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Sample records for surface hydration state

  1. Effects of surface hydration state and application method on the bond strength of self-etching adhesives to cut enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caneppele, Taciana Marco Ferraz; Torres, Carlos Rocha Carlos; Sassaki, Alan; Valdetaro, Fernanda; Fernandes, Ricardo Silva; Prieto de Freitas, Carolina; Batista, Graziela Ribeiro

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of surface hydration state and application method on the microtensile bond strength of one-step self-etching adhesives systems to cut enamel. One hundred ninety-five bovine teeth were used. The enamel on the buccal side was flattened with 600-grit SiC paper. For the control group, 15 teeth received Adper Single Bond 2, applied according to manufacturer's recommendations. The other specimens were divided into three groups according to the adhesive system used: Futura Bond M (FM; Voco), Clearfil S3 Bond (CS; Kuraray), and Optibond All in One (OA; Kerr). For each group, two hydration states were tested: D: blown dry with air; W: the excess of water was removed with absorbent paper. Two application methods were tested: P (passive): the adhesive was simply left on the surface; A (active): the adhesive was rubbed with an applicator point. A coat of Grandio composite resin (Voco) was applied on the surface. The teeth were sectioned to obtain enamel-resin sticks (1 x 1 mm), which underwent microtensile bond testing. The data in MPa were submitted to a three-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 5%). The ANOVA showed significant differences for application method and the type of adhesive, but not for hydration state. For the application method, the results of Tukey's test were: P: 31.46 (± 7.09)a; A: 34.04 (± 7.19)b. For the type of adhesive, the results were: OA: 31.29 (± 7.05)a; CS: 32.28 (± 7.14)a; FM: 34.68 (± 7.17)b; different lower-case letters indicate statistically significant differences. Active application improved the bond strength to cut enamel. The adhesive Futurabond M showed the highest bond strength to cut enamel.

  2. Is the Surface of Gas Hydrates Dry?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuo Maeda

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Adhesion (cohesion and agglomeration properties of gas hydrate particles have been a key to hydrate management in flow assurance in natural gas pipelines. Despite its importance, the relevant data in the area, such as the surface energy and the interfacial energy of gas hydrates with gas and/or water, are scarce; presumably due to the experimental difficulties involved in the measurements. Here we review what is known about the surface energy and the interfacial energy of gas hydrates to date. In particular, we ask a question as to whether pre-melting can occur on the surface of gas hydrates. Surface thermodynamic analyses show that pre-melting is favoured to occur on the surface of gas hydrates, however, not sufficient data are available to assess its thickness. The effects of the existence of pre-melting layers on the cohesion and friction forces between gas hydrate particles are also discussed.

  3. [Artificial Cysteine Bridges on the Surface of Green Fluorescent Protein Affect Hydration of Its Transition and Intermediate States].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, T N; Nagibina, G S; Surin, A K; Glukhova, K A; Melnik, B S

    2018-01-01

    Studying the effect of cysteine bridges on different energy levels of multistage folding proteins will enable a better understanding of the process of folding and functioning of globular proteins. In particular, it will create prospects for directed change in the stability and rate of protein folding. In this work, using the method of differential scanning microcalorimetry, we have studied the effect of three cysteine bridges introduced in different structural elements of the green fluorescent protein on the denaturation enthalpies, activation energies, and heat-capacity increments when this protein passes from native to intermediate and transition states. The studies have allowed us to confirm that, with this protein denaturation, the process hardly damages the structure initially, but then changes occur in the protein structure in the region of 4-6 beta sheets. The cysteine bridge introduced in this region decreases the hydration of the second transition state and increases the hydration of the second intermediate state during the thermal denaturation of the green fluorescent protein.

  4. Hydration states of AFm cement phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baquerizo, Luis G., E-mail: luis.baquerizoibarra@holcim.com [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Matschei, Thomas [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Scrivener, Karen L. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Saeidpour, Mahsa; Wadsö, Lars [Building Materials, Lund University, Box 124, 221 000 Lund (Sweden)

    2015-07-15

    The AFm phase, one of the main products formed during the hydration of Portland and calcium aluminate cement based systems, belongs to the layered double hydrate (LDH) family having positively charged layers and water plus charge-balancing anions in the interlayer. It is known that these phases present different hydration states (i.e. varying water content) depending on the relative humidity (RH), temperature and anion type, which might be linked to volume changes (swelling and shrinkage). Unfortunately the stability conditions of these phases are insufficiently reported. This paper presents novel experimental results on the different hydration states of the most important AFm phases: monocarboaluminate, hemicarboaluminate, strätlingite, hydroxy-AFm and monosulfoaluminate, and the thermodynamic properties associated with changes in their water content during absorption/desorption. This data opens the possibility to model the response of cementitious systems during drying and wetting and to engineer systems more resistant to harsh external conditions.

  5. Hydrate-phobic surfaces: fundamental studies in clathrate hydrate adhesion reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J David; Meuler, Adam J; Bralower, Harrison L; Venkatesan, Rama; Subramanian, Sivakumar; Cohen, Robert E; McKinley, Gareth H; Varanasi, Kripa K

    2012-05-07

    Clathrate hydrate formation and subsequent plugging of deep-sea oil and gas pipelines represent a significant bottleneck for deep-sea oil and gas operations. Current methods for hydrate mitigation are expensive and energy intensive, comprising chemical, thermal, or flow management techniques. In this paper, we present an alternate approach of using functionalized coatings to reduce hydrate adhesion to surfaces, ideally to a low enough level that hydrodynamic shear stresses can detach deposits and prevent plug formation. Systematic and quantitative studies of hydrate adhesion on smooth substrates with varying solid surface energies reveal a linear trend between hydrate adhesion strength and the practical work of adhesion (γ(total)[1 + cos θ(rec)]) of a suitable probe liquid, that is, one with similar surface energy properties to those of the hydrate. A reduction in hydrate adhesion strength by more than a factor of four when compared to bare steel is achieved on surfaces characterized by low Lewis acid, Lewis base, and van der Waals contributions to surface free energy such that the practical work of adhesion is minimized. These fundamental studies provide a framework for the development of hydrate-phobic surfaces, and could lead to passive enhancement of flow assurance and prevention of blockages in deep-sea oil and gas operations.

  6. Spectroscopic determination of optimal hydration time of zircon surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordonez R, E. [ININ, Departamento de Quimica, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Garcia R, G. [Instituto Tecnologico de Toluca, Division de Estudios del Posgrado, Av. Tecnologico s/n, Ex-Rancho La Virgen, 52140 Metepec, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Garcia G, N., E-mail: eduardo.ordonez@inin.gob.m [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Facultad de Quimica, Av. Colon y Av. Tollocan, 50180 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    When a mineral surface is immersed in an aqueous solution, it develops and electric charge produced by the amphoteric dissociation of hydroxyl groups created by the hydration of the solid surface. This is one influential surface property. The complete hydration process takes a time which is specific for each mineral species. The knowledge of the aqueous solution contact time for complete surface hydration is mandatory for further surface phenomena studies. This study deals with the optimal hydration time of the raw zircon (ZrSiO{sub 4}) surface comparing the classical potentiometric titrations with a fluorescence spectroscopy technique. The latter is easy and rea liable as it demands only one sample batch to determine the optimal time to ensure a total hydration of the zircon surface. The analytical results of neutron activation analysis showed the presence of trace quantities of Dy{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+} and Er{sup 3} in the bulk of zircon. The Dy{sup 3+} is structured in the zircon crystalline lattice and undergoes the same chemical reactions as zircon. Furthermore, the Dy{sup 3+} has a good fluorescent response whose intensity is enhanced by hydration molecules. The results show that, according to the potentiometric analysis, the hydration process for each batch (at least 8 sample batches) takes around 2 h, while the spectrometric method indicates only 5 minutes from only one batch. Both methods showed that the zircon surface have a 16 h optimal hydration time. (Author)

  7. Spectroscopic determination of optimal hydration time of zircon surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordonez R, E.; Garcia R, G.; Garcia G, N.

    2010-01-01

    When a mineral surface is immersed in an aqueous solution, it develops and electric charge produced by the amphoteric dissociation of hydroxyl groups created by the hydration of the solid surface. This is one influential surface property. The complete hydration process takes a time which is specific for each mineral species. The knowledge of the aqueous solution contact time for complete surface hydration is mandatory for further surface phenomena studies. This study deals with the optimal hydration time of the raw zircon (ZrSiO 4 ) surface comparing the classical potentiometric titrations with a fluorescence spectroscopy technique. The latter is easy and rea liable as it demands only one sample batch to determine the optimal time to ensure a total hydration of the zircon surface. The analytical results of neutron activation analysis showed the presence of trace quantities of Dy 3+ , Eu 3+ and Er 3 in the bulk of zircon. The Dy 3+ is structured in the zircon crystalline lattice and undergoes the same chemical reactions as zircon. Furthermore, the Dy 3+ has a good fluorescent response whose intensity is enhanced by hydration molecules. The results show that, according to the potentiometric analysis, the hydration process for each batch (at least 8 sample batches) takes around 2 h, while the spectrometric method indicates only 5 minutes from only one batch. Both methods showed that the zircon surface have a 16 h optimal hydration time. (Author)

  8. Adhesion force between cyclopentane hydrate and mineral surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aman, Zachary M; Leith, William J; Grasso, Giovanny A; Sloan, E Dendy; Sum, Amadeu K; Koh, Carolyn A

    2013-12-17

    Clathrate hydrate adhesion forces play a critical role in describing aggregation and deposition behavior in conventional energy production and transportation. This manuscript uses a unique micromechanical force apparatus to measure the adhesion force between cyclopentane hydrate and heterogeneous quartz and calcite substrates. The latter substrates represent models for coproduced sand and scale often present during conventional energy production and transportation. Micromechanical adhesion force data indicate that clathrate hydrate adhesive forces are 5-10× larger for calcite and quartz minerals than stainless steel. Adhesive forces further increased by 3-15× when increasing surface contact time from 10 to 30 s. In some cases, liquid water from within the hydrate shell contacted the mineral surface and rapidly converted to clathrate hydrate. Further measurements on mineral surfaces with physical control of surface roughness showed a nonlinear dependence of water wetting angle on surface roughness. Existing adhesive force theory correctly predicted the dependence of clathrate hydrate adhesive force on calcite wettability, but did not accurately capture the dependence on quartz wettability. This comparison suggests that the substrate surface may not be inert, and may contribute positively to the strength of the capillary bridge formed between hydrate particles and solid surfaces.

  9. Solid state interconversion between anhydrous norfloxacin and its hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chongcharoen, Wanchai; Byrn, Stephen R; Sutanthavibul, Narueporn

    2008-01-01

    This work is focused on characterizing and evaluating the solid state interconversion of norfloxacin (NF) hydrates. Four stoichiometric NF hydrates, dihydrate, hemipentahydrate, trihydrate, pentahydrate and a disordered NF state, were generated by various methods and characterized by X-ray powder diffractometry (XRPD), thermal analysis and Karl Fisher titrimetry. XRPD patterns of all NF hydrates exhibited crystalline structures. NF hydrate conversion was studied with respect to mild elevated temperature and various degrees of moisture levels. NF hydrates transformed to anhydrous NF Form A after gentle heating at 60 degrees C for 48 h except dihydrate and trihydrate where mixture in XRPD patterns between anhydrous NF Form A and former structures existed. Desiccation of NF hydrates at 0% RH for 7 days resulted in only partial removal of water molecules from the hydrated structures. The hydrated transitional phase and the disordered NF state were obtained from the incomplete dehydration of NF hydrates after thermal treatment and pentahydrate NF after desiccation, respectively. Anhydrous NF Form A and NF hydrates transformed to pentahydrate NF when exposed to high moisture environment except dihydrate. In conclusion, surrounding moisture levels, temperatures and the duration of exposure strongly influenced the interconversion pathways and stoichiometry of anhydrous NF and its hydrates. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Defining reactive sites on hydrated mineral surfaces: Rhombohedral carbonate minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas-Jiménez, Adrián; Mucci, Alfonso; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Schott, Jacques

    2009-08-01

    Despite the success of surface complexation models (SCMs) to interpret the adsorptive properties of mineral surfaces, their construct is sometimes incompatible with fundamental chemical and/or physical constraints, and thus, casts doubts on the physical-chemical significance of the derived model parameters. In this paper, we address the definition of primary surface sites (i.e., adsorption units) at hydrated carbonate mineral surfaces and discuss its implications to the formulation and calibration of surface equilibria for these minerals. Given the abundance of experimental and theoretical information on the structural properties of the hydrated (10.4) cleavage calcite surface, this mineral was chosen for a detailed theoretical analysis of critical issues relevant to the definition of primary surface sites. Accordingly, a single, generic charge-neutral surface site ( tbnd CaCO 3·H 2O 0) is defined for this mineral whereupon mass-action expressions describing adsorption equilibria were formulated. The one-site scheme, analogous to previously postulated descriptions of metal oxide surfaces, allows for a simple, yet realistic, molecular representation of surface reactions and provides a generalized reference state suitable for the calculation of sorption equilibria for rhombohedral carbonate minerals via Law of Mass Action (LMA) and Gibbs Energy Minimization (GEM) approaches. The one-site scheme is extended to other rhombohedral carbonate minerals and tested against published experimental data for magnesite and dolomite in aqueous solutions. A simplified SCM based on this scheme can successfully reproduce surface charge, reasonably simulate the electrokinetic behavior of these minerals, and predict surface speciation agreeing with available spectroscopic data. According to this model, a truly amphoteric behavior is displayed by these surfaces across the pH scale but at circum-neutral pH (5.8-8.2) and relatively high ΣCO 2 (⩾1 mM), proton/bicarbonate co

  11. Hydration-controlled bacterial motility and dispersal on surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dechesne, Arnaud; Wang, G.; Gulez, Gamze

    2010-01-01

    Flagellar motility, a mode of active motion shared by many prokaryotic species, is recognized as a key mechanism enabling population dispersal and resource acquisition in microbial communities living in marine, freshwater, and other liquid-replete habitats. By contrast, its role in variably...... resume motility in response to periodic increases in hydration. We propose a biophysical model that captures key effects of hydration and liquid-film thickness on individual cell velocity and use a simple roughness network model to simulate colony expansion. Model predictions match experimental results...... the costs associated with flagella synthesis and explain the sustained presence of flagellated prokaryotes in partially saturated habitats such as soil surfaces....

  12. Surface modification and characterization of magnesium hydroxide sulfate hydrate nanowhiskers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao Chuanhui [Key Laboratory of Marine Chemistry Theory and Technology, Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China); Li Xianguo, E-mail: chuanhuigao@foxmail.com [Key Laboratory of Marine Chemistry Theory and Technology, Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China); Feng Lijuan; Lu Shaoyan; Liu Jinyan [Key Laboratory of Marine Chemistry Theory and Technology, Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China)

    2010-03-01

    In order to enhance the compatibility with plastic polymers, magnesium hydroxide sulfate hydrate (MHSH) nanowhiskers were modified through grafting methyl methacrylate (MMA) on the surface of the nanowhiskers by emulsion polymerization. The influences of the reaction time, MMA monomer content, adding speed of monomer and the reaction temperature on the grafting ratio were investigated. Thermogravimetry (TG), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy and surface contact angle measurement were used to characterize the effect of surface modification. The results showed that the MHSH nanowhiskers were uniformly coated by polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), and a well-defined core-shell hybrid structure of MHSH/PMMA was obtained. The surface contact angle of the hybrid whiskers increased to 87.32 deg. from 12.71 deg. and the whiskers surface was changed from hydrophilic to lipophilic.

  13. Adsorption Mechanism of Inhibitor and Guest Molecules on the Surface of Gas Hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagasaki, Takuma; Matsumoto, Masakazu; Tanaka, Hideki

    2015-09-23

    The adsorption of guest and kinetic inhibitor molecules on the surface of methane hydrate is investigated by using molecular dynamics simulations. We calculate the free energy profile for transferring a solute molecule from bulk water to the hydrate surface for various molecules. Spherical solutes with a diameter of ∼0.5 nm are significantly stabilized at the hydrate surface, whereas smaller and larger solutes exhibit lower adsorption affinity than the solutes of intermediate size. The range of the attractive force is subnanoscale, implying that this force has no effect on the macroscopic mass transfer of guest molecules in crystal growth processes of gas hydrates. We also examine the adsorption mechanism of a kinetic hydrate inhibitor. It is found that a monomer of the kinetic hydrate inhibitor is strongly adsorbed on the hydrate surface. However, the hydrogen bonding between the amide group of the inhibitor and water molecules on the hydrate surface, which was believed to be the driving force for the adsorption, makes no contribution to the adsorption affinity. The preferential adsorption of both the kinetic inhibitor and the spherical molecules to the surface is mainly due to the entropic stabilization arising from the presence of cavities at the hydrate surface. The dependence of surface affinity on the size of adsorbed molecules is also explained by this mechanism.

  14. Surface Assisted Formation of methane Hydrates on Ice and Na Montmorillonite Clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, Margaret Ellen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cygan, Randall Timothy [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Meserole, Stephen P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rodriguez, Mark A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Methane hydrates are extremely important naturally-occurring crystalline materials that impact climate change, energy resources, geological hazards, and other major environmental issues. Whereas significant experimental effort has been completed to understanding the bulk thermodynamics of methane hydrate assemblies, little is understood on heterogeneous nucleation and growth of methane hydrates in clay-rich environments. Controlled synthesis experiments were completed at 265-285 K and 6.89 MPa to examine the impact of montmorillonite surfaces in clay-ice mixtures to nucleate and form methane hydrate. The results suggest that the hydrophilic and methane adsorbing properties of Namontmorillonite reduce the nucleation period of methane hydrate formation in pure ice systems.

  15. Microscopic Characterization of Brevundimonas diminuta in the Hydrated State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harp, Gary; Cho, Seok-Jun; Lester, Elisabeth; Rose, David; Sabanyagam, Chandran; Ross, Scott F

    2015-01-01

    Brevundimonas diminuta is the organism most commonly used for challenge testing of sterilizing-grade filter membranes. ASTM F838-05 and PDA Technical Report 26 rely on B. diminuta ATCC #19146 for standard challenge tests used to designate sterilizing-grade filter performance. Despite the importance and widespread use of B. diminuta in filter testing and validation, information about this microorganism in its native hydrated state is limited. In this work, we measure, for the first time, the mechanical property of modulus for B. diminuta cultured in saline lactose broth (as described in ASTM F838-05) via wet atomic force microscopy. For comparison, we also imaged B. diminuta by the traditional method of electron microscopy after capture on a filter and chemical fixation. The modulus of hydrated B. diminuta cells was ∼193 mPa. To put this result into context, a simple model for pore penetration that correlates the role of the Young's modulus of hydrated cells to the penetration of sterilizing-grade filters is proposed. The model confirms the industry experience that pore size is an essential parameter in preventing the penetration of B. diminuta into sterilizing-grade filters. The small microorganism Brevundimonas diminuta is used to characterize the performance of sterilizing-grade filter membranes used in the manufacturing of sterile drug products. Little is known about the size, shape, or elasticity of living bacterial cells, as it is easier to characterize bacteria after chemical fixation in a dry state. In this work, we use atomic force microscopy to determine the size, shape, and deformability of this important microorganism while it is alive and fully hydrated. Additionally, we compare the physical and mechanical properties of B. diminuta measured in wet and dry states. This information can be used to advance our understanding of how filter membranes remove these organisms from fluid streams. © PDA, Inc. 2015.

  16. Molecular analysis of petroleum derived compounds that adsorb onto gas hydrate surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgund, Anna E.; Hoiland, Sylvi; Barth, Tanja; Fotland, Per; Askvik, Kjell M.

    2009-01-01

    Field observations have shown that some streams of water, gas and crude oil do not form gas hydrate plugs during petroleum production even when operating within thermodynamic conditions for hydrate formation. Also, when studied under controlled laboratory conditions, some oils are found to form hydrate dispersed systems whereas others form plugs. Oils with low tendency to form hydrate plugs are believed to contain natural hydrate plug inhibiting components (NICs) that adsorb onto the hydrate surface, making them less water-wet and preventing the particles from agglomerating into large hydrate clusters. The molecular structure of the NICs is currently unknown. In this work, hydrate adsorbing components were extracted from crude oils using freon hydrates as an extraction phase. The fractions were found to be enriched in polar material, and more polar material is associated with hydrates generated in biodegraded crude oils than in non-biodegraded oils. Various fractionation schemes and analytical techniques have been applied in the search for molecular characterisation. The average molecular weights were found to be approximately 500 g/mole. GC-MS chromatograms show a large UCM (Unresolved Complex Mixture). Thus, GC-MS has a limited potential for identification of compounds. A commercial biosurfactant was used as a model compound in the search for similar structures in the extracts. The results from analysis of the hydrate adsorbing components suggest that the type and structure are more important for hydrate morphology than the amount of material adsorbed.

  17. Surface hydration drives rapid water imbibition into strongly hydrophilic nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Chao; Qiao, Rui

    2017-08-09

    The imbibition of liquids into nanopores plays a critical role in numerous applications, and most prior studies focused on imbibition due to capillary flows. Here we report molecular simulations of the imbibition of water into single mica nanopores filled with pressurized gas. We show that, while capillary flow is suppressed by the high gas pressure, water is imbibed into the nanopore through surface hydration in the form of monolayer liquid films. As the imbibition front moves, the water film behind it gradually densifies. Interestingly, the propagation of the imbibition front follows a simple diffusive scaling law. The effective diffusion coefficient of the imbibition front, however, is more than ten times larger than the diffusion coefficient of the water molecules in the water film adsorbed on the pore walls. We clarify the mechanism for the rapid water imbibition observed here.

  18. Effect of Hydration State of Martian Perchlorate Salts on Their Decomposition Temperatures During Thermal Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royle, Samuel H.; Montgomery, Wren; Kounaves, Samuel P.; Sephton, Mark A.

    2017-12-01

    Three Mars missions have analyzed the composition of surface samples using thermal extraction techniques. The temperatures of decomposition have been used as diagnostic information for the materials present. One compound of great current interest is perchlorate, a relatively recently discovered component of Mars' surface geochemistry that leads to deleterious effects on organic matter during thermal extraction. Knowledge of the thermal decomposition behavior of perchlorate salts is essential for mineral identification and possible avoidance of confounding interactions with organic matter. We have performed a series of experiments which reveal that the hydration state of magnesium perchlorate has a significant effect on decomposition temperature, with differing temperature releases of oxygen corresponding to different perchlorate hydration states (peak of O2 release shifts from 500 to 600°C as the proportion of the tetrahydrate form in the sample increases). Changes in crystallinity/crystal size may also have a secondary effect on the temperature of decomposition, and although these surface effects appear to be minor for our samples, further investigation may be warranted. A less than full appreciation of the hydration state of perchlorate salts during thermal extraction analyses could lead to misidentification of the number and the nature of perchlorate phases present.

  19. Dynamics of hydration water and coupled protein sidechains around a polymerase protein surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yangzhong; Yang, Yi; Wang, Lijuan; Zhong, Dongping

    2017-09-01

    Water-protein coupled interactions are essential to the protein structural stability, flexibility and dynamic functions. The ultimate effects of the hydration dynamics on the protein fluctuations remain substantially unexplored. Here, we investigated the dynamics of both hydration water and protein sidechains at 13 different sites around the polymerase β protein surface using a tryptophan scan with femtosecond spectroscopy. Three types of hydration-water relaxations and two types of protein sidechain motions were determined, reflecting a highly dynamic water-protein interactions fluctuating on the picosecond time scales. The hydration-water dynamics dominate the coupled interactions with higher flexibility.

  20. Hydration state inside HeLa cell monolayer investigated with terahertz spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraga, K.; Suzuki, T.; Kondo, N.; Tanaka, K.; Ogawa, Y.

    2015-06-01

    The hydration state in living cells is believed to be associated with various cellular activities. Nevertheless, in vivo characterization of intracellular hydration state under physiological condition has not been well documented to date. In this study, the hydration state of an intact HeLa cell monolayer was investigated by terahertz time-domain attenuated total reflection spectroscopy. Combined with the extended theory of Onsager, we found 23.8 ± 7.4% of HeLa intracellular water was hydrated to biomolecules (corresponding to 1.25 g H2O/g solute); exhibiting slower relaxation dynamics than bulk water.

  1. The Complex Solid-State Landscape of Sodium Diatrizoate Hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najib, Mohd Nadzri Mohd; Back, Kevin; Edkins, Katharina

    2017-12-06

    Pharmaceutical sodium salts are prone to incorporate water into their crystal structures. The model compound diatrizoic acid monosodium salt, an X-ray contrast agent, has been investigated in depth towards its interaction with water in the solid state. Five hydrates with water content ranging from 0.3 to 8 molar equivalents of water show a high degree of interconvertibility, stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric behaviour, and potential of amorphisation during release of water. A DMSO/water mixed solvate further highlights the high attraction of this salt to incorporate water. All incorporated solvent coordinates to the sodium cation and can further interact and stabilise the respective crystal forms by hydrogen bonding. DTS thus highlights the importance of an in-depth investigation of sodium salts used pharmaceutically to guarantee dose uniformity and stability of final formulation. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Dry heat treatment affects wheat bran surface properties and hydration kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Pieter J; Hemdane, Sami; Delcour, Jan A; Courtin, Christophe M

    2016-07-15

    Heat stabilization of wheat bran aims at inactivation of enzymes which may cause rancidity and processability issues. Such treatments may however cause additional unanticipated phenomena which may affect wheat bran technological properties. In this work, the impact of toasting on wheat bran hydration capacity and hydration kinetics was studied. Hydration properties were assessed using the Enslin-Neff and drainage centrifugation water retention capacity methods, thermogravimetric analysis and contact angle goniometry, next to more traditional methods. While equilibrium hydration properties of bran were not affected by the heat treatment, the rate at which the heat treated bran hydrated was, however, very significantly reduced compared to the untreated bran. This phenomenon was found to originate from the formation of a lipid coating during the treatment rendering the bran surface hydrophobic. These insights help to understand and partially account for the modified processability of heat treated bran in food applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Proteomic indicators of oxidation and hydration state in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M. Dick

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available New integrative approaches are needed to harness the potential of rapidly growing datasets of protein expression and microbial community composition in colorectal cancer. Chemical and thermodynamic models offer theoretical tools to describe populations of biomacromolecules and their relative potential for formation in different microenvironmental conditions. The average oxidation state of carbon (ZC can be calculated as an elemental ratio from the chemical formulas of proteins, and water demand per residue ( ${\\overline{n}}_{{\\mathrm{H}}_{2}\\mathrm{O}}$ n ¯ H 2 O is computed by writing the overall formation reactions of proteins from basis species. Using results reported in proteomic studies of clinical samples, many datasets exhibit higher mean ZC or ${\\overline{n}}_{{\\mathrm{H}}_{2}\\mathrm{O}}$ n ¯ H 2 O of proteins in carcinoma or adenoma compared to normal tissue. In contrast, average protein compositions in bacterial genomes often have lower ZC for bacteria enriched in fecal samples from cancer patients compared to healthy donors. In thermodynamic calculations, the potential for formation of the cancer-related proteins is energetically favored by changes in the chemical activity of H2O and fugacity of O2 that reflect the compositional differences. The compositional analysis suggests that a systematic change in chemical composition is an essential feature of cancer proteomes, and the thermodynamic descriptions show that the observed proteomic transformations in host tissue could be promoted by relatively high microenvironmental oxidation and hydration states.

  4. Field hydration state varies among tropical frog species with different habitat use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Christopher R; Tixier, Thomas; Le Nöene, Camille; Christian, Keith A

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that ecological habit (e.g., arboreal, terrestrial, amphibious) correlates with thermoregulatory behaviors and water balance physiology among species of hylid frogs in northern Australia. We hypothesized that these frogs would be different with respect to their field hydration states because of the challenges associated with the different ecological habits. There are very few data on the hydration levels that frogs maintain in the field, and the existing data are from disparate species and locations and do not relate hydration state to habit or changes in seasonal water availability. We measured the hydration state of 15 species of frogs from tropical northern Australia to determine the influences of ecological habit and season on the hydration state that these frogs maintain. As predicted, frogs were significantly less hydrated in the dry season than they were in the wet season and showed significantly higher variation among individuals, suggesting that maintaining hydration is more challenging in the dry season. In the wet season, terrestrial species were significantly less hydrated than arboreal or amphibious species. During the dry season, amphibious species that sought refuge in cracking mud after the pond dried were significantly less hydrated than terrestrial or arboreal species. These data suggest that hydration behaviors and voluntary tolerance of dehydration vary with habitat use, even within closely related species in the same family or genus. Terrestrial and arboreal species might be expected to be the most vulnerable to changes in water availability, because they are somewhat removed from water sources, but the physiological characteristics of arboreal frogs that result in significant cutaneous resistance to water loss allow them to reduce the effects of their dehydrating microenvironment.

  5. A modeling study of methane hydrate decomposition in contact with the external surface of zeolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Konstantin S

    2017-08-30

    The behavior of methane hydrate (MH) enclosed between the (010) surfaces of the silicalite-1 zeolite was studied by means of molecular dynamics simulations at temperatures of 150 and 250 K. Calculations reveal that the interaction with the hydrophilic surface OH groups destabilizes the clathrate structure of hydrate. While MH mostly conserves the structure in the simulation at the low temperature, thermal motion at the high temperature breaks the fragilized cages of H-bonded water molecules, thus leading to the release of methane. The dissociation proceeds in a layer-by-layer manner starting from the outer parts of the MH slab until complete hydrate decomposition. The released CH 4 molecules are absorbed by the microporous solid, whereas water is retained at the surfaces of hydrophobic silicalite and forms a meniscus in the interlayer space. Methane uptake reaches 70% of the silicalite sorption capacity. The energy necessary for the endothermic MH dissociation is supplied by the exothermic methane absorption by the zeolite.

  6. Hydration water dynamics around a protein surface: a first passage time approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shivangi; Biswas, Parbati

    2018-01-01

    A stochastic noise-driven dynamic model is proposed to study the diffusion of water molecules around a protein surface, under the effect of thermal fluctuations that arise due to the collision of water molecules with the surrounding environment. The underlying dynamics of such a system may be described in the framework of the generalized Langevin equation, where the thermal fluctuations are assumed to be algebraically correlated in time, which governs the non-Markovian behavior of the system. Results of the calculations of mean-square displacement and the velocity autocorrelation function reveal that the hydration water around the protein surface follows subdiffusive dynamics at long times. Analytical expressions for the first passage time distribution, survival probability, mean residence time and mean first passage time of water molecules are derived for different boundary conditions, to analyze hydration water dynamics under the effect of thermally correlated noise. The results depict a unimodal distribution of the first passage time unlike Brownian motion. The survival probability of hydration water follows a stretched exponential decay for both boundary conditions. The mean residence time of the hydration water molecule for different initial positions increases with increase in the complexity/heterogeneity of the surrounding environment for both boundary conditions. The mean first passage time of the water molecule to reach the absorbing/reflecting boundary follows an asymptotic power law with respect to the thickness of the hydration layer, and increases with increase in the complexity/heterogeneity of the environment.

  7. The inhibition of methane hydrate formation by water alignment underneath surface adsorption of surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ngoc N.; Nguyen, Anh V.; Dang, Liem X.

    2017-06-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) has been widely shown to strongly promote the formation of methane hydrate. Here we show that SDS displays an extraordinary inhibition effect on methane hydrate formation when the surfactant is used in sub-millimolar concentration (around 0.3 mM). We have also employed Sum Frequency Generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG) and molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) to elucidate the molecular mechanism of this inhibition. The SFG and MDS results revealed a strong alignment of water molecules underneath surface adsorption of SDS in its sub-millimolar solution. Interestingly, both the alignment of water and the inhibition effect (in 0.3 mM SDS solution) went vanishing when an oppositely-charged surfactant (tetra-n-butylammonium bromide, TBAB) was suitably added to produce a mixed solution of 0.3 mM SDS and 3.6 mM TBAB. Combining structural and kinetic results, we pointed out that the alignment of water underneath surface adsorption of dodecyl sulfate (DS-) anions gave rise to the unexpected inhibition of methane hydration formation in sub-millimolar solution of SDS. The adoption of TBAB mitigated the SDS-induced electrostatic field at the solution’s surface and, therefore, weakened the alignment of interfacial water which, in turn, erased the inhibition effect. We discussed this finding using the concept of activation energy of the interfacial formation of gas hydrate. The main finding of this work is to reveal the interplay of interfacial water in governing gas hydrate formation which sheds light on a universal molecular-scale understanding of the influence of surfactants on gas hydrate formation. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  8. Hydrated salt minerals on Ganymede's surface: evidence of an ocean below.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCord, T B; Hansen, G B; Hibbitts, C A

    2001-05-25

    Reflectance spectra from Galileo's near-infrared mapping spectrometer (NIMS) suggests that the surface of Ganymede, the largest satellite of Jupiter, contains hydrated materials. These materials are interpreted to be similar to those found on Europa, that is, mostly frozen magnesium sulfate brines that are derived from a subsurface briny layer of fluid.

  9. Atomistic modeling of structure II gas hydrate mechanics: Compressibility and equations of state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlasic, Thomas M.; Servio, Phillip; Rey, Alejandro D., E-mail: alejandro.rey@mcgill.ca [Department of Chemical Engineering, McGill University, Montreal H3A 0C5 (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    This work uses density functional theory (DFT) to investigate the poorly characterized structure II gas hydrates, for various guests (empty, propane, butane, ethane-methane, propane-methane), at the atomistic scale to determine key structure and mechanical properties such as equilibrium lattice volume and bulk modulus. Several equations of state (EOS) for solids (Murnaghan, Birch-Murnaghan, Vinet, Liu) were fitted to energy-volume curves resulting from structure optimization simulations. These EOS, which can be used to characterize the compressional behaviour of gas hydrates, were evaluated in terms of their robustness. The three-parameter Vinet EOS was found to perform just as well if not better than the four-parameter Liu EOS, over the pressure range in this study. As expected, the Murnaghan EOS proved to be the least robust. Furthermore, the equilibrium lattice volumes were found to increase with guest size, with double-guest hydrates showing a larger increase than single-guest hydrates, which has significant implications for the widely used van der Waals and Platteeuw thermodynamic model for gas hydrates. Also, hydrogen bonds prove to be the most likely factor contributing to the resistance of gas hydrates to compression; bulk modulus was found to increase linearly with hydrogen bond density, resulting in a relationship that could be used predictively to determine the bulk modulus of various structure II gas hydrates. Taken together, these results fill a long existing gap in the material chemical physics of these important clathrates.

  10. Atomistic modeling of structure II gas hydrate mechanics: Compressibility and equations of state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M. Vlasic

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This work uses density functional theory (DFT to investigate the poorly characterized structure II gas hydrates, for various guests (empty, propane, butane, ethane-methane, propane-methane, at the atomistic scale to determine key structure and mechanical properties such as equilibrium lattice volume and bulk modulus. Several equations of state (EOS for solids (Murnaghan, Birch-Murnaghan, Vinet, Liu were fitted to energy-volume curves resulting from structure optimization simulations. These EOS, which can be used to characterize the compressional behaviour of gas hydrates, were evaluated in terms of their robustness. The three-parameter Vinet EOS was found to perform just as well if not better than the four-parameter Liu EOS, over the pressure range in this study. As expected, the Murnaghan EOS proved to be the least robust. Furthermore, the equilibrium lattice volumes were found to increase with guest size, with double-guest hydrates showing a larger increase than single-guest hydrates, which has significant implications for the widely used van der Waals and Platteeuw thermodynamic model for gas hydrates. Also, hydrogen bonds prove to be the most likely factor contributing to the resistance of gas hydrates to compression; bulk modulus was found to increase linearly with hydrogen bond density, resulting in a relationship that could be used predictively to determine the bulk modulus of various structure II gas hydrates. Taken together, these results fill a long existing gap in the material chemical physics of these important clathrates.

  11. Weakly Hydrated Surfaces and the Binding Interactions of Small Biological Solutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady, J. W.; Tavagnacco, L.; Ehrlich, L.; Chen, M.; Schnupf, U.; Himmel, M. E.; Saboungi, M. L.; Cesaro, A.

    2012-04-01

    Extended planar hydrophobic surfaces, such as are found in the side chains of the amino acids histidine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan, exhibit an affinity for the weakly hydrated faces of glucopyranose. In addition, molecular species such as these, including indole, caffeine, and imidazole, exhibit a weak tendency to pair together by hydrophobic stacking in aqueous solution. These interactions can be partially understood in terms of recent models for the hydration of extended hydrophobic faces and should provide insight into the architecture of sugar-binding sites in proteins.

  12. Epithermal Neutron Evidence for a Diurnal Surface Hydration Process in the Moon's High Latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClanahan, T. P.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Boynton, W. V.; Chin, G.; Parsons, A.; Starr, R. D.; Evans, L. G.; Sanin, A.; Litvak, M.; Livengood, T.

    2015-01-01

    We report evidence from epithermal neutron flux observations that show that the Moon's high latitude surfaces are being actively hydrated, dehydrated and rehydrated in a diurnal cycle. The near-surface hydration is indicated by an enhanced suppression of the lunar epithermal neutron leakage flux on the dayside of the dawn terminator on poleward-facing slopes (PFS). At 0600 to 0800 local-time, hydrogen concentrations within the upper 1 meter of PFS are observed to be maximized relative to equivalent equator-facing slopes (EFS). During the lunar day surface hydrogen concentrations diminish towards dusk and then rebuild overnight. Surface hydration is determined by differential comparison of the averaged EFS to PFS epithermal neutron count rates above +/- 75 deg latitude. At dawn the contrast bias towards PFS is consistent with at least 15 to 25 parts-per-million (ppm) hydrogen that dissipates by dusk. We review several lines of evidence derived from temperature and epithermal neutron data by a correlated analysis of observations from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter's (LRO) Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) that were mapped as a function of lunar local-time, Lunar Observing Laser Altimeter (LOLA) topography and Diviner (DLRE) surface temperature.

  13. Staphylococcus aureus dry-surface biofilms are more resistant to heat treatment than traditional hydrated biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almatroudi, A; Tahir, S; Hu, H; Chowdhury, D; Gosbell, I B; Jensen, S O; Whiteley, G S; Deva, A K; Glasbey, T; Vickery, K

    2018-02-01

    The importance of biofilms to clinical practice is being increasingly realized. Biofilm tolerance to antibiotics is well described but limited work has been conducted on the efficacy of heat disinfection and sterilization against biofilms. To test the susceptibility of planktonic, hydrated biofilm and dry-surface biofilm forms of Staphylococcus aureus, to dry-heat and wet-heat treatments. S. aureus was grown as both hydrated biofilm and dry-surface biofilm in the CDC biofilm generator. Biofilm was subjected to a range of temperatures in a hot-air oven (dry heat), water bath or autoclave (wet heat). Dry-surface biofilms remained culture positive even when treated with the harshest dry-heat condition of 100°C for 60min. Following autoclaving samples were culture negative but 62-74% of bacteria in dry-surface biofilms remained alive as demonstrated by live/dead staining and confocal microscopy. Dry-surface biofilms subjected to autoclaving at 121°C for up to 30min recovered and released planktonic cells. Recovery did not occur following autoclaving for longer or at 134°C, at least during the time-period tested. Hydrated biofilm recovered following dry-heat treatment up to 100°C for 10min but failed to recover following autoclaving despite the presence of 43-60% live cells as demonstrated by live/dead staining. S. aureus dry-surface biofilms are less susceptible to killing by dry heat and steam autoclaving than hydrated biofilms, which are less susceptible to heat treatment than planktonic suspensions. Copyright © 2017 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Environmental Stress-mediated EPS Production Shape Microbial Activity on Various Hydrated Rough Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, G.; Liu, L.; Chen, G.

    2016-12-01

    The complex environmental physical and chemical processes and interplay with the associating biological responses are keys to understanding the environmental microbiology ensconced in environmental remediation, water quality control, food safety, nutrient cycling, and etc., yet remain poorly understood. Using experimental micromodels, we study how environmental conditions (e.g., hydration fluctuation, nutrient limitation, pH variation, etc.) affect microbial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) production and their configuration within various hydrated surfaces, and impacts on microbial motility, surface attachment, aggregation, and other bioremediation activities. To elucidate the potential mechanisms underlying the complex bio-physicochemical processes, we developed an individual-based and spatio-temporally resolved modeling platform that explicitly considers microscale aqueous-phase configuration and nutrient transport/diffusion and associated biophysical processes affecting individual microbial cell life history. We quantitatively explore the effects of the above microscale environmental processes on bio-physicochemical interactions affecting microbial growth, motility, surface attachment and aggregation, and shaping population interactions and functions. Simulation scenarios of microbial induced pollutant (e.g., roxarsone) biotransformation on various hydrated rough surfaces will also be present.

  15. Effect of well construction on the mechanical state of unconsolidated methane hydrate-bearing sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, T.; Soga, K.; Yamamoto, K.

    2016-12-01

    World's first offshore production of gas from methane hydrate-bearing sediment was accomplished in Nankai Trough off the coast of Japan. The achievement signals the beginning of exploitation of methane hydrate as a new source of energy, as an estimated amount of the new gas resource significantly exceeds that of the existing conventional oil and gas resources. Conventional gas reservoirs exist in consolidated sediment (i.e. rocks) thousands of metres below seafloor, and such sediment is hard enough to resist deformation. Methane hydrate reservoirs, on the other hand, lies only a couple of hundreds of metres down the seafloor, which means the sediment is unconsolidated (i.e. soils) and is readily deformed. In addition, the hydrate melts away in the pore space when it releases gas, giving rise to a significant rearrangement of stresses in the sediment. Well construction in methane hydrate reservoir might affect the mechanical state of the sediment to the point where the interpretation of the fracture pressure test becomes difficult and sand production could be enhanced. Existing numerical simulations tend to overlook soil mechanics, which is more appropriate than rock mechanics to model unconsolidated sediment, and the effect of methane hydrate on soil's mechanical behaviour is missed. In the present research, the construction of well in unconsolidated hydrate-bearing sediment was modelled with finite element analysis incorporating the critical state soil mechanics. Results showed that cement shrinkage in the well annulus would have a significant effect on the principal stresses and directions of the sediment even if the magnitude of the shrinkage was 0.1%. Cement shrinkage would also promote the generation of plastic strains, potentially enhancing sand production. Results also showed that the direction of fracture inferred from a fracture pressure test at Nankai Trough might have been vertical, indicating it was developed at the cement-sediment interface.

  16. Onset and stability of gas hydrates under permafrost in an environment of surface climatic change : past and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majorowicz, J.A.; Osadetz, K.; Safanda, J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presented a model designed to simulate permafrost and gas hydrate formation in a changing surface temperature environment in the Beaufort-Mackenzie Basin (BMB). The numerical model simulated surface forcing due to general cooling trends that began in the late Miocene era. This study modelled the onset of permafrost formation and subsequent gas hydrate formation in the changing surface temperature environment for the BMB. Paleoclimatic data were used. The 1-D model was constrained by deep heat flow from well bottom hole temperatures; conductivity; permafrost thickness; and the thickness of the gas hydrates. The model used latent heat effects for the ice-bearing permafrost and hydrate intervals. Surface temperatures for glacial and interglacial histories for the last 14 million years were considered. The model also used a detailed Holocene temperature history as well as a scenario in which atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) levels were twice as high as current levels. Two scenarios were considered: (1) the formation of gas hydrates from gas entrapped under geological seals; and (2) the formation of gas hydrates from gas located in free pore spaces simultaneously with permafrost formation. Results of the study showed that gas hydrates may have formed at a depth of 0.9 km only 1 million years ago. Results of the other modelling scenarios suggested that the hydrates formed 6 million years ago, when temperature changes caused the gas hydrate layer to expand both downward and upward. Detailed models of more recent glacial and interglacial histories showed that the gas hydrate zones will persist under the thick body of the BMB permafrost through current interglacial warming as well as in scenarios where atmospheric CO 2 is doubled. 28 refs., 13 figs

  17. Oil and gas pipelines with hydrophobic surfaces better equipped to deal with gas hydrate flow assurance issues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perfeldt, Christine Malmos; Sharifi, Hassan; von Solms, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Gas hydrate deposition can cause plugging in oil and gas pipelines with resultant flow assurance challenges. Presently, the energy industry uses chemical additives in order to manage hydrate formation, however these chemicals are expensive and may be associated with safety and environmental...... crystallizer. This indicates that 10 to 14 times less KHI is needed in the presence of a hydrophobically coated surface. These experimental studies suggest that the use of hydrophobic surfaces or pipelines could serve as an alternative or additional flow assurance approach for gas hydration mitigation...... and management....

  18. Surface states and spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaksic, V.; Last, Y.; California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA

    2001-01-01

    Let Z + d+1 =Z d x Z + , let H 0 be the discrete Laplacian on the Hilbert space l 2 (Z + d+1 ) with a Dirichlet boundary condition, and let V be a potential supported on the boundary ∂Z + d+1 . We introduce the notions of surface states and surface spectrum of the operator H=H 0 +V and explore their properties. Our main result is that if the potential V is random and if the disorder is either large or small enough, then in dimension two H has no surface spectrum on σ(H 0 ) with probability one. To prove this result we combine Aizenman-Molchanov theory with techniques of scattering theory. (orig.)

  19. Hofmeister Effect on PNIPAM in Bulk and at an Interface: Surface Partitioning of Weakly Hydrated Anions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghaddam, Saeed Zajforoushan; Thormann, Esben

    2017-01-01

    The effect of sodium fluoride, sodium trichloroacetate, and sodium thiocyanate on the stability and conformation of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide), in bulk solution and at the gold-aqueous interface, is investigated by differential scanning calorimetry, dynamic light scattering, quartz crystal...... microbalance, and atomic force microscopy. The results indicate a surface partitioning of the weakly hydrated anions, i.e., thiocyanate and trichloroacetate, and the findings are discussed in terms of anion-induced electrostatic stabilization. Although attractive polymer-ion interactions are suggested...... for thiocyanate and trichloroacetate, a salting-out effect is found for sodium trichloroacetate. This apparent contradiction is explained by a combination of previously suggested mechanisms for the salting-out effect by weakly hydrated anions....

  20. Physicochemical properties and thermal stability of quercetin hydrates in the solid state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borghetti, G.S., E-mail: greicefarm@yahoo.com.br [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Farmaceuticas, Faculdade de Farmacia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Ipiranga 2752, CEP 90.610-000, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Carini, J.P. [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Farmaceuticas, Faculdade de Farmacia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Ipiranga 2752, CEP 90.610-000, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Honorato, S.B.; Ayala, A.P. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Caixa Postal 6030, CEP 60.455-970, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Moreira, J.C.F. [Departamento de Bioquimica, Instituto de Ciencias Basicas da Saude, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Rua Ramiro Barcelos 2600, CEP 90035-003, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Bassani, V.L. [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Farmaceuticas, Faculdade de Farmacia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Ipiranga 2752, CEP 90.610-000, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2012-07-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quercetin raw materials may present different degree of hydration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal stability of quercetin in the solid state depends on its degree of hydration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quercetin dehydrate is thermodynamically more stable than the other crystal forms. - Abstract: In the present work three samples of quercetin raw materials (QCTa, QCTb and QCTc), purchased from different Brazilian suppliers, were characterized employing scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, simultaneous thermogravimetry and infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and variable temperature-powder X-ray diffraction, in order to know their physicochemical properties, specially the thermal stability in solid state. The results demonstrated that the raw materials of quercetin analyzed present distinct crystalline structures, ascribed to the different degree of hydration of their crystal lattice. The thermal stability of these quercetin raw materials in the solid state was highly dependent on their degree of hydration, where QCTa (quercetin dihydrate) was thermodynamically more stable than the other two samples.

  1. On the lipid head group hydration of floating surface monolayers bound to self-assembled molecular protein layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lösche, M.; Erdelen, C.; Rump, E.

    1994-01-01

    The structure of monomolecular layers of the protein streptavidin, specifically bound to biotin-functionalized lipid monolayers at aqueous surfaces, has been characterized. Neutron and X-ray reflectivity measurements allowed an assessment of the organization of these self-assembled systems...... with molecular resolution. Emphasis here is placed on the hydration of the lipid head groups in the bound state. For three functionalized lipids with spacers of different lengths between the biotin and their chains it was observed that the head groups were dehydrated in monolayers of the pure lipids, which were...... kept at low surface pressure before protein adsorption. The introduction of dipole moments at the interface by the admixture of phospholipids or the application of lateral pressure on the lipid monolayer before protein adsorption were found to impose an extension of the spacer moieties. The biotin...

  2. Pf1 bacteriophage hydration by magic angle spinning solid-state NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sergeyev, Ivan V.; Bahri, Salima; McDermott, Ann E., E-mail: aem5@columbia.edu [Department of Chemistry, Columbia University, 3000 Broadway, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Day, Loren A. [Public Health Research Institute, Rutgers University, 225 Warren St., Newark, New Jersey 07103 (United States)

    2014-12-14

    High resolution two- and three-dimensional heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy ({sup 1}H–{sup 13}C, {sup 1}H–{sup 15}N, and {sup 1}H–{sup 13}C–{sup 13}C HETCOR) has provided a detailed characterization of the internal and external hydration water of the Pf1 virion. This long and slender virion (2000 nm × 7 nm) contains highly stretched DNA within a capsid of small protein subunits, each only 46 amino acid residues. HETCOR cross-peaks have been unambiguously assigned to 25 amino acids, including most external residues 1–21 as well as residues 39–40 and 43–46 deep inside the virion. In addition, the deoxyribose rings of the DNA near the virion axis are in contact with water. The sets of cross-peaks to the DNA and to all 25 amino acid residues were from the same hydration water {sup 1}H resonance; some of the assigned residues do not have exchangeable side-chain protons. A mapping of the contacts onto structural models indicates the presence of water “tunnels” through a highly hydrophobic region of the capsid. The present results significantly extend and modify results from a lower resolution study, and yield a comprehensive hydration surface map of Pf1. In addition, the internal water could be distinguished from external hydration water by means of paramagnetic relaxation enhancement. The internal water population may serve as a conveniently localized magnetization reservoir for structural studies.

  3. A method for the estimation of hydration state during hemodialysis using a calf bioimpedance technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, F; Kuhlmann, M K; Kotanko, P; Seibert, E; Leonard, E F; Levin, N W

    2008-06-01

    Although many methods have been utilized to measure degrees of body hydration, and in particular to estimate normal hydration states (dry weight, DW) in hemodialysis (HD) patients, no accurate methods are currently available for clinical use. Biochemcial measurements are not sufficiently precise and vena cava diameter estimation is impractical. Several bioimpedance methods have been suggested to provide information to estimate clinical hydration and nutritional status, such as phase angle measurement and ratio of body fluid compartment volumes to body weight. In this study, we present a calf bioimpedance spectroscopy (cBIS) technique to monitor calf resistance and resistivity continuously during HD. Attainment of DW is defined by two criteria: (1) the primary criterion is flattening of the change in the resistance curve during dialysis so that at DW little further change is observed and (2) normalized resistivity is in the range of observation of healthy subjects. Twenty maintenance HD patients (12 M/8 F) were studied on 220 occasions. After three baseline (BL) measurements, with patients at their DW prescribed on clinical grounds (DW(Clin)), the target post-dialysis weight was gradually decreased in the course of several treatments until the two dry weight criteria outlined above were met (DW(cBIS)). Post-dialysis weight was reduced from 78.3 +/- 28 to 77.1 +/- 27 kg (p hydration status. Since no current techniques have been developed to detect DW as precisely, it is suggested as a standard to be evaluated clinically.

  4. Adhesion of CO2 on hydrated mineral surfaces and its implications to geologic carbon sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S.; Clarens, A. F.; Tao, Z.; Persily, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    Most mineral surfaces are water wetting, which has important implications for the transport of non-aqueous phase liquids, such as CO2, through porous media. In this work, contact angle experiments were carried out wherein unusual wetting behavior was observed between mineral surfaces and liquid or supercritical CO2 under certain geochemical conditions. This behavior can be understood in the context of adhesion between the CO2 and the mineral surface. When adhesion occurs, the wettability characteristics of the surfaces are significantly altered. More importantly, the CO2 exhibits a strong affinity for the surface and is highly resistant to shear forces in the aqueous phase. A static pendant drop method was used on a variety of polished mineral surfaces to measure contact angles. The composition of the aqueous phase (e.g., pH, ionic strength) and the characteristics of the mineral surface (e.g., composition, roughness), were evaluated to understand their impact on the prevalence of adhesion. Pressure and temperature conditions were selected to represent those that would be prevalent in geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) or during leakage from target repositories. Adhesion was widely observed on phlogopite mica, silica, and calcite surfaces with roughness on the order of ~10 nanometers. CO2 exhibited no adhesion on mineral surfaces with higher roughness (e.g., quartz). On smoother surfaces, the CO2 is thought to have more effective contact area with the mineral, enabling the weak van der Waals forces that drive most adhesion processes. Brine chemistry also had an important role in controlling CO2 adhesion. Increases in CO2 partial pressure and ionic strength both increased the incidence of adhesion. The addition of strong acid or strong base permanently inhibited the development of adhesion. These results suggest that the development of adhesion between the CO2 and the mineral surface is dependent on the integrity and thickness of the hydration layer between the CO2

  5. Conformation and hydration of surface grafted and free polyethylene oxide chains in solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahal, Udaya; Wang, Zilu; Dormidontova, Elena

    Due to the wide application of polyethylene oxide (PEO), ranging from biomedicine to fuel cells, it is one of the most studied polymers in the scientific world. In order to elucidate detailed molecular-level insights on the impact of surface grafting on PEO conformation, we performed atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of PEO chains in solution and grafted to a flat gold surface in different solvents. We examined the hydration as well as conformation of the free chain compared to the grafted polymer in pure water and mixed solvents. We find that grafted chains are stiffer and have a stronger tendency to form helical structures in isobutyric acid or mixture of isobutyric acid and water solution than the free chains in corresponding solutions. For grafted chains exposed to pure water the random coil conformation is retained at low grafting density, but becomes stretched and more dehydrated as the grafting density or temperature increases. This research is supported by NSF (DMR-1410928).

  6. Using extremely halophilic bacteria to understand the role of surface charge and surface hydration in protein evolution, folding, and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Wouter; Deole, Ratnakar; Osu Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    Halophilic Archaea accumulate molar concentrations of KCl in their cytoplasm as an osmoprotectant, and have evolved highly acidic proteomes that only function at high salinity. We examine osmoprotection in the photosynthetic Proteobacteria Halorhodospira halophila. We find that H. halophila has an acidic proteome and accumulates molar concentrations of KCl when grown in high salt media. Upon growth of H. halophila in low salt media, its cytoplasmic K + content matches that of Escherichia coli, revealing an acidic proteome that can function in the absence of high cytoplasmic salt concentrations. These findings necessitate a reassessment of two central aspects of theories for understanding extreme halophiles. We conclude that proteome acidity is not driven by stabilizing interactions between K + ions and acidic side chains, but by the need for maintaining sufficient solvation and hydration of the protein surface at high salinity through strongly hydrated carboxylates. We propose that obligate protein halophilicity is a non-adaptive property resulting from genetic drift in which constructive neutral evolution progressively incorporates weakly stabilizing K + binding sites on an increasingly acidic protein surface.

  7. Characterizing the hydration state of L-threonine in solution using terahertz time-domain attenuated total reflection spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huachuan; Liu, Qiao; Zhu, Liguo; Li, Zeren

    2018-01-01

    The hydration of biomolecules is closely related to the dynamic process of their functional expression, therefore, characterizing hydration phenomena is a subject of keen interest. However, direct measurements on the global hydration state of biomolecules couldn't have been acquired using traditional techniques such as thermodynamics, ultrasound, microwave spectroscopy or viscosity, etc. In order to realize global hydration characterization of amino acid such as L-threonine, terahertz time-domain attenuated total reflectance spectroscopy (THz-TDS-ATR) was adopted in this paper. By measuring the complex permittivity of L-threonine solutions with various concentrations in the THz region, the hydration state and its concentration dependence were obtained, indicating that the number of hydrous water decreased with the increase of concentration. The hydration number was evaluated to be 17.8 when the molar concentration of L-threonine was 0.34 mol/L, and dropped to 13.2 when the molar concentration increased to 0.84 mol/L, when global hydration was taken into account. According to the proposed direct measurements, it is believed that the THz-TDS-ATR technique is a powerful tool for studying the picosecond molecular dynamics of amino acid solutions.

  8. Coherent states and rational surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brody, Dorje C; Graefe, Eva-Maria

    2010-01-01

    The state spaces of generalized coherent states associated with special unitary groups are shown to form rational curves and surfaces in the space of pure states. These curves and surfaces are generated by the various Veronese embeddings of the underlying state space into higher dimensional state spaces. This construction is applied to the parameterization of generalized coherent states, which is useful for practical calculations, and provides an elementary combinatorial approach to the geometry of the coherent state space. The results are extended to Hilbert spaces with indefinite inner products, leading to the introduction of a new kind of generalized coherent states.

  9. Coherent states and rational surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brody, Dorje C; Graefe, Eva-Maria, E-mail: d.brody@imperial.ac.u [Department of Mathematics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-25

    The state spaces of generalized coherent states associated with special unitary groups are shown to form rational curves and surfaces in the space of pure states. These curves and surfaces are generated by the various Veronese embeddings of the underlying state space into higher dimensional state spaces. This construction is applied to the parameterization of generalized coherent states, which is useful for practical calculations, and provides an elementary combinatorial approach to the geometry of the coherent state space. The results are extended to Hilbert spaces with indefinite inner products, leading to the introduction of a new kind of generalized coherent states.

  10. Hydrate-CASM for modeling Methane Hydrate-Bearing Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Fuente Ruiz, M.; Vaunat, J.; Marin Moreno, H.

    2017-12-01

    A clear understanding of the geomechanical behavior of methane hydrate-bearing sediments (MHBS) is crucial to assess the stability of the seafloor and submarine infrastructures to human and natural loading changes. Here we present the Hydrate-CASM, a new elastoplastic constitutive model to predict the geomechanical behavior of MHBS. Our model employs the critical state model CASM (Clay and Sand Model) because of its flexibility in describing the shape of the yield surface and its proven ability to predict the mechanical behavior of sands, the most commercially viable hydrate reservoirs. The model considers MHBS as a deformable elastoplastic continuum, and hydrate-related changes in the stress-strain behavior are predicted by a densification mechanism. The densification attributes the mechanical contribution of hydrate to; a reduction of the available void ratio; a decrease of the swelling line slope; and an increase of the volumetric yield stress. It is described by experimentally derived physical parameters except from the swelling slope coefficient that requires empirical calibration. The Hydrate-CASM is validated against published triaxial laboratory tests performed at different confinement stresses, hydrate saturations, and hydrate morphologies. During the validation, we focused on capturing the mechanical behavior of the host sediment and consider perturbations of the sediment's mechanical properties that could result from the sample preparation. Our model successfully captures the experimentally observed influence of hydrate saturation in the magnitude and trend of the stiffness, shear strength, and dilatancy of MHBS. Hence, we propose that hydrate-related densification changes might be a major factor controlling the geomechanical response of MHBS.

  11. A method for the estimation of hydration state during hemodialysis using a calf bioimpedance technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, F; Kuhlmann, M K; Kotanko, P; Seibert, E; Levin, N W; Leonard, E F

    2008-01-01

    Although many methods have been utilized to measure degrees of body hydration, and in particular to estimate normal hydration states (dry weight, DW) in hemodialysis (HD) patients, no accurate methods are currently available for clinical use. Biochemcial measurements are not sufficiently precise and vena cava diameter estimation is impractical. Several bioimpedance methods have been suggested to provide information to estimate clinical hydration and nutritional status, such as phase angle measurement and ratio of body fluid compartment volumes to body weight. In this study, we present a calf bioimpedance spectroscopy (cBIS) technique to monitor calf resistance and resistivity continuously during HD. Attainment of DW is defined by two criteria: (1) the primary criterion is flattening of the change in the resistance curve during dialysis so that at DW little further change is observed and (2) normalized resistivity is in the range of observation of healthy subjects. Twenty maintenance HD patients (12 M/8 F) were studied on 220 occasions. After three baseline (BL) measurements, with patients at their DW prescribed on clinical grounds (DW Clin ), the target post-dialysis weight was gradually decreased in the course of several treatments until the two dry weight criteria outlined above were met (DW cBIS ). Post-dialysis weight was reduced from 78.3 ± 28 to 77.1 ± 27 kg (p −2 Ω m 3 kg −1 (p cBIS was 0.3 ± 0.2%. The results indicate that cBIS utilizing a dynamic technique continuously during dialysis is an accurate and precise approach to specific end points for the estimation of body hydration status. Since no current techniques have been developed to detect DW as precisely, it is suggested as a standard to be evaluated clinically

  12. Surface modification of magnesium hydroxide sulfate hydrate whiskers using a silane coupling agent by dry process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Donghai, E-mail: zhudonghai-2001@163.com [Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining, 810008 (China); Key Laboratory of Comprehensive and Highly Efficient Utilization of Salt Lake Resources, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining, 810008 (China); Nai, Xueying [Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining, 810008 (China); Key Laboratory of Comprehensive and Highly Efficient Utilization of Salt Lake Resources, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining, 810008 (China); Lan, Shengjie; Bian, Shaoju [Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining, 810008 (China); Key Laboratory of Comprehensive and Highly Efficient Utilization of Salt Lake Resources, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining, 810008 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100049 (China); Liu, Xin [Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining, 810008 (China); Key Laboratory of Comprehensive and Highly Efficient Utilization of Salt Lake Resources, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining, 810008 (China); Li, Wu, E-mail: driverlaoli@163.com [Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining, 810008 (China); Key Laboratory of Comprehensive and Highly Efficient Utilization of Salt Lake Resources, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining, 810008 (China)

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • Dry process was adopted to modify the surface of MHSH whiskers using silane. • Si−O−Mg bonds were formed directly by the reaction between Si−OC{sub 2}H{sub 5} and −OH of MHSH. • Dispersibility and compatibility of modified whiskers greatly improved in organic phase. • Thermal stability of whiskers was enhanced after modified. - Abstract: In order to improve the compatibility of magnesium hydroxide sulfate hydrate (MHSH) whiskers with polymers, the surface of MHSH whiskers was modified using vinyltriethoxysilane (VTES) by dry process. The possible mechanism of the surface modification and the interfacial interactions between MHSH whiskers and VTES, as well as the effect of surface modification, were studied. Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) analyses showed that the agglomerations were effectively separated and a thin layer was formed on the surface of the whiskers after modification. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses showed that the VTES molecules were bound to the surface of MHSH whiskers after modification. Chemical bonds (Si−O−Mg) were formed by the reaction between Si−OC{sub 2}H{sub 5} or Si−OH and the hydroxyl group of MHSH whiskers. The effect of surface modification was evaluated by sedimentation tests, contact angle measurements and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The results showed that the surface of MHSH whiskers was transformed from hydrophilic to hydrophobic, and the dispersibility and the compatibility of MHSH whiskers were significantly improved in the organic phase. Additionally, the thermal stability of the VTES-modified MHSH whiskers was improved significantly.

  13. Hydration status affects mood state and pain sensation during ultra-endurance cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyen, Nicole E; Ganio, Matthew S; Wiersma, Lenny D; Kavouras, Stavros A; Gray, Michelle; McDermott, Brendon P; Adams, J D; Binns, Ashley P; Judelson, Daniel A; McKenzie, Amy L; Johnson, Evan C; Muñoz, Colleen X; Kunces, Laura J; Armstrong, Lawrence E

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory-based studies indicate mild dehydration adversely affects mood. Although ultra-endurance events often result in mild to moderate dehydration, little research has evaluated whether the relationship between hydration status and mood state also exists in these arduous events. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate how hydration status affected mood state and perceptual measures during a 161 km ultra-endurance cycling event. One hundred and nineteen cyclists (103 males, 16 females; age = 46 ± 9 years; height = 175.4 ± 17.9 cm; mass = 82.8 ± 16.3 kg) from the 2011 and 2013 Hotter'N Hell events participated. Perceived exertion, Thermal, Thirst, and Pain sensations, Brunel Profile of Mood States, and urine specific gravity (USG) were measured pre- (~1 h before), mid- (~97 km), and post-ride. Participants were classified at each time point as dehydrated (USG ≥ 1.022) or euhydrated (USG ≤ 1.018). Independent of time point, dehydrated participants (USG = 1.027 ± 0.004) had decreased Vigour and increased Fatigue, Pain, Thirst, and Thermal sensations compared to euhydrated participants (USG = 1.012 ± 0.004; all P mood state and perceptual ratings during ultra-endurance cycling.

  14. Inter-and intra-individual differences in skin hydration and surface lipids measured with mid-infrared spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ezerskaia, A.; Pereira, S.F.; Urbach, Paul; Varghese, Babu; Coté, Gerard L.

    2016-01-01

    Skin health is characterized by heterogeneous system of water and lipids in upper layers providing protection from external environment and preventing loss of vital components of the body. Skin hydration (moisture) and sebum (skin surface lipids) are considered to be important factors in skin

  15. Balance between hydration enthalpy and entropy is important for ice binding surfaces in Antifreeze Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauperl, Michael; Podewitz, Maren; Ortner, Teresa S; Waibl, Franz; Thoeny, Alexander; Loerting, Thomas; Liedl, Klaus R

    2017-09-19

    Antifreeze Proteins (AFPs) inhibit the growth of an ice crystal by binding to it. The detailed binding mechanism is, however, still not fully understood. We investigated three AFPs using Molecular Dynamics simulations in combination with Grid Inhomogeneous Solvation Theory, exploring their hydration thermodynamics. The observed enthalpic and entropic differences between the ice-binding sites and the inactive surface reveal key properties essential for proteins in order to bind ice: While entropic contributions are similar for all sites, the enthalpic gain for all ice-binding sites is lower than for the rest of the protein surface. In contrast to most of the recently published studies, our analyses show that enthalpic interactions are as important as an ice-like pre-ordering. Based on these observations, we propose a new, thermodynamically more refined mechanism of the ice recognition process showing that the appropriate balance between entropy and enthalpy facilitates ice-binding of proteins. Especially, high enthalpic interactions between the protein surface and water can hinder the ice-binding activity.

  16. Hydration behavior at the ice-binding surface of the Tenebrio molitor antifreeze protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midya, Uday Sankar; Bandyopadhyay, Sanjoy

    2014-05-08

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been carried out at two different temperatures (300 and 220 K) to study the conformational rigidity of the hyperactive Tenebrio molitor antifreeze protein (TmAFP) in aqueous medium and the structural arrangements of water molecules hydrating its surface. It is found that irrespective of the temperature the ice-binding surface (IBS) of the protein is relatively more rigid than its nonice-binding surface (NIBS). The presence of a set of regularly arranged internally bound water molecules is found to play an important role in maintaining the flat rigid nature of the IBS. Importantly, the calculations reveal that the strategically located hydroxyl oxygens of the threonine (Thr) residues in the IBS influence the arrangements of five sets of ordered waters around it on two parallel planes that closely resemble the basal plane of ice. As a result, these waters can register well with the ice basal plane, thereby allowing the IBS to preferentially bind at the ice interface and inhibit its growth. This provides a possible molecular reason behind the ice-binding activity of TmAFP at the basal plane of ice.

