WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface fire behaviour

  1. Behaviour and effects of prescribed fire in masticated fuelbeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric Knapp; J. Morgan Varner; Matt Busse; Carl Skinner; Carol Shestak

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical mastication converts shrub and small tree fuels into surface fuels, and this method is being widely used as a treatment to reduce fire hazard. The compactness of these fuelbeds is thought to moderate fire behaviour, but whether standard fuel models can accurately predict fire behaviour and effects is poorly understood. Prescribed burns were conducted in...

  2. Corrosion behaviour and surface analysis of a Co-Cr and two Ni-Cr dental alloys before and after simulated porcelain firing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jing; Yu, Wei-Qiang; Zhang, Fu-Qiang; Smales, Roger J; Zhang, Yi-Lin; Lu, Chun-Hui

    2011-02-01

    This study evaluated the corrosion behaviour and surface properties of a commercial cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloy and two nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) alloys [beryllium (Be)-free and Be-containing] before and after a simulated porcelain-firing process. Before porcelain firing, the microstructure, surface composition and hardness, electrochemical corrosion properties, and metal-ion release of as-cast alloy specimens were examined. After firing, similar alloy specimens were examined for the same properties. In both as-cast and fired conditions, the Co-Cr alloy (Wirobond C) showed significantly more resistance to corrosion than the two Ni-Cr alloys. After firing, the corrosion rate of the Be-free Ni-Cr alloy (Stellite N9) increased significantly, which corresponded to a reduction in the levels of Cr, molybdenum (Mo), and Ni in the surface oxides and to a reduction in the thickness of the surface oxide film. The corrosion properties of the Co-Cr alloy and the Be-containing Ni-Cr alloy (ChangPing) were not significantly affected by the firing process. Porcelain firing also changed the microstructure and microhardness values of the alloys, and there were increases in the release of Co and Ni ions, especially for Ni from the Be-free Ni-Cr alloy. Thus, the corrosion rate of the Be-free Ni-Cr alloy increased significantly after porcelain firing, whereas the firing process had little effect on the corrosion susceptibility of the Co-Cr alloy and the Be-containing Ni-Cr alloy. © 2011 Eur J Oral Sci.

  3. Shear and anchorage behaviour of fire exposed hollow core slabs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fellinger, J.

    2005-01-01

    The fire resistance of hollow core slabs is currently assessed considering flexural failure only. However, fire tests show that shear or anchorage failure can also govern the load bearing behaviour. This paper is based on the dissertation by the author1 and discusses existing and new fire tests. It

  4. Fire behaviour in the Kruger National Park. | Trollope | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fire research in the Kruger National Park has largely been focused on the effect of the season and frequency of burning on the vegetation. Very little information is available on the effect of fire behaviour and in particular fire intensity, on the flora of the park. Consequently a research project was conducted to develop ...

  5. Characteristics of fire behaviour in the montane grasslands of Natal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fire behaviour characteristics were investigated in the montane grasslands of the Natal Drakensberg. The behaviour of experimental fires was measured together with the accompanying biotic and abiotic conditions. Estimates of heat yield, mass of available fuel and forward rate of spread enabled the calculation of intensity ...

  6. Fire behaviour - A preliminary study. | W.S.W. | African Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fire behaviour - A preliminary study. ... be taken cognisance of in any future research on fire in relation to vegetation. Keywords: behaviour; botany; environmental conditions; fire; fire behaviour; fire ecology; fires; grass; grasses; management; rate of spread; recovery; south africa; vegetation; veld; veld management; yield ...

  7. Fire behaviour - A preliminary study. | W.S.W. | African Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These results demonstrate the value of knowledgte about fire behaviour in veld management; it is recommended that fire behaviour and its effect on vegetation always be taken cognisance of in any future research on fire in relation to vegetation. Keywords: behaviour; botany; environmental conditions; fire; fire behaviour; ...

  8. Does season affect fire behaviour in the Cerrado?

    OpenAIRE

    Rissi, Mariana Ninno; Baeza, M. Jaime; Gorgone-Barbosa, Elizabeth; Zupo, Talita; Fidelis, Alessandra

    2017-01-01

    Fire has played an important role in the plant dynamics and diversity of the Cerrado for millions of years. We evaluated fire behaviour in different fire seasons in areas of an open savanna, providing information for fire management plans. It has been hypothesised that early fires (May – end of the rainy season) will be less intense than those conducted in the middle and end of the dry season (July and October) owing to the amount of dead biomass accumulated. Therefore, we compared fire behav...

  9. Shear and anchorage behaviour of fire exposed hollow core slabs

    OpenAIRE

    Fellinger, J.H.H.; Stark, J.; Walraven, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    The fire resistance of hollow core slabs is currently assessed considering flexural failure only. However, fire tests showed that shear or anchorage failure can also govern the load bearing behaviour. As the shear and anchorage capacity of these slabs rely on the tensile strength of the concrete, the load bearing capacity with respect to these failure modes decreases dramatically during fire due to the impact of thermal stresses. This paper presents a FE model for the shear and anchorage beha...

  10. Shear and anchorage behaviour of fire exposed hollow core slabs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fellinger, J.H.H.; Stark, J.; Walraven, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    The fire resistance of hollow core slabs is currently assessed considering flexural failure only. However, fire tests showed that shear or anchorage failure can also govern the load bearing behaviour. As the shear and anchorage capacity of these slabs rely on the tensile strength of the concrete,

  11. Coupled influences of topography and wind on wildland fire behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodman Linn; Judith Winterkamp; Carleton Edminster; Jonah J. Colman; William S. Smith

    2007-01-01

    Ten simulations were performed with the HIGRAD/FIRETEC wildfire behaviour model in order to explore its utility in studying wildfire behaviour in inhomogeneous topography. The goal of these simulations is to explore the potential extent of the coupling between the fire, atmosphere, and topography. The ten simulations described in this paper include five different...

  12. Behaviour of electrical cables under fire conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertrand, R.; Chaussard, M.; Gonzalez, R.; Lacoue, J.; Mattei, J.M.; Such, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    A Fire Probabilistic Safety Assessment - called the Fire PSA - is being carried out by the French Institute of Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IPSN) to be used in the framework of the safety assessment of operating 900 MWe PWRs. The aim of this study is to evaluate the core damage conditional probability which could result from a fire. A fire can induce unavailability of safety equipment, notably damaging electrical cables introducing a significant risk contributor. The purpose of this paper is to present the electrical cable fire tests carried out by IPSN to identify the failure modes and to determine the cable damage criteria. The impact of each kind of cable failure mode and the methodology used to estimate the conditional probability of a failure mode when cable damage occurred is also discussed. (orig.) [de

  13. Behaviour of aluminum foam under fire conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Grabian

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Taking into account fire-protection requirements it is advantageous for aluminum foam, after melting at a temperature considerably exceeding the melting point, to have a structure of discontinuous suspension of solid inclusions to liquid metal instead of liquid consistency. Continuity of the suspension depends on the solid phase content. The boundary value of the phase determined by J. Śleziona, above which the suspension becomes discontinuous, is provided by the formula (1. Figure 1 presents the relationship graphically. Boundary values of the vs content resulting from the above relationship is too low, taking into account the data obtained from the technology of suspension composites [4]. Therefore, based on the structure assumed for the suspension shown in Figure 2 these authors proposed another way of determining the contents, the value of which is determined by the relationship (3 [5].For purposes of the experimental study presented in the paper two foams have been molten: a commercially available one, made by aluminum foaming with titanium hydride, and a foam manufactured in the Marine Materials Plant of the Maritime University of Szczecin by blowing the AlSi7 +20% SiC composite with argon. Macrophotographs of foam cross-sections are shown in Figure 3. The foams have been molten in the atmosphere of air at a temperature of 750ºC. The products of melting are presented in Figure 4. It appears that molten aluminum foam may have no liquid consistency, being unable to flow, which is a desired property from the point of view of fire-protection. The above feature of the molten foam results from the fact that it may be a discontinuous suspension of solid particles in a liquid metal. The suspended particles may be solid particles of the composite that served for making the foam or oxide membranes formed on extended metal surface of the bubbles included in the foam. The desired foam ability to form a discontinuous suspension after melting may be

  14. Correlation analysis of heat flux and fire behaviour and hazards of polycrystalline silicon photovoltaic panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Xiaoyu; Zhou, Xiaodong; Peng, Fei; Wu, Zhibo; Lai, Dimeng; Hu, Yue; Yang, Lizhong

    2017-05-01

    This work aims to gain a better understanding of fire behaviour and hazards of PV panels under different radiation heat fluxes. The cone calorimeter tests were applied to simulate the situations when the front and back surfaces are exposed to heat flux in a fire, respectively. Through comparison of ignition time, mass loss rate and heat release rate, it is found that the back-up condition is more hazardous than face-up condition. Meanwhile, three key parameters: flashover propensity, total heat release and FED, were introduced to quantitatively illustrate fire hazards of a PV panel.

  15. Behaviour of High Strength Steel Endplate Connections in Fire and after Fire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qiang, X.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research is to reveal more information and understanding on behaviour and failure mechanisms of high strength steel endplate connections (combining high strength steel endplates with either mild steel or high strength steel beams and columns in endplate connections) in fire and after

  16. Surface cooling due to forest fire smoke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robock, Alan

    1991-11-01

    In four different cases of extensive forest fire smoke the surface temperature effects were determined under the smoke cloud. In all cases, daytime cooling and no nighttime effects were found. The locations of smoke clouds from extensive forest fires in western Canada in 1981 and 1982, in northern China and Siberia in 1987, and in Yellowstone National Park in northwestern Wyoming in 1988 were determined from satellite imagery. As these smoke clouds passed over the midwestern United States for the Canadian and Yellow-stone fires and over Alaska for the Chinese/Siberian fires, surface air temperature effects were determined by comparing actual surface air temperatures with those forecast by model output statistics (MOS) of the United States National Weather Service. MOS error fields corresponding to the smoke cloud locations showed day-time cooling of 1.5° to 7°C under the smoke but no nighttime effects. These results correspond to theoretical estimates of the effects of smoke, and they serve as observational confirmation of a portion of the nuclear winter theory. This also implies that smoke from biomass burning can have a daytime cooling effect of a few degrees over seasonal time scales. In order to properly simulate the present climate with a numerical climate model in regions of regular burning it may be necessary to include this smoke effect.

  17. Post-fire vegetation behaviour in large burnt scars from 2005 fire season in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, A.; Gouveia, C. M.; DaCamara, C. C.; Trigo, R. M.

    2012-04-01

    remaining areas (centre and south), vegetation recovered very slowly and irregularly. Four years following the fire, vegetation density in these two scars was still markedly below pre-fire levels. Spatial patterns of recovery times were assessed in order to evaluate the influence of physical factors such as fire damage, pre-fire vegetation density and land-cover type, in post-fire behaviour of vegetation for each scar. Pre-fire land-cover type raised as a key factor that may partially explain the differences observed, with shrublands and mixed forests recovering faster than coniferous. Gouveia C., DaCamara C.C. and Trigo R.M.: Post fire vegetation recovery in Portugal based on SPOT-VEGETATION data, Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences, 10, 673-684, 2010. Viedma, O., Moreno, J.M. and Rieiro, I.: Interactions between land use/land cover change, forest fires and landscape structure in Sierra de Gredos (central Spain), Environmental Conservation, 33, 212-222, 2006.

  18. Experimental Studies on the Fire Behaviour of High Performance Concrete Thin Plates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulin, Thomas; Hodicky, Kamil; Schmidt, Jacob Wittrup

    2015-01-01

    pressure, stress concentrations, and thermo-mechanical energy accumulation in the tested specimens. Unexpectedly, spalling at the unexposed surface was observed during two of the tests, suggesting a potentially unusual, unwanted failure mode of very thin-plates during fire. On this basis it is recommended......In recent decades, the use of structural high performance concrete (HPC) sandwich panels made with thin plates has increased as a response to modern environmental challenges. Fire endurance is a requirement in structural HPC elements, as for most structural elements. This paper presents...... experimental investigations on the fire behaviour of HPC thin plates (20 or 30 mm thick) being used in lightweight structural sandwich elements. Tests were undertaken using a standard testing furnace and a novel heat-transfer rate inducing system (H-TRIS), recently developed at the University of Edinburgh...

  19. Effects of salvage logging and pile-and-burn on fuel loading, potential fire behaviour, fuel consumption and emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris C. Johnson; Jessica E. Halofsky; David L. Peterson

    2013-01-01

    We used a combination of field measurements and simulation modelling to quantify the effects of salvage logging, and a combination of salvage logging and pile-and-burn fuel surface fuel treatment (treatment combination), on fuel loadings, fire behaviour, fuel consumption and pollutant emissions at three points in time: post-windstorm (before salvage logging), post-...

  20. Performance of fire behavior fuel models developed for the Rothermel Surface Fire Spread Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert Ziel; W. Matt Jolly

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, 40 new fire behavior fuel models were published for use with the Rothermel Surface Fire Spread Model. These new models are intended to augment the original 13 developed in 1972 and 1976. As a compiled set of quantitative fuel descriptions that serve as input to the Rothermel model, the selected fire behavior fuel model has always been critical to the resulting...

  1. Standard fire behavior fuel models: a comprehensive set for use with Rothermel's surface fire spread model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joe H. Scott; Robert E. Burgan

    2005-01-01

    This report describes a new set of standard fire behavior fuel models for use with Rothermel's surface fire spread model and the relationship of the new set to the original set of 13 fire behavior fuel models. To assist with transition to using the new fuel models, a fuel model selection guide, fuel model crosswalk, and set of fuel model photos are provided.

  2. The effect of leaf beetle herbivory on the fire behaviour of tamarisk (Tamarix ramosissima Lebed.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drus, Gail M.; Dudley, Tom L.; Brooks, Matthew L.; Matchett, John R.

    2012-01-01

    The non-native tree, Tamarix spp. has invaded desert riparian ecosystems in the south-western United States. Fire hazard has increased, as typically fire-resistant native vegetation is replaced by Tamarix. The tamarisk leaf beetle, Diorhabda carinulata Desbrochers, introduced for biological control, may affect fire behaviour by converting hydrated live Tamarix leaves and twigs into desiccated and dead fuels. This potentially increases fire hazard in the short term before native vegetation can be re-established. This study investigates how fire behaviour is altered in Tamarix fuels desiccated by Diorhabda herbivory at a Great Basin site, and by herbivory simulated by foliar herbicide at a Mojave Desert site. It also evaluates the influence of litter depth on fire intensity. Fire behaviour was measured with a fire intensity index that integrates temperature and duration (degree-minutes above 70°C), and with maximum temperature, duration, flame lengths, rates of spread and vegetation removal. Maximum temperature, flame length and rate of spread were enhanced by foliar desiccation of Tamarix at both sites. At only the Mojave site, there was a trend for desiccated trees to burn with greater fire intensity. At both sites, fire behaviour parameters were influenced to a greater degree by litter depth, vegetation density and drier and windier conditions than by foliar desiccation.

  3. [Effects of fire recurrence on fire behaviour in cork oak woodlands (Quercus suber L.) and Mediterranean shrublands over the last fifty years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffhauser, Alice; Pimont, François; Curt, Thomas; Cassagne, Nathalie; Dupuy, Jean-Luc; Tatoni, Thierry

    2015-12-01

    Past fire recurrence impacts the vegetation structure, and it is consequently hypothesized to alter its future fire behaviour. We examined the fire behaviour in shrubland-forest mosaics of southeastern France, which were organized along a range of fire frequency (0 to 3-4 fires along the past 50 years) and had different time intervals between fires. The mosaic was dominated by Quercus suber L. and Erica-Cistus shrubland communities. We described the vegetation structure through measurements of tree height, base of tree crown or shrub layer, mean diameter, cover, plant water content and bulk density. We used the physical model Firetec to simulate the fire behaviour. Fire intensity, fire spread, plant water content and biomass loss varied significantly according to fire recurrence and vegetation structure, mainly linked to the time since the last fire, then the number of fires. These results confirm that past fire recurrence affects future fire behaviour, with multi-layered vegetation (particularly high shrublands) producing more intense fires, contrary to submature Quercus woodlands that have not burnt since 1959 and that are unlikely to reburn. Further simulations, with more vegetation scenes according to shrub and canopy covers, will complete this study in order to discuss the fire propagation risk in heterogeneous vegetation, particularly in the Mediterranean area, with a view to a local management of these ecosystems. Copyright © 2015 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Building safety and human behaviour in fire: A literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kobes, M.; Helsloot, I.; de Vries, B.; Post, J.

    2010-01-01

    The most crucial aspect of a building's safety in the face of fire is the possibility of safe escape. An important precondition is that its fire safety facilities enable independent and adequate fire response performances by the building's occupants. In practice, it appears that the measures

  5. Fire disturbance effects on land surface albedo in Alaskan tundra

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Nancy H. F.; Whitley, Matthew A.; Jenkins, Liza K.

    2016-03-01

    The study uses satellite Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer albedo products (MCD43A3) to assess changes in albedo at two sites in the treeless tundra region of Alaska, both within the foothills region of the Brooks Range, the 2007 Anaktuvuk River Fire (ARF) and 2012 Kucher Creek Fire (KCF). Results are compared to each other and other studies to assess the magnitude of albedo change and the longevity of impact of fire on land surface albedo. In both sites there was a marked decrease of albedo in the year following the fire. In the ARF, albedo slowly increased until 4 years after the fire, when it returned to albedo values prior to the fire. For the year immediately after the fire, a threefold difference in the shortwave albedo decrease was found between the two sites. ARF showed a 45.3% decrease, while the KCF showed a 14.1% decrease in shortwave albedo, and albedo is more variable in the KCF site than ARF site 1 year after the fire. These differences are possibly the result of differences in burn severity of the two fires, wherein the ARF burned more completely with more contiguous patches of complete burn than KCF. The impact of fire on average growing season (April-September) surface shortwave forcing in the year following fire is estimated to be 13.24 ± 6.52 W m-2 at the ARF site, a forcing comparable to studies in other treeless ecosystems. Comparison to boreal studies and the implications to energy flux are discussed in the context of future increases in fire occurrence and severity in a warming climate.

  6. The impact of aging on laboratory fire behaviour in masticated shrub fuelbeds of California and Oregon, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse K. Kreye; J. Morgan Varner; Jeffrey M. Kane; Eric E. Knapp; Warren P. Reed

    2016-01-01

    Mastication of shrubs and small trees to reduce fire hazard has become a widespread management practice, yet many aspects of the fire behaviour of these unique woody fuelbeds remain poorly understood. To examine the effects of fuelbed aging on fire behaviour, we conducted laboratory burns with masticated Arctostaphylos spp. and Ceanothus...

  7. Amontonian frictional behaviour of nanostructured surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilkington, Georgia A; Thormann, Esben; Claesson, Per M; Fuge, Gareth M; Fox, Oliver J L; Ashfold, Michael N R; Leese, Hannah; Mattia, Davide; Briscoe, Wuge H

    2011-05-28

    With nanotextured surfaces and interfaces increasingly being encountered in technological and biomedical applications, there is a need for a better understanding of frictional properties involving such surfaces. Here we report friction measurements of several nanostructured surfaces using an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). These nanostructured surfaces provide well defined model systems on which we have tested the applicability of Amontons' laws of friction. Our results show that Amontonian behaviour is observed with each of the surfaces studied. However, no correlation has been found between measured friction and various surface roughness parameters such as average surface roughness (R(a)) and root mean squared (rms) roughness. Instead, we propose that the friction coefficient may be decomposed into two contributions, i.e., μ = μ(0) + μ(g), with the intrinsic friction coefficient μ(0) accounting for the chemical nature of the surfaces and the geometric friction coefficient μ(g) for the presence of nanotextures. We have found a possible correlation between μ(g) and the average local slope of the surface nanotextures. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2011

  8. Post-fire logging reduces surface woody fuels up to four decades following wildfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    David W. Peterson; Erich Kyle Dodson; Richy J. Harrod

    2015-01-01

    Severe wildfires create pulses of dead trees that influence future fuel loads, fire behavior, and fire effects as they decay and deposit surface woody fuels. Harvesting fire-killed trees may reduce future surface woody fuels and related fire hazards, but the magnitude and timing of post-fire logging effects on woody fuels have not been fully assessed. To address this...

  9. Climate Impacts of Fire-Induced Land-Surface Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Hao, X.; Qu, J. J.

    2017-12-01

    One of the consequences of wildfires is the changes in land-surface properties such as removal of vegetation. This will change local and regional climate through modifying the land-air heat and water fluxes. This study investigates mechanism by developing and a parameterization of fire-induced land-surface property changes and applying it to modeling of the climate impacts of large wildfires in the United States. Satellite remote sensing was used to quantitatively evaluate the land-surface changes from large fires provided from the Monitoring Trends in Burning Severity (MTBS) dataset. It was found that the changes in land-surface properties induced by fires are very complex, depending on vegetation type and coverage, climate type, season and time after fires. The changes in LAI are remarkable only if the actual values meet a threshold. Large albedo changes occur in winter for fires in cool climate regions. The signs are opposite between the first post-fire year and the following years. Summer day-time temperature increases after fires, while nigh-time temperature changes in various patterns. The changes are larger in forested lands than shrub / grassland lands. In the parameterization scheme, the detected post-fire changes are decomposed into trends using natural exponential functions and fluctuations of periodic variations with the amplitudes also determined by natural exponential functions. The final algorithm is a combination of the trends, periods, and amplitude functions. This scheme is used with Earth system models to simulate the local and regional climate effects of wildfires.

  10. Experimental investigations of the fire behaviour of facades with EPS exposed to different fire loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Northe Christian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In context of recent fire damages to façades and the related discussion about the safety of façade systems in case of fire, there is a need for discussion about the boundary conditions and the phenomena of façade fires based on fundamental investigation. On behalf of the European Institute for Fire Protection (EIFP four major fire tests were carried out on a flat facade with external thermal insulation composite systems (ETICS based on polystyrene with fire loads at the ground in front of the façade [1]. The tests were conducted at the Materialprüfanstalt Dresden based in Freiberg. The tests differ to the fire tests of the German building ministers in case of different fire loads and the corner-situation of the studied façade. The four fire tests are a step in systematic investigations to study examination criteria of the fire phenomena at façades. Further experimental and numerical investigations will follow.

  11. Post-fire surface fuel dynamics in California forests across three burn severity classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianca N. I. Eskelson; Vicente J. Monleon

    2018-01-01

    Forest wildfires consume fuel and are followed by post-fire fuel accumulation. This study examines post-fire surface fuel dynamics over 9 years across a wide range of conditions characteristic of California fires in dry conifer and hardwood forests. We estimated post-fire surface fuel loadings (Mg ha _1) from 191 repeatedly measured United States...

  12. Treatment of natural wood veneers with nano-oxides to improve their fire behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francés Bueno, A. B.; Navarro Bañón, M. V.; Martínez de Morentín, L.; Moratalla García, J.

    2014-08-01

    Conventional flame retardants used to improve fire behaviour of wood based materials are commonly based on halogenated and/or nitrogenated chemicals. These chemicals are toxic and can harm the environment and human health. Some works describe the incorporation of nanomaterials to the polymeric systems to improve their fire behaviour. The aim of this work was to analyze the effect of several treatments based on the use of nanomaterials on the properties of natural wood veneers and mainly on their fire behaviour. Firstly, several modes for treating pine veneers (immersion, spraying and impregnation) were evaluated using a commercial flame retardant to select the most effective treatment. The treatment selected as the most effective was immersion in a bath of flame retarding agent for 30 minutes at standard conditions. Afterward, pine veneers were treated by immersion in aqueous dispersions which contained 3wt% of the following nanoparticles: SiO2, TiO2 and ZrO2, respectively. The effect of each treatment on the properties of veneers was analyzed. The results obtained showed that the treatment based on the use of 3wt% SiO2 aqueous dispersion was the most effective to improve the fire behaviour of pine veneers.

  13. Treatment of natural wood veneers with nano-oxides to improve their fire behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bueno, A B Francés; Bañón, M V Navarro; De Morentín, L Martínez; García, J Moratalla

    2014-01-01

    Conventional flame retardants used to improve fire behaviour of wood based materials are commonly based on halogenated and/or nitrogenated chemicals. These chemicals are toxic and can harm the environment and human health. Some works describe the incorporation of nanomaterials to the polymeric systems to improve their fire behaviour. The aim of this work was to analyze the effect of several treatments based on the use of nanomaterials on the properties of natural wood veneers and mainly on their fire behaviour. Firstly, several modes for treating pine veneers (immersion, spraying and impregnation) were evaluated using a commercial flame retardant to select the most effective treatment. The treatment selected as the most effective was immersion in a bath of flame retarding agent for 30 minutes at standard conditions. Afterward, pine veneers were treated by immersion in aqueous dispersions which contained 3wt% of the following nanoparticles: SiO 2 , TiO 2 and ZrO 2 , respectively. The effect of each treatment on the properties of veneers was analyzed. The results obtained showed that the treatment based on the use of 3wt% SiO 2 aqueous dispersion was the most effective to improve the fire behaviour of pine veneers

  14. Forest fuels and potential fire behaviour 12 years after variable-retention harvest in lodgepole pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justin S. Crotteau; Christopher R. Keyes; Elaine K. Sutherland; David K. Wright; Joel M. Egan

    2016-01-01

    Variable-retention harvesting in lodgepole pine offers an alternative to conventional, even-aged management. This harvesting technique promotes structural complexity and age-class diversity in residual stands and promotes resilience to disturbance. We examined fuel loads and potential fire behaviour 12 years after two modes of variable-retention harvesting (...

  15. Effect of Sodium bicarbonate on Fire behaviour of tilled E- Glass Reinforced Epoxy Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girish, S.; Devendra, K.; Bharath, K. N.

    2016-09-01

    Composites such as fibre reinforced polymers give us the good mechanical properties, but their fire behaviour is not appreciable and needs to be improved. In this work, E- glass fiber is used as a reinforcement material and Epoxy resin is used as a matrix with particulate sodium bi-carbonate (NaHCO3) is used as additive. The hand lay-up technique is adopted for the development of composites by varying percentage of additive. All the tests were conducted according to ASTM standards to study the Fire behaviour of the developed composites. The different fire properties like Ignition time, mass loss rate and flame propagation rate of Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRP) with NaHCO3 are compared with neat FRPs. It is found that the ignition time increases as the percentage of additive is increased.

  16. Behaviour of Passive Fire Protection K-Geopolymer under Successive Severe Fire Incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakkas, Konstantinos; Sofianos, Alexandros; Nomikos, Pavlos; Panias, Dimitrios

    2015-09-11

    The performance of a fire resistant coating for tunnel passive fire protection under successive severe thermal loading is presented. The material falls under the class of potassium based geopolymers (K-geopolymer) and was prepared by mixing ferronickel (FeNi) slag, doped with pure alumina, with a highly alkaline potassium hydroxide aqueous phase. Its performance was assessed by subjecting a concrete slab with a five cm thick K-geopolymer coating layer into successive RijksWaterStaat (RWS) fire incidents. During the first test, the maximum measured temperature in the K-geopolymer/concrete interface was 250 °C, which is 130 °C lower than the RWS test requirement, while, during the second fire test, the maximum temperature was almost 370 °C, which is still lower than the RWS requirement proving the effectiveness of the material as a thermal barrier. In addition, the material retained its structural integrity, during and after the two tests, without showing any mechanical or thermal damages.

  17. Modeling wind adjustment factor and midflame wind speed for Rothermel's surface fire spread model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia L. Andrews

    2012-01-01

    Rothermel's surface fire spread model was developed to use a value for the wind speed that affects surface fire, called midflame wind speed. Models have been developed to adjust 20-ft wind speed to midflame wind speed for sheltered and unsheltered surface fuel. In this report, Wind Adjustment Factor (WAF) model equations are given, and the BehavePlus fire modeling...

  18. How to generate and interpret fire characteristics charts for surface and crown fire behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia L. Andrews; Faith Ann Heinsch; Luke Schelvan

    2011-01-01

    A fire characteristics chart is a graph that presents primary related fire behavior characteristics-rate of spread, flame length, fireline intensity, and heat per unit area. It helps communicate and interpret modeled or observed fire behavior. The Fire Characteristics Chart computer program plots either observed fire behavior or values that have been calculated by...

  19. Predicting fire severity using surface fuels and moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamela G. Sikkink; Robert E. Keane

    2012-01-01

    Fire severity classifications have been used extensively in fire management over the last 30 years to describe specific environmental or ecological impacts of fire on fuels, vegetation, wildlife, and soils in recently burned areas. New fire severity classifications need to be more objective, predictive, and ultimately more useful to fire management and planning. Our...

