrum utilization of solar energy for various photovoltaic devices related with hybrid photovoltaic–thermoelectric systems

  1. Ultra-refractive and extended-range one-dimensional photonic crystal superprisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, D. Z. Y.

    2003-01-01

    We describe theoretical analysis and design of one-dimensional photonic crystal prisms. We found that inside the photonic crystal, for frequencies near the band edges, light propagation direction is extremely sensitive to the variations in wavelength and incident angle.

  2. Surface morphological changes on the human dental enamel and cement after the Er:YAG laser irradiation at different incidence angles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannous, Jose Trancoso

    2001-01-01

    This is a morphological analysis study through SEM of the differences of the laser tissue interaction as a function of the laser beam irradiation angle, under different parameters of energy. Fourteen freshly extracted molars stored in a 0,9% sodium chloride solution were divided in seven pairs and were irradiated with 100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600 and 700 mJ per pulse, respectively. Each sample received three enamel irradiations and three cement irradiations, either in the punctual or in the contact mode, one near to the other, with respectively 30, 45 and 90 inclinations degrees of dental surface-laser-beam incidence. Four Er:YAG pulses (2,94 μm, 7-20 Hz, 0,1-1 J energy/pulse - Opus 20 - Opus Dent) with water cooling system (0,4 ml/s) were applied. After the laser irradiation the specimens were analysed through scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results were analysed by SEM micrographs showing a great difference on the laser tissue interaction characteristics as a function of the irradiation angle of the laser beam. All the observations led to conclude that, considering the laser parameters used, the incidence angle variation is a very important parameter regarding the desired morphological effects. This represents an extremely relevant detail on the technical description of the Er:YAG laser irradiation protocols on dental tissues. (author)

  3. Grazing incidence collisions of ions and atoms with surfaces: from charge exchange to atomic diffraction; Collisions rasantes d'ions ou d'atomes sur les surfaces: de l'echange de charge a la diffraction atomique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseau, P

    2006-09-15

    This thesis reports two studies about the interaction with insulating surfaces of keV ions or atoms under grazing incidence. The first part presents a study of charge exchange processes occurring during the interaction of singly charged ions with the surface of NaCl. In particular, by measuring the scattered charge fraction and the energy loss in coincidence with electron emission, the neutralization mechanism is determined for S{sup +}, C{sup +}, Xe{sup +}, H{sup +}, O{sup +}, Kr{sup +}, N{sup +}, Ar{sup +}, F{sup +}, Ne{sup +} and He{sup +}. These results show the importance of the double electron capture as neutralization process for ions having too much potential energy for resonant capture and not enough for Auger neutralization. We have also studied the ionisation of the projectile and of the surface, and the different Auger-like neutralization processes resulting in electron emission, population of conduction band or excited state. For oxygen scattering, we have measured an higher electron yield in coincidence with scattered negative ion than with scattered atom suggesting the transient formation above the surface of the oxygen doubly negative ion. The second study deals with the fast atom diffraction, a new phenomenon observed for the first time during this work. Due to the large parallel velocity, the surface appears as a corrugated wall where rows interfere. Similarly to the Thermal Atom Scattering the diffraction pattern corresponds to the surface potential and is sensitive to vibrations. We have study the H-NaCl and He-LiF atom-surface potentials in the 20 meV - 1 eV range. This new method offers interesting perspectives for surface characterisation. (author)

  4. Measurements of Conversion Efficiency for a Flat Plate Thermophotovoltaic System Using a Photonic Cavity Test System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, E.J.; Ballinger, C.T.; Burger, S.R.; Charache, G.W.; Danielson, L.R.; DePoy, D.M.; Donovan, T.J.; LoCascio, M.

    2000-01-01

    The performance of a 1 cm 2 thermophotovoltaic (TPV) module was recently measured in a photonic cavity test system. A conversion efficiency of 11.7% was measured at a radiator temperature of 1076 C and a module temperature of 29.9 C. This experiment achieved the highest direct measurement of efficiency for an integrated TPV system. Efficiency was calculated from the ratio of the peak (load matched) electrical power output and the heat absorption rate. Measurements of these two parameters were made simultaneously to assure the validity of the measured efficiency value. This test was conducted in a photonic cavity which mimicked a typical flat-plate TPV system. The radiator was a large, flat graphite surface. The module was affixed to the top of a copper pedestal for heat absorption measurements. The heat absorption rate was proportional to the axial temperature gradient in the pedestal under steady-state conditions. The test was run in a vacuum to eliminate conductive and convective heat transfer mechanisms. The photonic cavity provides the optimal test environment for TPV efficiency measurements because it incorporates all important physical phenomena found in an integrated TPV system: high radiator emissivity and blackbody spectral shape, photon recycling, Lambertian distribution of incident radiation and complex geometric effects. Furthermore, the large aspect ratio between radiating surface area and radiator/module spacing produces a view factor approaching unity with minimal photon leakage

  5. Photonic crystal based polarization insensitive flat lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turduev, M.; Bor, E.; Kurt, H.

    2017-07-01

    The paper proposes a new design of an inhomogeneous artificially created photonic crystal lens structure consisting of annular dielectric rods to efficiently focus both transverse electric and transverse magnetic polarizations of light into the same focal point. The locations of each individual cell that contains the annular dielectric rods are determined according to a nonlinear distribution function. The inner and outer radii of the annular photonic dielectric rods are optimized with respect to the polarization insensitive frequency response of the transmission spectrum of the lens structure. The physical background of the polarization insensitive focusing mechanism is investigated in both spatial and frequency domains. Moreover, polarization independent wavefront transformation/focusing has been explored in detail by investigating the dispersion relation of the structure. Corresponding phase index distribution of the lens is attained for polarization insensitive normalized frequency range of a/λ  =  0.280 and a/λ  =  0.300, where a denotes the lattice constant of the designed structure and λ denotes the wavelength of the incident light. We show the wave transformation performance and focal point movement dynamics for both polarizations of the lens structure by specially adjusting the length of the structure. The 3D finite-difference time domain numerical analysis is also performed to verifiy that the proposed design is able to focus the wave regardless of polarization into approximately the same focal point (difference between focal distances of both polarizations stays below 0.25λ) with an operating bandwidth of 4.30% between 1476 nm and 1541 nm at telecom wavelengths. The main superiorities of the proposed lens structure are being all dielectric and compact, and having flat front and back surfaces, rendering the proposed lens design more practical in the photonic integration process in various applications such as optical switch

  6. Surface Plasmon Polariton Resonance of Gold, Silver, and Copper Studied in the Kretschmann Geometry: Dependence on Wavelength, Angle of Incidence, and Film Thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Kentaro; Nair, Selvakumar V.; Watanabe, Ryosuke; Seto, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Takayoshi; Tokunaga, Eiji

    2017-12-01

    Surface plasmon polariton (SPP) resonance spectra for noble metals (Au, Ag, and Cu) were comprehensively studied in the Kretschmann attenuated total reflection (ATR) geometry, in the wavelength (λ) range from 300 to 1000 nm with the angle of incidence (θ) ranging from 45 to 60° and the film thickness (d) ranging from 41 to 76 nm. The experimental plasmon resonance spectra were reproduced by a calculation that included the broadening effects as follows: (1) the imaginary part of the bulk dielectric constant, (2) the thickness-dependent radiative coupling of the SPP at the metal-air interface to the prism, (3) the lack of conservation of the wavevector parallel to the interface kx(k||) caused by the surface roughness, (4) scanning λ at a fixed θ (changing both energy and kx at the same time) over the SPP dispersion relation. For Au and Ag, the experimental results were in good agreement with the calculated results using the bulk dielectric constants, showing no film thickness dependence of the plasmon resonance energy. A method to extract the true width of the plasmon resonance from raw ATR spectra is proposed and the results are rigorously compared with those expected from the bulk dielectric function given in the literature. For Au and Ag, the width increases with energy, in agreement with that expected from the relaxation of bulk free electrons including the electron-electron interaction, but there is clear evidence of extra broadening, which is more significant for thinner films, possibly due to relaxation pathways intrinsic to plasmons near the interface. For Cu, the visibility of the plasmon resonance critically depends on the evaporation conditions, and low pressures and fast deposition rates are required. Otherwise, scattering from the surface roughness causes considerable broadening of the plasmon resonance, resulting in an apparently fixed resonance energy without clear incident angle dependence. For Cu, the observed plasmon dispersion agrees well with

  7. Incidence and interactions of heavy metals and pharmaceutical products in surface waters of a Mediterranean coastal wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu, Vicente; Pascual, Juan Antonio; Gimeno, Eugenia; Picó, Yolanda

    2013-04-01

    Heavy metals have been during decades a result of the human fingerprint on the ecosystems, mainly in waters, soils or vegetation, being considered as a major s threat also on human health. However, the increasing in human population shows other aspect, such as the so called "emerging contaminants". They constitute an increasing group of compounds that includes, among others, personal care products, drugs of abuse and pharmaceuticals. These contaminants have become, in recent years, of great concern for researchers and, even, for the population. Among these substances, the presence of pharmaceuticals in the ecosystems compartments has becoming an increasing problem for environmental sustainability, and also for human health, with consequences very scarcely known. They reach the nature from waste waters treatment plants, industrial waste effluents, uncontrolled landfills, etc. affecting particularly the fauna in its different levels. Some pharmaceuticals have shown toxicity not only to bacteria, algae and invertebrates but also to fish, mollusks, etc. This work is focused on the study of the presence of 17 relevant pharmaceuticals and 7 heavy metals (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) in surface waters of the irrigation channels and the lagoon of the Pego-Oliva Marsh Natural Park (Valencian Community, Spain), which is characterized by a long history of human pressures, such as marsh transformation for agricultural uses, urbanization, etc. In this area, 34 sampling zones were selected, covering the main land uses. The interactions and possible relationships between both groups of contaminants were studied, together with the influences of the source of water samples, land uses and their spatial distribution. All water samples appeared contaminated with at least with two compounds. Ibuprofen and codeine were the compounds more frequently detected in concentrations between detection limit and a maximum of 59 ng/L and 63 ng/L respectively. Regarding the studied metals, Zn

  8. Resonance formation in photon-photon collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gidal, G.

    1988-08-01

    Recent experimental progress on resonance formation in photon-photon collisions is reviewed with particular emphasis on the pseudoscalar and tensor nonents and on the ..gamma gamma..* production of spin-one resonances. 37 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Photonic crystal scintillators and methods of manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Ricardo D.; Sexton, Lindsay T.; Fuentes, Roderick E.; Cortes-Concepcion, Jose

    2015-08-11

    Photonic crystal scintillators and their methods of manufacture are provided. Exemplary methods of manufacture include using a highly-ordered porous anodic alumina membrane as a pattern transfer mask for either the etching of underlying material or for the deposition of additional material onto the surface of a scintillator. Exemplary detectors utilizing such photonic crystal scintillators are also provided.

  10. Virtual photon spectra for finite nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolynec, E.; Martins, M.N.

    1988-01-01

    The experimental results of an isochromat of the virtual photon spectrum, obtained by measuring the number of ground-state protons emitted by the 16.28 MeV isobaric analogue state in 90 Zr as a function of electron incident energy in the range 17-105 MeV, are compared with the values predicted by a calculation of the E1 DWBA virtual photon spectra for finite nuclei. It is found that the calculations are in excellent agreement with the experimental results. The DWBA virtual photon spectra for finite nuclei for E2 and M1 multipoles are also assessed. (author) [pt

  11. Energy spectrum of Compton scattering of laser photons on relativistic electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Hiroaki; Yoneda, Yasuharu

    1976-01-01

    The high energy photons in gamma-ray region are obtainable by the Compton scattering of laser photons on relativistic electrons. But the motion of the electrons in the storage ring is not necessarily uniform. In the study of the uneven effect, the energy distribution of scattered photons is derived from the assumed momentum distribution of incident electrons. It is generally impossible to derive the momentum distribution of incident electrons from the energy spectrum of scattered photons. The additional conditions which make this possible in a special case are considered. A calculational method is examined for deriving the energy spectrum of scattered photons from the assumed momentum distribution of incident electrons. (Mori, K.)

  12. Topological Photonics for Continuous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveirinha, Mario

    Photonic crystals have revolutionized light-based technologies during the last three decades. Notably, it was recently discovered that the light propagation in photonic crystals may depend on some topological characteristics determined by the manner how the light states are mutually entangled. The usual topological classification of photonic crystals explores the fact that these structures are periodic. The periodicity is essential to ensure that the underlying wave vector space is a closed surface with no boundary. In this talk, we prove that it is possible calculate Chern invariants for a wide class of continuous bianisotropic electromagnetic media with no intrinsic periodicity. The nontrivial topology of the relevant continuous materials is linked with the emergence of edge states. Moreover, we will demonstrate that continuous photonic media with the time-reversal symmetry can be topologically characterized by a Z2 integer. This novel classification extends for the first time the theory of electronic topological insulators to a wide range of photonic platforms, and is expected to have an impact in the design of novel photonic systems that enable a topologically protected transport of optical energy. This work is supported in part by Fundacao para a Ciencia e a Tecnologia Grant Number PTDC/EEI-TEL/4543/2014.

  13. Hybrid Integrated Platforms for Silicon Photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Di; Roelkens, Gunther; Baets, Roel; Bowers, John E.

    2010-01-01

    A review of recent progress in hybrid integrated platforms for silicon photonics is presented. Integration of III-V semiconductors onto silicon-on-insulator substrates based on two different bonding techniques is compared, one comprising only inorganic materials, the other technique using an organic bonding agent. Issues such as bonding process and mechanism, bonding strength, uniformity, wafer surface requirement, and stress distribution are studied in detail. The application in silicon photonics to realize high-performance active and passive photonic devices on low-cost silicon wafers is discussed. Hybrid integration is believed to be a promising technology in a variety of applications of silicon photonics.

  14. Search for chameleon particles via photon regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, Aaron S.; CCPP, New York U.

    2008-01-01

    We report the first results from the GammeV search for chameleon particles, which may be created via photon-photon interactions within a strong magnetic field. The chameleons are assumed to have matter effects sufficiently strong that they reflect from all solid surfaces of the apparatus, thus evading detection in our previous search for weakly-interacting axion-like particles. We implement a novel technique to create and trap the reflective particles within a jar and to detect them later via their afterglow as they slowly convert back into photons. These measurements provide the first experimental constraints on the couplings of chameleons to photons

  15. X-ray structural study of Ge(001):Te 1x1 performed at the advanced photon source. Current status of the surface-interface structure beamline at SPring-8

    CERN Document Server

    Sakata, O

    2002-01-01

    This article is composed of two parts. In the first half, we describe a study that we performed at 5ID-C of the Dupont- Northwestern University-Dow (DND) CAT in the Advanced Photon Source, the Argonne National Laboratory for 1998 to 2000. A surface structure of Ge(001):Te 1x1 was determined by least-squares fits of x-ray scattered intensities with calculations based on some surface atomic structural models. The fitted structural model has a characteristic that a direction of a Ge-Ge dimer bond on the first Ge atomic layer is perpendicular to a Te missing row. It was distinct from those based on first-principles total energy calculations. In the second half, we introduce up-to-the-minute status of BL13XU for surface-interface structural studies at SPring-8. Scientific research goals we desire are mentioned as well. (author)

  16. Colloidal photonic crystals: from lasing to microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clays, Koen; Zhong, Kuo; Song, Kai

    2017-08-01

    Colloidal photonic crystals are photonic crystals made by bottom-up physical chemistry strategies from monodisperse colloidal particles. The self-assembly process is automatically leading to inherently three-dimensional structures with their optical properties determined by the periodicity, induced by this ordering process, in the dielectric properties of the colloidal material. The best-known optical effect is the photonic band gap, the range of energies, or wavelengths, that is forbidden for photons to exist in the structure. This photonic band gap is similar to the electronic band gap of electronic semiconductor crystals. We have previously shown how with the proper photonic band gap engineering, we can insert allowed pass band defect modes and use the suppressing band gap in combination with the transmitting pass band to induce spectral narrowing of emission. We show now how with a high-quality narrow pass band in a broad stop band, it is possible to achieve photonic crystal lasing in self-assembled colloidal photonic crystals with a planar defect. In addition, with proper surface treatment in combination with patterning, we prepare for addressable integrated photonics. Finally, by incorporating a water in- and outlet, we can create optomicrofluidic structures on a photonic crystal allowing the optical probing of microreactors or micro-stopped-flow in the lab-on-an-optical-chip.

  17. Molecular Desorption of a NEG St 707 Irradiated at Room Temperature with Synchrotron Radiation of 194 eV Critical Photon Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Le Pimpec, F; Laurent, Jean Michel

    2002-01-01

    Photon stimulated molecular desorption from a NEG St 707 (SAES Getters$^{TM}$) surface after conditioning and after saturation with isotopic carbon monoxide, 13C18O, has been studied on a dedicated beam line at the EPA ring at CERN. The synchrotron radiation of 194 eV critical energy and with an average photon intensity of ~1 10**17 photons.s**-1 was impinging on the sample at perpendicular incidence. It is found that the desorption yields h molecules/photon) of the characteristic gases in an UHV system (hydrogen, methane, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide) for a freshly activated NEG and for a NEG fully saturated with 13C18O are lower than that of 300 C baked stainless steel.

  18. Ultra compact spectrometer apparatus and method using photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Hill, Cory J. (Inventor); Bandara, Sumith V. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention is directed to methods of photonic crystal formation, and to methods and apparatus for using such photonic crystals, particularly in conjunction with detector arrays. Photonic crystal parameters and detector array parameters are compared to optimize the selection and orientation of a photonic crystal shape. A photonic crystal is operatively positioned relative to a plurality of light sensors. The light sensors can be separated by a pitch distance and positioned within one half of the pitch distance of an exit surface of the photonic crystals.

  19. RR photons

    CERN Document Server

    Camara, Pablo G; Marchesano, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    Type II string compactifications to 4d generically contain massless Ramond-Ramond U(1) gauge symmetries. However there is no massless matter charged under these U(1)'s, which makes a priori difficult to measure any physical consequences of their existence. There is however a window of opportunity if these RR U(1)'s mix with the hypercharge $U(1)_Y$ (hence with the photon). In this paper we study in detail different avenues by which $U(1)_{RR}$ bosons may mix with D-brane U(1)'s. We concentrate on Type IIA orientifolds and their M-theory lift, and provide geometric criteria for the existence of such mixing, which may occur either via standard kinetic mixing or via the mass terms induced by St\\"uckelberg couplings. The latter case is particularly interesting, and appears whenever D-branes wrap torsional $p$-cycles in the compactification manifold. We also show that in the presence of torsional cycles discrete gauge symmetries and Aharanov-Bohm strings and particles appear in the 4d effective action, and that ty...

  20. Micro- and nanotechnologies for photonics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavelyev, Vladimir S.

    2017-05-01

    Different technologies for formation of 2- and 3 dimensional optical micro- and nanostructures: 2-photon polymerization technology, laser ablation of substrate surface, multibeam intereference 3-d lithography, technology of focused ion beams (FIB) are considered.

  1. Decoupling Bulk and Surface Contributions in Water- Splitting Photocatalysts by In Situ Ultrafast Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appavoo, Kannatassen [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Center for Functional Nanomaterials; Mingzhao, Liu [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Center for Functional Nanomaterials; Black, Charles T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Center for Functional Nanomaterials; Sfeir, Matthew Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    2015-05-10

    By performing ultrafast emission spectroscopy in an operating, bias-controlled photoelectrochemical cell, we distinguish between bulk (charge transport) and surface (chemical reaction) recombination processes in a nanostructured photocatalyst and correlate its electronic properties directly with its incident-photon-to-current efficiency.

  2. Photonic time crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Lunwu; Xu, Jin; Wang, Chengen; Zhang, Jianhua; Zhao, Yuting; Zeng, Jing; Song, Runxia

    2017-12-07

    When space (time) translation symmetry is spontaneously broken, the space crystal (time crystal) forms; when permittivity and permeability periodically vary with space (time), the photonic crystal (photonic time crystal) forms. We proposed the concept of photonic time crystal and rewritten the Maxwell's equations. Utilizing Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method, we simulated electromagnetic wave propagation in photonic time crystal and photonic space-time crystal, the simulation results show that more intensive scatter fields can obtained in photonic time crystal and photonic space-time crystal.

  3. Ultrafast photon number resolving detector with a temperature stabilized si multi pixel photon counter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Minsoo; Hong, Eugene; Won, Eunil; Yoon, Tai Hyun [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-11-15

    Quantum information science has been rapidly progressed and matured and matured thanks to the recent developments of the single photon detection technologies. Single photon detectors such as a Si avalanche photo diode(APD)in the infrared, an InGaAs/InP APD in the telecommunication band, and a super conducting transient edge sensor(TES)in the broad region of the spectrum have been widely used. Single photon detectors, however, operating at the ultraviolet to visible (370nm∼800nm)regions has not been actively investigated partly due to the lack of single photon and/or entangled photon sources and the lack of solid state single photon detectors. In this paper, we investigate the single photon detection characteristics of a Si multi pixel photon counter(MPPC), which has a high spectral responsivity between 300nm to 800nm, as a photon number resolving solid state detector. Figure 1 shows the schematic diagram of the single photon detection set up at 399nm by using a temperature stabilized Si MPPC. The output beam of the laser being properly attenuated is directed to the MPPC module, at which fixed number of photo electrons corresponding to incident individual photon are generated at Geiger mode of the Si APD pixels. The detected photo current is converted into a digital signal by using a fast analog to digital converter and a digital oscilloscope stores the time sequence of the photo currents. Figure 2 shows the accumulated charges collected by MPPC at∼10.deg.C showing a clear single photon and two photons peaks, respectively, separated by ∼5 sigma of the coincidence counts at the two output ports of a Mach Zender interferometer as a function of optical path length difference. The research was supported by Seoul R and BD program(NT070127)and by the KRISS.

  4. Ultrafast photon number resolving detector with a temperature stabilized si multi pixel photon counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Minsoo; Hong, Eugene; Won, Eunil; Yoon, Tai Hyun

    2008-01-01

    Quantum information science has been rapidly progressed and matured and matured thanks to the recent developments of the single photon detection technologies. Single photon detectors such as a Si avalanche photo diode(APD)in the infrared, an InGaAs/InP APD in the telecommunication band, and a super conducting transient edge sensor(TES)in the broad region of the spectrum have been widely used. Single photon detectors, however, operating at the ultraviolet to visible (370nm∼800nm)regions has not been actively investigated partly due to the lack of single photon and/or entangled photon sources and the lack of solid state single photon detectors. In this paper, we investigate the single photon detection characteristics of a Si multi pixel photon counter(MPPC), which has a high spectral responsivity between 300nm to 800nm, as a photon number resolving solid state detector. Figure 1 shows the schematic diagram of the single photon detection set up at 399nm by using a temperature stabilized Si MPPC. The output beam of the laser being properly attenuated is directed to the MPPC module, at which fixed number of photo electrons corresponding to incident individual photon are generated at Geiger mode of the Si APD pixels. The detected photo current is converted into a digital signal by using a fast analog to digital converter and a digital oscilloscope stores the time sequence of the photo currents. Figure 2 shows the accumulated charges collected by MPPC at∼10.deg.C showing a clear single photon and two photons peaks, respectively, separated by ∼5 sigma of the coincidence counts at the two output ports of a Mach Zender interferometer as a function of optical path length difference. The research was supported by Seoul R and BD program(NT070127)and by the KRISS

  5. Wheelchair incidents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drongelen AW van; Roszek B; Hilbers-Modderman ESM; Kallewaard M; Wassenaar C; LGM

    2002-01-01

    This RIVM study was performed to gain insight into wheelchair-related incidents with powered and manual wheelchairs reported to the USA FDA, the British MDA and the Dutch Center for Quality and Usability Research of Technical Aids (KBOH). The data in the databases do not indicate that incidents with

  6. Spectrum of acetylene fluorescence excited by single XUV photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmieder, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    The spectrum of visible emission from photofragments of acetylene excited by single 16.85 eV photons has been recorded for the first time. The spectrum is dominated by the Swan and Deslandres-d'Azambuja bands of C 2 and the 431.5 nm band of CH. The yields of these emissions are of the order 10 -3 photons per absorbed incident photon. The experimental conditions suggest that the emission results from primary C* 2 and CH* photofragments

  7. In situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy/synchrotron radiation grazing incidence X-ray diffraction-A powerful new technique for the characterization of electrochemical surfaces and interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Marco, Roland; Jiang, Z.-T.; Martizano, Jay; Lowe, Alex; Pejcic, Bobby; Riessen, Arie van

    2006-01-01

    A marriage of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and in situ synchrotron radiation grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (SR-GIXRD) has provided a powerful new technique for the elucidation of the mechanistic chemistry of electrochemical systems. In this study, EIS/SR-GIXRD has been used to investigate the influence of metal ion buffer calibration ligands, along with natural organic ligands in seawater, on the behaviour of the iron chalcogenide glass ion-selective electrode (ISE). The SR-GIXRD data demonstrated that citrate - a previously reported poor iron calibration ligand for the analysis of seawater - induced an instantaneous and total dissolution of crystalline GeSe and Sb 2 Se 3 in the modified surface layer (MSL) of the ISE, while natural organic ligands in seawater and a mixture of ligands in a mimetic seawater ligand system protected the MSL's crystalline inclusions of GeSe and Sb 2 Se 3 from oxidative attack. Expectedly, the EIS data showed that citrate induced a loss in the medium frequency time constant for the MSL of the ISE, while seawater's natural organic ligands and the mimetic ligand system preserved the medium frequency EIS response characteristics of the ISE's MSL. The new EIS/SR-GIXRD technique has provided insights into the suitability of iron calibration ligands for the analysis of iron in seawater

  8. Sound conversion phenomena at the free surface of liquid helium. I. Calculation of the coefficients of reflection, transmission, and transformation of sound waves incident on the liquid--vapor interface of helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiechert, H.; Buchholz, F.I.

    1980-01-01

    On the basis of a set of boundary conditions describing quite generally mass and energy transport processes across the free surface of helium II, the acoustic coefficients of reflection, transmission, and transformation of first sound, second sound, and the sound wave propagating in the vapor are calculated in the case of perpendicular incidence of sound waves against the liquid--vapor phase boundary. Considering rigoroulsy the influences of the Onsager surface coefficients, the isobaric thermal expansion coefficients, and the thermal conductivities of the liquid and the vapor, we derive sets of equations from which the acoustic coefficients are determined numerically. For estimations, simple explicit formulas of the acoustic coefficients are given. It is shown that the evaporation and energy transport processes occurring at the free surface of helium II due to the incidence of sound waves may be connected with appreciable energy dissipation. The surface absorption coefficients of first, second, and gas sound waves are deduced

  9. Broad tunable photonic microwave generation based on period-one dynamics of optical injection vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Songkun; Hong, Yanhua; Spencer, Paul S; Benedikt, Johannes; Davies, Iwan

    2017-08-21

    Photonic microwave generation based on period-one dynamics of an optically injected VCSEL has been study experimentally. The results have shown that the frequency of the generated microwave signal can be broadly tunable through the adjustment of the injection power and the frequency detuning. Strong optical injection power and higher frequency detuning are favorable for obtaining a high frequency microwave signal. These results are similar to those found in systems based on distributed feedback lasers and quantum dot lasers. The variation of the microwave power at the fundamental frequency and the second-harmonic distortion have also been characterized.

  10. Photonic Crystals Towards Nanoscale Photonic Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Lourtioz, Jean-Michel; Berger, Vincent; Gérard, Jean-Michel; Maystre, Daniel; Tchelnokov, Alexis

    2005-01-01

    Just like the periodical crystalline potential in solid-state crystals determines their properties for the conduction of electrons, the periodical structuring of photonic crystals leads to envisioning the possibility of achieving a control of the photon flux in dielectric and metallic materials. The use of photonic crystals as a cage for storing, filtering or guiding light at the wavelength scale thus paves the way to the realisation of optical and optoelectronic devices with ultimate properties and dimensions. This should contribute toward meeting the demands for a greater miniaturisation that the processing of an ever increasing number of data requires. Photonic Crystals intends at providing students and researchers from different fields with the theoretical background needed for modelling photonic crystals and their optical properties, while at the same time presenting the large variety of devices, from optics to microwaves, where photonic crystals have found applications. As such, it aims at building brid...