  17. A force field for tricalcium aluminate to characterize surface properties, initial hydration, and organically modified interfaces in atomic resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Ratan K; Fernández-Carrasco, Lucia; Flatt, Robert J; Heinz, Hendrik

    2014-07-21

    Tricalcium aluminate (C3A) is a major phase of Portland cement clinker and some dental root filling cements. An accurate all-atom force field is introduced to examine structural, surface, and hydration properties as well as organic interfaces to overcome challenges using current laboratory instrumentation. Molecular dynamics simulation demonstrates excellent agreement of computed structural, thermal, mechanical, and surface properties with available experimental data. The parameters are integrated into multiple potential energy expressions, including the PCFF, CVFF, CHARMM, AMBER, OPLS, and INTERFACE force fields. This choice enables the simulation of a wide range of inorganic-organic interfaces at the 1 to 100 nm scale at a million times lower computational cost than DFT methods. Molecular models of dry and partially hydrated surfaces are introduced to examine cleavage, agglomeration, and the role of adsorbed organic molecules. Cleavage of crystalline tricalcium aluminate requires approximately 1300 mJ m(-2) and superficial hydration introduces an amorphous calcium hydroxide surface layer that reduces the agglomeration energy from approximately 850 mJ m(-2) to 500 mJ m(-2), as well as to lower values upon surface displacement. The adsorption of several alcohols and amines was examined to understand their role as grinding aids and as hydration modifiers in cement. The molecules mitigate local electric fields through complexation of calcium ions, hydrogen bonds, and introduction of hydrophobicity upon binding. Molecularly thin layers of about 0.5 nm thickness reduce agglomeration energies to between 100 and 30 mJ m(-2). Molecule-specific trends were found to be similar for tricalcium aluminate and tricalcium silicate. The models allow quantitative predictions and are a starting point to provide fundamental understanding of the role of C3A and organic additives in cement. Extensions to impure phases and advanced hydration stages are feasible.

  18. A Force field for tricalcium aluminate to characterize surface properties, initial hydration, and organically modified interfaces in atomic resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Ratan K.; Fernández Carrasco, Lucía; Flatt, Robert J.; Heinz, Hendrik

    2014-01-01

    Tricalcium aluminate (C3A) is a major phase of Portland cement clinker and some dental root filling cements. An accurate all-atom force field is introduced to examine structural, surface, and hydration properties as well as organic interfaces to overcome challenges using current laboratory instrumentation. Molecular dynamics simulation demonstrates excellent agreement of computed structural, thermal, mechanical, and surface properties with available experimental data. The parameters are integ...

  19. Luminescence study on hydration states of lanthanide(III)-polyaminopolycarboxylate complexes in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, T.; Kato, Y.

    1998-01-01

    The hydration states of lanthanide (Ln)(III) complexes (Ln=Sm, Eu, Tb and Dy) with a series of polyaminopolycarboxylate ligands were evaluated in detail on the basis of the linear correlation between the luminescence decay constants k obs and the inner-sphere hydration number N H 2 O in D 2 O-H 2 O solutions. The k obs of Ln(III) complexes in D 2 O showed that these ligands were not effective in causing non-radiative de-excitation of the excited states for these ions. The N H 2 O of Sm(III) in a certain polyaminopolycarboxylate complex was apparently larger than those of Eu(III), Tb(III) and Dy(III) in the complexes. These results suggest that the empirical formulae proposed in this study are valid for the calibration of k obs vs. N H 2 O and that the total coordination number, i.e. the sum of the number of ligand donor groups and the N H 2 O of Sm(III) is possibly unity larger than those of Eu(III), Tb(III) and Dy(III) in the complexes. (orig.)

  20. Adsorption behavior of some metal ions on hydrated amorphous titanium dioxide surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panit Sherdshoopongse

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide was prepared from titanium tetrachloride and diluted ammonia solution at low temperature. The product obtained was characterized by XRD, EDXRF, TGA, DSC, and FT-IR techniques. It was found that the product was in the form of hydrated amorphous titanium dioxide, TiO2·1.6H2O (ha- TiO2. Ha-TiO2 exhibits high BET surface area at 449 m2/g. Adsorptions of metal ions onto the ha-TiO2 surface were investigated in the batch equilibrium experiments, using Mn(II, Fe(III, Cu(II, and Pb(II solutions. The concentrations of metal ions were determined by atomic absorption spectrometer. The adsorption isotherms of all metal ions were studied at pH 7. The adsorption of Mn(II, Cu(II, and Pb(II ions on ha-TiO2 conformed to the Langmuir isotherm while that of Fe(III fit equally well to both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms.

  1. Cooperation in carbon source degradation shapes spatial self-organization of microbial consortia on hydrated surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tecon, Robin; Or, Dani

    2017-03-06

    Mounting evidence suggests that natural microbial communities exhibit a high level of spatial organization at the micrometric scale that facilitate ecological interactions and support biogeochemical cycles. Microbial patterns are difficult to study definitively in natural environments due to complex biodiversity, observability and variable physicochemical factors. Here, we examine how trophic dependencies give rise to self-organized spatial patterns of a well-defined bacterial consortium grown on hydrated surfaces. The model consortium consisted of two Pseudomonas putida mutant strains that can fully degrade the aromatic hydrocarbon toluene. We demonstrated that obligate cooperation in toluene degradation (cooperative mutualism) favored convergence of 1:1 partner ratio and strong intermixing at the microscale (10-100 μm). In contrast, competition for benzoate, a compound degraded independently by both strains, led to distinct segregation patterns. Emergence of a persistent spatial pattern has been predicted for surface attached microbial activity in liquid films that mediate diffusive exchanges while permitting limited cell movement (colony expansion). This study of a simple microbial consortium offers mechanistic glimpses into the rules governing the assembly and functioning of complex sessile communities, and points to general principles of spatial organization with potential applications for natural and engineered microbial systems.

  2. Surface states in photonic crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojtíšek P.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Among many unusual and interesting physical properties of photonic crystals (PhC, in recent years, the propagation of surface electromagnetic waves along dielectric PhC boundaries have attracted considerable attention, also in connection to their possible applications. Such surfaces states, produced with the help of specialized defects on PhC boundaries, similarly to surfaces plasmons, are localized surfaces waves and, as such, can be used in various sensing applications. In this contribution, we present our recent studies on numerical modelling of surface states (SS for all three cases of PhC dimensionality. Simulations of these states were carried out by the use of plane wave expansion (PWE method via the MIT MPB package.

  3. Application of Response Surface Methodology in Development of Sirolimus Liposomes Prepared by Thin Film Hydration Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Ghanbarzadeh

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The present investigation was aimed to optimize the formulating process of sirolimus liposomes by thin film hydration method. Methods: In this study, a 32 factorial design method was used to investigate the influence of two independent variables in the preparation of sirolimus liposomes. The dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC /Cholesterol (Chol and dioleoyl phosphoethanolamine(DOPE /DPPC molar ratios were selected as the independent variables. Particle size (PS and Encapsulation Efficiency (EE % were selected as the dependent variables. To separate the un-encapsulated drug, dialysis method was used. Drug analysis was performed with a validated RP-HPLC method. Results: Using response surface methodology and based on the coefficient values obtained for independent variables in the regression equations, it was clear that the DPPC/Chol molar ratio was the major contributing variable in particle size and EE %. The use of a statistical approach allowed us to see individual and/or interaction effects of influencing parameters in order to obtain liposomes with desired properties and to determine the optimum experimental conditions that lead to the enhancement of characteristics. In the prediction of PS and EE % values, the average percent errors are found to be as 3.59 and 4.09%. This value is sufficiently low to confirm the high predictive power of model. Conclusion: Experimental results show that the observed responses were in close agreement with the predicted values and this demonstrates the reliability of the optimization procedure in prediction of PS and EE % in sirolimus liposomes preparation.

  4. The Hydrated Electron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, John M.; Coons, Marc P.

    2017-05-01

    Existence of a hydrated electron as a byproduct of water radiolysis was established more than 50 years ago, yet this species continues to attract significant attention due to its role in radiation chemistry, including DNA damage, and because questions persist regarding its detailed structure. This work provides an overview of what is known in regards to the structure and spectroscopy of the hydrated electron, both in liquid water and in clusters [Formula: see text], the latter of which provide model systems for how water networks accommodate an excess electron. In clusters, the existence of both surface-bound and internally bound states of the excess electron has elicited much debate, whereas in bulk water there are questions regarding how best to understand the structure of the excess electron's spin density. The energetics of the equilibrium species e-(aq) and its excited states, in bulk water and at the air/water interface, are also addressed.

  5. A relationship between three-dimensional surface hydration structures and force distribution measured by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Naritaka; Watkins, Matthew; Shluger, Alexander L.; Amano, Ken-Ichi; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2016-03-01

    Hydration plays important roles in various solid-liquid interfacial phenomena. Very recently, three-dimensional scanning force microscopy (3D-SFM) has been proposed as a tool to visualise solvated surfaces and their hydration structures with lateral and vertical (sub) molecular resolution. However, the relationship between the 3D force map obtained and the equilibrium water density, ρ(r), distribution above the surface remains an open question. Here, we investigate this relationship at an interface of an inorganic mineral, fluorite, and water. The force maps measured in pure water are directly compared to force maps generated using the solvent tip approximation (STA) model and from explicit molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that the simulated STA force map describes the major features of the experimentally obtained force image. The agreement between the STA data and the experiment establishes the correspondence between the water density used as an input to the STA model and the experimental hydration structure and thus provides a tool to bridge the experimental force data and atomistic solvation structures. Further applications of this method should improve the accuracy and reliability of both interpretation of 3D-SFM force maps and atomistic simulations in a wide range of solid-liquid interfacial phenomena.Hydration plays important roles in various solid-liquid interfacial phenomena. Very recently, three-dimensional scanning force microscopy (3D-SFM) has been proposed as a tool to visualise solvated surfaces and their hydration structures with lateral and vertical (sub) molecular resolution. However, the relationship between the 3D force map obtained and the equilibrium water density, ρ(r), distribution above the surface remains an open question. Here, we investigate this relationship at an interface of an inorganic mineral, fluorite, and water. The force maps measured in pure water are directly compared to force maps generated using the solvent

  6. Role of Aquaporin Water Channels in Airway Fluid Transport, Humidification, and Surface Liquid Hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yuanlin; Jayaraman, Sujatha; Yang, Baoxue; Matthay, Michael A.; Verkman, A.S.

    2001-01-01

    Several aquaporin-type water channels are expressed in mammalian airways and lung: AQP1 in microvascular endothelia, AQP3 in upper airway epithelia, AQP4 in upper and lower airway epithelia, and AQP5 in alveolar epithelia. Novel quantitative methods were developed to compare airway fluid transport–related functions in wild-type mice and knockout mice deficient in these aquaporins. Lower airway humidification, measured from the moisture content of expired air during mechanical ventilation with dry air through a tracheotomy, was 54–56% efficient in wild-type mice, and reduced by only 3–4% in AQP1/AQP5 or AQP3/AQP4 double knockout mice. Upper airway humidification, measured from the moisture gained by dry air passed through the upper airways in mice breathing through a tracheotomy, decreased from 91 to 50% with increasing ventilation from 20 to 220 ml/min, and reduced by 3–5% in AQP3/AQP4 knockout mice. The depth and salt concentration of the airway surface liquid in trachea was measured in vivo using fluorescent probes and confocal and ratio imaging microscopy. Airway surface liquid depth was 45 ± 5 μm and [Na+] was 115 ± 4 mM in wild-type mice, and not significantly different in AQP3/AQP4 knockout mice. Osmotic water permeability in upper airways, measured by an in vivo instillation/sample method, was reduced by ∼40% by AQP3/AQP4 deletion. In doing these measurements, we discovered a novel amiloride-sensitive isosmolar fluid absorption process in upper airways (13% in 5 min) that was not affected by aquaporin deletion. These results establish the fluid transporting properties of mouse airways, and indicate that aquaporins play at most a minor role in airway humidification, ASL hydration, and isosmolar fluid absorption. PMID:11382807

  7. Effect of hydration state on strength, power, and resistance exercise performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judelson, Daniel A; Maresh, Carl M; Farrell, Mark J; Yamamoto, Linda M; Armstrong, Lawrence E; Kraemer, William J; Volek, Jeff S; Spiering, Barry A; Casa, Douglas J; Anderson, Jeffrey M

    2007-10-01

    Although many studies have attempted to examine the effect of hypohydration on strength, power, and high-intensity endurance, few have successfully isolated changes in total body water from other variables that alter performance (e.g., increased core temperature), and none have documented the influence of hypohydration on an isotonic, multiset, multirepetition exercise bout typical of resistance exercise training. Further, no investigations document the effect of hypohydration on the ability of the central nervous system to stimulate the musculature, despite numerous scientists suggesting this possibility. The purposes of this study were to examine the isolated effect of hydration state on 1) strength, power, and the performance of acute resistance exercise, and 2) central activation ratio (CAR). Seven healthy resistance-trained males (age = 23 +/- 4 yr, body mass = 87.8 +/- 6.8 kg, body fat = 11.5 +/- 5.2%) completed three resistance exercise bouts in different hydration states: euhydrated (EU), hypohydrated by approximately 2.5% body mass (HY25), and hypohydrated by approximately 5.0% body mass (HY50). Investigators manipulated hydration status via exercise-heat stress and controlled fluid intake 1 d preceding testing. Body mass decreased 2.4 +/- 0.4 and 4.8 +/- 0.4% during HY25 and HY50, respectively. No significant differences existed among trials in vertical jump height, peak lower-body power (assessed via jump squat), or peak lower-body force (assessed via isometric back squat). CAR tended to decrease as hypohydration increased (EU = 95.6 +/- 4.9%, HY25 = 94.0 +/- 3.1%, HY50 = 92.5 +/- 5.1%; P = 0.075, eta(p)(2) = 0.41). When evaluated as a function of the percentage of total work completed during a six-set back squat protocol, hypohydration significantly decreased resistance exercise performance during sets 2-3 and 2-5 for HY25 and HY50, respectively. These data indicate that hypohydration attenuates resistance exercise performance; the role of central drive

  8. Hydration water and microstructure in calcium silicate and aluminate hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fratini, Emiliano; Ridi, Francesca; Chen, Sow-Hsin; Baglioni, Piero

    2006-01-01

    Understanding the state of the hydration water and the microstructure development in a cement paste is likely to be the key for the improvement of its ultimate strength and durability. In order to distinguish and characterize the reacted and unreacted water, the single-particle dynamics of water molecules in hydrated calcium silicates (C 3 S, C 2 S) and aluminates (C 3 A, C 4 AF) were studied by quasi-elastic neutron scattering, QENS. The time evolution of the immobile fraction represents the hydration kinetics and the mobile fraction follows a non-Debye relaxation. Less sophisticated, but more accessible and cheaper techniques, like differential scanning calorimetry, DSC, and near-infrared spectroscopy, NIR, were validated through QENS results and they allow one to easily and quantitatively follow the cement hydration kinetics and can be widely applied on a laboratory scale to understand the effect of additives (i.e., superplasticizers, cellulosic derivatives, etc) on the thermodynamics of the hydration process. DSC provides information on the free water index and on the activation energy involved in the hydration process while the NIR band at 7000 cm -1 monitors, at a molecular level, the increase of the surface-interacting water. We report as an example the effect of two classes of additives widely used in the cement industry: superplasticizers, SPs, and cellulose derivatives. SPs interact at the solid surface, leading to a consistent increment of the activation energy for the processes of nucleation and growth of the hydrated phases. In contrast, the cellulosic additives do not affect the nucleation and growth activation energy, but cause a significant increment in the water availability: in other words the hydration process is more efficient without any modification of the solid/liquid interaction, as also evidenced by the 1 H-NMR. Additional information is obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), ultra small angle neutron scattering (USANS) and wide

  9. Hydration water and microstructure in calcium silicate and aluminate hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fratini, Emiliano [Department of Chemistry and CSGI, University of Florence, via della Lastruccia 3-Sesto Fiorentino, I-50019 Florence (Italy); Ridi, Francesca [Department of Chemistry and CSGI, University of Florence, via della Lastruccia 3-Sesto Fiorentino, I-50019 Florence (Italy); Chen, Sow-Hsin [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Baglioni, Piero [Department of Chemistry and CSGI, University of Florence, via della Lastruccia 3-Sesto Fiorentino, I-50019 Florence (Italy)

    2006-09-13

    Understanding the state of the hydration water and the microstructure development in a cement paste is likely to be the key for the improvement of its ultimate strength and durability. In order to distinguish and characterize the reacted and unreacted water, the single-particle dynamics of water molecules in hydrated calcium silicates (C{sub 3}S, C{sub 2}S) and aluminates (C{sub 3}A, C{sub 4}AF) were studied by quasi-elastic neutron scattering, QENS. The time evolution of the immobile fraction represents the hydration kinetics and the mobile fraction follows a non-Debye relaxation. Less sophisticated, but more accessible and cheaper techniques, like differential scanning calorimetry, DSC, and near-infrared spectroscopy, NIR, were validated through QENS results and they allow one to easily and quantitatively follow the cement hydration kinetics and can be widely applied on a laboratory scale to understand the effect of additives (i.e., superplasticizers, cellulosic derivatives, etc) on the thermodynamics of the hydration process. DSC provides information on the free water index and on the activation energy involved in the hydration process while the NIR band at 7000 cm{sup -1} monitors, at a molecular level, the increase of the surface-interacting water. We report as an example the effect of two classes of additives widely used in the cement industry: superplasticizers, SPs, and cellulose derivatives. SPs interact at the solid surface, leading to a consistent increment of the activation energy for the processes of nucleation and growth of the hydrated phases. In contrast, the cellulosic additives do not affect the nucleation and growth activation energy, but cause a significant increment in the water availability: in other words the hydration process is more efficient without any modification of the solid/liquid interaction, as also evidenced by the {sup 1}H-NMR. Additional information is obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), ultra small angle neutron

  10. Morphology and side-chain dynamics in hydrated hard α-keratin fibres by 1H solid-state NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melian, Claudiu; Demco, Dan E.; Istrate, Monica; Balaceanu, Andreea; Moldovan, Dumitrita; Fechete, Radu; Popescu, Crisan; Möller, Martin

    2009-10-01

    The effect of hydration on phase composition, aminoacids side-chain dynamics, and domain thickness of hard α-keratin was investigated by 1H solid-state NMR. Decomposition of wide-line 1H NMR spectra was used to determine the phase composition and to obtain information on molecular motion. Proton spin-diffusion NMR experiments using a double-quantum dipolar filter were used to estimate the rigid domain sizes for the hydrated Caucasian hair fibres. The relative domain sizes were obtained from the solution of spin-diffusion equation for cylindrical morphologies in the initial-rate approximation by a novel approach. A qualitative model describing the morphological and molecular dynamics changes induced by hydration was developed.

  11. Phonon density of states in different clathrate hydrates measured by inelastic neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celli, M.; Colognesi, D.; Ulivi, L.; Zoppi, M.; Ramirez-Cuesta, A. J.

    2012-02-01

    Clathrate hydrates, depending on the guest molecule type, generally exhibit one out of three different crystal structures: two cubic structures, sI and sII and one hexagonal structure, sH. In the past, our inelastic neutron scattering measurements on hydrogen clathrates have provided information on the quantum dynamics of the guest molecules in the water cages. Besides the guest dynamics, the dynamics of the water lattice itself has a large interest, due to the analogy with ice (e.g. proton disorder), and to the existence of various possible structures. Additionally, in these inclusion compounds, a coupling between the host and the guest motions is generally observed, and is considered to be relevant to explain the anomalous features of some macroscopic properties, such as thermal conductivity. Here, we present a systematic study of the H-projected phonon density of states (H-PDoS) of the lattice modes in clathrate hydrates. We have experimentally investigated the three existing structures (i.e. sI, sII, and sH) through inelastic neutron scattering measurements, and we have extracted the acoustic-optic and the librational H-PDoS's. By using proper isotopic substitutions, we have been able to tune the host scattering intensity with respect to the guest one. The studied samples consisted in three clathrates made of light water (namely, simple sI structure with Xe, simple sII structure with fully deuterated THF, and binary sH structure with MTBE and D2), and two made of heavy water (namely, simple sII structure with Ne, and simple sII structure with fully deuterated THF). The experimental results have been compared with lattice dynamics simulations performed by us.

  12. Selective Permeability of Uranyl Peroxide Nanocages to Different Alkali Ions: Influences from Surface Pores and Hydration Shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Yunyi; Haso, Fadi; Szymanowski, Jennifer E. S.; Zhou, Jing; Hu, Lang; Burns, Peter C.; Liu, Tianbo

    2015-11-16

    The precise guidance to different ions across the biological channels is essential for many biological processes. An artificial nanopore system will facilitate the study of the ion-transport mechanism through nanosized channels and offer new views for designing nanodevices. Herein we reveal that a 2.5 nm-sized, fullerene-shaped molecular cluster Li48+mK12(OH)m[UO2(O2)(OH)]60-(H2O)n (m≈20 and n≈310) (U60) shows selective permeability to different alkali ions. The subnanometer pores on the water–ligand-rich surface of U60 are able to block Rb+ and Cs+ ions from passing through, while allowing Na+ and K+ ions, which possess larger hydrated sizes, to enter the interior space of U60. An interestingly high entropy gain during the binding process between U60 and alkali ions suggests that the hydration shells of Na+/K+ and U60 are damaged during the interaction. The ion selectivity of U60 is greatly influenced by both the morphologies of the surface nanopores and the dynamics of the hydration shells.

  13. Selective permeability of uranyl peroxide nanocages to different alkali ions: influences from surface pores and hydration shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Yunyi; Haso, Fadi; Zhou, Jing; Hu, Lang; Liu, Tianbo [Department of Polymer Science, University of Akron, OH (United States); Szymanowski, Jennifer E.S.; Burns, Peter C. [Department of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, IN (United States)

    2015-12-14

    The precise guidance to different ions across the biological channels is essential for many biological processes. An artificial nanopore system will facilitate the study of the ion-transport mechanism through nanosized channels and offer new views for designing nanodevices. Herein we reveal that a 2.5 nm-sized, fullerene-shaped molecular cluster Li{sub 48+m}K{sub 12}(OH){sub m}[UO{sub 2}(O{sub 2})(OH)]{sub 60-}(H{sub 2}O){sub n} (m∼20 and n∼310) (U{sub 60}) shows selective permeability to different alkali ions. The subnanometer pores on the water-ligand-rich surface of U{sub 60} are able to block Rb{sup +} and Cs{sup +} ions from passing through, while allowing Na{sup +} and K{sup +} ions, which possess larger hydrated sizes, to enter the interior space of U{sub 60}. An interestingly high entropy gain during the binding process between U{sub 60} and alkali ions suggests that the hydration shells of Na{sup +}/K{sup +} and U{sub 60} are damaged during the interaction. The ion selectivity of U{sub 60} is greatly influenced by both the morphologies of the surface nanopores and the dynamics of the hydration shells. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Shifts in oxidation states of cerium oxide nanoparticles detected inside intact hydrated cells and organelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szymanski, Craig J.; Munusamy, Prabhakaran; Mihai, Cosmin; Xie, Yumei; Hu, Dehong; Gilles, Marry K.; Tyliszczak, T.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Baer, Donald R.; Orr, Galya

    2015-09-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs) have been shown to induce diverse biological effects, ranging from toxic to beneficial. The beneficial effects have been attributed to the potential antioxidant activity of CNPs via certain redox reactions, depending on their oxidation state or Ce3+/Ce4+ ratio. However, this ratio is strongly dependent on the environment and age of the nanoparticles and it is unclear whether and how the complex intracellular environment impacts this ratio and the possible redox reactions of CNPs. To identify any changes in the oxidation state of CNPs in the intracellular environment and better understand their intracellular reactions, we directly quantified the oxidation states of CNPs outside and inside intact hydrated cells and organelles using correlated scanning transmission x-ray and super resolution fluorescence microscopies. By analyzing hundreds of small CNP aggregates, we detected a shift to a higher Ce3+/Ce4+ ratio in CNPs inside versus outside the cells, indicating a net reduction of CNPs in the intracellular environment. We further found a similar ratio in the cytoplasm and in the lysosomes, indicating that the net reduction occurs earlier in the internalization pathway. Together with oxidative stress and toxicity measurements, our observations identify a net reduction of CNPs in the intracellular environment, which is consistent with their involvement in potentially beneficial oxidation reactions, but also point to interactions that can negatively impact the health of cells.

  15. Origins of hydration lubrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Liran; Gaisinskaya-Kipnis, Anastasia; Kampf, Nir; Klein, Jacob

    2015-01-14

    Why is friction in healthy hips and knees so low? Hydration lubrication, according to which hydration shells surrounding charges act as lubricating elements in boundary layers (including those coating cartilage in joints), has been invoked to account for the extremely low sliding friction between surfaces in aqueous media, but not well understood. Here we report the direct determination of energy dissipation within such sheared hydration shells. By trapping hydrated ions in a 0.4-1 nm gap between atomically smooth charged surfaces as they slide past each other, we are able to separate the dissipation modes of the friction and, in particular, identify the viscous losses in the subnanometre hydration shells. Our results shed light on the origins of hydration lubrication, with potential implications both for aqueous boundary lubricants and for biolubrication.

  16. Three-dimensional hydration layer mapping on the (10.4) surface of calcite using amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marutschke, Christoph; Hermes, Ilka; Bechstein, Ralf; Kühnle, Angelika; Walters, Deron; Cleveland, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Calcite, the most stable modification of calcium carbonate, is a major mineral in nature. It is, therefore, highly relevant in a broad range of fields such as biomineralization, sea water desalination and oil production. Knowledge of the surface structure and reactivity of the most stable cleavage plane, calcite (10.4), is pivotal for understanding the role of calcite in these diverse areas. Given the fact that most biological processes and technical applications take place in an aqueous environment, perhaps the most basic—yet decisive—question addresses the interaction of water molecules with the calcite (10.4) surface. In this work, amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy is used for three-dimensional (3D) mapping of the surface structure and the hydration layers above the surface. An easy-to-use scanning protocol is implemented for collecting reliable 3D data. We carefully discuss a comprehensible criterion for identifying the solid–liquid interface within our data. In our data three hydration layers form a characteristic pattern that is commensurate with the underlying calcite surface. (paper)

  17. Formation rate of natural gas hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mork, Marit

    2002-07-01

    The rate of methane hydrate and natural gas hydrate formation was measured in a 9.5 litre stirred tank reactor of standard design. The experiments were performed to better understand the performance and scale-up of a reactor for continuous production of natural gas hydrates. The hydrate formation rate was measured at steady-state conditions at pressures between 70 and 90 bar and temperatures between 7 and 15 deg C. Between 44 and 56 % of the gas continuously supplied to the reactor was converted to hydrate. The experimental results show that the rate of hydrate formation is strongly influenced by gas injection rate and pressure. The effect of stirring rate is less significant and subcooling has no observable effect on the formation rate. Hydrate crystal concentration and gas composition do not influence the hydrate formation rate. Observations of produced hydrate crystals indicate that the crystals are elongated, about 5 micron in diameter and 10 micron long. Analysis of the results shows that the rate of hydrate formation is dominated by gas-liquid mass transfer. A mass transfer model, the bubble-to-crystal model, was developed for the hydrate formation rate in a continuous stirred tank reactor, given in terms of concentration driving force and an overall mass transfer coefficient. The driving force is the difference between the gas concentration at the gas-liquid interface and at the hydrate crystal surface. These concentrations correspond to the solubility of gas in water at experimental temperature and pressure and the solubility of gas at hydrate equilibrium temperature and experimental pressure, respectively. The overall mass transfer coefficient is expressed in terms of superficial gas velocity and impeller power consumption, parameters commonly used in study of stirred tank reactors. Experiments and modeling show that the stirred tank reactor has a considerable potential for increased production capacity. However, at higher hydrate production rates the

  18. Band gap and density of states of the hydrated C60 fullerene system at finite temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivelino, Roberto; de Brito Mota, F

    2007-06-01

    We examine the electronic properties of the hydrated C60 fullerene under ambient conditions using a sequential Monte Carlo/density functional theory scheme. In this procedure, the average electronic properties of the first hydration shell of C60 equilibrate for ca. 40 uncorrelated configurations of the fullerene aqueous solution. We obtain a systematic red-shift of 0.8 eV in the band gap of the hydrated system, which is mainly attributed to the thermal fluctuations of the aqueous environment.

  19. Association of plasma adiponectin levels with cellular hydration state measured using bioelectrical impedance analysis in patients with COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikawa T

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Takahiro Yoshikawa,1 Hiroshi Kanazawa21Department of Sports Medicine, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, JapanBackground: It is widely recognized that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD includes a variety of extra pulmonary complications and comorbidities. Recently, adiponectin was shown to regulate cellular metabolism in humans. Cellular hydration state is affected by a variety of hormonal factors and regulates cellular metabolic state. Therefore, this study was designed to determine whether adiponectin is a possible factor involved in cellular hydration state in COPD.Methods: Thirty patients with COPD and 41 age-matched controls participated in the study. Plasma levels of total and high molecular weight (HMW adiponectin were measured and anthropometry and pulmonary function tests were conducted. Intracellular water (ICW, extracellular water (ECW, and ECW/ICW ratio, which are parameters of cellular hydration state, were measured using bioelectrical impedance analysis.Results: Higher levels of total and HMW adiponectin in plasma were found in patients with COPD compared with levels in controls. A significant inverse correlation was observed between body mass index and plasma levels of total and HMW adiponectin in the control group. However, this significant correlation was not observed in patients with COPD. The plasma levels of total and HMW adiponectin were also not significantly correlated with any pulmonary function parameters in patients with COPD. Regarding the state of cellular hydration, the plasma levels of total adiponectin were inversely correlated with the ECW/ICW ratio and positively with ICW values in patients with COPD. Moreover, closer correlations were found between these parameters and plasma HMW adiponectin levels.Conclusion: The results of the present study suggest a novel association of the plasma

  20. Impact of hydration state and molecular oxygen on the chemical stability of levothyroxine sodium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, Mazen Lee; Engen, William; Morris, Kenneth R

    2015-05-01

    Levothyroxine sodium is an important medication used primarily for treating patients with hypothyroidism. Levothyroxine sodium tablets have been recalled many times since their 1955 introduction to the US market. These recalls resulted from the failure of lots to meet their content uniformity and potency specifications. The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that the chemical stability of levothyroxine sodium pentahydrate is compromised upon exposing the dehydrated substance to molecular oxygen. The impact of temperature, oxygen and humidity storage conditions on the stability of solid-state levothyroxine sodium was examined. After exposure to these storage conditions for selected periods of time, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to quantify the formation of impurities. The results showed that levothyroxine sodium samples degraded significantly over a 32-day test period when subjected to dry conditions in the presence of molecular oxygen. However, dehydrated samples remained stable when oxygen was removed from the storage chamber. Furthermore, hydrated samples were stable in the presence of oxygen and in the absence of oxygen. These results reveal conditions that will degrade levothyroxine sodium pentahydrate and elucidate measures that can be taken to stabilize the drug substance.

  1. Freezing and melting of salt hydrates next to solid surfaces probed by infrared-visible sum frequency generation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anim-Danso, Emmanuel; Zhang, Yu; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2013-06-12

    Understanding the freezing of salt solutions near solid surfaces is important in many scientific fields. Here we use sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy to study the freezing of a NaCl solution next to a sapphire substrate. During cooling we observe two transitions. The first corresponds to segregation of concentrated brine next to the sapphire surface as we cool the system down to the region where ice and brine phases coexist. At this transition, the intensity of the ice-like peak decreases, suggesting the disruption of hydrogen-bonding by sodium ions. The second transition corresponds to the formation of NaCl hydrates with abrupt changes in both the SFG intensity and the sharpness of spectral peaks. The similarity in the position of the SFG peaks with those observed using IR and Raman spectroscopy indicates the formation of NaCl·2H2O crystals next to the sapphire substrate. The melting temperatures of the hydrates are very similar to those reported for bulk NaCl·2H2O. This study enhances our understanding of nucleation and freezing of salt solutions on solid surfaces and the effects of salt ions on the structure of interfacial ice.

  2. Hydration properties and phosphorous speciation in native, gelatinized and enzymatically modified potato starch analyzed by solid-state MAS NMR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Flemming Hofmann; Kasprzak, Miroslaw Marek; Lærke, Helle Nygaard

    2013-01-01

    Hydration of granular, gelatinized and molecularly modified states of potato starch in terms of molecular mobility were analyzed by 13C and 31P solid-state MAS NMR. Gelatinization (GEL) tremendously reduced the immobile fraction compared to native (NA) starch granules. This effect was enhanced....... Comparative analysis of wheat and waxy maize starches demonstrated that starches were similar upon gelatinization independent of botanical origin and that the torsion angles of the glycosidic linkages were averages of the crystalline A and B type structures. In starch suspension phosphorous in immobile...... regions was only observed in NA starch. Moreover phosphorous was observed in a minor pH-insensitive form and as major phosphate in hydrated GEL and BE starches....

  3. Physical and Mechanical Properties of Surface Sediments and methane hydrate-bearing sediments in the Shenhu area of South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, J.; Shen, Z.; Jia, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Methane hydrates are superior energy resources and potential predisposing factors of geohazard. With the success in China's persistent exploitation of methane hydrates in the Shenhu area of South China Sea for 60 days, there is an increasing demand for detailed knowledge of sediment properties and hazard assessment in this area. In this paper, the physical and mechanical properties of both the surface sediments and methane hydrate-bearing sediments (MHBS) in the exploitation area, the Shenhu area of South China Sea, were investigated using laboratory geotechnical experiments, and triaxial tests were carried out on remolded sediment samples using a modified triaxial apparatus. The results show that sediments in this area are mainly silt with high moisture content, high plasticity, low permeability and low shear strength. The moisture content and permeability decrease while the shear strength increases with the increasing depth. The elastic modulus and peak strength of MHBS increase with the increasing effective confining pressure and higher hydrate saturation. The cohesion increases with higher hydrate saturation while the internal friction angle is barely affected by hydrate saturation. The obtained results demonstrate clearly that methane hydrates have significant impacts on the physical and mechanical properties of sediments and there is still a wide gap in knowledge about MHBS.

  4. The Hydrated Electron at the Surface of Neat Liquid Water Appears To Be Indistinguishable from the Bulk Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coons, Marc P; You, Zhi-Qiang; Herbert, John M

    2016-08-31

    Experiments have suggested that the aqueous electron, e(-)(aq), may play a significant role in the radiation chemistry of DNA. A recent measurement of the energy (below vacuum level) of the putative "interfacial" hydrated electron at the water/vacuum interface, performed using liquid microjet photoelectron spectroscopy, has been interpreted to suggest that aqueous electrons at the water/biomolecule interface may possess the appropriate energetics to induce DNA strand breaks, whereas e(-)(aq) in bulk water lies too far below the vacuum level to induce such reactions. Other such experiments, however, find no evidence of a long-lived feature at low binding energy. We employ a variety of computational strategies to demonstrate that the energetics of the hydrated electron at the surface of neat liquid water are not significantly different from those of e(-)(aq) in bulk water and as such are incompatible with dissociative electron attachment reactions in DNA. We furthermore suggest that no stable interfacial species may exist at all, consistent with the interpretation of certain surface-sensitive spectroscopy measurements, and that even if a short-lived, metastable species does exist at the vacuum/water interface, it would be extremely difficult to distinguish, experimentally, from e(-)(aq) in bulk water, using either optical absorption or photoelectron spectroscopy.

  5. Topological states on the gold surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Binghai; Stadtmüller, Benjamin; Haag, Norman; Jakobs, Sebastian; Seidel, Johannes; Jungkenn, Dominik; Mathias, Stefan; Cinchetti, Mirko; Aeschlimann, Martin; Felser, Claudia

    2015-12-14

    Gold surfaces host special electronic states that have been understood as a prototype of Shockley surface states. These surface states are commonly employed to benchmark the capability of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and scanning tunnelling spectroscopy. Here we show that these Shockley surface states can be reinterpreted as topologically derived surface states (TDSSs) of a topological insulator (TI), a recently discovered quantum state. Based on band structure calculations, the Z2-type invariants of gold can be well-defined to characterize a TI. Further, our ARPES measurement validates TDSSs by detecting the dispersion of unoccupied surface states. The same TDSSs are also recognized on surfaces of other well-known noble metals (for example, silver, copper, platinum and palladium), which shines a new light on these long-known surface states.

  6. Echocardiographic findings in haemodialysis patients according to their state of hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Cristina Di Gioia

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: We found that left atrial volume index determined by echocardiographic Area-length method, but not left ventricle hypertrophy or dimensions of cavities, are related on hydration status based on bioimpedance measured time-averaged fluid overload (TAFO, and not with FO/ECW.

  7. The amphoteric effect on friction between the bovine cartilage/cartilage surfaces under slightly sheared hydration lubrication mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, Zenon; Gadomski, Adam; Sojka, Michal; Urbaniak, Wieslaw; Bełdowski, Piotr

    2016-10-01

    The amphoteric effect on the friction between the bovine cartilage/cartilage contacts has been found to be highly sensitive to the pH of an aqueous solution. The cartilage surface was characterized using a combination of the pH, wettability, as well as the interfacial energy and friction coefficient testing methods to support lamellar-repulsive mechanism of hydration lubrication. It has been confirmed experimentally that phospholipidic multi-bilayers are essentially described as lamellar frictionless lubricants protecting the surface of the joints against wear. At the hydrophilicity limit, the low friction would then be due to (a) lamellar slippage of bilayers and (b) a short-range (nanometer-scale) repulsion between the interfaces of negatively charged (PO4(-)) cartilage surfaces, and in addition, contribution of the extracellular matrix (ECM) collagen fibers, hyaluronate, proteoglycans aggregates (PGs), glycoprotein termed lubricin and finally, lamellar PLs phases. In this paper we demonstrate experimentally that the pH sensitivity of cartilage to friction provides a novel concept in joint lubrication on charged surfaces. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. In silico approach to investigating the adsorption mechanisms of short chain perfluorinated sulfonic acids and perfluorooctane sulfonic acid on hydrated hematite surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Hongru; Lin, Yuan; Sun, Yuzhen; Cao, Huiming; Fu, Jianjie; Gao, Ke; Zhang, Aiqian

    2017-05-01

    Short chain perfluorinated sulfonic acids (PFSAs) that were introduced as alternatives for perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) have been widely produced and used. However, few studies have investigated the environmental process of short chain PFSAs, and the related adsorption mechanisms still need to be uncovered. The water-oxide interface is one of the major environmental interfaces that plays an important role in affecting the adsorption behaviour and transport potential of the environmental pollutant. In this study, we performed molecular dynamics simulations and quantum chemistry calculations to investigate the adsorption mechanisms of five PFSAs and their adsorption on hydrated hematite surface as well. Different to the vertical configuration reported for PFOS on titanium oxide, all PFSAs share the same adsorption configuration as the long carbon chains parallel to the surface. The formation of hydrogen bonds between F and inter-surface H helps to stabilize the unique configuration. As a result, the sorption capacity increases with increasing C-F chain length. Moreover, both calculated adsorption energy and partial density of states (PDOS) analysis demonstrate a PFSAs adsorption mechanism in between physical and chemical adsorption because the hydrogen bonds formed by the overlap of F (p) orbital and H (s) orbital are weak intermolecular interactions while the physical adsorption are mainly ascribed to the electrostatic interactions. This massive calculation provides a new insight into the pollutant adsorption behaviour, and in particular, may help to evaluate the environmental influence of pollutants. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Surface states in an external electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steslicka, M.

    1975-10-01

    Under conditions typical for field ion microscopy, true surface states can exist. Their shift towards higher energies can be quite significant and, moreover, additional surface levels at still higher energies can appear. The latter can play an important role in the process of tunneling of image gas electrons into surface states

  10. Phase equilibria of carbon dioxide and methane gas-hydrates predicted with the modified analytical S-L-V equation of state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Span Roland

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Gas-hydrates (clathrates are non-stoichiometric crystallized solutions of gas molecules in the metastable water lattice. Two or more components are associated without ordinary chemical union but through complete enclosure of gas molecules in a framework of water molecules linked together by hydrogen bonds. The clathrates are important in the following applications: the pipeline blockage in natural gas industry, potential energy source in the form of natural hydrates present in ocean bottom, and the CO2 separation and storage. In this study, we have modified an analytical solid-liquid-vapor equation of state (EoS [A. Yokozeki, Fluid Phase Equil. 222–223 (2004] to improve its ability for modeling the phase equilibria of clathrates. The EoS can predict the formation conditions for CO2- and CH4-hydrates. It will be used as an initial estimate for a more complicated hydrate model based on the fundamental EoSs for fluid phases.

  11. Natural Gas Hydrate Phase Equilibria and Kinetics : Understanding the State-Of-The-Art Équilibres des phases des hydrates de gaz naturel et cinétique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sloan E. D.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available An overview is given of gas hydrate phase equilibria and kinetics. It is suggested that with only a few exceptions hydrate phase equilibrium conditions may be predicted with acceptable accuracy for industrial purposes via the current state-of-the art. Hydrate research is at a milestone, going beyond equilibrium experiments to time-dependent measurements, such as in the kinetic arena, where there is a severe paucity of date. To illustrate the concepts, two qualitative microscopic models are presented :1 the hydrate guest: cavity size ratio and2 the dissolution of apolar molecules in liquid water. Hypotheses for macroscopic phase equilibria and kinetic nucleation phenomena are given, based upon the two models. Cet article présente brièvement les équilibres des phases des hydrates de gaz naturel et leur cinétique. Il signale qu'en l'état actuel des connaissances, les conditions d'équilibre des phases des hydrates peuvent être connues, à quelques exceptions près, avec une précision acceptable dans un but industriel. La recherche sur les hydrates atteint un point décisif, elle dépasse les expériences d'équilibre et s'intéresse aux mesures variant en fonction du temps, celles de la cinétique par exemple, où les données sont particulièrement rares. Pour illustrer le concept deux modèles qualitatifs microscopiques sont présentés : 1 le rapport de grosseur hydrate hôte/cavité, et 2 la dissolution des molécules apolaires dans l'eau liquide. L'auteur émet des hypothèses relatives aux phénomènes macroscopiques d'équilibres des phases et de nucléation cinétique, basées sur ces deux modèles.

  12. Simulation of the solid state and the first and second hydration shell of the xanthine oxidase inhibitor allopurinol: Structures obtained using DFT and MP2 methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Ros, M. C.; Alcolea Palafox, M.

    2016-05-01

    Allopurinol (AL) was investigated in the isolated state, solid state, and in the hydrated form through an exhaustive quantum-chemical analysis. Full geometry optimization and energy calculations of the 11 most stable tautomers in the isolated state were performed. The most stable one corresponds to AL-15 at all the levels of computation. Several weak bands of the experimental spectrum in Ar-matrix were tentatively assigned to tautomer AL-25. The crystal unit cell of the solid state was simulated by a heptamer form. Comparisons with the experimental values confirm that only tautomer AL-15 appears in the solid state. The hydration of the two most stable tautomers: AL-15 and AL-25 was carried out. Solvent effects were considered using the Tomasi's polarized continuum model (PCM) and by the explicit model (EM) including a variable number of water molecules surrounding the base to simulate the first and second hydration shells. In this second hydration shell the calculated difference in the free energy between both tautomers is so small, that both tautomers can coexist in bull water. Some of the most important conclusions on the effects of the hydration on the molecular structure were presented. The deformation and interaction energies were corrected for basis set superposition error (BSSE) using the counterpoise (CP) procedure.

  13. Anomalous surface behavior of hydrated guanidinium ions due to ion pairing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekholm, Victor; Vazdar, Mario; Mason, Philip E.; Bialik, Erik; Walz, Marie-Madeleine; Öhrwall, Gunnar; Werner, Josephina; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Jungwirth, Pavel; Björneholm, Olle

    2018-04-01

    Surface affinity of aqueous guanidinium chloride (GdmCl) is compared to that of aqueous tetrapropylammonium chloride (TPACl) upon addition of sodium chloride (NaCl) or disodium sulfate (Na2SO4). The experimental results have been acquired using the surface sensitive technique X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy on a liquid jet. Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to produce radial distribution functions and surface density plots. The surface affinities of both TPA+ and Gdm+ increase upon adding NaCl to the solution. With the addition of Na2SO4, the surface affinity of TPA+ increases, while that of Gdm+ decreases. From the results of MD simulations it is seen that Gdm+ and SO4 2 - ions form pairs. This finding can be used to explain the decreased surface affinity of Gdm+ when co-dissolved with SO4 2 - ions. Since SO4 2 - ions avoid the surface due to the double charge and strong water interaction, the Gdm+-SO4 2 - ion pair resides deeper in the solutions' bulk than the Gdm+ ions. Since TPA+ does not form ion pairs with SO4 2 -, the TPA+ ions are instead enriched at the surface.

  14. Topological surface states scattering in antimony

    KAUST Repository

    Narayan, Awadhesh

    2012-11-05

    In this work we study the topologically protected states of the Sb(111) surface by using ab initio transport theory. In the presence of a strong surface perturbation we obtain standing-wave states resulting from the superposition of spin-polarized surface states. By Fourier analysis, we identify the underlying two dimensional scattering processes and the spin texture. We find evidence of resonant transmission across surface barriers at quantum well state energies and evaluate their lifetimes. Our results are in excellent agreement with experimental findings. We also show that despite the presence of a step edge along a different high-symmetry direction, the surface states exhibit unperturbed transmission around the Fermi energy for states with near to normal incidence. © 2012 American Physical Society.

  15. Methane Hydrates: Chapter 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, Ray; Yamamoto, Koji; Lee, Sung-Rock; Collett, Timothy S.; Kumar, Pushpendra; Dallimore, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Gas hydrate is a solid, naturally occurring substance consisting predominantly of methane gas and water. Recent scientific drilling programs in Japan, Canada, the United States, Korea and India have demonstrated that gas hydrate occurs broadly and in a variety of forms in shallow sediments of the outer continental shelves and in Arctic regions. Field, laboratory and numerical modelling studies conducted to date indicate that gas can be extracted from gas hydrates with existing production technologies, particularly for those deposits in which the gas hydrate exists as pore-filling grains at high saturation in sand-rich reservoirs. A series of regional resource assessments indicate that substantial volumes of gas hydrate likely exist in sand-rich deposits. Recent field programs in Japan, Canada and in the United States have demonstrated the technical viability of methane extraction from gas-hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs and have investigated a range of potential production scenarios. At present, basic reservoir depressurisation shows the greatest promise and can be conducted using primarily standard industry equipment and procedures. Depressurisation is expected to be the foundation of future production systems; additional processes, such as thermal stimulation, mechanical stimulation and chemical injection, will likely also be integrated as dictated by local geological and other conditions. An innovative carbon dioxide and methane swapping technology is also being studied as a method to produce gas from select gas hydrate deposits. In addition, substantial additional volumes of gas hydrate have been found in dense arrays of grain-displacing veins and nodules in fine-grained, clay-dominated sediments; however, to date, no field tests, and very limited numerical modelling, have been conducted with regard to the production potential of such accumulations. Work remains to further refine: (1) the marine resource volumes within potential accumulations that can be

  16. Protection of surface states in topological nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siroki, Gleb; Haynes, Peter D.; Lee, Derek K. K.; Giannini, Vincenzo

    2017-07-01

    Topological insulators host protected electronic states at their surface. These states show little sensitivity to disorder. For miniaturization one wants to exploit their robustness at the smallest sizes possible. This is also beneficial for optical applications and catalysis, which favor large surface-to-volume ratios. However, it is not known whether discrete states in particles share the protection of their continuous counterparts in large crystals. Here we study the protection of the states hosted by topological insulator nanoparticles. Using both analytical and tight-binding simulations, we show that the states benefit from the same level of protection as those on a planar surface. The results hold for many shapes and sustain surface roughness which may be useful in photonics, spectroscopy, and chemistry. They complement past studies of large crystals—at the other end of possible length scales. The protection of the nanoparticles suggests that samples of all intermediate sizes also possess protected states.

  17. Electron spectroscopy of nanodiamond surface states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belobrov, P.I.; Bursill, L.A.; Maslakov, K.I.; Dementjev, A.P

    2003-06-15

    Electronic states of nanodiamond (ND) were investigated by PEELS, XPS and CKVV Auger spectra. Parallel electron energy loss spectra (PEELS) show that the electrons inside of ND particles are sp{sup 3} hybridized but there is a surface layer containing distinct hybridized states. The CKVV Auger spectra imply that the HOMO of the ND surface has a shift of 2.5 eV from natural diamond levels of {sigma}{sub p} up to the Fermi level. Hydrogen (H) treatment of natural diamond surface produces a chemical state indistinguishable from that of ND surfaces using CKVV. The ND electronic structure forms {sigma}{sub s}{sup 1}{sigma}{sub p}{sup 2}{pi}{sup 1} surface states without overlapping of {pi}-levels. Surface electronic states, including surface plasmons, as well as phonon-related electronic states of the ND surface are also interesting and may also be important for field emission mechanisms from the nanostructured diamond surface.

  18. Enhancement of the surface methane hydrate-bearing layer based on the specific microorganisms form deep seabed sediment in Japan Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, T.; Yoneda, J.; Yamamoto, K.

    2017-12-01

    A methane hydrate-bearing layer located near the Japan Sea has been investigated as a new potential energy resource. In this study examined the feasibility of the seabed surface sediment strength located in the Japan Sea improvement technologies for enhancing microbial induced carbonate precipitation (MICP) process. First, the authors cultivated the specific urease production bacterium culture medium from this surface methane hydrate-bearing layer in the seabed (-600m depth) of Japan Sea. After that, two types of the laboratory test (consolidated-drained triaxial tests) were conducted using this specific culture medium from the seabed in the Japan Sea near the Toyama Prefecture and high urease activities bacterium named Bacillus pasteurii. The main outcomes of this research are as follows. 1) Specific culture medium focused on the urease production bacterium can enhancement of the urease activities from the methane hydrate-bearing layer near the Japan Sea side, 2) This specific culture medium can be enhancement of the surface layer strength, 3) The microbial induced carbonate precipitation process can increase the particle size compared to that of the original particles coating the calcite layer surface, 4) The mechanism for increasing the soil strength is based on the addition of cohesion like a cement stabilized soil.

  19. A coordination chemistry study of hydrated and solvated cationic vanadium ions in oxidation states +III, +IV, and +V in solution and solid state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakowiak, Joanna; Lundberg, Daniel; Persson, Ingmar

    2012-09-17

    The coordination chemistry of hydrated and solvated vanadium(III), oxovanadium(IV), and dioxovanadium(V) ions in the oxygen-donor solvents water, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), and N,N'-dimethylpropyleneurea (DMPU) has been studied in solution by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and large-angle X-ray scattering (LAXS) and in the solid state by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and EXAFS. The hydrated vanadium(III) ion has a regular octahedral configuration with a mean V-O bond distance of 1.99 Å. In the hydrated and DMSO-solvated oxovanadium(IV) ions, vanadium binds strongly to an oxo group at ca. 1.6 Å. The solvent molecule trans to the oxo group is very weakly bound, at ca. 2.2 Å, while the remaining four solvent molecules, with a mean V-O bond distance of 2.0 Å, form a plane slightly below the vanadium atom; the mean O═V-O(perp) bond angle is ca. 98°. In the DMPU-solvated oxovanadium(IV) ion, the space-demanding properties of the DMPU molecule leave no solvent molecule in the trans position to the oxo group, which reduces the coordination number to 5. The O═V-O bond angle is consequently much larger, 107°, and the mean V═O and V-O bond distances decrease to 1.58 and 1.97 Å, respectively. The hydrated and DMSO-solvated dioxovanadium(V) ions display a very distorted octahedral configuration with the oxo groups in the cis position with a mean V═O bond distance of 1.6 Å and a O═V═O bond angle of ca. 105°. The solvent molecules trans to the oxo groups are weakly bound, at ca. 2.2 Å, while the remaining two have bond distances of 2.02 Å. The experimental studies of the coordination chemistry of hydrated and solvated vanadium(III,IV,V) ions are complemented by summarizing previously reported crystal structures to yield a comprehensive description of the coordination chemistry of vanadium with oxygen-donor ligands.

  20. A coordination chemistry study of hydrated and solvated cationic vanadium ions in oxidation states +III, +IV, and +V in solution and solid state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakowiak, Joanna; Lundberg, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The coordination chemistry of hydrated and solvated vanadium(III), oxovanadium(IV), and dioxovanadium(V) ions in the oxygen donor solvents water, dimethylsulfoxide (dmso) and N,N′-dimethylpropyleneurea (dmpu) has been studied in solution by EXAFS and large angle X-ray scattering (LAXS) and in solid state by single crystal X-ray diffraction and EXAFS. The hydrated vanadium(III) ion has a regular octahedral configuration with a mean V-O bond distance of 1.99 Å. In the hydrated and dimethylsulfoxide solvated oxovanadium(IV) ions vanadium binds strongly to an oxo group at ca. 1.6 Å. The solvent molecule trans to the oxo group is very weakly bound, at ca. 2.2 Å, while the remaining four solvent molecules, with a mean V-O bond distance of 2.0 Å, form a plane slightly below the vanadium atom; the mean O=V-Operp bond angle is ca. 98°. In the dmpu solvated oxovanadium(IV) ion, the space demanding properties of the dmpu molecule leaving no solvent molecule in the trans position to the oxo group which reduces the coordination number to 5. The O=V-O bond angle is consequently much larger, 106°, and the mean V=O and V-O bond distances decrease to 1.58 and 1.97 Å, respectively. The hydrated and dimethylsulfoxide solvated dioxovanadium(V) ions display a very distorted octahedral configuration with the oxo groups in cis position with mean V=O bond distances of 1.6 Å and a O=V=O bond angle of ca. 105°. The solvent molecules trans to the oxo groups are weakly bound, at ca. 2.2 Å, while the remaining two have bond distances of 2.02 Å. The experimental studies of the coordination chemistry of hydrated and solvated vanadium(III,IV,V) ions are complemented by summarizing previously reported crystal structures to yield a comprehensive description of the coordination chemistry of vanadium with oxygen donor ligands. PMID:22950803

  1. The role of echocardiography measurement index collapsing VCI in the evaluation of dialysis and determining the state of hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šulović Ljiljana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Often the only available way of checking the adequacy of HD reaching dry weight after completion of dialysis treatment or monitoring arterial blood pressure. The goal of this paper is to show whether echocardiographic index measuring inspiratory collapse VCI can further assist in assessing the state of hydration of patients on HD. Method: In a study that we conducted on the UDK in Belgrade Centre for HD at 20 toro children on HD (before and after HD and 20 healthy children, the control group. The M mode echocardiography we measured the diameter of the inferior vena cava (VCI and calculated the index VCI inspiratory collapse. Also, accompanied by the correlation of these parameters with the dimensions of the left atrium, left ventricular in diastolic and body weight. Results: Children were before HD was significantly higher static diameter VCI and LA diameter compared to the control group (p <0.05. Index is collapsed before the HD was be substantially lower than in the control group (p <0.05. After HD LA diameter was still significantly higher than in the control group (p <0.05, while the other parameters were not statistically be substantially different. Index collapsing VCI differed significantly before and after HD (p <0.05, examining the correlation between VCI and diameter dimensions of the left ventricle during diastole (LVD found a statistically significant positive correlation between these two parameters in all three groups of measurements (p <0.01. A statistically significant positive linear correlation was found between the VCI diameter and diameter of the left atrium (LA in all three of measurements (p <0.01. A statistically significant positive linear correlation was found between the diameter of VCI and body weight in children after HD and control groups (p <0.01. CONCLUSION: Index collapsing and VCI in combination with other parameters can further improve the monitoring of the state of hydration and improve the quality of life of

  2. Formation of natural gas hydrates in marine sediments 1. Conceptual model of gas hydrate growth conditioned by host sediment properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clennell, M.B.; Hovland, M.; Booth, J.S.; Henry, P.; Winters, W.J.

    1999-01-01

    The stability of submarine gas hydrates is largely dictated by pressure and temperature, gas composition, and pore water salinity. However, the physical properties and surface chemistry of deep marine sediments may also affect the thermodynamic state, growth kinetics, spatial distributions, and growth forms of clathrates. Our conceptual model presumes that gas hydrate behaves in a way analogous to ice in a freezing soil. Hydrate growth is inhibited within fine-grained sediments by a combination of reduced pore water activity in the vicinity of hydrophilic mineral surfaces, and the excess internal energy of small crystals confined in pores. The excess energy can be thought of as a "capillary pressure" in the hydrate crystal, related to the pore size distribution and the state of stress in the sediment framework. The base of gas hydrate stability in a sequence of fine sediments is predicted by our model to occur at a lower temperature (nearer to the seabed) than would be calculated from bulk thermodynamic equilibrium. Capillary effects or a build up of salt in the system can expand the phase boundary between hydrate and free gas into a divariant field extending over a finite depth range dictated by total methane content and pore-size distribution. Hysteresis between the temperatures of crystallization and dissociation of the clathrate is also predicted. Growth forms commonly observed in hydrate samples recovered from marine sediments (nodules, and lenses in muds; cements in sands) can largely be explained by capillary effects, but kinetics of nucleation and growth are also important. The formation of concentrated gas hydrates in a partially closed system with respect to material transport, or where gas can flush through the system, may lead to water depletion in the host sediment. This "freeze-drying" may be detectable through physical changes to the sediment (low water content and overconsolidation) and/or chemical anomalies in the pore waters and metastable

  3. Surface-bound states in nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Peng; Antonov, Denis; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Bester, Gabriel

    2017-05-01

    We show via ab initio calculations and an electrostatic model that the notoriously low, but positive, electron affinity of bulk diamond becomes negative for hydrogen passivated nanodiamonds and argue that this peculiar situation (type-II offset with a vacuum level at nearly midgap) and the three further conditions: (i) a surface dipole with positive charge on the outside layer, (ii) a spherical symmetry, and (iii) a dielectric mismatch at the surface, results in the emergence of a peculiar type of surface state localized just outside the nanodiamond. These states are referred to as "surface-bound states" and have consequently a strong environmental sensitivity. These type of states should exist in any nanostructure with negative electron affinity. We further quantify the band offsets of different type of nanostructures as well as the exciton binding energy and contrast the results with results for "conventional" silicon quantum dots.

  4. Surface Water Treatment Rules State Implementation Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    These documents provide guidance to states, tribes and U.S. EPA Regions exercising primary enforcement responsibility under the Safe Drinking Water Act. The documents contain EPA’s recommendations for implementation of the Surface Water Treatment Rules.

  5. Chloral Hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if you are allergic to chloral hydrate, aspirin, tartrazine (a yellow dye in some processed foods and ... in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it at room temperature, away from excess ...

  6. Echocardiographic findings in haemodialysis patients according to their state of hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristina Di Gioia, María; Gascuena, Raul; Gallar, Paloma; Cobo, Gabriela; Camacho, Rosa; Acosta, Nuria; Baranyi, Zsofia; Rodriguez, Isabel; Oliet, Aniana; Ortega, Olimpia; Fernandez, Inmaculada; Mon, Carmen; Ortiz, Milagros; Manzano, Mari C; Herrero, Juan C; Martinez, José I; Palma, Joaquín; Vigil, Ana

    Chronic fluid overload is frequent in hemodialysis patients (P) and it associates with hypertension, left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and higher mortality. Moreover, echocardiographic data assessing fluid overload is limited. Our aim was to evaluate the relationship between fluid overload measured by bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) and different echocardiographic parameters. Cross-sectional observational study including 76 stable patients. Dry weight was clinically assessed. BIS and echocardiography were performed. Weekly time-averaged fluid overload (TAFO) and relative fluid overload (FO/ECW) were calculated using BIS measurements. Based on TAFO three groups were defined: A- dehydrated, TAFO 1.5 l: 18 (24%). We found significant correlation between TAFO and left atrial volume index (LAVI) (r: 0.29; p=0.013) but not with FO/ECW (r 0.06; p=0.61). TAFO, but not FO/ECW kept a significant relationship with LAVI (p=0.03) using One-Way ANOVA test and linear regression methods. LVH was present in 73.7% (concentric 63.2%, eccentric in 10.5%). No differences between groups in the presence of LVH or left ventricular mass index were found. We found that left atrial volume index determined by echocardiographic Area-length method, but not left ventricle hypertrophy or dimensions of cavities, are related on hydration status based on bioimpedance measured time-averaged fluid overload (TAFO), and not with FO/ECW. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Topological Surface States in Dense Solid Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumov, Ivan I; Hemley, Russell J

    2016-11-11

    Metallization of dense hydrogen and associated possible high-temperature superconductivity represents one of the key problems of physics. Recent theoretical studies indicate that before becoming a good metal, compressed solid hydrogen passes through a semimetallic stage. We show that such semimetallic phases predicted to be the most stable at multimegabar (∼300  GPa) pressures are not conventional semimetals: they exhibit topological metallic surface states inside the bulk "direct" gap in the two-dimensional surface Brillouin zone; that is, metallic surfaces may appear even when the bulk of the material remains insulating. Examples include hydrogen in the Cmca-12 and Cmca-4 structures; Pbcn hydrogen also has metallic surface states but they are of a nontopological nature. The results provide predictions for future measurements, including probes of possible surface superconductivity in dense hydrogen.

  8. Historical methane hydrate project review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy; Bahk, Jang-Jun; Frye, Matt; Goldberg, Dave; Husebo, Jarle; Koh, Carolyn; Malone, Mitch; Shipp, Craig; Torres, Marta

    2013-01-01

    In 1995, U.S. Geological Survey made the first systematic assessment of the volume of natural gas stored in the hydrate accumulations of the United States. That study, along with numerous other studies, has shown that the amount of gas stored as methane hydrates in the world greatly exceeds the volume of known conventional gas resources. However, gas hydrates represent both a scientific and technical challenge and much remains to be learned about their characteristics and occurrence in nature. Methane hydrate research in recent years has mostly focused on: (1) documenting the geologic parameters that control the occurrence and stability of gas hydrates in nature, (2) assessing the volume of natural gas stored within various gas hydrate accumulations, (3) analyzing the production response and characteristics of methane hydrates, (4) identifying and predicting natural and induced environmental and climate impacts of natural gas hydrates, and (5) analyzing the effects of methane hydrate on drilling safety.Methane hydrates are naturally occurring crystalline substances composed of water and gas, in which a solid water-­‐lattice holds gas molecules in a cage-­‐like structure. The gas and water becomes a solid under specific temperature and pressure conditions within the Earth, called the hydrate stability zone. Other factors that control the presence of methane hydrate in nature include the source of the gas included within the hydrates, the physical and chemical controls on the migration of gas with a sedimentary basin containing methane hydrates, the availability of the water also included in the hydrate structure, and the presence of a suitable host sediment or “reservoir”. The geologic controls on the occurrence of gas hydrates have become collectively known as the “methane hydrate petroleum system”, which has become the focus of numerous hydrate research programs.Recognizing the importance of methane hydrate research and the need for a coordinated

  9. Hydration processes of electrolyte anions and cations on pt(111), Ir(111), Ru(001) and Au(111) surfaces: coadsorption of water molecules with electrolyte ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, M; Nakamura, M

    2002-01-01

    Water adsorption on Pt( 111) and Ru(001) treated with oxygen, hydrogen chloride and sodium atom at 20 K has been studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy and surface X-ray diffraction. Water molecules chemisorb predominantly on the sites of the electronegative additives, forming hydrogen bonds. Three types of hydration water molecules coordinate to an adsorbed Na atom through an oxygen lone pair. In contrast, water molecules adsorb on electrode surfaces in a simple way in solution. In 1 mM CuSO4 + 0.5 M H2SO4 solution on an Au(111) electrode surface, water molecules coadsorb not only with sulfuric acid anions through hydrogen bonding but also with copper, over wide potential ranges. In the first stage of underpotential deposition (UPD), each anion is accommodated by six copper hexagon (honeycomb) atoms on which water molecules dominate. At any UPD stage water molecules interact with both the copper atom and sulfuric acid anions on the Au(111) surface. Water molecules also coadsorb with CO molecules on the surface of 2 x 2-2CO-Ru(001). All of the hydration water molecules chemisorb weakly on the surfaces. There appears to be a correlation between the orientation of hydrogen bonding water molecules and the electrode potential.

  10. [Conformational states of NADH molecules in hydrated shell under weak electromagnetic irradiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabolotnyĭ, M A; Barabash, Iu M; Kulish, N P; Dmitrienko, O P; Kuz'menko, M O

    2015-01-01

    The work deals with spectra of capillary waves of water distillate and water solution of NADH and dynamics of NADH under electromagnetic irradiation in the range of millimeters at different space frequencies of surface wave k.

  11. Energy resource potential of natural gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, T.S.

    2002-01-01

    The discovery of large gas hydrate accumulations in terrestrial permafrost regions of the Arctic and beneath the sea along the outer continental margins of the world's oceans has heightened interest in gas hydrates as a possible energy resource. However, significant to potentially insurmountable technical issues must be resolved before gas hydrates can be considered a viable option for affordable supplies of natural gas. The combined information from Arctic gas hydrate studies shows that, in permafrost regions, gas hydrates may exist at subsurface depths ranging from about 130 to 2000 m. The presence of gas hydrates in offshore continental margins has been inferred mainly from anomalous seismic reflectors, known as bottom-simulating reflectors, that have been mapped at depths below the sea floor ranging from about 100 to 1100 m. Current estimates of the amount of gas in the world's marine and permafrost gas hydrate accumulations are in rough accord at about 20,000 trillion m3. Disagreements over fundamental issues such as the volume of gas stored within delineated gas hydrate accumulations and the concentration of gas hydrates within hydrate-bearing strata have demonstrated that we know little about gas hydrates. Recently, however, several countries, including Japan, India, and the United States, have launched ambitious national projects to further examine the resource potential of gas hydrates. These projects may help answer key questions dealing with the properties of gas hydrate reservoirs, the design of production systems, and, most important, the costs and economics of gas hydrate production.

  12. Gas hydrates forming and decomposition conditions analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. М. Павленко

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The concept of gas hydrates has been defined; their brief description has been given; factors that affect the formation and decomposition of the hydrates have been reported; their distribution, structure and thermodynamic conditions determining the gas hydrates formation disposition in gas pipelines have been considered. Advantages and disadvantages of the known methods for removing gas hydrate plugs in the pipeline have been analyzed, the necessity of their further studies has been proved. In addition to the negative impact on the process of gas extraction, the hydrates properties make it possible to outline the following possible fields of their industrial use: obtaining ultrahigh pressures in confined spaces at the hydrate decomposition; separating hydrocarbon mixtures by successive transfer of individual components through the hydrate given the mode; obtaining cold due to heat absorption at the hydrate decomposition; elimination of the open gas fountain by means of hydrate plugs in the bore hole of the gushing gasser; seawater desalination, based on the hydrate ability to only bind water molecules into the solid state; wastewater purification; gas storage in the hydrate state; dispersion of high temperature fog and clouds by means of hydrates; water-hydrates emulsion injection into the productive strata to raise the oil recovery factor; obtaining cold in the gas processing to cool the gas, etc.

