WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface implanted ions

  1. Surface microhardening by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Amarjit

    1986-01-01

    The paper discusses the process and the underlying mechanism of surface microhardening by implanting suitable energetic ions in materials like 4145 steel, 304 stainless steel, aluminium and its 2024-T351 alloy. It has been observed that boron and nitrogen implantation in materials like 4145 steel and 304 stainless steel can produce a significant increase in surface hardness. Moreover the increase can be further enhanced with suitable overlay coatings such as aluminium (Al), Titanium (Ti) and carbon (C). The surface hardening due to implantation is attributed to precipitation hardening or the formation of stable/metastable phase or both. The effect of lithium implantation in aluminium and its alloy on microhardness with increasing ion dose and ion beam energy is also discussed. (author)

  2. Surface engineering by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, Bjarne Roger

    1995-01-01

    Awidespread commercial applica tion iof particle accelerators is for ion implantation. Accelerator beams are used for ion implantation into metals, alloying a thin surface layer with foreign atoms to concentrations impossible to achieve by thermal processes, making for dramatic improvements in hardness and in resistance to wear and corrosion. Traditional hardening processes require high temperatures causing deformation; ion implantation on the other hand is a ''cold process'', treating the finished product. The ionimplanted layer is integrated in the substrate, avoiding the risk of cracking and delamination from normal coating processes. Surface properties may be ''engineered'' independently of those of the bulk material; the process does not use environmentally hazardous materials such as chromium in the surface coating. The typical implantation dose required for the optimum surface properties of metals is around 2 x 10 17 ion/cm 2 , a hundred times the typical doses for semiconductor processing. When surface areas of more than a few square centimetres have to be treated, the implanter must therefore be able to produce high beam currents (5 to 10 mA) to obtain an acceptable treatment time. Ion species used include nitrogen, boron, carbon, titanium, chromium and tantalum, and beam energies range from 50 to 200 keV. Since most components are three dimensional, it must be possible to rotate and tilt them in the beam, and control beam position over a large area. Examples of industrial applications are: - surface treatment of prostheses (hip and knee joints) to reduce wear of the moving parts, using biocompatible materials; - ion implantation into high speed ball bearings to protect against the aqueous corrosion in jet engines (important for service helicopters on oil rigs); - hardening of metal forming and cutting tools; - reduction of corrosive wear of plastic moulding tools, which are expensive to produce

  3. Ion implantation into concave polymer surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakudo, N. [Kanazawa Institute of Technology, Advanced Materials R and D Center, 3-1 Yatsukaho, Matto, Hakusan, Ishikawa 924-0838 (Japan)]. E-mail: sakudo@neptune.kanazawa-it.ac.jp; Shinohara, T. [Kanazawa Institute of Technology, Advanced Materials R and D Center, 3-1 Yatsukaho, Matto, Hakusan, Ishikawa 924-0838 (Japan); Amaya, S. [Kanazawa Institute of Technology, Advanced Materials R and D Center, 3-1 Yatsukaho, Matto, Hakusan, Ishikawa 924-0838 (Japan); Endo, H. [Kanazawa Institute of Technology, Advanced Materials R and D Center, 3-1 Yatsukaho, Matto, Hakusan, Ishikawa 924-0838 (Japan); Okuji, S. [Lintec Corp., 5-14-42 Nishiki-cho, Warabi, Saitama 335-0005 (Japan); Ikenaga, N. [Japan Science and Technology Corp., Nomigun, Ishikawa 923-1121 (Japan)

    2006-01-15

    A new technique for ion implantation into concave surface of insulating materials is proposed and experimentally studied. The principle is roughly described by referring to modifying inner surface of a PET (polyethylene terephthalate) bottle. An electrode that is supplied with positive high-voltage pulses is inserted into the bottle. Both plasma formation and ion implantation are simultaneously realized by the same high-voltage pulses. Ion sheath with a certain thickness that depends on plasma parameters is formed just on the inner surface of the bottle. Since the plasma potential is very close to that of the electrode, ions from the plasma are accelerated in the sheath and implanted perpendicularly into the bottle's inner surface. Laser Raman spectroscopy shows that the inner surface of an ion-implanted PET bottle is modified into DLC (diamond-like carbon). Gas permeation measurement shows that gas-barrier property enhances due to the modification.

  4. Ion beam analysis of metal ion implanted surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, P.J.; Chu, J.W.; Johnson, E.P.; Noorman, J.T. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Sood, D.K. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    Ion implantation is an established method for altering the surface properties of many materials. While a variety of analytical techniques are available for the characterisation of implanted surfaces, those based on particle accelerators such as Rutherford backscattering (RBS) and nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) provide some of the most useful and powerful for this purpose. Application of the latter techniques to metal ion implantation research at ANSTO will be described with particular reference to specific examples from recent studies. Where possible, the information obtained from ion beam analysis will be compared with that derived from other techniques such as Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) and Auger spectroscopies. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Cell adhesion and growth on ion-implanted polymer surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae-Suk; Kaibara, M.; Iwaki, M.; Sasabe, H.; Suzuki, Y.; Kusakabe, M.

    1992-01-01

    The adhesion and growth of endothelial cells on ion-implanted polystyrene and segmented polyurethane surface were investigated. Ions of Na + , N 2 + , O 2 + , Ar + and Kr + were implanted to the polymer surface with ion fluences between 1 x 10 15 and 3 x 10 17 ions/cm 2 at energy of 150 KeV at room temperature. Ion-implanted polymers were characterized by FT-IR-ATR an Raman spectroscopies. The adhesion and proliferation of bovine aorta endothelial cells on ion-implanted polymer surface were observed by an optical microscope. The rate of growth of BAECs on ion-implanted PSt was faster than that on non-implanted PSt. Complete cell adhesion and growth were observed on ion-implanted SPU, whereas the adhesion and growth of BAECs on the non-implanted SPU was not observed. It was attempted to control the cell culture on the ion-implanted domain fabricated using a mask. (author)

  6. Modification of polyvinyl alcohol surface properties by ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pukhova, I.V., E-mail: ivpuhova@mail.ru [National Research Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Ave, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Institute of High Current Electronics, 2/3 Akademichesky Ave, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Kurzina, I.A. [National Research Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Ave, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Savkin, K.P. [Institute of High Current Electronics, 2/3 Akademichesky Ave, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Laput, O.A. [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Ave, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Oks, E.M. [Institute of High Current Electronics, 2/3 Akademichesky Ave, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation)

    2017-05-15

    We describe our investigations of the surface physicochemical properties of polyvinyl alcohol modified by silver, argon and carbon ion implantation to doses of 1 × 10{sup 14}, 1 × 10{sup 15} and 1 × 10{sup 16} ion/cm{sup 2} and energies of 20 keV (for C and Ar) and 40 keV (for Ag). Infrared spectroscopy (IRS) indicates that destructive processes accompanied by chemical bond (−C=O) generation are induced by implantation, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis indicates that the implanted silver is in a metallic Ag3d state without stable chemical bond formation with polymer chains. Ion implantation is found to affect the surface energy: the polar component increases while the dispersion part decreases with increasing implantation dose. Surface roughness is greater after ion implantation and the hydrophobicity increases with increasing dose, for all ion species. We find that ion implantation of Ag, Ar and C leads to a reduction in the polymer microhardness by a factor of five, while the surface electrical resistivity declines modestly.

  7. Thin hydroxyapatite surface layers on titanium produced by ion implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Baumann, H; Bilger, G; Jones, D; Symietz, I

    2002-01-01

    In medicine metallic implants are widely used as hip replacement protheses or artificial teeth. The biocompatibility is in all cases the most important requirement. Hydroxyapatite (HAp) is frequently used as coating on metallic implants because of its high acceptance by the human body. In this paper a process is described by which a HAp surface layer is produced by ion implantation with a continuous transition to the bulk material. Calcium and phosphorus ions are successively implanted into titanium under different vacuum conditions by backfilling oxygen into the implantation chamber. Afterwards the implanted samples are thermally treated. The elemental composition inside the implanted region was determined by nuclear analysis methods as (alpha,alpha) backscattering and the resonant nuclear reaction sup 1 H( sup 1 sup 5 N,alpha gamma) sup 1 sup 2 C. The results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicate the formation of HAp. In addition a first biocompatibility test was performed to compare the growing of m...

  8. Industrial applications of ion implantation into metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.M.

    1987-07-01

    The modern materials processing technique, ion implantation, has intriguing and attractive features that stimulate the imaginations of scientists and technologists. Success of the technique for introducing dopants into semiconductors has resulted in a stable and growing infrastructure of capital equipment and skills for use of the technique in the economy. Attention has turned to possible use of ion implantation for modification of nearly all surface related properties of materials - optical, chemical and corrosive, tribological, and several others. This presentation provides an introduction to fundamental aspects of equipment, technique, and materials science of ion implantation. Practical and economic factors pertaining to the technology are discussed. Applications and potential applications are surveyed. There are already available a number of ion-implanted products, including ball-and-roller bearings and races, punches-and-dies, injection screws for plastics molding, etc., of potential interest to the machine tool industry

  9. Surface energy absorbing layers produced by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurarie, V.N.

    1997-01-01

    Single crystals of magnesia have been ion implanted with 80 keV Si and Cr ions at variable doses and then subjected to testing in a shock plasma. The peak surface temperature has been calibrated by measuring the size and temperature deformation of the fragments formed by multiple microcracking during thermal shock. the crack density curves for MgO crystals demonstrate that in a wide range of thermal shock intensity the ion implanted crystals develop a system of microcracks of a considerably higher density than the unimplanted ones. The high density of cracks nucleated in the ion implanted samples results in the formation of a surface energy absorbing layer which effectively absorbs elastic strain energy induced by thermal shock. As a consequence the depth of crack penetration in the layer and hence the degree of fracture damage are decreased. the results indicate that a Si implant decreases the temperature threshold of cracking and simultaneously increases the crack density in MgO crystals. However, in MgO crystals implanted with Cr a substantial increase in the crack density is achieved without a noticeable decrease in the temperature threshold of fracture. This effect is interpreted in terms of different Cr and Si implantation conditions and damage. The mechanical properties of the energy-absorbing layer and the relation to implantation-induced lattice damage are discussed. 11 refs., 4 figs

  10. Surface sputtering in high-dose Fe ion implanted Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishimaru, Manabu

    2007-01-01

    Microstructures and elemental distributions in high-dose Fe ion implanted Si were characterized by means of transmission electron microscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. Single crystalline Si(0 0 1) substrates were implanted at 350 deg. C with 120 keV Fe ions to fluences ranging from 0.1 x 10 17 to 4.0 x 10 17 /cm 2 . Extensive damage induced by ion implantation was observed inside the substrate below 1.0 x 10 17 /cm 2 , while a continuous iron silicide layer was formed at 4.0 x 10 17 /cm 2 . It was found that the spatial distribution of Fe projectiles drastically changes at the fluence between 1.0 x 10 17 and 4.0 x 10 17 /cm 2 due to surface sputtering during implantation

  11. Study on surface modification of M2 steel induced by Cu ions and Al ions implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chao; Liu Zhengmin

    2001-01-01

    Changes of surface hardness and wear resistances in M2 type steel implanted by Cu Al ions were reported. The dependence of surface strengthening on ion species and dose was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS) for microhardness and wear resistances measurement. It is shown that both hardness and wear resistance increases apparently after ion implantation. XRD analysis indicates that different phases formed after Al Cu ions implanted. It is also suggested that Cu, Al ions have different role in surface strengthening

  12. N + surface doping on nanoscale polymer fabrics via ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho Wong, Kenneth Kar; Zinke-Allmang, Martin; Wan, Wankei

    2006-08-01

    Non-woven poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) fabrics composed of small diameter (∼110 nm) fibers have been spun by an electrospinning technique and then have been modified by ion implantation. 1.7 MeV N+ ion implantation with a dose of 1.2 × 1016 ions/cm2 was applied on the fabrics through a metal foil at room temperature. By using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), no surface morphology degradation has been observed on the fabric after the ion beam treatment. The diameter of the fibers has shrunk by 30% to about 74 nm. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) show that nitrogen surface doping was achieved and the formation of two new functional chemical groups (N-Cdbnd O and C-N) in the PVA is observed.

  13. Surface modification of commercial tin coatings by carbon ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, L.J.; Sood, D.K.; Manory, R.R. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    Commercial TiN coatings of about 2 {mu}m thickness on high speed steel substrates were implanted at room temperature with 95 keV carbon ions at nominal doses between 1 x 10{sup 17} - 8x10{sup 17} ions cm{sup -2}. Carbon ion implantation induced a significant improvement in ultramicrohardness, friction coefficient and wear properties. The surface microhardness increases monotonically by up to 115% until a critical dose is reached. Beyond this dose the hardness decreases, but remains higher than that of unimplanted sample. A lower friction coefficient and a longer transition period towards a steady state condition were obtained by carbon ion implantation. The changes in tribomechanical properties are discussed in terms of radiation damage and possible formation of a second phase rich in carbon. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Surface modification of austenitic stainless steel by titanium ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, P.J.; Hyvarinen, J.; Samandi, M.

    1995-01-01

    The wear properties of AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel implanted with Ti were investigated for ion doses in the range (2.3-5.4)x10 16 ionscm -2 and average ion energies of 60 and 90keV. The implanted layer was examined by Rutherford backscattering, from which the retained doses were determined, and glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy. Following implantation, the surface microhardness was observed to increase with the greatest change occurring at higher ion energy. Pin-on-disc wear tests and associated friction measurements were also performed under both dry and lubricated conditions using applied loads of 2N and 10N. In the absence of lubrication, breakthrough of the implanted layer occurred after a short sliding time; only for a dose of 5.1x10 16 ionscm -2 implanted at an average energy of 90keV was the onset of breakthrough appreciably delayed. In contrast, the results of tests with lubrication showed a more gradual variation, with the extent of wear decreasing with implant dose at both 2N and 10N loads. Finally, the influence of Ti implantation on possible wear mechanisms is discussed in the light of information provided by several surface characterization techniques. ((orig.))

  15. Yttrium ion implantation on the surface properties of magnesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, X.M.; Zeng, X.Q.; Wu, G.S.; Yao, S.S.

    2006-01-01

    Owing to their excellent physical and mechanical properties, magnesium and its alloys are receiving more attention. However, their application has been limited to the high reactivity and the poor corrosion resistance. The aim of the study was to investigate the beneficial effects of ion-implanted yttrium using a MEVVA ion implanter on the surface properties of pure magnesium. Isothermal oxidation tests in pure O 2 at 673 and 773 K up to 90 min indicated that the oxidation resistance of magnesium had been significantly improved. Surface morphology of the oxide scale was analyzed using scanning electron microscope (SEM). Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses indicated that the implanted layer was mainly composed of MgO and Y 2 O 3 , and the implanted layer with a duplex structure could decrease the inward diffusion of oxygen and reduce the outward diffusion of Mg 2+ , which led to improving the oxidation resistance of magnesium. Potentiodynamic polarization curves were used to evaluate the corrosion resistance of the implanted magnesium. The results show yttrium implantation could enhance the corrosion resistance of implanted magnesium compared with that of pure magnesium

  16. Surface disorder production during plasma immersion implantation and high energy ion implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El-sherbiny, M.A.; Khanh, N.Q.; Wormeester, Herbert; Fried, M.; Fried, M.; Lohner, T.; Lohner, T.; Pinter, I.; Gyulai, J.

    1996-01-01

    High-depth-resolution Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) combined with channeling technique was used to analyze the surface layer formed during plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) of single crystal silicon substrates. Single wavelength multiple angle of incidence ellipsometry (MAIE)

  17. Highly antibacterial UHMWPE surfaces by implantation of titanium ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delle Side, D., E-mail: domenico.delleside@le.infn.it [LEAS, Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “Ennio de Giorgi”, Università del Salento, Lecce (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare – Sezione di Lecce, Lecce (Italy); Nassisi, V.; Giuffreda, E.; Velardi, L. [LEAS, Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “Ennio de Giorgi”, Università del Salento, Lecce (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare – Sezione di Lecce, Lecce (Italy); Alifano, P.; Talà, A.; Tredici, S.M. [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biologiche ed Ambientali, Università del Salento, Lecce (Italy)

    2014-07-15

    The spreading of pathogens represents a serious threat for human beings. Consequently, efficient antimicrobial surfaces are needed in order to reduce risks of contracting severe diseases. In this work we present the first evidences of a new technique to obtain a highly antibacterial Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) based on a non-stoichiometric titanium oxide coating, visible-light responsive, obtained through ion implantation.

  18. Highly antibacterial UHMWPE surfaces by implantation of titanium ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delle Side, D.; Nassisi, V.; Giuffreda, E.; Velardi, L.; Alifano, P.; Talà, A.; Tredici, S. M.

    2014-07-01

    The spreading of pathogens represents a serious threat for human beings. Consequently, efficient antimicrobial surfaces are needed in order to reduce risks of contracting severe diseases. In this work we present the first evidences of a new technique to obtain a highly antibacterial Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) based on a non-stoichiometric titanium oxide coating, visible-light responsive, obtained through ion implantation.

  19. Surface modification of titanium and titanium alloys by ion implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautray, Tapash R; Narayanan, R; Kwon, Tae-Yub; Kim, Kyo-Han

    2010-05-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys are widely used in biomedical devices and components, especially as hard tissue replacements as well as in cardiac and cardiovascular applications, because of their desirable properties, such as relatively low modulus, good fatigue strength, formability, machinability, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility. However, titanium and its alloys cannot meet all of the clinical requirements. Therefore, to improve the biological, chemical, and mechanical properties, surface modification is often performed. In view of this, the current review casts new light on surface modification of titanium and titanium alloys by ion beam implantation. (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. N and Cr ion implantation of natural ruby surfaces and their characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, K. Sudheendra; Sahoo, Rakesh K.; Dash, Tapan [CSIR-Institute of Minerals and Materials Technology, Bhubaneswar 751013 (India); Magudapathy, P.; Panigrahi, B.K. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Nayak, B.B.; Mishra, B.K. [CSIR-Institute of Minerals and Materials Technology, Bhubaneswar 751013 (India)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Cr and N ion implantation on natural rubies of low aesthetic quality. • Cr-ion implantation improves colour tone from red to deep red (pigeon eye red). • N-ion implantation at fluence of 3 × 10{sup 17} causes blue coloration on surface. • Certain extent of amorphization is observed in the case of N-ion implantation. - Abstract: Energetic ions of N and Cr were used to implant the surfaces of natural rubies (low aesthetic quality). Surface colours of the specimens were found to change after ion implantation. The samples without and with ion implantation were characterized by diffuse reflectance spectra in ultra violet and visible region (DRS-UV–Vis), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and nano-indentation. While the Cr-ion implantation produced deep red surface colour (pigeon eye red) in polished raw sample (without heat treatment), the N-ion implantation produced a mixed tone of dark blue, greenish blue and violet surface colour in the heat treated sample. In the case of heat treated sample at 3 × 10{sup 17} N-ions/cm{sup 2} fluence, formation of colour centres (F{sup +}, F{sub 2}, F{sub 2}{sup +} and F{sub 2}{sup 2+}) by ion implantation process is attributed to explain the development of the modified surface colours. Certain degree of surface amorphization was observed to be associated with the above N-ion implantation.

  1. Ion microanalysis and implantation applied to fusion surface research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vook, F.L.; Doyle, B.L.; Picraux, S.T.

    1978-01-01

    Ion microanalysis and implantation have been used to investigate and analyze plasma-surface interactions relevant to fusion plasma materials. Previous results for pure metals are reviewed and new results are presented for TiB 2 coatings for Tokamak surfaces. Enhanced trapping of implanted, low-energy hydrogen has been shown to occur at room temperature in W, Au, Pd, Mo, Nb, and TiB 2 for He or other ion predamage. Hydrogen depth profiles obtained using 1 H( 19 F,αγ) 16 O resonant nuclear reaction show that the H decorates the He damage profiles at traps whose concentration is proportional to the He-induced damage. For room temperature implantation in TiB 2 , H is trapped at the end of range, and isochronal annealing indicates that the H is lost by release from traps followed by rapid diffusion. For He predamaged samples, annealing at 400 0 C causes the H to be retrapped in the region of the He-induced damage at traps whose cross section is approx. = 1.8 x 10 -18 cm 2 /trap

  2. Characterization of surface enhancement of carbon ion-implanted TiN coatings by metal vapor vacuum arc ion implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, C L

    2002-01-01

    The modification of the surfaces of energetic carbon-implanted TiN films using metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) ion implantation was investigated, by varying ion energy and dose. The microhardness, microstructure and chemical states of carbon, implanted on the surface layer of TiN films, were examined, as functions of ion energy and dose, by nanoindenter, transmission electron microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Results revealed that the microhardness increased from 16.8 up to 25.3 GPa and the friction coefficient decreased to approximately 0.2, depending on the implanted ion energy and dose. The result is attributed to the new microcrystalline phases of TiCN and TiC formed, and carbon concentration saturation of the implanted matrix can enhance the partial mechanical property of TiN films after MEVVA treatment. The concentration distribution, implantation depth and chemical states of carbon-implanted TiN coatings depended strongly on the ion dose and...

  3. Surface modification technique of structural ceramics: ion implantation-assisted multi-arc ion plating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Zhijian; Miao Hezhuo; Si Wenjie; Qi Longhao; Li Wenzhi

    2003-01-01

    Through reviewing the advantages and disadvantages of the existed surface modification techniques, a new technique, ion implantation-assisted multi-arc ion plating, was proposed. Using the proposed technique, the surfaces of silicon nitride ceramics were modified by Ti ion implantation, and then three kinds of ternary coatings, (Ti,Al)N, (Ti,Zr)N and (Ti,Cr)N, were deposited on the as-implanted ceramics. The coatings prepared by this technique are of high-hardness and well adhesive to the ceramic substrates. The maximal hardness measured by nanoindentation tests is more than 40 GPa. The maximal critical load by nanoscratch tests is more than 60 mN. The cutting tools prepared by this technique with the presented coatings are of excellent performance in industrial applications. The technique may be promising for the surface modification of structural ceramics. (orig.)

  4. Surface depression of glass and surface swelling of ceramics induced by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeyama, Masami; Saitoh, Kazuo; Nakao, Setsuo; Niwa, Hiroaki; Tanemura, Seita; Miyagawa, Yoshiko; Miyagawa, Souji

    1994-01-01

    By the measurement of the change of the surface shapes of the glass and ceramics in which ion implantation was performed, it was clarified that glass surface was depressed, and ceramic surface swelled. These depression and swelling changed according to the kinds of ions, energy and the amount to be implanted and the temperature of samples. It became clear that the depression of glass surface was nearly proportional to the range of flight of the implanted ions, and the swelling of ceramic surface showed different state in the silicon nitride with strong covalent bond and the alumina and sapphire with strong ionic bond. For the improvement of the mechanical characteristics of solid materials such as hardness, strength, toughness, wear resistance, oxidation resistance and so on, attention has been paid to the surface reforming by high energy ion implantation at MeV level. The change of shapes of base materials due to ion implantation is not always negligible. The experiment was carried out on sintered silicon nitride and alumina, polished sapphire single crystals and quartz glass. The experimental method and the results are reported. (K.I.)

  5. Application of nitrogen plasma immersion ion implantation to titanium nasal implants with nanonetwork surface structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Ying-Sui; Yang, Wei-En [Department of Dentistry, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Zhang, Lan [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Zhu, Hongqin [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Lan, Ming-Ying [Division of Rhinology, Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 112, Taiwan and School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Lee, Sheng-Wei [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, National Central University, Taoyuan 320, Taiwan (China); Huang, Her-Hsiung, E-mail: hhhuang@ym.edu.tw [Department of Dentistry, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Institute of Oral Biology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Department of Bioinformatics and Medical Engineering, Asia University, Taichung 413, Taiwan (China); Department of Stomatology, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China)

    2016-07-15

    In nasal reconstruction, the response of cells to titanium (Ti) implants is mainly determined by surface features of the implant. In a pilot study, the authors applied electrochemical anodization to Ti surfaces in an alkaline solution to create a network of nanoscale surface structures. This nanonetwork was intended to enhance the responses of primary human nasal epithelial cell (HNEpC) to the Ti surface. In this study, the authors then treated the anodized, nanonetwork-structured Ti surface using nitrogen plasma immersion ion implantation (NPIII) in order to further improve the HNEpC response to the Ti surface. Subsequently, surface characterization was performed to elucidate morphology, roughness, wettability, and chemistry of specimens. Cytotoxicity, blood, and HNEpC responses were also evaluated. Our results demonstrate that NPIII treatment led to the formation of a noncytotoxic TiN-containing thin film (thickness <100 nm) on the electrochemically anodized Ti surface with a nanonetwork-structure. NPIII treatment was shown to improve blood clotting and the adhesion of platelets to the anodized Ti surface as well as the adhesion and proliferation of hNEpC. This research spreads our understanding of the fact that a TiN-containing thin film, produced using NPIII treatment, could be used to improve blood and HNEpC responses to anodized, nanonetwork-structured Ti surfaces in nasal implant applications.

  6. Ion beam sputter modification of the surface morphology of biological implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigand, A. J.; Banks, B. A.

    1976-01-01

    The surface chemistry and texture of materials used for biological implants may significantly influence their performance and biocompatibility. Recent interest in the microscopic control of implant surface texture has led to the evaluation of ion beam sputtering as a potentially useful surface roughening technique. Ion sources, similar to electron bombardment ion thrusters designed for propulsive applications, are used to roughen the surfaces of various biocompatible alloys or polymer materials. These materials are typically used for dental implants, orthopedic prostheses, vascular prostheses, and artificial heart components. Masking techniques and resulting surface textures are described along with progress concerning evaluation of the biological response to the ion beam sputtered surfaces.

  7. Nanoscale patterns produced by self-sputtering of solid surfaces: The effect of ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, R. Mark [Department of Physics, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States); Hofsäss, Hans [II. Physikalisches Institut, Universität Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2016-08-21

    A theory of the effect that ion implantation has on the patterns produced by ion bombardment of solid surfaces is introduced. For simplicity, the case of self-sputtering of an elemental material is studied. We find that implantation of self-ions has a destabilizing effect along the projected beam direction for angles of incidence θ that exceed a critical value. In the transverse direction, ion implantation has a stabilizing influence for all θ.

  8. Surface potential measurement of negative-ion-implanted insulators by analysing secondary electron energy distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyota, Yoshitaka; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Nagumo, Syoji; Gotoh, Yasuhito; Ishikawa, Junzo; Sakai, Shigeki.

    1994-01-01

    The negative ion implantation method we have proposed is a noble technique which can reduce surface charging of isolated electrodes by a large margin. In this paper, the way to specify the surface potential of negative-ion-implanted insulators by the secondary electron energy analysis is described. The secondary electron energy distribution is obtained by a retarding field type energy analyzer. The result shows that the surface potential of fused quartz by negative-ion implantation (C - with the energy of 10 keV to 40 keV) is negatively charged by only several volts. This surface potential is extremely low compared with that by positive-ion implantation. Therefore, the negative-ion implantation is a very effective method for charge-up free implantation without charge compensation. (author)

  9. The influence of ion implantation on the surface properties of metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, W.A.; Carter, G.

    1975-10-01

    The report falls into three sections: (1) annealing behaviour of high dose rare gas (Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) implantations into silicon; (2) measurement of projected and lateral range parameters for low energy heavy ions (Ar, Cu, Kr, Cd, Xe, Cs, Dy, W, Au, Pb, Bi) in silicon by Rutherford backscattering; (3) surface chemistry of ion implanted solids (e.g. corrosion, catalysis, oxidation, synthesis of compounds in ion implanted layers). (U.K.)

  10. Modification of anti-bacterial surface properties of textile polymers by vacuum arc ion source implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolaev, A.G., E-mail: nik@opee.hcei.tsc.ru [High Current Electronics Institute, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Yushkov, G.Yu.; Oks, E.M. [High Current Electronics Institute, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Oztarhan, A. [Izmir University, Izmir 35140 (Turkey); Akpek, A.; Hames-Kocabas, E.; Urkac, E.S. [Bioengineering Department, Ege University, Bornova 35100, Izmir (Turkey); Brown, I.G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94708 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Ion implantation. • Anti-bacterial properties. • Textile polymer. • Vacuum arc ion source. - Abstract: Ion implantation provides an important technology for the modification of material surface properties. The vacuum arc ion source is a unique instrument for the generation of intense beams of metal ions as well as gaseous ions, including mixed metal–gas beams with controllable metal:gas ion ratio. Here we describe our exploratory work on the application of vacuum arc ion source-generated ion beams for ion implantation into polymer textile materials for modification of their biological cell compatibility surface properties. We have investigated two specific aspects of cell compatibility: (i) enhancement of the antibacterial characteristics (we chose to use Staphylococcus aureus bacteria) of ion implanted polymer textile fabric, and (ii) the “inverse” concern of enhancement of neural cell growth rate (we chose Rat B-35 neuroblastoma cells) on ion implanted polymer textile. The results of both investigations were positive, with implantation-generated antibacterial efficiency factor up to about 90%, fully comparable to alternative conventional (non-implantation) approaches and with some potentially important advantages over the conventional approach; and with enhancement of neural cell growth rate of up to a factor of 3.5 when grown on suitably implanted polymer textile material.

  11. The effect of metal ion implantation on the surface mechanical properties of Mylar (PET)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, W.; Sood, D.K. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia); Yao, X.; Brown, I.G. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Lawrence Berkeley Lab.

    1993-12-31

    Ion implantation of polymers leads to the formation of new carbonaceous materials, the revolution during implantation of various species consists of (1) ion beam induced damage: chain scission, crosslinking, molecular emission of volatile elements and compounds, stoichiometric change in the surface layer of pristine polymers; and (2) chemical effect between ion and target materials: microalloying and precipitation. Literature regarding ion implanted polymers shows that the reorganisation of the carbon network after implantation can dramatically modify several properties of pristine polymers solubility, molecular weight, and electrical, optical and mechanical properties. However, ion implantation of polymers is actually a very complex interaction which depends on not only ion species, implantation condition, but also polymer type and specific structure. In this paper the effect of Ag or Ti ions implantation on surface mechanical properties of PET (polyethylenne terephthalate) polymer is reported. There was a clear deterioration in wear resistance after implantation of both Ag and Ti ions. It is suggested that the increment of wear after implantation may result from not only ion damage but also chemical effect between ion and target material. 3 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  12. Surface ion implantation induced by laser-generated plasmas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Giuffrida, L.; Torrisi, L.; Gammino, S.; Wolowski, J.; Ullschmied, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 165, 6-10 (2010), s. 534-542 ISSN 1042-0150. [International Workshop on Pulsed Plasma Laser Ablation (PPLA)/4./. Monte Pieta, Messina, 18.06.2009-20.06.2009] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : laser ablation * laser plasma * ion implantation * RBS analysis Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.660, year: 2010

  13. N and Cr ion implantation of natural ruby surfaces and their characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, K. Sudheendra; Sahoo, Rakesh K.; Dash, Tapan; Magudapathy, P.; Panigrahi, B. K.; Nayak, B. B.; Mishra, B. K.

    2016-04-01

    Energetic ions of N and Cr were used to implant the surfaces of natural rubies (low aesthetic quality). Surface colours of the specimens were found to change after ion implantation. The samples without and with ion implantation were characterized by diffuse reflectance spectra in ultra violet and visible region (DRS-UV-Vis), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and nano-indentation. While the Cr-ion implantation produced deep red surface colour (pigeon eye red) in polished raw sample (without heat treatment), the N-ion implantation produced a mixed tone of dark blue, greenish blue and violet surface colour in the heat treated sample. In the case of heat treated sample at 3 × 1017 N-ions/cm2 fluence, formation of colour centres (F+, F2, F2+ and F22+) by ion implantation process is attributed to explain the development of the modified surface colours. Certain degree of surface amorphization was observed to be associated with the above N-ion implantation.

  14. Tribological properties and surface structures of ion implanted 9Cr18Mo stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fengbin, Liu; Guohao, Fu; Yan, Cui; Qiguo, Sun; Min, Qu; Yi, Sun

    2013-07-01

    The polished quenched-and-tempered 9Cr18Mo steels were implanted with N ions and Ti ions respectively at a fluence of 2 × 1017 ions/cm2. The mechanical properties of the samples were investigated by using nanoindenter and tribometer. The results showed that the ion implantations would improve the nanohardness and tribological property, especially N ion implantation. The surface analysis of the implanted samples was carried out by using XRD, XPS and AES. It indicated that the surface exhibits graded layers after ion implantation. For N ion implantation, the surface about 20 nm thickness is mainly composed of supersaturated interstitial N solid solution, oxynitrides, CrxCy phase and metal nitrides. In the subsurface region, the metal nitrides dominate and the other phases disappear. For Ti ion implantation, the surface of about 20 nm thickness is mainly composed of titanium oxides and carbon amorphous phase, the interstitial solid solution of Ti in Fe is abundant in the subsurface region. The surface components and structures have significant contributions to the improved mechanical properties.

  15. Tribological properties and surface structures of ion implanted 9Cr18Mo stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fengbin, Liu; Guohao, Fu; Yan, Cui; Qiguo, Sun; Min, Qu; Yi, Sun

    2013-01-01

    The polished quenched-and-tempered 9Cr18Mo steels were implanted with N ions and Ti ions respectively at a fluence of 2 × 10 17 ions/cm 2 . The mechanical properties of the samples were investigated by using nanoindenter and tribometer. The results showed that the ion implantations would improve the nanohardness and tribological property, especially N ion implantation. The surface analysis of the implanted samples was carried out by using XRD, XPS and AES. It indicated that the surface exhibits graded layers after ion implantation. For N ion implantation, the surface about 20 nm thickness is mainly composed of supersaturated interstitial N solid solution, oxynitrides, Cr x C y phase and metal nitrides. In the subsurface region, the metal nitrides dominate and the other phases disappear. For Ti ion implantation, the surface of about 20 nm thickness is mainly composed of titanium oxides and carbon amorphous phase, the interstitial solid solution of Ti in Fe is abundant in the subsurface region. The surface components and structures have significant contributions to the improved mechanical properties

  16. The third generation multi-purpose plasma immersion ion implanter for surface modification of materials

    CERN Document Server

    Tang Bao Yin; Wang Xiao Feng; Gan Kong Yin; Wang Song Yan; Chu, P K; Huang Nian Ning; Sun Hong

    2002-01-01

    The third generation multi-purpose plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) equipment has been successfully used for research and development of surface modification of biomedical materials, metals and their alloys in the Southwest Jiaotong University. The implanter equipped with intense current, pulsed cathodic arc metal plasma sources which have both strong coating function and gas and metal ion implantation function. Its pulse high voltage power supply can provide big output current. It can acquire very good implantation dose uniformity. The equipment can both perform ion implantation and combine ion implantation with sputtering deposition and coating to form many kinds of synthetic surface modification techniques. The main design principles, features of important components and achievement of research works in recent time have been described

  17. Effects of ion-implanted C on the microstructure and surface mechanical properties of Fe alloys implanted with Ti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Follstaedt, D.M.; Knapp, J.A.; Pope, L.E.; Yost, F.G.; Picraux, S.T.

    1984-01-01

    The microstructural and tribological effects of ion implanting C into Ti-implanted, Fe-based alloys are examined and compared to the influence of C introduced by vacuum carburization during Ti implantation alone. The amorphous surface alloy formed by Ti implantation of pure Fe increases in thickness when additional C is implanted at depths containing Ti but beyond the range of carburization. Pin-on-disc tests of 15-5 PH stainless steel show that implantation of both Ti and C reduces friction significantly under conditions where no reduction is obtained by Ti implantation alone; wear depths are also less when C is implanted. All available experimental results can be accounted for by consideration of the thickness and Ti concentration of the amorphous Fe-Ti-C alloy. The thicker amorphous layer on samples implanted with additional C extends tribological benefits to more severe wear regimes

  18. Characterization of Nitride Layers Formed by Nitrogen Ion Implantation into Surface Region of Iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudjatmoko; Subki, M. Iyos R.

    2000-01-01

    Ion implantation is a convenient means of modifying the physical and chemical properties of the near-surface region of materials. The nitrogen implantation into pure iron has been performed at room temperature with ion dose of 1.310 17 to 1.310 18 ions/cm 2 and ion energy of 20 to 100 keV. The optimum dose of nitrogen ions implanted into pure iron was around 2.2310 17 ions/cm 2 in order to get the maximum wear resistant. SEM micrographs and EDX show that the nitride layers were found on the surface of substrate. The nitrogen concentration profile was measured using EDX in combination with spot technique, and it can be shown that the depth profile of nitrogen implanted into substrate was nearly Gaussian. (author)

  19. Platelet adhesion and plasma protein adsorption control of collagen surfaces by He+ ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurotobi, K.; Suzuki, Y.; Nakajima, H.; Suzuki, H.; Iwaki, M.

    2003-01-01

    He + ion implanted collagen-coated tubes with a fluence of 1 x 10 14 ions/cm 2 were exhibited antithrombogenicity. To investigate the mechanisms of antithrombogenicity of these samples, plasma protein adsorption assay and platelet adhesion experiments were performed. The adsorption of fibrinogen (Fg) and von Willebrand factor (vWf) was minimum on the He + ion implanted collagen with a fluence of 1 x 10 14 ions/cm 2 . Platelet adhesion (using platelet rich plasma) was inhibited on the He + ion implanted collagen with a fluence of 1 x 10 14 ions/cm 2 and was accelerated on the untreated collagen and ion implanted collagen with fluences of 1 x 10 13 , 1 x 10 15 and 1 x 10 16 ions/cm 2 . Platelet activation with washed platelets was observed on untreated collagen and He + ion implanted collagen with a fluence of 1 x 10 14 ions/cm 2 and was inhibited with fluences of 1 x 10 13 , 1 x 10 15 and 1 x 10 16 ions/cm 2 . Generally, platelets can react with a specific ligand inside the collagen (GFOGER sequence). The results of platelets adhesion experiments using washed platelets indicated that there were no ligands such as GFOGER on the He + ion implanted collagen over a fluence of 1 x 10 13 ions/cm 2 . On the 1 x 10 14 ions/cm 2 implanted collagen, no platelet activation was observed due to the influence of plasma proteins. >From the above, it is concluded that the decrease of adsorbed Fg and vWf caused the antithrombogenicity of He + ion implanted collagen with a fluence of 1 x 10 14 ions/cm 2 and that plasma protein adsorption took an important role repairing the graft surface

  20. Investigation of Steel Surfaces Treated by a Hybrid Ion Implantation Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuther, H.; Richter, E.; Prokert, F.; Ueda, M.; Beloto, A. F.; Gomes, G. F.

    2004-01-01

    Implantation of nitrogen ions into stainless steel in combination with oxidation often results in a decrease or even complete removal of the chromium in the nitrogen containing outermost surface layer. While iron nitrides can be formed easily by this method, due to the absence of chromium, the formation of chromium nitrides is impossible and the beneficial influence of chromium in the steel for corrosion resistance cannot be used. To overcome this problem we use the following hybrid technique. A thin chromium layer is deposited on steel and subsequently implanted with nitrogen ions. Chromium can be implanted by recoil into the steel surface and thus the formation of iron/chromium nitrides should be possible. Both beam line ion implantation and plasma immersion ion implantation are used. Due to the variation of the process parameters, different implantation profiles and different compounds are produced. The produced layers are characterized by Auger electron spectroscopy, conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The obtained results show that due to the variation of the implantation parameters, the formation of iron/chromium nitrides can be achieved and that plasma immersion ion implantation is the most suitable technique for the enrichment of chromium in the outermost surface layer of the steel when compared to the beam line implantation.

  1. Mg ion implantation on SLA-treated titanium surface and its effects on the behavior of mesenchymal stem cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Beom-Su; Kim, Jin Seong; Park, Young Min; Choi, Bo-Young; Lee, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg) is one of the most important ions associated with bone osseointegration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cellular effects of Mg implantation in titanium (Ti) surfaces treated with sand blast using large grit and acid etching (SLA). Mg ions were implanted into the surface via vacuum arc source ion implantation. The surface morphology, chemical properties, and the amount of Mg ion release were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS), and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES). Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were used to evaluate cellular parameters such as proliferation, cytotoxicity, and adhesion morphology by MTS assay, live/dead assay, and SEM. Furthermore, osteoblast differentiation was determined on the basis of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the degree of calcium accumulation. In the Mg ion-implanted disk, 2.3 × 10 16 ions/cm 2 was retained. However, after Mg ion implantation, the surface morphology did not change. Implanted Mg ions were rapidly released during the first 7 days in vitro. The MTS assay, live/dead assay, and SEM demonstrated increased cell attachment and growth on the Mg ion-implanted surface. In particular, Mg ion implantation increased the initial cell adhesion, and in an osteoblast differentiation assay, ALP activity and calcium accumulation. These findings suggest that Mg ion implantation using the plasma source ion implantation (PSII) technique may be useful for SLA-treated Ti dental implants to improve their osseointegration capacity. - Highlights: ► Mg ion was coated onto surface of SLA treated titanium via vacuum arc source ion implantation method. ► The morphological characteristics did not change after Mg ion implantation. ► Mg ion implanted SLA Ti is highly cytocompatible. ► Initial cell adhesion of MSCs is improved by Mg ion implantation. ► Mg ion implantation improved

  2. Mg ion implantation on SLA-treated titanium surface and its effects on the behavior of mesenchymal stem cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Beom-Su; Kim, Jin Seong [Wonkwang Bone Regeneration Research Institute, Wonkwang University, Iksan 570-749 (Korea, Republic of); Bonecell Biotech Inc., 77, Dunsan-ro, Seo-gu, Daejeon 302-830 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Min [DIO Corporation, 66, Centum seo-ro, Haeundae-gu, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Bo-Young [Department of Oral and maxillofacial Surgery, Wonkwang University Daejeon Dental Hospital, Daejeon 302-830 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jun, E-mail: omslee@wku.ac.kr [Wonkwang Bone Regeneration Research Institute, Wonkwang University, Iksan 570-749 (Korea, Republic of); Bonecell Biotech Inc., 77, Dunsan-ro, Seo-gu, Daejeon 302-830 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-01

    Magnesium (Mg) is one of the most important ions associated with bone osseointegration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cellular effects of Mg implantation in titanium (Ti) surfaces treated with sand blast using large grit and acid etching (SLA). Mg ions were implanted into the surface via vacuum arc source ion implantation. The surface morphology, chemical properties, and the amount of Mg ion release were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS), and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES). Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were used to evaluate cellular parameters such as proliferation, cytotoxicity, and adhesion morphology by MTS assay, live/dead assay, and SEM. Furthermore, osteoblast differentiation was determined on the basis of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the degree of calcium accumulation. In the Mg ion-implanted disk, 2.3 × 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2} was retained. However, after Mg ion implantation, the surface morphology did not change. Implanted Mg ions were rapidly released during the first 7 days in vitro. The MTS assay, live/dead assay, and SEM demonstrated increased cell attachment and growth on the Mg ion-implanted surface. In particular, Mg ion implantation increased the initial cell adhesion, and in an osteoblast differentiation assay, ALP activity and calcium accumulation. These findings suggest that Mg ion implantation using the plasma source ion implantation (PSII) technique may be useful for SLA-treated Ti dental implants to improve their osseointegration capacity. - Highlights: ► Mg ion was coated onto surface of SLA treated titanium via vacuum arc source ion implantation method. ► The morphological characteristics did not change after Mg ion implantation. ► Mg ion implanted SLA Ti is highly cytocompatible. ► Initial cell adhesion of MSCs is improved by Mg ion implantation. ► Mg ion implantation

  3. Near-surface recrystallization of the amorphous implanted layer of ion implanted 6H-SiC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhudzai, R. J.; van der Berg, N. G.; Malherbe, J. B.; Hlatshwayo, T. T.; Theron, C. C.; Buys, A. V.; Botha, A. J.; Wendler, E.; Wesch, W.

    2014-08-01

    The recrystallization and subsequent crystal growth during annealing of amorphous surface layers on 6H-SiC produced by ion implantation is investigated. Amorphous surface layers were produced by ion implantation of 360 keV ions of iodine, silver, xenon, cesium and strontium into single crystalline 6H-silicon carbide samples. The ion fluence for all the implantations were in the order of 1016 cm-2. Vacuum annealing of the damaged silicon carbide samples was then performed. The microstructure of SiC surfaces before and after annealing was investigated using a high resolution field emission scanning electron microscope (SEM). SEM analysis was complimented by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). SEM images acquired by an in-lens detector using an accelerating voltage of 2 kV show nano-crystallites developed for all implanted samples after annealing. Larger and more faceted crystallites along with elongated thin crystallites were observed for iodine and xenon implanted 6H-SiC. Crystallites formed on surfaces implanted with strontium and cesium were smaller and less faceted. Strontium, silver and cesium implanted samples also exhibited more cavities on the surface. AFM was used to evaluate the effect of annealing on the surface roughness. For all the amorphous surfaces which were essentially featureless, the root mean square (rms) roughness was approximately 1 nm. The roughness increased to approximately 17 nm for the iodine implanted sample after annealing with the surface roughness below this value for all the other samples. AFM also showed that the largest crystals grew to heights of about 17, 20, 45, 50 and 65 nm for Sr, Cs, Ag, Xe and I implanted samples after annealing at 1200 °C for 5 h respectively. SEM images and AFM analysis suggest that iodine is more effective in promoting crystal growth during the annealing of bombardment-induced amorphous SiC layers than the rest of the ions we implanted. In samples of silicon carbide co-implanted with iodine and silver, few

  4. Improvement of in vitro corrosion and cytocompatibility of biodegradable Fe surface modified by Zn ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Henan; Zheng, Yang; Li, Yan; Jiang, Chengbao

    2017-05-01

    Pure Fe was surface-modified by Zn ion implantation to improve the biodegradable behavior and cytocompatibility. Surface topography, chemical composition, corrosion resistance and cytocompatibility were investigated. Atomic force microscopy, auger electron spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results showed that Zn was implanted into the surface of pure Fe in the depth of 40-60 nm and Fe2O3/ZnO oxides were formed on the outmost surface. Electrochemical measurements and immersion tests revealed an improved degradable behavior for the Zn-implanted Fe samples. An approximately 12% reduction in the corrosion potential (Ecorr) and a 10-fold increase in the corrosion current density (icorr) were obtained after Zn ion implantation with a moderate incident ion dose, which was attributed to the enhanced pitting corrosion. The surface free energy of pure Fe was decreased by Zn ion implantation. The results of direct cell culture indicated that the short-term (4 h) cytocompatibility of MC3T3-E1 cells was promoted by the implanted Zn on the surface.

  5. Study of highly functionalized metal surface treated by plasma ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeyama, Masami; Miyagawa, Soji; Miyagawa, Yoshiko; Nakao, Setsuo; Masuda, Haruho; Saito, Kazuo; Ono, Taizou; Hayashi, Eiji

    2004-01-01

    Technology for processing metal surfaces with hardness, low friction and free from foreign substances was developed with plasma ion implantation. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating is a most promising method for realization of hard and smooth metal surface. DLC coating was tested in a metal pipe with 10 mm diameter and 10 cm length by a newly developed plasma ion implantation instrument. The surface coated by DLC was proved to have characteristics equivalent to those prepared with other methods. A computer program simulating a formation process of DLC coating was developed. Experiments for fluorinating the DLC coating surface was performed. (Y. Kazumata)

  6. Surface potential measurement of insulators in negative-ion implantation by secondary electron energy-peak shift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagumo, Shoji; Toyota, Yoshitaka; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Gotoh, Yasuhito; Ishikawa, Junzo; Sakai, Shigeki; Tanjyo, Masayasu; Matsuda, Kohji.

    1993-01-01

    Negative-ion implantation is expected to realize charge-up free implantation. In this article, about a way to specify surface potential of negative-ion implanted insulator by secondary-electron-energy distribution, its principle and preliminary experimental results are described. By a measuring system with retarding field type energy analyzer, energy distribution of secondary electron from insulator of Fused Quartz in negative-carbon-ion implantation was measured. As a result the peak-shift of its energy distribution resulted according with the surface potential of insulator. It was found that surface potential of insulator is negatively charged by only several volts. Thus, negative-ion implanted insulator reduced its surface charge-up potential (without any electron supply). Therefore negative-ion implantation is considered to be much more effective method than conventional positive-ion implantation. (author)

  7. Surface modification of polymeric substrates by plasma-based ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuji, S.; Sekiya, M.; Nakabayashi, M.; Endo, H.; Sakudo, N.; Nagai, K.

    2006-01-01

    Plasma-based ion implantation (PBII) as a tool for polymer modification is studied. Polymeric films have good performances for flexible use, such as food packaging or electronic devices. Compared with inorganic rigid materials, polymers generally have large permeability for gases and moisture, which causes packaged contents and devices to degrade. In order to add a barrier function, surface of polymeric films are modified by PBII. One of the advantageous features of this method over deposition is that the modified surface does not have peeling problem. Besides, micro-cracks due to mechanical stress in the modified layer can be decreased. From the standpoint of mass production, conventional ion implantation that needs low-pressure environment of less than 10-3 Pa is not suitable for continuous large-area processing, while PBII works at rather higher pressure of several Pa. In terms of issues mentioned above, PBII is one of the most expected techniques for modification on flexible substrates. However, the mechanism how the barrier function appears by ion implantation is not well explained so far. In this study, various kinds of polymeric films, including polyethyleneterephthalate (PET), are modified by PBII and their barrier characteristics that depend on the ion dose are evaluated. In order to investigate correlations of the barrier function with implanted ions, modified surface is analyzed with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It is assumed that the diffusion and sorption coefficients are changed by ion implantation, resulting in higher barrier function.

  8. Ion implantation into diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Susumu

    1994-01-01

    The graphitization and the change to amorphous state of diamond surface layer by ion implantation and its characteristics are reported. In the diamond surface, into which more than 10 16 ions/cm 2 was implanted, the diamond crystals are broken, and the structure changes to other carbon structure such as amorphous state or graphite. Accompanying this change of structure, the electric conductivity of the implanted layer shows two discontinuous values due to high resistance and low resistance. This control of structure can be done by the temperature of the base during the ion implantation into diamond. Also it is referred to that by the base temperature during implantation, the mutual change of the structure between amorphous state and graphite can be controlled. The change of the electric resistance and the optical characteristics by the ion implantation into diamond surface, the structural analysis by Raman spectroscopy, and the control of the structure of the implanted layer by the base temperature during implantation are reported. (K.I.)

  9. Ion implantation - an introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsend, P.D.

    1986-01-01

    Ion implantation is a widely used technique with a literature that covers semiconductor production, surface treatments of steels, corrosion resistance, catalysis and integrated optics. This brief introduction outlines advantages of the technique, some aspects of the underlying physics and examples of current applications. Ion implantation is already an essential part of semiconductor technology while in many other areas it is still in an early stage of development. The future scope of the subject is discussed. (author)

  10. Plasma immersion ion implantation for the efficient surface modification of medical materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slabodchikov, Vladimir A., E-mail: dipis1991@mail.ru; Borisov, Dmitry P., E-mail: borengin@mail.ru; Kuznetsov, Vladimir M., E-mail: kuznetsov@rec.tsu.ru [National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    The paper reports on a new method of plasma immersion ion implantation for the surface modification of medical materials using the example of nickel-titanium (NiTi) alloys much used for manufacturing medical implants. The chemical composition and surface properties of NiTi alloys doped with silicon by conventional ion implantation and by the proposed plasma immersion method are compared. It is shown that the new plasma immersion method is more efficient than conventional ion beam treatment and provides Si implantation into NiTi surface layers through a depth of a hundred nanometers at low bias voltages (400 V) and temperatures (≤150°C) of the substrate. The research results suggest that the chemical composition and surface properties of materials required for medicine, e.g., NiTi alloys, can be successfully attained through modification by the proposed method of plasma immersion ion implantation and by other methods based on the proposed vacuum equipment without using any conventional ion beam treatment.

  11. Plasma source ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conrad, J.R.; Forest, C.

    1986-01-01

    The authors' technique allows the ion implantation to be performed directly within the ion source at higher currents without ion beam extraction and transport. The potential benefits include greatly increased production rates (factors of 10-1000) and the ability to implant non-planar targets without rastering or shadowing. The technique eliminates the ion extractor grid set, beam raster equipment, drift space and target manipulator equipment. The target to be implanted is placed directly within the plasma source and is biased to a large negative potential so that plasma ions gain energy as they accelerate through the potential drop across the sheath that forms at the plasma boundary. Because the sheath surrounds the target on all sides, all surfaces of the target are implanted without the necessity to raster the beam or to rotate the target. The authors have succeeded in implanting nitrogen ions in a silicon target to the depths and concentrations required for surface treatment of materials like stainless steel and titanium alloys. They have performed ESCA measurements of the penetration depth profile of a silicon target that was biased to 30 kV in a nitrogen discharge plasma. Nitrogen ions were implanted to a depth of 700A at a peak concentration of 30% atomic. The measured profile is quite similar to a previously obtained profile in titanium targets with conventional techniques

  12. Zinc-ion implanted and deposited titanium surfaces reduce adhesion of Streptococccus mutans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Juan; Ding Gang; Li Jinlu; Yang Shenhui; Fang Bisong; Sun Hongchen; Zhou Yanmin

    2010-01-01

    While titanium (Ti) is a commonly used dental implant material with advantageous biocompatible and mechanical properties, native Ti surfaces do not have the ability to prevent bacterial colonization. The objective of this study was to evaluate the chemical composition and bacterial adhesive properties of zinc (Zn) ion implanted and deposited Ti surfaces (Zn-PIIID-Ti) as potential dental implant materials. Surfaces of pure Ti (cp-Ti) were modified with increasing concentrations of Zn using plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIIID), and elemental surface compositions were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS). To evaluate bacterial responses, Streptococcus mutans were seeded onto the modifiedTi surfaces for 48 h and subsequently observed by scanning electron microscopy. Relative numbers of bacteria on each surface were assessed by collecting the adhered bacteria, reculturing and counting colony forming units after 48 h on bacterial grade plates. Ti, oxygen and carbon elements were detected on all surfaces by XPS. Increased Zn signals were detected on Zn-PIIID-Ti surfaces, correlating with an increase of Zn-deposition time. Substantial numbers of S. mutans adhered to cp-Ti samples, whereas bacterial adhesion on Zn-PIIID-Ti surfaces signficantly decreased as the Zn concentration increased (p < 0.01). In conclusion, PIIID can successfully introduce Zn onto a Ti surface, forming a modified surface layer bearing Zn ions that consequently deter adhesion of S. mutans, a common bacterium in the oral environment.

  13. Zinc-ion implanted and deposited titanium surfaces reduce adhesion of Streptococccus mutans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Juan, E-mail: doctorxue@126.com [Implant Center, School of Stomatology Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin (China) and Stomatological Hospital, Urumqi, Xinjiang (China); Ding Gang [Department of Stomatology, Yidu Central Hospital, Weifang, Shandong (China); Capital Medical University School of Stomatology, Beijing (China); Li Jinlu; Yang Shenhui; Fang Bisong [Capital Medical University School of Stomatology, Beijing (China); Sun Hongchen, E-mail: hcsun@jlu.edu.cn [Implant Center, School of Stomatology Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin (China); Zhou Yanmin, E-mail: zhouym62@126.com [Implant Center, School of Stomatology Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin (China)

    2010-10-01

    While titanium (Ti) is a commonly used dental implant material with advantageous biocompatible and mechanical properties, native Ti surfaces do not have the ability to prevent bacterial colonization. The objective of this study was to evaluate the chemical composition and bacterial adhesive properties of zinc (Zn) ion implanted and deposited Ti surfaces (Zn-PIIID-Ti) as potential dental implant materials. Surfaces of pure Ti (cp-Ti) were modified with increasing concentrations of Zn using plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIIID), and elemental surface compositions were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS). To evaluate bacterial responses, Streptococcus mutans were seeded onto the modifiedTi surfaces for 48 h and subsequently observed by scanning electron microscopy. Relative numbers of bacteria on each surface were assessed by collecting the adhered bacteria, reculturing and counting colony forming units after 48 h on bacterial grade plates. Ti, oxygen and carbon elements were detected on all surfaces by XPS. Increased Zn signals were detected on Zn-PIIID-Ti surfaces, correlating with an increase of Zn-deposition time. Substantial numbers of S. mutans adhered to cp-Ti samples, whereas bacterial adhesion on Zn-PIIID-Ti surfaces signficantly decreased as the Zn concentration increased (p < 0.01). In conclusion, PIIID can successfully introduce Zn onto a Ti surface, forming a modified surface layer bearing Zn ions that consequently deter adhesion of S. mutans, a common bacterium in the oral environment.

  14. Modifications of the hydriding kinetics of a metallic surface, using ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crusset, D.

    1992-10-01

    Uranium reacts with hydrogen to form an hydride: this reaction leads to the total destruction of the material. To modify the reactivity of an uranium surface towards hydrogen, ion implantation was selected, among surface treatments techniques. Four elements (carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, sulfur) were implanted to different doses. The results show a modification of the hydriding mechanism and a significant increase in the reaction induction times, notably at high implantation doses. Several techniques (SIMS, X-rays phases analysis and residual stresses determination) were used to characterize the samples and understand the different mechanisms involved

  15. Ion implantation for materials processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smidt, F.A.

    1983-01-01

    This book reviews current research on ion implantation for materials processing as a viable technique for improving surface properties of metals and alloys-wear, fatigue, and corrosion. An introductory section on new potential applications of ion beam technology is provided. Contents: New potential applications of ion beam technology; ion implantation science and technology; wear and fatigue; corrosion; other research areas

  16. The biomedical properties of polyethylene terephthalate surface modified by silver ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jin; Li Jianxin; Shen Liru; Ling Ren; Xu Zejin; Zhao Ansha; Leng Yongxiang; Huang Nan

    2007-01-01

    Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film is modified by Ag ion implantation with a fluence 1 x 10 16 ions/cm 2 . The results of X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicate that silver has been successfully implanted into the surface of PET. The PET samples modified by silver ion implantation have significantly bactericidal property. The capacity of the staphylococcus epidermidis (SE) adhered on the Ag + implanted PET surface is 5.3 x 10 6 CFU/ml, but the capacity of the SE adhered on the untreated PET film is 2.23 x 10 7 CFU/ml. The thromboembolic property is evaluated by in vitro platelet adhesion test, and there is not statistically difference between the untreated PET and the Ag + implanted PET for the number of adhered and activated platelets. The PET implanted by silver ion has not acute toxicity to endothelial cell (EC) which was evaluated by the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) test

  17. Surface modification of PET film by plasma-based ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakudo, N.; Mizutani, D.; Ohmura, Y.; Endo, H.; Yoneda, R.; Ikenaga, N.; Takikawa, H.

    2003-01-01

    It has been reported that thin diamond like carbon (DLC) coating is very Amsterdam, Theenhancing the barrier characteristics of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) against CO 2 and O 2 gases. However, coating technique has a problem of DLC-deposit peeling. In this research, we develop a new technique to change the PET surface into DLC by ion implantation instead of coating the surface with the DLC deposit. The surface of PET film is modified by plasma-based ion implantation using pulse voltages of 10 kV in height and 5 μs in width. Attenuated total reflection FT-IR spectroscopy shows that the specific absorption peaks for PET decrease with dose, that is, the molecules of ethylene terephthalate are destroyed by ion bombardment. Then, laser Raman spectroscopy shows that thin DLC layer is formed in the PET surface area

  18. Modification of the iron mechanical- and corrosion features by ion implantation in surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumvol, I.J.R.

    1981-01-01

    The physical mechanisms responsable by the tin ion implantation in the iron surface at moderated doses are studied. Several techniques are used such as alpha-particle Rutherford backscattering, conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. (L.C.) [pt

  19. RTV silicone rubber surface modification for cell biocompatibility by negative-ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chenlong; Wang, Guangfu; Chu, Yingjie; Xu, Ya; Qiu, Menglin; Xu, Mi

    2016-03-01

    A negative cluster ion implantation system was built on the injector of a GIC4117 tandem accelerator. Next, the system was used to study the surface modification of room temperature vulcanization silicone rubber (RTV SR) for cell biocompatibility. The water contact angle was observed to decrease from 117.6° to 99.3° as the C1- implantation dose was increased to 1 × 1016 ions/cm2, and the effects of C1-, C2- and O1- implantation result in only small differences in the water contact angle at 3 × 1015 ions/cm2. These findings indicate that the hydrophilicity of RTV SR improves as the dose is increased and that the radiation effect has a greater influence than the doping effect on the hydrophilicity. There are two factors influence hydrophilicity of RTV: (1) based on the XPS and ATR-FTIR results, it can be inferred that ion implantation breaks the hydrophobic functional groups (Sisbnd CH3, Sisbnd Osbnd Si, Csbnd H) of RTV SR and generates hydrophilic functional groups (sbnd COOH, sbnd OH, Sisbnd (O)x (x = 3,4)). (2) SEM reveals that the implanted surface of RTV SR appears the micro roughness such as cracks and wrinkles. The hydrophilicity should be reduced due to the lotus effect (Zhou Rui et al., 2009). These two factors cancel each other out and make the C-implantation sample becomes more hydrophilic in general terms. Finally, cell culture demonstrates that negative ion-implantation is an effective method to improve the cell biocompatibility of RTV SR.

  20. Si+ ion implantation reduces the bacterial accumulation on the Ti6Al4V surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallardo-Moreno, A M; Pacha-Olivenza, M A; Perera-Nunez, J; Gonzalez-Carrasco, J L; Gonzalez-Martin, M L

    2010-01-01

    Ti6Al4V is one of the most commonly used biomaterials in orthopedic applications due to its interesting mechanical properties and reasonable biocompatibility. Nevertheless, after the implantation, microbial adhesion to its surface can provoke severe health problems associated to the development of biofilms and subsequent infectious processes. This work shows a modification of the Ti6Al4V surface by Si+ ion implantation which reduces the bacterial accumulation under shear forces. Results have shown that the number of bacteria remaining on the surface at the end of the adhesion experiments decreased for silicon-treated surface. In general, the new surface also behaved as less adhesive under in vitro flow conditions. Since no changes are observed in the electrical characteristics between the control and implanted samples, differences are likely related to small changes observed in hydrophobicity.