  11. Photonic Crystals Towards Nanoscale Photonic Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Lourtioz, Jean-Michel; Berger, Vincent; Gérard, Jean-Michel; Maystre, Daniel; Tchelnokov, Alexei; Pagnoux, Dominique

    2008-01-01

    Just like the periodical crystalline potential in solid state crystals determines their properties for the conduction of electrons, the periodical structuring of photonic crystals leads to envisioning the possibility of achieving a control of the photon flux in dielectric and metallic materials. The use of photonic crystals as cages for storing, filtering or guiding light at the wavelength scale paves the way to the realization of optical and optoelectronic devices with ultimate properties and dimensions. This will contribute towards meeting the demands for greater miniaturization imposed by the processing of an ever increasing number of data. Photonic Crystals will provide students and researchers from different fields with the theoretical background required for modelling photonic crystals and their optical properties, while at the same time presenting the large variety of devices, ranging from optics to microwaves, where photonic crystals have found application. As such, it aims at building bridges between...

  12. Nuclear photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habs, D.; Günther, M. M.; Jentschel, M.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2012-07-01

    With the planned new γ-beam facilities like MEGa-ray at LLNL (USA) or ELI-NP at Bucharest (Romania) with 1013 γ/s and a band width of ΔEγ/Eγ≈10-3, a new era of γ beams with energies up to 20MeV comes into operation, compared to the present world-leading HIγS facility at Duke University (USA) with 108 γ/s and ΔEγ/Eγ≈3ṡ10-2. In the long run even a seeded quantum FEL for γ beams may become possible, with much higher brilliance and spectral flux. At the same time new exciting possibilities open up for focused γ beams. Here we describe a new experiment at the γ beam of the ILL reactor (Grenoble, France), where we observed for the first time that the index of refraction for γ beams is determined by virtual pair creation. Using a combination of refractive and reflective optics, efficient monochromators for γ beams are being developed. Thus, we have to optimize the total system: the γ-beam facility, the γ-beam optics and γ detectors. We can trade γ intensity for band width, going down to ΔEγ/Eγ≈10-6 and address individual nuclear levels. The term "nuclear photonics" stresses the importance of nuclear applications. We can address with γ-beams individual nuclear isotopes and not just elements like with X-ray beams. Compared to X rays, γ beams can penetrate much deeper into big samples like radioactive waste barrels, motors or batteries. We can perform tomography and microscopy studies by focusing down to μm resolution using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) for detection with eV resolution and high spatial resolution at the same time. We discuss the dominating M1 and E1 excitations like the scissors mode, two-phonon quadrupole octupole excitations, pygmy dipole excitations or giant dipole excitations under the new facet of applications. We find many new applications in biomedicine, green energy, radioactive waste management or homeland security. Also more brilliant secondary beams of neutrons and positrons can be produced.

  13. 10-year survival rate and the incidence of peri-implant disease of 374 titanium dental implants with a SLA surface: a prospective cohort study in 177 fully and partially edentulous patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Velzen, F.J.J.; Ofec, R.; Schulten, E.A.J.M.; ten Bruggenkate, C.M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This prospective cohort study evaluates the 10-year survival and incidence of peri-implant disease at implant and patient level of sandblasted, large grid, and acid-etched titanium dental implants (Straumann, soft tissue level, SLA surface) in fully and partially edentulous patients.

  14. 10-year survival rate and the incidence of peri-implant disease of 374 titanium dental implants with a SLA surface: a prospective cohort study in 177 fully and partially edentulous patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Velzen, F.J.J.; Ofec, R.; Schulten, E.A.J.M.; ten Bruggenkate, C.M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This prospective cohort study evaluates the 10-year survival and incidence of peri-implant disease at implant and patient level of sandblasted, large grid, and acid-etched titanium dental implants (Straumann, soft tissue level, SLA surface) in fully and partially edentulous patients.

  15. Silicon applications in photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelenski, A. M.; Gawlik, G.; Wesolowski, M.

    2005-09-01

    Silicon technology enabled the miniaturization of computers and other electronic system for information storage, transmission and transformation allowing the development of the Knowledge Based Information Society. Despite the fact that silicon roadmap indicates possibilities for further improvement, already now the speed of electrons and the bandwidth of electronic circuits are not sufficient and photons are commonly utilized for signal transmission through optical fibers and purely photonic circuits promise further improvements. However materials used for these purposes II/V semiconductor compounds, glasses make integration of optoelectronic circuits with silicon complex an expensive. Therefore research on light generation, transformation and transmission in silicon is very active and recently, due to nanotechnology some spectacular results were achieved despite the fact that mechanisms of light generation are still discussed. Three topics will be discussed. Porous silicon was actively investigated due to its relatively efficient electroluminescence enabling its use in light sources. Its index of refraction, differs considerably from the index of silicon, and this allows its utilization for Bragg mirrors, wave guides and photonic crystals. The enormous surface enables several applications on medicine and biotechnology and in particular due to the effective chemo-modulation of its refracting index the design of optical chemosensors. An effective luminescence of doped and undoped nanocrystalline silicon opened another way for the construction of silicon light sources. Optical amplification was already discovered opening perspectives for the construction of nanosilicon lasers. Luminescences was observed at red, green and blue wavelengths. The used technology of silica and ion implantation are compatible with commonly used CMOS technology. Finally the recently developed and proved idea of optically pumped silicon Raman lasers, using nonlinearity and vibrations in the

  16. Microwave Photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-11-01

    Heeger, where he worked respectively on working on inhomogeneous superconductors and conducting polymers. From 1985-1995 Mark worked at Texas Instruments...Central Research Laboratories where he helped develop the Digital Micromirror metal surface micromachining (MEMS) technology used in TI’s DLP...experience over a broad range of applications in MEMS and semiconductors, including telecom devices, flat panel displays (field emission, micromirror

  17. Air-Stable Surface-Passivated Perovskite Quantum Dots for Ultra-Robust, Single- and Two-Photon-Induced Amplified Spontaneous Emission

    KAUST Repository

    Pan, Jun

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate ultra-air- and photostable CsPbBr3 quantum dots (QDs) by using an inorganic–organic hybrid ion pair as the capping ligand. This passivation approach to perovskite QDs yields high photoluminescence quantum yield with unprecedented operational stability in ambient conditions (60 ± 5% lab humidity) and high pump fluences, thus overcoming one of the greatest challenges impeding the development of perovskite-based applications. Due to the robustness of passivated perovskite QDs, we were able to induce ultrastable amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) in solution processed QD films not only through one photon but also through two-photon absorption processes. The latter has not been observed before in the family of perovskite materials. More importantly, passivated perovskite QD films showed remarkable photostability under continuous pulsed laser excitation in ambient conditions for at least 34 h (corresponds to 1.2 × 108 laser shots), substantially exceeding the stability of other colloidal QD systems in which ASE has been observed.

  18. Ordered photonic microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kevin Ming

    2001-09-01

    polystyrene latex colloidal particles into 2D crystals is presented. The colloidal assemblies offer a relatively easy processing route for fabrication of photonic bandgap structures. Large (>1 mm diameter) single crystal grains of colloids were formed using controlled evaporation and fluid flow techniques. A novel solution enabling post-processing of the fragile ordered assemblies is presented in which polyelectrolyte multilayers serve as adsorption platforms that anchor the colloidal assemblies. Tailorability of the polyelectrolyte surface properties (charge density, morphology) enables tuning of the colloid adsorption behavior. The polyelectrolyte surface affects colloid adsorption by influencing its surface diffusion. Observations of colloid surface diffusion were made using optical microscopy. Use of polyelectrolytes patterned via microcontact printing enables fabrication of colloid assemblies containing predesigned point and line defects. The patterned polyelectrolyte adsorption template allows placement of colloids in specific geometric arrangement, making possible the realization of sensors or functional photonic bandgap devices such as waveguides or photon traps. Three mechanisms were used to control adsorption: (1)pH of the colloid suspension, which determines the ionization of the uppermost surface of the polyelectrolyte multilayer; (2)ionic strength of the suspension, which determines the extent of charge screening about the colloid and polyelectrolyte; and (3)concentration of added surfactant, which causes charge screening and introduces hydrophobic interactions between the surfactant and polyelectrolyte. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253- 1690.)

  19. Supernova brightening from chameleon-photon mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrage, C.

    2008-01-01

    Measurements of standard candles and measurements of standard rulers give an inconsistent picture of the history of the universe. This discrepancy can be explained if photon number is not conserved as computations of the luminosity distance must be modified. I show that photon number is not conserved when photons mix with chameleons in the presence of a magnetic field. The strong magnetic fields in a supernova mean that the probability of a photon converting into a chameleon in the interior of the supernova is high, this results in a large flux of chameleons at the surface of the supernova. Chameleons and photons also mix as a result of the intergalactic magnetic field. These two effects combined cause the image of the supernova to be brightened resulting in a model which fits both observations of standard candles and observations of standard rulers

  20. Photonic crystals: towards nanoscale photonic devices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lourtioz, J.-M

    2005-01-01

    .... From this point of view, the emergence of photonic bandgap materials and photonic crystals at the end of the 1980s can be seen as a revenge to the benefit this time of optics and electromagnetism. In the same way as the periodicity of solid state crystals determines the energy bands and the conduction properties of electrons, the periodical structur...

  1. Photon-photon measurements in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Chudasama, Ruchi

    2017-01-01

    We discuss the measurement of photon-photon processes using data collected by the CMS experiment in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 and 8 TeV and in PbPb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{{\\rm NN}}}}= 5.02$ TeV.

  2. High energy photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, S.J.; Zerwas, P.M.

    1994-07-01

    The collisions of high energy photons produced at a electron-positron collider provide a comprehensive laboratory for testing QCD, electroweak interactions and extensions of the standard model. The luminosity and energy of the colliding photons produced by back-scattering laser beams is expected to be comparable to that of the primary e + e - collisions. In this overview, we shall focus on tests of electroweak theory in photon-photon annihilation, particularly γγ → W + W - , γγ → Higgs bosons, and higher-order loop processes, such as γγ → γγ, Zγ and ZZ. Since each photon can be resolved into a W + W minus pair, high energy photon-photon collisions can also provide a remarkably background-free laboratory for studying WW collisions and annihilation. We also review high energy γγ tests of quantum chromodynamics, such as the scaling of the photon structure function, t bar t production, mini-jet processes, and diffractive reactions

  3. Programmable Quantum Photonic Processor Using Silicon Photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    mentioned above, increased infidelity in the single photon states produced by sources sharply increases the resource overhead for quantum repeaters...for a time-invariant cavity. Using a “dual Hong-Ou-Mandel” geometry shown in Fig. 3, we were able to ensure that the incoming and existing photon

  4. Photonic crystal light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, James G [Albuquerque, NM; Lin, Shawn-Yu [Albuquerque, NM; Bur, James A [Corrales, NM

    2004-07-27

    A light source is provided by a photonic crystal having an enhanced photonic density-of-states over a band of frequencies and wherein at least one of the dielectric materials of the photonic crystal has a complex dielectric constant, thereby producing enhanced light emission at the band of frequencies when the photonic crystal is heated. The dielectric material can be a metal, such as tungsten. The spectral properties of the light source can be easily tuned by modification of the photonic crystal structure and materials. The photonic crystal light source can be heated electrically or other heating means. The light source can further include additional photonic crystals that exhibit enhanced light emission at a different band of frequencies to provide for color mixing. The photonic crystal light source may have applications in optical telecommunications, information displays, energy conversion, sensors, and other optical applications.

  5. Photonic Design for Photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosten, E.; Callahan, D.; Horowitz, K.; Pala, R.; Atwater, H.

    2014-08-28

    We describe photonic design approaches for silicon photovoltaics including i) trapezoidal broadband light trapping structures ii) broadband light trapping with photonic crystal superlattices iii) III-V/Si nanowire arrays designed for broadband light trapping.

  6. Photonic crystal pioneer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anscombe, Nadya

    2011-08-01

    Over the past ten years, Crystal Fiber, now part of NKT Photonics, has been busy commercializing photonic crystal fibre. Nadya Anscombe finds out about the evolution of the technology and its applications.

  7. Incidents analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francois, P.

    1996-01-01

    We undertook a study programme at the end of 1991. To start with, we performed some exploratory studies aimed at learning some preliminary lessons on this type of analysis: Assessment of the interest of probabilistic incident analysis; possibility of using PSA scenarios; skills and resources required. At the same time, EPN created a working group whose assignment was to define a new approach for analysis of incidents on NPPs. This working group gave thought to both aspects of Operating Feedback that EPN wished to improve: Analysis of significant incidents; analysis of potential consequences. We took part in the work of this group, and for the second aspects, we proposed a method based on an adaptation of the event-tree method in order to establish a link between existing PSA models and actual incidents. Since PSA provides an exhaustive database of accident scenarios applicable to the two most common types of units in France, they are obviously of interest for this sort of analysis. With this method we performed some incident analyses, and at the same time explores some methods employed abroad, particularly ASP (Accident Sequence Precursor, a method used by the NRC). Early in 1994 EDF began a systematic analysis programme. The first, transient phase will set up methods and an organizational structure. 7 figs

  8. Photonic crystals: role of architecture and disorder on spectral properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Rupesh; Audhkhasi, Romil; Thyagarajan, Krishna; Banerjee, Varsha

    2018-03-01

    Many of the present-day optical devices use photonic crystals. These are multilayers of dielectric media that control the reflection and transmission of light falling on them. In this paper, we study the optical properties of periodic, fractal, and aperiodic photonic crystals and compare them based on their attributes. Our calculations of the band reflectivity and degree of robustness reveal novel features, e.g., fractal photonic crystals are found to reflect the maximum amount of incident light. On the other hand, aperiodic photonic crystals have the largest immunity to disorder. We believe that such properties will be useful in a variety of applications in the field of optical communication.

  9. Band structure peculiarities of magnetic photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevorgyan, A. H.; Golik, S. S.

    2017-10-01

    In this work we studied light diffraction in magneto-photonic crystals (MPC) having large magneto-optical activity and modulation large depth. The case of arbitrary angles between the direction of the external static magnetic field and the normal to the border of the MPC layer is considered. The problem is solved by Ambartsumian's modified layer addition method. It is found that there is a new type of non-reciprocity, namely, the relation R (α) ≠ R (- α) takes place, where R is the reflection coefficient, and α is the incidence angle. It is shown the formation of new photonic band gap (PBG) at oblique incidence of light, which is not selective for the polarization of the incident light, in the case when the external magnetic field is directed along the medium axis. Such a system can be used as: a tunable polarization filter, polarization mirror, circular (elliptical) polarizer, tunable optical diode, etc.

  10. Collisional and photon induced molecular synthesis within ice mantles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, N.J.; Dawes, A.; Tegeder, P.; Holtom, P.

    2002-01-01

    Multilayers of molecules condensed on bulk surfaces at temperatures below 270 K are of great importance in several areas of modern physical and chemical research, for example in the terrestrial stratosphere where they play a key role in the heterogeneous catalytic destruction of ozone on the surfaces of ice crystals in polar stratospheric clouds. The interactions of photons, electrons and ions with a molecular adsorbate produces highly reactive species (radicals, cations, anions) which can subsequently react with neighbouring molecules to form new products and hence initiate further chemical and physical processes. To date, few studies of molecules synthesis by collisions within multilayers has been done and are largely restricted to ion-molecule reactions. Neutral atom/molecule-molecule collisions stimulated by photon, electron and ion impact were studied. A prototype instrument in which multilayers of ice with co-adsorbed molecular species may be formed on a cold substrate at temperatures compatible with the terrestrial atmosphere, the interstellar medium or planetary bodies was constructed. Using UV irradiation, electrons and ions films were bombarded. Molecular synthesis within the mantle was proved by a combination of FTIR, UV-vis and mass spectrometry as a function of incident flux, energy and polarization. First results of synchrotron irradiation of water film are given. (nevyjel)

  11. Photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper; Hansen, K P; Nielsen, M D

    2003-01-01

    Photonic crystal fibers having a complex microstructure in the transverse plane constitute a new and promising class of optical fibers. Such fibers can either guide light through total internal reflection or the photonic bandgap effect, In this paper, we review the different types and applications...... of photonic crystal fibers with particular emphasis on recent advances in the field....

  12. Delayed photon selfinterference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessel', A.R.; Moiseev, S.A.

    1993-01-01

    Delayed photon selfinterference on a sample containing resonant two-level atoms is considered when the difference in the lengths in two optical paths exceeds the photon 'length'. It is shown that a reading pulse of the electromagnetic field can induce photon echo

  13. Diffusion Based Photon Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjøth, Lars; Olsen, Ole Fogh; Sporring, Jon

    2006-01-01

    . To address this problem we introduce a novel photon mapping algorithm based on nonlinear anisotropic diffusion. Our algorithm adapts according to the structure of the photon map such that smoothing occurs along edges and structures and not across. In this way we preserve the important illumination features......, while eliminating noise. We call our method diffusion based photon mapping....

  14. Hidden photon dark matter search with large metallic mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doebrich, Babette; Lindner, Axel; Daumiller, Kai; Engel, Ralph; Roth, Markus; Kowalski, Marek

    2014-10-01

    If Dark Matter is composed of hidden-sector photons that kinetically mix with photons of the visible sector, then Dark Matter has a tiny oscillating electric field component. Its presence would lead to a small amount of visible radiation being emitted from a conducting surface, with the photon frequency given approximately by the mass of the hidden photon. Here, we report on experimental efforts that have started recently to search for such hidden photon Dark Matter in the (sub-)eV regime with a prototype mirror for the Auger fluorescence detector at the Karlsruhe Institute for Technology.

  15. Photon correlation holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Dinesh N; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Ezawa, Takahiro; Miyamoto, Yoko; Takeda, Mitsuo

    2011-01-17

    Unconventional holography called photon correlation holography is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. Using photon correlation, i.e. intensity correlation or fourth order correlation of optical field, a 3-D image of the object recorded in a hologram is reconstructed stochastically with illumination through a random phase screen. Two different schemes for realizing photon correlation holography are examined by numerical simulations, and the experiment was performed for one of the reconstruction schemes suitable for the experimental proof of the principle. The technique of photon correlation holography provides a new insight into how the information is embedded in the spatial as well as temporal correlation of photons in the stochastic pseudo thermal light.

  16. Asymmetry ratio in pair production and the degree of linearly polarized photons at intermediate energies

    CERN Document Server

    Asai, J

    1999-01-01

    In order to initiate the experiments using linearly polarized tagged photons at intermediate energies, it is imperative to know and to monitor the degree of polarization. The relationship is re-examined between the linear polarization of photons and the asymmetry ratio in pair production by such photons. An improved method is proposed in which pairs are prohibited from entering the cone region around the incident photon beam. By restricting the directions of pairs, the asymmetry ratio is much improved. (author)

  17. Two-photon luminescence microscopy of field enhancement at gold nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beermann, Jonas; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2005-01-01

    Using a reflection scanning optical microscope detecting two-photon luminescence (TPL) we have imaged square gold bumps positioned in a periodic array either on a smooth gold film or directly on a glass substrate. The second-harmonic (SH) and TPL response from these structures show both...... polarization and wavelength dependence. The gold bumps on gold film showed extremely high sensitivity to the incident field, with the strongest TPL response from the gold bumps being enhanced nearly 103 times compared to the TPL response from the smooth gold surface. For gold bumps directly on glass...

  18. First results from electron-photon damage equivalence studies on a generic ethylene-propylene rubber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckalew, W.H.

    1986-04-01

    As part of a simulator adequacy assessment program, the relative effectiveness of electrons and photons to produce damage in a generic ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) has been investigated. The investigation was limited in extent in that a single EPR material, in three thickness, was exposed to Cobalt-60 photons and three electron beam energies. Basing material damage on changes in the EPR mechanical properties elongation and tensile strength, we observed that EPR damage was a smoothly varying function of absorbed energy and independent of irradiating particle type. EPR damage tracked equally well as a function of both incident particle energy and material front surface dose. Based on these preliminary data, we tentatively concluded that a correlation between particle, particle energy, and material damage (as measured by changes in material elongation and/or tensile strength) has been demonstrated. 14 figs

  19. Dynamically tunable interface states in 1D graphene-embedded photonic crystal heterostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhao; Li, Shuaifeng; Liu, Xin; Zhao, Degang; Ye, Lei; Zhu, Xuefeng; Zang, Jianfeng

    2018-03-07

    Optical interface states exhibit promising applications in nonlinear photonics, low-threshold lasing, and surface-wave assisted sensing. However, the further application of interface states in configurable optics is hindered by their limited tunability. Here, we demonstrate a new approach to generate dynamically tunable and angle-resolved interface states using graphene-embedded photonic crystal (GPC) heterostructure device. By combining the GPC structure design with in situ electric doping of graphene, a continuously tunable interface state can be obtained and its tuning range is as wide as the full bandgap. Moreover, the exhibited tunable interface states offer a possibility to study the correspondence between space and time characteristics of light, which is beyond normal incident conditions. Our strategy provides a new way to design configurable devices with tunable optical states for various advanced optical applications such as beam splitter and dynamically tunable laser.

  20. Dynamically tunable interface states in 1D graphene-embedded photonic crystal heterostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhao; Li, Shuaifeng; Liu, Xin; Zhao, Degang; Ye, Lei; Zhu, Xuefeng; Zang, Jianfeng

    2018-03-01

    Optical interface states exhibit promising applications in nonlinear photonics, low-threshold lasing, and surface-wave assisted sensing. However, the further application of interface states in configurable optics is hindered by their limited tunability. Here, we demonstrate a new approach to generate dynamically tunable and angle-resolved interface states using graphene-embedded photonic crystal (GPC) heterostructure device. By combining the GPC structure design with in situ electric doping of graphene, a continuously tunable interface state can be obtained and its tuning range is as wide as the full bandgap. Moreover, the exhibited tunable interface states offer a possibility to study the correspondence between space and time characteristics of light, which is beyond normal incident conditions. Our strategy provides a new way to design configurable devices with tunable optical states for various advanced optical applications such as beam splitter and dynamically tunable laser.

  1. High-birefringence photonic crystal fiber polarization filter with gold-coated and liquid-filled air holes based on surface plasmon resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Junbo; Li, Shuguang; Cheng, Tonglei; Yan, Xin; Zhang, Xuenan

    2018-01-01

    A high-birefringence photonic crystal fiber polarization filter is proposed. The coupling theory is used to explain full and incomplete couplings. The resonance point can be adjusted to the communication band by optimizing the fiber structure parameters. Numerical simulation results indicate that the resonance strength can reach 924.96 and 710.28 dB.cm-1 at the communication wavelength of 1.31 and 1.55 μm in x- and y-polarized directions, respectively. By filling liquid analyte, the confinement loss can reach 804.52 dB.cm-1 at the wavelength of 1.55 μm. Furthermore, when the fiber length of L equals 500 μm, the peak value of the cross talk (CT) can reach 389.15 and -280.52 dB, respectively. When the length of the fiber L equals 200 μm, the bandwidth of the CT better than 20 dB is up to 120 nm at the wavelength of 1.31 μm, and the bandwidth of the CT<-20 dB is up to 140 nm at the wavelength of 1.55 μm. These properties make it a good candidate for designing types of polarization filter devices.

  2. Electron and Photon ID

    CERN Document Server

    Hryn'ova, Tetiana; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The identification of prompt photons and the rejection of background coming mostly from photons from hadron decays relies on the high granularity of the ATLAS calorimeter. The electron identification used in ATLAS for run 2 is based on a likelihood discrimination to separate isolated electron candidates from candidates originating from photon conversions, hadron misidentification and heavy flavor decays. In addition, isolation variables are used as further handles to separate signal and background. Several methods are used to measure with data the efficiency of the photon identification requirements, to cover a broad energy spectrum. At low energy, photons from radiative Z decays are used. In the medium energy range, similarities between electrons and photon showers are exploited using Z->ee decays. At high energy, inclusive photon samples are used. The measurement of the efficiencies of the electron identification and isolation cuts are performed with the data using tag and probe techniques with large statis...

  3. Enhancement of light output power of GaN-based light-emitting diodes with photonic quasi-crystal patterned on p-GaN surface and n-side sidewall roughing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with photonic quasi-crystal (PQC) structure on p-GaN surface and n-side roughing by nano-imprint lithography are fabricated and investigated. At an injection current of 20 mA, the LED with PQC structure on p-GaN surface and n-side roughing increased the light output power of the InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well LEDs by a factor of 1.42, and the wall-plug efficiency is 26% higher than the conventional GaN-based LED type. After 500-h life test (55°C/50 mA), it was found that the normalized output power of GaN-based LED with PQC structure on p-GaN surface and n-side roughing only decreased by 6%. These results offer promising potential to enhance the light output powers of commercial light-emitting devices using the technique of nano-imprint lithography. PMID:23683526

  4. 200-MeV bremsstrahlung tagged photon beams at Sendai

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, K.; Chiba, M.; Inoue, M.; Kanda, H.; Kimura, R.; Kino, K.; Kobayashi, Y.; Konno, O.; Maeda, K.; Miyase, H.; Miyamoto, A.; Ohtsuki, T.; Saito, A.; Suda, T.; Takahashi, K.; Tamae, T.; Terasaki, Y.; Terasawa, T.; Tsubota, H.; Tsuruta, T.; Utoyama, M.; Yuuki, H.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamazaki, H.

    2006-01-01

    A new beam line for photonuclear reaction experiments using tagged photons has been constructed to take advantage of the completion of the 1.2-GeV STretcher Booster (STB) ring at the Laboratory of Nuclear Science (LNS), Tohoku University. A photon tagging system was installed at the end of the new beam line. It provides bremsstrahlung tagged photon beams in an energy range from 0.2E 0 to 0.8E 0 MeV at the incident electron energy E 0 with an energy resolution of ΔE/E∼10 -2 . The tagged photon intensity I= 6 photons/s is available for typical photonuclear reaction experiments. We introduce the basic parameters of the tagged photons by showing the commissioning data

  5. Photonics of 2D materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Han; Wang, Junzhuan; Hasan, Tawfique; Bao, Qiaoliang

    2018-01-01

    The emergence of graphene and graphene-like two dimensional (2D) materials has attracted a strong interest from the photonics community in recent decade. Apart from zero-gap graphene, insulating hexagonal boron nitride and semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides and phosphorene/black phosphorus are being intensively investigated because of their fascinating photonic and optoelectronic properties. Compared to traditional bulk photonic materials such as Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) and Silicon (Si), 2D materials exhibit many unique properties important for device applications in nanophotonics. Firstly, quantum confinement in the direction perpendicular to 2D plane leads to novel electronic and optical features that are distinctively different from their bulk counterparts. Secondly, their surfaces are naturally passivated without any dangling bonds making them readily compatible for integration with photonic structures such as waveguides and cavities. It is also possible to construct vertical hetero-structures by using different 2D materials, without considering lattice mismatch issues that are common in bulk semiconductors. This is because the 2D layers with different lattice constants in heterostructures are only weakly bounded by van der Waals force. Thirdly, despite being atomically thin, many 2D materials interact very strongly with light.