  13. Gas hydrates

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramprasad, T.

    Fuels in India’s Energy Future. Workshop on “Alternate Fuels in India’s Energy Future”, held at Hotel International, New Delhi,19 Sept 2006 , Jointly organised by CII,ERM and British High Commission Bangs, N.L., D.S. Sawyer, X. Golovchenko... hydrates: relevance to world margin stability and climatic change, Tutorial book: Gent, Belgium, pp. 1-37. Sloan, E. D., 1998, Clathrate hydrates of natural gases. 2 nd edition: Marcel Dekker, Inc., New York, pp705. Stakes...

  14. Surface states in crystals with low-index surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hui-Ping; Tao Rui-Bao

    2015-01-01

    For most of the conventional crystals with low-index surfaces, the hopping between the nearest neighbor (1NN) crystal planes (CPs) is dominant and the ones from the nNN (2 ≤ n < ∞) CPs are relatively weak, considered as small perturbations. The recent theoretical analysis [1] has demonstrated the absence of surface states at the level of the hopping approximation between the 1NN CPs when the original infinite crystal has the geometric reflection symmetry (GRS) for each CP. Meanwhile, based on the perturbation theory, it has also been shown that small perturbations from the hopping between the nNN (2 ≤ n < ∞) CPs and surface relaxation have no impact on the above conclusion. However, for the crystals with strong intrinsic spin-orbit coupling (SOC), the dominant terms of intrinsic SOC associate with two 1NN bond hoppings. Thus SOC will significantly contribute the hoppings from the 1NN and/or 2NN CPs except the ones within each CP. Here, we will study the effect of the hopping between the 2NN CPs on the surface states in model crystals with three different type structures (Type I: “···–P–P–P–P–···”, Type II: “···–P–Q–P–Q–···” and Type III: “···–P=Q–P=Q–···” where P and Q indicate CPs and the signs “−” and “=” mark the distance between the 1NN CPs). In terms of analytical and numerical calculations, we study the behavior of surface states in three types after the symmetric/asymmetric hopping from the 2NN CPs is added. We analytically prove that the symmetric hopping from the 2NN CPs cannot induce surface states in Type I when each CP has only one electron mode. The numerical calculations also provide strong support for the conclusion, even up to 5NN. However, in general, the coupling from the 2NN CPs (symmetric and asymmetric) is favorable to generate surface states except Type I with single electron mode only. (paper)

  15. Surface study of liquid 3He using surface state electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirahama, K.; Ito, S.; Suto, H.; Kono, K.

    1995-01-01

    We have measured the mobility of surface state electrons (SSE) on liquid 3 He, μ 3 , aiming to study the elementary surface excitations of the Fermi liquid. A gradual increase of μ 3 below 300 mK is attributed to the scattering of electrons by ripplons. Ripplons do exist in 3 He down to 100 mK. We observe an abrupt decrease of μ 3 , due to the transition to the Wigner solid (WS). The dependences of the WS conductivity and mobility on temperature and magnetic field differ from the SSE behavior on liquid 4 He

  16. 15N and 31P solid-state NMR study of transmembrane domain alignment of M2 protein of influenza A virus in hydrated cylindrical lipid bilayers confined to anodic aluminum oxide nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekmenev, Eduard Y.; Hu, Jun; Gor'kov, Peter L.; Brey, William W.; Cross, Timothy A.; Ruuge, Andres; Smirnov, Alex I.

    2005-04-01

    This communication reports the first example of a high resolution solid-state 15N 2D PISEMA NMR spectrum of a transmembrane peptide aligned using hydrated cylindrical lipid bilayers formed inside nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) substrates. The transmembrane domain SSDPLVVA(A- 15N)SIIGILHLILWILDRL of M2 protein from influenza A virus was reconstituted in hydrated 1,2-dimyristoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine bilayers that were macroscopically aligned by a conventional micro slide glass support or by the AAO nanoporous substrate. 15N and 31P NMR spectra demonstrate that both the phospholipids and the protein transmembrane domain are uniformly aligned in the nanopores. Importantly, nanoporous AAO substrates may offer several advantages for membrane protein alignment in solid-state NMR studies compared to conventional methods. Specifically, higher thermal conductivity of aluminum oxide is expected to suppress thermal gradients associated with inhomogeneous radio frequency heating. Another important advantage of the nanoporous AAO substrate is its excellent accessibility to the bilayer surface for exposure to solute molecules. Such high accessibility achieved through the substrate nanochannel network could facilitate a wide range of structure-function studies of membrane proteins by solid-state NMR.

  17. X-Ray Microspectroscopic Investigations of Remote Aerosol Composition and Changes in Aerosol Microstructure and Phase State upon Hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreae, M. O.; Artaxo, P.; Bechtel, M.; Förster, J. D.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Krüger, M. L.; Pöhlker, C.; Saturno, J.; Weigand, M.; Wiedemann, K. T.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols play a crucial role in the Earth's climate system and hydrological cycle by scattering and absorbing sunlight and affecting the formation and development of clouds and precipitation. Our research focuses on aerosols in remote regions, in order to characterize the properties and sources of natural aerosol particles and the extent of human perturbations of the aerosol burden. The phase and mixing state of atmospheric aerosols, and particularly their hygroscopic response to relative humidity (RH) variations, is a central determinant of their atmospheric life cycle and impacts. We present an investigation using X-ray microspectroscopy on submicrometer aerosols under variable RH conditions, showing in situ changes in morphology, microstructure, and phase state upon humidity cycling. We applied Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy with Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy (STXM-NEXAFS) under variable RH conditions to standard aerosols for a validation of the experimental approach and to internally mixed aerosol particles from the Amazonian rain forest collected during periods with anthropogenic pollution. The measurements were conducted at X-ray microscopes at the synchrotron facilities Advanced Light Source (ALS) in Berkeley, USA, and BESSY II in Berlin, Germany. Upon hydration, we observed substantial and reproducible changes in microstructure of the Amazonian particles (internal mixture of secondary organic material, ammoniated sulfate, and soot), which appear as mainly driven by efflorescence and recrystallization of sulfate salts. Multiple solid and liquid phases were found to coexist, especially in intermediate humidity regimes (60-80% RH). This shows that X-ray microspectroscopy under variable RH is a valuable technique to analyze the hygroscopic response of individual ambient aerosol particles. Our initial results underline that RH changes can trigger strong particle restructuring, in agreement with previous studies on

  18. Hydrogen storage in clathrate hydrates: Current state of the art and future directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veluswamy, Hari Prakash; Kumar, Rajnish; Linga, Praveen

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen is looked upon as the next generation clean energy carrier, search for an efficient material and method for storing hydrogen has been pursued relentlessly. Improving hydrogen storage capacity to meet DOE targets has been challenging and research efforts are continuously put forth to achieve the set targets and to make hydrogen storage a commercially realizable process. This review comprehensively summarizes the state of the art experimental work conducted on the storage of hydrogen as hydrogen clathrates both at the molecular level and macroscopic level. It identifies future directions and challenges for this exciting area of research. Hydrogen storage capacities of different clathrate structures – sI, sII, sH, sVI and semi clathrates have been compiled and presented. In addition, promising new approaches for increasing hydrogen storage capacity have been described. Future directions for achieving increased hydrogen storage and process scale up have been outlined. Despite few limitations in storing hydrogen in the form of clathrates, this domain receives prominent attention due to more environmental-friendly method of synthesis, easy recovery of molecular hydrogen with minimum energy requirement, and improved safety of the process

  19. Flow assurance intervention, hydrates remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancini, Christopher S. [Oceaneering International Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-07-01

    This paper addresses the issues of removing hydrates in sub sea flow lines and associated equipment with an Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) of opportunity and a multi-service-vessel (MSV). The paper is split into three topics: the equipment used with the ROV, assessing the interface points and handling fluids produced from drawing down the pressure. Each section is explained thoroughly and backed up with real world experience. The equipment section details information from actual jobs performed and why the particular components were utilized. The system is generally contained in an ROV mounted skid. Pumps are utilized to draw down the pressure inside the hydrated section of equipment, removing one of the three necessary components for hydrates formation. Once the section is pumped down, several options exist for handling the fluids pumped out of the system: pumping to surface, re-injection into the well, or injection into an operating flow line. This method of hydrates remediation is both economical and timely. Hydrate blockages form in low temperatures and high pressures. Reducing the pressure or increasing the temperature so the conditions lie to the right of the hydrate dissociation curve will slowly decompose the blockage. Depressurization and the use of MEG or methanol will give favorable conditions to remove the hydrate plug. Oceaneering has the capabilities to remove hydrates using the FRS in conjunction with an installation vessel to dispose of the gas and fluid removed from the flow line. Hydrate remediation techniques should be implemented into the initial design to reduce costs later. The cost of stopped production combined with the day rate for equipment needed for hydrate removal outweighs the costs if no technique is utilized. (author)

  20. Metals: Phonon states, electron states and Fermi surfaces. Subvolume a

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dederichs, P.H.; Schober, H.; Sellmyer, D.J.

    1981-01-01

    This collection of tables and diagrams is the first contribution to a larger programme aiming at a complete and critical tabulation of reliable data relevant to metal physics. No such complete collection exists at present, and these tables should fill a long felt need of both experimentalists and theoreticians. Group III in the New Series of the Landolt-Boernstein tables deals with Crystal and Solid State Physics. Volume III/13 to which this subvolume 13a belongs will cover all data published up to 1980 on phonon and electron states and Fermi surfaces in metals. Both experimental and theoretical results are included. (orig./WL)

  1. Formation of natural gas hydrates in marine sediments. Gas hydrate growth and stability conditioned by host sediment properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clennell, M.B.; Henry, P.; Hovland, M.; Booth, J.S.; Winters, W.J.; Thomas, M.

    2000-01-01

    The stability conditions of submarine gas hydrates (methane clathrates) are largely dictated by pressure, temperature, gas composition, and pore water salinity. However, the physical properties and surface chemistry of the host sediments also affect the thermodynamic state, growth kinetics, spatial distributions, and growth forms of clathrates. Our model presumes that gas hydrate behaves in a way analogous to ice in the pores of a freezing soil, where capillary forces influence the energy balance. Hydrate growth is inhibited within fine-grained sediments because of the excess internal phase pressure of small crystals with high surface curvature that coexist with liquid water in small pores. Therefore, the base of gas hydrate stability in a sequence of fine sediments is predicted by our model to occur at a lower temperature, and so nearer to the seabed than would be calculated from bulk thermodynamic equilibrium. The growth forms commonly observed in hydrate samples recovered from marine sediments (nodules, sheets, and lenses in muds; cements in sand and ash layers) can be explained by a requirement to minimize the excess of mechanical and surface energy in the system.

  2. Experimental techniques for cement hydration studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Luttge

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cement hydration kinetics is a complex problem of dissolution, nucleation and growth that is still not well understood, particularly in a quantitative way. While cement systems are unique in certain aspects they are also comparable to natural mineral systems. Therefore, geochemistry and particularly the study of mineral dissolution and growth may be able to provide insight and methods that can be utilized in cement hydration research. Here, we review mainly what is not known or what is currently used and applied in a problematic way. Examples are the typical Avrami approach, the application of Transition State Theory (TST to overall reaction kinetics and the problem of reactive surface area. Finally, we suggest an integrated approach that combines vertical scanning interferometry (VSI with other sophisticated analytical techniques such as atomic force microscopy (AFM and theoretical model calculations based on a stochastic treatment.

  3. Evidence of mud volcanism rooted in gas hydrate-rich cryosphere linking surface and subsurface for the search for life on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Toffoli, Barbara; Pozzobon, Riccardo; Mazzarini, Francesco; Massironi, Matteo; Cremonese, Gabriele

    2017-04-01

    We mapped around 6000 mounds in three different portions of the Martian surface on an average area of about 90.000 Km2 for each region. The study areas are located in Hellas basin, Utopia basin and a portion of the Northern Plains lying north of Arabia Terra, between Acidalia and Utopia Planitia. The aim of the study was to understand the nature of the observed features, particularly if they could be interpreted as mud volcanoes or not, and improve our knowledge about the Martian mound fields origin. The analysis of Context Camera (onboard Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter) images showed circular, elliptical and coalescent mounds with central and/or distal pits and flow features such as concentric annular lobes around the source pits and apron-like extensions. We produced DTMs and then high-to-diameter morphometric analysis on two groups of mounds located in Utopia and Hellas basins to enhance the geomorphological observations. We inferred, by means of cluster and fractal analyses, the thickness of the medium cracked by connected fractures and, consequently, the depths of reservoirs that fed the mounds. We found that the fields, which are seated at different latitudes, has been fed, at least partially, by reservoirs located at the base of the gas hydrate stability zone according to Clifford et al., 2010. This evidence produces a meaningful relationship between the clathrates distribution underneath the Martian surface and the occurrence of mound fields on the surface leading to the assumption that the involvement of water, ostensibly as a result of gas hydrate dissociation, plays a key role in the subsurface processes that potentially worked as triggers. These outcomes corroborate the hypothesis that the mapped mounds are actually mud volcanoes and make these structures outstanding targets for astrobiology and habitability studies. In fact, mud volcanoes, extruding material from depths that are still not affordable by our present-day instrumentations, could have sampled

  4. Methane hydrates as potential energy resource: Part 2 - Methane production processes from gas hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demirbas, Ayhan

    2010-01-01

    Three processes have been proposed for dissociation of methane hydrates: thermal stimulation, depressurization, and inhibitor injection. The obvious production approaches involve depressurization, heating and their combinations. The depressurization method is lowering the pressure inside the well and encouraging the methane hydrate to dissociate. Its objective is to lower the pressure in the free-gas zone immediately beneath the hydrate stability zone, causing the hydrate at the base of the hydrate stability zone to decompose. The thermal stimulation method is applied to the hydrate stability zone to raise its temperature, causing the hydrate to decompose. In this method, a source of heat provided directly in the form of injected steam or hot water or another heated liquid, or indirectly via electric or sonic means. This causes methane hydrate to decompose and generates methane gas. The methane gas mixes with the hot water and returns to the surface, where the gas and hot water are separated. The chemical inhibition method seeks to displace the natural-gas hydrate equilibrium condition beyond the hydrate stability zone's thermo-dynamic conditions through injection of a liquid inhibitor chemical adjacent to the hydrate. In this method, inhibitor such as methanol is injected from surface down to methane hydrate-bearing layers. The thermal stimulation method is quite expensive. The chemical inhibitor injection method is also expensive. The depressurization method may prove useful to apply more than one production.

  5. Unconventional Fermi surface in an insulating state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Neil [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tan, B. S. [Cambridge Univ., Cambridge (United Kingdom); Hsu, Y. -T. [Cambridge Univ., Cambridge (United Kingdom); Zeng, B. [National High Magnetic Field Lab., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Hatnean, M. Ciomaga [Univ. of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom); Zhu, Z. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hartstein, M. [Cambridge Univ., Cambridge (United Kingdom); Kiourlappou, M. [Cambridge Univ., Cambridge (United Kingdom); Srivastava, A. [Cambridge Univ., Cambridge (United Kingdom); Johannes, M. D. [Center for Computational Materials Science, Washington, DC (United States); Murphy, T. P. [National High Magnetic Field Lab., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Park, J. -H. [National High Magnetic Field Lab., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Balicas, L. [National High Magnetic Field Lab., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Lonzarich, G. G. [Cambridge Univ., Cambridge (United Kingdom); Balakrishnan, G. [Univ. of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom); Sebastian, Suchitra E. [Cambridge Univ., Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-17

    Insulators occur in more than one guise; a recent finding was a class of topological insulators, which host a conducting surface juxtaposed with an insulating bulk. Here, we report the observation of an unusual insulating state with an electrically insulating bulk that simultaneously yields bulk quantum oscillations with characteristics of an unconventional Fermi liquid. We present quantum oscillation measurements of magnetic torque in high-purity single crystals of the Kondo insulator SmB6, which reveal quantum oscillation frequencies characteristic of a large three-dimensional conduction electron Fermi surface similar to the metallic rare earth hexaborides such as PrB6 and LaB6. As a result, the quantum oscillation amplitude strongly increases at low temperatures, appearing strikingly at variance with conventional metallic behavior.

  6. Dynamics of soil GHG emissions shaped by hydration state, aggregate size distribution and carbon placement: Column experiments using artificial soil aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Ali; Or, Dani

    2017-04-01

    Dynamics of soil hydration affect microbial community dynamics and various biogeochemical processes (soil respiration, denitrification, methane production). Evidence suggests that anoxic conditions may persist in soil aggregates (long after bulk soil is aerated) thereby providing niches for anaerobic microbial communities (hot spots). Despite their recognized role in mediating soil biogeochemical fluxes, systematic studies of the impact of different environmental conditions on CO2, N2O and CH4 emissions from soil aggregates remain rare. We constructed artificial aggregates using a silt loam soil of different sizes and different carbon configurations (mixed, core, no addition) to study effects of hydration, aggregate size and carbon source configuration on GHG emissions. An assembly of aggregates of three sizes (18, 12, and 6 mm aggregates) was embedded in sand columns at four distinct layers (3 replicates for each aggregate-carbon source, 9 columns) and the water level was varied periodically to quantify effects of wetting/drying and submersion on GHG fluxes. Several gas samples were taken from the headspaces of each column (after closure) and analyzed using GC with the proper detectors to resolve fluxes. Results illustrate the critical role of hydration states on GHG emission, for example, lowering the water table (unsaturated conditions) decreases CH4 emissions while increasing N2O flux. We observe links between aerobic processes (e.g., nitrification) and anaerobic denitrification presumably by promoting alternative pathways (e.g., ammonia and nitrite oxidation). Methane production was activated under highly anoxic conditions (prolonged inundation). N2O production was highest form aggregates with carbon placed in the (anoxic) core whereas CO2 production rates were comparable from mixed and centered carbon sources (at rates that fluctuated with hydration conditions). Experimental results of artificial soil aggregates are of interest for improvement of physically

  7. Exploring the perceptions of physicians, caregivers and families towards artificial nutrition and hydration for people in permanent vegetative state: How can a photo-elicitation method help?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie Cretin

    Full Text Available The question of withdrawing artificial nutrition and hydration from people in a permanent vegetative state sparks considerable ethical and legal debate. Therefore, understanding the elements that influence such a decision is crucial. However, exploring perceptions of artificial nutrition and hydration is methodologically challenging for several reasons. First, because of the emotional state of the professionals and family members, who are facing an extremely distressing situation; second, because this question mirrors representations linked to a deep-rooted fear of dying of hunger and thirst; and third, because of taboos surrounding death. We sought to determine the best method to explore such complex situations in depth. This article aims to assess the relevance of the photo-elicitation interview method to analyze the perceptions and attitudes of health professionals and families of people in a permanent vegetative state regarding artificial nutrition and hydration. The photo-elicitation interview method consists in inserting one or more photographs into a research interview. An original set of 60 photos was built using Google Images and participants were asked to choose photos (10 maximum and talk about them. The situations of 32 patients were explored in 23 dedicated centers for people in permanent vegetative state across France. In total, 138 interviews were conducted with health professionals and family members. We found that the photo-elicitation interview method 1 was well accepted by the participants and allowed them to express their emotions constructively, 2 fostered narration, reflexivity and introspection, 3 offered a sufficient "unusual angle" to allow participants to go beyond stereotypes and habits of thinking, and 4 can be replicated in other research areas. The use of visual methods currently constitutes an expanding area of research and this study stressed that this is of special interest to enhance research among populations

  8. Ion bombardment effect on surface state of metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaulin, E.P.; Georgieva, N.E.; Martynenko, T.P.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of slow argon ion bombardment on the surface microstructure of polycrystalline copper as well as the effect of surface state on sputtering of D-16 polycrystalline alloy are experimentally studied. Reduction of copper surface roughness is observed. It is shown that the D-16 alloy sputtering coefficient is sensitive to the surface state within the limits of the destructed surface layer

  9. Neuroethics with regard to treatment limiting and withdrawal of nutrition and hydration in long lasting irreversible full state apallic syndrome and minimal conscious state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Wild, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiology in Europe shows constantly increasing figures for the Apallic Syndrome (AS)/Vegetative State (VS) as a consequence of advanced rescue, emergency services, intensive care treatment after acute brain damage, and high standard activating home nursing for completely dependent end stage cases secondary to progressive neurological disease. Management of patients in irreversible apallic syndrome has been the subject of sustained scientific and moral-legal debate over the last decade. Neuroethics coming more and more into consideration when neurological societies address key issues relating to AS/VS prevalence and quality management. With regard to treatment limiting and withdrawal of nutrition and hydration of patients suffering from irreversible full state Apallic Syndrome and Minimal Conscious State. The overall incidence of new AS/VS full stage cases all aetiology is 0.5 - 2/ 100.000 population per year. About one third is traumatic and two thirds are non-traumatic cases. The worst prognosis might be expected from nontraumatic hypoxemic apallic syndrome. The main conceptual criticism is based on assessment and diagnosis of all different AS/VS stages based solely on behavioural findings without knowing the exact or uniform pathogenesis or neuropathologic findings. No special diagnostics, no specific medical management can be recommended for class II or III AS treatment and rehabilitation. But in United Kingdom, The Netherlands, Belgium, and Switzerland active euthanasia is now practiced in medicine taking into account the uncertainty of the right diagnose the clinical features for humanistic treatment of patients in irreversible "AS full or early, remission stages". As long as there is no single AS/VS specific diagnostic tool, no specific laboratory investigation regimen to be recommended neuroethical principles demands by all means a humanistic (ethical) activating nursing even in the irreversible full stage AS cases. Full acceptable is only the palliative

  10. Phase equilibria with hydrate formation in H2O + CO2 mixtures modeled with reference equations of state

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jäger, A.; Vinš, Václav; Gernert, J.; Span, R.; Hrubý, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 338, Januar (2013), s. 100-113 ISSN 0378-3812 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GPP101/11/P046; GA ČR(CZ) GAP101/11/1593 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : carbon dioxide * gas hydrate * modeling Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 2.241, year: 2013 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378381212005158

  11. Hydrophobic hydration of poly-N-isopropyl acrylamide: a matter of the mean energetic state of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischofberger, I.; Calzolari, D. C. E.; de Los Rios, P.; Jelezarov, I.; Trappe, V.

    2014-03-01

    The enthalpically favoured hydration of hydrophobic entities, termed hydrophobic hydration, impacts the phase behaviour of numerous amphiphiles in water. Here, we show experimental evidence that hydrophobic hydration is strongly determined by the mean energetics of the aqueous medium. We investigate the aggregation and collapse of an amphiphilic polymer, poly-N-isopropyl acrylamide (PNiPAM), in aqueous solutions containing small amounts of alcohol and find that the thermodynamic characteristics defining the phase transitions of PNiPAM evolve relative to the solvent composition at which the excess mixing enthalpy of the water/alcohol mixtures becomes minimal. Such correlation between solvent energetics and solution thermodynamics extends to other mixtures containing neutral organic solutes that are considered as kosmotropes to induce a strengthening of the hydrogen bonded water network. This denotes the energetics of water as a key parameter controlling the phase behaviour of PNiPAM and identifies the excess mixing enthalpy of water/kosmotrope mixtures as a gauge of the kosmotropic effect on hydrophobic assemblies.

  12. Re-dispersion of alumina particles in water: influence of the surface state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desset, Sabine

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the mechanisms by which suspensions of alpha alumina particles may be dried and then re-dispersed spontaneously in water. To get reproducible results, we designed appropriate protocols: (i) for preparing the surface state, and for generating controlled interparticle contacts (presence of water or complexing agents); (ii) for measuring the amount of re-dispersed material with a proper averaging over all interparticle bonds (turbidity). These results show that there are thresholds, determined by the conditions of drying and re-dispersion, where all the powder goes from the aggregated state to the dispersed state. With hydrated powders, it was found that mild changes in the chemical conditions (pH) and application of very weak mechanical forces (sedimentation) were enough to cause significant change in re-dispersion. According to these thresholds, a re-dispersion mechanism could be identified. Re-dispersion is ruled, indeed, by a balance of forces and the displacement of the re-dispersion thresholds indicates a shift in the balance of forces. These forces are the well-known forces that control colloidal stability: van der Waals attraction, electrostatic repulsion and hydration forces. We found that hydration acts as a repulsive wall corresponding to one or two monolayers of water on each surface and depends on the Relative Humidity of drying. We also found that electrostatic repulsions at short separations are much weaker than the predictions based on the Poisson Boltzmann equation, but should be modelled according to the triple layer model. Repulsions to be considered are those calculated with the screened charges of the particles. Another aim of this work was to facilitate re-dispersion by using complexing agents that bind to the surfaces and add a steric repulsion We have found that molecules with carboxylic and hydroxyl groups can be efficient in this respect, if they are bound to surfaces before aggregation, if they are not

  13. Re-dispersion of alumina particles in water: influence of the surface state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desset, Sabine

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the mechanisms by which suspensions of alpha alumina particles may be dried and then re-dispersed spontaneously in water. To get reproducible results, we designed appropriate protocols: (i) for preparing the surface state, and for generating controlled interparticle contacts (presence of water or complexing agents); (ii) for measuring the amount of re-dispersed material with a proper averaging over all interparticle bonds (turbidity). These results show that there are thresholds, determined by the conditions of drying and re-dispersion, where all the powder goes from the aggregated state to the dispersed state. With hydrated powders, it was found that mild changes in the chemical conditions (pH) and application of very weak mechanical forces (sedimentation) were enough to cause significant change in re-dispersion. According to these thresholds, a re-dispersion mechanism could be identified. Re-dispersion is ruled, indeed, by a balance of forces and the displacement of the re-dispersion thresholds indicates a shift in the balance of forces. These forces are the well known forces that control colloidal stability: van der Waals attraction, electrostatic repulsion and hydration forces. We found that hydration acts as a repulsive wall corresponding to one or two monolayers of water on each surface and depends on the Relative Humidity of drying. We also found that electrostatic repulsions at short separations are much weaker than the predictions based on the Poisson Boltzmann equation, but should be modelled according to the triple layer model. Repulsions to be considered are those calculated with the screened charges of the particles. Another aim of this work was to facilitate re-dispersion by using complexing agents that bind to the surfaces and add a steric repulsion We have found that molecules with carboxylic and hydroxyl groups can be efficient in this respect, if they are bound to surfaces before aggregation, if they are not

  14. Viscoelastic modeling of highly hydrated laminin layers at homogeneous and nanostructured surfaces: quantification of protein layer properties using QCM-D and SPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmström, Jenny; Agheli, Hossein; Kingshott, Peter; Sutherland, Duncan S

    2007-09-11

    The adsorption of proteins at material surfaces is important in applications such as biomaterials, drug delivery, and diagnostics. The interaction of cells with artificial surfaces is mediated through adsorbed proteins, where the type of protein, amount, orientation, and conformation are of consequence for the cell response. Laminin, an important cell adhesive protein that is central in developmental biology, is studied by a combination of quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to characterize the adsorption of laminin on surfaces of different surface chemistries. The combination of these two techniques allows for the determination of the thickness and effective density of the protein layer as well as the adsorbed mass and viscoelastic properties. We also evaluate the capacity of QCM-D to be used as a quantitative technique on a nanostructured surface, where protein is adsorbed specifically in a nanopattern exploiting PLL-g-PEG as a protein-resistant background. We show that laminin forms a highly hydrated protein layer with different characteristics depending on the underlying substrate. Using a combination of QCM-D and atomic force microscopy (AFM) data from nanostructured surfaces, we model laminin and antibody binding to nanometer-scale patches. A higher amount of laminin was found to adsorb in a thicker layer of a lower effective density in nanopatches compared to equivalent homogeneous surfaces. These results suggest that modeling of QCM-D data of soft viscoelastic layers arranged in nanopatterns may be applied where an independent measure of the "dry" mass is known.

  15. Hydration of dicalcium silicate and diffusion through neo-formed calcium-silicate-hydrates at weathered surfaces control the long-term leaching behaviour of basic oxygen furnace (BOF) steelmaking slag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Douglas I; Bray, Andrew W; Udoma, Gideon; Hobson, Andrew J; Mayes, William M; Rogerson, Mike; Burke, Ian T

    2018-01-25

    Alkalinity generation and toxic trace metal (such as vanadium) leaching from basic oxygen furnace (BOF) steel slag particles must be properly understood and managed by pre-conditioning if beneficial reuse of slag is to be maximised. Water leaching under aerated conditions was investigated using fresh BOF slag at three different particle sizes (0.5-1.0, 2-5 and 10 × 10 × 20 mm blocks) and a 6-month pre-weathered block. There were several distinct leaching stages observed over time associated with different phases controlling the solution chemistry: (1) free-lime (CaO) dissolution (days 0-2); (2) dicalcium silicate (Ca 2 SiO 4 ) dissolution (days 2-14) and (3) Ca-Si-H and CaCO 3 formation and subsequent dissolution (days 14-73). Experiments with the smallest size fraction resulted in the highest Ca, Si and V concentrations, highlighting the role of surface area in controlling initial leaching. After ~2 weeks, the solution Ca/Si ratio (0.7-0.9) evolved to equal those found within a Ca-Si-H phase that replaced dicalcium silicate and free-lime phases in a 30- to 150-μm altered surface region. V release was a two-stage process; initially, V was released by dicalcium silicate dissolution, but V also isomorphically substituted for Si into the neo-formed Ca-Si-H in the alteration zone. Therefore, on longer timescales, the release of V to solution was primarily controlled by considerably slower Ca-Si-H dissolution rates, which decreased the rate of V release by an order of magnitude. Overall, the results indicate that the BOF slag leaching mechanism evolves from a situation initially dominated by rapid hydration and dissolution of primary dicalcium silicate/free-lime phases, to a slow diffusion limited process controlled by the solubility of secondary Ca-Si-H and CaCO 3 phases that replace and cover more reactive primary slag phases at particle surfaces.

  16. Protons in hydrated protein powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Careri, G.; Bruni, F.; Consolini, G.

    1995-01-01

    Previous work from this laboratory has shown that hydrated lysozyme powders exhibit a dielectric behaviour, due to proton conductivity, explainable within the frame of percolation theory. Long range proton displacement appears only above the critical hydration for percolation, when the 2-dimensional motion takes place on fluctuating clusters of hydrogen-bonded water molecules adsorbed on the protein surface. The emergence of biological function, enzyme catalysis, was found to coincide with the critical hydration for percolation. More recently, we have evaluated the protonic conductivity of hydrated lysozyme powders, from room down to liquid N 2 temperature. In the high temperature limit a classical isotopic effect can be detected, and the conductivity follows the familiar Arrhenius law for thermally activated hopping. In the low temperature region the conductivity shows a temperature dependence in agreement with prediction by the theory of dissipative quantum tunneling. Below room temperature the static dielectric constant, and the dielectric relaxation time for charge transport showed an increase likely to be identified with the formation of a polaronic-solitonic species as predicted by the theory of proton transport in water chains, a species which displays a larger effective mass and a larger dipole moment that the usual hydrated protonic defects. The purpose of this paper is twofold. In the first section we present a tutorial report of some previous experimental results on proton displacement in slightly hydrated biological systems at room temperature, to show that in these systems the emergence of biological systems at room temperature, to show that in these systems the emergence of biological function coincides with the onset of percolative pathways in the water molecules network adsorbed on the surface of biomolecules. In the second section, we report on preliminary data on the dielectric relaxation of hydrated lysozyme below room temperature, to suggest

  17. Polymer hydration and stiffness at biointerfaces and related cellular processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerch, Garry

    2018-01-01

    The direct and indirect (by changing mechanical properties) effects of hydration at interfaces on cellular processes and tissue diseases are reviewed. The essential effect of substrate stiffness on cellular processes was demonstrated in the last decade. The combined effect of surface stiffness and hydration at interfaces has garnered much less attention, though hydration and dehydration play important roles in biological processes. This review focuses on the studies that demonstrate how hydration affects biological processes at interfaces. Elevated sodium and dehydration stimulate inflammatory signaling in endothelial cells and promote atherosclerosis. Various types of implant and blood contacting device coatings with varied surface stiffness and hydration have been reported. Effect of hydration on polymer modulus of elasticity and viscoelasticity was discussed taking into account cells adhesion, migration, proliferation, differentiation on surfaces with various degree of hydration. Future directions of research were considered, including the use of nanotechnology to regulate the hydration degree. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Hydration state of goats transported by road for 12 hours during the hot-dry conditions and the modulating role of ascorbic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minka, Salka Ndazo; Ayo, Joseph Olusegun

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of 12 hr of road transportation during the hot-dry conditions and the modulating role of ascorbic acid (AA) on the hydration state of goats. Twenty goats who served as treatment goats received oral administration of 100 mg/kg body weight of AA, whereas another 20 control goats received sterile water; thereafter, the goats were loaded and transported. The study determined changes in skin thickness; albumin (Alb); total protein (TP); elimination of the gut content; fecal water; urine specific gravity (SG); and pH before, during, and after the transportation. The result obtained in the control goats showed significant (p transportation. In the treatment goats who were administered AA, the changes observed in the values were insignificant (p > .05). In conclusion, 12-hr road transportation of goats induced dehydration, which may affect the welfare and health status of the goats. The administration of AA ameliorated the risk of adverse effects of handling, loading, transportation, and hot-dry conditions on hydration state of goats.

  19. Hydration of swelling clays: multi-scale sequence of hydration and determination of macroscopic energies from microscopic properties; Hydratation des argiles gonflantes: sequence d'hydratation multi-echelle determination des energies macroscopiques a partir des proprietes microscopiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salles, F

    2006-10-15

    smectites: it is responsible for the structure of porosity in a dry state and of the evolution of the pore sizes as a function of the RH and it modifies the hydration sequence by its mobility inside the interlayer space. The distinction between various types of water in the smectite structure is also achieved by thermo-poro-metry at different RH: water bound to the cations and surfaces, water structured by porosity and free water. This distinction is important to understand the behaviour of smectite and in particular the diffusion properties in clayey materials. The importance of the cation nature is also highlighted by the energetic model. Electrostatic calculations using the PACHA formalism (Electronegativities Equalization method) show that, for the small cations, the hydration energy of the layers is predominant. To obtain these results, we determine the surface enthalpies for the dry state, which show a coherent evolution as a function of the cation partial charge with the increase of pore sizes and thus with particle sizes. Then, using a theoretical model, we calculated swelling energies, surface hydration energies and cation hydration energies. The behaviour of mixed purified clay displays a behaviour closer to that of a calcic clay for the experiments carried out, in contradiction with the fact that the Na cation is the most abundant. This observation implies results on the clay properties, different from that expected for hydration properties, swelling and interlayer cation mobility within the framework of the radioactive waste. (author)

  20. Natural gas hydrate occurrence and issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1994-01-01

    Naturally occurring gas hydrate is found in sediment of two regions: (1) continental, including continental shelves, at high latitudes where surface temperatures are very cold, and (2) submarine outer continental margins where pressures are very high and bottom-water temperatures are near 0??C. Continental gas hydrate is found in association with onshore and offshore permafrost. Submarine gas hydrate is found in sediment of continental slopes and rises. The amount of methane present in gas hydrate is thought to be very large, but the estimates that have been made are more speculative than real. Nevertheless, at the present time there has been a convergence of ideas regarding the amount of methane in gas hydrate deposits worldwide at about 2 x 1016 m3 or 7 x 1017 ft3 = 7 x 105 Tcf [Tcf = trillion (1012) ft3]. The potentially large amount of methane in gas hydrate and the shallow depth of gas hydrate deposits are two of the principal factors driving research concerning this substance. Such a large amount of methane, if it could be commercially produced, provides a potential energy resource for the future. Because gas hydrate is metastable, changes of surface pressure and temperature affect its stability. Destabilized gas hydrate beneath the sea floor leads to geologic hazards such as submarine mass movements. Examples of submarine slope failures attributed to gas hydrate are found worldwide. The metastability of gas hydrate may also have an effect on climate. The release of methane, a 'greenhouse' gas, from destabilized gas hydrate may contribute to global warming and be a factor in global climate change.

  1. Hydration of swelling clays: multi-scale sequence of hydration and determination of macroscopic energies from microscopic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salles, F.

    2006-10-01

    smectites: it is responsible for the structure of porosity in a dry state and of the evolution of the pore sizes as a function of the RH and it modifies the hydration sequence by its mobility inside the interlayer space. The distinction between various types of water in the smectite structure is also achieved by thermo-poro-metry at different RH: water bound to the cations and surfaces, water structured by porosity and free water. This distinction is important to understand the behaviour of smectite and in particular the diffusion properties in clayey materials. The importance of the cation nature is also highlighted by the energetic model. Electrostatic calculations using the PACHA formalism (Electronegativities Equalization method) show that, for the small cations, the hydration energy of the layers is predominant. To obtain these results, we determine the surface enthalpies for the dry state, which show a coherent evolution as a function of the cation partial charge with the increase of pore sizes and thus with particle sizes. Then, using a theoretical model, we calculated swelling energies, surface hydration energies and cation hydration energies. The behaviour of mixed purified clay displays a behaviour closer to that of a calcic clay for the experiments carried out, in contradiction with the fact that the Na cation is the most abundant. This observation implies results on the clay properties, different from that expected for hydration properties, swelling and interlayer cation mobility within the framework of the radioactive waste. (author)

  2. Fundamentals and applications of gas hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Carolyn A; Sloan, E Dendy; Sum, Amadeu K; Wu, David T

    2011-01-01

    Fundamental understanding of gas hydrate formation and decomposition processes is critical in many energy and environmental areas and has special importance in flow assurance for the oil and gas industry. These areas represent the core of gas hydrate applications, which, albeit widely studied, are still developing as growing fields of research. Discovering the molecular pathways and chemical and physical concepts underlying gas hydrate formation potentially can lead us beyond flowline blockage prevention strategies toward advancing new technological solutions for fuel storage and transportation, safely producing a new energy resource from natural deposits of gas hydrates in oceanic and arctic sediments, and potentially facilitating effective desalination of seawater. The state of the art in gas hydrate research is leading us to new understanding of formation and dissociation phenomena that focuses on measurement and modeling of time-dependent properties of gas hydrates on the basis of their well-established thermodynamic properties.

  3. Hydration states of clays followed by water and hydroxyls vibrational analyses in the near infrared: application to saponite and bentonite systems; Etats d'hydratation d'argiles suivis par analyses vibrationnelles de l'eau et des hydroxyles dans le proche infrarouge: application aux systemes saponite et bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinnert, E

    2004-07-01

    The study of the feasibility of a deep geological disposal facility conducted by ANDRA - the French national radioactive waste management agency -, requires the knowledge of water status and water content in clays. Thanks to an original lab-built device coupling vibrational spectroscopies and water adsorption isotherms, adsorbed water and clay's structure are described quantitatively and qualitatively. A multidisciplinary approach allows the description of hydration mechanisms and water molecules network in the inter lamellar space of synthetic saponites. The effects of density and nature of inter-foliar cations and the influence of temperature on hydration are presented. Using mechanisms and important parameters established on saponites, hydration of bentonite MX80 is carried out. In order to describe and quantify simultaneously two different water states, a simple but relevant method of spectra analysis was developed. (author)

  4. Fine surface structure of unfixed and hydrated macrophages observed by laser-plasma x-ray contact microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Yoshimasa; Friedman, Herman; Yoshimura, Hideyuki; Kinjo, Yasuhito; Shioda, Seiji; Debari, Kazuhiro; Shinohara, Kunio; Rajyaguru, Jayshree; Richardson, Martin

    2000-01-01

    A compact, high-resolution, laser-plasma, x-ray contact microscope using a table-top Nd:glass laser system has been developed and utilized for the analysis of the surface structure of live macrophages. Fine fluffy surface structures of murine peritoneal macrophages, which were live, hydrolyzed and not sliced and stained, were observed by the x-ray microscope followed by analysis using an atomic force microscopy. In order to compare with other techniques, a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was utilized to observe the surface structure of the macrophages. The SEM offered a fine whole cell image of the same macrophages, which were fixed and dehydrated, but the surfaces were ruffled and different from that of x-ray images. A standard light microscope was also utilized to observe the shape of live whole macrophages. Light microscopy showed some fluffy surface structures of the macrophages, but the resolution was too low to observe the fine structures. Thus, the findings of fine fluffy surface structures of macrophages by x-ray microscopy provide valuable information for studies of phagocytosis, cell spreading and adherence, which are dependent on the surface structure of macrophages. Furthermore, the present study also demonstrates the usefulness of x-ray microscopy for analysis of structures of living cells

  5. Thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Douglas D.; Martin, Ana I.; Yun, Tae Sup; Francisca, Franco M.; Santamarina, J. Carlos; Ruppel, Carolyn D.

    2009-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for evaluating phase transformation processes that would accompany energy production from gas hydrate deposits and for estimating regional heat flow based on the observed depth to the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. The coexistence of multiple phases (gas hydrate, liquid and gas pore fill, and solid sediment grains) and their complex spatial arrangement hinder the a priori prediction of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments. Previous studies have been unable to capture the full parameter space covered by variations in grain size, specific surface, degree of saturation, nature of pore filling material, and effective stress for hydrate-bearing samples. Here we report on systematic measurements of the thermal conductivity of air dry, water- and tetrohydrofuran (THF)-saturated, and THF hydrate–saturated sand and clay samples at vertical effective stress of 0.05 to 1 MPa (corresponding to depths as great as 100 m below seafloor). Results reveal that the bulk thermal conductivity of the samples in every case reflects a complex interplay among particle size, effective stress, porosity, and fluid-versus-hydrate filled pore spaces. The thermal conductivity of THF hydrate–bearing soils increases upon hydrate formation although the thermal conductivities of THF solution and THF hydrate are almost the same. Several mechanisms can contribute to this effect including cryogenic suction during hydrate crystal growth and the ensuing porosity reduction in the surrounding sediment, increased mean effective stress due to hydrate formation under zero lateral strain conditions, and decreased interface thermal impedance as grain-liquid interfaces are transformed into grain-hydrate interfaces.

  6. Enhanced Dynamics of Hydrated tRNA on Nanodiamond Surfaces: A Combined Neutron Scattering and MD Simulation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhindsa, Gurpreet K; Bhowmik, Debsindhu; Goswami, Monojoy; O'Neill, Hugh; Mamontov, Eugene; Sumpter, Bobby G; Hong, Liang; Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Chu, Xiang-Qiang

    2016-09-14

    Nontoxic, biocompatible nanodiamonds (ND) have recently been implemented in rational, systematic design of optimal therapeutic use in nanomedicines. However, hydrophilicity of the ND surface strongly influences structure and dynamics of biomolecules that restrict in situ applications of ND. Therefore, fundamental understanding of the impact of hydrophilic ND surface on biomolecules at the molecular level is essential. For tRNA, we observe an enhancement of dynamical behavior in the presence of ND contrary to generally observed slow motion at strongly interacting interfaces. We took advantage of neutron scattering experiments and computer simulations to demonstrate this atypical faster dynamics of tRNA on ND surface. The strong attractive interactions between ND, tRNA, and water give rise to unlike dynamical behavior and structural changes of tRNA in front of ND compared to without ND. Our new findings may provide new design principles for safer, improved drug delivery platforms.

  7. Investigations into surfactant/gas hydrate relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, Rudy; Zhang, Guochang; Dearman, Jennifer; Woods, Charles [Swalm School of Chemical Engineering, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762 (United States)

    2007-03-15

    Gas hydrates have unique physical properties portending useful industrial applications of gas storage, gas separation, or water desalination. When gas hydrates were found in the early 1990s to occur naturally and abundantly in seafloors, three other primary interests and concerns emerged: potential new energy source, climate threat from their greenhouse gases, and seafloor instabilities. This paper presents research showing how anionic synthetic surfactants helped develop an industrial gas hydrate storage process for natural gas and how naturally-occurring in-situ anionic biosurfactants influence the formation and placement of gas hydrates in ocean sediments. The catalytic effects, mechanisms, and surface specificities imparted by synthetic surfactants in the gas storage process and imparted by biosurfactants in porous media are discussed. The Bacillus subtilis bacterium that is indigenous to gas hydrate mounds in the Gulf of Mexico was cultured in the laboratory. Its biosurfactant was separated and found to catalyze gas hydrates in porous media. The experiments indicate that seafloor-biosurfactants can be produced rapidly in-situ to achieve threshold concentrations whereby hydrates are promoted. The biosurfactants accumulate and promote hydrate formation on specific mineral surfaces such as sodium montmorillonite. (author)

  8. Subgap in the Surface Bound States Spectrum of Superfluid ^3 He-B with Rough Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagato, Y.; Higashitani, S.; Nagai, K.

    2017-12-01

    The subgap structure in the surface bound states spectrum of superfluid ^3 He-B with rough surface is discussed. The subgap is formed by the level repulsion between the surface bound state and the continuum states in the course of multiple scattering by the surface roughness. We show that the level repulsion is originated from the nature of the wave function of the surface bound state that is now recognized as Majorana fermion. We study the superfluid ^3 He-B with a rough surface and in a magnetic field perpendicular to the surface using the quasi-classical Green function together with a random S-matrix model. We calculate the self-consistent order parameters, the spin polarization density and the surface density of states. It is shown that the subgap is found also in a magnetic field perpendicular to the surface. The magnetic field dependence of the transverse acoustic impedance is also discussed.

  9. Polyethylene oxide hydration in grafted layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dormidontova, Elena; Wang, Zilu

    Hydration of water soluble polymers is one of the key-factors defining their conformation and properties, similar to biopolymers. Polyethylene oxide (PEO) is one of the most important biomedical-applications polymers and is known for its reverse temperature solubility due to hydrogen bonding with water. As in many practical applications PEO chains are grafted to surfaces, e.g. of nanoparticles or planar surfaces, it is important to understand PEO hydration in such grafted layers. Using atomistic molecular dynamic simulations we investigate the details of molecular conformation and hydration of PEO end-grafted to gold surfaces. We analyze polymer and water density distribution as a function of distance from the surface for different grafting densities. Based on a detailed analysis of hydrogen bonding between polymer and water in grafted PEO layers, we will discuss the extent of PEO hydration and its implication for polymer conformation, mobility and layer properties. This research is supported by NSF (DMR-1410928).

  10. Surface states in thin versus thick organic quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Ba An; Hanamura, E.

    1995-08-01

    Surface states are studied in dependence on thickness or organic quantum wells within the nearest layer approximation. It is shown that there is a material-dependent critical thickness. Structures, that have thickness thinner or thicker than the critical one, exhibit qualitatively different characteristics of surface states. Criteria for existence and sign rules for location of energy levels of surface states are established which are general and contain the results of the previous works as particular cases. (author). 18 refs, 3 figs

  11. Detecting surface oil slick related to gas hydrate/petroleum on the ocean bed of South China Sea by ENVI/ASAR radar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunpeng; Chen, Duofu; Song, Zhiguang

    2013-03-01

    For exploring the distribution of oil slick related to gas hydrate or petroleum in the northern part of South China Sea and evaluating the potential of ENVI/ASAR radar data for detecting oil slick, this paper tries to detect the oil slick on ocean surface of some potential areas in South China Sea and map oil slick from anomaly area in radar image. Seven surface oil slicks in Qiongdongnan Basin and four potential targets of oil slicks in Taixi-Dongsha Basin were detected and extracted by using ENIV/ASAR data. The anomalies of the radar image representing oil slick are validated by in-site sampling and laboratory analyzing. The Gas Chromatograph (GC) results of the extracted oil from the water samples gathered from the sites of detected oil slick demonstrate a typical composition of oil rather than that of ocean microbial origins, and Total Organic Carbon (TOC) concentrations in two designed vertical profiles keep steady in different depths, showing that the organic contents in water column are steady from the deep area to ocean surface. These results suggest the detected oil slick is a thin floating oil rather than a thick spill. Influencing factors to the results of oil slick detection including wind speed, current, small islands and capes as well as deep-sea petroleum reservoirs are discussed. The results in this study exhibit that extracting the anomaly signals related to oil slick related to oil/gas seeps using image processing techniques from ENVI/ASAR data is helpful to predict anomaly areas as potential targets for further exploration in this area.

  12. Topological surface states on Bi$_{1-x}$Sb$_x$

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xie-Gang; Hofmann, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Topological insulators support metallic surface states whose existence is protected by the bulk band structure. It has been predicted early that the topology of the surface state Fermi contour should depend on several factors, such as the surface orientation and termination and this raises...... the question to what degree a given surface state is protected by the bulk electronic structure upon structural changes. Using tight-binding calculations, we explore this question for the prototypical topological insulator Bi$_{1-x}$Sb$_x$, studying different terminations of the (111) and (110) surfaces. We...

  13. Effects of hydration on the protonation state of a lysine analog crossing a phospholipid bilayer - insights from molecular dynamics and free-energy calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonhenry, Daniel; Dehez, François; Tarek, Mounir

    2018-03-22

    The low bioavailability of most therapeutic compounds is often counterbalanced by association with molecular vectors capable of crossing cell membranes. Previous studies demonstrated that for vectors bearing titratable chemical groups, the translocation process might be accompanied by a change in the protonation state. For simple compounds e.g. a lysine analog, free energy calculations, using a single collective variable, namely the insertion depth, suggest that such a transition could only take place if the amino acid diffuses deep enough into the hydrophobic core of the membrane, a situation thermodynamically unfavorable. Here, we determined the 2D potential of mean force associated with the translocation of lysine across a model membrane using as reaction coordinates not only its location in the bilayer but also its hydration. Our results cogently demonstrate that the change in protonation can result from a small fluctuation in the latter, even at low insertion depth.

  14. Artificial Hydration and Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Crisis Situations Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans ... Your Health Resources Healthcare Management Artificial Hydration and Nutrition Artificial Hydration and Nutrition Share Print Patients who ...

  15. Symmetric-gapped surface states of fractional topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Gil Young; Teo, Jeffrey C. Y.; Fradkin, Eduardo

    2017-10-01

    We construct the symmetric-gapped surface states of a fractional topological insulator with an electromagnetic θ angle θem=π/3 and a discrete Z3 gauge field. They are the proper generalizations of the T-Pfaffian state and Pfaffian/antisemion state and feature an extended periodicity compared with their "integer" topological band insulator counterparts. We demonstrate that the surface states have the correct anomalies associated with time-reversal symmetry and charge conservation.

  16. Rates and mechanisms of conversion of ice nanocrystals to hydrates of HCl and HBr: acid diffusion in the ionic hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin, J Paul; Gulluru, Dheeraj B; Buch, Victoria

    2005-03-03

    This FTIR study focuses on solid-state chemistry associated with formation and interconversion of the ionic HX (X = Cl, Br) hydrates. Kinetic data are reported for conversions of ice nanocrystal arrays exposed to the saturation pressure of the acids in the 110 approximately 125 K range. The product is amorphous acid dihydrate in the case of HBr, and amorphous monohydrate for HCl. The rate-determining step is identified as HX diffusion through the hydrate product crust toward the interfacial reaction zone, rather than diffusion through ice, as commonly believed. Slowing of the conversion process is thus observed with increasing thickness of the crust. The diffusion coefficient (D(e)) and activation energy values for HX diffusion through the hydrates were evaluated with the help of the shrinking-core model. Hydrate crystallization occurs as a separate step, upon heating above 130 K. Subsequently, rates of reversible transitions between crystal di- and monohydrates were observed upon exposure to acid vapor and acid evacuation. In conversion from di- to monohydrate, the rate slows after fast formation of several layers; subsequently, diffusion through the product crust appears to be the rate-controlling step. The activation energy for HBr diffusion through crystal dihydrate is found to be significantly higher than that for the amorphous analogue. Conjecture is offered for a molecular mechanism of HX transport through the crystal hydrate, based on (i) spectroscopic/computational evidence for the presence of molecular HX bonded to X(-) in each of the ionic hydrate phases and (ii) the relative E(a) values found for HBr and HCl diffusion. Monte Carlo modeling suggests acid transport to the reaction zone along boundaries between "nanocrystallites" generated by multiple hydrate nucleation events at the particle surfaces. The reverse conversion, of crystalline monohydrate particles to the dihydrate phase, as well as dihydrate to trihydrate, displays nearly constant rate

  17. Distribution and abundance of gas hydrates in near-surface deposits of the Håkon Mosby Mud Volcano, SW Barents Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pape, Thomas; Feseker, Tomas; Kasten, Sabine; Fischer, David; Bohrmann, Gerhard

    2011-09-01

    The occurrence of gas hydrates at submarine mud volcanoes (MVs) located within the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) is controlled by upward fluid and heat flux associated with MV activity. Determining the spatial distribution of gas hydrates at MVs is crucial to evaluate their sensitivity to known episodic changes in volcanic activity. We determined the hydrocarbon inventory and spatial distribution of hydrates at an individual MV structure. The Håkon Mosby Mud Volcano (HMMV), located at 1,250 m water depth on the Barents Sea slope, was investigated by combined pressure core sampling, heat flow measurements, and pore water chemical analysis. Quantitative pressure core degassing revealed gas-sediment ratios between 3.1 and 25.7, corresponding to hydrate concentrations of up to 21.3% of the pore volume. Hydrocarbon compositions and physicochemical conditions imply that gas hydrates incipiently crystallize as structure I hydrate, with a dissociation temperature of around 13.8°C at this water depth. Based on numerous in situ measurements of the geothermal gradient in the seabed, pore water sulfate profiles and microbathymetric data, we show that the thickness of the GHSZ increases from less than 1 m at the warm center to around 47 m in the outer parts of the HMMV. We estimate the total mass of hydrate-bound methane stored at the HMMV to be about 102.5 kt, of which 2.8 kt are located within the morphological Unit I around the center and thus are likely to be dissociated in the course of a large eruption.

  18. THE TISSUE HYDRATION STATE IN UW-PRESERVED HUMAN DONOR LIVERS - A CLINICAL-STUDY OF THE RELATION BETWEEN PROTON MAGNETIC-RESONANCE RELAXATION-TIMES, DONOR CONDITION, PRESERVATION PROCEDURE, AND EARLY GRAFT FUNCTION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WOLF, RFE; DENBUTTER, G; KAMMAN, RL; DEKETH, HP; SLUTTER, WJ; SLOOFF, MJH

    1994-01-01

    To determine the relation between tissue hydration state-as indicated by tissue proton magnetic resonance relaxation times-in UW-preserved human donor livers and viability parameters of the donor and early graft function, ''ex vivo'' magnetic resonance relaxometry was performed with a clinical MR

  19. Development of hydrate risk quantification in oil and gas production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Piyush N.

    order to reduce the parametric study that may require a long duration of time using The Colorado School of Mines Hydrate Kinetic Model (CSMHyK). The evolution of the hydrate plugging risk along flowline-riser systems is modeled for steady state and transient operations considering the effect of several critical parameters such as oil-hydrate slip, duration of shut-in, and water droplet size on a subsea tieback system. This research presents a novel platform for quantification of the hydrate plugging risk, which in-turn will play an important role in improving and optimizing current hydrate management strategies. The predictive strength of the hydrate risk quantification and hydrate prediction models will have a significant impact on flow assurance engineering and design with respect to building safe and efficient hydrate management techniques for future deep-water developments.

  20. Effects of Nanosilica on Early Age Stages of Cement Hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forood Torabian Isfahani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of nanosilica on cement hydration have been broadly investigated in the literature and early age cement hydration, as a whole, has been mainly considered, disregarding the substages of the hydration. The hydration of cement is characterized by different substages and nanosilica effect on the hydration could be a result of diverse, even contradictory, behavior of nanosilica in individual stages of the hydration. In this study, effects of nanosilica on different substages of cement hydration are investigated. Isothermal calorimetry results show that at early ages (initial 72 hours the effects of nanosilica depend on the phenomenon by which the hydration is governed: when the hydration is chemically controlled, that is, during initial reaction, dormant period, and acceleratory period, the hydration rate is accelerated by adding nanosilica; when the hydration is governed by diffusion process, that is, during postacceleratory period, the hydration rate is decelerated by adding nanosilica. The Thermal Gravimetric Analysis on the samples at the hardened state (after 28 days of curing reveals that, after adding nanosilica, the hydration degree slightly increased compared to the plain paste.

  1. Minimal model for spoof acoustoelastic surface states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Johan; Liang, Z.; Willatzen, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Similar to textured perfect electric conductors for electromagnetic waves sustaining artificial or spoof surface plasmons we present an equivalent phenomena for the case of sound. Aided by a minimal model that is able to capture the complex wave interaction of elastic cavity modes and airborne...... sound radiation in perfect rigid panels, we construct designer acoustoelastic surface waves that are entirely controlled by the geometrical environment. Comparisons to results obtained by full-wave simu- lations confirm the feasibility of the model and we demonstrate illustrative examples...

  2. Relict gas hydrates as possible reason of gas emission from shallow permafrost at the northern part of West Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuvilin, Evgeny; Bukhanov, Boris; Tumskoy, Vladimir; Istomin, Vladimir; Tipenko, Gennady

    2017-04-01

    Intra-permafrost gas (mostly methane) is represent a serious geological hazards during exploration and development of oil and gas fields. Special danger is posed by large methane accumulations which usually confined to sandy and silty sand horizons and overlying in the frozen strata on the depth up to 200 meters. Such methane accumulations are widely spread in a number of gas fields in the northern part of Western Siberia. According to indirect indicators this accumulations can be relic gas hydrates, that formed earlier during favorable conditions for hydrate accumulation (1, 2). Until now, they could be preserved in the frozen sediments due to geological manifestation of the self-preservation effect of gas hydrates at temperatures below zero. These gas hydrate formations, which are lying above the gas hydrate stability zone today, are in a metastable state and are very sensitive to various anthropogenic impacts. During drilling and operation of production wells in the areas where the relic of gas hydrates can occur, there are active gas emission and gas explosion, that can lead to various technical complications up to the accident. Mathematical and experimental simulations were were conducted to evaluate the possibility of existence of relic gas hydrates in the northern part of West Siberia. The results of math simulations revealed stages of geological history when the gas hydrate stability zone began virtually from the ground surface and saturated in shallow permafrost horizons. Later permafrost is not completely thaw. Experimental simulations of porous gas hydrate dissociation in frozen soils and evaluation of self-preservation manifestation of gas hydrates at negative temperatures were carried out for identification conditions for relic gas hydrates existence in permafrost of northern part of West Siberia. Sandy and silty sand sediments were used in experimental investigations. These sediments are typical of most gas-seeping (above the gas hydrate stability

  3. Hydration shells exchange charge with their protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abitan, Haim; Lindgård, Per-Anker; Nielsen, Bjørn Gilbert

    2010-01-01

    . In our experiments, the amplitude of an ultrasonic pressure wave is gradually increased (0–20 atm) while we simultaneously measure the Raman spectra from the hydrated protein (β-lactoglobulin and lysozyme). We detected two types of spectral changes: first, up to 70% increase in the intensity......Investigation of the interaction between a protein and its hydration shells is an experimental and theoretical challenge. Here, we used ultrasonic pressure waves in aqueous solutions of a protein to explore the conformational states of the protein and its interaction with its hydration shells...... the presence of an ultrasonic pressure, a protein and its hydration shells are in thermodynamic and charge equilibrium, i.e. a protein and its hydration shells exchange charges. The ultrasonic wave disrupts these equilibria which are regained within 30–45 min after the ultrasonic pressure is shut off....

  4. Gas hydrate and humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvenvolden, K.A.

    2000-01-01

    The potential effects of naturally occurring gas hydrate on humans are not understood with certainty, but enough information has been acquired over the past 30 years to make preliminary assessments possible. Three major issues are gas hydrate as (1) a potential energy resource, (2) a factor in global climate change, and (3) a submarine geohazard. The methane content is estimated to be between 1015 to 1017 m3 at STP and the worldwide distribution in outer continental margins of oceans and in polar regions are significant features of gas hydrate. However, its immediate development as an energy resource is not likely because there are various geological constraints and difficult technological problems that must be solved before economic recovery of methane from hydrate can be achieved. The role of gas hydrate in global climate change is uncertain. For hydrate methane to be an effective greenhouse gas, it must reach the atmosphere. Yet there are many obstacles to the transfer of methane from hydrate to the atmosphere. Rates of gas hydrate dissociation and the integrated rates of release and destruction of the methane in the geo/hydro/atmosphere are not adequately understood. Gas hydrate as a submarine geohazard, however, is of immediate and increasing importance to humans as our industrial society moves to exploit seabed resources at ever-greater depths in the waters of our coastal oceans. Human activities and installations in regions of gas-hydrate occurrence must take into account the presence of gas hydrate and deal with the consequences of its presence.

  5. Simulation and Characterization of Methane Hydrate Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, S.; Gupta, I.

    2017-12-01

    The ever rising global energy demand dictates human endeavor to explore and exploit new and innovative energy sources. As conventional oil and gas reserves deplete, we are constantly looking for newer sources for sustainable energy. Gas hydrates have long been discussed as the next big energy resource to the earth. Its global occurrence and vast quantity of natural gas stored is one of the main reasons for such interest in its study and exploration. Gas hydrates are solid crystalline substances with trapped molecules of gas inside cage-like crystals of water molecules. Gases such as methane, ethane, propane and carbon dioxide can form hydrates but in natural state, methane hydrates are the most common. Subsurface geological conditions with high pressure and low temperature favor the formation and stability of gas hydrates. While the occurrence and potential of gas hydrates as energy source has long been studied, there are still gaps in knowledge, especially in the quantitative research of gas hydrate formation and reservoir characterization. This study is focused on exploring and understanding the geological setting in which gas hydrates are formed and the subsequent changes in rock characteristics as they are deposited. It involves the numerical simulation of methane gas flow through fault to form hydrates. The models are representative of the subsurface geologic setting of Gulf of Mexico with a fault through layers of shale and sandstone. Hydrate formation simulated is of thermogenic origin. The simulations are conducted using TOUGH+HYDRATE, a numerical code developed at the Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory for modeling multiphase flow through porous medium. Simulation results predict that as the gas hydrates form in the pores of the model, the porosity, permeability and other rock properties are altered. Preliminary simulation results have shown that hydrates begin to form in the fault zone and gradually in the sandstone layers. The increase in hydrate

  6. Gas Hydrate Storage of Natural Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudy Rogers; John Etheridge

    2006-03-31

    Environmental and economic benefits could accrue from a safe, above-ground, natural-gas storage process allowing electric power plants to utilize natural gas for peak load demands; numerous other applications of a gas storage process exist. A laboratory study conducted in 1999 to determine the feasibility of a gas-hydrates storage process looked promising. The subsequent scale-up of the process was designed to preserve important features of the laboratory apparatus: (1) symmetry of hydrate accumulation, (2) favorable surface area to volume ratio, (3) heat exchanger surfaces serving as hydrate adsorption surfaces, (4) refrigeration system to remove heat liberated from bulk hydrate formation, (5) rapid hydrate formation in a non-stirred system, (6) hydrate self-packing, and (7) heat-exchanger/adsorption plates serving dual purposes to add or extract energy for hydrate formation or decomposition. The hydrate formation/storage/decomposition Proof-of-Concept (POC) pressure vessel and supporting equipment were designed, constructed, and tested. This final report details the design of the scaled POC gas-hydrate storage process, some comments on its fabrication and installation, checkout of the equipment, procedures for conducting the experimental tests, and the test results. The design, construction, and installation of the equipment were on budget target, as was the tests that were subsequently conducted. The budget proposed was met. The primary goal of storing 5000-scf of natural gas in the gas hydrates was exceeded in the final test, as 5289-scf of gas storage was achieved in 54.33 hours. After this 54.33-hour period, as pressure in the formation vessel declined, additional gas went into the hydrates until equilibrium pressure/temperature was reached, so that ultimately more than the 5289-scf storage was achieved. The time required to store the 5000-scf (48.1 hours of operating time) was longer than designed. The lower gas hydrate formation rate is attributed to a

  7. Methane hydrates in nature - Current knowledge and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of methane hydrate research and the need for a coordinated effort, the United States Congress enacted the Methane Hydrate Research and Development Act of 2000. At the same time, the Ministry of International Trade and Industry in Japan launched a research program to develop plans for a methane hydrate exploratory drilling project in the Nankai Trough. India, China, the Republic of Korea, and other nations also have established large methane hydrate research and development programs. Government-funded scientific research drilling expeditions and production test studies have provided a wealth of information on the occurrence of methane hydrates in nature. Numerous studies have shown that the amount of gas stored as methane hydrates in the world may exceed the volume of known organic carbon sources. However, methane hydrates represent both a scientific and technical challenge, and much remains to be learned about their characteristics and occurrence in nature. Methane hydrate research in recent years has mostly focused on: (1) documenting the geologic parameters that control the occurrence and stability of methane hydrates in nature, (2) assessing the volume of natural gas stored within various methane hydrate accumulations, (3) analyzing the production response and characteristics of methane hydrates, (4) identifying and predicting natural and induced environmental and climate impacts of natural methane hydrates, (5) analyzing the methane hydrate role as a geohazard, (6) establishing the means to detect and characterize methane hydrate accumulations using geologic and geophysical data, and (7) establishing the thermodynamic phase equilibrium properties of methane hydrates as a function of temperature, pressure, and gas composition. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Consortium for Ocean Leadership (COL) combined their efforts in 2012 to assess the contributions that scientific drilling has made and could continue to make to advance

  8. Polycrystalline methane hydrate: Synthesis from superheated ice, and low-temperature mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.

    1998-01-01

    We describe a new and efficient technique to grow aggregates of pure methane hydrate in quantities suitable for physical and material properties testing. Test specimens were grown under static conditions by combining cold, pressurized CH4 gas with granulated H2O ice, and then warming the reactants to promote the reaction CH4(g) + 6H2O(s???1) ??? CH4??6H2O (methane hydrate). Hydrate formation evidently occurs at the nascent ice/liquid water interface on ice grain surfaces, and complete reaction was achieved by warming the system above the ice melting point and up to 290 K, at 25-30 MPa, for approximately 8 h. The resulting material is pure, cohesive, polycrystalline methane hydrate with controlled grain size and random orientation. Synthesis conditions placed the H2O ice well above its melting temperature while reaction progressed, yet samples and run records showed no evidence for bulk melting of the unreacted portions of ice grains. Control experiments using Ne, a non-hydrate-forming gas, showed that under otherwise identical conditions, the pressure reduction and latent heat associated with ice melting are easily detectable in our fabrication apparatus. These results suggest that under hydrate-forming conditions, H2O ice can persist metastably to temperatures well above its ordinary melting point while reacting to form hydrate. Direct observations of the hydrate growth process in a small, high-pressure optical cell verified these conclusions and revealed additional details of the hydrate growth process. Methane hydrate samples were then tested in constant-strain-rate deformation experiments at T = 140-200 K, Pc = 50-100 MPa, and ?? = 10-4 10-6 s-1. Measurements in both the brittle and ductile fields showed that methane hydrate has measurably different strength than H2O ice, and work hardens to an unusually high degree compared to other ices as well as to most metals and ceramics at high homologous temperatures. This work hardening may be related to a changing

  9. Exogenous origin of hydration on asteroid (16) Psyche: the role of hydrated asteroid families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avdellidou, C.; Delbo', M.; Fienga, A.