  1. Biofunctionalization of surfaces by energetic ion implantation: Review of progress on applications in implantable biomedical devices and antibody microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilek, Marcela M. M.

    2014-08-01

    Despite major research efforts in the field of biomaterials, rejection, severe immune responses, scar tissue and poor integration continue to seriously limit the performance of today's implantable biomedical devices. Implantable biomaterials that interact with their host via an interfacial layer of active biomolecules to direct a desired cellular response to the implant would represent a major and much sought after improvement. Another, perhaps equally revolutionary, development that is on the biomedical horizon is the introduction of cost-effective microarrays for fast, highly multiplexed screening for biomarkers on cell membranes and in a variety of analyte solutions. Both of these advances will rely on effective methods of functionalizing surfaces with bioactive molecules. After a brief introduction to other methods currently available, this review will describe recently developed approaches that use energetic ions extracted from plasma to facilitate simple, one-step covalent surface immobilization of bioactive molecules. A kinetic theory model of the immobilization process by reactions with long-lived, mobile, surface-embedded radicals will be presented. The roles of surface chemistry and microstructure of the ion treated layer will be discussed. Early progress on applications of this technology to create diagnostic microarrays and to engineer bioactive surfaces for implantable biomedical devices will be reviewed.

  2. RTV silicone rubber surface modification for cell biocompatibility by negative-ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Chenlong [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, 100875 Beijing (China); Wang, Guangfu, E-mail: 88088@bnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, 100875 Beijing (China); Beijing Radiation Center, 100875 Beijing (China); Chu, Yingjie; Xu, Ya; Qiu, Menglin; Xu, Mi [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, 100875 Beijing (China)

    2016-03-01

    Highlights: • The radiation effect has a greater influence than doping effect on the hydrophilicity of RTV SR. • The implanted ions result in a new surface atomic bonding state and morphology. • Generating hydrophilic functional groups is a reason for the improved cell biocompatibility. • The micro roughness makes the hydrophilicity should be reduced due to the lotus effect. • Cell culture demonstrates that negative-ion implantation can improve biocompatibility. - Abstract: A negative cluster ion implantation system was built on the injector of a GIC4117 tandem accelerator. Next, the system was used to study the surface modification of room temperature vulcanization silicone rubber (RTV SR) for cell biocompatibility. The water contact angle was observed to decrease from 117.6° to 99.3° as the C{sub 1}{sup −} implantation dose was increased to 1 × 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}, and the effects of C{sub 1}{sup −}, C{sub 2}{sup −} and O{sub 1}{sup −} implantation result in only small differences in the water contact angle at 3 × 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}. These findings indicate that the hydrophilicity of RTV SR improves as the dose is increased and that the radiation effect has a greater influence than the doping effect on the hydrophilicity. There are two factors influence hydrophilicity of RTV: (1) based on the XPS and ATR-FTIR results, it can be inferred that ion implantation breaks the hydrophobic functional groups (Si−CH{sub 3}, Si−O−Si, C−H) of RTV SR and generates hydrophilic functional groups (−COOH, −OH, Si−(O){sub x} (x = 3,4)). (2) SEM reveals that the implanted surface of RTV SR appears the micro roughness such as cracks and wrinkles. The hydrophilicity should be reduced due to the lotus effect (Zhou Rui et al., 2009). These two factors cancel each other out and make the C-implantation sample becomes more hydrophilic in general terms. Finally, cell culture demonstrates that negative ion-implantation is an effective method

  3. Optical, chemical and mechanical modifications induced by ion implantation on glass surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinellato, V.; Nicoletti, F.; Polato, P.; Gottardi, V.

    1982-01-01

    Soda-lime glasses have been implanted with 50 keV Ar ions. Modifications induced on the glass surface have been studied as a function of implanted dose, with particular regard to optical, chemical, and mechanical properties. Optical measurements indicate a reduction of the refractive index, connected to the surface sodium content. The sodium profile has been measured using the Na 23 (p,α)Ne 20 nuclear reaction. An improvement of the mechanical resistance has been observed at low implantation dose, together with a change of the chemical durability. An expansion of glass has been observed by S.E.M. and interferometric microscopy for 80 keV implantation energy. (author)

  4. Nitrogen ion implantation on stainless steel: AFM study of surface modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chico, B. [Dpto. Ingenieria de Materiales, Degradacion y Durabilidad, Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas (CENIM), CSIC, Avda. Gregorio del Amo, 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: bchico@cenim.csic.es; Martinez, L. [Dpto. Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Perez, F.J. [Dpto. Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2005-04-30

    This work presents a study by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM) of the modification of the surface topography of AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel after N-ion implantation, irradiated by 1 x 10{sup 15} N{sub 2}{sup +}/cm{sup 2} at 80 keV. Prior to the implantation surface modification, the samples were electropolished for the optimum observation of the surface at a small scale to obtain an initial surface with the smaller roughness. The electrolytic bath was composed of a mixture of water/sulphuric acid/orthophosphoric acid in percentages 20, 20 and 60%, respectively. Once the surface was optimized, the samples were implanted and observed by AFM, a new technique whose importance relies on its resolution power, allowing the acquisition of topographic images of the surface with nanometric resolution. Thanks to the high resolution power could be observed that ion implantation increases the surface roughness and promotes the apparition of 3 {mu}m wide and 10 nm depth craters as well as the apparition of products with singular morphology.

  5. Surface changes of nanotopography by carbon ion implantation to enhance the biocompatibility of silicone rubber: an in vitro study of the optimum ion fluence and adsorbed protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianhui; Zhou, Xin; Chen, Yao; Yu, Shu; Chen, Xin; Xia, Xin; Shi, Xiaohua; Zhang, Yiming; Fan, Dongli

    2017-09-15

    Lower cellular adhesion and dense fibrous capsule formation around silicone breast implants caused by lower biocompatibility is a serious clinical problem. Preliminary work has shown that ion implantation enhances cell adhesion. Whether the biocompatibility is further enhanced by higher doses of carbon ion implantation and the mechanism by which ion implantation enhances biocompatibility remain unclear. In this study, five doses of carbon ions, which gradually increase, were implanted on the surface of silicone rubber and then the surface characteristics were surveyed. Then, cell adhesion, proliferation and migration were investigated. Furthermore, the vitronectin (VN) protein was used as a model protein to investigate whether the ion implantation affected the adsorbed protein on the surface. The obtained results indicate that enhanced cytocompatibility is dose dependent when the doses of ion implantation are less than 1 × 10 16  ions/cm 2 . However, when the doses of ion implantation are more than 1 × 10 16  ions/cm 2 , enhanced cytocompatibility is not significant. In addition, surface physicochemical changes by ion implantation induced a conformational change of the adsorbed vitronectin protein that enhanced cytocompatibility. Together, these results suggest that the optimum value of carbon ion implantation in silicone rubber to enhance biocompatibility is 1 × 10 16  ions/cm 2 , and ion implantation regulates conformational changes of adsorbed ECM proteins, such as VN, and mediates the expression of intracellular signals that enhance the biocompatibility of silicone rubber. The results herein provide new insights into the surface modification of implant polymer materials to enhance biocompatibility. It has potentially broad applications in the biomedical field.

  6. Surface treatment of dental implants with high- power pulsed ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shulov, V.A.; Nochovnaya, N.A.; Remnev, G.E.; Ivanov, S.Y.; Lomakin, M.V.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the present research is development of HPPIB technology for surface processing of compact components with a complex shape. The surface state of the dental implants from titanium alloys before and after irradiation and long time operation was investigated by Auger electron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray structural analysis, optical metallography methods. It is shown that the homogeneous state in the surface layer of titanium alloys is formed due to the irradiation (carbon ions and protons, energy of ions is equal to 300 keV, density of ion energy in a pulse achieves 1-5 J/cm 2 ). This state is characterized by a low amount of the impurities and a fine dispersion structure formed as a result of high speed crystallization. Thus, HPPIB irradiation of the dental implants leads to formation of developed micro relief and the decrease of impurities content on the surface. As a result, this treatment allows one to achieve a good cohesion between the implants and a body tissue. The latter allows the conclusion that biocompatibility of the dental titanium implants produced by can be improved using HPPIB treatment

  7. Surface modification by metal ion implantation forming metallic nanoparticles in an insulating matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvadori, M.C.; Teixeira, F.S.; Sgubin, L.G.; Cattani, M.; Brown, I.G.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Metal nanoparticles can be produced through metallic ion implantation in insulating substrate, where the implanted metal self-assembles into nanoparticles. • The nanoparticles nucleate near the maximum of the implantation depth profile, that can be estimated by computer simulation using the TRIDYN. • Nanocomposites, obtained by this way, can be produced in different insulator materials. More specifically we have studied Au/PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate), Pt/PMMA, Ti/alumina and Au/alumina systems. • The nanocomposites were characterized by measuring the resistivity of the composite layer as function of the dose implanted, reaching the percolation threshold. • Excellent agreement was found between the experimental results and the predictions of the theory. - Abstract: There is special interest in the incorporation of metallic nanoparticles in a surrounding dielectric matrix for obtaining composites with desirable characteristics such as for surface plasmon resonance, which can be used in photonics and sensing, and controlled surface electrical conductivity. We have investigated nanocomposites produced by metal ion implantation into insulating substrates, where the implanted metal self-assembles into nanoparticles. The nanoparticles nucleate near the maximum of the implantation depth profile (projected range), which can be estimated by computer simulation using the TRIDYN code. TRIDYN is a Monte Carlo simulation program based on the TRIM (Transport and Range of Ions in Matter) code that takes into account compositional changes in the substrate due to two factors: previously implanted dopant atoms, and sputtering of the substrate surface. Our study show that the nanoparticles form a bidimentional array buried a few nanometers below the substrate surface. We have studied Au/PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate), Pt/PMMA, Ti/alumina and Au/alumina systems. Transmission electron microscopy of the implanted samples show that metallic nanoparticles form in

  8. Ion implantation in ices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strazzulla, G.; Baratta, G.A.; Palumbo, M.E.; Satorre, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    We have studied, by in situ infrared spectroscopy, some effects due to ion implantation in frozen ices. In particular mixtures containing C, N and O atoms (e.g., N 2 :H 2 O:CH 4 ) have been irradiated with unreactive (noble gases) ions: the resulting alteration of the frozen sample induces the formation of other molecules (e.g., CO 2 , R- - -OCN, CO and HCN) and of a refractory organic residue. Similar products are formed when mixtures containing only C and O atoms (e.g., H 2 O:CH 4 ) are irradiated with N ions, i.e. molecular species that include the projectile are formed. These results are important, in particular for their applications to planetary physics. In planetary environments ice thickness is usually much larger than the penetration depth of the relevant ion populations (solar wind ions, magnetospheric particles, etc.) and ion implantation phenomena are expected. Our results indicate that some molecular species observed on icy planetary surfaces could not be native of that object but formed by ion irradiation and/or by implantation of reactive ions

  9. Plasma immersion ion implantation of polyurethane shape memory polymer: Surface properties and protein immobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xinying; Kondyurin, Alexey; Bao, Shisan; Bilek, Marcela M. M.; Ye, Lin

    2017-09-01

    Polyurethane-type shape memory polymers (SMPU) are promising biomedical implant materials due to their ability to recover to a predetermined shape from a temporary shape induced by thermal activation close to human body temperature and their advantageous mechanical properties including large recovery strains and low recovery stresses. Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) is a surface modification process using energetic ions that generates radicals in polymer surfaces leading to carbonisation and oxidation and the ability to covalently immobilise proteins without the need for wet chemistry. Here we show that PIII treatment of SMPU significantly enhances its bioactivity making SMPU suitable for applications in permanent implantable biomedical devices. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), contact angle measurements, surface energy measurements, attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterise the PIII modified surface, including its after treatment aging kinetics and its capability to covalently immobilise protein directly from solution. The results show a substantial improvement in wettability and dramatic changes of surface chemical composition dependent on treatment duration, due to the generation of radicals and subsequent oxidation. The SMPU surface, PIII treated for 200s, achieved a saturated level of covalently immobilized protein indicating that a full monolayer coverage was achieved. We conclude that PIII is a promising and efficient surface modification method to enhance the biocompatibility of SMPU for use in medical applications that demand bioactivity for tissue integration and stability in vivo.

  10. Surface modification of biomaterials using plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Tao; Qiao, Yuqin; Liu, Xuanyong

    2012-01-01

    Although remarkable progress has been made on biomaterial research, the ideal biomaterial that satisfies all the technical requirements and biological functions is not available up to now. Surface modification seems to be a more economic and efficient way to adjust existing conventional biomaterials to meet the current and ever-evolving clinical needs. From an industrial perspective, plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIII&D) is an attractive method for biomaterials owing to it...

  11. Studies on the surface modification of TiN coatings using MEVVA ion implantation with selected metallic species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, L.P.; Purushotham, K.P.; Manory, R.R.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Reduced surface roughness was observed after ion implantation. • W implantation increased residual stress. • Reduced friction and wear accompanied Mo implantation. • Mo implanted layer was more resistant to breakdown during wear testing. • Ion implantation effects can be complex on various implanting species properties. - Abstract: Improvement in the performance of TiN coatings can be achieved using surface modification techniques such as ion implantation. In the present study, physical vapor deposited (PVD) TiN coatings were implanted with Cr, Zr, Nb, Mo and W using the metal evaporation vacuum arc (MEVVA) technique at a constant nominal dose of 4 × 10 16 ions cm −2 for all species. The samples were characterized before and after implantation, using Rutherford backscattering (RBS), glancing incident angle X-ray diffraction (GIXRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and optical microscopy. Friction and wear studies were performed under dry sliding conditions using a pin-on-disc CSEM Tribometer at 1 N load and 450 m sliding distance. A reduction in the grain size and surface roughness was observed after implantation with all five species. Little variation was observed in the residual stress values for all implanted TiN coatings, except for W implanted TiN which showed a pronounced increase in compressive residual stress. Mo-implanted samples showed a lower coefficient of friction and higher resistance to breakdown during the initial stages of testing than as-received samples. Significant reduction in wear rate was observed after implanting with Zr and Mo ions compared with unimplanted TiN. The presence of the Ti 2 N phase was observed with Cr implantation.

  12. Negative-ion current density dependence of the surface potential of insulated electrode during negative-ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Hiroshi; Okayama, Yoshio; Toyota, Yoshitaka; Gotoh, Yasuhito; Ishikawa, Junzo; Sakai, Shigeki; Tanjyo, Masayasu; Matsuda, Kouji.

    1994-01-01

    Positive ion implantation has been utilized as the method of impurity injection in ultra-LSI production, but the problem of substrate charging cannot be resolved by conventional charge compensation method. It was forecast that by negative ion implantation, this charging problem can be resolved. Recently the experiment on the negative ion implantation into insulated electrodes was carried out, and the effect of negative ion implantation to this problem was proved. However, the dependence of charged potential on the increase of negative ion current at the time of negative ion implantation is a serious problem in large current negative ion implantation hereafter. The charged potential of insulated conductor substrates was measured by the negative ion implantation using the current up to several mA/cm 2 . The experimental method is explained. Medium current density and high current density negative ion implantation and charged potential are reported. Accordingly in negative ion implantation, if current density is optimized, the negative ion implantation without charging can be realized. (K.I.)

  13. Evolution of arsenic in high fluence plasma immersion ion implanted silicon: Behavior of the as-implanted surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vishwanath, V. [Applied Materials, 3225 Oakmead Village Drive, Santa Clara, CA 95052 (United States); Demenev, E. [Center for Materials and Microsystems, Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Via Sommarive 18, 38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); Department of Molecular Science and Nanosystems, Ca’Foscari University, Dorsoduro 2137, 30123 Venice (Italy); Giubertoni, D., E-mail: giuberto@fbk.eu [Center for Materials and Microsystems, Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Via Sommarive 18, 38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); Vanzetti, L. [Center for Materials and Microsystems, Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Via Sommarive 18, 38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); Koh, A.L. [Stanford Nanocharacterization Laboratory, Stanford University, 476 Lomita Mall, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Steinhauser, G. [Colorado State University, Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (United States); Leibniz Universität Hannover, Institut für Radioökologie und Strahlenschutz, 30419 Hannover (Germany); Pepponi, G.; Bersani, M. [Center for Materials and Microsystems, Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Via Sommarive 18, 38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); Meirer, F., E-mail: f.meirer@uu.nl [Inorganic Chemistry and Catalysis, Utrecht University, Utrecht 3584 CG (Netherlands); Foad, M.A. [Applied Materials, 3225 Oakmead Village Drive, Santa Clara, CA 95052 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Samples prepared by high fluence, low-energy PIII of AsH{sub 3}{sup +} on Si(1 0 0) were studied. • PIII is of high technological interest for ultra-shallow doping and activation. • We used a multi-technique approach to study the As-implanted surface. • We show that PIII presents a new set of problems that needs to be tackled. • The presented study goes toward understanding the root mechanisms involved. - Abstract: High fluence (>10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}) low-energy (<2 keV) plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) of AsH{sub 3}{sup +} on (1 0 0) silicon was investigated, with the focus on stability and retention of the dopant. At this dose, a thin (∼3 nm) amorphous layer forms at the surface, which contains about 45% arsenic (As) in a silicon and oxygen matrix. The presence of silicon indicates that the layer is not only a result of deposition, but predominantly ion mixing. High fluence PIII introduces high concentration of arsenic, modifying the stopping power for incoming ions resulting in an increased deposition. When exposed to atmosphere, the arsenic rich layer spontaneously evolves forming arsenolite As{sub 2}O{sub 3} micro-crystals at the surface. The micro-crystal formation was monitored over several months and exhibits typical crystal growth kinetics. At the same time, a continuous growth of native silicon oxide rich in arsenic was observed on the exposed surface, suggesting the presence of oxidation enhancing factors linked to the high arsenic concentration at the surface.

  14. Surface modification effects of fluorine-doped tin dioxide by oxygen plasma ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Peng; Liu, Cai; Zhang, Jingquan; Wu, Lili; Li, Wei; Feng, Lianghuan; Zeng, Guanggen; Wang, Wenwu

    2018-04-01

    SnO2:F (FTO), as a kind of transparent conductive oxide (TCO), exhibits excellent transmittance and conductivity and is widely used as transparency electrodes in solar cells. It's very important to modifying the surface of FTO for it plays a critical role in CdTe solar cells. In this study, modifying effects of oxygen plasma on FTO was investigated systematically. Oxygen plasma treatment on FTO surface with ion accelerating voltage ranged from 0.4 kV to 1.6 kV has been processed. The O proportion of surface was increased after ion implantation. The Fermi level of surface measurement by XPS valance band spectra was lowered as the ion accelerating voltage increased to 1.2 kV and then raised as accelerating voltage was elevated to 1.6 kV. The work function measured by Kelvin probe force microscopy increased after ion implanting, and it was consistent with the variation of Fermi level. The change of energy band structure of FTO surface mainly originated from the surface composition variation. As FTO conduction was primarily due to oxyanion hole, the carrier was electron and its concentration was reduced while O proportion was elevated at the surface of FTO, as a result, the Fermi level lowered and the work function was enlarged. It was proved that oxygen plasma treatment is an effective method to modulate the energy band structure of the surface as well as other properties of FTO, which provides much more space for interface and surface modification and then photoelectric device performance promotion.

  15. Ion implantation effects on surface-mechanical properties of metals and polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, G.R.

    1993-04-01

    Fatigue of 8 complex alloys based on Fe-13Cr-15Ni-2Mo-2Mn-0.2Ti-0.8Si- 0.06C, and single-crystal Fe-15Cr-15Ni, implanted with 400-keV B[sup +] and 550-keV N[sup +] (total dose 2.3[times]10[sup 16] ions/cm[sup 2]) was examined. 600 C creep was also examined. The dual implantation increased hardness but decreased fatigue life of the 8 complex alloys. An optimum strengthening level and a shift to grain boundary cracking were determined. The single crystals also showed reduced fatigue life after implantation. High temperature creep of E1 and B1 alloys were improved by the dual implantation. Four polymers (PE, polypropylene, polystyrene, polyethersulfone) were implanted with 200keV B[sup +] to 3 different doses. PS was also implanted with both B[sup +] and Ar[sup +]. Near-surface hardness and tribological properties were measured. The hardness increased with dose and energy; wear also improved, with an optimum dose. (DLC)

  16. Ion implantation effects on surface-mechanical properties of metals and polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, G.R.

    1993-04-01

    Fatigue of 8 complex alloys based on Fe-13Cr-15Ni-2Mo-2Mn-0.2Ti-0.8Si- 0.06C, and single-crystal Fe-15Cr-15Ni, implanted with 400-keV B{sup +} and 550-keV N{sup +} (total dose 2.3{times}10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}) was examined. 600 C creep was also examined. The dual implantation increased hardness but decreased fatigue life of the 8 complex alloys. An optimum strengthening level and a shift to grain boundary cracking were determined. The single crystals also showed reduced fatigue life after implantation. High temperature creep of E1 and B1 alloys were improved by the dual implantation. Four polymers (PE, polypropylene, polystyrene, polyethersulfone) were implanted with 200keV B{sup +} to 3 different doses. PS was also implanted with both B{sup +} and Ar{sup +}. Near-surface hardness and tribological properties were measured. The hardness increased with dose and energy; wear also improved, with an optimum dose. (DLC)

  17. Inner surface modification of a tube by magnetic glow-arc plasma source ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Guling; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Wang Jiuli; Feng Wenran; Chen Guangliang; Gu Weichao; Niu Erwu; Fan Songhua; Liu Chizi; Yang Size; Wu Xingfang

    2006-01-01

    A new method named the magnetic glow-arc plasma source ion implantation (MGA-PSII) is proposed for inner surface modification of tubes. In MGA-PSII, under the control of an axial magnetic field, which is generated by an electric coil around the tube sample, glow arc plasma moves spirally into the tube from its two ends. A negative voltage applied on the tube realized its inner surface implantation. Titanium nitride (TiN) films are prepared on the inner surface of a stainless steel tube in diameter 90 mm and length 600 mm. Hardness tests show that the hardness at the tube centre is up to 20 GPa. XRD, XPS and AES analyses demonstrate that good quality of TiN films can be achieved. (authors)

  18. Inner Surface Modification of a Tube by Magnetic Glow-Arc Plasma Source Ion Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gu-Ling; Wang, Jiu-Li; Wu, Xing-Fang; Feng, Wen-Ran; Chen, Guang-Liang; Gu, Wei-Chao; Niu, Er-Wu; Fan, Song-Hua; Liu, Chi-Zi; Yang, Si-Ze

    2006-05-01

    A new method named the magnetic glow-arc plasma source ion implantation (MGA-PSII) is proposed for inner surface modification of tubes. In MGA-PSII, under the control of an axial magnetic field, which is generated by an electric coil around the tube sample, glow arc plasma moves spirally into the tube from its two ends. A negative voltage applied on the tube realized its inner surface implantation. Titanium nitride (TiN) films are prepared on the inner surface of a stainless steel tube in diameter 90 mm and length 600 mm. Hardness tests show that the hardness at the tube centre is up to 20 GPa. XRD, XPS and AES analyses demonstrate that good quality of TiN films can be achieved.

  19. Synthesis of sponge-like hydrophobic NiBi{sub 3} surface by 200 keV Ar ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siva, Vantari; Datta, D.P. [School of Physical Sciences, National Institute of Science Education and Research, HBNI, Jatni 752050 (India); Chatterjee, S. [Colloids and Materials Chemistry Department, CSIR-Institute of Minerals and Materials Technology, Acharya Vihar, Bhubaneswar 751 013 (India); Varma, S. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India); Kanjilal, D. [Inter-University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India); Sahoo, Pratap K., E-mail: pratap.sahoo@niser.ac.in [School of Physical Sciences, National Institute of Science Education and Research, HBNI, Jatni 752050 (India)

    2017-07-15

    Highlights: • A sponge-like hydrophobic NiBi{sub 3} surface has been synthesized using 200 keV Ar ion implantation. • A competition between amorphization and re-crystallization was observed in the existing phases owing to comparable magnitudes of nuclear and electronic energy depositions. • The relation between hydrophobic nature and sponge-like NiBi{sub 3} phase seems interesting, which is attributed to ion beam induced sputtering and mixing of the layers. - Abstract: Sponge-like nanostructures develop under Ar-ion implantation of a Ni–Bi bilayer with increasing ion fluence at room temperature. The surface morphology features different stages of evolution as a function of ion fluence, finally resulting in a planar surface at the highest fluence. Our investigations on the chemical composition reveal a spontaneous formation of NiBi{sub 3} phase on the surface of the as deposited bilayer film. Interestingly, we observe a competition between crystallization and amorphization of the existing poly-crystalline phases as a function of the implanted fluence. Measurements of contact angle by sessile drop method clearly show the ion-fluence dependent hydrophobic nature of the nano-structured surfaces. The wettability has been correlated with the variation in roughness and composition of the implanted surface. In fact, our experimental results confirm dominant effect of ion-sputtering as well as ion-induced mixing at the bilayer interface in the evolution of the sponge-like surface.

  20. Effect of surface modification by ion implantation on the fatigue behavior in metastable β-phase Ti-24V alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, J.G.

    1985-01-01

    Fatigue response of ion implanted Ti-24V alloy was studied under strain and stress controlled fatigue conditions. The structural changes by ion implantation were investigated using Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Nitrogen and boron implantation resulted in surface regions having a fine titanium nitride and dense titanium boride, respectively. A metastable substitutional solid solution was produced through vanadium implantation. These modifications in surface structure altered the surface deformation modes and crack initiation response and the related fatigue life under strain controlled fatigue conditions. Nitrogen and vanadium implantation resulted in a beneficial effect in strain controlled fatigue. The improvement contributed to enhancement of crack nucleation resistance through strain homogenization for nitrogen implanted surfaces and an increase of slip reversibility for vanadium implanted specimens. The inhomogeneous coarse slip resulting from boron implantation induced early crack initiation under strain controlled conditions and thereby reduced the fatigue life. Under stress controlled fatigue conditions, fatigue life and endurance limit were enhanced following ion implantation with nitrogen, boron, and vanadium

  1. Growth of DySi sub 2 layers on Si surface by high-current Dy-ion implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, X Q

    2003-01-01

    We report, in this paper, the synthesis of DySi sub 2 layers on Si surfaces by high-current Dy-ion implantation in Si wafers using a metal vapor vacuum arc ion source. It was found that the continuous DySi sub 2 layers could grow at a relatively low formation temperature of 190degC and that the surface morphology varied with the variation of the implantation parameters. The formation mechanism of the equilibrium DySi sub 2 phase as well as the continuous DySi sub 2 layer on Si surface is proposed in terms of ion beam heating and the effect of ion dose on the Dy-ion implantation process. (author)

  2. The microstructure and surface hardness of Ti6Al4V alloy implanted with nitrogen ions at an elevated temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlcak, Petr, E-mail: petr.vlcak@fs.cvut.cz [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Technicka 4, 16607 Prague (Czech Republic); Cerny, Frantisek [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Technicka 4, 16607 Prague (Czech Republic); Drahokoupil, Jan [Department of Metals, Institute of Physics, AS CR, v.v.i., Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague (Czech Republic); Sepitka, Josef [Department of Mechanics, Biomechanics and Mechatronics, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Technicka 4, 16607 Prague (Czech Republic); Tolde, Zdenek [Department of Materials Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Technicka 4, 16607 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-01-25

    Highlights: • The Ti6Al4V samples were implanted with 90 keV nitrogen ions. • The samples were annealed at 500 °C during the ion implantation process. • An elevated temperature increases the mobility of the atoms and the quantity of TiN. • The hardness showed a significant increase compared to room temperature implantation. - Abstract: The effect of an elevated temperature during nitrogen ion implantation on the microstructure and on the surface hardness of Ti6Al4V titanium alloy was examined. The implantation process was carried out at fluences of 1 ⋅ 10{sup 17}, 2.7 ⋅ 10{sup 17} and 6 ⋅ 10{sup 17} cm{sup −2} and at ion energy 90 keV. The implanted samples were annealed at 500 °C during the implantation process. X-ray diffraction analysis was performed to obtain a phase characterization and a phase quantification in the implanted sample surface. The surface hardness was investigated by nanoindentation testing, and the nitrogen depth distribution was measured by Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy. Elevated temperature led to increased formation of a TiN compound. It was found that a mixture of TiN and an α-Ti(+N) solid solution had a predominant amount of TiN for samples with fluence of 2.7 ⋅ 10{sup 17} cm{sup −2} or higher. Elevated temperature during ion implantation caused an increase in surface hardening more towards the depth of the substrate in comparison with room temperature implantation. The hardness showed a remarkably significant increase at a fluence of 1 ⋅ 10{sup 17} and 2.7 ⋅ 10{sup 17} cm{sup −2} compared to samples implanted at the same fluences and at room temperature. There is a discussion of such mechanisms that explain the observed hardening more towards the depth of the substrate, and the increase in hardness.

  3. Effect of ion-implantation on surface characteristics of nickel titanium and titanium molybdenum alloy arch wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manu Krishnan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the changes in surface roughness and frictional features of ′ion-implanted nickel titanium (NiTi and titanium molybdenum alloy (TMA arch wires′ from its conventional types in an in-vitro laboratory set up. Materials and Methods: ′Ion-implanted NiTi and low friction TMA arch wires′ were assessed for surface roughness with scanning electron microscopy (SEM and 3 dimensional (3D optical profilometry. Frictional forces were studied in a universal testing machine. Surface roughness of arch wires were determined as Root Mean Square (RMS values in nanometers and Frictional Forces (FF in grams. Statistical Analysis Used: Mean values of RMS and FF were compared by Student′s ′t′ test and one way analysis of variance (ANOVA. Results: SEM images showed a smooth topography for ion-implanted versions. 3D optical profilometry demonstrated reduction of RMS values by 58.43% for ion-implanted NiTi (795.95 to 330.87 nm and 48.90% for TMA groups (463.28 to 236.35 nm from controls. Nonetheless, the corresponding decrease in FF was only 29.18% for NiTi and 22.04% for TMA, suggesting partial correction of surface roughness and disproportionate reduction in frictional forces with ion-implantation. Though the reductions were highly significant at P < 0.001, relations between surface roughness and frictional forces remained non conclusive even after ion-implantation. Conclusion: The study proved that ion-implantation can significantly reduce the surface roughness of NiTi and TMA wires but could not make a similar reduction in frictional forces. This can be attributed to the inherent differences in stiffness and surface reactivity of NiTi and TMA wires when used in combination with stainless steel brackets, which needs further investigations.

  4. Surface properties of W-implanted TiN coatings post-treated by low temperature ion sulfurization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Bin; Yue, Wen; Wang, Chengbiao; Liu, Jiajun

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • PVD TiN coatings are implanted with W ions at dose of 9 × 10 17 ions/cm 2 . • Low temperature ion sulfurization (LTIS) is adopted on W-implanted TiN coatings. • W content and depth in the W-implanted coatings reduce after LTIS. • LTIS cannot well improve friction and wear of W-implanted TiN under dry sliding. - Abstract: TiN coatings were implanted with W ions by metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) source at dose of 9 × 10 17 ions/cm 2 , and then they were post-treated by low temperature ion sulfurization (LTIS) at 160 °C. The W-implanted TiN samples were characterized before and after post-treatment of LTIS, using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Scanning Auger Microprobe (SAM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Nano Indenter System. Friction and wear properties were evaluated using a ball-on-disc tribometer under dry sliding in air. After post-treatment of LTIS, XRD results showed no diffraction peaks of tungsten sulfides on surfaces of W-implanted TiN coatings; W-implanted TiN coatings were sputtered by the sulfur plasma with about 36% reducing of W depth. Further, the nano-hardness decreased mainly due to the amount decreasing of Ti 2 N and the formation of more metal oxides on surfaces of W-implanted TiN coatings after LTIS. As a result, LTIS treatment could not well improve tribological properties of W-implanted TiN coatings.

  5. Enhanced osteoblast responses to poly ether ether ketone surface modified by water plasma immersion ion implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Heying; Lu, Tao; Meng, Fanhao; Zhu, Hongqin; Liu, Xuanyong

    2014-05-01

    Poly ether ether ketone (PEEK) offers a set of characteristics superior for human implants; however, its application is limited by the bio-inert surface property. In this work, PEEK surface was modified using single step plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) treatment with a gas mixture of water vapor as a plasma resource and argon as an ionization assistant. Field emission scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to investigate the microstructure and composition of the modified PEEK surface. The water contact angle and zeta-potential of the surfaces were also measured. Osteoblast precursor cells MC3T3-E1 and rat bone mesenchymal stem cells were cultured on the PEEK samples to evaluate their cytocompatibility. The obtained results show that the hydroxyl groups as well as a "ravined structure" are constructed on water PIII modified PEEK. Compared with pristine PEEK, the water PIII treated PEEK is more favorable for osteoblast adhesion, spreading and proliferation, besides, early osteogenic differentiation indicated by the alkaline phosphatase activity is also up-regulated. Our study illustrates enhanced osteoblast responses to the PEEK surface modified by water PIII, which gives positive information in terms of future biomedical applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Surface potential measurement of the insulator with secondary electron caused by negative ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Hiroshi; Toyota, Yoshitaka; Nagumo, Syoji; Gotoh, Yasuhito; Ishikawa, Junzo; Sakai, Shigeki; Tanjyo, Masayasu; Matsuda, Kohji.

    1994-01-01

    Ion implantation has the merit of the good controllability of implantation profile and low temperature process, and has been utilized for the impurity introduction in LSI production. However, positive ion implantation is carried out for insulator or insulated conductor substrates, their charged potential rises, which is a serious problem. As the requirement for them advanced, charge compensation method is not the effective means for resolving it. The negative ion implantation in which charging is little was proposed. When the experiment on the negative ion implantation into insulated conductors was carried out, it was verified that negative ion implantation is effective as the implantation process without charging. The method of determining the charged potential of insulators at the time of negative ion implantation by paying attention to the energy distribution of the secondary electrons emitted from substrates at the time was devised. The energy analyzer for measuring the energy distribution of secondary electrons was made, and the measurement of the charged potential of insulators was carried out. The principle of the measurement, the measuring system and the experimental results are reported. (K.I.)

  7. Dynamic ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oppenheim, I.F.C.

    1988-01-01

    The Dynamic Ion Implantation Technique consists of ion implantation of a film during the film-deposition process. This technique was investigated theoretically and experimentally with ions whose incident energy is of the order of a few times 100 keV. It was found to be a viable alternative low-temperature method for the preparation of thick zirconium nitride films (∼1 μm) with good mechanical properties. Theoretical modeling of the processes involved during dynamic ion implantation lead to analytical expressions for the ions' depth-profile distributions. Numerical evaluations of these equations indicated that the depth distributions of dynamically implanted ions are in general more uniform than those predicted by the model for ions implanted by more conventional techniques. Mechanical properties of stoichiometric RF sputter-deposited zirconium nitride films post implanted with krypton and rubidium ions were investigated. Scratch-adhesion critical load and Vickers microhardness of samples implanted with doses varying from 1 x 10 15 to 5 x 10 16 ions/cm 2 and energies ranging from 300 to 500 keV were studied. In general, best mechanical properties were observed for 300- keV krypton implantations

  8. Ion implantation technology

    CERN Document Server

    Downey, DF; Jones, KS; Ryding, G

    1993-01-01

    Ion implantation technology has made a major contribution to the dramatic advances in integrated circuit technology since the early 1970's. The ever-present need for accurate models in ion implanted species will become absolutely vital in the future due to shrinking feature sizes. Successful wide application of ion implantation, as well as exploitation of newly identified opportunities, will require the development of comprehensive implant models. The 141 papers (including 24 invited papers) in this volume address the most recent developments in this field. New structures and possible approach

  9. The use of an ion-beam source to alter the surface morphology of biological implant materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigand, A. J.

    1978-01-01

    An electron-bombardment ion-thruster was used as a neutralized-ion-beam sputtering source to texture the surfaces of biological implant materials. The materials investigated included 316 stainless steel; titanium-6% aluminum, 4% vanadium; cobalt-20% chromium, 15% tungsten; cobalt-35% nickel, 20% chromium, 10% molybdenum; polytetrafluoroethylene; polyoxymethylene; silicone and polyurethane copolymer; 32%-carbon-impregnated polyolefin; segmented polyurethane; silicone rubber; and alumina. Scanning electron microscopy was used to determine surface morphology changes of all materials after ion-texturing. Electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis was used to determine the effects of ion-texturing on the surface chemical composition of some polymers. Liquid contact angle data were obtained for ion-textured and untextured polymer samples. Results of tensile and fatigue tests of ion-textured metal alloys are presented. Preliminary data of tissue response to ion-textured surfaces of some metals, polytetrafluoroethylene, alumina, and segmented polyurethane have been obtained.

  10. Quantitative ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gries, W.H.

    1976-06-01

    This is a report of the study of the implantation of heavy ions at medium keV-energies into electrically conducting mono-elemental solids, at ion doses too small to cause significant loss of the implanted ions by resputtering. The study has been undertaken to investigate the possibility of accurate portioning of matter in submicrogram quantities, with some specific applications in mind. The problem is extensively investigated both on a theoretical level and in practice. A mathematical model is developed for calculating the loss of implanted ions by resputtering as a function of the implanted ion dose and the sputtering yield. Numerical data are produced therefrom which permit a good order-of-magnitude estimate of the loss for any ion/solid combination in which the ions are heavier than the solid atoms, and for any ion energy from 10 to 300 keV. The implanted ion dose is measured by integration of the ion beam current, and equipment and techniques are described which make possible the accurate integration of an ion current in an electromagnetic isotope separator. The methods are applied to two sample cases, one being a stable isotope, the other a radioisotope. In both cases independent methods are used to show that the implantation is indeed quantitative, as predicted. At the same time the sample cases are used to demonstrate two possible applications for quantitative ion implantation, viz. firstly for the manufacture of calibration standards for instrumental micromethods of elemental trace analysis in metals, and secondly for the determination of the half-lives of long-lived radioisotopes by a specific activity method. It is concluded that the present study has advanced quantitative ion implantation to the state where it can be successfully applied to the solution of problems in other fields

  11. Release of titanium ions from an implant surface and their effect on cytokine production related to alveolar bone resorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachi, Takanori; Shuto, Takahiro; Shinohara, Yoshinori; Matono, Yoshinari; Makihira, Seicho

    2015-01-01

    Although interest in peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis has recently been increasing, the mechanisms driving these diseases remain unknown. Here, the effects of titanium ions on the inflammation and bone resorption around an implant were investigated. First, the accumulated amount of Ti ions released into gingival and bone tissues from an implant exposed to sodium fluoride solution was measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Next, the cellular responses in gingival and bone tissues to Ti ions and/or Porphyromonas gingivalis-lipopolysaccharide (P. gingivalis-LPS) were assessed using a rat model. More Ti ions were detected in the gingival tissues around an implant after treatment with sodium fluoride (pH 4.2) than in its absence, which suggests that the fluoride corroded the implant surface under salivary buffering capacity. The injection of Ti ions (9 ppm) significantly increased the mRNA expression and protein accumulation of chemokine (C–C motif) ligand 2, as well as the ratio of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand to osteoprotegerin, in rat gingival tissues exposed to P. gingivalis-LPS in a synergistic manner. In addition, the enhanced localization of toll-like receptor 4, which is an LPS receptor, was observed in gingival epithelium loaded with Ti ions (9 ppm). These data suggest that Ti ions may be partly responsible for the infiltration of monocytes and osteoclast differentiation by increasing the sensitivity of gingival epithelial cells to microorganisms in the oral cavity. Therefore, Ti ions may be involved in the deteriorating effects of peri-implant mucositis, which can develop into peri-implantitis accompanied by alveolar bone resorption

  12. Nonpolar III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers incorporating an ion implanted aperture

    KAUST Repository

    Leonard, J. T.

    2015-07-06

    © 2015 AIP Publishing LLC. We report on our recent progress in improving the performance of nonpolar III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) by using an Al ion implanted aperture and employing a multi-layer electron-beam evaporated ITO intracavity contact. The use of an ion implanted aperture improves the lateral confinement over SiNx apertures by enabling a planar ITO design, while the multi-layer ITO contact minimizes scattering losses due to its epitaxially smooth morphology. The reported VCSEL has 10 QWs, with a 3nm quantum well width, 1nm barriers, a 5nm electron-blocking layer, and a 6.95- λ total cavity thickness. These advances yield a single longitudinal mode 406nm nonpolar VCSEL with a low threshold current density (∼16kA/cm2), a peak output power of ∼12μW, and a 100% polarization ratio. The lasing in the current aperture is observed to be spatially non-uniform, which is likely a result of filamentation caused by non-uniform current spreading, lateral optical confinement, contact resistance, and absorption loss.

  13. Ion implantation in semiconductor bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badawi, M.H.

    1984-01-01

    Ions are selectively implanted into layers of a semiconductor substrate of, for example, semi-insulating gallium arsenide via a photoresist implantation mask and a metallic layer of, for example, titanium disposed between the substrate surface and the photoresist mask. After implantation the mask and metallic layer are removed and the substrate heat treated for annealing purposes. The metallic layer acts as a buffer layer and prevents possible contamination of the substrate surface, by photoresist residues, at the annealing stage. Such contamination would adversely affect the electrical properties of the substrate surface, particularly gallium arsenide substrates. (author)

  14. Modification of surface properties of yttria stabilized zirconia by ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legg, K. O.; Cochran, J. K.; Solnick-Legg, H. F.; Mann, X. L.

    1985-03-01

    In order to determine in what ways ion implantation and subsequent heat treatment can be used to improve mechanical properties of ceramics, (110) yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) was implanted with Al + or Zr + ions and heat treated at a series of temperatures. Ion doses from 10 16 to 4 × 10 17{ion}/{cm 2} were used, with annealing temperatures up to 1575°C. In Al + implanted samples, many small precipitates formed at temperatures of about 1200δC, while at higher temperatures, the alumminum was precipitated as micro-sized alumina crystallites with 10-20% increases in hardness and fracture toughness. However, by allowing sufficient time for the nucleation of a large number of precipitates in the 1150 to 1250°C range, a new nucleation controlled microstructure (NCM) was formed, consisting of interlocking zirconia and alumina phases which exhibited improvements of 50% in fracture toughness and 25% in hardness.

  15. Surface damage in TEM thick α-Fe samples by implantation with 150 keV Fe ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliaga, M.J.; Caturla, M.J.; Schäublin, R.

    2015-01-01

    We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of implantation of 150 keV Fe ions in pure bcc Fe. The thickness of the simulation box is of the same order of those used in in situ TEM analysis of irradiated materials. We assess the effect of the implantation angle and the presence of front and back surfaces. The number and type of defects, ion range, cluster distribution and primary damage morphology are studied. Results indicate that, for the very thin samples used in in situ TEM irradiation experiments the presence of surfaces affect dramatically the damage produced. At this particular energy, the ion has sufficient energy to damage both the top and the back surfaces and still leave the sample through the bottom. This provides new insights on the study of radiation damage using TEM in situ

  16. Effects of rapid, high-dose, elevated temperature ion implantation on the microstructure and tribology of ferrous surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, D. L.; Wei, R.; Wilbur, P. J.

    1991-05-01

    High-current, broad-beam ion implantation at 60 keV using a relatively simple system produces elevated target temperatures and results in remarkable enhancements in the wear resistance of ferrous materials compared to lower implantation temperatures. Effects of N, C and O implantation into AISI 304 stainless steel at 200 and 400°C on the microstructure and tribology are evaluated by conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and a specially designed pin-on-disc tribotester. C and N implantation at 400°C yields unusually thick layers of austenite containing high concentrations of C and N in interstitial solid solution thereby accounting for the enhanced mechanical properties. O implantation at 400°C results in Fe 2O 3-like oxide rather than O in solid solution so a dispersion strengthening of the surface layer is suggested.

  17. Surface modification of NiTi by plasma based ion implantation for application in harsh environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, R. M.; Fernandes, B. B.; Carreri, F. C.; Gonçalves, J. A. N.; Ueda, M.; Silva, M. M. N. F.; Silva, M. M.; Pichon, L.; Camargo, E. N.; Otubo, J.

    2012-12-01

    The substitution of conventional components for NiTi in distinct devices such as actuators, valves, connectors, stents, orthodontic arc-wires, e.g., usually demands some kind of treatment to be performed on the surface of the alloy. A typical case is of biomaterials made of NiTi, in which the main drawback is the Ni out-diffusion, an issue that has been satisfactorily addressed by plasma based ion implantation (PBII). Even though PBII can tailor selective surface properties of diverse materials, usually, only thin modified layers are attained. When NiTi alloys are to be used in the harsh space environment, as is the case of devices designed to remotely release the solar panels and antenna arrays of satellites, e.g., superior mechanical and tribological properties are demanded. For this case the thickness of the modified layer must be larger than the one commonly achieved by conventional PBII. In this paper, new nitrogen PBII set up was used to treat samples of NiTi in moderate temperature of 450 °C, with negative voltage pulses of 7 kV/250 Hz/20 μs, in a process lasting 1 h. A rich nitrogen atomic concentration of 85 at.% was achieved on the near surface and nitrogen diffused at least for 11 μm depth. Tribological properties as well as corrosion resistance were evaluated.

  18. An apparatus for combined vapor deposition and ion implantation to modify the surface properties of metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margesin, B.; Giacomozzi, F.; Guzman, L.; Lazzari, G.; Zanini, V.

    A low energy ion implanter has been adequately modified in order to perform reactive ion beam enhanced deposition (RIBED) and dynamic recoil ion mixing experiments under controlled conditions in a high vacuum environment. The machine consists of a Duoplasmatron ion source, a mass analyzer, a target chamber adaptable for use with various samples, and an electron gun evaporator equipped with a film thickness monitor. For a high degree of process automation the implantation chamber and the evaporator are controlled by a system based on two microprocessors in a master/slave configuration. The microprocessors are programmed in FORTH and communicate with each other in the same language. In this apparatus, independently controlled atom and ion beams of different species able to form the required compounds, impinge sequentially (or simultaneously) on a 4 × 8 cm 2 area with a good uniformity (10%). Ion mixing prevails in the first steps of the treatment, resulting in a good relative adhesion between substrate and film; then the RIBED film is grown up to typically 0.5 μm, this thickness being equivalent to a total implanted dose of 5.0 × 10 18 ions/cm 2 with an excellent depth homogeneity and without sputtering limitations.

  19. Surface modification of the hard metal tungsten carbide-cobalt by boron ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mrotchek, I.

    2007-01-01

    In the present thesis ion beam implantation of boron is studied as method for the increasement of the hardness and for the improvement of the operational characteristics of cutting tools on the tungsten carbide-cobalt base. For the boron implantation with 40 keV energy and ∼5.10 17 ions/cm 2 fluence following topics were shown: The incoerporation of boron leads to a deformation and remaining strain of the WC lattice, which possesses different stregth in the different directions of the elementary cell. The maximum of the deformation is reached at an implantation temperature of 450 C. The segregation of the new phases CoWB and Co 3 W was detected at 900 C implantation temperature. At lower temperatures now new phases were found. The tribological characteristics of WC-Co are improved. Hereby the maxiaml effect was measured for implantation temperatures from 450 C to 700 C: Improvement of the microhardness by the factor 2..2.5, improvement of the wear resistance by the factor 4. The tribological effects extend to larger depths than the penetration depth of the boron implantation profile. The detected property improvements of the hard metal H3 show the possibility of a practical application of boron ion implantation in industry. The effects essential for a wer decreasement are a hardening of the carbide phase by deformation of the lattice, a hardening of the cobalt binding material and the phase boundaries because of the formation of a solid solution of the implanted boron atoms in Co and by this a blocking of the dislocation movement and the rupture spreading under load

  20. Ion implantation in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vook, F.L.

    1977-02-01

    The application of ion beams to metals is rapidly emerging as a promising area of research and technology. This report briefly describes some of the recent advances in the modification and study of the basic properties of metals by ion implantation techniques. Most of the research discussed illustrates some of the new and exciting applications of ion beams to metals which are under active investigation at Sandia Laboratories, Albuquerque

  1. Hardness of ion implanted ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, W.C.; McHargue, C.J.; Farlow, G.C.; White, C.W.

    1985-01-01

    It has been established that the wear behavior of ceramic materials can be modified through ion implantation. Studies have been done to characterize the effect of implantation on the structure and composition of ceramic surfaces. To understand how these changes affect the wear properties of the ceramic, other mechanical properties must be measured. To accomplish this, a commercially available ultra low load hardness tester has been used to characterize Al 2 O 3 with different implanted species and doses. The hardness of the base material is compared with the highly damaged crystalline state as well as the amorphous material

  2. Room-temperature vacancy migration in crystalline Si from an ion-implanted surface layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Arne Nylandsted; Christensen, Carsten; Petersen, Jon Wulff

    1999-01-01

    examined, the vacancies migrate to a maximum depth of about 1 µm and at least one vacancy per implanted Ge ion migrates into the silicon crystal. The annealing of the E centers is accompanied, in an almost one-to-one fashion, by the appearance of a new DLTS line corresponding to a level at EC...

  3. Surface modification of NiTi by plasma based ion implantation for application in harsh environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, R.M., E-mail: rogerio@plasma.inpe.br [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), S. J. Campos, SP (Brazil); Fernandes, B.B.; Carreri, F.C.; Goncalves, J.A.N.; Ueda, M.; Silva, M.M.N.F. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), S. J. Campos, SP (Brazil); Silva, M.M. [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA), S. J. Campos, SP (Brazil); Pichon, L. [Laboratoire de Metallurgie Physique, University of Poitiers, Poitiers (France); Camargo, E.N.; Otubo, J. [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA), S. J. Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New nitrogen PBII set up was used to treat samples of NiTi in moderate temperature of 450 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A very rich nitrogen atomic concentration was achieved on the top surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nitrogen diffused at least for 11 {mu}m depth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Improved tribological and corrosion properties were achieved. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A concentration dependent diffusion coefficient was calculated. - Abstract: The substitution of conventional components for NiTi in distinct devices such as actuators, valves, connectors, stents, orthodontic arc-wires, e.g., usually demands some kind of treatment to be performed on the surface of the alloy. A typical case is of biomaterials made of NiTi, in which the main drawback is the Ni out-diffusion, an issue that has been satisfactorily addressed by plasma based ion implantation (PBII). Even though PBII can tailor selective surface properties of diverse materials, usually, only thin modified layers are attained. When NiTi alloys are to be used in the harsh space environment, as is the case of devices designed to remotely release the solar panels and antenna arrays of satellites, e.g., superior mechanical and tribological properties are demanded. For this case the thickness of the modified layer must be larger than the one commonly achieved by conventional PBII. In this paper, new nitrogen PBII set up was used to treat samples of NiTi in moderate temperature of 450 Degree-Sign C, with negative voltage pulses of 7 kV/250 Hz/20 {mu}s, in a process lasting 1 h. A rich nitrogen atomic concentration of 85 at.% was achieved on the near surface and nitrogen diffused at least for 11 {mu}m depth. Tribological properties as well as corrosion resistance were evaluated.

  4. High-energy ion implantation of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.M.

    1991-11-01

    High-energy ion implantation is an extremely flexible type of surface treatment technique, in that it offers the possibility of treating almost any type of target material or product with ions of almost any chemical species, or combinations of chemical species. In addition, ion implantations can be combined with variations in temperature during or after ion implantation. As a result, the possibility of approaching a wide variety of surface-related materials science problems exists with ion implantation. This paper will outline factors pertinent to application of high-energy ion implantation to surface engineering problems. This factors include fundamental advantages and limitations, economic considerations, present and future equipment, and aspects of materials science

  5. Ion implantation method for preparing polymers having oxygen erosion resistant surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eal H.; Mansur, Louis K.; Heatherly, Jr., Lee

    1995-01-01

    Hard surfaced polymers and the method for making them are generally described. Polymers are subjected to simultaneous multiple ion beam bombardment, that results in a hardening of the surface, improved wear resistance, and improved oxygen erosion resistance.

  6. Friction and wear of stainless steel, titanium and aluminium with various surface treatments, ion implantation and overlay hard coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunshah, R.F.

    1979-01-01

    This paper deals with the evaluation of the wear properties of 304 stainless steel, commercial grade titanium and commercial grade aluminium without and with different surface treatments, i.e., ion implantation of boron and nitrogen, and overlay coating of superhard materials, titanium carbide and nitride by the Biased Activated Reactive Evaporation (BARE) process. Wear properties were evaluated in adhesive, erosive and abrasive modes of wear. In the case of adhesive wear, ion implantation resulted in an improved wear behaviour in lubricated conditions but had no beneficial effect in dry wear conditions. Overlay coatings on the other hand resulted in improved wear behaviour for both the dry and lubricating conditions. In the case of erosive wear with SiC particles at high velocities, overlay coatings showed higher erosion rates (typical of brittle materials in normal impingement) whereas ion implanted materials behaved similarly as untreated materials; i.e., a lower wear rate than the specimens with overlay coatings. In the case of abrasive wear, it was again observed that the wear rates of overlay coatings is far lower than the wear rates of untreated or ion implanted materials. (author)

  7. Ion implantation for semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grey-Morgan, T.

    1995-01-01

    Full text: Over the past two decades, thousands of particle accelerators have been used to implant foreign atoms like boron, phosphorus and arsenic into silicon crystal wafers to produce special embedded layers for manufacturing semiconductor devices. Depending on the device required, the atomic species, the depth of implant and doping levels are the main parameters for the implantation process; the selection and parameter control is totally automated. The depth of the implant, usually less than 1 micron, is determined by the ion energy, which can be varied between 2 and 600 keV. The ion beam is extracted from a Freeman or Bernas type ion source and accelerated to 60 keV before mass analysis. For higher beam energies postacceleration is applied up to 200 keV and even higher energies can be achieved by mass selecting multiplycharged ions, but with a corresponding reduction in beam output. Depending on the device to be manufactured, doping levels can range from 10 10 to 10 15 atoms/cm 2 and are controlled by implanter beam currents in the range up to 30mA; continuous process monitoring ensures uniformity across the wafer of better than 1 % . As semiconductor devices get smaller, additional sophistication is required in the design of the implanter. The silicon wafers charge electrically during implantation and this charge must be dissipated continuously to reduce the electrical stress in the device and avoid destructive electrical breakdown. Electron flood guns produce low energy electrons (below 10 electronvolts) to neutralize positive charge buildup and implanter design must ensure minimum contamination by other isotopic species and ensure low internal sputter rates. The pace of technology in the semiconductor industry is such that implanters are being built now for 256 Megabit circuits but which are only likely to be widely available five years from now. Several specialist companies manufacture implanter systems, each costing around US$5 million, depending on the

  8. Comparison of single and mixed ion implantation effects on the changes of the surface hardness, light transmittance, and electrical conductivity of polymeric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J. W.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, J. S.; Kil, J. G.; Choi, B. H.; Han, Z. H.

    2001-01-01

    Single or mixed ions of N, He, C were implanted onto the transparent PET(Polyethylen Terephtalate) with the ion energies of less than 100 keV and the surface hardness, light transmittance and electrical conductivity were examined. As measured with nanoindentation, mixed ion implantations such as N + +He + or N + + C + exhibited more increase in the surface hardness than the single ion implantation. Especially, implantation of C+N ions increased the surface hardness by about three times as compared to the implantation of N ion alone, which means more than 10 times increase than the untreated PET. Surface electrical conductivity was increased along with the hardness increase. The conductivity increase was more proportional to the hardness when used the higher ion energy and ion dose, while it did not show any relationship at as low as 50 keV of ion energy. The light at the 550 nm wavelength (visual range) transmitted more than 85%, which is close to that of as-received PET, and at the wavelength below 300 nm(UV range) the rays were absorbed more than 95% as traveling through the sheet, implying that there are processing parameters which the ion implanted PET maintains the transparency and absorbs the UV rays

  9. Ion Implantation of Polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popok, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    is put on the low-energy implantation of metal ions causing the nucleation and growth of nanoparticles in the shallow polymer layers. Electrical, optical and magnetic properties of metal/polymer composites are under the discussion and the approaches towards practical applications are overviewed....

  10. Surface modification of TiO2 coatings by Zn ion implantation for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    bone and plays an important role in improving the adhe- sion, proliferation and differentiation of bone cells [8]. Zn .... inoculated into a standard agar culture medium. After incu- bation at 37◦C for 24 h, the active .... sive process including physical adsorption or ion exchange at cell surfaces; (2) slower transport of metal ions ...

  11. Surface modification of TiO2 coatings by Zn ion implantation for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to the PIII-treated TiO2 coatings than E. coli. Surface chemical composition of TiO2-based implants plays a crucial role in biological interaction because it is in direct contact with the biological environment. Zn is an important trace element for enhancing cell proliferation,. ALP activity, collagen synthesis, and protein synthesis.

  12. Surface modification of materials by ion implantations for industrial and medical applications. Final report of a co-ordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-07-01

    The objectives of the Co-ordinated Research Project on Modification of Materials by Ion Treatment for Industrial Applications were to develop economically acceptable surface modification techniques leading to thick treated layers, to predict ion beam mixing and impurity atom migration during and after implantation, and to evaluate the tribological post-implantation properties and performance of treated components. This TECDOC summarises the current status and prospects in surface modification by ion implantation methodology and technology, providing new information in basic and applied research

  13. Production of amorphous metal layers using ion implantation and investigation of the related modification of some surface properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoang Dac Luc; Vu Hoang Lam.

    1993-01-01

    Amorphous layers were produced by implanting B + ions into Al at 50 keV. The modification of the electrochemical corrosion resistance and the mechanical strength of implanted specimen was investigated. (author). 2 refs, 1 tab, 2 figs

  14. Evolution of arsenic in high fluence plasma immersion ion implanted silicon : Behavior of the as-implanted surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vishwanath, V.; Demenev, E.; Giubertoni, D.; Vanzetti, L.; Koh, A. L.; Steinhauser, G.; Pepponi, G.; Bersani, M.; Meirer, F.; Foad, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    High fluence (>1015 ions/cm2) low-energy (3 + on (1 0 0) silicon was investigated, with the focus on stability and retention of the dopant. At this dose, a thin (∼3 nm) amorphous layer forms at the surface, which contains about 45% arsenic (As) in a silicon and oxygen matrix. The presence of silicon

  15. Elimination of carbon vacancies in 4H-SiC epi-layers by near-surface ion implantation: Influence of the ion species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayedh, H. M.; Hallén, A.; Svensson, B. G.

    2015-11-01

    The carbon vacancy (VC) is a prevailing point defect in high-purity 4H-SiC epitaxial layers, and it plays a decisive role in controlling the charge carrier lifetime. One concept of reducing the VC-concentration is based on carbon self-ion implantation in a near surface layer followed by thermal annealing. This leads to injection of carbon interstitials (Ci's) and annihilation of VC's in the epi-layer "bulk". Here, we show that the excess of C atoms introduced by the self-ion implantation plays a negligible role in the VC annihilation. Actually, employing normalized implantation conditions with respect to displaced C atoms, other heavier ions like Al and Si are found to be more efficient in annihilating VC's. Concentrations of VC below ˜2 × 1011 cm-3 can be reached already after annealing at 1400 °C, as monitored by deep-level transient spectroscopy. This corresponds to a reduction in the VC-concentration by about a factor of 40 relative to the as-grown state of the epi-layers studied. The negligible role of the implanted species itself can be understood from simulation results showing that the concentration of displaced C atoms exceeds the concentration of implanted species by two to three orders of magnitude. The higher efficiency for Al and Si ions is attributed to the generation of collision cascades with a sufficiently high energy density to promote Ci-clustering and reduce dynamic defect annealing. These Ci-related clusters will subsequently dissolve during the post-implant annealing giving rise to enhanced Ci injection. However, at annealing temperatures above 1500 °C, thermodynamic equilibrium conditions start to apply for the VC-concentration, which limit the net effect of the Ci injection, and a competition between the two processes occurs.

  16. Surface Modification of Austenitic Stainless Steels by High-Flux Elevated-Temperature Nitrogen-Ion Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Orhan

    Nitrogen diffusivity is found to be enhanced under unusual N ion beam conditions used for modification of fcc AISI 304 stainless steel surfaces. The unusual conditions also lead to the development of various near-surface microstructures and enhanced mechanical properties. The relative importance of ion energy and current density on N penetration was studied in order to help understand the enhanced N diffusivity. The role of residual stresses in the N implanted layers was also investigated. The N beam conditions included: (1) ion beam energies from 0.4 to 60 keV; (2) beam current densities from 0.1 to 5 mA/cm^2; (3) an elevated substrate temperature of 400^ circC; (4) implantation times of 10 to 30 minutes. Mossbauer spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to characterize the near-surface N ion implanted microstructures. Supplemental data were obtained by Auger electron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE) and electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA) on selected samples. A metastable, fcc, high-N phase (gamma _{N}) is found to be generally produced in fcc 304 SS for all ion energies and current densities at 400^circC. The gamma_{N} was found to be either paramagnetic or magnetic in nature depending on the N content. With a low-energy, high-flux N beam, magnetic gamma_{N} was found to be ferromagnetic at room temperature. The N contents and depths were found to depend on the grain orientation relative to the ion beam direction for low -energy, high-flux conditions. The N was found to diffuse deeper in the (200) oriented grains compared to the (111) oriented grains and the N contents were significantly higher in the (200) planes relative to the (111) planes. Post-implantation annealing experiments showed that the magnetic gamma_{N} phase was destabilized as a result of annealing it at 400^circC, thereby resulting in thicker and predominantly paramagnetic gamma _{N} layers with less N in solution and less lattice

  17. Effect of surface texture by ion beam sputtering on implant biocompatibility and soft tissue attachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, D. F.