  6. Optics of anisotropic metamaterial based structurally chiral photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gevorgyan, A H; Rafayelyan, M S

    2013-01-01

    Light transmission through and reflection from a medium layer with dielectric and magnetic helicities are discussed. The axes of the dielectric permittivity tensor, ε-hat , and the magnetic permeability tensor, μ-hat , as well as the medium helix axis are all parallel to each other and they are perpendicular to the boundary surfaces. The possibilities of formation of some new types of photonic bandgaps (PBGs) are presented for large anisotropies of the medium—namely, direct and indirect nonselective PBGs (with respect to the incident light polarization, in contrast to the usual direct PBGs, which are selective with respect to the polarization of the incident light). It is shown that a transmission region can arise among the three types of PBGs, in certain conditions, of course. In this paper we generalize the concept of nihility for structurally chiral media, such as cholesteric liquid crystals (CLCs) and we identify two types of CLC nihilities. It is shown that, for certain characteristic parameters of the medium, superluminal light propagation is possible in the transmission band. The influence of the anisotropy of the medium on the reflection spectra is considered and it is shown that one can tune the width, number and frequency range of PBGs of this layer, at essentially large limits, tuning the parameters of the layer. The case of oblique light incidence on the CLC layer is also discussed. (paper)

  7. Photonic crystals with active organic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yeheng

    The concept of photonic crystals, which involves periodically arranged dielectrics that form a new type of material having novel photonic properties, was first proposed about two decades ago. Since then, a number of applications in photonic technology have been explored. Specifically, organic and hybrid photonic crystals are promising because of the unique advantages of the organic materials. A one-dimensional (1D) photonic crystal (multilayer) has high reflectance across a certain wavelength range. We report on studies of 1D multilayer polymer films that were fabricated using spin-coating, free film stacking, and co-extrusion techniques. For example, a stack fabricated by placing a laser dye-doped gain medium between two multilayer reflecting polymer films forms a micro-resonator laser or distributed Bragg laser. The resulting laser system is made entirely of plastic and is only several tens of micrometers in thickness. When the gain, a dye-doped medium, comprises one type of a two-type multilayer film, it results a laser exhibiting distributed feedback. At the edge of the photonic band, the group velocity becomes small and the density of photon states becomes high, which leads to laser emission. Such distributed feedback lasers were fabricated using the co-extrusion technique. The refractive indices and the photonic lattice determine the photonic band gap, which can be tuned by changing these parameters. Materials with Kerr nonlinearity exhibit a change in refractive index depending on the incident intensity of the light. To demonstrate such switching, electrochemical etching techniques on silicon wafers were used to form two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystals. By incorporating the nonlinear organic material into the 2D structure, we have made all-optical switches. The reflection of a beam from the 2D photonic crystal can be controlled by another beam because it induces a refractive index change in the active material by altering the reflection band. A mid

  8. Achieving an Accurate Surface Profile of a Photonic Crystal for Near-Unity Solar Absorption in a Super Thin-Film Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Ping; Eyderman, Sergey; Hsieh, Mei-Li; Post, Anthony; John, Sajeev; Lin, Shawn-Yu

    2016-06-28

    In this work, a teepee-like photonic crystal (PC) structure on crystalline silicon (c-Si) is experimentally demonstrated, which fulfills two critical criteria in solar energy harvesting by (i) its Gaussian-type gradient-index profile for excellent antireflection and (ii) near-orthogonal energy flow and vortex-like field concentration via the parallel-to-interface refraction effect inside the structure for enhanced light trapping. For the PC structure on 500-μm-thick c-Si, the average reflection is only ∼0.7% for λ = 400-1000 nm. For the same structure on a much thinner c-Si ( t = 10 μm), the absorption is near unity (A ∼ 99%) for visible wavelengths, while the absorption in the weakly absorbing range (λ ∼ 1000 nm) is significantly increased to 79%, comparing to only 6% absorption for a 10-μm-thick planar c-Si. In addition, the average absorption (∼94.7%) of the PC structure on 10 μm c-Si for λ = 400-1000 nm is only ∼3.8% less than the average absorption (∼98.5%) of the PC structure on 500 μm c-Si, while the equivalent silicon solid content is reduced by 50 times. Furthermore, the angular dependence measurements show that the high absorption is sustained over a wide angle range (θinc = 0-60°) for teepee-like PC structure on both 500 and 10-μm-thick c-Si.

  9. The polarization modulation and fabrication method of two dimensional silica photonic crystals based on UV nanoimprint lithography and hot imprint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shuai; Niu, Chunhui; Liang, Liang; Chai, Ke; Jia, Yaqing; Zhao, Fangyin; Li, Ya; Zou, Bingsuo; Liu, Ruibin

    2016-10-04

    Based on a silica sol-gel technique, highly-structurally ordered silica photonic structures were fabricated by UV lithography and hot manual nanoimprint efforts, which makes large-scale fabrication of silica photonic crystals easy and results in low-cost. These photonic structures show perfect periodicity, smooth and flat surfaces and consistent aspect ratios, which are checked by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). In addition, glass substrates with imprinted photonic nanostructures show good diffraction performance in both transmission and reflection mode. Furthermore, the reflection efficiency can be enhanced by 5 nm Au nanoparticle coating, which does not affect the original imprint structure. Also the refractive index and dielectric constant of the imprinted silica is close to that of the dielectric layer in nanodevices. In addition, the polarization characteristics of the reflected light can be modulated by stripe nanostructures through changing the incident light angle. The experimental findings match with theoretical results, making silica photonic nanostructures functional integration layers in many optical or optoelectronic devices, such as LED and microlasers to enhance the optical performance and modulate polarization properties in an economical and large-scale way.

  10. Nonlinear silicon photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi, M.; Castellan, C.; Signorini, S.; Trenti, A.; Pavesi, L.

    2017-09-01

    Silicon photonics is a technology based on fabricating integrated optical circuits by using the same paradigms as the dominant electronics industry. After twenty years of fervid development, silicon photonics is entering the market with low cost, high performance and mass-manufacturable optical devices. Until now, most silicon photonic devices have been based on linear optical effects, despite the many phenomenologies associated with nonlinear optics in both bulk materials and integrated waveguides. Silicon and silicon-based materials have strong optical nonlinearities which are enhanced in integrated devices by the small cross-section of the high-index contrast silicon waveguides or photonic crystals. Here the photons are made to strongly interact with the medium where they propagate. This is the central argument of nonlinear silicon photonics. It is the aim of this review to describe the state-of-the-art in the field. Starting from the basic nonlinearities in a silicon waveguide or in optical resonator geometries, many phenomena and applications are described—including frequency generation, frequency conversion, frequency-comb generation, supercontinuum generation, soliton formation, temporal imaging and time lensing, Raman lasing, and comb spectroscopy. Emerging quantum photonics applications, such as entangled photon sources, heralded single-photon sources and integrated quantum photonic circuits are also addressed at the end of this review.

  11. Prompt photon production in photoproduction at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowak, Krzysztof

    2010-03-15

    This thesis presents measurement of the production of prompt photons in photoproduction with the H1 experiment at HERA. The analysis is based on the data taken in the years 2004-2007, with a total integrated luminosity of 340 pb{sup -1}. The main difficulty of the measurement comes from the high background of neutral mesons decaying into photons. It is accounted for with the help of multivariate analysis. Prompt photon cross sections are measured with the low negative four-momentum transfer squared Q{sup 2} < 1GeV{sup 2} and in the inelasticity range 0.1 < y < 0.7 for photons with a transverse energy 6 < E{sub T}{sup {gamma}} < 15GeV and in the pseudorapidity range.1.0 < {eta}{sup {gamma}} < 2.4 as a function of photons transverse energy and its pseudorapidity. Cross sections for prompt photon events with an additional hadronic jet are measured as a function of the transverse energy and pseudorapidity of the jet and of the momentum fractions x{sub {gamma}} and x{sub p} of the incident photon and proton carried by the constituents participating in the hard scattering process. Additionally, the transverse correlation between the photon and the jet is studied. The results are compared with predictions of a next-to-leading order calculation and a calculation based on the k{sub T} factorisation approach. Neither of calculations is able to describe all the aspects of the measurement. (orig.)

  12. Photon routing in cavity QED: Beyond the fundamental limit of photon blockade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenblum, Serge; Dayan, Barak [Department of Chemical Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Parkins, Scott [Department of Physics, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand)

    2011-09-15

    The most simple and seemingly straightforward application of the photon blockade effect, in which the transport of one photon prevents the transport of others, would be to separate two incoming indistinguishable photons to different output ports. We show that time-energy uncertainty relations inherently prevent this ideal situation when the blockade is implemented by a two-level system. The fundamental nature of this limit is revealed in the fact that photon blockade in the strong coupling regime of cavity QED, resulting from the nonlinearity of the Jaynes-Cummings energy level structure, exhibits efficiency and temporal behavior identical to those of photon blockade in the bad cavity regime, where the underlying nonlinearity is that of the atom itself. We demonstrate that this limit can be exceeded, yet not avoided, by exploiting time-energy entanglement between the incident photons. Finally, we show how this limit can be circumvented completely by using a three-level atom coupled to a single-sided cavity, enabling an ideal and robust photon routing mechanism.

  13. Single-photon imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Seitz, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The acquisition and interpretation of images is a central capability in almost all scientific and technological domains. In particular, the acquisition of electromagnetic radiation, in the form of visible light, UV, infrared, X-ray, etc. is of enormous practical importance. The ultimate sensitivity in electronic imaging is the detection of individual photons. With this book, the first comprehensive review of all aspects of single-photon electronic imaging has been created. Topics include theoretical basics, semiconductor fabrication, single-photon detection principles, imager design and applications of different spectral domains. Today, the solid-state fabrication capabilities for several types of image sensors has advanced to a point, where uncoooled single-photon electronic imaging will soon become a consumer product. This book is giving a specialist´s view from different domains to the forthcoming “single-photon imaging” revolution. The various aspects of single-photon imaging are treated by internati...

  14. Hybrid photon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    D'Ambrosio, C

    2003-01-01

    Hybrid photon detectors detect light via vacuum photocathodes and accelerate the emitted photoelectrons by an electric field towards inversely polarized silicon anodes, where they are absorbed, thus producing electron-hole pairs. These, in turn, are collected and generate electronic signals on their ohmic contacts. This review first describes the characteristic properties of the main components of hybrid photon detectors: light entrance windows, photocathodes, and silicon anodes. Then, essential relations describing the trajectories of photoelectrons in electric and magnetic fields and their backscattering from the silicon anodes are derived. Depending on their anode configurations, three families of hybrid photon detectors are presented: hybrid photomultiplier tubes with single anodes for photon counting with high sensitivity and for gamma spectroscopy; multi-anode photon detector tubes with anodes subdivided into square or hexagonal pads for position-sensitive photon detection; imaging silicon pixel array t...

  15. One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Superprisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David

    2005-01-01

    Theoretical calculations indicate that it should be possible for one-dimensional (1D) photonic crystals (see figure) to exhibit giant dispersions known as the superprism effect. Previously, three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystal superprisms have demonstrated strong wavelength dispersion - about 500 times that of conventional prisms and diffraction gratings. Unlike diffraction gratings, superprisms do not exhibit zero-order transmission or higher-order diffraction, thereby eliminating cross-talk problems. However, the fabrication of these 3D photonic crystals requires complex electron-beam substrate patterning and multilayer thin-film sputtering processes. The proposed 1D superprism is much simpler in structural complexity and, therefore, easier to design and fabricate. Like their 3D counterparts, the 1D superprisms can exhibit giant dispersions over small spectral bands that can be tailored by judicious structure design and tuned by varying incident beam direction. Potential applications include miniature gas-sensing devices.

  16. Printed Large-Area Single-Mode Photonic Crystal Bandedge Surface-Emitting Lasers on Silicon (Open Access Publisher’s Version)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-04

    beam shape, catastrophic optical damage free, and two-dimensional integration capabilities with CMOS electronics , vertical-cavity surface-emitting...longitudinal and transverse mode over a large lasing area , narrow linewidth, high power output, small beam divergence angle, polarization control...crystal lasers—ultimate nanolasers and broad - area coherent lasers [Invited]. J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 27, B1–B8 (2010). 13. Painter, O. et al. Two-dimensional

  17. Tale of two photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    A very profitable spinoff from electron- positron collisions is two-photon physics. Rather than the electron and positron interacting directly via an exchanged photon, two virtual (transient) photons, one from each particle, get tangled up. With new electron-positron colliders appearing on the scene, a topical meeting on two-photon physics - 'From DAPHNE to LEP 200 and beyond' - held from 2-4 February in Paris, in the premises of the Ministry of Higher Education and Research, was particularly timely. Some 60 physicists, both experimentalists and theorists, participated, with some thirty speakers

  18. Photon virtual bound state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, J.; Ohtaka, K.

    2004-01-01

    We study virtual bound states in photonics, which are a vectorial extension of electron virtual bound states. The condition for these states is derived. It is found that the Mie resonant state which satisfies the condition that the size parameter is less than the angular momentum should be interpreted as a photon virtual bound state. In order to confirm the validity of the concept, we compare the photonic density of states, the width of which represents the lifetime of the photon virtual bound states, with numerical results

  19. Photonic Integrated Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainak, Michael; Merritt, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Integrated photonics generally is the integration of multiple lithographically defined photonic and electronic components and devices (e.g. lasers, detectors, waveguides passive structures, modulators, electronic control and optical interconnects) on a single platform with nanometer-scale feature sizes. The development of photonic integrated circuits permits size, weight, power and cost reductions for spacecraft microprocessors, optical communication, processor buses, advanced data processing, and integrated optic science instrument optical systems, subsystems and components. This is particularly critical for small spacecraft platforms. We will give an overview of some NASA applications for integrated photonics.

  20. Advanced Photon Source (APS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratoryprovides this nation's (in fact, this hemisphere's) brightest storage...

  1. Review on Dark Photon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curciarello Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available e+e− collider experiments at the intensity frontier are naturally suited to probe the existence of a force beyond the Standard Model between WIMPs, the most viable dark matter candidates. The mediator of this new force, known as dark photon, should be a new vector gauge boson very weakly coupled to the Standard Model photon. No significant signal has been observed so far. I will report on current limits set on the coupling factor ε2 between the photon and the dark photon by e+e− collider experiments.

  2. Biomedical photonics handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2003-01-01

    1.Biomedical Photonics: A Revolution at the Interface of Science and Technology, T. Vo-DinhPHOTONICS AND TISSUE OPTICS2.Optical Properties of Tissues, J. Mobley and T. Vo-Dinh3.Light-Tissue Interactions, V.V. Tuchin 4.Theoretical Models and Algorithms in Optical Diffusion Tomography, S.J. Norton and T. Vo-DinhPHOTONIC DEVICES5.Laser Light in Biomedicine and the Life Sciences: From the Present to the Future, V.S. Letokhov6.Basic Instrumentation in Photonics, T. Vo-Dinh7.Optical Fibers and Waveguides for Medical Applications, I. Gannot and

  3. Optical Assembly and Characterization System for Nano-Photonics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Integrated device characterization for both in-plane and surface-normal photonic devices. This assembly and characterization system will significantly...Unlimited Final Report: Optical Assembly and Characterization System for Nano- Photonics Research The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this...reviewed journals: Final Report: Optical Assembly and Characterization System for Nano- Photonics Research Report Title With this equipment funding support

  4. TH-C-12A-10: Surface Dose Enhancement Using Novel Hybrid Electron and Photon Low-Z Therapy Beams: Monte Carlo Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsons, C; Parsons, D; Robar, J; Kelly, R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The introduction of the TrueBeam linac platform provides access to an in-air target assembly making it possible to apply novel treatments using multiple target designs. One such novel treatment uses multiple low-Z targets to enhance surface dose replacing the use of synthetic tissue equivalent material (bolus). This treatment technique will decrease the common dosimetric and set up errors prevalent in using physical treatment accessories like bolus. The groundwork for a novel treatment beam used to enhance surface dose to within 80-100% of the dose at dmax by utilizing low-Z (Carbon) targets of various percent CSDA range thickness operated at 2.5–4 MeV used in conjunction with a clinical 6 MV beam is presented herein. Methods: A standard Monte Carlo model of a Varian Clinac accelerator was developed to manufacturers specifications. Simulations were performed using Be, C, AL, and C, as potential low-Z targets, placed in the secondary target position. The results determined C to be the target material of choice. Simulations of 15, 30 and 60% CSDA range C beams were propagated through slab phantoms. The resulting PDDs were weighted and combined with a standard 6 MV treatment beam. Versions of the experimental targets were installed into a 2100C Clinac and the models were validated. Results: Carbon was shown to be the low-Z material of choice for this project. Using combinations of 15, 30, 60% CSDA beams operated at 2.5 and 4 MeV in combination with a standard 6 MV treatment beam the surface dose was shown to be enhanced to within 80–100% the dose at dmax. Conclusion: The modeled low-Z beams were successfully validated using machined versions of the targets. Water phantom measurements and slab phantom simulations show excellent correlation. Patient simulations are now underway to compare the use of bolus with the proposed novel beams. NSERC

  5. Three kinds of high-energy Pb ion tracks on the LiF crystal surface at grazing angles of incidence

    CERN Document Server

    Vorobyova, I V

    2002-01-01

    Tracks induced on a surface of a LiF crystal by Pb ions with energy of 4.46 MeV/u were studied by the method of shadow replica electron microscopy. The irradiation was carried out at angles of 0.5 deg. and 2 deg. relative to the surface plane of the crystal. Lengths and widths of three kinds of tracks were compared: (1) surface tracks which are formed on a pure crystal surface; (2) island tracks which are formed in an island film of gold (with island radius and separation of <=5 nm) deposited on the crystal surface prior to irradiation and (3) island tracks which are formed in the same island film pressed against the crystal surface by the carbon layer. It was established: (1) At angle of irradiation of 0.5 deg. , the surface track formation is initiated at a point where the ion has not yet crossed the crystal surface, but rather moves above the surface plane at a distance of <=1 nm. (2) When the island track is formed in the free island film, the islands completely removed from the track zone. (3) When...

  6. Two Photon Distribution Amplitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Beiyad, M.; Pire, B.; Szymanowski, L.; Wallon, S.

    2008-01-01

    The factorization of the amplitude of the process γ*γ→γγ in the low energy and high photon virtuality region is demonstrated at the Born order and in the leading logarithmic approximation. The leading order two photon (generalized) distribution amplitudes exhibit a characteristic ln Q 2 behaviour and obey new inhomogeneous evolution equations

  7. Integrated microwave photonics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marpaung, D.A.I.; Roeloffzen, C.G.H.; Heideman, Rene; Leinse, Arne; Sales, S.; Capmany, J.

    2013-01-01

    Microwave photonics (MWP) is an emerging field in which radio frequency (RF) signals are generated, distributed, processed and analyzed using the strength of photonic techniques. It is a technology that enables various functionalities which are not feasible to achieve only in the microwave domain. A

  8. Diffusion Based Photon Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjøth, Lars; Fogh Olsen, Ole; Sporring, Jon

    2007-01-01

    . To address this problem we introduce a novel photon mapping algorithm based on nonlinear anisotropic diffusion. Our algorithm adapts according to the structure of the photon map such that smoothing occurs along edges and structures and not across. In this way we preserve the important illumination features...

  9. ALICE Photon Multiplicity Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Nayak, T

    2013-01-01

    Photon Multiplicity Detector (PMD) measures the multiplicity and spatial distribution of photons in the forward region of ALICE on a event-by-event basis. PMD is a pre-shower detector having fine granularity and full azimuthal coverage in the pseudo-rapidity region 2.3 < η < 3.9.

  10. Diffusion Based Photon Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjøth, Lars; Sporring, Jon; Fogh Olsen, Ole

    2008-01-01

    . To address this problem, we introduce a photon mapping algorithm based on nonlinear anisotropic diffusion. Our algorithm adapts according to the structure of the photon map such that smoothing occurs along edges and structures and not across. In this way, we preserve important illumination features, while...

  11. Time-resolved two-photon photoemission at the Si(001)-surface. Hot electron dynamics and two-dimensional Fano resonance; Zeitaufgeloeste Zweiphotonen-Photoemission an der Si(001)-Oberflaeche. Dynamik heisser Elektronen und zweidimensionaler Fano-Effekt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eickhoff, Christian

    2010-10-27

    By combining ultrafast laser excitation with energy-, angle- and time-resolved twophoton photoemission (2PPE), the electronic properties of bulk silicon and the Si(001) surface are investigated in this thesis. A custom-built laser- and UHV-systemequipped with a display type 2D-CCD-detector gives new insight into the relaxation dynamics of excited carriers on a femtosecond timescale. The bandgap between occupied valence bands and unoccupied conduction bands characteristically influences the dynamics of excited electrons in the bulk, as well as in surface states and resonances. For the electron-phonon interaction this leads to the formation of a bottleneck during the relaxation of hot electrons in the conduction band, which maintains the elevated electronic temperature for several picoseconds. During relaxation, excited electrons also scatter from the conduction band into the unoccupied dangling-bond surface state D{sub down}. Depending on the excitation density this surface recombination is dominated by electron-electron- or electron-phonon scattering. The relaxation of the carriers in the D{sub down}-band is again slowed down by the formation of a bottleneck in electron-phonon coupling. Furthermore, the new laser system has allowed detection of the Rydberg-like series of image-potential resonances on the Si(001)-surface. It is shown that the lifetime of these image-potential resonances in front of the semiconducting surface exhibits the same behavior as those in front of metallic surfaces. Moreover the electron-phonon coupling in the first image-potential resonance was investigated and compared to the D{sub down}-surface state. For the first time, Fano-type lineprofiles are demonstrated and analyzed in a 2PPEprocess on a surface. Tuning the photon energy of the pump-laser across the resonance between the occupied dangling-bond state D{sub up}, and the unoccupied image-potential resonance n=1, reveals a clear intensity variation that can be successfully described

  12. Prompt photon production in photoproduction at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowak, Krzysztof

    2010-03-01

    This thesis presents measurement of the production of prompt photons in photoproduction with the H1 experiment at HERA. The analysis is based on the data taken in the years 2004-2007, with a total integrated luminosity of 340 pb -1 . The main difficulty of the measurement comes from the high background of neutral mesons decaying into photons. It is accounted for with the help of multivariate analysis. Prompt photon cross sections are measured with the low negative four-momentum transfer squared Q 2 2 and in the inelasticity range 0.1 T γ γ γ and x p of the incident photon and proton carried by the constituents participating in the hard scattering process. Additionally, the transverse correlation between the photon and the jet is studied. The results are compared with predictions of a next-to-leading order calculation and a calculation based on the k T factorisation approach. Neither of calculations is able to describe all the aspects of the measurement. (orig.)

  13. High energy photon response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummings, F.M.; Yoder, R.C.; Endres, G.W.R.; Kathren, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    This study examines the response of the Hanford 4-chip and 5-chip dosimeter to high energy photons. The dose response of the Hanford Multipurpose Personnel Diometer (HMPD) to photons with energies greater than 0.65 MeV has been evaluated relative to the dose produced by photons from a 60 Co. source. The penetrating dose determined with the HMPD is compared to the 1 cm depth dose in tissue measured with an extrapolation chamber. The results of the study indicate that the HMPD can be used to estimate the 1 cm depth dose in tissue from photons with energies between 0.65 MeV and 3.0 MeV to within an accuracy of 15%. However, the 1 cm depth dose is underestimated by 38% when the dosimeter is irradiated in a beam of very high energy photons produced by bombarding a tungsten target with 25 MeV electrons

  14. Photonic Crystal Fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard; Broeng, Jes; Sanchez Bjarklev, Araceli

    Photonic crystal fibres represent one of the most active research areas today in the field of optics. The diversity of applications that may be addressed by these fibres and their fundamental appeal, by opening up the possibility of guiding light in a radically new way compared to conventional...... optical fibres, have spun an interest from almost all areas of optics and photonics. The aim of this book is to provide an understanding of the different types of photonic crystal fibres and to outline some of the many new and exciting applications that these fibres offer. The book is intended for both...... readers with a general interest in photonic crystals, as well as for scientists who are entering the field and desire a broad overview as well as a solid starting point for further specialized stuides. Teh book, therefore, covers bothe general aspects such as the link from classical optics to photonic...

  15. Active Photonic Crystal Waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ek, Sara

    This thesis deals with the fabrication and characterization of active photonic crystal waveguides, realized in III-V semiconductor material with embedded active layers. The platform offering active photonic crystal waveguides has many potential applications. One of these is a compact photonic...... crystal semiconductor optical amplier. As a step towards such a component, photonic crystal waveguides with a single quantum well, 10 quantum wells and three layers of quantum dots are fabricated and characterized. An experimental study of the amplied spontaneous emission and a implied transmission...... are presented in this thesis. A variation of photonic crystal design parameters are used leading to a spectral shift of the dispersion, it is veried that the observed effects shift accordingly. An enhancement of the amplified spontaneous emission was observed close to the band edge, where light is slowed down...

  16. Nonlinear Photonics 2014: introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmediev, N; Kartashov, Yaroslav

    2015-01-12

    International Conference "Nonlinear Photonics-2014" took place in Barcelona, Spain on July 27-31, 2014. It was a part of the "Advanced Photonics Congress" which is becoming a traditional notable event in the world of photonics. The current focus issue of Optics Express contains contributions from the participants of the Conference and the Congress. The articles in this focus issue by no means represent the total number of the congress contributions (around 400). However, it demonstrates wide range of topics covered at the event. The next conference of this series is to be held in 2016 in Australia, which is the home of many researchers working in the field of photonics in general and nonlinear photonics in particular.

  17. Ion photon emission microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Barney L.

    2003-04-22

    An ion beam analysis system that creates microscopic multidimensional image maps of the effects of high energy ions from an unfocussed source upon a sample by correlating the exact entry point of an ion into a sample by projection imaging of the ion-induced photons emitted at that point with a signal from a detector that measures the interaction of that ion within the sample. The emitted photons are collected in the lens system of a conventional optical microscope, and projected on the image plane of a high resolution single photon position sensitive detector. Position signals from this photon detector are then correlated in time with electrical effects, including the malfunction of digital circuits, detected within the sample that were caused by the individual ion that created these photons initially.

  18. Photodamage of mesotetraphenylporphyrin under one- and two-photon excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Yanan; Liu Yuqiang; Yang Zhenling; Yang Yanqiang; Guo Ximing

    2010-01-01

    Photoinduced damage behavior of mesotetraphenylporphyrin (TPP) under one- and two-photon excitation with femtosecond laser pulses is investigated in the present work. Quenching in the luminescent intensity is observed. Results suggest that laser irradiation on TPP mainly causes two simultaneously occurring photoprocesses: photodamage and formation of a porphine-type photoproduct. The damage rate exhibits a linear dependence on the incident light power in one-photon excitation, whereas in two-photon excitation, the power dependence of the damage rate turns out to be exponential. The photoproduct formed in one- and two-photon excitation is identical. This product, which is observed to possess superior photostability and two-photon absorbing ability compared with the original TPP sensitizer, is likely to be treated as a secondary photosensitizer in the activation process of photodynamic therapy (PDT). This work might be helpful for the drug evaluation in the practical application of PDT.

  19. Single-photon light detection with transition-edge sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajteri, M.; Taralli, E.; Portesi, C.; Monticone, E.

    2008-01-01

    Transition-Edge Sensors (TESs) are micro calorimeters that measure the energy of incident single-photons by the resistance increase of a superconducting film biased within the superconducting-to-normal transition. TES are able to detect single photons from x-ray to IR with an intrinsic energy resolution and photon-number discrimination capability. Metrological, astronomical and quantum communication applications are the fields where these properties can be particularly important. In this work, we report about characterization of different TESs based on Ti films. Single-photons have been detected from 200 nm to 800 nm working at T c ∼ 100 m K. Using a pulsed laser at 690 nm we have demonstrated the capability to resolve up to five photons.