    2018-04-01

    Asteroid (16) Psyche, which for a long time was the largest M-type with no detection of hydration features in its spectrum, was recently discovered to have a weak 3-μm band and thus it was eventually added to the group of hydrated asteroids. Its relatively high density, in combination with the high radar albedo, led researchers to classify the asteroid as a metallic object. It is believed that it is possibly a core of a differentiated body, a remnant of `hit-and-run' collisions. The detection of hydration is, in principle, inconsistent with a pure metallic origin for this body. Here, we consider the scenario in which the hydration on its surface is exogenous and was delivered by hydrated impactors. We show that impacting asteroids that belong to families whose members have the 3-μm band can deliver hydrated material to Psyche. We developed a collisional model with which we test all dark carbonaceous asteroid families, which contain hydrated members. We find that the major source of hydrated impactors is the family of Themis, with a total implanted mass on Psyche of the order of ˜1014 kg. However, the hydrated fraction could be only a few per cent of the implanted mass, as the water content in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites, the best analogue for the Themis asteroid family, is typically a few per cent of their mass.

  10. Aspects of Hydrate Management - Deposition Phenomena

    OpenAIRE

    Langen, Heidi

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis has been to investigate the factors with the largest influence on the adhesion strength of a hydrate deposit on a solid surface. This has been done through a literature study on the subject, and a thorough experimental project in a laboratory. The experiments involved forming hydrate deposits on a pipe of steel, before removing the deposits and finding the pressure required to do so. The hydrate was formed by a solution of tetrahydrofuran and water in a tank where t...

  11. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donn McGuire; Steve Runyon; Richard Sigal; Bill Liddell; Thomas Williams; George Moridis

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. Hot Ice No. 1 was planned to test the Ugnu and West Sak sequences for gas hydrates and a concomitant free gas accumulation on Anadarko's 100% working interest acreage in section 30 of Township 9N, Range 8E of the Harrison Bay quadrangle of the North Slope of Alaska. The Ugnu and West Sak intervals are favorably positioned in the hydrate-stability zone over an area extending from Anadarko's acreage westward to the vicinity of the aforementioned gas-hydrate occurrences. This suggests that a large, north-to-south trending gas-hydrate accumulation may exist in that area. The presence of gas shows in the Ugnu and West Sak reservoirs in wells situated eastward and down dip of the Hot Ice location indicate that a free-gas accumulation may be trapped by gas hydrates. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was designed to core from the surface to the base of the West Sak interval using the

  12. Atomistic simulations of cation hydration in sodium and calcium montmorillonite nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guomin; Neretnieks, Ivars; Holmboe, Michael

    2017-08-01

    During the last four decades, numerous studies have been directed to the swelling smectite-rich clays in the context of high-level radioactive waste applications and waste-liners for contaminated sites. The swelling properties of clay mineral particles arise due to hydration of the interlayer cations and the diffuse double layers formed near the negatively charged montmorillonite (MMT) surfaces. To accurately study the cation hydration in the interlayer nanopores of MMT, solvent-solute and solvent-clay surface interactions (i.e., the solvation effects and the shape effects) on the atomic level should be taken into account, in contrast to many recent electric double layer based methodologies using continuum models. Therefore, in this research we employed fully atomistic simulations using classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, the software package GROMACS along with the CLAYFF forcefield and the SPC/E water model. We present the ion distributions and the deformation of the hydrated coordination structures, i.e., the hydration shells of Na+ and Ca2+ in the interlayer, respectively, for MMT in the first-layer, the second-layer, the third-layer, the fourth-layer, and the fifth-layer (1W, 2W, 3W, 4W, and 5W) hydrate states. Our MD simulations show that Na+ in Na-MMT nanopores have an affinity to the ditrigonal cavities of the clay layers and form transient inner-sphere complexes at about 3.8 Å from clay midplane at water contents less than the 5W hydration state. However, these phenomena are not observed in Ca-MMT regardless of swelling states. For Na-MMT, each Na+ is coordinated to four water molecules and one oxygen atom of the clay basal-plane in the first hydration shell at the 1W hydration state, and with five to six water molecules in the first hydration shell within a radius of 3.1 Å at all higher water contents. In Ca-MMT, however each Ca2+ is coordinated to approximately seven water molecules in the first hydration shell at the 1W hydration state and

  13. Site-specific hydration dynamics in the nonpolar core of a molten globule by dynamic nuclear polarization of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Brandon D; Choi, Jennifer; López, Carlos; Wesener, Darryl A; Hubbell, Wayne; Cavagnero, Silvia; Han, Songi

    2011-04-20

    Water-protein interactions play a direct role in protein folding. The chain collapse that accompanies protein folding involves extrusion of water from the nonpolar core. For many proteins, including apomyoglobin (apoMb), hydrophobic interactions drive an initial collapse to an intermediate state before folding to the final structure. However, the debate continues as to whether the core of the collapsed intermediate state is hydrated and, if so, what the dynamic nature of this water is. A key challenge is that protein hydration dynamics is significantly heterogeneous, yet suitable experimental techniques for measuring hydration dynamics with site-specificity are lacking. Here, we introduce Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization at 0.35 T via site-specific nitroxide spin labels as a unique tool to probe internal and surface protein hydration dynamics with site-specific resolution in the molten globular, native, and unfolded protein states. The (1)H NMR signal enhancement of water carries information about the local dynamics of the solvent within ∼10 Å of a spin label. EPR is used synergistically to gain insights on local polarity and mobility of the spin-labeled protein. Several buried and solvent-exposed sites of apoMb are examined, each bearing a covalently bound nitroxide spin label. We find that the nonpoloar core of the apoMb molten globule is hydrated with water bearing significant translational dynamics, only 4-6-fold slower than that of bulk water. The hydration dynamics of the native state is heterogeneous, while the acid-unfolded state bears fast-diffusing hydration water. This study provides a high-resolution glimpse at the folding-dependent nature of protein hydration dynamics.

  14. Hydrate formation in heterogeneous sediments: To what extent does hydrate distribution record the local environmental history?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rempel, A. W.; VanderBeek, B. P.

    2017-12-01

    The distribution of methane hydrate in marine sediments reflects the interplay between supply by methanogenesis and far-field transport, and the environmental conditions that set the local methane solubility, which is modulated by the physical properties of the host sediments. We explore the extent to which detailed observations of hydrate distribution and models of hydrate growth, especially in the vicinity of dipping sand layers, can be used to infer the environmental conditions that prevailed during emplacement. Anomalously high hydrate saturations found in association with relatively more coarse-grained strata have been attributed to both enhanced fluid focusing through more permeable sediment layers and to perturbations in phase equilibrium related to pore-space geometry. In order to achieve more accurate predictions of hydrate occurrence, we incorporate treatments for the influence of pore architecture on growth dynamics that have been validated using analog ice-water and water-vapor systems. We demonstrate how pore-size effects on methane solubility and permeability-driven variations in fluid flux can be parameterized into a 1D model for hydrate growth along dipping, coarse-grained layers embedded in a finer-grained sediment package. We show how the vertical distribution of hydrate varies in response to changes in grain size and rates of fluid advection, sedimentation, and in situ methane production. Our modeling shows that sharp gradients in methane solubility, which occur along stratigraphic boundaries, promote the diffusive growth of localized regions of high hydrate saturation while enhanced fluid advection favors more distributed growth throughout high permeability layers. Sedimentation tends to suppress the growth of diffusive hydrate saturation anomalies and can lead to steady-state hydrate saturation profiles. In situ methane production increases hydrate concentrations at shallow depths relative to models where methane is supplied advectively from a

  15. Gas hydrate in nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, Carolyn D.

    2018-01-17

    Gas hydrate is a naturally occurring, ice-like substance that forms when water and gas combine under high pressure and at moderate temperatures. Methane is the most common gas present in gas hydrate, although other gases may also be included in hydrate structures, particularly in areas close to conventional oil and gas reservoirs. Gas hydrate is widespread in ocean-bottom sediments at water depths greater than 300–500 meters (m; 984–1,640 feet [ft]) and is also present in areas with permanently frozen ground (permafrost). Several countries are evaluating gas hydrate as a possible energy resource in deepwater or permafrost settings. Gas hydrate is also under investigation to determine how environmental change may affect these deposits.

  16. Life Origination Hydrate Hypothesis (LOH-Hypothesis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrovskii, Victor; Kadyshevich, Elena

    2012-01-04

    The paper develops the Life Origination Hydrate Hypothesis (LOH-hypothesis), according to which living-matter simplest elements (LMSEs, which are N-bases, riboses, nucleosides, nucleotides), DNA- and RNA-like molecules, amino-acids, and proto-cells repeatedly originated on the basis of thermodynamically controlled, natural, and inevitable processes governed by universal physical and chemical laws from CH4, niters, and phosphates under the Earth's surface or seabed within the crystal cavities of the honeycomb methane-hydrate structure at low temperatures; the chemical processes passed slowly through all successive chemical steps in the direction that is determined by a gradual decrease in the Gibbs free energy of reacting systems. The hypothesis formulation method is based on the thermodynamic directedness of natural movement and consists ofan attempt to mentally backtrack on the progression of nature and thus reveal principal milestones alongits route. The changes in Gibbs free energy are estimated for different steps of the living-matter origination process; special attention is paid to the processes of proto-cell formation. Just the occurrence of the gas-hydrate periodic honeycomb matrix filled with LMSEs almost completely in its final state accounts for size limitation in the DNA functional groups and the nonrandom location of N-bases in the DNA chains. The slowness of the low-temperature chemical transformations and their "thermodynamic front" guide the gross process of living matter origination and its successive steps. It is shown that the hypothesis is thermodynamically justified and testable and that many observed natural phenomena count in its favor.

  17. Life Origination Hydrate Hypothesis (LOH-Hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Ostrovskii

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper develops the Life Origination Hydrate Hypothesis (LOH-hypothesis, according to which living-matter simplest elements (LMSEs, which are N-bases, riboses, nucleosides, nucleotides, DNA- and RNA-like molecules, amino-acids, and proto-cells repeatedly originated on the basis of thermodynamically controlled, natural, and inevitable processes governed by universal physical and chemical laws from CH4, niters, and phosphates under the Earth's surface or seabed within the crystal cavities of the honeycomb methane-hydrate structure at low temperatures; the chemical processes passed slowly through all successive chemical steps in the direction that is determined by a gradual decrease in the Gibbs free energy of reacting systems. The hypothesis formulation method is based on the thermodynamic directedness of natural movement and consists ofan attempt to mentally backtrack on the progression of nature and thus reveal principal milestones alongits route. The changes in Gibbs free energy are estimated for different steps of the living-matter origination process; special attention is paid to the processes of proto-cell formation. Just the occurrence of the gas-hydrate periodic honeycomb matrix filled with LMSEs almost completely in its final state accounts for size limitation in the DNA functional groups and the nonrandom location of N-bases in the DNA chains. The slowness of the low-temperature chemical transformations and their “thermodynamic front” guide the gross process of living matter origination and its successive steps. It is shown that the hypothesis is thermodynamically justified and testable and that many observed natural phenomena count in its favor.

  18. Methane hydrate in the global organic carbon cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvenvolden, K.A.

    2002-01-01

    The global occurrence of methane hydrate in outer continental margins and in polar regions, and the magnitude of the amount of methane sequestered in methane hydrate suggest that methane hydrate is an important component in the global organic carbon cycle. Various versions of this cycle have emphasized the importance of methane hydrate, and in the latest version the role of methane hydrate is considered to be analogous to the workings of an electrical circuit. In this circuit the methane hydrate is a condenser and the consequences of methane hydrate dissociation are depicted as a resistor and inductor, reflecting temperature change and changes in earth surface history. These consequences may have implications for global change including global climate change.

  19. Gas hydrate nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The overall aim of the project was to gain more knowledge about the kinetics of gas hydrate formation especially the early growth phase. Knowledge of kinetics of gas hydrate formation is important and measurements of gas hydrate particle size and concentration can contribute to improve this knowledge. An experimental setup for carrying out experimental studies of the nucleation and growth of gas hydrates has been constructed and tested. Multi wavelength extinction (MWE) was the experimental technique selected for obtaining particle diameter and concentration. The principle behind MWE is described as well as turbidity spectrum analysis that in an initial stage of the project was considered as an alternative experimental technique. Details of the experimental setup and its operation are outlined. The measuring cell consists of a 1 litre horizontal tube sustaining pressures up to 200 bar. Laser light for particle size determination can be applied through sapphire windows. A description of the various auxiliary equipment and of another gas hydrate cell used in the study are given. A computer program for simulation and analysis of gas hydrate experiments is based on the gas hydrate kinetics model proposed by Skovborg and Rasmussen (1993). Initial measurements showed that knowledge of the refractive index of gas hydrates was important in order to use MWE. An experimental determination of the refractive index of methane and natural gas hydrate is described. The test experiments performed with MWE on collectives of gas hydrate particles and experiments with ethane, methane and natural gas hydrate are discussed. Gas hydrate particles initially seem to grow mainly in size and at latter stages in number. (EG) EFP-94; 41 refs.

  20. Electronic state of europium atoms on surface of oxidized tungsten

    CERN Document Server

    Davydov, S Y

    2001-01-01

    The energy scheme of the europium atoms adsorption system on the tungsten surface, coated with the oxygen monolayer, is considered. The evaluations of the europium adatoms charged state on the oxidized tungsten surface are performed. It is established, that europium, adsorbed at the oxidized tungsten surface, is a positive ion with the charge close to the unit. The zonal scheme of the Eu-O/W adsorption system for the europium low and high concentrations is proposed

  1. Packing interactions in hydrated and anhydrous forms of the antibiotic Ciprofloxacin: a solid-state NMR, X-ray diffraction, and computer simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafra, Luís; Santos, Sérgio M; Siegel, Renée; Alves, Inês; Paz, Filipe A Almeida; Dudenko, Dmytro; Spiess, Hans W

    2012-01-11

    We present an experimental NMR, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and computational study of the supramolecular assemblies of two crystalline forms of Ciprofloxacin: one anhydrate and one hydrate forming water wormholes. The resonance assignment of up to 51 and 54 distinct (13)C and (1)H resonances for the hydrate is reported. The effect of crystal packing, identified by XRD, on the (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts including weak interionic H-bonds, is quantified; (1)H chemical shift changes up to ∼-3.5 ppm for CH···π contacts and ∼+2 ppm (CH···O((-))); ∼+4.7 ppm (((+))NH···O((-))) for H-bonds. Water intake induces chemical shift changes up to 2 and 5 ppm for (1)H and (13)C nuclei, respectively. Such chemical shifts are found to be sensitive detectors of hydration/dehydration in highly insoluble hydrates. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  2. Hydrated and Solvated Tin(II) Ions in Solution and the Solid State, and a Coordination Chemistry Overview of the d10s2Metal Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Ingmar; D'Angelo, Paola; Lundberg, Daniel

    2016-12-19

    The coordination chemistry of d 10 s 2 metal ions is strongly affected by an (at least partially) occupied d 10 s 2 metal ion-ligand atom antibonding orbital, which may cause a void in the coordination sphere due to repulsion between the electrons in the antibonding orbital on the metal ion and those on the ligands. The character of the formed d 10 s 2 metal ion-ligand atom bond plays an important role in the electron density in the antibonding orbital and thereby also in the coordination chemistry. The hydrated tin(II) ion, [Sn(H 2 O) 3 ] 2+ , and the trihydroxidostannate ion, [Sn(OH) 3 ] - , have very different mean Sn-O bond lengths (2.21 and 2.08 Å, respectively) and O-Sn-O angles (ca. 78 and 90°, respectively) both in the solid state and in solution. On increasing the covalency of the tin(II)-ligand bonds, the repulsion decreases and higher coordination numbers are obtained, as seen in the dimethylsulfoxide- and N,N-dimethylthioformamide-solvated tin(II) ions, both of which are five-coordinate with square-pyramidal structures. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Comparative Assessment of Advanced Gay Hydrate Production Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. D. White; B. P. McGrail; S. K. Wurstner

    2009-06-30

    Displacing natural gas and petroleum with carbon dioxide is a proven technology for producing conventional geologic hydrocarbon reservoirs, and producing additional yields from abandoned or partially produced petroleum reservoirs. Extending this concept to natural gas hydrate production offers the potential to enhance gas hydrate recovery with concomitant permanent geologic sequestration. Numerical simulation was used to assess a suite of carbon dioxide injection techniques for producing gas hydrates from a variety of geologic deposit types. Secondary hydrate formation was found to inhibit contact of the injected CO{sub 2} regardless of injectate phase state, thus diminishing the exchange rate due to pore clogging and hydrate zone bypass of the injected fluids. Additional work is needed to develop methods of artificially introducing high-permeability pathways in gas hydrate zones if injection of CO{sub 2} in either gas, liquid, or micro-emulsion form is to be more effective in enhancing gas hydrate production rates.

  4. Nonlinear Tamm states and surface effects in periodic photonic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kivshar, Yu S

    2008-01-01

    We present a brief overview of the basic concepts and important experimental observations of the effect of light localization near the surfaces of truncated periodic photonic structures. In particular, we discuss the formation of nonlinear localized modes and discrete surface solitons near the edges of nonlinear optical waveguide arrays and two-dimensional photonic lattices. We draw an analogy between the nonlinear surface optical modes and the surface Tamm states known in the electronic theory. We discuss the crossover between discrete solitons in the array and surface solitons at the edge of the array by analyzing the families of even and odd nonlinear localized modes located at finite distances from the edge of a waveguide array. We discuss various generalization of this concept including surface solitons in chirped lattices, multi-gap vector surface solitons, polychromatic surface states generated by a supercontinuum source, surface modes in two-dimensional photonic lattices, and spatiotemporal surface solitons. Finally, we discuss briefly several other related concepts including the enhanced beaming of light from subwavelength waveguides in photonic crystals

  5. Surface Relaxation and Electronic States of Pt(111) Surface with Varying Slab Thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushal, Ashok K.; Mullick, Shanta; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2011-01-01

    Surface relaxation and electronic DOS's of Pt(111) surface have been studied with varying slab thickness using ab-initio SIESTA method. We found the expansion in the top layer and contraction in the subsurface layers of Pt(111) surface. Our results match with the experimental results. Also observing electronic density of states we found that as we increase the thickness of slab, the PDOS of Pt(111) surface goes towards the bulk density of states and Fermi energy shifts towards the bulk fermi energy.

  6. Tamm–Hubbard surface states in the continuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhi, S; Della Valle, G

    2013-01-01

    In the framework of the Bose–Hubbard model, we show that two-particle surface bound states embedded in the continuum (BIC) can be sustained at the edge of a semi-infinite one-dimensional tight-binding lattice for any infinitesimally-small impurity potential V at the lattice boundary. Such thresholdless surface states, which can be referred to as Tamm–Hubbard BIC states, exist provided that the impurity potential V is attractive (repulsive) and the particle–particle Hubbard interaction U is repulsive (attractive), i.e. for UV < 0. (paper)

  7. LABORATORY STRATEGIES FOR HYDRATE FORMATION IN FINE-GRAINED SEDIMENTS

    KAUST Repository

    Lei, L.

    2018-04-02

    Fine‐grained sediments limit hydrate nucleation, shift the phase boundary and hinder gas supply. Laboratory experiments in this study explore different strategies to overcome these challenges, including the use of a more soluble guest molecule rather than methane, grain‐scale gas‐storage within porous diatoms, ice‐to‐hydrate transformation to grow lenses at predefined locations, forced gas injection into water saturated sediments, and long‐term guest molecule transport. Tomographic images, thermal and pressure data provide rich information on hydrate formation and morphology. Results show that hydrate formation is inherently displacive in fine‐grained sediments; lenses are thicker and closer to each other in compressible, high specific surface area sediments subjected to low effective stress. Temperature and pressure trajectories follow a shifted phase boundary that is consistent with capillary effects. Exo‐pore growth results in freshly formed hydrate with a striped and porous structure; this open structure becomes an effective pathway for gas transport to the growing hydrate front. Ice‐to‐hydrate transformation goes through a liquid stage at pre‐melt temperatures; then, capillarity and cryogenic suction compete, and some water becomes imbibed into the sediment faster than hydrate reformation. The geometry of hydrate lenses and the internal hydrate structure continue evolving long after the exothermal response to hydrate formation has completely decayed. Multiple time‐dependent processes occur during hydrate formation, including gas, water and heat transport, sediment compressibility, reaction rate and the stochastic nucleation process. Hydrate formation strategies conceived for this study highlight the inherent difficulties in emulating hydrate formation in fine‐grained sediments within the relatively short time‐scale available for laboratory experiments.

  8. Micromechanical cohesion force measurements to determine cyclopentane hydrate interfacial properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aman, Zachary M; Joshi, Sanjeev E; Sloan, E Dendy; Sum, Amadeu K; Koh, Carolyn A

    2012-06-15

    Hydrate aggregation and deposition are critical factors in determining where and when hydrates may plug a deepwater flowline. We present the first direct measurement of structure II (cyclopentane) hydrate cohesive forces in the water, liquid hydrocarbon and gas bulk phases. For fully annealed hydrate particles, gas phase cohesive forces were approximately twice that obtained in a liquid hydrocarbon phase, and approximately six times that obtained in the water phase. Direct measurements show that hydrate cohesion force in a water-continuous bulk may be only the product of solid-solid cohesion. When excess water was present on the hydrate surface, gas phase cohesive forces increased by a factor of three, suggesting the importance of the liquid or quasi-liquid layer (QLL) in determining cohesive force. Hydrate-steel adhesion force measurements show that, when the steel surface is coated with hydrophobic wax, forces decrease up to 96%. As the micromechanical force technique is uniquely capable of measuring hydrate-surface forces with variable contact time, the present work contains significant implications for hydrate applications in flow assurance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Skin physiology in men and women: in vivo evaluation of 300 people including TEWL, SC hydration, sebum content and skin surface pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luebberding, S; Krueger, N; Kerscher, M

    2013-10-01

    Evidence is given that differences in skin physiological properties exist between men and women. However, despite an assessable number of available publications, the results are still inconsistent. Therefore, the aim of this clinical study is the first systematic assessment of gender-related differences in skin physiology in men and women, with a special focus on changes over lifetime. A total of 300 healthy male and female subjects (20-74 years) were selected following strict criteria including age, sun behaviour or smoking habits. TEWL, hydration level, sebum production and pH value were measured with worldwide-acknowledged biophysical measuring methods at forehead, cheek, neck, volar forearm and dorsum of hand. Until the age of 50 men's TEWL is significantly lower than the water loss of women of the same age, regardless of the location. With ageing gender-related differences in TEWL assimilate. Young men show higher SC hydration in comparison with women. But, whereas SC hydration is stable or even increasing in women over lifetime, the skin hydration in men is progressively decreasing, beginning at the age of 40. Sebum production in male skin is always higher and stays stable with increasing age, whereas sebum production in women progressively decreases over lifetime. Across all localizations and age groups, the pH value in men is below 5, the pH value of female subjects is, aside from limited expectations, higher than 5. Skin physiological distinctions between the sexes exist and are particularly remarkable with regard to sebum production and pH value. © 2013 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  10. Spectroscopic determination of gas-water interactions in clathrate hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, H.H. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The technique of forming clathrate hydrates by first forming the amorphous deposits of gas-water mixture and, secondly, annealing this deposit was used to form the clathrate hydrates of ethylene oxide, hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide. Once the clathrate hydrate formed as a thin film on the CsI substrate, the infrared spectrum of these hydrates could be obtained. The clathrate hydrates could be irradiated with 1.7 MeV electrons to promote high proton concentrations in the clathrate hydrate lattice at low temperatures (approx.30K) where the Bjerrum defects in the lattice are not mobile. The ring breathing model of ethylene oxide in the clathrate hydrate can be assigned. It was possible to incorporate D 2 O into the hydrogen bonded lattice of the ethylene oxide clathrate hydrate by growing the clathrate hydrate epitaxially on a thin film of clathrate hydrate at 100 K. The half-life of the D 2 O molecules in the ethylene oxide clathrate hydrate was only 9 minutes at 120 K. The activation energy determined from the hopping rate constant in ethylene oxide clathrate hydrate was 4.5 +/- 1.8 Kcal/mole. Irradiation of the ethylene oxide clathrate hydrate with 1.7 MeV electrons transformed some of the ethylene oxide molecules in the cages to (a) CH 2 = CH 2 , (b) CH 2 = C = O, (c) CH 3 -CH 2 -OH, (d) CO 2 , and (e) CO. A steady state concentration of coupled HOD was maintained in irradiated samples of ethylene oxide clathrate hydrates at a temperature around 80 K. The enclathrated H 2 S molecule in the small cages had a different infrared spectrum (broad band complex centered at 2600 cm -1 ) from the H 2 S molecules which had been enclathrated in the large cages (broad band complex centered at 2550 cm -1 )

  11. Anaerobic oxidation of methane above gas hydrates at Hydrate Ridge, NE Pacific Ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treude, T.; Boetius, A.; Knittel, K.

    2003-01-01

    At Hydrate Ridge (HR), Cascadia convergent margin, surface sediments contain massive gas hydrates formed from methane that ascends together with fluids along faults from deeper reservoirs. Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), mediated by a microbial consortium of archaea and sulfate-reducing bac......At Hydrate Ridge (HR), Cascadia convergent margin, surface sediments contain massive gas hydrates formed from methane that ascends together with fluids along faults from deeper reservoirs. Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), mediated by a microbial consortium of archaea and sulfate...... oxidation was extremely low (2.1 mmol m(-2) d(-1)) and was probably due to aerobic oxidation of methane. SR was fueled largely by methane at flow-impacted sites, but exceeded AOM in some cases, most likely due to sediment heterogeneity. At the Acharax field, SR was decoupled from methane oxidation...

  12. Hydrate Shell Growth Measured Using NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, Agnes; Akhfash, Masoumeh; Loh, Charles K; Aman, Zachary M; Fridjonsson, Einar O; May, Eric F; Johns, Michael L

    2015-08-18

    Benchtop nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) pulsed field gradient (PFG) and relaxation measurements were used to monitor the clathrate hydrate shell growth occurring in water droplets dispersed in a continuous cyclopentane phase. These techniques allowed the growth of hydrate inside the opaque exterior shell to be monitored and, hence, information about the evolution of the shell's morphology to be deduced. NMR relaxation measurements were primarily used to monitor the hydrate shell growth kinetics, while PFG NMR diffusion experiments were used to determine the nominal droplet size distribution (DSD) of the unconverted water inside the shell core. A comparison of mean droplet sizes obtained directly via PFG NMR and independently deduced from relaxation measurements showed that the assumption of the shell model-a perfect spherical core of unconverted water-for these hydrate droplet systems is correct, but only after approximately 24 h of shell growth. Initially, hydrate growth is faster and heat-transfer-limited, leading to porous shells with surface areas larger than that of spheres with equivalent volumes. Subsequently, the hydrate growth rate becomes mass-transfer-limited, and the shells become thicker, spherical, and less porous.

  13. The U.S. Geological Survey’s Gas Hydrates Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, Carolyn D.

    2018-01-17

    The Gas Hydrates Project at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) focuses on the study of methane hydrates in natural environments. The project is a collaboration between the USGS Energy Resources and the USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Programs and works closely with other U.S. Federal agencies, some State governments, outside research organizations, and international partners. The USGS studies the formation and distribution of gas hydrates in nature, the potential of hydrates as an energy resource, and the interaction between methane hydrates and the environment. The USGS Gas Hydrates Project carries out field programs and participates in drilling expeditions to study marine and terrestrial gas hydrates. USGS scientists also acquire new geophysical data and sample sediments, the water column, and the atmosphere in areas where gas hydrates occur. In addition, project personnel analyze datasets provided by partners and manage unique laboratories that supply state-of-the-art analytical capabilities to advance national and international priorities related to gas hydrates.

  14. The role of hydration in vocal fold physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivasankar, Mahalakshmi; Leydon, Ciara

    2010-06-01

    Increased vocal fold hydration is a popular target in the prevention and management of voice disorders. Current intervention strategies focus on enhancing both systemic (internal) and superficial (surface) hydration. We review relevant bench and human research on the role of hydration in vocal fold physiology. Bench and human studies provide converging evidence that systemic and superficial dehydration are detrimental to vocal fold physiology. Dehydration challenges increase the viscous properties of excised vocal fold tissue. Systemic, superficial, and combined drying challenges increase aerodynamic and acoustic measures of voice production in speakers. Emerging theoretical and clinical data suggest that increasing both systemic and superficial hydration levels may benefit voice production; however, robust evidence for positive outcomes of hydration treatments is lacking. Increased systemic and superficial vocal fold hydration as a component of vocal hygiene may improve overall health and efficiency of the vocal apparatus. However, continued exploration of biological mechanisms regulating vocal fold hydration is needed to optimize clinical hydration interventions. Specifically, the development of hydration treatments that maximize positive phonatory outcomes will necessitate understanding of the signaling pathways linking systemic and superficial hydration.

  15. Dual hierarchical biomimic superhydrophobic surface with three energy states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Hung; Hsu, Tsung-Hsing; Chuang, Yun-Ju; Tseng, Fan-Gang

    2009-07-01

    A low hysteresis surface prepared by two-length-scaled hierarchical textures to mimic the Lotus effect is proposed. The fabricated textures incorporate self-masked nanorods on microextrusions. A high static contact angle (160°) and low hysteresis (˜2.7°) are obtained and comparable to the surface properties of a natural lotus leaf. The stability of hydrophobicity is described with respect to three energy states (nonwetting, microwetting, and nanowetting) based on dynamic contact angle analysis by droplet impinging onto the surface. The estimated texture-induced energy barrier based on the principle of energy conservation is in good agreement to those estimated from Laplace's law.

  16. Large Rashba spin splitting of a metallic surface-state band on a semiconductor surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaji, Koichiro; Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Hatta, Shinichiro; Okuyama, Hiroshi; Miyamoto, Koji; Okuda, Taichi; Kimura, Akio; Namatame, Hirofumi; Taniguchi, Masaki; Aruga, Tetsuya

    2010-01-01

    The generation of spin-polarized electrons at room temperature is an essential step in developing semiconductor spintronic applications. To this end, we studied the electronic states of a Ge(111) surface, covered with a lead monolayer at a fractional coverage of 4/3, by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES), spin-resolved ARPES and first-principles electronic structure calculation. We demonstrate that a metallic surface-state band with a dominant Pb 6p character exhibits a large Rashba spin splitting of 200 meV and an effective mass of 0.028 me at the Fermi level. This finding provides a material basis for the novel field of spin transport/accumulation on semiconductor surfaces. Charge density analysis of the surface state indicated that large spin splitting was induced by asymmetric charge distribution in close proximity to the nuclei of Pb atoms. PMID:20975678

  17. Overview of pressure drawdown production test results for the Japex/JNOC/GSC Mallik 5L-38 gas hydrate research well

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hancock, S.; Carle, D. [APA Petroleum Engineering Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Dallimore, S. [Geological Survey of Canada, Sidney, BC (Canada); Collett, T. [United States Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Satoh, T. [Japan Petroleum Exploration Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Inoue, T. [Japan National Oil Corp., Chiba (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    Schlumberger's Modular Dynamic Tester (MDT) cased hole wireline tool was used during a pressure drawdown production test at the Mallik 5L-38 well to successfully test 3 separate hydrate intervals as well as free gas and water zones. The MDT test was initially performed to reduce reservoir pressure below the hydrate stability point, and to shut-in and observe the pressure build-up. It was assumed that the rate of gas production would be too small to measure, so the rate of hydrate dissociation would have to be inferred from changing pressure versus time data. Two important phenomena were observed during the hydrate tests: (1) free gas was produced on a steady state basis following the initial clean-up flow of water, and (2) the pressure response upon shut-in displayed porous media effects and indicated both flow contribution and pressure effects beyond the surface area of the hydrate open to the wellbore. In response to these observations, the MDT test procedures for the hydrate intervals were changed to include multiple flow and build-up periods, as well as injection and pressure fall-off periods. The factors that should be considered in interpreting the pressure transient data obtained during the MDT tests of the hydrate intervals include wellbore and perforation geometry with respect to the pressure affected area in the reservoir; radial and time dependent hydrate saturation changes which result in dynamic multiphase fluid flow, changing relative permeability, and changing system compressibility; the addition of free gas during the shut-in periods from continued hydrate dissociation; and the changing presence and character of boundaries due either to localized fractures or the limit of the hydrate dissociation front. Since analytical pressure transient analysis software cannot incorporate such dynamic reservoir parameters, conventional analytical techniques were used to evaluate the test data. 1 fig.

  18. Electrochemical characterization of GaN surface states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winnerl, Andrea; Garrido, Jose A.; Stutzmann, Martin

    2017-07-01

    In this work, we present a systematic study of the electrochemical properties of metal-organic chemical vapor deposition and hybrid vapor phase epitaxy grown n-type GaN in aqueous electrolytes. For this purpose, we perform cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy measurements over a wide range of potentials and frequencies, using a pure aqueous electrolyte and adding two different types of redox couples, as well as applying different surface treatments to the GaN electrodes. For Ga-polar GaN electrodes, the charge transfer to an electrolyte is dominated by surface states, which are not related to dislocations and are independent of the specific growth technique. These surface states can be modified by the surface treatment; they are generated by etching in HCl and are passivated by oxidation. Different surface defect states are present on N-polar GaN electrodes which do not significantly contribute to the charge transfer across the GaN/electrolyte interface.

  19. Gas Hydrates of Coal Layers as a Methane Source in the Atmosphere and Mine Working

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyrdin, Valery; Shepeleva, Sofya; Kim, Tatiana

    2017-11-01

    Living conditions of gas hydrates of a methane in a coal matrix as one of possible forms of finding of molecules of a methane in coal layers are considered. However, gas hydrates are formed not in all mineral coals even under the thermobaric conditions corresponding to their equilibrium state as the minimum humidity and the corresponding pore width are necessary for each brand of coal for formation of gas hydrate. It is shown that it depends on electric electrical dipole moment of a macromolecule of coal. Coals of brands K, D, Zh were considered. The electric field created by the surface of coal does not allow molecules of water to carry out threedimensional driving, and they keep on an internal surface of a time. By means of theoretical model operation a dipole - dipole interaction of molecules of water with the steam surface of coal values of energy of fiber interaction for various functional groups located in coal "fringe" which size for the first and second layers does not allow molecules of water to participate in formation of gas hydrates are received. For coals of brands K, Zh, D, considering distribution of a time on radiuses, the percent of moisture, which cannot share in education solid coal of gas solutions, is calculated.

  20. Spectroscopic methods in gas hydrate research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauh, Florian; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2012-01-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline structures comprising a guest molecule surrounded by a water cage, and are particularly relevant due to their natural occurrence in the deep sea and in permafrost areas. Low molecular weight molecules such as methane and carbon dioxide can be sequestered into that cage at suitable temperatures and pressures, facilitating the transition to the solid phase. While the composition and structure of gas hydrates appear to be well understood, their formation and dissociation mechanisms, along with the dynamics and kinetics associated with those processes, remain ambiguous. In order to take advantage of gas hydrates as an energy resource (e.g., methane hydrate), as a sequestration matrix in (for example) CO(2) storage, or for chemical energy conservation/storage, a more detailed molecular level understanding of their formation and dissociation processes, as well as the chemical, physical, and biological parameters that affect these processes, is required. Spectroscopic techniques appear to be most suitable for analyzing the structures of gas hydrates (sometimes in situ), thus providing access to such information across the electromagnetic spectrum. A variety of spectroscopic methods are currently used in gas hydrate research to determine the composition, structure, cage occupancy, guest molecule position, and binding/formation/dissociation mechanisms of the hydrate. To date, the most commonly applied techniques are Raman spectroscopy and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Diffraction methods such as neutron and X-ray diffraction are used to determine gas hydrate structures, and to study lattice expansions. Furthermore, UV-vis spectroscopic techniques and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have assisted in structural studies of gas hydrates. Most recently, waveguide-coupled mid-infrared spectroscopy in the 3-20 μm spectral range has demonstrated its value for in situ studies on the formation and dissociation of gas

  1. Hydration, fluid regulation and the eye: in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwin, Justin C; Kokavec, Jan; Thornton, Simon N

    2015-11-01

    Variation in systemic hydration status, namely chronic systemic hypohydration or dehydration, can influence the development of several chronic non-ophthalmic diseases. Owing to the eye's high water content and unique system of fluid regulation, we hypothesized that hydration status may affect the eye in health and disease states. Therefore, we performed a systematic review of the current evidence implicating changes in hydration and their association with ocular physiology and morphological characteristics. We also reviewed relevant clinical correlations of changes in hydration and major common eye diseases. Our findings suggest that systemic hydration status broadly affects a variety of ocular pathophysiologic processes and disease states. For example, dehydration may be associated with development of dry eye syndrome, cataract, refractive changes and retinal vascular disease. On the other hand, excessive hydration is associated with some ocular diseases. Tear fluid osmolarity may be an effective marker of systemic hydration status. Recent studies implicate chronic renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system activation in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma but also suggest its antagonism may be a useful therapeutic target. Our findings indicate that assessment of hydration status may be an important consideration in the management of patients with chronic eye diseases and undergoing eye surgery. Further research investigating the role of acute and chronic changes in hydration in individuals with and without ocular disease is warranted. © 2015 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  2. Final state effects in photoemission studies of Fermi surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurtz, Richard L; Browne, Dana A; Mankey, Gary J

    2007-01-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy is one of the most important methods for extracting information about the Fermi surface (FS) of materials. An electron photoexcited from the FS is emitted from the crystal conserving the parallel momentum, k parallel , while the perpendicular momentum k perpendicular is reduced due to the surface potential barrier. A simple interpretation of the process assumes the final state is free-electron-like allowing one to 'map' the detected photoelectron back to its initial k momentum. There are multiple final state effects that can complicate the interpretation of photoelectron data and these effects are reviewed here. These can involve both energy and k broadening, which can give rise to shadow or ghost FS contours, scattering and final state diffraction effects that modify intensities, and matrix element effects which reflect the symmetries of the states involved and can be highly dependent on photon polarization. These matrix elements result in contours of photoelectron intensity that follow the dispersion in k-space of the initial state, the FS, and the final state. Locations where intensities go to zero due to matrix element and symmetry effects can result in gaps where FS contours 'disappear'. Recognition that these effects can play a significant role in determining the measured angular distributions is crucial in developing an informed model of where the FS contours actually lie in relation to measured intensity contours

  3. Non-steady-state heat transfer of finned surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Y.; Kameoka, T.

    1974-01-01

    For many purposes, the finned surface is being used to increase heat transfer. Heat exchangers and fuel elements of gas cooled nuclear reactors require the use of the finned surface for high flux heat transfer. The problem is analytically treated by deriving a non-steady-state equation of radiative and convective heat transfer of annular and radial fins in case of sudden change of the fin-root temperature or heat flux. The numerical solution of temperature distribution along the fin is obtained for several typical transient cases. (U.S.)

  4. Band mapping of surface states vs. adsorbate coverage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotenberg, E.; Kevan, S.D.; Denlinger, J.D.; Chung, Jin-Wook

    1997-01-01

    The theory of electron bands, which arises from basic quantum mechanical principles, has been the cornerstone of solid state physics for over 60 years. Simply put, an energy band is an electron state in a solid whose energy varies with its momentum (similar to, but with a more complicated dependence than, how a free electron's energy is proportional to its momentum squared). Much attention over the last 15 years has been given to the study of band structure of surfaces and interfaces, especially as the applications of these two-dimensional systems have become increasingly important to industry and science. The ultraESCA endstation at beamline 7.01 at the Advanced Light Source was developed for very high-energy - (∼50 meV) and angular - ( 12 photons/sec) makes the detailed study of the evolution of bands possible. The authors are interested in learning how, when one forms a chemical bond between a metal and an overlaying atom or molecule, the resulting charge transfer to or from the adsorbate affects the surface bands. In some cases of interest, intermediate coverages lead to different band structure than at the extremes of clean and saturated surfaces. Surfaces of tungsten are particularly interesting, as their atomic geometry has been shown to be exquisitely sensitive to both the surface vibrational and electronic properties. In this study, the authors looked at the surface bands of tungsten ((110) surface), as a function both of coverage and mass of overlaying atoms. The adsorbed atoms were hydrogen and the alkali atoms lithium and cesium

  5. Hydration and nutrition knowledge in adolescent swimmers. Does water intake affect urine hydration markers after swimming?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesare Altavilla

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Little data exists regarding nutritional knowledge and hydration in adolescent swimmers. The aim of this study was to assess the level of nutrition and hydration knowledge and to describe the fluid balance in adolescent swimmers during training. A study was carried out with a cross-sectional descriptive part and a longitudinal part with repeated measurements over five swimming sessions. Eighty-six adolescent swimmers completed a questionnaire to assess their sport nutrition and hydration knowledge. Fluid balance and urine hydration markers were studied during training. Swimmers showed a limited nutrition knowledge (33.26 % ± SD 12.59 and meagre hydration knowledge (28.61 % ± SD 28.59. Females showed lower scores than male swimmers in nutrition and hydration knowledge. Based on urine specific gravity, swimmers started the training close to the euhydrated threshold (1.019 g/mL ± SD 0.008. Although urine specific gravity and urine colour were reduced after the training, there were minimal changes in body mass (-0.12 Kg ± SD 0.31. Sweat loss (2.67 g/min ± SD 3.23 and the net changes in the fluid balance (-0.22 % ± SD 0.59 were low. The poor knowledge in nutrition and hydration encountered in the swimmers can justify the development of a strategy to incorporate nutritional education programmes for this group. Body water deficit from swimming activity seems to be easily replaced with the water intake to maintain hydration. After the training, the urine of swimmers was diluted regardless of their water intake. Dilution of urine did not reflect real hydration state in swimming.

  6. Evaluation of Nutritional Status and Hydration in Patients on Chronic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Nutrition and hydration of the dialysis patients have major influences on the outcomes of chronic hemodialysis. Purpose: To characterize the states of nutrition and hydration in patients on chronic hemodialysis at Jos University Teaching Hospital (JUTH) and to evaluate the usefulness of measurements by ...

  7. Hydration behaviour of synthetic saponite at variable relative humidity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hydration behaviour of synthetic saponite was examined by X-ray powder diffraction simulation at various relative humidities (RH). The basal spacing of the Ca-saponite increased stepwise with increase in RH. The (00) reflections observed reflect single or dual hydration states of smectite. Quasi-rational, intermediate, or ...

  8. Overview of pressure-drawdown production-test results for the JAPEX/JNOC/GSC et al. Mallik 5L-38 gas hydrate production research well

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hancock, S.H.; Carle, D.; Weatherill, B. [APA Petroleum Engineering Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Dallimore, S.R. [Geological Survey of Canada, Pacific Geoscience Centre, Sidney, BC (Canada); Collett, T.S. [United States Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Satoh, T. [Japan Petroleum Exploration Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Inoue, T. [Japan National Oil Corp., Chiba (Japan)

    2005-07-01

    Schlumberger's Modular Dynamic Tester (MDT) cased hole wireline tool was used during a pressure drawdown production test at the Mallik 5L-38 well to successfully test separate hydrate intervals as well as free gas and water zones. This paper provided an overview of the pressure-drawdown testing operations and results. Preliminary analysis of the gas hydrate porous-media response was also presented. Two important phenomena were observed during the hydrate tests: (1) free gas was produced on a steady state basis following the initial clean-up flow of water, and (2) the pressure response upon shut-in displayed porous media effects and indicated both flow contribution and pressure effects beyond the surface area of the hydrate open to the wellbore. Since analytical pressure transient analysis software cannot incorporate dynamic reservoir parameters, conventional analytical techniques were used to evaluate the test data.

  9. Protein dynamics: hydration and cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heremans K.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The temperature-pressure behavior of proteins seems to be unique among the biological macromolecules. Thermodynamic as well as kinetic data show the typical elliptical stability diagram. This may be extended by assuming that the unfolded state gives rise to volume and enthalpy-driven liquid-liquid transitions. A molecular interpretation follows from the temperature and the pressure dependence of the hydration and cavities. We suggest that positron annihilation spectroscopy can provide additional quantitative evidence for the contributions of cavities to the dynamics of proteins. Only mature amyloid fibrils that form from unfolded proteins are very resistant to pressure treatment.

  10. Optical conductivity of topological surface states with emergent supersymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejko, Joseph; Witczak-Krempa, William

    Topological states of electrons present new avenues to explore the rich phenomenology of corre- lated quantum matter. Topological insulators (TIs) in particular offer an experimental setting to study novel quantum critical points (QCPs) of massless Dirac fermions, which exist on the sample's surface. Here, we obtain exact results for the zero- and finite-temperature optical conductivity at the semimetal-superconductor QCP for these topological surface states. This strongly interacting QCP is described by a scale invariant theory with emergent supersymmetry, which is a unique symmetry mixing bosons and fermions. We show that supersymmetry implies exact relations between the op- tical conductivity and two otherwise unrelated properties: the shear viscosity and the entanglement entropy. We discuss experimental considerations for the observation of these signatures in TIs. This work was supported by NSERC, CRC, CIFAR, and the University of Alberta.

  11. Morphology of methane hydrate host sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, K.W.; Feng, H.; Tomov, S.; Winters, W.J.; Eaton, M.; Mahajan, D.

    2005-01-01

    The morphological features including porosity and grains of methane hydrate host sediments were investigated using synchrotron computed microtomography (CMT) technique. The sediment sample was obtained during Ocean Drilling Program Leg 164 on the Blake Ridge at water depth of 2278.5 m. The CMT experiment was performed at the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source facility. The analysis gave ample porosity, specific surface area, mean particle size, and tortuosity. The method was found to be highly effective for the study of methane hydrate host sediments.

  12. Ultrasonic sound speed of hydrating calcium sulphate hemihydrate; part 2, the correlation of sound velocity to hydration degree

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Korte, A.C.J.; Brouwers, Jos; Fischer, H.B; Matthes, C.; Beuthan, C.

    2011-01-01

    In this article the sound velocity through a mix is correlated to the hydration degree of the mix. Models are presented predicting the sound velocity through fresh slurries and hardened products. These two states correspond to the starting and finishing point of the hydration process. The present

  13. Free energy surfaces in the superconducting mixed state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnemore, D. K.; Fang, M. M.; Bansal, N. P.; Farrell, D. E.

    1989-01-01

    The free energy surface for Tl2Ba2Ca2Cu3O1O has been measured as a function of temperature and magnetic field to determine the fundamental thermodynamic properties of the mixed state. The change in free energy, G(H)-G(O), is found to be linear in temperature over a wide range indicating that the specific heat is independent of field.

  14. Characteristics of SF{sub 6} gas hydrate formation mechanisms (kinetics) and surfactants effects on hydrate formation rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, B.; Lee, H.; Kim, Y.D. [Pusan National Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of). School of Materials Science and Engineering; Kim, Y.S.; Lee, J.D. [Korea Inst. of Industrial Technology, Busan (Korea, Republic of). Advanced Energy Resource Development Team

    2008-07-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is used as an insulating gas in a variety of industrial applications, and is a potent greenhouse gas (GHG). Gas hydrates are stable crystalline compounds formed by water and natural gas molecules that have relatively large cavities that can be occupied by guest molecules. SF{sub 6} gas is able to form hydrates at relatively mild conditions. This study investigated the hydrate formation mechanisms of SF{sub 6} gas, and presented a potential hydration treatment for the gas. The effects of surface active agents on SF{sub 6} gas hydrate formation were examined experimentally using Tween 20, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LABS). The surfactants showed promoter behaviour for SF{sub 6} gas hydrate formation. Formation rates occurred in 2 stages, with rates rapidly increasing during the second phase. The inflection point occurred approximately 30 minutes after the hydrate nucleation point. Results indicated the existence of a critical concentration of surfactants. It was concluded that SF{sub 6} gas hydrate formation rates were increased by the addition of surfactants. Further studies are needed to investigate 2-stage hydrate formation rates. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Direct Observations of Three Dimensional Growth of Hydrates Hosted in Porous Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerkar, P.; Jones, K; Kleinberg, R; Lindquist, W; Tomov, S; Feng, H; Mahajan, D

    2009-01-01

    The visualization of time-resolved three-dimensional growth of tetrahydrofuran hydrates with glass spheres of uniform size as porous media using synchrotron x-ray computed microtomography is presented. The images of hydrate patches, formed from excess tetrahydrofuran in aqueous solution, show random nucleation and growth concomitant with grain movement but independent of container-wall effect. Away from grain surfaces, hydrate surface curvature was convex showing that liquid, not hydrate, was the wetting phase, similar to ice growth in porous media. The extension of the observed behavior to methane hydrates could have implications in understanding their role in seafloor stability and climate change.

  16. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Sigal; Kent Newsham; Thomas Williams; Barry Freifeld; Timothy Kneafsey; Carl Sondergeld; Shandra Rai; Jonathan Kwan; Stephen Kirby; Robert Kleinberg; Doug Griffin

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. The work scope drilled and cored a well The Hot Ice No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was drilled from the surface to a measured depth of 2300 ft. There was almost 100% core recovery from the bottom of surface casing at 107 ft to total depth. Based on the best estimate of the bottom of the methane hydrate stability zone (which used new data obtained from Hot Ice No. 1 and new analysis of data from adjacent wells), core was recovered over its complete range. Approximately 580 ft of porous, mostly frozen, sandstone and 155 of conglomerate were recovered in the Ugnu Formation and approximately 215 ft of porous sandstone were recovered in the West Sak Formation. There were gas shows in the bottom

  17. Protein hydration and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Kataoka, Mikio

    2015-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering can measure the protein thermal fluctuations under the physiological aqueous environment, especially it is powerful to observe the low-energy protein dynamics in THz region, which are revealed theoretically to be coupled with solvations. Neutron enables the selective observation of protein and hydration water by deuteration. The complementary analysis with molecular dynamics simulation is also effective for the study of protein hydration. Some examples of the application toward the understanding of molecular basis of protein functions will be introduced. (author)

  18. Dehydration of plutonium or neptunium trichloride hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foropoulos, J. Jr.; Avens, L.R.; Trujillo, E.A.

    1992-03-24

    A process is described for preparing anhydrous actinide metal trichlorides of plutonium or neptunium by reacting an aqueous solution of an actinide metal trichloride selected from the group consisting of plutonium trichloride or neptunium trichloride with a reducing agent capable of converting the actinide metal from an oxidation state of +4 to +3 in a resultant solution, evaporating essentially all the solvent from the resultant solution to yield an actinide trichloride hydrate material, dehydrating the actinide trichloride hydrate material by heating the material in admixture with excess thionyl chloride, and recovering anhydrous actinide trichloride.

  19. Thermal Conductivity of Methane-Hydrate

    OpenAIRE

    Krivchikov, A. I.; Gorodilov, B. Ya.; Korolyuk, O. A.; Manzhelii, V. G.; Conrad, H.; Press, W.

    2004-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of the methane hydrate CH4 (5.75 H2O) was measured in the interval 2-140 K using the steady-state technique. The thermal conductivity corresponding to a homogeneous substance was calculated from the measured effective thermal conductivity obtained in the experiment. The temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity is typical for the thermal conductivity of amorphous solids. It is shown that after separation of the hydrate into ice and methane, at 240 K, the ther...

  20. Direct observation of a surface resonance state and surface band inversion control in black phosphorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlen, N.; Sanna, A.; Senkovskiy, B. V.; Petaccia, L.; Fedorov, A. V.; Profeta, G.; Grüneis, A.

    2018-01-01

    We report a Cs-doping-induced band inversion and the direct observation of a surface resonance state with an elliptical Fermi surface in black phosphorus (BP) using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. By selectively inducing a higher electron concentration (1.7 ×1014cm-2 ) in the topmost layer, the changes in the Coulomb potential are sufficiently large to cause surface band inversion between the parabolic valence band of BP and a parabolic surface state around the Γ point of the BP Brillouin zone. Tight-binding calculations reveal that band gap openings at the crossing points in the two high-symmetry directions of the Brillouin zone require out-of-plane hopping and breaking of the glide mirror symmetry. Ab initio calculations are in very good agreement with the experiment if a stacking fault on the BP surface is taken into account. The demonstrated level of control over the band structure suggests the potential application of few-layer phosphorene in topological field-effect transistors.

  1. Study of Agglomeration Characteristics of Hydrate Particles in Oil/Gas Pipelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wuchang Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The force acting on hydrate particles is the critical factor to hydrate slurry stability which serves as fundamental basis for slurry flow assurance. A comprehensive analysis of forces acting on the hydrate particles was executed to determine the major agglomeration forces and separation forces, and comparison of forces reveals that the main agglomeration force is capillary force and the main separation force is shear force. Furthermore, four main influencing factors deciding the hydrate particle agglomeration were also analyzed and calculated, which shows contacting angle of capillary bridge is the most important factor for hydrate particles agglomeration, while interface tension of oil and water is the least important one. Some methods must be adopted to change the surface of hydrate agglomerates from hydrophile to lipophilicity so as to control the agglomeration of hydrate particle, which is the significant guarantee for safe flow of oil and gas transporting pipeline with hydrate particles.

  2. Hydration effects of Al2 (MoO4)4 and AlPO4 phases in hydrotreating catalysts studied by solid state nuclear magnetic resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, O.H.; Lin, C.Y.; Haller, G.L.

    1992-01-01

    Catalytic hydrotreating, particularly with regard to hydrodesulfurization (HDS) and hydrodenitrogenation (HDN), has undergone rapid growth in the 1980s and its current capacity approaches 50% of installed crude refining capacity. Typical catalysts contain 15 ∼ 20 weight % MoO3 promoted with 2.5 ∼ 3.5 weight % CoO or NiO supported on γ-Al 2 O 3 . As a practical matter, the Mo precursor is stabilized in solution at low pH using H 3 PO 4 . Therefore, commercial catalysts in general also contain phosphorus. While hydrotreating catalysts are presulfided to achieve the desired activity and selectivity, both the fresh and regenerated catalysts are sold and transported in the oxidized state which results from calcination, or air oxidation. This process may result in some formation of surface Al 2 (MoO 4 ) 3 , particularly in the burn off of coke in the generation of the catalysts. It is generally assumed that this compound is catalytically inactive and stable in subsequent treatment; i.e., formation of Al 2 (MoO 4 ) 3 results in irreversible deactivation of the catalyst. However, the authors' results suggests that Al 2 (MoO 4 ) 3 is not as inert as has been assumed and that it might be possible to design schemes that would allow regeneration of an active Mo phase from Al 2 (MoO 4 ) 3 on alumina supports. Solid state NMR spectroscopy is one of a few techniques which are sensitive to elements at a surface,a nd which also give information on its electronic and geometric environment. In this paper, the authors report the investigation of surface species on a commercial NiPMo/Al 2 O 3 hydrotreating catalyst calcined at 750 degrees C before and after rehydration with solid state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of 27 Al, 31 P, and 95 Mo nuclei

  3. Antifreeze proteins: Adsorption to ice, silica and gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Huang; Brown, Alan; Wathen, Brent; Ripmeester, John A.; Walker, VIrginia K.

    2005-07-01

    Certain organisms survive under freezing conditions that could otherwise prove fatal by the synthesis of antifreeze proteins (AFPs). AFPs adsorb to the surface of microscopic ice crystals and prevent further ice growth, resulting in a noncolligative freezing point depression. Type I AFP from the winter flounder (wfAFP) is an alfa-helical, alanine-rich serum protein that helps protect against innoculative freezing from ice-laden seas. The AFP of a moth from the boreal forest, Choristoneura fumiferana (Cf), is a beta-helical threonine-rich protein that helps prevent freezing at the overwintering, caterpillar stage. In contrast, the beta-roll AFP from the grass, Lolium perenne (Lp), confers little freezing point depression and the plants readily freeze. Remarkably, AFPs also adsorb to tetrahyrofuran (THF) hydrate, changing the hydrate's octahedral morphology and, as well, inhibiting the growth of THF and gas hydrates. The hyperactive CfAFP, with 30-100 times the activity of wfAFP toward ice, showed far greater nucleation inhibition for THF hydrate than did a commercial hydrate inhibitor, poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP). Active AFPs were also judged to be superior to PVP in that they inhibited the memory effect, a phenomenon whereby hydrate reforms at a faster rate soon after melting. An inactive mutant wfAFP, with an amino acid substitution at the ice-binding site, also reduced the growth of THF hydrate but was ineffective at suppressing hydrate reformation. These results suggest that the molecular properties important for ice adsorption and inhibition of hydrate reformation may be similar, and are distinct from those required for hydrate growth inhibition. The different AFPs also show markedly different aggregations on a third hydrophilic substrate, silica. Together these studies suggest that AFP adsorption to ice, hydrates and silica depends on the overall structure, specific residues and protein-protein interactions. (Author)

  4. Surface defect indices and 2d-4d BPS states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdova, Clay; Gaiotto, Davide; Shao, Shu-Heng

    2017-12-01

    We conjecture a formula for the Schur index of four-dimensional N=2 theories coupled to (2, 2) surface defects in terms of the 2 d-4 d BPS spectrum in the Coulomb phase of the theory. The key ingredient in our conjecture is a refined 2 d-4 d wall-crossing invariant, which we also formulate. Our result intertwines recent conjectures expressing the four-dimensional Schur index in terms of infrared BPS particles, with the Cecotti-Vafa formula for limits of the elliptic genus in terms of two-dimensional BPS solitons. We extend our discussion to framed 2 d-4 d BPS states, and use this to demonstrate a general relationship between surface defect indices and line defect indices. We illustrate our results in the example of su(2) super Yang-Mills coupled to the ℂℙ1 sigma model defect.

  5. Aluminum Sulfate 18 Hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jay A.

    2004-01-01

    A chemical laboratory information profile (CLIP) of the chemical, aluminum sulfate 18 hydrate, is presented. The profile lists physical and harmful properties, exposure limits, reactivity risks, and symptoms of major exposure for the benefit of teachers and students using the chemical in the laboratory.

  6. Internal state distributions of molecules scattering and desorbing from surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auerbach, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    Attempts are made to interpret scattering experiments of NO molecules on Ag(111) where a (rotational) state-specific detector has been used. A model using an anisotropic potential is proposed to explain the observed incoming energy- and angle dependence. The so-called rotational rainbows are explained. It is concluded, that in this way information on intermolecular potentials and the transfer of translational to rotational energy in the dynamics of trapping and sticking of molecules on surfaces can be extracted. (G.Q.)

  7. Modified Critical State Two-Surface Plasticity Model for Sands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kris Wessel; Nielsen, Søren Kjær; Shajarati, Amir

    This article describes the outline of a numerical integration scheme for a critical state two-surface plasticity model for sands. The model is slightly modified by LeBlanc (2008) compared to the original formulation presented by Manzari and Dafalias (1997) and has the ability to correctly model...... the stress-strain response of sands. The model is versatile and can be used to simulate drained and undrained conditions, due to the fact that the model can efficiently calculate change in void ratio as well as pore pressure. The objective of the constitutive model is to investigate if the numerical...

  8. The Methane Hydrate Reservoir System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemings, P. B.; Liu, X.

    2007-12-01

    We use multi phase flow modeling and field examples (Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon and Blake Ridge, offshore North Carolina) to demonstrate that the methane hydrate reservoir system links traditional and non- traditional hydrocarbon system components: free gas flow is a fundamental control on this system. As in a traditional hydrocarbon reservoir, gas migrates into the hydrate reservoir as a separate phase (secondary migration) where it is trapped in a gas column beneath the base of the hydrate layer. With sufficient gas supply, buoyancy forces exceed either the capillary entry pressure of the cap rock or the fracture strength of the cap rock, and gas leaks into the hydrate stability zone, or cap rock. When gas enters the hydrate stability zone and forms hydrate, it becomes a very non traditional reservoir. Free gas forms hydrate, depletes water, and elevates salinity until pore water is too saline for further hydrate formation: salinity and hydrate concentration increase upwards from the base of the regional hydrate stability zone (RHSZ) to the seafloor and the base of the hydrate stability zone has significant topography. Gas chimneys couple the free gas zone to the seafloor through high salinity conduits that are maintained at the three-phase boundary by gas flow. As a result, significant amounts of gaseous methane can bypass the RHSZ, which implies a significantly smaller hydrate reservoir than previously envisioned. Hydrate within gas chimneys lie at the three-phase boundary and thus small increases in temperature or decreases in pressure can immediately transport methane into the ocean. This type of hydrate deposit may be the most economical for producing energy because it has very high methane concentrations (Sh > 70%) located near the seafloor, which lie on the three-phase boundary.

  9. Synthesis, crystal structure, spectroscopic characterization, Hirshfeld surface analysis, and DFT calculations of 1,4-dimethyl-2-oxo-pyrimido[1,2-a]benzimidazole hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bakri, Youness; Anouar, El Hassane; Ramli, Youssef; Essassi, El Mokhtar; Mague, Joel T.

    2018-01-01

    Imidazopyrimidine derivatives are organic synthesized compounds with a pyrimido[1,2-a]benzimidazole as basic skeleton. They are known for their various biological properties and as an important class of compounds in medicinal chemistry. A new 1,4-dimethyl-2-oxo-pyrimido[1,2-a]benzimidazole hydrate derivative of the tilted group has been synthesized and characterized by spectroscopic techniques NMR and FT-IR; and by a single crystal X-ray diffraction. The X-ray results showed that the tricyclic core of the title compound, C12H11N3O·H2O, is almost planar. The molecules stack along the a-axis direction in head-to- tail fashion through π-stacking interactions involving all three rings. The stacks are tied together by direct Csbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds and by Osbnd H⋯O, Osbnd N⋯N and Csbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds with the lattice water. DFT calculations at B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) in gas phase an polarizable continuum model have been carried out to predict the spectral and geometrical data of the tilted compound. The obtained results showed relatively good correlations between the predicted and experimental data with correlation coefficients higher than 98%.

  10. Ground movements associated with gas hydrate production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siriwardane, H.J.; Kutuk, B.

    1992-03-01

    This report deals with a study directed towards a modeling effort on production related ground movements and subsidence resulting from hydrate dissociation. The goal of this research study was to evaluate whether there could be subsidence related problems that could be an impediment to hydrate production. During the production of gas from a hydrate reservoir, it is expected that porous reservoir matrix becomes more compressible which may cause reservoir compression (compaction) under the influence of overburden weight. The overburden deformations can propagate its influence upwards causing subsidence near the surface where production equipment will be located. In the present study, the reservoir compaction is modeled by using the conventional ''stress equilibrium'' approach. In this approach, the overburden strata move under the influence of body force (i.e. self weight) in response to the ''cavity'' generated by reservoir depletion. The present study is expected to provide a ''lower bound'' solution to the subsidence caused by hydrate reservoir depletion. The reservoir compaction anticipated during hydrate production was modeled by using the finite element method, which is a powerful computer modeling technique. The ground movements at the reservoir roof (i.e. reservoir compression) cause additional stresses and disturbance in the overburden strata. In this study, the reservoir compaction was modeled by using the conventional ''stress equilibrium'' approach. In this approach, the overburden strata move under the influence of body force (i.e. self weight) in response to the ''cavity'' generated by reservoir depletion. The resulting stresses and ground movements were computed by using the finite element method. Based on the parameters used in this investigation, the maximum ground subsidence could vary anywhere from 0.50 to 6.50 inches depending on the overburden depth and the size of the depleted hydrate reservoir

  11. Computational Recreation of Carbon Dioxide Hydrates at Habitable Planetary Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recio, J. M.; Izquierdo-Ruiz, F.; Prieto-Ballesteros, O.

    2017-12-01

    Gas clathrate hydrates are proposed as constituents of the icy moons of the giant planets in the Solar System [1]. Carbon dioxide has been detected on the surface of the moons of Jupiter, supposedly originated by internal degasification. In Ganymede, an aqueous ocean is proposed to exist under a thick ice crust in coexistence with several forms of ice, with pressure reaching up to 1.3 GPa [2]. Due to the limited available data on these systems under these conditions, we propose a combination of computational and experimental studies to describe microscopically and macroscopically the structural and chemical behavior of CO2@H2O polymorphs. This will allow us to understand how their presence affects the geophysical structure and activity and their impact on the habitability of the icy moon. A transition from the sI cubic structure to a high pressure phase at around 0.7 GPa has been found for CO2@H2O. In spite of different attempts to characterize the new structure, a definite answer has not been provided yet. A MH-III Filled Ice Structure type was proposed after neutron diffraction experiments in contrast with an alternative structure similar to the hexagonal C0 type for H2 hydrates [3]. It has an estimated hydration level ratio up to 2H2O:1CO2 and 6 water molecules per unit cell. In the figure below, our optimized unit cell based on this hexagonal C0 structure is displayed. Ab initio calculations using the XDM approximation to include van der Waals effects are performed in our search for the pressure evolution of the equilibrium geometries of the C0-CO2@H2O phase and those of a close related structure to this one called Ih-C0, with 8 water molecules per unit cell. We obtain occupation energies at different hydration ratios, densities, equations of state parameters, and stability energies with respect to decomposition. Raman and IR frequencies are also computed in the 0-2 GPa range. High pressure experiments are also being done in a newly designed chamber able to

  12. Comparative study of protein dynamics in hydrated powders and in solutions: A neutron scattering investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marconi, M.; Cornicchi, E.; Onori, G.; Paciaroni, A.

    2008-01-01

    Neutron scattering spectroscopy on a time-of-flight spectrometer has been exploited to reveal the vibrational and relaxational spectral contributions of lysozyme in hydrated powder and solution states. The inelastic component of the dynamical structure factor seems to be quite similar for lysozyme in both the solid- and the liquid-state samples, particularly for energies higher than ∼4 meV. After the subtraction of this component, the quasielastic contribution is evaluated. In the case of hydrated lysozyme powder the quasielastic scattering follows a two-power law with a ballistic Gaussian decrease above ∼2 meV. The quasielastic scattering of lysozyme in solution exhibits a rather similar trend but a much larger intensity. This may be related to the increase of both the number and the amplitudes of the confined diffusive processes related to protein side-chains motions at the protein surface

  13. Modifying Cement Hydration with NS@PCE Core-Shell Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Gu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that fine particles could accelerate cement hydration process, or, more specifically, this accelerating effect can be attributed to additional surface area introduced by fine particles. In addition to this view, the surface state of fine particles is also an important factor, especially for nanoparticles. In the previous study, a series of nano-SiO2-polycarboxylate superplasticizer core-shell nanoparticles (NS@PCE were synthesized, which have a similar particle size distribution but different surface properties. In this study, the impact of NS@PCE on cement hydration was investigated by heat flow calorimetry, mechanical property measurement, XRD, and SEM. Results show that, among a series of NS@PCE, NS@PCE-2 with a moderate shell-core ratio appeared to be more effective in accelerating cement hydration. As dosage increases, the efficiency of NS@PCE-2 would reach a plateau which is quantified by various characteristic values. Compressive strength results indicate that strength has a linear correlation with cumulative heat release. A hypothesis was proposed to explain the modification effect of NS@PCE, which highlights a balance between initial dispersion and pozzolanic reactivity. This paper provides a new understanding for the surface modification of supplementary cementitious materials and their application and also sheds a new light on nano-SiO2 for optimizing cement-based materials.