    1977-01-01

    The objectives in this report were to use the ion beam sputtering technique to produce surface textures on polymers, metals, and ceramics. The morphology of the texture was altered by varying both the width and depth of the square pits which were formed by ion beam erosion. The width of the ribs separating the pits were defined by the mask used to produce the texture. The area of the surface containing pits varies as the width was changed. The biological parameters used to evaluate the biological response to the texture were: (1) fibrous capsule and inflammatory response in subcutaneous soft tissue; (2) strength of the mechanical attachment of the textured surface by the soft tissue; and (3) morphology of the epidermal layer interfacing the textured surface of percutaneous connectors. Because the sputter yield on teflon ribs was approximately an order of magnitude larger than any other material the majority of the measurements presented in the report were obtained with teflon.

  18. Evaluation of an expence of materials during ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannikov, M.G.; Zlobin, N.; Zotov, A.V.; Vasilev, V.I.; Vasilev, I.P.

    2003-01-01

    Ion implantation is used for a surface modification. The implantation dose must be sufficient to obtain the required properties of a processed surface, but should not be exceeded to prevent over-expenditure of implanted materials. The latter is especially important when noble metals are used as an implanted material. The ion implanter includes a vacuum chamber, source of metal ions (target) and a vacuum pumping-out system. Ions of a plasma-forming gas sputter the target and ions of metal are then accelerated and implanted into surface treated. Ion implantation dose can be calculated from operation parameters such as ion beam current density and duration of implanting. The presence of the plasma-forming gas in the ion flow makes it difficult to determine the expenditure of an implanted metal itself. The objective of this paper is the more accurate definition of an expense of an implanted metal. Mass- spectrometric analysis of an ion beam together with the weighing of the target was used to determine the expense of an implanted metal. It was found that, depending on the implantation parameters, on average around 50% of a total ion flow are metal ions. Results obtained allow more precise definition of an implantation dose. Thus, over- expenditure of implanted metals can be eliminated. (author)

  19. Ion implantation: an annotated bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ting, R.N.; Subramanyam, K.

    1975-10-01

    Ion implantation is a technique for introducing controlled amounts of dopants into target substrates, and has been successfully used for the manufacture of silicon semiconductor devices. Ion implantation is superior to other methods of doping such as thermal diffusion and epitaxy, in view of its advantages such as high degree of control, flexibility, and amenability to automation. This annotated bibliography of 416 references consists of journal articles, books, and conference papers in English and foreign languages published during 1973-74, on all aspects of ion implantation including range distribution and concentration profile, channeling, radiation damage and annealing, compound semiconductors, structural and electrical characterization, applications, equipment and ion sources. Earlier bibliographies on ion implantation, and national and international conferences in which papers on ion implantation were presented have also been listed separately

  20. Scanning electron microscopy of the surfaces of ion implanted SiC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malherbe, Johan B.; van der Berg, N. G.; Kuhudzai, R. J.; Hlatshwayo, T. T.; Thabethe, T. T.; Odutemowo, O. S.; Theron, C. C.; Friedland, E.; Botha, A. J.; Wendler, E.

    2015-07-01

    This paper gives a brief review of radiation damage caused by particle (ions and neutrons) bombardment in SiC at different temperatures, and its annealing, with an expanded discussion on the effects occurring on the surface. The surface effects were observed using SEM (scanning electron microscopy) with an in-lens detector and EBSD (electron backscatter diffraction). Two substrates were used, viz. single crystalline 6H-SiC wafers and polycrystalline SiC, where the majority of the crystallites were 3C-SiC. The surface modification of the SiC samples by 360 keV ion bombardment was studied at temperatures below (i.e. room temperature), just at (i.e. 350 °C), or above (i.e. 600 °C) the critical temperature for amorphization of SiC. For bombardment at a temperature at about the critical temperature an extra step, viz. post-bombardment annealing, was needed to ascertain the microstructure of bombarded layer. Another aspect investigated was the effect of annealing of samples with an ion bombardment-induced amorphous layer on a 6H-SiC substrate. SEM could detect that this layer started to crystalize at 900 °C. The resulting topography exhibited a dependence on the ion species. EBSD showed that the crystallites forming in the amorphized layer were 3C-SiC and not 6H-SiC as the substrate. The investigations also pointed out the behaviour of the epitaxial regrowth of the amorphous layer from the 6H-SiC interface.

  1. Ion implantation in Thailand (I) - development of ion implantation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilaithong, T.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Yotsombat, B.; Boonyawan, D.; Charoennugul, R.; Vichaisirimongkol, P.; Aumkaew, S.; A-No, V.

    1997-01-01

    Ion implantation with its many advantages has been widely and rapidly developed in the world to be a novel material treatment technique, which holds significance in both academic research and technical application. In order to develop and apply the ion implantation technique in the country, Thailand has launched a program to establish an ion beam center at Chiang Mai University. By efforts made during the past six years, the University has completed construction and installation of a 150-kV, research-purpose ion implantation facility, which consists of two beam lines - a 00 non-analyzed line and a 450 analyzed line, and which is being put into regular operation, and a 20-kV, high-current ion implanter based on a duoplasmatron ion source for non-analyzed N-ion beam implantation, and a high-intensity, multi cusp ion source for special implantation purposes. The facilities have formed powerful tools for research, teaching and engineering application, and have played an indispensable role in promoting development of novel techniques in the country

  2. Biocompatible implant surface treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bikash Pattanaik

    2012-01-01

    Limitation of this study is that we tried to give a broader overview related to implant surface treatments. It does not give any conclusion regarding the best biocompatible implant surface treatment investigated till date. Unfortunately, the eventually selected studies were too heterogeneous for inference of data.

  3. Biofunctionalization of silicone rubber with microgroove-patterned surface and carbon-ion implantation to enhance biocompatibility and reduce capsule formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Ze-Yuan; Liu, Ting; Li, Wei-Juan; Shi, Xiao-Hua; Fan, Dong-Li

    Silicone rubber implants have been widely used to repair soft tissue defects and deformities. However, poor biocompatibility can elicit capsule formation, usually resulting in prosthesis contracture and displacement in long-term usage. To overcome this problem, this study investigated the properties of silicone rubber materials with or without a microgroove-patterned surface and with or without carbon (C)-ion implantation. Atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and a water contact angle test were used to characterize surface morphology and physicochemical properties. Cytocompatibility was investigated by a cell adhesion experiment, immunofluorescence staining, a Cell Counting Kit-8 assay, and scanning electron microscopy in vitro. Histocompatibility was evaluated by studying the inflammatory response and fiber capsule formation that developed after subcutaneous implantation in rats for 7 days, 15 days, and 30 days in vivo. Parallel microgrooves were found on the surfaces of patterned silicone rubber (P-SR) and patterned C-ion-implanted silicone rubber (PC-SR). Irregular larger peaks and deeper valleys were present on the surface of silicone rubber implanted with C ions (C-SR). The silicone rubber surfaces with microgroove patterns had stable physical and chemical properties and exhibited moderate hydrophobicity. PC-SR exhibited moderately increased dermal fibroblast cell adhesion and growth, and its surface microstructure promoted orderly cell growth. Histocompatibility experiments on animals showed that both the anti-inflammatory and antifibrosis properties of PC-SR were slightly better than those of the other materials, and there was also a lower capsular contracture rate and less collagen deposition around implants made from PC-SR. Although the surface chemical properties, dermal fibroblast cell growth, and cell adhesion were not changed by microgroove pattern modification, a more orderly cell arrangement was obtained, leading to enhanced

  4. Tungsten contamination in ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polignano, M.L., E-mail: maria.polignano@st.com; Barbarossa, F.; Galbiati, A.; Magni, D.; Mica, I.

    2016-06-15

    In this paper the tungsten contamination in ion implantation processes is studied by DLTS analysis both in typical operating conditions and after contamination of the implanter by implantation of wafers with an exposed tungsten layer. Of course the contaminant concentration is orders of magnitude higher after contamination of the implanter, but in addition our data show that different mechanisms are active in a not contaminated and in a contaminated implanter. A moderate tungsten contamination is observed also in a not contaminated implanter, however in that case contamination is completely not energetic and can be effectively screened by a very thin oxide. On the contrary, the contamination due to an implantation in a previously contaminated implanter is reduced but not suppressed even by a relatively thick screen oxide. The comparison with SRIM calculations confirms that the observed deep penetration of the contaminant cannot be explained by a plain sputtering mechanism.

  5. Surface modification of TiO2 coatings by Zn ion implantation for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... TiO2 coating has been widely applied in orthopaedic and dental implants owing to its excellent mechanical and biological properties. However, one of the biggest complications of TiO2 coating is implant-associated infections. The aim of this work is to improve the antibacterial activity of plasma-sprayed ...

  6. Anodized dental implant surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Mishra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Anodized implants with moderately rough surface were introduced around 2000. Whether these implants enhanced biologic effect to improve the environment for better osseointegration was unclear. The purpose of this article was to review the literature available on anodized surface in terms of their clinical success rate and bone response in patients till now. Materials and Methods: A broad electronic search of MEDLINE and PubMed databases was performed. A focus was made on peer-reviewed dental journals. Only articles related to anodized implants were included. Both animal and human studies were included. Results: The initial search of articles resulted in 581 articles on anodized implants. The initial screening of titles and abstracts resulted in 112 full-text papers; 40 animal studies, 16 studies on cell adhesion and bacterial adhesion onto anodized surfaced implants, and 47 human studies were included. Nine studies, which do not fulfill the inclusion criteria, were excluded. Conclusions: The long-term studies on anodized surface implants do favor the surface, but in most of the studies, anodized surface is compared with that of machined surface, but not with other surfaces commercially available. Anodized surface in terms of clinical success rate in cases of compromised bone and immediately extracted sockets has shown favorable success.

  7. Operation of low-energy ion implanters for Si, N, C ion implantation into silicon and glassy carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carder, D.A.; Markwitz, A.

    2009-01-01

    This report details the operation of the low-energy ion implanters at GNS Science for C, N and Si implantations. Two implanters are presented, from a description of the components through to instructions for operation. Historically the implanters have been identified with the labels 'industrial' and 'experimental'. However, the machines only differ significantly in the species of ions available for implantation and sample temperature during implantation. Both machines have been custom designed for research purposes, with a wide range of ion species available for ion implantation and the ability to implant two ions into the same sample at the same time from two different ion sources. A fast sample transfer capability and homogenous scanning profiles are featured in both cases. Samples up to 13 mm 2 can be implanted, with the ability to implant at temperatures down to liquid nitrogen temperatures. The implanters have been used to implant 28 Si + , 14 N + and 12 C + into silicon and glassy carbon substrates. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy has been used to analyse the implanted material. From the data a Si 30 C 61 N 9 layer was measured extending from the surface to a depth of about 77 ± 2 nm for (100) silicon implanted with 12 C + and 14 N + at multiple energies. Silicon and nitrogen ion implantation into glassy carbon produced a Si (40.5 %), C (38 %), N (19.5 %) and O (2%) layer centred around a depth of 50 ± 2 nm from the surface. (author). 8 refs., 20 figs

  8. Phase and Microstructural Study of Surface Layers Produced by Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation of Stainless Steel X6CrNiTi1810

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blawert, C.; Mordike, B. L.; Jirásková, Yvonna; Schneeweiss, Oldřich

    1999-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 6 (1999), s. 1-7 ISSN 0267-0844. [International Plasma-Based Ion Implantation Workshop /4./. Dearborn, 02.06.1998-04.06.1998] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4032601; GA ČR GA202/97/0444 Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials

  9. Effects of calcium phosphate coating to SLA surface implants by the ion-beam-assisted deposition method on self-contained coronal defect healing in dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Heun-Joo; Song, Ji-Eun; Um, Yoo-Jung; Chae, Gyung Joon; Jung, Ui-Won; Kim, Chang-Sung; Choi, Seong-Ho [Department of Periodontology, Research Institute for Periodontal Regeneration, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Sung-Min [Dentium Co., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, In-Seop, E-mail: shchoi726@yuhs.a [Institute of Physics and Applied Physics, Atomic-scale Surface Science Research Center, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-08-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the healing of self-contained coronal defects on a sand-blasted, large-grit, acid-etched (SLA) surface implant, which had a calcium phosphate (CaP) coating applied by ion-beam-assisted deposition (IBAD). We also evaluated the effect of heating the coating to different temperatures. The CaP-coated SLA implants exhibited a slightly larger bone healing capacity in the self-contained coronal defect than SLA implants, indicating that combining SLA surface implants and a CaP coating by the IBAD method had synergistic effects on bone healing. There was no difference in the healing capacity between 350 deg. C and 450 deg. C heat treatment of the coating layer.

  10. Transverse microanalysis of high energy Ion implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooley, S.P.; Jamieson, D.N.; Nugent, K.W.; Prawer, S. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    High energy ion implants in semiconductor materials have been analyzed by Channeling Contrast Microscopy (CCM) perpendicular to the implant direction, allowing imaging of the entire ion track. The damage produced by Channeled and Random 1.4 MeV H{sup +} implants into the edge of a <100> type IIa diamond wafer were analyzed by channeling into the face of the crystal. The results showed negligible damage in the surface region of the implants, and swelling induced misalignment at the end of range of the implants. Channeled 1.4 MeV H{sup +} implants in diamond had a range only 9% deeper than Random implants, which could be accounted for by dechanneling of the beam. The channeling of H{sup +}{sub 2} ions has been previously found to be identical to that of protons of half energy, however the current experiment has shown a 1% increase in {chi}{sub min} for H{sup +}{sub 2} in diamond compared to H{sup +} at 1,2 MeV per proton. This is due to repulsion between protons within the same channel. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  11. TEM investigation of the surface layer structure [111]{sub B2} of the single NiTi crystal modified by the Si-ion beam implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girsova, S. L., E-mail: girs@ispms.tsc.ru; Poletika, T. M., E-mail: poletm@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Meisner, S. N., E-mail: msn@ispms.tsc.ru; Meisner, L. L., E-mail: llm@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    The study was carried on for the single NiTi crystals subjected to the Si-ion beam implantation. Using the transmission electron microscopy technique (TEM), the surface layer structure [111]{sub B2} was examined for the treated material. The modified near-surface sublayers were found to have different composition. Thus the uppermost sublayer contained mostly oxides; the lower-lying modified sublayer material was in an amorphous state and the thin underlying sublayer had a defect structure.

  12. The mirostructure and surface hardness of Ti6Al4V alloy implanted with nitrogen ions at an elevated temperature

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlčák, P.; Černý, F.; Drahokoupil, Jan; Sepitka, J.; Tolde, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 620, Jan (2015), 48-54 ISSN 0925-8388 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : hardening * microstructure * phase identification * phase quantification * ion implantation * titanium alloy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.014, year: 2015

  13. Fingerprinting diamonds using ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVries, R.C.; Reihl, R.F.; Tuft, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    It is possible to ion implant patterns in diamond crystals at fluences below that which would impart visible damage and then to reveal those patterns by electrostatic charging and dusting. The charge distribution - and therefore the dust attachment - is related to the difference in electrical conductivity between the implanted region and the rest of the crystal. The technique may have applicability for ''fingerprinting'' or personalizing diamond gemstones. (author)

  14. Surface modification of coronary artery stent by Ti-O/Ti-N complex film coating prepared with plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, N.; Leng, Y.X.; Yang, P.

    2006-01-01

    This paper reported the work of surface coating of Ti-O/Ti-N complex films on coronary stents by means of the plasma immersion ion implantation/deposition process. The deformation behavior of the Ti-O/Ti-N coated stainless steel stents was investigated. In vivo investigation of the anticoagulation behavior of Ti-O coated coronary stents was also performed. The results of mechanical characterization of the Ti-O/Ti-N coated stents show that the film has strong binding strength, and to some extent the ability to withstand plastic deformation. The biological response behavior of the coated stent surface was significantly different from the uncoated. The results of implantation of stents into rabbit ventral aorta show no thrombus formation on the surfaces of the Ti-O coated stents, although serious coagulation had occurred on the surfaces of unmodified stents over a period of 4 weeks under conditions with no anticoagulant

  15. Enhanced Physicochemical and Biological Properties of Ion-Implanted Titanium Using Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csaba Hegedűs

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The surface properties of metallic implants play an important role in their clinical success. Improving upon the inherent shortcomings of Ti implants, such as poor bioactivity, is imperative for achieving clinical use. In this study, we have developed a Ti implant modified with Ca or dual Ca + Si ions on the surface using an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS. The physicochemical and biological properties of ion-implanted Ti surfaces were analyzed using various analytical techniques, such as surface analyses, potentiodynamic polarization and cell culture. Experimental results indicated that a rough morphology was observed on the Ti substrate surface modified by ECRIS plasma ions. The in vitro electrochemical measurement results also indicated that the Ca + Si ion-implanted surface had a more beneficial and desired behavior than the pristine Ti substrate. Compared to the pristine Ti substrate, all ion-implanted samples had a lower hemolysis ratio. MG63 cells cultured on the high Ca and dual Ca + Si ion-implanted surfaces revealed significantly greater cell viability in comparison to the pristine Ti substrate. In conclusion, surface modification by electron cyclotron resonance Ca and Si ion sources could be an effective method for Ti implants.

  16. Surface Analytics in Support of the Development of Static AutoClean - an In-Situ Cleaning Process for Ion Implanters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stawasz, Michele; Yedave, Sharad; Hiscock, Laura; Sweeney, Joseph; Kaim, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Static AutoClean is a new in-situ cleaning strategy in development at ATMI registered that enables increased process efficiency and safety in the ion implantation process. Like the Dynamic in-situ AutoClean technology previously introduced and released by ATMI, Static AutoClean utilizes XeF 2 chemistry for in-situ cleaning of hazardous contaminants and deposits. Static AutoClean, however, is targeted towards cleaning areas of the beam-line (like electrode insulators or source bushings) where cleaning efforts using Dynamic AutoClean may not be sufficient. An explanation of this cleaning strategy and results showing its effectiveness will be presented in a separate paper at this conference (S. Yedave et al.). This paper presents the surface analytical data and methods used to understand and evaluate the effectiveness of Static AutoClean in removing contaminants from surfaces within the source vacuum chamber. Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) was used to track the magnitude and spatial distribution of contaminants present on the surfaces within various regions in the source chamber space of an implanter following ion source operation with a commonly used dopant gas. After in-situ cleaning, these same components and surfaces were re-evaluated by EDS to quantitatively determine the reduction in surface contaminants present within the chamber. Learnings regarding the distribution of implant process contamination within the source chamber as well as Static AutoClean's effectiveness in removing it will be presented.

  17. Ion surface treatments on organic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaki, Masaya

    2001-04-01

    A study has been made of surface modification of various organic materials by ion bombardment or implantation to make the surface properties of high and multiple functions in RIKEN. Substrates used were polyimide (PI), polyacetylene, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), polystyrene (PS), silicone rubber, various kinds of proteins and so on. Bombarded or implanted ions were inert gas elements, chemically active gaseous elements and metallic elements. Surface properties such as electrical conductivity, wettability and cell adhesion of implanted layers have been investigated. Surface characterization of implanted materials has been carried out by means of transmission electron microscopy, laser Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. In this paper, studies in RIKEN are reviewed of electrical conductivity, optical absorbance, wettability and cell adhesion depending on current densities and doping elements. Applications of ion bombardment to biomedical materials are introduced using cell adhesion control. It is concluded that ion bombardment or implantation is useful to change and control surface properties of various organic materials.

  18. Adhesive, abrasive and oxidative wear in ion-implanted metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearnaley, G.

    1985-01-01

    Ion implantation is increasingly being used to provide wear resistance in metals and cemented tungsten carbides. Field trials and laboratory tests indicate that the best performance is achieved in mild abrasive wear. This can be understood in terms of the classification of wear modes (adhesive, abrasive, oxidative etc.) introduced by Burwell. Surface hardening and work hardenability are the major properties to be enhanced by ion implantation. The implantation of nitrogen or dual implants of metallic and interstitial species are effective. Recently developed techniques of ion-beam-enhanced deposition of coatings can further improve wear resistance by lessening adhesion and oxidation. In order to support such hard coatings, ion implantation of nitrogen can be used as a preliminary treatment. There is thus emerging a versatile group of related hard vacuum treatments involving intense beams of nitrogen ions for the purpose of tailoring metal surfaces to resist wear. (Auth.)

  19. Ion implantation induced blistering of rutile single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Bing-Xi [School of Physics, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China); Jiao, Yang [College of Physics and Electronics, Shandong Normal University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China); Guan, Jing [School of Physics, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China); Wang, Lei [School of Physics, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China); Key Laboratory of Nanodevices and Applications, Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)

    2015-07-01

    The rutile single crystals were implanted by 200 keV He{sup +} ions with a series fluence and annealed at different temperatures to investigate the blistering behavior. The Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, optical microscope and X-ray diffraction were employed to characterize the implantation induced lattice damage and blistering. It was found that the blistering on rutile surface region can be realized by He{sup +} ion implantation with appropriate fluence and the following thermal annealing.

  20. Implant surfaces and interface processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasemo, B; Gold, J

    1999-06-01

    The past decades and current R&D of biomaterials and medical implants show some general trends. One major trend is an increased degree of functionalization of the material surface, better to meet the demands of the biological host system. While the biomaterials of the past and those in current use are essentially bulk materials (metals, ceramics, polymers) or special compounds (bioglasses), possibly with some additional coating (e.g., hydroxyapatite), the current R&D on surface modifications points toward much more complex and multifunctional surfaces for the future. Such surface modifications can be divided into three classes, one aiming toward an optimized three-dimensional physical microarchitecture of the surface (pore size distributions, "roughness", etc.), the second one focusing on the (bio) chemical properties of surface coatings and impregnations (ion release, multi-layer coatings, coatings with biomolecules, controlled drug release, etc.), and the third one dealing with the viscoelastic properties (or more generally the micromechanical properties) of material surfaces. These properties are expected to affect the interfacial processes cooperatively, i.e., there are likely synergistic effects between and among them: The surface is "recognized" by the biological system through the combined chemical and topographic pattern of the surface, and the viscoelastic properties. In this presentation, the development indicated above is discussed briefly, and current R&D in this area is illustrated with a number of examples from our own research. The latter include micro- and nanofabrication of surface patterns and topographies by the use of laser machining, photolithographic techniques, and electron beam and colloidal lithographies to produce controlled structures on implant surfaces in the size range 10 nm to 100 microns. Examples of biochemical modifications include mono- or lipid membranes and protein coatings on different surfaces. A new method to evaluate, e

  1. Modification of the hydriding of uranium using ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musket, R.G.; Robinson-Weis, G.; Patterson, R.G.

    1983-01-01

    The hydriding of depleted uranium at 76 Torr hydrogen and 130 0 C has been significantly reduced by implantation of oxygen ions. The high-dose implanted specimens had incubation times for the initiation of the reaction after exposure to hydrogen that exceeded those of the nonimplanted specimens by more than a factor of eight. Furthermore, the nonimplanted specimens consumed enough hydrogen to cause macroscopic flaking of essentially the entire surface in times much less than the incubation time for the high-dose implanted specimens. In contrast, the ion-implanted specimens reacted only at isolated spots with the major fraction of the surface area unaffected by the hydrogen exposure

  2. A novel method for effective sodium ion implantation into silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Qiuyuan; Chu, Paul K. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2012-07-15

    Although sodium ion implantation is useful to the surface modification of biomaterials and nano-electronic materials, it is a challenging to conduct effective sodium implantation by traditional implantation methods due to its high chemical reactivity. In this paper, we present a novel method by coupling a Na dispenser with plasma immersion ion implantation and radio frequency discharge. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth profiling reveals that sodium is effectively implanted into a silicon wafer using this apparatus. The Na 1s XPS spectra disclose Na{sub 2}O-SiO{sub 2} bonds and the implantation effects are confirmed by tapping mode atomic force microscopy. Our setup provides a feasible way to conduct sodium ion implantation effectively.

  3. Ion bombardment modification of surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auciello, O.

    1984-01-01

    An historical overview of the main advances in the understanding of bombardment-induced surface topography is presented. The implantation and sputtering mechanisms which are relevant to ion bombardment modification of surfaces and consequent structural, electronic and compositional changes are described. Descriptions of plasma and ion-beam sputtering-induced film formation, primary ion-beam deposition, dual beam techniques, cluster of molecule ion-beam deposition, and modification of thin film properties by ion bombardment during deposition are presented. A detailed account is given of the analytical and computational modelling of topography from the viewpoint of first erosion theory. Finally, an account of the possible application and/or importance of textured surfaces in technologies and/or experimental techniques not considered in previous chapters is presented. refs.; figs.; tabs

  4. Doping of silicon carbide by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimbert, J.

    1999-01-01

    It appeared that in some fields, as the hostile environments (high temperature or irradiation), the silicon compounds showed limitations resulting from the electrical and mechanical properties. Doping of 4H and 6H silicon carbide by ion implantation is studied from a physicochemical and electrical point of view. It is necessary to obtain n-type and p-type material to realize high power and/or high frequency devices, such as MESFETs and Schottky diodes. First, physical and electrical properties of silicon carbide are presented and the interest of developing a process technology on this material is emphasised. Then, physical characteristics of ion implantation and particularly classical dopant implantation, such as nitrogen, for n-type doping, and aluminium and boron, for p-type doping are described. Results with these dopants are presented and analysed. Optimal conditions are extracted from these experiences so as to obtain a good crystal quality and a surface state allowing device fabrication. Electrical conduction is then described in the 4H and 6H-SiC polytypes. Freezing of free carriers and scattering processes are described. Electrical measurements are carried out using Hall effect on Van der Panw test patterns, and 4 point probe method are used to draw the type of the material, free carrier concentrations, resistivity and mobility of the implanted doped layers. These results are commented and compared to the theoretical analysis. The influence of the technological process on electrical conduction is studied in view of fabricating implanted silicon carbide devices. (author)

  5. Structural, electrical and catalytic properties of ion-implanted oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hassel, B.A.; Burggraaf, A.J.

    1989-01-01

    The potential application of ion implantation to modify the surfaces of ceramic materials is discussed. Changes in the chemical composition and microstructure result in important variations of the electrical and catalytic properties of oxides.

  6. Ion implantation induced nanotopography on titanium and bone cell adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braceras, Iñigo, E-mail: inigo.braceras@tecnalia.com [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (Ciber-BBN) (Spain); Vera, Carolina; Ayerdi-Izquierdo, Ana [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (Ciber-BBN) (Spain); Muñoz, Roberto [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); Lorenzo, Jaione; Alvarez, Noelia [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (Ciber-BBN) (Spain); Maeztu, Miguel Ángel de [Private Practice, P° San Francisco, 43 A-1°, 20400 Tolosa (Spain)

    2014-08-15

    Graphical abstract: Titanium surfaces modified by inert ion implantation affect cell adhesion through modification of the nanotopography in the same dimensional range of that of human bone inorganic phases. - Highlights: • Inert ion implantation on Ti modifies surface nanotopography and bone cell adhesion. • Ion implantation can produce nanostructured surfaces on titanium in the very same range as of those of the mineral phase of the human bone. • Appropriate tool for studying the relevance of nanostructured surfaces on bone mineralization and implant osseointegration. • Ion implantation induced nanotopography have a statistically significant influence on bone cell adhesion. - Abstract: Permanent endo-osseous implants require a fast, reliable and consistent osseointegration, i.e. intimate bonding between bone and implant, so biomechanical loads can be safely transferred. Among the parameters that affect this process, it is widely admitted that implant surface topography, surface energy and composition play an important role. Most surface treatments to improve osseointegration focus on micro-scale features, as few can effectively control the effects of the treatment at nanoscale. On the other hand, ion implantation allows controlling such nanofeatures. This study has investigated the nanotopography of titanium, as induced by different ion implantation surface treatments, its similarity with human bone tissue structure and its effect on human bone cell adhesion, as a first step in the process of osseointegration. The effect of ion implantation treatment parameters such as energy (40–80 keV), fluence (1–2 e17 ion/cm{sup 2}) and ion species (Kr, Ar, Ne and Xe) on the nanotopography of medical grade titanium has been measured and assessed by AFM and contact angle. Then, in vitro tests have been performed to assess the effect of these nanotopographies on osteoblast adhesion. The results have shown that the nanostructure of bone and the studied ion implanted

  7. Ion implantation induced nanotopography on titanium and bone cell adhesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braceras, Iñigo; Vera, Carolina; Ayerdi-Izquierdo, Ana; Muñoz, Roberto; Lorenzo, Jaione; Alvarez, Noelia; Maeztu, Miguel Ángel de

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Titanium surfaces modified by inert ion implantation affect cell adhesion through modification of the nanotopography in the same dimensional range of that of human bone inorganic phases. - Highlights: • Inert ion implantation on Ti modifies surface nanotopography and bone cell adhesion. • Ion implantation can produce nanostructured surfaces on titanium in the very same range as of those of the mineral phase of the human bone. • Appropriate tool for studying the relevance of nanostructured surfaces on bone mineralization and implant osseointegration. • Ion implantation induced nanotopography have a statistically significant influence on bone cell adhesion. - Abstract: Permanent endo-osseous implants require a fast, reliable and consistent osseointegration, i.e. intimate bonding between bone and implant, so biomechanical loads can be safely transferred. Among the parameters that affect this process, it is widely admitted that implant surface topography, surface energy and composition play an important role. Most surface treatments to improve osseointegration focus on micro-scale features, as few can effectively control the effects of the treatment at nanoscale. On the other hand, ion implantation allows controlling such nanofeatures. This study has investigated the nanotopography of titanium, as induced by different ion implantation surface treatments, its similarity with human bone tissue structure and its effect on human bone cell adhesion, as a first step in the process of osseointegration. The effect of ion implantation treatment parameters such as energy (40–80 keV), fluence (1–2 e17 ion/cm 2 ) and ion species (Kr, Ar, Ne and Xe) on the nanotopography of medical grade titanium has been measured and assessed by AFM and contact angle. Then, in vitro tests have been performed to assess the effect of these nanotopographies on osteoblast adhesion. The results have shown that the nanostructure of bone and the studied ion implanted

  8. Properties and applications of ion-implanted alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, S.M.

    1979-01-01

    Ion implantation is a controlled and versatile means for near-surface alloying of metals. Supersaturated solutions, metastable compounds, amorphous phases, and equilibrium alloys have been produced. Uses include the investigation of new metastable phases, characterization of alloying reactions occurring in conventional materials, and improvement of surface properties such as hardness, wear, and corrosion. A brief review is given of the physical processes occurring during ion implantation, the types of alloys which result, and representative applications

  9. Polyatomic ions from a high current ion implanter driven by a liquid metal ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilz, W.; Laufer, P.; Tajmar, M.; Böttger, R.; Bischoff, L.

    2017-12-01

    High current liquid metal ion sources are well known and found their first application as field emission electric propulsion thrusters in space technology. The aim of this work is the adaption of such kind of sources in broad ion beam technology. Surface patterning based on self-organized nano-structures on, e.g., semiconductor materials formed by heavy mono- or polyatomic ion irradiation from liquid metal (alloy) ion sources (LMAISs) is a very promising technique. LMAISs are nearly the only type of sources delivering polyatomic ions from about half of the periodic table elements. To overcome the lack of only very small treated areas by applying a focused ion beam equipped with such sources, the technology taken from space propulsion systems was transferred into a large single-end ion implanter. The main component is an ion beam injector based on high current LMAISs combined with suited ion optics allocating ion currents in the μA range in a nearly parallel beam of a few mm in diameter. Different types of LMAIS (needle, porous emitter, and capillary) are presented and characterized. The ion beam injector design is specified as well as the implementation of this module into a 200 kV high current ion implanter operating at the HZDR Ion Beam Center. Finally, the obtained results of large area surface modification of Ge using polyatomic Bi2+ ions at room temperature from a GaBi capillary LMAIS will be presented and discussed.

  10. Surface topographical and structural analysis of Ag+-implanted polymethylmethacrylate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arif, Shafaq; Rafique, M. Shahid; Saleemi, Farhat; Naab, Fabian; Toader, Ovidiu; Sagheer, Riffat; Bashir, Shazia; Zia, Rehana; Siraj, Khurram; Iqbal, Saman

    2016-01-01

    Specimens of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) were implanted with 400-keV Ag + ions at different ion fluences ranging from 1 × 10 14 to 5 × 10 15 ions/cm 2 using a 400-kV NEC ion implanter. The surface topographical features of the implanted PMMA were investigated by a confocal microscope. Modifications in the structural properties of the implanted specimens were analyzed in comparison with pristine PMMA by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. UV–Visible spectroscopy was applied to determine the effects of ion implantation on optical transmittance of the implanted PMMA. The confocal microscopic images revealed the formation of hillock-like microstructures along the ion track on the implanted PMMA surface. The increase in ion fluence led to more nucleation of hillocks. The XRD pattern confirmed the amorphous nature of pristine and implanted PMMA, while the Raman studies justified the transformation of Ag + -implanted PMMA into amorphous carbon at the ion fluence of ⩾5 × 10 14 ions/cm 2 . Moreover, the decrease in optical transmittance of PMMA is associated with the formation of hillocks and ion-induced structural modifications after implantation.

  11. Development of industrial ion implantation and ion assisted coating processes: A perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legg, K.O.; Solnick-Legg, H.

    1989-01-01

    Ion beam processes have gone through a series of developmental stages, from being the mainstay of the semiconductor industry for production of integrated circuits, to new commercial processes for biomedical, aerospace and other industries. Although research is still continuing on surface modification using ion beam methods, ion implantation and ion assisted coatings for treatment of metals, ceramics, polymers and composites must now be considered viable industrial processes of benefit in a wide variety of applications. However, ion implantation methods face various barriers to acceptability, in terms not only of other surface treatment processes, but for implantation itself. This paper will discuss some of the challenges faced by a small company whose primary business is development and marketing of ion implantation and ion-assisted coating processes. (orig.)

  12. Mutagenic effects of ion implanted rice seed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Cailian; Shen Mei; Chen Qiufang

    1996-04-01

    Dry seeds of rice were implanted with 15∼30 keV N + , H + , Ar + ion beam of various doses. The biological effects in M 1 and mutation in M 2 were studied. The results showed that ion beam could induce the variation on the chromosome structure and inhibit mitosis in root tip cell. The chromosomal aberration rate of cells tended to be increased with increase of implanted ion dose. Compared with 60 Co γ-rays, ion implantation induced lower rate of cells with chromosome aberration. However, there was a similar inhibitory effect on mitosis between ion beam and γ-rays. The electrophoretic banding patterns of peroxidase enzymes were altered by both mutagens and varied. Frequency of the chlorophyll mutation implanted by ion beam was higher than that induced by γ-rays. Mutation frequencies of heading date and plant height were similar between ion beam implanting and γ-rays irradiation. (11 tabs., 2 figs.)

  13. Large area buried nanopatterning by broad ion implantation without any mask or direct writing

    OpenAIRE

    Karmakar, Prasanta; Satpati, Biswarup

    2013-01-01

    We have introduced here a simple, single step and cost effective broad ion beam technique for preparation of nanoscale electronic, magnetic, optical and mechanical devices without the need of resist, mask, or focused electron and ion beams. In this approach, broad beam ion implantation of desired atom on a prefabricated ion beam patterned surface promotes site selective deposition by adjusting the local angle of ion implantation. We show that implantation of Fe ions on an O+ induced pre fabri...

  14. Electrical properties of polymer modified by metal ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yuguang; Zhang Tonghe; Zhang Huixing; Zhang Xiaoji; Deng Zhiwei; Zhou Gu

    2000-01-01

    Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) has been modified by Ag, Cr, Cu and Si ion implantation with a dose range from 1x10 16 to 2x10 17 ions cm -2 using a metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) source. The electrical properties of PET have been changed after metal ion implantation. The resistivity of implanted PET decreased obviously with an increase of ion dose. When metal ion dose of 2x10 17 cm -2 was selected, the resistivity of PET could be less than 10 Ω cm, but when Si ions are implanted, the resistivity of PET would be up to several hundred Ω cm. The results show that the conductive behavior of a metal ion implanted sample is obviously different from Si implantation one. The changes of the structure and composition have been observed with transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The surface structure is varying after ion implantation and it is believed that the change would cause the improvement of the conductive properties. The mechanism of electrical conduction will be discussed

  15. Plasma source ion implantation research at southwestern institute of physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang Zhenkui; Geng Man; Tong Honghui

    1997-10-01

    The PSII-EX device and PSII-IM device for research and development of plasma source ion implantation (PSII) technology are described briefly. The functions, main technical specifications and properties of the devices are also discussed. After ion implantation by PSII, the improvements of the surface-mechanical properties (such as microhardness, wear-resistance, friction factor, biological compatibility, etc) for some materials, microanalysis and numerical simulation of modified layers of materials, the technical developments for the practical workpiece treatments and the preliminary experiments for plasma source ion implantation-enhanced deposition are introduced too. As last, the future work about PSII have been proposed

  16. Ion implantations of oxide dispersion strengthened steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sojak, S., E-mail: stanislav.sojak@stuba.sk; Simeg Veternikova, J.; Slugen, V.; Petriska, M.; Stacho, M.

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • ODS steel MA 956 was studied after thermal treatment and ion implantations. • Increase of the defects size was observed after hydrogen ions implantation. • Intensity/amount of the defects did not increase after ion implantations. • Due to defects aggregation defects concentration decreased. - Abstract: This paper is focused on a study of radiation damage and thermal stability of high chromium oxide dispersion strengthened steel MA 956 (20% Cr), which belongs to the most perspective structural materials for the newest generation of nuclear reactors – Generation IV. The radiation damage was simulated by the implantation of hydrogen ions up to the depth of about 5 μm, which was performed at a linear accelerator owned by Slovak University of Technology. The ODS steel MA 956 was available for study in as-received state after different thermal treatments as well as in ions implanted state. Energy of the hydrogen ions chosen for the implantation was 800 keV and the implantation fluence of 6.24 × 10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2}. The investigated specimens were measured by non-destructive technique Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy in order to study the defect behavior after different thermal treatments in the as-received state and after the hydrogen ions implantation. Although, different resistance to defect production was observed in individual specimens of MA 956 during the irradiation, all implanted specimens contain larger defects than the ones in as-received state.

  17. Mutagenic effects of ion implantation on stevia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Cailian; Shen Mei; Chen Qiufang; Lu Ting; Shu Shizhen

    1998-01-01

    Dry seeds of Stevia were implanted by 75 keV nitrogen and carbon ions with various doses. The biological effects in M 1 and mutation in M 2 were studied. The results showed that ion beam was able to induce variation on chromosome structure in root tip cells. The rate of cells with chromosome aberration was increased with ion beam dose. The rate of cells with chromosomal aberration was lower than that induced with γ-rays. Frequency of the mutation induced by implantation of N + and C + ions were higher than those induced by γ-rays. The rate of cell with chromosome aberration and in M 2 useful mutation induced by implantation of C + ion was higher than those induced by implantation of N + ion. Mutagenic effects Feng 1 x Riyuan and Riyuan x Feng 2 by implantation of N + and C + were higher than that of Jining and Feng 2

  18. Prospects of ion implantation and ion beam mixing for corrosion protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, G.K.; Munn, P.; Ensinger, W.

    1985-01-01

    Ion implantation is very useful new low temperature treatment for improving the mechanical surface properties of materials without any dimensional changes. In addition also the corrosion properties of metals can be modified considerably by this technique. The long term corrosion behaviour of implanted metals, however, has been studied only for a very limited number of cases. In this contribution a survey of attempts to do this will be presented. As examples of promising systems for corrosion protection by ion beams iron, steel and titanium were examined with and without pretreatment by ion implantation and ion beam mixing. The corrosion rates of the systems have been obtained by neutron activation analysis and by electrochemical methods. Experimental results are presented on: Palladium implanted in titanium - crevice corrosion in salt solution; Palladium implanted in and deposited on titanium -corrosion in sulfuric acid; Platinum implanted in stainless steel -corrosion in sulfuric acid. (author)

  19. Optical, mechanical and surface properties of amorphous carbonaceous thin films obtained by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turri, Rafael G.; Santos, Ricardo M.; Rangel, Elidiane C.; Cruz, Nilson C. da; Bortoleto, José R.R. [Laboratório de Plasmas Tecnológicos, Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Av. Três de Marco 511, Alto de Boa Vista, 18087-180, Sorocaba, SP (Brazil); Dias da Silva, José H. [Laboratório de Filmes Semicondutores, Depto. de Física, Faculdade de Ciências, UNESP, Bauru, SP (Brazil); Antonio, César Augusto [Laboratório de Plasmas Tecnológicos, Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Av. Três de Marco 511, Alto de Boa Vista, 18087-180, Sorocaba, SP (Brazil); Durrant, Steven F., E-mail: steve@sorocaba.unesp.br [Laboratório de Plasmas Tecnológicos, Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Av. Três de Marco 511, Alto de Boa Vista, 18087-180, Sorocaba, SP (Brazil)

    2013-09-01

    Diverse amorphous hydrogenated carbon-based films (a-C:H, a-C:H:F, a-C:H:N, a-C:H:Cl and a-C:H:Si:O) were obtained by radiofrequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) and plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIIID). The same precursors were used in the production of each pair of each type of film, such as a-C:H, using both PECVD and PIIID. Optical properties, namely the refractive index, n, absorption coefficient, α, and optical gap, E{sub Tauc}, of these films were obtained via transmission spectra in the ultraviolet–visible near-infrared range (wavelengths from 300 to 3300 nm). Film hardness, elastic modulus and stiffness were obtained as a function of depth using nano-indentation. Surface energy values were calculated from liquid drop contact angle data. Film roughness and morphology were assessed using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The PIIID films were usually thinner and possessed higher refractive indices than the PECVD films. Determined refractive indices are consistent with literature values for similar types of films. Values of E{sub Tauc} were increased in the PIIID films compared to the PECVD films. An exception was the a-C:H:Si:O films, for which that obtained by PIIID was thicker and exhibited a decreased E{sub Tauc}. The mechanical properties – hardness, elastic modulus and stiffness – of films produced by PECVD and PIIID generally present small differences. An interesting effect is the increase in the hardness of a-C:H:Cl films from 1.0 to 3.0 GPa when ion implantation is employed. Surface energy correlates well with surface roughness. The implanted films are usually smoother than those obtained by PECVD.

  20. Optical, mechanical and surface properties of amorphous carbonaceous thin films obtained by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turri, Rafael G.; Santos, Ricardo M.; Rangel, Elidiane C.; Cruz, Nilson C. da; Bortoleto, José R.R.; Dias da Silva, José H.; Antonio, César Augusto; Durrant, Steven F.

    2013-01-01

    Diverse amorphous hydrogenated carbon-based films (a-C:H, a-C:H:F, a-C:H:N, a-C:H:Cl and a-C:H:Si:O) were obtained by radiofrequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) and plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIIID). The same precursors were used in the production of each pair of each type of film, such as a-C:H, using both PECVD and PIIID. Optical properties, namely the refractive index, n, absorption coefficient, α, and optical gap, E Tauc , of these films were obtained via transmission spectra in the ultraviolet–visible near-infrared range (wavelengths from 300 to 3300 nm). Film hardness, elastic modulus and stiffness were obtained as a function of depth using nano-indentation. Surface energy values were calculated from liquid drop contact angle data. Film roughness and morphology were assessed using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The PIIID films were usually thinner and possessed higher refractive indices than the PECVD films. Determined refractive indices are consistent with literature values for similar types of films. Values of E Tauc were increased in the PIIID films compared to the PECVD films. An exception was the a-C:H:Si:O films, for which that obtained by PIIID was thicker and exhibited a decreased E Tauc . The mechanical properties – hardness, elastic modulus and stiffness – of films produced by PECVD and PIIID generally present small differences. An interesting effect is the increase in the hardness of a-C:H:Cl films from 1.0 to 3.0 GPa when ion implantation is employed. Surface energy correlates well with surface roughness. The implanted films are usually smoother than those obtained by PECVD.

  1. Behavior of PET implanted by Ti, Ag, Si and C ion using MEVVA implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yuguang; Zhang Tonghe; Zhang Yanwen; Zhang Huixing; Zhang Xiaoji; Zhou Gu

    2001-01-01

    Polyethylene terephthalane (PET) has been modified with Ti, Ag, Si and C ions from a metal vapor arc source (MEVVA). Ti, Ag, Si and C ions were implanted with acceleration voltage 40 kV to fluences ranging from 1x10 16 to 2x10 17 cm -2 . The surface of implanted PET darkened with increasing ion dose, when the metal ion dose was greater than 1x10 17 cm -2 the color changed to metallic bright. The surface resistance decreases by 5-6 orders of magnitude with increasing dose. The resistivity is stable after long-term storage. The depth of Ti- and Ag-implanted layer is approximately 150 and 80 nm measured by Rutherford backscattering (RBS), respectively. TEM photos revealed the presence of Ti and Ag nano-meter particles on the surface resulting from the high-dose implantation. Ti and Ag ion implantations improved conductivity and wear resistance significantly. The phase and structural changes were obtained by X-ray diffraction (XRD). It can be seen that nano-meter particles of Ti precipitation, TiO 2 and Ti-carbides have been formed in implanted layer. Nano-hardness of implanted PET has been measured by a nano-indenter. The results show that the surface hardness, modulus and wear resistance could be increased

  2. Cluster Ion Implantation in Graphite and Diamond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popok, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Cluster ion beam technique is a versatile tool which can be used for controllable formation of nanosize objects as well as modification and processing of surfaces and shallow layers on an atomic scale. The current paper present an overview and analysis of data obtained on a few sets of graphite...... and diamond samples implanted by keV-energy size-selected cobalt and argon clusters. One of the emphases is put on pinning of metal clusters on graphite with a possibility of following selective etching of graphene layers. The other topic of concern is related to the development of scaling law for cluster...

  3. Defect characteristics by boron cluster ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Takaaki; Matsuo, Jiro; Takaoka, Gikan; Toyoda, Noriaki; Yamada, Isao

    2003-01-01

    Cluster ion implantation using decaborane (B 10 H 14 ) has been proposed as a shallow implantation technique for LSI devices with gate lengths of several-tens nanometers. Experiments and computer simulations of low-energy boron monomers and decaborane clusters implantation were performed. Molecular dynamics simulations of B 10 cluster implantation have shown similar implant depth but different damage density and damage structure compared to monomer (B 1 ) ion implantation with the same energy-per-atom. For monomer implantation, point-defects such as vacancy-interstitial pairs are mainly formed. On the other hand, B 10 generates large numbers of defects within a highly-amorphised region at the impact location. This difference in damage structure produced during implantation is expected to cause different annihilation processes

  4. Development of industrial ion implantation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Byung Ho; Hwang, Churl Kew; Kim, Wan; Jin, Jung Tai; Jung, Ki Sok; Yoon, Su Ho; Shin, Won Churl; Kim, Jong Gook; Han, Jeon Geon; Chung, Ki Hyung

    1994-01-01

    On a cooperation between KAERI, Kurchatov Institute (Russia), and Mirae Co., development of a metal ion implanter and ion implantation technology is performed on a basic idea of popularization and refinement of ion implantation technology applied to the industrial components. The developed implanter is a two beam type: the mass separation line produces several mA of metal ion beams and the non-separation line produces several tens of mA gas ion beams, thus making the synergistic effect possible by the irradiation of beams from both lines. The target is made of a rotating plate of 60cm in radius and can treat various types of industrial components or parts. About 60 kinds of specimens were treated for the development of implantation technology. Two or five times lengthening of longevities were achieved on the PCB drills, razor blades, cutters, and precision dies. (Author)

  5. Modification of polyethyleneterephtalate by implantation of nitrogen ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svorcik, V.; Endrst, R.; Rybka, V.; Hnatowicz, V.; Cerny, F.

    1994-01-01

    The implantation of 90 keV N + ions into polyethyleneterephtalate (PET) to fluences of 1 x 10 14 --1 x 10 17 cm -2 was studied. The changes in electrical sheet conductivity and polarity of ion-exposed PET were observed and the structural changes were examined using IR spectroscopy. One degradation process is a chain fission according to the Norrish II reaction. The sheet conductivity due to conjugated double bonds was increased by ten orders of magnitude as a result of ion implantation. The surface polarity of the PET samples increases slightly with increasing ion fluence

  6. Osteoconductivity of hydrophilic microstructured titanium implants with phosphate ion chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Woo; Jang, Je-Hee; Lee, Chong Soo; Hanawa, Takao

    2009-07-01

    This study investigated the surface characteristics and bone response of titanium implants produced by hydrothermal treatment using H(3)PO(4), and compared them with those of implants produced by commercial surface treatment methods - machining, acid etching, grit blasting, grit blasting/acid etching or spark anodization. The surface characteristics were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, thin-film X-ray diffractometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, contact angle measurement and stylus profilometry. The osteoconductivity of experimental implants was evaluated by removal torque testing and histomorphometric analysis after 6 weeks of implantation in rabbit tibiae. Hydrothermal treatment with H(3)PO(4) and subsequent heat treatment produced a crystalline phosphate ion-incorporated oxide (titanium oxide phosphate hydrate, Ti(2)O(PO(4))(2)(H(2)O)(2); TiP) surface approximately 5microm in thickness, which had needle-like surface microstructures and superior wettability compared with the control surfaces. Significant increases in removal torque forces and bone-to-implant contact values were observed for TiP implants compared with those of the control implants (p<0.001). After thorough cleaning of the implants removed during the removal torque testing, a considerable quantity of attached bone was observed on the surfaces of the TiP implants.

  7. Amorphization of metals by ion implantation and ion beam mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauschenbach, B.; Heera, V.

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous metallic systems can be formed either by high-fluence ion implantation of glassforming species or by irradiation of layered metal systems with inert gas ions. Both techniques and experimental examples are presented. Empirical rules are discussed which predict whether a given system can be transformed into an amorphous phase. Influence of temperature, implantation dose and pre-existing crystalline metal composition on amorphization is considered. Examples are given of the implantation induced amorphous structure, recrystallization and formation of quasicrystalline structures. (author)

  8. Effect of anomalous drift during ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrov, P.A.; Baranova, E.K.; Beloshitskii, V.V.; Demakov, K.D.; Starostin, V.A.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical results are presented on Tl-ion implantation into hot silicon substrates (approx. 1200 0 C). a An anomalously large (by more than an order of magnitude) displacement of the peak position of the implanted impurity distribution into the bulk of the substrate is found. b) The conclusion is drawn that the basic process responsible for this displacement of the peak is radiation-enhanced diffusion (RED) due to nonequilibrium concentration of point defects produced in the heated target directly under implantation. c) The crystalline structure of the resulting ion-implanted layer indicates that in-situ annealing of the exposed layer occurs during high-temperature implantation. d) Experimental impurity distributions confirm the possibility of producing an implanted-impurity 'buried layer' below the layer of a single crystal silicon, the 'buried layer' depth depending on the implantation regime. (author)

  9. Techniques for the implantation of ions in microelectronics. A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calleja, W.; Aceves, M.; Linares, M.; Fuentes, S.; Fuentes, I.; Landa, M.; Zuniga, C.; Remolina, J.; Peykov, P.

    1991-01-01

    The technique of ion implantation in the field of microelectronics is indispensable as tool for introducing dopant atoms in a semiconductor material surface. It is possible with sophisticated equipment for selecting and accelerating particle to control precisely the electronic behavior of devices and integrated circuits. At National Institute of Astrophysics, Optics and Electronics a process has been developed for fabrication Metal Oxide Silicon integrated circuits which utilized a medium powered ion implanter. In this work a review is given of the functions of a basic implanter which is required in making electronic devices and the technique we developed in the department of microelectronics at National Institute of Astrophysics, Optics and Electronics. (Author)

  10. Production of Endohedral Fullerenes by Ion Implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diener, M.D.; Alford, J. M.; Mirzadeh, S.

    2007-05-31

    The empty interior cavity of fullerenes has long been touted for containment of radionuclides during in vivo transport, during radioimmunotherapy (RIT) and radioimaging for example. As the chemistry required to open a hole in fullerene is complex and exceedingly unlikely to occur in vivo, and conformational stability of the fullerene cage is absolute, atoms trapped within fullerenes can only be released during extremely energetic events. Encapsulating radionuclides in fullerenes could therefore potentially eliminate undesired toxicity resulting from leakage and catabolism of radionuclides administered with other techniques. At the start of this project however, methods for production of transition metal and p-electron metal endohedral fullerenes were completely unknown, and only one method for production of endohedral radiofullerenes was known. They therefore investigated three different methods for the production of therapeutically useful endohedral metallofullerenes: (1) implantation of ions using the high intensity ion beam at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Surface Modification and Characterization Research Center (SMAC) and fullerenes as the target; (2) implantation of ions using the recoil energy following alpha decay; and (3) implantation of ions using the recoil energy following neutron capture, using ORNL's High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) as a thermal neutron source. While they were unable to obtain evidence of successful implantation using the ion beam at SMAC, recoil following alpha decay and neutron capture were both found to be economically viable methods for the production of therapeutically useful radiofullerenes. In this report, the procedures for preparing fullerenes containing the isotopes {sup 212}Pb, {sup 212}Bi, {sup 213}Bi, and {sup 177}Lu are described. None of these endohedral fullerenes had ever previously been prepared, and all of these radioisotopes are actively under investigation for RIT. Additionally, the chemistry for

  11. Change of sheet resistance of high purity alumina ceramics implanted by Cu and Ti ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Dexing; Zhang Jizhong; Yu Miao; Kang Jianchang; Li Wenzhi

    2005-01-01

    High purity alumina ceramics (99% Al 2 O 3 ) was implanted by copper ion and titanium ion in a metal vapour vacuum arc (MEVVA) implanter, respectively. The influence of implantation parameters was studied varying ion fluence. The samples were implanted by 68 keV Cu ion and 82 keV Ti ion with fluences from 1 x 10 15 to 1 x 10 18 ions/cm 2 , respectively. The as-implanted samples were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), glancing X-ray diffraction (GXRD), scanning Auger microscopy (SAM), and four-probe method. Different morphologies were observed on the surfaces of the as-implanted samples and clearly related to implantation parameters. For both ion implantations, the sheet resistances of the alumina samples implanted with Cu and Ti ion fluences of 1 x 10 18 ions/cm 2 , respectively, reached the corresponding minimum values because of the surface metallization. The experimental results indicate that the high-fluence ion implantation resulted in conductive layer on the surface of the as-implanted high purity alumina ceramics

  12. Ion beam sputter implantation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, W.J.

    1978-01-01

    By means of ion beam atomizing or sputtering an integrally composed coating, the composition of which continuously changes from 100% of the substrate to 100% of the coating, can be surfaced on a substrate (e.g. molten quartz on plastic lenses). In order to do this in the facility there is directed a primary beam of accelerated noble gas ions on a target from the group of the following materials: SiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 , Corning Glass 7070, Corning Glass 7740 or borosilicate glass. The particles leaving the target are directed on the substrate by means of an acceleration potential of up to 10 KV. There may, however, be coated also metal layers (Ni, Co) on a mylar film resulting in a semireflecting metal film. (RW) [de

  13. Boron precipitates in ion implanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, W.K.; Washburn, J.

    1975-03-01

    Long rod-like defects are observed in ion implanted silicon when boron is present either as a prior dopant addition or as the implanted species. Results of recent work indicates that these defects have the characteristics of narrow extrinsic dipoles or elongated dislocation loops and that there are two different types along each of the six (110) directions. An annealing kinetics method has been used to identify the nature of these defects formed during post-implantation annealing in boron ion (100 keV) implanted silicon irradiated at room temperature to a dose of 2 x 10 14 /cm 2 . It is concluded that at least two different kinds of rod-like defects exist in boron ion implanted silicon. From the activation energy for shrinkage, it is also concluded that one type (anti A) is composed largely of boron atoms. (U.S.)

  14. Plasma-implantation-based surface modification of metals with single-implantation mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, X. B.; Cui, J. T.; Yang, S. Q.; Fu, Ricky K. Y.; Chu, Paul K.

    2004-12-01

    Plasma ion implantation has proven to be an effective surface modification technique. Its biggest advantage is the capability to treat the objects with irregular shapes without complex manipulation of target holder. Many metal materials such as aluminum, stainless steel, tool steel, titanium, magnesium etc, has been treated using this technique to improve their wear-resistance, corrosion-resistance, fatigue-resistance, oxidation-resistance, bio-compatiblity etc. However in order to achieve thicker modified layers, hybrid processes combining plasma ion implantation with other techniques have been frequently employed. In this paper plasma implantation based surface modification of metals using single-implantation mode is reviewed.

  15. Physico-chemical behaviour of a metal/polymer contact subject to a low amplitude friction in a chlorinated medium. Effect of ionitriding and ion implantation surface treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabbe, L.M.

    1993-10-01

    The fretting-corrosion behaviour of two tribological couples (TA6V/PMMA and 316L/PMMA) had been studied in order to better understand the degradation mechanisms observed on pivot prosthesis sealed in bones. Pressure appears to have a major role; at high contact pressure, the PMMA wear is the main degradation mechanism with PMMA debris acting as a metal surface protecting agent; at low contact pressure, both material deterioration is involved, and titanium has a corrosion-dominated degradation. An optimal resistance to fretting is achieved when TA6V is coated with Ti N (ion implantation) and Ti N, Ti 2 N (ionitriding). When nitriding, processing temperature appears as a critical factor to ensure thickness and homogeneity of the nitride coatings. 181 p., 106 figs., 110 refs

  16. Ion bombardment modification of surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auciello, O.

    1984-01-01

    Ion bombardment-induced modification of surfaces may be considered one of the significant scientific and technological developments of the last two decades. The understanding acquired concerning the underlying mechanisms of several phenomena occurring during ion-surface interactions has led to applications within different modern technologies. These include microelectronics, surface acoustical and optical technologies, solar energy conversion, thin film technology, ion implantation metallurgy, nuclear track technology, thermonuclear fusion, vacuum technology, cold welding technology, biomedicine (implantology). It has become clear that information on many relevant advances, regarding ion bombardment modification of surfaces is dispersed among journals involving fields sometimes not clearly related. This may result, in some cases, in a loss of the type of interdisciplinary exchange of ideas, which has proved to be so fruitful for the advancement of science and technology. This book has been planned in an attempt to collect at least some of today's relevant information about the experimental and theoretical knowledge related to surface modification and its application to technology. (Auth.)

  17. Surface Passivation and Junction Formation Using Low Energy Hydrogen Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonash, S. J.

    1985-01-01

    New applications for high current, low energy hydrogen ion implants on single crystal and polycrystal silicon grain boundaries are discussed. The effects of low energy hydrogen ion beams on crystalline Si surfaces are considered. The effect of these beams on bulk defects in crystalline Si is addressed. Specific applications of H+ implants to crystalline Si processing are discussed. In all of the situations reported on, the hydrogen beams were produced using a high current Kaufman ion source.

  18. Silicon carbide layer structure recovery after ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Violin, Eh.E.; Demakov, K.D.; Kal'nin, A.A.; Nojbert, F.; Potapov, E.N.; Tairov, Yu.M.

    1984-01-01

    The process of recovery of polytype structure of SiC surface layers in the course of thermal annealing (TA) and laser annealing (LA) upon boron and aluminium implantation is studied. The 6H polytype silicon carbide C face (0001) has been exposed to ion radiation. The ion energies ranged from 80 to 100 keV, doses varied from 5x10 14 to 5x10 16 cm -2 . TA was performed in the 800-2000 K temperature range. It is shown that the recovery of the structure of silicon carbide layers after ion implantation takes place in several stages. Considerable effect on the structure of the annealed layers is exerted by the implantation dose and the type of implanted impurity. The recovery of polytype structure is possible only under the effect of laser pulses with duration not less than the time for the ordering of the polytype in question

  19. Silicon technologies ion implantation and thermal treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Baudrant, Annie

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this book is to remind new engineers in silicon foundry, the fundamental physical and chemical rules in major Front end treatments: oxidation, epitaxy, ion implantation and impurities diffusion.

  20. Ion Implantation Processing Technologies for Telecommunications Electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haynes, T E

    2000-05-01

    The subject CRADA was a collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies (formerly AT and T Bell Laboratories) to explore the development of ion implantation technologies for silicon integrated circuit (IC) manufacturing.

  1. Thermal stress resistance of ion implanted sapphire crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurarie, V.N.; Jamieson, D.N.; Szymanski, R.; Orlov, A.V.; Williams, J.S.; Conway, M.