  20. Photonic Bandgap (PBG) Shielding Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastin, Gary L.

    2007-01-01

    Photonic Bandgap (PBG) shielding technology is a new approach to designing electromagnetic shielding materials for mitigating Electromagnetic Interference (EM!) with small, light-weight shielding materials. It focuses on ground planes of printed wiring boards (PWBs), rather than on components. Modem PSG materials also are emerging based on planar materials, in place of earlier, bulkier, 3-dimensional PBG structures. Planar PBG designs especially show great promise in mitigating and suppressing EMI and crosstalk for aerospace designs, such as needed for NASA's Constellation Program, for returning humans to the moon and for use by our first human visitors traveling to and from Mars. Photonic Bandgap (PBG) materials are also known as artificial dielectrics, meta-materials, and photonic crystals. General PBG materials are fundamentally periodic slow-wave structures in I, 2, or 3 dimensions. By adjusting the choice of structure periodicities in terms of size and recurring structure spacings, multiple scatterings of surface waves can be created that act as a forbidden energy gap (i.e., a range of frequencies) over which nominally-conductive metallic conductors cease to be a conductor and become dielectrics. Equivalently, PBG materials can be regarded as giving rise to forbidden energy gaps in metals without chemical doping, analogous to electron bandgap properties that previously gave rise to the modem semiconductor industry 60 years ago. Electromagnetic waves cannot propagate over bandgap regions that are created with PBG materials, that is, over frequencies for which a bandgap is artificially created through introducing periodic defects

  1. Photon Factory activity report, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The Photon Factory at the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics is a national facility for scientific research utilizing synchrotron radiation. Although the Photon Factory operator the linear injector, two light sources including the 2.5 GeV storage ring and the 6.5 GeV TRISTAN accumulation Ring as well as a major fraction of their beamlines and experimental station. This report is covered the period from October 1994 to September 1995. The total number of proposals by this PAC was 399 in 1995. Facility development projects currently in progress include the following, TRISTAN Super Light Facility (TSLF) project, VUV-FEL project, KEKB project and Slow-positron Source. This report contents outline of the Photon Factory, introduction, scientific disciplines, electronic properties of condensed matters, atomic and molecular science, X-ray imaging, radiobiology using synchrotron radiation, structural properties of condensed matters, structural properties of solid surfaces and adsorbates, structure and function of proteins, theoretical researches, experimental facilities, beamlines, new instrumentation, AR Upgrade, collaborations, projects, user`s short reports, list of published papers 1994/95. (S.Y.)

  2. Photon Factory activity report, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The Photon Factory at the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics is a national facility for scientific research utilizing synchrotron radiation. Although the Photon Factory operator the linear injector, two light sources including the 2.5 GeV storage ring and the 6.5 GeV TRISTAN accumulation Ring as well as a major fraction of their beamlines and experimental station. This report is covered the period from October 1994 to September 1995. The total number of proposals by this PAC was 399 in 1995. Facility development projects currently in progress include the following, TRISTAN Super Light Facility (TSLF) project, VUV-FEL project, KEKB project and Slow-positron Source. This report contents outline of the Photon Factory, introduction, scientific disciplines, electronic properties of condensed matters, atomic and molecular science, X-ray imaging, radiobiology using synchrotron radiation, structural properties of condensed matters, structural properties of solid surfaces and adsorbates, structure and function of proteins, theoretical researches, experimental facilities, beamlines, new instrumentation, AR Upgrade, collaborations, projects, user's short reports, list of published papers 1994/95. (S.Y.)

  3. Ion desorption from solid surfaces under slow (KeV) and fast (MeV) ion sputtering. Influence of the charge state and of the incidence angle on the input channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joret, H.

    1990-06-01

    Solid surfaces of organic and inorganic materials have been bombarded by fast heavy ions (several MeV). It is shown that the charge state of the projectile has a strong influence on the atomic and molecular ion desorption yield. Experimental studies proved that molecular ions can be emitted intact from deep layers underneath the surface (volume emission) with the existence of a crater emission. On the other hand light ions like H(+), H(+)-2, H(+)-3 are emitted from the surface of the solid in a time around 10 -16 second. The H(+) depends on the incident charge state g-i. When using slow ions (keV) the same dependence was observed for the first time and compared to the fast ion results. The equilibrum charge state of fast ions passing through solids was measured. The influence of the angle of incidence was investigated. Langmuir-Blodgett films of fatty acid were used. A geometrical model is developed for the 50 angstroms layer [fr

  4. Lightning incidents in Mongolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myagmar Doljinsuren

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This is one of the first studies that has been conducted in Mongolia on the distribution of lightning incidents. The study covers a 10-year period from 2004 to 2013. The country records a human death rate of 15.4 deaths per 10 million people per year, which is much higher than that of many countries with similar isokeraunic level. The reason may be the low-grown vegetation observed in most rural areas of Mongolia, a surface topography, typical to steppe climate. We suggest modifications to Gomes–Kadir equation for such countries, as it predicts a much lower annual death rate for Mongolia. The lightning incidents spread over the period from May to August with the peak of the number of incidents occurring in July. The worst lightning affected region in the country is the central part. Compared with impacts of other convective disasters such as squalls, thunderstorms and hail, lightning stands as the second highest in the number of incidents, human deaths and animal deaths. Economic losses due to lightning is only about 1% of the total losses due to the four extreme weather phenomena. However, unless precautionary measures are not promoted among the public, this figure of losses may significantly increase with time as the country is undergoing rapid industrialization at present.

  5. Characterization of photonic structures using visible and infrared polarimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kral Z.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Photonic Crystals are materials with a spatial periodic variation of the refractive index on the wavelength scale. This confers these materials interesting photonic properties such as the existence of photonic bands and forbidden photon frequency ranges, the photonic band gaps. Among their applications it is worth mentioning the achievement of low-threshold lasers and high-Q resonant cavities. A particular case of the Photonic Crystals is well-known and widely studied since a long time: the periodic thin film coatings. The characterization of thin film coatings is a classical field of study with a very well established knowledge. However, characterization of 2D and 3D photonic crystals needs to be studied in detail as it poses new problems that have to be solved. In this sense, Polarimetry is a specially suited tool given their inherent anisotropy: photonic bands depend strongly on the propagation direction and on polarization. In this work we show how photonic crystal structures can be characterized using polarimetry equipment. We compare the numerical modeling of the interaction of the light polarization with the photonic crystal with the polarimetry measurements. With the S-Matrix formalism, the Mueller matrix of a Photonic Crystal for a given wavelength, angle of incidence and propagation direction can be obtained. We will show that useful information from polarimetry (and also from spectrometry can be obtained when multivariate spectra are considered. We will also compare the simulation results with Polarimetry measurements on different kinds of samples: macroporous silicon photonic crystals in the near-IR range and Laser-Interference-Lithography nanostructured photoresist.

  6. Enhanced photochemistry on metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncher, G.M.; Parsons, C.A.; Harris, C.B.

    1984-01-01

    Due to the fast relaxation of molecular excited states in the vicinity of a metal or semiconductor surface, few observations of surface photochemistry have been reported. The following work concerns the surface-enhanced photo-reactions of a variety of physisorbed molecules on roughened Ag surfaces. In summary, photodecomposition leads to a graphitic surface carbon product which is monitored via surface-enhanced Raman scattering. In most cases an initial two-photon molecular absorption step followed by further absorption and fragmentation is thought to occur. Enhancement of the incident fields occurs through roughness-mediated surface plasmon resonances. This mechanism provides the amplified electromagnetic surface fields responsible for the observed photodecomposition. The photodecomposition experiments are performed under ultra-high vacuum. Surface characterization of the roughened surfaces was done by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and electron-stimulated emission. The SEM revealed morphology on the order of 300-400 A. This size of roughness feature, when modelled as isolated spheres should exhibit the well-known Mie resonances for light of the correct wavelengths. For protrusions existing on a surface these Mie resonances can be thought of as a coupling of the light with the surface plasmon. Experimental verification of these resonances was provided by the electron-stimulated light emission results. These showed that a polished Ag surface emitted only the expected transition radiation at the frequency of the Ag bulk plasmon. Upon roughening, however, a broad range of lower frequencies extending well into the visible are seen from electron irradiation of the surface. Large enhancements are expected for those frequencies which are able to couple into the surface modes

  7. Single photons on demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grangier, P.; Abram, I.

    2004-01-01

    Quantum cryptography and information processing are set to benefit from developments in novel light sources that can emit photons one by one. Quantum mechanics has gained a reputation for making counter-intuitive predictions. But we rarely get the chance to witness these effects directly because, being humans, we are simply too big. Take light, for example. The light sources that are familiar to us, such as those used in lighting and imaging or in CD and DVD players, are so huge that they emit billions and billions of photons. But what if there was a light source that emitted just one photon at a time? Over the past few years, new types of light source that are able to emit photons one by one have been emerging from laboratories around the world. Pulses of light composed of a single photon correspond to power flows in the femtowatt range - a million billion times less than that of a table lamp. The driving force behind the development of these single-photon sources is a range of novel applications that take advantage of the quantum nature of light. Quantum states of superposed and entangled photons could lead the way to guaranteed-secure communication, to information processing with unprecedented speed and efficiency, and to new schemes for quantum teleportation. (U.K.)

  8. Progress in neuromorphic photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira de Lima, Thomas; Shastri, Bhavin J.; Tait, Alexander N.; Nahmias, Mitchell A.; Prucnal, Paul R.

    2017-03-01

    As society's appetite for information continues to grow, so does our need to process this information with increasing speed and versatility. Many believe that the one-size-fits-all solution of digital electronics is becoming a limiting factor in certain areas such as data links, cognitive radio, and ultrafast control. Analog photonic devices have found relatively simple signal processing niches where electronics can no longer provide sufficient speed and reconfigurability. Recently, the landscape for commercially manufacturable photonic chips has been changing rapidly and now promises to achieve economies of scale previously enjoyed solely by microelectronics. By bridging the mathematical prowess of artificial neural networks to the underlying physics of optoelectronic devices, neuromorphic photonics could breach new domains of information processing demanding significant complexity, low cost, and unmatched speed. In this article, we review the progress in neuromorphic photonics, focusing on photonic integrated devices. The challenges and design rules for optoelectronic instantiation of artificial neurons are presented. The proposed photonic architecture revolves around the processing network node composed of two parts: a nonlinear element and a network interface. We then survey excitable lasers in the recent literature as candidates for the nonlinear node and microring-resonator weight banks as the network interface. Finally, we compare metrics between neuromorphic electronics and neuromorphic photonics and discuss potential applications.

  9. Searching for Heavy Photons with Detached Verices in the Heavy Photon Search Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szumila-Vance, Holly [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The Jefferson Lab Heavy Photon Search (HPS) experiment is searching for a hypothetical massive particle called the heavy photon which could mediate a dark electromagnetic-type force. If heavy photons kinetically mix with Standard Model photons, they may be radiated by electrons scattering from a heavy nucleus and then decay to e+e- pairs. HPS uniquely searches for heavy photons that either decay at the target or a measurable distance after. The experiment utilizes a silicon vertex tracker (SVT) for momentum and vertex reconstruction, together with an electromagnetic calorimeter for measuring particle energies and triggering events. The HPS experiment took its first data during the spring 2015 engineering run using a 1 GeV electron beam incident on a tungsten target and its second data in the spring of 2016 at a beam energy of 2.3 GeV. The 2015 run obtained two days of production data that was used for the first physics results. The analysis of the data was conducted as a blinded analysis by tuning cuts on 10% of the data. This dissertation discusses the displaced vertex search for heavy photons in the 2015 engineering run. It describes the theoretical motivation for looking for heavy photons and provides an overview of the HPS experimental design and performance. The performance details of the experiment are primarily derived from the 2015 engineering run with some discussion from the higher energy running in 2016. This dissertation further discusses the cuts used to optimize the displaced vertex search and the results of the search. The displaced vertex search did not set a limit on the heavy photon but did validate the methodology for conducting the search. Finally, we used the full data set to make projections and guide future analyses.

  10. Fundamentals of microwave photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Urick, V J; McKinney , Jason D

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive resource to designing andconstructing analog photonic links capable of high RFperformanceFundamentals of Microwave Photonics provides acomprehensive description of analog optical links from basicprinciples to applications.  The book is organized into fourparts. The first begins with a historical perspective of microwavephotonics, listing the advantages of fiber optic links anddelineating analog vs. digital links. The second section coversbasic principles associated with microwave photonics in both the RFand optical domains.  The third focuses on analog modulationformats-starti

  11. Single-Photon Optomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunnenkamp, A.; Børkje, K.; Girvin, S. M.

    2011-08-01

    Optomechanics experiments are rapidly approaching the regime where the radiation pressure of a single photon displaces the mechanical oscillator by more than its zero-point uncertainty. We show that in this limit the power spectrum has multiple sidebands and that the cavity response has several resonances in the resolved-sideband limit. Using master-equation simulations, we also study the crossover from the weak-coupling many-photon to the single-photon strong-coupling regime. Finally, we find non-Gaussian steady states of the mechanical oscillator when multiphoton transitions are resonant. Our study provides the tools to detect and take advantage of this novel regime of optomechanics.

  12. Photonics: Technology project summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depaula, Ramon P.

    1991-01-01

    Photonics involves the use of light (photons) in conjunction with electronics for applications in communications, computing, control, and sensing. Components used in photonic systems include lasers, optical detectors, optical wave guide devices, fiber optics, and traditional electronic devices. The goal of this program is to develop hybrid optoelectronic devices and systems for sensing, information processing, communications, and control. It is hoped that these new devices will yield at least an order of magnitude improvement in performance over existing technology. The objective of the program is to conduct research and development in the following areas: (1) materials and devices; (2) networking and computing; (3) optical processing/advanced pattern recognition; and (4) sensing.

  13. Single photon ECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Toshio; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Tada, Akira; Bunko, Hisashi; Koizumi, Kiyoshi

    1982-01-01

    The detectability of lesions located deep in a body or overlapped with a physiologically increased activity improve with the help of single photon ECT. In some cases, the ECT is superior to the conventional gamma camera images and X-ray CT scans in the evaluation of the location and size of lesion. The single photon ECT of the brain compares favorably with the contrast enhansed X-ray CT scans. The most important adaptation of the single photon ECT are the detection of recurrent brain tumors after craniotomy and the evaluation of ischemic heart diseases. (author)

  14. Fundamentals of photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Saleh, Bahaa E A

    2007-01-01

    Now in a new full-color edition, Fundamentals of Photonics, Second Edition is a self-contained and up-to-date introductory-level textbook that thoroughly surveys this rapidly expanding area of engineering and applied physics. Featuring a logical blend of theory and applications, coverage includes detailed accounts of the primary theories of light, including ray optics, wave optics, electromagnetic optics, and photon optics, as well as the interaction of photons and atoms, and semiconductor optics. Presented at increasing levels of complexity, preliminary sections build toward more advan

  15. Electron spectra obtained by photon bombadment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Minh Duc

    1981-01-01

    The physical factors modifying the kinetic energy of electrons emitted from a surface by photon irradiation are discussed, mamely: photoemission excitation mechanism and Auger emission, effects of the neutral initial state, of chemical displacements, of ionized final state, of relaxation energy. Spectra structure, spin multiplets energy loss peaks are also explained [fr

  16. Vapor Responsive One-Dimensional Photonic Crystals from Zeolite Nanoparticles and Metal Oxide Films for Optical Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina Lazarova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The preparation of responsive multilayered structures with quarter-wave design based on layer-by-layer deposition of sol-gel derived Nb2O5 films and spin-coated MEL type zeolite is demonstrated. The refractive indices (n and thicknesses (d of the layers are determined using non-linear curve fitting of the measured reflectance spectra. Besides, the surface and cross-sectional features of the multilayered structures are characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The quasi-omnidirectional photonic band for the multilayered structures is predicted theoretically, and confirmed experimentally by reflectance measurements at oblique incidence with polarized light. The sensing properties of the multilayered structures toward acetone are studied by measuring transmittance spectra prior and after vapor exposure. Furthermore, the potential of the one-dimensional photonic crystals based on the multilayered structure consisting of Nb2O5 and MEL type zeolite as a chemical sensor with optical read-out is discussed.

  17. Vapor Responsive One-Dimensional Photonic Crystals from Zeolite Nanoparticles and Metal Oxide Films for Optical Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarova, Katerina; Awala, Hussein; Thomas, Sebastien; Vasileva, Marina; Mintova, Svetlana; Babeva, Tsvetanka

    2014-01-01

    The preparation of responsive multilayered structures with quarter-wave design based on layer-by-layer deposition of sol-gel derived Nb2O5 films and spin-coated MEL type zeolite is demonstrated. The refractive indices (n) and thicknesses (d) of the layers are determined using non-linear curve fitting of the measured reflectance spectra. Besides, the surface and cross-sectional features of the multilayered structures are characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The quasi-omnidirectional photonic band for the multilayered structures is predicted theoretically, and confirmed experimentally by reflectance measurements at oblique incidence with polarized light. The sensing properties of the multilayered structures toward acetone are studied by measuring transmittance spectra prior and after vapor exposure. Furthermore, the potential of the one-dimensional photonic crystals based on the multilayered structure consisting of Nb2O5 and MEL type zeolite as a chemical sensor with optical read-out is discussed. PMID:25010695

  18. Quantum dots in photonic crystals for integrated quantum photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Je-Hyung; Richardson, Christopher J. K.; Leavitt, Richard P.; Waks, Edo

    2017-08-01

    Integrated quantum photonic technologies hold a great promise for application in quantum information processing. A major challenge is to integrate multiple single photon sources on a chip. Quantum dots are bright sources of high purity single photons, and photonic crystals can provide efficient photonic platforms for generating and manipulating single photons from integrated quantum dots. However, integrating multiple quantum dots with photonic crystal devices still remains as a challenging task due to the spectral randomness of the emitters. Here, we present the integration of multiple quantum dots with individual photonic crystal cavities and report quantum interference from chip-integrated multiple quantum dots. To solve the problem of spectral randomness, we introduce local engineering techniques for tuning multiple quantum dots and cavities. From integrated quantum dot devices we observe indistinguishable nature of single photons from individual quantum dots on the same chip. Therefore, our approach paves the way for large-scale quantum photonics with integrated quantum emitters.

  19. Observation of higher-order diffraction features in self-assembled photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, Rajesh V.; Vijaya, R.

    2007-01-01

    The optical response of high quality three dimensionally (3D) ordered photonic crystals is analyzed in the high energy region. By tuning the reflectance with the angle of incidence of light, the peaks in the reflection spectrum that correspond to the first, second, and third order photonic stop bands and the van Hove singular point in the photon density of states are clearly distinguished. The high energy features have been observed for photonic crystals made from colloids of different diameters, having different index contrast and fabricated by two different self-assembly routes. The observation of van Hove singularity at near-normal incidence of light and its presence even in low index-contrast photonic crystals provide conclusive evidence that these high energy features are due to the perfect periodic ordering present in the photonic crystals with less defects and disorder

  20. Microwave photonics shines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Rachel

    2011-12-01

    The combination of microwave photonics and optics has advanced many applications in defence, wireless communications, imaging and network infrastructure. Rachel Won talks to Jianping Yao from the University of Ottawa in Canada about the importance of this growing field.

  1. Photonic fabrics take shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham-Rowe, Duncan

    2007-01-01

    Electronics firms, fashion houses and medical-equipment suppliers are all busy developing textiles that blend photonics technology with materials science. Duncan Graham-Rowe reports on the striking results of their endeavours.

  2. Photonic Crystal Nanocavity Arrays

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Altug, Hatice; Vuckovic, Jelena

    2006-01-01

    We recently proposed two-dimensional coupled photonic crystal nanocavity arrays as a route to achieve a slow-group velocity of light in all crystal directions, thereby enabling numerous applications...

  3. Nonlinear Photonic Crystal Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim Per

    2004-01-01

    Despite the general recession in the global economy and the collapse of the optical telecommunication market, research within specialty fibers is thriving. This is, more than anything else, due to the technology transition from standard all-glass fibers to photonic crystal fibers, which, instead...... of doping, use a microstructure of air and glass to obtain a refractive index difference between the core and the cladding. This air/glass microstructure lends the photonic crystal fibers a range of unique and highly usable properties, which are very different from those found in solid standard fibers......, leading to reduced mode confinement and dispersion flexibility. In this thesis, we treat the nonlinear photonic crystal fiber – a special sub-class of photonic crystal fibers, the core of which has a diameter comparable to the wavelength of the light guided in the fiber. The small core results in a large...

  4. Photonic Crystal Fibers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kristiansen, Rene E

    2005-01-01

    This report results from a contract tasking Crystal Fibre A/S as follows: Crystal Fibre will conduct research and development of large mode area, dual clad multi-core Yb-doped photonic crystal fiber...

  5. Photonic Quantum Information Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walther, P.

    2012-01-01

    The advantage of the photon's mobility makes optical quantum system ideally suited for delegated quantum computation. I will present results for the realization for a measurement-based quantum network in a client-server environment, where quantum information is securely communicated and computed. Related to measurement-based quantum computing I will discuss a recent experiment showing that quantum discord can be used as resource for the remote state preparation, which might shine new light on the requirements for quantum-enhanced information processing. Finally, I will briefly review recent photonic quantum simulation experiments of four frustrated Heisenberg-interactions spins and present an outlook of feasible simulation experiments with more complex interactions or random walk structures. As outlook I will discuss the current status of new quantum technology for improving the scalability of photonic quantum systems by using superconducting single-photon detectors and tailored light-matter interactions. (author)

  6. Nonlinear optics and photonics

    CERN Document Server

    He, Guang S

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive presentation on most of the major topics in nonlinear optics and photonics, with equal emphasis on principles, experiments, techniques, and applications. It covers many major new topics including optical solitons, multi-photon effects, nonlinear photoelectric effects, fast and slow light , and Terahertz photonics. Chapters 1-10 present the fundamentals of modern nonlinear optics, and could be used as a textbook with problems provided at the end of each chapter. Chapters 11-17 cover the more advanced topics of techniques and applications of nonlinear optics and photonics, serving as a highly informative reference for researchers and experts working in related areas. There are also 16 pages of color photographs to illustrate the visual appearances of some typical nonlinear optical effects and phenomena. The book could be adopted as a textbook for both undergraduates and graduate students, and serve as a useful reference work for researchers and experts in the fields of physics...

  7. Principles of photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jia-Ming

    2016-01-01

    With this self-contained and comprehensive text, students will gain a detailed understanding of the fundamental concepts and major principles of photonics. Assuming only a basic background in optics, readers are guided through key topics such as the nature of optical fields, the properties of optical materials, and the principles of major photonic functions regarding the generation, propagation, coupling, interference, amplification, modulation, and detection of optical waves or signals. Numerous examples and problems are provided throughout to enhance understanding, and a solutions manual containing detailed solutions and explanations is available online for instructors. This is the ideal resource for electrical engineering and physics undergraduates taking introductory, single-semester or single-quarter courses in photonics, providing them with the knowledge and skills needed to progress to more advanced courses on photonic devices, systems and applications.

  8. Fresnel Lenses fabricated by femtosecond laser micromachining on Polymer 1D Photonic Crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guduru Surya S.K.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We report the fabrication of micro Fresnel lenses by femtosecond laser surface ablation on polymer 1D photonic crystals. This device is designed to focus the transmitted wavelength of the photonic crystal and filter the wavelengths corresponding to the photonic band gap region. Integration of such devices in a wavelength selective light harvesting and filtering microchip can be achieved.

  9. The photon collider at TESLA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Badelek, B.; Bloechinger, C.; Blümlein, J.; Boos, E.; Brinkman, R.; Burkhardt, H.; Bussey, P.; Carimalo, C.; Chýla, Jiří; Ciftci, A.K.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 30 (2004), s. 5097-5186 ISSN 0217-751X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010920 Keywords : photon collider * linear collider * gamma-gamma * photon-photon * photon electron * Compton scattering Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 1.054, year: 2004

  10. Photonics Explorer: revolutionizing photonics in the classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Amrita; Debaes, Nathalie; Cords, Nina; Fischer, Robert; Vlekken, Johan; Euler, Manfred; Thienpont, Hugo

    2012-10-01

    The `Photonics Explorer' is a unique intra-curricular optics kit designed to engage, excite and educate secondary school students about the fascination of working with light - hands-on, in their own classrooms. Developed with a pan European collaboration of experts, the kit equips teachers with class sets of experimental material provided within a supporting didactic framework, distributed in conjunction with teacher training courses. The material has been specifically designed to integrate into European science curricula. Each kit contains robust and versatile components sufficient for a class of 25-30 students to work in groups of 2-3. The didactic content is based on guided inquiry-based learning (IBL) techniques with a strong emphasis on hands-on experiments, team work and relating abstract concepts to real world applications. The content has been developed in conjunction with over 30 teachers and experts in pedagogy to ensure high quality and ease of integration. It is currently available in 7 European languages. The Photonics Explorer allows students not only to hone their essential scientific skills but also to really work as scientists and engineers in the classroom. Thus, it aims to encourage more young people to pursue scientific careers and avert the imminent lack of scientific workforce in Europe. 50 Photonics Explorer kits have been successfully tested in 7 European countries with over 1500 secondary school students. The positive impact of the kit in the classroom has been qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated. A non-profit organisation, EYESTvzw [Excite Youth for Engineering Science and Technology], is responsible for the large scale distribution of the Photonics Explorer.

  11. EDITORIAL: Selected papers from Photon06

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Julian D. C.

    2007-06-01

    , and that by Sheridan et al on spectral techniques for measuring fading in sliced, cured ham. Applied spectroscopy features strongly, partly driven by the needs of society for more intensive environmental monitoring, e.g. in vehicle emissions (Dooly et al). Imaging has always been an intrinsic and natural theme in applied optics, and I recommend the article `The optics of microscopy' by Sheppard as a comprehensive treatment of an important subject. Fibre optic sensors continue to be a strong theme, with a notable emphasis on in-fibre gratings for in situ monitoring (Ogin et al and Buggy et al). An established feature of the Photon conference is a meeting of the Fringe Analysis Special Interest Group, concentrating on full-field measurement techniques such as speckle pattern interferometry and shape measurement by structured light. A representative sample of contributions in this issue are on that subject (Rajoub et al, Zhang et al and Somers et al). In addition to the papers on optical instrumentation, there are others on laser material processing. One is struck by how sophisticated the subject has become, with one paper concerned with using surface modification by ps pulses (Gakovic et al), and another with two-photon ablation techniques (Fischer et al). This issue is a small sample, but a very worthwhile example of what Photon06 had to offer. As well as its intrinsic interest, I hope that it will inspire readers to attend Photon08, an event for which provisional plans are in hand, to be held in Edinburgh at the end of August 2008.

  12. Nanofabrication of Plasmonic Circuits Containing Single Photon Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siampour, Hamidreza; Kumar, Shailesh; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2017-01-01

    Nanofabrication of photonic components based on dielectric loaded surface plasmon polariton waveguides (DLSPPWs) excited by single nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in nanodiamonds is demonstrated. DLSPPW circuits are built around NV containing nanodiamonds, which are certified to be single...

  13. Magnetic photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyubchanskii, I L [Donetsk Physical and Technical Institute of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 72, R. Luxemburg St., 83114 Donetsk (Ukraine); Dadoenkova, N N [Donetsk Physical and Technical Institute of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 72, R. Luxemburg St., 83114 Donetsk (Ukraine); Lyubchanskii, M I [Donetsk Physical and Technical Institute of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 72, R. Luxemburg St., 83114 Donetsk (Ukraine); Shapovalov, E A [Department of Physics, Donetsk National University, 24, Universitetskaya St., 83055 Donetsk (Ukraine); Rasing, Th [NSRIM Institute, University of Nijmegen, 6525 ED, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2003-09-21

    In this paper we outline a new direction in the area of photonic crystals (PCs), or photonic band gap materials, i.e. one-, two-, or three-dimensional superstructures with periods that are comparable with the wavelengths of electromagnetic radiation. The main (and principal) characteristic of this new class of PCs is the presence of magnetically ordered components (or external magnetic field). The linear and nonlinear optical properties of such magnetic PCs are discussed. (topical review)

  14. ALICE photon spectrometer crystals

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    Members of the mechanical assembly team insert the last few crystals into the first module of ALICE's photon spectrometer. These crystals are made from lead-tungstate, a crystal as clear as glass but with nearly four times the density. When a high-energy particle passes through one of these crystals it will scintillate, emitting a flash of light allowing the energy of photons, electrons and positrons to be measured.

  15. Photonics in switching

    CERN Document Server

    Midwinter, John E; Kelley, Paul

    1993-01-01

    Photonics in Switching provides a broad, balanced overview of the use of optics or photonics in switching, from materials and devices to system architecture. The chapters, each written by an expert in the field, survey the key technologies, setting them in context and highlighting their benefits and possible applications. This book is a valuable resource for those working in the communications industry, either at the professional or student level, who do not have extensive background knowledge or the underlying physics of the technology.