  14. Hydration of Portland cement with additions of calcium sulfoaluminates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Saoût, Gwenn; Lothenbach, Barbara; Hori, Akihiro; Higuchi, Takayuki; Winnefeld, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The effect of mineral additions based on calcium aluminates on the hydration mechanism of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) was investigated using isothermal calorimetry, thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, solid state nuclear magnetic resonance and pore solution analysis. Results show that the addition of a calcium sulfoaluminate cement (CSA) to the OPC does not affect the hydration mechanism of alite but controls the aluminate dissolution. In the second blend investigated, a rapid setting cement, the amorphous calcium aluminate reacts very fast to ettringite. The release of aluminum ions strongly retards the hydration of alite but the C–S–H has a similar composition as in OPC with no additional Al to Si substitution. As in CSA–OPC, the aluminate hydration is controlled by the availability of sulfates. The coupling of thermodynamic modeling with the kinetic equations predicts the amount of hydrates and pore solution compositions as a function of time and validates the model in these systems.

  15. A new aluminium-hydrate species in hydrated Portland cements characterized by 27Al and 29Si MAS NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, Morten Daugaard; Jakobsen, Hans J.; Skibsted, Jorgen

    2006-01-01

    Recent 27 Al MAS NMR studies of hydrated Portland cements and calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H) phases have shown a resonance from Al in octahedral coordination, which cannot be assigned to the well-known aluminate species in hydrated Portland cements. This resonance, which exhibits the isotropic chemical shift δ iso = 5.0 ppm and the quadrupole product parameter P Q = 1.2 MHz, has been characterized in detail by 27 Al MAS and 27 Al{ 1 H} CP/MAS NMR for different hydrated white Portland cements and C-S-H phases. These experiments demonstrate that the resonance originates from an amorphous or disordered aluminate hydrate which contains Al(OH) 6 3- or O x Al(OH) 6-x (3+x)- units. The formation of the new aluminate hydrate is related to the formation of C-S-H at ambient temperatures, however, it decomposes by thermal treatment at temperatures of 70-90 o C. From the experiments in this work it is proposed that the new aluminate hydrate is either an amorphous/disordered aluminate hydroxide or a calcium aluminate hydrate, produced as a separate phase or as a nanostructured surface precipitate on the C-S-H phase. Finally, the possibilities of Al 3+ for Ca 2+ substitution in the principal layers and interlayers of the C-S-H structure are discussed

  16. Bound and resonant surface states at the (110) surfaces of AlSb, AlAs, and AlP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beres, R.P.; Allen, R.E.; Buisson, J.P.; Bowen, M.A.; Blackwell, G.F.; Hjalmarson, H.P.; Dow, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    The dispersion curves E(k-bar) have been calculated for bound and resonant (110) surface states of AlSb, AlAs, and AlP. AlSb is predicted to have no surface states within the bulk fundamental band gap, but AlAs and AlP are predicted to have surface state band minima which are very near the conduction band edge, and could lie either within the gap or immediately above the edge

  17. Portland cement hydration in the presence of admixtures: black gram pulse and superplasticizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viveka Nand Dwivedi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Effect of admixtures such as black gram pulse (BGP and sulfonated naphthalene based superplasticizer (SP on the hydration of Portland cement has been studied. The hydration characteristics of OPC in the presence of BGP and SP were studied with the help of non evaporable water content determinations, calorimetric method, Mössbauer spectroscopic and atomic force microscopic techniques. Results have shown that both BGP and SP get adsorbed at the surface of cement and its hydration products. The hydration of Portland cement is retarded in the presence of both the admixtures and nanosize hydration products are formed.

  18. Vibrational spectra of halide-water dimers: Insights on ion hydration from full-dimensional quantum calculations on many-body potential energy surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Pushp; Wang, Xiao-Gang; Carrington, Tucker; Paesani, Francesco

    2018-03-14

    Full-dimensional vibrational spectra are calculated for both X - (H 2 O) and X - (D 2 O) dimers (X = F, Cl, Br, I) at the quantum-mechanical level. The calculations are carried out on two sets of recently developed potential energy functions (PEFs), namely, Thole-type model energy (TTM-nrg) and many-body energy (MB-nrg), using the symmetry-adapted Lanczos algorithm with a product basis set including all six vibrational coordinates. Although both TTM-nrg and MB-nrg PEFs are derived from coupled-cluster single double triple-F12 data obtained in the complete basis set limit, they differ in how many-body effects are represented at short range. Specifically, while both models describe long-range interactions through the combination of two-body dispersion and many-body classical electrostatics, the relatively simple Born-Mayer functions employed in the TTM-nrg PEFs to represent short-range interactions are replaced in the MB-nrg PEFs by permutationally invariant polynomials to achieve chemical accuracy. For all dimers, the MB-nrg vibrational spectra are in close agreement with the available experimental data, correctly reproducing anharmonic and nuclear quantum effects. In contrast, the vibrational frequencies calculated with the TTM-nrg PEFs exhibit significant deviations from the experimental values. The comparison between the TTM-nrg and MB-nrg results thus reinforces the notion that an accurate representation of both short-range interactions associated with electron density overlap and long-range many-body electrostatic interactions is necessary for a correct description of hydration phenomena at the molecular level.

  19. Vibrational spectra of halide-water dimers: Insights on ion hydration from full-dimensional quantum calculations on many-body potential energy surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Pushp; Wang, Xiao-Gang; Carrington, Tucker; Paesani, Francesco

    2018-03-01

    Full-dimensional vibrational spectra are calculated for both X-(H2O) and X-(D2O) dimers (X = F, Cl, Br, I) at the quantum-mechanical level. The calculations are carried out on two sets of recently developed potential energy functions (PEFs), namely, Thole-type model energy (TTM-nrg) and many-body energy (MB-nrg), using the symmetry-adapted Lanczos algorithm with a product basis set including all six vibrational coordinates. Although both TTM-nrg and MB-nrg PEFs are derived from coupled-cluster single double triple-F12 data obtained in the complete basis set limit, they differ in how many-body effects are represented at short range. Specifically, while both models describe long-range interactions through the combination of two-body dispersion and many-body classical electrostatics, the relatively simple Born-Mayer functions employed in the TTM-nrg PEFs to represent short-range interactions are replaced in the MB-nrg PEFs by permutationally invariant polynomials to achieve chemical accuracy. For all dimers, the MB-nrg vibrational spectra are in close agreement with the available experimental data, correctly reproducing anharmonic and nuclear quantum effects. In contrast, the vibrational frequencies calculated with the TTM-nrg PEFs exhibit significant deviations from the experimental values. The comparison between the TTM-nrg and MB-nrg results thus reinforces the notion that an accurate representation of both short-range interactions associated with electron density overlap and long-range many-body electrostatic interactions is necessary for a correct description of hydration phenomena at the molecular level.

  20. Arctic Gas hydrate, Environment and Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mienert, Jurgen; Andreassen, Karin; Bünz, Stefan; Carroll, JoLynn; Ferre, Benedicte; Knies, Jochen; Panieri, Giuliana; Rasmussen, Tine; Myhre, Cathrine Lund

    2015-04-01

    Arctic methane hydrate exists on land beneath permafrost regions and offshore in shelf and continental margins sediments. Methane or gas hydrate, an ice-like substrate, consists mainly of light hydrocarbons (mostly methane from biogenic sources but also ethane and propane from thermogenic sources) entrapped by a rigid cage of water molecules. The pressure created by the overlying water and sediments offshore stabilizes the CH4 in continental margins at a temperature range well above freezing point; consequently CH4 exists as methane ice beneath the seabed. Though the accurate volume of Arctic methane hydrate and thus the methane stored in hydrates throughout the Quaternary is still unknown it must be enormous if one considers the vast regions of Arctic continental shelves and margins as well as permafrost areas offshore and on land. Today's subseabed methane hydrate reservoirs are the remnants from the last ice age and remain elusive targets for both unconventional energy and as a natural methane emitter influencing ocean environments and ecosystems. It is still contentious at what rate Arctic warming may govern hydrate melting, and whether the methane ascending from the ocean floor through the hydrosphere reaches the atmosphere. As indicated by Greenland ice core records, the atmospheric methane concentration rose rapidly from ca. 500 ppb to ca. 750 ppb over a short time period of just 150 years at the termination of the younger Dryas period ca. 11600 years ago, but the dissociation of large quantities of methane hydrates on the ocean floor have not been documented yet (Brook et al., 2014 and references within). But with the major projected warming and sea ice melting trend (Knies et al., 2014) one may ask, for how long will CH4 stay trapped in methane hydrates if surface and deep-ocean water masses will warm and permafrost continuous to melt (Portnov et al. 2014). How much of the Arctic methane will be consumed by the micro- and macrofauna, how much will

  1. Anhydrate to hydrate solid-state transformations of carbamazepine and nitrofurantoin in biorelevant media studied in situ using time-resolved synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtker, Johan Peter; Rantanen, Jukka; Arnfast, Lærke

    2016-01-01

    with different biorelevant media, simulated fasted and fed state intestinal fluids containing bile salt and dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) micelles, DOPC/sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) mixture, bile salt solution and water. Two anhydrate compounds (carbamazepine, CBZ and nitrofurantoin, NF) with different...... analysis, PCA) and compared to those for nitrofurantoin (NF). The study showed that the solution-mediated phase transformation of CBZ anhydrate was remarkably faster in the DOPC/SDS medium compared to transformation in all the other aqueous dispersion media. The conversion time for CBZ anhydrate in water...... was shorter than for DOPC/SDS but still faster than the conversion seen in fed and fasted state micellar media. The conversion of CBZ anhydrate to hydrate was the slowest in the solution containing bile salt alone. In contrast, the solution-mediated phase transformations of NF did only show limited kinetic...

  2. Overview of thermal stimulation production test results for the Japex/JNOC/GSC Mallik 5L-38 gas hydrate research well

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hancock, S. [APA Petroleum Engineering Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Collett, T. [United States Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Dallimore, S. [Geological Survey of Canada, Sidney, BC (Canada); Satoh, T. [Japan Petroleum Exploration Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Inoue, T. [Japan National Oil Corp., Chiba (Japan); Huenges, E.; Henninges, J. [GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam, Potsdam (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    The production data obtained during a thermal stimulation test program at the Mallik 5L-38 research test well was presented. The test was used to observe the dissociation of a well-defined and constrained hydrate interval at temperatures above the hydrate stability point and at constant pressure. Tests results were used to calibrate numerical simulation models to determine the in-situ kinetic and thermodynamic properties of the hydrate. The Mallik 5L-38 program involved the collection of surface and downhole data as well as the use of several advanced monitoring and investigation tools and services such as mass flow meters to measure low and unsteady-state gas production volumes; a fibre-optic distributed temperature sensing system installed on the outside of the production casing to measure temperature from the surface to below the hydrate thermal test interval; a chemical tracer in the thermal circulation fluid to detect dilution; continuous on-line gas chromatograph readings; a gas sampling program for conventional and isotope analyses; cross-hole tomography and other seismic surveys; and a post-test cased hole logging program with Schlumberger's Reservoir Saturation Tool and Cased Hole Formation Resistivity tools to determine the radius of hydrate dissociation. The thermal stimulation test resulted in increased bottom hole temperature which remained constant above 50 degrees C. Dissociated gas was produced, sampled, and flared at surface. In addition, large amounts of real-time downhole temperature and pressure data was obtained. 1 fig.

  3. NMR Studies of Protein Hydration and Protein-Ligand Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Yuan

    Water on the surface of a protein is called hydration water. Hydration water is known to play a crucial role in a variety of biological processes including protein folding, enzymatic activation, and drug binding. Although the significance of hydration water has been recognized, the underlying mechanism remains far from being understood. This dissertation employs a unique in-situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique to study the mechanism of protein hydration and the role of hydration in alcohol-protein interactions. Water isotherms in proteins are measured at different temperatures via the in-situ NMR technique. Water is found to interact differently with hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups on the protein. Water adsorption on hydrophilic groups is hardly affected by the temperature, while water adsorption on hydrophobic groups strongly depends on the temperature around 10 C, below which the adsorption is substantially reduced. This effect is induced by the dramatic decrease in the protein flexibility below 10 C. Furthermore, nanosecond to microsecond protein dynamics and the free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of protein hydration are studied as a function of hydration level and temperature. A crossover at 10 C in protein dynamics and thermodynamics is revealed. The effect of water at hydrophilic groups on protein dynamics and thermodynamics shows little temperature dependence, whereas water at hydrophobic groups has stronger effect above 10 C. In addition, I investigate the role of water in alcohol binding to the protein using the in-situ NMR detection. The isotherms of alcohols are first measured on dry proteins, then on proteins with a series of controlled hydration levels. The free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of alcohol binding are also determined. Two distinct types of alcohol binding are identified. On the one hand, alcohols can directly bind to a few specific sites on the protein. This type of binding is independent of temperature and can be

  4. Exploitation of marine gas hydrates: Benefits and risks (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallmann, K. J.

    2013-12-01

    Vast amounts of natural gas are stored in marine gas hydrates deposited at continental margins. The global inventory of carbon bound as methane in gas hydrates is currently estimated as 1000 × 500 Gt. Large-scale national research projects located mostly in South-East Asia but also in North America and Europe are aiming to exploit these ice-like solids as new unconventional resource of natural gas. Japan, South Korea and other Asian countries are taking the lead because their national waters harbor exploitable gas hydrate deposits which could be developed to reduce the dependency of these nations on costly LGN imports. In 2013, the first successful production test was performed off Japan at water depths of ca. 1000 m demonstrating that natural gas can be released and produced from marine hydrates by lowering the pressure in the sub-seabed hydrate reservoirs. In an alternative approach, CO2 from coal power plans and other industrial sources is used to release natural gas (methane) from hydrates while CO2 is bound and stored in the sub-surface as solid hydrate. These new approaches and technologies are still in an early pre-commercial phase; the costs of field development and gas production exceed the value of natural gas being produced from the slowly dissociating hydrates. However, new technologies are currently under development in the German SUGAR project and elsewhere to reduce costs and enhance gas production rates such that gas hydrates may become commercially exploitable over the coming decade(s). The exploitation of marine gas hydrates may help to reduce CO2 emissions from the fossil fuel sector if the produced natural gas is used to replace coal and/or LNG. Hydrate development could also provide important incentives for carbon capture technologies since CO2 can be used to produce natural gas from hydrates. However, leakage of gas may occur during the production process while slope failure may be induced by the accompanying dissociation/conversion of gas

  5. Modeling Hydrates and the Gas Hydrate Markup Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihua Wang

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural gas hydrates, as an important potential fuels, flow assurance hazards, and possible factors initiating the submarine geo-hazard and global climate change, have attracted the interest of scientists all over the world. After two centuries of hydrate research, a great amount of scientific data on gas hydrates has been accumulated. Therefore the means to manage, share, and exchange these data have become an urgent task. At present, metadata (Markup Language is recognized as one of the most efficient ways to facilitate data management, storage, integration, exchange, discovery and retrieval. Therefore the CODATA Gas Hydrate Data Task Group proposed and specified Gas Hydrate Markup Language (GHML as an extensible conceptual metadata model to characterize the features of data on gas hydrate. This article introduces the details of modeling portion of GHML.

  6. Overview: Nucleation of clathrate hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrier, Pramod; Khan, M. Naveed; Srivastava, Vishal; Maupin, C. Mark; Koh, Carolyn A.

    2016-12-01

    Molecular level knowledge of nucleation and growth of clathrate hydrates is of importance for advancing fundamental understanding on the nature of water and hydrophobic hydrate formers, and their interactions that result in the formation of ice-like solids at temperatures higher than the ice-point. The stochastic nature and the inability to probe the small length and time scales associated with the nucleation process make it very difficult to experimentally determine the molecular level changes that lead to the nucleation event. Conversely, for this reason, there have been increasing efforts to obtain this information using molecular simulations. Accurate knowledge of how and when hydrate structures nucleate will be tremendously beneficial for the development of sustainable hydrate management strategies in oil and gas flowlines, as well as for their application in energy storage and recovery, gas separation, carbon sequestration, seawater desalination, and refrigeration. This article reviews various aspects of hydrate nucleation. First, properties of supercooled water and ice nucleation are reviewed briefly due to their apparent similarity to hydrates. Hydrate nucleation is then reviewed starting from macroscopic observations as obtained from experiments in laboratories and operations in industries, followed by various hydrate nucleation hypotheses and hydrate nucleation driving force calculations based on the classical nucleation theory. Finally, molecular simulations on hydrate nucleation are discussed in detail followed by potential future research directions.

  7. Synchrotron X-ray computed microtomography study on gas hydrate decomposition in a sedimentary matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Falenty, Andrzej; Chaouachi, Marwen; Haberthür, David; Kuhs, Werner F.

    2016-09-01

    In-situ synchrotron X-ray computed microtomography with sub-micrometer voxel size was used to study the decomposition of gas hydrates in a sedimentary matrix. Xenon-hydrate was used instead of methane hydrate to enhance the absorption contrast. The microstructural features of the decomposition process were elucidated indicating that the decomposition starts at the hydrate-gas interface; it does not proceed at the contacts with quartz grains. Melt water accumulates at retreating hydrate surface. The decomposition is not homogeneous and the decomposition rates depend on the distance of the hydrate surface to the gas phase indicating a diffusion-limitation of the gas transport through the water phase. Gas is found to be metastably enriched in the water phase with a concentration decreasing away from the hydrate-water interface. The initial decomposition process facilitates redistribution of fluid phases in the pore space and local reformation of gas hydrates. The observations allow also rationalizing earlier conjectures from experiments with low spatial resolutions and suggest that the hydrate-sediment assemblies remain intact until the hydrate spacers between sediment grains finally collapse; possible effects on mechanical stability and permeability are discussed. The resulting time resolved characteristics of gas hydrate decomposition and the influence of melt water on the reaction rate are of importance for a suggested gas recovery from marine sediments by depressurization.

  8. Numerical analysis of wellbore instability in gas hydrate formation during deep-water drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huaiwen; Cheng, Yuanfang; Li, Qingchao; Yan, Chuanliang; Han, Xiuting

    2018-02-01

    Gas hydrate formation may be encountered during deep-water drilling because of the large amount and wide distribution of gas hydrates under the shallow seabed of the South China Sea. Hydrates are extremely sensitive to temperature and pressure changes, and drilling through gas hydrate formation may cause dissociation of hydrates, accompanied by changes in wellbore temperatures, pore pressures, and stress states, thereby leading to wellbore plastic yield and wellbore instability. Considering the coupling effect of seepage of drilling fluid into gas hydrate formation, heat conduction between drilling fluid and formation, hydrate dissociation, and transformation of the formation framework, this study established a multi-field coupling mathematical model of the wellbore in the hydrate formation. Furthermore, the influences of drilling fluid temperatures, densities, and soaking time on the instability of hydrate formation were calculated and analyzed. Results show that the greater the temperature difference between the drilling fluid and hydrate formation is, the faster the hydrate dissociates, the wider the plastic dissociation range is, and the greater the failure width becomes. When the temperature difference is greater than 7°C, the maximum rate of plastic deformation around the wellbore is more than 10%, which is along the direction of the minimum horizontal in-situ stress and associated with instability and damage on the surrounding rock. The hydrate dissociation is insensitive to the variation of drilling fluid density, thereby implying that the change of the density of drilling fluids has a minimal effect on the hydrate dissociation. Drilling fluids that are absorbed into the hydrate formation result in fast dissociation at the initial stage. As time elapses, the hydrate dissociation slows down, but the risk of wellbore instability is aggravated due to the prolonged submersion in drilling fluids. For the sake of the stability of the wellbore in deep

  9. Molecular mechanisms responsible for hydrate anti-agglomerant performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Anh; Bui, Tai; Acosta, Erick; Krishnamurthy, Pushkala; Striolo, Alberto

    2016-09-28

    Steered and equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations were employed to study the coalescence of a sI hydrate particle and a water droplet within a hydrocarbon mixture. The size of both the hydrate particle and the water droplet is comparable to that of the aqueous core in reverse micelles. The simulations were repeated in the presence of various quaternary ammonium chloride surfactants. We investigated the effects due to different groups on the quaternary head group (e.g. methyl vs. butyl groups), as well as different hydrophobic tail lengths (e.g. n-hexadecyl vs. n-dodecyl tails) on the surfactants' ability to prevent coalescence. Visual inspection of sequences of simulation snapshots indicates that when the water droplet is not covered by surfactants it is more likely to approach the hydrate particle, penetrate the protective surfactant film, reach the hydrate surface, and coalesce with the hydrate than when surfactants are present on both surfaces. Force-distance profiles obtained from steered molecular dynamics simulations and free energy profiles obtained from umbrella sampling suggest that surfactants with butyl tripods on the quaternary head group and hydrophobic tails with size similar to the solvent molecules can act as effective anti-agglomerants. These results qualitatively agree with macroscopic experimental observations. The simulation results provide additional insights, which could be useful in flow assurance applications: the butyl tripod provides adhesion between surfactants and hydrates; when the length of the surfactant tail is compatible with that of the hydrocarbon in the liquid phase a protective film can form on the hydrate; however, once a molecularly thin chain of water molecules forms through the anti-agglomerant film, connecting the water droplet and the hydrate, water flows to the hydrate and coalescence is inevitable.

  10. Hydration process of nuclear-waste glass: an interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, J.K.; Jardine, L.J.; Steindler, M.J.

    1982-07-01

    Aging of simulated nuclear waste glass by contact with a controlled-temperature, humid atmosphere results in the formation of a double hydration layer penetrating the glass, as well as the formation of minerals on the glass surface. The hydration process can be described by Arrhenius behavior between 120 and 240 0 C. Results suggest that simulated aging reactions are necessary for demonstrating that nuclear waste forms can meet projected Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations. 16 figures, 4 tables

  11. Rapid gas hydrate formation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Unione, Alfred J.

    2013-01-15

    The disclosure provides a method and apparatus for forming gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas. The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone which may be wholly included within the body of a spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction zone, where the reaction zone is under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for formation of the gas hydrate. The reaction zone pressure is less than the mixing zone pressure so that expansion of the hydrate-forming gas in the mixture provides a degree of cooling by the Joule-Thompson effect and provides more intimate mixing between the water and the hydrate-forming gas. The result of the process is the formation of gas hydrates continuously and with a greatly reduced induction time. An apparatus for conduct of the method is further provided.

  12. Gel phase in hydrated calcium dipicolinate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajak, Pankaj; Mishra, Ankit; Sheng, Chunyang; Tiwari, Subodh; Krishnamoorthy, Aravind; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2017-11-01

    The mineralization of dipicolinic acid (DPA) molecules in bacterial spore cores with Ca2+ ions to form Ca-DPA is critical to the wet-heat resistance of spores. This resistance to "wet-heat" also depends on the physical properties of water and DPA in the hydrated Ca-DPA-rich protoplasm. Using reactive molecular dynamics simulations, we have determined the phase diagram of hydrated Ca-DPA as a function of temperature and water concentration, which shows the existence of a gel phase along with distinct solid-gel and gel-liquid phase transitions. Simulations reveal monotonically decreasing solid-gel-liquid transition temperatures with increasing hydration, which explains the experimental trend of wet-heat resistance of bacterial spores. Our observation of different phases of water also reconciles previous conflicting experimental findings on the state of water in bacterial spores. Further comparison with an unmineralized hydrated DPA system allows us to quantify the importance of Ca mineralization in decreasing diffusivity and increasing the heat resistance of the spore.

  13. Potential Energy Surface of NO on Pt(997: Adsorbed States and Surface Diffusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Tsukahara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential energy surface (PES of NO on Pt(997 has been elucidated: the adsorption states and diffusion processes of NO on Pt(997 at low coverage were investigated by using infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM. When NO molecules adsorb on a surface at a low temperature (11 K, each molecule transiently migrates on the surface from the first impact point to a possible adsorption site. We found that there are four stable adsorption sites for NO on Pt(997: a bridge site of the upper step, an fcc- (or hcp- hollow site of the terrace, an on-top site of the terrace, and an fcc-hollow site of the lower step. At higher temperatures above 45 K, NO molecules start to migrate thermally to more stable adsorption sites on a terrace, and they are finally trapped at the bridge sites of the step, which are the most stable among the four sites.

  14. MORPHOLOGY OF METHANE HYDRATE HOST SEDIMENTS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JONES,K.W.; FENG,H.; TOMOV,S.; WINTER,W.J.; EATON,M.; MAHAJAN,D.

    2004-12-01

    Results from simulated experiments in several laboratories show that host sediments influence hydrate formation in accord with known heterogeneity of host sediments at sites of gas hydrate occurrence (1). For example, in Mackenzie Delta, NWT Canada (Mallik 2L-38 well), coarser-grained units (pore-filling model) are found whereas in the Gulf of Mexico, the found hydrate samples do not appear to be lithologically controlled. We have initiated a systematic study of sediments, initially focusing on samples from various depths at a specific site, to establish a correlation with hydrate occurrence (or variations thereof) to establish differences in their microstructure, porosity, and other associated properties. The synchrotron computed microtomography (CMT) set-up at the X-27A tomography beam line at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), Brookhaven National Laboratory was used as a tool to study sediments from Blake Ridge at three sub bottom depths of 0.2, 50, and 667 meters. Results from the tomographic analysis of the deepest sample (667 m) are presented here to illustrate how tomography can be used to obtain new insights into the structures of methane hydrate host sediments. The investigation shows the internal grain/pore space resolution in the microstructure and a 3-D visualization of the connecting pathways obtained following data segmentation into pore space and grains within the sediment sample. The analysis gives the sample porosity, specific surface area, mean particle size, and tortuosity, as well. An earlier report on the experimental program has been given by Mahajan et al. (2).

  15. Residue specific hydration of primary cell wall potato pectin identified by solid-state 13C single-pulse MAS and CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Flemming Hofmann; Chrestensen, Inge Byg; Damager, Iben

    2011-01-01

    Hydration of rhamnogalacturonan-I (RG-I) derived from potato cell wall was analyzed by 13C single-pulse (SP) magic-angle-spinning (MAS) and 13C cross-polarization (CP) MAS nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and supported by 2H SP/MAS NMR experiments. The study shows that the arabinan side chains...... hydrate more readily than the galactan side chains and suggests that the overall hydration properties can be controlled by modifying the ratio of these side chains. Enzymatic modification of native (NA) RG-I provided samples with reduced content of arabinan (sample DA), galactan (sample DG), or both side...... chains (sample DB). Results of these samples suggested that hydration properties were determined by the length and character of the side chains. NA and DA exhibited similar hydration characteristics, whereas DG and DB were difficult to hydrate because of the less hydrophilic properties of the rhamnose...

  16. Study on p-Wave Attenuation in Hydrate-Bearing Sediments Based on BISQ Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanhui Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In hydrate-bearing sediments, the elastic wave attenuation characteristics depend on the elastic properties of the sediments themselves on the one hand, and on the other hand, they also depend on the hydrate occurrence state and hydrate saturation. Since the hydrate-bearing sediments always have high porosity, so they show significant porous medium characteristics. Based on the BISQ porous medium model which is the most widely used model to study the attenuation characteristics in the porous media, we focused on p-wave attenuation in hydrate-bearing sediments in Shenhu Area, South China Sea, especially in specific seismic frequency range, which lays a foundation for the identification of gas hydrates by using seismic wave attenuation in Shenhu Area, South China Sea. Our results depict that seismic wave attenuation is an effective attribute to identify gas hydrates.

  17. Carbonation of wollastonite(001) competing hydration: microscopic insights from ion spectroscopy and density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Roberto C; Cho, Kyeongjae; Brüner, Philipp; Welle, Alexander; Gerdes, Andreas; Thissen, Peter

    2015-03-04

    In this paper, we report about the influence of the chemical potential of water on the carbonation reaction of wollastonite (CaSiO3) as a model surface of cement and concrete. Total energy calculations based on density functional theory combined with kinetic barrier predictions based on nudge elastic band method show that the exposure of the water-free wollastonite surface to CO2 results in a barrier-less carbonation. CO2 reacts with the surface oxygen and forms carbonate (CO3(2-)) complexes together with a major reconstruction of the surface. The reaction comes to a standstill after one carbonate monolayer has been formed. In case one water monolayer is covering the wollastonite surface, the carbonation is no more barrier-less, yet ending in a localized monolayer. Covered with multilayers of water, the thermodynamic ground state of the wollastonite completely changes due to a metal-proton exchange reaction (also called early stage hydration) and Ca(2+) ions are partially removed from solid phase into the H2O/wollastonite interface. Mobile Ca(2+) reacts again with CO2 and forms carbonate complexes, ending in a delocalized layer. By means of high-resolution time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry images, we confirm that hydration can lead to a partially delocalization of Ca(2+) ions on wollastonite surfaces. Finally, we evaluate the impact of our model surface results by the meaning of low-energy ion-scattering spectroscopy combined with careful discussion about the competing reactions of carbonation vs hydration.

  18. Hydrate plugging or slurry flow : effect of key variables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dellecase, E.; Geraci, G.; Barrios, L.; Estanga, D.; Domingues, R.; Volk, M. [Tulsa Univ., Tulsa, OK (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Although oil and gas companies have proven design criteria and proper operating procedures to prevent hydrate plugs from forming, hydrates remain the primary issue in flow assurance. The costs associated with hydrate prevention affect project economics, particularly in deepwater pipelines. As such, there is an interest in developing a technology that allows hydrates to be transported as a slurry, while avoiding plugs. The feasibility of managing such hydrate flow was investigated. This study used a hydrate flow loop to investigate the effects of flow conditions on the transportability of a slurry in both steady-state and restart conditions. For most cases, uninhibited steady-state slurry flow conditions above 25 per cent water-cut were marginal, and most likely not feasible at 50 per cent water-cut or above. Liquid loading and velocity appeared to have a marginal effect on plugging tendency. However, minimum velocity may be needed to guarantee slurry transportation. Some of the important parameters and key variables that determine if a plug will form, particularly in restart conditions, include oil-water dispersion properties; oil-water phase segregation on the plugging tendency of model fluids; the location and state of the water; and the flow pattern. It was concluded that the plugging behaviour of oil systems changes with these variables, and with the oil-water chemistry. As such, specific strategies must be developed for each field. 4 refs., 1 tab., 14 figs.

  19. Full-dimensional, high-level ab initio potential energy surfaces for H{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O) and H{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} with application to hydrogen clathrate hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homayoon, Zahra; Conte, Riccardo; Qu, Chen; Bowman, Joel M., E-mail: jmbowma@emory.edu [Cherry L. Emerson Center for Scientific Computation and Department of Chemistry, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)

    2015-08-28

    New, full-dimensional potential energy surfaces (PESs), obtained using precise least-squares fitting of high-level electronic energy databases, are reported for intrinsic H{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O) two-body and H{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} three-body potentials. The database for H{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O) consists of approximately 44 000 energies at the coupled cluster singles and doubles plus perturbative triples (CCSD(T))-F12a/haQZ (aug-cc-pVQZ for O and cc-pVQZ for H) level of theory, while the database for the three-body interaction consists of more than 36 000 energies at the CCSD(T)-F12a/haTZ (aug-cc-pVTZ for O, cc-pVTZ for H) level of theory. Two precise potentials are based on the invariant-polynomial technique and are compared to computationally faster ones obtained via “purified” symmetrization. All fits use reduced permutational symmetry appropriate for these non-covalent interactions. These intrinsic potentials are employed together with existing ones for H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and (H{sub 2}O){sub 2}, to obtain full PESs for H{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O) and H{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}. Properties of these full PESs are presented, including a diffusion Monte Carlo calculation of the zero-point energy and wavefunction, and dissociation energy of the H{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O) dimer. These PESs together with an existing one for water clusters are used in a many-body representation of the PES of hydrogen clathrate hydrates, illustrated for H{sub 2}@(H{sub 2}O){sub 20}. An analysis of this hydrate is presented, including the electronic dissociation energy to remove H{sub 2} from the calculated equilibrium structure.

  20. Thermal Regeneration of Sulfuric Acid Hydrates after Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffler, Mark J.; Hudson, Reggie L.

    2012-01-01

    In an attempt to more completely understand the surface chemistry of the jovian icy satellites, we have investigated the effect of heating on two irradiated crystalline sulfuric acid hydrates, H2SO4 4H2O and H2SO4 H2O. At temperatures relevant to Europa and the warmer jovian satellites, post-irradiation heating recrystallized the amorphized samples and increased the intensities of the remaining hydrate's infrared absorptions. This thermal regeneration of the original hydrates was nearly 100% efficient, indicating that over geological times, thermally-induced phase transitions enhanced by temperature fluctuations will reform a large fraction of crystalline hydrated sulfuric acid that is destroyed by radiation processing. The work described is the first demonstration of the competition between radiation-induced amorphization and thermally-induced recrystallization in icy ionic solids relevant to the outer Solar System.

  1. Hydrated-ion ordering in electrical double layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Marzal, Rosa M; Drobek, Tanja; Balmer, Tobias; Heuberger, Manfred P

    2012-05-07

    In this work we revisit the surface forces measured between two atomically flat mica surfaces submerged in a reservoir of potassium nitrate (KNO(3)) solution. We consider a comprehensive range of concentrations from 0.08 mM to 2.6 M. The significantly improved resolution available from the extended surface force apparatus (eSFA) allows the distinction of hydration structures and hydrated-ion correlations. Above concentrations of 0.3 mM, hydrated-ion correlations give rise to multiple collective transitions (4 ± 1 Å) in the electrical double layers upon interpenetration. These features are interpreted as the result of hydrated-ion ordering (e.g. layering), in contrast to the traditional interpretation invoking water layering. The hydrated-ion layer adjacent to the surface (i.e. outer Helmholtz layer) is particularly well defined and plays a distinctive role. It can be either collectively expelled in a 5.8 ± 0.3 Å film-thickness transition or collectively forced to associate with the surface by external mechanical work. The latter is observed as a characteristic 2.9 ± 0.3 Å film-thickness transition along with an abrupt decrease of surface adhesion at concentrations above 1 mM. At concentrations as low as 20 mM, attractive surface forces are measured in deviation to the DLVO theory. The hydration number in the confined electrolyte seems to be significantly below that of the bulk. A 1-3 nm thick ionic layer solidifies at the surfaces at concentrations >100 mM, i.e. below bulk saturation.

  2. Discrete surface state related to nitrogen-vacancy defect on plasma-treated GaN surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Hashizume, Tamotsu; Nakasaki, Ryusuke

    2002-01-01

    Detailed studies on the defect-related surface states of plasma-exposed n-GaN surfaces were carried out. An anomalous flat portion appeared in the metal–insulator–semiconductor capacitance–voltage characteristics for the sample exposed to H2 plasma, corresponding to a localized peak at EC–0.5 eV in the surface state density distribution. Atomic-force microscope and x-ray photoemission studies revealed the formation of Ga droplets on H2-plasma-treated GaN surfaces, caused by the desorption of ...

  3. Ultrasonic assessment of early age property development in hydrating cementitious materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojun

    The internal structure (microstructure) of cementitious materials, such as cement paste, mortar and concrete, evolves over time because of cement hydration. The microstructure of the cementitious phase plays a very important role in determining the strength, the mechanical properties and the long-term durability of cementitious materials. Therefore any understanding of the strength gain and the long-term durability of cementitious materials requires a proper assessment of the microstructure of its cementitious phase. Current methods for evaluating the microstructure of the cement are invasive and primarily laboratory-based. These methods are not conducive for studying the pore structure changes in the first few hours after casting since the changes in microstructure occur on a time scale that is an order of magnitude faster than the time required for sample preparation. The primary objective of the research presented in this thesis is to contribute towards advancing the current state-of-the-art in assessing the microstructure of cementitious systems. An ultrasonic wave reflection technique which allows for real-time assessment of the porosity and the elastic modulus of cementitious materials is developed. The test procedure for monitoring changes in the amplitude of horizontally polarized ultrasonic shear waves from the surface of hydrating cement paste is presented. A theoretical framework based on a poro-elastic idealization of the hydrating cementitious material is developed for interpreting the ultrasonic reflection data. The poro-elastic representation of hydrating cementitious material is shown to provide simultaneous, realistic estimates of porosity and shear modulus for hydrating cement paste and mortar through setting and early strength gain. The porosity predicted by the poro-elastic representation is identical to the capillary water content within the cement paste predicted by Powers' model. The shear modulus of the poro-elastic skeleton was compares

  4. Ductile flow of methane hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2003-01-01

    Compressional creep tests (i.e., constant applied stress) conducted on pure, polycrystalline methane hydrate over the temperature range 260-287 K and confining pressures of 50-100 MPa show this material to be extraordinarily strong compared to other icy compounds. The contrast with hexagonal water ice, sometimes used as a proxy for gas hydrate properties, is impressive: over the thermal range where both are solid, methane hydrate is as much as 40 times stronger than ice at a given strain rate. The specific mechanical response of naturally occurring methane hydrate in sediments to environmental changes is expected to be dependent on the distribution of the hydrate phase within the formation - whether arranged structurally between and (or) cementing sediments grains versus passively in pore space within a sediment framework. If hydrate is in the former mode, the very high strength of methane hydrate implies a significantly greater strain-energy release upon decomposition and subsequent failure of hydrate-cemented formations than previously expected.

  5. Three types of gas hydrate reservoirs in the Gulf of Mexico identified in LWD data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung Woong; Collett, Timothy S.

    2011-01-01

    High quality logging-while-drilling (LWD) well logs were acquired in seven wells drilled during the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II in the spring of 2009. These data help to identify three distinct types of gas hydrate reservoirs: isotropic reservoirs in sands, vertical fractured reservoirs in shale, and horizontally layered reservoirs in silty shale. In general, most gas hydratebearing sand reservoirs exhibit isotropic elastic velocities and formation resistivities, and gas hydrate saturations estimated from the P-wave velocity agree well with those from the resistivity. However, in highly gas hydrate-saturated sands, resistivity-derived gas hydrate-saturation estimates appear to be systematically higher by about 5% over those estimated by P-wave velocity, possibly because of the uncertainty associated with the consolidation state of gas hydrate-bearing sands. Small quantities of gas hydrate were observed in vertical fractures in shale. These occurrences are characterized by high formation resistivities with P-wave velocities close to those of water-saturated sediment. Because the formation factor varies significantly with respect to the gas hydrate saturation for vertical fractures at low saturations, an isotropic analysis of formation factor highly overestimates the gas hydrate saturation. Small quantities of gas hydrate in horizontal layers in shale are characterized by moderate increase in P-wave velocities and formation resistivities and either measurement can be used to estimate gas hydrate saturations.

  6. Modelling Changes in the Global Methane Hydrate Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, S. J.; Goldobin, D.; Haywood, A. M.; Rees, J. G.; Ridgwell, A. J.; Brilliantov, N.; Jackson, P.; Rochelle, C.; Lovell, M.; Levesley, J.

    2010-12-01

    We present initial results from a study designed to investigate how the global methane hydrate reservoir has changed during the last interglacial-glacial cycle. Bottom water conditions through the last 120 kyr are derived from a series of long-integration snapshot-type HadCM3 GCM experiments (Singarayer and Valdes, 2009), these are then used to drive a modified 1-d time-dependent hydrate model (Davie and Buffett, 2003). The hydrate model is first evaluated using sensitivity experiments against a number of hydrate bearing ODP/DSDP sites. We then explore the potential initial-state hydrate inventory using Pliocene boundary conditions and compare against a modelled and previously published modern-day inventories. Using modelled bottom water conditions and a thermal diffusion model, changes in the hydrate stability zone thickness though the last 120 kyr are investigated. We consider the timing and potential role of hydrate disassociation in the triggering of submarine landslides. Finally, the glacial cycle modelling strategy is discussed and preliminary results of the transient hydrate model run are presented. We aim to use these models and simulations to investigate potential changes in the volume and stability of the marine reservoir through many pseudo glacial-cycles as a precursor to running the model forward through potential climate change scenarios. References: J. S. Singarayer, P. J. Valdes, (2009) High-latitude climate sensitivity to ice-sheet forcing over the last 120 kyr, QSR v. 29 (1-2), p. 43-55 M. K. Davie, B. A. Buffett, (2003) Sources of methane for marine gas hydrate: inferences from a comparison of observations and numerical models, EPSL v. 206, p. 51-63

  7. Detecting gas hydrate behavior in crude oil using NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shuqiang; House, Waylon; Chapman, Walter G

    2006-04-06

    Because of the associated experimental difficulties, natural gas hydrate behavior in black oil is poorly understood despite its grave importance in deep-water flow assurance. Since the hydrate cannot be visually observed in black oil, traditional methods often rely on gas pressure changes to monitor hydrate formation and dissociation. Because gases have to diffuse through the liquid phase for hydrate behavior to create pressure responses, the complication of gas mass transfer is involved and hydrate behavior is only indirectly observed. This pressure monitoring technique encounters difficulties when the oil phase is too viscous, the amount of water is too small, or the gas phase is absent. In this work we employ proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to observe directly the liquid-to-solid conversion of the water component in black oil emulsions. The technique relies on two facts. The first, well-known, is that water becomes essentially invisible to liquid state NMR as it becomes immobile, as in hydrate or ice formation. The second, our recent finding, is that in high magnetic fields of sufficient homogeneity, it is possible to distinguish water from black oil spectrally by their chemical shifts. By following changes in the area of the water peak, the process of hydrate conversion can be measured, and, at lower temperatures, the formation of ice. Taking only seconds to accomplish, this measurement is nearly direct in contrast to conventional techniques that measure the pressure changes of the whole system and assume these changes represent formation or dissociation of hydrates - rather than simply changes in solubility. This new technique clearly can provide accurate hydrate thermodynamic data in black oils. Because the technique measures the total mobile water with rapidity, extensions should prove valuable in studying the dynamics of phase transitions in emulsions.

  8. Characterization of silicon surface states at clean and copper contaminated condition via transient capacitance measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lihui; Xie, Meng; Yu, Xuegong; Yang, Deren

    2017-10-01

    Silicon surface is one of the dominant recombination sites for silicon solar cells. Generally, the recombination ability of silicon surface is characterized in terms of surface recombination velocity. However, silicon surface actually contain a series of donor and acceptor levels across the silicon band gap, and therefore the surface recombination velocity is too general to provide detailed information of the silicon surface states. In this paper, we used the measured transient capacitance data to extract the detailed information (like defect energy levels, defect densities, and capture cross sections) of the silicon surface states. Furthermore, the influence of copper contamination on silicon surface states was examined, and it was found that copper contamination can change the localized energy levels of "clean" silicon surface states to the band-like energy levels, meanwhile the defect densities and capture cross sections were both enlarged.

  9. Generating surface states in a Weyl semimetal by applying electromagnetic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Oindrila; Sen, Diptiman

    2017-04-01

    We show that the application of circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation on the surface of a Weyl semimetal can generate states at that surface. These states can be characterized by their surface momentum. The Floquet eigenvalues ei θ of these states come in complex conjugate pairs rather than being equal to ±1 . If the amplitude of the radiation is small, we find some unusual bulk-boundary relations: the values of θ of the surface states lie at the extrema of the θ 's of the bulk system, and the peaks of the Fourier transforms of the surface state wave functions lie at the momenta where the bulk θ 's have extrema. For the case of zero surface momentum, we can analytically derive scaling relations between the decay length of the surface states and the amplitude and penetration length of the radiation. For topological insulators, we again find that circularly polarized radiation can generate states on the top surface; these states have much larger decay lengths than the surface states which are present even in the absence of radiation. Finally, we show that radiation can generate surface states for trivial insulators also.

  10. Methane Hydrate Field Program: Development of a Scientific Plan for a Methane Hydrate-Focused Marine Drilling, Logging and Coring Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, Greg [Consortium for Ocean Leadership, Washington, DC (United States)

    2014-02-01

    This final report document summarizes the activities undertaken and the output from three primary deliverables generated during this project. This fifteen month effort comprised numerous key steps including the creation of an international methane hydrate science team, determining and reporting the current state of marine methane hydrate research, convening an international workshop to collect the ideas needed to write a comprehensive Marine Methane Hydrate Field Research Plan and the development and publication of that plan. The following documents represent the primary deliverables of this project and are discussed in summary level detail in this final report: Historical Methane Hydrate Project Review Report; Methane Hydrate Workshop Report; Topical Report: Marine Methane Hydrate Field Research Plan; and Final Scientific/Technical Report.

  11. Maximum Recoverable Gas from Hydrate Bearing Sediments by Depressurization

    KAUST Repository

    Terzariol, Marco

    2017-11-13

    The estimation of gas production rates from hydrate bearing sediments requires complex numerical simulations. This manuscript presents a set of simple and robust analytical solutions to estimate the maximum depressurization-driven recoverable gas. These limiting-equilibrium solutions are established when the dissociation front reaches steady state conditions and ceases to expand further. Analytical solutions show the relevance of (1) relative permeabilities between the hydrate free sediment, the hydrate bearing sediment, and the aquitard layers, and (2) the extent of depressurization in terms of the fluid pressures at the well, at the phase boundary, and in the far field. Close form solutions for the size of the produced zone allow for expeditious financial analyses; results highlight the need for innovative production strategies in order to make hydrate accumulations an economically-viable energy resource. Horizontal directional drilling and multi-wellpoint seafloor dewatering installations may lead to advantageous production strategies in shallow seafloor reservoirs.

  12. Five ab initio potential energy and dipole moment surfaces for hydrated NaCl and NaF. I. Two-body interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yimin, E-mail: yimin.wang@emory.edu; Bowman, Joel M., E-mail: jmbowma@emory.edu [Department of Chemistry, Cherry L. Emerson Center for Scientific Computation, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Kamarchik, Eugene, E-mail: eugene.kamarchik@gmail.com [Quantum Pomegranate, LLC, 2604 Kings Lake Court NE, Atlanta, Georgia 30345 (United States)

    2016-03-21

    We report full-dimensional, ab initio-based potentials and dipole moment surfaces for NaCl, NaF, Na{sup +}H{sub 2}O, F{sup −}H{sub 2}O, and Cl{sup −}H{sub 2}O. The NaCl and NaF potentials are diabatic ones that dissociate to ions. These are obtained using spline fits to CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pV5Z energies. In addition, non-linear least square fits using the Born-Mayer-Huggins potential are presented, providing accurate parameters based strictly on the current ab initio energies. The long-range behavior of the NaCl and NaF potentials is shown to go, as expected, accurately to the point-charge Coulomb interaction. The three ion-H{sub 2}O potentials are permutationally invariant fits to roughly 20 000 coupled cluster CCSD(T) energies (awCVTZ basis for Na{sup +} and aVTZ basis for Cl{sup −} and F{sup −}), over a large range of distances and H{sub 2}O intramolecular configurations. These potentials are switched accurately in the long range to the analytical ion-dipole interactions, to improve computational efficiency. Dipole moment surfaces are fits to MP2 data; for the ion-ion cases, these are well described in the intermediate- and long-range by the simple point-charge expression. The performance of these new fits is examined by direct comparison to additional ab initio energies and dipole moments along various cuts. Equilibrium structures, harmonic frequencies, and electronic dissociation energies are also reported and compared to direct ab initio results. These indicate the high fidelity of the new PESs.

  13. Ion bombardment effects on surface states in selected oxide systems: rutile and alkaline earth titanates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruen, D.M.

    1978-01-01

    In this paper, the nature of the surface states of n-type TiO 2 and SrTiO 3 is discussed and the role of ion bombardment in modifying the properties of these states is elucidated. Insofar as possible, the interrelationships between oxide nonstoichiometry, surface states, ion bombardment effects and photoelectrolysis are explored

  14. Fully quantal calculation of H{sub 2} translation-rotation states in the (p-H{sub 2}){sub 2}@5{sup 12}6{sup 4} clathrate hydrate inclusion compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felker, Peter M., E-mail: felker@chem.ucla.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095-1569 (United States)

    2014-11-14

    The quantal translation-rotation (TR) states of the (p-H{sub 2}){sub 2}@5{sup 12}6{sup 4} clathrate hydrate inclusion compound have been computed. The ten-dimensional problem (in the rigid-cage and rigid-H{sub 2} approximation) is solved by first approximating the H{sub 2} moieties as spherically symmetric and solving for their 6D translational eigenstates. These are then combined with H{sub 2} free rotational states in a product basis that is used to diagonalize the full TR hamiltonian. The computed low-energy eigenstates have translational components that are essentially identical to the 6D translational eigenstates and rotational components that are 99.9% composed of rotationally unexcited H{sub 2} moieties. In other words, TR coupling is minimal for the low-energy states of the species. The low-energy level structure is found to be substantially more congested than that of the more tightly packed (p-H{sub 2}){sub 4}@5{sup 12}6{sup 4} clathrate species. The level structure is also shown to be understandable in terms of a model of (H{sub 2}){sub 2} as a semirigid diatomic species consisting of two spherically symmetric H{sub 2} pseudo-atoms.

  15. Shifting Focus: From Hydration for Performance to Hydration for Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrier, Erica T

    2017-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, literature on hydration biomarkers has evolved considerably - from (de)hydration assessment towards a more global definition of biomarkers of hydration in daily life. This shift in thinking about hydration markers was largely driven by investigating the differences that existed between otherwise healthy individuals whose habitual, ad-libitum drinking habits differ, and by identifying physiological changes in low-volume drinkers who subsequently increase their water intake. Aside from obvious differences in urinary volume and concentration, a growing body of evidence is emerging that links differences in fluid intake with small, but biologically significant, differences in vasopressin (copeptin), glomerular filtration rate, and markers of metabolic dysfunction or disease. Taken together, these pieces of the puzzle begin to form a picture of how much water intake should be considered adequate for health, and represent a shifting focus from hydration for performance, toward hydration for health outcomes. This narrative review outlines the key areas of research in which the global hydration process - including water intake, urinary hydration markers, and vasopressin - has been associated with health outcomes, focusing on kidney and metabolic endpoints. It will also provide a commentary on how various hydration biomarkers may be used in hydration for health assessment. Finally, if adequate water intake can play a role in maintaining health, how might we tell if we are drinking enough? Urine output is easily measured, and can take into account differences in daily physical activity, climate, dietary solute load, and other factors that influence daily water needs. Today, targets have been proposed for urine osmolality, specific gravity, and color that may be used by researchers, clinicians, and individuals as simple indicators of optimal hydration. However, there remain a large number of incomplete or unanswered research questions regarding the

  16. Ultrasonic Surface Treatment of Titanium Alloys. The Submicrocrystalline State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimenov, V. A.; Vlasov, V. A.; Borozna, V. Y.; Klopotov, A. A.

    2015-09-01

    The paper presents the results of the research on improvement of physical-and- mechanical properties of titanium alloys VT1-0 and VT6 by modification of surfaces using ultrasonic treatment, and a comprehensive study of the microstructure and mechanical properties of modified surface layers. It has been established that exposure to ultrasonic treatment leads to formation in the surface layer of a structure with an average size of elements 50 - 100 nm, depending on the brand of titanium alloy.

  17. Experimental study on combustion of a methane hydrate sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Tomoki; Yamamoto, Yuji; Yokomori, Takeshi; Ohmura, Ryo; Ueda, Toshihisa

    2015-10-01

    The combustion behavior of a methane hydrate sphere under normal gravity is experimentally investigated. The initial diameter of the sphere is 20 mm. Variation in temperature at the center of the sphere ( T c) is measured with a K-type thermocouple at ignition temperatures ( T c,i) from 193 to 253 K at 20 K intervals. Variation in the near-surface temperature of the sphere ( T s) is measured at ignition temperatures ( T s,i) from 233 to 263 K at 10 K intervals. Two combustion phases are observed. When the hydrate is ignited, a stable flame envelope is formed around the sphere (phase 1). In phase 1, the surface of the sphere is dry. After a few seconds, water formed by dissociation of the methane hydrate appears on the surface and methane bubbles are formed by methane ejected from inside the sphere (phase 2), thus destabilizing the flame and causing local extinction. Methane bubbles move down along the surface and merge into a large methane bubble at the bottom of the sphere. This bubble bursts, releasing methane to form a temporary flame, and the water drops from the hydrate sphere. Water on the surface is cooled by the hydrate inside, and an ice shell confines the methane gas that dissociated inside the sphere. Because the dissociation occurs continuously inside the hydrate, the inner pressure gradually increases and at some instant, the ice cracks and methane gas is ejected from the cracks, which results in a micro-explosion with a flame. In phase 1, the surface temperature is below the freezing point of water, and so the surface remains dry and a stable flame envelope is formed; in phase 2, the surface temperature is above the freezing point, and so water appears on the surface. When the temperature at the center of the sphere is lower (193, 213, or 233 K), some methane hydrate remains even after flame extinction because heat transfer from the flame decreases in phase 2 as a result of local extinction. The diameter of the sphere decreases during combustion in

  18. Hydration Phase Diagram of Clay Particles from Molecular Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honorio, Tulio; Brochard, Laurent; Vandamme, Matthieu

    2017-11-07

    Adsorption plays a fundamental role in the behavior of clays. Because of the confinement between solid clay layers on the nanoscale, adsorbed water is structured in layers, which can occupy a specific volume. The transition between these states is intimately related to key features of clay thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior. In this article, we consider the hydration states of clays as phases and the transition between these states as phase changes. The thermodynamic formulation supporting this idea is presented. Then, the results from grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations of sodium montmorillonite are used to derive hydration phase diagrams. The stability analysis presented here explains the coexistence of different hydration states at clay particle scale and improves our understanding of the irreversibilities of clay thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior. Our results provide insights into the mechanics of the elementary constituents of clays, which is crucial for a better understanding of the macroscopic behavior of clay-rich rocks and soils.

  19. A coupled THMC model of a heating and hydration laboratory experiment in unsaturated compacted FEBEX bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, L.; Samper, J.; Montenegro, L.; Fernandez, A.M.

    2010-05-01

    Unsaturated compacted bentonite is foreseen by several countries as a backfill and sealing material in high-level radioactive waste repositories. The strong interplays between thermal (T), hydrodynamic (H), mechanical (M) and chemical (C) processes during the hydration stage of a repository call for fully coupled THMC models. Validation of such THMC models is prevented by the lack of comprehensive THMC experiments and the difficulties of experimental methods to measure accurately the chemical composition of bentonite porewater. We present here a non-isothermal multiphase flow and multicomponent reactive solute transport model for a deformable medium of a heating and hydration experiment performed on a sample of compacted FEBEX bentonite. Besides standard solute transport and geochemical processes, the model accounts for solute cross diffusion and thermal and chemical osmosis. Bentonite swelling is solved with a state-surface approach. The THM model is calibrated with transient temperature, water content and porosity data measured at the end of the experiment. The reactive transport model is calibrated with porewater chemical data derived from aqueous extract data. Model results confirm that thermal osmosis is relevant for the hydration of FEBEX bentonite while chemical osmosis can be safely neglected. Dilution and evaporation are the main processes controlling the concentration of conservative species. Dissolved cations are mostly affected by calcite dissolution-precipitation and cation exchange reactions. Dissolved sulphate is controlled by gypsum/anhydrite dissolution-precipitation. pH is mostly buffered by protonation/deprotonation via surface complexation. Computed concentrations agree well with inferred aqueous extract data at all sections except near the hydration boundary where cation data are affected by a sampling artifact. The fit of Cl{sup -} data is excellent except for the data near the heater. The largest deviations of the model from inferred aqueous

  20. Surface energies of metals in both liquid and solid states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aqra, Fathi; Ayyad, Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    Although during the last years one has seen a number of systematic studies of the surface energies of metals, the aim and the scientific meaning of this research is to establish a simple and a straightforward theoretical model to calculate accurately the mechanical and the thermodynamic properties of metal surfaces due to their important application in materials processes and in the understanding of a wide range of surface phenomena. Through extensive theoretical calculations of the surface tension of most of the liquid metals, we found that the fraction of broken bonds in liquid metals (f) is constant which is equal to 0.287. Using our estimated f value, the surface tension (γ m ), surface energy (γ SV ), surface excess entropy (-dγ/dT), surface excess enthalpy (H s ), coefficient of thermal expansion (α m and α b ), sound velocity (c m ) and its temperature coefficient (-dc/dT) have been calculated for more than sixty metals. The results of the calculated quantities agree well with available experimental data.

  1. Surface energies of metals in both liquid and solid states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aqra, Fathi, E-mail: fathiaqra2009@hotmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Technology, Hebron University, P.O. Box 40, Hebron, West Bank, Palestine (Country Unknown); Ayyad, Ahmed [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Technology, Hebron University, P.O. Box 40, Hebron, West Bank, Palestine (Country Unknown)

    2011-05-15

    Although during the last years one has seen a number of systematic studies of the surface energies of metals, the aim and the scientific meaning of this research is to establish a simple and a straightforward theoretical model to calculate accurately the mechanical and the thermodynamic properties of metal surfaces due to their important application in materials processes and in the understanding of a wide range of surface phenomena. Through extensive theoretical calculations of the surface tension of most of the liquid metals, we found that the fraction of broken bonds in liquid metals (f) is constant which is equal to 0.287. Using our estimated f value, the surface tension ({gamma}{sub m}), surface energy ({gamma}{sub SV}), surface excess entropy (-d{gamma}/dT), surface excess enthalpy (H{sub s}), coefficient of thermal expansion ({alpha}{sub m} and {alpha}{sub b}), sound velocity (c{sub m}) and its temperature coefficient (-dc/dT) have been calculated for more than sixty metals. The results of the calculated quantities agree well with available experimental data.

  2. Energy from gas hydrates - assessing the opportunities and challenges for Canada: report of the expert panel on gas hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-09-01

    Gas hydrates form when water and natural gas combine at low temperatures and high pressures in regions of permafrost and in marine subseafloor sediments. Estimates suggest that the total amount of natural gas bound in hydrate form may exceed all conventional gas resources, or even the amount of all combined hydrocarbon energy. Gas from gas hydrate could provide a potentially vast new source of energy to offset declining supplies of conventional natural gas in North America and to provide greater energy security for countries such as Japan and India that have limited domestic sources. However, complex issues would need to be addressed if gas hydrate were to become a large part of the energy future of Canada. Natural Resources Canada asked the Council of Canadian Academies to assemble a panel of experts to examine the challenges for an acceptable operational extraction of gas hydrates in Canada. This report presented an overview of relevant contextual background, including some basic science; the medium-term outlook for supply and demand in markets for natural gas; broad environmental issues related to gas hydrate in its natural state and as a fuel; and an overview of Canada's contribution to knowledge about gas hydrate in the context of ongoing international research activity. The report also presented current information on the subject and what would be required to delineate and quantify the resource. Techniques for extracting gas from gas hydrate were also outlined. The report also addressed safety issues related to gas hydrate dissociation during drilling operations or release into the atmosphere; the environmental issues associated with potential leakage of methane into the atmosphere and with the large volumes of water produced during gas hydrate dissociation; and jurisdictional and local community issues that would need to be resolved in order to proceed with the commercial exploitation of gas hydrate. It was concluded that there does not appear to be

  3. Spin-resolved photoemission of surface states of W(110)-(1x1)H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hochstrasser, M.; Tobin, J.G.; Rotenberg, Eli; Kevan, S.D.

    2002-01-01

    The surface electronic states of W(110)-(1x1)H have been measured using spin- and angle-resolved photoemission. We directly demonstrate that the surface bands are both split and spin-polarized by the spin-orbit interaction in association with the loss of inversion symmetry near a surface. We observe 100 percent spin polarization of the surface states, with the spins aligned in the plane of the surface and oriented in a circular fashion relative to the S-bar symmetry point. In contrast, no measurable polarization of nearby bulk states is observed

  4. Instability of the topological surface state in Bi2Se3 upon deposition of gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyakov, A.; Tusche, C.; Ellguth, M.; Crozier, E. D.; Mohseni, K.; Otrokov, M. M.; Zubizarreta, X.; Vergniory, M. G.; Geilhufe, M.; Chulkov, E. V.; Ernst, A.; Meyerheim, H. L.; Parkin, S. S. P.

    2017-05-01

    Momentum-resolved photoemission spectroscopy indicates the instability of the Dirac surface state upon deposition of gold on the (0001) surface of the topological insulator Bi2Se3 . Based on the structure model derived from extended x-ray absorption fine structure experiments showing that gold atoms substitute bismuth atoms, first-principles calculations provide evidence that a gap appears due to hybridization of the surface state with gold d states near the Fermi level. Our findings provide insights into the mechanisms affecting the stability of the surface state.

  5. The current state of bearing surfaces in total hip replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajpura, A; Kendoff, D; Board, T N

    2014-02-01

    We reviewed the literature on the currently available choices of bearing surface in total hip replacement (THR). We present a detailed description of the properties of articulating surfaces review the understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of existing bearing couples. Recent technological developments in the field of polyethylene and ceramics have altered the risk of fracture and the rate of wear, although the use of metal-on-metal bearings has largely fallen out of favour, owing to concerns about reactions to metal debris. As expected, all bearing surface combinations have advantages and disadvantages. A patient-based approach is recommended, balancing the risks of different options against an individual's functional demands.

  6. Topological surface states of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 2}Se are robust against surface chemical modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Conor R.; Sahasrabudhe, Girija; Kushwaha, Satya Kumar; Cava, Robert J.; Schwartz, Jeffrey [Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States); Xiong, Jun [Department of Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2014-12-01

    The robustness of the Dirac-like electronic states on the surfaces of topological insulators (TIs) during materials process-ing is a prerequisite for their eventual device application. Here, the (001) cleavage surfaces of crystals of the topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 2}Se (BTS) were subjected to several surface chemical modification procedures that are common for electronic materials. Through measurement of Shubnikov-de Hass (SdH) oscillations, which are the most sensitive measure of their quality, the surface states of the treated surfaces were compared to those of pristine BTS that had been exposed to ambient conditions. In each case - surface oxidation, deposition of thin layers of Ti or Zr oxides, or chemical modification of the surface oxides - the robustness of the topological surface electronic states was demonstrated by noting only very small changes in the frequency and amplitude of the SdH oscillations. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. A Surface-Mounted Rotor State Sensing System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A surface-mounted instrumentation system for measuring rotor blade motions on rotorcraft, for use both in flight and in wind tunnel testing, is proposed for...

  8. Hydration Structures and Water Chemistry at Zirconia-Water Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Binyang; Park, Changyong; Kim, Seunghyun; Kim, Taeho; Kim, Ji Hyun; Kim, Jongjin; Hong, Seungbum; Bahn, Chi Bum

    Zirconia is an important material in numerous applications, such as gas sensors, solid oxide fuel cell electrolytes, and bio-medical materials. It also plays a key role on protecting zirconium alloys in highly corrosive environments found in pressurized water reactors. The degradation of the metal/oxide is primarily due to the interactions of surface oxide with water. Here we study the interactions of zirconia with water in terms of interfacial hydration structures at the 8 mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) surfaces using synchrotron-based X-ray reflectivity techniques. Interfacial hydration structures on three crystallographic orientations were determined with sub-angstrom resolution and compared with each other to identify common features and different surface chemistry effects on the interfacial processes. Meanwhile, zinc injection into the reactor coolant system has been known to be effective in both reducing radioactive wastes and stabilizing crud oxide layers of the metal alloys. We also studied the effect of zinc adsorption on the interfacial hydration structures of YSZs. Our X-ray reflectivity data reveal obvious hydration structure changes at (100) and (111) surfaces, but only minor changes at (110) surface. We further confirmed the detailed element specific adsorption profiles of Zn2+ ions near (110) and (111) surfaces with resonant anomalous X-ray reflectivity measurements.

  9. Thermoelectric Transport by Surface States in Bi2Se3-Based Topological Insulator Thin Films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Long-Long; Xu Wen

    2015-01-01

    We develop a tractable theoretical model to investigate the thermoelectric (TE) transport properties of surface states in topological insulator thin films (TITFs) of Bi 2 Se 3 at room temperature. The hybridization between top and bottom surface states in the TITF plays a significant role. With the increasing hybridization-induced surface gap, the electrical conductivity and electron thermal conductivity decrease while the Seebeck coefficient increases. This is due to the metal-semiconductor transition induced by the surface-state hybridization. Based on these TE transport coefficients, the TE figure-of-merit ZT is evaluated. It is shown that ZT can be greatly improved by the surface-state hybridization. Our theoretical results are pertinent to the exploration of the TE transport properties of surface states in TITFs and to the potential application of Bi 2 Se 3 -based TITFs as high-performance TE materials and devices. (paper)

  10. The effect of the condensed-phase environment on the vibrational frequency shift of a hydrogen molecule inside clathrate hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Anna; Scribano, Yohann; Lauvergnat, David; Mebe, Elsy; Benoit, David M; Bačić, Zlatko

    2018-04-14

    We report a theoretical study of the frequency shift (redshift) of the stretching fundamental transition of an H 2 molecule confined inside the small dodecahedral cage of the structure II clathrate hydrate and its dependence on the condensed-phase environment. In order to determine how much the hydrate water molecules beyond the confining small cage contribute to the vibrational frequency shift, quantum five-dimensional (5D) calculations of the coupled translation-rotation eigenstates are performed for H 2 in the v=0 and v=1 vibrational states inside spherical clathrate hydrate domains of increasing radius and a growing number of water molecules, ranging from 20 for the isolated small cage to over 1900. In these calculations, both H 2 and the water domains are treated as rigid. The 5D intermolecular potential energy surface (PES) of H 2 inside a hydrate domain is assumed to be pairwise additive. The H 2 -H 2 O pair interaction, represented by the 5D (rigid monomer) PES that depends on the vibrational state of H 2 , v=0 or v=1, is derived from the high-quality ab initio full-dimensional (9D) PES of the H 2 -H 2 O complex [P. Valiron et al., J. Chem. Phys. 129, 134306 (2008)]. The H 2 vibrational frequency shift calculated for the largest clathrate domain considered, which mimics the condensed-phase environment, is about 10% larger in magnitude than that obtained by taking into account only the small cage. The calculated splittings of the translational fundamental of H 2 change very little with the domain size, unlike the H 2 j = 1 rotational splittings that decrease significantly as the domain size increases. The changes in both the vibrational frequency shift and the j = 1 rotational splitting due to the condensed-phase effects arise predominantly from the H 2 O molecules in the first three complete hydration shells around H 2 .