  20. Effects of fuel load and moisture content on fire behaviour and heating in masticated litter-dominated fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse K. Kreye; Leda N. Kobziar; Wayne C. Zipperer

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical fuels treatments are being used in fire-prone ecosystems where fuel loading poses a hazard, yetlittle research elucidating subsequent fire behaviour exists, especially in litter-dominated fuelbeds. To address this deficiency, we burned constructed fuelbeds from masticated sites in pine flatwoods forests in northern Florida...

  1. Droplet impaction on solid surfaces exposed to impinging jet fires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazemi, Zia

    2005-12-15

    The thermal response of hot surfaces exposed to impinging jet fire and subsequent impacting water droplets is investigated. The research was done mainly experimentally by utilizing three different concepts. This included experiments on a laboratory scale steel plate and large outdoor fire tests with a quadratic steel channel and steel plates. Besides the horizontal jet flame itself was characterized in a comprehensive study. As a comparative study, the last three types of the experiment were additionally modeled by the CFD-code Kameleon FireEx for validation of results. The purpose of the experiments done on bench scale steel plate (L x W x T : 300 x 200 x 8 mm) was mainly to map data on wetting temperature, water droplet size, droplet impingement angle, and droplet velocity prior to large scale jet fire tests. The droplet release angle normal to hot surface gives best cooling effect, when the surface is oriented in upright position. The partial wetting begins at about 165 degrees C. When the surface is positioned in horizontal plane, the droplet of about 5 mm in diameter wets the hot surface partially at around 240-250 degrees C within an impaction distance of 20 cm. At about 150 degrees C, the droplet is entirely attached to the surface with almost zero contact angle, and cools down the solid at a critical heat flux equivalent to 1750 kW/m{sup 2}. The cooling effectiveness is about 8 % with a Weber number of 68. Although in the event of horizontal channel (L x W x T : 1000 x 200 x 8 mm) water droplets were not applied, however, the knowledge gained with jet fire tests gave valuable information about temperature progress in solids (steels and insulation) and their response to impinging jet fire during long duration experiments. The temperature of the insulated area of the channel keeps 200 degrees C below that of the exposed surface, as long as the insulation material remained intact. Upon long test fire durations, the insulation either burns or degrades despite

  2. Dynamic model of Fire Growth in Abernethy Estate and Glen Tanar using FARSITE simulator

    OpenAIRE

    Grabowiecka, Magdalena

    2008-01-01

    Most of the vegetation fires in Great Britain are of an anthropogenic nature. The possibility of a wildfire occurrence depends on the combination of human behaviour, the type and condition of the vegetation and the weather conditions. By using FARSITE – Fire Area Simulator it is easy to develop a two-dimensional output such as Fire Growth model on personal computer. The simulator incorporates existing fire behaviour models of surface fire spread, crown fire, fire acceleration, fuel moisture a...

  3. Restoring surface fire stabilizes forest carbon under extreme fire weather in the Sierra Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel J. Krofcheck; Matthew D. Hurteau; Robert M. Scheller; E. Louise Loudermilk

    2017-01-01

    Climate change in the western United States has increased the frequency of extreme fire weather events and is projected to increase the area burned by wildfire in the coming decades. This changing fire regime, coupled with increased high-severity fire risk from a legacy of fire exclusion, could destabilize forest carbon (C), decrease net ecosystem exchange (...

  4. Describing wildland surface fuel loading for fire management: A review of approaches, methods and systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Keane

    2013-01-01

    Wildland fuelbeds are exceptionally complex, consisting of diverse particles of many sizes, types and shapes with abundances and properties that are highly variable in time and space. This complexity makes it difficult to accurately describe, classify, sample and map fuels for wildland fire research and management. As a result, many fire behaviour and effects software...

  5. Flexural behaviour of partially bonded carbon fibre reinforced polymers strengthened concrete beams: Application to fire protection systems design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firmo, J.P.; Arruda, M.R.T.; Correia, J.R.; Tiago, C.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The mechanical behaviour of partially bonded CFRP strengthened beams was modelled. • Two dimensional non-linear finite element models were developed. • Partially bonded beams can present similar flexural strength to fully bonded ones. • Relations between the bonded length and the strength reduction were proposed. • The proposed relations were used for the design of fire protection systems. - Abstract: Recent fire resistance tests on reinforced concrete (RC) beams strengthened with carbon fibre reinforced polymers (CFRP) laminates showed that it is possible to attain considerable fire endurance provided that thermal insulation is applied at the anchorage zones of the strengthening system. With such protection, although the CFRP laminate prematurely debonds in the central part of the beam, it transforms into a cable fixed at the extremities until one of the anchorage zones loses its bond strength. The main objective of this paper is to propose a simplified methodology for the design of fire protection systems for CFRP strengthened-RC beams, which is based on applying thicker insulation at the anchorage zones (promoting the above mentioned “cable behaviour”) and a thinner one at the current zone (avoiding tensile rupture of the carbon fibres). As a first step towards the validation of this methodology, finite element (FE) models were developed to simulate the flexural behaviour at ambient temperature of full-scale RC beams strengthened with CFRP laminates according to the externally bonded reinforcement (EBR) and near surface mounted (NSM) techniques, in both cases fully or partially bonded (the latter simulating the cable). The FE models were calibrated with results of 4-point bending tests on small-scale beams and then extended for different beam geometries, with spans (L) varying from 2 m to 5 m, in which the influence of the CFRP bonded length (l b ) and the loading type (point or uniformly distributed) on the strength reduction was

  6. Exit choice, (pre-)movement time and (pre-)evacuation behaviour in hotel fire evacuation – Behavioural analysis and validation of the use of serious gaming in experimental research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kobes, M.; Helsloot, I.; de Vries, B.; Post, J.

    2010-01-01

    Human behaviour in fires is mainly studied by incident evaluations and real-life experiments, such as unannounced evacuation drills. The possibilities of virtual reality for studying human behaviour in fires are so far hardly adopted by researchers. Nevertheless, the application of a behavioural

  7. Osteoblastic cell behaviour on modified titanium surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukaszewska-Kuska, Magdalena; Wirstlein, Przemysław; Majchrowski, Radomir; Dorocka-Bobkowska, Barbara

    2018-02-01

    The surfaces of endoosseous dental implants have been subjected to numerous modifications in order to create a surface which can provide rapid bone healing and fast implant loading. Each modification has involved changes to the chemical composition and topography of the surfaces which have resulted in various biological reactions to the implanted material. The aim of this study was to evaluate the surface topography and chemistry of various modified titanium surfaces: (1) machined surface (MA), (2) alumina-blasted (Al2O3), (3) alumina-blasted and acid-etched (Al2O3 DE), (4) hydroxyapatite/tricalcium phosphate grit-blasted (HA/TCP) and (5) hydroxyapatite/tricalcium phosphate grit-blasted and acid-etched (HA/TCP DE) and to analyse the effects of surface roughness, and chemical composition on human osteoblast vitality, differentiation, morphology and orientation. The modified surfaces were subjected to topographic analysis using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), optical profilometry, roughness analysis and chemical composition evaluation using Energy Dispersion Spectroscopy (EDS) analysis. The biological effects of the titanium modifications was analysed using human osteoblasts cell culture where the cell morphology, vitality (MTS assay) and differentiation (ALP activity) was analysed. The machined surfaces were classified as anisotropic, smooth and composed of titanium and oxygen. The blasted surface samples along with the blasted and etched samples were found to be isotropic and rough. The grit-blasting procedure resulted in the incorporation of components from the blasting material. In the case of the blasted and etched samples, etching decreased the surface development as indicated by the Sdr and also reduced the amount of chemical compounds incorporated into the surfaces during the blasting procedure. The attached NHOst cells, proliferated the surfaces. With regard to the MA samples, the cells spread close to the titanium surface, with expanded cytoplasmic

  8. Beyond "fire temperatures": calibrating thermocouple probes and modeling their response to surface fires in hardwood fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony S. Bova; Matthew B. Dickinson

    2008-01-01

    The maximum temperatures of thermocouples, temperature-sensitive paints, and calorimeters exposed to flames in wildland fires are often called "fire temperatures" but are determined as much by the properties and deployment of the measurement devices as by the fires themselves. Rather than report device temperatures that are not generally comparable among...

  9. Thermal surface characteristics of coal fires 1 results of in-situ measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianzhong; Kuenzer, Claudia

    2007-12-01

    Natural underground coal fires are fires in coal seams occurring subsurface. The fires are ignited through a process named spontaneous combustion, which occurs based on a natural reaction but is usually triggered through human interaction. Coal mining activities expose coal to the air. This leads to the exothermal oxidation of the carbon in the coal with the air's oxygen to CO 2 and - under certain circumstances - to spontaneous combustion. Coal fires occur in many countries world wide - however, currently the Chinese coal mining industry faces the biggest problems with coal fires. Coal fires destroy the valuable resource coal and furthermore lead to many environmental degradation phenomena such as the deterioration of surrounding vegetation, land subsidence and the emission of toxic gasses (CO, N 2O). They additionally contribute to the emission of green house relevant gasses such as CO 2 and CH 4 to the atmosphere. In this paper we present thermal characteristics of coal fires as measured in-situ during a field campaign to the Wuda coal fire area in south-central Inner Mongolia, China. Thermal characteristics include temperature anomaly measurements at the surface, spatial surface temperature profiles of fire areas and unaffected background areas, diurnal temperature profiles, and temperature measurements inside of coal fire induced cracks in the overlying bedrock. For all the measurements the effects of uneven solar heating through influences of slope and aspect are considered. Our findings show that coal fires result in strong or subtle thermal surface anomalies. Especially the latter can easily be influenced by heating of the surrounding background material through solar influences. Temperature variation of background rocks with different albedo, slope, aspect or vegetation cover can substantially influence the detectability of thermal anomalies. In the worst case coal fire related thermal anomalies can be completely masked by solar patterns during the daytime

  10. Surface Fire Hazards Analysis Technical Report-Constructor Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flye, R.E.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this Fire Hazards Analysis Technical Report (hereinafter referred to as Technical Report) is to assess the risk from fire within individual fire areas to ascertain whether the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) fire safety objectives are met. The objectives identified in DOE Order 420.1, Change 2, Facility Safety, Section 4.2, establish requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for facilities sufficient to minimize the potential for: The occurrence of a fire or related event; A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of employees, the public, or the environment; Vital DOE programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards; Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding defined limits established by DOE; and Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related events

  11. Characterization of polymer surface structure and surface mechanical behaviour by sum frequency generation surface vibrational spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opdahl, Aric; Koffas, Telly S; Amitay-Sadovsky, Ella; Kim, Joonyeong; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2004-01-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) have been used to study polymer surface structure and surface mechanical behaviour, specifically to study the relationships between the surface properties of polymers and their bulk compositions and the environment to which the polymer is exposed. The combination of SFG surface vibrational spectroscopy and AFM has been used to study surface segregation behaviour of polyolefin blends at the polymer/air and polymer/solid interfaces. SFG surface vibrational spectroscopy and AFM experiments have also been performed to characterize the properties of polymer/liquid and polymer/polymer interfaces, focusing on hydrogel materials. A method was developed to study the surface properties of hydrogel contact lens materials at various hydration conditions. Finally, the effect of mechanical stretching on the surface composition and surface mechanical behaviour of phase-separated polyurethanes, used in biomedical implant devices, has been studied by both SFG surface vibrational spectroscopy and AFM. (topical review)

  12. Connection behaviour and the robustness of steel-framed structures in fire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burgess Ian

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The full-scale fire tests at Cardington in the 1990s, and the collapse of at least one of the WTC buildings in 2001, illustrated that connections are potentially the most vulnerable parts of a structure in fire. Fracture of connections causes structural discontinuities and reduces the robustness provided by alternative load paths. An understanding of connection performance is essential to the assessment of structural robustness, and so to structural design against progressive collapse. The forces and deformations to which connectionscan be subjected during a fire differ significantly from those assumed in general design. The internal forces i generally start with moment and shear at ambient temperature, then superposing compression in the initial stages of a fire, which finally changes to catenary tension at high temperatures. If a connection does not have sufficient resistance or ductility to accommodate simultaneous large rotations and normal forces, then connections may fracture, leading to extensive damage or progressive collapse of the structure. Practical assessment of the robustness of steel connections in fire will inevitably rely largely on numerical modelling, but this is unlikely to include general-purpose finite element modelling, because of the complexity of such models. The most promising alternative is the component method, a practical approach which can be included within global three-dimensional frame analysis. The connection is represented by an assembly of individual components with known mechanical properties. Component characterization must include high-deflection elevated-temperature behaviour, and represent it up to fracture.In reality a connection may either be able to regain its stability after the initial fracture of one (or a few components, or the first failure may trigger a cascade of failures of other components, leading to complete detachment of the supported member. Numerical modelling must be capable of

  13. Analysis of the behaviour of biofuel-fired gas turbine power plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Escudero Marcos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The utilisation of biofuels in gas turbines is a promising alternative to fossil fuels for power generation. It would lead to a significant reduction of CO2 emissions using an existing combustion technology, although considerable changes appear to be required and further technological development is necessary. The goal of this work is to conduct energy and exergy analyses of the behaviour of gas turbines fired with biogas, ethanol and synthesis gas (bio-syngas, compared with natural gas. The global energy transformation process (i.e., from biomass to electricity also has been studied. Furthermore, the potential reduction of CO2 emissions attained by the use of biofuels has been determined, after considering the restrictions regarding biomass availability. Two different simulation tools have been used to accomplish this work. The results suggest a high interest in, and the technical viability of, the use of Biomass Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (BioIGCC systems for large scale power generation.

  14. Modelling of the behaviour of a UF6 container in a fire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinton, Eric

    1996-01-01

    This thesis is justified by the safety needs about storage and transport of UF 6 containers. To define their behaviour under fire conditions, a modelling was developed. Before tackling the numerical modelling, a phenomenological interpretation with experimental results of containers inside a furnace (800 C) during a fixed period was carried out. The internal heat transfers were considerably improved with these results. The 2D elaborated model takes into account most of the physical phenomena encountered in this type of situation (boiling, evaporation, condensation, radiant heat transfers through an absorbing gas, convection, pressurisation, thermal contact resistance, UF 6 expansion, solid core sinking in the liquid, elastic and plastic deformations of the steel container). This model was successfully confronted with experiments. (author) [fr

  15. The influence of fire-coral colony size and agonistic behaviour of territorial damselfish on associated coral reef fish communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Isabela Carolina Silva; de Araújo, Maria Elisabeth; da Cunha, Simone Rabelo; Pereira, Pedro Henrique Cipresso

    2015-07-01

    Branching hydrocorals from the genus Millepora play an important ecological role in South Atlantic reefs, where branching scleractinian corals are absent. Previous studies have shown a high proportion of reef fish species using branching fire-coral colonies as shelter, breeding, and feeding sites. However, the effects of Millepora spp. colony size and how the agonistic behaviour of a competitive damselfish affect the associated reef fish community are still unknown. The present study examined how fire-coral colony volume and the presence of a highly territorial and aggressive damselfish (Brazilian endemic Stegastes fuscus) affects the reef fish community associated with the fire-coral Millepora alcicornis. M. alcicornis colonies were surveyed from September 2012 to April 2013 at Tamandaré Reefs off Northeast Brazil. Our results show that the abundance and richness of coral associated fish was positively correlated with M. alcicornis coral colony volume. Additionally, behaviour of S. fuscus, the most abundant reef fish species found associated with fire-coral colonies (almost 57% of the fish community), was also influenced by fire-coral colony volume. There was a clear trend of increased agonistic behaviour and feeding on coral polyps as colony volume increased. This trend was reversed for the non-occupational swimming category, which decreased as M. alcicornis colony volume increased. Behavioural ontogenetic changes were also detected for S. fuscus individuals. Juveniles mainly showed two distinct behaviours: sheltered on coral branches and feeding on coral polyps. In contrast, adults presented greater equitability among the behavioural categories, mostly non-occupational swimming around coral colonies and agonistic behaviour. Lastly, S. fuscus individuals actively defended fire-coral colonies from intruders. A large number of agonistic interactions occurred against potential food competitors, which were mainly roving herbivores, omnivores, and sessile

  16. Relationship of post-fire ground cover to surface fuel loads and consumption in longleaf pine ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew T. Hudak; Roger D. Ottmar; Robert E. Vihnanek; Clint S. Wright

    2014-01-01

    The RxCADRE research team collected multi-scale measurements of pre-, during, and post-fire variables on operational prescribed fires conducted in 2008, 2011, and 2012 in longleaf pine ecosystems in the southeastern USA. Pre- and post-fire surface fuel loads were characterized in alternating pre- and post-fire clip plots systematically established within burn units....

  17. Atmospheric moisture's influence on fire behavior: surface moisture and plume dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian E. Potter; Joseph J. Charney; Lesley A. Fusina

    2006-01-01

    Nine measures of atmospheric surface moisture are tested for statistical relationships with fire size and number of fires using data from the Great Lakes region of the United States. The measures include relative humidity, water vapor mixing ratio, mixing ratio deficit, vapor pressure, vapor pressure deficit, dew point temperature, dew point depression, wet bulb...

  18. Predicting Fire Season Severity in South America Using Sea Surface Temperature Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Randerson, James T.; Morton, Douglas C.; Jin, Yufang; DeFries, Ruth S.; Collatz, George J.; Kasibhatla, Prasad S.; Giglio, Louis; Jin, Yufang; Marlier, Miriam

    2011-01-01

    Fires in South America cause forest degradation and contribute to carbon emissions associated with land use change. Here we investigated the relationship between year-to-year changes in satellite-derived estimates of fire activity in South America and sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies. We found that the Oceanic Ni o Index (ONI) was correlated with interannual fire activity in the eastern Amazon whereas the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) index was more closely linked with fires in the southern and southwestern Amazon. Combining these two climate indices, we developed an empirical model that predicted regional annual fire season severity (FSS) with 3-5 month lead times. Our approach provides the foundation for an early warning system for forecasting the vulnerability of Amazon forests to fires, thus enabling more effective management with benefits for mitigation of greenhouse gas and air pollutant emissions.

  19. Correction of systematic behaviour in topographical surface analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quagliotti, Danilo; Baruffi, Federico; Tosello, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Four specimens in the sub-micrometre range and with different polishing were topographically investigated in fiveareas over their respective surfaces. Uncertainties were evaluated with and without correction for systematicbehaviour and successively analysed by a design of experiment (DOE). Result...... showed that the correction forsystematic behaviour allowed for a lower value of the estimated uncertainty when the correction was adequate tocompletely recognise the systematic effects. If not, the correction can produce an overestimation of the uncertainty....

  20. Modeling the protection afforded by burrows, cavities, and roosts during wildland surface fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony Bova; Matthew Dickinson

    2009-01-01

    Wildland surface fires produce many toxic and irritating compounds, such as formaldehyde and acrolein, and harmful gases such as carbon monoxide. Several factors influence the degree of protection offered by animal shelters against combustion products and heat.

  1. Computer-simulation study on fire behaviour in the ventilated cavity of ventilated façade systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giraldo María P.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Fire spread through the façades is widely recognized as one of the fastest pathways of fire spreading in the buildings. Fire may spread through the façade in different ways depending on the type of façade system and on the elements and materials from which it is constructed. Ventilated façades are multilayer systems whose main feature is the creation of an air chamber of circulating air between the original building wall and the external cladding. The “chimney effect” in the air cavity is a mechanism that improves the façade's thermal behaviour and avoids the appearance of moisture from rain or condensation. However, in a event of fire, it may contribute to the quickest spreading of fire, representing a significant risk to the upper floors of a building. This study deals with some aspects of fire propagation through the ventilated cavity in ventilated façade systems. Also we review the provisions stipulated by the Spanish building code (Código Técnico de la Edificación, CTE [1] to avoid fire spread outside the building. The results highlight the importance of the use of proper fire barriers to ensure the compartmentalization of the ventilated cavity, as well as the use of non-combustible thermal insulation materials, among others. In addition, based on the results, it might be considered that the measures stipulated by the CTE are insufficient to limit the risks associated with this kind of façades systems. The study has been performed using field models of computational fluid-dynamics. In particular, the Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS software has been used to numerically solve the mathematical integration models.

  2. Test Plan to Assess Fire Effects on the Function of an Engineered Surface Barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, Anderson L.; Berlin, Gregory T.; Cammann, Jerry W.; Leary, Kevin D.; Link, Steven O.

    2008-09-29

    Wildfire is a frequent perturbation in shrub steppe ecosystems, altering the flora, fauna, atmosphere, and soil of these systems. Research on the fire effects has focused mostly on natural ecosystems with essentially no attention on engineered systems like surface barriers. The scope of the project is to use a simulated wildfire to induce changes in an engineered surface barrier and document the effects on barrier performance. The main objective is to quantify the effects of burning and the resulting post-fire conditions on alterations in soil physical properties; hydrologic response, particularly the water balance; geochemical properties; and biological properties. A secondary objective is to use the lessons learned to maximize fire protection in the design of long-term monitoring systems based on electronic sensors. A simulated wildfire will be initiated, controlled and monitored at the 200-BP-1 barrier in collaboration with the Hanford Fire Department during the fall of 2008. The north half of the barrier will be divided into nine 12 x 12 m plots, each of which will be randomly assigned a fuel load of 2 kg m-2 or 4 kg m-2. Each plot will be ignited around the perimeter and flames allowed to carry to the centre. Any remaining unburned vegetation will be manually burned off using a drip torch. Progress of the fire and its effects will be monitored using point measurements of thermal, hydrologic, and biotic variables. Three measures of fire intensity will be used to characterize fire behavior: (1) flame height, (2) the maximum temperature at three vertical profile levels, and (3) total duration of elevated temperature at these levels. Pre-burn plant information, including species diversity, plant height, and canopy diameter will be measured on shrubs from the plots to be burned and from control plots at the McGee ranch. General assessments of shrub survival, recovery, and recruitment will be made after the fire. Near-surface soil samples will be collected pre- and

  3. Colony-level behavioural variation correlates with differences in expression of the foraging gene in red imported fire ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockoven, Alison A; Coates, Craig J; Eubanks, Micky D

    2017-11-01

    Among social insects, colony-level variation is likely to be widespread and has significant ecological consequences. Very few studies, however, have documented how genetic factors relate to behaviour at the colony level. Differences in expression of the foraging gene have been associated with differences in foraging and activity of a wide variety of organisms. We quantified expression of the red imported fire ant foraging gene (sifor) in workers from 21 colonies collected across the natural range of Texas fire ant populations, but maintained under standardized, environmentally controlled conditions. Colonies varied significantly in their behaviour. The most active colonies had up to 10 times more active foragers than the least active colony and more than 16 times as many workers outside the nest. Expression differences among colonies correlated with this colony-level behavioural variation. Colonies with higher sifor expression in foragers had, on average, significantly higher foraging activity, exploratory activity and recruitment to nectar than colonies with lower expression. Expression of sifor was also strongly correlated with worker task (foraging vs. working in the interior of the nest). These results provide insight into the genetic and physiological processes underlying collective differences in social behaviour. Quantifying variation in expression of the foraging gene may provide an important tool for understanding and predicting the ecological consequences of colony-level behavioural variation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Melt-Flow Behaviours of Thermoplastic Materials under Fire Conditions: Recent Experimental Studies and Some Theoretical Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Joseph

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Polymeric materials often exhibit complex combustion behaviours encompassing several stages and involving solid phase, gas phase and interphase. A wide range of qualitative, semi-quantitative and quantitative testing techniques are currently available, both at the laboratory scale and for commercial purposes, for evaluating the decomposition and combustion behaviours of polymeric materials. They include, but are not limited to, techniques such as: thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA, oxygen bomb calorimetry, limiting oxygen index measurements (LOI, Underwriters Laboratory 94 (UL-94 tests, cone calorimetry, etc. However, none of the above mentioned techniques are capable of quantitatively deciphering the underpinning physiochemical processes leading to the melt flow behaviour of thermoplastics. Melt-flow of polymeric materials can constitute a serious secondary hazard in fire scenarios, for example, if they are present as component parts of a ceiling in an enclosure. In recent years, more quantitative attempts to measure the mass loss and melt-drip behaviour of some commercially important chain- and step-growth polymers have been accomplished. The present article focuses, primarily, on the experimental and some theoretical aspects of melt-flow behaviours of thermoplastics under heat/fire conditions.

  5. High-resolution infrared thermography for capturing wildland fire behaviour - RxCADRE 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph J. O’Brien; E. Louise Loudermilk; Benjamin Hornsby; Andrew T. Hudak; Benjamin C. Bright; Matthew B. Dickinson; J. Kevin Hiers; Casey Teske; Roger D. Ottmar

    2016-01-01

    Wildland fire radiant energy emission is one of the only measurements of combustion that can be made at wide spatial extents and high temporal and spatial resolutions. Furthermore, spatially and temporally explicit measurements are critical for making inferences about fire effects and useful for examining patterns of fire spread. In this study we describe our...

  6. InSAR detects increase in surface subsidence caused by an Arctic tundra fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Jafarov, Elchin E.; Schaefer, Kevin M.; Jones, Benjamin M.; Zebker, Howard A.; Williams, Christopher A.; Rogan, John; Zhang, Tingjun

    2014-01-01

    Wildfire is a major disturbance in the Arctic tundra and boreal forests, having a significant impact on soil hydrology, carbon cycling, and permafrost dynamics. This study explores the use of the microwave Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) technique to map and quantify ground surface subsidence caused by the Anaktuvuk River fire on the North Slope of Alaska. We detected an increase of up to 8 cm of thaw-season ground subsidence after the fire, which is due to a combination of thickened active layer and permafrost thaw subsidence. Our results illustrate the effectiveness and potential of using InSAR to quantify fire impacts on the Arctic tundra, especially in regions underlain by ice-rich permafrost. Our study also suggests that surface subsidence is a more comprehensive indicator of fire impacts on ice-rich permafrost terrain than changes in active layer thickness alone.

  7. InSAR detects increase in surface subsidence caused by an Arctic tundra fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Jafarov, Elchin E.; Schaefer, Kevin M.; Jones, Benjamin M.; Zebker, Howard A.; Williams, Christopher A.; Rogan, John; Zhang, Tingjun

    2014-06-01

    Wildfire is a major disturbance in the Arctic tundra and boreal forests, having a significant impact on soil hydrology, carbon cycling, and permafrost dynamics. This study explores the use of the microwave Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) technique to map and quantify ground surface subsidence caused by the Anaktuvuk River fire on the North Slope of Alaska. We detected an increase of up to 8 cm of thaw-season ground subsidence after the fire, which is due to a combination of thickened active layer and permafrost thaw subsidence. Our results illustrate the effectiveness and potential of using InSAR to quantify fire impacts on the Arctic tundra, especially in regions underlain by ice-rich permafrost. Our study also suggests that surface subsidence is a more comprehensive indicator of fire impacts on ice-rich permafrost terrain than changes in active layer thickness alone.

  8. Surface Accessibility with Spatial Analysis During Fire Extinguishing Procedures: Example on the Island of Vis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kruno Lepoglavec

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: The existing public and forest transport infrastructure (truck forest roads are permanent objects used when passing through forests. They also serve as a firefighter belt and provide direct access to firefighting vehicles, or are used as the starting point where firefighting teams extinguish fires or move toward remote fires. The paper identifies the existing fire road network (including public roads, forest roads, non-classified roads and fire roads for access of firefighting vehicles during fire extinguishing interventions. Material and Methods: An analysis of the intervention rate was conducted on a dispersive sample (35 positions from two volunteer fire associations (VFA on the island of Vis. Also, an analysis of the surface availability to fire vehicles concerning the time of departure from the fire station was conducted, as well as the comparison with the Standard time of intervention defined by the regulations on fire department organization in the Republic of Croatia. Results: For each simulated fire location for intervention of two existing volunteer fire associations: VFA Komiža and VFA Vis, results show that for a few fire locations, despite a smaller distance from the VFA Komiža, a quicker intervention is possible from the VFA Vis (locations 4, 5 and 14, and vice versa (locations 21, 22 and 25. With the use of a New Service Area, tool intervention times regarding different areas were calculated. Intervention times were divided into intervals: 25 min. The last two categories of area are beyond reach for firefighters within the Standard time of intervention (15 min and together they comprise to 27.88% of the total research area. Conclusions: The results of Closest Facility tool indicate that for the simulated fire position the best/fastest route is not always the shortest one, because of a significant effect of the structural elements of each road, the state of the road and the longitudinal slope of the road

  9. High-resolution observations of combustion in heterogeneous surface fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Louise Loudermilk; Gary L. Achtemeier; Joseph J. O' Brien; J. Kevin Hiers; Benjamin S. Hornsby

    2014-01-01

    In ecosystems with frequent surface fires, fire and fuel heterogeneity at relevant scales have been largely ignored. This could be because complete burns give an impression of homogeneity, or due to the difficulty in capturing fine-scale variation in fuel characteristics and fire behaviour. Fire movement between patches of fuel can have implications for modelling fire...