  16. Photon structure function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardeen, W.A.

    1980-11-01

    Theoretical understanding of the photon structure function is reviewed. As an illustration of the pointlike component, the parton model is briefly discussed. However, the systematic study of the photon structure function is presented through the framework of the operator product expansion. Perturbative QCD is used as the theoretical basis for the calculation of leading contributions to the operator product expansion. The influence of higher order QCD effects on these results is discussed. Recent results for the polarized structure functions are discussed

  17. Photon Production at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Lafaye, Remi; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    We review the last results on photon production at LHC by the ATLAS and CMS experiments obtained in proton-proton collisions with a center of mass energy of 7 TeV. We discuss the impact of prompt photon and photon-jet differential cross-sections, on the parton distribution function of the proton. Di-photon differential cross-sections are also presented as a function of the di-photon invariant mass, transverse momentum, azimuthal separation, and cos theta*.

  18. Characterization and flux of marine oil snow settling toward the seafloor in the northern Gulf of Mexico during the Deepwater Horizon incident: Evidence for input from surface oil and impact on shallow shelf sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, Scott A; German, Christopher R

    2017-11-03

    Sediment trap samples from the shelf edge area (400-450m water depth), 58km northeast of the failed Macondo well, were collected before, during and after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Detailed chemical analyses of particulates revealed that fluxes of spill-derived TPH (2356μg/m 2 /day), total PAH (5.4μg/m 2 /day), and hopane (0.89μg/m 2 /day) settling to the seafloor directly beneath the surface-plume were 19- to 44-times higher during the active spill than pre- and post-spill background values. The oil was variably biodegraded, evaporated and photo-oxidized indicating that it derived from the sinking of surface oil. The hopane-based oil flux that we calculate (10bbl/km 2 ) indicates that at least 76,000bbl of Macondo oil that reached the ocean surface subsequently sank over an area of approximately 7600km 2 . We explore how this flux of sunken surface oil contributed to the total volume of oil deposited on the seafloor following the Deepwater Horizon incident. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Non-Poissonian photon statistics from macroscopic photon cutting materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Mathijs; Meijerink, Andries; Rabouw, Freddy T

    2017-05-24

    In optical materials energy is usually extracted only from the lowest excited state, resulting in fundamental energy-efficiency limits such as the Shockley-Queisser limit for single-junction solar cells. Photon-cutting materials provide a way around such limits by absorbing high-energy photons and 'cutting' them into multiple low-energy excitations that can subsequently be extracted. The occurrence of photon cutting or quantum cutting has been demonstrated in a variety of materials, including semiconductor quantum dots, lanthanides and organic dyes. Here we show that photon cutting results in bunched photon emission on the timescale of the excited-state lifetime, even when observing a macroscopic number of optical centres. Our theoretical derivation matches well with experimental data on NaLaF 4 :Pr 3+ , a material that can cut deep-ultraviolet photons into two visible photons. This signature of photon cutting can be used to identify and characterize new photon-cutting materials unambiguously.

  20. Double gyroid photonic crystal: synthesis and mid-infrared photonic characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Siying; Zhang, Runyu; Khabiboulline, Emil; Barim, Vitoria; Chen, Hongjie; Hon, Philip; Garcia, Juan; Sweatlock, Luke; Braun, Paul; Atwater, Harry

    Gyroids are triply symmetric and have surfaces containing no straight lines. Single gyroid (SG) photonic crystals have a large band gap, while double gyroids (DG) with P-breaking symmetry possess Weyl points and topologically non-trivial surface states. These topologically protected states give rise to backscattering immune unidirectional transport. We have synthesized and characterized the first mid-IR gyroid photonic crystals, including both SGs and DGs with Weyl points. Polymer gyroid scaffold was written by DLW, followed by ALD of Al2O3, polymer removal and conformally coating of a-Si. The resulting DGs have Weyl points at 8 μ m and k between 0.3-0.5 π/a. Characterization of SG and DG have been performed by angle resolved mid-IR spectroscopy. The photonic bandstructure is constructed from angle resolved reflectance and transmittance spectra, all the way close to the light line. Constructed bandstructures from SGs exhibit a photonic bandgap. For DGs the bandstructures reveal defect photonic states emerging inside the bandgap. Strategies to observe protected surface states in DGs will be discussed.

  1. EDITORIAL: Photonic terahertz technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisauskas, Alvydas; Löffler, Torsten; Roskos, Hartmut G.

    2005-07-01

    In recent years, when reading newspapers and journals or watching TV, one has been able to find feature presentations dealing with the prospects of terahertz (THz) technology and its potential impact on market applications. THz technology aims to fill the THz gap in the electro-magnetic spectrum in order to make the THz frequency regime, which spans the two orders of magnitude from 100 GHz to 10 THz, accessible for applications. From the lower-frequency side, electronics keeps pushing upwards, while photonic approaches gradually improve our technological options at higher frequencies. The popular interest reflects the considerable advances in research in the THz field, and it is mainly advances in the photonic branch, with the highlight being the development of the THz quantum cascade laser, which in recent years have caught the imagination of the public, and of potential users and investors. This special issue of Semiconductor Science and Technology provides an overview of key scientific developments which currently represent the cutting edge of THz photonic technology. In order to be clear about the implications, we should define exactly what we mean by 'THz photonic technology', or synonymously 'THz photonics'. It is characterized by the way in which THz radiation (or a guided THz wave) is generated, namely by the use of lasers. This may be done in one of two fundamentally different schemes: (i) by laser action in the terahertz frequency range itself (THz lasers), or (ii) by down-conversion processes (photomixing) involving the radiation of lasers which operate in the visible, near-infrared or infrared spectral ranges, either in pulsed or continuous-wave mode. The field of THz photonics has grown so considerably that it is out of the question to cover all its aspects in a single special issue of a journal. We have elected, instead, to focus our attention on two types of development with a potentially strong impact on the THz field: first, on significant advances

  2. Probing the surface microstructure of layer-by-layer self-assembly chitosan/poly(L-glutamic acid) multilayers: A grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Nie; Yang, Chunming, E-mail: yangchunming@sinap.ac.cn; Wang, Yuzhu; Zhao, Binyu; Bian, Fenggang; Li, Xiuhong; Wang, Jie, E-mail: wangjie@sinap.ac.cn

    2016-01-01

    This study characterized the surface structure of layer-by-layer self-assembly chitosan/poly(L-glutamic acid) multilayers through grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS), X-ray reflectivity (XRR), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). A weakly long-period ordered structure along the in-plane direction was firstly observed in the polyelectrolyte multilayer by the GISAXS technique. This structure can be attributed to the specific domains on the film surface. In the domain, nanodroplets that were formed by polyelectrolyte molecules were orderly arranged along the free surface of the films. This ordered structure gradually disappeared with the increasing bilayer number because of the complex merging behavior of nanodroplets into large islands. Furthermore, resonant diffuse scattering became evident in the GISAXS patterns as the number of bilayers in the polyelectrolyte multilayer was increased. Notably, the lateral cutoff length of resonant diffuse scattering for these polyelectrolyte films was comparable with the long-period value of the ordered nanodroplets in the polyelectrolyte multilayer. Therefore, the nanodroplets could be considered as a basic transmission unit for structure propagation from the inner interface to the film surface. It suggests that the surface structure with length scale larger than the size of nanodroplets was partially complicated from the interface structure near the substrate, but surface structure smaller than the cutoff length was mainly depended on the conformation of nanodroplets. - Highlights: • The growth of ordered nanodroplets in PEMs was characterized by the GISAXS technique. • The basic transmission units for structure propagation within PEMs were nanodroplets. • High-performance of wave-guiding devices prepared by PEMs was predicted.

  3. Topology optimization for nano-photonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Sigmund, Ole

    2011-01-01

    Topology optimization is a computational tool that can be used for the systematic design of photonic crystals, waveguides, resonators, filters and plasmonics. The method was originally developed for mechanical design problems but has within the last six years been applied to a range of photonics...... applications. Topology optimization may be based on finite element and finite difference type modeling methods in both frequency and time domain. The basic idea is that the material density of each element or grid point is a design variable, hence the geometry is parameterized in a pixel-like fashion....... The optimization problem is efficiently solved using mathematical programming-based optimization methods and analytical gradient calculations. The paper reviews the basic procedures behind topology optimization, a large number of applications ranging from photonic crystal design to surface plasmonic devices...

  4. UV photoprocessing of NH3 ice: photon-induced desorption mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Doménech, R.; Cruz-Díaz, G. A.; Muñoz Caro, G. M.

    2018-01-01

    Ice mantles detected on the surface of dust grains towards the coldest regions of the interstellar medium can be photoprocessed by the secondary ultraviolet (UV) field present in dense cloud interiors. In this work, we present UV-irradiation experiments under astrophysically relevant conditions of pure NH3 ice samples in an ultra-high vacuum chamber where solid samples were deposited on to a substrate at 8 K. The ice analogues were subsequently photoprocessed with a microwave-discharged hydrogen-flow lamp. The induced radiation and photochemistry led to the production of H2, N2 and N2H4. In addition, photodesorption to the gas phase of the original ice component, NH3, and two of the three detected photoproducts, H2 and N2, was observed thanks to a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS). Calibration of the QMS allowed quantification of the photodesorption yields, leading to Ypd (NH3) = 2.1^{+2.1}_{-1.0} × 10-3 molecules/{incident photon}, which remained constant during the whole experiments, while photodesorption of H2 and N2 increased with fluence, pointing towards an indirect photodesorption mechanism involving energy transfer for these species. Photodesorption yield of N2 molecules after a fluence equivalent to that experienced by ice mantles in space was similar to that of the NH3 molecules (Ypd (N2) = 1.7^{+1.7}_{-0.9} × 10-3 molecules/{incident photon}).

  5. A study on new types of metallic photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, M.I.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, I tried to synthesize a one dimension dielectric photonic crystal. I have succeeded in depositing single layers of zinc oxide and magnesium oxide on glass substrates. Each single layer was characterized by a scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, A Mirue interferometer, and a spectrophotometer. The refractive indices, extinction coefficients, and absorption coefficients of each single layer were calculated from the measured transmittance, reflectance, and thickness data. Using the calculated parameters (refractive indices) and measured parameters (thicknesses) the transmission spectrum of the one dimension photonic crystal composed of zinc oxide and magnesium oxide was modelled. Using the transfer matrix method, a comparative study of the one dimension-dielectric and metallic photonic crystals was done. Effect of the refractive index difference, filling factor, number of periods, Plasmon frequency, damping coefficient, and incidence angle on the transmittance of the dielectric and metallic photonic crystal was carried out. A multilayered structure composed of Silver and Gallium Nitride was designed to transmit in the visible region, block UV frequencies, and reflect the IR and microwave frequencies. Using a combination of MaxwellGarnett Approximation and the transfer matrix method; the properties of a nanocomposite photonic crystal consisting of Cryolite and spherical nanoparticles of silver distributed in a dielectric matrix of titanium dioxide was studied. Effect of the nanoparticle concentration, lattice constant and incidence angle on the polaritonic and structure photonic band gap were studied.

  6. CMOS-compatible photonic devices for single-photon generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiong Chunle

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Sources of single photons are one of the key building blocks for quantum photonic technologies such as quantum secure communication and powerful quantum computing. To bring the proof-of-principle demonstration of these technologies from the laboratory to the real world, complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS-compatible photonic chips are highly desirable for photon generation, manipulation, processing and even detection because of their compactness, scalability, robustness, and the potential for integration with electronics. In this paper, we review the development of photonic devices made from materials (e.g., silicon and processes that are compatible with CMOS fabrication facilities for the generation of single photons.

  7. Photonics for life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Bassi, Andrea; Comelli, Daniela; Cova, Sergio; Farina, Andrea; Ghioni, Massimo; Rech, Ivan; Pifferi, Antonio; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Taroni, Paola; Torricelli, Alessandro; Tosi, Alberto; Valentini, Gianluca; Zappa, Franco

    2011-01-01

    Light is strictly connected with life, and its presence is fundamental for any living environment. Thus, many biological mechanisms are related to light interaction or can be evaluated through processes involving energy exchange with photons. Optics has always been a precious tool to evaluate molecular and cellular mechanisms, but the discovery of lasers opened new pathways of interactions of light with biological matter, pushing an impressive development for both therapeutic and diagnostic applications in biomedicine. The use of light in different fields has become so widespread that the word photonics has been utilized to identify all the applications related to processes where the light is involved. The photonics area covers a wide range of wavelengths spanning from soft X-rays to mid-infrared and includes all devices related to photons as light sources, optical fibers and light guides, detectors, and all the related electronic equipment. The recent use of photons in the field of telecommunications has pushed the technology toward low-cost, compact, and efficient devices, making them available for many other applications, including those related to biology and medicine where these requirements are of particular relevance. Moreover, basic sciences such as physics, chemistry, mathematics, and electronics have recognized the interdisciplinary need of biomedical science and are translating the most advanced researches into these fields. The Politecnico school has pioneered many of them,and this article reviews the state of the art of biomedical research at the Politecnico in the field internationally known as biophotonics.

  8. Molecular desorption of a nonevaporable getter St 707 irradiated at room temperature with synchrotron radiation of 194 eV critical photon energy

    CERN Document Server

    Le Pimpec, F; Laurent, Jean Michel

    2003-01-01

    Photon stimulated molecular desorption from a nonevaporable getter (NEG) St 707(R) (SAES Getters TM ) surface after conditioning and after saturation with isotopic carbon monoxide Ýcf. nomenclature in Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 74th edition, edited by D. R. Lide (CRC Press, Boca Raton, 1994)¿ /sup 13/C/sup 18/O, has been studied on a dedicated beamline at the EPA ring at CERN. The synchrotron radiation of 194 eV critical energy and with an average photon intensity of ~1 * 10/sup 17/ photons s/sup -1/ was impinging on the sample at perpendicular incidence. It is found that the desorption yields eta (molecules/photon) of the characteristic gases in an UHV system (hydrogen, methane, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide) for a freshly activated NEG and for a NEG fully saturated with /sup 13/C /sup 18/O are lower than that of 300 degrees C baked stainless steel. (22 refs). Fully activated NEG was studied and found to desorb less as compared to a 300 degree c baked stainless-steel surface. Furthermore, it ...

  9. The bremsstrahlung tagged photon beam in Hall B at JLab

    CERN Document Server

    Sober, D I; Longhi, A; Matthews, S K; O'Brien, J T; Berman, B L; Briscoe, W J; Cole, P L; Connelly, J P; Dodge, W R; Murphy, L Y; Philips, S A; Dugger, M K; Lawrence, D; Ritchie, B G; Smith, E S; Lambert, J M; Anciant, E; Audit, G; Auger, T; Marchand, C; Klusman, M; Napolitano, J; Khandaker, M A; Salgado, C W; Sarty, A J

    2000-01-01

    We describe the design and commissioning of the photon tagging beamline installed in experimental Hall B at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). This system can tag photon energies over a range from 20% to 95% of the incident electron energy, and is capable of operation with beam energies up to 6.1 GeV. A single dipole magnet is combined with a hodoscope containing two planar arrays of plastic scintillators to detect energy-degraded electrons from a thin bremsstrahlung radiator. The first layer of 384 partially overlapping small scintillators provides photon energy resolution, while the second layer of 61 larger scintillators provides the timing resolution necessary to form a coincidence with the corresponding nuclear interaction triggered by the tagged photon. The definitions of overlap channels in the first counter plane and of geometric correlation between the two planes are determined using digitized time information from the individual counters. Auxiliary beamline devices are briefl...

  10. Short-range surface plasmonics: Localized electron emission dynamics from a 60-nm spot on an atomically flat single-crystalline gold surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Bettina; Kahl, Philip; Podbiel, Daniel; Spektor, Grisha; Orenstein, Meir; Fu, Liwei; Weiss, Thomas; Horn-von Hoegen, Michael; Davis, Timothy J; Meyer Zu Heringdorf, Frank-J; Giessen, Harald

    2017-07-01

    We experimentally and theoretically visualize the propagation of short-range surface plasmon polaritons using atomically flat single-crystalline gold platelets on silicon substrates. We study their excitation and subfemtosecond dynamics via normal-incidence two-photon photoemission electron microscopy. By milling a plasmonic disk and grating structure into a single-crystalline gold platelet, we observe nanofocusing of the short-range surface plasmon polariton. Localized two-photon ultrafast electron emission from a spot with a smallest dimension of 60 nm is observed. Our novel approach opens the door toward reproducible plasmonic nanofocusing devices, which do not degrade upon high light intensity or heating due to the atomically flat surface without any tips, protrusions, or holes. Our nanofoci could also be used as local emitters for ultrafast electron bunches in time-resolved electron microscopes.

  11. Mesoscopic photon heat transistor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ojanen, T.; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2008-01-01

    We show that the heat transport between two bodies, mediated by electromagnetic fluctuations, can be controlled with an intermediate quantum circuit-leading to the device concept of a mesoscopic photon heat transistor (MPHT). Our theoretical analysis is based on a novel Meir-Wingreen-Landauer-typ......We show that the heat transport between two bodies, mediated by electromagnetic fluctuations, can be controlled with an intermediate quantum circuit-leading to the device concept of a mesoscopic photon heat transistor (MPHT). Our theoretical analysis is based on a novel Meir......-Wingreen-Landauer-type of conductance formula, which gives the photonic heat current through an arbitrary circuit element coupled to two dissipative reservoirs at finite temperatures. As an illustration we present an exact solution for the case when the intermediate circuit can be described as an electromagnetic resonator. We discuss...

  12. Graphene-based photonic crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, Oleg L.; Boyko, Vladimir S.; Kezerashvili, Roman Ya.; Kolesnikov, Anton A.; Lozovik, Yurii E.

    2010-01-01

    A novel type of photonic crystal formed by embedding a periodic array of constituent stacks of alternating graphene and dielectric discs into a background dielectric medium is proposed. The photonic band structure and transmittance of such photonic crystal are calculated. The graphene-based photonic crystals can be used effectively as the frequency filters and waveguides for the far infrared region of electromagnetic spectrum. Due to substantial suppression of absorption of low-frequency radiation in doped graphene the damping and skin effect in the photonic crystal are also suppressed. The advantages of the graphene-based photonic crystal are discussed.

  13. Update on photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arteaga-Romero, N.; Cochard, G.; Ong, S.; Amiens Univ., 80; Carimalo, C.; Kessler, P.; Nicolaidis, A.; Parisi, J.; Courau, A.

    1980-03-01

    This report is the continuation of the 'Update' of last year (L.P.C. 79-03, March 1979, in French). In Part I, the structure functions of the photon in QCD are examined. It is shown that, while large psub(T) hadron production is similar to some extent in γγ collisions and in hadron-hadron collisions, the point-like nature of the photon introduces new terms which are entirely calculable, providing new means to test the dynamics of strong interactions. In Part II, problems of analysis in γγ experiments are discussed. The pros and cons of various options with regard to the measurement of outgoing electrons (non-tagging, finite-angle tagging, tagging at 0 0 ) are compared. It is shown that (a) non-tagging may be applied to the study of a limited number of processes only; (b) finite-angle tagging counters allow for various possibilities (double-tagging, single-tagging, double anti-tagging), but none of them is entirely satisfactory; (c) the ideal measurement is double tagging at 0 0 , provided the problem of bremsstrahlung saturation of the tagging counters can be solved

  14. Models for photon-photon total cross-sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godbole, R.M.; Grau, A.; Pancheri, G.

    1999-01-01

    The paper presents here a brief overview of recent models describing the photon-photon cross-section into hadrons. It shall be showed in detail results from the eikonal minijet model, with and without soft gluon summation

  15. Handedness of direct photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopeliovich, B.Z.; Rezaeian, A.H.; Schmidt, Ivan

    2008-01-01

    The azimuthal asymmetry of direct photons originating from primary hard scatterings between partons is calculated. This can be accounted for by the inclusion of the color dipole orientation, which is sensitive to the rapid variation of the nuclear profile. To this end we introduce the dipole orientation within the saturation model of Golec-Biernat and Wuesthoff, while preserving all its features at the cross-section level. We show that the direct photon elliptic anisotropy v2 coming from this mechanism changes sign and becomes negative for peripheral collisions, albeit it is quite small for nuclear collisions at the RHIC energy. (author)

  16. Recent developments in the theory of photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1984-09-01

    Over the past few years the field of photon-photon collisions has emerged as one of the best testing grounds for QCD, particularly in the area of exclusive and inclusive hard scattering processes, exotic resonance production, and detailed tests of the coupling of real and virtual photons to the quark current. In this summary of contributed papers, I will briefly review recent theoretical progress in the analysis of two-photon reactions and possible directions for future work. 29 references

  17. Photon states in anisotropic media

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rosen) cor- relations as codified in Bell's inequalities have been tested for the polarization-entangled states of two photons. Similarly, quantum teleportation and quantum encryption have also been accomplished using photon polarization states.

  18. Photon strength functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergqvist, I.

    1976-01-01

    Methods for extracting photon strength functions are briefly discussed. We follow the Brink-Axel approach to relate the strength functions to the giant resonances observed in photonuclear work and summarize the available data on the E1, E2 and M1 resonances. Some experimental and theoretical problems are outlined. (author)

  19. Photonic band structure computations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, D; Frank, M; Busch, K; Wolfle, P

    2001-01-29

    We introduce a novel algorithm for band structure computations based on multigrid methods. In addition, we demonstrate how the results of these band structure calculations may be used to compute group velocities and effective photon masses. The results are of direct relevance to studies of pulse propagation in such materials.

  20. ALICE Photon Spectrometer

    CERN Multimedia

    Kharlov, Y

    2013-01-01

    PHOS provides unique coverage of the following physics topics: - Study initial phase of the collision of heavy nuclei via direct photons, - Jet-quenching as a probe of deconfinement, studied via high Pτ ϒ and π0, - Signals of chiral-symmetry restoration, - QCD studies in pp collisions via identified neutral spectra.

  1. What is a Photon?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    We discuss the absorber theory of radiation as put forward by Wheeler and Feynman. We show that it gives a better understanding of the photon compared to the usual quantum electrodynamics. (QED) picture. All the fifty years of conscious brooding have brought me no closer to answer the question, `What are light quanta ...

  2. Magnetic photon scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovesey, S.W.

    1987-05-01

    The report reviews, at an introductory level, the theory of photon scattering from condensed matter. Magnetic scattering, which arises from first-order relativistic corrections to the Thomson scattering amplitude, is treated in detail and related to the corresponding interaction in the magnetic neutron diffraction amplitude. (author)

  3. Biomedical photonics handbook biomedical diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2014-01-01

    Shaped by Quantum Theory, Technology, and the Genomics RevolutionThe integration of photonics, electronics, biomaterials, and nanotechnology holds great promise for the future of medicine. This topic has recently experienced an explosive growth due to the noninvasive or minimally invasive nature and the cost-effectiveness of photonic modalities in medical diagnostics and therapy. The second edition of the Biomedical Photonics Handbook presents fundamental developments as well as important applications of biomedical photonics of interest to scientists, engineers, manufacturers, teachers, studen

  4. Limits on the photon mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasseur, G.

    1996-03-01

    Is the photon mass strictly null as it is told in quantum electrodynamics. In fact, a coherent theory can be build with a massive photon. Experiences have been regularly led to try to make obvious an eventual non null photon mass. Superior limits more and more strict have been found. Here is given a general survey of the consequences of a non null photon mass, different methods to measure it and the achieved limits. (author). 30 refs., 1 fig

  5. Applications of Photonic Crystals to Photovoltaic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Stephen

    Photonic crystals are structures that exhibit wavelength-scale spatial periodicity in their dielectric function. They are best known for their ability to exhibit complete photonic band gaps (PBGs) - spectral regions over which no light can propagate within the crystal. PBGs are specific instances of a more general phenomenon, in which the local photonic density of states can be enhanced or suppressed over different frequency ranges by tuning the properties of the crystal. This can be used to redirect, concentrate, or even trap light incident on the crystal. In this thesis, we investigate how photonic crystals can be used to enhance the efficiency of photovoltaic devices by trapping light. Due to the many different types of photovoltaic devices in existence (varying widely in materials used, modes of operation, and internal structure), there is no single light trapping architecture that can be applied to all photovoltaics. In this work we study a number of different devices: dye-sensitized solar cells, polymer solar cells, silicon-perovskite tandem cells, and single-junction silicon cells. We propose novel photonic crystal-based light trapping designs for each type of device, and evaluate these designs numerically to demonstrate their effectiveness. Full-field optical simulations of the cell are performed for each design, using either finite element method (FEM) or finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) techniques. Where appropriate, electrical modelling of the cell is also performed, through either the use of a simple one-diode model, or by obtaining full solutions to the semiconductor drift-diffusion equations within the cell. In all cases we find that the photonic crystal-based designs significantly outperform their non-nanostructured counterparts. In the case of dye-sensitized and polymer cells, enhancements in light absorption of 33% and 40% (respectively) are seen, relative to reference cells with planar geometries. In the case of silicon-perovskite tandem cells

  6. FY 2005 Infrared Photonics Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anheier, Norman C.; Allen, Paul J.; Ho, Nicolas; Krishnaswami, Kannan; Johnson, Bradley R.; Sundaram, S. K.; Riley, Bradley M.; Martinez, James E.; Qiao, Hong (Amy); Schultz, John F.

    2005-12-01

    Research done by the Infrared Photonics team at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is focused on developing miniaturized integrated optics for mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) sensing applications by exploiting the unique optical and material properties of chalcogenide glass. PNNL has developed thin-film deposition capabilities, direct laser writing techniques, infrared photonic device demonstration, holographic optical element design and fabrication, photonic device modeling, and advanced optical metrology—all specific to chalcogenide glass. Chalcogenide infrared photonics provides a pathway to quantum cascade laser (QCL) transmitter miniaturization. QCLs provide a viable infrared laser source for a new class of laser transmitters capable of meeting the performance requirements for a variety of national security sensing applications. The high output power, small size, and superb stability and modulation characteristics of QCLs make them amenable for integration as transmitters into ultra-sensitive, ultra-selective point sampling and remote short-range chemical sensors that are particularly useful for nuclear nonproliferation missions. During FY 2005, PNNL’s Infrared Photonics research team made measurable progress exploiting the extraordinary optical and material properties of chalcogenide glass to develop miniaturized integrated optics for mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) sensing applications. We investigated sulfur purification methods that will eventually lead to routine production of optical quality chalcogenide glass. We also discovered a glass degradation phenomenon and our investigation uncovered the underlying surface chemistry mechanism and developed mitigation actions. Key research was performed to understand and control the photomodification properties. This research was then used to demonstrate several essential infrared photonic devices, including LWIR single-mode waveguide devices and

  7. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Karthik

    2011-12-01

    Silicon Photonics is quickly proving to be a suitable interconnect technology for meeting the future goals of on-chip bandwidth and low power requirements. However, it is not clear how silicon photonics will be integrated into CMOS chips, particularly microprocessors. The issue of integrating photonic circuits into electronic IC fabrication processes to achieve maximum flexibility and minimum complexity and cost is an important one. In order to minimize usage of chip real estate, it will be advantageous to integrate in three-dimensions. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is emerging as a promising material for the 3-D integration of silicon photonics for on-chip optical interconnects. In addition, a-Si:H film can be deposited using CMOS compatible low temperature plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process at any point in the fabrication process allowing maximum flexibility and minimal complexity. In this thesis, we demonstrate a-Si:H as a high performance alternate platform to crystalline silicon, enabling backend integration of optical interconnects in a hybrid photonic-electronic network-on-chip architecture. High quality passive devices are fabricated on a low-loss a-Si:H platform enabling wavelength division multiplexing schemes. We demonstrate a broadband all-optical modulation scheme based on free-carrier absorption effect, which can enable compact electro-optic modulators in a-Si:H. Furthermore, we comprehensively characterize the optical nonlinearities in a-Si:H and observe that a-Si:H exhibits enhanced nonlinearities as compared to crystalline silicon. Based on the enhanced nonlinearities, we demonstrate low-power four-wave mixing in a-Si:H waveguides enabling high speed all-optical devices in an a-Si:H platform. Finally, we demonstrate a novel data encoding scheme using thermal and all-optical tuning of silicon waveguides, increasing the spectral efficiency in an interconnect link.