  11. Mesostructure from hydration gradients in demosponge biosilica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilson, James R; George, Nathan C; Murr, Meredith M; Seshadri, Ram; Morse, Daniel E

    2014-04-22

    Organisms of the phylum Porifera, that is, sponges, utilize enzymatic hydrolysis to concatenate bioavailable inorganic silicon to produce lightweight, strong, and often flexible skeletal elements called spicules. In their optical transparency, these remarkable biomaterials resemble fused silica, despite having been formed under ambient marine biological conditions. Although previous studies have elucidated the chemical mechanisms of spicule formation and revealed the extensive hydration of these glasses, their precise composition and local and medium-range structures had not been determined. We have employed a combination of compositional analysis, (1) H and (29) Si solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and synchrotron X-ray total scattering to characterize spicule-derived silica produced by the demosponge Tethya aurantia. These studies indicate that the materials are highly hydrated, but in an inhomogeneous manner. The spicule-derived silica is, on average, perfectly dense for the given extent of hydration and regions of fully condensed and unstrained SiO networks persist throughout each monolithic spicule. To accommodate chemical strain and defects, the extensive hydration is concentrated in distinct regions that give rise to mesostructural features. The chemistry responsible for producing spicule silica resembles hydrolytic sol-gel processing, which offers exceptional control over the precise local atomic arrangement of materials. However, the specific processing involved in forming the sponge spicule silica further results in regions of fully condensed silica coexisting with regions of incomplete condensation. This mesostructure suggests a mechanism for atomistic defect tolerance and strain relief that may account for the unusual mechanical properties of the biogenic spicules. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Excited triplet states as photooxidants in surface waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canonica, S.

    2012-12-01

    The chromophoric components of dissolved organic matter (DOM) are generally the main absorbers of sunlight in surface waters and therefore a source of transient reactants under irradiation. Such short-lived species can be relevant for the fate of various classes of chemical contaminants in the aquatic environment. The present contribution focuses on the role of excited triplet states of chromophoric DOM, 3CDOM*, as transient photooxidants initiating the transformation and degradation of organic chemical contaminants. An early study [1] indicated that 3CDOM* may play a dominant role in the photo-induced transformation of electron-rich phenols, a conclusion which was later fortified by the results of transient absorption investigations using aromatic ketones as model photosensitizers [2] and by a recent careful analysis of the effect of oxygen concentration on transformation rates [3]. The variety of aquatic contaminants shown to be affected by triplet-induced oxidation has kept increasing, phenylurea herbicides [4], sulfonamide antibiotics [5] and some phytoestrogens [6] being prominent examples. Recent research has shown that the triplet-induced transformation of specific contaminants, especially aromatic nitrogen compounds, could be inhibited by the presence of DOM, very probably due to its antioxidant moieties [7]. While such moieties are not relevant for the quenching of 3CDOM*, they are expected to react with it in a similar way as the studied contaminants. Analogous reactions can be postulated to occur in liquid or solid phases of the atmospheric environment, as demonstrated in the case of HONO formation [8]. References 1. Canonica, S.; Jans, U.; Stemmler, K.; Hoigné, J. Transformation kinetics of phenols in water: Photosensitization by dissolved natural organic material and aromatic ketones. Environ. Sci. Technol. 1995, 29 (7), 1822-1831. 2. Canonica, S.; Hellrung, B.; Wirz, J. Oxidation of phenols by triplet aromatic ketones in aqueous solution. J. Phys

  13. Effects of gas Hydrates on Archaeal Community Structure and Carbon Cycle in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Y.; Li, S.; Pearson, A.; Noakes, J.; Culp, R.; Zhang, C.

    2006-12-01

    The Gulf of Mexico is a unique place to study biological carbon cycle because dynamic microbial communities exist in association with the huge amounts of gas hydrates in the marine sediments. The abundance of Archaea is significantly enhanced in the hydrate environment and these organisms may play an important role in the oceanic carbon cycle. We examined the Archaeal lipids from the Gulf of Mexico using the high performance liquid chromatography- mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). The lipid profiles showed distinct patterns between gas hydrates and non-hydrate samples, suggesting variation in Archaeal communities with changing environments. In particular, a previously unknown biomarker was found in a gas hydrate sample, which may represent a novel group of Archaea. The relative abundance of this unidentified lipid varied significantly among non-gas hydrate and gas hydrate samples and may serve as a proxy for the presence of gas hydrate-related archaeal populations. The TEX86 index showed that the average paleo sea-surface temperature in the hydrate samples was higher (by 3°C) than the non-hydrate samples. The current annual sea-surface temperature is about 20~24°C in the winter and around 29°C in the summer, which is consistent with the results we got from the non-hydrate samples. Our results reveal that the archaeal community was significantly affected by the presence of hydrate, which contribute to oceanic carbon cycle and may also affect the utilization of TEX86 for paleo-climate studies.

  14. Hydration during intense exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, R J; Meyer, N L

    2013-01-01

    Hydration status has profound effects on both physical and mental performance, and sports performance is thus critically affected. Both overhydration and underhydration - if sufficiently severe - will impair performance and pose a risk to health. Athletes may begin exercise in a hypohydrated state as a result of incomplete recovery from water loss induced in order to achieve a specific body mass target or due to incomplete recovery from a previous competition or training session. Dehydration will also develop in endurance exercise where fluid intake does not match water loss. The focus has generally been on training rather than on competition, but sweat loss and fluid replacement in training may have important implications. Hypohydration may impair training quality and may also increase stress levels. It is unclear whether this will have negative effects (reduced training quality, impaired immunity) or whether it will promote a greater adaptive response. Hypohydration and the consequent hyperthermia, however, can enhance the effectiveness of a heat acclimation program, resulting in improved endurance performance in warm and temperate environments. Drinking in training may be important in enhancing tolerance of the gut when athletes plan to drink in competition. The distribution of water between body water compartments may also be important in the initiation and promotion of cellular adaptations to the training stimulus. Copyright © 2013 Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Study on molecular controlled mining system of methane hydrate; Methane hydrate no bunshi seigyo mining ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuriyagawa, M.; Saito, T.; Kobayashi, H.; Karasawa, H.; Kiyono , F.; Nagaoki, R.; Yamamoto, Y.; Komai, T.; Haneda, H.; Takahashi, Y. [National Institute for Resources and Environment, Tsukuba (Japan); Nada, H. [Science and Technology Agency, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-02-01

    Basic studies are conducted for the collection of methane from the methane hydrate that exists at levels deeper than 500m in the sea. The relationship between the hydrate generation mechanism and water cluster structure is examined by use of mass spectronomy. It is found that, among the stable liquid phase clusters, the (H2O)21H{sup +} cluster is the most stable. Stable hydrate clusters are in presence in quantities, and participate in the formation of hydrate crystal nuclei. For the elucidation of the nucleus formation mechanism, a kinetic simulation is conducted of molecules in the cohesion system consisting of water and methane molecules. Water molecules that array near methane molecules at the normal pressure is disarrayed under a higher pressure for rearray into a hydrate structure. Hydrate formation and breakdown in the three-phase equilibrium state of H2O, CH4, and CO2 at a low temperature and high pressure are tested, which discloses that supercooling is required for formation, that it is possible to extract CH4 first for replacement by guest molecule CO2 since CO2 is stabler than CH4 at a lower pressure or higher temperature, and that formation is easier to take place when the grain diameter is larger at the formation point since larger grain diameters result in a higher formation temperature. 3 figs.

  16. Mechanism of gypsum hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacheco, G.

    1991-06-01

    Full Text Available There is an hypothesis that the mechanism o f gypsum hydration and dehydration is performed through two simultaneous phenomena. In this study we try to clear up this phenomenon using chlorides as accelerators or a mixture of ethanol-methanol as retarders to carry out the gypsum setting. Natural Mexican gypsum samples and a hemihydrate prepared in the laboratory are used. The following analytical techniques are used: MO, DRX, DTA, TG and DTG. In agreement with the obtained results, it can be concluded: that colloid formation depends on the action of accelerators or retarders and the crystals are a consequence of the quantity of hemihydrate formed.

    En el mecanismo de hidratación y deshidratación del yeso existe la hipótesis de que éste se efectúa por dos fenómenos simultáneos. Este estudio intenta esclarecer estos fenómenos, empleando: cloruros como aceleradores o mezcla etanol-metanol como retardadores para efectuar el fraguado del yeso. Se emplean muestras de yeso de origen natural mexicano y hemihydrate preparado en laboratorio; se utilizan técnicas analíticas: MO, DRX, DTA, TG y DTG. De acuerdo a los resultados obtenidos se puede deducir: que la formación del coloide depende de la acción de los agentes aceleradores o retardadores y que los cristales son consecuencia de la cantidad de hemihidrato formado.

  17. Possible correlation effects of surface state electrons on a solid hydrogen film

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mugele, Friedrich Gunther; Albrecht, Uwe; Leiderer, Paul; Kono, Kimitoshi

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated the transport properties of surface state electrons on thin quench-condensed hydrogen films for various electron densities. The surface state electron mobility showed a continuous dependence on the plasma parameter Gamma in the range from 20 to 130, indicating a strong influence

  18. Surface states of a system of Dirac fermions: A minimal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, V. A.; Enaldiev, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    A brief survey is given of theoretical works on surface states (SSs) in Dirac materials. Within the formalism of envelope wave functions and boundary conditions for these functions, a minimal model is formulated that analytically describes surface and edge states of various (topological and nontopological) types in several systems with Dirac fermions (DFs). The applicability conditions of this model are discussed.

  19. Electronic interconnects and devices with topological surface states and methods for fabricating same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazdani, Ali; Ong, N. Phuan; Cava, Robert J.

    2016-05-03

    An interconnect is disclosed with enhanced immunity of electrical conductivity to defects. The interconnect includes a material with charge carriers having topological surface states. Also disclosed is a method for fabricating such interconnects. Also disclosed is an integrated circuit including such interconnects. Also disclosed is a gated electronic device including a material with charge carriers having topological surface states.

  20. Electronic interconnects and devices with topological surface states and methods for fabricating same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazdani, Ali; Ong, N. Phuan; Cava, Robert J.

    2017-04-04

    An interconnect is disclosed with enhanced immunity of electrical conductivity to defects. The interconnect includes a material with charge carriers having topological surface states. Also disclosed is a method for fabricating such interconnects. Also disclosed is an integrated circuit including such interconnects. Also disclosed is a gated electronic device including a material with charge carriers having topological surface states.

  1. Thermodynamic and Process Modelling of Gas Hydrate Systems in CO2 Capture Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herslund, Peter Jørgensen

    in this work compares well with other data available in the literature for similar systems. It is shown experimentally that the addition of tetrahydrofuran to the ternary system of water-cyclopentane-carbon dioxide provides an enhanced thermodynamic promotion of the gas hydrate phase. Hydrate equilibrium...... and tetrahydrofuran as the two most efficient pressure reducing additives in classical hydrate forming systems. The thermodynamic promoting effects reported in the literature for the two classical sII hydrate formers, tetrahydrofuran and cyclopentane are experimentally confirmed in the present work. Data presented...... pressures are reduced by approximately 20 percent compared to the cyclopentane promoted system. The mixed promoter system thereby represents a new state-ofthe-art within thermodynamic promotion of gas hydrates in the framework of the classical hydrate structures. A thermodynamic model based on the Cubic...

  2. Modelling of tetrahydrofuran promoted gas hydrate systems for carbon dioxide capture processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herslund, Peter Jørgensen; Thomsen, Kaj; Abildskov, Jens

    2014-01-01

    hydrate process, operates isothermally at a temperature of 280. K. Applying three consecutive hydrate formation/dissociation stages (three-stage capture process), a carbon dioxide-rich product (97. mol%) is finally delivered at a temperature of 280. K and a pressure of 3.65. MPa. The minimum pressure...... to produce a 96. mol% carbon dioxide-rich product stream. This stream is delivered at 280. K and a pressure of 0.17. MPa. The present modelling study suggests several drawbacks of using tetrahydrofuran as a thermodynamic hydrate promoter, when applied in low-pressure, hydrate-based gas separation processes...... of water, tetrahydrofuran, carbon dioxide and nitrogen. The applied model incorporates the Cubic-Plus-Association (CPA) equation of state for the fluid phase description and the van der Waals-Platteeuw hydrate model for the solid (hydrate) phase. Six binary pairs are studied for their fluid phase behaviour...

  3. Parametric study of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sand, silt, and clay sediments: 2. Small-strain mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.Y.; Francisca, F.M.; Santamarina, J.C.; Ruppel, C.

    2010-01-01

    The small-strain mechanical properties (e.g., seismic velocities) of hydrate-bearing sediments measured under laboratory conditions provide reference values for calibration of logging and seismic exploration results acquired in hydrate-bearing formations. Instrumented cells were designed for measuring the compressional (P) and shear (S) velocities of sand, silts, and clay with and without hydrate and subject to vertical effective stresses of 0.01 to 2 MPa. Tetrahydrofuran (THF), which is fully miscible in water, was used as the hydrate former to permit close control over the hydrate saturation Shyd and to produce hydrate from dissolved phase, as methane hydrate forms in most natural marine settings. The results demonstrate that laboratory hydrate formation technique controls the pattern of P and S velocity changes with increasing Shyd and that the small-strain properties of hydrate-bearing sediments are governed by effective stress, δ'v and sediment specific surface. The S velocity increases with hydrate saturation owing to an increase in skeletal shear stiffness, particularly when hydrate saturation exceeds Shyd≈ 0.4. At very high hydrate saturations, the small strain shear stiffness is determined by the presence of hydrates and becomes insensitive to changes in effective stress. The P velocity increases with hydrate saturation due to the increases in both the shear modulus of the skeleton and the bulk modulus of pore-filling phases during fluid-to-hydrate conversion. Small-strain Poisson's ratio varies from 0.5 in soft sediments lacking hydrates to 0.25 in stiff sediments (i.e., subject to high vertical effective stress or having high Shyd). At Shyd ≥ 0.5, hydrate hinders expansion and the loss of sediment stiffness during reduction of vertical effective stress, meaning that hydrate-rich natural sediments obtained through pressure coring should retain their in situ fabric for some time after core retrieval if the cores are maintained within the hydrate

  4. Surface states on a topologically nontrivial semimetal: The case of Sb(110)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bianchi, Marco; Guan, Dandan; Strózecka, Anna

    2012-01-01

    spin-orbit splitting. The bulk band structure of Sb has the characteristics of a strong topological insulator with a Z2 invariant ν0 = 1. This puts constraints on the existence of metallic surface states and the expected topology of the surface Fermi contour. However, bulk Sb is a semimetal......, not an insulator, and these constraints are therefore partly relaxed. This relation of bulk topology and expected surface-state dispersion for semimetals is discussed....

  5. Selection of conformational states in surface self-assembly for a molecule with eight possible pairs of surface enantiomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nuermaimaiti, Ajiguli; Schultz-Falk, Vickie; Lind Cramer, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembly of a molecule with many distinct conformational states, resulting in eight possible pairs of surface enantiomers, is investigated on a Au(111) surface under UHV conditions. The complex molecule is equipped with alkyl and carboxyl moieties to promote controlled self-assembly of lamel...... moieties in mirror-image domains of the lamellae structures, leading to selection of three out of the eight possible enantiomeric pairs....

  6. Rheological properties of hydrate suspensions in asphaltenic crude oils; Proprietes rheologiques de suspensions d'hydrate dans des bruts asphalteniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques de Toledo Camargo, R.

    2001-03-01

    The development of offshore oil exploitation under increasing water depths has forced oil companies to increase their understanding of gas hydrate formation and transportation in multiphase flow lines in which a liquid hydrocarbon phase is present. This work deals with the flow behaviour of hydrate suspensions in which a liquid hydrocarbon is the continuous phase. Three different liquid hydrocarbons are used: an asphaltenic crude oil, a condensate completely free of asphaltenes and a mixture between the asphaltenic oil and heptane. The rheological characterisation of hydrate suspensions is the main tool employed. Two original experimental devices are used: a PVT cell adapted to operate as a Couette type rheometer and a semi-industrial flow loop. Hydrate suspensions using the asphaltenic oil showed shear-thinning behaviour and thixotropy. This behaviour is typically found in flocculated systems, in which the particles attract each other forming flocs of aggregated particles at low shear rates. The suspensions using the condensate showed Newtonian behaviour. Their relative viscosities were high, which suggests that an aggregation process between hydrate particles takes. place during hydrate formation. Finally, hydrate suspensions using the mixture asphaltenic oil-heptane showed shear-thinning behaviour, thixotropy and high relative viscosity. From these results it can be inferred that, after the achievement of the hydrate formation process, the attractive forces between hydrate particles are weak. making unlikely pipeline obstruction by an aggregation process. Nevertheless, during the hydrate formation, these attractive forces can be sufficiently high. It seems that the hydrate surface wettability is an important parameter in this phenomena. (author)

  7. Molecular dynamics simulation of the intercalation behaviors of methane hydrate in montmorillonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, KeFeng; Li, XiaoSen; Xu, ChunGang; Lv, QiuNan; Ruan, XuKe

    2014-06-01

    The formation and mechanism of CH4 hydrate intercalated in montmorillonite are investigated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The formation process of CH4 hydrate in montmorillonite with 1 ~ 8 H2O layers is observed. In the montmorillonite, the "surface H2O" constructs the network by hydrogen bonds with the surface Si-O ring of clay, forming the surface cage. The "interlayer H2O" constructs the network by hydrogen bonds, forming the interlayer cage. CH4 molecules and their surrounding H2O molecules form clathrate hydrates. The cation of montmorillonite has a steric effect on constructing the network and destroying the balance of hydrogen bonds between the H2O molecules, distorting the cage of hydrate in clay. Therefore, the cages are irregular, which is unlike the ideal CH4 clathrate hydrates cage. The pore size of montmorillonite is another impact factor to the hydrate formation. It is quite easier to form CH4 hydrate nucleation in montmorillonite with large pore size than in montmorillonite with small pore. The MD work provides the constructive information to the investigation of the reservoir formation for natural gas hydrate (NGH) in sediments.

  8. Distribution of gas hydrate inhibitor monoethylene glycol in condensate and water systems: Experimental measurement and thermodynamic modeling using the cubic-plus-association equation of state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riaz, Muhammad; Yussuf, Mustafe A.; Frost, Michael

    2014-01-01

    data for liquid-liquid equilibrium of North Sea condensate + MEG and North Sea condensate + MEG + water systems for temperatures from 303.15 to 323.15 K and atmospheric pressure. These data are successfully modeled using the cubic-plus-association equation of state. © 2014 American Chemical Society....

  9. Reconsideration on Hydration of Sodium Ion: From Micro-Hydration to Bulk Hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yongquan, Zhou; Chunhui, Fang; Yan, Fang; Fayan, Zhu; Haiwen, Ge; Hongyan, Liu

    2017-12-01

    Micro hydration structures of the sodium ion, [Na(H2O) n ]+, n = 1-12, were probed by density functional theory (DFT) at B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ level in both gaseous and aqueous phase. The predicted equilibrium sodium-oxygen distance of 0.240 nm at the present level of theory. The four-, five- and six-coordinated cluster can transform from each other at the ambient condition. The analysis of the successive water binding energy and natural charge population (NBO) on Na+ clearly shows that the influence of Na+ on the surrounding water molecules goes beyond the first hydration shell with the hydration number of 6. The Car-Parrinello molecular dynamic simulation shows that only the first hydration sphere can be found, and the hydration number of Na+ is 5.2 and the hydration distance ( r Na-O) is 0.235 nm. All our simulations mentioned in the present paper show an excellent agreement with the diffraction result from X-ray scattering study.

  10. Oxygen reduction reaction over silver particles with various morphologies and surface chemical states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohyama, Junya; Okata, Yui; Watabe, Noriyuki; Katagiri, Makoto; Nakamura, Ayaka; Arikawa, Hidekazu; Shimizu, Ken-ichi; Takeguchi, Tatsuya; Ueda, Wataru; Satsuma, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in an alkaline solution was carried out using Ag powders having various particle morphologies and surface chemical states (Size: ca. 40-110 nm in crystalline size. Shape: spherical, worm like, and angular. Surface: smooth with easily reduced AgOx, defective with AgOx, and Ag2CO3 surface layer). The various Ag powders were well characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, N2 adsorption, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and stripping voltammetry of underpotential-deposited lead. Defective and oxidized surfaces enhanced the Ag active surface area during the ORR. The ORR activity was affected by the morphology and surface chemical state: Ag particles with defective and angular surfaces showed smaller electron exchange number between three and four but showed higher specific activity compared to Ag particles with smooth surfaces.

  11. Isotopic effect in the hydration reactions of 2, 2, 2 - trichloro - 1 - arylethanones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marconi, D.O.M.; Zucco, C.; Tanaka, A.S.; Nome, F.

    1985-01-01

    The equilibrium constants and rate constants for hydration and de-hydration of 2, 2, 2 - trichloro - 1 - arylethanones in tetrahydrofurane (THF) / H 2 O - D 2 O e THF/H 2 O using the proton inventory technique involved in the transition state are studied. (M.J.C.) [pt

  12. Optimization of Surface Ship Steering in Sea State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-01

    U ’I-. ’U C.2 0 0 .0 0 - znr 0 Q~a qQ- ( EL - ~- (Ye-(b~p) iu I - - - . -. -’ -~ -,---- .**~**~**~**~-* -.- - .---.--.----..,--... ’A 0 0 ~𔃼 0 e c * i...9. Meteorology for Mariners, Her Majesty’s Stationery Oice, oido -, Great Britain 10. Cass J., Theory and Applications of a Sea StateSimulatoS ation

  13. Hydration dynamics of protein molecules in aqueous solution: Unity ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Dielectric dispersion and NMRD experiments have revealed that a significant fraction of water molecules in the hydration shell of various proteins do not exhibit any slowing down of dynamics. This is usually attributed to the presence of the hydrophobic residues (HBR) on the surface, although HBRs alone ...

  14. Detection of gas hydrate with downhole logs and assessment of gas hydrate concentrations (saturations) and gas volumes on the Blake Ridge with electrical resistivity log data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, T.S.; Ladd, J.

    2000-01-01

    Let 164 of the Ocean Drilling Program was designed to investigate the occurrence of gas hydrate in the sedimentary section beneath the Blake Ridge on the southeastern continental margin of North America. Site 994, and 997 were drilled on the Blake Ridge to refine our understanding of the in situ characteristics of natural gas hydrate. Because gas hydrate is unstable at surface pressure and temperature conditions, a major emphasis was placed on the downhole logging program to determine the in situ physical properties of the gas hydrate-bearing sediments. Downhole logging tool strings deployed on Leg 164 included the Schlumberger quad-combination tool (NGT, LSS/SDT, DIT, CNT-G, HLDT), the Formation MicroScanner (FMS), and the Geochemical Combination Tool (GST). Electrical resistivity (DIT) and acoustic transit-time (LSS/SDT) downhole logs from Sites 994, 995, and 997 indicate the presence of gas hydrate in the depth interval between 185 and 450 mbsf on the Blake Ridge. Electrical resistivity log calculations suggest that the gas hydrate-bearing sedimentary section on the Blake Ridge may contain between 2 and 11 percent bulk volume (vol%) gas hydrate. We have determined that the log-inferred gas hydrates and underlying free-gas accumulations on the Blake Ridge may contain as much as 57 trillion m3 of gas.

  15. Modelling the incongruent dissolution of hydrated cement minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berner, U.R.

    1988-01-01

    Hydrated calciumsilicates are the main constituents of hydrated portland cements. Their chemistry will strongly influence the longterm behaviour of a concrete system envisioned in use in radioactive waste repositories. Experimental data show that hydrated calciumsilicates dissolve incongruently, depending on the calcium/silicon ratio of the solid. A model that simulates the incongruent dissolution behaviour of these hydrated calciumsilicates is presented. In the model the hydrated calciumcilicates are represented as a mixture of two congruently soluble components. The dissolution of the particular components is described using the concept of variable activities in the solid state. Each component's activity in the solid state is obtained from a large body of solubility data by applying the Gibbs-Duhem equation for nonideal mixtures. Using this approach a simplified set of equations, which describe the solubility of the components as a function of the calcium/silicon ratio of the solid, is derived. As an application, the degradation of a standard portland cement in pure water and in a carbonate-rich groundwater is modelled. (orig.)

  16. Phase field theory modeling of methane fluxes from exposed natural gas hydrate reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivelä, Pilvi-Helinä; Baig, Khuram; Qasim, Muhammad; Kvamme, Bjørn

    2012-12-01

    Fluxes of methane from offshore natural gas hydrate into the oceans vary in intensity from massive bubble columns of natural gas all the way down to fluxes which are not visible within human eye resolution. The driving force for these fluxes is that methane hydrate is not stable towards nether minerals nor towards under saturated water. As such fluxes of methane from deep below hydrates zones may diffuse through fluid channels separating the hydrates from minerals surfaces and reach the seafloor. Additional hydrate fluxes from hydrates dissociating towards under saturated water will have different characteristics depending on the level of dynamics in the actual reservoirs. If the kinetic rate of hydrate dissociation is smaller than the mass transport rate of distributing released gas into the surrounding water through diffusion then hydrodynamics of bubble formation is not an issue and Phase Field Theory (PFT) simulations without hydrodynamics is expected to be adequate [1, 2]. In this work we present simulated results corresponding to thermodynamic conditions from a hydrate field offshore Norway and discuss these results with in situ observations. Observed fluxes are lower than what can be expected from hydrate dissociating and molecularly diffusing into the surrounding water. The PFT model was modified to account for the hydrodynamics. The modified model gave higher fluxes, but still lower than the observed in situ fluxes.

  17. Comparing the sensitivity of permafrost and marine gas hydrate to climate warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, A.E.; Dallimore, S.R.; Hyndman, R.D.; Wright, F.

    2005-01-01

    The sensitivity of Arctic subpermafrost gas hydrate at the Mallik borehole was compared to temperate marine gas hydrate located offshore southwestern Canada. In particular, a finite element geothermal model was used to determine the sensitivity to the end of the ice age, and contemporary climate warming of a 30 m thick methane hydrate layer lying at the base of a gas hydrate stability zone prior to 13.5 kiloannum (ka) before present (BP). It was suggested that the 30 m gas-hydrate-bearing layer would have disappeared by now, according to the thermal signal alone. However, the same gas-hydrate-bearing layer underlying permafrost would persist until at least 4 ka after present, even with contemporary climate warming. The longer time for subpermafrost gas hydrate comes from the thawing pore ice at the base of permafrost, at the expense of dissociation of the deeper gas hydrate. The dissociation of underlying gas hydrate from climate surface warming is buffered by the overlying permafrost

  18. Visual observation of gas hydrates nucleation and growth at a water - organic liquid interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoporev, Andrey S.; Semenov, Anton P.; Medvedev, Vladimir I.; Sizikov, Artem A.; Gushchin, Pavel A.; Vinokurov, Vladimir A.; Manakov, Andrey Yu.

    2018-03-01

    Visual observation of nucleation sites of methane and methane-ethane-propane hydrates and their further growth in water - organic liquid - gas systems with/without surfactants was carried out. Sapphire Rocking Cell RCS6 with transparent sapphire cells was used. The experiments were conducted at the supercooling ΔTsub = 20.2 °C. Decane, toluene and crude oils were used as organics. Gas hydrate nucleation occurred on water - metal - gas and water - sapphire - organic liquid three-phase contact lines. At the initial stage of growth hydrate crystals rapidly covered the water - gas or water - organics interfaces (depending on the nucleation site). Further hydrate phase accrete on cell walls (sapphire surface) and into the organics volume. At this stage, growth was accompanied by water «drawing out» from under initial hydrate film formed at water - organic interface. Apparently, it takes place due to water capillary inflow in the reaction zone. It was shown that the hydrate crystal morphology depends on the organic phase composition. In the case of water-in-decane emulsion relay hydrate crystallization was observed in the whole sample, originating most likely due to the hydrate crystal intergrowth through decane. Contacts of such crystals with adjacent water droplets result in rapid hydrate crystallization on this droplet.

  19. Collective dynamics of hydrated β-lactogloblin by inelastic x-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Koji; Hosokawa, Shinya; Baron, Alfred Q. R.; Yamaguchi, Toshio

    2010-10-01

    Inelastic x-ray scattering measurements of hydrated β-lactoglobulin (β-lg) were performed to investigate the collective dynamics of hydration water and hydrated protein on a picosecond time scale. Samples with different hydration levels h [=mass of water (g)/mass of protein (g)] of 0 (dry), 0.5, and 1.0 were measured at ambient temperature. The observed dynamical structure factor S(Q,ω)/S(Q) was analyzed by a model composed of a Lorentzian for the central peak and a damped harmonic oscillator (DHO) for the side peak. The dispersion relation between the excitation energy in the DHO model and the momentum transfer Q was obtained for the hydrated β-lg at both hydration levels, but no DHO excitation was found for the dry β-lg. The high-frequency sound velocity was similar to that previously observed in pure water. The ratio of the high-frequency sound velocity of hydrated β-lg to the adiabatic one of hydrated lysozyme (h =0.41) was estimated as ˜1.6 for h =0.5. The value is significantly smaller than that (˜2) of pure water that has the tetrahedral network structure. The present finding thus suggests that the tetrahedral network structure of water around the β-lg is partially disrupted by the perturbation from protein surface. These results are consistent with those reported from Brillouin neutron spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulation studies of hydrated ribonuclease A.

  20. Formation of methane hydrate from polydisperse ice powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhs, Werner F; Staykova, Doroteya K; Salamatin, Andrey N

    2006-07-06

    Neutron diffraction runs and gas-consumption experiments based on pressure-volume-temperature measurements are conducted to study the kinetics of methane hydrate formation from hydrogenated and deuterated ice powder samples in the temperature range of 245-270 K up to high degrees of transformation. An improved theory of the hydrate growth in a polydisperse ensemble of randomly packed ice spheres is developed to provide a quantitative interpretation of the data in terms of kinetic model parameters. This paper continues the research line of our earlier study which was limited to the monodisperse case and shorter reaction times (Staykova et al., 2003). As before, we distinguish the process of initial hydrate film spreading over the ice particle surface (stage I) and the subsequent hydrate shell growth (stage II) which includes two steps, i.e., an interfacial clathration reaction and the gas and water transport (diffusion) through the hydrate layer surrounding the shrinking ice cores. Although kinetics of hydrate formation at stage II is clearly dominated by the diffusion mechanism which becomes the limiting step at temperatures above 263 K, both steps are shown to be essential at lower temperatures. The permeation coefficient D is estimated as (1.46 +/- 0.44) x 10(-12) m2/h at 263 K with an activation energy Q(D) approximately 52.1 kJ/mol. This value is close to the energy of breaking hydrogen bonds in ice Ih and suggests that this process is the rate-limiting step in hydrate formation from ice in the slower diffusion-controlled part of the reaction.

  1. Electronic-state control of amino acids on semiconductor surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Masato; Nakayama, Takashi

    2005-01-01

    Electronic structures of amino acids on the Si(1 1 1) surfaces are investigated by using ab initio Hartree-Fock calculations. It is shown that among various polar amino acids, a histidine is the only one that can be positively ionized when hole carriers are supplied in the Si substrate, by transferring the hole charge from Si substrate to an amino acid. This result indicates that the ionization of a histidine, which will activate the protein functions, can be controlled electrically by producing amino acid/Si junctions

  2. Multiple Coexisting Dirac Surface States in Three-Dimensional Topological Insulator PbBi₆Te₁₀.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papagno, Marco; Eremeev, Sergey V; Fujii, Jun; Aliev, Ziya S; Babanly, Mahammad B; Mahatha, Sanjoy Kr; Vobornik, Ivana; Mamedov, Nazim T; Pacilé, Daniela; Chulkov, Evgueni V

    2016-03-22

    By means of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) measurements, we unveil the electronic band structure of three-dimensional PbBi6Te10 topological insulator. ARPES investigations evidence multiple coexisting Dirac surface states at the zone-center of the reciprocal space, displaying distinct electronic band dispersion, different constant energy contours, and Dirac point energies. We also provide evidence of Rashba-like split states close to the Fermi level, and deeper M- and V-shaped bands coexisting with the topological surface states. The experimental findings are in agreement with scanning tunneling microscopy measurements revealing different surface terminations according to the crystal structure of PbBi6Te10. Our experimental results are supported by density functional theory calculations predicting multiple topological surface states according to different surface cleavage planes.

  3. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben; Lachowski, Eric E.

    1999-01-01

    Vapour phase hydration of purl cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities is described. This is relevant to modern high performance concrete that may self-desiccate during hydration and is also relevant to the quality of the cement during storage. Both the oretical considerations...... and experimental data are presented showing that C(3)A can hydrate at lower humidities than either C3S or C2S. It is suggested that the initiation of hydration during exposure to water vapour is nucleation controlled. When C(3)A hydrates at low humidity, the characteristic hydration product is C(3)AH(6...

  4. State boundary surface of a hypoplastic model for clays

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mašín, David; Herle, Ivo

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 6 (2005), s. 400-410 ISSN 0266-352X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA103/04/0672 Grant - others:Evropská komise SSPI-CT-2003-501837 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20710524 Keywords : hypoplasticity * clay * limit state Subject RIV: JM - Building Engineering Impact factor: 0.562, year: 2005

  5. Compositional characteristics and hydration behavior of mineral trioxide aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Hsi Wang

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA was one of most popular biomaterials for endodontic treatment in the past decade. Its superb biocompatibility, sealing ability and surface for tissue adhesion all make MTA a potential candidate for many dental applications, such as apexification, perforation repair, repair of root resorption, and as a root-end filling material. There are many review articles regarding the physical, chemical and biological properties of MTA. However, there are few reviews discussing the relationship between the composition and hydration behavior of MTA. The aim of this article was to provide a systematic review regarding the compositional characteristics and hydration behavior of MTA.

  6. Hydrate Evolution in Response to Ongoing Environmental Shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rempel, Alan [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States)

    2015-12-31

    Natural gas hydrates have the potential to become a vital domestic clean-burning energy source. However, past changes in environmental conditions have caused hydrates to become unstable and trigger both massive submarine landslides and the development of crater-like pockmarks, thereby releasing methane into the overlying seawater and atmosphere, where it acts as a powerful greenhouse gas. This project was designed to fill critical gaps in our understanding of domestic hydrate resources and improve forecasts for their response to environmental shifts. Project work can be separated into three interrelated components, each involving the development of predictive mathematical models. The first project component concerns the role of sediment properties on the development and dissociation of concentrated hydrate anomalies. To this end, we developed numerical models to predict equilibrium solubility of methane in twophase equilibrium with hydrate as a function of measureable porous medium characteristics. The second project component concerned the evolution of hydrate distribution in heterogeneous reservoirs. To this end, we developed numerical models to predict the growth and decay of anomalies in representative physical environments. The third project component concerned the stability of hydrate-bearing slopes under changing environmental conditions. To this end, we developed numerical treatments of pore pressure evolution and consolidation, then used "infinite-slope" analysis to approximate the landslide potential in representative physical environments, and developed a "rate-and-state" frictional formulation to assess the stability of finite slip patches that are hypothesized to develop in response to the dissociation of hydrate anomalies. The increased predictive capabilities that result from this work provide a framework for interpreting field observations of hydrate anomalies in terms of the history of environmental forcing that led to their development. Moreover

  7. Cryopegs as destabilization factor of intra-permafrost gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuvilin, Evgeny; Bukhanov, Boris; Istomin, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    A characteristic feature of permafrost soils in the Arctic is widespread intra-permafrost unfrozen brine lenses - cryopegs. They are often found in permafrost horizons in the north part of Western Siberia, in particular, on the Yamal Peninsula. Cryopegs depths in permafrost zone can be tens and hundreds of meters from the top of frozen strata. The chemical composition of natural cryopegs is close to sea waters, but is characterized by high mineralization. They have a sodium-chloride primary composition with a minor amount of sulphate. Mineralization of cryopegs brine is often hundreds of grams per liter, and the temperature is around -6…-8 °C. The formation of cryopegs in permafrost is associated with processes of long-term freezing of sediments and cryogenic concentration of salts and salt solutions in local areas. The cryopegs' formation can take place in the course of permafrost evolution at the sea transgressions and regressions during freezing of saline sea sediments. Very important feature of cryopegs in permafrost is their transformation in the process of changing temperature and pressure conditions. As a result, the salinity and chemical composition are changed and in addition the cryopegs' location can be changed during their migration. The cryopegs migration violates the thermodynamic conditions of existence intra-permafrost gas hydrate formations, especially the relic gas hydrates deposits, which are situated in the shallow permafrost up to 100 meters depth in a metastable state [1]. The interaction cryopegs with gas hydrates accumulations can cause decomposition of intra-permafrost hydrates. Moreover, the increasing of salt and unfrozen water content in sedimentary rocks sharply reduce the efficiency of gas hydrates self-preservation in frozen soils. It is confirmed by experimental investigations of interaction of frozen gas hydrate bearing sediments with salt solutions [2]. So, horizons with elevated pressure can appear, as a result of gas hydrate

  8. NATURAL GAS HYDRATES STORAGE PROJECT PHASE II. CONCEPTUAL DESIGN AND ECONOMIC STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.E. Rogers

    1999-09-27

    DOE Contract DE-AC26-97FT33203 studied feasibility of utilizing the natural-gas storage property of gas hydrates, so abundantly demonstrated in nature, as an economical industrial process to allow expanded use of the clean-burning fuel in power plants. The laboratory work achieved breakthroughs: (1) Gas hydrates were found to form orders of magnitude faster in an unstirred system with surfactant-water micellar solutions. (2) Hydrate particles were found to self-pack by adsorption on cold metal surfaces from the micellar solutions. (3) Interstitial micellar-water of the packed particles were found to continue forming hydrates. (4) Aluminum surfaces were found to most actively collect the hydrate particles. These laboratory developments were the bases of a conceptual design for a large-scale process where simplification enhances economy. In the design, hydrates form, store, and decompose in the same tank in which gas is pressurized to 550 psi above unstirred micellar solution, chilled by a brine circulating through a bank of aluminum tubing in the tank employing gas-fired refrigeration. Hydrates form on aluminum plates suspended in the chilled micellar solution. A low-grade heat source, such as 110 F water of a power plant, circulates through the tubing bank to release stored gas. The design allows a formation/storage/decomposition cycle in a 24-hour period of 2,254,000 scf of natural gas; the capability of multiple cycles is an advantage of the process. The development costs and the user costs of storing natural gas in a scaled hydrate process were estimated to be competitive with conventional storage means if multiple cycles of hydrate storage were used. If more than 54 cycles/year were used, hydrate development costs per Mscf would be better than development costs of depleted reservoir storage; above 125 cycles/year, hydrate user costs would be lower than user costs of depleted reservoir storage.

  9. Neutron and X-ray crystallographic analysis of Achromobacter protease I at pD 8.0: protonation states and hydration structure in the free-form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Yuki; Yamada, Taro; Kurihara, Kazuo; Tanaka, Ichiro; Sakiyama, Fumio; Masaki, Takeharu; Niimura, Nobuo

    2013-08-01

    The structure of the free-form of Achromobacter protease I (API) at pD 8.0 was refined by simultaneous use of single crystal X-ray and neutron diffraction data sets to investigate the protonation states of key catalytic residues of the serine protease. Occupancy refinement of the catalytic triad in the active site of API free-form showed that ca. 30% of the imidazole ring of H57 and ca. 70% of the hydroxyl group of S194 were deuterated. This observation indicates that a major fraction of S194 is protonated in the absence of a substrate. The protonation state of the catalytic triad in API was compared with the bovine β-trypsin-BPTI complex. The comparison led to the hypothesis that close contact of a substrate with S194 could lower the acidity of its hydroxyl group, thereby allowing H57 to extract the hydrogen from the hydroxyl group of S194. H210, which is a residue specific to API, does not form a hydrogen bond with the catalytic triad residue D113. Instead, H210 forms a hydrogen bond network with S176, H177 and a water molecule. The close proximity of the bulky, hydrophobic residue W169 may protect this hydrogen bond network, and this protection may stabilize the function of API over a wide pH range. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Hydrates removal during the exploration evaluation of the 3-SES-149A well; Remocao de hidrato na avaliacao exploratoria do poco 3-SES-149A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barros Filho, Armando F.; Franco, Marcus L. de A. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Gomes, Luiz A.Q.M. [Schlumberger, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    The 3-SES-149A well, at a water depth of 1164 meters, is part of the SEAL-100 block located offshore of the State of Sergipe. The objective of the intervention was to evaluate the 3674-3682 meters interval of the Riachuelo Formation. Bottom hole gauges and real time data transmission to the surface were deployed for this test, during which the target interval produced gas and condensate, without any evidence of formation of hydrate at the surface. After the test, while pulling out the electrical cable with the Link Running Tool, it got stuck close to the subsea well-test tree at a depth of 1257 meters. The formation of hydrate not only kept the cable from moving up, but also rendered impossible the reverse circulation in the column and consequently pulling out the test string. Removing the hydrate would allow releasing the logging cable, thus enabling fluid circulation in the string and its safe retrieval. The goal was achieved via the injection of solvent through the subsea well-test tree, drilling fluid circulation through the annulus above the BOP, and fluid circulation on the top of the hydrate plug through Coiled Tubing. The greatest challenge was running the Coiled Tubing in the string with the electrical cable inside. (author)

  11. Preliminary assessment of hydrocarbon gas sources from the Mt. Elbert no. 1 gas hydrate test well, Milne Pt., Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenson, T.D. [United States Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Collett, T.S. [United States Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Hunter, R.B. [ASRC Energy Services, Anchorage, AK (United States)

    2008-07-01

    This paper presented details of an extensive data collection and analysis program conducted at the Mount Elbert gas hydrate stratigraphic test well located in the Milne Point area on the Alaska North Slope. The aim of the program was to characterize and assess gas hydrate resources in the area and identify issues that will help the development of gas hydrates as an energy resources. Gases were collected from sample cores and cuttings taken from deposits overlying the Prudhoe Bay, Milne Point, and Kuparuk River oil fields. The hydrates occurred in an upper zone containing 14 meters of gas hydrate-bearing sediments; and a lower zone containing 16 meters of sediments with gas hydrate saturations of between 60 to 75 per cent. Hydrocarbon gases obtained from the samples contained methane with an isotopic composition ranging from -50.1 to -47.2 per cent. The study showed that the gas hydrates contained a mixture of deep source thermogenic gas as well as shallow, microbial gas. The hydrate petroleum system showed evidence of oil migration, and oil biodegradation. Evidence also suggested that permafrost and gas hydrate layers acted as gas traps. It was concluded that the shallow microbial gas had a biodegraded oil gas source contribution that directly converted to gas hydrate, or concentrated as a free gas in conventional traps and converted to gas hydrates in response to changes in surface conditions. 7 refs., 7 figs.

  12. Gas hydrate characterization and grain-scale imaging of recovered cores from the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Laura A.; Lorenson, T.D.; Pinkston, John C.

    2011-01-01

    Using cryogenic scanning electron microscopy (CSEM), powder X-ray diffraction, and gas chromatography methods, we investigated the physical states, grain characteristics, gas composition, and methane isotopic composition of two gas-hydrate-bearing sections of core recovered from the BPXA–DOE–USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well situated on the Alaska North Slope. The well was continuously cored from 606.5 m to 760.1 m depth, and sections investigated here were retrieved from 619.9 m and 661.0 m depth. X-ray analysis and imaging of the sediment phase in both sections shows it consists of a predominantly fine-grained and well-sorted quartz sand with lesser amounts of feldspar, muscovite, and minor clays. Cryogenic SEM shows the gas-hydrate phase forming primarily as a pore-filling material between the sediment grains at approximately 70–75% saturation, and more sporadically as thin veins typically several tens of microns in diameter. Pore throat diameters vary, but commonly range 20–120 microns. Gas chromatography analyses of the hydrate-forming gas show that it is comprised of mainly methane (>99.9%), indicating that the gas hydrate is structure I. Here we report on the distribution and articulation of the gas-hydrate phase within the cores, the grain morphology of the hydrate, the composition of the sediment host, and the composition of the hydrate-forming gas.

  13. Animated molecular dynamics simulations of hydrated caesium-smectite interlayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Rebecca; Sposito, Garrison

    2002-01-01

    Computer animation of center of mass coordinates obtained from 800 ps molecular dynamics simulations of Cs-smectite hydrates (1/3 and 2/3 water monolayers) provided information concerning the structure and dynamics of the interlayer region that could not be obtained through traditional simulation analysis methods. Cs+ formed inner sphere complexes with the mineral surface, and could be seen to jump from one attracting location near a layer charge site to the next, while water molecules were observed to migrate from the hydration shell of one ion to that of another. Neighboring ions maintained a partial hydration shell by sharing water molecules, such that a single water molecule hydrated two ions simultaneously for hundreds of picoseconds. Cs-montmorillonite hydrates featured the largest extent of this sharing interaction, because interlayer ions were able to inhabit positions near surface cavities as well as at their edges, close to oxygen triads. The greater positional freedom of Cs+ within the montmorillonite interlayer, a result of structural hydroxyl orientation and low tetrahedral charge, promoted the optimization of distances between cations and water molecules required for water sharing. Preference of Cs+ for locations near oxygen triads was observed within interlayer beidellite and hectorite. Water molecules also could be seen to interact directly with the mineral surface, entering its surface cavities to approach attracting charge sites and structural hydroxyls. With increasing water content, water molecules exhibited increased frequency and duration of both cavity habitation and water sharing interactions. Competition between Cs+ and water molecules for surface sites was evident. These important cooperative and competitive features of interlayer molecular behavior were uniquely revealed by animation of an otherwise highly complex simulation output.

  14. Animated molecular dynamics simulations of hydrated caesium-smectite interlayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sposito Garrison

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Computer animation of center of mass coordinates obtained from 800 ps molecular dynamics simulations of Cs-smectite hydrates (1/3 and 2/3 water monolayers provided information concerning the structure and dynamics of the interlayer region that could not be obtained through traditional simulation analysis methods. Cs+ formed inner sphere complexes with the mineral surface, and could be seen to jump from one attracting location near a layer charge site to the next, while water molecules were observed to migrate from the hydration shell of one ion to that of another. Neighboring ions maintained a partial hydration shell by sharing water molecules, such that a single water molecule hydrated two ions simultaneously for hundreds of picoseconds. Cs-montmorillonite hydrates featured the largest extent of this sharing interaction, because interlayer ions were able to inhabit positions near surface cavities as well as at their edges, close to oxygen triads. The greater positional freedom of Cs+ within the montmorillonite interlayer, a result of structural hydroxyl orientation and low tetrahedral charge, promoted the optimization of distances between cations and water molecules required for water sharing. Preference of Cs+ for locations near oxygen triads was observed within interlayer beidellite and hectorite. Water molecules also could be seen to interact directly with the mineral surface, entering its surface cavities to approach attracting charge sites and structural hydroxyls. With increasing water content, water molecules exhibited increased frequency and duration of both cavity habitation and water sharing interactions. Competition between Cs+ and water molecules for surface sites was evident. These important cooperative and competitive features of interlayer molecular behavior were uniquely revealed by animation of an otherwise highly complex simulation output.

  15. Water Dynamics in Protein Hydration Shells: The Molecular Origins of the Dynamical Perturbation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Protein hydration shell dynamics play an important role in biochemical processes including protein folding, enzyme function, and molecular recognition. We present here a comparison of the reorientation dynamics of individual water molecules within the hydration shell of a series of globular proteins: acetylcholinesterase, subtilisin Carlsberg, lysozyme, and ubiquitin. Molecular dynamics simulations and analytical models are used to access site-resolved information on hydration shell dynamics and to elucidate the molecular origins of the dynamical perturbation of hydration shell water relative to bulk water. We show that all four proteins have very similar hydration shell dynamics, despite their wide range of sizes and functions, and differing secondary structures. We demonstrate that this arises from the similar local surface topology and surface chemical composition of the four proteins, and that such local factors alone are sufficient to rationalize the hydration shell dynamics. We propose that these conclusions can be generalized to a wide range of globular proteins. We also show that protein conformational fluctuations induce a dynamical heterogeneity within the hydration layer. We finally address the effect of confinement on hydration shell dynamics via a site-resolved analysis and connect our results to experiments via the calculation of two-dimensional infrared spectra. PMID:24479585

  16. Hydraulic Functions for Swelling Soils: Clay Fabric Hydration and Flow in Textural Pore Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Or, D.; Tuller, M.

    2001-12-01

    Changes in pore space with hydration state of swelling soils present a challenge to predictive modeling of their hydraulic properties. We developed a pore scale model considering the soil clay fabric as an assembly of idealized colloidal-size tactoids characterized by large surface area associated with the lamellar nature of clays. The arrangement of clay tactoids and the spacing between individual lamellas are functions of clay hydration state quantifiable via the disjoining pressure formalism (DLVO theory) as dominated by a large electrostatic repulsive component. Silt and sand textural components are represented by rigid spheres interspaced by clay fabric in two basic configurations of "expansive" and "reductive" unit cells. Bulk soil properties such as porosity and surface area serve as constraints for the idealized geometry. Total volumetric expansion as a function of water content was constrained by experimentally based universal relationships developed by Giraldez and Sposito. Calculations of mass-volume relationships and soil water characteristics show favorable agreement with measured values. Calculated saturated hydraulic conductivity is within an order of magnitude of experimental data. Work is underway to estimate unsaturated hydraulic conductivity.

  17. Water in the Martian Crust Locked in Hydrated Minerals: A Significant Planetary Reservoir of Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustard, J. F.

    2017-10-01

    Calculations for a reservoir of water locked in hydrated minerals is estimated to range from a low of < 20 m global equivalent layer to approximately 1 km for the high end. This is sufficient to strongly impact surface geomorphic processes.

  18. Prediction of Gas Hydrate Formation Conditions in Aqueous Solutions of Single and Mixed Electrolytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zuo, You-Xiang; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, the extended Patel-Teja equation of state was modified to describe non-ideality of the liquid phase containing water and electrolytes accurately. The modified Patel-Teja equation of state (MPT EOS) was utilized to develop a predictive method for gas hydrate equilibria. The new method...... employs the Barkan and Sheinin hydrate model for the description of the hydrate phase, the original Patel-Teja equation of state for the vapor phase fugacities, and the MPT EOS (instead of the activity coefficient model) for the activity of water in the aqueous phase. The new method has succesfully...

  19. Is Obsidian Hydration Dating Affected by Relative Humidity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, I.; Trembour, F.W.; Smith, G.I.; Smith, F.L.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments carried out under temperatures and relative humidities that approximate ambient conditions show that the rate of hydration of obsidian is a function of the relative humidity, as well as of previously established variables of temperature and obsidian chemical composition. Measurements of the relative humidity of soil at 25 sites and at depths of between 0.01 and 2 m below ground show that in most soil environments, at depths below about 0.25 m, the relative humidity is constant at 100%. We have found that the thickness of the hydrated layer developed on obsidian outcrops exposed to the sun and to relative humidities of 30-90% is similar to that formed on other portions of the outcrop that were shielded from the sun and exposed to a relative humidity of approximately 100%. Surface samples of obsidian exposed to solar heating should hydrate more rapidly than samples buried in the ground. However, the effect of the lower mean relative humidity experiences by surface samples tends to compensate for the elevated temperature, which may explain why obsidian hydration ages of surface samples usually approximate those derived from buried samples.

  20. Animated molecular dynamics simulations of hydrated Cesium-smectite interlayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutton, Rebecca; Sposito, Garrison

    2002-01-01

    Computer animation of center of mass coordinates obtained from 800 ps molecular dynamics simulations of Cs-smectite hydrates (1/3 and 2/3 water monolayers) provided information concerning the structure and dynamics of the interlayer region that could not be obtained through traditional analytical methods. Cs+ could be seen to jump from one attracting location near a layer charge site to the next, and water molecules were observed to migrate from the hydration shell of one ion to that of another. Neighboring ions maintained a partial hydration shell by sharing water molecules, such that a single water molecule hydrated two ions simultaneously for hundreds of picoseconds. The extent of this sharing interaction in the interlayer was determined by the smectite charge distribution, but increased with increasing water content. Water molecules also could be seen to interact directly with the mineral surface, entering its ditrigonal cavities to approach attracting charge sites. The frequency and duration of cavity habitation increased with increasing water content and tetrahedral charge, and was inhibited the more perpendicular was the structural hydroxyl orientation relative to the mineral surface. Competition between Cs+ and water molecules for surface sites was evident. These important cooperative and competitive features of interlayer molecular behavior were uniquely revealed by animation of an otherwise highly complex simulation output

  1. Solid state cesium ion guns for surface studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souzis, A.E.; Carr, W.E.; Kim, S.I.; Seidl, M.

    1990-01-01

    Three cesium ion guns covering the energy range of 5--5000 V are described. These guns use a novel source of cesium ions that combine the advantages of porous metal ionizers with those of aluminosilicate emitters. Cesium ions are chemically stored in a solid electrolyte pellet and are thermionically emitted from a porous thin film of tungsten at the surface. Cesium supply to the emitting surface is controlled by applying a bias across the pellet. A total charge of 10.0 C can be extracted, corresponding to greater than 2000 h of lifetime with an extraction current of 1.0 μA. This source is compact, stable, and easy to use, and produces a beam with >99.5% purity. It requires none of the differential pumping or associated hardware necessary in designs using cesium vapor and porous tungsten ionizers. It has been used in ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) experiments at pressures of -10 Torr with no significant gas load. Three different types of extraction optics are used depending on the energy range desired. For low-energy deposition, a simple space-charge-limited planar diode with a perveance of 1x10 -7 A/V 3/2 is used. Current densities of 10.0 μA/cm 2 at the exit aperture for energies ≤20 V are typical. This type of source provides an alternative to vapor deposition with the advantage of precise flux calibration by integration of the ion current. For energies from 50 to 500 V and typical beam radii of 0.5 to 0.2 mm, a high perveance Pierce-type ion gun is used. This gun was designed with a perveance of 1x10 -9 A/V 3/2 and produces a beam with an effective temperature of 0.35 eV. For the energy range of 0.5 to 5 keV, the Pierce gun is used in conjunction with two Einzel lenses, enabling a large range of imaging ratios to be obtained. Beam radii of 60 to 300 μm are typical for beam currents of 50 nA to 1.0 μA

  2. Change of electrical conductivities between hydrated and dehydrated samples of honeycomb sheet structures with mixed oxidation state paddlewheel dirhodium complexes and halide ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuma, Yasuhiro; Miyashita, Osamu; Kawamura, Takashi; Ebihara, Masahiro

    2012-07-21

    A series of mixed oxidation state compounds, [{Rh(2)(acam)(4)}(3)(μ(3)-X)(2)]·nH(2)O (Hacam = acetamide; X = Cl, n = 4 (1·4H(2)O); X = Br, n = 10 (2·10H(2)O); X = I, n = 10 (3·10H(2)O)) and [{Rh(2)(pram)(4)}(3)(μ(3)-X)(2)]·6H(2)O (Hpram = propionamide; X = Cl (4·6H(2)O), Br (5·6H(2)O), I (6·6H(2)O)) were synthesized and their X-ray structures were determined. In the crystal structure of all of these complexes, dirhodium complexes and halide ions construct 2-D honeycomb sheet arrangements in which the walls consist of Rh(2) units and halide ions lie at the corners. Complexes 1·4H(2)O, 4·6H(2)O, 5·6H(2)O and 6·6H(2)O have three independent Rh(2) units, in which there are two Rh(2)(5+) and one Rh(2)(4+). In these structures, the water molecules hydrogen bond to O atoms and from the N atoms of the amidate ligands. The number of hydrogen bonds from water molecules to the Rh(2)(4+) unit is greater than that to the Rh(2)(5+) units. This suggests that there exists pinning of the oxidation states by water molecules. In the structures of 2·10H(2)O and 3·10H(2)O, all of the Rh(2) units are crystallographically equivalent. In these structures, eight of the 10 water molecules form a honeycomb-like network between the {Rh(2)(acam)(4)}(3)X(2) honeycomb sheets. The former four structures show very low electrical conductivities of ca. 10(-8) S cm(-1) (room temperature, pellets) and the latter structures have the higher values of ca. 10(-4) S cm(-1). In the former complexes, improvement of the values to 10(-6) S cm(-1) was observed, caused by loss of pinning water.

  3. Dynamic morphology of gas hydrate on a methane bubble in water: Observations and new insights for hydrate film models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warzinski, Robert P.; Lynn, Ronald; Haljasmaa, Igor; Leifer, Ira; Shaffer, Frank; Anderson, Brian J.; Levine, Jonathan S.

    2014-10-01

    Predicting the fate of subsea hydrocarbon gases escaping into seawater is complicated by potential formation of hydrate on rising bubbles that can enhance their survival in the water column, allowing gas to reach shallower depths and the atmosphere. The precise nature and influence of hydrate coatings on bubble hydrodynamics and dissolution is largely unknown. Here we present high-definition, experimental observations of complex surficial mechanisms governing methane bubble hydrate formation and dissociation during transit of a simulated oceanic water column that reveal a temporal progression of deep-sea controlling mechanisms. Synergistic feedbacks between bubble hydrodynamics, hydrate morphology, and coverage characteristics were discovered. Morphological changes on the bubble surface appear analogous to macroscale, sea ice processes, presenting new mechanistic insights. An inverse linear relationship between hydrate coverage and bubble dissolution rate is indicated. Understanding and incorporating these phenomena into bubble and bubble plume models will be necessary to accurately predict global greenhouse gas budgets for warming ocean scenarios and hydrocarbon transport from anthropogenic or natural deep-sea eruptions.

  4. Evaluation of superpave mixtures containing hydrated lime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The use of hydrated lime in Hot-Mix Asphalt (HMA) mixtures can reduce permanent deformation, long-term aging, and moisture : susceptibility of mixtures. In addition, hydrated lime increases the stiffness and fatigue resistance of mixtures. This study...

  5. Novel understanding of calcium silicate hydrate from dilute hydration

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Lina

    2017-05-13

    The perspective of calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) is still confronting various debates due to its intrinsic complicated structure and properties after decades of studies. In this study, hydration at dilute suspension of w/s equaling to 10 was conducted for tricalcium silicate (C3S) to interpret long-term hydration process and investigate the formation, structure and properties of C-S-H. Based on results from XRD, IR, SEM, NMR and so forth, loose and dense clusters of C-S-H with analogous C/S ratio were obtained along with the corresponding chemical formulae proposed as Ca5Si4O13∙6.2H2O. Crystalline structure inside C-S-H was observed by TEM, which was allocated at the foil-like proportion as well as the edge of wrinkles of the product. The long-term hydration process of C3S in dilute suspension could be sketchily described as migration of calcium hydroxide and in-situ growth of C-S-H with equilibrium silicon in aqueous solution relatively constant and calcium varied.

  6. Influence of refraction of p-polarized light on photoemission from metallic surface states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagchi, A.; Barrera, R.G.

    1979-01-01

    The refraction of p-polarized light at a metal surface leads, under certain circumstances, to a large peak in the spatial distribution of the normal component of the electric field near the surface. The origin of this peak is explained both in terms of a classical correspondence and in terms of a theory based on the non-local dielectric response of the metal surface. The significance of the large magnitude and rapid variation of the surface electric field in exciting photoelectrons from surface states is discussed [pt

  7. Direct measurement of surface-state conductance by microscopic four-point probe method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasegawa, S.; Shiraki, I.; Tanikawa, T.

    2002-01-01

    For in situ measurements of local electrical conductivity of well defined crystal surfaces in ultrahigh vacuum, we have developed microscopic four-point probes with a probe spacing of several micrometres, installed in a scanning-electron - microscope/electron-diffraction chamber. The probe...... is precisely positioned on targeted areas of the sample surface by using piezoactuators. This apparatus enables conductivity measurement with extremely high surface sensitivity, resulting in direct access to surface-state conductivity of the surface superstructures, and clarifying the influence of atomic steps...

  8. Investigating the influence of lithologic heterogeneity on gas hydrate formation and methane recycling at the base of the gas hydrate stability zone in channelized systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daigle, Hugh; Nole, Michael; Cook, Ann; Malinverno, Alberto

    2017-12-14

    In marine environments, gas hydrate preferentially accumulates in coarse-grained sediments. At the meso- to micro-scale, however, hydrate distribution in these coarse-grained units is often heterogeneous. We employ a methane hydrate reservoir simulator coupling heat and mass transfer as well as capillary effects to investigate how capillary controls on methane solubility affect gas and hydrate accumulations in reservoirs characterized by graded bedding and alternating sequences of coarse-grained sands and fine-grained silt and clay. Simulations bury a channelized reservoir unit encased in homogeneous, fine-grained material characterized by small pores (150 nm) and low permeability (~1 md in the absence of hydrate). Pore sizes within each reservoir bed between vary between coarse sand and fine silt. Sands have a median pore size of 35 microns and a lognormal pore size distribution. We also investigate how the amount of labile organic carbon (LOC) affects hydrate growth due to microbial methanogenesis within the sediments. In a diffusion-dominated system, methane movies into reservoir layers along spatial gradients in dissolved methane concentration. Hydrate grows in such a way as to minimize these concentration gradients by accumulating slower in finer-grained reservoir layers and faster in coarser-grained layers. Channelized, fining-upwards sediment bodies accumulate hydrate first along their outer surfaces and thence inward from top to bottom. If LOC is present in thin beds within the channel, higher saturations of hydrate will be distributed more homogeneously throughout the unit. When buried beneath the GHSZ, gas recycling can occur only if enough hydrate is present to form a connected gas phase upon dissociation. Simulations indicate that this is difficult to achieve for diffusion-dominated systems, especially those with thick GHSZs and/or small amounts of LOC. However, capillary-driven fracturing behavior may be more prevalent in settings with thick GHSZs.

  9. Surface State Capture Cross-Section at the Interface between Silicon and Hafnium Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Chien Chiu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The interfacial properties between silicon and hafnium oxide (HfO2 are explored by the gated-diode method and the subthreshold measurement. The density of interface-trapped charges, the current induced by surface defect centers, the surface recombination velocity, and the surface state capture cross-section are obtained in this work. Among the interfacial properties, the surface state capture cross-section is approximately constant even if the postdeposition annealing condition is changed. This effective capture cross-section of surface states is about 2.4 × 10−15 cm2, which may be an inherent nature in the HfO2/Si interface.

  10. Acoustical method of whole-body hydration status monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarvazyan, A. P.; Tsyuryupa, S. N.; Calhoun, M.; Utter, A.

    2016-07-01

    An acoustical handheld hydration monitor (HM) for assessing the water balance of the human body was developed. Dehydration is a critical public health problem. Many elderly over age of 65 are particularly vulnerable as are infants and young children. Given that dehydration is both preventable and reversible, the need for an easy-to-perform method for the detection of water imbalance is of the utmost clinical importance. The HM is based on an experimental fact that ultrasound velocity in muscle is a linear function of water content and can be referenced to the hydration status of the body. Studies on the validity of HM for the assessment of whole-body hydration status were conducted in the Appalachian State University, USA, on healthy young adults and on elderly subjects residing at an assisted living facility. The HM was able to track changes in total body water during periods of acute dehydration and rehydration in athletes and day-to-day and diurnal variability of hydration in elderly. Results of human studies indicate that HM has a potential to become an efficient tool for detecting abnormal changes in the body hydration status.

  11. Systemic hydration: relating science to clinical practice in vocal health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Naomi A; Thibeault, Susan L

    2014-09-01

    To examine the current state of the science regarding the role of systemic hydration in vocal function and health. Literature review. Literature search spanning multiple disciplines, including speech-language pathology, nutrition and dietetics, medicine, sports and exercise science, physiology, and biomechanics. The relationship between hydration and physical function is an area of common interest among multiple professions. Each discipline provides valuable insight into the connection between performance and water balance, as well as complimentary methods of investigation. Existing voice literature suggests a relationship between hydration and voice production; however, the underlying mechanisms are not yet defined and a treatment effect for systemic hydration remains to be demonstrated. Literature from other disciplines sheds light on methodological shortcomings and, in some cases, offers an alternative explanation for observed phenomena. A growing body of literature in the field of voice science is documenting a relationship between hydration and vocal function; however, greater understanding is required to guide best practice in the maintenance of vocal health and management of voice disorders. Integration of knowledge and technical expertise from multiple disciplines facilitates analysis of existing literature and provides guidance as to future research. Copyright © 2014 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Gas Hydrate Research Database and Web Dissemination Channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Micheal Frenkel; Kenneth Kroenlein; V Diky; R.D. Chirico; A. Kazakow; C.D. Muzny; M. Frenkel

    2009-09-30

    To facilitate advances in application of technologies pertaining to gas hydrates, a United States database containing experimentally-derived information about those materials was developed. The Clathrate Hydrate Physical Property Database (NIST Standard Reference Database {number_sign} 156) was developed by the TRC Group at NIST in Boulder, Colorado paralleling a highly-successful database of thermodynamic properties of molecular pure compounds and their mixtures and in association with an international effort on the part of CODATA to aid in international data sharing. Development and population of this database relied on the development of three components of information-processing infrastructure: (1) guided data capture (GDC) software designed to convert data and metadata into a well-organized, electronic format, (2) a relational data storage facility to accommodate all types of numerical and metadata within the scope of the project, and (3) a gas hydrate markup language (GHML) developed to standardize data communications between 'data producers' and 'data users'. Having developed the appropriate data storage and communication technologies, a web-based interface for both the new Clathrate Hydrate Physical Property Database, as well as Scientific Results from the Mallik 2002 Gas Hydrate Production Research Well Program was developed and deployed at http://gashydrates.nist.gov.

  13. Monthly version of HadISST sea surface temperature state-space components

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — State-Space Decomposition of Monthly version of HadISST sea surface temperature component (1-degree). See Rayner, N. A., Parker, D. E., Horton, E. B., Folland, C....

  14. Evaluation of hydration indexes in kale leaves

    OpenAIRE

    Calbo, Adonai G.; Ferreira, Marcos D.

    2011-01-01

    Hydration indexes are practical variables for quantifying plant water stress and can be useful for agronomic purposes. Three adapted hydration indexes based on relative water content, volumetric hydration, and leaf turgor pressure were evaluated in kale (Brassica oleracea var. acephala) leaf segments. Relative water content and volumetric hydration were measured in leaf segments after a water infiltration procedure with the aim of filling its large intercellular volumes (@18%v/v). The infiltr...

  15. Thermodynamic simulations of hydrate formation from gas mixtures in batch operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Takehito; Mori, Yasuhiko H.