  10. Spatiotemporal variation of surface shortwave forcing from fire-induced albedo change in interior Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shengli; Dahal, Devendra; Liu, Heping; Jin, Suming; Young, Claudia J.; Liu, Shuang; Liu, Shu-Guang

    2015-01-01

    The albedo change caused by both fires and subsequent succession is spatially heterogeneous, leading to the need to assess the spatiotemporal variation of surface shortwave forcing (SSF) as a component to quantify the climate impacts of high-latitude fires. We used an image reconstruction approach to compare postfire albedo with the albedo assuming fires had not occurred. Combining the fire-caused albedo change from the 2001-2010 fires in interior Alaska and the monthly surface incoming solar radiation, we examined the spatiotemporal variation of SSF in the early successional stage of around 10 years. Our results showed that while postfire albedo generally increased in fall, winter, and spring, some burned areas could show an albedo decrease during these seasons. In summer, the albedo increased for several years and then declined again. The spring SSF distribution did not show a latitudinal decrease from south to north as previously reported. The results also indicated that although the SSF is usually largely negative in the early successional years, it may not be significant during the first postfire year. The annual 2005-2010 SSF for the 2004 fire scars was -1.30, -4.40, -3.31, -4.00, -3.42, and -2.47 Wm-2. The integrated annual SSF map showed significant spatial variation with a mean of -3.15 Wm-2 and a standard deviation of 3.26 Wm-2, 16% of burned areas having positive SSF. Our results suggest that boreal deciduous fires would be less positive for climate change than boreal evergreen fires. Future research is needed to comprehensively investigate the spatiotemporal radiative and non-radiative forcings to determine the effect of boreal fires on climate.

  11. Patterns of canopy and surface layer consumption in a boreal forest fire from repeat airborne lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Michael; Morton, Douglas C.; Cook, Bruce D.; Andersen, Hans-Erik; Babcock, Chad; Pattison, Robert

    2017-05-01

    Fire in the boreal region is the dominant agent of forest disturbance with direct impacts on ecosystem structure, carbon cycling, and global climate. Global and biome-scale impacts are mediated by burn severity, measured as loss of forest canopy and consumption of the soil organic layer. To date, knowledge of the spatial variability in burn severity has been limited by sparse field sampling and moderate resolution satellite data. Here, we used pre- and post-fire airborne lidar data to directly estimate changes in canopy vertical structure and surface elevation for a 2005 boreal forest fire on Alaska’s Kenai Peninsula. We found that both canopy and surface losses were strongly linked to pre-fire species composition and exhibited important fine-scale spatial variability at sub-30 m resolution. The fractional reduction in canopy volume ranged from 0.61 in lowland black spruce stands to 0.27 in mixed white spruce and broadleaf forest. Residual structure largely reflects standing dead trees, highlighting the influence of pre-fire forest structure on delayed carbon losses from aboveground biomass, post-fire albedo, and variability in understory light environments. Median loss of surface elevation was highest in lowland black spruce stands (0.18 m) but much lower in mixed stands (0.02 m), consistent with differences in pre-fire organic layer accumulation. Spatially continuous depth-of-burn estimates from repeat lidar measurements provide novel information to constrain carbon emissions from the surface organic layer and may inform related research on post-fire successional trajectories. Spectral measures of burn severity from Landsat were correlated with canopy (r = 0.76) and surface (r = -0.71) removal in black spruce stands but captured less of the spatial variability in fire effects for mixed stands (canopy r = 0.56, surface r = -0.26), underscoring the difficulty in capturing fire effects in heterogeneous boreal forest landscapes using proxy measures of burn

  12. Stem mortality in surface fires: Part II, experimental methods for characterizing the thermal response of tree stems to heating by fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. M. Jimenez; B. W. Butler; J. Reardon

    2003-01-01

    Current methods for predicting fire-induced plant mortality in shrubs and trees are largely empirical. These methods are not readily linked to duff burning, soil heating, and surface fire behavior models. In response to the need for a physics-based model of this process, a detailed model for predicting the temperature distribution through a tree stem as a function of...

  13. Quantitative risk assessment of continuous liquid spill fires based on spread and burning behaviours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Jinlong; Huang, Hong; Li, Yuntao

    2017-01-01

    Spill fires usually occur during the storage and transportation of hazardous materials, posing a threat to the people and environment in their immediate proximity. In this paper, a classical Quantitative Risk Assessment (QRA) method is used to assess the risk of spill fires. In this method, the m......, large-scale experiments of spill fires on water and a glass sheet were conducted to verify the accuracy and application of the model. The results show that the procedure we developed can be used to quantitatively calculate the risk associated with a continuous spill fire....

  14. The Retrograde Frequency Response of Passive Dendritic Trees Constrains the Nonlinear Firing Behaviour of a Reduced Neuron Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hojeong; Jones, Kelvin E.

    2012-01-01

    Our goal was to investigate how the propagation of alternating signals (i.e. AC), like action potentials, into the dendrites influenced nonlinear firing behaviour of motor neurons using a systematically reduced neuron model. A recently developed reduced modeling approach using only steady-current (i.e. DC) signaling was analytically expanded to retain features of the frequency-response analysis carried out in multicompartment anatomically reconstructed models. Bifurcation analysis of the extended model showed that the typically overlooked parameter of AC amplitude attenuation was positively correlated with the current threshold for the activation of a plateau potential in the dendrite. Within the multiparameter space map of the reduced model the region demonstrating “fully-bistable” firing was bounded by directional DC attenuation values that were negatively correlated to AC attenuation. Based on these results we conclude that analytically derived reduced models of dendritic trees should be fit on DC and AC signaling, as both are important biophysical parameters governing the nonlinear firing behaviour of motor neurons. PMID:22916290

  15. Effects of particle fracturing and moisture content on fire behaviour in masticated fuelbeds burned in a laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse K. Kreye; J. Morgan Varner; Eric E. Knapp

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical mastication is a fuels treatment that converts shrubs and small trees into dense fuelbeds composed of fractured woody particles. Although compaction is thought to reduce fireline intensity, the added particle surface area due to fracturing could also influence fire behavior. We evaluated effects of particle fracturing and moisture content (ranging from 2.5...

  16. Predicting Potential Fire Severity Using Vegetation, Topography and Surface Moisture Availability in a Eurasian Boreal Forest Landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Fang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Severity of wildfires is a critical component of the fire regime and plays an important role in determining forest ecosystem response to fire disturbance. Predicting spatial distribution of potential fire severity can be valuable in guiding fire and fuel management planning. Spatial controls on fire severity patterns have attracted growing interest, but few studies have attempted to predict potential fire severity in fire-prone Eurasian boreal forests. Furthermore, the influences of fire weather variation on spatial heterogeneity of fire severity remain poorly understood at fine scales. We assessed the relative importance and influence of pre-fire vegetation, topography, and surface moisture availability (SMA on fire severity in 21 lightning-ignited fires occurring in two different fire years (3 fires in 2000, 18 fires in 2010 of the Great Xing’an Mountains with an ensemble modeling approach of boosted regression tree (BRT. SMA was derived from 8-day moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS evapotranspiration products. We predicted the potential distribution of fire severity in two fire years and evaluated the prediction accuracies. BRT modeling revealed that vegetation, topography, and SMA explained more than 70% of variations in fire severity (mean 83.0% for 2000, mean 73.8% for 2010. Our analysis showed that evergreen coniferous forests were more likely to experience higher severity fires than the dominant deciduous larch forests of this region, and deciduous broadleaf forests and shrublands usually burned at a significantly lower fire severity. High-severity fires tended to occur in gentle and well-drained slopes at high altitudes, especially those with north-facing aspects. SMA exhibited notable and consistent negative association with severity. Predicted fire severity from our model exhibited strong agreement with the observed fire severity (mean r2 = 0.795 for 2000, 0.618 for 2010. Our results verified that spatial variation

  17. Pre-fire and post-fire surface fuel and cover measurements collected in the southeastern United States for model evaluation and development - RxCADRE 2008, 2011 and 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger D. Ottmar; Andrew T. Hudak; Susan J. Prichard; Clinton S. Wright; Joseph C. Restaino; Maureen C. Kennedy; Robert E. Vihnanek

    2016-01-01

    A lack of independent, quality-assured data prevents scientists from effectively evaluating predictions and uncertainties in fire models used by land managers. This paper presents a summary of pre-fire and post-fire fuel, fuel moisture and surface cover fraction data that can be used for fire model evaluation and development. The data were collected in the...

  18. Risk of post-fire metal mobilization into surface water resources: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Joji; Dowling, Kim; Florentine, Singarayer

    2017-12-01

    One of the significant economic benefits to communities around the world of having pristine forest catchments is the supply of substantial quantities of high quality potable water. This supports a saving of around US$ 4.1 trillion per year globally by limiting the cost of expensive drinking water treatments and provision of unnecessary infrastructure. Even low levels of contaminants specifically organics and metals in catchments when in a mobile state can reduce these economic benefits by seriously affecting the water quality. Contamination and contaminant mobility can occur through natural and anthropogenic activities including forest fires. Moderate to high intensity forest fires are able to alter soil properties and release sequestered metals from sediments, soil organic matter and fragments of vegetation. In addition, the increase in post-fire erosion rate by rainfall runoff and strong winds facilitates the rapid transport of these metals downslope and downstream. The subsequent metal deposition in distal soil and water bodies can influence surface water quality with potential impacts to the larger ecosystems inclusive of negative effects on humans. This is of substantial concern as 4 billion hectares of forest catchments provide high quality water to global communities. Redressing this problem requires quantification of the potential effects on water resources and instituting rigorous fire and environmental management plans to mitigate deleterious effects on catchment areas. This paper is a review of the current state of the art literature dealing with the risk of post-fire mobilization of the metals into surface water resources. It is intended to inform discussion on the preparation of suitable management plans and policies during and after fire events in order to maintain potable water quality in a cost-effective manner. In these times of climate fluctuation and increased incidence of fires, the need for development of new policies and management frameworks

  19. Fire wood and country societies (High-Atlas and Saharian piedmont, morocco): energetic behaviours and natural resources management modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auclair, L.

    1991-12-01

    This work has been realized after two inquiries years in six Moroccan villages. Four of them are situated at a high altitude in the High-Atlas and two of them on Saharian piedmont. In the first part of this work are described the observed energetic behaviours (the thermal energy uses, the consumption and the supply). The second part reveals the relation between the energy uses and different components of land systems; and more particularly the natural resources management modes (water, forest, run). The last part situates the stakes and the future prospects in the field of fuels and fire wood. (O.L.). 246 refs., 95 figs., 41 tabs.

  20. Examination of the wind speed limit function in the Rothermel surface fire spread model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia L. Andrews; Miguel G. Cruz; Richard C. Rothermel

    2013-01-01

    The Rothermel surface fire spread model includes a wind speed limit, above which predicted rate of spread is constant. Complete derivation of the wind limit as a function of reaction intensity is given, along with an alternate result based on a changed assumption. Evidence indicates that both the original and the revised wind limits are too restrictive. Wind limit is...

  1. Numerical simulation on behaviour of timber-concrete composite beams in fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Hao; Hu, Xiamin; Zhang, Bing; Minli, Yao

    2017-08-01

    This paper established sequentially coupled thermal-mechanical models of timber--concrete composite (TCC) beams by finite element software ANSYS to investigate the fire resistance of TCC beam. Existing experimental results were used to verify the coupled thermal-mechanical model. The influencing parameters consisted of the width of timber beam, the thickness of the concrete slab and the timber board. Based on the numerical results, the effects of these parameters on fire resistance of TCC beams were investigated in detail. The results showed that modeling results agreed well with test results, and verified the reliability of the finite element model. The width of the timber beam had a significant influence on the fire resistance of TCC beams. The fire resistance of TCC beams would be enhanced by increasing the width of timber beam, the thickness of concrete slab and the timber board.

  2. A summary of the scientific literature on the effects of fire on the concentration of nutrients in surface waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranalli, Anthony J.

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides a detailed review of the chemical changes that occur in soil during a fire, the pathways by which nutrients are transferred from soil to surface-water bodies following a fire, and the temporal and spatial effects of fires on the concentration of nutrients in surface-water bodies during and following a fire that have been reported in the scientific literature. Thirty-nine papers from the scientific literature that represent studies that (1) were done in a variety of environments (savannas, grasslands, temperate forests, alpine forests, and so forth); (2) had a range of sampling frequency and duration, such as during and immediately following a fire (from the start of fire to 1 year later), short-term sampling (from end of fire to 3 years later), and long term-sampling (sampling for greater than 3 years following a fire); and (3) incorporated watersheds with various burn intensities, severities, and histories were reviewed and summarized. The review of the scientific literature has revealed that measurable effects of fires on streamwater quality are most likely to occur if the fire was severe enough to burn large amounts of organic matter, if windy conditions were present during the fire, if heavy rain occurred following the fire, and if the fire occurred in a watershed with steep slopes and soils with little cation-exchange capacity. Measurable effects of fires on lake- and reservoir-water quality are most likely to occur if, in addition to the factors listed for streams, the lake or reservoir is oligotrophic or mesotrophic and the residence time of water in the lake or reservoir is short relative to the length of time elevated concentrations of nutrients occur in runoff. Knowledge of whether a lake or reservoir is nitrogen or phosphorus limited is important because eutrophication of nitrogen-limited lakes may occur following a fire due to increasing nitrogen:phosphorus ratios caused by prolonged increases of nitrogen concentrations, especially

  3. Characterizing the surface heterogeneity of fire effects using multi-temporal reflective wavelength data

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roy, DP

    2005-10-10

    Full Text Available of fire effects using multi-temporal reflective wavelength data D. P. Roy a; T. Landmann ba Department of Geography, College Park, and NASA Goddard, Space Flight Center, University of Maryland. Code 614.5 (B32), Greenbelt, MD 20771. USAb CSIR Environmentek... Characterizing the surface heterogeneity of fire effects using multi-temporal reflective wavelength data D. P. ROY*{ and T. LANDMANN{ {Department of Geography, University of Maryland, College Park, and NASA Goddard, Space Flight Center, Code 614.5 (B32...

  4. Understanding Changes in Modeled Land Surface Characteristics Prior to Lightning-Initiated Holdover Fire Breakout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Christopher J.; Case, Jonathan L.; Hain, Christopher R.; White, Kristopher; Wachter, J. Brent; Nauslar, Nicholas; MacNamara, Brittany

    2018-01-01

    Lightning initiated wildfires are only 16% of the total number of wildfires within the United States, but account for 56% of the acreage burned. One of the challenges with lightning-initiated wildfires is their ability to "holdover" which means smolder for up to 2+ weeks before breaking out into a full fledged fire. This work helps characterize the percentage of holdover events due to lightning, and helps quantify changes in the land surface characteristics to help understand trends in soil moisture and vegetation stress that potentially contribute to the fire breaking out into a full wildfire.

  5. The Numerical Simulation Application for Fire-Tube Boiler Heating Surface Safety Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaustov Sergei A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The numerical simulation is applied for fire-tube boiler heating surface safety estimation. Thermal processes in an inflatable fire-tube furnace during its emergency operation were simulated using the finite volume method with Euler approximation and the implicit pressure based algorithm. Study results reproduce failures connected with increasing of impasse aerodynamic resistance. The method of these failures prediction is suggested. Simulation has shown that entering the amount of coolant into combustion volume results in burner fan incapability to overcome the impasse resistance of the furnace. The simulation results are visually confirmed during the inspection of emergency boilers.

  6. Sodium fires in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menzenhauer, P.

    1974-01-01

    The work deals with the behaviour of liquid sodium when it comes into contact with air, especially in the course of fires in technical plants. The most important fire procedures are constructed as realistically as possible, that is to say that the fires were not only carried out on a laboratory scale but with quantities of up to 200 kg sodium at temperatures of up to 800 0 C. The following was investigated: 1) the course of the fire in rooms, 2) restriction of the fire, 3) removal of the burnt remains, 4) protection measures. The fire was varied in its most important physical appearance such as surface fire, spurt fire and fire on isolated pipe lines. The fires were checked by precautionary, contructive measures - it was not necessary to place persons at the site of the fire - and by active measures such as for example by covering with extinguishing powder. All important test phases were captured in film and slides series. Visible material is thus available for the operation team of sodium plants and fire brigades who might possibly be called upon. (orig./LH) [de

  7. Buildings exposed to fire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The 24 lectures presented to the colloquium cover the following subject fields: (1) Behaviour of structural components exposed to fire; (2) Behaviour of building materials exposed to fire; (3) Thermal processes; (4) Safety related, theoretical studies. (PW) [de

  8. Characterization of post-fire surface cover, soils, and burn severity at the Cerro Grande Fire, New Mexico, using hyperspectral and multispectral remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, R.F.; Rockwell, B.W.; Haire, S.L.; King, T.V.V.

    2007-01-01

    Forest fires leave behind a changed ecosystem with a patchwork of surface cover that includes ash, charred organic matter, soils and soil minerals, and dead, damaged, and living vegetation. The distributions of these materials affect post-fire processes of erosion, nutrient cycling, and vegetation regrowth. We analyzed high spatial resolution (2.4??m pixel size) Airborne Visible and Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data collected over the Cerro Grande fire, to map post-fire surface cover into 10 classes, including ash, soil minerals, scorched conifer trees, and green vegetation. The Cerro Grande fire occurred near Los Alamos, New Mexico, in May 2000. The AVIRIS data were collected September 3, 2000. The surface cover map revealed complex patterns of ash, iron oxide minerals, and clay minerals in areas of complete combustion. Scorched conifer trees, which retained dry needles heated by the fire but not fully combusted by the flames, were found to cover much of the post-fire landscape. These scorched trees were found in narrow zones at the edges of completely burned areas. A surface cover map was also made using Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) data, collected September 5, 2000, and a maximum likelihood, supervised classification. When compared to AVIRIS, the Landsat classification grossly overestimated cover by dry conifer and ash classes and severely underestimated soil and green vegetation cover. In a comparison of AVIRIS surface cover to the Burned Area Emergency Rehabilitation (BAER) map of burn severity, the BAER high burn severity areas did not capture the variable patterns of post-fire surface cover by ash, soil, and scorched conifer trees seen in the AVIRIS map. The BAER map, derived from air photos, also did not capture the distribution of scorched trees that were observed in the AVIRIS map. Similarly, the moderate severity class of Landsat-derived burn severity maps generated from the differenced Normalized Burn Ratio (dNBR) calculation

  9. Surface and Sliding Wear Behaviour of Different Coatings and Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera-Cárdenas E.E.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the sliding wear behaviour of the coatings TiN, CrN and WC/C applied on steel substrates was studied using a reciprocating wear test machine. All tests were carried out in dry conditions, at room temperature (20-23 C and 45% - 50% relative humidity. The average sliding velocity was 0.08 m/s and an amplitude of 2 mm was used. The applied loads were 11.76 N (Po = 1.74 GPa and 7.84 N (Po = 1.52 GPa. Optical microscopy was used to observe the characteristics of wear scars and spalls and possible causes of their formation. The variation of the friction coefficient against the number of cycles was obtained. This was used to determine more precisely the time (number of cycles where the coating presented the first signs of wear, in addition Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS was performed, as well as Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and hardness tests on the wear traces, which reinforced the previous observations. Thus it was possible to know the wear life of different coatings and possible causes of variation. Increasing the load was an important factor in the variation of wear life results. But it is also important to consider other factors such as surface roughness and thickness of coatings.

  10. Impacts of wildfires on interannual trends in land surface phenology: an investigation of the Hayman Fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianmin; Zhang, Xiaoyang

    2017-05-01

    Land surface phenology (LSP) derived from satellite data has been widely associated with recent global climate change. However, LSP is frequently influenced by land disturbances, which significantly limits our understanding of the phenological trends driven by climate change. Because wildfire is one of the most significant disturbance agents, we investigated the influences of wildfire on the start of growing season (SOS) and the interannual trends of SOS in the Hayman Fire area that occurred in 2002 in Colorado using time series of daily MODIS data (2001-2014). Results show that the Hayman Fire advanced the area-integrated SOS by 15.2 d and converted SOS from a delaying trend of 3.9 d/decade to an advancing trend of -1.9 d/decade during 2001-2014. The fire impacts on SOS increased from low burn severity to high burn severity. Moreover, the rate of increase of annual maximum and minimum EVI2 from 2003-2014 reflects that vegetation greenness could recover to pre-fire status in 2022 and 2053, respectively, which suggests that the fire impacts on the satellite-derived SOS variability and the interannual trends should continue in the next few decades.

  11. Surface conductivity dependent dynamic behaviour of an ultrafine atmospheric pressure plasma jet for microscale surface processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abuzairi, Tomy [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Shizuoka University, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan); Department of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universitas Indonesia, Depok 16424 (Indonesia); Okada, Mitsuru [Department of Engineering, Shizuoka University, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan); Bhattacharjee, Sudeep [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208016 (India); Nagatsu, Masaaki, E-mail: nagatsu.masaaki@shizuoka.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Shizuoka University, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan); Department of Engineering, Shizuoka University, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan); Research Institute of Electronics, Shizuoka University, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan)

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • Spatio-temporal behaviors of capillary APPJs are studied for various substrates. • Plasma irradiation area depended on the substrate conductivity and permittivity. • Surface irradiation area was significantly broadened in polymer-like substrate. • Effect of applying a substrate bias on the APPJ irradiation area was investigated. - Abstract: An experimental study on the dynamic behaviour of microcapillary atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) with 5 μm tip size for surfaces of different conductivity is reported. Electrical and spatio-temporal characteristics of the APPJs are monitored using high voltage probe, current monitor and high speed intensified charge couple device camera. From these experimental results, we presented a simple model to understand the electrical discharge characteristics of the capillary APPJs with double electrodes, and estimated the velocity of the ionization fronts in the jet and the electron density to be 3.5–4.2 km/s and 2–7 × 10{sup 17} m{sup −3}. By analyzing the dynamics of the microcapillary APPJs for different substrate materials, it was found that the surface irradiation area strongly depended on the substrate conductivity and permittivity, especially in the case of polymer-like substrate, surface irradiation area was significantly broadened probably due to the repelling behaviour of the plasma jets from the accumulated electrical charges on the polymer surface. The effect of applying a substrate bias in the range from −900 V to +900 V on the plasma irradiation onto the substrates was also investigated. From the knowledge of the present results, it is helpful for choosing the substrate materials for microscale surface modification.

  12. Fire protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janetzky, E.

    1980-01-01

    Safety and fire prevention measurements have to be treated like the activities developing, planning, construction and erection. Therefore it is necessary that these measurements have to be integrated into the activities mentioned above at an early stage in order to guarantee their effectiveness. With regard to fire accidents the statistics of the insurance companies concerned show that the damage caused increased in the last years mainly due to high concentration of material. Organization of fire prevention and fire fighting, reasons of fire break out, characteristics and behaviour of fire, smoke and fire detection, smoke and heat venting, fire extinguishers (portable and stationary), construction material in presence of fire, respiratory protection etc. will be discussed. (orig./RW)

  13. Thermal Behaviour of a Gypsum Fibre Board Associated with Rigid Polyurethane Foam under Standard Fire Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreau, Jerome Le; Jensen, Rasmus Lund; Kolding, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Due to its low thermal conductivity (λ ≈ 20 mW/m.K), rigid polyurethane (PUR) foam has the potential to improve the thermal performance of buildings without increasing the thickness of construction elements. Nevertheless, PUR foam has the drawback of having a low resistance to fire: non-flaming t......Due to its low thermal conductivity (λ ≈ 20 mW/m.K), rigid polyurethane (PUR) foam has the potential to improve the thermal performance of buildings without increasing the thickness of construction elements. Nevertheless, PUR foam has the drawback of having a low resistance to fire: non...

  14. Single motor unit firing behaviour in the right trapezius muscle during rapid movement of right or left index finger.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen eSøgaard

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Computer work is associated with low level sustained activity in the trapezius muscle that may cause myalgia. The activity may be attention related or part of a general multijoint motor program providing stabilization of the shoulder girdle for precise finger manipulation. This study examines single motor unit (MU firing pattern in the right trapezius muscle during fast movements of ipsi or contralateral index finger. Modulated firing rate would support a general multi joint motor program, while a generally increased and continuous firing rate would support attention related activation. 12 healthy female subjects were seated at a computer work place with elbows and forearms supported. Ten double clicks (DC were performed with right and left index finger on a computer mouse instrumented with a trigger.Surface EMG was recorded from right and left trapezius muscle. Intramuscular EMG was recorded with a quadripolar wire electrode in the right trapezius.Surface EMG was analysed as %MVE. The intramuscular EMG was decomposed into individual MU action potential trains. Instantaneous firing rate (IFR was calculated from inter-spike interval with ISI shorter than 20 ms defined as doublets. IFR was averaged across 10 DC to show IFR modulation.Surface EMG in both right and left trapezius was 1.8-2.5%MVE. During right hand DC a total of 32 MUs were identified. Four subjects showed no activity. Four showed MU activity with weak or no variations related to the timing of DC. Four subjects showed large modulation in IFR with temporal relation to DC. During left hand DC 15 MUs were identified in 4 subjects, for two of the subjects with IFR modulations related to DC. Doublets was found as an integrated part of MU activation in the trapezius muscle and for one subject temporarily related to DC. In conclusion, DC with ipsi- and contralateral fast movements of the index finger was found to evoke biomechanically as well as attention related activity pattern in the

  15. Response Predicting LTCC Firing Shrinkage: A Response Surface Analysis Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girardi, Michael; Barner, Gregg; Lopez, Cristie; Duncan, Brent; Zawicki, Larry

    2009-02-25

    The Low Temperature Cofired Ceramic (LTCC) technology is used in a variety of applications including military/space electronics, wireless communication, MEMS, medical and automotive electronics. The use of LTCC is growing due to the low cost of investment, short development time, good electrical and mechanical properties, high reliability, and flexibility in design integration (3 dimensional (3D) microstructures with cavities are possible)). The dimensional accuracy of the resulting x/y shrinkage of LTCC substrates is responsible for component assembly problems with the tolerance effect that increases in relation to the substrate size. Response Surface Analysis was used to predict product shrinkage based on specific process inputs (metal loading, layer count, lamination pressure, and tape thickness) with the ultimate goal to optimize manufacturing outputs (NC files, stencils, and screens) in achieving the final product design the first time. Three (3) regression models were developed for the DuPont 951 tape system with DuPont 5734 gold metallization based on green tape thickness.

  16. Fuel dynamics and fire behaviour in Australian mallee and heath vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juanita Myers; Jim Gould; Miguel Cruz; Meredith Henderson

    2007-01-01

    In southern Australia, shrubby heath vegetation together with woodlands dominated by multistemmed eucalypts (mallee) comprise areas of native vegetation with important biodiversity values. These vegetation types occur in semiarid and mediterranean climates and can experience large frequent fires. This study is investigating changes in the fuel complex with time, fuel...

  17. Within-stand variation in understorey vegetation affects fire behaviour in longleaf pine xeric sandhills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evelyn S. Wenk; G. Geoff Wang; Joan L. Walker

    2011-01-01

    The frequent fires typical of the longleaf pine ecosystem in the south-eastern USA are carried by live understorey vegetation and pine litter. Mature longleaf pine stands in the xeric sandhills region have a variable understory vegetation layer, creating several fuel complexes at the within-stand scale (20 m2). We identified three fuel complexes...

  18. Motor unit firing behaviour of soleus muscle in isometric and dynamic contractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallio, Jouni; Søgaard, Karen; Avela, Janne

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the detailed control of human locomotion and balance can be improved, when individual motor units can be isolated and their firing rates followed in natural movement of large, fuctionally important muscles. For this reason the present study investigated the motor unit discharge rate...... (MUDR) in isometric and dynamic contractions of the soleus muscle....