  8. Optimization of photonic crystal cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Fengwen; Sigmund, Ole

    2017-01-01

    We present optimization of photonic crystal cavities. The optimization problem is formulated to maximize the Purcell factor of a photonic crystal cavity. Both topology optimization and air-hole-based shape optimization are utilized for the design process. Numerical results demonstrate...... that the Purcell factor of the photonic crystal cavity can be significantly improved through optimization....

  9. Construction of Nanowire Heterojunctions: Photonic Function-Oriented Nanoarchitectonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong Jun; Yan, Yongli; Zhao, Yong Sheng; Yao, Jiannian

    2016-02-10

    Nanophotonics has received broad research interest because it may provide an alternative opportunity to overcome the fundamental limitations of electronic circuits. So far, diverse photonic functions, such as light generation, modulation, and detection, have been realized based on various nano-materials. The exact structural features of these material systems, including geometric characteristics, surface morphology, and material composition, play a key role in determining the photonic functions. Therefore, rational designs and constructions of materials on both morphological and componential levels, namely nanoarchitectonics, are indispensable for any photonic device with specific functionalities. Recently, a series of nanowire heterojunctions (NWHJs), which are usually made from two or more kinds of material compositions, were constructed for novel photonic applications based on various interactions between different materials at the junctions, for instance, energy transfer, exciton-plasmon coupling, or photon-plasmon coupling. A summary of these works is necessary to get a more comprehensive understanding of the relationship between photonic functions and architectonics of NWHJs, which will be instructive for designing novel photonic devices towards integrated circuits. Here, photonic function oriented nanoarchitectonics based on recent breakthroughs in nanophotonic devices are discussed, with emphasis on the design mechanisms, fabrication strategies, and excellent performances. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Development of a high-speed single-photon pixellated detector for visible wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Mac Raighne, Aaron; Mathot, Serge; McPhate, Jason; Vallerga, John; Jarron, Pierre; Brownlee, Colin; O’Shea, Val

    2009-01-01

    We present the development of a high-speed, single-photon counting, Hybrid Photo Detector (HPD). The HPD consists of a vacuum tube, containing the detector assembly, sealed with a transparent optical input window. Photons incident on the photocathode eject a photoelectron into a large electric field, which accelerates the incident electron onto a silicon detector. The silicon detector is bump bonded to a Medipix readout chip. This set-up allows for the detection and readout of low incident photon intensities at rates that are otherwise unattainable with current camera technology. Reported is the fabrication of the camera that brings together a range of sophisticated design and fabrication techniques and the expected theoretical imaging performance. Applications to cellular and molecular microscopy are also described in which single-photon-counting abilities at high frame rates are crucial

  11. Photonic Waveguide Choke Joint with Absorptive Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollack, Edward J. (Inventor); U-Yen, Kongpop (Inventor); Chuss, David T. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A photonic waveguide choke includes a first waveguide flange member having periodic metal tiling pillars, a dissipative dielectric material positioned within an area between the periodic metal tiling pillars and a second waveguide flange member disposed to be coupled with the first waveguide flange member and in spaced-apart relationship separated by a gap. The first waveguide flange member has a substantially smooth surface, and the second waveguide flange member has an array of two-dimensional pillar structures formed therein.

  12. Diagnostic phosphors for photon beams at the ALS and APS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, Deming; Warwick, T.; Johnson, E.D.

    1991-01-01

    Some tests have been made of phosphors for photon beam diagnosis. Plasma sprayed coatings were checked for damage and decay during a period of several ampere-hours of irradiation from the NSLS Xray ring. Surface temperatures were measured and extrapolated to give an indication of the temperatures expected in more powerful photon beams. Based on our findings we have chosen plasma-sprayed coatings of Europium-doped Yttrium Oxide as the best candidate for use on masks and flags in ''white'' photon beams of the new facilities. 4 refs., 2 figs

  13. Photon-Emission From Peeling Pressure Sensitive Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, J. T.

    1988-04-01

    When materials are deformed and fractured, new surfaces are formed which may contain charge concentrations, defects, and broken bonds. The consequences of such departures from non-equilibrium can be the emission of particles (electrons, ions, and neutral species) as well as photons (triboluminescence). Collectively, we refer to these emissions as fracto-emission. In the case of peeling pressure sensitive adhesives from various substrates, charge separation plays a dominant role in producing relatively intense photon-emission as well as other emissions. Here we report on a few of the properties of the photon emission from peeling commercial adhesive tapes and address in particular the time, spectral, and spatial domains.

  14. Tunable omnidirectional photonic band gap of one-dimensional photonic crystals containing Dirac semimetals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yunkun; Zhang, Yuping; Guo, Xiaohan; Liu, Maodong; Chen, Huan; Liu, Shande; Zhang, Huiyun

    2017-12-01

    We have theoretically investigated the tunability of the omnidirectional bandgap (OBG) of a one-dimensional photonic crystal consisting of alternating Dirac semimetals (DSs) and SiO2 dielectrics by adjusting the structural Fermi level. This photonic bandgap (PBG) is strongly dependent on the Fermi level and thickness ratio of the DSs and SiO2 layers. The effects of different parameters such as Fermi level, incident angle, and lattice constant on PBG are analyzed in detail. It is found that the first gap does not change with the change in lattice constant, but it is sensitive to the Fermi level; the width of the omnidirectional PBG increases with the structural Fermi level. The second gap is also sensitive to the Fermi level, the upper and lower frequency limits of this PBG shift to higher frequency, and the width becomes narrower as the Fermi level is increasing, where only one OBG exists in the range of 3.6-4.3 THz for transverse electric polarization. However, as the angle of incidence increases, the photonic bandgap can close for transverse magnetic polarization. All these properties can be applied to tunable optical filters or optical switches.

  15. Few-photon optical diode

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Dibyendu

    2010-01-01

    We propose a novel scheme of realizing an optical diode at the few-photon level. The system consists of a one-dimensional waveguide coupled asymmetrically to a two-level system. The two or multi-photon transport in this system is strongly correlated. We derive exactly the single and two-photon current and show that the two-photon current is asymmetric for the asymmetric coupling. Thus the system serves as an optical diode which allows transmission of photons in one direction much more efficie...

  16. Photon production at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Lafaye, R

    2013-01-01

    We review the last results on photon production at the LHC by the ATLAS and CMS experiments obtained in proton-proton collisions with a center of mass energy of 7 TeV in 2010 and 2011, corresponding to a maximum integrated luminosity of 5 fb−1. We compare the prompt photon and photon-jet differential cross-sections to theoretical predictions and discuss their impact on the parton distribution functions of the proton. Di-photon differential cross-sections are also presented as a function of the di-photon invariant mass, transverse momentum, azimuthal separation, and cos theta*.

  17. Physics with Photons in ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2011-01-01

    The fine granularity ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter provides a precise measurement of the photon energy and direction, as well as efficient rejection of background from fake photons, while the high precision inner detector allows also the reconstruction of photons that convert into electron-positron pairs.Isolated photons are measured using well-defined infrared-safe isolation criteria corrected for underlying event and the effects of additional proton-proton collisions. Differential cross sections for inclusive photons and diphotons are presented, and the spectrum of diphoton production is used to search for the Higgs boson in this decay channel.

  18. Photonic band gap materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassagne, D.

    Photonic band gap materials Photonic band gap materials are periodic dielectric structures that control the propagation of electromagnetic waves. We describe the plane wave method, which allows to calculate the band structures of photonic crystals. By symmetry analysis and a perturbative approach, we predict the appearance of the low energy photonic band gaps of hexagonal structures. We propose new two-dimensional structures called graphite and boron nitride. Using a transfer matrix method, we calculate the transmission of the graphite structure and we show the crucial role of the coupling with external modes. We study the appearance of allowed modes in the photonic band gap by the introduction of localized defects in the periodicity. Finally, we discuss the properties of opals formed by self-organized silica microspheres, which are very promising for the fabrication of three-dimensional photonic crystals. Les matériaux à bandes interdites photoniques sont des structures diélectriques périodiques qui contrôlent la propagation des ondes électromagnétiques. Nous décrivons la méthode des ondes planes qui permet de calculer les structures de bandes des cristaux photoniques. Par une analyse de la symétrie et une approche perturbative, nous précisons les conditions d'existence des bandes interdites de basse énergie. Nous proposons de nouvelles structures bidimensionnelles appelées graphite et nitrure de bore. Grâce à une méthode de matrices de transfert, nous calculons la transmission de la structure graphite et nous mettons en évidence le rôle fondamental du couplage avec les modes extérieurs. Nous étudions l'apparition de modes permis dans la bande interdite grâce à l'introduction de défauts dans la périodicité. Enfin, nous discutons les propriétés des opales constituées de micro-billes de silice auto-organisées, qui sont très prometteuses pour la fabrication de cristaux photoniques tridimensionnels.

  19. Photonic band gap structure for a ferroelectric photonic crystal at microwave frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Tzu-Chyang; Chen, De-Xin; Lin, Wei-Cheng; Wu, Chien-Jang

    2015-10-10

    In this work, the photonic band gap (PBG) structure in a one-dimensional ferroelectric photonic crystal (PC) is theoretically investigated. We consider a PC, air/(AB)N/air, in which layer A is a dielectric of MgO and layer B is taken to be a ferroelectric of Ba0.55Sr0.45TiO3 (BSTO). With an extremely high value in the dielectric constant in BSTO, the calculated photonic band structure at microwave frequencies exhibits some interesting features that are significantly different from those in a usual dielectric-dielectric PC. First, the photonic transmission band consists of multiple and nearly discrete transmission peaks. Second, the calculated bandwidth of the PBG is nearly unchanged as the angle of incidence varies in the TE wave. The bandwidth will slightly reduce for the TM mode. Thus, a wide omnidirectional PBG can be obtained. Additionally, the effect of the thickness of the ferroelectric layer on the PBG is much more pronounced compared to the dielectric layer thickness. That is, the increase of ferroelectric thickness can significantly decrease the PBG bandwidth.

  20. Perspectives: Nanofibers and nanowires for disordered photonics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Pisignano

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available As building blocks of microscopically non-homogeneous materials, semiconductor nanowires and polymer nanofibers are emerging component materials for disordered photonics, with unique properties of light emission and scattering. Effects found in assemblies of nanowires and nanofibers include broadband reflection, significant localization of light, strong and collective multiple scattering, enhanced absorption of incident photons, synergistic effects with plasmonic particles, and random lasing. We highlight recent related discoveries, with a focus on material aspects. The control of spatial correlations in complex assemblies during deposition, the coupling of modes with efficient transmission channels provided by nanofiber waveguides, and the embedment of random architectures into individually coded nanowires will allow the potential of these photonic materials to be fully exploited, unconventional physics to be highlighted, and next-generation optical devices to be achieved. The prospects opened by this technology include enhanced random lasing and mode-locking, multi-directionally guided coupling to sensors and receivers, and low-cost encrypting miniatures for encoders and labels.

  1. Photonic Crystal Sensors Based on Porous Silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Pacholski

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Porous silicon has been established as an excellent sensing platform for the optical detection of hazardous chemicals and biomolecular interactions such as DNA hybridization, antigen/antibody binding, and enzymatic reactions. Its porous nature provides a high surface area within a small volume, which can be easily controlled by changing the pore sizes. As the porosity and consequently the refractive index of an etched porous silicon layer depends on the electrochemial etching conditions photonic crystals composed of multilayered porous silicon films with well-resolved and narrow optical reflectivity features can easily be obtained. The prominent optical response of the photonic crystal decreases the detection limit and therefore increases the sensitivity of porous silicon sensors in comparison to sensors utilizing Fabry-Pérot based optical transduction. Development of porous silicon photonic crystal sensors which allow for the detection of analytes by the naked eye using a simple color change or the fabrication of stacked porous silicon photonic crystals showing two distinct optical features which can be utilized for the discrimination of analytes emphasize its high application potential.

  2. Photonic Crystal Sensors Based on Porous Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacholski, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Porous silicon has been established as an excellent sensing platform for the optical detection of hazardous chemicals and biomolecular interactions such as DNA hybridization, antigen/antibody binding, and enzymatic reactions. Its porous nature provides a high surface area within a small volume, which can be easily controlled by changing the pore sizes. As the porosity and consequently the refractive index of an etched porous silicon layer depends on the electrochemial etching conditions photonic crystals composed of multilayered porous silicon films with well-resolved and narrow optical reflectivity features can easily be obtained. The prominent optical response of the photonic crystal decreases the detection limit and therefore increases the sensitivity of porous silicon sensors in comparison to sensors utilizing Fabry-Pérot based optical transduction. Development of porous silicon photonic crystal sensors which allow for the detection of analytes by the naked eye using a simple color change or the fabrication of stacked porous silicon photonic crystals showing two distinct optical features which can be utilized for the discrimination of analytes emphasize its high application potential. PMID:23571671

  3. Photon activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segebade, C.; Weise, H.P.; Lutz, G.J.

    1988-01-01

    This book is written to give, in a concentrated form, an overview of the application of photonuclear reactions to activation analysis. Is is intended to accompany the analyst's work in the photon activation analysis laboratory as a practical usable reference. Emphasis is placed upon analytical qualitative and quantitative data which are based upon experimentally obtained results. Therefore, both a source of general information on photon activation analysis and a laboratory manual are combined in this book. The results of the authors' laboratory work and a large amount of literature data are evaluated and presented as completely as possible by the authors. Special knowledge of photonuclear physics is not required; only a very elementary theoretical introduction is given. More detailed information on the physical and mathematical theory should be sought in the special literature which is cited in the relevant chapters. (orig./RB)

  4. Photons in a ball

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueck, Wolfgang [Universita degli Studi di Napoli ' ' Federico II' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica ' ' Ettore Pancini' ' , Naples (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Napoli, Naples (Italy)

    2015-12-15

    The electromagnetic field inside a spherical cavity of large radius R is considered in the presence of stationary charge and current densities. R provides infra-red regularisation while maintaining gauge invariance. The quantum ground state of physical photons forming the magnetic field is found to be a coherent state with a definite mean occupation number. The electric field, which is determined by the Gauss law constraint, is maintained by a minimum uncertainty coherent state, according to the projection operator approach to the quantisation of constrained systems. The mean occupation number of this state is proportional to the square of the total charge. The results confirm formulae obtained previously from a calculation with a finite photon mass for infra-red regularisation. (orig.)

  5. Photons in a ball

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mück, Wolfgang, E-mail: mueck@na.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica “Ettore Pancini”, Università degli Studi di Napoli “Federico II”, Via Cintia, 80126, Naples (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia, 80126, Naples (Italy)

    2015-12-11

    The electromagnetic field inside a spherical cavity of large radius R is considered in the presence of stationary charge and current densities. R provides infra-red regularisation while maintaining gauge invariance. The quantum ground state of physical photons forming the magnetic field is found to be a coherent state with a definite mean occupation number. The electric field, which is determined by the Gauss law constraint, is maintained by a minimum uncertainty coherent state, according to the projection operator approach to the quantisation of constrained systems. The mean occupation number of this state is proportional to the square of the total charge. The results confirm formulae obtained previously from a calculation with a finite photon mass for infra-red regularisation.

  6. Natural photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigneron, Jean Pol; Simonis, Priscilla

    2012-10-01

    Photonic structures appeared in nature several hundred millions years ago. In the living world, color is used for communication and this important function strongly impacts the individual chances of survival as well as the chances to reproduce. This has a statistical influence on species populations. Therefore, because they are involved in evolution, natural color-generating structures are - from some point of view - highly optimized. In this short review, a survey is presented of the development of natural photonic crystal-type structures occurring in insects, spiders, birds, fishes and other marine animals, in plants and more, from the standpoint of light-waves propagation. One-, two-, and three-dimensional structures will be reviewed with selected examples.

  7. Essentials of photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Rogers, Alan; Baets, Roel

    2008-01-01

    Photons and ElectronsHistorical SketchThe Wave Nature of LightPolarizationThe Electromagnetic SpectrumEmission and Absorption ProcessesPhoton Statistics The Behaviour of Electrons LasersSummaryWave Properties of LightThe Electromagnetic SpectrumWave RepresentationElectromagnetic WavesReflection and RefractionTotal Internal ReflectionInterference of LightLight WaveguidingInterferometersDiffractionGaussian Beams and Stable Optical ResonatorsPolarization OpticsThe Polarization EllipseCrystal OpticsRetarding WaveplatesA Variable Waveplate: The Soleil-Babinet Compensator Polarizing PrismsLinear BirefringenceCircular BirefringenceElliptical BirefringencePractical Polarization EffectsPolarization AnalysisThe Form of the Jones MatricesLight and Matter Emission, Propagation, and Absorption ProcessesClassical Theory of Light Propagation in Uniform Dielectric Media Optical Dispersion Emission and Absorption of LightOptical Coherence and CorrelationIntroductionMeasure of Coherence Wiener-Khinchin TheoremDual-Beam Interfe...

  8. Photonics an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Reider, Georg A

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction into photonics, from the electrodynamic and quantum mechanic fundamentals to the level of photonic components and building blocks such as lasers, amplifiers, modulators, waveguides, and detectors. The book will serve both as textbook and as a reference work for the advanced student or scientist. Theoretical results are derived from basic principles with convenient, yet state-of-the-art mathematical tools, providing not only deeper understanding but also familiarization with formalisms used in the relevant technical literature and research articles. Among the subject matters treated are polarization optics, pulse and beam propagation, waveguides, light–matter interaction, stationary and transient behavior of lasers, semiconductor optics and lasers (including low-dimensional systems such as quantum wells), detector technology, photometry, and colorimetry. Nonlinear optics are elaborated comprehensively. The book is intended for both students of physics and elect...

  9. Energy deposition model for I-125 photon radiation in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuss, M.C.; Garcia, G. [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Madrid (Spain); Munoz, A.; Oller, J.C. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Blanco, F. [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Limao-Vieira, P. [Laboratorio de Colisoes Atomicas e Moleculares, Departamento de Fisica, CEFITEC, FCT-Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Caparica (Portugal); Williart, A.; Garcia, G. [Departamento de Fisica de los Materiales, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Madrid (Spain); Huerga, C.; Tellez, M. [Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-10-15

    In this study, an electron-tracking Monte Carlo algorithm developed by us is combined with established photon transport models in order to simulate all primary and secondary particle interactions in water for incident photon radiation. As input parameters for secondary electron interactions, electron scattering cross sections by water molecules and experimental energy loss spectra are used. With this simulation, the resulting energy deposition can be modelled at the molecular level, yielding detailed information about localization and type of single collision events. The experimental emission spectrum of I-125 seeds, as used for radiotherapy of different tumours, was used for studying the energy deposition in water when irradiating with this radionuclide. (authors)

  10. Energy deposition model for I-125 photon radiation in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuss, M.C.; Garcia, G.; Munoz, A.; Oller, J.C.; Blanco, F.; Limao-Vieira, P.; Williart, A.; Garcia, G.; Huerga, C.; Tellez, M.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, an electron-tracking Monte Carlo algorithm developed by us is combined with established photon transport models in order to simulate all primary and secondary particle interactions in water for incident photon radiation. As input parameters for secondary electron interactions, electron scattering cross sections by water molecules and experimental energy loss spectra are used. With this simulation, the resulting energy deposition can be modelled at the molecular level, yielding detailed information about localization and type of single collision events. The experimental emission spectrum of I-125 seeds, as used for radiotherapy of different tumours, was used for studying the energy deposition in water when irradiating with this radionuclide. (authors)

  11. Three-photon micromasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obada, A.S.F.; Abu Sitta, A.M.M.; Yasin, O.M.

    1993-01-01

    A non-degenerate 3-photon micromaser is analyzed. A 4-level atom is taken and 3 models of the field are considered. The model is solved for the case of resonance and the master equation for the density matrix is obtained. Semi-analytical solutions are obtained under specified approximations. Three modes can exist depending on the time of interaction. (author). 10 refs, 2 figs

  12. Active Photonic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Valle, Giuseppe; Osellame, Roberto

    The chapter is devoted to active photonic devices fabricated by fs-laser writing. After a brief introduction focused on the role played by fs-laser written active devices, Sect. 10.2 briefly reviews the spectroscopical properties of the most interesting active ions so far exploited, namely erbium, ytterbium, neodimium, and bismuth. In Sect. 10.3 the main figures of merit for an active waveguide, namely the internal gain, the insertion loss, the net gain, and the noise figure are introduced and the experimental procedure for accurate gain measurement is also detailed. A thorough review of the active photonic devices demonstrated with the femtosecond laser microfabrication technique is presented in Sects. 10.4, 10.5, and 10.6, where several active waveguides and amplifiers, prototypal lasers, as well as more functionalized laser devices (operating under single longitudinal mode or stable mode-locking regime) are illustrated, respectively. Finally, conclusions and future perspectives of femtosecond-laser micromachining of active photonic devices are provided.

  13. Photon-activation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairchild, R.G.; Bond, V.P.

    1982-01-01

    Photon Activation Therapy (PAT) is a technique in which radiation dose to tumor is enhanced via introduction of stable 127 I in the form of iodinated deoxyuridine (IdUrd). Stimulation of cytotoxic effects from IdUrd is accomplished by activation with external (or implanted) radiation sources. Thus, accumulations of this nucleoside in actively competing cellpools do not preclude therapy in so far as such tissues can be excluded from the radiation field. Calculations show that 5% replacement of thymidine (Tyd) in tumor DNA should enhance the biological effectiveness of a given photon radiotherapy dose by a factor of approx. 3. Proportionally higher gains would result from higher replacements of Tyd and IdUrd. In addition, biological response is enhanced by chemical sensitization with IdUrd. The data indicate that damage from photon activation as well as chemical sensitization does not repair. Thus, at low dose rates, a further increase in therapeutic gain should accrue as normal tissues are allowed to repair and regenerate. A samarium-145 source has been developed for PAT, with activating x-ray energies of from 38 to 45 keV. Favorable clinical results can be expected through the use of IdUrd and protracted irradiations with low energy x-rays. In particular, PAT may provide unique advantages at selected sites such as brain, or head and neck tumors

  14. Slotted Photonic Crystal Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scullion, Mark G.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Di Falco, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Optical biosensors are increasingly being considered for lab-on-a-chip applications due to their benefits such as small size, biocompatibility, passive behaviour and lack of the need for fluorescent labels. The light guiding mechanisms used by many of them results in poor overlap of the optical field with the target molecules, reducing the maximum sensitivity achievable. This review article presents a new platform for optical biosensors, namely slotted photonic crystals, which provide higher sensitivities due to their ability to confine, spatially and temporally, the optical mode peak within the analyte itself. Loss measurements showed values comparable to standard photonic crystals, confirming their ability to be used in real devices. A novel resonant coupler was designed, simulated, and experimentally tested, and was found to perform better than other solutions within the literature. Combining with cavities, microfluidics and biological functionalization allowed proof-of-principle demonstrations of protein binding to be carried out. Higher sensitivities were observed in smaller structures than possible with most competing devices reported in the literature. This body of work presents slotted photonic crystals as a realistic platform for complete on-chip biosensing; addressing key design, performance and application issues, whilst also opening up exciting new ideas for future study. PMID:23503295

  15. Photonic Molecule Lasers Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Denis; Dumont, Joey; Déziel, Jean-Luc; Dubé, Louis J.

    2014-05-01

    Photonic molecules (PMs) formed by coupling two or more optical resonators are ideal candidates for the fabrication of integrated microlasers, photonic molecule lasers. Whereas most calculations on PM lasers have been based on cold-cavity (passive) modes, i.e. quasi-bound states, a recently formulated steady-state ab initio laser theory (SALT) offers the possibility to take into account the spectral properties of the underlying gain transition, its position and linewidth, as well as incorporating an arbitrary pump profile. We will combine two theoretical approaches to characterize the lasing properties of PM lasers: for two-dimensional systems, the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory will obtain the resonant modes of the coupled molecules in an active medium described by SALT. Not only is then the theoretical description more complete, the use of an active medium provides additional parameters to control, engineer and harness the lasing properties of PM lasers for ultra-low threshold and directional single-mode emission. We will extend our recent study and present new results for a number of promising geometries. The authors acknowledge financial support from NSERC (Canada) and the CERC in Photonic Innovations of Y. Messaddeq.

  16. Bio-inspired photonic crystals with superwettability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Minxuan; Wang, Jingxia; Jiang, Lei

    2016-12-21

    Photonic crystals (PCs) have attracted enormous research interest due to their unique light manipulation and potential applications in sensing, catalysts, detection, displays, solar cells and other fields. In particular, many novel applications of PCs are derived from their surface wettability. Generally, the wettability of PCs is determined by a combination of its surface geometrical structures and surface chemical compositions. This review focuses on the recent developments in the mechanism, fabrication and application of bio-inspired PCs with superwettability. It includes information on constructing superwetting PCs based on designing the topographical structure and regulating the surface chemical composition, and information on extending the practical applications of superwetting PCs in humidity/oil/solvent sensing, actuating, anti-fouling and liquid-impermeable surface, chemical detection, etc.

  17. Effect of Temperature on Photonic Band Gaps in Semiconductor-Based One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. V. Malik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the temperature and angle of incidence on the photonic band gap (PBG for semiconductor-based photonic crystals has been investigated. The refractive index of semiconductor layers is taken as a function of temperature and wavelength. Three structures have been analyzed by choosing a semiconductor material for one of the two materials in a bilayer structure. The semiconductor material is taken to be ZnS, Si, and Ge with air in first, second, and third structures respectively. The shifting of band gaps with temperature is more pronounced in the third structure than in the first two structures because the change in the refractive index of Ge layers with temperature is more than the change of refractive index of both ZnS and Si layers with temperature. The propagation characteristics of the proposed structures are analyzed by transfer matrix method.

  18. Omnidirectional photonic band gap enlarged by one-dimensional ternary unmagnetized plasma photonic crystals based on a new Fibonacci quasiperiodic structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Haifeng [College of Electronic and Information Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Nanjing Artillery Academy, Nanjing 211132 (China); Liu Shaobin [College of Electronic and Information Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); State Key Laboratory of Millimeter Waves of Southeast University, Nanjing Jiangsu 210096 (China); Kong Xiangkun; Bian Borui; Dai Yi [College of Electronic and Information Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China)

    2012-11-15

    In this paper, an omnidirectional photonic band gap realized by one-dimensional ternary unmagnetized plasma photonic crystals based on a new Fibonacci quasiperiodic structure, which is composed of homogeneous unmagnetized plasma and two kinds of isotropic dielectric, is theoretically studied by the transfer matrix method. It has been shown that such an omnidirectional photonic band gap originates from Bragg gap in contrast to zero-n gap or single negative (negative permittivity or negative permeability) gap, and it is insensitive to the incidence angle and the polarization of electromagnetic wave. From the numerical results, the frequency range and central frequency of omnidirectional photonic band gap can be tuned by the thickness and density of the plasma but cease to change with increasing Fibonacci order. The bandwidth of omnidirectional photonic band gap can be notably enlarged. Moreover, the plasma collision frequency has no effect on the bandwidth of omnidirectional photonic band gap. It is shown that such new structure Fibonacci quasiperiodic one-dimensional ternary plasma photonic crystals have a superior feature in the enhancement of frequency range of omnidirectional photonic band gap compared with the conventional ternary and conventional Fibonacci quasiperiodic ternary plasma photonic crystals.