    1999-01-01

    Monocrystals of sapphire have been subjected to ion implantation with 86 keV Si - and 80 keV Cr - ions to doses in the range of 5x10 14 -5x10 16 cm -2 prior to thermal stress testing in a pulsed plasma. Above a certain critical dose ion implantation is shown to modify the near-surface structure of samples by introducing damage, which makes crack nucleation easier under the applied stress. The effect of ion dose on the stress resistance is investigated and the critical doses which produce a noticeable change in the stress resistance are determined. The critical dose for Si ions is shown to be much lower than that for Cr - ions. However, for doses exceeding 2x10 16 cm -2 the stress resistance parameter decreases to approximately the same value for both implants. The size of the implantation-induced crack nucleating centers and the density of the implantation-induced defects are considered to be the major factors determining the stress resistance of sapphire crystals irradiated with Si - and Cr - ions

  2. Magnetoreflection studies of ion implanted bismuth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolini, C.; Chieu, T.C.; Dresselhaus, M.S.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge; Dresselhaus, G.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of the implantation of Sb ions on the electronic structure of the semimetal bismuth is studied by the magnetoreflection technique. The results show long electronic mean free paths and large implantation-induced increases in the band overlap and L-point band gap. These effects are opposite to those observed for Bi chemically doped with Sb. (author)

  3. Cryogenic surface ion traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niedermayr, M.

    2015-01-01

    Microfabricated surface traps are a promising architecture to realize a scalable quantum computer based on trapped ions. In principle, hundreds or thousands of surface traps can be located on a single substrate in order to provide large arrays of interacting ions. To this end, trap designs and fabrication methods are required that provide scalable, stable and reproducible ion traps. This work presents a novel surface-trap design developed for cryogenic applications. Intrinsic silicon is used as the substrate material of the traps. The well-developed microfabrication and structuring methods of silicon are utilized to create simple and reproducible traps. The traps were tested and characterized in a cryogenic setup. Ions could be trapped and their life time and motional heating were investigated. Long ion lifetimes of several hours were observed and the measured heating rates were reproducibly low at around 1 phonon per second at a trap frequency of 1 MHz. (author) [de

  4. Nanostructured Surfaces of Dental Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Sivolella

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The structural and functional fusion of the surface of the dental implant with the surrounding bone (osseointegration is crucial for the short and long term outcome of the device. In recent years, the enhancement of bone formation at the bone-implant interface has been achieved through the modulation of osteoblasts adhesion and spreading, induced by structural modifications of the implant surface, particularly at the nanoscale level. In this context, traditional chemical and physical processes find new applications to achieve the best dental implant technology. This review provides an overview of the most common manufacture techniques and the related cells-surface interactions and modulation. A Medline and a hand search were conducted to identify studies concerning nanostructuration of implant surface and their related biological interaction. In this paper, we stressed the importance of the modifications on dental implant surfaces at the nanometric level. Nowadays, there is still little evidence of the long-term benefits of nanofeatures, as the promising results achieved in vitro and in animals have still to be confirmed in humans. However, the increasing interest in nanotechnology is undoubted and more research is going to be published in the coming years.

  5. Highly Stripped Ion Sources for MeV Ion Implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    2009-06-30

    Original technical objectives of CRADA number PVI C-03-09 between BNL and Poole Ventura, Inc. (PVI) were to develop an intense, high charge state, ion source for MeV ion implanters. Present day high-energy ion implanters utilize low charge state (usually single charge) ion sources in combination with rf accelerators. Usually, a MV LINAC is used for acceleration of a few rnA. It is desirable to have instead an intense, high charge state ion source on a relatively low energy platform (de acceleration) to generate high-energy ion beams for implantation. This de acceleration of ions will be far more efficient (in energy utilization). The resultant implanter will be smaller in size. It will generate higher quality ion beams (with lower emittance) for fabrication of superior semiconductor products. In addition to energy and cost savings, the implanter will operate at a lower level of health risks associated with ion implantation. An additional aim of the project was to producing a product that can lead to long­ term job creation in Russia and/or in the US. R&D was conducted in two Russian Centers (one in Tomsk and Seversk, the other in Moscow) under the guidance ofPVI personnel and the BNL PI. Multiple approaches were pursued, developed, and tested at various locations with the best candidate for commercialization delivered and tested at on an implanter at the PVI client Axcelis. Technical developments were exciting: record output currents of high charge state phosphorus and antimony were achieved; a Calutron-Bemas ion source with a 70% output of boron ion current (compared to 25% in present state-of-the-art). Record steady state output currents of higher charge state phosphorous and antimony and P ions: P{sup 2+} (8.6 pmA), P{sup 3+} (1.9 pmA), and P{sup 4+} (0.12 pmA) and 16.2, 7.6, 3.3, and 2.2 pmA of Sb{sup 3+} Sb {sup 4 +}, Sb{sup 5+}, and Sb{sup 6+} respectively. Ultimate commercialization goals did not succeed (even though a number of the products like high

  6. Ion-implantation dense cascade data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winterbon, K.B.

    1983-04-01

    A tabulation is given of data useful in estimating various aspects of ion-implantation cascades in the nuclear stopping regime, particularly with respect to nonlinearity of the cascade at high energy densities. The tabulation is restricted to self-ion implantation. Besides power-cross-section cascade dimensions, various material properties are included. Scaling of derived quantities with input data is noted, so one is not limited to the values assumed by the author

  7. Electrical conductivity enhancement of polyethersulfone (PES) by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bridwell, L.B.; Giedd, R.E.; Wang Yongqiang; Mohite, S.S.; Jahnke, T.; Brown, I.M.

    1991-01-01

    Amorphous polyethersulfone (PES) films have been implanted with a variety of ions (He, B, C, N and As) at a bombarding energy of 50 keV in the dose range 10 16 -10 17 ions/cm 2 . Surface resistance as a function of dose indicates a saturation effect with a significant difference between He and the other ions used. ESR line shapes in the He implanted samples changed from a mixed Gaussian/Lorentzian to a pure Lorentzian and narrowed with increasing dose. Temperature dependent resistivity indicates an electron hopping mechanism for conduction. Infrared results indicate cross-linking or self-cyclization occurred for all implanted ions with further destruction in the case of As. (orig.)

  8. Hardening of cutting tool inserts by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zlobin, V.N.; Bannikov, M.G.; Draper, P.H.; Zotov, A.V.

    2001-01-01

    Surface hardening has long been recognized as an important method of increasing the integrity and life of cutting tools. In this work we report preliminary investigations of hardening of conventional hard metal tools by ion implantation Three types of mixed carbide tool inserts were treated by bombardment with 40kV ions of Al, Ti, Zr or W in an ambient of Ar or N/sub 2/, with doses of up to 13*10/sup 17/ ions/cm/sup 2/. The samples were monitored by micro-hardness measurements. Complex behaviors as a function of the implantation dose/time have been observed, and are commented on in terms of the lattice disruption caused by the bombardment. Hardness increments of up to 22 % have been obtained using an ion implanter of industrial size, and cutting tests have shown an improvement, by a factor of three, in the life of these treated tools. (author)

  9. Molecular ion sources for low energy semiconductor ion implantation (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershcovitch, A; Gushenets, V I; Seleznev, D N; Bugaev, A S; Dugin, S; Oks, E M; Kulevoy, T V; Alexeyenko, O; Kozlov, A; Kropachev, G N; Kuibeda, R P; Minaev, S; Vizir, A; Yushkov, G Yu

    2016-02-01

    Smaller semiconductors require shallow, low energy ion implantation, resulting space charge effects, which reduced beam currents and production rates. To increase production rates, molecular ions are used. Boron and phosphorous (or arsenic) implantation is needed for P-type and N-type semiconductors, respectively. Carborane, which is the most stable molecular boron ion leaves unacceptable carbon residue on extraction grids. A self-cleaning carborane acid compound (C4H12B10O4) was synthesized and utilized in the ITEP Bernas ion source resulting in large carborane ion output, without carbon residue. Pure gaseous processes are desired to enable rapid switch among ion species. Molecular phosphorous was generated by introducing phosphine in dissociators via 4PH3 = P4 + 6H2; generated molecular phosphorous in a pure gaseous process was then injected into the HCEI Calutron-Bernas ion source, from which P4(+) ion beams were extracted. Results from devices and some additional concepts are described.

  10. Ion implantation in semiconductors and other materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guernet, G.; Bruel, M.; Gailliard, J.P.; Garcia, M.; Robic, J.Y.

    1977-01-01

    The evolution of ion implantation techniques in the field of semiconductors and its extension to various fields such as metallurgy, mechanics, superconductivity and opto-electronics are considered. As for semiconductors ion implantation is evoked as: a means of predeposition of impurities at low doping level (10 11 to 10 14 cm -2 ); a means for obtaining profiles of controlled concentration; a means of reaching high doping levels with using 'strong current' implantation machines of the second generation. Some results obtained are presented [fr

  11. Ion implantation induced martensite nucleation in SUS301 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Heishichiro; Gustiono, Dwi; Sakaguchi, Norihito; Shibayama, Tamaki; Watanabe, Seiichi

    2007-01-01

    Phase transformation behaviors of the austenitic 301 stainless steel was studied under Fe + , Ti + and Ar + ions implantation at room temperature with 100, 200 and 300 keV up to fluence of 1x10 21 ions/m 2 and the microstructures were observed by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The plane and cross-sectional observations of the implanted specimen showed that the induced-phases due to implantation from the γ matrix phase were identified as α' martensite phases with the orientation relationship of (11-bar0) α parallel (111-bar) γ and [111] α parallel [011] γ close to the Kurdjumov-Sachs (K-S). The ion implantation induced phases nucleated near the surface region and the depth position of the nucleation changed depending on the ion accelerating energy and ion species. It was also found that the induced marten sites phases nucleate under the influence of the stress distribution, which is introduced due to the concentration of implanted ions, especially due to the stress gradient caused by the corresponding concentration gradient. (author)

  12. Krypton ion implantation effect on selenium nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchal, Suresh; Chauhan, R. P.

    2017-08-01

    Among the rapidly progressing interdisciplinary areas of physics, chemistry, material science etc. ion induced modifications of materials is one such evolving field. It has been realized in recent years that a material, in the form of an accelerated ion beam, embedded into a target specimen offers a most productive tool for transforming its properties in a controlled manner. In semiconductors particularly, where the transport behavior is determined by very small concentrations of certain impurities, implantation of ions may bring considerable changes. The present work is based on the study of the effect of krypton ion implantation on selenium nanowires. Selenium nanowires of diameter 80 nm were synthesized by template assisted electro deposition technique. Implantation of krypton ions was done at Inter University Accelerator Centre (IUAC), New Delhi, India. The effect of implantation on structural, electrical and optical properties of selenium nanowires was investigated. XRD analysis of pristine and implanted nanowires shows no shifting in the peak position but there is a variation in the relative intensity with fluence. UV-Visible spectroscopy shows the decrease in the optical band gap with fluence. PL spectra showed emission peak at higher wavelength. A substantial rise in the current was observed from I-V measurements, after implantation and with the increase in fluence. The increase in current conduction may be due to the increase in the current carriers.

  13. Corrosion resistance of titanium ion implanted AZ91 magnesium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chenglong; Xin Yunchang; Tian Xiubo; Zhao, J.; Chu, Paul K.

    2007-01-01

    Degradable metal alloys constitute a new class of materials for load-bearing biomedical implants. Owing to their good mechanical properties and biocompatibility, magnesium alloys are promising in degradable prosthetic implants. The objective of this study is to improve the corrosion behavior of surgical AZ91 magnesium alloy by titanium ion implantation. The surface characteristics of the ion implanted layer in the magnesium alloys are examined. The authors' results disclose that an intermixed layer is produced and the surface oxidized films are mainly composed of titanium oxide with a lesser amount of magnesium oxide. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that the oxide has three layers. The outer layer which is 10 nm thick is mainly composed of MgO and TiO 2 with some Mg(OH) 2 . The middle layer that is 50 nm thick comprises predominantly TiO 2 and MgO with minor contributions from MgAl 2 O 4 and TiO. The third layer from the surface is rich in metallic Mg, Ti, Al, and Ti 3 Al. The effects of Ti ion implantation on the corrosion resistance and electrochemical behavior of the magnesium alloys are investigated in simulated body fluids at 37±1 deg. C using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and open circuit potential techniques. Compared to the unimplanted AZ91 alloy, titanium ion implantation significantly shifts the open circuit potential (OCP) to a more positive potential and improves the corrosion resistance at OCP. This phenomenon can be ascribed to the more compact surface oxide film, enhanced reoxidation on the implanted surface, as well as the increased β-Mg 12 Al 17 phase

  14. Ion implantation planar in targets with semi-cylindrical grooves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filiz, Y.; Demokan, O.

    2002-01-01

    The experimental and numerical investigations suggest that the ion-matrix phase of the sheath evolution plays a crucial role in determining the ion flux to the target surfaces . It can easily be realized that conformal mapping of the target's surface by the sheath is questionable, or even inapplicable in the case of surfaces with fine irregularities or this continuities. The theoretical analysis of such cases is evidently quite complicated. On the other hand, most actual targets fall into this category, and hence, the understanding of the corresponding sheath behavior remains vital for accomplishing uniform implantation. The ion- matrix sheaths have been treated analytically by Conrad for planar, cylindrical and spherical targets successfully. Similar y, Sheridan and Zang et al. have investigated the ion matrix sheath in cylindrical bores, without and with axial electrodes, respectively. All these works assumed targets with infinite areas or length, Zeng et al. and Kwok et al. have started studying implantation into grooves, by carrying out simulations for the inner and outer races of bearings, which are modeled as semi- cylinders of infinite length. Finally, Demokan has presented the first analytic treatment of on matrix sheaths in two- dimensions, by considering targets with rectangular grooves of infinite length, representing a broad range of industrial items. In this work, ion-matrix sheath near infinite length are theoretically analysed. Understanding the sheath formation near such targets is essential for achieving successful ion implantation on the surfaces of a broad range of industrial products, including all types of bearings. The potential profiles both inside and outside the groove are derived and the consequent ion velocity higher plasma densities may improve the uniformity of implantation on the surfaces of such grooves. Furthermore, the sheath edge deformation due to the grooves, the variation of the angle of incidence on the surface of the groove

  15. Application of ion implantation in stevia breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Cailian; Chen Qiufang; Jin Wei; Lu Ting; Shu Shizhen

    1999-08-01

    Dry seed of stevia were implanted with 60-100 keV nitrogen ion and 75 keV carbon ion of various doses, and the effects of the composition and yield of stevioside were studied. The results showed that ion beam could induce variation in total stevioside yield and the composition of the plant. The best treatment was 75 keV nitrogen ion with 5 x 10 14 N + /cm 2 , the stevioside yield and Rebaudioside A (R-A) content were increased by 4.74% and 14.08% respectively. The effects induced by implantation of carbon ion were higher than those induced by implantation of nitrogen ion. Effects of Feng 1 x Ri Yuan and Ri Yuan x Feng 2 are higher than those of Ji Ning and Feng 2 . Seven mutation lines were selected from the mutation progenies. The stevioside composition of these lines were previously improved. The results suggest a potential application of ion implantation in stevia breeding

  16. Surface modification of the hard metal tungsten carbide-cobalt by boron ion implantation; Oberflaechenmodifikation des Hartmetalls Wolframkarbid-Kobalt durch Bor-Ionenimplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mrotchek, I.

    2007-09-07

    In the present thesis ion beam implantation of boron is studied as method for the increasement of the hardness and for the improvement of the operational characteristics of cutting tools on the tungsten carbide-cobalt base. For the boron implantation with 40 keV energy and {approx}5.10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} fluence following topics were shown: The incoerporation of boron leads to a deformation and remaining strain of the WC lattice, which possesses different stregth in the different directions of the elementary cell. The maximum of the deformation is reached at an implantation temperature of 450 C. The segregation of the new phases CoWB and Co{sub 3}W was detected at 900 C implantation temperature. At lower temperatures now new phases were found. The tribological characteristics of WC-Co are improved. Hereby the maxiaml effect was measured for implantation temperatures from 450 C to 700 C: Improvement of the microhardness by the factor 2..2.5, improvement of the wear resistance by the factor 4. The tribological effects extend to larger depths than the penetration depth of the boron implantation profile. The detected property improvements of the hard metal H3 show the possibility of a practical application of boron ion implantation in industry. The effects essential for a wer decreasement are a hardening of the carbide phase by deformation of the lattice, a hardening of the cobalt binding material and the phase boundaries because of the formation of a solid solution of the implanted boron atoms in Co and by this a blocking of the dislocation movement and the rupture spreading under load.

  17. Cobalt alloy ion sources for focused ion beam implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muehle, R.; Doebeli, M. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Zimmermann, P. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Cobalt alloy ion sources have been developed for silicide formation by focused ion beam implantation. Four eutectic alloys AuCo, CoGe, CoY and AuCoGe were produced by electron beam welding. The AuCo liquid alloy ion source was investigated in detail. We have measured the emission current stability, the current-voltage characteristics, and the mass spectrum as a function of the mission current. (author) 1 fig., 2 refs.

  18. Implant surface material, design, and osseointegration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogle, Orrett E

    2015-04-01

    The structural and functional union of the implant with living bone is greatly influenced by the surface properties of the implant. The success of a dental implant depends on the chemical, physical, mechanical, and topographic characteristics of its surface. The influence of surface topography on osseointegration has translated to shorter healing times from implant placement to restoration. This article presents a discussion of surface characteristics and design of implants, which should allow the clinician to better understand osseointegration and information coming from implant manufacturers, allowing for better implant selection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. High current pelletron for ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    Since 1984, when the first production MeV ion implanter (an NEC model MV-T30) went on-line, interest in versatile electrostatic accelerator systems for MeV ion implantation has grown. The systems use a negative ion source to inject a tandem megavolt accelerator. In early systems the 0.4 mA of charging current from the two Pelletron charging chains in the accelerator was sufficient for the low intensity of beams from the ion source. This 2-chain system, however, is no longer adequate for the much higher beam intensities from today's improved ion sources. A 4-chain charging system, which delivers 1.3 mA to the high voltage terminal, was developed and is in operation in new models of NEC S Series Pelletron accelerators. This paper describes the latest beam performance of 1 MV and 1.7 MW Pelletron accelerators with this new 4-chain charging system. (orig.)

  20. High current pelletron for ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, James B.

    1989-04-01

    Since 1984, when the first production MeV ion implanter (an NEC model MV-T30) went on-line, interest in versatile electrostatic accelerator systems for MeV ion implantation has grown. The systems use a negative ion source to inject a tandem megavolt accelerator. In early systems the 0.4 mA of charging current from the two Pelletron charging chains in the accelerator was sufficient for the low intensity of beams from the ion source. This 2-chain system, however, is no longer adequate for the much higher beam intensities from today's improved ion sources. A 4-chain charging system, which delivers 1.3 mA to the high voltage terminal, was developed and is in operation in new models of NEC S Series Pelletron accelerators. This paper describes the latest beam performance of 1 MV and 1.7 MV Pelletron accelerators with this new 4-chain charging system.

  1. Modification of ion implanted or irradiated single crystal sapphire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Yin; Zhang Chonghong; Wang Zhiguang; Zhao Zhiming; Yao Cunfeng; Zhou Lihong; Jin Yunfan

    2006-01-01

    Single crystal sapphire (Al 2 O 3 ) samples were implanted at 600 K by He, Ne and Ar ions with energy of 110 keV to doses ranging from 5 x 10 16 to 2 x 10 17 ion/cm 2 or irradiated at 320 K by 208 Pb 27+ ion with energy of 1.1 MeV/u to the fluences ranging from 1 x 10 12 to 5 x 10 14 ion/cm 2 . The modification of structure and optical properties induced by ion implantation or irradiation were analyzed by using photoluminescence (PL) and Fourier transformation infrared spectrum (FTIR) spectra and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements. The PL measurements showed that absorption peaks located at 375, 413 and 450 nm appeared in all the implanted or irradiated samples, the PL intensities reached up to the maximum for the 5 x 10 16 ion/cm 2 implanted samples. After Pb-ion irradiation, a new peak located at 390 nm formed. TEM analyses showed that small size voids (1-2 nm) with high density were formed in the region from the surface till to about 100 nm in depth and also large size Ne-bubble formed in the Ne-doped region. Form the obtained FTIR spectra, it was found that Pb-ion irradiation induced broadening of the absorption band in 460-510 cm -1 and position shift of the absorption band in 1000-1300 cm -1 towards to high wavenumber. The possible damage mechanism in single crystal sapphire induced by energetic ion implantation or irradiation was briefly discussed. (authors)

  2. Adhesive and abrasive wear mechanisms in ion implanted metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearnaley, G.

    1985-01-01

    The distinction between adhesive and abrasive wear processes was introduced originally by Burwell during the nineteen-fifties, though some authors prefer to classify wear according to whether it is mild or severe. It is argued here that, on the basis of the performance of a variety of ion implanted metal surfaces, exposed to different modes of wear, the Burwell distinction is a valid one which, moreover, enables us to predict under which circumstances a given treatment will perform well. It is shown that, because wear rates under abrasive conditions are very sensitive to the ratio of the hardness of the surface to that of the abrasive particles, large increases in working life are attainable as a result of ion implantation. Under adhesive wear conditions, the wear rate appears to fall inversely as the hardness increases, and it is advantageous to implant species which will create and retain a hard surface oxide or other continuous film in order to reduce metal-metal contact. By the appropriate combination of physico-chemical changes in an implanted layer it has been possible to reduce wear rates by up to three orders of magnitude. Such rates compensate for the shallow depths achievable by ion implantation. (orig.)

  3. Studies of ion implanted thermally oxidised chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhl, S.

    1977-01-01

    The thermal oxidation of 99.99% pure chromium containing precise amounts of foreign elements has been studied and compared to the oxidation of pure chromium. Thirty-three foreign elements including all of the naturally occurring rare earth metals were ion implanted into chromium samples prior to oxidation at 750 0 C in oxygen. The role of radiation induced damage, inherent in this doping technique, has been studied by chromium implantations at various energies and doses. The repair of the damage has been studied by vacuum annealing at temperatures up to 800 0 C prior to oxidation. Many of the implants caused an inhibition of oxidation, the greatest being a 93% reduction for 2 x 10 16 ions/cm 2 of praseodymium. The distribution of the implant was investigated by the use of 2 MeV alpha backscattering and ion microprobe analysis. Differences in the topography and structure of the chromic oxide on and off the implanted area were studied using scanning electron and optical microscopy. X-ray diffraction analysis was used to investigate if a rare earth-chromium compound of a perovskite-type structure had been formed. Lastly, the electrical conductivity of chromic oxide on and off the implanted region was examined at low voltages. (author)

  4. Effect of ion implantation on thin hard coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auner, G.; Hsieh, Y.F.; Padmanabhan, K.R.; Chevallier, J.; Soerensen, G.

    1983-01-01

    The surface mechanical properties of thin hard coatings of carbides, nitrides and borides deposited by r.f. sputtering were improved after deposition by ion implantation. The thickness and the stoichiometry of the films were measured by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and nuclear reaction analysis before and after ion bombardment. The post ion bombardment was achieved with heavy inert ions such as Kr + and Xe + with an energy sufficient to penetrate the film and to reach the substrate. Both the film adhesion and the microhardness were consistently improved. In order to achieve a more detailed understanding, Rb + and Ni + ions were also used as projectiles, and it was found that these ions were more effective than the inert gas ions. (Auth.)

  5. Nitrogen ion implantation: Barriers to industrial acceptance and prospects for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, R.B.

    1989-01-01

    Nitrogen ion implantation has been used to improve the wear and fatigue resistance of metals in industrial applications since the process was developed at the UK Harwell Laboratory in the 1970s. However, implantation service companies like Ion Surface Technology have found so far that the market for nitrogen implantation is limited. Both market and technical barriers exist to more widespread acceptance in industry. Market factors include cost, industrial conservatism, and production priorities in manufacturing. Technical factors include the size of available implanters, the line-of-sight limitation of ion implantation, sputtering, and other process limitations such as shallow penetration depth. Several recent technical developments that should greatly increase market acceptance are described: 1. large-scale nitrogen implanters, 2. the non-line-of-sight plasma source ion implantation process, and 3. ion assisted coating techniques. (orig.)

  6. Effect of silicon ion implantation upon the structure and corrosion resistance of the surface layer of stainless steel 316L, Vitalium and titanium alloy Ti6Al14V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baszkiewicz, J.; Kaminski, M.; Krupa, D.; Kozubowski, J.; Barcz, A.; Gawlik, A.; Jagielski, J.

    1995-01-01

    Samples of 316L stainless steel, Vitalium and Ti6A14V titanium alloy have been implanted with doses of 1.5, 3, and 4.5 x 10 17 Si + /cm 2 . Transmission electron microscopy shows that during ion implantation amorphous layers are formed. When samples of titanium alloy were implanted with a dose of 0.5 x 10 17 Si + /cm 2 , the implanted layer consisted of a dispersion of fine silicide crystallites instead of being amorphous. The corrosion resistance was analyzed by electrochemical techniques in 0.9% NaCl at the temperature of 37 C. The increase of corrosion resistance has been observed as a result of structural modifications of the surface layer. (author). 7 refs, 4 tabs

  7. Characterization of duplex hard coatings with additional ion implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Škorić

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present the results of a study of TiN thin fi lms which are deposited by a Physical Vapour Deposition (PVD and Ion Beam Assisted Deposition (IBAD. In the present investigation the subsequent ion implantation was provided with N+2 ions. The ion implantation was applied to enhance the mechanical properties of surface. The thin film deposition process exerts a number of eff ects such as crystallographic orientation, morphology, topography, densifi cation of the fi lms. The evolution of the microstructure from porous and columnar grains to densel packed grains is accompanied by changes in mechanical and physical properties. A variety of analytic techniques were used for characterization, such as scratch test, calo test, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Atomic Force Microscope (AFM, X-ray diff raction (XRD and Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX.

  8. Ion beam studies of hydrogen implanted Si wafers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurmela, A.; Henttinen, K.; Suni, T.; Tolkki, A.; Suni, I.

    2004-01-01

    We have studied silicon-on-insulator (SOI) materials with two different ion beam analysis methods. The SOI samples were implanted with boron and hydrogen ions. After implantation the wafers were annealed, and some of them were bonded to thermally oxidized silicon wafers. The damage in silicon single crystal due to ion implantations has been studied by Rutherford Backscattering in the channeling mode (RBS/C). The content of the ion-implanted hydrogen has been studied by elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) method. The strength of the implanted region after thermal annealings were measured with the crack opening method. The boron implantation before hydrogen implantation resulted to shallower implantation depth and lower splitting temperature than in samples implanted with hydrogen only. The boron implantation after hydrogen implantation did not influence the splitting temperature and RBS spectra showed that B implantation drove the H deeper to the sample

  9. Synthesis of optical waveguides in SiO2 by silver ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, H.; Salazar, D.; Rangel-Rojo, R.; Angel-Valenzuela, J. L.; Vázquez, G. V.; Flores-Romero, E.; Rodríguez-Fernández, L.; Oliver, A.

    2013-03-01

    Optical waveguides have been obtained by silver ion implantation on fused silica substrates. Silver ion implantation profiles were calculated in a SiO2 matrix with different energies of implantation from 125 keV to 10 MeV. Refractive index change (Δn) of the ion implanted waveguides was calculated as a function of their chemical composition. Optical absorption spectra of waveguides obtained by 9 MeV silver ion implantation, at a dose of 5 × 1016 ions/cm2, exhibit the typical absorption band associated to the surface plasmon resonance of silver nanoparticles. Effective refractive indices of the propagation modes and waveguide propagation losses of silver ion implanted waveguides are also presented.

  10. Chemical characterization of 4140 steel implanted by nitrogen ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nino, Ely Dannier V.; Duran, Fernando; Pinto, Jose L.C.; Dugar-Zhabon, V.; Garnica, Hernan

    2010-01-01

    AISI-SAE 4140 sample surfaces of different roughness which are implanted by nitrogen ions of 20 keV and 30 keV at a dose of 10 17 ions/cm 2 through a three dimensional ion implantation technique are studied. Crystal phases of nitrogen compositions of the implanted samples, obtained with help of an x-ray diffraction method, are confronted with the data reported by the International Centre for Diffraction Data (ICDD), PDF-2. It is observed that the implanted into the metal nitrogen atoms produce changes in orientation of crystal planes that is manifested as variations of the intensity of the refracted rays and of cell dimensions (a displacement of 2 theta of the maximum intensity position). An analysis for determining nitrogen atoms implanted by high-voltage pulsed discharges at low pressures in the crystal structure of the solid surface was carried out by X-Ray Diffraction due to this technique permits to assess the possibility of formation of new compounds. (author)

  11. ION SOURCES FOR ENERGY EXTREMES OF ION IMPLANTATION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HERSCHCOVITCH,A.; JOHNSON, B.M.; BATALIN, V.A.; KROPACHEV, G.N.; KUIBEDA, R.P.; KULEVOY, T.V.; KOLOMIETS, A.A.; PERSHIN, V.I.; PETRENKO, S.V.; RUDSKOY, I.; SELEZNEV, D.N.; BUGAEV, A.S.; GUSHENETS, V.I.; LITOVKO, I.V.; OKS, E.M.; YUSHKOV, G. YU.; MASEUNOV, E.S.; POLOZOV, S.M.; POOLE, H.J.; STOROZHENKO, P.A.; SVAROVSKI, YA.

    2007-08-26

    For the past four years a joint research and development effort designed to develop steady state, intense ion sources has been in progress with the ultimate goal to develop ion sources and techniques, which meet the two energy extreme range needs of mega-electron-volt and 100's of electron-volt ion implanters. This endeavor has already resulted in record steady state output currents of high charge state of Antimony and Phosphorous ions: P{sup 2+} (8.6 pmA), P{sup 3+} (1.9 pmA), and P{sup 4+} (0.12 pmA) and 16.2, 7.6, 3.3, and 2.2 pmA of Sb{sup 3+} Sb{sup 4+}, Sb{sup 5+}, and Sb{sup 6+} respectively. For low energy ion implantation our efforts involve molecular ions and a novel plasmaless/gasless deceleration method. To date, 1 emA of positive Decaborane ions were extracted at 10 keV and smaller currents of negative Decaborane ions were also extracted. Additionally, Boron current fraction of over 70% was extracted from a Bemas-Calutron ion source, which represents a factor of 3.5 improvement over currently employed ion sources.

  12. Charging of dielectric substrate materials during plasma immersion ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Xiubo; Fu, Ricky K.Y.; Chen Junying; Chu, Paul K.; Brown, Ian G.

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated the electrostatic charging effects of dielectric substrate materials during plasma immersion ion implantation. The results demonstrate that the time-dependent surface potential (negative) may be reduced in magnitude due to the charging effect of the dielectric surface, leading in turn to a reduction in the energy of the incident ions and a broadening of the implanted ion energy spectrum. The charging effect is greater during the plasma immersion bias pulse rise-time, and the electrostatic potential charging may be as large as 75% of the total applied (pulse) potential. This is due to abundant charge movement both of ions and secondary electrons, and has been confirmed by computer simulation. The plasma sheath capacitance has a small influence on the surface potential, via the bias pulse rise-time. Processing parameters, for example voltage, pulse duration, plasma density, and pulse rise-time, have a critical influence on the charging effects. Short pulse duration, high pulse frequency and low plasma density are beneficial from the viewpoint of maximizing the implantation ion energy

  13. Structure transformations in ion implanted anodic alumina films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherenda, N.N.; Uglov, V.V.; Litvinovich, G.V.; Daniluyk, A.L.

    2002-01-01

    The effect of ion implantation on aluminium oxide has been widely studied. The change of mechanical, electrical, optical and chemical properties were investigated. Most studies were performed on a single crystal (a- or c-oriented) α-Al 2 O 3 though polycrystalline α-Al 2 O 3 or amorphous aluminium oxide films were the subject of the investigation too. Porous anodic alumina films were the object of the investigation of this work. An unique structure, low cost, controllability and ease of production allow it application in developing of microelectronic devices. Earlier it was shown that implantation of metal ions in anodic alumina films decreases its surface resistance to tens of Ωm. The aim of this work was the investigation of anodic alumina films structure changes after implantation. The implantation of Ti and Cu ions was carried out using a MEVVA source with an impulse duration of 1 ms. The applied acceleration voltage was 80 kV, the ions current density - 53 μA/cm 2 , the doses -1·10 17 ions/cm 2 and 1.5·10 18 ions/cm 2 . Implantation was carried out into two types of crystalline structure: amorphous and γ-Al 2 O 3 . The latter structure was produced by annealing at 830 deg. C. A variety of techniques were used for phase and element composition investigations: X-ray diffraction analysis, Auger electron spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering analysis and scanning electron microscopy. It was found that implantation into amorphous film results in the formation of γ-AO 2 O 3 while implantation into γ-Al 2 O 3 film - in the formation of an amorphous structure. Implantation both to amorphous and crystalline AA films also led to the formation of θ-Al 2 O 3 phase inclusions in the film structure. The whole structure of AA films with the thickness of 200 μm undergoes these transformations. Implantation also lead to sputtering of the surface barrier layer thus resulting in the shift of the ions depth profile to the surface at higher doses. Diffusion of Ti

  14. Characterization and mechanical investigation of Ti–O2−x film prepared by plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition for cardiovascular stents surface modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Dong; Wan Guojiang; Maitz, Manfred F.; Lei Yifeng; Huang Nan; Sun Hong

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We prepared Ti–O 2−x films of good quality by PIII and D successfully on stents product. ► The Ti–O 2−x film shows good homogeneity and intergradient film/substrate interface. ► The Ti–O 2−x films on stent sustain clinically-required expansion without failure. ► The films show good mechanical durability for cardiovascular stents application. - Abstract: Up to date, materials for cardiovascular stents are still far from satisfactory because of high risk of biomaterials-associated restenosis and thrombosis. Extensive efforts have been made to improve the biocompatibility of the materials by various surface modification techniques. Ti–O 2−x films prepared by plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIII and D) have shown good blood compatibility. For clinical application, surface quality and mechanical durability of the Ti–O 2−x film on stents are also of critical importance for the long-term serving. In this paper we present our research results on surface quality, mechanical investigation and characterization of Ti–O 2−x films prepared using PIII and D on stent products provided by Boston Scientific SCIMED. Ti–O 2−x films with mostly Rutile and little non-stoichiometric phases were obtained with smoothness of 2−x films on stents products were sustained balloon-expansion of clinically-required extent without mechanical failure, showing highly potential feasibility for cardiovascular stents application.

  15. Characterization and mechanical investigation of Ti-O{sub 2-x} film prepared by plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition for cardiovascular stents surface modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie Dong [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, 610031 (China); School of Physical Science and Technology, Southwest Jiaotong University, 610031 Chengdu (China); Wan Guojiang, E-mail: guojiang.wan@home.swjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, 610031 (China); Maitz, Manfred F. [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, 610031 (China); Max Bergmann Center of Biomaterials Dresden, Leibniz Institute of Polymer Research Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Lei Yifeng; Huang Nan; Sun Hong [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, 610031 (China)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We prepared Ti-O{sub 2-x} films of good quality by PIII and D successfully on stents product. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ti-O{sub 2-x} film shows good homogeneity and intergradient film/substrate interface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ti-O{sub 2-x} films on stent sustain clinically-required expansion without failure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The films show good mechanical durability for cardiovascular stents application. - Abstract: Up to date, materials for cardiovascular stents are still far from satisfactory because of high risk of biomaterials-associated restenosis and thrombosis. Extensive efforts have been made to improve the biocompatibility of the materials by various surface modification techniques. Ti-O{sub 2-x} films prepared by plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIII and D) have shown good blood compatibility. For clinical application, surface quality and mechanical durability of the Ti-O{sub 2-x} film on stents are also of critical importance for the long-term serving. In this paper we present our research results on surface quality, mechanical investigation and characterization of Ti-O{sub 2-x} films prepared using PIII and D on stent products provided by Boston Scientific SCIMED. Ti-O{sub 2-x} films with mostly Rutile and little non-stoichiometric phases were obtained with smoothness of <3 nm RMS, largely homogeneity as well as good intergradient film/substrate interface. The Ti-O{sub 2-x} films on stents products were sustained balloon-expansion of clinically-required extent without mechanical failure, showing highly potential feasibility for cardiovascular stents application.

  16. Ion implantation and ion beam analysis of lithium niobate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, G.W.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on implantations of He and Ti made into LiNbO 3 and the H and Li profiles determined by elastic recoil detection (ERD) techniques. The loss of Li and gain of H depends upon the supply of surface H (surface contaminants or ambient atmosphere). For 50 KeV He implants into LiNbO 3 through a 200 Angstrom Al film, the small Li loss is governed by the interface H. This is also the case for He implants into uncoated LiNbO 3 in a beam line with low hydrocarbon surface contamination; similar implants under conditions of greater hydrocarbon deposition result in proportionally larger Li loss and H gain in the implant damage region. The exchange is possible only for those He energies, i.e., 50 keV, where the damage profile intersects the surface. For Ti implants Li is lost with little H gain. For this case the Li loss is believed to result from radiation-enhanced diffusion. Where He implantation is used to establish waveguiding in LiNbO 3 , the presence or absence of H in the implanted region is crucial with regard to refractive index stability, due to the replacement of H by Li from the bulk

  17. Raman microprobe measurements of stress in ion implanted materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nugent, K.W.; Prawer, S.; Weiser, P.S.; Dooley, S.P.

    1993-01-01

    Raman microprobe measurements of ion implanted diamond and silicon have shown significant shifts in the Raman line due to stresses in the materials. The Raman line shifts to higher energy if the stress is compressive and to lower energy for tensile stress 1 . The silicon sample was implanted in a 60 μm square with 2.56 x 10 17 ions per square centimeter of 2 MeV Helium. This led to the formation of raised squares with the top 370mm above the original surface. In Raman studies of silicon using visible light, the depth of penetration of the laser beam into the sample is much less than one micron. It was found that the Raman line is due to the silicon overlying the damage region. The diamond sample was implanted with 2 x 10 15 ions per square centimeter of 2.8 MeV carbon. It was concluded that the Raman spectrum could provide information concerning both the magnitude and the direction of stress in an ion implanted sample. It was possible in some cases to determine whether the stress direction is parallel or perpendicular to the sample surface. 1 refs., 2 figs

  18. Raman microprobe measurements of stress in ion implanted materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nugent, K.W.; Prawer, S.; Weiser, P.S.; Dooley, S.P. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1993-12-31

    Raman microprobe measurements of ion implanted diamond and silicon have shown significant shifts in the Raman line due to stresses in the materials. The Raman line shifts to higher energy if the stress is compressive and to lower energy for tensile stress{sup 1}. The silicon sample was implanted in a 60 {mu}m square with 2.56 x 10{sup 17} ions per square centimeter of 2 MeV Helium. This led to the formation of raised squares with the top 370mm above the original surface. In Raman studies of silicon using visible light, the depth of penetration of the laser beam into the sample is much less than one micron. It was found that the Raman line is due to the silicon overlying the damage region. The diamond sample was implanted with 2 x 10{sup 15} ions per square centimeter of 2.8 MeV carbon. It was concluded that the Raman spectrum could provide information concerning both the magnitude and the direction of stress in an ion implanted sample. It was possible in some cases to determine whether the stress direction is parallel or perpendicular to the sample surface. 1 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Semiconductor applications of plasma immersion ion implantation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    549. Semiconductor applications of plasma immersion ion implantation technology. MUKESH KUMAR*, RAJKUMAR†, DINESH KUMAR and P J GEORGE. Department of Electronic Science, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra 136 119, India. †Semiconductor Complex Ltd., Industrial Area Phase 8, Mohali 160 059, India.

  20. Semiconductor applications of plasma immersion ion implantation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 25; Issue 6. Semiconductor applications of plasma immersion ion implantation technology ... Department of Electronic Science, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra 136 119, India; Semiconductor Complex Ltd., Industrial Area Phase 8, Mohali 160 059, India ...

  1. SSMS near surface analysis of B in irradiated Zircaloy-2: ion implantation standards as a calibration technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christie, W.H.; Carter, J.A.; Eby, R.E.; Landau, L.; Musick, W.R.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose of this study was to determine the amount of 10 B contamination on the surface of Zircaloy-2 clad irradiated fuel elements that had been stored in an aqueous solution containing 5000 wt. ppM enriched B. SMSS indicated that the contamination was less than 0.06 μg/cm 2

  2. Peripheral nerve regeneration through a silicone chamber implanted with negative carbon ions: Possibility to clinical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeguchi, Ryosuke; Kakinoki, Ryosuke; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Yasuda, Tadashi; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2014-08-01

    We investigated whether a tube with its inner surface implanted with negative-charged carbon ions (C- ions) would enable axons to extend over a distance greater than 10 mm. The tube was found to support nerves regenerating across a 15-mm-long inter-stump gap. We also investigated whether a C- ion-implanted tube pretreated with basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) promotes peripheral nerve regeneration. The C- ion implanted tube accelerated nerve regeneration, and this effect was enhanced by bFGF. Silicone treated with C- ions showed increased hydrophilic properties and cellular affinity, and axon regeneration was promoted with this increased biocompatibility.

  3. Substitutionality of Ge atoms in ion implanted AlSb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, K.M.; Moll, A.J.; Chan, N.; Walukiewicz, W.; Becla, P.

    1995-01-01

    The substitution of Ge atoms into ion implanted AlSb is investigated by extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. Our results reveal that in the as-implanted material, the implanted Ge atoms are equally distributed between two specific sites, one surrounded by Al atoms and the other surrounded by Sb atoms. After annealing at 750 degree C for 5 s, the coordination number of the Ge atoms increases from ∼3 to ∼4 indicating solid phase regrowth of the implantation induced amorphous surface layer. Moreover, in the annealed AlSb, the substitution of Ge atoms into the Al sublattice dominates with an estimated Ge Al :[Ge Sb ]∼0.8:0.2. These results suggest that Ge atoms act preferentially as donor species in AlSb

  4. Materials science issues of plasma source ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nastasi, M.; Faehl, R.J.; Elmoursi, A.A.

    1996-01-01

    Ion beam processing, including ion implantation and ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD), are established surface modification techniques which have been used successfully to synthesize materials for a wide variety of tribological applications. In spite of the flexibility and promise of the technique, ion beam processing has been considered too expensive for mass production applications. However, an emerging technology, Plasma Source Ion Implantation (PSII), has the potential of overcoming these limitations to become an economically viable tool for mass industrial applications. In PSII, targets are placed directly in a plasma and then pulsed-biased to produce a non-line-of-sight process for intricate target geometries without complicated fixturing. If the bias is a relatively high negative potential (20--100 kV) ion implantation will result. At lower voltages (50--1,200 V), deposition occurs. Potential applications for PSII are in low-value-added products such as tools used in manufacturing, orthopedic devices, and the production of wear coatings for hard disk media. This paper will focus on the technology and materials science associated with PSII

  5. Reduction of Glass Surface Reflectance by Ion Beam Surface Modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Spitzer

    2011-03-11

    This is the final report for DOE contract DE-EE0000590. The purpose of this work was to determine the feasibility of the reduction of the reflection from the front of solar photovoltaic modules. Reflection accounts for a power loss of approximately 4%. A solar module having an area of one square meter with an energy conversion efficiency of 18% generates approximately 180 watts. If reflection loss can be eliminated, the power output can be increased to 187 watts. Since conventional thin-film anti-reflection coatings do not have sufficient environmental stability, we investigated the feasibility of ion beam modification of the glass surface to obtain reduction of reflectance. Our findings are generally applicable to all solar modules that use glass encapsulation, as well as commercial float glass used in windows and other applications. Ion implantation of argon, fluorine, and xenon into commercial low-iron soda lime float glass, standard float glass, and borosilicate glass was studied by implantation, annealing, and measurement of reflectance. The three ions all affected reflectance. The most significant change was obtained by argon implantation into both low-iron and standard soda-lime glass. In this way samples were formed with reflectance lower than can be obtained with a single-layer coatings of magnesium fluoride. Integrated reflectance was reduced from 4% to 1% in low-iron soda lime glass typical of the glass used in solar modules. The reduction of reflectance of borosilicate glass was not as large; however borosilicate glass is not typically used in flat plate solar modules. Unlike conventional semiconductor ion implantation doping, glass reflectance reduction was found to be tolerant to large variations in implant dose, meaning that the process does not require high dopant uniformity. Additionally, glass implantation does not require mass analysis. Simple, high current ion implantation equipment can be developed for this process; however, before the process

  6. Plasma immersion ion implantation for reducing metal ion release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, C.; Garcia, J. A.; Maendl, S.; Pereiro, R.; Fernandez, B.; Rodriguez, R. J. [Centro de Ingenieria Avanzada de Superficies AIN, 31191, Cordovilla-Pamplona (Spain); Leibniz-Institut fuer Oberflaechenmodifizierung, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Universidad de Oviedo, Departamento Quimica Fisica y Analitica (Spain); Centro de Ingenieria Avanzada de Superficies AIN, 31191, Cordovilla-Pamplona (Spain)

    2012-11-06

    Plasma immersion ion implantation of Nitrogen and Oxygen on CoCrMo alloys was carried out to improve the tribological and corrosion behaviors of these biomedical alloys. In order to optimize the implantation results we were carried experiments at different temperatures. Tribocorrosion tests in bovine serum were used to measure Co, Cr and Mo releasing by using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry analysis after tests. Also, X-ray Diffraction analysis were employed in order to explain any obtained difference in wear rate and corrosion tests. Wear tests reveals important decreases in rate of more than one order of magnitude for the best treatment. Moreover decreases in metal release were found for all the implanted samples, preserving the same corrosion resistance of the unimplanted samples. Finally this paper gathers an analysis, in terms of implantation parameters and achieved properties for industrial implementation of these treatments.

  7. Development of a microwave ion source for ion implantations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, N., E-mail: Nbk-Takahashi@shi.co.jp; Murata, H.; Kitami, H.; Mitsubori, H.; Sakuraba, J.; Soga, T.; Aoki, Y.; Katoh, T. [Technology Research Center, Sumitomo Heavy Industries Ltd., Yokosuka, Kanagawa 237-8555 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    A microwave ion source is expected to have a long lifetime, as it has fewer consumables. Thus, we are in the process of developing a microwave ion source for ion implantation applications. In this paper, we report on a newly developed plasma chamber and the extracted P{sup +} beam currents. The volume of the plasma chamber is optimized by varying the length of a boron nitride block installed within the chamber. The extracted P{sup +} beam current is more than 30 mA, at a 25 kV acceleration voltage, using PH{sub 3} gas.

  8. Shape memory effect and superelasticity of titanium nickelide alloys implanted with high ion doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pogrebnjak, A D; Bratushka, S N; Beresnev, V M; Levintant-Zayonts, N

    2013-01-01

    The state of the art in ion implantation of superelastic NiTi shape memory alloys is analyzed. Various technological applications of the shape memory effect are outlined. The principles and techiques of ion implantation are described. Specific features of its application for modification of surface layers in surface engineering are considered. Key properties of shape memory alloys and problems in utilization of ion implantation to improve the surface properties of shape memory alloys, such as corrosion resistance, friction coefficient, wear resistance, etc. are discussed. The bibliography includes 162 references

  9. Range and damage distribution in cluster ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, I.; Matsuo, J.; Jones, E.C.; Takeuchi, D.; Aoki, T.

    1997-01-01

    Cluster ion implantation is an attractive alternative to conventional ion implantation, particularly for shallow junction formation. It is easy to obtain high current ion beams with low equivalent energy using cluster ion beams. The implanted boron distribution in 5 keV B 10 H 14 implanted Si is markedly shallower than that in 5 keV BF 2 ion implanted Si. The implanted depth is less than 0.04 μm, indicating that cluster ion implantation is capable of forming shallow junctions. The sheet resistance of 3 keV B 10 H 14 implanted samples falls below 500 Ω/sq after annealing at 1,000 C for 10s. Shallow implantation can be realized by a high energy cluster beam without space-charge problems in the incident beam. Defect formation, resulting from local energy deposition and multiple collisions, is unique for cluster ions. The thickness of the damaged layer formed by cluster ion bombardment increases with the size of the cluster, if implant energy and ion dose remain constant. This is one of the nonlinear cluster effects, which may allow some control over the implant damage distributions that accompany implanted ions, and which have been shown to have a great effect on dopant redistribution during annealing

  10. Effects of ion-implantation in magnetic garnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betsui, Keiichi; Komenou, Kazunari

    1986-01-01

    Ion implantation in magnetic garnet film induces anisotropy field change, ΔH k . The primary origin of the ΔH k is the stress-induced anisotropy, but it was precisely reported that ion-implantation also induces non-magnetostrictive anisotropy change due to the growth-induced anisotropy suppression. The hydrogen ion-implantation induces a large ΔH k due to the chemical effects of the hydrogen in the implanted layer. The ΔH k in ion-implanted garnet is greatly enhanced by exposing implanted films to plasma of hydrogen or rare gases. These large anisotropy changes in hydrogen implantation and plasma exposure are attributed to the change in valence state of Fe-ions. This report reviews these recent developments on ion-implanted garnets. (author)

  11. Introduction to several solid state techniques for the study of ion implanted materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borders, J.A.

    1978-01-01

    The study of ion implanted materials requires methods which are sensitive to the local structure and chemistry of the implanted atoms. Optical spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy are among the most useful solid state methods. Study of materials implanted to very high fluences and the use of surface analysis methods provide some unique information. The characteristics of these methods will be reviewed and examples presented which show how the techniques can be used to analyze implanted materials

  12. Detection and reduction of tungsten contamination in ion implantation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polignano, M.L.; Galbiati, A.; Grasso, S.; Mica, I.; Barbarossa, F.; Magni, D.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we review the results of some studies addressing the problem of tungsten contamination in implantation processes. For some tests, the implanter was contaminated by implantation of wafers with an exposed tungsten layer, resulting in critical contamination conditions. First, DLTS (deep level transient spectroscopy) measurements were calibrated to measure tungsten contamination in ion-implanted samples. DLTS measurements of tungsten-implanted samples showed that the tungsten concentration increases linearly with the dose up to a rather low dose (5 x 10 10 cm -2 ). Tungsten deactivation was observed when the dose was further increased. Under these conditions, ToF-SIMS revealed tungsten at the wafer surface, showing that deactivation was due to surface segregation. DLTS calibration could therefore be obtained in the linear dose regime only. This calibration was used to evaluate the tungsten contamination in arsenic implantations. Ordinary operating conditions and critical contamination conditions of the equipment were compared. A moderate tungsten contamination was observed in samples implanted under ordinary operating conditions. This contamination was easily suppressed by a thin screen oxide. On the contrary, implantations in critical conditions of the equipment resulted in a relevant tungsten contamination, which could be reduced but not suppressed even by a relatively thick screen oxide (up to 150 Aa). A decontamination process consisting of high dose implantations of dummy wafers was tested for its efficiency to remove tungsten and titanium contamination. This process was found to be much more effective for titanium than for tungsten. Finally, DLTS proved to be much more sensitive that TXRF (total reflection X-ray fluorescence) in detecting tungsten contamination. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Detection and reduction of tungsten contamination in ion implantation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polignano, M.L.; Galbiati, A.; Grasso, S.; Mica, I.; Barbarossa, F.; Magni, D. [STMicroelectronics, Agrate Brianza (Italy)

    2016-12-15

    In this paper, we review the results of some studies addressing the problem of tungsten contamination in implantation processes. For some tests, the implanter was contaminated by implantation of wafers with an exposed tungsten layer, resulting in critical contamination conditions. First, DLTS (deep level transient spectroscopy) measurements were calibrated to measure tungsten contamination in ion-implanted samples. DLTS measurements of tungsten-implanted samples showed that the tungsten concentration increases linearly with the dose up to a rather low dose (5 x 10{sup 10} cm{sup -2}). Tungsten deactivation was observed when the dose was further increased. Under these conditions, ToF-SIMS revealed tungsten at the wafer surface, showing that deactivation was due to surface segregation. DLTS calibration could therefore be obtained in the linear dose regime only. This calibration was used to evaluate the tungsten contamination in arsenic implantations. Ordinary operating conditions and critical contamination conditions of the equipment were compared. A moderate tungsten contamination was observed in samples implanted under ordinary operating conditions. This contamination was easily suppressed by a thin screen oxide. On the contrary, implantations in critical conditions of the equipment resulted in a relevant tungsten contamination, which could be reduced but not suppressed even by a relatively thick screen oxide (up to 150 Aa). A decontamination process consisting of high dose implantations of dummy wafers was tested for its efficiency to remove tungsten and titanium contamination. This process was found to be much more effective for titanium than for tungsten. Finally, DLTS proved to be much more sensitive that TXRF (total reflection X-ray fluorescence) in detecting tungsten contamination. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Plasma source ion implantation of ammonia into electroplated chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheuer, J.T.; Walter, K.C.; Rej, D.J.; Nastasi, M.; Blanchard, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    Ammonia gas (NH 3 ) has been used as a nitrogen source for plasma source ion implantation processing of electroplated chromium. No evidence was found of increased hydrogen concentrations in the bulk material, implying that ammonia can be used without risking hydrogen embrittlement. The retained nitrogen dose of 2.1 x 10 17 N-at/cm 2 is sufficient to increase the surface hardness of electroplated Cr by 24% and decrease the wear rate by a factor of 4

  15. Antimicrobial coatings for implant surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Brunetto, Priscilla S.; Fromm, Katharina M.

    2008-01-01

    Body-foreign materials are used more and more frequently in our lives: joint implants (hips, knees, fingers, etc.), catheters, pacemakers, dental and aesthetic implants, etc. The increasing numbers of patients requiring such implants also raises the absolute numbers of implant-related infections. Thus, it is known that body-foreign materials are prone to bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation, either via bacterial debris on implant materials, infections during implantation or, la...

  16. Quantum effects in ion implanted devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamieson, D.N.; Chan, V.; Hudson, F.E.; Andresen, S.E.; Yang, C.; Hopf, T.; Hearne, S.M.; Pakes, C.I.; Prawer, S.; Gauja, E.; Yang, C.; Dzurak, A.S.; Yang, C.; Clark, R.G.; Yang, C.

    2005-01-01

    Fabrication of nanoscale devices that exploit the rules of quantum mechanics to process information presents formidable technical challenges because it will be necessary to control quantum states at the level of individual atoms, electrons or photons. We have developed a pathway to the construction of quantum devices using ion implantation and demonstrate, using charge transport analysis, that the devices exhibit single electron effects. We construct devices that employ two P donors in Si by employing the technique of ion beam induced charge (IBIC) in which single 14 keV P ions can be implanted into ultra-pure silicon by monitoring on-substrate detector electrodes. We have used IBIC with a MeV nuclear microprobe to map and measure the charge collection efficiency in the development of the electrode structure and show that 100% charge collection efficiency can be achieved leading to the fabrication of prototype devices that display quantum effects in the transport of single charge quanta between the islands of implanted donors. (author). 9 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  17. Surface topographical and structural analysis of Ag{sup +}-implanted polymethylmethacrylate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arif, Shafaq, E-mail: sarif2005@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Lahore College for Women University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Rafique, M. Shahid [Department of Physics, University of Engineering & Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Saleemi, Farhat [Department of Physics, Lahore College for Women University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Naab, Fabian; Toader, Ovidiu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory, University of Michigan, MI 48109-2104 (United States); Sagheer, Riffat [Department of Physics, Lahore College for Women University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Bashir, Shazia [Center for Advanced Studies in Physics (CASP), Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Zia, Rehana [Department of Physics, Lahore College for Women University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Siraj, Khurram; Iqbal, Saman [Department of Physics, University of Engineering & Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan)

    2016-08-15

    Specimens of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) were implanted with 400-keV Ag{sup +} ions at different ion fluences ranging from 1 × 10{sup 14} to 5 × 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2} using a 400-kV NEC ion implanter. The surface topographical features of the implanted PMMA were investigated by a confocal microscope. Modifications in the structural properties of the implanted specimens were analyzed in comparison with pristine PMMA by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. UV–Visible spectroscopy was applied to determine the effects of ion implantation on optical transmittance of the implanted PMMA. The confocal microscopic images revealed the formation of hillock-like microstructures along the ion track on the implanted PMMA surface. The increase in ion fluence led to more nucleation of hillocks. The XRD pattern confirmed the amorphous nature of pristine and implanted PMMA, while the Raman studies justified the transformation of Ag{sup +}-implanted PMMA into amorphous carbon at the ion fluence of ⩾5 × 10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2}. Moreover, the decrease in optical transmittance of PMMA is associated with the formation of hillocks and ion-induced structural modifications after implantation.

  18. Electrical conduction in 100 keV Kr+ ion implanted poly (ethylene terephthalate)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, P. K.; Kumar, V.; Gupta, Renu; Mahendia, S.; Anita, Kumar, S.

    2012-06-01

    Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) samples have been implanted to 100 keV Kr+ ions at the fluences 1×1015-- 1×1016 cm-2. From I-V characteristics, the conduction mechanism was found to be shifted from ohmic to space charge limited conduction (SCLC) after implantation. The surface conductivity of these implanted samples was found to increase with increasing implantation dose. The structural alterations in the Raman spectra of implanted PET samples indicate that such an increase in the conductivity may be attributed to the formation of conjugated double bonded carbonaceous structure in the implanted layer of PET.

  19. Retention of ion-implanted deuterium in tungsten pre-irradiated with carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alimov, V.Kh.; Ertl, K.; Roth, J.; Schmid, K.

    2000-01-01

    Deuterium (D) ion implantation and retention at room temperature was studied in pure and carbon (C) implanted tungsten single crystals. Pre-implantation with C was done at 40 keV and D implantation at 10 keV with the range confined in the carbon modified layer and at 100 keV with the range exceeding the carbon modified layer. The range distributions were investigated in situ using 1 MeV 3 He ions analysing the energy distributions of α particles from the D( 3 He,p)α reaction while the total amount of retained D was obtained from the p-integral. The range distribution of carbon was obtained from the backscattered 3 He energy distribution. C pre-impantation influences the D retention only if the range of the D ions is confined within the carbon modified surface layer. In this case, D diffusion beyond the ion range distribution does not occur and the retained D amount is smaller than in the pure W crystal. At D energies exceeding the carbon modified layer the retention occurs in the dislocation zone up to 1 μm and the total retained amount is the same for carbon implanted and pure W samples

  20. Effect of ion implantation on thermal shock resistance of magnesia and glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurarie, V.N.; Williams, J.S.; Watt, A.J.

    1995-01-01

    Monocrystals of magnesia together with glass samples have been subjected to ion implantation prior to thermal shock testing in an impulse plasma of continuously varied intensity. Measurements of the separation between fragments have been used to estimate the surface temperature. Fracture and deformation characteristics of the surface layer are measured in ion implanted and unimplanted samples using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Implantation-induced near-surface damage is analysed by ion channeling using 2 MeV He + ions. Ion implantation is shown to modify the near-surface structure of magnesia samples by introducing damage, which makes crack initiation easier under thermal stresses. The fracture threshold and maximum crack density are shifted towards the lower temperature range. Ion implanted MgO crystals show a ten fold increase in surface crack density. An increased crack density results in a decreased degree of damage characterised by the depth of crack penetration. The thermal stress resistance parameter of glass samples is increased at relatively small doses and decreased at higher doses. The results suggest that crack density and the degree of fracture damage in brittle ceramics operating under thermal shock conditions can be effectively controlled by ion implantation which provides crack initiating defects in the near-surface region. 23 refs., 7 figs

  1. The compaction of fused silica resulting from ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, C.M.; Ridgway, M.C. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia); Leech, P.L. [Telstra Research Laboratories, Clayton, Victoria (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    Ion implantation of fused silica results in compaction and consequently an increase in refractive index. This method of modifying the near-surface region has been shown as a potential means for fabricating single mode channel waveguides. This study has measured the compaction of the implanted regions for Si implantations as a function of dose (2x10{sup 12} - 6x10{sup l6} ions/cm{sup 2}), energy (1-9 MeV) and post-implantation annealing temperature (200-900 degree C). For a given energy, a dose-dependence of the step height (depth of compacted region) is observed for doses less than {approx}10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}. At higher doses the step height saturates. For a given dose, a linear trend is evident for the step height as a function of energy suggesting that the major mechanism for this compaction is electronic stopping. As the annealing temperature increases, the step height gradually decreases from {approx}0.1-0.2 {mu} to -10-20% of the original value. From the annealing data, it is possible to extract an activation energy of 0.08 eV associated with the thermal removal of the compacted region. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Radioactive ion implantation as a tool for wear measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagger, C.; Soerensen, G.

    1979-01-01

    The present paper deals with ion implantation of radioactive krypton ions in surfaces with aim of measuring wear of different magnetic materials in sound-heads. The technique is especially suited for a relatively fast comparison of wear-characteristics of materials of varying composition in small inaccessible areas. In the present case utilisation of a 60 KeV accelerator allows determination of a total wear as small as 0.05 μm with an accuracy of 10%. Further the technique yields information of the time dependence of the wear process with an accuracy less than 0.001 μm. (author)

  3. Argon ion beam interaction on polyethylene terephthalate surface by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Polyethylene terephthalate surface treatment; Amirkabir plasma focus; plasma focus ... and ion-assisted coating [5], ion implantation and thermal surface treatment [6]. ..... after one month for steps (a) and (b). Therefore, in many applications it is suggested that the adhesion takes place immediately after plasma exposure to ...

  4. Mechanical properties of ion-beam-textured surgical implant alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigand, A. J.

    1977-01-01

    An electron-bombardment Hg ion thruster was used as an ion source to texture surfaces of materials used to make orthopedic and/or dental prostheses or implants. The materials textured include 316 stainless steel, titanium-6% aluminum, 4% vanadium, and cobalt-20% chromium, 15% tungsten. To determine the effect of ion texturing on the ultimate strength and yield strength, stainless steel and Co-Cr-W alloy samples were tensile tested to failure. Three types of samples of both materials were tested. One type was ion-textured (the process also heats each sample to 300 C), another type was simply heated to 300 C in an oven, and the third type was untreated. Stress-strain diagrams, 0.2% offset yield strength data, total elongation data, and area reduction data are presented. Fatigue specimens of ion textured and untextured 316 stainless steel and Ti-6% Al-4% V were tested. Included as an ion textured sample is a Ti-6% Al-4% V sample which was ion machined by means of Ni screen mask so as to produce an array of 140 mu m x 140 mu m x 60 mu m deep pits. Scanning electron microscopy was used to characterize the ion textured surfaces.

  5. Effects of ion implantation on the abrasive wear of WC-Co

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartolucci Luyckx, S.; Sellschop, J.P.F.

    1988-01-01

    An explanation of the improved abrasive wear resistance of ion-implanted WC-Co components has been sought. X-ray analysis is reported of scratches produced on polished implanted and non-implanted WC-Co surfaces by a single pass scratch test. It can be inferred from the results that extrusion of cobalt from a WC-Co surface under the stress of an abrading diamond is easier in the non-implanted than in the implanted case; this is the first stage of the abrasion wear process. Transmission electron diffraction of a WC-Co foil, before and after implantation by nitrogen ions, indicated the formation of Co 2 N microprecipitates during implantation. Precipitation hardening, hindering cobalt extrusion, is offered therefore as the explanation of the improved service life of the components. (U.K.)