  19. A mobility constraint model to infer sensor behaviour in forest fire risk monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ballari, D.E.; Wachowicz, M.; Bregt, A.K.; Manso-Callejo, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) play an important role in forest fire risk monitoring. Various applications are in operation. However, the use of mobile sensors in forest risk monitoring remains largely unexplored. Our research contributes to fill this gap by designing a model which abstracts

  20. Influences of multiple firings and aging on surface roughness, strength and hardness of veneering ceramics for zirconia frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xuehua; Luo, Huinan; Bai, Yang; Tang, Hui; Nakamura, Takashi; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the effects of multiple firings and aging on surface roughness, strength, and hardness of veneering ceramics for zirconia frameworks. Five different veneering ceramics for zirconia frameworks were used: Vintage ZR (ZR), Cerabien ZR (CZR), VitaVM9 (VM9), Cercon ceram KISS (KISS), and IPS e.max ceram (e.max). Specimens were fired 2 or 10 times in order to accelerate aging. Surface roughness was evaluated using laser profilometry. Flexural strength and Vickers hardness were also measured. Surface topography was observed using scanning electron microscopy. After accelerated aging, the surface roughness of all specimens fired 10 times was significantly lower than that of the same specimens fired 2 times (P=0.000). Except for VM9, the flexural strength of all specimens fired 10 times was greater than that of the same specimens fired 2 times, and the differences were significant for ZR and CZR (Phardness of ZR and VM9 fired 10 times was significantly higher than that of the same specimens fired 2 times (Phardness of many aged veneering ceramics used for zirconia restorations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Surface ozone at the Devils Postpile National Monument receptor site during low and high wildland fire years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrzej Bytnerowicz; Joel D. Burley; Ricardo Cisneros; Haiganoush K. Preisler; Susan Schilling; Donald Schweizer; John Ray; Deanna Dulen; Christopher Beck; Bianca Auble

    2013-01-01

    Surface ozone (O3) was measured at the Devils Postpile National Monument (DEPO), eastern Sierra Nevada Mountains, California, during the 2007 (low-fire) and 2008 (high-fire) summer seasons. While mean and median values of O3 concentrations for the 2007 and 2008 summer seasons were similar, maximum O3...

  2. The impact of fire on sand dune stability: Surface coverage and biomass recovery after fires on Western Australian coastal dune systems from 1988 to 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumack, Samuel; Hesse, Paul; Turner, Liam

    2017-12-01

    This study aims to determine the common response of coastal sand dunes in Western Australia (WA) to fire on decadal time-scales, in terms of ecological-geomorphic-climatic interactions to test the hypothesis that fire plays a role in coastal dune destabilisation. Fires are commonly suggested to have contributed to widespread dune reactivation in Australia and globally, a hypothesis that is relatively untested. We used data from the Landsat Thematic Mapper, Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus, and Operational Land Imager missions to monitor changes in surface coverage on coastal sand dunes in south-west WA after fires. We analysed 31 fire scars from 1988 to 2016 in two Landsat scenes on the west and south coast of WA. Recovery ratios derived from the Normalised Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) were used to monitor patterns in post-fire biomass and surface cover. Recovery ratios are correlated with indices of burn severity, and meteorological data to investigate relationships. We also used Maximum Likelihood Classification to monitor changes in bare sand area. Results suggest that recovery followed a strongly consistent pattern, and is characterised by rapid vegetation cover re-establishment within six to twelve months. Prior to this, some aeolian activity may have occurred but without substantial surface changes. Initial germination and/or resprouting were followed by steady growth up to seven years, where NDVI typically neared pre-fire values. Some variation in early recovery occurred between the west and south coast, possibly owing to relative proportions of reseeding and resprouting plants. A log regression explained 75% of the recovery pattern (79% on the south coast). Precipitation had some ability to explain recovery up to nine months post-fire (r2 = 0.29 to 0.54). No relationships were observed between estimates of burn severity and recovery. After nine months, the biggest cause of spatial variation in recovery was the pre-fire community composition and related

  3. Soil surface changes increase runoff and erosion risk after a low–moderate severity fire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoof, C.R.; Ferreira, A.J.D.; Mol, W.; Berg, van den J.; Kort, De A.; Drooger, S.; Slingerland, E.C.; Mansholt, A.U.; Ritsema, C.J.

    2015-01-01

    Post-fire land degradation is to a large degree determined by what happens to soil properties and ground cover during and after the fire. To study fire impact in relation to fire intensity and post-fire soil exposure, a 9-ha Portuguese shrubland catchmentwas burned by experimental fire in the 2008/9

  4. The footprint of Alaskan tundra fires during the past half-century: implications for surface properties and radiative forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Adrian V.; Loranty, Michael M.; Higuera, Phil E.; Mack, Michelle C.; Hu, Feng Sheng; Jones, Benjamin M.; Breen, Amy L.; Rastetter, Edward B.; Goetz, Scott J.; Shaver, Gus R.

    2012-12-01

    Recent large and frequent fires above the Alaskan arctic circle have forced a reassessment of the ecological and climatological importance of fire in arctic tundra ecosystems. Here we provide a general overview of the occurrence, distribution, and ecological and climate implications of Alaskan tundra fires over the past half-century using spatially explicit climate, fire, vegetation and remote sensing datasets for Alaska. Our analyses highlight the importance of vegetation biomass and environmental conditions in regulating tundra burning, and demonstrate that most tundra ecosystems are susceptible to burn, providing the environmental conditions are right. Over the past two decades, fire perimeters above the arctic circle have increased in size and importance, especially on the North Slope, indicating that future wildfire projections should account for fire regime changes in these regions. Remote sensing data and a literature review of thaw depths indicate that tundra fires have both positive and negative implications for climatic feedbacks including a decadal increase in albedo radiative forcing immediately after a fire, a stimulation of surface greenness and a persistent long-term (>10 year) increase in thaw depth. In order to address the future impact of tundra fires on climate, a better understanding of the control of tundra fire occurrence as well as the long-term impacts on ecosystem carbon cycling will be required.

  5. The footprint of Alaskan tundra fires during the past half-century: implications for surface properties and radiative forcing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, Adrian V; Loranty, Michael M; Higuera, Phil E; Mack, Michelle C; Hu Fengsheng; Jones, Benjamin M; Breen, Amy L; Rastetter, Edward B; Shaver, Gus R; Goetz, Scott J

    2012-01-01

    Recent large and frequent fires above the Alaskan arctic circle have forced a reassessment of the ecological and climatological importance of fire in arctic tundra ecosystems. Here we provide a general overview of the occurrence, distribution, and ecological and climate implications of Alaskan tundra fires over the past half-century using spatially explicit climate, fire, vegetation and remote sensing datasets for Alaska. Our analyses highlight the importance of vegetation biomass and environmental conditions in regulating tundra burning, and demonstrate that most tundra ecosystems are susceptible to burn, providing the environmental conditions are right. Over the past two decades, fire perimeters above the arctic circle have increased in size and importance, especially on the North Slope, indicating that future wildfire projections should account for fire regime changes in these regions. Remote sensing data and a literature review of thaw depths indicate that tundra fires have both positive and negative implications for climatic feedbacks including a decadal increase in albedo radiative forcing immediately after a fire, a stimulation of surface greenness and a persistent long-term (>10 year) increase in thaw depth. In order to address the future impact of tundra fires on climate, a better understanding of the control of tundra fire occurrence as well as the long-term impacts on ecosystem carbon cycling will be required. (letter)

  6. The footprint of Alaskan tundra fires during the past half-century: implications for surface properties and radiative forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Adrian V.; Loranty, Michael M.; Higuera, Phil E.; Mack, Michelle C.; Hu, Feng Sheng; Jones, Benjamin M.; Breen, Amy L.; Rastetter, Edward B.; Goetz, Scott J.; Shaver, Gus R.

    2012-01-01

    Recent large and frequent fires above the Alaskan arctic circle have forced a reassessment of the ecological and climatological importance of fire in arctic tundra ecosystems. Here we provide a general overview of the occurrence, distribution, and ecological and climate implications of Alaskan tundra fires over the past half-century using spatially explicit climate, fire, vegetation and remote sensing datasets for Alaska. Our analyses highlight the importance of vegetation biomass and environmental conditions in regulating tundra burning, and demonstrate that most tundra ecosystems are susceptible to burn, providing the environmental conditions are right. Over the past two decades, fire perimeters above the arctic circle have increased in size and importance, especially on the North Slope, indicating that future wildfire projections should account for fire regime changes in these regions. Remote sensing data and a literature review of thaw depths indicate that tundra fires have both positive and negative implications for climatic feedbacks including a decadal increase in albedo radiative forcing immediately after a fire, a stimulation of surface greenness and a persistent long-term (>10 year) increase in thaw depth. In order to address the future impact of tundra fires on climate, a better understanding of the control of tundra fire occurrence as well as the long-term impacts on ecosystem carbon cycling will be required.

  7. Surface and sliding wear behaviour of different coatings and steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vera-Cardenas, E.E. [Universidad Politecnica de Pachuca, Zempoala, Hidalgo (Mexico)]. E-mail: evera@upp.edu.mx; Vite-Torres, M. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: drmanulvite9@hotmail.com; Lewis, R. [University of Sheffield (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: roger.lewis@sheffield.ac.uk

    2012-01-15

    In this work, the sliding wear behaviour of the coatings TiN, CrN and WC/C applied on steel substrates was studied using a reciprocating wear test machine. All tests were carried out in dry conditions, at room temperature (20-23 degrees Celsius and 45% - 50% relative humidity). The average sliding velocity was 0.08 m/s and an amplitude of 2 mm was used. The applied loads were 11.76 N (Po = 1.74 GPa) and 7.84 N (Po = 1.52 GPa). Optical microscopy was used to observe the characteristics of wear scars and spalls and possible causes of their formation. The variation of the friction coefficient against the number of cycles was obtained. This was used to determine more precisely the time (number of cycles) where the coating presented the first signs of wear, in addition Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS) was performed, as well as Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and hardness tests on the wear traces, which reinforced the previous observations. Thus it was possible to know the wear life of different coatings and possible causes of variation. Increasing the load was an important factor in the variation of wear life results. But it is also important to consider other factors such as surface roughness and thickness of coatings. [Spanish] En este trabajo se estudio el comportamiento en desgaste por deslizamiento de los recubrimientos de TiN, CrN y WC/C aplicados sobre sustratos de acero. Las pruebas se realizaron con una maquina reciprocante en condiciones secas a temperatura ambiente (20-23 grados centigrados y 45% - 50% de humedad relativa). Se empleo una velocidad promedio de 0.08 m/s y una amplitud de 2 mm. Las cargas aplicadas fueron de 11.76N (Po = 1.74 GPa) y de 7.84 N (Po = 1.52 GPa). Se realizo microscopia optica para observar las caracteristicas de las zonas de desgaste y sus posibles causas de formacion. Se obtuvo graficamente la variacion del coeficiente de friccion con el numero de ciclos. Estos datos se emplearon para determinar con mayor precision el

  8. Keep the fire burning: Reciprocal gains of basic need satisfaction, intrinsic motivation and innovative work behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Devloo, T.; Anseel, F.; De Beuckelaer, A.; Salanova, M.

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on insights from self-determination theory, we explored the dynamic relationship between intrinsic motivation and innovative work behaviour (IWB) over time. Specifically, we investigated how basic need satisfaction influences IWB through its effect on intrinsic motivation and how IWB in turn

  9. The Effects of Fire on the Function of the 200-BP-1 Engineered Surface Barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, Anderson L.; Link, Steven O.; Hasan, Nazmul; Draper, Kathryn E.

    2009-09-01

    A critical unknown in use of barrier technology for long-term waste isolation is performance after a major disturbance especially when institutional controls are intact, but there are no resources to implement corrective actions. The objective of this study was to quantify the effects of wild fire on alterations the function of an engineered barrier. A controlled burn September 26, 2008 was used to remove all the vegetation from the north side of the barrier. Flame heights exceeded 9 m and temperatures ranged from 250 oC at 1.5 cm below the surface to over 700 oC at 1 m above the surface. Post-fire analysis of soil properties show significant decreases in wettability, hydraulic conductivity, air entry pressure, organic matter, and porosity relative to pre-fire conditions whereas dry bulk density increased. Decreases in hydraulic conductivity and wettabilty immediately after the fire are implicated in a surface runoff event that occurred in January 2009, the first in 13 years. There was a significant increase in macro-nutrients, pH, and electrical conductivity. After one year, hydrophobicity has returned to pre-burn levels with only 16% of samples still showing signs of decreased wettability. Over the same period, hydraulic conductivity and air entry pressure returned to pre-burn levels at one third of the locations but remained identical to values recorded immediately after the fire at the other two thirds. Soil nutrients, pH, and electrical conductivity remain elevated after 1 year. Species composition on the burned surface changed markedly from prior years and relative to the unburned surface and two analog sites. An increase in the proportion of annuals and biennials is characteristic of burned surfaces that have become dominated by ruderal species. Greenhouse seedling emergence tests conducted to assess the seed bank of pre- and post-burn soils and of two analog sites at the McGee Ranch show no difference in the number of species emerging from soils collected

  10. Surface hardness behaviour of Ti–Al–Mo alloys

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    formation behaviour as well as its creep strength (Ger- mann et al 2005). The brittle characteristics of these alloys have made the preparation of samples for the .... from various regions of the sample are superimposed. indentation is a difficult exercise to attain in absence of availability of large specimen for bend and torsion ...

  11. Influence of surface roughness on the corrosion behaviour of magnesium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, R.; Kannan, M. Bobby

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Surface roughness of AZ91 magnesium alloy plays a critical role in the passivation behaviour of the alloy. → The passivation behaviour of the alloy influences the pitting tendency. → Increase in surface roughness of AZ91 magnesium alloy increases the pitting tendency of the alloy. -- Abstract: In this study, the influence of surface roughness on the passivation and pitting corrosion behaviour of AZ91 magnesium alloy in chloride-containing environment was examined using electrochemical techniques. Potentiodynamic polarisation and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests suggested that the passivation behaviour of the alloy was affected by increasing the surface roughness. Consequently, the corrosion current and the pitting tendency of the alloy also increased with increase in the surface roughness. Scanning electron micrographs of 24 h immersion test samples clearly revealed pitting corrosion in the highest surface roughness (Sa 430) alloy, whereas in the lowest surface roughness (Sa 80) alloy no evidence of pitting corrosion was observed. Interestingly, when the passivity of the alloy was disturbed by galvanostatically holding the sample at anodic current for 1 h, the alloy underwent high pitting corrosion irrespective of their surface roughness. Thus the study suggests that the surface roughness plays a critical role in the passivation behaviour of the alloy and hence the pitting tendency.

  12. Reciprocating Sliding Behaviour of Solid Lubricant Coating over Modified Titanium Alloy Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jothi Prakash, V. M.; Sathish, S.; Gopalakrishnan, T.; Venugopal, S.

    2017-03-01

    Tribological behaviour of contacting surfaces rigid sphere is using flat plate the with influence of normal and tangential loading (shear traction) is analysed using FEA model and surfaces being coated on flat plate by Titanium Alloy, Aluminium Alloy Molybdenum Di-sulphide. The finite element model facilitates to Evaluating the surface variables like contact stress distribution with the surface level and surface, contact pressure, shear stress and displacement. The finite element solution is validated through the hertz solution and on the successful verification.

  13. Anticorrosive behaviour of lumefantrine hydrophobic layer on mild steel surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavithra M. Krishnegowda

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The surface modification of mild steel was achieved by chemical treatment in lumefantrine (LF solution. The surface morphology and wettability of modified surface was analysed by 3D profilometer and contact angle goniometer. The corrosion inhibition performance of modified mild steel surface in 1.0 M HCl solution was investigated by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance techniques.Electroche­mical measurements illustrate that the corrosion of mild steel in acidic chloride medium get substantially reduced by introducing LF film on its surface (94 % efficiency. Quantum chemical parameters were evaluated by ab initio method and they confer appropriate theoretical support to the experimental findings.

  14. Metallurgical, surface, and corrosion analysis of Ni-Cr dental casting alloys before and after porcelain firing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsin-Yi; Bowers, Bonnie; Wolan, John T; Cai, Zhuo; Bumgardner, Joel D

    2008-03-01

    A porcelain veneer is often fired on nickel-chromium casting alloys used in dental restorations for aesthetic purposes. The porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) process brings the temperature to over 950 degrees C and may change the alloy's corrosion properties. In this study, the metallurgical, surface, and corrosion properties of two Ni-Cr alloys were examined, before and after PFM firing. Two types of alloy were tested-a high Cr, Mo alloy without Be and a low Cr, Mo alloy with Be. Before the PFM firing, specimens from both alloys were examined for their microstructures, hardness, electrochemical corrosion properties, surface composition, and metal ion release. After the PFM firing, the same specimens were again examined for the same properties. Neither of the alloys showed any differences in their electrochemical corrosion properties after the PFM firing. However, both alloys exhibited new phases in their microstructure and significant changes in hardness after firing. In addition, there was a slight increase in CrO(x) on the surface of the Be-free alloy and increased Mo-Ni was observed on the surface of both alloys via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). This might be one of the reasons why both alloys had increased Ni and Mo ion release after firing. The PFM firing process changed the alloys' hardness, microstructure, and surface composition. No significant changes in the alloys' corrosion behavior were observed, however, the significant increase in metal ion release over a month may need to be further investigated for its clinical effects.

  15. Effect of surface morphology on atmospheric corrosion behaviour of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Co18Si1B14 ribbon, was evaluated. The wheel side surface of the ribbon was more corroded than the air side surface, due to the higher density of air pockets present. The phases present in atmospheric rust were analysed by X-ray diffraction ...

  16. modelling the behaviour of interface surfaces using the finite eleme

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Norwell, M.A.. 36. Wingo, etal, Hardware assisted self-collision for rigid and deformable surfaces, Journal of. Tele-operators and Virtual Environments. Dec., 2004. Vol. 13, No 6 pp 681-691. 37. Brian Von Herzen, etal. Geometric Collisions for Time- dependent parametric surfaces. ACM SIGGRAPH Computer Graphics, Aug.,.

  17. Civilians under fire: evacuation behaviour in north Israel during the Second Lebanon War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidron, David; Peleg, Kobi; Jaffe, Dena; Shenhar, Gili

    2010-10-01

    This paper seeks to understand evacuation behaviour in a case of spontaneous evacuation. During the Second Lebanon War of 2006, more than one-third of residents in north Israel spontaneously evacuated--the remainder stayed in situ. Using a telephone survey of 665 respondents residing in north Israel, we were able to characterise the behaviour of evacuees and non-evacuees. The main reasons cited for evacuating were fear of injury to self or family, the effect on children, inability to remain in a protective space, and family pressure. The main reasons cited for remaining at home were no suitable alternative, did not perceive a high level of danger, had to go to work, and there is no place like home. There were no significant differences with regard to most socio-demographic characteristics of the population. These findings should aid emergency managers in preparing the population for a future emergency and in engaging in effective dialogue with the population during an emergency on the evacuation option. © 2010 The Author(s). Journal compilation © Overseas Development Institute, 2010.

  18. Surface behaviour of S. Thyphimurium, S. Derby, S. Brandenburg and S. Infantis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castelijn, G.A.A.; Parabirsing, J.A.; Zwietering, M.H.; Moezelaar, R.; Abee, T.

    2013-01-01

    Cross-contamination due to Salmonella on the surface of processing equipment greatly contributes to contamination of pork products. Therefore, a clear understanding of surface and survival behaviour of relevant Salmonella serovars in pork processing environments is needed to develop better

  19. Motor unit firing behaviour of soleus muscle in isometric and dynamic contractions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jouni Kallio

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Understanding the detailed control of human locomotion and balance can be improved, when individual motor units can be isolated and their firing rates followed in natural movement of large, fuctionally important muscles. For this reason the present study investigated the motor unit discharge rate (MUDR in isometric and dynamic contractions of the soleus muscle. METHODS: Eleven males performed isometric (10-100% MVC and dynamic (10-40% MVC plantar flexions. Intramuscular EMG was measured from Soleus with bipolar wire-electrodes and decomposed with custom built "Daisy" software. RESULTS: The Soleus MUDR was significantly higher in concentric compared to isometric or eccentric contractions at all submaximal force levels (P<0.05. In isometric contractions MUDR increased up to 100% MVC. CONCLUSION: Motor unit discharge properties of a large plantarflexor can be measured in dynamic and maximal contractions. For a given torque output, MUDR is dependent upon contraction type, as set by the major mechanical differences between concentric and eccentric actions.

  20. Surface roughness influences on the behaviour of flow inside microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, M. H.; Castro, C. S.; Garcia, D. A.; Henrique, J. S.

    2018-03-01

    This work discusses influence of the surface roughness on the behavior of liquids flowing inside microchannels. By measuring the flow profile using the micro-PIV technique, the flow of water inside two rectangular microchannels of different wall roughness and in a circular smooth microchannel was studied. Comparisons were made among the experimental results, showing that a metrological approach concerning surface characteristics of microdevices is required to ensure reliability of the measurements for flow analyses in microfluidic processes.

  1. Surface modification and electrochemical behaviour of undoped nanodiamonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zang Jianbing; Wang Yanhui; Bian Linyan; Zhang Jinhui; Meng Fanwei; Zhao Yuling; Ren Shubin; Qu Xuanhui

    2012-01-01

    Surface modifications of undoped nanodiamond (ND) particles were carried out through different annealing treatments. The methods of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the ND surface before and after the annealing process. The electrochemical properties of the modified ND powders in aqueous solution were investigated with Fe(CN) 6 3−/4− as a redox probe. When the annealing temperature was below 850 °C, vacuum annealing removed parts of the oxygen-containing surface functionalities from the ND surface and produced more sp 2 carbon atoms in the shell. The charge transfer of the Fe(CN) 6 3−/4− redox couple decreased with increasing annealing temperature. Re-annealing in air restored the original surface conditions: few sp 2 -bonded carbon atoms and similar surface functionalities, and thus the electrochemical activity. When ND was annealed in vacuum at 900–1100 °C, more serious graphitization produced a continuous fullerenic shell wrapped around a diamond core, which had a high conductivity and electrochemical activity. This provides a novel nanoparticle with high conductivity and high stability for electrochemical applications.

  2. Extreme fire events are related to previous-year surface moisture conditions in permafrost-underlain larch forests of Siberia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forkel, Matthias; Beer, Christian; Thonicke, Kirsten; Cramer, Wolfgang; Bartalev, Sergey; Schmullius, Christiane

    2012-01-01

    Wildfires are a natural and important element in the functioning of boreal forests. However, in some years, fires with extreme spread and severity occur. Such severe fires can degrade the forest, affect human values, emit huge amounts of carbon and aerosols and alter the land surface albedo. Usually, wind, slope and dry air conditions have been recognized as factors determining fire spread. Here we identify surface moisture as an additional important driving factor for the evolution of extreme fire events in the Baikal region. An area of 127 000 km 2 burned in this region in 2003, a large part of it in regions underlain by permafrost. Analyses of satellite data for 2002–2009 indicate that previous-summer surface moisture is a better predictor for burned area than precipitation anomalies or fire weather indices for larch forests with continuous permafrost. Our analysis advances the understanding of complex interactions between the atmosphere, vegetation and soil, and how coupled mechanisms can lead to extreme events. These findings emphasize the importance of a mechanistic coupling of soil thermodynamics, hydrology, vegetation functioning, and fire activity in Earth system models for projecting climate change impacts over the next century. (letter)

  3. Climatic variability of near-surface turbulent kinetic energy over the United States: implications for fire-weather predications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren E. Heilman; Xindi. Bain

    2013-01-01

    Recent research suggests that high levels of ambient near-surface atmospheric turbulence are often associated with rapid and sometimes erratic wildland fire spread that may eventually lead to large burn areas. Previous research has also examined the feasibility of using near-surface atmospheric turbulent kinetic energy (TKEs) alone or in...

  4. Simulated western spruce budworm defoliation reduces torching and crowning potential: A sensitivity analysis using a physics-based fire model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory M. Cohn; Russell A. Parsons; Emily K. Heyerdahl; Daniel G. Gavin; Aquila Flower

    2014-01-01

    The widespread, native defoliator western spruce budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis Freeman) reduces canopy fuels, which might affect the potential for surface fires to torch (ignite the crowns of individual trees) or crown (spread between tree crowns). However, the effects of defoliation on fire behaviour are poorly understood. We used a physics-based fire model to...

  5. Effect of surface morphology on atmospheric corrosion behaviour of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    adverse effect of quenched-in defects on the corrosion resistance of Fe34Ni36Cr10P14B6 amorphous alloy has been reported by some investigators (Gravano et al 1992). The inferior corrosion resistance of the wheel side surface has been attributed to higher concentration of quenched- in defects due to higher cooling rate ...

  6. Surface degradation behaviour of sodium borophosphate glass in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    corrosion mechanism were different in acid and alkali media. Keywords. Borophosphate glass; surface degradation; aqueous media. 1. Introduction. Phosphate glasses and glass–ceramics are useful for appli- cations such as bone transplantation, glass–to–metal seals, containment of radioactive wastes, fast ion conduc-.

  7. Effects of surface and bulk transverse fields on critical behaviour of ferromagnetic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saber, A.; Lo Russo, S.; Mattei, G.

    2002-02-01

    The influence of surface and bulk transverse fields on the critical behaviour of a ferromagnetic Ising film is studied using the effective field theory based on a single-site cluster method. Surface exchange enhancement is considered and a critical value is obtained. The dependence of the critical uniform transverse field on film thickness, phase diagrams in the fields, critical surface transverse field versus the bulk one, and exchange coupling ratio are presented. (author)

  8. An effective field study of the magnetic properties and critical behaviour at the surface Ising film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengrine, M.; Benyoussef, A.; Ez-Zahraouy, H.; Mhirech, F.

    1998-09-01

    The influence of corrugation and disorder at the surface on the critical behaviour of a ferromagnetic spin-1/2 Ising film is investigated using mean-field theory and finite cluster approximation. It is found that the critical surface exponent β 1 follows closely the one of a perfect surface, in the two cases: corrugated surface and random equiprobable coupling surface. However, in the case of flat surface with random interactions the surface critical exponent β 1 depends on the concentration p of the strong interaction for p>p c =0,5, while for p≤p c , such critical exponent is independent on the value of p and is equal to the one of the perfect surface. Moreover, in the case of corrugated surface, the effective exponent for a layer z, β eff J(z,n), is calculated as a function of the number of steps at the surface. (author)

  9. Evaporation behaviour of different organic effluents from open surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhorar, B S; Malik, R S

    1993-01-01

    Production of large quantities of effluents from different industrial units and the problems of their disposal necessitated this evaporation study. The evaporation of water, sewage water, oil refinery effluent, papermill effluent and liquor distillery effluent was observed in glass beakers when placed (i) in an oven at 60 degrees C and (ii) in screen house for 30 days, by periodically weighing of the beakers. In other experiments, the effect of increasing the frequency of stirring on increasing the evaporation efficiency of the liquor distillery effluent (ELD) was examined in detail. All of the organic effluents except ELD had similar evaporation behaviours as water, but formation of a self-forming film caused the evaporation of ELD to be considerably lower. Resistance to evaporation caused by this film was found to be a decreasing function of the frequency of stirring. This study has a bearing on improving the efficiency of evaporation lagoons, and three stirrings in a day with a manually drawn stirrer in a full-scale lagoon are proposed as a practical and economically viable technique to save 44% of lagoon land in arid and semi-arid regions of the world.

  10. Development of a methodology for monthly forecasting of surface fires of Colombia's vegetation cover, an application to north Andean region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Hernandez, Yolanda; Rangel CH, Jesus Orlando

    2004-01-01

    In the present article a methodology is presented for the forecasting of the monthly risk of surface fires of the vegetation cover in Colombia, based on the analysis of meteorological components and variables of climatic and anthropic variability involved in fire risks of the north Andean region. The methodology enables one to regionalize the country, with fire prediction purposes in mind, into ten sub-regions, in each one of which seven height levels are defined to make up separate regions of study. For each of these, a database is built to feed both the logistic regression models and the Poisson models, which identify the variables independent from, and/or associated with the presence or absence of fires

  11. Surface Heave Behaviour of Coir Geotextile Reinforced Sand Beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Dharmesh; Sankar, N.; Chandrakaran, S.