  19. Monte Carlo studies on photon interactions in radiobiological experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahmohammadi Beni, Mehrdad; Krstic, D; Nikezic, D; Yu, K N

    2018-01-01

    X-ray and γ-ray photons have been widely used for studying radiobiological effects of ionizing radiations. Photons are indirectly ionizing radiations so they need to set in motion electrons (which are a directly ionizing radiation) to perform the ionizations. When the photon dose decreases to below a certain limit, the number of electrons set in motion will become so small that not all cells in an "exposed" cell population can get at least one electron hit. When some cells in a cell population are not hit by a directly ionizing radiation (in other words not irradiated), there will be rescue effect between the irradiated cells and non-irradiated cells, and the resultant radiobiological effect observed for the "exposed" cell population will be different. In the present paper, the mechanisms underlying photon interactions in radiobiological experiments were studied using our developed NRUphoton computer code, which was benchmarked against the MCNP5 code by comparing the photon dose delivered to the cell layer underneath the water medium. The following conclusions were reached: (1) The interaction fractions decreased in the following order: 16O > 12C > 14N > 1H. Bulges in the interaction fractions (versus water medium thickness) were observed, which reflected changes in the energies of the propagating photons due to traversals of different amount of water medium as well as changes in the energy-dependent photon interaction cross-sections. (2) Photoelectric interaction and incoherent scattering dominated for lower-energy (10 keV) and high-energy (100 keV and 1 MeV) incident photons. (3) The fractions of electron ejection from different nuclei were mainly governed by the photoelectric effect cross-sections, and the fractions from the 1s subshell were the largest. (4) The penetration fractions in general decreased with increasing medium thickness, and increased with increasing incident photon energy, the latter being explained by the corresponding reduction in

  20. INDIA: Photon multiplicity detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Full text: The team of Indian scientists from Calcutta's Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Bhubaneswar Institute of Physics, Panjab (Chandigarh), Rajasthan (Jaipur) and Jammu in collaboration with GSI Darmstadt have contributed a large and highly granular preshower photon multiplicity detector (PMD) for the WA98 experiment at the CERN SPS proton synchrotron. This experiment studies high energy collisions of lead ions and will measure both charged particle and photon multiplicity in a large overlap region. The motivation for measuring photon multiplicity in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions stems from theoretical predictions of changes in the relative production of photons and charged particles in the phase transition of hadronic matter to quarkgluon plasma and its subsequent hadronization. The photon multiplicity detector consists of a matrix of scintillator pads placed in light-tight boxes and mounted behind the lead converter plates. The light from the scintillator pads is transported to the readout system using wavelength shifting (WLS) fibres. Developing on the team's earlier experience with a smaller version for the WA93 experiment (September 1991, page 16), several modifications were incorporated to improve light collection and transport. Use of improved WLS fibres, short WLS pieces to minimize self-absorption, and thermal splicing with long clear fibres were some of the important changes incorporated. Tests showed signficantly improved light collection. The scintillator pads were fabricated at all the five collaborating centres in India and the complicated assembly in the detector box modules carried out at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Calcutta. More than 400 lead converter plates were machined in Calcutta to rigorous tolerances of 0.2 mm. The assembled detector box modules and lead plates were shipped to CERN in spring 1994 for tests and installation. The WA98 PMD consists of over 50,000 scintillator pads of sizes varying from 15 to

  1. First Swiss bachelor in Photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leutenegger, Tobias; Studer, Bruno

    2015-10-01

    Swissmem, the Swiss association of mechanical and electrical engineering industries, founded a new photonics group in 2013. This reflects the importance of this key technology for Switzerland. Swissmem requested from the Swiss Universities of Applied Sciences to introduce a new bachelor program to fulfill the increasing demand of the Swiss industry of young academics in the field of photonics. Optech Consulting is investigating the Swiss photonics market since many years on behalf of Swissphotonics, the Swiss national thematic network for photonics. The study concluded that the total production volume of the Swiss photonics industry in the year 2013 was 3 billion Swiss francs and a slight growth is expected for 2014. The University of Applied Science HTW Chur is located in the Eastern part of Switzerland. This area of the Rhine valley is a technology cluster of innovative companies in the field of optics and electronics. The industry is growing and the R&D departments of the worldwide active companies are lacking well-educated photonics engineers. The HTW Chur is dedicated to establish the first Swiss bachelor in Photonics. Supported by strong industrial players and an excellent network, the HTW Chur developed different job descriptions and a complete curriculum, which reflect the needs of the Swiss photonics industry. Almost 60% of the ECTS of this national degree program are assigned to photonics specific courses and the practical projects are organized in close collaboration with the photonics industry. Curriculum, job descriptions and the industrial needs will be discussed in detail in this paper.

  2. Role of electron back action on photons in hybridizing double-layer graphene plasmons with localized photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Danhong; Iurov, Andrii; Gumbs, Godfrey

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we deal with the electromagnetic coupling between an incident surface-plasmon-polariton wave and relativistic electrons in two graphene layers. Our previous investigation was limited to single-layer graphene (Iurov et al 2017 Phys. Rev. B 96 081408). However, the present work, is both an expanded and extended version of this previous Phys. Rev. B paper after having included very detailed theoretical formalisms and extensive comparisons of results from either one or two graphene layers embedded in a dielectric medium. The additional retarded Coulomb interaction between two graphene layers will compete with the coupling between the single graphene layer and the surface of a conductor. Consequently, some distinctive features, such as triply-hybridized absorption peaks and a new acoustic-like graphene plasmon mode within the anticrossing region, have been found for the double-layer graphene system. Physically, our theory is self-consistent, in comparison with a commonly adopted perturbative theory, for studying hybrid light-plasmon modes and the electron back action on photons. Instead of usual radiation or grating-deflection field coupling, a surface-plasmon-polariton localized field coupling is introduced with completely different dispersion relations for radiative (small wave numbers) and evanescent (large wave numbers) field modes. Technically, the exactly calculated effective scattering matrix for this theory can be employed to construct an effective-medium theory in order to improve the accuracy of the well-known finite-difference time-domain method for solving Maxwell’s equations numerically. Practically, the predicted triply-hybridized absorption peaks can excite polaritons only, giving rise to a possible polariton-condensation based laser.

  3. Asymmetric-cut variable-incident-angle monochromator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smither, R K; Graber, T J; Fernandez, P B; Mills, D M

    2012-03-01

    A novel asymmetric-cut variable-incident-angle monochromator was constructed and tested in 1997 at the Advanced Photon Source of Argonne National Laboratory. The monochromator was originally designed as a high heat load monochromator capable of handling 5-10 kW beams from a wiggler source. This was accomplished by spreading the x-ray beam out on the surface an asymmetric-cut crystal and by using liquid metal cooling of the first crystal. The monochromator turned out to be a highly versatile monochromator that could perform many different types of experiments. The monochromator consisted of two 18° asymmetrically cut Si crystals that could be rotated about 3 independent axes. The first stage (Φ) rotates the crystal around an axis perpendicular to the diffraction plane. This rotation changes the angle of the incident beam with the surface of the crystal without changing the Bragg angle. The second rotation (Ψ) is perpendicular to the first and is used to control the shape of the beam footprint on the crystal. The third rotation (Θ) controls the Bragg angle. Besides the high heat load application, the use of asymmetrically cut crystals allows one to increase or decrease the acceptance angle for crystal diffraction of a monochromatic x-ray beam and allows one to increase or decrease the wavelength bandwidth of the diffraction of a continuum source like a bending-magnet beam or a normal x-ray-tube source. When the monochromator is used in the doubly expanding mode, it is possible to expand the vertical size of the double-diffracted beam by a factor of 10-15. When this was combined with a bending magnet source, it was possible to generate an 8 keV area beam, 16 mm wide by 26 mm high with a uniform intensity and parallel to 1.2 arc sec that could be applied in imaging experiments.

  4. High resolution reversible color images on photonic crystal substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Pilgyu; Ogunbo, Samuel O; Erickson, David

    2011-08-16

    When light is incident on a crystalline structure with appropriate periodicity, some colors will be preferentially reflected (Joannopoulos, J. D.; Meade, R. D.; Winn, J. N. Photonic crystals: molding the flow of light; Princeton University Press: Princeton, NJ, 1995; p ix, 137 pp). These photonic crystals and the structural color they generate represent an interesting method for creating reflective displays and drawing devices, since they can achieve a continuous color response and do not require back lighting (Joannopoulos, J. D.; Villeneuve, P. R.; Fan, S. H. Photonic crystals: Putting a new twist on light. Nature 1997, 386, 143-149; Graham-Rowe, D. Tunable structural colour. Nat. Photonics 2009, 3, 551-553.; Arsenault, A. C.; Puzzo, D. P.; Manners, I.; Ozin, G. A. Photonic-crystal full-colour displays. Nat. Photonics 2007, 1, 468-472; Walish, J. J.; Kang, Y.; Mickiewicz, R. A.; Thomas, E. L. Bioinspired Electrochemically Tunable Block Copolymer Full Color Pixels. Adv. Mater.2009, 21, 3078). Here we demonstrate a technique for creating erasable, high-resolution, color images using otherwise transparent inks on self-assembled photonic crystal substrates (Fudouzi, H.; Xia, Y. N. Colloidal crystals with tunable colors and their use as photonic papers. Langmuir 2003, 19, 9653-9660). Using inkjet printing, we show the ability to infuse fine droplets of silicone oils into the crystal, locally swelling it and changing the reflected color (Sirringhaus, H.; Kawase, T.; Friend, R. H.; Shimoda, T.; Inbasekaran, M.; Wu, W.; Woo, E. P. High-resolution inkjet printing of all-polymer transistor circuits. Science 2000, 290, 2123-2126). Multicolor images with resolutions as high as 200 μm are obtained from oils of different molecular weights with the lighter oils being able to penetrate deeper, yielding larger red shifts. Erasing of images is done simply by adding a low vapor pressure oil which dissolves the image, returning the substrate to its original state.

  5. Scattering-Type Surface-Plasmon-Resonance Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Pain, Bedabrata; Cunningham, Thomas; Seshadri, Suresh

    2005-01-01

    Biosensors of a proposed type would exploit scattering of light by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Related prior biosensors exploit absorption of light by SPR. Relative to the prior SPR biosensors, the proposed SPR biosensors would offer greater sensitivity in some cases, enough sensitivity to detect bioparticles having dimensions as small as nanometers. A surface plasmon wave can be described as a light-induced collective oscillation in electron density at the interface between a metal and a dielectric. At SPR, most incident photons are either absorbed or scattered at the metal/dielectric interface and, consequently, reflected light is greatly attenuated. The resonance wavelength and angle of incidence depend upon the permittivities of the metal and dielectric. An SPR sensor of the type most widely used heretofore includes a gold film coated with a ligand a substance that binds analyte molecules. The gold film is thin enough to support evanescent-wave coupling through its thickness. The change in the effective index of refraction at the surface, and thus the change in the SPR response, increases with the number of bound analyte molecules. The device is illuminated at a fixed wavelength, and the intensity of light reflected from the gold surface opposite the ligand-coated surface is measured as a function of the angle of incidence. From these measurements, the angle of minimum reflection intensity is determined

  6. Lateral propagation of fast electrons at the laser-irradiated target surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y T; Lin, X X; Liu, B C; Du, F; Wang, S J; Li, C; Zhou, M L; Zhang, L; Liu, X; Wang, J; Liu, X L; Chen, L M; Wang, Z H; Ma, J L; Wei, Z Y; Zhang, J; Liu, F; Liu, F

    2010-01-01

    Lateral propagation of fast electrons at the target surfaces irradiated by femtosecond intense laser pulses is measured by k α x-ray imaging technique when a preplasma is presented. An annular halo surrounding a bright spot is observed in the x-ray images when the scale length of the electron density is large. For an incidence angle of 70 0 the x-ray images show a non-symmetrical distribution peaked to the laser propagation direction. The x-ray photons in the halo are mainly excited by the fast electrons that flow in the preplasma when their paths intersect the high density regions near the target surface.

  7. MCFRS Incidents by Station

    Data.gov (United States)

    Montgomery County of Maryland — This dataset contains the monthly summary data indicating incident occurred in each fire station response area. The summary data is the incident count broken down by...

  8. Police Incident Reports Written

    Data.gov (United States)

    Town of Chapel Hill, North Carolina — This table contains incident reports filed with the Chapel Hill Police Department. Multiple incidents may have been reported at the same time. The most serious...

  9. Two photon versus one photon fluorescence excitation in whispering gallery mode microresonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastells, Carme; Marco, M.-Pilar; Merino, David; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo; Pasquardini, Laura; Lunelli, Lorenzo; Pederzolli, Cecilia; Daldosso, Nicola; Farnesi, Daniele; Berneschi, Simone; Righini, Giancarlo C.; Quercioli, Franco; Nunzi Conti, Gualtiero; Soria, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of both one photon and two photon fluorescence excitation using whispering gallery mode microresonators. We report the linear and non linear fluorescence real-time detection of labeled IgG covalently bonded to the surface of a silica whispering gallery mode resonator (WGMR). The immunoreagents have been immobilized onto the surface of the WGMR sensor after being activated with an epoxy silane and an orienting layer. The developed immunosensor presents great potential as a robust sensing device for fast and early detection of immunoreactions. We also investigate the potential of microbubbles as nonlinear enhancement platform. The dyes used in these studies are dylight800, tetramethyl rhodamine isothiocyanate, rhodamine 6G and fluorescein. All measurements were performed in a modified confocal microscope. - Highlights: • One photon fluorescence overlaps with the semiconductor pump laser gain bandwidth. • We report on the feasibility to excite two photon fluorescence in microbubble resonators. • Our functionalization process maintains a good quality factor of the microresonator.

  10. Two photon versus one photon fluorescence excitation in whispering gallery mode microresonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastells, Carme; Marco, M.-Pilar [Nanobiotechnology for Diagnostics Group (Nb4Dg), IQAC-CSIC, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Merino, David; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo [ICFO-Institut de Ciències Fotòniques, Castelldefels, 08860 Barcelona (Spain); Pasquardini, Laura [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, 38123 Povo, TN (Italy); Lunelli, Lorenzo [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, 38123 Povo, TN (Italy); IBF-CNR, 38123 Povo, TN (Italy); Pederzolli, Cecilia [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, 38123 Povo, TN (Italy); Daldosso, Nicola [Department of Computer Science, University of Verona, Strada le Grazie 15, 37134 Verona (Italy); Farnesi, Daniele [CNR-IFAC “Nello Carrara” Institute of Applied Physics, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, FI (Italy); Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche “E. Fermi”, 00184 Roma (Italy); Berneschi, Simone [CNR-IFAC “Nello Carrara” Institute of Applied Physics, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, FI (Italy); Righini, Giancarlo C. [CNR-IFAC “Nello Carrara” Institute of Applied Physics, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, FI (Italy); Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche “E. Fermi”, 00184 Roma (Italy); Quercioli, Franco [CNR-INO National Institute of Optics, Sesto Fiorentino, FI (Italy); Nunzi Conti, Gualtiero [CNR-IFAC “Nello Carrara” Institute of Applied Physics, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, FI (Italy); Soria, Silvia, E-mail: s.soria@ifac.cnr.it [CNR-IFAC “Nello Carrara” Institute of Applied Physics, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, FI (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    We investigate the feasibility of both one photon and two photon fluorescence excitation using whispering gallery mode microresonators. We report the linear and non linear fluorescence real-time detection of labeled IgG covalently bonded to the surface of a silica whispering gallery mode resonator (WGMR). The immunoreagents have been immobilized onto the surface of the WGMR sensor after being activated with an epoxy silane and an orienting layer. The developed immunosensor presents great potential as a robust sensing device for fast and early detection of immunoreactions. We also investigate the potential of microbubbles as nonlinear enhancement platform. The dyes used in these studies are dylight800, tetramethyl rhodamine isothiocyanate, rhodamine 6G and fluorescein. All measurements were performed in a modified confocal microscope. - Highlights: • One photon fluorescence overlaps with the semiconductor pump laser gain bandwidth. • We report on the feasibility to excite two photon fluorescence in microbubble resonators. • Our functionalization process maintains a good quality factor of the microresonator.

  11. TART calculations of neutron attenuation and neutron-induced photons on 5% and 20% borated polyethylene slabs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuest, C.R.

    1993-01-01

    The coupled neutron/photon transport code TART has been used to calculate the attenuation of neutrons and the production of induced photons for neutrons incidents on 5% and 20% borated polyethylene slabs. The neutron attenuation lengths are found to be 2.4 cm and 2.9 cm for 5% and 20% borated polyethylene, respectively

  12. Frequency Agile Microwave Photonic Notch Filter in a Photonic Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-21

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2016-0087 Frequency Agile Microwave Photonic Notch Filter in a Photonic Chip Benjamin Eggleton UNIVERSITY OF SYDNEY Final Report 10...REPORT TYPE      Final 3.  DATES COVERED (From - To)      14 May 2014 to 13 May 2016 4.  TITLE AND SUBTITLE Frequency Agile Microwave Photonic Notch Filter...in a Photonic Chip 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA2386-14-1-4030 5c.  PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6.  AUTHOR(S) Benjamin Eggleton, David

  13. Electrospinning for nano- to mesoscale photonic structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skinner Jack L.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The fabrication of photonic and electronic structures and devices has directed the manufacturing industry for the last 50 years. Currently, the majority of small-scale photonic devices are created by traditional microfabrication techniques that create features by processes such as lithography and electron or ion beam direct writing. Microfabrication techniques are often expensive and slow. In contrast, the use of electrospinning (ES in the fabrication of micro- and nano-scale devices for the manipulation of photons and electrons provides a relatively simple and economic viable alternative. ES involves the delivery of a polymer solution to a capillary held at a high voltage relative to the fiber deposition surface. Electrostatic force developed between the collection plate and the polymer promotes fiber deposition onto the collection plate. Issues with ES fabrication exist primarily due to an instability region that exists between the capillary and collection plate and is characterized by chaotic motion of the depositing polymer fiber. Material limitations to ES also exist; not all polymers of interest are amenable to the ES process due to process dependencies on molecular weight and chain entanglement or incompatibility with other polymers and overall process compatibility. Passive and active electronic and photonic fibers fabricated through the ES have great potential for use in light generation and collection in optical and electronic structures/devices. ES produces fiber devices that can be combined with inorganic, metallic, biological, or organic materials for novel device design. Synergistic material selection and post-processing techniques are also utilized for broad-ranging applications of organic nanofibers that span from biological to electronic, photovoltaic, or photonic. As the ability to electrospin optically and/or electronically active materials in a controlled manner continues to improve, the complexity and diversity of devices

  14. Electrospinning for nano- to mesoscale photonic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Jack L.; Andriolo, Jessica M.; Murphy, John P.; Ross, Brandon M.

    2017-08-01

    The fabrication of photonic and electronic structures and devices has directed the manufacturing industry for the last 50 years. Currently, the majority of small-scale photonic devices are created by traditional microfabrication techniques that create features by processes such as lithography and electron or ion beam direct writing. Microfabrication techniques are often expensive and slow. In contrast, the use of electrospinning (ES) in the fabrication of micro- and nano-scale devices for the manipulation of photons and electrons provides a relatively simple and economic viable alternative. ES involves the delivery of a polymer solution to a capillary held at a high voltage relative to the fiber deposition surface. Electrostatic force developed between the collection plate and the polymer promotes fiber deposition onto the collection plate. Issues with ES fabrication exist primarily due to an instability region that exists between the capillary and collection plate and is characterized by chaotic motion of the depositing polymer fiber. Material limitations to ES also exist; not all polymers of interest are amenable to the ES process due to process dependencies on molecular weight and chain entanglement or incompatibility with other polymers and overall process compatibility. Passive and active electronic and photonic fibers fabricated through the ES have great potential for use in light generation and collection in optical and electronic structures/devices. ES produces fiber devices that can be combined with inorganic, metallic, biological, or organic materials for novel device design. Synergistic material selection and post-processing techniques are also utilized for broad-ranging applications of organic nanofibers that span from biological to electronic, photovoltaic, or photonic. As the ability to electrospin optically and/or electronically active materials in a controlled manner continues to improve, the complexity and diversity of devices fabricated from this

  15. Photonics technology development for optical fuzing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geib, K. M.; Serkland, D. K.; Keeler, G. A.; Peake, G. M.; Mar, A.; von der Lippe, C. M.; Liu, J. J.

    2005-09-01

    This paper describes the photonic component development taking place at Sandia National Laboratories, ARDEC and the Army Research Laboratory in support of an effort to develop a robust, compact, and affordable photonic proximity sensor for munitions fuzing applications. Successful implementation of this sensor will provide a new capability for direct fire applications. The technologies under investigation for the optical fuze design covered in this paper are vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs), vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VECSELs), integrated resonant-cavity photodetectors (RCPDs), and refractive micro-optics. The culmination of this work will be low cost, robust, fully integrated, g-hardened components suitable for proximity fuzing applications. The use of advanced photonic components will enable replacement of costly assemblies that employ discrete lasers, photodetectors, and bulk optics. The integrated devices will be mass produced and impart huge savings for a variety of Army applications. The specific application under investigation is for gun-fired munitions. Nevertheless, numerous civilian uses exist for this proximity sensor in automotive, robotics and aerospace applications. This technology is also applicable to robotic ladar and short-range 3-D imaging.

  16. Surface morphology of vacuum-evaporated pentacene film on Si substrate studied by in situ grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering: I. The initial stage of formation of pentacene film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirosawa, Ichiro; Watanabe, Takeshi; Koganezawa, Tomoyuki; Kikuchi, Mamoru; Yoshimoto, Noriyuki

    2018-03-01

    The progress of the surface morphology of a growing sub-monolayered pentacene film on a Si substrate was studied by in situ grazing-incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS). The observed GISAXS profiles did not show sizes of pentacene islands but mainly protuberances on the boundaries around pentacene film. Scattering of X-ray by residual pits in the pentacene film was also detected in the GISAXS profiles of an almost fully covered film. The average radius of pentacene protuberances increased from 13 to 24 nm as the coverage increased to 0.83 monolayer, and the most frequent radius was almost constant at approximately 9 nm. This result suggests that the population of larger protuberances increase with increasing lengths of boundaries of the pentacene film. It can also be considered that the detected protuberances were crystallites of pentacene, since the average size of protuberances was nearly equal to crystallite sizes of pentacene films. The almost constant characteristic distance of 610 nm and amplitudes of pair correlation functions at low coverages suggest that the growth of pentacene films obeyed the diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) model, as previously reported. It is also considered that the sites of islands show a triangular distribution for small variations of estimated correlation distances.

  17. Incident Information Management Tool

    CERN Document Server

    Pejovic, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Flaws of\tcurrent incident information management at CMS and CERN\tare discussed. A new data\tmodel for future incident database is\tproposed and briefly described. Recently developed draft version of GIS-­‐based tool for incident tracking is presented.

  18. Photonic crystals in epitaxial semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    La Rue, R M de

    1998-01-01

    The title of the paper uses the expression "photonic crystals". By photonic crystals, we mean regular periodic structures with a substantial refractive index variation in one-, two- or three- dimensional space. Such crystals can $9 exist naturally, for example natural opal, but are more typically fabricated by people. Under sufficiently strong conditions, i.e., sufficiently large refractive index modulation, correct size of structural components, and $9 appropriate rotational and translational symmetry, these crystals exhibit the characteristics of a photonic bandgap (PBG) structure. In a full photonic bandgap structure there is a spectral stop band for electromagnetic waves $9 propagating in any direction through the structure and with an arbitrary state of polarization. This behavior is of interest both from a fundamental viewpoint and from the point of view of novel applications in photonic devices. The $9 paper gives an outline review of work on photonic crystals carried out by the Optoelectronics Researc...

  19. All-photonic quantum repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Koji; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-01-01

    Quantum communication holds promise for unconditionally secure transmission of secret messages and faithful transfer of unknown quantum states. Photons appear to be the medium of choice for quantum communication. Owing to photon losses, robust quantum communication over long lossy channels requires quantum repeaters. It is widely believed that a necessary and highly demanding requirement for quantum repeaters is the existence of matter quantum memories. Here we show that such a requirement is, in fact, unnecessary by introducing the concept of all-photonic quantum repeaters based on flying qubits. In particular, we present a protocol based on photonic cluster-state machine guns and a loss-tolerant measurement equipped with local high-speed active feedforwards. We show that, with such all-photonic quantum repeaters, the communication efficiency scales polynomially with the channel distance. Our result paves a new route towards quantum repeaters with efficient single-photon sources rather than matter quantum memories. PMID:25873153

  20. Photonics technology development for optical fuzing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, J.J. (U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, MD); Geib, Kent Martin; von der Lippe, C.M. (U.S. Army ARDEC, Adelphi, MD); Peake, Gregory Merwin; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Keeler, Gordon Arthur; Mar, Alan

    2005-07-01

    This paper describes the photonic component development, which exploits pioneering work and unique expertise at Sandia National Laboratories, ARDEC and the Army Research Laboratory by combining key optoelectronic technologies to design and demonstrate components for this fuzing application. The technologies under investigation for the optical fuze design covered in this paper are vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VECSELs), integrated resonant cavity photodetectors (RCPD), and diffractive micro-optics. The culmination of this work will be low cost, robust, fully integrated, g-hardened components designed suitable for proximity fuzing applications. The use of advanced photonic components will enable replacement of costly assemblies that employ discrete lasers, photodetectors, and bulk optics. The integrated devices will be mass produced and impart huge savings for a variety of Army applications.

  1. The Photon Collider at Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badelek, B.; Blöchinger, C.; Blümlein, J.; Boos, E.; Brinkmann, R.; Burkhardt, H.; Bussey, P.; Carimalo, C.; Chyla, J.; Çiftçi, A. K.; Decking, W.; de Roeck, A.; Fadin, V.; Ferrario, M.; Finch, A.; Fraas, H.; Franke, F.; Galynskii, M.; Gamp, A.; Ginzburg, I.; Godbole, R.; Gorbunov, D. S.; Gounaris, G.; Hagiwara, K.; Han, L.; Heuer, R.-D.; Heusch, C.; Illana, J.; Ilyin, V.; Jankowski, P.; Jiang, Y.; Jikia, G.; Jönsson, L.; Kalachnikow, M.; Kapusta, F.; Klanner, R.; Klassen, M.; Kobayashi, K.; Kon, T.; Kotkin, G.; Krämer, M.; Krawczyk, M.; Kuang, Y. P.; Kuraev, E.; Kwiecinski, J.; Leenen, M.; Levchuk, M.; Ma, W. F.; Martyn, H.; Mayer, T.; Melles, M.; Miller, D. J.; Mtingwa, S.; Mühlleitner, M.; Muryn, B.; Nickles, P. V.; Orava, R.; Pancheri, G.; Penin, A.; Potylitsyn, A.; Poulose, P.; Quast, T.; Raimondi, P.; Redlin, H.; Richard, F.; Rindani, S. D.; Rizzo, T.; Saldin, E.; Sandner, W.; Schönnagel, H.; Schneidmiller, E.; Schreiber, H. J.; Schreiber, S.; Schüler, K. P.; Serbo, V.; Seryi, A.; Shanidze, R.; da Silva, W.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Spira, M.; Stasto, A. M.; Sultansoy, S.; Takahashi, T.; Telnov, V.; Tkabladze, A.; Trines, D.; Undrus, A.; Wagner, A.; Walker, N.; Watanabe, I.; Wengler, T.; Will, I.; Wipf, S.; Yavaş, Ö.; Yokoya, K.; Yurkov, M.; Zarnecki, A. F.; Zerwas, P.; Zomer, F.

    High energy photon colliders (γγ,γe) are based on e-e- linear colliders where high energy photons are produced using Compton scattering of laser light on high energy electrons just before the interaction point. This paper is a part of the Technical Design Report of the linear collider TESLA.1 Physics program, possible parameters and some technical aspects of the photon collider at TESLA are discussed.

  2. Topological Order in Silicon Photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-07

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2017-0037 Topological orders in Silicon photonics Mohammad Hafezi MARYLAND UNIV COLLEGE PARK 3112 LEE BLDG COLLEGE PARK, MD 20742...15 SEP 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Topological Order in Silicon Photonics 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA-9550-14-1-0267 5c. PROGRAM...matter to ultra cold gases. Recently, photonic systems have been under investigation to explore various types of topological orders and to potentially

  3. CERN manufactured hybrid photon detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    These hybrid photon detectors (HPDs) produce an electric signal from a single photon. An electron is liberated from a photocathode and accelerated to a silicon pixel array allowing the location of the photon on the cathode to be recorded. The electronics and optics for these devices have been developed in close collaboration with industry. HPDs have potential for further use in astrophysics and medical imaging.