    2007-01-01

    This paper deals with the hydrate formation from mixed hydrate-forming gases such as natural gas to be converted to hydrates for the purpose of its storage and biogases from which carbon dioxide is to be separated by hydrate formation. When a batch operation is selected for processing such a gas mixture in a closed reactor, we need to predict the evolution of the thermodynamic and compositional states inside the reactor during the operation. We have contrived a simulation scheme that allows us to estimate the simultaneous changes in the composition of the residual gas, the structure of the hydrate formed and the guest composition in the hydrate, in addition to the change in the system pressure, with the progress of hydrate formation during each operation. This scheme assumes the transient hydrate forming process in a reactor during each operation to be a series of numerous equilibrium states, each slightly deviating from the preceding state. That is, a thermodynamic system composed of the contents of the reactor is assumed to be subjected to a quasi-static, irreversible change in state, instantaneously keeping itself in thermodynamic equilibrium. The paper demonstrates a simulation of a process of hydrate formation from a methane + propane mixture and compares its results to relevant experimental results reported by Uchida et al. [Uchida T, Morikawa M, Takeya S, Ikeda IY, Ohmura R, Nagao J, et al. Two-step formation of methane-propane mixed gas hydrates in a batch-type reactor. AIChE J 2004;50(2):518-23

  16. Influence of Fines Content on the Mechanical Behavior of Methane Hydrate-Bearing Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyodo, Masayuki; Wu, Yang; Nakashima, Koji; Kajiyama, Shintaro; Nakata, Yukio

    2017-10-01

    Methane hydrate-bearing sediments with different amounts of fines content and at three densities were artificially prepared under controlled temperature and pressure conditions. The void ratios of specimens after isotropic consolidation tend to decrease with a rise in fines content. The fines particles enter into the pore space between sand grains and densify the specimens. A series of triaxial compression tests were performed to systematically investigate the influences of fines content and density on the shear properties of hydrate-free sediments and methane hydrate-bearing sediments. The test results demonstrate that a rise in fines content within methane hydrate-bearing sediments significantly enhances peak shear strength and promotes dilation behavior. These influences are particularly prominent for specimens at loose packing state. A decrease in void ratio increases the shear strength and stiffness of hydrate-free sediments and methane hydrate-bearing sediments containing fines content of 0% and 8.9%. It is noted that the formation of methane hydrate in samples with varying amounts of fines content increases the stress ratios at the critical state. The addition of fines particles into coarse-grained sand grains alters the internal microstructure of sand matrix and the hydrate formation pattern in the pore space between sand grains and fines particles.

  17. Transition State Theory for solvated reactions beyond recrossing-free dividing surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Revuelta, F.; Bartsch, Thomas; Garcia-Muller, P. L.; Hernandez, Rigoberto; Benito, R. M.; Borondo, F.

    2016-01-01

    The accuracy of rate constants calculated using transition state theory depends crucially on the correct identification of a recrossing--free dividing surface. We show here that it is possible to define such optimal dividing surface in systems with non--Markovian friction. However, a more direct approach to rate calculation is based on invariant manifolds and avoids the use of a dividing surface altogether, Using that method we obtain an explicit expression for the rate of crossing an anharmo...

  18. Pressure controlled transition into a self-induced topological superconducting surface state

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Zhiyong

    2014-02-07

    Ab-initio calculations show a pressure induced trivial-nontrivial-trivial topological phase transition in the normal state of 1T-TiSe2. The pressure range in which the nontrivial phase emerges overlaps with that of the superconducting ground state. Thus, topological superconductivity can be induced in protected surface states by the proximity effect of superconducting bulk states. This kind of self-induced topological surface superconductivity is promising for a realization of Majorana fermions due to the absence of lattice and chemical potential mismatches. For appropriate electron doping, the formation of the topological superconducting surface state in 1T-TiSe 2 becomes accessible to experiments as it can be controlled by pressure.

  19. Strong Linear Dichroism in Spin-Polarized Photoemission from Spin-Orbit-Coupled Surface States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentmann, H; Maaß, H; Krasovskii, E E; Peixoto, T R F; Seibel, C; Leandersson, M; Balasubramanian, T; Reinert, F

    2017-09-08

    A comprehensive understanding of spin-polarized photoemission is crucial for accessing the electronic structure of spin-orbit coupled materials. Yet, the impact of the final state in the photoemission process on the photoelectron spin has been difficult to assess in these systems. We present experiments for the spin-orbit split states in a Bi-Ag surface alloy showing that the alteration of the final state with energy may cause a complete reversal of the photoelectron spin polarization. We explain the effect on the basis of ab initio one-step photoemission theory and describe how it originates from linear dichroism in the angular distribution of photoelectrons. Our analysis shows that the modulated photoelectron spin polarization reflects the intrinsic spin density of the surface state being sampled differently depending on the final state, and it indicates linear dichroism as a natural probe of spin-orbit coupling at surfaces.

  20. In Situ Raman Detection of Gas Hydrates Exposed on the Seafloor of the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Du, Zengfeng; Luan, Zhendong; Wang, Xiujuan; Xi, Shichuan; Wang, Bing; Li, Lianfu; Lian, Chao; Yan, Jun

    2017-10-01

    Gas hydrates are usually buried in sediments. Here we report the first discovery of gas hydrates exposed on the seafloor of the South China Sea. The in situ chemical compositions and cage structures of these hydrates were measured at the depth of 1,130 m below sea level using a Raman insertion probe (RiP-Gh) that was carried and controlled by a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) Faxian. This in situ analytical technique can avoid the physical and chemical changes associated with the transport of samples from the deep sea to the surface. Natural gas hydrate samples were analyzed at two sites. The in situ spectra suggest that the newly formed hydrate was Structure I but contains a small amount of C3H8 and H2S. Pure gas spectra of CH4, C3H8, and H2S were also observed at the SCS-SGH02 site. These data represent the first in situ proof that free gas can be trapped within the hydrate fabric during rapid hydrate formation. We provide the first in situ confirmation of the hydrate growth model for the early stages of formation of crystalline hydrates in a methane-rich seafloor environment. Our work demonstrates that natural hydrate deposits, particularly those in the early stages of formation, are not monolithic single structures but instead exhibit significant small-scale heterogeneities due to inclusions of free gas and the surrounding seawater, there inclusions also serve as indicators of the likely hydrate formation mechanism. These data also reinforce the importance of correlating visual and in situ measurements when characterizing a sampling site.

  1. Hydration modeling of calcium sulphates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Korte, A.C.J.; Brouwers, H.J.H.; Al-Mattarneh, Hashem; Mustapha, Kamal N.; Nuruddin, Muhd Fadhil

    2008-01-01

    The CEMHYD3D model has been extended at the University of Twente in the last ten years [1,2]. At present the cement hydration model is extended for the use of gypsum. Although gypsum was present in the model already, the model was not suitable for high contents of gypsum and did not include the

  2. Is Br2 hydration hydrophobic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaraz-Torres, A; Gamboa-Suárez, A; Bernal-Uruchurtu, M I

    2017-02-28

    The spectroscopic properties of bromine in aqueous systems suggest it can behave as either hydrophilic or hydrophobic solute. In small water clusters, the halogen bond and the hydrogen-halogen interaction are responsible for its specific way of binding. In water hydrates, it is efficiently hosted by two different cages forming the crystal structure and it has been frequently assumed that there is little or no interaction between the guest and the host. Bromine in liquid solution poses a challenging question due to its non-negligible solubility and the large blue shift measured in its absorption spectra. Using a refined semi-empirical force field, PM3-PIF, we performed a Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics study of bromine in liquid water. Here we present a detailed study in which we retrieved the most representative hydration structures in terms of the most frequent positions around bromine and the most common water orientations. Albeit being an approximate description of the total hydration phenomenon, it captures the contribution of the leading molecular interactions in form of the recurrent structures. Our findings confirm that the spectroscopic signature is mainly caused by the closest neighbors. The dynamics of the whole first hydration shell strongly suggests that the external molecules in that structure effectively isolate the bulk from the presence of bromine. The solvation structure fluctuates from a hydrophilic to a hydrophobic-like environment along the studied trajectory.

  3. Water Intake and Hydration Indices in Healthy European Adults: The European Hydration Research Study (EHRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malisova, Olga; Athanasatou, Adelais; Pepa, Alex; Husemann, Marlien; Domnik, Kirsten; Braun, Hans; Mora-Rodriguez, Ricardo; Ortega, Juan F.; Fernandez-Elias, Valentin E.; Kapsokefalou, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Hydration status is linked with health, wellness, and performance. We evaluated hydration status, water intake, and urine output for seven consecutive days in healthy adults. Volunteers living in Spain, Germany, or Greece (n = 573, 39 ± 12 years (51.1% males), 25.0 ± 4.6 kg/m2 BMI) participated in an eight-day study protocol. Total water intake was estimated from seven-day food and drink diaries. Hydration status was measured in urine samples collected over 24 h for seven days and in blood samples collected in fasting state on the mornings of days 1 and 8. Total daily water intake was 2.75 ± 1.01 L, water from beverages 2.10 ± 0.91 L, water from foods 0.66 ± 0.29 L. Urine parameters were: 24 h volume 1.65 ± 0.70 L, 24 h osmolality 631 ± 221 mOsmol/kg Η2Ο, 24 h specific gravity 1.017 ± 0.005, 24 h excretion of sodium 166.9 ± 54.7 mEq, 24 h excretion of potassium 72.4 ± 24.6 mEq, color chart 4.2 ± 1.4. Predictors for urine osmolality were age, country, gender, and BMI. Blood indices were: haemoglobin concentration 14.7 ± 1.7 g/dL, hematocrit 43% ± 4% and serum osmolality 294 ± 9 mOsmol/kg Η2Ο. Daily water intake was higher in summer (2.8 ± 1.02 L) than in winter (2.6 ± 0.98 L) (p = 0.019). Water intake was associated negatively with urine specific gravity, urine color, and urine sodium and potassium concentrations (p hydration level. PMID:27058557

  4. Hydration mechanisms of mineral trioxide aggregate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, J

    2007-06-01

    To report the hydration mechanism of white mineral trioxide aggregate (White MTA, Dentsply, Tulsa Dental Products, Tulsa, OK, USA). The chemical constitution of white MTA was studied by viewing the powder in polished sections under the scanning electron microscope (SEM). The hydration of both white MTA and white Portland cement (PC) was studied by characterizing cement hydrates viewed under the SEM, plotting atomic ratios, performing quantitative energy dispersive analyses with X-ray (EDAX) and by calculation of the amount of anhydrous clinker minerals using the Bogue calculation. Un-hydrated MTA was composed of impure tri-calcium and di-calcium silicate and bismuth oxide. The aluminate phase was scarce. On hydration the white PC produced a dense structure made up of calcium silicate hydrate, calcium hydroxide, monosulphate and ettringite as the main hydration products. The un-reacted cement grain was coated with a layer of hydrated cement. In contrast MTA produced a porous structure on hydration. Levels of ettringite and monosulphate were low. Bismuth oxide was present as un-reacted powder but also incorporated with the calcium silicate hydrate. White MTA was deficient in alumina suggesting that the material was not prepared in a rotary kiln. On hydration this affected the production of ettringite and monosulphate usually formed on hydration of PC. The bismuth affected the hydration mechanism of MTA; it formed part of the structure of C-S-H and also affected the precipitation of calcium hydroxide in the hydrated paste. The microstructure of hydrated MTA would likely be weaker when compared with that of PC.

  5. Surface states of topological insulators: the Dirac fermion in curved two-dimensional spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dung-Hai

    2009-11-06

    The surface of a topological insulator is a closed two-dimensional manifold. The surface states are described by the Dirac Hamiltonian in curved two-dimensional spaces. For a slablike sample with a magnetic field perpendicular to its top and bottom surfaces, there are chiral states delocalized on the four side faces. These "chiral sheets" carry both charge and spin currents. In strong magnetic fields, the quantized charge Hall effect [sigma(xy) = (2n + 1)e2/h] will coexist with spin Hall effect.

  6. Impact of trophic state on the distribution of intact polar lipids in surface waters of lakes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bale, N.J.; Hopmans, E.C.; Schoon, P.; de Kluijver, A.; Downing, J.A.; Middelburg, J.J.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Schouten, S.

    2016-01-01

    We characterized the intact polar lipid (IPL) composition in the surface waters of 22 lakes from Minnesota and Iowa, ranging in trophic state between eutrophic and oligo-mesotrophic, to investigate the impact of trophic state on IPL composition. A high diversity of IPL classes was detected. Most IPL

  7. Tailoring the surface chemical bond states of the NbN films by doping Ag: Achieving hard hydrophobic surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Ping; Zhang, Kan; Du, Suxuan [Department of Materials Science, State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, and Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials, MOE, Jilin University, Changchun, 130012 (China); Meng, Qingnan [College of Construction Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun, 130026 (China); He, Xin [Department of Materials Science, State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, and Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials, MOE, Jilin University, Changchun, 130012 (China); Wang, Shuo [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wen, Mao, E-mail: wenmao225@jlu.edu.cn [Department of Materials Science, State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, and Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials, MOE, Jilin University, Changchun, 130012 (China); Zheng, Weitao, E-mail: WTZheng@jlu.edu.cn [Department of Materials Science, State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, and Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials, MOE, Jilin University, Changchun, 130012 (China)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Intrinsically hydrophilic NbN films can transfer to hydrophobic Nb-Ag-N films by doping Ag atoms into NbN sublattice. • Solute Ag can promote that the hydrophobic Ag{sub 2}O groups formed on the Nb-Ag-N film surface through self-oxidation. • The present work may provide a straightforward approach for the production of robust hydrophobic ceramic surfaces. - Abstract: Robust hydrophobic surfaces based on ceramics capable of withstanding harsh conditions such as abrasion, erosion and high temperature, are required in a broad range of applications. The metal cations with coordinative saturation or low electronegativity are commonly chosen to achieve the intrinsically hydrophobic ceramic by reducing Lewis acidity, and thus the ceramic systems are limited. In this work, we present a different picture that robust hydrophobic surface with high hardness (≥20 GPa) can be fabricated through doping Ag atoms into intrinsically hydrophilic ceramic film NbN by reactive co-sputtering. The transition of wettability from hydrophilic to hydrophobic of Nb-Ag-N films induced by Ag doping results from the appearance of Ag{sub 2}O groups on the films surfaces through self-oxidation, because Ag cations (Ag{sup +}) in Ag{sub 2}O are the filled-shell (4d{sup 10}5S{sup 0}) electronic structure with coordinative saturation that have no tendency to interact with water. The results show that surface Ag{sub 2}O benefited for hydrophobicity comes from the solute Ag atoms rather than precipitate metal Ag, in which the more Ag atoms incorporated into Nb-sublattice are able to further improve the hydrophobicity, whereas the precipitation of Ag nanoclusters would worsen it. The present work opens a window for fabricating robust hydrophobic surface through tailoring surface chemical bond states by doping Ag into transition metal nitrides.

  8. Structure of the ordered hydration of amino acids in proteins: analysis of crystal structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biedermannová, Lada, E-mail: lada.biedermannova@ibt.cas.cz; Schneider, Bohdan [Institute of Biotechnology CAS, Videnska 1083, 142 20 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-10-27

    The hydration of protein crystal structures was studied at the level of individual amino acids. The dependence of the number of water molecules and their preferred spatial localization on various parameters, such as solvent accessibility, secondary structure and side-chain conformation, was determined. Crystallography provides unique information about the arrangement of water molecules near protein surfaces. Using a nonredundant set of 2818 protein crystal structures with a resolution of better than 1.8 Å, the extent and structure of the hydration shell of all 20 standard amino-acid residues were analyzed as function of the residue conformation, secondary structure and solvent accessibility. The results show how hydration depends on the amino-acid conformation and the environment in which it occurs. After conformational clustering of individual residues, the density distribution of water molecules was compiled and the preferred hydration sites were determined as maxima in the pseudo-electron-density representation of water distributions. Many hydration sites interact with both main-chain and side-chain amino-acid atoms, and several occurrences of hydration sites with less canonical contacts, such as carbon–donor hydrogen bonds, OH–π interactions and off-plane interactions with aromatic heteroatoms, are also reported. Information about the location and relative importance of the empirically determined preferred hydration sites in proteins has applications in improving the current methods of hydration-site prediction in molecular replacement, ab initio protein structure prediction and the set-up of molecular-dynamics simulations.

  9. Experimental studies of the stress state of the surface layer of detailat treatment with submerged jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Олександр Олександрович Анділахай

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the instrument and electrical industry was the use of the method of abrasive machining submerged jet, which is the most promising method for abrasive blasting of small parts of low stiffness. This method eliminates the main drawback сhip plants - abrasion channel nozzles or injection nozzles, but the state of the surface layer of machined parts are poorly understood and to make maximum use of the potential to provide the required quality parameters. The study of the state of the surfaces of parts resulting from abrasive blasting traditional methods, dedicated work, which define quality indicators: microhardness depth residual stress, as well as their nature (compressive, tensile. However, known from the literature values correspond to the conditions of surface treatment of parts in a fixed state with an abrasive material through the feed nozzle, and therefore the dynamics of the interaction of a single abrasive grain and significantly different parts. The process in question, and different modes of processing characteristics of the abrasive grains. In the paper, a series of experimental studies designed to assess the state of machined surfaces of parts as a result of abrasion submerged jets. It is established that during the treatment the non-oriented disorderly traces overlay the abrasive grains on the treated surface, thereby forming a tight skin layer thickness of 4 - 5 micrometers. Processed surface gets cold working, as evidenced by the study of microhardness before and after abrasive machining in a free state submerged jets

  10. CASSCF/CI calculations of electronic states and potential energy surfaces of PtH2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasubramanian, K.

    1987-01-01

    Complete active space MCSCF followed by MRSDCI (multireference singles and doubles configuration interaction) calculations are carried out on the electronic states of PtH 2 . Spin--orbit interaction is introduced using a relativistic configuration interaction scheme on PtH + whose d orbital Mulliken population is close to that of the d population of PtH 2 and thus enables calculation of spin--orbit splittings for the electronic states of PtH 2 . The bending potential energy surfaces of the 1 A 1 and 3 A 1 states are obtained. The 1 A 1 surface has a bent minimum and dissociates almost without a barrier into Pt( 1 S 0 ) and H 2 , while the 3 A 1 state has a large (--55 kcal/mol) barrier to dissociation into Pt( 3 D 3 )+H 2 . The ground state of PtH 2 is a bent 1 A 1 state (θ = 85 0 )

  11. Surface defect states in MBE-grown CdTe layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olender, Karolina; Wosinski, Tadeusz; Fronc, Krzysztof; Tkaczyk, Zbigniew; Chusnutdinow, Sergij; Karczewski, Grzegorz [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-02-21

    Semiconductor surface plays an important role in the technology of semiconductor devices. In the present work we report results of our deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) investigations of surface defect states in nitrogen doped p-type CdTe layers grown by the molecular-beam epitaxy technique. We observed a deep-level trap associated with surface states, with the activation energy for hole emission of 0.33 eV. DLTS peak position in the spectra for this trap, and its ionization energy, strongly depend on the electric field. Our measurements allow to determine a mechanism responsible for the enhancement of hole emission rate from the traps as the phonon-assisted tunnel effect. Density of surface defect states significantly decreased as a result of passivation in ammonium sulfide. Capacitance-voltage measurements confirmed the results obtained by the DLTS technique.

  12. Hot-electron-mediated desorption rates calculated from excited-state potential energy surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Thomas; Gavnholt, Jeppe; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    We present a model for desorption induced by (multiple) electronic transitions [DIET (DIMET)] based on potential energy surfaces calculated with the delta self-consistent field extension of density-functional theory. We calculate potential energy surfaces of CO and NO molecules adsorbed on various...... transition-metal surfaces and show that classical nuclear dynamics does not suffice for propagation in the excited state. We present a simple Hamiltonian describing the system with parameters obtained from the excited-state potential energy surface and show that this model can describe desorption dynamics...... in both the DIET and DIMET regimes and reproduce the power-law behavior observed experimentally. We observe that the internal stretch degree of freedom in the molecules is crucial for the energy transfer between the hot electrons and the molecule when the coupling to the surface is strong....

  13. Fermi surface and quantum well states of V(110) films on W(110)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krupin, Oleg [MS 6-2100, Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Rotenberg, Eli [MS 6-2100, Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kevan, S D [Department of Physics, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403 (United States)

    2007-09-05

    Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we have measured the Fermi surface of V(110) films epitaxially grown on a W(110) substrate. We compare our results for thicker films to existing calculations and measurements for bulk vanadium and find generally very good agreement. For thinner films, we observe and analyse a diverse array of quantum well states that split and distort the Fermi surface segments. We have searched unsuccessfully for a thickness-induced topological transition associated with contact between the zone-centre jungle gym and zone-boundary hole ellipsoid Fermi surface segments. We also find no evidence for ferromagnetic splitting of any bands on this surface.

  14. Moessbauer and calorimetric studies of portland cement hydration in the presence of black gram pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rai, Sarita; Kurian, Sajith; Dwivedi, V. N.; Das, S. S.; Singh, N. B.; Gajbhiye, N. S.

    2009-01-01

    Effect of different concentrations of naturally occurring admixture in the form of fine powder of black gram pulse (BGP) on the hydration of Portland cement was studied by isothermal calorimetry and 57 Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy. The spectra were recorded for anhydrous cement and the hydration products at room temperature and 77 K. In the presence of BGP, the spectra showed superparamagnetic doublets at room temperature and the sextet at 77 K, due to the presence of fine particles of iron containing component. Moessbauer studies of hydration products confirmed the formation of nanosize hydration products containing Fe 3+ . The isomer shift (δ) and the quadrupole splitting (ΔE Q ) values of C 4 AF in the cement confirmed iron in an octahedral and tetrahedral environment with +3 oxidation state. The high value of quadrupole splitting showed the high asymmetry of the electron environment around the iron atom. The overall mechanism of the hydration of cement in presence of BGP is discussed.

  15. Apparatus investigates geological aspects of gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, J.S.; Winters, W.J.; Dillon, William P.

    1999-01-01

    The US Geological Survey (USGS), in response to potential geohazards, energy resource potential, and climate issues associated with marine gas hydrates, has developed a laboratory research system that permits hydrate genesis and dissociation under deep-sea conditions, employing user-selected sediment types and pore fluids.The apparatus, GHASTI (gas hydrate and sediment test laboratory instrument), provides a means to link field studies and theory and serves as a tool to improve gas hydrate recognition and assessment, using remote sensing techniques.GHASTLI's use was proven in an exploration well project led by the Geological Survey of Canada and the Japanese National Oil Corp., collaborating with Japan Petroleum Exploration Co. and the USGS. The site was in the Mackenzie Delta region of the Northwest Territories (Mallik 2L-38 drillsite).From tests on natural methane hydrate-bearing sand recovered at about 1,000 m subsurface, the in situ quantity of hydrate was estimated from acoustic properties, and a substantial increase in shear strength due to the presence of the hydrate was measured.1 2GHASTI can mimic a wide range of geologic settings and processes. Initial goals involve improved recognition and mapping of gas hydrate-bearing sediments, understanding factors that control the occurrence and concentration of gas hydrates, knowledge of hydrate's significance to slope failure and foundation problems, and analysis of gas hydrate's potential use as an energy resource.

  16. Influence of fluorosurfactants on hydrate formation rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, C.U.; Jeong, K.E.; Chae, H.J.; Jeong, S.Y. [Korea Reasearch Inst. of Chemical Technology, Alternative Chemicals/Fuel Research Center, Yuseong-Gu, Daejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrates, or clathrates, are ice-like solids that forms when natural gas is in contact with liquid water or ice under high pressure and low temperature. There is significant interest in studying the storage and transportation of gas in the form of hydrates. However, a critical problem impacting the industrial application of gas hydrates for storage and transportation of natural gas is the slow formation rate of natural gas hydrate. Researchers have previously reported on the promotion effect of some additives on gas hydrate formation and hydrate gas content. Fluorosurfactants are significantly superior to nonfluorinated surfactants in wetting action, as well as stability in harsh environments, both thermal and chemical. This paper discussed an experimental investigation into the effects of fluorosurfactants with different ionic types on the formation of methane hydrate. The surfactants used were FSN-100 of DuPont Zonyl as non-ionic surfactant and FC-143 of DuPont as anionic surfactant. The paper discussed the experimental apparatus for methane hydrate formation. It also discussed hydrate formation kinetics and the series of hydrate formation experiments that were conducted in the presence of fluorosurfactants. Last, the paper explored the results of the study. It was concluded that anionic fluorosurfactant of FC-143 had a better promoting effect on methane hydrate formation compared with nonionic surfactant of FSN-100. 8 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs.

  17. Chiral orbital-angular momentum in the surface states of Bi2Se3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seung Ryong; Han, Jinhee; Kim, Chul; Koh, Yoon Young; Kim, Changyoung; Lee, Hyungjun; Choi, Hyoung Joon; Han, Jung Hoon; Lee, Kyung Dong; Hur, Nam Jung; Arita, Masashi; Shimada, Kenya; Namatame, Hirofumi; Taniguchi, Masaki

    2012-01-27

    We performed angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) experiments with circularly polarized light and first-principles density functional calculation with spin-orbit coupling to study surface states of a topological insulator Bi2Se3. We observed circular dichroism (CD) as large as 30% in the ARPES data with upper and lower Dirac cones showing opposite signs in CD. The observed CD is attributed to the existence of local orbital-angular momentum (OAM). First-principles calculation shows that OAM in the surface states is significant and is locked to the electron momentum in the opposite direction to the spin, forming chiral OAM states. Our finding opens a new possibility for strong light-induced spin-polarized current in surface states. We also provide a proof for local OAM origin of the CD in ARPES.

  18. Terahertz Time Domain Spectroscopy for Structure-II Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takeya, Kei; Zhang, Caihong; Kawayama, Iwao

    2009-01-01

    For the nondestructive inspection of gas hydrates, terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) was applied to tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate and propane hydrate. The absorption of propane hydrate monotonically increases with frequency, similar to the case of ice, while THF hydrate has a charact......For the nondestructive inspection of gas hydrates, terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) was applied to tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate and propane hydrate. The absorption of propane hydrate monotonically increases with frequency, similar to the case of ice, while THF hydrate has...

  19. Handbook of gas hydrate properties and occurrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuustraa, V.A.; Hammershaimb, E.C.

    1983-12-01

    This handbook provides data on the resource potential of naturally occurring hydrates, the properties that are needed to evaluate their recovery, and their production potential. The first two chapters give data on the naturally occurring hydrate potential by reviewing published resource estimates and the known and inferred occurrences. The third and fourth chapters review the physical and thermodynamic properties of hydrates, respectively. The thermodynamic properties of hydrates that are discussed include dissociation energies and a simplified method to calculate them; phase diagrams for simple and multi-component gases; the thermal conductivity; and the kinetics of hydrate dissociation. The final chapter evaluates the net energy balance of recovering hydrates and shows that a substantial positive energy balance can theoretically be achieved. The Appendices of the Handbook summarize physical and thermodynamic properties of gases, liquids and solids that can be used in designing and evaluating recovery processes of hydrates. 158 references, 67 figures, 47 tables.

  20. Glacial Cycles Influence Marine Methane Hydrate Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinverno, A.; Cook, A. E.; Daigle, H.; Oryan, B.

    2018-01-01

    Methane hydrates in fine-grained continental slope sediments often occupy isolated depth intervals surrounded by hydrate-free sediments. As they are not connected to deep gas sources, these hydrate deposits have been interpreted as sourced by in situ microbial methane. We investigate here the hypothesis that these isolated hydrate accumulations form preferentially in sediments deposited during Pleistocene glacial lowstands that contain relatively large amounts of labile particulate organic carbon, leading to enhanced microbial methanogenesis. To test this hypothesis, we apply an advection-diffusion-reaction model with a time-dependent organic carbon deposition controlled by glacioeustatic sea level variations. In the model, hydrate forms in sediments with greater organic carbon content deposited during the penultimate glacial cycle ( 120-240 ka). The model predictions match hydrate-bearing intervals detected in three sites drilled on the northern Gulf of Mexico continental slope, supporting the hypothesis of hydrate formation driven by enhanced organic carbon burial during glacial lowstands.

  1. Possibilities of new materials surface sensibility express determination based on ZnSe-CdS system by pH isoelectric state measurements of the surface state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirovskaya, I. A.; Mironova, E. V.; Ushakov, O. V.; Nor, P. E.; Yureva, A. V.; Matyash, Yu I.

    2018-01-01

    A method for determining the hydrogen index of the surfaces isoelectric state (pHiso) at various gases pressures -possible components of the surrounding and technological media has been developed. With its use, changes in pH of binary and more complex semiconductors-components of the new system-ZnSe-CdS under the influence of nitrogen dioxide-have been found. The limiting sensitivity of surfaces - minimum PNO2, causing a change in pH has been estimated. The most active components of ZnSe-CdS system, recommended as materials for measuring cells of NO2, have been revealed. The relationship between the changing patterns with the composition of surface (acid-base) and bulk (in particular, theoretical calculated crystal density) properties has been established, allowing to find the most effective materials for sensor technology and for semiconductor analysis.

  2. Stepwise hydration and evaporation of adenosine monophosphate nucleotide anions: a multiscale theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, F; Douady, J

    2010-04-14

    The structure and finite-temperature properties of hydrated nucleotide anion adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) have been theoretically investigated with a variety of methods. Using a polarizable version of the Amber force field and replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations, putative lowest-energy structures have been located for the AMP(-)(H(2)O)(n) cluster anions with n = 0-20. The hydration energies obtained with the molecular mechanics potential slightly overestimate experimental measurements. However, closer values are found after reoptimizing the structures locally at more sophisticated levels, namely semi-empirical (PM6) and density-functional theory (B3LYP/6-31+G*). Upon heating the complexes, various indicators such as the heat capacity, number of hydrogen bonds or surface area provide evidence that the water cluster melts below 200 K but remains bonded to the AMP anion. The sequential loss of water molecules after sudden heating has been studied using a statistical approach in which unimolecular evaporation is described using the orbiting transition state version of phase space theory, together with anharmonic densities of vibrational states. The evaporation rates are calibrated based on the results of molecular dynamics trajectories at high internal energy. Our results indicate that between 4 and 10 water molecules are lost from AMP(-)(H(2)O)(20) after one second depending on the initial heating in the 250-350 K range, with a concomitant cooling of the remaining cluster by 75-150 K.

  3. Quantum State-Resolved Collision Dynamics of Nitric Oxide at Ionic Liquid and Molten Metal Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zutz, Amelia Marie

    Detailed molecular scale interactions at the gas-liquid interface are explored with quantum state-to-state resolved scattering of a jet-cooled beam of NO(2pi1/2; N = 0) from ionic liquid and molten metal surfaces. The scattered distributions are probed via laser-induced fluorescence methods, which yield rotational and spin-orbit state populations that elucidate the dynamics of energy transfer at the gas-liquid interface. These collision dynamics are explored as a function of incident collision energy, surface temperature, scattering angle, and liquid identity, all of which are found to substantially affect the degree of rotational, electronic and vibrational excitation of NO via collisions at the liquid surface. Rotational distributions observed reveal two distinct scattering pathways, (i) molecules that trap, thermalize and eventually desorb from the surface (trapping-desorption, TD), and (ii) those that undergo prompt recoil (impulsive scattering, IS) prior to complete equilibration with the liquid surface. Thermally desorbing NO molecules are found to have rotational temperatures close to, but slightly cooler than the surface temperature, indicative of rotational dependent sticking probabilities on liquid surfaces. Nitric oxide is a radical with multiple low-lying electronic states that serves as an ideal candidate for exploring nonadiabatic state-changing collision dynamics at the gas-liquid interface, which induce significant excitation from ground (2pi1/2) to excited (2pi 3/2) spin-orbit states. Molecular beam scattering of supersonically cooled NO from hot molten metals (Ga and Au, Ts = 300 - 1400 K) is also explored, which provide preliminary evidence for vibrational excitation of NO mediated by thermally populated electron-hole pairs in the hot, conducting liquid metals. The results highlight the presence of electronically nonadiabatic effects and build toward a more complete characterization of energy transfer dynamics at gas-liquid interfaces.

  4. Direct observation of surface-state thermal oscillations in SmB6 oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Brian; Stern, Alex; Efimkin, Dmitry K.; Fisk, Zachary; Xia, Jing

    2018-01-01

    SmB6 is a mixed valence Kondo insulator that exhibits a sharp increase in resistance following an activated behavior that levels off and saturates below 4 K. This behavior can be explained by the proposal of SmB6 representing a new state of matter, a topological Kondo insulator, in which a Kondo gap is developed, and topologically protected surface conduction dominates low-temperature transport. Exploiting its nonlinear dynamics, a tunable SmB6 oscillator device was recently demonstrated, where a small dc current generates large oscillating voltages at frequencies from a few Hz to hundreds of MHz. This behavior was explained by a theoretical model describing the thermal and electronic dynamics of coupled surface and bulk states. However, a crucial aspect of this model, the predicted temperature oscillation in the surface state, has not been experimentally observed to date. This is largely due to the technical difficulty of detecting an oscillating temperature of the very thin surface state. Here we report direct measurements of the time-dependent surface-state temperature in SmB6 with a RuO2 microthermometer. Our results agree quantitatively with the theoretically simulated temperature waveform, and hence support the validity of the oscillator model, which will provide accurate theoretical guidance for developing future SmB6 oscillators at higher frequencies.

  5. Two-dimensional lattice model for the surface states of topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan-Feng; Jiang, Hua; Xie, X. C.; Sun, Qing-Feng

    2017-06-01

    The surface states in three-dimensional (3D) topological insulators can be described by a two-dimensional (2D) continuous Dirac Hamiltonian. However, there exists the fermion doubling problem when putting the continuous 2D Dirac equation into a lattice model. In this paper, we introduce a Wilson term with a zero bare mass into the 2D lattice model to overcome the difficulty. By comparing with a 3D Hamiltonian, we show that the modified 2D lattice model can faithfully describe the low-energy electrical and transport properties of surface states of 3D topological insulators. So this 2D lattice model provides a simple and cheap way to numerically simulate the surface states of 3D topological-insulator nanostructures. Based on the 2D lattice model, we also establish the wormhole effect in a topological-insulator nanowire by a magnetic field along the wire and show the surface states being robust against disorder. The proposed 2D lattice model can be extensively applied to study the various properties and effects, such as the transport properties, Hall effect, universal conductance fluctuations, localization effect, etc. So, it paves a way to study the surface states of the 3D topological insulators.

  6. InN/GaN quantum dot superlattices: Charge-carrier states and surface electronic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanouni, F.; Brezini, A.; Djenane, M.; Zou, Q.

    2018-03-01

    We have theoretically investigated the electron energy spectra and surface states energy in the three dimensionally ordered quantum dot superlattices (QDSLs) made of InN and GaN semiconductors. The QDSL is assumed in this model to be a matrix of GaN containing cubic dots of InN of the same size and uniformly distributed. For the miniband’s structure calculation, the resolution of the effective mass Schrödinger equation is done by decoupling it in the three directions within the framework of Kronig-Penney model. We found that the electrons minibands in infinite ODSLs are clearly different from those in the conventional quantum-well superlattices. The electrons localization and charge-carrier states are very dependent on the quasicrystallographic directions, the size and the shape of the dots which play a role of the artificial atoms in such QD supracrystal. The energy spectrum of the electron states localized at the surface of InN/GaN QDSL is represented by Kronig-Penney like-model, calculated via direct matching procedure. The calculation results show that the substrate breaks symmetrical shape of QDSL on which some localized electronic surface states can be produced in minigap regions. Furthermore, we have noticed that the surface states degeneracy is achieved in like very thin bands located in the minigaps, identified by different quantum numbers nx, ny, nz. Moreover, the surface energy bands split due to the reduction of the symmetry of the QDSL in z-direction.

  7. Observation of the spin-polarized surface state in a noncentrosymmetric superconductor BiPd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neupane, Madhab; Alidoust, Nasser; Hosen, M Mofazzel; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Dimitri, Klauss; Xu, Su-Yang; Dhakal, Nagendra; Sankar, Raman; Belopolski, Ilya; Sanchez, Daniel S; Chang, Tay-Rong; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Miyamoto, Koji; Okuda, Taichi; Lin, Hsin; Bansil, Arun; Kaczorowski, Dariusz; Chou, Fangcheng; Hasan, M Zahid; Durakiewicz, Tomasz

    2016-11-07

    Recently, noncentrosymmetric superconductor BiPd has attracted considerable research interest due to the possibility of hosting topological superconductivity. Here we report a systematic high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and spin-resolved ARPES study of the normal state electronic and spin properties of BiPd. Our experimental results show the presence of a surface state at higher-binding energy with the location of Dirac point at around 700 meV below the Fermi level. The detailed photon energy, temperature-dependent and spin-resolved ARPES measurements complemented by our first-principles calculations demonstrate the existence of the spin-polarized surface states at high-binding energy. The absence of such spin-polarized surface states near the Fermi level negates the possibility of a topological superconducting behaviour on the surface. Our direct experimental observation of spin-polarized surface states in BiPd provides critical information that will guide the future search for topological superconductivity in noncentrosymmetric materials.

  8. Anatomy of topological surface states: Exact solutions from destructive interference on frustrated lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunst, Flore K.; Trescher, Maximilian; Bergholtz, Emil J.

    2017-08-01

    The hallmark of topological phases is their robust boundary signature whose intriguing properties—such as the one-way transport on the chiral edge of a Chern insulator and the sudden disappearance of surface states forming open Fermi arcs on the surfaces of Weyl semimetals—are impossible to realize on the surface alone. Yet, despite the glaring simplicity of noninteracting topological bulk Hamiltonians and their concomitant energy spectrum, the detailed study of the corresponding surface states has essentially been restricted to numerical simulation. In this work, however, we show that exact analytical solutions of both topological and trivial surface states can be obtained for generic tight-binding models on a large class of geometrically frustrated lattices in any dimension without the need for fine-tuning of hopping amplitudes. Our solutions derive from local constraints tantamount to destructive interference between neighboring layer lattices perpendicular to the surface and provide microscopic insights into the structure of the surface states that enable analytical calculation of many desired properties including correlation functions, surface dispersion, Berry curvature, and the system size dependent gap closing, which necessarily occurs when the spatial localization switches surface. This further provides a deepened understanding of the bulk-boundary correspondence. We illustrate our general findings on a large number of examples in two and three spatial dimensions. Notably, we derive exact chiral Chern insulator edge states on the spin-orbit-coupled kagome lattice, and Fermi arcs relevant for recently synthesized slabs of pyrochlore-based Eu2Ir2O7 and Nd2Ir2O7 , which realize an all-in-all-out spin configuration, as well as for spin-ice-like two-in-two-out and one-in-three-out configurations, which are both relevant for Pr2Ir2O7 . Remarkably, each of the pyrochlore examples exhibit clearly resolved Fermi arcs although only the one

  9. The effects of hydration on growth of the house cricket, Acheta domesticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCluney, Kevin E; Date, Rishabh C

    2008-01-01

    Maintenance of biochemical gradients, membrane fluidity, and sustained periods of activity are key physiological and behavioral functions of water for animals living in desiccating environments. Water stress may reduce the organism's ability to maintain these functions and as such, may reduce an organism's growth. However, few studies have examined this potential effect. The effects of altered hydration state of the house cricket, Acheta domesticus L. (Orthoptera: Gryllidae) on individual growth were studied under laboratory conditions. Crickets were permitted access to water for three different durations each day, resulting in significant differences in hydration state (32% greater hydration for maximum than minimum duration of water availability). Growth was 59% and 72% greater in dry mass and length, respectively, between the lowest and highest hydration state treatments. These findings may be representative for a variety of animal species and environments and could have important ecological implications.

  10. Interplay of Dirac surface states and magnetic fluctuations in topological insulator heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Hilary M.; Efimkin, Dmitry K.; Galitski, Victor

    We consider the proximity effect between Dirac states at the surface of a topological insulator and a ferromagnet with easy plane anisotropy, which is described by the XY-model and undergoes a Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) phase transition. Classical magnetic fluctuations interacting with the surface states of a topological insulator can be described by an effective gauge field. This model can be mapped onto the problem of Dirac fermions in a random magnetic field, however this analogy is only partial in the presence of electron-hole asymmetry or warping of the Dirac dispersion which results in screening of magnetic fluctuations. We show that this proximity coupling leads to anomalous transport behavior of the surface states near the BKT transition temperature.

  11. Topologically Entangled Rashba-Split Shockley States on the Surface of Grey Arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Ma, J-Z; Ishida, Y; Zhao, L-X; Xu, Q-N; Lv, B-Q; Yaji, K; Chen, G-F; Weng, H-M; Dai, X; Fang, Z; Chen, X-Q; Fu, L; Qian, T; Ding, H; Shin, S

    2017-01-27

    We discover a pair of spin-polarized surface bands on the (111) face of grey arsenic by using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). In the occupied side, the pair resembles typical nearly-free-electron Shockley states observed on noble-metal surfaces. However, pump-probe ARPES reveals that the spin-polarized pair traverses the bulk band gap and that the crossing of the pair at Γ[over ¯] is topologically unavoidable. First-principles calculations well reproduce the bands and their nontrivial topology; the calculations also support that the surface states are of Shockley type because they arise from a band inversion caused by crystal field. The results provide compelling evidence that topological Shockley states are realized on As(111).

  12. Reduced Heat Flux Through Preferential Surface Reactions Leading to Vibrationally and Electronically Excited Product States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-04

    an ideal gas at a given temperature, pressure, and composition. A more detailed description of this method can be found in: Norman...are generated at random points on a plane above the surface with a frequency corresponding to the flux of an ideal gas through that plane. This plane...to a dissociated gas at a given temperature and pressure. Examples of steady state surfaces for both amorphous SiO2 and crystalline SiO2 (quartz

  13. Real-space Mapping of Surface Trap States in CIGSe Nanocrystals using 4D Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Bose, Riya

    2016-05-26

    Surface trap states in semiconductor copper indium gallium selenide nanocrystals (NCs) which serve as undesirable channels for non-radiative carrier recombination, remain a great challenge impeding the development of solar and optoelectronics devices based on these NCs. In order to design efficient passivation techniques to minimize these trap states, a precise knowledge about the charge carrier dynamics on the NCs surface is essential. However, selective mapping of surface traps requires capabilities beyond the reach of conventional laser spectroscopy and static electron microscopy; it can only be accessed by using a one-of-a-kind, second-generation four-dimensional scanning ultrafast electron microscope (4D S-UEM) with sub-picosecond temporal and nanometer spatial resolutions. Here, we precisely map the surface charge carrier dynamics of copper indium gallium selenide NCs before and after surface passivation in real space and time using S-UEM. The time-resolved snapshots clearly demonstrate that the density of the trap states is significantly reduced after zinc sulfide (ZnS) shelling. Furthermore, removal of trap states and elongation of carrier lifetime are confirmed by the increased photocurrent of the self-biased photodetector fabricated using the shelled NCs.

  14. Probing spin helical surface states in topological HgTe nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, J.; Kozlovsky, R.; Gorini, C.; Liu, M.-H.; Weishäupl, S.; Maier, H.; Fischer, R.; Kozlov, D. A.; Kvon, Z. D.; Mikhailov, N.; Dvoretsky, S. A.; Richter, K.; Weiss, D.

    2018-01-01

    Nanowires with helical surface states represent key prerequisites for observing and exploiting phase-coherent topological conductance phenomena, such as spin-momentum locked quantum transport or topological superconductivity. We demonstrate in a joint experimental and theoretical study that gated nanowires fabricated from high-mobility strained HgTe, known as a bulk topological insulator, indeed preserve the topological nature of the surface states, that moreover extend phase-coherently across the entire wire geometry. The phase-coherence lengths are enhanced up to 5 μ m when tuning the wires into the bulk gap, so as to single out topological transport. The nanowires exhibit distinct conductance oscillations, both as a function of the flux due to an axial magnetic field and of a gate voltage. The observed h /e -periodic Aharonov-Bohm-type modulations indicate surface-mediated quasiballistic transport. Furthermore, an in-depth analysis of the scaling of the observed gate-dependent conductance oscillations reveals the topological nature of these surface states. To this end we combined numerical tight-binding calculations of the quantum magnetoconductance with simulations of the electrostatics, accounting for the gate-induced inhomogeneous charge carrier densities around the wires. We find that helical transport prevails even for strongly inhomogeneous gating and is governed by flux-sensitive high-angular momentum surface states that extend around the entire wire circumference.

  15. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy studies of metallic surface and interface states of oxide insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumb, Nicholas C.; Radović, Milan

    2017-11-01

    Over the last decade, conducting states embedded in insulating transition metal oxides (TMOs) have served as gateways to discovering and probing surprising phenomena that can emerge in complex oxides, while also opening opportunities for engineering advanced devices. These states are commonly realized at thin film interfaces, such as the well-known case of LaAlO3 (LAO) grown on SrTiO3 (STO). In recent years, the use of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) to investigate the k-space electronic structure of such materials led to the discovery that metallic states can also be formed on the bare surfaces of certain TMOs. In this topical review, we report on recent studies of low-dimensional metallic states confined at insulating oxide surfaces and interfaces as seen from the perspective of ARPES, which provides a direct view of the occupied band structure. While offering a fairly broad survey of progress in the field, we draw particular attention to STO, whose surface is so far the best-studied, and whose electronic structure is probably of the most immediate interest, given the ubiquitous use of STO substrates as the basis for conducting oxide interfaces. The ARPES studies provide crucial insights into the electronic band structure, orbital character, dimensionality/confinement, spin structure, and collective excitations in STO surfaces and related oxide surface/interface systems. The obtained knowledge increases our understanding of these complex materials and gives new perspectives on how to manipulate their properties.

  16. Multiple charge density wave states at the surface of TbT e3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Ling; Kraft, Aaron M.; Sharma, Bishnu; Singh, Manoj; Walmsley, Philip; Fisher, Ian R.; Boyer, Michael C.

    2016-11-01

    We studied TbT e3 using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) in the temperature range of 298-355 K. Our measurements detect a unidirectional charge density wave (CDW) state in the surface Te layer with a wave vector consistent with that of the bulk qCDW=0.30 ±0.01 c* . However, unlike previous STM measurements, and differing from measurements probing the bulk, we detect two perpendicular orientations for the unidirectional CDW with no directional preference for the in-plane crystal axes (a or c axis) and no noticeable difference in wave vector magnitude. In addition, we find regions in which the bidirectional CDW states coexist. We propose that observation of two unidirectional CDW states indicates a decoupling of the surface Te layer from the rare-earth block layer below, and that strain variations in the Te surface layer drive the local CDW direction to the specific unidirectional or, in rare occurrences, bidirectional CDW orders observed. This indicates that similar driving mechanisms for CDW formation in the bulk, where anisotropic lattice strain energy is important, are at play at the surface. Furthermore, the wave vectors for the bidirectional order we observe differ from those theoretically predicted for checkerboard order competing with stripe order in a Fermi-surface nesting scenario, suggesting that factors beyond Fermi-surface nesting drive CDW order in TbT e3 . Finally, our temperature-dependent measurements provide evidence for localized CDW formation above the bulk transition temperature TCDW.

  17. The effect of cerium valence states at cerium oxide nanoparticle surfaces on cell proliferation

    KAUST Repository

    Naganuma, Tamaki

    2014-05-01

    Understanding and controlling cell proliferation on biomaterial surfaces is critical for scaffold/artificial-niche design in tissue engineering. The mechanism by which underlying integrin ligates with functionalized biomaterials to induce cell proliferation is still not completely understood. In this study, poly-l-lactide (PL) scaffold surfaces were functionalized using layers of cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs), which have recently attracted attention for use in therapeutic application due to their catalytic ability of Ce4+ and Ce3+ sites. To isolate the influence of Ce valance states of CNPs on cell proliferation, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and osteoblast-like cells (MG63) were cultured on the PL/CNP surfaces with dominant Ce4+ and Ce3+ regions. Despite cell type (hMSCs and MG63 cells), different surface features of Ce4+ and Ce3+ regions clearly promoted and inhibited cell spreading, migration and adhesion behavior, resulting in rapid and slow cell proliferation, respectively. Cell proliferation results of various modified CNPs with different surface charge and hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity, indicate that Ce valence states closely correlated with the specific cell morphologies and cell-material interactions that trigger cell proliferation. This finding suggests that the cell-material interactions, which influence cell proliferation, may be controlled by introduction of metal elements with different valence states onto the biomaterial surface. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Ground state potential energy surfaces around selected atoms from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreck, Simon; Pietzsch, Annette; Kennedy, Brian; Såthe, Conny; Miedema, Piter S; Techert, Simone; Strocov, Vladimir N; Schmitt, Thorsten; Hennies, Franz; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2016-01-29

    Thermally driven chemistry as well as materials' functionality are determined by the potential energy surface of a systems electronic ground state. This makes the potential energy surface a central and powerful concept in physics, chemistry and materials science. However, direct experimental access to the potential energy surface locally around atomic centers and to its long-range structure are lacking. Here we demonstrate how sub-natural linewidth resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering at vibrational resolution is utilized to determine ground state potential energy surfaces locally and detect long-range changes of the potentials that are driven by local modifications. We show how the general concept is applicable not only to small isolated molecules such as O2 but also to strongly interacting systems such as the hydrogen bond network in liquid water. The weak perturbation to the potential energy surface through hydrogen bonding is observed as a trend towards softening of the ground state potential around the coordinating atom. The instrumental developments in high resolution resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering are currently accelerating and will enable broad application of the presented approach. With this multidimensional potential energy surfaces that characterize collective phenomena such as (bio)molecular function or high-temperature superconductivity will become accessible in near future.

  19. Full-dimensional diabatic potential energy surfaces including dissociation: the ²E″ state of NO₃.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisfeld, Wolfgang; Vieuxmaire, Olivier; Viel, Alexandra

    2014-06-14

    A scheme to produce accurate full-dimensional coupled diabatic potential energy surfaces including dissociative regions and suitable for dynamical calculations is proposed. The scheme is successfully applied to model the two-sheeted surface of the (2)E″ state of the NO3 radical. An accurate potential energy surface for the NO₃⁻ anion ground state is developed as well. Both surfaces are based on high-level ab initio calculations. The model consists of a diabatic potential matrix, which is expanded to higher order in terms of symmetry polynomials of symmetry coordinates. The choice of coordinates is key for the accuracy of the obtained potential energy surfaces and is discussed in detail. A second central aspect is the generation of reference data to fit the expansion coefficients of the model for which a stochastic approach is proposed. A third ingredient is a new and simple scheme to handle problematic regions of the potential energy surfaces, resulting from the massive undersampling by the reference data unavoidable for high-dimensional problems. The final analytical diabatic surfaces are used to compute the lowest vibrational levels of NO₃⁻ and the photo-electron detachment spectrum of NO₃⁻ leading to the neutral radical in the (2)E″ state by full dimensional multi-surface wave-packet propagation for NO3 performed using the Multi-Configuration Time Dependent Hartree method. The achieved agreement of the simulations with available experimental data demonstrates the power of the proposed scheme and the high quality of the obtained potential energy surfaces.

  20. A new corresponding state-based correlation for the surface tension of organic fatty acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cuihua; Tian, Jianxiang; Zheng, Mengmeng; Yi, Huili; Zhang, Laibin; Liu, Shuzhen

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we proposed a new corresponding state-based correlation for organic fatty (aliphatic, carboxylic and polyfunctional) acids. By using the recently published surface tension data of the 99 acids [A. Mulero and I. Cachadiña, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 45 (2016) 033105] and comparing with the recently published other corresponding state correlations, we found that this correlation reproduces the lowest absolute average deviation (AAD) values for 82 acids out of the 99 acids. It can reproduce the surface tension data with AAD less than 10% for 89 out of the 99 acids.

  1. Energy of surface states for 3D magnetic Schrödinger operators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nasrallah, Marwa

    In this dissertation, we study the Schrödinger operator with magnetic field in a three dimensional domain with compact smooth boundary. Functions in the domain of the operator satisfy (magnetic) Neumann condition on the boundary. The operator depends on the semi-classical parameter....... As this parameter becomes small, certain eigenfunctions of the operator are localized near the boundary of the domain, hence they will be called surface states. The main result of this dissertation is the calculation of the leading order terms of the energy and the number of surface states when the semi-classical...

  2. Topological surface states of strained Mercury-Telluride probed by ARPES

    OpenAIRE

    Crauste, Olivier; Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Ballet, Philippe; Delplace, Pierre André Louis; Carpentier, David; Bouvier, Clément; Meunier, Tristan; Taleb-Ibrahimi, Amina; Lévy, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    with supplementary material; The topological surface states of strained HgTe have been measured using high-resolution ARPES measurements. The dispersion of surface states form a Dirac cone, which origin is close to the top of the \\ghh band: the top half of the Dirac cone is inside the stress-gap while the bottom half lies within the heavy hole bands and keeps a linear dispersion all the way to the X-point. The circular dichroism of the photo-emitted electron intensity has also been measured f...

  3. The influence of the surface parameter changes onto the phonon states in ultrathin crystalline films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šetrajčić, Jovan P.; Ilić, Dušan I.; Jaćimovski, Stevo K.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we have analytically investigated how the changes in boundary surface parameters influence the phonon dispersion law in ultrathin films of the simple cubic crystalline structure. Spectra of possible phonon states are analyzed using the method of two-time dependent Green's functions and for the diverse combination of boundary surface parameters, this problem was presented numerically and graphically. It turns out that for certain values and combinations of parameters, displacement of dispersion branches outside of bulk zone occurs, leading to the creation of localized phonon states. This fact is of great importance for the heat removal, electrical conductivity and superconducting properties of ultrathin films.

  4. A Modified Critical State Two-surface Plasticity Model for Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakmar, Christian LeBlanc; Hededal, O.; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    This paper provides background information and documentation for the implementation of a robust plasticity model as a user-subroutine in the commercial finite difference code, FLAC3D by Itasca. The plasticity model presented is equal to the 3 dimensional critical state two-surface plasticity model...... for sands by Manzari et al., but uses a modified multi-axial surface formulation based on a versatile shape function prescribing a family of smooth and convex contours in the π-plane. The model is formulated within the framework of critical state soil mechanics and is capable of accurately simulating...

  5. Study of Formation Mechanisms of Gas Hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jia-Sheng; Wu, Cheng-Yueh; Hsieh, Bieng-Zih

    2015-04-01

    Gas hydrates, which had been found in subsurface geological environments of deep-sea sediments and permafrost regions, are solid crystalline compounds of gas molecules and water. The estimated energy resources of hydrates are at least twice of that of the conventional fossil fuel in the world. Gas hydrates have a great opportunity to become a dominating future energy. In the past years, many laboratory experiments had been conducted to study chemical and thermodynamic characteristics of gas hydrates in order to investigate the formation and dissociation mechanisms of hydrates. However, it is difficult to observe the formation and dissociation of hydrates in a porous media from a physical experiment directly. The purpose of this study was to model the dynamic formation mechanisms of gas hydrate in porous media by reservoir simulation. Two models were designed for this study: 1) a closed-system static model with separated gas and water zones; this model was a hydrate equilibrium model to investigate the behavior of the formation of hydrates near the initial gas-water contact; and 2) an open-system dynamic model with a continuous bottom-up gas flow; this model simulated the behavior of gas migration and studied the formation of hydrates from flowed gas and static formation water in porous media. A phase behavior module was developed in this study for reservoir simulator to model the pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) behavior of hydrates. The thermodynamic equilibriums and chemical reactions were coupled with the phase behavior module to have functions modelling the formation and dissociation of hydrates from/to water and gas. The simulation models used in this study were validated from the code-comparison project proposed by the NETL. According to the modelling results of the closed-system static model, we found that predominated location for the formation of hydrates was below the gas-water contact (or at the top of water zone). The maximum hydrate saturation

  6. Formation of metastable tetragonal zirconia nanoparticles: Competitive influence of the dopants and surface state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorban, Oksana, E-mail: matscidep@aim.com [Donetsk Institute for Physics and Engineering named after A.A. Galkin of the NAS of Ukraine, Nauki av. 46, Kyiv 03680 (Ukraine); Synyakina, Susanna; Volkova, Galina; Gorban, Sergey; Konstantiova, Tetyana [Donetsk Institute for Physics and Engineering named after A.A. Galkin of the NAS of Ukraine, Nauki av. 46, Kyiv 03680 (Ukraine); Lyubchik, Svetlana, E-mail: s_lyubchik@yahoo.com [REQUIMTE, Universida de Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)

    2015-12-15

    The effect of the surface modification of the nanoparticles of amorphous and crystalline partially stabilized zirconia by fluoride ions on stability of the metastable tetragonal phase was investigated. Based on the DSC, titrimetry and FTIR spectroscopy data it was proven that surface modification of the xerogel resulted from an exchange of the fluoride ions with the basic OH groups. The effect of the powder pre-calcination temperature before modification on the formation of metastable tetragonal phase in partially stabilized zirconia was investigated. It was shown that the main factor of tetragonal zirconia stabilization is the state of nanoparticles surface at pre-crystallization temperatures.

  7. Transition state theory for solvated reactions beyond recrossing-free dividing surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revuelta, F; Bartsch, Thomas; Garcia-Muller, P L; Hernandez, Rigoberto; Benito, R M; Borondo, F

    2016-06-01

    The accuracy of rate constants calculated using transition state theory depends crucially on the correct identification of a recrossing-free dividing surface. We show here that it is possible to define such optimal dividing surface in systems with non-Markovian friction. However, a more direct approach to rate calculation is based on invariant manifolds and avoids the use of a dividing surface altogether, Using that method we obtain an explicit expression for the rate of crossing an anharmonic potential barrier. The excellent performance of our method is illustrated with an application to a realistic model for LiNC⇌LiCN isomerization.

  8. Gas hydrate decomposition recorded by authigenic barite at pockmark sites of the northern Congo Fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasten, Sabine; Nöthen, Kerstin; Hensen, Christian; Spieß, Volkhard; Blumenberg, Martin; Schneider, Ralph R.

    2012-12-01

    The geochemical cycling of barium was investigated in sediments of pockmarks of the northern Congo Fan, characterized by surface and subsurface gas hydrates, chemosynthetic fauna, and authigenic carbonates. Two gravity cores retrieved from the so-called Hydrate Hole and Worm Hole pockmarks were examined using high-resolution pore-water and solid-phase analyses. The results indicate that, although gas hydrates in the study area are stable with respect to pressure and temperature, they are and have been subject to dissolution due to methane-undersaturated pore waters. The process significantly driving dissolution is the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) above the shallowest hydrate-bearing sediment layer. It is suggested that episodic seep events temporarily increase the upward flux of methane, and induce hydrate formation close to the sediment surface. AOM establishes at a sediment depth where the upward flux of methane from the uppermost hydrate layer counterbalances the downward flux of seawater sulfate. After seepage ceases, AOM continues to consume methane at the sulfate/methane transition (SMT) above the hydrates, thereby driving the progressive dissolution of the hydrates "from above". As a result the SMT migrates downward, leaving behind enrichments of authigenic barite and carbonates that typically precipitate at this biogeochemical reaction front. Calculation of the time needed to produce the observed solid-phase barium enrichments above the present-day depths of the SMT served to track the net downward migration of the SMT and to estimate the total time of hydrate dissolution in the recovered sediments. Methane fluxes were higher, and the SMT was located closer to the sediment surface in the past at both sites. Active seepage and hydrate formation are inferred to have occurred only a few thousands of years ago at the Hydrate Hole site. By contrast, AOM-driven hydrate dissolution as a consequence of an overall net decrease in upward methane flux seems to

  9. Parametric study of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sand, silt, and clay sediments: 1. Electromagnetic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.Y.; Santamarina, J.C.; Ruppel, C.

    2010-01-01

    The marked decrease in bulk electrical conductivity of sediments in the presence of gas hydrates has been used to interpret borehole electrical resistivity logs and, to a lesser extent, the results of controlled source electromagnetic surveys to constrain the spatial distribution and predicted concentration of gas hydrate in natural settings. Until now, an exhaustive laboratory data set that could be used to assess the impact of gas hydrate on the electromagnetic properties of different soils (sand, silt, and clay) at different effective stress and with different saturations of hydrate has been lacking. The laboratory results reported here are obtained using a standard geotechnical cell and the hydrate-formed tetrahydrofuran (THF), a liquid that is fully miscible in water and able to produce closely controlled saturations of hydrate from dissolved phase. Both permittivity and electrical conductivity are good indicators of the volume fraction of free water in the sediment, which is in turn dependent on hydrate saturation. Permittivity in the microwave frequency range is particularly predictive of free water content since it is barely affected by ionic concentration, pore structure, and surface conduction. Electrical conductivity (or resistivity) is less reliable for constraining water content or hydrate saturation: In addition to fluid-filled porosity, other factors, such as the ionic concentration of the pore fluid and possibly other conduction effects (e.g., surface conduction in high specific surface soils having low conductivity pore fluid), also influence electrical conductivity.

  10. 1H nuclear magnetic resonance study of hydrated water dynamics in perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer Nafion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Jun Hee; Lee, Kyu Won; Jeon, G. W.; Lee, Cheol Eui; Park, W. K.; Choi, E. H.

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the dynamics of hydrated water molecules in the proton exchange membrane of Nafion by means of high-resolution 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements. “Bound” and “free” states of hydrated water clusters as well as the exchange protons were identified from the NMR chemical shift measurements, and their activation energies were obtained from the temperature-dependent laboratory- and rotating-frame spin-lattice relaxation measurements. Besides, a peculiar motional transition in the ultralow frequency region was observed at 373 K for the “free” hydrated water from the rotating-frame NMR spin-lattice relaxation time measurements

  11. Separation of water through gas hydrate formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boch Andersen, Torben; Thomsen, Kaj

    2009-01-01

    Gas hydrate is normally recognized as a troublemaker in the oil and gas industry. However, gas hydrate has some interesting possibilities when used in connection with separation of water. Nordic Sugar has investigated the possibility of using gas hydrates for concentration of sugar juice. The goa...... volumes and the needs for high pressure. The process could be interesting for concentration of heat sensitive, high value products...

  12. Hydrate crystallization at oil-water interface, the effect of nonionic surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Liat; Dann, Kevin; Rosenfeld Team

    2017-11-01

    Gas hydrates pose economic and environmental risks to the oil and gas industry when plug formation occurs in pipelines. A novel approach using interfacial rheology and visualization techniques was applied to understand cyclopentane clathrate hydrate formation in the presence of nonionic surfactant to achieve hydrate inhibition at low percent weight compared to thermodynamic inhibitors. The hydrate-inhibiting performance of various surfactants on a manually nucleated 2 μL droplet showed a morphological shift in crystallization from planar shell growth to conical growth. Monitoring the internal pressure of the water droplet undergoing hydrate crystallization provides information on the change of interfacial tension during crystallization process. At low surfactant concentrations, planar hydrate crystal was formed and decreasing interfacial tension was observed. At high surfactant concentration, crystal morphology was shifted to conical. Interfacial tension measurements reveal oscillations of interfacial tension during the crystallization process. The oscillatory behavior of the interfacial tension is a result of the growth and release of the hydrate cones from the surface of the droplet.

  13. Evaluation of influence of proteoglycans on hydration of articular cartilage with the use of ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-yi YANG

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To monitor the changes in hydration behaviour of articular cartilage induced by degradation of proteoglycans, and to explore the effect of proteoglycans on hydration behaviour of articular cartilage by using high-frequency ultrasound. Methods Twelve porcine patellae with smooth cartilage surface were prepared and equally divided into two groups: normal group without any enzyme treatment, and trypsin group they were treated with 0.25% trypsin for 8h to digest proteoglycan in the cartilage. The hydration behaviour of the cartilage tissue was scanned by high-frequency ultrasound system with a central frequency of 25MHz. Parameters including cartilage hydration strain and cartilage thickness were measured. The histopathological changes in the articular cartilage were observed under a light microscope. Results It took approximately 20min to reach equilibrium during the hydration process in the normal cartilages, while proteoglycan-degraded cartilage took only about 5min to achieve equilibrium. The equilibrium strain of normal cartilage was 3.5%±0.5%. The degradation of proteoglycans induced a significant decrease in equilibrium strain (1.8%±0.2%, P0.05. Conclusion Proteoglycans play an important role in hydration behaviour of articular cartilage. The degradation of proteoglycans could induce degeneration of cartilage structure and decrease in hydration behaviour after dehydration. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.03.03

  14. Controlled formation of cyclopentane hydrate suspensions via capillary-driven jet break-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geri, Michela; McKinley, Gareth

    2017-11-01

    Clathrate hydrates are crystalline compounds that form when a lattice of hydrogen-bonded water molecules is filled by guest molecules sequestered from an adjacent gas or liquid phase. Being able to rapidly produce and transport synthetic hydrates is of great interest given their significant potential as a clean energy source and safe option for hydrogen storage. We propose a new method to rapidly produce cyclopentane hydrate suspensions at ambient pressure with tunable particle size distribution by taking advantage of the Rayleigh-Plateau instability to form a mono-disperse stream of droplets during the controlled break-up of a water jet. The droplets are immediately frozen into ice particles through immersion in a subcooled reservoir and converted into hydrates with a dramatic reduction in the nucleation induction time. By measuring the evolution of the rheological properties with time, we monitor the process of hydrates formation via surface crystallization and agglomeration with different droplet size distributions. This new method enables us to gain new insights into hydrate formation and transport which was previously hindered by uncontrolled droplet formation and hydrate nucleation processes. MITei Chevron Fellowship.

  15. Accelerated hydration of high silica cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, Colin; Yui, Mikazu

    2012-01-01

    Current Japanese designs for high level radioactive waste (HLW) repositories anticipate the use of both bentonite (buffer and backfill material) and cement based materials. Using hydrated Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) as a grouting material is undesirable because the associated high pH buffer will have an undisputed detrimental effect on the performance of the bentonite buffer and backfill and of the host rock by changing its porosity. Instead, hydrated low pH cement (LopHC) grouting materials are being developed to provide a pH inferior or equal to 11 to reduce these detrimental effects. LopHC grouting materials use mixtures of superfine OPC (SOPC) clinker and silica fume (SF), and are referred as high silica cements (HSC). The focus of the present study was to identify the development of the unhydrated and hydrated mineral assemblage and the solution chemistry during the hydration of HSC. Since hydration experiments of cementitious materials are notably slow, a ball mill was used to accelerate hydration. This was done for two reasons. Firstly, to develop a method to rapidly hydrate cement based materials without the need for higher temperatures (which can alter the mineral assemblage), and secondly, to ensure that the end point of hydration was reached in a reasonable time frame and so to realize the final mineralogy and solution chemistry of hydrated HSC

  16. Quantum confinement and heavy surface states of Dirac fermions in bismuth (111) films: An analytical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enaldiev, V. V.; Volkov, V. A.

    2018-03-01

    Recent high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy experiments have given a reason to believe that pure bismuth is a topologically nontrivial semimetal. We derive an analytic theory of surface and size-quantized states of Dirac fermions in Bi(111) films taking into account the new data. The theory relies on a new phenomenological momentum-dependent boundary condition for the effective Dirac equation. The boundary condition is described by two real parameters that are expressed by a linear combination of the Dresselhaus and Rashba interface spin-orbit interaction parameters. In semi-infinite Bi(111), near the M ¯ point the surface states possess anisotropical parabolic dispersion with very heavy effective mass in the Γ ¯-M ¯ direction order of ten free electron masses and light effective mass in the M ¯-K ¯ direction order of one hundredth of free electron mass. In Bi(111) films with equivalent surfaces, the surface states from top and bottom surfaces are not split. In such a symmetric film with arbitrary thickness, the bottom of the lowest quantum confinement subband in the conduction band coincides with the bottom of the bulk conduction band in the M ¯ point.

  17. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy of the surface states of Dirac fermions in thermoelectrics based on bismuth telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukyanova, L. N.; Makarenko, I. V.; Usov, O. A.; Dementev, P. A.