    2017-06-01

    Soil reinforcement by natural fibers is one of the cheapest and attractive ground improvement techniques. Coir is the most abundant natural fiber available in India and due to its high lignin content; it has a larger life span than other natural fibers. It is widely used in India for erosion control purposes, but its use as a reinforcement material is rather limited. This study focuses on the use of coir geotextile as a reinforcement material to reduce surface heave phenomena occurring in shallow foundations. This paper presents the results of laboratory model tests carried out on square footings supported on coir geotextile reinforced sand beds. The influence of various parameters such as depth of reinforcement, length, and number of layers of reinforcement was studied. It was observed that surface heave is considerably reduced with the provision of geotextile. Heave reduction up to 98.7% can be obtained by the proposed method. Heave reduction is quantified by a non-dimensional parameter called heave reduction factor.

  12. Multiscale modelling of hydrogen behaviour on beryllium (0001 surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ch. Stihl

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Beryllium is proposed to be a neutron multiplier and plasma facing material in future fusion devices. Therefore, it is crucial to acquire an understanding of the microscopic mechanisms of tritium accumulation and release as a result of transmutation processes that Be undergoes under neutron irradiation. A multiscale simulation of ad- and desorption of hydrogen isotopes on the beryllium (0001 surface is developed. It consists of ab initio calculations of certain H adsorption configurations, a suitable cluster expansion approximating the energies of arbitrary configurations, and a kinetic Monte Carlo method for dynamic simulations of adsorption and desorption. The processes implemented in the kinetic Monte Carlo simulation are deduced from further ab initio calculations comprising both, static relaxation as well as molecular dynamics runs. The simulation is used to reproduce experimental data and the results are compared and discussed. Based on the observed results, proposals for a refined model are made.

  13. Using Haines Index coupled with fire weather model predicted from high resolution LAM forecasts to asses wildfire extreme behaviour in Southern Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaetani, Francesco; Baptiste Filippi, Jean; Simeoni, Albert; D'Andrea, Mirko

    2010-05-01

    Haines Index (HI) was developed by USDA Forest Service to measure the atmosphere's contribution to the growth potential of a wildfire. The Haines Index combines two atmospheric factors that are known to have an effect on wildfires: Stability and Dryness. As operational tools, HI proved its ability to predict plume dominated high intensity wildfires. However, since HI does not take into account the fuel continuity, composition and moisture conditions and the effects of wind and topography on fire behaviour, its use as forecasting tool should be carefully considered. In this work we propose the use of HI, predicted from HR Limited Area Model forecasts, coupled with a Fire Weather model (i.e., RISICO system) fully operational in Italy since 2003. RISICO is based on dynamic models able to represent in space and in time the effects that environment and vegetal physiology have on fuels and, in turn, on the potential behaviour of wildfires. The system automatically acquires from remote databases a thorough data-set of input information both of in situ and spatial nature. Meteorological observations, radar data, Limited Area Model weather forecasts, EO data, and fuel data are managed by a Unified Interface able to process a wide set of different data. Specific semi-physical models are used in the system to simulate the dynamics of the fuels (load and moisture contents of dead and live fuel) and the potential fire behaviour (rate of spread and linear intensity). A preliminary validation of this approach will be provided with reference to Sardinia and Corsica Islands, two major islands of the Mediterranean See frequently affected by extreme plume dominated wildfires. A time series of about 3000 wildfires burnt in Sardinia and Corsica in 2007 and 2008 will be used to evaluate the capability of HI coupled with the outputs of the Fire Weather model to forecast the actual risk in time and in space.

  14. Forest fires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, M.

    1991-01-01

    This book examines the many complex and sensitive issues relating to wildland fires. Beginning with an overview of the fires of 1980s, the book discusses the implications of continued drought and considers the behavior of wildland fires, from ignition and spread to spotting and firestorms. Topics include the effects of weather, forest fuels, fire ecology, and the effects of fire on plants and animals. In addition, the book examines firefighting methods and equipment, including new minimum impact techniques and compressed air foam; prescribed burning; and steps that can be taken to protect individuals and human structures. A history of forest fire policies in the U.S. and a discussion of solutions to fire problems around the world completes the coverage. With one percent of the earth's surface burning every year in the last decade, this is a penetrating book on a subject of undeniable importance

  15. Kinematic behaviour of a large earthflow defined by surface displacement monitoring, DEM differencing, and ERT imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Prokešová, R.; Kardoš, M.; Tábořík, Petr; Medveďová, A.; Stacke, V.; Chudý, F.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 224, NOV 1 (2014), s. 86-101 ISSN 0169-555X R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2010008 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : earthflow * surface displacement * strain modelling * DEM differencing * kinematic behaviour Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 2.577, year: 2013

  16. Self-assembling behaviour of Pt nanoparticles onto surface of TiO2 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present study, self-assembling behaviour of guest nanoparticles (platinum) onto the surface of host support (titanium dioxide) during photodeposition process as a function of solution pH has been explored in detail by means of transmission electron microscope (TEM). The photocatalytic activity of the resulting ...

  17. Behaviour of uranium series radionuclides in surface water (Crouzille, Limousin). Geochemical implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moulin, J.

    2008-06-01

    Understanding natural radionuclides behaviour in surface water is a required step to achieve uranium mine rehabilitation and preserve water quality. The first objective of this thesis is to determine which are the radionuclides sources in a drinking water reservoir. The second objective is to improve the knowledge about the behaviour of uranium series radionuclides, especially actinium. The investigated site is a brook (Sagnes, Limousin, France) which floods a peat bog contaminated by a former uranium mine and which empties into the Crouzille lake. It allows studying radionuclides transport in surface water and radionuclides retention through organic substance or water reservoir. Radionuclides distribution in particulate, colloidal and dissolved phases is determined thanks to ultra-filtrations. Gamma spectrometry allows measuring almost all natural radionuclides with only two counting stages. However, low activities of 235 U series radionuclides impose the use of very low background well-type Ge detectors, such as those of the Underground Laboratory of Modane (France). Firstly, this study shows that no or few radionuclides are released by the Sagnes peat bog, although its radioactivity is important. Secondly, it provides details on the behaviour of uranium series radionuclides in surface water. More specifically, it provides the first indications of actinium solubility in surface water. Actinium's behaviour is very close to uranium's even if it is a little less soluble. (author)

  18. Behaviour of Chernobyl fallout radionuclides deposited on peat and urban surfaces in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reponen, A.

    1992-10-01

    In the thesis the impact of the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident on Finland was studied in three aspects: (1) the areal distribution of Chernobyl fallout in Finland was determined by measuring peat samples, (2) the behaviour of fallout radionuclides was investigated in the combustion of peat in power plants, and (3) the removal rates of fallout radionuclides on urban surfaces were resolved

  19. Observations on the near-surface behaviour of sardinella schools in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The schooling dynamics and swimming behaviour of sardinella Sardinella maderensis and S. aurita schooling near the surface in Angolan waters were recorded visually, using a calibrated echo integration system and a 95kHz high resolution sonar on board RV Dr Fridtjof Nansen during three cruises; July 1996, May 1997 ...

  20. Safety during sea transport of radioactive materials. Probabilistic safety analysis of package fro sea surface fire accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Takeshi; Obara, Isonori; Akutsu, Yukio; Aritomi, Masanori

    2000-01-01

    The ships carrying irradiated nuclear fuel, plutonium and high level radioactive wastes(INF materials) are designed to keep integrity of packaging based on the various safety and fireproof measures, even if the ship encounters a maritime fire accident. However, granted that the frequency is very low, realistic severe accidents should be evaluated. In this paper, probabilistic safety assessment method is applied to evaluate safety margin for severe sea fire accidents using event tree analysis. Based on our separate studies, the severest scenario was estimated as follows; an INF transport ship collides with oil tanker and induces a sea surface fire. Probability data such as ship's collision, oil leakage, ignition, escape from fire region, operations of cask cooling system and water flooding systems were also introduced from above mentioned studies. The results indicate that the probability of which packages cannot keep their integrity during the sea surface fire accident is very low and sea transport of INF materials is carried out very safely. (author)

  1. Decades-old silvicultural treatments influence surface wildfire severity and post-fire nitrogen availability in a ponderosa pine forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ann L. Lezberg; Michael A. Battaglia; Wayne D. Shepperd; Anna W. Schoettle

    2008-01-01

    Wildfire severity and subsequent ecological effects may be influenced by prior land management, via modification of forest structure and lingering changes in fuels. In 2002, the Hayman wildfire burned as a low to moderate-severity surface fire through a 21-year pine regeneration experiment with two overstory harvest cuttings (shelterwood, seed-tree) and two site...

  2. Surface dependent behaviour of CdS LO-phonon mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina-Contreras, J R; Medina-Gutierrez, C; Frausto-Reyes, C; Trejo-Vazquez, R; Villalobos-Pina, F J; Romo-Luevano, G; Calixto, S

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a sensitive optical method to monitor the surface roughness in the investigation of surfaces. By applying this method to measure the RMS surface roughness of various surfaces, we found RMS values which are comparable to those obtained by atomic force microscopy measurements. In addition, we present a simple empirical model to calculate the RMS surface roughness which shows very good agreement with the surface roughness measurements taken by the method reported in this paper. Finally, the application of our method to the study of the LO-phonon mode of CdS suggests that its intensity is dominated by the surface roughness. This roughness dependent behaviour of the CdS LO-phonon mode is experimentally confirmed by using an excitation wavelength near its E 0 transition

  3. Surface dependent behaviour of CdS LO-phonon mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina-Contreras, J R [Departamento de IngenierIa Electrica y Electronica, Instituto Tecnologico de Aguascalientes, Av. Lopez Mateos 1081 Oriente, Fracc. Bonna Gens, CP 20256. Aguascalientes, Ags. (Mexico); Medina-Gutierrez, C [Universidad de Guadalajara, Centro Universitario de los Lagos, Av. Enrique DIaz de Leon s/n, Fracc. Paseos de la Montana, CP 47460, Lagos de Moreno, Jal. (Mexico); Frausto-Reyes, C [Centro de Investigaciones en Optica AC, Unidad Aguascalientes, Prolong., Constitucion 607, Fracc. Reserva Loma Bonita, CP 20200, Apartado Postal 507, Ags. (Mexico); Trejo-Vazquez, R [Departamento de IngenierIa Electrica y Electronica, Instituto Tecnologico de Aguascalientes, Av. Lopez Mateos 1081 Oriente, Fracc. Bonna Gens, CP 20256. Aguascalientes, Ags. (Mexico); Villalobos-Pina, F J [Departamento de IngenierIa Electrica y Electronica, Instituto Tecnologico de Aguascalientes, Av. Lopez Mateos 1081 Oriente, Fracc. Bonna Gens, CP 20256. Aguascalientes, Ags. (Mexico); Romo-Luevano, G [Intel TecnologIa de Mexico, SA de CV, Systems Research Center-Mexico, Parque Industrial Tecnologico II, Periferico Sur 7980, edificio 4-E, 45600 Tlaquepaque, Jalisco (Mexico); Calixto, S [Centro de Investigaciones en Optica, AC, Loma del Bosque 115, Colonia Lomas del Campestre, CP 37150 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2007-08-21

    In this paper, we develop a sensitive optical method to monitor the surface roughness in the investigation of surfaces. By applying this method to measure the RMS surface roughness of various surfaces, we found RMS values which are comparable to those obtained by atomic force microscopy measurements. In addition, we present a simple empirical model to calculate the RMS surface roughness which shows very good agreement with the surface roughness measurements taken by the method reported in this paper. Finally, the application of our method to the study of the LO-phonon mode of CdS suggests that its intensity is dominated by the surface roughness. This roughness dependent behaviour of the CdS LO-phonon mode is experimentally confirmed by using an excitation wavelength near its E{sub 0} transition.

  4. Using a prescribed fire to test custom and standard fuel models for fire behaviour prediction in a non-native, grass-invaded tropical dry shrubland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew D. Pierce; Sierra McDaniel; Mark Wasser; Alison Ainsworth; Creighton M. Litton; Christian P. Giardina; Susan Cordell; Ralf Ohlemuller

    2014-01-01

    Questions: Do fuel models developed for North American fuel types accurately represent fuel beds found in grass-invaded tropical shrublands? Do standard or custom fuel models for firebehavior models with in situ or RAWS measured fuel moistures affect the accuracy of predicted fire behavior in grass-invaded tropical shrublands? Location: Hawai’i Volcanoes National...

  5. Fire-induced albedo change and surface radiative forcing in sub-Saharan Africa savanna ecosystems: Implications for the energy balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dintwe, Kebonye; Okin, Gregory S.; Xue, Yongkang

    2017-06-01

    Surface albedo is a critical parameter that controls surface energy balance. In dryland ecosystems, fires play a significant role in decreasing surface albedo, resulting in positive radiative forcing. Here we investigate the long-term effect of fire on surface albedo. We devised a method to calculate short-, medium-, and long-term effect of fire-induced radiative forcing and their relative effects on energy balance. We used Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data in our analysis, covering different vegetation classes in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Our analysis indicated that mean short-term fire-induced albedo change in SSA was -0.022, -0.035, and -0.041 for savannas, shrubland, and grasslands, respectively. At regional scale, mean fire-induced albedo change in savannas was -0.018 and -0.024 for northern sub-Saharan of Africa and the southern hemisphere Africa, respectively. The short-term mean fire-induced radiative forcing in burned areas in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) was 5.41 W m-2, which contributed continental and global radiative forcings of 0.25 and 0.058 W m-2, respectively. The impact of fire in surface albedo has long-lasting effects that varies with vegetation type. The long-term energetic effects of fire-induced albedo change and associated radiative forcing were, on average, more than 19 times greater across SSA than the short-term effects, suggesting that fires exerted far more radiative forcing than previously thought. Taking into account the actual duration of fire's effect on surface albedo, we conclude that the contribution of SSA fires, globally and throughout the year, is 0.12 W m-2. These findings provide crucial information on possible impact of fire on regional climate variability.

  6. A dynamic tester to evaluate the thermal and moisture behaviour of the surface of textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenbin; Xu, Weilin; Wang, Hao; Wang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The thermal and moisture behaviour of the microclimate of textiles is crucial in determining the physiological comfort of apparel, but it has not been investigated sufficiently due to the lack of particular evaluation techniques. Based on sensing, temperature controlling and wireless communicating technology, a specially designed tester has been developed in this study to evaluate the thermal and moisture behaviour of the surface of textiles in moving status. A temperature acquisition system and a temperature controllable hotplate have been established to test temperature and simulate the heat of human body, respectively. Relative humidity of the surface of fabric in the dynamic process has been successfully tested through sensing. Meanwhile, wireless communication technology was applied to transport the acquired data of temperature and humidity to computer for further processing. Continuous power supply was achieved by intensive contact between an elastic copper plate and copper ring on the rotating shaft. This tester provides the platform to evaluate the thermal and moisture behaviour of textiles. It enables users to conduct a dynamic analysis on the temperature and humidity together with the thermal and moisture transport behaviour of the surface of fabric in moving condition. Development of this tester opens the door of investigation on the micro-climate of textiles in real time service, and eventually benefits the understanding of the sensation comfort and wellbeing of apparel wearers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of surface finishing on the oxidation behaviour of a ferritic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ardigo-Besnard, M.R., E-mail: maria-rosa.ardigo-besnard@u-bourgogne.fr [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne (ICB), UMR 6303 CNRS—Université de Bourgogne Franche-Comté, BP 47870, 21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Popa, I.; Heintz, O.; Chassagnon, R. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne (ICB), UMR 6303 CNRS—Université de Bourgogne Franche-Comté, BP 47870, 21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Vilasi, M. [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198 CNRS—Université de Lorraine, Parc de Saurupt, 54011 Nancy (France); Herbst, F. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne (ICB), UMR 6303 CNRS—Université de Bourgogne Franche-Comté, BP 47870, 21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Girardon, P. [APERAM, Centre de Recherche, BP15, 62330 Isbergues (France); Chevalier, S. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne (ICB), UMR 6303 CNRS—Université de Bourgogne Franche-Comté, BP 47870, 21078 Dijon Cedex (France)

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • Study of surface finishing effect on the corrosion behaviour of a stainless steel. • Mirror polished samples were compared to as-rolled material. • Two oxidation mechanisms were identified depending on the surface finishing. • Before oxidation, native chemical phases are identical for both samples. • Subsurface dislocations generated by the polishing process promote Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} formation. - Abstract: The corrosion behaviour and the oxidation mechanism of a ferritic stainless steel, K41X (AISI 441), were evaluated at 800 °C in water vapour hydrogen enriched atmosphere. Mirror polished samples were compared to as-rolled K41X material. Two different oxidation behaviours were observed depending on the surface finishing: a protective double (Cr,Mn){sub 3}O{sub 4}/Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale formed on the polished samples whereas external Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and (Cr,Fe){sub 2}O{sub 3} oxides grew on the raw steel. Moreover, isotopic marker experiments combined with SIMS analyses revealed different growth mechanisms. The influence of surface finishing on the corrosion products and growth mechanisms was apprehended by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and residual stress analyses using XRD at the sample surfaces before ageing.

  8. Fire safety of historical buildings traditional versus innovative “behavioural design” solutions by using wayfinding systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bernardini, Gabriele

    2017-01-01

    This book applies a behavioral point of view to individuals’ fire safety in historic buildings. It outlines theoretical and operative issues, based on recent studies and international guidelines. Firstly, critical issues for Building Heritage fire safety are widely discussed, by including the modelling of human factor and man-environment-fire interference in these architectural spaces. A significant part of the book includes a discussion on emergency modeling and simulation. A source code for representing the fire evacuation process (including man-evacuation facilities interactions) is offered to the reader. Methods for effectiveness assessment of risk-reducing solutions are provided and tested in a case-study. Being a structured approach to occupants-related problems during a fire in heritage buildings, it offers an innovative methodology and practical examples that researchers and designers can use as a guide when proposing and testing solutions. Evaluation indexes for effectiveness assessment (also usefu...

  9. Excellent c-Si surface passivation by thermal atomic layer deposited aluminum oxide after industrial firing activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, B.; Stangl, R.; Ma, F.; Mueller, T.; Lin, F.; Aberle, A. G.; Bhatia, C. S.; Hoex, B.

    2013-09-01

    We demonstrate that by using a water (H2O)-based thermal atomic layer deposited (ALD) aluminum oxide (Al2O3) film, excellent surface passivation can be attained on planar low-resistivity silicon wafers. Effective carrier lifetime values of up to 12 ms and surface recombination velocities as low as 0.33 cm s-1 are achieved on float-zone wafers after a post-deposition thermal activation of the Al2O3 passivation layer. This post-deposition activation is achieved using an industrial high-temperature firing process which is commonly used for contact formation of standard screen-printed silicon solar cells. Neither a low-temperature post-deposition anneal nor a silicon nitride capping layer is required in this case. Deposition temperatures in the 100-400 °C range and peak firing temperatures of about 800 °C (set temperature) are investigated. Photoluminescence imaging shows that the surface passivation is laterally uniform. Corona charging and capacitance-voltage measurements reveal that the negative fixed charge density near the AlOx/c-Si interface increases from 1.4 × 1012 to 3.3 × 1012 cm-2 due to firing, while the midgap interface defect density reduces from 3.3 × 1011 to 0.8 × 1011 cm-2 eV-1. This work demonstrates that direct firing activation of thermal ALD Al2O3 is feasible, which could be beneficial for solar cell manufacturing.

  10. Effect of residual stress and surface roughness on the fatigue behaviour of aluminium matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smaga, M; Eifler, D

    2010-01-01

    In this investigation the fatigue properties of specimens manufactured with different turning parameters were investigated in stress-controlled constant amplitude tests at ambient temperature. The change of feed rate and depth of cut lead to a change in the near surface microstructure. Hence the fatigue properties were influenced significantly due to different surface roughness and surface residual stress resulting from the unequal turning processes. The cyclic deformation behaviour of AMC225xe is characterised by pronounced initial cyclic hardening. Continuous load increase tests allow a reliable estimation of the endurance limit of AMC225xe with one single specimen on the basis of cyclic deformation, temperature and electrical resistance data.

  11. Impacts of global open-fire aerosols on direct radiative, cloud and surface-albedo effects simulated with CAM5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Jiang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Aerosols from open-land fires could significantly perturb the global radiation balance and induce climate change. In this study, Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5 with prescribed daily fire aerosol emissions is used to investigate the spatial and seasonal characteristics of radiative effects (REs, relative to the case of no fires of open-fire aerosols including black carbon (BC and particulate organic matter (POM from 2003 to 2011. The global annual mean RE from aerosol–radiation interactions (REari of all fire aerosols is 0.16 ± 0.01 W m−2 (1σ uncertainty, mainly due to the absorption of fire BC (0.25 ± 0.01 W m−2, while fire POM induces a small effect (−0.05 and 0.04 ± 0.01 W m−2 based on two different methods. Strong positive REari is found in the Arctic and in the oceanic regions west of southern Africa and South America as a result of amplified absorption of fire BC above low-level clouds, in general agreement with satellite observations. The global annual mean RE due to aerosol–cloud interactions (REaci of all fire aerosols is −0.70 ± 0.05 W m−2, resulting mainly from the fire POM effect (−0.59 ± 0.03 W m−2. REari (0.43 ± 0.03 W m−2 and REaci (−1.38 ± 0.23 W m−2 in the Arctic are stronger than in the tropics (0.17 ± 0.02 and −0.82 ± 0.09 W m−2 for REari and REaci, although the fire aerosol burden is higher in the tropics. The large cloud liquid water path over land areas and low solar zenith angle of the Arctic favor the strong fire aerosol REaci (up to −15 W m−2 during the Arctic summer. Significant surface cooling, precipitation reduction and increasing amounts of low-level cloud are also found in the Arctic summer as a result of the fire aerosol REaci based on the atmosphere-only simulations. The global annual mean RE due to surface-albedo changes (REsac over land areas (0.03 ± 0.10 W m−2 is small and

  12. Fire-induced surface forcing of the Siberian larch forests since 2000 in the context of climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, D.; Loboda, T. V.; He, T.; Zhang, Y.; Liang, S.

    2017-12-01

    The Siberian larch forests are a major component of the global boreal biome with wildfire being the most important disturbance agent. However, due to their unique characteristics and remote location, coupled with a limited record of remotely sensed datasets, we know little about the post-fire albedo dynamics in the region as well as the associated climatic impact, especially over a relatively longer temporal span at the regional scale. This is unfortunate as it has been suggested that the fire-induced albedo changes may have a pivotal role in controlling the net climatic impact of the boreal forests. Utilizing a 30-m 24-year stand age distribution map of the Siberian larch forests, combined with the full record of the MODIS albedo product, this study quantified the surface forcing induced by stand-replacing fires in the Siberian larch forests over 2001-2015. The results show that the larch forests experienced stand-replacing fires in the region has a cooling effect lasting for more than 25 years, and the magnitude of the cooling (-9.60 ± 0.03 Wm-2) is much larger than previously expected. Due to the strong cooling of stand-replacing fires, coupled with their wide distribution, the net surface forcing of the Siberian larch forests between 2001 and 2013 is negative (-0.78 Wm-2). In contrast, the forests that did not experience stand-replacing fires since 2000 show a warming effect, which is largely attributable to a lengthening of snow-free duration in the region. These results together indicate that wildfire may play a much bigger role in modulating the climatic impact of the Siberian larch forests than we previously thought, but this role is likely weakened by the considerable warming in the region, thus needs to be evaluated in the context of global climate change.

  13. Aquatic surface respiration and swimming behaviour in adult and developing zebrafish exposed to hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Sara J; Thomas, Benjamin S; Jonz, Michael G

    2015-06-01

    Severe hypoxia elicits aquatic surface respiration (ASR) behaviour in many species of fish, where ventilation of the gills at the air-water interface improves O2 uptake and survival. ASR is an important adaptation that may have given rise to air breathing in vertebrates. The neural substrate of this behaviour, however, is not defined. We characterized ASR in developing and adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) to ascertain a potential role for peripheral chemoreceptors in initiation or modulation of this response. Adult zebrafish exposed to acute, progressive hypoxia (PO2 from 158 to 15 mmHg) performed ASR with a threshold of 30 mmHg, and spent more time at the surface as PO2 decreased. Acclimation to hypoxia attenuated ASR responses. In larvae, ASR behaviour was observed between 5 and 21 days postfertilization with a threshold of 16 mmHg. Zebrafish decreased swimming behaviour (i.e. distance, velocity and acceleration) as PO2 was decreased, with a secondary increase in behaviour near or below threshold PO2 . In adults that underwent a 10-day intraperitoneal injection regime of 10 μg g(-1) serotonin (5-HT) or 20 μg g(-1) acetylcholine (ACh), an acute bout of hypoxia (15 mmHg) increased the time engaged in ASR by 5.5 and 4.9 times, respectively, compared with controls. Larvae previously immersed in 10 μmol l(-1) 5-HT or ACh also displayed an increased ASR response. Our results support the notion that ASR is a behavioural response that is reliant upon input from peripheral O2 chemoreceptors. We discuss implications for the role of chemoreceptors in the evolution of air breathing. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. An investigation of surface and crown fire dynamics in shrub fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse Sandoval. Lozano

    2011-01-01

    Fires burn large areas in California and around the world annually. California experiences numerous wildland fires that affect the lives of thousands of citizens every year. In 2000 the U.S. census bureau reported that 33.8 million people resided in California. The last census in 2010 showed California population had grown to 37.3 million people. As a consequence of...

  15. Surface characterization and wear behaviour of laser surface melted AISI 316L stainless steel

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kumar, A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study concerns an in depth investigation of the influence of laser surface melting of AISI 316L stainless steel using Ar and N2 as shrouding atmosphere. Laser surface melting has been carried out using a 5 kW continuous wave (CW) fibre...

  16. Solid-solid contacts due to surface roughness and their effects on suspension behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Robert H; Zhao, Yu; Galvin, Kevin P; Wilson, Helen J

    2003-05-15

    Solid-solid contacts due to microscopic surface roughness in viscous fluids were examined by observing the translational and rotational behaviours of a suspended sphere falling past a lighter sphere or down an inclined surface. In both cases, a roll-slip behaviour was observed, with the gravitational forces balanced by not only hydrodynamic forces but also normal and tangential solid-solid contact forces. Moreover, the nominal separation between the surfaces due to microscopic surface roughness elements is not constant but instead varies due to multiple roughness scales. By inverting the system, so that the heavy sphere fell away from the lighter sphere or the plane, it was found that the average nominal separation increases with increasing angle of inclination of the plane or the surface of the lighter sphere from horizontal; the larger asperities lift the sphere up from the opposing surface and then gravity at large angles of inclination is too weak to pull the sphere back down to the opposing surface before another large asperity is encountered. The existence of microscopic surface roughness and solid-solid contacts is shown to modify the rheological properties of suspensions. For example, the presence of compressive, but not tensile, contact forces removes the reversibility of sphere-sphere interactions and breaks the symmetry of the particle trajectories. As a result, suspensions of rough spheres exhibit normal stress differences that are absent for smooth spheres. For the conditions studied, surface roughness reduces the effective viscosity of a suspension by limiting the lubrication resistance during near-contact motion, and it also modifies the suspension microstructure and hydrodynamic diffusivity.

  17. Dual protection of wood surface treated with melamine-modified urea-formaldehyde resin mixed with ammonium polyphosphate against both fire and decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing-xia Ma; Grant T. Kirker; Ming-liang Jiang; Yu-zhang Wu

    2016-01-01

    Surface coatings of melamine-modified urea-formaldehyde resins (MUFs) containing ammonium polyphosphate (APP) have been shown to significantly improve the fire retardancy of wood by prolonging the ignition time and reducing the heat release rate, total heat released, and mass loss rate. Dual protection of wood against both decay and fire has been proposed for remedial...

  18. Urban surface temperature behaviour and heat island effect in a tropical planned city

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Adeb Qaid; Ossen, Dilshan Remaz; Jamei, Elmira; Manaf, Norhashima Abd; Said, Ismail; Ahmad, Mohd Hamdan

    2015-02-01

    Putrajaya is a model city planned with concepts of a "city in the garden" and an "intelligent city" in the tropics. This study presents the behaviour of the surface temperature and the heat island effect of Putrajaya. Findings show that heat island intensity is 2 °C on average at nighttime and negligible at daytime. But high surface temperature values were recorded at the main boulevard due to direct solar radiation incident, street orientation in the direction of northeast and southwest and low building height-to-street width ratio. Buildings facing each other had cooling effect on surfaces during the morning and evening hours; conversely, they had a warming effect at noon. Clustered trees along the street are effective in reducing the surface temperature compared to scattered and isolated trees. Surface temperature of built up areas was highest at noon, while walls and sidewalks facing northwest were hottest later in the day. Walls and sidewalks that face northwest were warmer than those that face southeast. The surface temperatures of the horizontal street surfaces and of vertical façades are at acceptable levels relative to the surface temperature of similar surfaces in mature cities in subtropical, temperate and Mediterranean climates.