  6. Copper nanoparticles synthesized in polymers by ion implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popok, Vladimir; Nuzhdin, Vladimir; Valeev, Valerij

    2015-01-01

    Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and polyimide (PI) samples are implanted by 40 keV Cu+ ions with high fluences in order to synthesize copper nanoparticles in shallow polymer layers. The produced metal/polymer nanocomposites are studied using atomic force and scanning electron microscopies as well...... as optical transmission spectroscopy. It is found that copper nanoparticles nucleation and growth are strongly fluence dependent as well as they are affected by the polymer properties, in particular, by radiation stability yielding different nanostructures for the implanted PI and PMMA. Shallow synthesized...... nanoparticles are observed to partly tower above the sample surface due to a side effect of high-fluence irradiation leading to considerable sputtering of polymers. Implantation and particle formation significantly change optical properties of both polymers reducing transmittance in the UV-visible range due...

  7. [Comperative study of implant surface characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katona, Bernadett; Daróczi, Lajos; Jenei, Attila; Bakó, József; Hegedus, Csaba

    2013-12-01

    The osseointegration between the implant and its' bone environment is very important. The implants shall meet the following requirements: biocompatibility, rigidity, resistance against corrosion and technical producibility. In our present study surface morphology and material characteristics of different implants (Denti Bone Level, Denti Zirconium C, Bionika CorticaL, Straumann SLA, Straumann SLA Active, Dentsply Ankylos and Biotech Kontact implant) were investigated with scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The possible surface alterations caused by the manufacturing technology were also investigated. During grit-blasting the implants' surface is blasted with hard ceramic particles (titanium oxide, alumina, calcium phosphate). Properties of blasting material are critical because the osseointegration of dental implants should not be hampered. The physical and chemical features of blasting particles could importantly affect the produced surfaces of implants. Titanium surfaces with micro pits are created after immersion in mixtures of strong acids. On surfaces after dual acid-etching procedures the crosslinking between fibrin and osteogenetic cells could be enhanced therefore bone formation could be directly facilitated on the surface of the implant. Nowadays there are a number of surface modification techniques available. These can be used as a single method or in combination with each other. The effect of the two most commonly used surface modifications (acid-etching and grit-blasting) on different implants are demonstrated in our investigation.

  8. Properties of ion implanted Ti-6Al-4V processed using beamline and PSII techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, K.C.; Woodring, J.S.; Nastasi, M.; Munson, C.M.; Williams, J.M.; Poker, D.B.

    1996-01-01

    The surface of Ti-6Al-4V (Ti64) alloy has been modified using beamline implantation of boron. In separate experiments, Ti64 has been implanted with nitrogen using a plasma source ion implantation (PSII) technique utilizing either ammonia (NH 3 ), nitrogen (N 2 ), or their combinations as the source of nitrogen ions. Beamline experiments have shown the hardness of the N-implanted surface saturates at a dose level of ∼ 4 x 10 17 at/cm 2 at ∼ 10 GPa. The present work makes comparisons of hardness and tribological tests of (1) B implantation using beamline techniques, and (2) N implanted samples using ammonia and/or nitrogen gas in a PSII process. The results show that PSII using N 2 or NH 3 gives similar hardness as N implantation using a beamline process. The presence of H in the Ti alloy surface does not affect the hardness of the implanted surface. Boron implantation increased the surface hardness by as much as 2.5x at the highest dose level. Wear testing by a pin-on-disk method indicated that nitrogen implantation reduced the wear rate by as much as 120x, and boron implantation reduced the wear rate by 6.5x. Increased wear resistance was accompanied by a decreased coefficient of friction

  9. Influence of implantation of three metallic ions on the mechanical properties of two polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swain, M.V. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Lindfield, NSW (Australia). Div. of Applied Physics; Perry, A.J. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia); Treglio, J.R.

    1996-12-31

    Ion implantation of poly ethylene terephthalate (PET) and polystyrene (PS) with various high energy metallic ions at 70 kV to dose of 3 x 10{sup 16} ions/cm 2 have been made. Measurements of the mechanical properties of the polymers before and after implantation have been made with an ultra microindentation system using both pointed and a small (2 nm) radiused spherical tipped indenter. Significant differences have been observed between the Ti-B dual implanted surfaces and those of the Au and W implanted surfaces. For both the PET and PS the resistance to indenter penetration at very low loads was much greater for the Ti-B dual implanted surfaces. The estimated hardness and modulus versus depth of penetration for both indenters shows that the spherical indenter produces more consistent and less controversial values that are somewhat lower than the optimistic estimates from pointed indenters. 8 refs., 2 fig.

  10. Ion enhanced deposition by dual titanium and acetylene plasma immersion ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Z. M.; Tian, X. B.; Chu, P. K.

    2003-01-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIII-D) offers a non-line-of-sight fabrication method for various types of thin films on steels to improve the surface properties. In this work, titanium films were first deposited on 9Cr18 (AISI440) stainless bearing steel by metal plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (MePIII-D) using a titanium vacuum arc plasma source. Afterwards, carbon implantation and carbon film deposition were performed by acetylene (C2H2) plasma immersion ion implantation. Multiple-layered structures with superior properties were produced by conducting Ti MePIII-D + C2H2 PIII successively. The composition and structure of the films were investigated employing Auger electron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. It is shown that the mixing for Ti and C atoms is much better when the target bias is higher during Ti MePIII-D. A top diamond-like carbon layer and a titanium oxycarbide layer are formed on the 9Cr18 steel surface. The wear test results indicate that this dual PIII-D method can significantly enhance the wear properties and decrease the surface friction coefficient of 9Cr18 steel.

  11. Ion enhanced deposition by dual titanium and acetylene plasma immersion ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, Z.M.; Tian, X.B.; Chu, P.K.

    2003-01-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIII-D) offers a non-line-of-sight fabrication method for various types of thin films on steels to improve the surface properties. In this work, titanium films were first deposited on 9Cr18 (AISI440) stainless bearing steel by metal plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (MePIII-D) using a titanium vacuum arc plasma source. Afterwards, carbon implantation and carbon film deposition were performed by acetylene (C 2 H 2 ) plasma immersion ion implantation. Multiple-layered structures with superior properties were produced by conducting Ti MePIII-D + C 2 H 2 PIII successively. The composition and structure of the films were investigated employing Auger electron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. It is shown that the mixing for Ti and C atoms is much better when the target bias is higher during Ti MePIII-D. A top diamond-like carbon layer and a titanium oxycarbide layer are formed on the 9Cr18 steel surface. The wear test results indicate that this dual PIII-D method can significantly enhance the wear properties and decrease the surface friction coefficient of 9Cr18 steel

  12. Paramagnetism in ion-implanted oxides

    CERN Document Server

    Mølholt, Torben Esmann; Gíslason, Hafliði Pétur; Ólafsson, Sveinn

    This thesis describes the investigation on para-magnetism in dilute ion-implanted single-crystal oxide samples studied by on- and off-line $^{57}$Fe emission Mössbauer spectroscopy. The ion-implantation of the radioactive isotopes ( $^{57}$Mn and $^{57}$Co) was performed at the ISOLDE facility at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. The off-line measurements were performed at Aarhus University, Denmark. Mössbauer spectroscopy is a unique method, giving simultaneously local information on valence/spin state of the $^{57}$Fe probe atoms, site symmetry and magnetic properties on an atomic scale. The utilisation of emission Mössbauer spectroscopy opens up many new possibilities compared with traditional transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy. Among them is the possibility of working with a low concentration below 10$^{-4}$ –10$^{-3}$ at.%, where the implanted Mössbauer $^{57}$Fe probes are truly dilute impurities exclusively interacting with their nearest neighbours and therefore the possibility of crea...

  13. Ion implantation to improve mechanical and electrical properties of resistive materials based on ruthenium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byeli, A.V.; Shykh, S.K.; Beresina, V.P.

    1996-01-01

    This paper reports the influence of ion implantation, using different chemical species, on the surface micromorphology, wear resistance, coefficient of friction and electrical resistivity, and its variation during friction for resistive materials based on ruthenium dioxide. It is demonstrated that nitrogen and hydrogen ions are the most effective for modifying surface properties. (Author)

  14. Doping of silicon carbide by ion implantation; Dopage du carbure de silicium par implantation ionique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gimbert, J

    1999-03-04

    It appeared that in some fields, as the hostile environments (high temperature or irradiation), the silicon compounds showed limitations resulting from the electrical and mechanical properties. Doping of 4H and 6H silicon carbide by ion implantation is studied from a physicochemical and electrical point of view. It is necessary to obtain n-type and p-type material to realize high power and/or high frequency devices, such as MESFETs and Schottky diodes. First, physical and electrical properties of silicon carbide are presented and the interest of developing a process technology on this material is emphasised. Then, physical characteristics of ion implantation and particularly classical dopant implantation, such as nitrogen, for n-type doping, and aluminium and boron, for p-type doping are described. Results with these dopants are presented and analysed. Optimal conditions are extracted from these experiences so as to obtain a good crystal quality and a surface state allowing device fabrication. Electrical conduction is then described in the 4H and 6H-SiC polytypes. Freezing of free carriers and scattering processes are described. Electrical measurements are carried out using Hall effect on Van der Panw test patterns, and 4 point probe method are used to draw the type of the material, free carrier concentrations, resistivity and mobility of the implanted doped layers. These results are commented and compared to the theoretical analysis. The influence of the technological process on electrical conduction is studied in view of fabricating implanted silicon carbide devices. (author)

  15. Si-nanoparticle synthesis using ion implantation and MeV ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chulapakorn, T.; Wolff, M.; Primetzhofer, D.; Possnert, G. [Uppsala University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, P.O. Box 516, 751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Sychugov, I.; Suvanam, S.S.; Linnros, J. [Royal Institute of Technology, School of Information and Communication Technology, P.O. Box Electrum 229, 164 40 Kista (Sweden); Hallen, A. [Uppsala University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, P.O. Box 516, 751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Royal Institute of Technology, School of Information and Communication Technology, P.O. Box Electrum 229, 164 40 Kista (Sweden)

    2015-12-15

    A dielectric matrix with embedded Si-nanoparticles may show strong luminescence depending on nanoparticles size, surface properties, Si-excess concentration and matrix type. Ion implantation of Si ions with energies of a few tens to hundreds of keV in a SiO{sub 2} matrix followed by thermal annealing was identified as a powerful method to form such nanoparticles. The aim of the present work is to optimize the synthesis of Si-nanoparticles produced by ion implantation in SiO{sub 2} by employing MeV ion irradiation as an additional annealing process. The luminescence properties are measured by spectrally resolved photoluminescence including PL lifetime measurement, while X-ray reflectometry, atomic force microscopy and ion beam analysis are used to characterize the nanoparticle formation process. The results show that the samples implanted at 20%-Si excess atomic concentration display the highest luminescence and that irradiation of 36 MeV {sup 127}I ions affects the luminosity in terms of wavelength and intensity. It is also demonstrated that the nanoparticle luminescence lifetime decreases as a function of irradiation fluence. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Quantum effects in ion implanted devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamieson, D.N.; Chan, V.; Hudson, F.E.; Andresen, S.E.; Yang, C.; Hopf, T.; Hearne, S.M.; Pakes, C.I.; Prawer, S.; Gauja, E.; Dzurak, A.S.; Clark, R.G.

    2006-01-01

    Fabrication of nanoscale devices that exploit the rules of quantum mechanics to process information presents formidable technical challenges because of the need to control quantum states at the level of individual atoms, electrons or photons. We have used ion implantation to fabricate devices on the scale of 10 nm that have allowed the development and test of nanocircuitry for the control of charge transport at the level of single electrons. This fabrication method is compatible with the construction of devices that employ counted P dopants in Si by employing the technique of ion beam induced charge (IBIC) in which single 14 keV P ions can be implanted into ultra-pure silicon substrates by monitoring on-substrate detector electrodes. We have used IBIC with a MeV nuclear microprobe to map and measure the charge collection efficiency in the development of the electrode structure and show that 100% charge collection efficiency can be achieved. Prototype devices fabricated by this method have been used to investigate quantum effects in the control and transport of single electrons with potential applications to solid state quantum information processing devices

  17. Wear properties of metal ion implanted 4140 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, P.J.; Paoloni, F.J.

    1994-01-01

    AISI type 4140 (high tensile) steel has been implanted with tungsten and titanium using a metal vapour vacuum arc ion source. Doses in the range (1-5)x10 16 ionscm -2 were implanted to a depth of approximately 30nm. The relative wear resistance between non-implanted and implanted specimens has been estimated using pin-on-disc and abrasive wear tests. Implantation of titanium decreased the area of wear tracks by a factor of 5 over unimplanted steel. In some cases the steel was also hardened by a liquid carburization treatment before implantation. Abrasion tests revealed a further improvement in wear resistance on this material following ion irradiation. ((orig.))

  18. Effects of calcium ions on titanium surfaces for bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitua, Eduardo; Piñas, Laura; Murias, Alia; Prado, Roberto; Tejero, Ricardo

    2015-06-01

    The chemistry and topography of implant surfaces are of paramount importance for the successful tissue integration of load-bearing dental and orthopedic implants. Here we evaluate in vitro and in vivo titanium implant surfaces modified with calcium ions (Ca(2+) surfaces). Calcium ions produce a durable chemical and nano-topographical modification of the titanium oxide interface. Time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry examination of the outermost surface composition, shows that calcium ions in Ca(2+) surfaces effectively prevent adventitious hydrocarbon passivation of the oxide layer. In aqueous solutions Ca(2+) surfaces release within the first minute, 2/3 of the total measured Ca(2+), the rest is released over the following 85 days. Additionally, Ca(2+) surfaces significantly increase human fetal osteoblasts-like cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation, as measured by the autocrine synthesis of osteopontin. Relevant for clinical application, after 12 weeks of healing in sheep tibia, microcomputer tomography and histomorphometric analysis show that Ca(2+) surfaces develop significantly more bone contacts and higher bone density in the 1mm region around the implant. Consequently, titanium implants modified with calcium ions represent a valuable tool to improve endosseous integration in the clinical practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Biodegradable radioactive implants for glaucoma filtering surgery produced by ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assmann, W. [Department fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany)]. E-mail: walter.assmann@lmu.de; Schubert, M. [Department fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Held, A. [Augenklinik, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 81675 Munich (Germany); Pichler, A. [Augenklinik, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 81675 Muenchen (Germany); Chill, A. [Zentralinstitut fuer Medizintechnik, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Kiermaier, S. [Zentralinstitut fuer Medizintechnik, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Schloesser, K. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Busch, H. [NTTF GmbH, 53619 Rheinbreitbach (Germany); Schenk, K. [NTTF GmbH, 53619 Rheinbreitbach (Germany); Streufert, D. [Acri.Tec GmbH, 16761 Hennigsdorf (Germany); Lanzl, I. [Augenklinik, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 81675 Munich (Germany)

    2007-04-15

    A biodegradable, {beta}-emitting implant has been developed and successfully tested which prevents fresh intraocular pressure increase after glaucoma filtering surgery. Ion implantation has been used to load the polymeric implants with the {beta}-emitter {sup 32}P. The influence of ion implantation and gamma sterilisation on degradation and {sup 32}P-fixation behavior has been studied by ion beam and chemical analysis. Irradiation effects due to the applied ion fluence (10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}) and gamma dose (25 kGy) are found to be tolerable.

  20. Ion-implantation-induced phase separation and crystallization in lithia-silica glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, G.W.; Peercy, P.S.; Doyle, B.L.

    1980-01-01

    Crystallization of annealed Li 2 O.2SiO 2 glasses implanted with inert ions and fused SiO 2 glass implanted with Li ions was monitored using infrared reflection spectroscopy. Elastic recoil detection analysis was used to study changes in the Li and H concentration induced in these glasses by implantation and annealing. Implantation of Li 2 O.2SiO 2 with inert ions results in Li depletion, accompanied by H indiffusion, in the implanted region. For Li-implanted SiO 2 , crystallization of α-quartz is accompanied by appreciable Li diffusion to the surface and attendant H migration to the Li-depleted region. The crystallization mechanisms are discussed in terms of phase separation in the lithia-silica system

  1. Ion implanted GaAs microwave FET's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, S. S.; Blockley, E. G.; Dawsey, J. R.; Foreman, B. J.; Woodward, J.; Ball, G.; Beard, S. J.; Gaskell, J. M.; Allenson, M. B.

    1988-06-01

    The combination of ion implantation and photolithographic patterning techniques was applied to the fabrication of GaAs microwave FETs to provide a large number of devices having consistently predictable dc and high frequency characteristics. To validate the accuracy and repeatability of the high frequency device parameters, an X-band microwave circuit was designed and realized. The performance of this circuit, a buffered amplifier, is very close to the design specification. The availability of a large number of reproducible, well-characterized transistors enabled work to commence on the development of a large signal model for FETs. Work in this area is also described.

  2. Surface disorder production during plasma immersion implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohner, T.; Khanh, N.Q.; Petrik, P.; Biro, L.P.; Fried, M.; Pinter, I.; Lehnert, W.; Frey, L.; Ryssel, H.; Wentink, D.J.; Gyulai, J.

    1998-01-01

    Comparative investigations were performed using high-depth-resolution Rutherford backscattering (RBS) combined with channeling, spectroellipsometry (SE) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to analyze surface disorder and surface roughness formed during plasma immersion implantation of silicon (100)

  3. Corrosion resistance study of grey cast iron implanted with C, N, Cr and Cu ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usanova, O. Yu; Maryushin, L. A.; Kazantsev, A. Yu; Dyukova, A. I.

    2017-10-01

    This article deals with the corrosion resistance of gray cast iron implanted with C, N, Cr and Cu ions in sodium chloride solution and sulfuric acid solution. The potentiodynamic research was conducted in atmosphere, simulating corrosion conditions: in 3% sodium chloride solution and in 0,1 N sulfuric acid solution. Potentiodynamic curves were obtained and surfaces of samples were observed. The research proves that the implantation of ions with N and Cr leads to an increase in the corrosion resistance of cast iron in sodium chloride solution, and the implantation of ions with N and Cu leads to increased corrosion resistance in sulfuric acid solution.

  4. Temperature behavior of damage in sapphire implanted with light ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, E. [Ion Beam Laboratory, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Sacavem 2686-953 (Portugal); Centro de Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon (Portugal)], E-mail: ealves@itn.pt; Marques, C. [Ion Beam Laboratory, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Sacavem 2686-953 (Portugal); Centro de Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon (Portugal); Safran, G. [Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); McHargue, Carl J. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-0750 (United States)

    2009-05-01

    In this study, we compare and discuss the defect behavior of sapphire single crystals implanted with different fluences (1 x 10{sup 16}-1 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2}) of carbon and nitrogen with 150 keV. The implantation temperatures were RT, 500 deg. C and 1000 deg. C to study the influence of temperature on the defect structures. For all the ions the Rutherford backscattering-channeling (RBS-C) results indicate a surface region with low residual disorder in the Al-sublattice. Near the end of range the channeled spectrum almost reaches the random indicating a high damage level for fluences of 1 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2}. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) photographs show a layered contrast feature for the C implanted sample where a buried amorphous region is present. For the N implanted sample the Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) elemental mapping give evidence for the presence of a buried damage layer decorated with bubbles. Samples implanted at high temperatures (500 deg. C and 1000 deg. C) show a strong contrast fluctuation indicating a defective crystalline structure of sapphire.

  5. Decrease of Staphylococcal adhesion on surgical stainless steel after Si ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braceras, Iñigo; Pacha-Olivenza, Miguel A.; Calzado-Martín, Alicia; Multigner, Marta; Vera, Carolina; Broncano, Luis Labajos-; Gallardo-Moreno, Amparo M.; González-Carrasco, José Luis; Vilaboa, Nuria

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Si ion implantation of AISI 316LVM medical grade alloy might reduce bacterial adhesion and colonization. • Si ion implantation does not impair the attachment, viability and matrix maturation of human mesenchymal stem cells. • Nano-topography and surface chemistry changes account for the Si ion implantation induced effects. - Abstract: 316LVM austenitic stainless steel is often the material of choice on temporal musculoskeletal implants and surgical tools as it combines good mechanical properties and acceptable corrosion resistance to the physiologic media, being additionally relatively inexpensive. This study has aimed at improving the resistance to bacterial colonization of this surgical stainless steel, without compromising its biocompatibility and resistance. To achieve this aim, the effect of Si ion implantation on 316LVM has been studied. First, the effect of the ion implantation parameters (50 keV; fluence: 2.5–5 × 10 16 ions/cm 2 ; angle of incidence: 45–90°) has been assessed in terms of depth profiling of chemical composition by XPS and nano-topography evaluation by AFM. The in vitro biocompatibility of the alloy has been evaluated with human mesenchymal stem cells. Finally, bacterial adhesion of Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus on these surfaces has been assessed. Reduction of bacterial adhesion on Si implanted 316LVM is dependent on the implantation conditions as well as the features of the bacterial strains, offering a promising implantable biomaterial in terms of biocompatibility, mechanical properties and resistance to bacterial colonization. The effects of surface composition and nano-topography on bacterial adhesion, directly related to ion implantation conditions, are also discussed

  6. Decrease of Staphylococcal adhesion on surgical stainless steel after Si ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braceras, Iñigo, E-mail: inigo.braceras@tecnalia.com [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN) (Spain); Pacha-Olivenza, Miguel A. [CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN) (Spain); Universidad de Extremadura, Departamento de Física Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Av. Elvas s/n, 06006 Badajoz (Spain); Calzado-Martín, Alicia [Hospital Universitario La Paz-IdiPAZ, Paseo de la Castellana 261, 28046 Madrid (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN) (Spain); Multigner, Marta [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalúrgicas, CENIM-CSIC, Avda Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN) (Spain); Vera, Carolina [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN) (Spain); Broncano, Luis Labajos-; Gallardo-Moreno, Amparo M. [Universidad de Extremadura, Departamento de Física Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Av. Elvas s/n, 06006 Badajoz (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN) (Spain); González-Carrasco, José Luis [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalúrgicas, CENIM-CSIC, Avda Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN) (Spain); Vilaboa, Nuria [Hospital Universitario La Paz-IdiPAZ, Paseo de la Castellana 261, 28046 Madrid (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN) (Spain); and others

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Si ion implantation of AISI 316LVM medical grade alloy might reduce bacterial adhesion and colonization. • Si ion implantation does not impair the attachment, viability and matrix maturation of human mesenchymal stem cells. • Nano-topography and surface chemistry changes account for the Si ion implantation induced effects. - Abstract: 316LVM austenitic stainless steel is often the material of choice on temporal musculoskeletal implants and surgical tools as it combines good mechanical properties and acceptable corrosion resistance to the physiologic media, being additionally relatively inexpensive. This study has aimed at improving the resistance to bacterial colonization of this surgical stainless steel, without compromising its biocompatibility and resistance. To achieve this aim, the effect of Si ion implantation on 316LVM has been studied. First, the effect of the ion implantation parameters (50 keV; fluence: 2.5–5 × 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}; angle of incidence: 45–90°) has been assessed in terms of depth profiling of chemical composition by XPS and nano-topography evaluation by AFM. The in vitro biocompatibility of the alloy has been evaluated with human mesenchymal stem cells. Finally, bacterial adhesion of Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus on these surfaces has been assessed. Reduction of bacterial adhesion on Si implanted 316LVM is dependent on the implantation conditions as well as the features of the bacterial strains, offering a promising implantable biomaterial in terms of biocompatibility, mechanical properties and resistance to bacterial colonization. The effects of surface composition and nano-topography on bacterial adhesion, directly related to ion implantation conditions, are also discussed.

  7. Electrochemical investigations of ion-implanted oxide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultze, J.W.; Danzfuss, B.; Meyer, O.; Stimming, U.

    1985-01-01

    Oxide films (passive films) of 40-50 nm thickness were prepared by anodic polarization of hafnium and titanium electrodes up to 20 V. Multiple-energy ion implantation of palladium, iron and xenon was used in order to obtain modified films with constant concentration profiles of the implanted ions. Rutherford backscattering, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements and electrochemical charging curves prove the presence of implanted ions, but electrochemical and photoelectrochemical measurements indicate that the dominating effect of ion implantation is the disordering of the oxide film. The capacity of hafnium electrodes increases as a result of an increase in the dielectric constant D. For titanium the Schottky-Mott analysis shows that ion implantation causes an increase in D and the donor concentration N. Additional electronic states in the band gap which are created by the implantation improve the conductivity of the semiconducting or insulating films. This is seen in the enhancement of electron transfer reactions and its disappearance during repassivation and annealing. Energy changes in the band gap are derived from photoelectrochemical measurements; the absorption edge of hafnium oxide films decreases by approximately 2 eV because of ion implantation, but it stays almost constant for titanium oxide films. All changes in electrochemical behavior caused by ion implantation show little variation with the nature of the implanted ion. Hence the dominating effect seems to be a disordering of the oxide. (Auth.)

  8. TEM study of the ion beam induced damage during 14 kev P+ implantation in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubanov, S.; Tamanyan, G.; Hudson, F.; Jamieson, D.N.; McCallum, J.C.; Prawer, S.

    2005-01-01

    The proposed silicon-based quantum computer architecture comprises an array of phosphorus donor atoms (qubits) positioned with nanometre accuracy beneath the surface of a semiconductor host, using a single ion implantation technique. The average depth of the implanted ions (the projected range R p ), lateral range R p 1, and the distribution of ions about that depth can be approximated as two-dimensional Gaussian with standard deviation ΔR p and ΔR p 1 (lateral straggle). Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) we studied ion beam induced damage after 14 keV P + implantation in Si. The TEM images allowed us to compare the depth of the amorphous cluster formation to R p , R p 1, ΔR p 1 calculated from SRIM and hence determine evidence for the limitation on the accuracy of the position of the implanted ions imposed by straggling. (author). 4 refs., 3 figs

  9. Development of pulsed processes for the manufacture of solar cells. [Ion implantation and annealing process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minnucci, J.A.

    1978-12-01

    This report describes the results of a 1-year program to develop the processes required for low-energy ion implantation for the automated production of silicon solar cells. The program included (1) demonstrating state-of-the-art ion implantation equipment and designing an automated ion implanter, (2) making efforts to improve the performance of ion-implanted solar cells to 16.5 percent AM1, (3) developing a model of the pulse annealing process used in solar cell production, and (4) preparing an economic analysis of the process costs of ion implantation. During the program, phosphorus ions at an energy of 10 keV and dose of 2 x 10/sup 15/ cm/sup -2/ were implanted in silicon solar cells to produce junctions, while boron ions at 25 keV and 5 x 10/sup 15/ cm/sup -2/ were implanted in the cells to produce effective back surface fields. An ion implantation facility with a beam current up to 4 mA and a production throughput of 300 wafers per hour was designed and installed. A design was prepared for a 100-mA, automated implanter with a production capacity of 100 MW/sub e/ per year. A Solar Array Manufacturing Industry Costing Standards (SAMICS) economic analysis of the automated process steps of ion implantation and pulse annealing indicated that junctions can be formed and annealed at a cost of less than 3 cents per watt. The efforts during this program represent a major advancement in developing the automated production of silicon solar cells with efficiencies greater than 16 percent AM1.

  10. Effect of surface modification by nitrogen ion implantation on the electrochemical and cellular behaviors of super-elastic NiTi shape memory alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki-Ghaleh, H; Khalil-Allafi, J; Sadeghpour-Motlagh, M; Shakeri, M S; Masoudfar, S; Farrokhi, A; Beygi Khosrowshahi, Y; Nadernezhad, A; Siadati, M H; Javidi, M; Shakiba, M; Aghaie, E

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this investigation was to enhance the biological behavior of NiTi shape memory alloy while preserving its super-elastic behavior in order to facilitate its compatibility for application in human body. The surfaces of NiTi samples were bombarded by three different nitrogen doses. Small-angle X-ray diffraction was employed for evaluating the generated phases on the bombarded surfaces. The electrochemical behaviors of the bare and surface-modified NiTi samples were studied in simulated body fluid (SBF) using electrochemical impedance and potentio-dynamic polarization tests. Ni ion release during a 2-month period of service in the SBF environment was evaluated using atomic absorption spectrometry. The cellular behavior of nitrogen-modified samples was studied using fibroblast cells. Furthermore, the effect of surface modification on super-elasticity was investigated by tensile test. The results showed the improvement of both corrosion and biological behaviors of the modified NiTi samples. However, no significant change in the super-elasticity was observed. Samples modified at 1.4E18 ion cm(-2) showed the highest corrosion resistance and the lowest Ni ion release.

  11. Use of low energy hydrogen ion implants in high efficiency crystalline silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonash, S. J.; Singh, R.

    1985-01-01

    This program is a study of the use of low energy hydrogen ion implantation for high efficiency crystalline silicon solar cells. The first quarterly report focuses on two tasks of this program: (1) an examination of the effects of low energy hydrogen implants on surface recombination speed; and (2) an examination of the effects of hydrogen on silicon regrowth and diffusion in silicon. The first part of the project focussed on the measurement of surface properties of hydrogen implanted silicon. Low energy hydrogen ions when bombarded on the silicon surface will create structural damage at the surface, deactivate dopants and introduce recombination centers. At the same time the electrically active centers such as dangling bonds will be passivated by these hydrogen ions. Thus hydrogen is expected to alter properties such as the surface recombination velocity, dopant profiles on the emitter, etc. In this report the surface recombination velocity of a hydrogen emplanted emitter was measured.

  12. Synergistic effect of nanotopography and bioactive ions on peri-implant bone response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Y

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Yingmin Su,1 Satoshi Komasa,1 Peiqi Li,2 Mariko Nishizaki,1 Luyuan Chen,1 Chisato Terada,1 Shigeki Yoshimine,1 Hiroshi Nishizaki,1 Joji Okazaki1 1Department of Removable Prosthodontics and Occlusion, 2Department of Oral Implantology, Osaka Dental University, Hirakata, Osaka, Japan Abstract: Both bioactive ion chemistry and nanoscale surface modifications are beneficial for enhanced osseointegration of endosseous implants. In this study, a facile synthesis approach to the incorporation of bioactive Ca2+ ions into the interlayers of nanoporous structures (Ca-nano formed on a Ti6Al4V alloy surface was developed by sequential chemical and heat treatments. Samples with a machined surface and an Na+ ion-incorporated nanoporous surface (Na-nano fabricated by concentrated alkali and heat treatment were used in parallel for comparison. The bone response was investigated by microcomputed tomography assessment, sequential fluorescent labeling analysis, and histological and histomorphometric evaluation after 8 weeks of implantation in rat femurs. No significant differences were found in the nanotopography, surface roughness, or crystalline properties of the Ca-nano and Na-nano surfaces. Bone–implant contact was better in the Ca-nano and Na-nano implants than in the machined implant. The Ca-nano implant was superior to the Na-nano implant in terms of enhancing the volume of new bone formation. The bone formation activity consistently increased for the Ca-nano implant but ceased for the Na-nano implant in the late healing stage. These results suggest that Ca-nano implants have promising potential for application in dentistry and orthopedics. Keywords: surface modification, nanotopography, bioactive ion, osteoinduction, osseointegration

  13. Use of low-energy hydrogen ion implants in high-efficiency crystalline-silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonash, S. J.; Sigh, R.; Mu, H. C.

    1986-01-01

    The use of low-energy hydrogen implants in the fabrication of high-efficiency crystalline silicon solar cells was investigated. Low-energy hydrogen implants result in hydrogen-caused effects in all three regions of a solar cell: emitter, space charge region, and base. In web, Czochralski (Cz), and floating zone (Fz) material, low-energy hydrogen implants reduced surface recombination velocity. In all three, the implants passivated the space charge region recombination centers. It was established that hydrogen implants can alter the diffusion properties of ion-implanted boron in silicon, but not ion-implated arsenic.

  14. SIMS analysis of isotopic impurities in ion implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykes, D.E.; Blunt, R.T.

    1986-01-01

    The n-type dopant species Si and Se used for ion implantation in GaAs are multi-isotopic with the most abundant isotope not chosen because of potential interferences with residual gases. SIMS analysis of a range of 29 Si implants produced by several designs of ion implanter all showed significant 28 Si impurity with a different depth distribution from that of the deliberately implanted 29 Si isotope. This effect was observed to varying degrees with all fifteen implanters examined and in every 29 Si implant analysed to date 29 Si + , 29 Si ++ and 30 Si implants all show the same effect. In the case of Se implantation, poor mass resolution results in the implantation of all isotopes with the same implant distribution (i.e. energy), whilst implants carried out with good mass resolution show the implantation of all isotopes with the characteristic lower depth distribution of the impurity isotopes as found in the Si implants. This effect has also been observed in p-type implants into GaAs (Mg) and for Ga implanted in Si. A tentative explanation of the effect is proposed. (author)

  15. Influence of Ro radiation upon ion-implanted MOS structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaschieva, S.; Djakov, A.

    1986-01-01

    The interaction of Ro radiation with defects in ion-implanted MOS structures is studied using the method of thermally stimulated charge release and C/V method. It is shown that preliminary treatment with Ro radiation decreases the temperature of thermal annealing of the radiation defects introduced by ion-implantation up to 450 0 C. (author)

  16. Surface characterization and biodegradation behavior of magnesium implanted poly(L-lactide/caprolactone) films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokullu, Emel; Ersoy, Fulya; Yalçın, Eyyup; Öztarhan, Ahmet

    2017-11-01

    Biopolymers are great source for medical applications such as drug delivery, wound patch, artificial tissue studies etc., food packaging, cosmetic applications etc. due to their biocompatibility and biodegradability. Particularly, the biodegradation ability of a biomaterial makes it even advantageous for the applications. The more tunable the biodegradation rate the more desired the biopolymers. There are many ways to tune degradation rate including surface modification. In this study ion implantation method applied to biopolymer surface to determine its effect on biodegradation rate. In this study, surface modification of poly(L-lactide/caprolactone) copolymer film is practiced via Mg-ion-implantation using a MEVVA ion source. Mg ions were implanted at a fluence of 1 × 1015 ions/cm2 and ion energy of 30 keV. Surface characterization of Mg-ion-implanted samples is examined using Atomic Force Microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, contact angle measurement and FT-IR Spectroscopy. These analyses showed that the surface become more hydrophilic and rougher after the ion implantation process which is advantageous for cell attachment on medical studies. The in vitro enzymatic degradation of Mg-implanted samples was investigated in Lipase PS containing enzyme solution. Enzymatic degradation rate was examined by mass loss calculation and it is shown that Mg-implanted samples lost more than 30% of their weight while control samples lost around 20% of their weight at the end of the 16 weeks. The evaluation of the results confirmed that Mg-ion-implantation on poly(L-lactide/caprolactone) films make the surface rougher and more hydrophilic and changes the organic structure on the surface. On the other hand, ion implantation has increased the biodegradation rate.

  17. Effect of H + ion implantation on structural, morphological, optical and dielectric properties of L-arginine monohydrochloride monohydrate single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangeetha, K.; Babu, R. Ramesh; Kumar, P.; Bhagvannarayana, G.; Ramamurthi, K.

    2011-06-01

    L-arginine monohydrochloride monohydrate (LAHCl) single crystals have been implanted with 100 keV H + ions at different ion fluence ranging from 10 12 to 10 15 ions/cm 2. Implanted LAHCl single crystals have been investigated for property changes. Crystal surface and crystalline perfection of the pristine and implanted crystals were analyzed by atomic force microscope and high-resolution X-ray diffraction studies, respectively. Optical absorption bands induced by colour centers, refractive index and birefringence, mechanical stability and dielectric constant of implanted crystals were studied at different ion fluence and compared with that of pristine LAHCl single crystal.

  18. Modulation of the sound press level by the treatment of polymer diaphragms through ion implantation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeo, Sunmog; Park, Jaewon; Lee, Hojae

    2010-01-01

    We present two different surface modification treatments, an ion implantation, and an ion beam mixing, and show that the surface modifications caused by these treatments are useful tools to modulate the sound press level. The ion implantations on various polymer diaphragms cause an increase in the resonant frequency so that the sound press level is lowered at low frequencies. On the contrary, a Cu or Fe 2 O 3 coating by using an ion beam mixing method causes a decrease in the resonant frequency, resulting in a high sound press level at low frequencies. We discuss the physical reasons for the change in the sound press level due to the ion-implantation methods.

  19. Development of EL element by ion implanting into aluminium film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeno, Tomokazu; Tanizaki, Yoshiyuki [Tokyo Metropolitan Industrial Technology Research Inst. (Japan); Morisaki; Shigeki

    1999-01-01

    Rare earth elements were added to a barrier type anodized aluminium film by an ion implantation method, and then the film was reoxidized with direct current. EL characteristic properties by adding elements were observed by reoxidation. Red, blue and green were shown by adding Eu, Tm and Tb, respectively. The EL characteristics of barrier type film were affected by the surface pretreatment. The film treated with degreasing showed that the EL intensity increased much more from lower reanodizing voltage than that of film treated with electropolishing. The film with some elements showed each peculiar color without interference. So that we can see the mixed colors of them. (S.Y.)

  20. Raman scattering in silicon disordered by gold ion implantation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lavrentiev, Vasyl; Vacík, Jiří; Vorlíček, Vladimír; Voseček, Václav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 247, č. 8 (2010), s. 2022-2026 ISSN 0370-1972. [8th International Conference on Optics of Surfaces and Interfaces (OSI-VIII). Ischia, 07.09.2009-11.09.2009] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA200480702; GA AV ČR IAA400100701; GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN400480701; GA ČR GA106/09/1264 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505; CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : ion implantation * Raman spectra * Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.344, year: 2010

  1. Annealing effects on the migration of ion-implanted cadmium in glassy carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hlatshwayo, T.T., E-mail: thulani.hlatshwayo@up.ac.za [Physics Department, University of Pretoria, Pretoria (South Africa); Sebitla, L.D. [Physics Department, University of Pretoria, Pretoria (South Africa); Physics Department, University of Botswana, Gaborone (Botswana); Njoroge, E.G.; Mlambo, M.; Malherbe, J.B. [Physics Department, University of Pretoria, Pretoria (South Africa)

    2017-03-15

    The migration behaviour of cadmium (Cd) implanted into glassy carbon and the effects of annealing on radiation damage introduced by ion implantation were investigated. The glassy carbon substrates were implanted with Cd at a dose of 2 × 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2} and energy of 360 keV. The implantation was performed at room temperature (RT), 430 °C and 600 °C. The RT implanted samples were isochronally annealed in vacuum at 350, 500 and 600 °C for 1 h and isothermally annealed at 350 °C up to 4 h. The as-implanted and annealed samples were characterized by Raman spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS). Raman results revealed that implantation at room temperature amorphized the glassy carbon structure while high temperature implantations resulted in slightly less radiation damage. Isochronal annealing of the RT implanted samples resulted in some recrystallization as a function of increasing temperature. The original glassy carbon structure was not achieved at the highest annealing temperature of 600 °C. Diffusion of Cd in glassy carbon was already taking place during implantation at 430 °C. This diffusion of Cd was accompanied by significant loss from the surface during implantation at 600 °C. Isochronal annealing of the room temperature implanted samples at 350 °C for 1 h caused Cd to diffuse towards the bulk while isothermal annealing at 500 and 600 °C resulted in the migration of implanted Cd toward the surface accompanied by a loss of Cd from the surface. Isothermal annealing at 350 °C for 1 h caused Cd to diffuse towards the bulk while for annealing time >1 h Cd diffused towards the surface. These results were interpreted in terms of trapping and de-trapping of implanted Cd by radiation damage.

  2. Cell adhesion control by ion implantation into extra-cellular matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Kusakabe, Masahiro; Kaibara, Makoto; Iwaki, Masaya; Sasabe, Hiroyuki; Nishisaka, Tsuyoshi

    1994-01-01

    Cell adhesion control of polymer surfaces by ion implantation into polymers and extra-cellular matrix has been studied by means of in vitro adhesion measurements of the carcinoma of the cervix (HeLa cell). The specimens used were polystyrene (PS), oxygen plasma treated polystyrene (PS-O), extra-cellular matrix (Collagen: Type I) coated polystyrene (PS-C), and gelatin coated polystyrene (PS-G). Ne + , Na + , and Ar + implantations were performed with a fluence of 1x10 15 ions/cm 2 at energies of 50, 100 and 150 keV. The chemical and physical structures of ion implanted specimens have been investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR-ATR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy. Ion implanted PS demonstrated a dramatic improvement of adhesion of HeLa cell. HeLa cell adhered only to ion implanted circular domains of a diameter about 0.1 mm on PS. By contrast, ion implanted PS-C, PS-G and PS-O domains inhibited the cell adhesion. These phenomena were observed on Ne + , Na + , and Ar + implanted specimens at energies of 50, 100, and 150 keV. Ion implantation broke the original chemical bonds to form new radicals such as =C=O, condensed rings, C-C, C-O and OH radical. Ion implanted PS had a large amount of new radicals compared with that of PS-C, PS-G and PS-O. Ion implantation broke NH and NH 3 bonds originating from amino acid in PS-C and PS-G. OH and =C=O caused by oxygen treatment in PS-O were also destroyed by ion implantation. It is concluded that cell adhesion to ion implanted PS was caused by carbon structure and new radicals induced by ion implantation. The inhibition of HeLa cell adhesion on PS-C, PS-G and PS-O was caused by the destruction of cell adhesion properties of amino acid, OH and =C=O by radiation effects. ((orig.))

  3. Titanium Nitride and Nitrogen Ion Implanted Coated Dental Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W. Berzins

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Titanium nitride and/or nitrogen ion implanted coated dental materials have been investigated since the mid-1980s and considered in various applications in dentistry such as implants, abutments, orthodontic wires, endodontic files, periodontal/oral hygiene instruments, and casting alloys for fixed restorations. Multiple methodologies have been employed to create the coatings, but detailed structural analysis of the coatings is generally lacking in the dental literature. Depending on application, the purpose of the coating is to provide increased surface hardness, abrasion/wear resistance, esthetics, and corrosion resistance, lower friction, as well as greater beneficial interaction with adjacent biological and material substrates. While many studies have reported on the achievement of these properties, a consensus is not always clear. Additionally, few studies have been conducted to assess the efficacy of the coatings in a clinical setting. Overall, titanium nitride and/or nitrogen ion implanted coated dental materials potentially offer advantages over uncoated counterparts, but more investigation is needed to document the structure of the coatings and their clinical effectiveness.

  4. Development and experimental study of large size composite plasma immersion ion implantation device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falun, SONG; Fei, LI; Mingdong, ZHU; Langping, WANG; Beizhen, ZHANG; Haitao, GONG; Yanqing, GAN; Xiao, JIN

    2018-01-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) overcomes the direct exposure limit of traditional beam-line ion implantation, and is suitable for the treatment of complex work-piece with large size. PIII technology is often used for surface modification of metal, plastics and ceramics. Based on the requirement of surface modification of large size insulating material, a composite full-directional PIII device based on RF plasma source and metal plasma source is developed in this paper. This device can not only realize gas ion implantation, but also can realize metal ion implantation, and can also realize gas ion mixing with metal ions injection. This device has two metal plasma sources and each metal source contains three cathodes. Under the condition of keeping the vacuum unchanged, the cathode can be switched freely. The volume of the vacuum chamber is about 0.94 m3, and maximum vacuum degree is about 5 × 10‑4 Pa. The density of RF plasma in homogeneous region is about 109 cm‑3, and plasma density in the ion implantation region is about 1010 cm‑3. This device can be used for large-size sample material PIII treatment, the maximum size of the sample diameter up to 400 mm. The experimental results show that the plasma discharge in the device is stable and can run for a long time. It is suitable for surface treatment of insulating materials.

  5. Sliding wear characteristics of carburized steels and thermally refined steels implanted with nitrogen ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terashima, Keiichi; Koda, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Eiichi.

    1995-01-01

    In order to concretely examine the application of surface reforming by ion implantation, nitrogen ion implantation was applied to the thermally refined steels S45C and SCM440 and the carburized steel SCM415, which are high versatile steels for mechanical structures, and their friction and wear characteristics were examined. The results are summarized as follows. In the surface-reformed material, in which nitrogen was implanted for the purpose of improving the seizure durability of the carburized steel, the load-frictional coefficient curve in lubricated sliding friction was similar to that of the material without implantation, but it was recognized that the load at which seizure occurred reached 2000 kgf or more, and as the amount of implantation was more, the material withstood higher load. In the lubricated sliding friction using a pin-ring type wear testing machine of the thermally refined steels and those to which implantation was applied, it was recognized that the specific wear amount was less in the implanted steels than in those without implantation. The results of the analysis of the implanted surface layers and the friction surfaces are reported. (K.I.)

  6. Immobilization of extracellular matrix on polymeric materials by carbon-negative-ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Hiroshi; Sommani, Piyanuch; Muto, Takashi; Utagawa, Yoshiyuki; Sakai, Shun; Sato, Hiroko; Gotoh, Yasuhito; Ishikawa, Junzo

    2005-08-01

    Effects of ion implantation into polystyrene (PS), silicone rubber (SR) and poly-L-lactic acid (PLA) have been investigated for immobilization of extracellular matrix. Carbon negative ions were implanted into PS and SR sheets at various energies between 5-30 keV and various doses between 1.0 × 1014-1.0 × 1016 ions/cm2. Contact angles of pure water on C-implanted surfaces of PS and SR were decreased as increase in ion energy and in dose due to formation of functional groups such as OH and C-O. Selective attachment of nerve cells was observed on C-implanted them at 10 keV and 3 × 1015 ions/cm2 after in vitro cell culture of nerve cells of PC-12 h. Neurite outgrowth also extended over the implanted area. After dipping in a serum medium and in a fibronectin solution for 2 h, the detection of N 1s electrons by X-ray induced photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) revealed a significant distinction of protein adhesion on the implanted area. Thus, immobilization of proteins on surface is used for considering the selective cell-attachment. For PLA, the selective attachment of cells and protein depended on the implantation conditions.

  7. Deep ultra violet and visible Raman spectroscopy studies of ion implanted 6H-SiC: Recrytallisation behaviour and thermal decomposition/thermal etching of the near surface region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhudzai, R.J., E-mail: rj.kuhudzai@tuks.co.za [Physics Department, University of Pretoria, Pretoria (South Africa); Malherbe, J.B.; Berg, N.G. van der; Hlatshwayo, T.T.; Odutemowo, O.; Prinsloo, L.C. [Physics Department, University of Pretoria, Pretoria (South Africa); Buys, A.V. [Laboratory for Microscopy and Microanalysis, University of Pretoria (South Africa); Erasmus, R. [School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa); Wendler, E. [Institut Für Festköperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Jena (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    The recystallisation behaviour and thermal decomposition of the near surface amorphised region of 6H-SiC have been investigated by Raman spectroscopy. 360 keV ions of iodine and silver were implanted at room temperature into wafers of 6H-SiC resulting in the amorphisation of the near surface region. Vacuum annealing of the samples was performed at 1200 °C for 5 h and then sequentially from 1200 to 1600 °C in steps of 100 °C for 30 h at each annealing temperature. Raman spectroscopy was performed using two laser wavelength excitation regimes, the 514 nm laser (visible region) and the 244 nm laser (deep ultraviolet region, DUV). Measurements in the visible region for samples annealed at 1200 °C for 5 h showed that the characteristic 6H-SiC peaks, namely, the Transverse Optical (TO) and Longitudinal Optical (LO) are similar to the virgin samples, albeit with lower intensity due to some retained defects upon recystallisation of the SiC surface region. The similarities between the virgin spectra and the annealed sample were due to the deep penetration of the 514 nm laser into 6H-SiC resulting in the signal from the bulk undamaged 6H-SiC contributing to the overall spectra. However, DUV laser excitation, which only probes the near surface region, shows that after annealing the peaks are broader and asymmetrical compared to the virgin samples. DUV Raman spectra of samples annealed at 1600 °C indicate that SiC has completely decomposed and the top surface layer is now covered by a carbon layer. However the deeper penetrating laser in the visible region showed that the extent of decomposition at 1600 °C was greater for the silver implanted samples than for the iodine implanted samples.

  8. Hardness depth profile of lattice strained cemented carbide modified by high-energy boron ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Y.; Matsumura, A.; Higeta, K.; Inoue, T.; Shimizu, S.; Motonami, Y.; Sato, M.; Sadahiro, T.; Fujii, K.

    1991-07-01

    The hardness depth profiles of cemented carbides which were implanted with high-energy B + ions have been estimated using a dynamic microhardness tester. The B + implantations into (16% Co)-cemented WC alloys were carried out under conditions where the implantation energies were 1-3 MeV and the fluences 1 × 10 17-1 × 10 18ions/cm 2. The profiles show that the implanted layer becomes harder as fluences are chosen at higher values and there is a peak at a certain depth which depends on the implantation energy. In X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies of the implanted surface the broadened refraction peaks of only WC and Co are detected and the increments of lattice strain and of residual stress in the near-surface region are observed. It is supposed that the hardening effect should be induced by an increase in residual stress produced by lattice strain. The hardness depth profile in successive implantation of ions with different energies agrees with the compounded profile of each one of the implantations. It is concluded that the hardness depth profile can be controlled under adequate conditions of implantation.

  9. Carbon Ion Implantation: A Good Method to Enhance the Biocompatibility of Silicone Rubber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xin; Chen, Xing; Mao, Tong-cun; Li, Xiang; Shi, Xiao-hua; Fan, Dong-li; Zhang, Yi-ming

    2016-04-01

    Silicone rubber and silicone rubber-based materials have been used as medical tissue implants in the field of plastic surgery for many years, but there are still some reports of adverse reactions to long-term implants. Earlier studies have shown that ion implantation could enhance the biocompatibility of biomaterials. However, whether ion implantation has a good effect on silicone rubber is unknown. Three types of carbon ion silicone rubber were obtained by implanting three doses of carbon ions. Then, the antibacterial adhesion properties and the in vivo host responses were evaluated. The antibacterial adhesion properties were examined by plate colony counting, fluorescence staining, and scanning electron microscopic observation. The host responses were evaluated by surveying inflammation and fiber capsule formation that developed after subcutaneous implantation in Sprague-Dawley rats for 7, 30, 90, and 180 days. In addition, the possible mechanism by which ion implantation enhanced the biocompatibility of the biomaterial was investigated and discussed. Carbon ion silicone rubber exhibits less bacterial adhesion, less collagen deposition, and thinner and weaker tissue capsules. Immunohistochemical staining results for CD4, tumor necrosis factor-α, α-smooth muscle actin, and elastin showed the possible mechanism enhancing the biocompatibility of silicone rubber. These data indicate that carbon ion silicone rubber exhibits good antibacterial adhesion properties and triggers thinner and weaker tissue capsules. In addition, high surface roughness and high zeta potential may be the main factors that induce the unique biocompatibility of carbon ion silicone rubber. Ion implantation should be considered for further investigation and application, and carbon ion silicone rubber could be a better biomaterial to decrease silicone rubber-initiated complications.

  10. Ion implantation: [fundamental factors which affect accelerator performance and their implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armour, D.G.

    1987-01-01

    The use of ion implantation to modify the composition of the near surface layers of solid materials has been widely exploited in the semiconductor industry and is finding increasing application in the treatment of metals, ceramics and polymers. The bombardment of a solid with energetic ions inevitably involves the deposition of energy as well as material and this effect, which results in unwanted effects such as radiation damage in conventional implantation situations, is also being utilized to assist in the deposition of highly adherent or epitaxial layers. The increasing range of applications of ion implantation and ion assisted processing of materials has placed increasingly stringent demands on machine performance; in the present paper implantation techniques and their applications will be discussed. (author)

  11. Thermal characterization of Ag and Ag + N ion implanted ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokullu Urkac, E.; Oztarhan, A.; Tihminlioglu, F.; Kaya, N.; Ila, D.; Muntele, C.; Budak, S.; Oks, E.; Nikolaev, A.; Ezdesir, A.; Tek, Z.

    2007-08-01

    Most of total hip joints are composed of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). However, as ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene is too stable in a body, wear debris may accumulate and cause biological response such as bone absorption and loosening of prosthesis. In this study, ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene samples were Ag and Ag + N hybrid ion implanted by using MEVVA ion implantation technique to improve its surface properties. Samples were implanted with a fluence of 1017 ion/cm2 and extraction voltage of 30 kV. Implanted and unimplanted samples were investigated by thermo-gravimetry analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), optical microscopy (OM) and contact Angle measurement. Thermal characterization results showed that the ion bombardment induced an increase in the % crystallinity, onset and termination degradation temperatures of UHMWPE.

  12. Thermal characterization of Ag and Ag + N ion implanted ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokullu Urkac, E. [Department of Materials Science, Izmir High Technology Institute, Gulbahcekoyu Urla, Izmir (Turkey)]. E-mail: emelsu@gmail.com; Oztarhan, A. [Bioengineering Department, Ege University, Bornova, Izmir 35100 (Turkey); Tihminlioglu, F. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Izmir High Technology Institute, Gulbahcekoyu Urla, Izmir (Turkey); Kaya, N. [Bioengineering Department, Ege University, Bornova, Izmir 35100 (Turkey); Ila, D. [Center for Irradiation of Materials, Alabama A and M University, Normal AL 35762 (United States); Muntele, C. [Center for Irradiation of Materials, Alabama A and M University, Normal AL 35762 (United States); Budak, S. [Center for Irradiation of Materials, Alabama A and M University, Normal AL 35762 (United States); Oks, E. [H C Electronics Institute, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Nikolaev, A. [H C Electronics Institute, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Ezdesir, A. [R and D Department, PETKIM Holding A.S., Aliaga, Izmir 35801 (Turkey); Tek, Z. [Department of Physics, Celal Bayar University, Manisa (Turkey)

    2007-08-15

    Most of total hip joints are composed of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE ). However, as ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene is too stable in a body, wear debris may accumulate and cause biological response such as bone absorption and loosening of prosthesis. In this study, ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene samples were Ag and Ag + N hybrid ion implanted by using MEVVA ion implantation technique to improve its surface properties. Samples were implanted with a fluence of 10{sup 17} ion/cm{sup 2} and extraction voltage of 30 kV. Implanted and unimplanted samples were investigated by thermo-gravimetry analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), optical microscopy (OM) and contact Angle measurement. Thermal characterization results showed that the ion bombardment induced an increase in the % crystallinity, onset and termination degradation temperatures of UHMWPE.

  13. Modification of amorphous bright chromium deposited (ABCD) films by nitrogen ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferber, H.; Hoflund, G.B.; Mount, C.K.; Hoshino, Shigeo

    1991-01-01

    The hardness of amorphous bright chromium deposited (ABCD) layers can be increased by annealing or N ion implantation. In this study the N ion implantation parameters which influence hardness have been systematically examined. These parameters include sample pretreatment, ion beam energy and total dose. The properties of the resulting films have been characterized using Auger electron spectroscopy coupled with ion sputtering depth profiling, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Knoop microhardness measurements. Auger depth profiles suggest the formation of a stoichiometric CrN subsurface layer after implantation of high N doses (>8x10 17 N/cm 2 ). With higher doses this layer broadens toward the surface and N retention values decrease rapidly. Implanting at elevated temperatures increases the retained N, causes N to migrate more deeply into the bulk, and yields high hardness values. (orig.)

  14. Optical stability under photo-irradiation of urushi films by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awazu, Kaoru; Funada, Yoshinori; Kasamori, Masato; Sakamoto, Makoto; Ichikawa, Tachio

    1995-01-01

    Nitrogen ions, argon ions and others were implanted in urushi-coated surfaces by using a simplified ion implantation apparatus, and the optical stability test was carried out by a sunshine weather meter. The rate of remaining luster on urushi-coated surfaces accompanying ultraviolet irradiation showed respective peculiar behavior according to the kinds of the implanted ions, the time of implantation, transparent and black urushi films, and the use of brightener or not. In electron beam irradiation, change hardly occurred. In urushi-coated products, the luster and the properties are maintained for long period, therefore recently, urushi coating has become to be applied to road sign panels and notice boards in addition to lacquer wares and applied fine art products, and the improvement of the optical stability of urushi films has become the subject. In this study, the experimental methods on urushi coating, ion implantation, the optical stability test and measuring method are explained. The changes of urushi film luster, transmittance, haze, lightness, and chromaticity by nitrogen ion implantation are reported. (K.I.)

  15. Ion-induced surface modification of alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedersich, H.

    1983-11-01

    In addition to the accumulation of the implanted species, a considerable number of processes can affect the composition of an alloy in the surface region during ion bombardment. Collisions of energetic ions with atoms of the alloy induce local rearrangement of atoms by displacements, replacement sequences and by spontaneous migration and recombination of defects within cascades. Point defects form clusters, voids, dislocation loops and networks. Preferential sputtering of elements changes the composition of the surface. At temperatures sufficient for thermal migration of point defects, radiation-enhanced diffusion promotes alloy component redistribution within and beyond the damage layer. Fluxes of interstitials and vacancies toward the surface and into the interior of the target induce fluxes of alloying elements leading to depth-dependent compositional changes. Moreover, Gibbsian surface segregation may affect the preferential loss of alloy components by sputtering when the kinetics of equilibration of the surface composition becomes competitive with the sputtering rate. Temperature, time, current density and ion energy can be used to influence the individual processes contributing to compositional changes and, thus, produce a rich variety of composition profiles near surfaces. 42 references

  16. Application of ion implantation RBS to the study of electrocatalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, E.J.; Vallet, C.E.; White, C.W.

    1990-01-01

    Ir-implanted titanium near-surface alloys were prepared by ion implantation, characterized (Ir concentration/depth profiles) by Rutherford backscattering (RBS), and subsequently anodically oxidized to form electrocatalytically active Ir x Ti 1-x O 2 /Ti electrodes. The electrochemical behavior of the metallic-like Ir 4 Ti 1-x O 2 /Ti electrodes in acidic chloride, sulfate, and perchlorate solutions was investigated, and the results compared with those previously obtained with similarly prepared Ru x Ti 1-x O 2 /Ti electrodes. For both electrodes, M x Ti 1-x O 2 /Ti (M equals Ir or Ru), the Tafel slope for the Cl 2 evolution reaction is 40 mV, i.e.,δE/δlog i equals 2.303 (2RT/3F). The reaction order (n) with respect to chloride ion concentration δlogi/δlog[Cl - ] + 1, where K 9 equals 54.9 dm 3 mol -1 for Ir x Ti 1-x O 2 /Ti and K 9 equals 40 dm 3 mol -1 for Ru x Ti 1-x O 2 /Ti. A modified Volmer-Heyrovsky mechanism, one in which the role of absorbed chloride ions is taken into account, is shown to be consistent with aforementioned diagnostic parameters

  17. Nonlinear optical properties of Sn+ ion-implanted silica glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Y.; Hioki, T.; Motohiro, T.; Noda, S.; Kurauchi, T.

    1994-01-01

    The absolute value of the third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility, vertical stroke χ (3) vertical stroke , of Sn + ion-implanted silica glass was found to be similar 10 -6 esu. This value is as large as those reported for semiconductor-doped glasses. Silica glass substrates were implanted with Sn + ions at an acceleration energy of 400 keV to a dose of 2x10 17 ions/cm 2 at room temperature. Metallic Sn microcrystallites of 4-20 nm in diameter were found to be embedded in the silica glass matrix. The average volume fraction of the Sn microcrystallites was evaluated to be 28%. vertical stroke χ (3) vertical stroke and the imaginary part of the dielectric function, Im ε, had peaks at the same wavelength of 500 nm owing to surface plasmon resonance. The peak width of vertical stroke χ (3) vertical stroke was nearly half of that of Im ε, which can be explained by an effective medium theory. ((orig.))

  18. Mechanical and tribological properties of ion beam-processed surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kodali, Padma [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The intent of this work was to broaden the applications of well-established surface modification techniques and to elucidate the various wear mechanisms that occur in sliding contact of ion-beam processed surfaces. The investigation included characterization and evaluation of coatings and modified surfaces synthesized by three surface engineering methods; namely, beam-line ion implantation, plasma-source ion implantation, and DC magnetron sputtering. Correlation among measured properties such as surface hardness, fracture toughness, and wear behavior was also examined. This dissertation focused on the following areas of research: (1) investigating the mechanical and tribological properties of mixed implantation of carbon and nitrogen into single crystal silicon by beam-line implantation; (2) characterizing the mechanical and tribological properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings processed by plasma source ion implantation; and (3) developing and evaluating metastable boron-carbon-nitrogen (BCN) compound coatings for mechanical and tribological properties. The surface hardness of a mixed carbon-nitrogen implant sample improved significantly compared to the unimplanted sample. However, the enhancement in the wear factor of this sample was found to be less significant than carbon-implanted samples. The presence of nitrogen might be responsible for the degraded wear behavior since nitrogen-implantation alone resulted in no improvement in the wear factor. DLC coatings have low friction, low wear factor, and high hardness. The fracture toughness of DLC coatings has been estimated for the first time. The wear mechanism in DLC coatings investigated with a ruby slider under a contact stress of 1 GPa was determined to be plastic deformation. The preliminary data on metastable BCN compound coatings indicated high friction, low wear factor, and high hardness.

  19. Mechanical and tribological properties of ion beam-processed surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodali, P.