    2018-05-01

    The morphology of the interlayer van der Waals surface and differential tunneling conductance in p-Bi2‑xSbxTe3‑ySey solid solutions were studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy in dependence on compositions. The topological characteristics of the Dirac fermion surface states were determined. It was shown that the thermoelectric power factor and the material parameter enhance with the shift of the Dirac point to the top of the valence band with the increasing of atomic substitution in these thermoelectrics. A correlation between topological characteristics, power factor and material parameters was found. A growth contribution of the surface states is determined by an increase of the Fermi velocity for large atomic substitutions of Bi at x > 1.5 and small substitutions in the Te sublattice (y = 0.06). In compositions with smaller substitutions at x = (1–1.3) and y = (0.06–0.09), similar effect of the surface states is determined by raising the surface concentration of charge carriers.

  18. Development of corresponding states model for estimation of the surface tension of chemical compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gharagheizi, Farhad; Eslamimanesh, Ali; Sattari, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    The gene expression programming (GEP) strategy is applied for presenting two corresponding states models to represent/predict the surface tension of about 1,700 compounds (mostly organic) from 75 chemical families at various temperatures collected from the DIPPR 801 database. The models parameter...

  19. Controllable magnetic doping of the surface state of a topological insulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlenk, T.; Bianchi, M.; Koleini, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    principles calculations within density functional theory, these Fe substitutional impurities retain a large magnetic moment thus presenting an alternative scheme for magnetically doping the topological surface state. For both types of Fe doping, we see no indication of a gap at the Dirac point....

  20. On the bound states of Schrodinger operators with -interactions on conical surfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lotoreichik, Vladimir; Ourmieres-Bonafos, T.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 6 (2016), s. 999-1028 ISSN 0360-5302 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : conical and hyperconical surfaces * delta-interaction * existence of bound states * Schrodinger operator * spectral asymptotics Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 1.608, year: 2016

  1. Literature Survey Concerning State of the Art and Surface Generation in High Speed Milling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bissacco, Giuliano

    This report constitutes a short description of a literature survey concerning the state of the art and latest achievements on the rather new and powerful technology of high speed milling and its modelling, particularly looking at modelling of the generated surfaces. This task has been conducted...

  2. Rejuvenating Hydrator: Restoring Epidermal Hyaluronic Acid Homeostasis With Instant Benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narurkar, Vic A; Fabi, Sabrina G; Bucay, Vivian W; Tedaldi, Ruth; Downie, Jeanine B; Zeichner, Joshua A; Butterwick, Kimberly; Taub, Amy; Kadoya, Kuniko; Makino, Elizabeth T; Mehta, Rahul C; Vega, Virginia L

    2016-01-01

    Skin aging is a combination of multifactorial mechanisms that are not fully understood. Intrinsic and extrinsic factors modulate skin aging, activating distinctive processes that share similar molecular pathways. One of the main characteristics of youthful skin is its large capacity to retain water, and this decreases significantly as we age. A key molecule involved in maintaining skin hydration is hyaluronic acid (HA). Concentration of HA in the skin is determined by the complex balance between its synthesis, deposition, association with cellular structures, and degradation. HA bio-equivalency and bio-compatibility have been fundamental in keeping this macromolecule as the favorite of the skincare industry for decades. Scientific evidence now shows that topically applied HA is unable to penetrate the skin and is rapidly degraded on the skin surface. SkinMedica's HA5 Rejuvenating Hydrator (SkinMedica Inc., an Allergan company, Irvine, CA) promotes restoration of endogenous epidermal HA homeostasis and provides instant smoothing and hydration of the skin. These dual benefits are accomplished through the combination of 2 breakthrough technologies: 1) a unique blend of actives powered by SkinMedica proprietary flower-derived stem cell extract that restores the endogenous production of HA; and 2) a proprietary mix of 5 HA forms that plump the skin, decreasing the appearance of fine lines/wrinkles. Pre-clinical studies demonstrated that HA5 induces expression of key epidermal differentiation and barrier markers as well as epidermal HA synthases. A decrease expression of hyaluronidases was also observed upon HA5 application. Initial clinical studies showed that within 15 minutes of application, HA5 instantly improves the appearance of fine lines/wrinkles and skin hydration. Subjects that continue using HA5 (for 8 weeks) demonstrated significant improvements in fine lines/wrinkles, tactile roughness, and skin hydration. In summary, the blend of these 2 key technologies

  3. Origin Of Methane Gas And Migration Through The Gas Hydrate Stability Zone Beneath The Permafrost Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, T.; Waseda, A.; Namikawa, T.

    2005-12-01

    In 1998 and 2002 Mallik wells were drilled at Mackenzie Delta in the Canadian Arctic that clarified the characteristics of gas hydrate-dominant sandy layers at depths from 890 to 1110 m beneath the permafrost zone. Continuous downhole well log data as well as visible gas hydrates have confirmed pore-space hydrate as intergranular pore filling within sandy layers whose saturations are up to 80% in pore volume, but muddy sediments scarcely contain. Plenty of gas hydrate-bearing sand core samples have been obtained from the Mallik wells. According to grain size distributions pore-space hydrate is dominant in medium- to very fine-grained sandy strata. Methane gas accumulation and original pore space large enough to occur within host sediments may be required for forming highly saturated gas hydrate in pore system. The distribution of a porous and coarser-grained host rock should be one of the important factors to control the occurrence of gas hydrate, as well as physicochemical conditions. Subsequent analyses in sedimentology and geochemistry performed on gas hydrate-bearing sandy core samples also revealed important geologic and sedimentological controls on the formation and concentration of natural gas hydrate. This appears to be a similar mode for conventional oil and gas accumulations. It is necessary for investigating subsurface fluid flow behaviors to evaluate both porosity and permeability of gas hydrate-bearing sandy sediments, and the measurements of water permeability for them indicate that highly saturated sands may have permeability of a few millidarcies. The isotopic data of methane show that hydrocarbon gas contained in gas hydrate is generated by thermogenic decomposition of kerogen in deep mature sediments. Based on geochemical and geological data, methane is inferred to migrate upward closely associated with pore water hundreds of meters into and through the hydrate stability zone partly up to the permafrost zone and the surface along faults and

  4. Waters of Hydration of Cupric Hydrates: A Comparison between Heating and Absorbance Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlag, Rebecca; Nyasulu, Frazier

    2011-01-01

    The empirical formulas of four cupric hydrates are determined by measuring the absorbance in aqueous solution. The Beer-Lambert Law is verified by constructing a calibration curve of absorbance versus known Cu[superscript 2+](aq) concentration. A solution of the unknown hydrate is prepared by using 0.2-0.3 g of hydrate, and water is added such…

  5. Surface Tomonaga-Luttinger-Liquid State on Bi/InSb(001).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Kishi, Jun-Ichiro; Hagiwara, Kenta; Le Fèvre, Patrick; Bertran, François; Taleb-Ibrahimi, Amina; Yamane, Hiroyuki; Ideta, Shin-Ichiro; Matsunami, Masaharu; Tanaka, Kiyohisa; Kimura, Shin-Ichi

    2015-12-18

    A 1D metallic surface state was created on an anisotropic InSb(001) surface covered with Bi. Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) showed a 1D Fermi contour with almost no 2D distortion. Close to the Fermi level (E_{F}), the angle-integrated photoelectron spectra showed power-law scaling with the binding energy and temperature. The ARPES plot above E_{F}, obtained thanks to a thermally broadened Fermi edge at room temperature, showed a 1D state with continuous metallic dispersion across E_{F} and power-law intensity suppression around E_{F}. These results strongly suggest a Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid on the Bi/InSb(001) surface.

  6. Effects of Ultrasonic Nanocrystal Surface Modification (UNSM) on Residual Stress State and Fatigue Strength of AISI 304

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherif, A.; Pyoun, Y.; Scholtes, B.

    2010-03-01

    The effects of a new mechanical surface treatment method, called ultrasonic nanocrystal surface modification (UNSM), on near-surface microstructures and residual stress states as well as on the fatigue behavior of an austenitic steel AISI 304 are investigated and discussed. The results are compared with consequences of other mechanical surface treatment methods such as deep rolling or shot peening.

  7. Hydration in soccer: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monteiro Cristiano Ralo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydration should be considered before, during and after the exercise. This review intends to approach the main points of hydration process in soccer. The replacement of fluids during exercise is proportional to some factors, such as: exercise intensity; climatic conditions; the athlete's acclimatization; the athlete's physical conditioning; physiologic individual characteristics and the player's biomechanics. Performance is improved when players ingest not only water but also carbohydrate. The rates that carbohydrate and water are absorbed by the organism are limited by the rates of gastric emptying and intestinal absorption. The composition of drinks offered to the players should be influenced by the relative importance of the need of supplying carbohydrates or water; it should be remembered that the depletion of carbohydrate can result in fatigue and decrease of performance, but it is not usually a life-threatening condition. The addition of carbohydrate in these drinks increases the concentrations of blood glucose, increases the use of external fuel through the increase of the glucose oxidation in the muscles and it spares muscle glycogen. So, the ingestion of carbohydrate before and during the exercise can delay the emergence of fatigue and increase the players' performance. Several tactics can be used to avoid dehydration, like hyperhydration before exercise and player's acclimatization. The ideal situation to restore the player's fluid losses is between the sessions of exercises. Since soccer is a sport with quite peculiar characteristics related to hydration, the players should be concerned and educated about the importance of fluid ingestion before, during and after the exercise.

  8. Dynamics of hydration in hen egg white lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterpone, F; Ceccarelli, M; Marchi, M

    2001-08-10

    We investigate the hydration dynamics of a small globular protein, hen egg-white lysozyme. Extensive simulations (two trajectories of 9 ns each) were carried out to identify the time-scales and mechanism of water attachment to this protein. The location of the surface and integral water molecules in lysozyme was also investigated. Three peculiar temporal scales of the hydration dynamics can be discerned: two among these, with sub-nanosecond mean residence time, tau(w), are characteristic of surface hydration water; the slower time-scale (tau(w) approximately 2/3 ns) is associated with buried water molecules in hydrophilic pores and in superficial clefts. The computed tau(w) values in the two independent runs fall in a similar range and are consistent with each other, thus adding extra weight to our result. The tau(w) of surface water obtained from the two independent trajectories is 20 and 24 ps. In both simulations only three water molecules are bound to lysozyme for the entire length of the trajectories, in agreement with nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion estimates. Locations other than those identified in the protein crystal are found to be possible for these long-residing water molecules. The dynamics of the hydration water molecules observed in our simulations implies that each water molecule visits a multitude of residues during the lifetime of its bound with the protein. The number of residues seen by a single water molecule increases with the time-scale of its residence time and, on average, is equal to one only for the water molecules with shorter residence time. Thus, tau(w) values obtained from inelastic neutron scattering and based on jump-diffusion models are likely not to account for the contribution of water molecules with longer residence time. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  9. Quantum Hall states and conformal field theory on a singular surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, T.; Wiegmann, P.

    2017-12-01

    In Can et al (2016 Phys. Rev. Lett. 117), quantum Hall states on singular surfaces were shown to possess an emergent conformal symmetry. In this paper, we develop this idea further and flesh out details on the emergent conformal symmetry in holomorphic adiabatic states, which we define in the paper. We highlight the connection between the universal features of geometric transport of quantum Hall states and holomorphic dimension of primary fields in conformal field theory. In parallel we compute the universal finite-size corrections to the free energy of a critical system on a hyperbolic sphere with conical and cusp singularities, thus extending the result of Cardy and Peschel for critical systems on a flat cone (Cardy and Peschel 1988 Nucl. Phys. B 300 377–92), and the known results for critical systems on polyhedra and flat branched Riemann surfaces.

  10. Solvated Positron Chemistry. The Reaction of Hydrated Positrons with Chloride Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, O. E.; Shantarovich, V. P.

    1974-01-01

    The reaction of hydrated positrons (caq+ with cloride ions in aqueous solutions has been studied by means of positron annihilation angular correlation measurements. A rate constant of k = (2.5 ± 0.5) × 1010 M−1 s−1 was found. Probably the reacting positrons annihilated from an e+ Cl− bound state...... resulting in an angular correlation curve 8% narrower than for the hydrated positron. Carbontetrachloride in benzene seems to give similar, but smaller effect....

  11. Surface chemical state of Ti powders and its alloys: Effect of storage conditions and alloy composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hryha, Eduard, E-mail: hryha@chalmers.se [Department of Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, Rännvägen 2A, SE - 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Shvab, Ruslan [Department of Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, Rännvägen 2A, SE - 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Bram, Martin; Bitzer, Martin [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Materials Synthesis and Processing (IEK-1), D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Nyborg, Lars [Department of Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, Rännvägen 2A, SE - 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • Powder particles of Ti, NiTi and Ti6Al4V are covered by homogeneous Ti-oxide layer. • Thickness of the Ti-oxide layer is in the range of 2.9 to 4.2 nm in as-atomized state. • Exposure to the air results in immediate oxide thickness increase of up to 30%. • Oxide thickness increase of only 15% during storage for 8 years. • High passivation of the Ti, NiTi and Ti6Al4V powder surface by Ti-oxide layer. - Abstract: High affinity of titanium to oxygen in combination with the high surface area of the powder results in tremendous powder reactivity and almost inevitable presence of passivation oxide film on the powder surface. Oxide film is formed during the short exposure of the powder to the environment at even a trace amount of oxygen. Hence, surface state of the powder determines its usefulness for powder metallurgy processing. Present study is focused on the evaluation of the surface oxide state of the Ti, NiTi and Ti6Al4V powders in as-atomized state and after storage under air or Ar for up to eight years. Powder surface oxide state was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HR SEM). Results indicate that powder in as-atomized state is covered by homogeneous Ti-oxide layer with the thickness of ∼2.9 nm for Ti, ∼3.2 nm and ∼4.2 nm in case of Ti6Al4V and NiTi powders, respectively. Exposure to the air results in oxide growth of about 30% in case of Ti and only about 10% in case of NiTi and Ti6Al4V. After the storage under the dry air for two years oxide growth of only about 3-4% was detected in case of both, Ti and NiTi powders. NiTi powder, stored under the dry air for eight years, indicates oxide thickness of about 5.3 nm, which is about 30% thicker in comparison with the as-atomized powder. Oxide thickness increase of only ∼15% during the storage for eight years in comparison with the powder, shortly exposed to the air after manufacturing, was detected. Results indicate a

  12. Experimental measurements and thermodynamic modeling of refrigerant hydrates dissociation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemi, Hamed; Babaee, Saeedeh; Mohammadi, Amir H.; Naidoo, Paramespri; Ramjugernath, Deresh

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Dissociation conditions of refrigerant hydrates are studied experimentally and theoretically. • Refrigerants R23, R134a, R125a, R22, R410A, R407C and R507C are studied experimentally. • A thermodynamic model able to predict refrigerant hydrates dissociation conditions is proposed. • The results show good agreement between the experimental and predicted values. - Abstract: This study aims to investigate dissociation conditions of refrigerant hydrates both experimentally and theoretically. For this purpose, dissociation conditions of refrigerants R23, R134a, R125a, R22, R410A, R407C and R507C have been measured experimentally. A thermodynamic model that is able to predict refrigerant hydrates dissociation conditions in the various phase equilibrium regions has been proposed as well. Refrigerants modeled in this study include pure refrigerants: R11, R12, R13, R22, R23, R32, R134a, R141b, R143a, R125a, R152a, and mixed refrigerants: R11 + R12, R11 + R114, R12 + R114, R32 + R125a + R134a (R407C), R32 + R125a (R410A). For the modeling of the fluid and hydrate phases, the Peng-Robinson equation of state modified by Stryjek and Vera and the MHV2 G E -EoS mixing rule along with the UNIFAC (original) activity coefficient and van der Waals–Platteeuw (vdW–P) models were employed. The results show good agreement between the experimental and predicted values

  13. Characterization of Silicon Nanocrystal Surfaces by Multidimensional Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanrahan, Michael P. [Department; US DOE Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa 50011, United States; Fought, Ellie L. [Department; Windus, Theresa L. [Department; Wheeler, Lance M. [Chemistry; Anderson, Nicholas C. [Chemistry; Neale, Nathan R. [Chemistry; Rossini, Aaron J. [Department; US DOE Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa 50011, United States

    2017-11-17

    The chemical and photophysical properties of silicon nanocrystals (Si NCs) are strongly dependent on the chemical composition and structure of their surfaces. Here we use fast magic angle spinning (MAS) and proton detection to enable the rapid acquisition of dipolar and scalar 2D 1H-29Si heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) solid-state NMR spectra and reveal a molecular picture of hydride-terminated and alkyl-functionalized surfaces of Si NCs produced in a nonthermal plasma. 2D 1H-29Si HETCOR and dipolar 2D 1H-1H multiple-quantum correlation spectra illustrate that resonances from surface mono-, di-, and trihydride groups cannot be resolved, contrary to previous literature assignments. Instead the 2D NMR spectra illustrate that there is large distribution of 1H and 29Si chemical shifts for the surface hydride species in both the as-synthesized and functionalized Si NCs. However, proton-detected 1H-29Si refocused INEPT experiments can be used to unambiguously differentiate NMR signals from the different surface hydrides. Varying the 29Si evolution time in refocused INEPT experiments and fitting the oscillation of the NMR signals allows for the relative populations of the different surface hydrides to be estimated. This analysis confirms that monohydride species are the predominant surface species on the as-synthesized Si NCs. A reduction in the populations of the di- and trihydrides is observed upon functionalization with alkyl groups, consistent with our previous hypothesis that the trihydride, or silyl (*SiH3), group is primarily responsible for initiating surface functionalization reactions. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were used to obtain quantum chemical structural models of the Si NC surface and reproduce the observed 1H and 29Si chemical shifts. The approaches outlined here will be useful to obtain a more detailed picture of surface structures for Si NCs and other hydride-passivated nanomaterials.

  14. Water Intake and Hydration Indices in Healthy European Adults: The European Hydration Research Study (EHRS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Malisova

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydration status is linked with health, wellness, and performance. We evaluated hydration status, water intake, and urine output for seven consecutive days in healthy adults. Volunteers living in Spain, Germany, or Greece (n = 573, 39 ± 12 years (51.1% males, 25.0 ± 4.6 kg/m2 BMI participated in an eight-day study protocol. Total water intake was estimated from seven-day food and drink diaries. Hydration status was measured in urine samples collected over 24 h for seven days and in blood samples collected in fasting state on the mornings of days 1 and 8. Total daily water intake was 2.75 ± 1.01 L, water from beverages 2.10 ± 0.91 L, water from foods 0.66 ± 0.29 L. Urine parameters were: 24 h volume 1.65 ± 0.70 L, 24 h osmolality 631 ± 221 mOsmol/kg Η2Ο, 24 h specific gravity 1.017 ± 0.005, 24 h excretion of sodium 166.9 ± 54.7 mEq, 24 h excretion of potassium 72.4 ± 24.6 mEq, color chart 4.2 ± 1.4. Predictors for urine osmolality were age, country, gender, and BMI. Blood indices were: haemoglobin concentration 14.7 ± 1.7 g/dL, hematocrit 43% ± 4% and serum osmolality 294 ± 9 mOsmol/kg Η2Ο. Daily water intake was higher in summer (2.8 ± 1.02 L than in winter (2.6 ± 0.98 L (p = 0.019. Water intake was associated negatively with urine specific gravity, urine color, and urine sodium and potassium concentrations (p < 0.01. Applying urine osmolality cut-offs, approximately 60% of participants were euhydrated and 20% hyperhydrated or dehydrated. Most participants were euhydrated, but a substantial number of people (40% deviated from a normal hydration level.

  15. Photoelectron spectroscopy studies of mixed-valence states of Sm overlayers on transition-metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao Lian.

    1990-01-01

    To investigate and understand how the mixed-valent state of rare earths (RE) is formed and affected by their interactions with transition metals (TM), synchrotron-radiation-excited photoelectron spectroscopy was used to systematically study valence states of Sm overlayers on three TM surfaces as functions of Sm coverages. On polycrystalline Ta, Sm always has a mixed-valent state, consisting of the trivalent state and the divalent state. At a coverage of 0.02 monolayer, Sm has an average valence of 2.24. As the coverage increases, the Sm 3+ and Sm 2+ components increase at different rates. Sm on polycrystalline Cu behaves quite differently. At coverages below one monolayer, all the Sm ions adopt the trivalent state. When the coverage exceeds one monolayer, Sm 2+ ions appear, with a resulting average valence of 2.52. After that the average valence does not change significantly. On a Cu(110) single crystal surface, the situation is found to closely resemble that observed on polycrystalline Cu. These results indicate that the Sm-Ta interaction is weak compared to the Sm-Sm interaction, while the Sm-Cu interaction is stronger and affects the electronic structure

  16. Surface Irregularity Factor as a Parameter to Evaluate the Fatigue Damage State of CFRP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Zuluaga-Ramírez

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This work presents an optical non-contact technique to evaluate the fatigue damage state of CFRP structures measuring the irregularity factor of the surface. This factor includes information about surface topology and can be measured easily on field, by techniques such as optical perfilometers. The surface irregularity factor has been correlated with stiffness degradation, which is a well-accepted parameter for the evaluation of the fatigue damage state of composite materials. Constant amplitude fatigue loads (CAL and realistic variable amplitude loads (VAL, representative of real in- flight conditions, have been applied to “dog bone” shaped tensile specimens. It has been shown that the measurement of the surface irregularity parameters can be applied to evaluate the damage state of a structure, and that it is independent of the type of fatigue load that has caused the damage. As a result, this measurement technique is applicable for a wide range of inspections of composite material structures, from pressurized tanks with constant amplitude loads, to variable amplitude loaded aeronautical structures such as wings and empennages, up to automotive and other industrial applications.

  17. Dirac-Screening Stabilized Surface-State Transport in a Topological Insulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Brüne

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We report magnetotransport studies on a gated strained HgTe device. This material is a three-dimensional topological insulator and exclusively shows surface-state transport. Remarkably, the Landau-level dispersion and the accuracy of the Hall quantization remain unchanged over a wide density range (3×10^{11}  cm^{−2}surface-state dominated, where bulk transport would have been expected to coexist already. Moreover, the density dependence of the Dirac-type quantum Hall effect allows us to identify the contributions from the individual surfaces. A k·p model can describe the experiments but only when assuming a steep band bending across the regions where the topological surface states are contained. This steep potential originates from the specific screening properties of Dirac systems and causes the gate voltage to influence the position of the Dirac points rather than that of the Fermi level.

  18. Analysis of the trajectory surface hopping method from the Markov state model perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimov, Alexey V.; Wang, Linjun; Prezhdo, Oleg V.; Trivedi, Dhara

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the applicability of the seminal fewest switches surface hopping (FSSH) method of Tully to modeling quantum transitions between electronic states that are not coupled directly, in the processes such as Auger recombination. We address the known deficiency of the method to describe such transitions by introducing an alternative definition for the surface hopping probabilities, as derived from the Markov state model perspective. We show that the resulting transition probabilities simplify to the quantum state populations derived from the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, reducing to the rapidly switching surface hopping approach of Tully and Preston. The resulting surface hopping scheme is simple and appeals to the fundamentals of quantum mechanics. The computational approach is similar to the FSSH method of Tully, yet it leads to a notably different performance. We demonstrate that the method is particularly accurate when applied to superexchange modeling. We further show improved accuracy of the method, when applied to one of the standard test problems. Finally, we adapt the derived scheme to atomistic simulation, combine it with the time-domain density functional theory, and show that it provides the Auger energy transfer timescales which are in good agreement with experiment, significantly improving upon other considered techniques. (author)

  19. Duo gating on a 3D topological insulator - independent tuning of both topological surface states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuan; de Ronde, Bob; Snelder, Marieke; Stehno, Martin; Huang, Yingkai; Golden, Mark; Brinkman, Alexander; ICE Team; IOP Collaboration

    ABSTRACT: Topological insulators are associated with a trove of exciting physics, such as the ability to host robust anyons, Majorana Bound States, which can be used for quantum computation. For future Majorana devices it is desirable to have the Fermi energy tuned as close as possible to the Dirac point of the topological surface state. Based on previous work on gating BSTS, we report the experimental progress towards gate-tuning of the top and bottom topological surface states of BiSbTeSe2 crystal flakes. When the Fermi level is moved across the Dirac point conduction is shown to change from electron dominated transport to hole dominated transport independently for either surface. In the high magnetic field, one can tune the system precisely between the different landau levels of both surfaces, thus a full gating map of the possible landau levels combination is established. In addition, we provide a simple capacitance model to explain the general hysteresis behaviors in topological insulator systems.

  20. Molecular dynamics simulations of a fully hydrated dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine bilayer with different macroscopic boundary conditions and parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tieleman, D.P; Berendsen, H.J.C.

    1996-01-01

    We compared molecular dynamics simulations of a bilayer of 128 fully hydrated phospholipid (DPPC) molecules, using different parameters and macroscopic boundary conditions. The same system was studied under constant pressure, constant volume, and constant surface tension boundary conditions, with

  1. Isomers and energy landscapes of micro-hydrated sulfite and chlorate clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hey, John C.; Doyle, Emily J.; Chen, Yuting; Johnston, Roy L.

    2018-03-01

    We present putative global minima for the micro-hydrated sulfite SO32-(H2O)N and chlorate ClO32(H2O)N systems in the range 3≤N≤15 found using basin-hopping global structure optimization with an empirical potential. We present a structural analysis of the hydration of a large number of minimized structures for hydrated sulfite and chlorate clusters in the range 3≤N≤50. We show that sulfite is a significantly stronger net acceptor of hydrogen bonding within water clusters than chlorate, completely suppressing the appearance of hydroxyl groups pointing out from the cluster surface (dangling OH bonds), in low-energy clusters. We also present a qualitative analysis of a highly explored energy landscape in the region of the global minimum of the eight water hydrated sulfite and chlorate systems. This article is part of the theme issue `Modern theoretical chemistry'.

  2. Soil Diversity and Hydration as Observed by ChemCam at Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meslin, P.-Y.; Gasnault, O.; Forni, O.; Schröder, S.; Cousin, A.; Berger, G.; Clegg, S. M.; Lasue, J.; Maurice, S.; Sautter, V.; Le Mouélic, S.; Wiens, R. C.; Fabre, C.; Goetz, W.; Bish, D.; Mangold, N.; Ehlmann, B.; Lanza, N.; Harri, A.-M.; Anderson, R.; Rampe, E.; McConnochie, T. H.; Pinet, P.; Blaney, D.; Léveillé, R.; Archer, D.; Barraclough, B.; Bender, S.; Blake, D.; Blank, J. G.; Bridges, N.; Clark, B. C.; DeFlores, L.; Delapp, D.; Dromart, G.; Dyar, M. D.; Fisk, M.; Gondet, B.; Grotzinger, J.; Herkenhoff, K.; Johnson, J.; Lacour, J.-L.; Langevin, Y.; Leshin, L.; Lewin, E.; Madsen, M. B.; Melikechi, N.; Mezzacappa, A.; Mischna, M. A.; Moores, J. E.; Newsom, H.; Ollila, A.; Perez, R.; Renno, N.; Sirven, J.-B.; Tokar, R.; de la Torre, M.; d'Uston, L.; Vaniman, D.; Yingst, A.; Kemppinen, Osku; Minitti, Michelle; Cremers, David; Bell, James F.; Edgar, Lauren; Farmer, Jack; Godber, Austin; Wadhwa, Meenakshi; Wellington, Danika; McEwan, Ian; Newman, Claire; Richardson, Mark; Charpentier, Antoine; Peret, Laurent; King, Penelope; Weigle, Gerald; Schmidt, Mariek; Li, Shuai; Milliken, Ralph; Robertson, Kevin; Sun, Vivian; Baker, Michael; Edwards, Christopher; Farley, Kenneth; Griffes, Jennifer; Miller, Hayden; Newcombe, Megan; Pilorget, Cedric; Rice, Melissa; Siebach, Kirsten; Stack, Katie; Stolper, Edward; Brunet, Claude; Hipkin, Victoria; Marchand, Geneviève; Sánchez, Pablo Sobrón; Favot, Laurent; Cody, George; Steele, Andrew; Flückiger, Lorenzo; Lees, David; Nefian, Ara; Martin, Mildred; Gailhanou, Marc; Westall, Frances; Israël, Guy; Agard, Christophe; Baroukh, Julien; Donny, Christophe; Gaboriaud, Alain; Guillemot, Philippe; Lafaille, Vivian; Lorigny, Eric; Paillet, Alexis; Pérez, René; Saccoccio, Muriel; Yana, Charles; Armiens-Aparicio, Carlos; Rodríguez, Javier Caride; Blázquez, Isaías Carrasco; Gómez, Felipe Gómez; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Hettrich, Sebastian; Malvitte, Alain Lepinette; Jiménez, Mercedes Marín; Martínez-Frías, Jesús; Martín-Soler, Javier; Martín-Torres, F. Javier; Jurado, Antonio Molina; Mora-Sotomayor, Luis; Caro, Guillermo Muñoz; López, Sara Navarro; Peinado-González, Verónica; Pla-García, Jorge; Manfredi, José Antonio Rodriguez; Romeral-Planelló, Julio José; Fuentes, Sara Alejandra Sans; Martinez, Eduardo Sebastian; Redondo, Josefina Torres; Urqui-O'Callaghan, Roser; Mier, María-Paz Zorzano; Chipera, Steve; Mauchien, Patrick; Manning, Heidi; Fairén, Alberto; Hayes, Alexander; Joseph, Jonathan; Squyres, Steven; Sullivan, Robert; Thomas, Peter; Dupont, Audrey; Lundberg, Angela; DeMarines, Julia; Grinspoon, David; Reitz, Günther; Prats, Benito; Atlaskin, Evgeny; Genzer, Maria; Haukka, Harri; Kahanpää, Henrik; Kauhanen, Janne; Kemppinen, Osku; Paton, Mark; Polkko, Jouni; Schmidt, Walter; Siili, Tero; Wray, James; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Poitrasson, Franck; Patel, Kiran; Gorevan, Stephen; Indyk, Stephen; Paulsen, Gale; Gupta, Sanjeev; Schieber, Juergen; Geffroy, Claude; Baratoux, David; Cros, Alain; Lee, Qiu-Mei; Pallier, Etienne; Parot, Yann; Toplis, Mike; Brunner, Will; Heydari, Ezat; Achilles, Cherie; Oehler, Dorothy; Sutter, Brad; Cabane, Michel; Coscia, David; Israël, Guy; Szopa, Cyril; Robert, François; Nachon, Marion; Buch, Arnaud; Stalport, Fabien; Coll, Patrice; François, Pascaline; Raulin, François; Teinturier, Samuel; Cameron, James; Dingler, Robert; Jackson, Ryan Steele; Johnstone, Stephen; Little, Cynthia; Nelson, Tony; Williams, Richard B.; Jones, Andrea; Kirkland, Laurel; Treiman, Allan; Baker, Burt; Cantor, Bruce; Caplinger, Michael; Davis, Scott; Duston, Brian; Edgett, Kenneth; Fay, Donald; Hardgrove, Craig; Harker, David; Herrera, Paul; Jensen, Elsa; Kennedy, Megan R.; Krezoski, Gillian; Krysak, Daniel; Lipkaman, Leslie; Malin, Michael; McCartney, Elaina; McNair, Sean; Nixon, Brian; Posiolova, Liliya; Ravine, Michael; Salamon, Andrew; Saper, Lee; Stoiber, Kevin; Supulver, Kimberley; Van Beek, Jason; Van Beek, Tessa; Zimdar, Robert; French, Katherine Louise; Iagnemma, Karl; Miller, Kristen; Summons, Roger; Goesmann, Fred; Hviid, Stubbe; Johnson, Micah; Lefavor, Matthew; Lyness, Eric; Breves, Elly; Fassett, Caleb; Bristow, Thomas; DesMarais, David; Edwards, Laurence; Haberle, Robert; Hoehler, Tori; Hollingsworth, Jeff; Kahre, Melinda; Keely, Leslie; McKay, Christopher; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Bleacher, Lora; Brinckerhoff, William; Choi, David; Conrad, Pamela; Dworkin, Jason P.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer; Floyd, Melissa; Freissinet, Caroline; Garvin, James; Glavin, Daniel; Harpold, Daniel; Jones, Andrea; Mahaffy, Paul; Martin, David K.; McAdam, Amy; Pavlov, Alexander; Raaen, Eric; Smith, Michael D.; Stern, Jennifer; Tan, Florence; Trainer, Melissa; Meyer, Michael; Posner, Arik; Voytek, Mary; Anderson, Robert C.; Aubrey, Andrew; Beegle, Luther W.; Behar, Alberto; Brinza, David; Calef, Fred; Christensen, Lance; Crisp, Joy A.; Feldman, Jason; Feldman, Sabrina; Flesch, Gregory; Hurowitz, Joel; Jun, Insoo; Keymeulen, Didier; Maki, Justin; Morookian, John Michael; Parker, Timothy; Pavri, Betina; Schoppers, Marcel; Sengstacken, Aaron; Simmonds, John J.; Spanovich, Nicole; Vasavada, Ashwin R.; Webster, Christopher R.; Yen, Albert; Cucinotta, Francis; Jones, John H.; Ming, Douglas; Morris, Richard V.; Niles, Paul; Nolan, Thomas; Radziemski, Leon; Berman, Daniel; Dobrea, Eldar Noe; Williams, Rebecca M. E.; Lewis, Kevin; Cleghorn, Timothy; Huntress, Wesley; Manhès, Gérard; Hudgins, Judy; Olson, Timothy; Stewart, Noel; Sarrazin, Philippe; Grant, John; Vicenzi, Edward; Wilson, Sharon A.; Bullock, Mark; Ehresmann, Bent; Hamilton, Victoria; Hassler, Donald; Peterson, Joseph; Rafkin, Scot; Zeitlin, Cary; Fedosov, Fedor; Golovin, Dmitry; Karpushkina, Natalya; Kozyrev, Alexander; Litvak, Maxim; Malakhov, Alexey; Mitrofanov, Igor; Mokrousov, Maxim; Nikiforov, Sergey; Prokhorov, Vasily; Sanin, Anton; Tretyakov, Vladislav; Varenikov, Alexey; Vostrukhin, Andrey; Kuzmin, Ruslan; Wolff, Michael; McLennan, Scott; Botta, Oliver; Drake, Darrell; Bean, Keri; Lemmon, Mark; Schwenzer, Susanne P.; Lee, Ella Mae; Sucharski, Robert; Hernández, Miguel Ángel de Pablo; Ávalos, Juan José Blanco; Ramos, Miguel; Kim, Myung-Hee; Malespin, Charles; Plante, Ianik; Muller, Jan-Peter; Navarro-González, Rafael; Ewing, Ryan; Boynton, William; Downs, Robert; Fitzgibbon, Mike; Harshman, Karl; Morrison, Shaunna; Dietrich, William; Kortmann, Onno; Palucis, Marisa; Sumner, Dawn Y.; Williams, Amy; Lugmair, Günter; Wilson, Michael A.; Rubin, David; Jakosky, Bruce; Balic-Zunic, Tonci; Frydenvang, Jens; Jensen, Jaqueline Kløvgaard; Kinch, Kjartan; Koefoed, Asmus; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane; Boyd, Nick; Campbell, John L.; Gellert, Ralf; Perrett, Glynis; Pradler, Irina; VanBommel, Scott; Jacob, Samantha; Owen, Tobias; Rowland, Scott; Atlaskin, Evgeny; Savijärvi, Hannu; Boehm, Eckart; Böttcher, Stephan; Burmeister, Sönke; Guo, Jingnan; Köhler, Jan; García, César Martín; Mueller-Mellin, Reinhold; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert; Bridges, John C.; Benna, Mehdi; Franz, Heather; Bower, Hannah; Brunner, Anna; Blau, Hannah; Boucher, Thomas; Carmosino, Marco; Atreya, Sushil; Elliott, Harvey; Halleaux, Douglas; Rennó, Nilton; Wong, Michael; Pepin, Robert; Elliott, Beverley; Spray, John; Thompson, Lucy; Gordon, Suzanne; Williams, Joshua; Vasconcelos, Paulo; Bentz, Jennifer; Nealson, Kenneth; Popa, Radu; Kah, Linda C.; Moersch, Jeffrey; Tate, Christopher; Day, Mackenzie; Kocurek, Gary; Hallet, Bernard; Sletten, Ronald; Francis, Raymond; McCullough, Emily; Cloutis, Ed; ten Kate, Inge Loes; Kuzmin, Ruslan; Arvidson, Raymond; Fraeman, Abigail; Scholes, Daniel; Slavney, Susan; Stein, Thomas; Ward, Jennifer; Berger, Jeffrey

    2013-09-01

    The ChemCam instrument, which provides insight into martian soil chemistry at the submillimeter scale, identified two principal soil types along the Curiosity rover traverse: a fine-grained mafic type and a locally derived, coarse-grained felsic type. The mafic soil component is representative of widespread martian soils and is similar in composition to the martian dust. It possesses a ubiquitous hydrogen signature in ChemCam spectra, corresponding to the hydration of the amorphous phases found in the soil by the CheMin instrument. This hydration likely accounts for an important fraction of the global hydration of the surface seen by previous orbital measurements. ChemCam analyses did not reveal any significant exchange of water vapor between the regolith and the atmosphere. These observations provide constraints on the nature of the amorphous phases and their hydration.

  3. Isomers and energy landscapes of micro-hydrated sulfite and chlorate clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hey, John C; Doyle, Emily J; Chen, Yuting; Johnston, Roy L

    2018-03-13

    We present putative global minima for the micro-hydrated sulfite SO 3 2- (H 2 O) N and chlorate ClO 3 - (H 2 O) N systems in the range 3≤ N ≤15 found using basin-hopping global structure optimization with an empirical potential. We present a structural analysis of the hydration of a large number of minimized structures for hydrated sulfite and chlorate clusters in the range 3≤ N ≤50. We show that sulfite is a significantly stronger net acceptor of hydrogen bonding within water clusters than chlorate, completely suppressing the appearance of hydroxyl groups pointing out from the cluster surface (dangling OH bonds), in low-energy clusters. We also present a qualitative analysis of a highly explored energy landscape in the region of the global minimum of the eight water hydrated sulfite and chlorate systems.This article is part of the theme issue 'Modern theoretical chemistry'. © 2018 The Authors.

  4. Study on the hydration of oriented DNA by the neutron scattering technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlborg, U.; Dimic, V.; Rupprecht, A.

    1980-01-01

    Three different experimental methods of neutron scattering have been employed in order to study the hydration problem in various forms of oriented DNA fibrils. It is found that the water of hydration forms an internal structure in the samples and that this structure is not very strongly coupled to the macromolecular surface. The existence of hydrogen bonds between water molecules is clearly demonstrated. Qualitative agreement between calculated structure factors and measured 'elastic' diffraction patterns for a dry DNA sample is obtained. In order to reproduce the measured diffraction pattern for a wet sample it is not enough to include only the water molecules within the first hydration shell in a structure factor calculation. It is concluded that by employing the high resolution 'elastic' diffraction technique it should be possible to obtain detailed information on the problem of hydration in DNA. (Auth.)

  5. Effect of Graphene Oxide (GO on the Morphology and Microstructure of Cement Hydration Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liguo Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effects of graphene oxide (GO on the microstructure of cement mortars were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, thermogravimetric (TG, and X-ray diffraction (XRD techniques. Cement mortar samples with different proportions of GO (0.02, 0.04, 0.06, and 0.08 wt % based on the weight of cement were prepared. The test results showed that GO affected the crystallization of cement hydration products, C–S–H (calcium silicate hydrate is the main hydrate product and CH (calcium hydroxide. The morphology of hydration products changed with the increase of GO content. Furthermore, the results of XRD analyses showed that the diffraction peak intensity and the crystal grain size of CH (001, (100, (101, and (102 for GO samples increased considerably compared with the control sample. Based on the results, it can be understood that GO can modify the crystal surface of CH, leading to the formation of larger crystals.

  6. Importance of hydration in exoelectron emission from ceramic BeO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gammage, R.B.; Cheka, J.S.

    1976-01-01

    The influence of the state of hydration on the exoelectron emitting characteristics of BeO ceramic dosimeters for TSEE is very strong and very complex. For dosimetry the most unfavorable characteristics are a ruined TSEE peak shape and loss of intensity; this occurs if atmosphere moisture is allowed to condense onto, and evaporate from, the BeO surface. For unencapsulated dosimeters this occurs when the ambient temperature falls below the dew point. Immersion of irradiated detectors directly into liquid water for a few hours causes fading at a substantial rate, but surprisingly little change in the TSEE peak shape or intensity. The different behaviors with respect to immersion in liquid water and exposure to condensing atmospheric moisture present an enigma. Ceramic BeO TSEE dosimeters can only be used with confidence in atmospheres where below dew point conditions are avoidable, such as inside air conditioned buildings or encapsulated, dry air containers

  7. Global potential energy surface of ground state singlet spin O4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankodi, Tapan K.; Bhandarkar, Upendra V.; Puranik, Bhalchandra P.

    2018-02-01

    A new global potential energy for the singlet spin state O4 system is reported using CASPT2/aug-cc-pVTZ ab initio calculations. The geometries for the six-dimensional surface are constructed using a novel point generation scheme that employs randomly generated configurations based on the beta distribution. The advantage of this scheme is apparent in the reduction of the number of required geometries for a reasonably accurate potential energy surface (PES) and the consequent decrease in the overall computational effort. The reported surface matches well with the recently published singlet surface by Paukku et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 147, 034301 (2017)]. In addition to the O4 PES, the ground state N4 PES is also constructed using the point generation scheme and compared with the existing PES [Y. Paukku et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 044309 (2013)]. The singlet surface is constructed with the aim of studying high energy O2-O2 collisions and predicting collision induced dissociation cross section to be used in simulating non-equilibrium aerothermodynamic flows.

  8. An Information Retrieval Approach for Robust Prediction of Road Surface States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae-Hyung; Kim, Kwanho

    2017-01-28

    Recently, due to the increasing importance of reducing severe vehicle accidents on roads (especially on highways), the automatic identification of road surface conditions, and the provisioning of such information to drivers in advance, have recently been gaining significant momentum as a proactive solution to decrease the number of vehicle accidents. In this paper, we firstly propose an information retrieval approach that aims to identify road surface states by combining conventional machine-learning techniques and moving average methods. Specifically, when signal information is received from a radar system, our approach attempts to estimate the current state of the road surface based on the similar instances observed previously based on utilizing a given similarity function. Next, the estimated state is then calibrated by using the recently estimated states to yield both effective and robust prediction results. To validate the performances of the proposed approach, we established a real-world experimental setting on a section of actual highway in South Korea and conducted a comparison with the conventional approaches in terms of accuracy. The experimental results show that the proposed approach successfully outperforms the previously developed methods.

  9. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    1998-01-01

    This report deals with gas phase hydration of pure cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities. This is an important subject in relation to modern high performance concrete which may self-desiccate during hydration. In addition the subject has relevance to storage stability where...

  10. Raman Spectroscopic Studies of Methane Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Berg, Rolf W.

    2009-01-01

    A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory.......A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory....

  11. Free energy of hydration of niobium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plodinec, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    Some of the glasses being formulated by SRTC researchers contain niobium oxide. In this report, the free energy of hydration of the oxide is calculated from the free energies of formation of the oxide, the hydroxide, and water. This value can be used in calculations of the free energy of hydration of glasses containing niobium

  12. Pentagonal dodecahedron methane hydrate cage and methanol ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Density functional theory based studies have been performed to elucidate the role of methanol as an methane hydrate inhibitor. A methane hydrate pentagonal dodecahedron cage's geometry optimization, natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis, Mullikan charge determination, electrostatic potential evaluation and ...

  13. Multicomponent modelling of Portland cement hydration reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ukrainczyk, N.; Koenders, E.A.B.; Van Breugel, K.

    2012-01-01

    The prospect of cement and concrete technologies depends on more in depth understanding of cement hydration reactions. Hydration reaction models simulate the development of the microstructures that can finally be used to estimate the cement based material properties that influence performance and

  14. 78 FR 26337 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of Open Meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Methane.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Purpose of the Committee: The purpose of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee is to...

  15. 75 FR 9886 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Methane... the Committee: The purpose of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee is to provide advice on potential...

  16. 76 FR 59667 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of Open Meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Methane...-5600. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Purpose of the Committee: The purpose of the Methane Hydrate Advisory...

  17. 78 FR 37536 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Methane... Committee: The purpose of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee is to provide advice on potential...

  18. 77 FR 40032 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Methane... of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee is to provide advice on potential applications of methane...

  19. Molecular dynamics simulation of polyacrylamides in potassium montmorillonite clay hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Junfang; Rivero, Mayela; Choi, S K

    2007-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics simulation results for polyacrylamide in potassium montmorillonite clay-aqueous systems. Interlayer molecular structure and dynamics properties are investigated. The number density profile, radial distribution function, root-mean-square deviation (RMSD), mean-square displacement (MSD) and diffusion coefficient are reported. The calculations are conducted in constant NVT ensembles, at T = 300 K and with layer spacing of 40 A. Our simulation results showed that polyacrylamides had little impact on the structure of interlayer water. Density profiles and radial distribution function indicated that hydration shells were formed. In the presence of polyacrylamides more potassium counterions move close to the clay surface while water molecules move away, indicating that potassium counterions are hydrated to a lesser extent than the system in which no polyacrylamides were added. The diffusion coefficients for potassium and water decreased when polyacrylamides were added

  20. Molecular dynamics simulation of polyacrylamides in potassium montmorillonite clay hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Junfang [CSIRO Petroleum Resources, Ian Wark Laboratory, Bayview Avenue, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Rivero, Mayela [CSIRO Petroleum, PO Box 1130, Bentley, Western Australia, 6102 (Australia); Choi, S K [CSIRO Petroleum Resources, Ian Wark Laboratory, Bayview Avenue, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia)

    2007-02-14

    We present molecular dynamics simulation results for polyacrylamide in potassium montmorillonite clay-aqueous systems. Interlayer molecular structure and dynamics properties are investigated. The number density profile, radial distribution function, root-mean-square deviation (RMSD), mean-square displacement (MSD) and diffusion coefficient are reported. The calculations are conducted in constant NVT ensembles, at T = 300 K and with layer spacing of 40 A. Our simulation results showed that polyacrylamides had little impact on the structure of interlayer water. Density profiles and radial distribution function indicated that hydration shells were formed. In the presence of polyacrylamides more potassium counterions move close to the clay surface while water molecules move away, indicating that potassium counterions are hydrated to a lesser extent than the system in which no polyacrylamides were added. The diffusion coefficients for potassium and water decreased when polyacrylamides were added.

  1. Influence of the projectile charge state on electron emission spectra from a Cu(111) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archubi, C. D.; Silkin, V. M.; Gravielle, M. S.

    2015-09-01

    Double differential electron emission distributions produced by grazing impact of fast dressed ions on a Cu(111) surface are investigated focusing on the effects of the electronic band structure. The process is described within the Band-Structure-Based approximation, which is a perturbative method that includes an accurate representation of the electron-surface interaction, incorporating information of the electronic band structure of the solid. Differences in the behavior of the emission spectra for He+ q, Li+ q, Be+ q and C+ q projectiles with different charge states q are explained by the combined effect of the projectile trajectory and the projectile charge distribution.

  2. Surface hopping, transition state theory and decoherence. I. Scattering theory and time-reversibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Amber; Herman, Michael F; Ouyang, Wenjun; Subotnik, Joseph E

    2015-10-07

    We provide an in-depth investigation of transmission coefficients as computed using the augmented-fewest switches surface hopping algorithm in the low energy regime. Empirically, microscopic reversibility is shown to hold approximately. Furthermore, we show that, in some circumstances, including decoherence on top of surface hopping calculations can help recover (as opposed to destroy) oscillations in the transmission coefficient as a function of energy; these oscillations can be studied analytically with semiclassical scattering theory. Finally, in the spirit of transition state theory, we also show that transmission coefficients can be calculated rather accurately starting from the curve crossing point and running trajectories forwards and backwards.

  3. The Potential Socio-economic Impacts of Gas Hydrate Exploitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, David; Schaafsma, Marije; Marin-Moreno, Héctor; Minshull, Tim A.

    2017-04-01

    Gas hydrate has garnered significant interest as a possible clean fossil fuel resource, especially in countries with limited energy supplies. Whilst the sector is still in its infancy, there has been escalating development towards commercial production. To the best of our knowledge it appears that, despite its potential, existing analyses of the social and economic impacts of hydrate exploitation have been very limited. Before any viable commercial production commences, the potential impacts across society must be considered. It is likely that such impact assessments will become a legislative requirement for hydrate exploitation, similar to their requirement in conventional oil and gas projects. Social impact analysis should guide hydrate development to have the highest possible net benefits to the human and natural environment. Without active commercial hydrate operations, potential socio-economic impacts can only be inferred from other fossil fuel resource focused communities, including those directly or indirectly affected by the oil and gas industry either in the vicinity of the well or further afield. This review attempts to highlight potential impacts by synthesising current literature, focusing on social impacts at the extraction stage of operation, over time. Using a DPSIR (Driving forces; Pressures; States; Impacts; Responses) framework, we focus on impacts upon: health and wellbeing, land use and access, services and infrastructure, population, employment opportunities, income and lifestyles. Human populations directly or indirectly related with fossil fuel extraction activities often show boom and bust dynamics, and so any impacts may be finite or change temporally. Therefore potential impacts have to be reassessed throughout the lifetime of the exploitation. Our review shows there are a wide range of possible positive and negative socio-economic impacts from hydrate development. Exploitation can bring jobs and infrastructure to remote areas, although

  4. Methane Production and Carbon Capture by Hydrate Swapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mu, Liang; von Solms, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    There are essentially two different approaches to producing methane from natural gas hydrate reservoirs, either bring the hydrate out of its thermodynamic stability region or expose the hydrate to a substance that will form a more stable hydrate structure, forcing an in situ swapping of the trapped...... in small hydrate cages, as long as the equilibrium formation pressure of (CO2 + N2) binary gas hydrate is below that of methane hydrate, even though adding nitrogen to carbon dioxide reduces the thermodynamic driving force for the formation of a new hydrate. When other conditions are similar, the methane...

  5. 3He impurity states on liquid 4He: From thin films to the bulk surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavloff, N.; Treiner, J.

    1991-01-01

    The structure of the states accessible to 3 He impurities in films of liquid 4 He on Nuclepore is investigated using a density functional approach with a finite-range effective interaction. In thick films, one finds that the two lowest states are localized in the surface region. For thinner films, the variation with film thickness of the first three states results from a delicate balance between the attractive tail of the substrate potential and the quantum finite-size effect. The existence of states localized in the second layer of the films is discussed. The energy difference between the ground state and the first excited state agrees with the recent determination of Higley, Sprague, and Hallock from magnetization measurements. The effective mass of the ground state has a structure similar to that obtained by Krotscheck and coworkers and exhibits a maximum for a 4 He coverage of 0.15 angstrom -2 , in agreement with the data of Gasparini and coworkers. A similar behavior is predicted for the effective mass of the first, second, and third excited states. The structure of the energy spectrum may also explain former results on third-sound measurements in thin mixture films by Laheurte et al. and by Hallock

  6. Experimental Setup to Characterize Bentonite Hydration Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bru, A.; Casero, D.; Pastor, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    We present an experimental setup to follow-up the hydration process of a bentonite. Clay samples, of 2 cm x 12 cm x 12 cm, were made and introduced in a Hele-Shaw cell with two PMM windows and two steel frames. In hydration experiments, a fluid enters by an orifice in the frame, located both at the top and the bottom of the cell, to perform hydration in both senses. To get a uniform hydration we place a diffuser near the orifice. Volume influxes in hydration cells are registered in time. The evolution of the developed interface was recorded on a videotape. The video cameras was fixed to a holder so that the vertical direction in the monitor was the same as the direction of the larger extension of the cell. (Author) 6 refs

  7. Surface electron states on the quasi-two-dimensional excess-electron compounds Ca2N and Y2C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoshita, Takeshi; Takemoto, Seiji; Tada, Tomofumi; Hosono, Hideo

    2017-04-01

    Compounds having excess electrons from the formal valence viewpoint (electrides) are a new class of materials, which often take low-dimensional structures. We studied the (001) surface electronic structures of quasi-two-dimensional electrides Ca2N and Y2C by density functional theory using a slab model. Both materials were found to have a clean surface state well separated in energy from the bulk states. Furthermore, this state virtually floats above the surface and may be considered to be a hallmark of two-dimensional electrides. For Ca2N , a tight-binding model in the Wannier representation was derived and analyzed, from which we concluded that the surface state, described by extra-surface s -like orbitals, is a Tamm state originating from an abrupt increase in potential energy at the surface.

  8. Hydrogen speciation in hydrated layers on nuclear waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aines, R.D.; Weed, H.C.; Bates, J.K.

    1987-01-01

    The hydration of an outer layer on nuclear waste glasses is known to occur during leaching, but the actual speciation of hydrogen (as water or hydroxyl groups) in these layers has not been determined. As part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project, we have used infrared spectroscopy to determine hydrogen speciations in three nuclear waste glass compositions (SRL-131 and 165, and PNL 76-68), which were leached at 90 0 C (all glasses) or hydrated in a vapor-saturated atmosphere at 202 0 C (SRL-131 only). Hydroxyl groups were found in the surface layers of all the glasses. Molecular water was found in the surface of SRL-131 and PNL 76-68 glasses that had been leached for several months in deionized water, and in the vapor-hydrated sample. The water/hydroxyl ratio increases with increasing reaction time; molecular water makes up most of the hydrogen in the thick reaction layers on vapor-phase hydrated glass while only hydroxyl occurs in the least reacted samples. Using the known molar absorptivities of water and hydroxyl in silica-rich glass the vapor-phase layer contained 4.8 moles/liter of molecular water, and 0.6 moles water in the form hydroxyl. A 15 μm layer on SRL-131 glass formed by leaching at 90 0 C contained a total of 4.9 moles/liter of water, 2/3 of which was as hydroxyl. The unreacted bulk glass contains about 0.018 moles/liter water, all as hydroxyl. The amount of hydrogen added to the SRL-131 glass was about 70% of the original Na + Li content, not the 300% that would result from alkali=hydronium ion interdiffusion. If all the hydrogen is then assumed to be added as the result of alkali-H + interdiffusion, the molecular water observed may have formed from condensation of the original hydroxyl groups

  9. Applied research for profilometric testing of the state of interior surfaces in heat exchanger tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyongyosi, Tiberiu; Panaitescu, Valeriu Nicolae

    2009-01-01

    Generally, the surface flaws identified at heat exchangers tubing are characteristic for the heat secondary systems, located on the external surfaces of the heat exchanger tubes and are mostly the results of the ageing phenomena in systems operation. The tests performed, with the impressing replicating device confirmed the applicability of the technique, functionality of the device and resulted in replicas on metal support, these being the hard copy of the negative of the test tube surface, allowing the profile measurement. The visual inspection of the replicas on the metallic support gives information about the surface geometry replicated, pointing out the marks, which belong to the same area under observation. The minimum and maximum values for the depth of the channel worked out in the inner test tube wall have been determined by profile graphic measurement on the replicas. The paper presents the structural and functional description of the experimental devices. The first results and some conclusions are also included. Two patent applications were submitted at State Office for Inventions and Trademarks (OSIM) covering the original data to protect royalty: 'The local pit flaws, scratches, incipient micro-cracks replicating device on inner cylindrical surfaces', under no. A/00299/17.04.2008 and 'The annular local flaw, incipient micro-cracks replicating device on inner cylindrical surface' under no. A/00300/17.04.2008

  10. Overview on Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jon Burger; Deepak Gupta; Patrick Jacobs; John Shillinglaw

    2003-06-30

    Gas hydrates are crystalline, ice-like compounds of gas and water molecules that are formed under certain thermodynamic conditions. Hydrate deposits occur naturally within ocean sediments just below the sea floor at temperatures and pressures existing below about 500 meters water depth. Gas hydrate is also stable in conjunction with the permafrost in the Arctic. Most marine gas hydrate is formed of microbially generated gas. It binds huge amounts of methane into the sediments. Worldwide, gas hydrate is estimated to hold about 1016 kg of organic carbon in the form of methane (Kvenvolden et al., 1993). Gas hydrate is one of the fossil fuel resources that is yet untapped, but may play a major role in meeting the energy challenge of this century. In June 2002, Westport Technology Center was requested by the Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare a ''Best Practices Manual on Gas Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis'' under Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41327. The scope of the task was specifically targeted for coring sediments with hydrates in Alaska, the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and from the present Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) drillship. The specific subjects under this scope were defined in 3 stages as follows: Stage 1: Collect information on coring sediments with hydrates, core handling, core preservation, sample transportation, analysis of the core, and long term preservation. Stage 2: Provide copies of the first draft to a list of experts and stakeholders designated by DOE. Stage 3: Produce a second draft of the manual with benefit of input from external review for delivery. The manual provides an overview of existing information available in the published literature and reports on coring, analysis, preservation and transport of gas hydrates for laboratory analysis as of June 2003. The manual was delivered as draft version 3 to the DOE Project Manager for distribution in July 2003. This Final Report is provided for records purposes.

  11. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

    2005-03-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Oil-field engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in Arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrates agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored the HOT ICE No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was designed, constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. Unfortunately, no gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated

  12. Interannual and interdecadal variability in United States surface-air temperatures, 1910-87

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettinger, M.D.; Ghil, M.; Keppenne, C.L.

    1995-01-01

    Monthly mean surface-air temperatures at 870 sites in the contiguous United States were analyzed for interannual and interdecadal variability over the time interval 1910-87. The temperatures were analyzed spatially by empirical-orthogonal-function analysis and temporally by singularspectrum analysis (SSA). The dominant modes of spatio-temporal variability are trends and nonperiodic variations with time scales longer than 15 years, decadal-scale oscillations with periods of roughly 7 and 10 years, and interannual oscillations of 2.2 and 3.3 years. Together, these modes contribute about 18% of the slower-than-annual United States temperature variance. Two leading components roughly capture the mean hemispheric temperature trend and represent a long-term warming, largest in the southwest, accompanied by cooling of the domain's southeastern quadrant. The extremes of the 2.2-year interannual oscillation characterize temperature differences between the Northeastern and Southwestern States, whereas the 3.3-year cycle is present mostly in the Western States. The 7- to 10-year oscillations are much less regular and persistent than the interannual oscillations and characterize temperature differences between the western and interior sectors of the United States. These continental- or regional-scale temperature variations may be related to climatic variations with similar periodicities, either global or centered in other regions; such variations include quasi-biennial oscillations over the tropical Pacific or North Atlantic and quasi-triennial oscillations of North Pacific sea-surface temperatures.

  13. Probing the switching state of a surface-mounted azobenzene derivative using femtosecond XUV photoemission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunau, Jan; Heinemann, Nils; Rohwer, Timm; Zargarani, Dordaneh; Kuhn, Sonja; Jung, Ullrich; Kipp, Lutz; Magnussen, Olaf; Herges, Rainer; Bauer, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Photoemission spectroscopy using femtosecond XUV light pulses is applied to probe the isomerization state of the molecular switch 3-(4-(4-hexyl-phenylazo)-phenoxy)-propane-1-thiol deposited by liquid phase self-assembly on Au(111). Spectral shifts of valence-electronic signatures that we associate with the carbon C2s orbital enable us to distinguish the trans and the cis isomerization state of the adsorbed molecules. These preliminary results envision the potential to probe reversible switching processes of surface-mounted molecules in real time by tracking the temporal evolution of the electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom in a femtosecond XUV photoemission experiment.

  14. Surface/state correspondence and bulk local operators in pp-wave holography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakwoo Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We apply the surface/state correspondence proposal of Miyaji et al. to IIB pp-waves and propose that the bulk local operators should be instantonic D-branes. In line with ordinary AdS/CFT correspondence, the bulk local operators in pp-waves also create a hole, or a boundary, in the dual gauge theory as pointed out by H. Verlinde, and by Y. Nakayama and H. Ooguri. We also present simple calculations which illustrate how to extract the spacetime metric of pp-waves from instantonic D-branes in boundary state formalism.

  15. Transient surface states during the CBE growth of GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, T.; Hill, D.; Joyce, T. B.; Bullough, T. J.; Weightman, P.

    1997-05-01

    We report the occurrence of a transient surface state during the initial stages of CBE GaAs(0 0 1) growth. The state was detected in real-time reflectance ( R) and reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS) growth monitoring. At low growth rates, less than 1 μm/h, beam equivalent pressure (BEP) of triethylgallium (TEG) BEPs there was a rapid increase in R at all monitoring wavelengths, followed by a monotonic decay to its pre-growth value. This transient increase in R was accompanied by a change in the RAS signal, the magnitude and sign of which varied with wavelength. The initial increase in R is shown to be associated with the development of a metallic-like surface whereas the changes in the RAS signal are consistent with the formation of Ga dimers.

  16. Investigation of series resistance and surface states in Au/n - GaP structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiymaz, A.; Onal, B.; Ozer, M.; Acar, S.

    2009-01-01

    The variation in series resistance and surface state density of Au/n - GaP Schottky diodes have been systematically investigated at room temperature by using capacitance-voltage C-V and conductance-voltage G/w-V measurements techniques. The C-V and G/w-V characteristics of these devices were investigated by considering series resistance effects in a wide frequency range. It is shown that the capacitance of the Au/n - GaP Schottky diode decreases with increasing frequency. It is assumed that the surface states were responsible for this behaviour. The distribution profile of Rs-V gives a peak in the depletion region at low frequencies and disappears with increasing frequencies

  17. Modelling interstellar physics and chemistry: implications for surface and solid-state processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David; Viti, Serena

    2013-07-13

    We discuss several types of regions in the interstellar medium of the Milky Way and other galaxies in which the chemistry appears to be influenced or dominated by surface and solid-state processes occurring on or in interstellar dust grains. For some of these processes, for example, the formation of H₂ molecules, detailed experimental and theoretical approaches have provided excellent fundamental data for incorporation into astrochemical models. In other cases, there is an astrochemical requirement for much more laboratory and computational study, and we highlight these needs in our description. Nevertheless, in spite of the limitations of the data, it is possible to infer from astrochemical modelling that surface and solid-state processes play a crucial role in astronomical chemistry from early epochs of the Universe up to the present day.

  18. Dispersion states and surface characteristics of physically blended polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane/polymer hybrid nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Rahul

    Control of dispersion and segregation states of nanostructured additives is one of the biggest challenges in realizing the optimum potential of high performance hybrid polymer nanocomposites. Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) nanostructured chemicals, with their hybrid organic-inorganic nature and flexible functionalization with a variety of organic substituents, yield possibilities to control dispersion and tune compatibility in a wide range of polymer systems. The overall goal of this research is to investigate the fundamental parameters that influence the dispersion and segregation states of POSS nanostructured chemicals, and to understand chain dynamics and conformations in physically blended POSS hybrid polymer nanocomposites (HPNC's). Multiple structural and mechanical factors influencing macro to nano scale surface and bulk properties were successfully investigated and correlated. A strategy based on thermodynamic principles for selective control of POSS dispersion states in a given polymer matrix is developed and discussed. This dissertation consists of eight chapters. Chapter 1 provides a detailed introduction about the development and current research interest in POSS/polymer nanocomposites. This chapter also discusses limitations of current advanced nanoprobe techniques. Chapter 2 establishes the overall goal of this research and specific research ii objectives. Chapter 3 establishes the preferential surface migration behavior of physically dispersed, non-reactive, closed cage octaisobutyl POSS (Oib-POSS) in a non-polar polypropylene matrix. Furthermore, influence of POSS surface segregation on the surface properties, especially nano-tribomechanical behavior is also discussed. Chapter 4 expands the studies by melt blending two different types of POSS molecules, a non-reactive, closed cage Oib-POSS and an open cage trisilanolphenyl POSS (Tsp-POSS), in a nylon 6 matrix. This chapter discusses the morphology, nano-dispersion and macro- to

  19. An Improved Clearing and Mounting Solution to Replace Chloral Hydrate in Microscopic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas S. Villani

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: This study presents Visikol™, a new proprietary formulation that can be used as an efficient replacement for chloral hydrate as a clearing agent for microscopic examination. In the United States, chloral hydrate is regulated and therefore difficult to acquire. Methods and Results: Fresh and dry samples of the following plants: ginger (Zingiber officinale, maté (Ilex paraguariensis, lime basil (Ocimum americanum, oregano (Origanum vulgare, and mouse-ear cress (Arabidopsis thaliana, were cleared using Visikol or chloral hydrate solution and compared using a light microscope. Conclusions: This new method can be used successfully to clear specimens, allowing identification of diagnostic characteristics for the identification of plant materials. Visikol is as effective as chloral hydrate in providing clarity and resolution of all tissues examined. Tissues become transparent, allowing observation of deeper layers of cells and making it effective in research, botanical and quality control, and for educational applications.

  20. Development of Alaskan gas hydrate resources: Annual report, October 1986--September 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, G.D.; Kamath, V.A.; Godbole, S.P.; Patil, S.L.; Paranjpe, S.G.; Mutalik, P.N.; Nadem, N.

    1987-10-01

    Solid ice-like mixtures of natural gas and water in the form of natural gas hydrated have been found immobilized in the rocks beneath the permafrost in Arctic basins and in muds under the deep water along the American continental margins, in the North Sea and several other locations around the world. It is estimated that the arctic areas of the United States may contain as much as 500 trillion SCF of natural gas in the form of gas hydrates (Lewin and Associates, 1983). While the US Arctic gas hydrate resources may have enormous potential and represent long term future source of natural gas, the recovery of this resource from reservoir frozen with gas hydrates has not been commercialized yet. Continuing study and research is essential to develop technologies which will enable a detailed characterization and assessment of this alternative natural gas resource, so that development of cost effective extraction technology.

  1. Thermodynamics of a post combustion hydrate-based carbon dioxide capture process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Attouche Sfaxi, I.

    2011-07-01

    Hydrates selectivity towards carbon dioxide is offering a promising route for carbon dioxide removal from flue gases. Hydrate-based CO 2 capture process could substitute amine facilities widely implemented in gas treatment plants but suffering from oxidative degradation problems and high energy demand. In the framework of this thesis, we focus on phase equilibria that are involved in such process. Experimental dissociation conditions for clathrate hydrates of carbon dioxide and nitrogen, in the presence of some promoting molecules (Tetrahydrofuran, Tetrabutyl ammonium bromide and Tetrabutyl ammonium Fluoride ) are reported in the experimental section of this work. The data generated in this work along with literature data are compared to the model predictions. The developed model is based on the Cubic Plus Association (CPA) equation of state (EoS) for fluid phases combined to the van der Waals and Platteeuw's theory for the hydrate phase. (author)

  2. Surface polar states and pyroelectricity in ferroelastics induced by flexo-roto field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozovska, A. N.; Eliseev, E. A.; Kalinin, S. V.; Qing Chen, Long; Gopalan, Venkatraman