  19. Heat transfer studies in pool fire environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitsche, F.

    1993-01-01

    A Type B package has to withstand severe thermal accident conditions. To calculate the temperature behaviour of such a package in a real fire environment, heat transfer parameters simulating the effect of the fire are needed. For studying such heat transfer parameters, a systematic programme of experimental and theoretical investigations was performed which was part of the IAEA Coordinated Research Programme (Nitsche and Weib 1990). The studies were done by means of small, unfinned and finned, steel model containers of simplified design in hydrocarbon fuel open fire tests. By using various methods, flame and container temperatures were measured and also container surface absorptivity before and after the test to study the effect of sooting and surface painting on heat transfer. Based on all these experimental data and comparative calculations, simplified, effective heat transfer parameters could be derived, simulating the effect of the real fire on the model containers. (J.P.N.)

  20. Surface vitrification caused by natural fires in Late Pleistocene wetlands of the Atacama Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roperch, Pierrick; Gattacceca, Jerome; Valenzuela, Millarca; Devouard, Bertrand; Lorand, Jean-Pierre; Arriagada, Cesar; Rochette, Pierre; Latorre, Claudio

    2017-04-01

    Melted rocks are a common feature in many of the 175 recognized terrestrial impact structures [1]. However, some glasses, like the Dakhleh Glass [2] or the Edeowie Glass [3] are also attributed to impacts despite the lack of other direct evidence. These cases have been attributed to low-altitude airbursts of cosmic bodies (asteroids, comets) during their entry in the Earth's atmosphere but the identification and mechanism of formation of these glasses are however debated. Massive glass blocks were recently discovered [4] in the Tamarugal-Llamara basin of the Atacama desert in Chile. We show that these glasses, found near the town of Pica at four localities separated by up to 70 km, are neither fulgurites, nor volcanic glasses, nor metallurgical slags related to anthropic activity, but show close similarities with other glasses, which have been attributed to large airbursts. However, most glasses contain numerous plant imprints and some glasses are mainly made of partially melted silicified plant twigs and field observations indicate that the glasses are restricted to specific Late Pleistocene wetlands. Large oases did indeed form in the hyperarid Atacama desert due to elevated groundwater discharge and increased recharge during the Central Andean Pluvial Event (roughly coeval with the Mystery interval and Younger Dryas). 14C dating and paleomagnetic data indicate that the glasses were formed during at least two distinct periods. The strong environmental control on the distribution of the glasses and large differences in ages rule out the hypothesis of a single large airburst as the cause of surface melting. The available data suggest that the Atacama desert surface glasses were formed in situ by natural fires in soils rich in dry organic matter and siliceous biological remains, at a time of strong climate oscillations between wet (organic matter accumulation in soils) and dry periods (triggering fires) in desert wetlands. Our interpretation likely applies to other

  1. An Assessment of Pre- and Post Fire Near Surface Fuel Hazard in an Australian Dry Sclerophyll Forest Using Point Cloud Data Captured Using a Terrestrial Laser Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Wallace

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of ecological and structrual changes induced by fire events is important for understanding the effects of fire, and planning future ecological and risk mitigation strategies. This study employs Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS data captured at multiple points in time to monitor the changes in a dry sclerophyll forest induced by a prescribed burn. Point cloud data was collected for two plots; one plot undergoing a fire treatment, and the second plot remaining untreated, thereby acting as the control. Data was collected at three epochs (pre-fire, two weeks post fire and two years post fire. Coregistration of these multitemporal point clouds to within an acceptable tolerance was achieved through a two step process utilising permanent infield markers and manually extracted stem objects as reference targets. Metrics describing fuel height and fuel fragmentation were extracted from the point clouds for direct comparison with industry standard visual assessments. Measurements describing the change (or lack thereof in the control plot indicate that the method of data capture and coregistration were achieved with the required accuracy to monitor fire induced change. Results from the fire affected plot show that immediately post fire 67% of area had been burnt with the average fuel height decreasing from 0.33 to 0.13 m. At two years post-fire the fuel remained signicantly lower (0.11 m and more fragmented in comparison to pre-fire levels. Results in both the control and fire altered plot were comparable to synchronus onground visual assessment. The advantage of TLS over the visual assessment method is, however, demonstrated through the use of two physical and spatially quantifiable metrics to describe fuel change. These results highlight the capabilities of multitemporal TLS data for measuring and mapping changes in the three dimensional structure of vegetation. Metrics from point clouds can be derived to provide quantified estimates of surface

  2. Excellent c-Si surface passivation by thermal atomic layer deposited aluminum oxide after industrial firing activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, B; Stangl, R; Ma, F; Mueller, T; Lin, F; Aberle, A G; Bhatia, C S; Hoex, B

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate that by using a water (H 2 O)-based thermal atomic layer deposited (ALD) aluminum oxide (Al 2 O 3 ) film, excellent surface passivation can be attained on planar low-resistivity silicon wafers. Effective carrier lifetime values of up to 12 ms and surface recombination velocities as low as 0.33 cm s −1 are achieved on float-zone wafers after a post-deposition thermal activation of the Al 2 O 3 passivation layer. This post-deposition activation is achieved using an industrial high-temperature firing process which is commonly used for contact formation of standard screen-printed silicon solar cells. Neither a low-temperature post-deposition anneal nor a silicon nitride capping layer is required in this case. Deposition temperatures in the 100–400 °C range and peak firing temperatures of about 800 °C (set temperature) are investigated. Photoluminescence imaging shows that the surface passivation is laterally uniform. Corona charging and capacitance–voltage measurements reveal that the negative fixed charge density near the AlO x /c-Si interface increases from 1.4 × 10 12 to 3.3 × 10 12 cm −2 due to firing, while the midgap interface defect density reduces from 3.3 × 10 11 to 0.8 × 10 11 cm −2 eV −1 . This work demonstrates that direct firing activation of thermal ALD Al 2 O 3 is feasible, which could be beneficial for solar cell manufacturing. (paper)

  3. Attachment and growth behaviour of human gingival fibroblasts on titanium and zirconia ceramic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pae, Ahran; Kim, Hyeong-Seob; Woo, Yi-Hyung; Lee, Heesu; Kwon, Yong-Dae

    2009-01-01

    The attachment, growth behaviour and the genetic effect of human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) cultured on titanium and different zirconia surfaces were investigated. HGF cells were cultured on (1) titanium discs with a machined surface, (2) yttrium-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystals (Y-TZP) with a smooth surface and (3) Y-TZP with 100 μm grooves. The cell proliferation activity was evaluated through a MTT assay at 24 h and 48 h, and the cell morphology was examined by SEM. The mRNA expression of integrin-β1, type I and III collagen, laminin and fibronectin in HGF were evaluated by RT-PCR after 24 h. From the MTT assay, the mean optical density values for the titanium and grooved zirconia surfaces after 48 h of HGF adhesion were greater than the values obtained for the smooth zirconia surfaces. SEM images showed that more cells were attached to the grooves, and the cells appeared to follow the direction of the grooves. The results of RT-PCR suggest that all groups showed comparable fibroblast-specific gene expression. A zirconia ceramic surface with grooves showed biological responses that were comparable to those obtained with HGF on a titanium surface.

  4. Correlative study of scratch and wear behaviour of several surface treatments for uses in nuclear industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerout, F.; Zbinden, M.; Lina, A.; Clemendot, F.; Lelait, L.; Van Duysen, J.C.

    1992-06-01

    We have studied the scratch and wear behaviour of seven different surface treatments on an AISI 304L stainless steel substrate. These surface treatments have been elaborated by different processes: physical vapour deposition, ion nitriding, hypersonic projection and electrochemical deposition. The conventional scratch testing results show that the main surface damage feature is brittle cracking at the trailing edge of the indenter, but the cracking loads are broadly the same for all coatings considered here. So, we have carried out constant load scratch testing and analyzed the crack density inside of the track. The correlation between the crack density and the wear resistance, as measured in the GIBUS test, is satisfactory. This result shows the importance of the coating brittleness in the sliding-impact wear process. It is also necessary to adopt more precise and representative criterion for coating brittleness quantification

  5. Evaluation of surface characteristics under fretting of electrical contacts: Removal behaviour of hot dipped tin coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Young Woo; Ramesh Bapu, G.N.K.; Lee, Kang Yong

    2009-01-01

    The fretting corrosion behaviour of hot dipped tin coating is investigated at low fretting cycles at ±25 μm displacement amplitude, 0.5N normal load, 3 Hz frequency, 45-50% relative humidity, and 25 ± 1 deg. C temperature. The typical characteristics of the change in contact resistance with fretting cycles are explained. The fretted surface is examined using laser scanning microscope, scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive X-ray analysis to assess the surface profile, extent of fretting damage, extent of oxidation and elemental distribution across the contact zone. The interdependence of extent of wear and oxidation increases the complexity of the fretting corrosion behaviour of tin coating. The variation of contact resistance clearly revealed the fretting of tin coating from 50 to 1200 cycles and the fretting of the substrate above 1200 cycles. The observed low and stable contact resistance region and the fluctuating resistance region at various fretting cycles are explained and substantiated with Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), laser scanning microscope (LSM) and energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX) analysis results of the fretted surface.

  6. Evaluation of surface characteristics under fretting of electrical contacts: Removal behaviour of hot dipped tin coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Young Woo [Stainless Steel Research Group, Technical Research Laboratories, POSCO, Pohang 790-300 (Korea, Republic of); Ramesh Bapu, G.N.K. [Stress Analysis and Failure Design Laboratory, School of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, 134, Sinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kang Yong, E-mail: kyl2813@yonsei.ac.kr [Stress Analysis and Failure Design Laboratory, School of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, 134, Sinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-02-01

    The fretting corrosion behaviour of hot dipped tin coating is investigated at low fretting cycles at {+-}25 {mu}m displacement amplitude, 0.5N normal load, 3 Hz frequency, 45-50% relative humidity, and 25 {+-} 1 deg. C temperature. The typical characteristics of the change in contact resistance with fretting cycles are explained. The fretted surface is examined using laser scanning microscope, scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive X-ray analysis to assess the surface profile, extent of fretting damage, extent of oxidation and elemental distribution across the contact zone. The interdependence of extent of wear and oxidation increases the complexity of the fretting corrosion behaviour of tin coating. The variation of contact resistance clearly revealed the fretting of tin coating from 50 to 1200 cycles and the fretting of the substrate above 1200 cycles. The observed low and stable contact resistance region and the fluctuating resistance region at various fretting cycles are explained and substantiated with Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), laser scanning microscope (LSM) and energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX) analysis results of the fretted surface.

  7. High speed cine film studies of plasma behaviour and plasma surface interactions in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodall, D.H.J.

    1982-01-01

    High speed cine photography is a useful diagnostic aid for studying plasma behaviour and plasma surface interactions. Several workers have filmed discharges in tokamaks including ASDEX, DITE, DIVA, ISX, JFT2, TFR and PLT. These films are discussed and examples given of the observed phenomena which include plasma limiter interactions, diverted discharges, disruptions, magnetic islands and moving glowing objects often known as 'UFOs'. Examples of plasma structures in ASDEX and DITE not previously published are also given. The paper also reports experiments in DITE to determine the origin of UFOs. (orig.)

  8. High speed cine film studies of plasma behaviour and plasma surface interactions in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodall, D.H.J. (Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Association, Abingdon (UK). Culham Lab.)

    High speed cine photography is a useful diagnostic aid for studying plasma behaviour and plasma surface interactions. Several workers have filmed discharges in tokamaks including ASDEX, DITE, DIVA, ISX, JFT2, TFR and PLT. These films are discussed and examples given of the observed phenomena which include plasma limiter interactions, diverted discharges, disruptions, magnetic islands and moving glowing objects often known as 'UFOs'. Examples of plasma structures in ASDEX and DITE not previously published are also given. The paper also reports experiments in DITE to determine the origin of UFOs.

  9. Fire weather conditions and fire-atmosphere interactions observed during low-intensity prescribed fires - RxCADRE 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig B. Clements; Neil P. Lareau; Daisuke Seto; Jonathan Contezac; Braniff Davis; Casey Teske; Thomas J. Zajkowski; Andrew T. Hudak; Benjamin C. Bright; Matthew B. Dickinson; Bret W. Butler; Daniel Jimenez; J. Kevin. Hiers

    2016-01-01

    The role of fire-atmosphere coupling on fire behaviour is not well established, and to date few field observations have been made to investigate the interactions between fire spread and fire-induced winds. Therefore, comprehensive field observations are needed to better understand micrometeorological aspects of fire spread. To address this need, meteorological...

  10. Modelling Behaviour of a Carbon Epoxy Composite Exposed to Fire: Part I-Characterisation of Thermophysical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranchard, Pauline; Samyn, Fabienne; Duquesne, Sophie; Estèbe, Bruno; Bourbigot, Serge

    2017-05-04

    Thermophysical properties of a carbon-reinforced epoxy composite laminate (T700/M21 composite for aircraft structures) were evaluated using different innovative characterisation methods. Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), Simultaneous Thermal analysis (STA), Laser Flash analysis (LFA), and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) analysis were used for measuring the thermal decomposition, the specific heat capacity, the anisotropic thermal conductivity of the composite, the heats of decomposition and the specific heat capacity of released gases. It permits to get input data to feed a three-dimensional (3D) model given the temperature profile and the mass loss obtained during well-defined fire scenarios (model presented in Part II of this paper). The measurements were optimised to get accurate data. The data also permit to create a public database on an aeronautical carbon fibre/epoxy composite for fire safety engineering.

  11. Modelling Behaviour of a Carbon Epoxy Composite Exposed to Fire: Part I—Characterisation of Thermophysical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranchard, Pauline; Samyn, Fabienne; Duquesne, Sophie; Estèbe, Bruno; Bourbigot, Serge

    2017-01-01

    Thermophysical properties of a carbon-reinforced epoxy composite laminate (T700/M21 composite for aircraft structures) were evaluated using different innovative characterisation methods. Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), Simultaneous Thermal analysis (STA), Laser Flash analysis (LFA), and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) analysis were used for measuring the thermal decomposition, the specific heat capacity, the anisotropic thermal conductivity of the composite, the heats of decomposition and the specific heat capacity of released gases. It permits to get input data to feed a three-dimensional (3D) model given the temperature profile and the mass loss obtained during well-defined fire scenarios (model presented in Part II of this paper). The measurements were optimised to get accurate data. The data also permit to create a public database on an aeronautical carbon fibre/epoxy composite for fire safety engineering. PMID:28772854

  12. Modelling Behaviour of a Carbon Epoxy Composite Exposed to Fire: Part I—Characterisation of Thermophysical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Tranchard

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Thermophysical properties of a carbon-reinforced epoxy composite laminate (T700/M21 composite for aircraft structures were evaluated using different innovative characterisation methods. Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA, Simultaneous Thermal analysis (STA, Laser Flash analysis (LFA, and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR analysis were used for measuring the thermal decomposition, the specific heat capacity, the anisotropic thermal conductivity of the composite, the heats of decomposition and the specific heat capacity of released gases. It permits to get input data to feed a three-dimensional (3D model given the temperature profile and the mass loss obtained during well-defined fire scenarios (model presented in Part II of this paper. The measurements were optimised to get accurate data. The data also permit to create a public database on an aeronautical carbon fibre/epoxy composite for fire safety engineering.

  13. Implementation of fully coupled heat and mass transport model to determine the behaviour of timber elements in fire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pečenko, Robert; Huč, Sabina; Turk, Goran

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present results of numerical analysis of timber beam exposed to fire. The numerical procedure is divided into two physically separated but closely related phases. In the first phase coupled problem of moisture and heat transfer over the timber beam is numerically solved using the...... the enhanced finite element method. The results of the first computational stage were used as the input data for the numerical analysis of mechanical response of timber element....

  14. Changes in the surface energy budget after fire in boreal ecosystems of interior Alaska: An annual perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Heping; Randerson, James T.; Lindfors, Jamie; Chapin, F. Stuart

    2005-07-01

    Understanding links between the disturbance regime and regional climate in boreal regions requires observations of the surface energy budget from ecosystems in various stages of secondary succession. While several studies have characterized fire-induced differences in surface energy fluxes from boreal ecosystems during summer months, much less is known about these differences over the full annual cycle. Here we measured components of the surface energy budget (including both radiative and turbulent fluxes) at three sites from a fire chronosequence in interior Alaska for a 1-year period. Our sites consisted of large burn scars resulting from fires in 1999, 1987, and ˜1920 (hereinafter referred to as the 3-, 15-, and 80-year sites, respectively). Vegetation cover consisted primarily of bunch grasses at the 3-year site, aspen and willow at the 15-year site, and black spruce at the 80-year site. Annual net radiation declined by 31% (17 W m-2) for both the 3- and the 15-year sites as compared with the 80-year site (which had an annual mean of 55 W m-2). Annual sensible heat fluxes were reduced by an even greater amount, by 55% at the 3-year site and by 52% at the 15-year site as compared with the 80-year site (which had an annual mean of 21 W m-2). Absolute differences between the postfire ecosystems and the mature black spruce forest for both net radiation and sensible heat fluxes were greatest during spring (because of differences in snow cover and surface albedo), substantial during summer and winter, and relatively small during fall. Fire-induced disturbance also initially reduced annual evapotranspiration (ET). Annual ET decreased by 33% (99 mm yr-1) at the 3-year site as compared with the 80-year site (which had an annual flux of 301 mm yr-1). Annual ET at the 15-year site (283 mm yr-1) was approximately the same as that from the 80-year site, even though the 15-year site had substantially higher ET during July. Our study suggests that differences in annual ET

  15. Oxidation behaviour of cast aluminium matrix composites with Ce surface coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardo, A.; Merino, M.C.; Arrabal, R.; Feliu, S.; Viejo, F.

    2007-01-01

    The oxidation behaviour of SiC-reinforced aluminium matrix composites (A3xx.x/SiCp) has been studied after Ce-based treatments. Kinetics data of oxidation process were obtained from gravimetric tests performed at different temperatures (350, 425 and 500 o C). The nature of the oxidation layer was analyzed by scanning electron and atomic force microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The extent of oxidation degradation in untreated composites was preferentially localized in matrix/SiCp interfaces favouring the MgO formation. Ce coatings favoured a uniform oxidation of the composite surface with MgAl 2 O 4 spinel formation. This oxide increased the surface hardness of the materials

  16. Surface tension and wetting behaviour of Bi-In-Sn alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ervina Efzan Mohd Noor; Ahmad Badri Ismail; Soong, T.K.; Chin, Y.T.; Luay Bakir Hussain

    2007-01-01

    Concerns about possible landfill contamination, influent discharge from production process are one of the reasons convert from lead-containing electronics to lead-free containing. The surface and interfacial properties of Bi-In-Sn lead-free solder system as a basic system of multicomponent alloys proposed as lead-free solder materials have been studied. The surface tension of Bi-In-Sn lead-free solder system of melting temperature 60 degree Celsius has been measured the temperature range 80 degree Celsius and 140 degree Celsius. The study of the wetting behaviour of Bi-In-Sn lead-free solder system on a Cu substrate has been performed by measuring contact angle on various metal substrates by Optical Microscopy with software. (author)

  17. Surface fire effects on conifer and hardwood crowns--applications of an integral plume model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew Dickinson; Anthony Bova; Kathleen Kavanagh; Antoine Randolph; Lawrence Band

    2009-01-01

    An integral plume model was applied to the problems of tree death from canopy injury in dormant-season hardwoods and branch embolism in Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) crowns. Our purpose was to generate testable hypotheses. We used the integral plume models to relate crown injury to bole injury and to explore the effects of variation in fire...

  18. Fire safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keski-Rahkonen, O.; Bjoerkman, J.; Hostikka, S.; Mangs, J.; Huhtanen, R.; Palmen, H.; Salminen, A.; Turtola, A.

    1998-01-01

    According to experience and probabilistic risk assessments, fires present a significant hazard in a nuclear power plant. Fires may be initial events for accidents or affect safety systems planned to prevent accidents and to mitigate their consequences. The project consists of theoretical work, experiments and simulations aiming to increase the fire safety at nuclear power plants. The project has four target areas: (1) to produce validated models for numerical simulation programmes, (2) to produce new information on the behavior of equipment in case of fire, (3) to study applicability of new active fire protecting systems in nuclear power plants, and (4) to obtain quantitative knowledge of ignitions induced by important electric devices in nuclear power plants. These topics have been solved mainly experimentally, but modelling at different level is used to interpret experimental data, and to allow easy generalisation and engineering use of the obtained data. Numerical fire simulation has concentrated in comparison of CFD modelling of room fires, and fire spreading on cables on experimental data. So far the success has been good to fair. A simple analytical and numerical model has been developed for fire effluents spreading beyond the room of origin in mechanically strongly ventilated compartments. For behaviour of equipment in fire several full scale and scaled down calorimetric experiments were carried out on electronic cabinets, as well as on horizontal and vertical cable trays. These were carried out to supply material for CFD numerical simulation code validation. Several analytical models were developed and validated against obtained experimental results to allow quick calculations for PSA estimates as well as inter- and extrapolations to slightly different objects. Response times of different commercial fire detectors were determined for different types of smoke, especially emanating from smoldering and flaming cables to facilitate selection of proper detector

  19. Innovative work behaviour in knowledge-intensive public sector organizations: the case of supervisors in the Netherlands fire services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos-Nehles, Anna Christina; Bondarouk, Tatiana; Nijenhuis, Koen

    2017-01-01

    Studying innovative employee behaviours within knowledge-intensive public sector organizations (KIPSOs) might seem an odd thing to do given the lack of competitive pressures, the limited identification of the costs and benefits of innovative ideas and the lack of opportunities to incentivize

  20. Fire resistant behaviour of cellulosic textile functionalized with wastage plant bio-molecules: A comparative scientific report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Santanu; Wazed Ali, S

    2018-03-21

    Three different wastage plant based bio-molecules named banana peel powder (Musa acuminata) (BPP), coconut shell (Cocos nucifera) extract (CSE) and pomegranate rind (Punica granatum) extract (PRE) have been explored as fire resistant material on the cellulosic polymer (cotton fabric). To this end, extracts have been applied to the cotton fabric in different concentration at elevated temperature for specific time period. Treated cotton fabric showed 6 (BPP), 8.5 (CSE) and 12 (PRE) times lower vertical burning rate compared to the control cotton fabric. Thermo-gravimetry (TG) curves and the limiting oxygen index (LOI) value revealed that the PRE extract (LOI: 32) treated fabric encompassed more thermal stability compared to the BPP (LOI:26) and the CSE (LOI: 27) treated fabric as it showed higher oxygen index and more weight retention (40%) at higher temperature 450°C. Moreover, the carbonaceous samples remained after the burning of the extracts and the treated fabrics showed structural integration and more carbon content [65.6 (PRE extract) and 76.3% (PRE treated cotton)] compared to the fragile, net like char of the control cotton fabric, having less carbon content (49.8%). Gas Chromatography Mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) of the different extracts (CSE, PRE, BPP) used for the study showed the presence of high molecular weight aromatic phenolic compounds, tannin based compound and the nitrogen containing alkaloids, responsible for fire resistant effect of the different extract treated fabric. Besides fire retardancy, all the treated fabric showed attractive natural colour (measured by colour strength values) and there has been no adverse effect on the tensile strength property of the fabric after the treatment. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. External Thermal Insulation Composite Systems: Critical Parameters for Surface Hygrothermal Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Barreira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available External Thermal Insulation Composite Systems (ETICS are often used in Europe. Despite its thermal advantages, low cost, and ease of application, this system has serious problems of biological growth causing the cladding defacement. Recent studies pointed that biological growth is due to high values of surface moisture content, which mostly results from the combined effect of exterior surface condensation, wind-driven rain, and drying process. Based on numerical simulation, this paper points the most critical parameters involved in hygrothermal behaviour of ETICS, considering the influence of thermal and hygric properties of the external rendering, the effect of the characteristics of the façade, and the consequences of the exterior and interior climate on exterior surface condensation, wind-driven rain, and drying process. The model used was previously validated by comparison with the results of an “in situ” campaign. The results of the sensitivity analyses show that relative humidity and temperature of the exterior air, atmospheric radiation, and emissivity of the exterior rendering are the parameters that most influence exterior surface condensation. Wind-driven rain depends mostly on horizontal rain, building’s height, wind velocity, and orientation. The drying capacity is influenced by short-wave absorbance, incident solar radiation, and orientation.

  2. Surface fire intensity influences simulated crown fire behavior in lodgepole pine forests with recent mountain pine beetle-caused tree mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chad M. Hoffman; Penelope Morgan; William Mell; Russell Parsons; Eva Strand; Steve. Cook

    2013-01-01

    Recent bark beetle outbreaks have had a significant impact on forests throughout western North America and have generated concerns about interactions and feedbacks between beetle attacks and fire. However, research has been hindered by a lack of experimental studies and the use of fire behavior models incapable of accounting for the heterogeneous fuel complexes. We...

  3. Tyre friction behaviour under abrupt wheel torque transients on slippery road surfaces: experimental analysis and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanović, Vladimir; Deur, Joško; Kostelac, Milan; Pentek, Tibor; Hrovat, Davor

    2011-10-01

    The paper shows that, during abrupt wheel torque transients for ice surface and low vehicle speeds, the tyre can develop significantly larger longitudinal force than the peak value of the tyre static curve. This so-called dynamic tyre friction potential (DTFP) effect has many influencing factors such as the rate of change of the wheel torque, the vehicle speed, and the tyre dwell time. The paper presents a detailed analysis of the DTFP behaviour based on the experimental data collected by using an in-wheel motor-based tyre test vehicle. The analysis results and an insight into the brush structure of a tyre model lead to the hypothesis that the different influencing factors may be predominantly explained by the bristle dwell time (BDT) effect. Following this hypothesis, the LuGre model of the tyre friction dynamics is extended with a physical BDT sub-model. The experimental validation results show that the proposed model can accurately capture the low-speed tyre-ice friction behaviour during abrupt wheel torque transients.

  4. Fundamentals of Fire Phenomena

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quintiere, James

    analyses. Fire phenomena encompass everything about the scientific principles behind fire behaviour. Combining the principles of chemistry, physics, heat and mass transfer, and fluid dynamics necessary to understand the fundamentals of fire phenomena, this book integrates the subject into a clear...... as a visiting professor at BYG.DTU financed by the Larsen and Nielsen Foundation, and is entered to the research database by Kristian Hertz responsible for the visiting professorship....

  5. Modelling of the bending behaviour of double floor systems for different contact surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila PUSKAS

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In the practice of prefabricated concrete structures considerable surfaces of intermediate floors are constructed using double floor systems with prefabricated bottom layer and upper layer. This second layer is cast on site. The quality of the prefabricated concrete is often of superior class with respect to the monolithic layer. In the service state of the double floor system, important compressive stresses appear in the upper concrete layer. On the other hand, the bond quality between the concrete layers cast in successive stages raises questions especially in the case of hollow core floor units with no connecting reinforcement in-between. The paper presents results of the numerical models prepared for double floor elements having different thicknesses for the top and bottom layers, subjected to bending. Three situations have been studied: stepped top surface of the prefabricated slab with no connecting reinforcement, broom swept tracks on the prefabricated slab with no connecting reinforcement and broom swept tracks on the prefabricated slab with stirrups connecting the concrete layers. For each situation two different ratios of the thicknesses of the layers have been considered. The results are emphasizing the critical regions of the elements, the differences in crack development and in the behaviour resulting from surface preparation and use of connecting reinforcements.

  6. Electrochemical behaviour and surface conductivity of niobium carbide-modified austenitic stainless steel bipolar plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lixia; Sun, Juncai; Kang, Bin; Li, Song; Ji, Shijun; Wen, Zhongsheng; Wang, Xiaochun

    2014-01-01

    A niobium carbide diffusion layer with a cubic NbC phase surface layer (∼6 μm) and a Nb and C diffusion subsurface layer (∼1 μm) is fabricated on the surface of AISI 304 stainless steel (304 SS) bipolar plate in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) using plasma surface diffusion alloying. The electrochemical behaviour of the niobium carbide diffusion-modified 304 SS (Nb-C 304 SS) is investigated in simulated PEMFC environments (0.5 M H2SO4 and 2 ppm HF solution at 80 °C). Potentiodynamic, potentiostatic polarisation and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements reveal that the niobium carbide diffusion layer considerably improves the corrosion resistance of 304 SS compared with untreated samples. The corrosion current density of Nb-C 304 SS is maintained at 0.058 μA cm-2 and 0.051 μA cm-2 under simulated anodic and cathodic conditions, respectively. The interfacial contact resistance of Nb-C 304 SS is 8.47 mΩ cm2 at a compaction force of 140 N cm-2, which is significantly lower than that of the untreated sample (100.98 mΩ cm2). Moreover, only a minor increase in the ICR of Nb-C 304 SS occurs after 10 h potentiostatic tests in both cathodic and anodic environments.