    1998-01-01

    The intent of this work was to broaden the applications of well-established surface modification techniques and to elucidate the various wear mechanisms that occur in sliding contact of ion-beam processed surfaces. The investigation included characterization and evaluation of coatings and modified surfaces synthesized by three surface engineering methods; namely, beam-line ion implantation, plasma-source ion implantation, and DC magnetron sputtering. Correlation among measured properties such as surface hardness, fracture toughness, and wear behavior was also examined. This dissertation focused on the following areas of research: (1) investigating the mechanical and tribological properties of mixed implantation of carbon and nitrogen into single crystal silicon by beam-line implantation; (2) characterizing the mechanical and tribological properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings processed by plasma source ion implantation; and (3) developing and evaluating metastable boron-carbon-nitrogen (BCN) compound coatings for mechanical and tribological properties. The surface hardness of a mixed carbon-nitrogen implant sample improved significantly compared to the unimplanted sample. However, the enhancement in the wear factor of this sample was found to be less significant than carbon-implanted samples. The presence of nitrogen might be responsible for the degraded wear behavior since nitrogen-implantation alone resulted in no improvement in the wear factor. DLC coatings have low friction, low wear factor, and high hardness. The fracture toughness of DLC coatings has been estimated for the first time. The wear mechanism in DLC coatings investigated with a ruby slider under a contact stress of 1 GPa was determined to be plastic deformation. The preliminary data on metastable BCN compound coatings indicated high friction, low wear factor, and high hardness

  20. Enhancement of electrical conductivity of ion-implanted polymer films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brock, S.

    1985-01-01

    The electrical conductivity of ion-implanted films of Nylon 66, Polypropylene (PP), Poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (Teflon) and mainly Poly (ethylene terephthalate) (PET) was determined by DC measurements at voltages up to 4500 V and compared with the corresponding values of pristine films. Measurements were made at 21 0 C +/- 1 0 C and 65 +/- 2% RH. The electrical conductivity of PET films implanted with F + , Ar + , or As + ions at energies of 50 keV increases by seven orders of magnitude as the fluence increases from 1 x 10 18 to 1 x 10 20 ions/m 2 . The conductivity of films implanted with As + was approximately one order greater than those implanted with Ar + , which in turn was approximately one-half order greater than those implanted with F + . The conductivity of the most conductive film ∼1 S/m) was almost 14 orders of magnitude greater than the pristine PET film. Except for the three PET samples implanted at fluences near 1 x 10 20 ions/m 2 with F + , Ar + , and As + ions, all implanted films were ohmic up to an electric field strength of 600 kV/m. The temperature dependence of the conductivity of the three PET films implanted near a fluence of 1 x 10 20 ions/m 2 was measured over the range of 80 K < T < 300 K

  1. Metal ion implantation using a filtered cathodic vacuum arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilek, M. M. M.; Evans, P.; Mckenzie, D. R.; McCulloch, D. G.; Zreiqat, H.; Howlett, C. R.

    2000-05-01

    When plasma immersion ion implantation is performed in the condensable plasma stream produced by a cathodic vacuum arc, deposition as well as implantation usually occurs. In this article we describe a method of achieving pure implantation by orienting the substrate so that it is shadowed from the plasma beam. Implantation depth profiles measured in glassy carbon and CR39 polymer using Rutherford backscattering are compared to illustrate the effectiveness of the technique for conducting and insulating substrates. Charging of the insulating substrate was found to cause a reduction in implantation depth compared to a conducting substrate. The depth profiles in glassy carbon were comparable to those achieved by conventional extracted ion beam implantation. Implantation of magnesium into hydroxyapatite and alumina was carried out to improve the bone cell adhesion onto these materials for prosthetic applications.

  2. Ion-beam modifications of the surface morphology and conductivity ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Studies on the surface micromorphology and surface conductivity in thin polymer films of poly vinyl alcohol (PVA) and poly ethylene oxide (PEO) in both as-grown and ion-implanted polymer films have been carried out to reveal certain specific features of the ordered state in these materials. Optical microscopic.

  3. Ion-beam modifications of the surface morphology and conductivity ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Studies on the surface micromorphology and surface conductivity in thin polymer films of poly vinyl alcohol (PVA) and poly ethylene oxide (PEO) in both as-grown and ion-implanted polymer films have been carried out to reveal certain specific features of the ordered state in these materials. Optical microscopic ...

  4. Cytological effect of nitrogen ion implantation into Stevia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Mei; Wang Cailian; Chen Qiufang; Lu Ting; Shu Shizhen

    1997-01-01

    Dry seeds of Stevia were implanted by 35∼150 keV nitrogen ion with various doses. The cytological effect on M 1 was studied. The results showed that nitrogen ion beam was able to induce variation on chromosome structure in root tip cells. The rate of cells with chromosome aberration was increased with the increased with the increase of ion beam energy and dose. However, there was no significant linear regression relationship between ion dose and aberration rate. The cytological effect of nitrogen ion implantation was lower than that of γ-rays

  5. Air Abrasive Disinfection of Implant Surfaces in a Simulated Model of Peri-Implantitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Introduction: Dental implant technology has evolved into a predictable treatment option for the restoration of edentulous sites. However, peri... implantitis is an emerging complication leading to increased morbidity or mortality of osseointegrated implants . The prevalence of peri- implant ... implant surface. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the ability of air-powder abrasion to mechanically decontaminate dental implants in a

  6. Effects of sulphur ion implantation on the electrochemical behaviour of two stainless steels in sulphuric medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nader-Roux, J.; Becdelievre, A.M. de; Gaillard, F.; Roux, R.; Becdelievre, J. de

    1986-01-01

    The electrochemical behaviour in sulphuric acid of two austenitic stainless steels (AISI 304 L and AISI 321) modified by sulphur ion implantation has been studied. Surface analysis of oxygen and sulphur by LEEIXS and XRFS were performed before and after polarization on unimplanted and on implanted samples. I/E curves with implanted steels reveal an important corrosion peak (α peak) recovering widely the active peak of unimplanted samples. For high implanted doses, another peak (β peak) appears in the passive range. High doses implanted steels polarized in the range of the α peak exhibit a sulphur enriched black surface layer. SEM examination of this layer shows it is constituted by flakes rolling up themselves. The formation of a superficial non-protective sulphide layer and the internal stresses of this layer explain the corrosion enhancement of sulphur implanted materials. After dissolution of this layer the behaviour of unimplanted steels is found again. (author)

  7. Modification of medical metals by ion implantation of copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Y. Z.; Xiong, G. Y.; Liang, H.; Raman, S.; He, F.; Huang, Y.

    2007-10-01

    The effect of copper ion implantation on the antibacterial activity, wear performance and corrosion resistance of medical metals including 317 L of stainless steels, pure titanium, and Ti-Al-Nb alloy was studied in this work. The specimens were implanted with copper ions using a MEVVA source ion implanter with ion doses ranging from 0.5 × 10 17 to 4 × 10 17 ions/cm 2 at an energy of 80 keV. The antibacterial effect, wear rate, and inflexion potential were measured as a function of ion dose. The results obtained indicate that copper ion implantation improves the antibacterial effect and wear behaviour for all the three medical materials studied. However, corrosion resistance decreases after ion implantation of copper. Experimental results indicate that the antibacterial property and corrosion resistance should be balanced for medical titanium materials. The marked deteriorated corrosion resistance of 317 L suggests that copper implantation may not be an effective method of improving its antibacterial activity.

  8. Formation of shallow junctions for VLSI by ion implantation and rapid thermal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oeztuerk, M.C.

    1988-01-01

    In this work, several techniques were studied to form shallow junctions in silicon by ion implantation. These include ion implantation through thin layers of silicon dioxide and ion implantation through a thick polycrystalline silicon layer. These techniques can be used to reduce the junction depth. Their main disadvantage is dopant loss in the surface layer. As an alternative, preamorphization of the Si substrate prior to boron implantation to reduce boron channeling was investigated. The disadvantage of preamorphization is the radiation damage introduced into the Si substrate using the implant. Preamorphization by silicon self-implantation has been studied before. The goal of this study was to test Ge as an alternative amorphizing agent. It was found that good-quality p + -n junctions can be formed by both boron and BF 2 ion implantation into Ge-preamorphized Si provided that the preamorphization conditions are optimized. If the amorphous crystalline interface is sufficiently close to the surface, it is possible to completely remove the end-of-range damage. If these defects are not removed and are left in the depletion region, they can result in poor-quality, leaky junctions

  9. Single ion impact detection and scanning probe aligned ion implantation for quantum bit formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weis, Christoph D.

    2011-01-01

    Quantum computing and quantum information processing is a promising path to replace classical information processing via conventional computers which are approaching fundamental physical limits. Instead of classical bits, quantum bits (qubits) are utilized for computing operations. Due to quantum mechanical phenomena such as superposition and entanglement, a completely different way of information processing is achieved, enabling enhanced performance for certain problem sets. Various proposals exist on how to realize a quantum bit. Among them are electron or nuclear spins of defect centers in solid state systems. Two such candidates with spin degree of freedom are single donor atoms in silicon and nitrogen vacancy (NV) defect centers in diamond. Both qubit candidates possess extraordinary qualities which makes them promising building blocks. Besides certain advantages, the qubits share the necessity to be placed precisely in their host materials and device structures. A commonly used method is to introduce the donor atoms into the substrate materials via ion implantation. For this, focused ion beam systems can be used, or collimation techniques as in this work. A broad ion beam hits the back of a scanning probe microscope (SPM) cantilever with incorporated apertures. The high resolution imaging capabilities of the SPM allows the non destructive location of device areas and the alignment of the cantilever and thus collimated ion beam spot to the desired implant locations. In this work, this technique is explored, applied and pushed forward to meet necessary precision requirements. The alignment of the ion beam to surface features, which are sensitive to ion impacts and thus act as detectors, is demonstrated. The technique is also used to create NV center arrays in diamond substrates. Further, single ion impacts into silicon device structures are detected which enables deliberate single ion doping.

  10. Single ion impact detection and scanning probe aligned ion implantation for quantum bit formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weis, Christoph D.

    2011-10-04

    Quantum computing and quantum information processing is a promising path to replace classical information processing via conventional computers which are approaching fundamental physical limits. Instead of classical bits, quantum bits (qubits) are utilized for computing operations. Due to quantum mechanical phenomena such as superposition and entanglement, a completely different way of information processing is achieved, enabling enhanced performance for certain problem sets. Various proposals exist on how to realize a quantum bit. Among them are electron or nuclear spins of defect centers in solid state systems. Two such candidates with spin degree of freedom are single donor atoms in silicon and nitrogen vacancy (NV) defect centers in diamond. Both qubit candidates possess extraordinary qualities which makes them promising building blocks. Besides certain advantages, the qubits share the necessity to be placed precisely in their host materials and device structures. A commonly used method is to introduce the donor atoms into the substrate materials via ion implantation. For this, focused ion beam systems can be used, or collimation techniques as in this work. A broad ion beam hits the back of a scanning probe microscope (SPM) cantilever with incorporated apertures. The high resolution imaging capabilities of the SPM allows the non destructive location of device areas and the alignment of the cantilever and thus collimated ion beam spot to the desired implant locations. In this work, this technique is explored, applied and pushed forward to meet necessary precision requirements. The alignment of the ion beam to surface features, which are sensitive to ion impacts and thus act as detectors, is demonstrated. The technique is also used to create NV center arrays in diamond substrates. Further, single ion impacts into silicon device structures are detected which enables deliberate single ion doping.

  11. Cesium ion bombardment of metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tompa, G.S.

    1986-01-01

    The steady state cesium coverage due to cesium ion bombardment of molybdenum and tungsten was studied for the incident energy range below 500 eV. When a sample is exposed to a positive ion beam, the work function decreases until steady state is reached with a total dose of less than ≅10 16 ions/cm 2 , for both tungsten and molybdenum. A steady state minimum work function surface is produced at an incident energy of ≅100 eV for molybdenum and at an incident energy of ≅45 eV for tungsten. Increasing the incident energy results in an increase in the work function corresponding to a decrease in the surface coverage of cesium. At incident energies less than that giving the minimum work function, the work function approaches that of cesium metal. At a given bombarding energy the cesium coverage of tungsten is uniformly less than that of molybdenum. Effects of hydrogen gas coadsorption were also examined. Hydrogen coadsorption does not have a large effect on the steady state work functions. The largest shifts in the work function due to the coadsorption of hydrogen occur on the samples when there is no cesium present. A theory describing the steady-state coverage was developed is used to make predictions for other materials. A simple sticking and sputtering relationship, not including implantation, cannot account for the steady state coverage. At low concentrations, cesium coverage of a target is proportional to the ratio of (1 - β)/γ where β is the reflection coefficient and γ is the sputter yield. High coverages are produced on molybdenum due to implantation and low backscattering, because molybdenum is lighter than cesium. For tungsten the high backscattering and low implantation result in low coverages

  12. Application of micro beam PIXE to detection of titanium ion release from dental and orthopaedic implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ektessabi, A.M.; Otsuka, T.; Tsuboi, Y.; Yokoyama, K.; Albrektsson, T.; Sennerby, L.; Johansson, C.

    1994-01-01

    In the past two decades the utilization of dental and orthopaedic implants in reconstructive surgery has been spread widely. Most of these implants are inserted in the corrosive environment of the human body for long periods of time. The level of dissolution, release, and transport of metal ions as a result of corrosion of these materials are not fully known at present. We report the results of application of micro ion beam PIXE spectroscopy to detect release of titanium from titanium and titanium alloy implants inserted in the tibiae of rabbits for three months. It was found that titanium ions could be detected in the surrounding tissues, with high precision, as a gradient from the implant surface and in higher amounts in the bone tissue as compared with the soft tissues. It is concluded that application of micro ion beam PIXE spectroscopy for detection of metal ion release, and distribution of the released material around the implants with high special resolution and accuracy may be used to further investigate the mechanism of metal release, and the relation between surface micromorphology and corrosion resistance of the implant materials. (author)

  13. Development of vertical compact ion implanter for gemstones applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intarasiri, S.; Wijaikhum, A.; Bootkul, D.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Tippawan, U.; Yu, L.D.; Singkarat, S.

    2014-01-01

    Ion implantation technique was applied as an effective non-toxic treatment of the local Thai natural corundum including sapphires and rubies for the enhancement of essential qualities of the gemstones. Energetic oxygen and nitrogen ions in keV range of various fluences were implanted into the precious stones. It has been thoroughly proved that ion implantation can definitely modify the gems to desirable colors together with changing their color distribution, transparency and luster properties. These modifications lead to the improvement in quality of the natural corundum and thus its market value. Possible mechanisms of these modifications have been proposed. The main causes could be the changes in oxidation states of impurities of transition metals, induction of charge transfer from one metal cation to another and the production of color centers. For these purposes, an ion implanter of the kind that is traditionally used in semiconductor wafer fabrication had already been successfully applied for the ion beam bombardment of natural corundum. However, it is not practical for implanting the irregular shape and size of gem samples, and too costly to be economically accepted by the gem and jewelry industry. Accordingly, a specialized ion implanter has been requested by the gem traders. We have succeeded in developing a prototype high-current vertical compact ion implanter only 1.36 m long, from ion source to irradiation chamber, for these purposes. It has been proved to be very effective for corundum, for example, color improvement of blue sapphire, induction of violet sapphire from low value pink sapphire, and amelioration of lead-glass-filled rubies. Details of the implanter and recent implantation results are presented

  14. Development of vertical compact ion implanter for gemstones applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Intarasiri, S., E-mail: saweat@gmail.com [Science and Technology Research Institute, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Wijaikhum, A. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Bootkul, D., E-mail: mo_duangkhae@hotmail.com [Department of General Science (Gems and Jewelry), Faculty of Science, Srinakharinwirot University, Bangkok 10110 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Suwannakachorn, D.; Tippawan, U.; Yu, L.D.; Singkarat, S. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2014-08-15

    Ion implantation technique was applied as an effective non-toxic treatment of the local Thai natural corundum including sapphires and rubies for the enhancement of essential qualities of the gemstones. Energetic oxygen and nitrogen ions in keV range of various fluences were implanted into the precious stones. It has been thoroughly proved that ion implantation can definitely modify the gems to desirable colors together with changing their color distribution, transparency and luster properties. These modifications lead to the improvement in quality of the natural corundum and thus its market value. Possible mechanisms of these modifications have been proposed. The main causes could be the changes in oxidation states of impurities of transition metals, induction of charge transfer from one metal cation to another and the production of color centers. For these purposes, an ion implanter of the kind that is traditionally used in semiconductor wafer fabrication had already been successfully applied for the ion beam bombardment of natural corundum. However, it is not practical for implanting the irregular shape and size of gem samples, and too costly to be economically accepted by the gem and jewelry industry. Accordingly, a specialized ion implanter has been requested by the gem traders. We have succeeded in developing a prototype high-current vertical compact ion implanter only 1.36 m long, from ion source to irradiation chamber, for these purposes. It has been proved to be very effective for corundum, for example, color improvement of blue sapphire, induction of violet sapphire from low value pink sapphire, and amelioration of lead-glass-filled rubies. Details of the implanter and recent implantation results are presented.

  15. Development of vertical compact ion implanter for gemstones applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intarasiri, S.; Wijaikhum, A.; Bootkul, D.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Tippawan, U.; Yu, L. D.; Singkarat, S.

    2014-08-01

    Ion implantation technique was applied as an effective non-toxic treatment of the local Thai natural corundum including sapphires and rubies for the enhancement of essential qualities of the gemstones. Energetic oxygen and nitrogen ions in keV range of various fluences were implanted into the precious stones. It has been thoroughly proved that ion implantation can definitely modify the gems to desirable colors together with changing their color distribution, transparency and luster properties. These modifications lead to the improvement in quality of the natural corundum and thus its market value. Possible mechanisms of these modifications have been proposed. The main causes could be the changes in oxidation states of impurities of transition metals, induction of charge transfer from one metal cation to another and the production of color centers. For these purposes, an ion implanter of the kind that is traditionally used in semiconductor wafer fabrication had already been successfully applied for the ion beam bombardment of natural corundum. However, it is not practical for implanting the irregular shape and size of gem samples, and too costly to be economically accepted by the gem and jewelry industry. Accordingly, a specialized ion implanter has been requested by the gem traders. We have succeeded in developing a prototype high-current vertical compact ion implanter only 1.36 m long, from ion source to irradiation chamber, for these purposes. It has been proved to be very effective for corundum, for example, color improvement of blue sapphire, induction of violet sapphire from low value pink sapphire, and amelioration of lead-glass-filled rubies. Details of the implanter and recent implantation results are presented.

  16. Amorphous surface layers in Ti-implanted Fe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, J.A.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Picraux, S.T.

    1979-01-01

    Implanting Ti into high-purity Fe results in an amorphous surface layer which is composed of not only Fe and Ti, but also C. Implantations were carried out at room temperature over the energy range 90 to 190 keV and fluence range 1 to 2 x 10/sup 16/ at/cm/sup 2/. The Ti-implanted Fe system has been characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ion backscattering and channeling analysis, and (d,p) nuclear reaction analysis. The amorphous layer was observed to form at the surface and grow inward with increasing Ti fluence. For an implant of 1 x 10/sup 17/ Ti/cm/sup 2/ at 180 keV the layer thickness was 150 A, while the measured range of the implanted Ti was approx. 550 A. This difference is due to the incorporation of C into the amorphous alloy by C being deposited on the surface during implantation and subsequently diffusing into the solid. Our results indicate that C is an essential constituent of the amorphous phase for Ti concentrations less than or equal to 10 at. %. For the 1 x 10/sup 17/ Ti/cm/sup 2/ implant, the concentration of C in the amorphous phase was approx. 25 at. %, while that of Ti was only approx. 3 at. %. A higher fluence implant of 2 x 10/sup 17/ Ti/cm/sup 2/ produced an amorphous layer with a lower C concentration of approx. 10 at. % and a Ti concentration of approx. 20 at. %.

  17. First results from the Los Alamos plasma source ion implantation experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rej, D.J.; Faehl, R.J.; Gribble, R.J.; Henins, I.; Kodali, P.; Nastasi, M.; Reass, W.A.; Tesmer, J.; Walter, K.C.; Wood, B.P.; Conrad, J.R.; Horswill, N.; Shamim, M.; Sridharan, K.

    1993-01-01

    A new facility is operational at Los Alamos to examine plasma source ion implantation on a large scale. Large workpieces can be treated in a 1.5-m-diameter, 4.6-m-long plasma vacuum chamber. Primary emphasis is directed towards improving tribological properties of metal surfaces. First experiments have been performed at 40 kV with nitrogen plasmas. Both coupons and manufactured components, with surface areas up to 4 m 2 , have been processed. Composition and surface hardness of implanted materials are evaluated. Implant conformality and dose uniformity into practical geometries are estimated with multidimensional particle-in-cell computations of plasma electron and ion dynamics, and Monte Carlo simulations of ion transport in solids

  18. Corrosion resistance of modified layer on uranium formed by plasma immersion ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long Zhong; Liu Kezhao; Bai Bin; Yan Dongxu

    2010-01-01

    Nitrogen ion was implanted into uranium surface using plasma immersion ion implantation, and the corrosion resistance of modified layer was studied by corrosion experiment. SEM was used to observe variety of samples surface. In atmosphere, the sample surface had not changed during five months. In heat-humid environment, there was dot-corrosion appearing after two months, but it did not influence the integrity of the modified layer. AES was used to study the diffusion of oxygen and nitrogen during hot-humid corrosion, in three months, both of two elements diffused to the substrate, but the diffusion was weak. The structure of modified layer was not changed. Experimental results show that the modified layer formed by plasma immersion ion implantation has good corrosion resistance.

  19. Defects and defect generation in oxide layer of ion implanted silicon-silicon dioxide structures

    CERN Document Server

    Baraban, A P

    2002-01-01

    One studies mechanism of generation of defects in Si-SiO sub 2 structure oxide layer as a result of implantation of argon ions with 130 keV energy and 10 sup 1 sup 3 - 3.2 x 10 sup 1 sup 7 cm sup - sup 2 doses. Si-SiO sub 2 structures are produced by thermal oxidation of silicon under 950 deg C temperature. Investigations were based on electroluminescence technique and on measuring of high-frequency volt-farad characteristics. Increase of implantation dose was determined to result in spreading of luminosity centres and in its maximum shifting closer to boundary with silicon. Ion implantation was shown, as well, to result in increase of density of surface states at Si-SiO sub 2 interface. One proposed model of defect generation resulting from Ar ion implantation into Si-SiO sub 2

  20. Thermal annealing of waveguides formed by ion implantation of silica-on-si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.M.; Ridgway, M.C.; Simpson, P.J.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Buried channel waveguides were fabricated by ion implantation of PECVD-grown silica-on-Si. Post-implantation annealing was observed to have a significant influence on waveguide loss as measured at both 1.3 and 1.55 nm. Waveguide loss decreased abruptly from an as-implanted value of ∼1 dB/cm to ∼0.15 dB/cm following a 500 deg C/1 hr annealing cycle. However, annealing at greater temperatures (600 deg C) yielded a loss value comparable to the as implanted result (∼1dB/cm). This paper will address the factors that potentially influenced the observed loss behaviour which included thermally-induced changes to density and refractive index, precipitation of the implanted ions (Si) and mode profile spreading and subsequent interaction with the waveguide surface. Using surface profilometry and variable-energy positron spectroscopy, no significant density or structural changes were observed over the temperature range of 400-600deg C. The refractive index exhibited comparable behaviour as measured with prism coupling. The potential influence of precipitation was determined by comparing Si implantation with dual Si and O implantation, the latter with a dose ratio of 1:2. In addition, waveguides were also fabricated as a function of implantation energy to characterise the influence of the surface proximity

  1. Structural and electronic properties of ion-implanted superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernas, H.; Nedellec, P.

    1980-01-01

    Recent work on ion implanted superconductors is reviewed. In situ x-ray, channeling, resistivity, and electron tunneling experiments now approach the relation between lattice order (or disorder) and superconductivity

  2. Modelling of ion implantation in SiC crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakarov, Ivan [SILVACO International, 4701 Patrick Henry Drive, Building 2, Santa Clara, CA 95054 (United States)]. E-mail: ivan.chakarov@silvaco.com; Temkin, Misha [SILVACO International, 4701 Patrick Henry Drive, Building 2, Santa Clara, CA 95054 (United States)

    2006-01-15

    An advanced electronic stopping model for ion implantation in SiC has been implemented within the binary collision approximation. The model has been thoroughly tested and validated for Al implantation into 4H-, 6H-SiC under different initial implant conditions. A very good agreement between calculated and experimental profiles has been achieved. The model has been integrated in an industrial technology CAD process simulator.

  3. Modelling of ion implantation in SiC crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakarov, Ivan; Temkin, Misha

    2006-01-01

    An advanced electronic stopping model for ion implantation in SiC has been implemented within the binary collision approximation. The model has been thoroughly tested and validated for Al implantation into 4H-, 6H-SiC under different initial implant conditions. A very good agreement between calculated and experimental profiles has been achieved. The model has been integrated in an industrial technology CAD process simulator

  4. Quartz modification by Zn ion implantation and swift Xe ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Privezentsev, Vladimir [Institute of Physics and Technology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kulikauskas, Vaclav [Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Didyk, Alexander; Skuratov, Vladimir [Joint Institute of Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Steinman, Edward; Tereshchenko, Alexey; Kolesnikov, Nikolay [Institute of Solid-State Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation); Trifonov, Alexey; Sakharov, Oleg [National Research University ' ' MIET' ' , Zelenograd, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ksenich, Sergey [National University of Science and Technology ' ' MISiS' ' , Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-07-15

    The quartz slides were implanted by {sup 64}Zn{sup +} ions with dose of 5 x 10{sup 16}/cm{sup 2} and energy of 100 keV. After implantation, the amorphous metallic Zn nanoparticles with an average radius of 3.5 nm were created. The sample surface becomes nonuniform, its roughness is increased and its values rise up to 6 nm compared to virgin state, and the roughness maximum is at a value of about 0.8 nm. The surface is made up of valleys and hillocks which have a round shape with an average diameter about 200 nm. At the center of these hillocks are pores with a depth up to 6 nm and a diameter of about 20 nm. After implantation in UV-vis diapason, the optical transmission decreases while PL peak (apparently due to oxygen deficient centers) at wavelength of 400 nm increases. Then the samples were subjected to swift Xe ion irradiation with the fluences of 1 x 10{sup 12}-7.5 x 10{sup 14}/cm{sup 2} and energy of 167 MeV. After Xe irradiation, the sample surface roughness shat down to values of 0.5 nm and the roughness maximum is at a value of about 0.1 nm. Optical transmission in UV-vis diapason increases. The PL peak at wavelength of 400 nm is decreased while a PL peak at wavelength of 660 nm is raised. This peak is presumably due to non-bridging oxygen hole centers or/and NPs with structure Si(core)/SiO{sub 2}(shell). HRTEM image of Zn-implanted quartz subsurface layer. One can see the Zn amorphous nanoparticles, which confirms the electron diffraction pattern (insert). (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Auger processes in ion-surface collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zampieri, Guillermo.

    1985-01-01

    Bombardment of solid targets with low-energy noble gas ions can produce Auger electron emission from the target atoms and/or from the projectiles. In the case of Auger emission from the projectile, Auger emission was observed during the bombardment of Na, Mg, Al and Si with Ne + ions. This emission was studied as a function of the energy, incidence angle and charge state of the projectile. From the analysis, it is concluded that the emission originates in the decay in vacuum of excited and reflected Ne atoms, moving outside the surface. Auger emission was not observed during the bombardment of K, V and Ni with Ar + ions; Zr and Cs with Kr + , and Xe + ions, respectively; and Li and Be with He + ions. In the case of Auger emission from the target, studies of certain aspects of the Na, Mg and Al Auger electron emission spectra were made. The results allow to identify two components in the Auger feature, coresponding to two kinds of Auger transition. The total spectra results from the superposition of both kinds of emission. Auger spectra from K obtained during Ar + and K + bombardment of K-implanted Be, Mg, Al and Cu were also analyzed. Similar to the Na, Mg and Al Auger spectra, the K Auger feature is composed of an atomic like peak superimposed on a bandlike structure. Both components correspond to Auger transitions in K atoms with a 3p vacancy, occuring in vacuum and inside the solid, respectively. (M.E.L.) [es

  6. SIMPLANT: analytic calculation of ion implantation within the Tadpance system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fawcett, R.J.

    1988-04-01

    An analytic method for calculating the concentration distribution of dopant atoms introduced into a multilayer semiconductor device by ion beam implantation is explained. Computer software written to apply the method is described. The operation of the software within a semiconductor process and device modelling package is outlined. Implantation distributions generated by the software are illustrated. (author)

  7. Secondary ion mass spectrometry characterization of indium-implanted silicon wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmer-Krasinski, C.; Morinville, W. R.

    2004-06-01

    Indium is a key element in the formation of well, channel, and halo profiles in semiconductor fabrication. Indium has the advantage of being a large atom with a small projected range, creating a steeper implant profile than the boron implant used in the past [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Ion Implantation Technology, ITT, 2002]. Typically, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is used to provide implant profiles; however, when a set of indium-implanted samples were analyzed on the Cameca IMS-6F, non-repeatability of the implant profile was observed in the samples that had not received an oxide spacer prior to implantation. This non-repeatability was not observed when the same samples were analyzed on the Perkin-Elmer 6300 quadrupole secondary ion mass spectrometer. Several reasons for this were hypothesized: (1) an amorphous layer was being created due to the large size of the indium atom; (2) increased damage and surface roughening occurred on the samples that did not receive an oxide layer prior to implantation; (3) Gibbsian segregation similar to that of Cu in SiO 2 was being observed [Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry, Wiley, New York, 1989, p. 2.2-1]; and (4) sample heating was changing the thermodynamic properties of the samples. To explore these possibilities, two sets of indium-implanted samples—with and without spacer oxide—were analyzed with atomic force microscopy (AFM) for surface roughness and with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for differences in amorphization. SIMS analysis was also conducted on both types of dynamic SIMS instruments to develop an analytical protocol for determining the indium implant profile. Repeatable results, consistent with analysis on the quadrupole SIMS, were obtained by utilizing the cold finger on the Cameca 6F.

  8. Anticorrosion ion implantation of fragments of zirconium fuel can specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalin, B.A.; Osipov, V.V.; Volkov, N.V.; Khernov, V.Yu.

    2001-01-01

    Aimed at the study of specific features of oxide film formation in the initial stage of Eh110 and Eh635 alloy fuel can oxidation the modification of tubular specimen surfaces is performed using an ion mixing technique, and the structure of oxide films produced in a steam-water environment is investigated. Using the method of vacuum vapor deposition the outer surface of specimens is coated with alloying element films irradiated by a polyenergetic Ar + ion beam with a 10 keV mean energy up to radiation doses of (7-10) x 10 17 ion/cm 2 . Monatomic (Al, Fe, Cu, Cr, Mo, Sn) or diatomic (Al-Fe, Al-Mo, Al-Sn, Fe-Cu, Fe-Mo, Fe-Sn, Cr-Mo, Cr-Sn) implantation into a zirconium cladding occurs under irradiation effect. The positive influence of combined intrusion of Al and other elements is revealed. The presence of Al atoms enhances the oxide film structure. The least ZeO 2 film thickness is observed when alloying with molybdenum, Al-Fe, Al-Mo and Al-Sn [ru

  9. Large area diamond-like carbon coatings by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCabe, A.R.; Proctor, G.; Jones, A.M.; Bull, S.J.; Chivers, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    Diamond-like Carbon (DLC) coatings have been deposited onto large geometry components in the Harwell Blue Tank ion implantation facility. To modify the substrate surface and to crack the low vapour pressure oil which is evaporated and condensed onto the surface, a 40 Kev nitrogen ion bucket ion source is used. The coating of areas up to 1 metre in diameter is common and with component manipulation larger areas may be coated. Since the component temperature never exceeds 80 o C during the process, a wide range of materials may be coated including specialist tool steels and even certain high density polymers. In order to produce hard wear resistant coatings with extremely low coefficients of friction (0.02-0.15) and a range of mechanical and electrical properties, various oil precursors have been investigated. The production and assessment of such coatings, including measurements of their tribiological performance, is presented. Applications for wear resistance, corrosion protection and electrically conducting coatings are discussed with examples drawn from engineering, electronics and biomedicine. (7 figures, 13 references). (UK)

  10. Channel waveguides formed by ion implantation of PECVD grown silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leech, P.W.; Faith, M.F.; Johnson, C.M.; Ridgway, M.C.; Bazylenko, M.

    1997-01-01

    Low loss channel waveguides have been formed in silica-on-silicon by implantation with 5 MeV Si and Ge ions. In these experiments, the substrate was comprised of an undoped layer of silica (30 μm thick) which was grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD). The optical loss characteristics of the waveguides, as measured at both λ 1300 and 1550 nm, were independent of the implanted ion species. A minimum in the attenuation loss (α) of ∼0.10-0.20 dB/cm was obtained following both a pre-implant (1050 o C) and a post-implant (400-500 o C) anneal of the waveguides. The ability to produce a minimum in α by pre-implant annealing has been attributed to the thermally induced relaxation of the densified structure in the as-grown layer. Only a comparatively small degree of compaction was measured for Si-implanted samples which did not receive a pre-implant anneal. In contrast, the much larger degree of compaction in the pre-implant annealed samples was similar in magnitiude to that observed in fused silica. These are the first reported examples of ion-implanted waveguides using a substrate of silica grown by PECVD. (author)

  11. Effects of high-energy (MeV) ion implantation of polyester films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, Keiji; Matsumoto, Yasuyo; Nishimiya, Nobuyuki; Noshiro, Mitsuru; Satou, Mamoru

    1991-01-01

    The effects of high-energy ion beam irradiation on polyester (PET) films using a 3 MeV tandem-type ion beam accelerator were studied. O, Ni, Pt, and Au as ion species were irradiated at 10 14 -10 15 ions/cm 2 on 50 μm thick PET films. Physical properties and molecular structure changes were studied by the surface resistivity measurements and RBS. The surface resistivity decreases with an increase in irradiation dose. At 10 15 ions/cm 2 irradiation, the surface resistivity is 10 8 Ω/□. According to RBS and XPS analyses, some carbon and oxygen atoms in the PET are replaced by implanted ions and the -C=O bonds are destroyed easily by the ion beam. (orig.)

  12. Multifunctions of dual Zn/Mg ion co-implanted titanium on osteogenesis, angiogenesis and bacteria inhibition for dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yiqiang; Jin, Guodong; Xue, Yang; Wang, Donghui; Liu, Xuanyong; Sun, Jiao

    2017-02-01

    In order to improve the osseointegration and long-term survival of dental implants, it is urgent to develop a multifunctional titanium surface which would simultaneously have osteogeneic, angiogeneic and antibacterial properties. In this study, a potential dental implant material-dual Zn/Mg ion co-implanted titanium (Zn/Mg-PIII) was developed via plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII). The Zn/Mg-PIII surfaces were found to promote initial adhesion and spreading of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (rBMSCs) via the upregulation of the gene expression of integrin α1 and integrin β1. More importantly, it was revealed that Zn/Mg-PIII could increase Zn 2+ and Mg 2+ concentrations in rBMSCs by promoting the influx of Zn 2+ and Mg 2+ and inhibiting the outflow of Zn 2+ , and then could enhance the transcription of Runx2 and the expression of ALP and OCN. Meanwhile, Mg 2+ ions from Zn/Mg-PIII increased Mg 2+ influx by upregulating the expression of MagT1 transporter in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), and then stimulated the transcription of VEGF and KDR via activation of hypoxia inducing factor (HIF)-1α, thus inducing angiogenesis. In addition to this, it was discovered that zinc in Zn/Mg-PIII had certain inhibitory effects on oral anaerobic bacteria (Pg, Fn and Sm). Finally, the Zn/Mg-PIII implants were implanted in rabbit femurs for 4 and 12weeks with Zn-PIII, Mg-PIII and pure titanium as controls. Micro-CT evaluation, sequential fluorescent labeling, histological analysis and push-out test consistently demonstrated that Zn/Mg-PIII implants exhibit superior capacities for enhancing bone formation, angiogenesis and osseointegration, while consequently increasing the bonding strength at bone-implant interfaces. All these results suggest that due to the multiple functions co-produced by zinc and magnesium, rapid osseointegration and sustained biomechanical stability are enhanced by the novel Zn/Mg-PIII implants, which have the potential

  13. Conduction in ion implanted single crystal diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunn, J.D.; Parikh, N.R.; Swanson, M.L.

    1992-01-01

    We have implanted sodium, phosphorus and arsenic into single crystal type IIa diamond as possible n-type dopants. Particular emphasis was applied to the implantation of sodium at different temperatures and doses; combined implantation energies of 55,80 and 120 keV were used to provide a uniformly doped layer over approximately 100 nm depth. The implanted layers exhibited semiconducting behavior with a single exponential activation energy between 0.40 and 0.48 eV, as determined by temperature dependent resistance measurements. A sample implanted to a concentration of 5.10 19 Na + /cm 3 at 550 degrees C exhibited a single activation energy of 0.415 eV over a temperature range from 25 to 500 degrees C. Thermal annealing above 900 degrees C was found to remove implantation damage as measured by optical absorption and RBS/channeling. However, concomitant increases in the resistance and the activation energy were observed. Implantation of 22 Ne was used to introduce a damage density equivalent to the 23 Na implant, while not introducing an electrically active species. The activation energy and electrical resistance were similar but higher than those produced by implantation with sodium. We conclude that the electrical properties of the Na-implanted samples were at least partly due to electrically active Na, but that residual implantation damage was still important

  14. Effect of cathodic hydrogenation on the mechanical properties of AISI 304 stainless steel nitrided by ion implantation, glow discharge and plasma immersion ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foerster, C. E.; Souza, J. F. P.; Silva, C. A.; Ueda, M.; Kuromoto, N. K.; Serbena, F. C.; Silva, S. L. R.; Lepienski, C. M.

    2007-04-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement in austenitic stainless steels is restricted to the surface due to the low hydrogen diffusion in austenitic structures. The effect of three different nitriding processes: ion implantation (II), plasma immersion ion implantation (PI3) and glow discharge (GD), on the mechanical and structural properties of cathodically hydrogenated AISI 304 stainless steel were studied in the present work. Cathodic hydrogenation was made on untreated and nitrided samples. Surface microstructure after nitriding and hydrogenation was investigated by X-ray diffraction. Mechanical properties were measured by instrumented indentation. Surface crack formation and hardness decrease was observed in non-nitrided samples after cathodic hydrogenation. Hardness of nitrided samples decreases after hydrogen degassing but still has values higher than untreated samples. Comparative analysis of nitriding processes and working conditions indicated that glow discharge plasma nitriding process at 400 °C or 450 °C is the most adequate to avoid crack formation in steel surface after cathodic hydrogenation.

  15. The characteristics of surface oxidation and corrosion resistance of nitrogen implanted zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, G.; Choi, B.H.; Kim, W.; Jung, K.S.; Kwon, H.S.; Lee, S.J.; Lee, J.H.; Song, T.Y.; Shon, D.H.; Han, J.G.

    1997-01-01

    This work is concerned with the development and application of ion implantation techniques for improving the corrosion resistance of zircaloy-4. The corrosion resistance in nitrogen implanted zircaloy-4 under a 120 keV nitrogen ion beam at an ion dose of 3 x 10 17 cm -2 depends on the implantation temperature. The characteristics of surface oxidation and corrosion resistance were analyzed with the change of implantation temperature. It is shown that as implantation temperature rises from 100 to 724 C, the colour of specimen surface changes from its original colour to light yellow at 100 C, golden at 175 C, pink at 300 C, blue at 440 C and dark blue at 550 C. As the implantation temperature goes above 640 C, the colour of surface changes to light black, and the surface becomes a little rough. The corrosion resistance of zircaloy-4 implanted with nitrogen is sensitive to the implantation temperature. The pitting potential of specimens increases from 176 to 900 mV (SCE) as the implantation temperature increases from 100 to 300 C, and decreases from 900 to 90 mV(SCE) as the implantation temperature increases from 300 to 640 C. The microstructure, the distribution of oxygen, nitrogen and carbon elements, the oxide grain size and the feature of the precipitation in the implanted surface were investigated by optical microscope, TEM, EDS, XRD and AES. The experimental results reveal that the ZrO 2 is distributed mainly on the outer surface. The ZrN is distributed under the ZrO 2 layer. The characteristics of the distribution of ZrO 2 and ZrN in the nitrogen-implanted zircaloy-4 is influenced by the implantation temperature of the sample, and in turn the corrosion resistance is influenced. (orig.)

  16. Microstructure characterization and optical properties of sapphire after helium ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Mian; Yang, Liang; Shen, Huahai; Liu, Wei; Xiang, Xia; Zheng, Wanguo; Guo, Decheng; Huang, Jin; Sun, Kai; Yuan, Xiaodong

    2015-06-01

    The (0 0 0 1) sapphire samples are irradiated with 60 keV helium ions at the fluences of 5 × 1016, 1 × 1017and 5 × 1017 ions/cm2 at room temperature. After implantation, two broad absorption bands at 320-460 and 480-700 nm are observed and their intensities increase with the increasing ion fluence. The grazing incidence X-ray diffraction results indicate that the {0 0 0 1} diffraction peaks of sapphire decrease and broaden due to the disorientation of the generated crystallites after ion irradiation. The microstructure evolution is examined by the scanning and transmission electron microscopes. The surface becomes rough because of the aggregation of helium bubbles and migration towards the surface. There is a lattice expansion up to ∼4.5% in the implanted area and the lattice distortion measured from dispersion of (1 1 0) diffraction is ∼4.6°. Such strain of crystal lattice is rather large and leads to contrast fluctuation at scale of 1-2 nm (the bubble size). The laser induced damage threshold (LIDT) is investigated to understand the effect of helium ion beam irradiation on the laser damage resistance of sapphire components and the results show that the LIDT decreases from 5.4 to 2.5 J/cm2 due to the absorptive color centers, helium bubbles and defects induced by helium ion implantation. The laser damage morphologies of samples before and after ion implantation are also presented.

  17. Annealing effect on planar waveguides in LiNbO 3 produced by oxygen ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiu-Hong; Huang, Qing; Zhao, Jin-Hua; Liu, Peng; Wang, Xue-Lin; Du, Ji-Fu; Huang, Ning-Kang

    2011-01-01

    We reported on planar waveguides in stoichiometric lithium niobate fabricated by 4.5 MeV oxygen ion implantation with a dose of 6 × 10 14 ions/cm 2 at room temperature. After ion implantation, these samples were annealed at 240 °C, 260 °C, and 300 °C for 30 min. We investigated annealing effect on the guiding modes and near-field images in the waveguides by prism-coupling method and end-face coupling method respectively. We found that for the extraordinary refractive index a positive alternation occurred in the near-surface region while a negative alternation happened at the end of ion track. Moreover, we measured the transmission spectra for the pure sample and implanted samples before and after annealed at different temperatures, and we observed an absorption peak at ˜480 nm (2.6 eV) in all of these SLN samples.

  18. The production of optical waveguides by ion implantation: the case of rutile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rickards, J.; Trejo L, R.; Flores R, E.; Golzarri, J. I.; Espinosa, G., E-mail: rickards@fisica.unam.m [UNAM, Instituto de Fisica, Apdo. Postal 20-364, 01000 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2011-02-15

    With the purpose of developing optoelectronic devices, optical waveguides have been produced by ion implantation in many solids. The implantation process creates a damaged layer near the end of the ion trajectories, with a consequent reduction of density and index of refraction. This produces an optical barrier at a depth of a few microns, depending on the type of ion and its energy. The barrier and the surface constitute a planar waveguide. Rutile (TiO{sub 2} tetragonal structure) single crystals were implanted with 7 MeV carbon ions using the Physics Institute 3 MV Pelletron Accelerator, in the (100) and (001) directions, and Poly Allyl Diglycol Carbonate (P ADC) as detection material. The waveguides were observed using the coupled prism technique, which indicated differences in the waveguides produced for different directions due to crystal anisotropy. (Author)

  19. The effect of MEVVA ion implantation on the tribological properties of PVD-TiN films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manory, R.; Mollica, S.

    1998-01-01

    The present work is the first study in which the effects of metal evaporation vacuum (MEVVA) implantation are studied on TiN of the PVD type which is commercially available in Australia. The MEVVA ion implanter differs from the 'conventional' type of ion implanter in the fact that it has a high throughput of metal ions which are not mass analysed and therefore has more potential for industrial non-electronic applications. TiN-coated steel samples have been implanted with two types of species - one light and one heavy - C + and W + respectively. The samples were analysed by Rutherford backscattering (RBS) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The tribological performance was assessed by pin-on-disc and microhardness. The results show that carbon implantation was very effective in improving the friction coefficient by the formation of a carbonaceous layer on the surface. XRD also shows formation of TiC in the near surface region. W implantation does not improve the friction coefficient but improves the lifetime of the coating. Unimplanted films fail in the pin-on-disk test after 7000 cycles, whereas implanted films are still well adhered after 18000 cycles

  20. Residual stress in ion implanted titanium nitride studied by parallel beam glancing incidence x-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geist, D.E.; Perry, A.J.; Treglio, J.R.; Valvoda, V.; Rafaja, D.

    1995-01-01

    Ion implantation is known to increase the lifetime of cutting tools. Current theories are the increase in lifetime is caused by an increase in the residual stress, or by work hardening of the surface associated with the implantation. In this work the effect of ion implantation on the residual stress in titanium nitride coatings made by the standard industrial methods of chemical and physical vapor deposition (CVD and PVD) is studied. It is found in the as-received condition (unimplanted), the residual stress levels are near zero for CVD materials and highly compressive, of the order of 6 GPa, for PVD materials. Ion implantation has no effect on the residual stress in the coatings made by CVD. Nitrogen does increase the compressive residual stress by some 10% in the near surface regions of PVD coatings, while nickel-titanium dual metal ion implantation does not have any effect. It appears that the lifetime increase is not associated with residual stress effects

  1. Effective implantation of light emitting centers by plasma immersion ion implantation and focused ion beam methods into nanosized diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Himics, L.; Tóth, S.; Veres, M.; Tóth, A.; Koós, M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Characteristics of nitrogen implantation of nanodiamond using two low ion energy ion implantation methods were compared. • Formation of complex nitrogen-related defect centers was promoted by subsequent helium implantation and heat treatments. • Depth profiles of the implanted ions and the generated vacancies were determined using SRIM calculations. • The presence of nitrogen impurity was demonstrated by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopic measurements. • A new nitrogen related band was detected in the photoluminescence spectrum of the implanted samples that was attributed to the N3 color center in nanodiamond. - Abstract: Two different implantation techniques, plasma immersion ion implantation and focused ion beam, were used to introduce nitrogen ions into detonation nanodiamond crystals with the aim to create nitrogen-vacancy related optically active centers of light emission in near UV region. Previously samples were subjected to a defect creation process by helium irradiation in both cases. Heat treatments at different temperatures (750 °C, 450 °C) were applied in order to initiate the formation of nitrogen-vacancy related complex centers and to decrease the sp 2 carbon content formed under different treatments. As a result, a relatively narrow and intensive emission band with fine structure at 2.98, 2.83 and 2.71 eV photon energies was observed in the light emission spectrum. It was assigned to the N3 complex defect center. The formation of this defect center can be expected by taking into account the relatively high dose of implanted nitrogen ions and the overlapped depth distribution of vacancies and nitrogen. The calculated depth profiles distribution for both implanted nitrogen and helium by SRIM simulation support this expectation

  2. A collisional model for plasma immersion ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vahedi, V.; Lieberman, M.A.; Alves, M.V.; Verboncoeur, J.P.; Birdsall, C.K.

    1990-01-01

    In plasma immersion ion implantation, a target is immersed in a plasma and a series of negative short pulses are applied to it to implant the ions. A new analytical model is being developed for the high pressure regimes in which the motion of the ions is highly collisional. The model provides values for ion flux, average ion velocity at the target, and sheath edge motion as a function of time. These values are being compared with those obtained from simulation and show good agreement. A review is also given (for comparison) of the earlier work done at low pressures, where the motion of ions in the sheath is collisionless, also showing good agreement between analysis and simulation. The simulation code is PDP1 which utilizes particle-in-cell techniques plus Monte-Carlo simulation of electron-neutral (elastic, excitation and ionization) and ion-neutral (scattering and charge-exchange) collisions

  3. Homo-epitaxial diamond film growth on ion implanted diamond substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiser, P.S.; Prawer, S.; Nugent, K.W.; Bettiol, A.A.; Kostidis, L.I.; Jamieson, D.N. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    The nucleation of CVD diamond is a complicated process, governed by many interrelated parameters. In the present work we attempt to elucidate the effect of strain on the growth of a homo-epitaxial CVD diamond. We have employed laterally confined high dose (MeV) Helium ion implantation to produce surface swelling of the substrate. The strain is enhanced by the lateral confinement of the implanted region to squares of 100 x 100 {mu}m{sup 2}. After ion implantation, micro-Raman spectroscopy was employed to map the surface strain. The substrates were then inserted into a CVD reactor and a CVD diamond film was grown upon them. Since the strained regions were laterally confined, it was then possible to monitor the effect of strain on diamond nucleation. The substrates were also analysed using Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS), Proton induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and Ion Beam induced Luminescence (IBIL). 7 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Effect of ion implantation on subsequent erosion and wear behavior of solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHargue, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    The removal of material from a solid surface by mechanical forces is influenced by material properties (hardness, fracture toughness, yield strength, surface free energy) as well as system parameters (force, velocity of loading, environment). Ion implantation can modify many of the material properties either by directly affecting the deformation characteristics or indirectly by affecting the chemical or phase composition at the surface. The various forms of wear and erosion are analyzed to determine the material and system parameters which control material removal. The effects of implantation on these critical parameters are noted and examples of changes in surface topography under various test conditions are discussed. 18 figs

  5. Nitrogen ion implantation effect on friction coefficient of tool steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velichko, N.I.; Udovenko, V.F.; Markus, A.M.; Presnyakova, G.N.; Gamulya, G.D.

    1988-01-01

    Effect of nitrogen molecular ion implantation into KhVSG steel on the friction coefficient in the air and vacuum is investigated. Irradiation is carried out by the N 2 + beam with energy 120 keV and flux density 5 μ/cm 2 at room temperature in vacuum 5x10 -4 Pa. The integral dose of irradiation is 10 17 particle/cm 2 . Nitrogen ion implantation is shown to provide the formation of the modified layer changing friction properties of steel. The friction coefficient can either increase or decrease depending on implantation and test conditions. 4 refs.; 2 figs

  6. Positron annihilation study on defects in ion-implanted Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akahane, T.; Fujinami, M.; Sawada, T.

    2003-01-01

    Two-detector coincidence measurements of the Doppler broadened annihilation spectra with a variable energy positron beam are carried out for the study of the annealing behavior of Si implanted with As, P, Cu and H ions. In P-implanted Si, growth of the defect complexes are observed in coincidence Doppler broadening spectra up to 400degC. In Cu-implanted Si, the formation of defect-Cu complexes is indicated. In H-implanted Si, the passivation effect of hydrogen on positron traps are observed in the low temperature region up to 400degC. (author)

  7. Characterization of diamond amorphized by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, W.R.; Lee, E.H.

    1992-01-01

    Single crystal diamond has been implanted at 1 MeV with 2 x 10 20 Ar/m 2 . Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in a channeled geometry revealed a broad amorphized region underlying a thin, partially crystalline layer. Raman spectroscopy disclosed modifications in the bonding characteristic of the appearance of non-diamond carbon. The complementary nature of the two analysis techniques is demonstrated. The Knoop hardness of the implanted diamond was reduced by implantation

  8. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic depth profilometry of nitrogen implanted in materials for modification of their surface properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkissian, A.H.; Paynter, R.; Stansfield, B.L.

    1996-01-01

    The modification of the surface properties of materials has a wide range of industrial applications. For example, the authors change the electrical characteristics of semiconductors, improve surface hardness, decrease friction, increase resistance to corrosion, improve adhesion, etc. Nitriding is one of the most common processes used in industry for surface treatment. Nitrogen ion implantation is one technique often used to achieve this goal. Ion implantation offers the power to control the deposition profile, and can be achieved by either conventional ion beam implantation or plasma assisted ion implantation. They have used the technique of plasma assisted ion implantation to implant nitrogen in several materials, including titanium, silicon and stainless steel. The plasma source is a surface ECR source developed at INRS-Energie et Materiaux. The depth profile of the implanted ions has been measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. They have also conducted simulations using the TRIM-95 code to predict the depth profile of the implanted ions. Comparisons of the measured results with those from simulations are used to deduce information regarding the plasma composition and the collisional effects in the plasma. A fast responding, current and voltage measuring circuit with fiber optic links is being developed, which allows more accurate quantitative measurements. Further experiments to study the characteristics of the plasma, and their effects on the characteristics of the implanted surfaces are in progress, and the results are presented at this meeting

  9. Fe doped Magnetic Nanodiamonds made by Ion Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chienhsu; Cho, I. C.; Jian, Hui-Shan; Niu, H.

    2017-02-01

    Here we present a simple physical method to prepare magnetic nanodiamonds (NDs) using high dose Fe ion-implantation. The Fe atoms are embedded into NDs through Fe ion-implantation and the crystal structure of NDs are recovered by thermal annealing. The results of TEM and Raman examinations indicated the crystal structure of the Fe implanted NDs is recovered completely. The SQUID-VSM measurement shows the Fe-NDs possess room temperature ferromagnetism. That means the Fe atoms are distributed inside the NDs without affecting NDs crystal structure, so the NDs can preserve the original physical and chemical properties of the NDs. In addition, the ion-implantation-introduced magnetic property might make the NDs to become suitable for variety of medical applications.

  10. Statistical 3D damage accumulation model for ion implant simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Mangas, J.M.; Lazaro, J.; Enriquez, L.; Bailon, L.; Barbolla, J.; Jaraiz, M.

    2003-01-01

    A statistical 3D damage accumulation model, based on the modified Kinchin-Pease formula, for ion implant simulation has been included in our physically based ion implantation code. It has only one fitting parameter for electronic stopping and uses 3D electron density distributions for different types of targets including compound semiconductors. Also, a statistical noise reduction mechanism based on the dose division is used. The model has been adapted to be run under parallel execution in order to speed up the calculation in 3D structures. Sequential ion implantation has been modelled including previous damage profiles. It can also simulate the implantation of molecular and cluster projectiles. Comparisons of simulated doping profiles with experimental SIMS profiles are presented. Also comparisons between simulated amorphization and experimental RBS profiles are shown. An analysis of sequential versus parallel processing is provided

  11. Statistical 3D damage accumulation model for ion implant simulators

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez-Mangas, J M; Enriquez, L E; Bailon, L; Barbolla, J; Jaraiz, M

    2003-01-01

    A statistical 3D damage accumulation model, based on the modified Kinchin-Pease formula, for ion implant simulation has been included in our physically based ion implantation code. It has only one fitting parameter for electronic stopping and uses 3D electron density distributions for different types of targets including compound semiconductors. Also, a statistical noise reduction mechanism based on the dose division is used. The model has been adapted to be run under parallel execution in order to speed up the calculation in 3D structures. Sequential ion implantation has been modelled including previous damage profiles. It can also simulate the implantation of molecular and cluster projectiles. Comparisons of simulated doping profiles with experimental SIMS profiles are presented. Also comparisons between simulated amorphization and experimental RBS profiles are shown. An analysis of sequential versus parallel processing is provided.

  12. Surface changes of implants after laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechmann, Peter; Sadegh, Hamid M. M.; Goldin, Dan S.; Hennig, Thomas

    1999-05-01

    Periimplantitis is one of the major factors for the loss of dental implants. Due to the minor defense ability of the tissue surrounding the implant compared to natural teeth treatment of periimplantitis in the early stage is very important. Reducing bacteria with a laser might be the most successful step in therapy of periimplantitis. Aim of the study was to observe changes in surface morphology of seven different implants after irradiation with three different lasers. Two kinds of flat round samles were prepared by the manufacturers either identical to the body surface or to the cervical area of the corresponding implants. The samples were irradiated using different power settings. The lasers used were a CO2 laser (Uni Laser 450P, ASAH Medico Denmark; fiber guided, wavelength 10.6 μm, max. average power 8.3 W, "soft-pulse" and cw) an Er:YAG laser (KaVo Key Laser II, wavelength 2.94 μm, pulse duration 250-500μs, pulse energy 60-500 mJ, pulse repetition rate 1-15 Hz, focus diameter 620 μm, air-water cooling; Biberach, Germany; a frequency doubled Alexandrite laser (laboratory prototype, q-switched, fiber guided, wavelength 377 nm, pulse duration 1 μs, pulse repetition rate 30 Hz, water cooling). After irradiation the implant surfaces were investigated with a Scanning Electron Microscope. Ablation thresholds were determined. After CO2 laser irradiation no changes in surface morphology were observed whereas using the pulsed Er:YAG laser or frequency doubled Alexandrite laser even at low energies loss of integrity or melting of the surface was observed. The changes in surface morphology seem to depend very strongly on the type of surface coating.

  13. Study of ion implantation in grown layers of multilayer coatings under ion-plasma vacuum deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voevodin, A.A.; Erokhin, A.L.

    1993-01-01

    The model of ion implantation into growing layers of a multilayer coating produced with vacuum ion-plasma deposition was developed. The model takes into account a possibility for ions to pass through the growing layer and alloys to find the distribution of implanted atoms over the coating thickness. The experimental vitrification of the model was carried out on deposition of Ti and TiN coatings

  14. Transition Metal Ion Implantation into Diamond-Like Carbon Coatings: Development of a Base Material for Gas Sensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Markwitz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Micrometre thick diamond-like carbon (DLC coatings produced by direct ion deposition were implanted with 30 keV Ar+ and transition metal ions in the lower percentage (<10 at.% range. Theoretical calculations showed that the ions are implanted just beneath the surface, which was confirmed with RBS measurements. Atomic force microscope scans revealed that the surface roughness increases when implanted with Ar+ and Cu+ ions, whereas a smoothing of the surface from 5.2 to 2.7 nm and a grain size reduction from 175 to 93 nm are measured for Ag+ implanted coatings with a fluence of 1.24×1016 at. cm−2. Calculated hydrogen and carbon depth profiles showed surprisingly significant changes in concentrations in the near-surface region of the DLC coatings, particularly when implanted with Ag+ ions. Hydrogen accumulates up to 32 at.% and the minimum of the carbon distribution is shifted towards the surface which may be the cause of the surface smoothing effect. The ion implantations caused an increase in electrical conductivity of the DLC coatings, which is important for the development of solid-state gas sensors based on DLC coatings.

  15. Surface modifications of AISI 420 stainless steel by low energy Yttrium ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nassisi Vincenzo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we study surface modifications of AISI 420 stainless steel specimens in order to improve their surface properties. Oxidation resistance and surface micro-hardness were analyzed. Using an ion beam delivered by a Laser Ion Source (LIS coupled to an electrostatic accelerator, we performed implantation of low energy yttrium ions on the samples. The ions experienced an acceleration passing through a gap whose ends had a potential difference of 60 kV. The gap was placed immediately before the samples surface. The LIS produced high ions fluxes per laser pulse, up to 3x1011 ions/cm2, resulting in a total implanted flux of 7x1015 ions/cm2. The samples were characterized before and after ion implantation using two analytical techniques. They were also thermally treated to investigate the oxide scale. The crystal phases were identified by an X-ray diffractometer, while the micro-hardness was assayed using the scratch test and a profilometer. The first analysis was applied to blank, implanted and thermally treated sample surface, while the latter was applied only to blank and implanted sample surfaces. We found a slight increase in the hardness values and an increase to oxygen resistance. The implantation technique we used has the advantages, with respect to conventional methods, to modify the samples at low temperature avoiding stray diffusion of ions inside the substrate bulk.

  16. Surface modifications of AISI 420 stainless steel by low energy Yttrium ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassisi, Vincenzo; Delle Side, Domenico; Turco, Vito; Martina, Luigi

    2018-01-01

    In this work, we study surface modifications of AISI 420 stainless steel specimens in order to improve their surface properties. Oxidation resistance and surface micro-hardness were analyzed. Using an ion beam delivered by a Laser Ion Source (LIS) coupled to an electrostatic accelerator, we performed implantation of low energy yttrium ions on the samples. The ions experienced an acceleration passing through a gap whose ends had a potential difference of 60 kV. The gap was placed immediately before the samples surface. The LIS produced high ions fluxes per laser pulse, up to 3x1011 ions/cm2, resulting in a total implanted flux of 7x1015 ions/cm2. The samples were characterized before and after ion implantation using two analytical techniques. They were also thermally treated to investigate the oxide scale. The crystal phases were identified by an X-ray diffractometer, while the micro-hardness was assayed using the scratch test and a profilometer. The first analysis was applied to blank, implanted and thermally treated sample surface, while the latter was applied only to blank and implanted sample surfaces. We found a slight increase in the hardness values and an increase to oxygen resistance. The implantation technique we used has the advantages, with respect to conventional methods, to modify the samples at low temperature avoiding stray diffusion of ions inside the substrate bulk.

  17. Electrochemical behavior and biological response of Mesenchymal Stem Cells on cp-Ti after N-ions implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizwan, M.; Ahmad, A. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, University of Engineering and Technology, 54890 Lahore (Pakistan); Deen, K.M. [Corrosion Control Research Cell, Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, CEET, University of the Punjab, 54590 Lahore (Pakistan); Haider, W., E-mail: haiderw@utpa.edu [Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Texas Pan American, Edinburg, TX 78539 (United States)

    2014-11-30

    Highlights: • Nitrogen ions of known dosage were implanted on cp-Ti. • Increase in surface roughness with increase in ions dose was confirmed by AFM. • TiN{sub 0.3} and Ti{sub 3}N{sub 2−x} nitride phases were formed and validated by XRD. • The ions implantation reduced the corrosion rate and stabilized the passive film. • Surface roughness greatly affected the morphology and growth of Mesenchymal Stem Cells. - Abstract: Titanium and its alloys are most widely used as implant materials due to their excellent biocompatibility, mechanical properties and chemical stability. In this study Nitrogen ions of known dosage were implanted over cp-Ti by Pelletron accelerator with beam energy of 0.25 MeV.The atomic force microscopy of bare and nitrogen implanted specimens confirmed increase in surface roughness with increase in nitrogen ions concentration. X-ray diffraction patterns of ions implanted surfaces validated the formation of TiN{sub 0.3} and Ti{sub 3}N{sub 2-x}nitride phases. The tendency to form passive film and electrochemical behavior of these surfaces in ringer lactate (RL) solution was evaluated by Potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy respectively. It is proved that nitrogen ions implantation was beneficial to reduce corrosion rate and stabilizing passive film by increasing charge transfer resistance in RL. It was concluded that morphology and proliferation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells on nitrogen ions implanted surfaces strongly depends on surface roughness and nitride phases.