  4. Silicon photonic heater-modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zortman, William A.; Trotter, Douglas Chandler; Watts, Michael R.

    2015-07-14

    Photonic modulators, methods of forming photonic modulators and methods of modulating an input optical signal are provided. A photonic modulator includes a disk resonator having a central axis extending along a thickness direction of the disk resonator. The disk resonator includes a modulator portion and a heater portion. The modulator portion extends in an arc around the central axis. A PN junction of the modulator portion is substantially normal to the central axis.

  5. Silicon photonic integration in telecommunications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Richard Doerr

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Silicon photonics is the guiding of light in a planar arrangement of silicon-based materials to perform various functions. We focus here on the use of silicon photonics to create transmitters and receivers for fiber-optic telecommunications. As the need to squeeze more transmission into a given bandwidth, a given footprint, and a given cost increases, silicon photonics makes more and more economic sense.

  6. Photonic based marine radar demonstrator

    OpenAIRE

    Laghezza, Francesco; Scotti, Filippo; Ghelfi, Paolo; Bogoni, Antonella; Banchi, Luca; Malaspina, Vincenzo; Serafino, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results obtained during the field trial experiments of the first photonic-based radar system demonstrator, in a real maritime environment. The developed demonstrator exploits photonic technologies for both the generation and the detection of radar RF signals, allowing increased performance even in term of system flexibility. The photonic radar performance have been compared with a state of the art commercial system for maritime applications provide...

  7. Nanodiamond Emitters of Single Photons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlasov I.I.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Luminescence properties of single color centers were studied in nanodiamonds of different origin. It was found that single photon emitters could be realized even in molecularsized diamond (less than 2 nm capable of housing stable luminescent center “silicon-vacancy.” First results on incorporation of single-photon emitters based on luminescent nanodiamonds in plasmonic nanoantennas to enhance the photon count rate and directionality, diminish the fluorescence decay time, and provide polarization selectivity are presented.

  8. Higgs-photon resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; Fox, Patrick J.; Kearney, John [Fermilab, Theoretical Physics Department, Batavia, IL (United States)

    2017-10-15

    We study models that produce a Higgs boson plus photon (h{sup 0}γ) resonance at the LHC. When the resonance is a Z{sup '} boson, decays to h{sup 0}γ occur at one loop. If the Z{sup '} boson couples at tree level to quarks, then the h{sup 0}γ branching fraction is typically of order 10{sup -5} or smaller. Nevertheless, there are models that would allow the observation of Z{sup '} → h{sup 0}γ at √(s) = 13 TeV with a cross section times branching fraction larger than 1 fb for a Z{sup '} mass in the 200-450 GeV range, and larger than 0.1 fb for a mass up to 800 GeV. The one-loop decay of the Z{sup '} into lepton pairs competes with h{sup 0}γ, even if the Z{sup '} couplings to leptons vanish at tree level. We also present a model in which a Z{sup '} boson decays into a Higgs boson and a pair of collimated photons, mimicking an h{sup 0}γ resonance. In this model, the h{sup 0}γ resonance search would be the discovery mode for a Z{sup '} as heavy as 2 TeV. When the resonance is a scalar, although decay to h{sup 0}γ is forbidden by angular momentum conservation, the h{sup 0} plus collimated photons channel is allowed. We comment on prospects of observing an h{sup 0}γ resonance through different Higgs decays, on constraints from related searches, and on models where h{sup 0} is replaced by a nonstandard Higgs boson. (orig.)

  9. The quest for a third generation of gaseous photon detectors for Cherenkov imaging counters

    CERN Document Server

    Alexeev, M

    2009-01-01

    RICH (Ring Imaging CHerenkov) counters for PID in the high momentum domain and in large acceptance experiments require photon detectors covering extended surface (several square meters) and able to accept Cherenkov photons in a wide angular range. An ideal approach is represented by gaseous photon detectors, which allow covering wide surfaces at affordable costs. The first generation of these detectors was based on the use of organic vapors. The second generation consists of CsI photocathodes and open geometry gaseous detectors (MWPC). In spite of the success of this approach, some limits of the technique arise from the bombardment of the photocathodes by the ions generated in the amplification process and by the photon feedback. A third generation of gaseous photon detectors using closed geometry, as those possible with multistage arrangements of micropattern gaseous detectors, can overcome the observed limitations. We have started an R&D programme to develop a Thick-GEM-based photon detector and we repo...

  10. Search for dark matter in the hidden-photon sector with a large spherical mirror

    CERN Document Server

    Veberic, Darko; Doebrich, Babette; Engel, Ralph; Jaeckel, Joerg; Kowalski, Marek; Lindner, Axel; Mathes, Hermann-Josef; Redondo, Javier; Roth, Markus; Schaefer, Christoph; Ulrich, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    If dark matter consists of hidden-sector photons which kinetically mix with regular photons, a tiny oscillating electric-field component is present wherever we have dark matter. In the surface of conducting materials this induces a small probability to emit single photons almost perpendicular to the surface, with the corresponding photon frequency matching the mass of the hidden photons. We report on a construction of an experimental setup with a large ~14 m2 spherical metallic mirror that will allow for searches of hidden-photon dark matter in the eV and sub-eV range by application of different electromagnetic radiation detectors. We discuss sensitivity and accessible regions in the dark matter parameter space.

  11. Multichannel strobed photon counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganichev, V.A.; Elkin, O.K.; Zajdel', I.N.; Kozlov, V.A.; Lyapunov, G.M.; Malinovskij, A.L.; Ryabov, E.A.; Sil'kis, Eh.G.

    1987-01-01

    A multichannel strobed photon counter operating in the visible spectrum range is developed on the basis of luminescence amplifier with a microchannel plate and LI-706 supervidicon. The pulses overvoltaged supply mode of a microchannel plate has brought about amplification necessary for input into plateau of the counting characteristics and photoacceptor strobing in the nanosecond (140 ns) range. Device noises are practically completely determined by noises in luminescence amplifier photocathode. the above multichannel counter has a durable stability of parameters, electronic system simplicity and small dimensions of the photoacceptor

  12. Spaceborne Photonics Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venable, D. D.; Farrukh, U. O.; Han, K. S.; Hwang, I. H.; Jalufka, N. W.; Lowe, C. W.; Tabibi, B. M.; Lee, C. J.; Lyons, D.; Maclin, A.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes in chronological detail the development of the Spaceborne Photonics Institute as a sustained research effort at Hampton University in the area of optical physics. This provided the research expertise to initiate a PhD program in Physics. Research was carried out in the areas of: (1) modelling of spaceborne solid state laser systems; (2) amplified spontaneous emission in solar pumped iodine lasers; (3) closely simulated AM0 CW solar pumped iodine laser and repeatedly short pulsed iodine laser oscillator; (4) a materials spectroscopy and growth program; and (5) laser induced fluorescence and atomic and molecular spectroscopy.

  13. Photonic crystal optofluidic biolaser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozaffari, Mohammad Hazhir; Ebnali-Heidari, Majid; Abaeiani, Gholamreza; Moravvej-Farshi, Mohammad Kazem

    2017-09-01

    Optofluidic biolasers are recently being considered in bioanalytical applications due to their advantages over the conventional biosensing methods Exploiting a photonic crystal slab with selectively dye-infiltrated air holes, we propose a new optofluidic heterostructure biolaser, with a power conversion efficiency of 25% and the spectral linewidth of 0.24 nm. Simulations show that in addition to these satisfactory lasing characteristics, the proposed lab-on-a-chip biolaser is highly sensitive to the minute biological changes that may occur in its cavity and can detect a single virus with a radius as small as 13 nm.

  14. Recent photon results from ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Glasman, Claudia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The production of prompt isolated photons at hadron colliders provides a stringent test of perturbative QCD and can be used to probe the gluon density function of the proton. The ATLAS collaboration has performed precise measurements of the inclusive production o f isolated prompt photons at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV, differential in both rap idity and the photon transverse momentum. In addition, the integrated and differential c ross sections for isolated photon pair production 8 TeV have been measured. The results are compared with state-of-the-art theory predictions at NLO in QCD and with predictions of several MC generators.

  15. Progress in the research and development of photonic structure devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Van Hoi; Bui, Huy; Van Nguyen, Thuy; Nguyen, The Anh; Son Pham, Thanh; Pham, Van Dai; Cham Tran, Thi; Trang Hoang, Thu; Ngo, Quang Minh

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we review the results of the research and development of photonic structure devices performed in the Institute of Materials Science in the period from 2010-2015. We have developed a configuration of 1D photonic crystal (PC) microcavities based on porous silicon (PS) layers and applied them to optical sensing devices that can be used for the determination of organic content with a very low concentration in different liquid environments. Various important scientific and technological applications of photonic devices such as the ultralow power operation of microcavity lasers, the inhibition of spontaneous emissions and the manipulation of light amplification by combining the surface plasmonic effect and the microcavity are expected. We developed new kinds of photonic structures for optical filters based on guided-mode resonances in coupled slab waveguide gratings, which have great potential for application in fiber-optic communication and optical sensors.

  16. Photons in Natural and Life Sciences An Interdisciplinary Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Lewerenz, Hans-Joachim

    2012-01-01

    The book describes first the principle photon generation processes from nuclear reactions, electron motion and from discrete quantum transitions. It then focuses on the use of photons in various selected fields of modern natural and life sciences. It bridges disciplines such as physics, chemistry, earth- and materials science, proteomics, information technology, photoelectrochemistry, photosynthesis and spintronics. Advanced light sources and their use in natural and life sciences are emphasized and the effects related to the quantum nature of photons (quantum computing, teleportation) are described. The content encompasses among many other examples the role of photons on the origin of life and on homochirality in biology, femtosecond laser slicing, photothermal cancer therapy, the use of gamma rays in materials science, photoelectrochemical surface conditioning, quantum information aspects and photo-spintronics. The book is written for scientists and graduate students from all related disciplines who are int...

  17. Dose calculation validation of VMC++ for photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, J.; Siebers, J.; Kawrakow, I.

    2007-01-01

    The radiation therapy specific Voxel Monte Carlo (VMC++) dose calculation algorithm achieves a dramatic improvement in MC dose calculation efficiency for radiation therapy treatment planning dose evaluation compared with other MC algorithms. This work aims to validate VMC++ for radiation therapy photon beam planning. VMC++ was validated with respect to the well-benchmarked EGS-based DOSXYZnrc by comparing depth dose and lateral profiles for field sizes ranging from 1x1 to 40x40 cm 2 for 6 and 18 MV beams in a homogeneous water phantom and in a simulated bone-lung-bone phantom. Patient treatment plan dose distributions were compared for five prostate plans and five head-and-neck (H/N) plans, all using intensity-modulated radiotherapy beams. For all tests, the same incident particles were used in both codes to isolate differences due to modeling of the radiation source. Voxel-by-voxel observed differences were analyzed to distinguish between systematic and purely statistical differences. Dose-volume-histogram-derived dose indices were compared for the patient plans. For the homogeneous water phantom and the bone-lung-bone phantom, the depth dose curve predicted by VMC++ agreed with that predicted by DOSXYZnrc within expected statistical uncertainty in all voxels except the surface voxel of the water phantom, where VMC++ predicted a lower dose. When the electron cutoff parameter was decreased for both codes, the surface voxel agreed within expected statistical uncertainty. For prostate plans, the most severe difference between the codes resulted in 55% of the voxels showing a systematic difference of 0.32% of maximum dose. For H/N plans, the largest difference observed resulted in 2% of the voxels showing a systematic difference of 0.98% of maximum dose. For the prostate plans, the most severe difference in the planning target volume D 95 was 0.4%, the rectum D 35 was 0.2%, the rectum D 17 was 0.2%, the bladder D 50 was 0.3% and the bladder D 25 was 0.3%. For the H

  18. Photon and neutron interrogation techniques for chemical explosives detection in air cargo: A critical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runkle, Robert C.; White, Timothy A.; Miller, Erin A.; Caggiano, Joseph A.; Collins, Brian A.

    2009-01-01

    Scanning cargo transported via aircraft ('air cargo') for explosive threats is a problem that presently lacks a comprehensive technical solution. While chemical explosives detection in the baggage-scanning domain has a rich history that sheds light on potential solutions, air cargo differs in several important ways, and thus one cannot look to the present array of technologies. Some contemporary solutions, such as trace analysis, are not readily applied to cargo because of sampling challenges while the larger geometry of air cargo makes others less effective. This review article examines an array of interrogation techniques using photons and neutrons as incident particles. We first present a summary of the signatures and observables chemical explosives provide and review how they have been exploited in baggage scanning. Following this review is a description of the challenges posed by the air-cargo application space. After considering sources of photons and neutrons, we describe methods focused on transmission imaging, sub-surface examination, and elemental characterization. It is our goal to expand the understanding of each method's technical promise while largely deferring questions that revolve around footprint, safety, and conduct of operations. Our overarching intent is that a comprehensive understanding of potential techniques will foster the development of a comprehensive solution.

  19. Deterministically swapping frequency-bin entanglement from photon-photon to atom-photon hybrid systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Bao-Quan; Liu, Chang; Sun, Yuan; Chen, Ping-Xing

    2018-02-01

    Inspired by the recent developments of the research on the atom-photon quantum interface and energy-time entanglement between single-photon pulses, we are motivated to study the deterministic protocol for the frequency-bin entanglement of the atom-photon hybrid system, which is analogous to the frequency-bin entanglement between single-photon pulses. We show that such entanglement arises naturally in considering the interaction between a frequency-bin entangled single-photon pulse pair and a single atom coupled to an optical cavity, via straightforward atom-photon phase gate operations. Its anticipated properties and preliminary examples of its potential application in quantum networking are also demonstrated. Moreover, we construct a specific quantum entanglement witness tool to detect such extended frequency-bin entanglement from a reasonably general set of separable states, and prove its capability theoretically. We focus on the energy-time considerations throughout the analysis.

  20. Fabrication of ceramic layer-by-layer infrared wavelength photonic band gap crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Henry Hao-Chuan

    Photonic band gap (PBG) crystals, also known as photonic crystals, are periodic dielectric structures which form a photonic band gap that prohibit the propagation of electromagnetic (EM) waves of certain frequencies at any incident angles. Photonic crystals have several potential applications including zero-threshold semiconductor lasers, the inhibiting spontaneous emission, dielectric mirrors, and wavelength filters. If defect states are introduced in the crystals, light can be guided from one location to another or even a sharp bending of light in submicron scale can be achieved. This generates the potential for optical waveguide and optical circuits, which will contribute to the improvement in the fiber-optic communications and the development of high-speed computers. The goal of this dissertation research is to explore techniques for fabricating 3D ceramic layer-by-layer (LBL) photonic crystals operating in the infrared frequency range, and to characterize the infilling materials properties that affect the fabrication process as well as the structural and optical properties of the crystals. While various approaches have been reported in literature for the fabrication of LBL structure, the uniqueness of this work ties with its cost-efficiency and relatively short process span. Besides, very few works have been reported on fabricating ceramic LBL crystals at mid-IR frequency range so far. The fabrication techniques reported here are mainly based on the concepts of microtransfer molding with the use of polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) as molds/stamps. The infilling materials studied include titanium alkoxide precursors and aqueous suspensions of nanosize titania particles (slurries). Various infilling materials were synthesized to determine viscosities, effects on drying and firing shrinkages, effects on film surface roughness, and their moldability. Crystallization and phase transformation of the materials were also monitored using DTA, TGA and XRD. Mutilayer crystal

  1. Effects of frequency correlation in linear optical entangling gates operated with independent photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbieri, M.

    2007-01-01

    Bose-Einstein coalescence of independent photons at the surface of a beam splitter is the physical process that allows linear optical quantum gates to be built. When distinct parametric down-conversion events are used as an independent photon source, distinguishability arises form the energy correlation of each photon with its twin. We derive upper bound for the entanglement which can be generated under these conditions

  2. Photon and di-photon production at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00213273

    2013-01-01

    The latest ATLAS measurements of the cross section for the inclusive production of isolated prompt photons in $pp$ collisions at a centre-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV at the LHC are presented, as well as the measurement of the di-photon production cross section.

  3. Sidewall roughness measurement of photonic wires and photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svalgaard, Mikael; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Garnæs, Jørgen

    2007-01-01

    The performance of nanophotonic building blocks such as photonic wires and photonic crystals are rapidly improving, with very low propagation loss and very high cavity Q-factors being reported. In order to facilitate further improvements in performance the ability to quantitatively measure...

  4. Photonic band gap engineering in 2D photonic crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    -dimensional photonic crystals with square lattices composed of air holes in dielectric and vice versa i.e., dielectric rods in air, using the plane-wave expansion method are investigated. We then study, how the photonic band gap size is ...

  5. Quantum photonics with quantum dots in photonic wires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munsch, Mathieu; Kuhlmann, Andreas; Cadeddu, Davide

    2016-01-01

    We present results from the spectroscopy of a single quantum dot in a photonic wire. The device presents a high photon extraction efficiency, and strong hybrid coupling to mechanical modes. We use resonance fluorescence to probe the emitter’s properties with the highest sensitivity. Weperform...

  6. Non-Poissonian photon statistics from macroscopic photon cutting materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, Mathijs; Meijerink, A; Rabouw, Freddy T.

    2017-01-01

    In optical materials energy is usually extracted only from the lowest excited state, resulting in fundamental energy-efficiency limits such as the Shockley-Queisser limit for single-junction solar cells. Photon-cutting materials provide a way around such limits by absorbing high-energy photons and

  7. Topology optimized nanoparticles for near-infrared enhanced photon upconversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester-Petersen, Joakim; Christiansen, Rasmus E.; Julsgaard, Brian

    )converted into photons with higher energies through absorption in rare earth ions (Er3+) followed by radiative decay.This process converts otherwise non-absorbed long wavelength photos to shorter wavelength photons able to bridge the band gap energy and contribute to the energy generation of the solar modules...... have shown that the intensity of the upconverted light is proportional to the intensity of the incident light raised to some power, n, [1]. Experimentally n is found to be 1.5 and the light intensity is proportional to the square of the electric field norm, |E|2. We aim to enhance the incident light...... using topology optimized nanoparticles. Here, the distribution of nanoparticle material is optimized to enhance |E|3 in a thin Er3+ doped TiO2 film. Topology optimization has previously proven successful for optimizing wave propagation in acoustics [2] and electromagnetics [3,4]. The governing physics...

  8. Photon counting systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuby, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    This paper is a review of the various photon counting systems, used in astronomy, at optical wavelengths. Technological differences between available devices are introduced according to the processes applied to these photoelectrons (multiplication and/or acceleration), and their impact targets (phosphors, photodetectors, resistive or conductive anodes...). Two detection processes are involved: threshold discrimination above noise for most types of devices, and analog measurement for systems using resistive and wedge-and-strip anodes. Devices currently used for astronomical observations are presented, and their performance characteristics. These devices are: photomultipliers, which are monopixel detectors, using multiplication with dynodes; images intensifiers cameras, most frequently read with CCDs; analog devices with resistive or wedge-and-strip anodes, behind microchannel plates (MCP); Digicons, using direct electronic bombardment; the MAMA detector, with coincidence anodes behind MCP; and then the PAPA detector using masks encoding readout. Dead time effects, which define the dynamic range are presented with some details. Finally, because of the improvement of low level readout noise devices (CCDs), the field of application of the photon counting techniques confines to the blue and the UV part of the spectrum, at low signal to noise ratios [fr

  9. Amplified Photon Upconversion by Photonic Shell of Cholesteric Liquid Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ji-Hwan; Kim, Shin-Hyun; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto; Reichmanis, Elsa

    2017-04-26

    As an effective platform to exploit triplet-triplet-annihilation-based photon upconversion (TTA-UC), microcapsules composed of a fluidic UC core and photonic shell are microfluidically prepared using a triple emulsion as the template. The photonic shell consists of cholesteric liquid crystals (CLCs) with a periodic helical structure, exhibiting a photonic band gap. Combined with planar anchoring at the boundaries, the shell serves as a resonance cavity for TTA-UC emission and enables spectral tuning of the UC under low-power-density excitation. The CLC shell can be stabilized by introducing a polymerizable mesogen in the LC host. Because of the microcapsule spherical symmetry, spontaneous emission of the delayed fluorescence is omnidirectionally amplified at the edge of the stop band. These results demonstrate the range of opportunities provided by TTA-UC systems for the future design of low-threshold photonic devices.

  10. Photonic integration and photonics-electronics convergence on silicon platform

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jifeng; Baba, Toshihiko; Vivien, Laurent; Xu, Dan-Xia

    2015-01-01

    Silicon photonics technology, which has the DNA of silicon electronics technology, promises to provide a compact photonic integration platform with high integration density, mass-producibility, and excellent cost performance. This technology has been used to develop and to integrate various photonic functions on silicon substrate. Moreover, photonics-electronics convergence based on silicon substrate is now being pursued. Thanks to these features, silicon photonics will have the potential to be a superior technology used in the construction of energy-efficient cost-effective apparatuses for various applications, such as communications, information processing, and sensing. Considering the material characteristics of silicon and difficulties in microfabrication technology, however, silicon by itself is not necessarily an ideal material. For example, silicon is not suitable for light emitting devices because it is an indirect transition material. The resolution and dynamic range of silicon-based interference de...

  11. Robust Adaptive Photon Tracing using Photon Path Visibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hachisuka, Toshiya; Jensen, Henrik Wann

    2011-01-01

    algorithm is the use of visibility of photon path as the importance function which ensures that our sampling algorithm focuses on paths that are visible from the given viewpoint. Our sampling algorithm builds on two recent developments in Markov chain Monte Carlo methods: adaptive Markov chain sampling...... and replica exchange. Using these techniques, each photon path is adaptively mutated and it explores the sampling space efficiently without being stuck at a local peak of the importance function. We have implemented this sampling approach in the progressive photon mapping algorithm which provides visibility...... information in a natural way when a photon path contributes to a measurement point. We demonstrate that the final algorithm is strikingly simple, yet effective at sampling photons under lighting conditions that would be difficult for existing Monte Carlo ray tracing-based methods....

  12. Hard photons in heavy ion collisions: direct or statistical?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, N.; Bock, R.; Emling, H.; Freifelder, R.; Gobbi, A.; Grosse, E.; Hildenbrand, K.D.; Kulessa, R.; Matulewicz, T.; Rami, F.; Simon, R.S.; Stelzer, H.; Wessels, J.; Maurenzig, P.R.; Olmi, A.; Stefanini, A.A.; Kuehn, W.; Metag, V.; Novotny, R.

    1987-10-01

    Photons with energies from 2 to 60 MeV have been measured in coincidence with binary fragments in the reaction 92 Mo + 92 Mo at an incident energy of 19.5 A MeV. The rapid change of the γ-ray spectrum and multiplicity with the fragment total kinetic energy in the exit channel indicates that the γ-rays are emitted statistically by the highly excited fragments. Temperatures as high as 6 MeV are inferred. (orig.)

  13. Selective mode excitation in hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galea, A. D.; Couny, F.; Coupland, S.; Roberts, P. J.; Sabert, H.; Knight, J. C.; Birks, T. A.; Russell, Philip St. J.

    2005-04-01

    Modes are selectively excited by launching light through the cladding from the side into a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. Measuring the total output power at the end of the fiber as a function of the angle of incidence of the exciting laser beam provides a powerful diagnostic for characterizing the cladding bandgap. Furthermore, various types of modes on either side of the bandgap are excited individually, and their near-field images are obtained.

  14. The STAR Photon Multiplicity Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aggarwal, M.M.; Badyal, S.K.; Bhaskar, P.; Bhatia, V.S.; Chattopadhyay, S. E-mail: sub@veccal.ernet.in; Das, S.; Datta, R.; Dubey, A.K.; Dutta Majumdar, M.R.; Ganti, M.S.; Ghosh, P.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M.; Gupta, R.; Kaur, I.; Kumar, A.; Mahajan, S.; Mahapatra, D.P.; Mangotra, L.K.; Mishra, D.; Mohanty, B.; Nayak, S.K.; Nayak, T.K.; Pal, S.K.; Phatak, S.C.; Potukuchi, B.V.K.S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Sahoo, R.; Sharma, A.; Singaraju, R.N.; Sood, G.; Trivedi, M.D.; Varma, R.; Viyogi, Y.P

    2003-03-01

    Details concerning the design, fabrication and performance of STAR Photon Multiplicity Detector (PMD) are presented. The PMD will cover the forward region, within the pseudorapidity range 2.3-3.5, behind the forward time projection chamber. It will measure the spatial distribution of photons in order to study collective flow, fluctuation and chiral symmetry restoration.

  15. Photonic nanowires for quantum optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munsch, M.; Claudon, J.; Bleuse, J.

    Photonic nanowires (PWs) are simple dielectric structures for which a very efficient and broadband spontaneous emission (SE) control has been predicted [1]. Recently, a single photon source featuring a record high efficiency was demonstrated using this geometry [2]. Using time-resolved micro-phot...

  16. Advances on integrated microwave photonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dong, Jianji; Liao, Shasha; Yan, Siqi

    2017-01-01

    Integrated microwave photonics has attracted a lot of attentions and makes significant improvement in last 10 years. We have proposed and demonstrated several schemes about microwave photonics including waveform generation, signal processing and energy-efficient micro-heaters. Our schemes are all...

  17. Nanodiamond particles forming photonic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grichko, Varvara; Tyler, Talmage; Grishko, Victor I; Shenderova, Olga

    2008-01-01

    Colloid suspensions of irregularly shaped, highly charged detonation nanodiamond particles are found to have unexpected optical properties, similar to those of photonic crystals. This finding is all the more surprising since the particles used in this work are far more polydisperse than those typically forming photonic crystals. Intensely iridescent structures have been fabricated using the centrifugation of aqueous suspensions of nanodiamonds

  18. Nanodiamond particles forming photonic structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grichko, Varvara; Tyler, Talmage; Grishko, Victor I; Shenderova, Olga [International Technology Center, 8100 Brownleigh Drive, Suite 120, Raleigh, NC 27617 (United States)], E-mail: oshenderova@itc-inc.org

    2008-06-04

    Colloid suspensions of irregularly shaped, highly charged detonation nanodiamond particles are found to have unexpected optical properties, similar to those of photonic crystals. This finding is all the more surprising since the particles used in this work are far more polydisperse than those typically forming photonic crystals. Intensely iridescent structures have been fabricated using the centrifugation of aqueous suspensions of nanodiamonds.

  19. Photon Production Within Storage Capsules

    CERN Document Server

    Rittmann, P D

    2003-01-01

    This report provides tables and electronic worksheets that list the photon production rate within SrF2 and CsC1 storage capsules, particularly the continuous spectrum of bremsstrahlung photons from the slowing down of the emitted electrons (BREMCALC).

  20. Negative refraction angular characterization in one-dimensional photonic crystals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Eduardo Lugo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Photonic crystals are artificial structures that have periodic dielectric components with different refractive indices. Under certain conditions, they abnormally refract the light, a phenomenon called negative refraction. Here we experimentally characterize negative refraction in a one dimensional photonic crystal structure; near the low frequency edge of the fourth photonic bandgap. We compare the experimental results with current theory and a theory based on the group velocity developed here. We also analytically derived the negative refraction correctness condition that gives the angular region where negative refraction occurs.By using standard photonic techniques we experimentally determined the relationship between incidence and negative refraction angles and found the negative refraction range by applying the correctness condition. In order to compare both theories with experimental results an output refraction correction was utilized. The correction uses Snell's law and an effective refractive index based on two effective dielectric constants. We found good agreement between experiment and both theories in the negative refraction zone.Since both theories and the experimental observations agreed well in the negative refraction region, we can use both negative refraction theories plus the output correction to predict negative refraction angles. This can be very useful from a practical point of view for space filtering applications such as a photonic demultiplexer or for sensing applications.