  7. Fire exposed aluminium structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maljaars, J.; Fellinger, J.; Soetens, F.

    2005-01-01

    Material properties and mechanical response models for fire design of steel structures are based on extensive research and experience. Contrarily, the behaviour of aluminium load bearing structures exposed to fire is relatively unexplored. This article gives an overview of physical and mechanical

  8. Fire exposed aluminium structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maljaars, J.; Fellinger, J.H.H.; Soetens, F.

    2006-01-01

    Material properties and mechanical response models for fire design of steel structures are based on extensive research and experience. Contrarily, the behaviour of aluminium load bearing structures exposed to fire is relatively unexplored. This article gives an overview of physical and mechanical

  9. Electrochemical corrosion behaviours of pulsed bias MSIP aluminum coating on depleted uranium surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qingfu; Zhang Pengcheng; Chen Lin; Liu Qinghe; Lang Dingmu; Wang Xiaohong

    2009-01-01

    Aluminum coating was prepared by magnetron sputtering ion plating (MSIP) with pulsed bias on depleted uranium surface. Its electrochemical corrosion behaviours were studied by electrochemical technology, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscope (EDS). The corrosion potential of aluminum coating (-534.8 mV) is higher than that of depleted uranium (-641.2 mV). The aluminum coating is a cathodic deposit to depleted uranium. Depleted uranium coated aluminum has much higher polarization resistance,greater magnitude of electrochemical impedance and much lower corrosion current than that of depleted uranium. The aluminum coating has a good corrosion resistance to depleted uranium. Corrosion characteristic of depleted uranium coated aluminum is a typical local corrosion. Meanwhile,the aluminum coating cracks and flakes off from depleted uranium substrate, which deteriorates its anti-corrosion property. Pseudo-diffusion layer on interface between aluminum coating and uranium substrate has some degree of anti-corrosion effect. (authors)

  10. Voltammetric and impedance behaviours of surface-treated nano-crystalline diamond film electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. B. Liu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical performances of hydrogen- and oxygen-terminated nano-crystalline diamond film electrodes were investigated by cyclic voltammetry and AC impedance spectroscopy. In addition, the surface morphologies, phase structures, and chemical states of the two diamond films were analysed by scanning probe microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The results indicated that the potential window is narrower for the hydrogen-terminated nano-crystalline diamond film than for the oxygen-terminated one. The diamond film resistance and capacitance of oxygen-terminated diamond film are much larger than those of the hydrogen-terminated diamond film, and the polarization resistances and double-layer capacitance corresponding to oxygen-terminated diamond film are both one order of magnitude larger than those corresponding to the hydrogen-terminated diamond film. The electrochemical behaviours of the two diamond film electrodes are discussed.

  11. The relationship of post-fire white ash cover to surface fuel consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew T. Hudak; Roger D. Ottmar; Robert E. Vihnanek; Nolan W. Brewer; Alistair M. S. Smith; Penelope Morgan

    2013-01-01

    White ash results from the complete combustion of surface fuels, making it a logically simple retrospective indicator of surface fuel consumption. However, the strength of this relationship has been neither tested nor adequately demonstrated with field measurements. We measured surface fuel loads and cover fractions of white ash and four other surface materials (green...

  12. Thermal Behaviour of Unusual Local-Scale Surface Features on Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, F.; Capria, M. T.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Palomba, E.; Grassi, D.; Capaccioni, F.; Ammannito, E.; Combe, J.-Ph.; Sunshine, J. M.; McCord, T. B.; hide

    2012-01-01

    temperatures greater than 270 K. However, individual features may show different thermal behaviours, as a result of differences in composition and/or structure (e.g, average grain size of the surface regolith, porosity, etc.). To complement the temperature and near-infrared emissivity derived from the infrared spectra, a separate work is devoted to calculate thermal inertia and other thermal properties using theoretical models which solve the heat equation for airless bodies, and model the distribution of temperatures due to surface roughness variations.

  13. Fire and the dynamics of semi-arid grassland: influence on plant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is a lack of knowledge concerning the effect of fire behaviour on the vegetation dynamics of semi-arid climates. Arising from this, an investigation was initiated to characterise the behaviour of fires burning with the wind (head fire) and against the wind (back fire). The behaviour of these fires was related to the response ...

  14. Too hot to sleep? Sleep behaviour and surface body temperature of Wahlberg's Epauletted Fruit Bat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Colleen T; Awuah, Adwoa; Jordaan, Maryna; Magagula, Londiwe; Mkhize, Truth; Paine, Christine; Raymond-Bourret, Esmaella; Hart, Lorinda A

    2015-01-01

    The significance of sleep and factors that affect it have been well documented, however, in light of global climate change the effect of temperature on sleep patterns has only recently gained attention. Unlike many mammals, bats (order: Chiroptera) are nocturnal and little is known about their sleep and the effects of ambient temperature (Ta) on their sleep. Consequently we investigated seasonal temperature effects on sleep behaviour and surface body temperature of free-ranging Wahlberg's epauletted fruit bat, Epomophorus wahlbergi, at a tree roost. Sleep behaviours of E. wahlbergi were recorded, including: sleep duration and sleep incidences (i.e. one eye open and both eyes closed). Sleep differed significantly across all the individuals in terms of sleep duration and sleep incidences. Individuals generally spent more time awake than sleeping. The percentage of each day bats spent asleep was significantly higher during winter (27.6%), compared with summer (15.6%). In summer, 20.7% of the sleeping bats used one eye open sleep, and this is possibly the first evidence of one-eye-sleep in non-marine mammals. Sleep duration decreased with extreme heat as bats spent significantly more time trying to cool by licking their fur, spreading their wings and panting. Skin temperatures of E. wahlbergi were significantly higher when Ta was ≥35°C and no bats slept at these high temperatures. Consequently extremely hot days negatively impact roosting fruit bats, as they were forced to be awake to cool themselves. This has implications for these bats given predicted climate change scenarios.

  15. The simulation of surface fire spread based on Rothermel model in windthrow area of Changbai Mountain (Jilin, China)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hang; Jin, Hui; Zhao, Ying; Fan, Yuguang; Qin, Liwu; Chen, Qinghong; Huang, Liya; Jia, Xiang; Liu, Lijie; Dai, Yuhong; Xiao, Ying

    2018-03-01

    The forest-fire not only brings great loss to natural resources, but also destructs the ecosystem and reduces the soil fertility, causing some natural disasters as soil erosion and debris flow. However, due to the lack of the prognosis for forest fire spreading trend in forest fire fighting, it is difficult to formulate rational and effective fire-fighting scheme. In the event of forest fire, achieving accurate judgment to the fire behavior would greatly improve the fire-fighting efficiency, and reduce heavy losses caused by fire. Researches on forest fire spread simulation can effectively reduce the loss of disasters. The present study focused on the simulation of "29 May 2012" wildfire in windthrow area of Changbai Mountain. Basic data were retrieved from the "29 May 2012" wildfire and field survey. A self-development forest fire behavior simulated program based on Rothermel Model was used in the simulation. Kappa coefficient and Sørensen index were employed to evaluate the simulation accuracy. The results showed that: The perimeter of simulated burned area was 4.66 km, the area was 56.47 hm2 and the overlapped burned area was 33.68 hm2, and the estimated rate of fire spread was 0.259 m/s. Between the simulated fire and actual fire, the Kappa coefficient was 0.7398 and the Sørensen co-efficient was 0.7419. This proved the application of Rothermel model to conduct fire behavior simulation in windthrow meadow was feasible. It can achieve the goal of forecasting for the spread behavior in windthrow area of Changbai Mountain. Thus, our self-development program based on the Rothermel model can provide a effective forecast of fire spread, which will facilitate the fire suppression work.

  16. Meteosat SEVIRI Fire Radiative Power (FRP) products from the Land Surface Analysis Satellite Applications Facility (LSA SAF) - Part 1: Algorithms, product contents and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooster, M. J.; Roberts, G.; Freeborn, P. H.; Xu, W.; Govaerts, Y.; Beeby, R.; He, J.; Lattanzio, A.; Mullen, R.

    2015-06-01

    Characterising changes in landscape scale fire activity at very high temporal resolution is best achieved using thermal observations of actively burning fires made from geostationary Earth observation (EO) satellites. Over the last decade or more, a series of research and/or operational "active fire" products have been developed from these types of geostationary observations, often with the aim of supporting the generation of data related to biomass burning fuel consumption and trace gas and aerosol emission fields. The Fire Radiative Power (FRP) products generated by the Land Surface Analysis Satellite Applications Facility (LSA SAF) from data collected by the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) are one such set of products, and are freely available in both near real-time and archived form. Every 15 min, the algorithms used to generate these products identify and map the location of new SEVIRI observations containing actively burning fires, and characterise their individual rates of radiative energy release (fire radiative power; FRP) that is believed proportional to rates of biomass consumption and smoke emission. The FRP-PIXEL product contains the highest spatial resolution FRP dataset, delivered for all of Europe, northern and southern Africa, and part of South America at a spatial resolution of 3 km (decreasing away from the west African sub-satellite point) at the full 15 min temporal resolution. The FRP-GRID product is an hourly summary of the FRP-PIXEL data, produced at a 5° grid cell size and including simple bias adjustments for meteorological cloud cover and for the regional underestimation of FRP caused, primarily, by the non-detection of low FRP fire pixels at SEVIRI's relatively coarse pixel size. Here we describe the enhanced geostationary Fire Thermal Anomaly (FTA) algorithm used to detect the SEVIRI active fire pixels, and detail methods used to deliver atmospherically corrected FRP information

  17. Fire characteristics charts for fire behavior and U.S. fire danger rating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faith Ann Heinsch; Pat Andrews

    2010-01-01

    The fire characteristics chart is a graphical method of presenting U.S. National Fire Danger Rating indices or primary surface or crown fire behavior characteristics. A desktop computer application has been developed to produce fire characteristics charts in a format suitable for inclusion in reports and presentations. Many options include change of scales, colors,...

  18. 33 CFR 334.200 - Chesapeake Bay, Point Lookout to Cedar Point; aerial and surface firing range and target area, U...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chesapeake Bay, Point Lookout to... Chesapeake Bay, Point Lookout to Cedar Point; aerial and surface firing range and target area, U.S. Naval Air... of Chesapeake Bay within an area described as follows: Beginning at the easternmost extremity of...

  19. A comparison of three approaches for simulating fine-scale surface winds in support of wildland fire management: Part I. Model formulation and comparison against measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jason M. Forthofer; Bret W. Butler; Natalie S. Wagenbrenner

    2014-01-01

    For this study three types of wind models have been defined for simulating surface wind flow in support of wildland fire management: (1) a uniform wind field (typically acquired from coarse-resolution (,4 km) weather service forecast models); (2) a newly developed mass-conserving model and (3) a newly developed mass and momentumconserving model (referred to as the...

  20. WRF-Fire: coupled weather-wildland fire modeling with the weather research and forecasting model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janice L. Coen; Marques Cameron; John Michalakes; Edward G. Patton; Philip J. Riggan; Kara M. Yedinak

    2012-01-01

    A wildland fire behavior module (WRF-Fire) was integrated into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) public domain numerical weather prediction model. The fire module is a surface fire behavior model that is two-way coupled with the atmospheric model. Near-surface winds from the atmospheric model are interpolated to a finer fire grid and used, with fuel properties...

  1. Fire History

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Fire Perimeters data consists of CDF fires 300 acres and greater in size and USFS fires 10 acres and greater throughout California from 1950 to 2002. Some fires...

  2. Fire Perimeters

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Fire Perimeters data consists of CDF fires 300 acres and greater in size and USFS fires 10 acres and greater throughout California from 1950 to 2003. Some fires...

  3. Fire Perimeters

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — The Fire Perimeters data consists of CDF fires 300 acres and greater in size and USFS fires 10 acres and greater throughout California from 1950 to 2003. Some fires...

  4. Fire History

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — The Fire Perimeters data consists of CDF fires 300 acres and greater in size and USFS fires 10 acres and greater throughout California from 1950 to 2002. Some fires...

  5. Behaviour of oxygen atoms near the surface of nanostructured Nb2O5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cvelbar, U; Mozetic, M

    2007-01-01

    Recombination of neutral oxygen atoms on oxidized niobium foil was studied. Three sets of samples have been prepared: a set of niobium foils with a film of polycrystalline niobium oxide with a thickness of 40 nm, another one with a film thickness of about 2 μm and a set of foils covered with dense bundles of single-crystal Nb 2 O 3 nanowires. All the samples were prepared by oxidation of a pure niobium foil. The samples with a thin oxide film were prepared by exposure of as-received foils to a flux of O-atoms, the samples with a thick polycrystalline niobium oxide were prepared by baking the foils in air at a temperature of 800 deg. C, while the samples covered with nanowires were prepared by oxidation in a highly reactive oxygen plasma. The samples were exposed to neutral oxygen atoms from a remote oxygen plasma source. Depending on discharge parameters, the O-atom density in the postglow chamber, as measured with a catalytic probe, was between 5 x 10 20 and 8 x 10 21 m -3 . The O-atom density in the chamber without the samples was found rather independent of the probe position. The presence of the samples caused a decrease in the O-atom density. Depending on the distance from the samples, the O-atom density was decreased up to 5 times. The O-atom density also depended on the surface morphology of the samples. The strongest decrease in the O-atom density was observed with the samples covered with dense bundles of nanowires. The results clearly showed that niobium oxide nanowires exhibit excellent catalytic behaviour for neutral radicals and can be used as catalysts of exhaust radicals found in many applications

  6. The effect of surface preparation on the behaviour of double strap adhesive joints with thick steel adherents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anyfantis, K.N.; Tsouvalis, N.G.

    2009-01-01

    One of the major factors determining the integrity of an adhesive bond is the preparation of the bonding surfaces. The present study is an experimental investigation of the effect of the surface preparation procedure on the response of a steel-to-steel double strap adhesive joint. Two procedures...... for preparing the bonding surfaces are investigated, namely grit blasting (GB) and simple sandpaper (SP). The behaviour of the joints, in terms of the force-displacement and strains-displacement responses was monitored and compared for both cases. The joints with SP surface preparation exhibited slightly lower...... stiffness and lower strength than the joints with GB surface preparation, while the latter failed at a lower displacement. In both cases, failure initiated at the free edges of the joints and the dominating failure mode was interfacial. In addition to the above experimental measurements, results are also...

  7. Surface spin disorder and spin-glass-like behaviour in manganese-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Topkaya, R., E-mail: rtopkaya@gyte.edu.tr [Gebze Institute of Technology, Department of Physics (Turkey); Akman, Oe. [Sakarya University, Department of Physics (Turkey); Kazan, S.; Aktas, B. [Gebze Institute of Technology, Department of Physics (Turkey); Durmus, Z.; Baykal, A. [Fatih University, Department of Chemistry (Turkey)

    2012-10-15

    Manganese-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles coated with triethylene glycol (TREG) have been prepared by the glycothermal reaction. The effect of Mn substitution and coating on temperature-dependent magnetic properties of the TREG-coated Mn{sub x}Co{sub 1-x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (0.0 {<=} x {<=} 0.8) with size of {approx}5-7 nm has been investigated in the temperature range of 10-300 K in a magnetic field up to 9 T. After the irreversible processes of the magnetic hysteresis curves were completed, the high-field regions of these curves were fitted by using a 'law of approach to saturation' to extract the magnetic properties, such as the effective anisotropy constant (K{sub eff}) and the anisotropy field (H{sub A}) etc. High coercive field of 12.6 kOe is observed in pure cobalt ferrite coated with TREG at 10 K. The low temperature unsaturated magnetization behaviour indicates the core-shell structure of the Mn{sub x}Co{sub 1-x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} NPs. Zero-field-cooled (ZFC) and field-cooled (FC) measurements revealed superparamagnetic phase of TREG-coated Mn{sub x}Co{sub 1-x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles at room temperature. The blocking and irreversibility temperatures obtained from ZFC-FC curves decrease at highest Mn concentration (x = 0.8). The existence of spin-glass-like surface layer with freezing temperature of 215 K was established with the applied field dependence of the blocking temperatures following the de Almeida-Thouless line for the Mn{sub 0.6}Co{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} NPs. The shifted hysteresis loops with exchange bias field of 60 Oe and high-field irreversibility up to 60 kOe in FC M-H curve at 10 K show that spin-glass-like surface spins surrounds around ordered core material of the Mn{sub 0.6}Co{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} NPs. FMR measurement show that all the TREG-coated Mn{sub x}Co{sub 1-x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles absorb microwave in broad field range of about ten thousands Oe. The spectra for all the

  8. Use of high-frequency imaging sonar (DIDSON) to observe fish behaviour towards a surface trawl

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rakowitz, G.; Tušer, Michal; Říha, Milan; Jůza, Tomáš; Balk, H.; Kubečka, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 123, July (2012), s. 37-48 ISSN 0165-7836. [Fish Sampling with Active Methods. České Budějovice, 08.09.2010-11.09.2010] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA206/07/1392 Grant - others:NFM(CZ) CZ 0091 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : active sampling gear * trawl * fish avoidance behaviour * DIDSON * freshwater reservoir Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.695, year: 2012

  9. Influence of the surface chemistry on the nanotribological behaviour of (AFM tip/graphite) couples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jradi, Khalil [Universite du Quebec a Trois Rivieres, Centre Integre en pates et papiers, 3351 boulevard des forges, Trois Rivieres, Quebec G9A 5H7 (Canada); Schmitt, Marjorie, E-mail: Marjorie.Schmitt@uha.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie Organique et Bioorganique, Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Mulhouse - CNRS, 3, rue Alfred Werner, 68093 Mulhouse Cedex (France); Bistac, Sophie [Laboratoire de Photochimie et d' Ingenierie Macromoleculaires, 3, rue Alfred Werner, 68093 Mulhouse Cedex (France)

    2012-03-01

    The development of the nanotechnology has made essential the knowledge of the tribological behaviour of carbonaceous materials, and more particularly of graphite. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is thus used to study the friction properties at this nanoscopic scale. In this work, results concerning the friction of AFM tips against graphite pins are presented, with a particular emphasis on the effect of the chemical modification of these tips on the tribological behaviour of graphite.

  10. Variability in vegetation and surface fuels across mixed-conifer-dominated landscapes with over 40 years of natural fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon M. Collins; Jamie M. Lydersen; Danny L. Fry; Katherine Wilkin; Tadashi Moody; Scott L. Stephens

    2016-01-01

    Studies of historical fire and vegetation conditions in dry conifer forests have demonstrated a high degree of heterogeneity across landscapes. However, there is a limit to the amount of inference that can be drawn from historical fire reconstructions. Contemporary "reference" landscapes may be able to provide information that is not available from historical...

  11. Relating fuel loads to overstorey structure and composition in a fire-excluded Sierra Nevada mixed conifer forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamie M. Lydersen; Brandon M. Collins; Eric E. Knapp; Gary B. Roller; Scott Stephens

    2015-01-01

    Although knowledge of surface fuel loads is critical for evaluating potential fire behaviour and effects, their inherent variability makes these difficult to quantify. Several studies relate fuel loads to vegetation type, topography and spectral imaging, but little work has been done examining relationships between forest overstorey variables and surface fuel...

  12. INVESTIGATION OF THERMAL BEHAVIOR OF MULTILAYERED FIRE RESISTANT STRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. GUOBYS

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents experimental and numerical investigations of thermal behavior under real fire conditions of new generation multilayered fire resistant structure (fire door, dimensions H × W × D: 2090 × 980 × 52 mm combining high strength and fire safety. This fire door consists of two steel sheets (thickness 1.5 and 0.7 mm with stone wool ( = 33 kg/m3, k = 0.037 W/mK, E = 5000 N/m2,  = 0.2 insulating layer in between. One surface of the structure was heated in fire furnace for specified period of time of 60 min. Temperature and deformation of opposite surface were measured from outside at selected measuring points during fire resistance test. Results are presented as temperature-time and thermal deformation-time graphs. Experimental results were compared with numerical temperature field simulation results obtained from SolidWorks®Simulation software. Numerical results were found to be in good agreement with experimental data. The percent differences between door temperatures from simulation and fire resistance test don’t exceed 8%. This shows that thermal behaviour of such multilayered structures can be investigated numerically, thus avoiding costly and time-consuming fire resistance tests. It is established that investigated structure should be installed in a way that places thicker steel sheet closer to the potential heat source than thinner one. It is also obtained that stone wool layer of higher density should be used to improve fire resistance of the structure.

  13. Understanding the life cycle surface land requirements of natural gas-fired electricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordaan, Sarah M.; Heath, Garvin A.; Macknick, Jordan; Bush, Brian W.; Mohammadi, Ehsan; Ben-Horin, Dan; Urrea, Victoria; Marceau, Danielle

    2017-10-01

    The surface land use of fossil fuel acquisition and utilization has not been well characterized, inhibiting consistent comparisons of different electricity generation technologies. Here we present a method for robust estimation of the life cycle land use of electricity generated from natural gas through a case study that includes inventories of infrastructure, satellite imagery and well-level production. Approximately 500 sites in the Barnett Shale of Texas were sampled across five life cycle stages (production, gathering, processing, transmission and power generation). Total land use (0.62 m2 MWh-1, 95% confidence intervals ±0.01 m2 MWh-1) was dominated by midstream infrastructure, particularly pipelines (74%). Our results were sensitive to power plant heat rate (85-190% of the base case), facility lifetime (89-169%), number of wells per site (16-100%), well lifetime (92-154%) and pipeline right of way (58-142%). When replicated for other gas-producing regions and different fuels, our approach offers a route to enable empirically grounded comparisons of the land footprint of energy choices.

  14. Impact of Land Surface and Forcing Parameters on the Spin-up Behaviour of Noah Land Surface Model over the Indian Sub-Continent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, A.; Satyanarayana, A. N. V.; Mandal, M.

    2018-01-01

    In the present study, an attempt is made to understand the influence of land surface parameters (such as soil moisture conditions, soil type and vegetation type) and forcing parameters on the model spin-up behaviour of a land surface model (LSM), namely Noah LSM, over the Indian sub-continent. The work presented here primarily aims to understand the optimum initial conditions to achieve the least spin-up time over the subtropical conditions that exist over the region of interest. The study is presented in three major parts. In the first part, a multivariate statistical analysis, namely principle component analysis is employed to investigate how parameters such as precipitation, air temperature, soil moisture, radiation components as well as various parameters that characterize soil and vegetation types influence the model spin-up. The second part deals with the study of the impact of soil and vegetation parameters in different seasons on the model spin-up behaviour. Finally, the third part looks into the influence of initial soil moisture condition and precipitation forcing on the spin-up behaviour of the model in different seasons to obtain the optimum initial conditions for the minimum spin-up time of the model. From the study, it is seen that the soil and vegetation type, as well as the soil moisture content influence the model spin-up significantly. The present study reports that the experiments initialized just before a continuous rainfall event has the least spin-up unless the initial soil is saturated.

  15. Aerosol generation from Kerosene fires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, S.; Lindner, W.

    1981-01-01

    The course of solvent surface fires is dependent on the surface area on fire; depth of pool and solvent composition do not influence the fire rate. But the fire rate increases rapidly with the burning area. The residual oxygen concentration after a fire in a closed container is dependent on the violence of the fire, i.e. on the burning surface. Moreover the ending of the fire is influenced by the TBP-concentration of the solvent. With sufficient supply of solvent the TBP-concentration changes only slightly during the fire, so that a fire at 14% O 2 -concentration is extinguished within the container. With the TBP-concentration changing considerably, i.e. little mass, a fire with a similar burning surface is already extinguished at an O 2 -content of 18%. The aerosol generation depends on the fire rate, and so it is higher in free atmosphere than in closed containers. The soot production in the mixture fire (kerosene /TBP 70/30) is higher by a factor 7 than in the pure kerosene fire. Primary soot-particles have a diameter of approximately 0,05 μm and agglomerate rapidly into aggregates of 0,2-0,4 μm. (orig.) [de

  16. Surface characterisation and electrochemical behaviour of porous titanium dioxide coated 316L stainless steel for orthopaedic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagarajan, S.; Rajendran, N.

    2009-01-01

    Porous titanium dioxide was coated on surgical grade 316L stainless steel (SS) and its role on the corrosion protection and enhanced biocompatibility of the materials was studied. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) were carried out to characterise the surface morphology and also to understand the structure of the as synthesised coating on the substrates. The corrosion behaviour of titanium dioxide coated samples in simulated body fluid was evaluated using polarisation and impedance spectroscopy studies. The results reveal that the titanium dioxide coated 316L SS exhibit a higher corrosion resistance than the uncoated 316L SS. The titanium dioxide coated surface is porous, uniform and also it acts as a barrier layer to metallic substrate and the porous titanium dioxide coating induces the formation of hydroxyapatite layer on the metal surface.

  17. Wettability behaviour of RTV silicone rubber coated on nanostructured aluminium surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momen, Gelareh; Farzaneh, Masoud; Jafari, Reza

    2011-05-01

    A nanostructutered superhydrophobic surface was elaborated by applying an RTV silicone rubber coating on electrochemically processed aluminium substrates. Study of anodisation voltage on surface morphology showed that higher anodising voltage led to larger pore sizes. Scanning electron microscopy image analysis showed bird's nest and beehive structures formed on anodised surfaces at 50 V and 80 V. Water static contact angle on the treated surfaces reached up to 160° at room temperature. Study of superhydrophobic surfaces at super cooled temperature showed important delayed freezing time for RTV hydrophobic surfaces when compared to non-treated aluminium. However, lower wettability was observed when surface temperature went down from 20 °C to -10 °C. Also, it was found that the capacitance of superhydrophobic surfaces decreased with increasing anodising voltage.

  18. Superomniphobic Surfaces for Military Applications: Nano- and Micro-Fabrication Methods. Chapter 1: Lithographic Fabrication of Surfaces with Different Microgeometries and Investigation of Their Wetting Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Majesté la Reine (en droit du Canada), telle que représentée par le ministre de la Défense nationale, 2011 DRDC Atlantic CR 2010-329 i...en tenant compte du comportement des DRDC Atlantic CR 2010-329 v forces d’adhérence en fonction de certains facteurs géométriques, dont...the surface wetting behaviour. Résumé …..... Les progrès rapides qu’ont connus récemment les techniques de microfabrication et de nanofabrication

  19. Evaluation of a post-fire tree mortality model for western US conifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon M. Hood; Charles W McHugh; Kevin C. Ryan; Elizabeth Reinhardt; Sheri L. Smith

    2007-01-01

    Accurately predicting fire-caused mortality is essential to developing prescribed fire burn plans and post-fire salvage marking guidelines. The mortality model included in the commonly used USA fire behaviour and effects models, the First Order Fire Effects Model (FOFEM), BehavePlus, and the Fire and Fuels Extension to the Forest Vegetation Simulator (FFE-FVS), has not...

  20. Effects of Surface Alloying and Laser Beam Treatment on the Microstructure and Wear Behaviour of Surfaces Modified Using Submerged Metal Arc Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regita BENDIKIENE

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effects of surface alloying of cheap plain carbon steel using submerged metal arc technique and subsequent laser beam treatment on the microstructure and wear behaviour of surfaced layers were studied. This method is the cheapest one to obtain high alloyed coatings, because there is no need to apply complex technologies of powder making (metal powder is spread on the surface of base metal or inserted into the flux, it is enough to grind, granulate and blend additional materials. On the other hand, strengthening of superficial layers of alloys by thermal laser radiation is one of the applications of laser. Surface is strengthened by concentrated laser beam focused into teeny area (from section of mm till some mm. Teeny area of metal heat up rapidly and when heat is drain to the inner metal layers giving strengthening effect. Steel surface during this treatment exceeds critical temperatures, if there is a need to strengthen deeper portions of the base metal it is possible even to fuse superficial layer. The results presented in this paper are based on micro-structural and micro-chemical analyses of the surfaced and laser beam treated surfaces and are supported by analyses of the hardness, the wear resistance and resultant microstructures. Due to the usage of waste raw materials a significant improvement (~ 30 % in wear resistance was achieved. The maximum achieved hardness of surfaced layer was 62 HRC, it can be compared with high alloyed conventional steel grade. Wear properties of overlays with additional laser beam treatment showed that weight loss of these layers was ~10 % lower compared with overlays after welding; consequently it is possible to replace high alloyed conventional steel grades forming new surfaces or restoring worn machine elements and tools.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.1.7621

  1. Modeling and predicting abrasive wear behaviour of poly oxy methylenes using response surface methodolgy and neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sagbas

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, abrasive wear behaviour of poly oxy methylenes (POM under various testing conditions was investigated. A central composite design (CCD was used to describe response and to estimate the parameters in the model. Response surface methodology (RSM was adopted to obtain an empirical model of wear loss as a function of applied load and sliding distance. Also, a neural network (NN model was developed for the prediction and testing of the results. Finally, a comparison was made between the results obtained from RSM and NN.