  18. Neuron cell positioning on polystyrene in culture by silver-negative ion implantation and region control of neural outgrowth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Hiroshi; Sato, Hiroko; Baba, Takahiro; Ikemura, Shin'ichi; Gotoh, Yasuhito; Ishikawa, Junzo

    2000-01-01

    A new method to control the position of neuron cell attachment and extension region of neural outgrowth has been developed by using a pattering ion implantation with silver-negative ions into polystyrene dishes. This technique offers a promising method to form an artificially designed neural network in cell culture in vitro. Silver-negative ions were implanted into non-treated polystyrene dishes (NTPS) at conditions of 20 keV and 3x10 15 ions/cm 2 through a pattering mask, which had as many as 67 slits of 60 μm in width and 4 mm in length with a spacing of 60 μm. For cell culture in vitro, nerve cells of PC-12h (rat adrenal phechromocytoma) were used because they respond to a nerve growth factor (NGF). In the first 2 days in culture without NGF, we observed a selective cell attachment only to the ion-implanted region in patterning Ag - implanted polystyrene sample (p-Ag/NTPS). In another 2 days in culture with NGF, the nerve cells expanded neurites only over the ion-implanted region. For collagen-coated p-Ag/NTPS sample of which collagen was coated after the ion implantation (Collagen/p-Ag/NTPS), most nerve cells were also attached on the ion-implanted region. However, neurites expanded in both ion-implanted and unimplanted regions. The contact angle of NTPS decreased after the ion implantation from 86 deg. to 74 deg. . The region selectivity of neuron attachment and neurite extension is considered to be due to contact angle lowering by the ion implantation as radiation effect on the surface

  19. Implantation of D+ ions in niobium and deuterium gas reemission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisarev, A.A.; Tel'kovskij, V.G.

    1975-01-01

    This is a study of the implanting and reflex gasoisolation of D ions in niobium. It has been discovered that deutrium scope and gasoisolation are defined by several processes. An assumption is made that in ion bombarding conditions the implanting solutions are possible to exist and that deutrium can be replaced on the basis of niobium and hydrid compounds NbxDy. The portion of the particles entrained in the metal in one or another way depends on the ion energy. The dependence of the scope coefficient of n D + ions from the target temperature in the range of 290-1500 K was registered. An increase of the scope coefficient of the ions at high temperature with an increase of the ion energy was discovered

  20. Modification of electrical properties of polymer membranes by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dworecki, K.; Hasegawa, T.; Sudlitz, K.; Wasik, S.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of the electrical properties of polymer ion irradiated polyethylene terephthalate (PET) membranes. The polymer samples have been implanted with a variety of ions (O 5+ , N 4+ , Kr 9+ ) by the energy of 10 keV/q up to doses of 10 15 ions/cm 2 and then they were polarized in an electric field of 4.16x10 6 V/m at non-isothermal conditions. The electrical properties and the changes in the chemical structure of implanted membrane were measured by conductivity and discharge currents and FTIR spectra. Electrical conductivity of the membranes PET increases to 1-3 orders of magnitude after implantation and is determined by the charge transport caused by free space charge and by thermal detrapping of charge carriers. The spectra of thermally induced discharge current (TDC) shows that ion irradiated PET membranes are characterized by high ability to accumulate charge

  1. Electronic Transport and Raman Spectroscopy Characterization in Ion-Implanted Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesus, R. F.; Turatti, A. M.; Camargo, B. C.; da Silva, R. R.; Kopelevich, Y.; Behar, M.; Balzaretti, N. M.; Gusmão, M. A.; Pureur, P.

    2018-02-01

    We report on Raman spectroscopy, temperature-dependent in-plane resistivity, and in-plane magnetoresistance experiments in highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) implanted with As and Mn. A pristine sample was also studied for comparison. Two different fluences were applied, φ = 0.5× 10^{16} {ions}/{cm}2 and φ = 1.0× 10^{16} {ions}/{cm}2. The implantations were carried out with 20 keV ion energy at room temperature. The Raman spectroscopy results reveal the occurrence of drastic changes of the HOPG surface as a consequence of the damage caused by ionic implantation. For the higher dose, the complete amorphization limit is attained. The resistivity and magnetoresistance results were obtained placing electrical contacts on the irradiated sample surface. Owing to the strong anisotropy of HOPG, the electrical current propagates mostly near the implanted surface. Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillations were observed in the magnetoresistance at low temperatures. These results allow the extraction of the fundamental SdH frequencies and the carriers' effective masses. In general, the resistivity and magnetoresistance results are consistent with those obtained from Raman measurements. However, one must consider that the electrical conduction in our samples occurs as in a parallel association of a largely resistive thin sheet at the surface strongly modified by disorder with a thicker layer where damage produced by implantation is less severe. The SdH oscillations do not hint to significant changes in the carrier density of HOPG.

  2. The effect of ion implantation on the resistance of 316L stainless steel to crevice corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bombara, G.; Cavallini, M.

    1983-01-01

    The results of an investigation of the influence of aluminium, titanium and scandium implantation on the electrochemical and chemical crevice corrosion behaviour of 316L stainless steel are presented and discussed. Ion implantation, in addition to improving markedly the protective quality of the passive film at the free corrosion potential, greatly increases the resistance of 316L stainless steel to crevice corrosion in both neutral NaCl and acidic FeCl 3 solutions. A moderate decrease in pitting resistance is possibly due to coverage effect of implanted species on the surface molybdenum constituent. (Auth.)

  3. Terahertz generation from Cu ion implantation into lithium niobate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yuhua, E-mail: wyh61@163.com [Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Systems Science in Metallurgical Process, Wuhan university of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Wang, Ruwu; Yuan, Jie [Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Systems Science in Metallurgical Process, Wuhan university of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Wang, Yumei [Department of Nephrology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China)

    2014-03-15

    In this letter, the authors present first observation of terahertz generation from Cu implantation of lithium niobate crystal substrate. Lithium niobate single crystal is grown by Czochralski method. Metal nanoparticles synthesized by Cu ion implantation were implanted into lithium niobate single crystal using metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) ion source. 1 kHz, 35 fs laser pulse centred at 800 nm was focused onto the samples. The supercontinuum spectra of the sample are obtained. Terahertz was generated via this kind of sample and investigated using the electro-optical sampling technique. The findings suggest that under the investigated implantation parameter, a strong spectral component in excess of 0.46 THz emission was found from Cu ion implantation of lithium niobate. -- Highlights: • We first observation of terahertz generation from Cu implantation of lithium niobate crystal substrate. • Lithium niobate single crystal is grown by Czochralski method. Cu nanoparticles in lithium niobate have been formed by using MEVVA ion source. • The THz bandwidth and center from this kind of sample were determined.

  4. An automated ion implant/pulse anneal machine for low cost silicon cell production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armini, A.J.; Bunker, S.N.; Spitzer, M.B.

    1982-01-01

    The continuing development of a high throughput ion implanter and a pulsed electron beam annealer designed for dedicated silicon solar cell manufacture is reviewed. This equipment is intended for production of junctions in 10 cm wide wafers at a throughput up to 10 MWsub(p) per year. The principal features of the implanter are the lack of mass analysis and defocusing utilizing electrostatic deflection. The implanted surface is annealed by liquid phase epitaxy resulting from a single burst of a large area electron beam. Cells with non-mass analyzed ion implantation have yielded AM1 cell efficiencies in excess of 15%. Pulse annealed Czochralski cells have been made with AM1 efficiencies of 13% vs. 15% for a furnace annealed group. Results of pulse annealing of polycrystalline materials indicate that cell performance comparable to diffusion can be obtained. (Auth.)

  5. Corrosion behaviour of ion implanted aluminium alloy in 0.1 M NaCl electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, J.W.; Evans, P.J. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Sood, D.K. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    Aluminum and its alloys are widely used in industry because of their light weight, high strength and good corrosion resistance which is due to the formation of a protective oxide layer. However, under saline conditions such as those encountered in marine environments, this group of metals are vulnerable to localised degradation in the form of pitting corrosion. This type of corrosion involves the adsorption of an anion, such as chlorine, at the oxide solution interface. Ion implantation of metal ions has been shown to improve the corrosion resistance of a variety of materials. This effect occurs : when the implanted species reduces anion adsorption thereby decreasing the corrosion rate. In this paper we report on the pitting behavior of Ti implanted 2011 Al alloy in dilute sodium chloride solution. The Ti implanted surfaces exhibited an increased pitting potential and a reduced oxygen uptake. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Blistering in alloy Ti–6Al–4V from H + ion implantation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    6Al–4V, was studied, following H+ ion implantation of 150 keV and 250 keV energy to fluence of 2.6 × 1018 cm-2 and 2.5 × 1019 cm-2, respectively at ambient temperature. No detectable change was observed in surface features of either of the ...

  7. Compression of self-ion implanted iron micropillars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grieveson, E.M.; Armstrong, D.E.J.; Xu, S.; Roberts, S.G.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Self-ion implantation used to cause cascade damage in pure iron. ► Increase in hardness measured in implanted region using nanoindentation. ► Micropillars manufactured and tested in both implanted and unimplanted material. ► Marked difference in deformation mechanisms in each set of pillars seen using scanning electron microscopy. ► No difference in yield stress seen, suggesting it is difficult to use micro-compression to understand bulk properties. - Abstract: Ion implantation causes displacement damage in materials, leading to the formation of small dislocation loops and can cause changes to the material’s mechanical properties. Samples of pure Fe were subjected to Fe + implantation at 275 °C, producing damage of ∼6 dpa to ∼1 μm depth. Nanoindentation into implanted material shows an increase in hardness compared to unimplanted material. Micropillars were manufactured in cross-section specimens of implanted and unimplanted material and compressed using a nanoindenter. The implanted pillars have a deformation mode which differs markedly from the unimplanted pillars but show no change in yield-stress. This suggests that the controlling mechanism for deformation is different between nanoindentation and micropillar compression and that care is needed if using micropillar compression to extract bulk properties of irradiated materials.

  8. Mechanical and tribological properties of AISI 304 stainless steel nitrided by glow discharge compared to ion implantation and plasma immersion ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foerster, C. E.; Serbena, F. C.; da Silva, S. L. R.; Lepienski, C. M.; Siqueira, C. J. de M.; Ueda, M.

    2007-04-01

    Results about mechanical and tribological behavior of AISI 304 stainless steel nitrided by three different ion beam processes - glow discharge (GD), ion implantation (II) and plasma immersion ion implantation (PI3) are reported. Expanded austenite γN and nitrides phases (Fe2+xN, γ‧-Fe4N and Cr-N) were identified as a function of nitriding conditions. Hardness (H) and elastic modulus (E) profiles were obtained by instrumented penetration. The hardness reached values as high as 21 GPa by PI3. Tribological behavior was studied by reciprocating sliding tests with a WC (Co) ball at room temperature (RT) in dry condition. Different wear regimes were identified in the friction coefficient profiles. The profile form and the running-in distance are strongly dependent on the nitriding process. Adhesive and abrasive wear components can be inferred from these friction profiles. Hardness and tribological performance, after the nitriding processes, are discussed in terms of surface microstructure.

  9. Formation and characterization of ZnO : Tm+ optical waveguides fabricated by Tm+ and O+ ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ming Xianbing; Lu Fei; Liu Hanping; Chen Ming; Wang Lei

    2009-01-01

    Planar optical waveguides were formed in ZnO crystal by Tm + and O + ion implantation. The distributions of Tm + in as-implanted and annealed ZnO samples were investigated by the RBS technique. A shift of the Tm + peak towards the sample surface and out diffusion were observed after thermal treatment and subsequent O + ion implantation. Waveguide formation was determined after O + implantation in Tm + -implanted ZnO crystal. By using the prism-coupling method two guided modes were detected. The refractive index profile in the implanted waveguide was reconstructed according to the SRIM and RCM simulation. The RBS/channelling measurements show that the lattice structure of ZnO did not suffer detectable damage after O + implantation.

  10. The effect of ion implantation on the tribomechanical properties of carbon fibre reinforced polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mistica, R.; Sood, D.K.; Janardhana, M.N.

    1993-01-01

    Graphite fibre reinforced epoxy composite material (GFRP) is used extensively in the aerospace and other industries for structural application. The trend is to address the 20 to 30 year life endurance of this material in service. Mechanical joints in air crafts are exposed to dynamic loads during service and wear may be experienced by the composite material joint. Generally it has been shown that graphite fibre reinforced polymers have superior wear and friction properties as compared with the unfilled polymers. In the described experiment, ion implantation was used as a novel surface treatment. Wear and friction of a polymer composite material (GFRP) was studied and ion implantation was used in order to observe the effect on the tribomechanical properties of the material. It was found that ion implantation of C on GFRP sliding against Ti changes the tribological properties of the system, and in particular decreases the coefficient of friction and wear. 4 refs., 2 figs

  11. The effect of ion implantation on the tribomechanical properties of carbon fibre reinforced polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mistica, R.; Sood, D.K. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia); Janardhana, M.N. [Deakin University, Geelong, VIC (Australia). School of Engineering and Technology

    1993-12-31

    Graphite fibre reinforced epoxy composite material (GFRP) is used extensively in the aerospace and other industries for structural application. The trend is to address the 20 to 30 year life endurance of this material in service. Mechanical joints in air crafts are exposed to dynamic loads during service and wear may be experienced by the composite material joint. Generally it has been shown that graphite fibre reinforced polymers have superior wear and friction properties as compared with the unfilled polymers. In the described experiment, ion implantation was used as a novel surface treatment. Wear and friction of a polymer composite material (GFRP) was studied and ion implantation was used in order to observe the effect on the tribomechanical properties of the material. It was found that ion implantation of C on GFRP sliding against Ti changes the tribological properties of the system, and in particular decreases the coefficient of friction and wear. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Enhanced osteogenic activity of poly ether ether ketone using calcium plasma immersion ion implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tao; Qian, Shi; Meng, Fanhao; Ning, Congqin; Liu, Xuanyong

    2016-06-01

    As a promising implantable material, poly ether ether ketone (PEEK) possesses similar elastic modulus to that of cortical bones yet suffers from bio-inertness and poor osteogenic properties, which limits its application as orthopedic implants. In this work, calcium is introduced onto PEEK surface using calcium plasma immersion ion implantation (Ca-PIII). The results obtained from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirm the modified layer with varying contents of calcium are formed on PEEK surfaces. Water contact angle measurements reveal the increasing hydrophobicity of both Ca-PIII treated surfaces. In vitro cell adhesion, viability assay, alkaline phosphatase activity and collagen secretion analyses disclose improved the adhesion, proliferation, and osteo-differentiation of rat bone mesenchymal stem cells (bMSCs) on Ca-PIII treated surfaces. The obtained results indicate that PEEK surface with enhanced osteogenic activity can be produced by calcium incorporation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Ion induced optical emission for surface and depth profile analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, C.W.

    1977-01-01

    Low-energy ion bombardment of solid surfaces results in the emission of infrared, visible, and ultraviolet radiation produced by inelastic ion-solid collision processes. The emitted optical radiation provides important insight into low-energy particle-solid interactions and provides the basis for an analysis technique which can be used for surface and depth profile analysis with high sensitivity. The different kinds of collision induced optical radiation emitted as a result of low-energy particle-solid collisions are reviewed. Line radiation arising from excited states of sputtered atoms or molecules is shown to provide the basis for surface and depth profile analysis. The spectral characteristics of this type of radiation are discussed and applications of the ion induced optical emission technique are presented. These applications include measurements of ion implant profiles, detection sensitivities for submonolayer quantities of impurities on elemental surfaces, and the detection of elemental impurities on complex organic substrates

  14. Investigation of Donor and Acceptor Ion Implantation in AlN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osinsky, Andrei [Agnitron Technology Inc., Eden Prairie, MN (United States)

    2015-09-16

    AlGaN alloys with high Al composition and AlN based electronic devices are attractive for high voltage, high temperature applications, including microwave power sources, power switches and communication systems. AlN is of particular interest because of its wide bandgap of ~6.1eV which is ideal for power electronic device applications in extreme environments which requires high dose ion implantation. One of the major challenges that need to be addressed to achieve full utilization of AlN for opto and microelectronic applications is the development of a doping strategy for both donors and acceptors. Ion implantation is a particularly attractive approach since it allows for selected-area doping of semiconductors due to its high spatial and dose control and its high throughput capability. Active layers in the semiconductor are created by implanting a dopant species followed by very high temperature annealing to reduce defects and thereby activate the dopants. Recovery of implant damage in AlN requires excessively high temperature. In this SBIR program we began the investigation by simulation of ion beam implantation profiles for Mg, Ge and Si in AlN over wide dose and energy ranges. Si and Ge are implanted to achieve the n-type doping, Mg is investigated as a p-type doping. The simulation of implantation profiles were performed in collaboration between NRL and Agnitron using a commercial software known as Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter (SRIM). The simulation results were then used as the basis for ion implantation of AlN samples. The implanted samples were annealed by an innovative technique under different conditions and evaluated along the way. Raman spectroscopy and XRD were used to determine the crystal quality of the implanted samples, demonstrating the effectiveness of annealing in removing implant induced damage. Additionally, SIMS was used to verify that a nearly uniform doping profile was achieved near the sample surface. The electrical characteristics

  15. Magnetic patterning by means of ion irradiation and implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fassbender, J.; McCord, J.

    2008-01-01

    A pure magnetic patterning by means of ion irradiation which relies on a local modification of the magnetic anisotropy of a magnetic multilayer structure has been first demonstrated in 1998. Since then also other magnetic properties like the interlayer exchange coupling, the exchange bias effect, the magnetic damping behavior and the saturation magnetization to name a few have also been demonstrated to be affected by ion irradiation or ion implantation. Consequently, all these effects can be used if combined with a masking technique or employing direct focused ion beam writing for a magnetic patterning and thus an imprinting of an artificial magnetic domain structure, which subsequently modifies the integral magnetization reversal behavior or the magnetization dynamics of the film investigated. The present review will summarize how ion irradiation and implantation can affect the magnetic properties by means of structural modifications. The main part will cover the present status with respect to the pure magnetic patterning of micro- and nano structures

  16. Nanohardness, friction and wear properties of nitrogen ion implanted Ti-6Al-4V alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nath, V.C.; Sood, D.K.; Manory, R.R.

    1991-01-01

    Over the last few years a large amount of evidence has appeared in literature covering the effect of ion implantation on the wear behaviour of Ti-6A1-4V alloy, a material widely used in medical and aerospace applications. Recent studies have shown improved hardness and wear properties of this alloy in as-implanted condition only, and any post-implantation annealing treatment causes a reversal of this effect. In this paper the influence of higher energy and high dose nitrogen ion implantation followed by post-implantation annealing on the microhardness, friction and wear behaviour of polycrystalline Ti-6A1-4V alloy is demonstrated. Polycrystalline Ti-6A1-4V alloy samples were implanted with 150 kev N + ions, and the hardness, friction and wear behaviour was investigated before and after annealing at 705 deg C for 2 hours. The hardness was measured by an ultramicrohardness indentation system and wear and friction were evaluated by sliding 1.6 mm ruby ball against the discs. The results shows that the hardness increased by 150 % in as-implanted and 200 % in annealed sample, the coefficient of friction is reduced from 0.29 in virgin sample to 0.11 in as-implanted to 0.08 in annealed sample. Wear rate was reduced by 50 % in as-implanted and 67 % in annealed sample, while post-implantation annealing caused the formation of TiN phase at sub-surface of the sample. 4 refs., 3 figs

  17. Status of surface treatment in endosseous implant: A literary overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Ankur

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The attachment of cells to titanium surfaces is an important phenomenon in the area of clinical implant dentistry. A major consideration in designing implants has been to produce surfaces that promote desirable responses in the cells and tissues. To achieve these requirements, the titanium implant surface can be modified in various ways. This review mainly focuses on the surface topography of dental implants currently in use, emphasizing the association of reported variables with biological outcome.

  18. Biofunctionalization of silicone rubber with microgroove-patterned surface and carbon-ion implantation to enhance biocompatibility and reduce capsule formation

    OpenAIRE

    Lei,Zeyuan; Liu,Ting; Li,Weijuan; Shi,Xiaohua; Fan,Dongli

    2016-01-01

    Ze-yuan Lei, Ting Liu, Wei-juan Li, Xiao-hua Shi, Dong-li Fan Department of Plastic and Cosmetic Surgery, XinQiao Hospital, The Third Military Medical University, ChongQing, People’s Republic of China Purpose: Silicone rubber implants have been widely used to repair soft tissue defects and deformities. However, poor biocompatibility can elicit capsule formation, usually resulting in prosthesis contracture and displacement in long-term usage. To overcome this problem, this study in...

  19. Effects of ion implantation on the hardness and friction behaviour of soda-lime silica glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bull, S.J.; Page, T.F.

    1992-01-01

    Ion implantation-induced changes in the near-surface mechanical properties of soda-lime silica glass have been investigated by indentation and scratch testing and have been found to be more complicated than changes in the corresponding properties of crystalline ceramic materials. Argon, nitrogen, carbon and potassium ions were used with energies in the range 45-300 keV. Hardness and scratch friction tests were performed under ambient laboratory conditions. At low doses, a decrease in hardness and an increase in both friction and surface stress are observed which are attributed to the electronic damage produced by ion implantation. At higher doses, the hardness increases again and a maximum is produced similar to the behaviour observed for crystalline materials. Similarly there is found to be a second stress and friction peak at this dose. This behaviour is shown to be due to the build-up of displacement damage produced by ion implantation and is thus very similar to the radiation hardening (and eventual amorphization) behaviour of ion-implanted crystalline ceramics. For glass, ''amorphization'' probably corresponds to some change in the existing amorphous state which, in turn, is responsible for the reduction in hardness, stress and friction at the highest doses. (author)

  20. Annealing behavior and selected applications of ion-implanted alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, S.M.

    Thermally activated processes cause ion-implanted metals to evolve from the initial state toward thermodynamic equilibrium. The degree of equilibration is strongly dependent upon temperature and is considered for three temperature regimes which are distinguished by the varying mobilities of interstitial and substitutional atoms. In addition, perturbations resulting from the irradiation environment are discussed. Examples are given of the use of implanted and annealed alloys in studies of diffusion, phase diagrams, and solute trapping

  1. Backscattering of light ions from metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verbeek, H.

    1975-07-01

    When a metal target is bombarded with light ions some are implanted and some are reflected from the surface or backscattered from deeper layers. This results in an energy distribution of the backscattered particles which reaches from zero to almost the primary energy. The number of the backscattered particles and their energy, angular, and charge distributions depends largely on the energy and the ion target combination. For high energies (i.e., greater than50 keV for protons) particles are backscattered in a single collision governed by the Rutherford cross section. Protons and He-ions with energies of 100 keV to several MeV are widely used for thin film analysis. For lower energies multiple collisions and the screening of the Coulomb potential have to be taken into account, which makes the theoretical treatment more difficult. This energy region is, however, of special interest in the field of nuclear fusion research. Some recent results for energies below 20 keV are discussed in some detail. (auth)

  2. Ion implantation for manufacturing bent and periodically bent crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellucci, Valerio; Camattari, Riccardo; Guidi, Vincenzo, E-mail: guidi@fe.infn.it; Mazzolari, Andrea; Paternò, Gianfranco [Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, University of Ferrara, Via Saragat 1/c, 44122 Ferrara, Italy and INFN, Section of Ferrara (Italy); Mattei, Giovanni, E-mail: giovanni.mattei@unipd.it; Scian, Carlo [Department of Physics and Astronomy Galileo Galilei, University of Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Lanzoni, Luca [Dipertimento di Economia e Tecnologia, Università degli Studi della Repubblica di San Marino, Salita alla Rocca, 44, 47890 San Marino Città (San Marino)

    2015-08-10

    Ion implantation is proposed to produce self-standing bent monocrystals. A Si sample 0.2 mm thick was bent to a radius of curvature of 10.5 m. The sample curvature was characterized by interferometric measurements; the crystalline quality of the bulk was tested by X-ray diffraction in transmission geometry through synchrotron light at ESRF (Grenoble, France). Dislocations induced by ion implantation affect only a very superficial layer of the sample, namely, the damaged region is confined in a layer 1 μm thick. Finally, an elective application of a deformed crystal through ion implantation is here proposed, i.e., the realization of a crystalline undulator to produce X-ray beams.

  3. Ion implantation of graphene-toward IC compatible technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangert, U; Pierce, W; Kepaptsoglou, D M; Ramasse, Q; Zan, R; Gass, M H; Van den Berg, J A; Boothroyd, C B; Amani, J; Hofsäss, H

    2013-10-09

    Doping of graphene via low energy ion implantation could open possibilities for fabrication of nanometer-scale patterned graphene-based devices as well as for graphene functionalization compatible with large-scale integrated semiconductor technology. Using advanced electron microscopy/spectroscopy methods, we show for the first time directly that graphene can be doped with B and N via ion implantation and that the retention is in good agreement with predictions from calculation-based literature values. Atomic resolution high-angle dark field imaging (HAADF) combined with single-atom electron energy loss (EEL) spectroscopy reveals that for sufficiently low implantation energies ions are predominantly substitutionally incorporated into the graphene lattice with a very small fraction residing in defect-related sites.

  4. Enhancing osseointegration using surface-modified titanium implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y.; Oh, N.; Liu, Y.; Chen, W.; Oh, S.; Appleford, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, K.; Park, S.; Bumgardner, J.; Haggard, W.; Ong, J.

    2006-07-01

    Osseointegrated dental implants are used to replace missing teeth. The success of implants is due to osseointegration or the direct contact of the implant surface and bone without a fibrous connective tissue interface. This review discusses the enhancement of osseointegration by means of anodized microporous titanium surfaces, functionally macroporous graded titanium coatings, nanoscale titanium surfaces, and different bioactive factors.

  5. Study of the effect of reactive-element addition by implanting metal ions in a preformed oxide layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, P.Y.; Brown, I.G.; Stringer, J.

    1991-01-01

    The influence of ion-implanted Y, Hf, Zr and Cr on the oxidation behavior of a Ni-25 wt.% Cr alloy at 1000degC has been investigated. The implantation dose was 5x10 16 ions/cm 2 . Two methods of implantation have been used. One was to implant ions directly into a clean alloy surface; the other was to implant into an approximately 0.6 μm thick Cr 2 O 3 layer formed at 1000degC on the alloy. In neither case did the Cr implantation show any beneficial effects. Implantations of Y, Hf and Zr produced all the reactive element effects, i.e. reduction in oxidation rate, elimination of base-metal oxide formation and improvement in scale adhesion, only if the ions were initially implanted in the alloy. When the ions were implanted into a preformed oxide, the subsequent oxidation process was altered to the same degree as before, but the scale adhesion was not affected. Implications of these results to the mechanism of the reactive-element effect are discussed. (orig.)

  6. Effects of ion implantation on the microstructure and residual stress of filter arc CrN films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weng, K.-W.; Chen, Y.-C.; Han Sheng; Hsu, C.-S.; Chen, Y.-L.; Wang, D.-Y.

    2008-01-01

    Chromium nitride coatings were deposited using a hybrid physical vapor deposition (PVD) system containing a filter arc deposition (FAD) and a metal plasma ion implantation source (MPII). Exactly how surface residual stress affects film characteristics is investigated using glancing incident X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and pole figure analyses. Compared with unimplanted CrN, implanted carbon typically increases compressive residual stress and hardness. Wear resistance was also improved by implanted carbon

  7. The recrystallization of ion-implanted silicon layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christodoulides, C.E.; Baragiola, R.A.; Chivers, D.; Grant, W.A.; Williams, J.S.

    1978-01-01

    Rutherford backscattering and channeling (RBS) has been employed to investigate the annealing characteristics of ion-bombarded silicon for a wide range of implant species. The general recrystallization behaviour is that high levels of remnant disorder are observed for high-dose (typically > 10 15 ions cm -2 ) implants of all species investigated, and transmission electron microscopy indicates the presence of a polycrystalline reordered layer in such cases. The magnitude of the remnant disorder (misorientation of grains with respect to the underlying bulk substrate) is observed to increase with both implant dose and original amorphous-layer thickness and to exhibit a slight implant-mass dependence. Although the recrystallization behaviour is qualitatively similar for all species studied, certain species (mainly those soluble in silicon) are found to influence the regrowth process at low implant concentrations. It is suggested that stress/strain effects, attributed to high implanted concentrations, play a major role in the inhibition of epitaxial silicon recrystallization but that species effects can become dominant at lower implant concentrations. (author)

  8. Electrochemical behavior and biological response of Mesenchymal Stem Cells on cp-Ti after N-ions implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizwan, M.; Ahmad, A.; Deen, K. M.; Haider, W.

    2014-11-01

    Titanium and its alloys are most widely used as implant materials due to their excellent biocompatibility, mechanical properties and chemical stability. In this study Nitrogen ions of known dosage were implanted over cp-Ti by Pelletron accelerator with beam energy of 0.25 MeV.The atomic force microscopy of bare and nitrogen implanted specimens confirmed increase in surface roughness with increase in nitrogen ions concentration. X-ray diffraction patterns of ions implanted surfaces validated the formation of TiN0.3 and Ti3N2-xnitride phases. The tendency to form passive film and electrochemical behavior of these surfaces in ringer lactate (RL) solution was evaluated by Potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy respectively. It is proved that nitrogen ions implantation was beneficial to reduce corrosion rate and stabilizing passive film by increasing charge transfer resistance in RL. It was concluded that morphology and proliferation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells on nitrogen ions implanted surfaces strongly depends on surface roughness and nitride phases.

  9. Development of a CMOS process using high energy ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolmeijer, A.

    1986-01-01

    The main interest of this thesis is the use of complementary metal oxide semiconductors (CMOS) in electronic technology. Problems in developing a CMOS process are mostly related to the isolation well of p-n junctions. It is shown that by using high energy ion implantation, it is possible to reduce lateral dimensions to obtain a rather high packing density. High energy ion implantation is also presented as a means of simplifying CMOS processing, since extended processing steps at elevated temperatures are superfluous. Process development is also simplified. (Auth.)

  10. On the Mechanisms of Hydrogen Implantation Induced Silicon Surface Layer Cleavage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hochbauer, Tobias [Univ. of Marburg (Germany)

    2001-11-01

    The “Ion-Cut”, a layer splitting process by hydrogen ion implantation and subsequent annealing is a versatile and efficient technique of transferring thin silicon surface layers from bulk substrates onto other substrates, thus enabling the production of silicon-oninsulator (SOI) materials. Cleavage is induced by the coalescence of the highly pressurized sub-surface H2-gas bubbles, which form upon thermal annealing. A fundamental understanding of the basic mechanisms on how the cutting process occurs is still unclear, inhibiting further optimization of the Ion-Cut process. This work elucidates the physical mechanisms behind the Ion-Cut process in hydrogen-implanted silicon. The investigation of the cleavage process reveals the cut to be largely controlled by the lattice damage, generated by the hydrogen ion irradiation process, and its effects on the local stress field and the fracture toughness within the implantation zone rather than by the depth of maximum H-concentration. Furthermore, this work elucidates the different kinetics in the H-complex formations in silicon crystals with different conductivity types, and examines the mechanically induced damage accumulation caused by the crack propagation through the silicon sample in the splitting step of the Ion-Cut process. Additionally, the influence of boron pre-implantation on the Ion-Cut in hydrogen implanted silicon is investigated. These studies reveal, that both, the atomic interaction between the boron implant and the hydrogen implant and the shift of the Fermi level due to the electrical activation of the implanted boron have a tremendous enhancing effect on the Ion-Cut process.

  11. On the Mechanisms of Hydrogen Implantation Induced Silicon Surface Layer Cleavage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hochbauer, Tobias Franz [Univ. of Marburg (Germany)

    2002-08-01

    The “Ion-Cut”, a layer splitting process by hydrogen ion implantation and subsequent annealing is a versatile and efficient technique of transferring thin silicon surface layers from bulk substrates onto other substrates, thus enabling the production of silicon-oninsulator (SOI) materials. Cleavage is induced by the coalescence of the highly pressurized sub-surface H2-gas bubbles, which form upon thermal annealing. A fundamental understanding of the basic mechanisms on how the cutting process occurs is still unclear, inhibiting further optimization of the Ion-Cut process. This work elucidates the physical mechanisms behind the Ion-Cut process in hydrogen-implanted silicon. The investigation of the cleavage process reveals the cut to be largely controlled by the lattice damage, generated by the hydrogen ion irradiation process, and its effects on the local stress field and the fracture toughness within the implantation zone rather than by the depth of maximum H-concentration. Furthermore, this work elucidates the different kinetics in the H-complex formations in silicon crystals with different conductivity types, and examines the mechanically induced damage accumulation caused by the crack propagation through the silicon sample in the splitting step of the Ion-Cut process. Additionally, the influence of boron pre-implantation on the Ion-Cut in hydrogen implanted silicon is investigated. These studies reveal, that both, the atomic interaction between the boron implant and the hydrogen implant and the shift of the Fermi level due to the electrical activation of the implanted boron have a tremendous enhancing effect on the Ion-Cut process.

  12. Formation of SiC using low energy CO2 ion implantation in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sari, A.H.; Ghorbani, S.; Dorranian, D.; Azadfar, P.; Hojabri, A.R.; Ghoranneviss, M.

    2008-01-01

    Carbon dioxide ions with 29 keV energy were implanted into (4 0 0) high-purity p-type silicon wafers at nearly room temperature and doses in the range between 1 x 10 16 and 3 x 10 18 ions/cm 2 . X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) was used to characterize the formation of SiC in implanted Si substrate. The formation of SiC and its crystalline structure obtained from above mentioned technique. Topographical changes induced on silicon surface, grains and evaluation of them at different doses observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Infrared reflectance (IR) and Raman scattering measurements were used to reconfirm the formation of SiC in implanted Si substrate. The electrical properties of implanted samples measured by four point probe technique. The results show that implantation of carbon dioxide ions directly leads to formation of 15R-SiC. By increasing the implantation dose a significant changes were also observed on roughness and sheet resistivity properties.

  13. Defect production in ion-implanted yttria-stabilized zirconia investigated by positron depth profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saude, S.; Grynszpan, R.I.; Anwand, W.; Brauer, G

    2004-11-17

    The presence and evolution of free-volume defects induced during ion-implantation in solids can be a critical issue in micro- and nano-technology processes. Using a slow positron beam and measuring the energy-line Doppler broadening (DB) of the annihilation radiation, sub-surface investigations were carried out on single crystals of yttria-fully stabilized zirconia (Y-FSZ), following implantation of 210 keV oxygen-ions at fluences ranging from 1.0 x 10{sup 13} to 2.5 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}. Depth profiles of the DB-lineshape S reveal a defect peak at 60 % of the oxygen-ion projected range R{sub p}, i.e., closer to the surface than the vacancy distribution derived from Monte-Carlo calculations. The S-dependence on the fluence exhibits three defect-production stages already identified after implantation with noble gas ions. The intermediate stage (0.1-1 displacements per atom (dpa)) displays a trapping saturation plateau, which rises with increasing ion mass, suggesting a specific critical size for the relevant dominant defect. A slight drop in defect concentration that follows indicates that defects of the last stage (above 2 dpa), are formed at the expense of former ones. No particular effect due to the self-ion is found.

  14. Application of TXRF for ion implanter dose matching experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, M. R.; French, M.; Harris, W.

    2004-06-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) has been utilized for many years to measure the dose of ion implants in silicon for the purpose of verifying the ability of ion implantation equipment to accurately and reproducibly implant the desired species at the target dose. The development of statistically and instrumentally rigorous protocols has lead to high confidence levels, particularly with regard to accuracy and short-term repeatability. For example, high-dose, high-energy B implant dosimetry can be targeted to within ±1%. However, performing dose determination experiments using SIMS does have undesirable aspects, such as being highly labor intensive and sample destructive. Modern total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) instruments are equipped with capabilities for full 300 mm wafer handling, automated data acquisition software and intense X-ray sources. These attributes enable the technique to overcome the SIMS disadvantages listed above, as well as provide unique strengths that make it potentially highly amenable to implanter dose matching. In this paper, we report on data collected to date that provides confidence that TXRF is an effective and economical method to perform these measurements within certain limitations. We have investigated a number of ion implanted species that are within the "envelope" of TXRF application. This envelope is defined by a few important parameters. Species: For the anode materials used in the more common X-ray sources on the market, each has its own set of elements that can be detected. We have investigated W and Mo X-ray sources, which are the most common in use in commercial instrumentation. Implant energy: In general, if the energy of the implanted species is too high (or more specifically, the distribution of the implanted species is too deep), the amount of dopant not detected by TXRF may be significant, increasing the error of the measurement. Therefore, for each species investigated, the implant energy cannot exceed a

  15. Amorphous GaP produced by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, T.; Kato, Y.; Shiraki, Y.; Komatsubara, K.F.

    1976-01-01

    Two types of non-crystalline states ('disordered' and 'amorphous') of GaP were produced by using ion implantation and post annealing. A structural-phase-transition-like annealing behaviour from the 'disordered' state to the 'amorphous' state was observed. The ion dose dependence and the annealing behaviour of the atomic structure of GaP implanted with 200 keV -N + ions were studied by using electron diffraction, backscattering and volume change measurements. The electronic structure was also investigated by measuring optical absorption and electrical conductivity. The implanted layer gradually loses the crystalline order with the increase of the nitrogen dose. The optical absorption coefficient α and electric conductivity sigma of GaP crystals implanted with 200 keV -N + ions of 1 x 10 16 cm -2 were expressed as αhν = C(hν - E 0 )sup(n) and log sigma = A -BTsup(-1/4), respectively. Moreover, the volume of the implanted layer increased about three percent and the electron diffraction pattern was diffused halo whose intensity monotonically decreases along the radial direction. These results indicate that the as-implanted layer has neither a long range order or short range order ('disordered state'). In the sample implanted at 1 x 10 16 cm -2 , a structural phase-transition-like annealing stage was observed at around 400 0 C. That is, the optical absorption coefficient abruptly fell off from 6 x 10 4 to 7 x 10 3 cm -1 and the volume of the implanted layer decreased about 2% within an increase of less than 10 degrees in the anneal temperature. Moreover, the short range order of the lattice structure appeared in the electron diffraction pattern. According to the backscattering experiment, the heavily implanted GaP was still in the non-crystalline state even after annealing. These facts suggest that heavily implanted GaP, followed by annealing at around 400 0 C, is in the 'amorphous' state, although as-implanted GaP is not in the 'amorphous' state but in the

  16. Amorphous Ge quantum dots embedded in SiO2 formed by low energy ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, J. P.; Huang, D. X.; Jacobson, A. J.; Chen, Z. Y.; Makarenkov, B.; Chu, W. K.; Bahrim, B.; Rabalais, J. W.

    2008-01-01

    Under ultrahigh vacuum conditions, extremely small Ge nanodots embedded in SiO 2 , i.e., Ge-SiO 2 quantum dot composites, have been formed by ion implantation of 74 Ge + isotope into (0001) Z-cut quartz at a low kinetic energy of 9 keV using varying implantation temperatures. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images and micro-Raman scattering show that amorphous Ge nanodots are formed at all temperatures. The formation of amorphous Ge nanodots is different from reported crystalline Ge nanodot formation by high energy ion implantation followed by a necessary high temperature annealing process. At room temperature, a confined spatial distribution of the amorphous Ge nanodots can be obtained. Ge inward diffusion was found to be significantly enhanced by a synergetic effect of high implantation temperature and preferential sputtering of surface oxygen, which induced a much wider and deeper Ge nanodot distribution at elevated implantation temperature. The bimodal size distribution that is often observed in high energy implantation was not observed in the present study. Cross-sectional TEM observation and the depth profile of Ge atoms in SiO 2 obtained from x-ray photoelectron spectra revealed a critical Ge concentration for observable amorphous nanodot formation. The mechanism of formation of amorphous Ge nanodots and the change in spatial distribution with implantation temperature are discussed

  17. Effect of H{sup +} ion implantation on structural, morphological, optical and dielectric properties of L-arginine monohydrochloride monohydrate single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sangeetha, K. [Crystal Growth and Thin film Laboratory, Department of Physics, School of Physics, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620024, Tamil Nadu (India); Babu, R. Ramesh, E-mail: rampap2k@yahoo.co.in [Crystal Growth and Thin film Laboratory, Department of Physics, School of Physics, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620024, Tamil Nadu (India); Kumar, P. [Inter-University Accelerator Centre, P.O. Box 10502, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India); Bhagvannarayana, G. [Materials Characterization Division, National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi 110012 (India); Ramamurthi, K. [Crystal Growth and Thin film Laboratory, Department of Physics, School of Physics, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620024, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2011-06-15

    L-arginine monohydrochloride monohydrate (LAHCl) single crystals have been implanted with 100 keV H{sup +} ions at different ion fluence ranging from 10{sup 12} to 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}. Implanted LAHCl single crystals have been investigated for property changes. Crystal surface and crystalline perfection of the pristine and implanted crystals were analyzed by atomic force microscope and high-resolution X-ray diffraction studies, respectively. Optical absorption bands induced by colour centers, refractive index and birefringence, mechanical stability and dielectric constant of implanted crystals were studied at different ion fluence and compared with that of pristine LAHCl single crystal.

  18. Semiconductor applications of plasma immersion ion implantation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    implantation technology. MUKESH KUMAR*, RAJKUMAR†, DINESH KUMAR and P J GEORGE. Department of Electronic Science, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra 136 119, India. †Semiconductor Complex Ltd., Industrial Area Phase 8, Mohali 160 059, India. Abstract. Many semiconductor integrated circuit ...

  19. The effects on γ-LiAlO2 induced by nuclear energy losses during Ga ions implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Song, Hong-Lian; Qiao, Mei; Yu, Xiao-Fei; Wang, Tie-Jun; Wang, Xue-Lin

    2017-09-01

    To explore the evolution of γ-LiAlO2 under ion irradiation at low energy, we implanted Ga ions of 30, 80 and 150 keV at fluences of 1 × 1014 and 1 × 1015 ions/cm2 in z-cut γ-LiAlO2 samples, respectively. The implantation resulted in damage regions dominated by nuclear energy losses at depth of 232 Å, 514 Å, and 911 Å beneath the surface, respectively, which was simulated by the Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter program. The irradiated γ-LiAlO2 were characterized with atomic force microscope, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and Rutherford backscattering in a channeling mode for morphology evolution, structure information and damage profiles. The interesting and partly abnormal results showed the various behaviors in modification of surface by Ga ions implantation.

  20. Chemical effects induced by ion implantation in molecular solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foti, G.; Calcagno, L. (Catania Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Struttura della Materia); Puglisi, O. (Catania Univ. (Italy). Ist. Dipartimentale di Chimica e di Chimica Industriale)

    1983-05-01

    Ion implantation in molecular solids as ice, frozen noble gases, benzene and polymers produces a large amount of new molecules compared to the starting materials. Mass and energy analysis of ejected molecules together with the erosion yield, are discussed for several ion-target combinations at low temperature. The observed phenomena are analyzed in terms of deposited energy in electronic and nuclear collisions, for incoming beams, as helium or argon, in the range 10-2000 keV.

  1. Enhancing osseointegration of orthopedic implants with titania nanotube surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Erin A.

    Introduction: As joint arthroplasty surgical procedures increase annually, the development of new strategies, including novel materials and surface modifications, to attain solid bone-implant fixation are needed to increase implant terms of service. In this study, we evaluate two morphologies of titania nanotubes in both in vitro and in vivo experiments to quantify osseointegrative potential and material-level biocompatibility. Materials and Methods: Samples were prepared via an electrochemical etching process. Two different titania nanotube (TiNT) morphologies were produced, Aligned and Trabecular. For the in vitro experiment, Sprague Dawley (SD) rat marrow-derived bone marrow cells (BMC) were seeded on samples. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, osteocalcin (OC) expression, expression of relevant genes as well as cell attachment and morphology were assessed. In the first in vivo experiment, Kirschner wires were implanted unilaterally into SD rat femora with a TiNT-etched or unmodified (Control) implant. General health assessments and weekly body weights were recorded. At a 12-week endpoint, hematologic, systemic metal ion, and histologic analyses were performed. For the second in vivo experiment, Kirschner wires were implanted bilaterally into SD rat femora, with a TiNT-etched implant in one femora and unmodified (Control) implant as an internal control. At 4- and 12-week endpoints, femora were assessed via biomechanics, undecalcified histology, micro-computed tomography (muCT), and backscattered electron imaging (BEI) to characterize de novo bone formation. Results: In vitro experiments demonstrated BMC attachment and differentiation into osteoblasts as well as greater ALP activity, OC expression, total cell counts, and gene expression (of Col1a1, IGF-1, and osteonectin) on TiNT surfaces versus Controls. Cells on TiNT-etched substrates were smaller in diameter and more eccentric than Controls. In the first in vivo experiment, there were significant differences

  2. Very broad beam metal ion source for large area ion implantation application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, I.; Anders, S.; Dickinson, M.R.; MacGill, R.A.; Yao, X.

    1993-01-01

    The authors have made and operated a very broad beam version of vacuum arc ion source and used it to carry out high energy metal ion implantation of a particularly large substrate. A multiple-cathode vacuum arc plasma source was coupled to a 50 cm diameter beam extractor (multiple aperture, accel-decel configuration) operated at a net extraction voltage of up to 50 kV. The metal ion species chosen were Ni and Ta. The mean ion charge state for Ni and Ta vacuum arc plasmas is 1.8 and 2.9, respectively, and so the mean ion energies were up to about 90 and 145 keV, respectively. The ion source was operated in a repetitively pulsed mode with pulse length 250 μs and repetition rate several pulses per second. The extracted beam had a gaussian profile with FWHM about 35 cm, giving a nominal beam area of about 1,000 cm 2 . The current of Ni or Ta metal ions in the beam was up to several amperes. The targets for the ion implantation were a number of 24-inch long, highly polished Cu rails from an electromagnetic rail gun. The rails were located about 80 cm away from the ion source extractor grids, and were moved across a diameter of the vessel in such a way as to maximize the uniformity of the implant along the rail. The saturation retained dose for Ta was limited to about 4 x 10 16 cm -2 because of the rather severe sputtering, in accordance with the theoretical expectations for these implantation conditions. Here they describe the ion source, the implantation procedure, and the kinds of implants that can be produced in this way

  3. Surface and corrosion characteristics of carbon plasma implanted and deposited nickel-titanium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poon, R.W.Y.; Liu, X.Y.; Chung, C.Y.; Chu, P.K.; Yeung, K.W.K.; Lu, W.W.; Cheung, K.M.C.

    2005-01-01

    Nickel-titanium shape memory alloys (NiTi) are potentially useful in orthopedic implants on account of their super-elastic and shape memory properties. However, the materials are prone to surface corrosion and the most common problem is out-diffusion of harmful Ni ions from the substrate into body tissues and fluids. In order to improve the corrosion resistance and related surface properties, we used the technique of plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition to deposit an amorphous hydrogenated carbon coating onto NiTi and implant carbon into NiTi. Both the deposited amorphous carbon film and carbon plasma implanted samples exhibit much improved corrosion resistances and surface mechanical properties and possible mechanisms are suggested

  4. Single track regime in ion implanted polystyrene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Licciardello, A.; Puglisi, O.; Calcagno, L.; Foti, G.

    1988-05-01

    The molecular weight distribution (MWD) of nearly monodisperse polystyrene thin films is heavily affected by ion bombardment. The main effect is an increase of the MW and is detectable at fluences as low as 10/sup 11/ ions cm/sup -2/ for 400 keV Ar/sup +/ bombardment. A statistical model, here outlined for the first time, allows us the predict the size distribution of these high MW components. From the analysis of the MWD curves one can extract useful information concerning the lateral dimensions of the ion tracks.

  5. A Mutant of Bacillus Subtilis with High-Producing Surfactin by Ion Beam Implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Qingmei; Yuan Hang; Wang Jun; Gong Guohong; Zhou Wei; Fan Yonghong; Wang Li; Yao Jianming; Yu Zengliang

    2006-01-01

    In order to generate a mutant of Bacillus subtilis with enhanced surface activity through low energy nitrogen ion beam implantation, the effects of energy and dose of ions implanted were studied. The morphological changes in the bacteria were observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The optimum condition of ions implantation, 20 keV of energy and 2.6x10 15 N + /cm 2 in dose, was determined. A mutant, B.s-E-8 was obtained, whose surface activity of 50-fold and 100-fold diluted cell-free Landy medium was as 5.6-fold and 17.4-fold as the wild strain. The microbial growth and biosurfactant production of both the mutant and the wild strain were compared. After purified by ultrafiltration and SOURCE 15PHE, the biosurfactant was determined to be a complex of surfactin family through analysis of electrospray ionization mass spectrum (ESI/MS) and there was an interesting finding that after the ion beam implantation the intensities of the components were different from the wild type strain

  6. The air oxidation behavior of lanthanum ion implanted zirconium at 500 deg. C

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, D Q; Chen, X W; Zhou, Q G

    2003-01-01

    The beneficial effect of lanthanum ion implantation on the oxidation behavior of zirconium at 500 deg. C has been studied. Zirconium specimens were implanted by lanthanum ions using a MEVVA source at energy of 40 keV with a fluence range from 1x10 sup 1 sup 6 to 1x10 sup 1 sup 7 ions/cm sup 2 at maximum temperature of 130 deg. C, The weight gain curves were measured after being oxidized in air at 500 deg. C for 100 min, which showed that a significant improvement was achieved in the oxidation behavior of zirconium ion implanted with lanthanum compared with that of the as-received zirconium. The valence of the oxides in the scale was analyzed by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy; and then the depth distributions of the elements in the surface of the samples were obtained by Auger electron spectroscopy. Glancing angle X-ray diffraction at 0.3 deg. incident angles was employed to examine the modification of its phase transformation because of the lanthanum ion implantation in the oxide films. It was obviously fou...

  7. Damage and in-situ annealing during ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadana, D.K.; Washburn, J.; Byrne, P.F.; Cheung, N.W.

    1982-11-01

    Formation of amorphous (α) layers in Si during ion implantation in the energy range 100 keV-11 MeV and temperature range liquid nitrogen (LN)-100 0 C has been investigated. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) shows that buried amorphous layers can be created for both room temperature (RT) and LN temperature implants, with a wider 100 percent amorphous region for the LN cooled case. The relative narrowing of the α layer during RT implantation is attributed to in-situ annealing. Implantation to the same fluence at temperatures above 100 0 C does not produce α layers. To further investigate in situ annealing effects, specimens already containing buried α layers were further irradiated with ion beams in the temperature range RT-400 0 C. It was found that isolated small α zones (less than or equal to 50 diameter) embedded in the crystalline matrix near the two α/c interfaces dissolved into the crystal but the thickness of the 100 percent α layer was not appreciably affected by further implantation at 200 0 C. A model for in situ annealing during implantation is presented

  8. Biological effect of nitrogen ion implantation on stevia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Cailian; Shen Mei; Chen Qiufang; Shu Shizhen

    1997-10-01

    Dry seed of stevia were implanted by 35∼150 keV nitrogen ions with various doses. The biological effect in M 1 was studied. The results showed that nitrogen ion beam was able to induce variation on chromosome structure in root tip cells. The rate of cells with chromosome aberration was increased with ion beam energy and dose added, but there was on significant linear regression relationship between ion dose and aberration rate. The results indicated the seedling height reduced with the increasing of dose for ion beam. The biological effect of nitrogen ion beam on M 1 stevia was lower than that of γ-rays. (6 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.)

  9. Quantum Hall samples prepared by helium-ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruus, H.; Lindelof, P.E.; Veje, E.

    1990-01-01

    We have produced GaAs/GaAlAs heterostructure based quantum Hall samples with a wide range of electron mobilities using ion implantation. The purpose has been to optimize the samples for use in metrology. We have in particular studied the critical current and the non-ohmic behavior of our samples in the vicinity of a quantum Hall plateau. (orig.)

  10. Lattice sites of ion-implanted Li in diamond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Restle, M.; Bharuth-Ram, K.; Quintel, H.; Ronning, C. R.; Hofsäss, H. C.; Jahn, S. G.; Wahl, U.

    1995-01-01

    Published in: Appl. Phys. Lett. 66 (1995) 2733-2735 citations recorded in [Science Citation Index] Abstract: Radioactive Li ions were implanted into natural IIa diamonds at temperatures between 100 K and 900 K. Emission channelling patterns of a-particles emitted in the nuclear decay of 8Li (t1/2 =

  11. Extreme Precipitation Strengthening in Ion-Implanted Nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Follstaedt, D.M.; Knapp, J.A.; Myers, S.M.; Petersen, G.A.

    1999-01-01

    Precipitation strengthening of nickel was investigated using ion-implantation alloying and nanoindentation testing for particle separations in the nanometer range and volume fractions extending above 10O/O. Ion implantation of either oxygen alone or oxygen plus aluminum at room temperature was shown to produce substantial strengthening in the ion-treated layer, with yield strengths near 5 GPa in both cases. After annealing to 550''C the oxygen-alone layer loses much of the benefit, with its yield strength reduced to 1.2 GP but the dual ion-implanted layer retains a substantially enhanced yield strength of over 4 GPa. Examination by transmission electron f microscopy showed very fine dispersions of 1-5 nm diameter NiO and y-A1203 precipitates in the implanted layers before annealing. The heat treatment at 550''C induced ripening of the NiO particles to sizes ranging from 7 to 20 nm, whereas the more stable -A1203 precipitates were little changed. The extreme strengthening we observe is in semiquantitative agreement with predictions based on the application of dispersion-hardening theory to these microstructure

  12. Plasma effects for heavy ions in implanted silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aiello, S.; Anzalone, A.; Campisi, M.G.; Cardella, G.; Cavallaro, Sl.; Filippo, E. De; Geraci, E.; Geraci, M.; Guazzoni, P.; Manno, M.C. Iacono; Lanzalone, G.; Lanzano, G.; Nigro, S. Lo; Pagano, A.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G.; Porto, F.; Rizzo, F.; Sambataro, S.; Sperduto, M.L.; Sutera, C.; Zetta, L.

    1999-01-01

    Plasma effects for heavy ions in implanted silicon detectors have been investigated for different detector characteristics as a function of type and energy of the detected particles. A new approach is presented and used to reproduce the effect of the plasma delay in the timing performances. The results are in good agreement with the present data and with previous measurements found in the literature

  13. Study about iron disilicide formation by high current ion implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Z Q; Li, W Z

    2002-01-01

    beta-FeSi sub 2 exhibits a strong optical absorption and luminescence peak at the energy of about 0.85 eV, which corresponds to the wavelength window preferred for optical communication systems. This property makes beta-FeSi sub 2 a promising material to be used in optoelectronic applications and it has received great research interest. In this study, the formation of beta-FeSi sub 2 by high current ion implantation using a metal vapor vacuum arc ion source was investigated. Fe atoms with dose ranging from 4x10 sup 1 sup 7 to 2x10 sup 1 sup 8 /cm sup 2 were implanted into (1 0 0)Si substrates. Pure beta-FeSi sub 2 was successfully fabricated. alpha-FeSi sub 2 with strong (1 1 1) preferred orientation was also formed when the implantation was conducted at the temperature of 580 degree sign C.

  14. Upgraded vacuum arc ion source for metal ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaev, A. G.; Oks, E. M.; Savkin, K. P.; Yushkov, G. Yu.; Brown, I. G.

    2012-01-01

    Vacuum arc ion sources have been made and used by a large number of research groups around the world over the past twenty years. The first generation of vacuum arc ion sources (dubbed ''Mevva,'' for metal vapor vacuum arc) was developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in the 1980s. This paper considers the design, performance parameters, and some applications of a new modified version of this kind of source which we have called Mevva-V.Ru. The source produces broad beams of metal ions at an extraction voltage of up to 60 kV and a time-averaged ion beam current in the milliampere range. Here, we describe the Mevva-V.Ru vacuum arc ion source that we have developed at Tomsk and summarize its beam characteristics along with some of the applications to which we have put it. We also describe the source performance using compound cathodes.

  15. Accelerator based synthesis of hydroxyapatite by MeV ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rautray, Tapash R.; Narayanan, R.; Kwon, Tae-Yub; Kim, Kyo-Han

    2010-01-01

    Accelerator based MeV ion implantation of Ca 2+ and P 2+ into the titanium substrate to form hydroxyapatite (HA) has been carried out. Calcium hydroxide was formed after heating the calcium implanted titanium in air at 80 o C for 3 h. Upon subsequent annealing for 5 min at 600 o C HA was formed on the surface. Penetration depth of the HA layer in this method is much higher as compared to keV ion implantation. By elemental analysis, Ca/P ratio of the HA was found to be 1.76 which is higher than the ideal 1.67. This higher Ca/P ratio is attributed to the higher penetration depth of the MeV technique used.

  16. Modification of wetting properties of SiOx surfaces by Ar implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chasse, M.; Ross, G.G.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this experiment is to better understand the mechanism leading to the modification of the wetting properties of insulating (quartz) and non-insulating (Si) surfaces by ion and atom implantation. Coupons of quartz and silicon (with its native oxide layer) have been irradiated by means of 3 keV Ar ions and atoms with a fluence of 1.8x10 16 Ar/cm 2 . Some exposures to Ar ions have been performed under oxygen partial pressure (∼5x10 -5 Torr). The samples have been characterized before and after implantation by means of contact angle hysteresis measurements, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) and angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS). Irradiation with argon ions or atoms has produced a more hydrophilic surface immediately after implantation. Ar depth profiling by means of RBS has shown that 4% of implanted (atoms and ions) Ar has been retained in quartz, while 13% and 21% of Ar has been retained in silicon after Ar implantation with and without oxygen partial pressure, respectively. However, no difference in the depth distribution has been measured. Characterization by means of ARXPS has shown a noticeable change in the composition of the quartz and silicon oxide surfaces (implantation of Si under an O 2 partial pressure producing a thicker oxide layer) which can explain the differences in the reported Ar retention. In general, the irradiation have removed a large portion of oxygen present in the pre-existing carbonaceous layer on the surface of the samples. The ion beam irradiation has been more efficient than atom beam to both, increase the wettability of the quartz surfaces and enhance the concentration of the carbonaceous layer in 'dispersed islands' on the surfaces

  17. Modification of wetting properties of SiO x surfaces by Ar implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassé, M.; Ross, G. G.

    2002-06-01

    The aim of this experiment is to better understand the mechanism leading to the modification of the wetting properties of insulating (quartz) and non-insulating (Si) surfaces by ion and atom implantation. Coupons of quartz and silicon (with its native oxide layer) have been irradiated by means of 3 keV Ar ions and atoms with a fluence of 1.8×10 16 Ar/cm 2. Some exposures to Ar ions have been performed under oxygen partial pressure (˜5×10 -5 Torr). The samples have been characterized before and after implantation by means of contact angle hysteresis measurements, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) and angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS). Irradiation with argon ions or atoms has produced a more hydrophilic surface immediately after implantation. Ar depth profiling by means of RBS has shown that 4% of implanted (atoms and ions) Ar has been retained in quartz, while 13% and 21% of Ar has been retained in silicon after Ar implantation with and without oxygen partial pressure, respectively. However, no difference in the depth distribution has been measured. Characterization by means of ARXPS has shown a noticeable change in the composition of the quartz and silicon oxide surfaces (implantation of Si under an O 2 partial pressure producing a thicker oxide layer) which can explain the differences in the reported Ar retention. In general, the irradiation have removed a large portion of oxygen present in the pre-existing carbonaceous layer on the surface of the samples. The ion beam irradiation has been more efficient than atom beam to both, increase the wettability of the quartz surfaces and enhance the concentration of the carbonaceous layer in "dispersed islands" on the surfaces.

  18. Broad-beam, high current, metal ion implantation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, I.G.; Dickinson, M.R.; Galvin, J.E.; Godechot, X.; MacGill, R.A.

    1990-07-01

    We have developed a high current metal ion implantation facility with which high current beams of virtually all the solid metals of the Periodic Table can be produced. The facility makes use of a metal vapor vacuum arc ion source which is operated in a pulsed mode, with pulse width 0.25 ms and repetition rate up to 100 pps. Beam extraction voltage is up to 100 kV, corresponding to an ion energy of up to several hundred keV because of the ion charge state multiplicity; beam current is up to several Amperes peak and around 10 mA time averaged delivered onto target. Implantation is done in a broad-beam mode, with a direct line-of-sight from ion source to target. Here we describe the facility and some of the implants that have been carried out using it, including the 'seeding' of silicon wafers prior to CVD with titanium, palladium or tungsten, the formation of buried iridium silicide layers, and actinide (uranium and thorium) doping of III-V compounds. 16 refs., 6 figs

  19. Coloration of natural beryl by iron ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaibullin, R.I. E-mail: rik@kfti.knc.ru; Lopatin, O.N.; Vagizov, F.G.; Bazarov, V.V.; Bakhtin, A.I.; Khaibullin, I.B.; Aktas, B

    2003-05-01

    Natural colorless crystals of Ural beryl were implanted at room temperature with 40 keV Fe{sup +} ions with fluences in the range of 0.5-1.5 x 10{sup 17} ion/cm{sup 2}. As-implanted samples show dark-grey tone due to radiation damage of beryl crystal. Subsequent thermal annealing of irradiated crystals in oxygen at 600 deg. C for 30 min results in the color change, to yellowish or yellow-orange tones with golden luster, depending on value of iron fluence. The nature of beryl coloration was studied by optical absorption, Moessbauer and Rutherford backscattering (RBS) spectroscopes. It was established that the thermal treatment of iron-irradiated beryl lead to inward diffusive redistribution of iron ions. An appearance of optical absorption bands connected with charge-transfers O{sup 2-} {yields} Fe{sub VI}{sup 3+} and O{sup 2-} {yields} Fe{sub IV}{sup 2+}, Fe{sub IV}{sup 3+} determine the yellow tone in colored beryls. Most of implanted iron ions are founded in both tetrahedral Fe{sub IV}{sup 2+} and octahedral Fe{sub VI}{sup 3+} sites where they may substitute beryllium and aluminum host ions by isomorphic way.

  20. Immobilization of calcium and phosphate ions improves the osteoconductivity of titanium implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunarso; Toita, Riki; Tsuru, Kanji; Ishikawa, Kunio

    2016-01-01

    In this work, to elevate weak osteoconductivity of titanium (Ti) implant, we prepared a Ti implant having both calcium and phosphate ions on its surface. To modify calcium and phosphate ions onto Ti, phosphate ions were first immobilized by treating the Ti with a NaH 2 PO 4 solution, followed by CaCl 2 treatment to immobilize calcium ions, which created the calcium and phosphate ions-modified Ti (Ca-P-Ti). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and thin-layer X-ray diffraction measurement confirmed that both phosphate and calcium ions were co-immobilized onto the Ti surface on the molecular level. Three-hour after seeding MC3T3-E1 murine pre-osteoblast cells on substrates, cell number on Ca-P-Ti was much larger than that of Ti and phosphate-modified Ti (P-Ti), but was similar to that of calcium-modified Ti (Ca-Ti). Also, MC3T3-E1 cells on Ca-P-Ti expressed larger amount of vinculin, a focal adhesion protein, than those on other substrates, probably resulting in larger cell size as well as greater cell proliferation on Ca-P-Ti than those on other substrates. Alkaline phosphatase activity of cells on Ca-P-Ti was greater than those on Ti and P-Ti, but was almost comparable to that of Ca-Ti. Moreover, the largest amount of bone-like nodule formation was observed on Ca-P-Ti. These results provide evidence that calcium and phosphate ions-co-immobilization onto Ti increased the osteoconductivity of Ti by stimulating the responses of pre-osteoblast cells. This simple modification would be promising technique for bone tissue implant including dental and orthopedic implants. - Highlights: • Phosphate and calcium ions have been successfully co-immobilize on Ti surface. • Co-immobilization of Ca and phosphate ions (Ca-P-Ti) did not alter the original surface morphology. • Ca-P-Ti significantly improved initial MC3T3-E1 cell adhesion. • Ca-P-Ti demonstrated remarkable cell proliferation, differentiation and mineralization. • Overall, Ca-P-Ti would be a promising bone

  1. An industrial application of 100 KeV ion beam accelerator: studies on N ion implanted stainless steel with respect to wear resistance to mild abrasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jae Won; Lee, Jae Hyung; Lee, Jae Sang; Sohn, Chang Won; Kil, Jae Geun

    2003-01-01

    We have built a 100 keV and 20 mA ion beam accelerator to apply for prolonged lifetime of metal parts subjected to mild abrasive environment. Studies were conducted on stainless steel which is often used for cutting blades. 70keV N ions of > 5x 10 16 /cm 2 were implanted into the surface polished stainless steel (SS420) with average surface roughness (Ra) of 0.04 μm. Then, wear resistance of N ion implanted specimen at the mild abrasive condition was investigated. When the beam incidence was 45 .deg. with respect to the specimen surfaces, the concentration of nitrogen in the near surface of the specimen was about 5 at% and detected up to at least 300 nm from the surface as measured with Auger electron spectroscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed that the implanted N formed mostly Cr 2 N without post irradiation annealing. Hardness profiles of the specimens were obtained with nano-indentation technique as a function of distance from the surface before and after ion implantations. The peak hardness of 14 Gpa formed at approx. 50 nm depth from the N ion implanted surface was about at least 2 times higher than non-irradiated specimen. Along with the hardness measurement, ball-on-disc wear resistance test was conducted. With 500 gf alumina ball, the wear track to the onset point of abrupt increase in the frictional coefficient was about 5 m for the N implanted specimen, while wear took place for the pristine as soon as the test started. On the other hand, when 1000 gf ball was used for the wear test, the difference in the wear track between the pristine and N implanted specimen was smaller than 500 gf ball, implying that the ion implantation is not suited to severe abrasive condition. After the ion beam irradiation, the surface roughness was reduced to Ra=0.02 μm. We found the ion implantation prolonged the lifetime of the metal parts subjected to mild abrasive environment like hair clipper blades

  2. Characterization of PEEK, PET and PI implanted with Mn ions and sub-sequently annealed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackova, A.; Malinsky, P.; Miksova, R.; Pupikova, H.; Khaibullin, R.I.; Slepicka, P.; Gombitová, A.; Kovacik, L.; Svorcik, V.; Matousek, J.

    2014-01-01

    Polyimide (PI), polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) foils were implanted with 80 keV Mn + ions at room temperature at fluencies of 1.0 × 10 15 –1.0 × 10 16 cm −2 . Mn depth profiles determined by RBS were compared to SRIM 2012 and TRIDYN simulations. The processes taking place in implanted polymers under the annealing procedure were followed. The measured projected ranges R P differ slightly from the SRIM and TRIDYN simulation and the depth profiles are significantly broader (up to 2.4 times) than those simulated by SRIM, while TRIDYN simulations were in a reasonable agreement up to the fluence 0.5 × 10 16 in PEEK. Oxygen and hydrogen escape from the implanted layer was examined using RBS and ERDA techniques. PET, PEEK and PI polymers exhibit oxygen depletion up to about 40% of its content in virgin polymers. The compositional changes induced by implantation to particular ion fluence are similar for all polymers examined. After annealing no significant changes of Mn depth distribution was observed even the further oxygen and hydrogen desorption from modified layers appeared. The surface morphology of implanted polymers was characterized using AFM. The most significant change in the surface roughness was observed on PEEK. Implanted Mn atoms tend to dissipate in the polymer matrix, but the Mn nanoparticles are too small to be observed on TEM micrographs. The electrical, optical and structural properties of the implanted and sub-sequently annealed polymers were investigated by sheet resistance measurement and UV–Vis spectroscopy. With increasing ion fluence, the sheet resistance decreases and UV–Vis absorbance increases simultaneously with the decline of optical band gap E g . The most pronounced change in the resistance was found on PEEK. XPS spectroscopy shows that Mn appears as a mixture of Mn oxides. Mn metal component is not present. All results were discussed in comparison with implantation experiment using the various ion

  3. Effects of ion implantation on the electrochemical characteristics of carbon electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Katsuo; Iwaki, Masaya

    1994-01-01

    Various carbon materials are important electrode materials for electrochemical field. By ion implantation, the surface layer reforming of carbon materials (mainly galssy carbon) was carried out, and the effect that it exerts to their electrode characteristics was investigated. As the results of the ion implantation of Li, N, O, K, Ti, Zn, Cd and others performed so far, it was found that mainly by the change of the surface layer to amorphous state, there were the effects of the lowering of base current and the lowering of electrode reaction rate, and it was known that the surface layers of carbon materials doped with various kinds of ions showed high chemical stability. The use of carbon materials as electrodes in electrochemistry is roughly divided into the electrodes for electrolytic industry and fuel cells for large current and those for the measurement in electrochemical reaction for small current. The structure of carbon materials and electrode characteristics, and the reforming effect by ion implantation are reported. (K.I.)

  4. Negative-ion beam surface modification of tissue-culture polystyrene dishes for changing hydrophilic and cell-attachment properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, H.; Satoh, H.; Ikeda, S.; Ikemura, S.; Gotoh, Y.; Ishikawa, J.

    1999-01-01

    Negative-silver-ion implantation into tissue-culture polystyrene (TCPS) dishes was investigated and it was found to modify hydrophilic and cell attachment properties of the dishes. Negative-ion implantation has an advantage of being almost free of surface charging, and is a suitable method for implantation into insulators such as polymers. Negative silver ions are used due to the antibacterial property of silver. Ag-implanted TCPS dishes had a contact angle larger than the normal value of 66 deg. of unimplanted dishes. The contact angle of water had a strong dependence on the ion energy rather than the dose. As a cell-culture experiment, human umbilical vascular endothelial cell (HUVEC) was used in unimplanted and Ag-implanted TCPS dishes, the implantation removed the cell-attachment property of the surface. In implantation with a mask with a striped pattern, most attached cells of HUVEC were in the unimplanted region aligned along a stripe direction

  5. The ion implanter of the Institute of Nuclear Physics and its application in the ion engineering; Implantator jonow IFJ i jego wykorzystanie w inzynierii jonowej

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drwiega, M.; Lipinska, E.; Lazarski, S.; Wierba, M.

    1993-09-01

    The device used for ion implantation is described in detail. It is built with the use of electromagnetic ion separator and consists of: ion source, ion beam system, ion mass analyzer and target chamber. The device parameters are also given. 14 refs, 5 figs, 2 tabs.

  6. Surface characterization of titanium based dental implants; Caracterizacao de implantes odontologicos a base de titanio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castilho, Guilherme Augusto Alcaraz

    2006-07-01

    Dental implantology uses metallic devices made of commercially pure titanium in order to replace lost teeth. Titanium presents favorable characteristics as bio material and modern implants are capable of integrate, witch is the union between bone and implant without fibrous tissue development. Three of the major Brazilian implant manufacturers were chosen to join the study. A foreign manufacturer participated as standard. The manufacturers had three specimens of each implant with two different surface finishing, as machined and porous, submitted to analysis. Surface chemical composition and implant morphology were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XP S), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and microprobe. Implant surface is mainly composed of titanium, oxygen and carbon. Few contaminants commonly present on implant surface were found on samples. Superficial oxide layer is basically composed of titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}), another oxides as Ti O and Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3} were also found in small amount. Carbon on implant surface was attributed to manufacturing process. Nitrogen, Phosphorous and Silicon appeared in smaller concentration on surface. There was no surface discrepancy among foreign and Brazilian made implants. SEM images were made on different magnification, 35 X to 3500 X, and showed similarity among as machined implants. Porous surface finishing implants presented distinct morphology. This result was attributed to differences on manufacturing process. Implant bioactivity was accessed through immersion on simulated body solution (SBF) in order to verify formation of an hydroxyapatite (HA) layer on surface. Samples were divided on three groups according to immersion time: G1 (7 days), G2 (14 days), G3 (21 days), and deep in SBF solution at 37 deg C. After being removed from solution, XPS analyses were made and then implants have been submitted to microprobe analysis. XPS showed some components of SBF solution on sample surface but microprobe

  7. Tuning of the electronic structure and magnetic properties of xenon ion implanted zinc oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, B.; Ray, Sekhar C.; Pattanaik, Shreenu; Sarma, Sweety; Mishra, Dilip K.; Pontsho, Mbule; Pong, W. F.

    2018-03-01

    A correlation between the electronic structure and magnetic properties of ZnO single crystals (ZnO SCs) and 300 keV xenon ion (Xe3+) implanted ZnO SCs has been studied using x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, valence band photoemission spectroscopy (VB-PES), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, and a superconducting quantum interference device-type magnetometer. The XANES studies revealed that the number of unoccupied p-states in the implanted ZnO SCs is higher than in the pristine ZnO SCs. In the implanted ZnO SCs, the binding energy of the Zn 2p 3/2 core level peak shifted to higher energy which further confirmed the increase in the valence band maximum (VBM) energy level. The VBM of the xenon ion (Xe3+) implanted ZnO SCs increased from 3.17–3.49 eV, obtained from UPS (He-I) measurements. A VB-PES study revealed that the number of electrons in the valence band of the O 2p–Zn 4sp hybridized states of the implanted ZnO SCs is higher than in the pristine ZnO SCs. The magnetic M–H loops demonstrated enhanced room temperature ferromagnetism in the Xe implanted ZnO SCs, attributable to the increasing number of surface defects and native defect sites in oxygen vacancies and zinc interstitials.

  8. Ellipsometric and channeling studies on ion-implanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohner, T.; Mezey, G.; Kotai, E.; Paszti, F.; Kiralyhidi, L.; Valyi, G.; Gyulai, J.

    1980-09-01

    RBS and ellipsometric investigations were combined to separate the contribution of radiation damage and overlayer contamination. It is pointed out that disorder effects which were produced by silicon self-implantation are shielded without proper surface cleaning. For cleaning, plasma stripping proved to be an effective method. The change in psi parameter could be correlated with the degree of amorphousness. It seems that Δ parameter ''feels'' crystalline-amorphous phase transition on low dose 31 P + and 27 Al + implants. No clear evidence was found for impurity effects on high-dose 75 As + and 31 P + implants. (author)

  9. Plasma-based ion implantation and deposition: A review of physics,technology, and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelletier, Jacques; Anders, Andre

    2005-05-16

    After pioneering work in the 1980s, plasma-based ion implantation (PBII) and plasma-based ion implantation and deposition (PBIID) can now be considered mature technologies for surface modification and thin film deposition. This review starts by looking at the historical development and recalling the basic ideas of PBII. Advantages and disadvantages are compared to conventional ion beam implantation and physical vapor deposition for PBII and PBIID, respectively, followed by a summary of the physics of sheath dynamics, plasma and pulse specifications, plasma diagnostics, and process modeling. The review moves on to technology considerations for plasma sources and process reactors. PBII surface modification and PBIID coatings are applied in a wide range of situations. They include the by-now traditional tribological applications of reducing wear and corrosion through the formation of hard, tough, smooth, low-friction and chemically inert phases and coatings, e.g. for engine components. PBII has become viable for the formation of shallow junctions and other applications in microelectronics. More recently, the rapidly growing field of biomaterial synthesis makes used of PBII&D to produce surgical implants, bio- and blood-compatible surfaces and coatings, etc. With limitations, also non-conducting materials such as plastic sheets can be treated. The major interest in PBII processing originates from its flexibility in ion energy (from a few eV up to about 100 keV), and the capability to efficiently treat, or deposit on, large areas, and (within limits) to process non-flat, three-dimensional workpieces, including forming and modifying metastable phases and nanostructures. We use the acronym PBII&D when referring to both implantation and deposition, while PBIID implies that deposition is part of the process.

  10. Industrial hygiene and control technology assessment of ion implantation operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ungers, L.J.; Jones, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    Ion implantation is a process used to create the functional units (pn junctions) of integrated circuits, photovoltaic (solar) cells and other semiconductor devices. During the process, ions of an impurity or a dopant material are created, accelerated and imbedded in wafers of silicon. Workers responsible for implantation equipment are believed to be at risk from exposure to both chemical (dopant compounds) and physical (ionizing radiation) agents. In an effort to characterize the chemical exposures, monitoring for chemical hazards was conducted near eleven ion implanters at three integrated circuit facilities, while ionizing radiation was monitored near four of these units at two of the facilities. The workplace monitoring suggests that ion implantation operators routinely are exposed to low-level concentrations of dopants. Although the exact nature of dopant compounds released to the work environment was not determined, area and personal samples taken during normal operating activities found concentrations of arsenic, boron and phosphorous below OSHA Permissible Exposure Limits (PELs) for related compounds; area samples collected during implanter maintenance activities suggest that a potential exists for more serious exposures. The results of badge dosimetry monitoring for ionizing radiation indicate that serious exposures are unlikely to occur while engineering controls remain intact. All emissions were detected at levels unlikely to result in exposures above the OSHA standard for the whole body (1.25 rems per calendar quarter). The success of existing controls in preventing worker exposures is discussed. Particular emphasis is given to the differential exposures likely to be experienced by operators and maintenance personnel.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Operations manual for the plasma source ion implantation economics program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibeault, M.L.; Thayer, G.R.

    1995-10-01

    Plasma Source Ion Implantation (PSII) is a surface modification technique for metal. PSIICOSTMODEL95 is an EXCEL-based program that estimates the cost for implementing a PSII system in a manufacturing setting where the number of parts to be processed is over 5,000 parts per day and the shape of each part does not change from day to day. Overall, the manufacturing process must be very well defined and should not change. This document is a self-contained manual for PSIICOSTMODEL95. It assumes the reader has some general knowledge of the technical requirements for PSII. Configuration of the PSII process versus design is used as the methodology in PSIICOSTMODEL95. The reason behind this is twofold. First, the design process cannot be programmed into a computer when the relationships between design variables are not understood. Second, the configuration methodology reduces the number of assumptions that must be programmed into our software. Misuse of results are less likely to occur if the user has fewer assumptions to understand

  12. Formation of Schottky junctions in silicon by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollmann, J.; Klose, H.; Mertens, A.

    1986-01-01

    In order to study the direct formation of a rectifying contact with Schottky junction properties low-energy high-dose silver ion implantations (E = 10 keV, D = 6 x 10 16 cm -2 ) were carried out in Czochralski-grown n- and p-type silicon (0.01 to 15 Ωcm) at 77 and 300 K, respectively. After the implantation an Al or Ag film was vacuum deposited in the same target chamber. The process-induced deep defect centers as well as their depth distribution and annealing behaviour were investigated by measuring electrical characteristics and deep level transient spectra

  13. Precipitation in ion-implanted Al during electron beam pulsed annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Follstaedt, D.M.; Picraux, S.T.; Wampler, W.R.

    1979-01-01

    TEM and ion channeling were used to examine the microstructure of Al implanted with Zn or Sb following pulsed electron beam annealing with deposited energies of 0.7 to 1.6 J/cm 2 . The Zn-implanted samples show a high density of dislocations in the near surface region. Zn precipitation is not seen in the electron diffraction patterns. For Sb, randomly oriented AlSb precipitates are observed, and precipitation is inferred to have occurred in molten Al. This is accounted for with the Al-Sb binary phase diagram

  14. Synthesis of Ag ion-implanted TiO2 thin films for antibacterial application and photocatalytic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xinggang; Ma, Huiyan; Liu, Feng; Deng, Jianhua; Ai, Yukai; Zhao, Xinlei; Mao, Dong; Li, Dejun; Liao, Bin

    2015-12-15

    TiO2 thin films were deposited by spin coating method. Silver ions were implanted into the films using a Metal Vapor Vacuum Arc implanter. The antibacterial ability of implanted films was tested using Escherichia coli removal under fluorescent irradiation and in the dark. The concentration of E. coli was evaluated by plating technique. The photocatalytic efficiency of the implanted films was studied by degradation of methyl orange under fluorescent illumination. The surface free energy of the implanted TiO2 films was calculated by contact angle testing. Vitamin C was used as radical scavengers to explore the antibacterial mechanism of the films. The results supported the model that both generation of reactive oxygen species and release of silver ions played critical roles in the toxic effect of implanted films against E. coli. XPS experimental results demonstrated that a portion of the Ag(Ag(3+)) ions were doped into the crystalline lattice of TiO2. As demonstrated by density functional theory calculations, the impurity energy level of subtitutional Ag was responsible for enhanced absorption of visible light. Ag ion-implanted TiO2 films with excellent antibacterial efficiency against bacteria and decomposed ability against organic pollutants could be potent bactericidal surface in moist environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Tantalum implanted entangled porous titanium promotes surface osseointegration and bone ingrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Qiao, Yuqin; Cheng, Mengqi; Jiang, Guofeng; He, Guo; Chen, Yunsu; Zhang, Xianlong; Liu, Xuanyong

    2016-05-01

    Porous Ti is considered to be an ideal graft material in orthopaedic and dental surgeries due to its similar spatial structures and mechanical properties to cancellous bone. In this work, to overcome the bioinertia of Ti, Ta-implanted entangled porous titanium (EPT) was constructed by plasma immersion ion implantation & deposition (PIII&D) method. Ca-implanted and unimplanted EPTs were investigated as control groups. Although no difference was found in surface topography and mechanical performances, both Ca- and Ta-implanted groups had better effects in promoting MG-63 cell viability, proliferation, differentiation, and mineralization than those of unimplanted group. The expression of osteogenic-related markers examined by qRT-PCR and western blotting was upregulated in Ca- and Ta-implanted groups. Moreover, Ta-implanted EPT group could reach a higher level of these effects than that of Ca-implanted group. Enhanced osseointegration of both Ca- and Ta-implanted EPT implants was demonstrated through in vivo experiments, including micro-CT evaluation, push-out test, sequential fluorescent labeling and histological observation. However, the Ta-implanted group possessed more stable and continuous osteogenic activity. Our results suggest that Ta-implanted EPT can be developed as one of the highly efficient graft material for bone reconstruction situations.

  16. Production and characterization of thin 7Li targets fabricated by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, J.; Fonseca, M.; Luis, H.; Mateus, R.; Marques, H.; Jesus, A.P.; Ribeiro, J.P.; Teodoro, O.M.N.D.; Rolfs, C.

    2009-01-01

    Very high fluence implantation of 7 Li + ions was used to promote the formation of a thin and high density 7 Li target in the surface region of Al samples. The implanted volume was characterized by particle induced gamma-ray emission, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and nuclear reaction analysis, revealing that the implanted surface is a combination of Li 2 CO 3 , metallic lithium, LiOH and C, with almost no Al present. Radiation damage effects by proton beams were studied by observing the evolution of the 7 Li(p, α) 4 He nuclear reaction yield with the accumulated charge, at different proton energies, revealing high stability of the produced Li target.

  17. CO2 laser surface treatment of failed dental implants for re-implantation: an animal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasraei, Shahin; Torkzaban, Parviz; Shams, Bahar; Hosseinipanah, Seyed Mohammad; Farhadian, Maryam

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the success rate of failed implants re-implanted after surface treatment with CO2 laser. Despite the widespread use of dental implants, there are many incidents of failures. It is believed that lasers can be applied to decontaminate the implant surface without damaging the implant. Ten dental implants that had failed for various reasons other than fracture or surface abrasion were subjected to CO2 laser surface treatment and randomly placed in the maxillae of dogs. Three failed implants were also placed as the negative controls after irrigation with saline solution without laser surface treatment. The stability of the implants was evaluated by the use of the Periotest values (PTVs) on the first day after surgery and at 1, 3, and 6 months post-operatively. The mean PTVs of treated implants increased at the first month interval, indicating a decrease in implant stability due to inflammation followed by healing of the tissue. At 3 and 6 months, the mean PTVs decreased compared to the 1-month interval (P laser surface debridement is associated with a high success rate in terms of implant stability.

  18. Ge nano-layer fabricated by high-fluence low-energy ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Tiecheng; Dun Shaobo; Hu Qiang; Zhang Songbao; An Zhu; Duan Yanmin; Zhu Sha; Wei Qiangmin; Wang Lumin

    2006-01-01

    A Ge nano-layer embedded in the surface layer of an amorphous SiO 2 film was fabricated by high-fluence low-energy ion implantation. The component, phase, nano-structure and luminescence properties of the nano-layer were studied by means of Rutherford backscattering, glancing incident X-ray diffraction, laser Raman scattering, transmission electron microscopy and photoluminescence. The relation between nano-particle characteristics and ion fluence was also studied. The results indicate that nano-crystalline Ge and nano-amorphous Ge particles coexist in the nano-layer and the ratio of nano-crystalline Ge to nano-particle Ge increases with increasing ion fluence. The intensity of photoluminescence from the nano-layer increases with increasing ion fluence also. Prepared with certain ion fluences, high-density nano-layers composed of uniform-sized nano-particles can be observed

  19. Study of creep of Ti-6Al-4V alloy using plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zepka, Susana; Yogi, Lucila Mayumi; Silva, Maria Margareth da; Reis, Danieli Aparecida Pereira; Moura Neto, Carlos de; Oliveira, Vinicius Souza de; Ueda, Mario

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the creep resistance of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy after surface modification by plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII). For the PIII treatment it was used nitrogen gas (ion implantation) to the formation of plasma, the material was treated for 100 minutes. After PIII treatment the samples were analyzed using the techniques of X-ray diffraction, spectrometry energy dispersive X-ray and atomic force microscopy. The creep tests were realized at 600°C, at constant load of 250 and 319 MPa. After the creep tests the samples were analyzed by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. By chemical analysis by X-ray and EDS it is possible to determinate the Ti 2 N on the surface. Through the study of the creep curves it is observed an increasing in creep resistance of the alloy after PIII treatment. (author)

  20. High-dose ion implantation of ceramics: benefits and limitations for tribology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bull, S.J.; Page, T.F.

    1988-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the effects of ion implantation on sapphire and soda-lime-silica glass. It establishes the complex interplay between radiation damage, hardness, surface stress and, for the first time, friction. For sapphire, both the shallow indentation hardness response and the integrated near-surface stress increase with damage and exhibit maxima as the surface eventually amorphizes. For the glass, initial damage is shown to result in structural softening before rehardening at higher doses; the radiation-induced stress is a complex function of dose and seems partly linked to electronic rather than displacement processes. Some structural change also eventually occurs akin to amorphization in crystals and is accompanied by changes in hardness and surface stress. Superimposed on these patterns of behaviour are changes in the friction behaviour, part of which is ascribed to increased adhesion presumed due to implantation changing the surface affinity for water adsorption. These effects are demonstrated and discussed in the context of ion-implanted ceramics finding application as controlled friction and/or wear components in engineering applications. Other effects such as gas bubble formation, crazing and sputtering are shown to lead to surface microstructures which can also play a deleterious role in tribological behaviour. (author)

  1. Dental implant surfaces after insertion in bone: an in vitro study in four commercial implant systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deppe, Herbert; Wolff, Carolina; Bauer, Florian; Ruthenberg, Ricarda; Sculean, Anton; Mücke, Thomas

    2017-10-24

    Primary healing of dental implants is influenced by their surface morphology. However, little is known about any alterations in morphology during their insertion. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the surface morphology of four different implant systems, following their insertion in porcine jaw bones. Four fresh porcine mandible specimens were used. Six new implants of four systems (Ankylos® 4.5 × 14 mm, Frialit Synchro® 4.5 × 15 mm, NobelReplace ® Tapered Groovy RP 4.3 × 13 mm, Straumann SLA® Bone Level 3.3 × 14 mm) were inserted, whereas one implant of each system served as a control. After their removal, implants were cleaned in an ultrasonic bath. All 28 implants were examined quantitatively by 3D confocal microscopy for surface characteristics. In the evaluated zones, implants of the Ankylos, Frialit, and Straumann systems showed mostly a reduction of the mean surface roughness Sa, the maximal surface roughness Sz, and the developed surface area ratio Sdr; Nobel implants showed an increase in these parameters. With respect to all three parameters Sa, Sz, and Sdr, statistical analysis revealed that differences between the four systems were highly significant in the apical region of implants. Controls showed no morphologic alterations. The insertion process had an impact on the surface of all four implant systems. Anodized implant surface modification seems to result in more alterations compared with subtractive surface modifications. Therefore, surgical planning should take into consideration the choice of surface treatment because the characteristics of the implants may be modified during the installation process. The given information is of value for daily implantation practice and the course of osseointegration.

  2. 4-rod RFQ linac for ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujisawa, Hiroshi; Hamamoto, Nariaki; Inouchi, Yutaka [Nisshin Electric Co. Ltd., Kyoto (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    A 34 MHz 4-rod RFQ linac system has been upgraded in both its rf power efficiency and beam intensity. The linac is able to accelerate in cw operation 0.83 mA of a B{sup +} ion beam from 0.03 to 0.91 MeV with transmission of 61 %. The rf power fed to the RFQ is 29 kW. The unloaded Q-value of the RFQ has been improved approximately 61 % to 5400 by copper-plating stainless steel cooling pipes in the RFQ cavity. (author)

  3. Ion Implantation of Wide Bandgap Semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-05-01

    u s i n g nomina l l v • S’~ xi lane in UHP argon and r o u g h ly eq u i va l e n t system cond it ions. We probably obtained a h o t t i t ’ of...dilute silane that is more c o nce n t rat e d han t he nomina l 1 .5Z reques ted . Both Auger ana l vs is and Rut her f o rd b ackscu t t er ing

  4. Improvement of the corrosion and tribological properties of CSS-42L aerospace bearing steel using carbon ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Fangfang; Zhou, Chungen; Zheng, Lijing, E-mail: zhenglijing@buaa.edu.cn; Zhang, Hu

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • The corrosion and tribological properties of an aerospace bearing steel CSS-42L was investigated. • Carbon ion implantation was conducted and an amorphous layer formed at the near surface of CSS-42L steel. • The enhanced Cr diffusion and the decreased free electrons are contributed to the improvement of corrosion properties. • The external hard layer has positive effect on the wear resistance. - Abstract: The aerospace bearings steel CSS-42L was ion implanted by carbon with implantation fluxes of 5 × 10{sup 16} ions cm{sup −2}. The composition, microstructure and hardness of the carbon implanted samples were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and nanoindentation tests. The corrosion and tribological properties were also evaluated in the present work. The results shown that carbon implantation produced an amorphous layer and graphitic bounds formed at the near surface of CSS-42L steel. In the electrochemical test, the carbon implanted samples suggested lower current densities and corrosion rates. Carbon ion implanted samples shown a relative Cr-enrichment at the surface as compared with nonimplanted samples. The improved corrosion resistance is believed to be related to the formed amorphous layer, the enhancement of Cr diffusion in the carbon implantation layer which contributed the formation of passive film on the surface, the decrease of free electrons which caused by the increase of carbon fraction. The external hard layer had positive effect on the wear resistance, reducing strongly the friction coefficient about 30% and the abrasive-adhesive mechanism present in the unimplanted samples was not modified by the implantation process.

  5. Seeding of silicon by copper ion implantation for selective electroless copper plating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhansali, S.; Sood, D.K.; Zmood, R.B. [Microelectronic and Materials Technology Centre, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technolgy, Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    We report on the successful use of copper(self) ion implantation into silicon to seed the electroless plating of copper on silicon (100) surfaces. Copper ions have been implanted to doses of 5E14-6.4E16 ions/cm{sup 2} using a MEEVA ion implanter at extraction voltage of 40kV. Dose was varied in fine steps to determine the threshold dose of 2E15 Cu ions/cm{sup 2} for `seed` formation of copper films on silicon using a commercial electroless plating solution. Plated films were studied with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy, EDX and profilometry . The adhesion of films was measured by `scotch tape test`. The adhesion was found to improve with increasing dose. However thicker films exhibited rather poor adhesion and high internal stress. SEM results show that the films grow first as isolated islands which become larger and eventually impinge into a continuous film as the plating time is increased. (authors). 5 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs.

  6. Novel chromium layers formed by nitrogen-ion implantation of conventional and ABCD electrodeposited films: Pt. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferber, H.; Hoflund, G.B.; Mount, C.K.

    1990-01-01

    Nitrogen-ion implantation of conventional Cr and amorphous bright chromium-deposited (ABCD) films, which were preannealed at various temperatures, has been carried out in order to determine the effect of implantation on the hardness of the Cr layers. The implantation was carried out using low ion beam fluxes in order to maintain a sample temperature below 250 0 C. Implantation leads to increased hardness, but the extent is most pronounced for conventional films which were not annealed and ABCD films which were annealed at or below 400 0 C for 1/2 h. The surface sensitivity of the hardness measurements was varied by altering the load used during the test. Data obtained in this manner show that the more surface-sensitive hardness is greater than the more bulk-sensitive hardness for both the implanted and non-implanted ABCD films and the implanted conventional Cr films. The compositions of the implanted films have been characterized using Auger electron spectroscopy in conjunction with sputter depth profiling. These data show that all the Cr in the implanted region is bound as CrN, Cr oxides and Cr carbides at large total N + doses. Furthermore, the N displaces the C in ABCD films producing N and C profiles that mimic each other in an inverse manner. (author)

  7. Long-wavelength germanium photodetectors by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, I.C.; Beeman, J.W.; Luke, P.N.; Hansen, W.L.; Haller, E.E.

    1990-11-01

    Extrinsic far-infrared photoconductivity in thin high-purity germanium wafers implanted with multiple-energy boron ions has been investigated. Initial results from Fourier transform spectrometer(FTS) measurements have demonstrated that photodetectors fabricated from this material have an extended long-wavelength threshold near 192μm. Due to the high-purity substrate, the ability to block the hopping conduction in the implanted IR-active layer yields dark currents of less than 100 electrons/sec at temperatures below 1.3 K under an operating bias of up to 70 mV. Optimum peak responsivity and noise equivalent power (NEP) for these sensitive detectors are 0.9 A/W and 5 x 10 -16 W/Hz 1/2 at 99 μm, respectively. The dependence of the performance of devices on the residual donor concentration in the implanted layer will be discussed. 12 refs., 4 figs

  8. Scattering of ion beams from surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiland, W.; Taglauer, E.

    1978-01-01

    A review is presented of the scattering of ion beams from surfaces and the physical phenomena which are probably most important for the formation of the final state (charge and excitation) of the secondary particles. The subject is treated under the headings: ion scattering, desorption by ion impact, and neutralization. (U.K.)

  9. Glass carbon surface modified by the fluorine ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teranishi, Yoshikazu; Ishizuka, Masanori; Kobayashi, Tomohiro; Nakamura, Isao; Uematu, Takahiko; Yasuda, Takeshi; Mitsuo, Atsushi; Morikawa, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    Application of nano and micro fabrication techniques in industry requires solution to some crucial problems. One of the significant problems is the sticking interface between mold surface and imprinted polymer. In this study, we report a solution to the sticking interface problem by modification of nano imprinting mold using fluorine ion implantation. After the fluorine implantation, anti sticking layer appeared on the nano imprinting mold surface. After the implantation, a mold made from glass like carbon was patterned by focused ion beam lithography. The pattern was made up of word “TIRI”. The line width was varied with 300 nm, 500 nm, and 1 μm. The line depth was about 200 ∼ 300 nm. The average depth of implanted fluorine was approximately 90 nm. After imprinting, the resin was removed from the mold by mechanical lift-off process. Transferred pattern was observed and confirmed by a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an atomic force microscope (AFM). The pattern transferred from mold to resin was found to be successful.

  10. Rapid Thermal annealing of silicon layers amorphized by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasenack, C.M.

    1986-01-01

    The recrystallization behavior and the supression mechanisms of the residual defects of silicon layers amorphized by ion implantation, were investigated. The samples were annealed with the aid of a rapid thermal annealing (RTA) system at temperature range from 850 to 1200 0 C, and annealing time up to 120 s. Random and aligned Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy were used to analyse the samples. Similarities in the recrystallization behavior for layers implanted with ions of the same chemical groups such as As or Sb; Ge, Sn or Pb, In or Ga, are observed. The results show that the effective supression of resisual defects of the recrystallired layers is vinculated to the redistribution of impurities via thermal diffusion. (author) [pt

  11. Radio-frequency linear accelerators for commercial ion implanters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glavish, H.F.

    1987-01-01

    There is now a demand for production-type ion implanters capable of delivering high beam current at energies in the MeV range. Hitherto, this application has been fulfilled only with dc machines of somewhat limited beam current. A recently developed radio-frequency linear accelerator has produced much higher beam currents yet is just as flexible as a dc machine in the sense that within seconds it can be programmed to accelerate any particle in the range of boron to antimony, to any selected final energy. Included in this review is a discussion of the general principles of rf acceleration including factors which determine the accelerating voltage gradient, energy spread, space charge limits, radial focusing, and the flexibility derived from independent rf phase control of individual rf accelerating cells. Various structures such as the 'two gap' resonator and the rf quadrupole are considered in relation to ion implantation applications. (orig.)

  12. Photoluminescence of magnesium-associated color centers in LiF crystals implanted with magnesium ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebogin, S. A.; Ivanov, N. A.; Bryukvina, L. I.; V. Shipitsin, N.; E. Rzhechitskii, A.; Papernyi, V. L.

    2018-05-01

    In the present paper, the effect of magnesium nanoparticles implanted in a LiF crystal on the optical properties of color centers is studied. The transmittance spectra and AFM images demonstrate effective formation of the color centers and magnesium nanoparticles in an implanted layer of ∼ 60-100 nm in thickness. Under thermal annealing, a periodical structure is formed on the surface of the crystal and in the implanted layer due to self-organization of the magnesium nanoparticles. Upon excitation by argon laser with a wavelength of 488 nm at 5 K, in a LiF crystal, implanted with magnesium ions as well as in heavily γ-irradiated LiF: Mg crystals, luminescence of the color centers at λmax = 640 nm with a zero-phonon line at 601.5 nm is observed. The interaction of magnesium nanoparticles and luminescing color centers in a layer implanted with magnesium ions has been revealed. It is shown that the luminescence intensity of the implanted layer at a wavelength of 640 nm is by more than two thousand times higher than that of a heavily γ-irradiated LiF: Mg crystal. The broadening of the zero-phonon line at 601.5 nm in the spectrum of the implanted layer indicates the interaction of the emitting quantum system with local field of the surface plasmons of magnesium nanoparticles. The focus of this work is to further optimize the processing parameters in a way to result in luminescence great enhancement of color centers by magnesium nanoparticles in LiF.

  13. Application of Coaxial Ion Gun for Film Generation and Ion Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatsu, Mikio; Asai, Tomohiko; Kurumi, Satoshi; Suzuki, Kaoru; Hirose, Hideharu; Masutani, Shigeyuki

    A magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) is here utilized for deposition on high-melting-point metals. MCPGs have hitherto been studied mostly in the context of nuclear fusion research, for particle and magnetic helicity injection and spheromak formation. During spheromak formation, the electrode materials are ionized and mixed into the plasmoid. In this study, this ablation process by gun-current sputtering is enhanced for metallic thin-film generation. In the proposed system geometry, only ionized materials are electromagnetically accelerated by the self-Lorentz force, with ionized operating gas as a magnetized thermal plasmoid, contributing to the thin-film deposition. This reduces the impurity and non-uniformity of the deposited thin-film. Furthermore, as the ions are accelerated in a parallel direction to the injection axis, vertical implantation of the ions into the substrate surface is achieved. To test a potential application of the developed system, experiments were conducted involving the formation of a buffer layer on hard ceramics, for use in dental materials.

  14. Fabrication of high-quality strain relaxed SiGe(1 1 0) films by controlling defects via ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, M.; Arimoto, K.; Yamanaka, J.; Nakagawa, K.; Sawano, K.

    2017-11-01

    We investigate effects of ion implantation on strain relaxation of SiGe(1 1 0) layers grown on Si(1 1 0) substrates. Ar+ or Si+ ion implantation is carried out before or after the SiGe growth. It is found that the strain relaxation of the SiGe(1 1 0) film is largely enhanced due to implantation-induced defects both for Ar and Si implantation. Particularly, the sample with Si implantation after the SiGe growth allows large strain relaxation and smaller surface roughness than Ar implantation. As a result, a 50-nm-thick Si0.79Ge0.21 or Si0.77Ge0.23(1 1 0) buffer layer with almost full relaxation and rms surface roughness below 0.5 nm was obtained. It is, therefore, expected that high-mobility strained Si/Ge(1 1 0) channels can be realized on the SiGe(1 1 0) relaxed buffer layers fabricated by Si implantation. It is also demonstrated that the local introduction of the implantation defects allows controlling of lateral strain states and dislocation generation, opening new concepts of engineering of both strain and surface orientation.

  15. Synthesis of dilute magnetic semiconductors by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunstein, G.H.; Dresselhaus, G.; Withrow, S.P.

    1986-01-01

    We have synthesized layers of CdMnTe by implantation of Mn into CdTe. Samples of CdTe have been implanted with Mn ions of 60 keV energy to fluences in the range 1 x 10 13 cm -2 to 2 x 10 16 cm -2 resulting in local concentrations of up to 10% at the maximum of the Mn distribution. Rutherford backscattering-channeling analysis has been used to study the radiation damage after implantation and after subsequent rapid thermal annealing (RTA). These experiments reveal that RTA for 15 sec at a temperature T greater than or equal to 700 0 C results in the complete recovery of the lattice order, without affecting the stoichiometry of CdTe. Photoluminescence (PL) measurements of a sample showing complete annealing reveal an increase in the band gap corresponding to the synthesis of very dilute (x approx. = 0.004) Cd/sub 1-x/Mn/sub x/Te. A shift of the excitonic PL peak to lower energies is observed when a magnetic field H less than or equal to 1T is applied. These measurements provide clear evidence for the synthesis of a DMS by ion implantation of Mn into CdTe

  16. Study of structural modifications induced by ion implantation in austenitic stainless steel; Etude des modifications structurales induites par implantation ionique dans les aciers austenitiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudognon, J

    2006-12-15

    Ion implantation in steels, although largely used to improve the properties of use, involves structural modifications of the surface layer, which remain still prone to controversies. Within this context, various elements (N, Ar, Cr, Mo, Ag, Xe and Pb) were implanted (with energies varying from 28 to 280 keV) in a 316LVM austenitic stainless steel. The implanted layer has a thickness limited to 80 nm and a maximum implanted element concentration lower than 10 % at. The analysis of the implanted layer by grazing incidence X ray diffraction highlights deformations of austenite lines, appearance of ferrite and amorphization of the layer. Ferritic phase which appears at the grain boundaries, whatever the implanted element, is formed above a given 'threshold' of energy (produced of fluency by the energy of an ion). The formation of ferrite as well as the amorphization of the implanted layer depends only on energy. In order to understand the deformations of austenite diffraction lines, a simulation model of these lines was elaborated. The model correctly describes the observed deformations (broadening, shift, splitting) with the assumption that the expansion of the austenitic lattice is due to the presence of implanted element and is proportional to the element concentration through a coefficient k'. This coefficient only depends on the element and varies linearly with its radius. (author)

  17. Implant Surface Design Regulates Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation and Maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyan, B D; Cheng, A; Olivares-Navarrete, R; Schwartz, Z

    2016-03-01

    Changes in dental implant materials, structural design, and surface properties can all affect biological response. While bulk properties are important for mechanical stability of the implant, surface design ultimately contributes to osseointegration. This article reviews the surface parameters of dental implant materials that contribute to improved cell response and osseointegration. In particular, we focus on how surface design affects mesenchymal cell response and differentiation into the osteoblast lineage. Surface roughness has been largely studied at the microscale, but recent studies have highlighted the importance of hierarchical micron/submicron/nanosurface roughness, as well as surface roughness in combination with surface wettability. Integrins are transmembrane receptors that recognize changes in the surface and mediate downstream signaling pathways. Specifically, the noncanonical Wnt5a pathway has been implicated in osteoblastic differentiation of cells on titanium implant surfaces. However, much remains to be elucidated. Only recently have studies been conducted on the differences in biological response to implants based on sex, age, and clinical factors; these all point toward differences that advocate for patient-specific implant design. Finally, challenges in implant surface characterization must be addressed to optimize and compare data across studies. An understanding of both the science and the biology of the materials is crucial for developing novel dental implant materials and surface modifications for improved osseointegration. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2016.

  18. Swept Line Electron Beam Annealing of Ion Implanted Semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-01

    a pre- liminary study using silicon solar cells. This work was undertaken in cooperation with Dr. J. Eguren of the Instituto De Energia Solar , Madrid...device fabrication has been attempted. To date, resistors, capacitors, diodes, bipolar transistors, MOSFEs, and solar cells have been fabricated with...34 " 48 *Si Solar Cells Ruby PL P+ Ion-Implanted 49 Ruby PL Pulsed Diffused 50 :C

  19. Erbium ion implantation into different crystallographic cuts of lithium niobate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nekvindová, P.; Švecová, B.; Cajzl, J.; Macková, Anna; Malinský, Petr; Oswald, Jiří; Kolitsch, A.; Špirková, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 4 (2012), s. 652-659 ISSN 0925-3467 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06041; GA ČR GA106/09/0125; GA ČR(CZ) GAP106/10/1477 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505; CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : Lithium niobate * Erbium * Ion implantation * Luminescence Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.918, year: 2012

  20. Er+ medium energy ion implantation into lithium niobate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Švecová, B.; Nekvindová, P.; Macková, Anna; Oswald, Jiří; Vacík, Jiří; Grotzschel, R.; Spirkova, J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 267, 8-9 (2009), s. 1332-1335 ISSN 0168-583X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06041; GA AV ČR IAA200480702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505; CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : lithium niobate * erbium * ion implantation Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.156, year: 2009

  1. Ion beam synthesis of IrSi3 by implantation of 2 MeV Ir ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjoreen, T.P.; Chisholm, M.F.; Hinneberg, H.J.

    1992-11-01

    Formation of a buried IrSi 3 layer in (111) oriented Si by ion implantation and annealing has been studied at an implantation energy of 2 MeV for substrate temperatures of 450--550C. Rutherford backscattering (RBS), ion channeling and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy showed that a buried epitaxial IrSi 3 layer is produced at 550C by implanting ≥ 3.4 x 10 17 Ir/cm 2 and subsequently annealing for 1 h at 1000C plus 5 h at 1100C. At a dose of 3.4 x 10 17 Ir/cm 2 , the thickness of the layer varied between 120 and 190 nm and many large IrSi 3 precipitates were present above and below the film. Increasing the dose to 4.4 x 10 17 Ir/cm 2 improved the layer uniformity at the expense of increased lattice damage in the overlying Si. RBS analysis of layer formation as a function of substrate temperature revealed the competition between the mechanisms for optimizing surface crystallinity vs. IrSi 3 layer formation. Little apparent substrate temperature dependence was evident in the as-implanted state but after annealing the crystallinity of the top Si layer was observed to deteriorate with increasing substrate temperature while the precipitate coarsening and coalescence improved

  2. New approach to the elucidation of corrosion mechanism of ceramics by the ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, J.; Hayashi, K.; Tachi, Y.; Kano, S.

    1998-08-01

    Ceramics possessing high temperature strength are promising materials for the structural application in severe environment. The development of ceramics has been carried out in order to use them in FBR environment such as liquid sodium. In particular, corrosion behavior of ceramics has been investigated to improve the corrosion resistance in liquid sodium. However, the corrosion mechanism of ceramics was not comprehended in detail even now. Because corrosion products which were deposited on the surface of test pieces during corrosion test and played an important role in corrosion behavior, were not detected distinctly after thr corrosion test. In this study, an ion implantation technique was applied to understand the corrosion mechanism of ceramics in stead of the conventional corrosion test. Sodium ions were implanted in ceramics (100 keV, 1.9 x 10 17 ions/cm 2 ) and then heat treatment was performed at either 923 K or 823 K for 36 ks in argon atmosphere. After that, products on the surface were analyzed using SEM and TEM observation and X-ray diffraction. Consequently, the corrosion products were not identified exactly, but their presence was confirmed on the surface. It was caused by the minute amount of corrosion products. In future, it is necessary to carry systematically out the implantation and heat treatment under various conditions. Therefore, it seems that the beneficial information will be obtained to understand the corrosion mechanism of ceramics. (author)

  3. Target-ion source unit ionization efficiency measurement by method of stable ion beam implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Panteleev, V.N; Fedorov, D.V; Moroz, F.V; Orlov, S.Yu; Volkov, Yu.M

    The ionization efficiency is one of the most important parameters of an on-line used target-ion source system exploited for production of exotic radioactive beams. The ionization efficiency value determination as a characteristic of a target-ion source unit in the stage of its normalizing before on-line use is a very important step in the course of the preparation for an on-line experiment. At the IRIS facility (Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina) a reliable and rather precise method of the target-ion source unit ionization efficiency measurement by the method of stable beam implantation has been developed. The method worked out exploits an off-line mass-separator for the implantation of the ion beams of selected stable isotopes of different elements into a tantalum foil placed inside the Faraday cup in the focal plane of the mass-separator. The amount of implanted ions has been measured with a high accuracy by the current integrator connected to the Faraday cup. After the implantation of needed a...

  4. Effect of elemental composition of ion beam on the phase formation and surface strengthening of structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avdienko, K.I.; Avdienko, A.A.; Kovalenko, I.A.

    2001-01-01

    The investigation results are reported on the influence of ion beam element composition on phase formation, wear resistance and microhardness of surface layers of titanium alloys VT-4 and VT-16 as well as stainless steel 12Kh18N10T implanted with nitrogen, oxygen and boron. It is stated that ion implantation into structural materials results in surface hardening and is directly dependent on element composition of implanted ion beam. The presence of oxygen in boron or nitrogen ion beams prevents the formation of boride and nitride phases thus decreasing a hardening effect [ru

  5. Architecture and control of a high current ion implanter system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayer, E.H.; Paul, L.F.; Kranik, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    The design of an ion implant system for use in production requires that special attention be given to areas of design which normally are not emphasized on research or development type ion implanters. Manually operated, local controls are replaced by remote controls, automatic sequencing, and digital displays. For ease of maintenance and replication the individual components are designed as simply as possible and are contained in modules of separate identities, joined only by the beam line and electrical interconnections. A production environment also imposes requirements for the control of contamination and maintainability of clean room integrity. For that reason the major portion of the hardware is separated from the clean operator area and is housed in a maintenance core area. The controls of a production system should also be such that relatively unskilled technicians are able to operate the system with optimum repeatability and minimum operator intervention. An extensive interlock system is required. Most important, for use in production the ion implant system has to have a relatively high rate of throughput. Since the rate of throughput at a given dose is a function of beam current, pumpdown time and wafer handling capacity, design of components affecting these parameters has been optimized. Details of the system are given. (U.K.)

  6. Homojunction silicon solar cells doping by ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milési, Frédéric; Coig, Marianne; Lerat, Jean-François; Desrues, Thibaut; Le Perchec, Jérôme; Lanterne, Adeline; Lachal, Laurent; Mazen, Frédéric

    2017-10-01

    Production costs and energy efficiency are the main priorities for the photovoltaic (PV) industry (COP21 conclusions). To lower costs and increase efficiency, we are proposing to reduce the number of processing steps involved in the manufacture of N-type Passivated Rear Totally Diffused (PERT) silicon solar cells. Replacing the conventional thermal diffusion doping steps by ion implantation followed by thermal annealing allows reducing the number of steps from 7 to 3 while maintaining similar efficiency. This alternative approach was investigated in the present work. Beamline and plasma immersion ion implantation (BLII and PIII) methods were used to insert n-(phosphorus) and p-type (boron) dopants into the Si substrate. With higher throughput and lower costs, PIII is a better candidate for the photovoltaic industry, compared to BL. However, the optimization of the plasma conditions is demanding and more complex than the beamline approach. Subsequent annealing was performed on selected samples to activate the dopants on both sides of the solar cell. Two annealing methods were investigated: soak and spike thermal annealing. Best performing solar cells, showing a PV efficiency of about 20%, was obtained using spike annealing with adapted ion implantation conditions.

  7. Surface Modifications and Their Effects on Titanium Dental Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jemat, A.; Ghazali, M. J.; Razali, M.; Otsuka, Y.

    2015-01-01

    This review covers several basic methodologies of surface treatment and their effects on titanium (Ti) implants. The importance of each treatment and its effects will be discussed in detail in order to compare their effectiveness in promoting osseointegration. Published literature for the last 18 years was selected with the use of keywords like titanium dental implant, surface roughness, coating, and osseointegration. Significant surface roughness played an important role in providing effective surface for bone implant contact, cell proliferation, and removal torque, despite having good mechanical properties. Overall, published studies indicated that an acid etched surface-modified and a coating application on commercial pure titanium implant was most preferable in producing the good surface roughness. Thus, a combination of a good surface roughness and mechanical properties of titanium could lead to successful dental implants. PMID:26436097

  8. Formation of optical properties of intermetallic nanoclusters formed by sequential ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuhr, R.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Solid State Div.; Magruder, R.H. III; Anderson, T.S. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States). Dept. of Applied and Engineering Sciences

    1997-09-01

    Recent demonstrations that large third order nonlinear responses can be achieved in metal nanocluster glass composites are of significant interest because of their potential for use in all optical switching networks. These composite materials exhibit picosecond switching and relaxation times, thermal and chemical stability, high laser damage thresholds, and low two photon absorption. Ion implantation has been shown to be a useful fabrication method to form these nanoclusters in silica because of its ability to produce thin films in waveguide configurations containing a high volume fraction (> 1%) of metal colloids with well defined vertical and horizontal dimensional control. Using sequential ion implantation of more than one element the authors can modify the composition and microstructure of the composites by forming intermetallic metal colloids. In this work the authors report on the improved optical response of metallic nanocluster composites formed by sequential implantation of Cd and Ag and Sb and Ag. Characterization of the samples by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals that approximately spherical metallic colloids are formed for all implanted species during the implantation process. Selected area diffraction patterns indicate that the colloids formed are intermetallic in composition. Linear optical absorption measurements made at room temperature in air from 900 to 200 nm show significant changes in both the magnitude and wavelength of the surface plasmon resonance. The formation of intermetallic nanoclusters results in changes in both the linear and nonlinear optical properties of the composite material that are not possible with single element colloids alone. The results are explained in terms of effective medium theory.

  9. Synthesis of borides in molybdenum implanted by B+ ions under thermal and electron annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazdaev, Kh.R.; Akchulakov, M.T.; Bayadilov, E.M.; Ehngel'ko, V.I.; Lazarenko, A.V.; Chebukov, E.S.

    1989-01-01

    The possibility of formation of borides in the near surface layers of monocrystalline molybdenum implanted by boron ions at 35 keV energy under thermal and pulsed electron annealing by an electon beam at 140 keV energy is investigated. It is found that implantation of boron ions into molybdenum with subsequent thermal annealing permits to produce both molybdenum monoboride (α-MoB) and boride (γ-Mo 2 B) with rather different formation mechanisms. Formation of the α-MoB phase occurs with the temperature elevation from the centers appeared during implantation, while the γ-Mo 2 B phase appears only on heating the implanted layers up to definite temperature as a result of the phase transformation of the solid solution into a chemical compound. Pulsed electron annealing instead of thermal annealing results mainly in formation of molybdenum boride (γ-Mo 2 B), the state of structure is determined by the degree of heating of implanted layers and their durable stay at temperatures exceeding the threshold values

  10. Surface characterization and clinical review of two commercially available implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Silvia; Jimbo, Ryo; Andersson, Martin; Bryington, Matthew; Albrektsson, Tomas

    2013-10-01

    To characterize topographically and chemically the surfaces of 2 commercially available implants. Furthermore, to gather an overview of the clinical results of these implant systems. Two commercially available oral implants were analyzed using optical interferometry, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. In addition, a literature search for all the clinical articles on the same implants was performed. No significant differences of topographical parameters were found between the 2 implants, except for the hybrid parameter Sdr presenting significant higher values for the Ankylos implants. Both surfaces had a homogenous microporosity. At higher magnifications of scanning electron microscope images, evenly distributed nanostructures (approximately 10 nm) were visible. Chemically, mainly titanium, oxygen and carbon were detected. Fifty-six clinical articles were included for the review. The implant survival rates (minimum follow-up: 5 years) ranged between 87.7% and 100%. The examined commercially available implants showed a moderately rough surface, with a homogenous microporosity. Nanofeatures were detected on the surface of both implants. The clinical performances of these implants were comparable to that of other commercialized implant systems.

  11. Low energy ion implantation and high energy heavy ion irradiation in C60 films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayanan, K.L.; Yamaguchi, M.; Dharmarasu, N.; Kojima, N.; Kanjilal, D.

    2001-01-01

    C 60 films have been bombarded with low energy boron ions and high energy swift heavy ions (SHI) of silver and oxygen at different doses. Raman scattering and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) studies were carried out on the virgin and irradiated films and the results are in good agreement with each other. The films subject to low energy boron ion implantation showed destruction of the bukky balls whereas the films subject to high energy ion irradiation did not show appreciable effects on their structure. These results indicate that C 60 films are more prone to defects by elastic collision and subsequent implantation at lower energy. Irradiation at higher energy was less effective in creating appreciable defects through electronic excitation by inelastic collisions at similar energy density

  12. Ni ion release, osteoblast-material interactions, and hemocompatibility of hafnium-implanted NiTi alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tingting; Li, Yan; Zhao, Xinqing; Chen, Hong; Zhang, Tao

    2012-04-01

    Hafnium ion implantation was applied to NiTi alloy to suppress Ni ion release and enhance osteoblast-material interactions and hemocompatibility. The auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscope results showed that a composite TiO(2)/HfO(2) nanofilm with increased surface roughness was formed on the surface of NiTi, and Ni concentration was reduced in the superficial surface layer. Potentiodynamic polarization tests displayed that 4 mA NiTi sample possessed the highest E(br) - E(corr), 470 mV higher than that of untreated NiTi, suggesting a significant improvement on pitting corrosion resistance. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry tests during 60 days immersion demonstrated that Ni ion release rate was remarkably decreased, for example, a reduction of 67% in the first day. The water contact angle increased and surface energy decreased after Hf implantation. Cell culture and methyl-thiazol-tetrazolium indicated that Hf-implanted NiTi expressed enhanced osteoblasts adhesion and proliferation, especially after 7 days culture. Hf implantation decreased fibrinogen adsorption, but had almost no effect on albumin adsorption. Platelets adhesion and activation were suppressed significantly (97% for 4 mA NiTi) and hemolysis rate was decreased by at least 57% after Hf implantation. Modified surface composition and morphology and decreased surface energy should be responsible for the improvement of cytocompatibility and hemocompatibility. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Metallic ion release after knee prosthesis implantation: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lons, Adrien; Putman, Sophie; Pasquier, Gilles; Migaud, Henri; Drumez, Elodie; Girard, Julien

    2017-12-01

    Metal-on-metal (MoM) hip replacement bearings produce metallic ions that can cause health complications. Metallic release also occurs with other materials, but data on metallic ion levels after knee arthroplasty are sparse. We postulate that knee replacement generates elevating metallic ions (chromium (Cr), cobalt (Co) and titanium (Ti)) during the first year after implantation. This ongoing prospective study included all patients who underwent the same type of knee arthroplasty between May and December 2013. Cr, Co and Ti levels were measured in whole blood at pre-operation and one-year follow-up (6 and 12 months). Clinical and radiographic data (range of motion, Oxford, International Knee Society (IKS) and satisfaction scores) were recorded. In 90 patients, preoperative Cr, Co and Ti metallic ion levels were respectively 0.45 μg/l, 0.22 μg/l, 2.94 μg/l and increased to 1.27 μg/l, 1.41 μg/l, 4.08 μg/l (p < 0.0001) at last one-year follow-up. Mean Oxford and IKS scores rose, respectively, from 45.9 (30-58) and 24.9 (12-52) to 88.3 (0-168) and 160.8 (93-200) (p < 0.001). After the implantation of knee arthroplasty, we found significant blood elevation of Cr, Co and Ti levels one year after implantation exceeding the normal values. This metallic ion release could lead to numerous effects: allergy, hypersensitivity, etc.

  14. Techniques and equipment for non-semiconductor applications of ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dearnaley, G.; Goode, P. D.

    1981-10-01

    Ion implantation is now being applied successfully to the treatment of engineering tools and components in order to improve their resistance to wear, fatique and oxidation. Examples are given to show the effectiveness of the process in steels, chromium, cemented carbides and titanium alloys. These applications have led to the development of a new range of equipment to provide the necessary high beam currents and versatile work-handling facilities. The process of bombardment-diffused coating (BDC), by which a thin metallic coating is caused to diffuse into the substrate under ion bombardment, is providing new possibilities for tailoring the surface properties of materials to meet arduous conditions.

  15. Assessment of modified gold surfaced titanium implants on skeletal fixation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zainali, Kasra; Danscher, Gorm; Jakobsen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    shown to liberate gold ions through the process termed dissolucytosis. Furthermore, gold ions are known to act in an anti-inflammatory manner by inhibiting cellular NF-κB-DNA binding. The present study investigated whether partial coating of titanium implants could augment early osseointegration...... osseointegration compared to control titanium implants in a similar model. Since sufficient early mechanical fixation is achieved with this new coating, it is reasonable to investigate the implant further in long-term studies. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  16. Enhancement of interaction of L-929 cells with functionalized graphene via COOH+ ion implantation vs. chemical method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Meng-li; Liu, Xiao-qi; Cao, Ye; Li, Xi-fei; Li, De-jun; Sun, Xue-liang; Gu, Han-qing; Wan, Rong-xin

    2016-01-01

    Low hydrophilicity of graphene is one of the major obstacles for biomaterials application. To create some hydrophilic groups on graphene is addressed this issue. Herein, COOH+ ion implantation modified graphene (COOH+/graphene) and COOH functionalized graphene were designed by physical ion implantation and chemical methods, respectively. The structure and surface properties of COOH+/graphene and COOH functionalized graphene were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and contact angle measurement. Compared with graphene, COOH+/graphene and COOH functionalized graphene revealed improvement of cytocompatibility, including in vitro cell viability and morphology. More importantly, COOH+/graphene exhibited better improvement effects than functionalized graphene. For instance, COOH+/graphene with 1 × 1018 ions/cm2 showed the best cell-viability, proliferation and stretching. This study demonstrated that ion implantation can better improve the cytocompatibility of the graphene. PMID:27845420

  17. The influence of excess vacancy generation on the diffusion of ion implanted phosphorus into silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakowski, A.

    1985-01-01

    The diffusion of ion implanted phosphorus in silicon has been studied. It was found that the diffusion coefficient is not only dependent on the phosphorus surface concentration (the concentration effect) but also on the conditions at the silicon surface (the surface effect). The phosphorus diffusion coefficient is considerably lower when the silicon surface during annealing is covered with a CVD oxide layer. It is suggested that excess vacancies generated at the surface are reponsible for both the concentration and surface effects. Enhanced phosphorus diffusion is attributed to the disturbance of thermodynamic equilibrium in the crystal through phosphorus-vacancy part formation by vacancies introduced into silicon at the surface. On the basis of the data presented, it can be concluded that two mechanisms for excess vacancy generation are involved. Assuming that phosphorus diffuses via E-centers, calculations of the concentration profiles and the diffusion coefficient were performed for different concentrations and surface conditions. (orig.)