  2. Controlled anisotropic wetting behaviour of multi-scale slippery surface structure of non fluoro polymer composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Sabarish

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A facile process for in-situ modification of surface properties of Waste Expanded Polystyrene (WEP/graphite film produced by spin coating technique has been described. The additives undergo spontaneous surface agglomeration with formation of islands of forest of flake structure during the spinning process. This results in polymer films with enhanced roughness and highly hydrophobic surfaces. Wettability was analyzed using static water contact angle, surface morphology was observed using atomic force microscopy (AFM and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM. The polymer composite exhibited maximum water contact angle (WCA of 129°. Surface texture reveals the variation of surface roughness which enables anisotropic surface wettability property. The present work exhibits promising approach for fabricating nano flake forest in polymer structures for various industrial applications.

  3. Effects of biosurfactants, mannosylerythritol lipids, on the hydrophobicity of solid surfaces and infection behaviours of plant pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, S; Koitabashi, M; Nakamura, J; Fukuoka, T; Sakai, H; Abe, M; Kitamoto, D; Kitamoto, H

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the effects of mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) on the hydrophobicity of solid surfaces, their suppressive activity against the early infection behaviours of several phytopathogenic fungal conidia, and their suppressive activity against disease occurrences on fungal host plant leaves. The changes in the hydrophobicity of plastic film surfaces resulting from treatments with MEL solutions (MEL-A, MEL-B, MEL-C and isoMEL-B) and synthetic surfactant solutions were evaluated based on the changes in contact angles of water droplets placed on the surfaces. The droplet angles on surfaces treated with MELs were verified to decrease within 100 s after placement, with contact angles similar to those observed on Tween 20-treated surfaces, indicating decreases in surface hydrophobicity after MEL treatments. Next, conidial germination, germ tube elongation and the formation of appressorium of Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici, Colletotrichum dematium, Glomerella cingulata and Magnaporthe grisea were evaluated on plastic surfaces that were pretreated with surfactant solutions. On the surfaces of MEL-treated plastic film, inhibition of conidial germination, germ tube elongation, and suppression of appressoria formation tended to be observed, although the level of effect was dependent on the combination of fungal species and type of MEL. Inoculation tests revealed that the powdery mildew symptom caused by B. graminis f. sp. tritici was significantly suppressed on wheat leaf segments treated with MELs. MELs exhibited superior abilities in reducing the hydrophobicity of solid surfaces, and have the potential to suppress powdery mildew in wheat plants, presumably due to the inhibition of conidial germination. This study provides significant evidence of the potential for MELs to be used as novel agricultural chemical pesticides. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  4. Large Scale Experiments on Spacecraft Fire Safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urban, David L.; Ruff, Gary A.; Minster, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    structure. As a result, the prediction of the behaviour of fires in reduced gravity is at present not validated. To address this gap in knowledge, a collaborative international project, Spacecraft Fire Safety, has been established with its cornerstone being the development of an experiment (Fire Safety 1...... to ensure the carrier vehicle does not sustain damage, the absence of a crew removes the need for strict containment of combustion products. This will facilitate the possibility of examin-ing fire behaviour on a scale that is relevant to spacecraft fire safety and will provide unique data for fire model...... validation. This unprecedented opportunity will expand the understanding of the fundamentals of fire behaviour in spacecraft. The experiment is being developed by an international topical team that is collaboratively defining the experiment requirements and performing supporting analysis, experimentation...

  5. Influence of Surface Charge/Potential of a Gold Electrode on the Adsorptive/Desorptive Behaviour of Fibrinogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dargahi, Mahdi; Konkov, Evgeny; Omanovic, Sasha

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Adsorptive/desorptive behavior of fibrinogen (FG) on an electrochemically-polarized gold substrate is reported. • The adsorption affinity of FG (afFG) is constant on a negatively-charged substrate surface. • The afFG increases linearly with an increase in positive substrate surface charge. • The FG adsorption kinetics is strongly dependant on substrate surface charge. • The adsorbed FG layer can be desorbed by electrochemical evolution of hydrogen and oxygen. - Abstract: The effect of gold substrate surface charge (potential) on adsorptive/desorptive behaviour of fibrinogen (FG) was studied by employing differential capacitance (DC) and polarization modulated infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS), in terms of FG adsorption thermodynamics, kinetics, and desorption kinetics. The gold substrate surface charge was modulated in-situ within the electrochemical double-layer region by means of electrochemical potentiostatic polarization in a FG-containing electrolyte, thus avoiding the interference of other physico-chemical properties of the gold surface on FG’s interfacial behaviour. The FG adsorption equilibrium was modeled using the Langmuir isotherm. Highly negative values of apparent Gibbs free energy of adsorption (ranging from from −52.1 ± 0.4 to −55.8 ± 0.8 kJ mol −1 , depending on the FG adsorption potential) indicated a highly spontaneous and strong adsorption of FG onto the gold surface. The apparent Gibbs free energy of adsorption was found to be independent of surface charge when the surface was negatively charged. However, when the gold surface was positively charged, the apparent Gibbs free energy of adsorption exhibited a pronounced linear relationship with the surface charge, shifting to more negative values with an increase in positive electrode potential. The adsorption kinetics of FG was also found to be dependent on gold surface charge in a similar manner to the apparent Gibbs free energy of adsorption

  6. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Nanooctahedra MnFe₂O₄ onto the Wood Surface with Soft Magnetism, Fire Resistance and Electromagnetic Wave Absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hanwei; Yao, Qiufang; Wang, Chao; Ma, Zhongqing; Sun, Qingfeng; Fan, Bitao; Jin, Chunde; Chen, Yipeng

    2017-05-23

    In this study, nanooctahedra MnFe₂O₄ were successfully deposited on a wood surface via a low hydrothermal treatment by hydrogen bonding interactions. As-prepared MnFe₂O₄/wood composite (MW) had superior performance of soft magnetism, fire resistance and electromagnetic wave absorption. Among them, small hysteresis loops and low coercivity (magnetization-field curve of MW with saturation magnetization of 28.24 emu/g, indicating its excellent soft magnetism. The MW also exhibited a good fire-resistant property due to its initial burning time at 20 s; while only 6 s for the untreated wood (UW) in combustion experiments. Additionally, this composite revealed good electromagnetic wave absorption with a minimum reflection loss of -9.3 dB at 16.48 GHz. Therefore, the MW has great potential in the fields of special decoration and indoor electromagnetic wave absorbers.

  7. [Fire behavior of ground surface fuels in Pinus koraiensis and Quercus mongolica mixed forest under no wind and zero slope condition: a prediction with extended Rothermel model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ji-Li; Liu, Bo-Fei; Chu, Teng-Fei; Di, Xue-Ying; Jin, Sen

    2012-06-01

    A laboratory burning experiment was conducted to measure the fire spread speed, residual time, reaction intensity, fireline intensity, and flame length of the ground surface fuels collected from a Korean pine (Pinus koraiensis) and Mongolian oak (Quercus mongolica) mixed stand in Maoer Mountains of Northeast China under the conditions of no wind, zero slope, and different moisture content, load, and mixture ratio of the fuels. The results measured were compared with those predicted by the extended Rothermel model to test the performance of the model, especially for the effects of two different weighting methods on the fire behavior modeling of the mixed fuels. With the prediction of the model, the mean absolute errors of the fire spread speed and reaction intensity of the fuels were 0.04 m X min(-1) and 77 kW X m(-2), their mean relative errors were 16% and 22%, while the mean absolute errors of residual time, fireline intensity and flame length were 15.5 s, 17.3 kW X m(-1), and 9.7 cm, and their mean relative errors were 55.5%, 48.7%, and 24%, respectively, indicating that the predicted values of residual time, fireline intensity, and flame length were lower than the observed ones. These errors could be regarded as the lower limits for the application of the extended Rothermel model in predicting the fire behavior of similar fuel types, and provide valuable information for using the model to predict the fire behavior under the similar field conditions. As a whole, the two different weighting methods did not show significant difference in predicting the fire behavior of the mixed fuels by extended Rothermel model. When the proportion of Korean pine fuels was lower, the predicted values of spread speed and reaction intensity obtained by surface area weighting method and those of fireline intensity and flame length obtained by load weighting method were higher; when the proportion of Korean pine needles was higher, the contrary results were obtained.

  8. Analytical aspects of the Cardington fire test programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Both, C.; Foeken, R.J. van; Twilt, L.

    1996-01-01

    In the scope of the ECSC co-sponsored research project "The behaviour of a multi-storey steel-framed building subject to fire", fire tests have been carried out on structural systems in a full scale building. This offers unique possibilities to evaluate the fire behaviour of steel structures under

  9. Assessment of crown fire initiation and spread models in Mediterranean conifer forests by using data from field and laboratory experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez y Silva, F.; Guijarro, M.; Madrigal, J.; Jiménez, E.; Molina, J.R.; Hernando, C.; Vélez, R.; Vega, J.A.

    2017-11-01

    Aims of study: To conduct the first full-scale crown fire experiment carried out in a Mediterranean conifer stand in Spain; to use different data sources to assess crown fire initiation and spread models, and to evaluate the role of convection in crown fire initiation. Area of study: The Sierra Morena mountains (Coordinates ETRS89 30N: X: 284793-285038; Y: 4218650-4218766), southern Spain, and the outdoor facilities of the Lourizán Forest Research Centre, northwestern Spain. Material and methods: The full-scale crown fire experiment was conducted in a young Pinus pinea stand. Field data were compared with data predicted using the most used crown fire spread models. A small-scale experiment was developed with Pinus pinaster trees to evaluate the role of convection in crown fire initiation. Mass loss calorimeter tests were conducted with P. pinea needles to estimate residence time of the flame, which was used to validate the crown fire spread model. Main results: The commonly used crown fire models underestimated the crown fire spread rate observed in the full-scale experiment, but the proposed new integrated approach yielded better fits. Without wind-forced convection, tree crowns did not ignite until flames from an intense surface fire contacted tree foliage. Bench-scale tests based on radiation heat flux therefore offer a limited insight to full-scale phenomena. Research highlights: Existing crown fire behaviour models may underestimate the rate of spread of crown fires in many Mediterranean ecosystems. New bench-scale methods based on flame buoyancy and more crown field experiments allowing detailed measurements of fire behaviour are needed.

  10. Correlation between surface chemistry and settlement behaviour in barnacle cyprids (Balanus improvisus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fino, A; Petrone, L; Aldred, N; Ederth, T; Liedberg, B; Clare, A S

    2014-02-01

    In laboratory-based biofouling assays, the influence of physico-chemical surface characteristics on barnacle settlement has been tested most frequently using the model organism Balanus amphitrite (= Amphibalanus amphitrite). Very few studies have addressed the settlement preferences of other barnacle species, such as Balanus improvisus (= Amphibalanus improvisus). This study aimed to unravel the effects of surface physico-chemical cues, in particular surface-free energy (SFE) and surface charge, on the settlement of cyprids of B. improvisus. The use of well-defined surfaces under controlled conditions further facilitates comparison of the results with recent similar data for B. amphitrite. Zero-day-old cyprids of B. improvisus were exposed to a series of model surfaces, namely self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkanethiols with varying end-groups, homogenously applied to gold-coated polystyrene (PS) Petri dishes. As with B. amphitrite, settlement of cyprids of B. improvisus was influenced by both SFE and charge, with higher settlement on low-energy (hydrophobic) surfaces and negatively charged SAMs. Positively charged SAMs resulted in low settlement, with intermediate settlement on neutral SAMs of similar SFE. In conclusion, it is demonstrated that despite previous suggestions to the contrary, these two species of barnacle show similar preferences in response to SFE; they also respond similarly to charge. These findings have positive implications for the development of novel antifouling (AF) coatings and support the importance of consistency in substratum choice for assays designed to compare surface preferences of fouling organisms.

  11. Corrosion behaviour of laser surface melted magnesium alloy AZ91D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taltavull, C.; Torres, B.; Lopez, A.J.; Rodrigo, P.; Otero, E.; Atrens, A.; Rams, J.

    2014-01-01

    A high power diode laser (HPDL) was used to produce laser surface melting (LSM) treatments on the surface of the Mg alloy AZ91D. Different treatments with different microstructures were produced by varying the laser-beam power and laser-scanning speed. Corrosion evaluation, using hydrogen evolution and electrochemical measurements, led to a relationship between microstructure and corrosion. Most corrosion rates for LSM treated specimens were within the scatter of the as-received AZ91D, whereas some treatments gave higher corrosion rates and some of the samples had corrosion rates lower than the average of the corrosion rate for AZ91D. There were differences in corroded surface morphology. Nevertheless laser treatments introduced surface discontinuities, which masked the effect of the microstructure. Removing these surface defects decreased the corrosion rate for the laser-treated samples. - Highlights: • Corrosion behavior of AZ91D Mg alloys is intimately related with its microstructure. • Laser surface melting treatments allows surface modification of the microstructure. • Different laser parameters can achieve different microstructures. • Controlling laser parameters can produce different corrosion rates and morphologies. • Increase of surface roughness due to laser treatment is relevant to the corrosion rate

  12. Surface and bulk behaviour of some (n-hexane + chloroalkane) mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Gregorio, V.; Montano, D.; Giner, B.; Lafuente, C.; Royo, F.M.

    2009-01-01

    Surface tensions at the temperatures of (283.15, 288.15, 293.15, 298.15, 303.15, 308.15, and 313.15) K and isothermal (vapour + liquid) equilibrium at the temperatures of (288.15, 298.15, and 308.15) K of n-hexane with 1-chlorobutane or 1-chloropentane mixtures have been measured. Surface tension measurements were carried out with a drop volume tensiometer while the (vapour + liquid) equilibrium was obtained using an all-glass dynamic recirculating type still. Several bulk thermodynamic properties of the studied mixtures have been used together with the experimental measurements to analyse the results. Furthermore, a thermodynamic study of surface formation, including interesting properties such as excess surface compositions and excess properties of surface formation, is also presented

  13. Surface and bulk behaviour of some (n-hexane + chloroalkane) mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Gregorio, V.; Montano, D.; Giner, B.; Lafuente, C. [Departamento de Quimica Organica-Quimica Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Royo, F.M. [Departamento de Quimica Organica-Quimica Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain)], E-mail: femer@unizar.es

    2009-04-15

    Surface tensions at the temperatures of (283.15, 288.15, 293.15, 298.15, 303.15, 308.15, and 313.15) K and isothermal (vapour + liquid) equilibrium at the temperatures of (288.15, 298.15, and 308.15) K of n-hexane with 1-chlorobutane or 1-chloropentane mixtures have been measured. Surface tension measurements were carried out with a drop volume tensiometer while the (vapour + liquid) equilibrium was obtained using an all-glass dynamic recirculating type still. Several bulk thermodynamic properties of the studied mixtures have been used together with the experimental measurements to analyse the results. Furthermore, a thermodynamic study of surface formation, including interesting properties such as excess surface compositions and excess properties of surface formation, is also presented.

  14. Geomorphology of coal seam fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuenzer, Claudia; Stracher, Glenn B.

    2012-02-01

    Coal fires occur in underground natural coal seams, in exposed surface seams, and in coal storage or waste piles. The fires ignite through spontaneous combustion or natural or anthropogenic causes. They are reported from China, India, USA, South Africa, Australia, and Russia, as well as many other countries. Coal fires lead to loss of a valuable resource (coal), the emission of greenhouse-relevant and toxic gases, and vegetation deterioration. A dangerous aspect of the fires is the threat to local mines, industries, and settlements through the volume loss underground. Surface collapse in coal fire areas is common. Thus, coal fires are significantly affecting the evolution of the landscape. Based on more than a decade of experience with in situ mapping of coal fire areas worldwide, a general classification system for coal fires is presented. Furthermore, coal seam fire geomorphology is explained in detail. The major landforms associated with, and induced by, these fires are presented. The landforms include manifestations resulting from bedrock surface fracturing, such as fissures, cracks, funnels, vents, and sponges. Further manifestations resulting from surface bedrock subsidence include sinkholes, trenches, depressions, partial surface subsidence, large surface subsidence, and slides. Additional geomorphologic coal fire manifestations include exposed ash layers, pyrometamorphic rocks, and fumarolic minerals. The origin, evolution, and possible future development of these features are explained, and examples from in situ surveys, as well as from high-resolution satellite data analyses, are presented. The geomorphology of coal fires has not been presented in a systematic manner. Knowledge of coal fire geomorphology enables the detection of underground coal fires based on distinct surface manifestations. Furthermore, it allows judgments about the safety of coal fire-affected terrain. Additionally, geomorphologic features are indicators of the burning stage of fires

  15. On the properties of two binary NiTi shape memory alloys. Effects of surface finish on the corrosion behaviour and in vitro biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Es-Souni, Mohammed; Es-Souni, Martha; Fischer-Brandies, Helge

    2002-07-01

    The present paper compares the transformation behaviour and mechanical properties of two orthodontic wires of close chemical compositions. The effects of surface topography and surface finish residues on the potentiodynamic corrosion behaviour and biocompatibility are also reported. The cytotoxicity tests were performed on both alloys in fibroblast cell cultures from human gingiva using the MTT test. It is shown that the surface finish and the amounts of surface finish residues affect dramatically the corrosion resistance. Bad surface finish results in lower corrosion resistance. The in vitro biocompatibility, though not affected to the extent of corrosion resistance, is also reduced as the surface roughness and the amounts of residues increase. This is thought to be due to surface effects on corrosion and metallic ions release.

  16. Behaviour of total surface charge in SiO2-Si system under short-pulsed ultraviolet irradiation cycles characterised by surface photo voltage technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Ban-Hong; Lee, Wah-Pheng; Yow, Ho-Kwang; Tou, Teck-Yong

    2009-01-01

    Effects of time-accumulated ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and surface treatment on thermally oxidized p-type silicon wafers were investigated by using the surface photo voltage (SPV) technique via the direct measurement of the total surface charge, Q SC . The rise and fall times of Q sc curves, as a function of accumulated UV irradiation, depended on the thermal oxide thickness. A simple model was proposed to explain the time-varying characteristics of Q sc based on the UV-induced bond breaking of SiOH and SiH, and photoemission of bulk electrons to wafer surface where O 2 - charges were formed. While these mechanisms resulted in charge variations and hence in Q sc , these could be removed by rinsing the silicon wafers in de-ionized water followed by spin-dry or blow-dry by an ionizer fan. Empirical parameters were used in the model simulations and curve-fitting of Q SC . The simulated results suggested that initial changes in the characteristic behaviour of Q sc were mainly due to the net changes in the positive and negative charges, but subsequently were dominated by the accumulation of O 2 - during the UV irradiation.

  17. Self-assembling behaviour of Pt nanoparticles onto surface of TiO2 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    platinum) onto the surface of host support (titanium dioxide) during photodeposition process as a function of solution pH has been explored in detail by means of transmission electron microscope (TEM). The photocatalytic activity of the ...

  18. FRACTURE BEHAVIOUR OF P/M Cr-V LEDEBURITIC STEEL WITH DIFFERENT SURFACE ROUGHNESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Jurči

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The samples made from the Vanadis 6 PM ledeburitic tool steel were surface machined to different quality and heat treated by standard regime of the processing. Three point bending tests were carried out on processed samples. It was found that the flexural strength decreased with decreasing surface quality. The lowering of flexural strength has been accompanied with the decrease of the plastic component of plastic straining preceeding to fracture initiation (work of fracture of the material. It indicates that the surface roughness leads to the crack initiation before a larger plastic deformation of the material can be developed. Based on the results it can be suggested that to prevent the cracking of tools in the practice it is essential to make a surface machining (grinding, lapping, polishing to as high quality as possible.

  19. Impact of external wall insulation thickness on internal surface temperature behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponechal Radoslav

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last years, the concept of low-energy buildings based on high insulation levels becomes the reality. The aim of this paper is to assess some alternatives of insulated and uninsulated external walls with respect of thermal inertia. The thermal damping factor, phase shift, together with the daily courses of indoor surface temperature of the external wall have been analysed. Analysed surface temperatures show the ability of constructions to accumulate heat gains, which can arise during the day.

  20. Using simulated 3D surface fuelbeds and terrestrial laser scan data to develop inputs to fire behavior models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric Rowell; E. Louise Loudermilk; Carl Seielstad; Joseph O' Brien

    2016-01-01

    Understanding fine-scale variability in understory fuels is increasingly important as physics-based fire behavior modelsdrive needs for higher-resolution data. Describing fuelbeds 3Dly is critical in determining vertical and horizontal distributions offuel elements and the mass, especially in frequently burned pine ecosystems where fine-scale...

  1. Identifying Social-ecological Linkages to Develop a Community Fire Plan in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel A.S Sheridan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Community forestry in rural Mexico presents a unique opportunity to study the linkages and feedback within coupled social-ecological systems due to the fact that agrarian or indigenous communities control approximately half of the national territory of Mexico. We used social and ecological diagnostic tools to develop a fire management strategy for a communal forest containing an endemic piñón pine species, Pinus cembroides subs. orizabensis, in the state of Tlaxcala, Mexico. The ecological diagnostic was done through fuel inventory, forest structure sampling, and fire behaviour modelling. The social assessment was conducted through household interviews, community workshops, and direct participant observation. The ecological fire hazard was quantified and coupled with the social assessment to develop a fire management plan. Vertical fuel continuity and flashy surface fuels created a high fire hazard. Modelled fire behaviour showed a rapid rate of spread and high flame lengths under multiple scenarios. Relative impunity for starting forest fires, poor community and inter-agency organisation, and lack of project continuity across organisational sectors appear to be the most significant social limiting factors for wildfire management. Combining both social and ecological diagnostic tools provides a comprehensive understanding of the actual risks to forests, and identifies realistic community-supported options for conservation on cooperatively managed lands.

  2. Linking complex forest fuel structure and fire behavior at fine scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    EL Loudermilk; Joseph O' Brien; RJ Mitchell; JK Hiers; WP Cropper; S Grunwald; J Grego; J Fernandez

    2012-01-01

    Improved fire management of savannas and open woodlands requires better understanding of the fundamental connection between fuel heterogeneity, variation in fire behaviour and the influence of fire variation on vegetation feedbacks. In this study, we introduce a novel approach to predicting fire behaviour at the submetre scale, including measurements of forest...

  3. The desorption behaviour of implanted noble gases at low energy on silicon surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtslag, A.H.M.; van Silfhout, Arend

    1987-01-01

    Under UHV conditions, clean crystalline Si(111) surfaces have been bombarded mass-selectively at room temperature with noble gas ions, Ne+, Ar+, Kr+, at normal incidence. By means of stepwise heating up to 1050 K the activation energies and desorbed doses of the noble gases have been straight

  4. Fracture behaviour of P/M Cr-V ledeburitic steel with different surface roughness

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jurči, P.; Dlouhý, Ivo

    -, č. 18 (2011), s. 36-43 ISSN 1335-0803 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/09/1821 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : PM Cr-V ledeburitic steel * Microstructure * Surface roughness * Three point bending strength * Fractography Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy http://fstroj.uniza.sk/journal-mi/current.html

  5. Adsorption of plasma proteins : adsorption behaviour on apolar surfaces and effect on colloid stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Scheer, Albert

    1978-01-01

    In this thesis the adsorption of some plasma proteins (human albumin (HSA) and fibrinogen (HFb)) on non polar surfaces is studied, together with the influence of these proteins on the stability of polystyrene latices. The aim of these investigations is a better understanding of the processes

  6. Sub-Surface and Bulk Creep Behaviour of Polyurethane/Clay Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, J; Yusoh, K; Zhang, H X; Song, M

    2016-03-01

    A series of exfoliated and intercalated polyurethane organoclay nanocomposites were prepared by in situ polymerization of polyol/organoclay mixture, chain extender and diisocyanate. The creep behaviour of subsurface and bulk of the polyurethane coatings was investigated by nanoindentation technique and uniaxial conventional creep testing method, respectively. The results showed that the creep resistance of the nanocomposites was significantly improved by incorporation of organoclay. The enhancement of creep resistance was dependent on clay content as well as organoclay structure (exfoliation or intercalation) in the polymer matrix. With 1 wt% organoclay, the creep resistance increased by about 50% for the intercalated organoclay and 6% for the exfoliated organoclay systems, respectively, compared to the pristine polyurethane. Viscoelastic model was employed to investigate the effect of organoclay loadings on the creep performance of the polyurethane. Results showed the model was in good agreement with the experimental data. Incorporation of clay leads to an increase in elastic deformation especially in exfoliated polyurethane nanocomposites and induces a higher initial displacement at the early stage of creep.

  7. Cut marks on bone surfaces: influences on variation in the form of traces of ancient behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, David R; Pante, Michael; Archer, William

    2016-06-06

    Although we know that our lineage has been producing sharp-edged tools for over 2.6 Myr, our knowledge of what they were doing with these tools is far less complete. Studies of these sharp-edged stone tools show that they were most probably used as cutting implements. However, the only substantial evidence of this is the presence of cut marks on the bones of animals found in association with stone tools in ancient deposits. Numerous studies have aimed to quantify the frequency and placement of these marks. At present there is little consensus on the meaning of these marks and how the frequency relates to specific behaviours in the past. Here we investigate the possibility that mechanical properties associated with edges of stone tools as well as the properties of bones themselves may contribute to the overall morphology of these marks and ultimately their placement in the archaeological record. Standardized tests of rock mechanics (Young's modulus and Vickers hardness) indicate that the hardness of tool edges significantly affects cut-mark morphology. In addition, we show that indentation hardness of bones also impacts the overall morphology of cut marks. Our results show that rock type and bone portions influence the shape and prevalence of cut marks on animal bones.

  8. Behaviour of model particles of local precipitations of surface nuclear explosion in food chain and digestive tract of farm animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koz'min, G.V.; Epimakhov, V.G.; Sanzharova, N.I.

    2016-01-01

    The behaviour regularities of radioactive particles - simulators of nuclear surface explosion local fall outs in food chain and gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of farm animals are analyzed. The results show that there is a large difference in transport regularities of radioactive silicate particles and radioactive solutions in GIT. At intake of young fission products high concentrations of radionuclides in GIT content deal with sorption and concentrating of radionuclides on food particles and observe in third stomach, blind gut, terminals of middle and bung guts. Transport regularities of fused radioactive particles depend on digestive apparatus mobility, content consistency and morphological peculiarities of mucosa, which work towards transport slowing and storage of such particles in the part of sheep GIT with minimal dry substance content - abomasum [ru

  9. Electrocatalytic behaviour of surface confined pentanethio cobalt (II) binuclear phthalocyanines towards the oxidation of 4-chlorophenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makinde, Zainab O.; Louzada, Marcel; Mashazi, Philani; Nyokong, Tebello; Khene, Samson

    2017-12-01

    Cobalt binuclear phthalocyanine (CoBiPc) bearing pentanethio substituents at the peripheral positions were synthesized. The immobilization of the synthesized cobalt phthalocyanines on gold electrode was achieved using self-assembled monolayer method (SAM). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Kelvin Probe (KP) techniques were used to characterise the formation of monomeric and binuclear phthalocyanine SAMs on the gold surface. The phthalocyanine SAMs on gold electrodes were investigated for electrocatalytic oxidation of 4-chlorophenol. The electrocatalytic properties of tetra- and octa- pentanethio substituted cobalt binuclear phthalocyanine (CoBiPc) are compared with their tetra- and octa-pentanethio substituted phthalocyanine (CoPc). The SAMs modified gold electrode surfaces showed a peak current enhancement and stability and reduction in electrocatalytic potentials compared to the bare or unmodified electrodes towards the detection of the 4-chlorophenol. The SAMs of cobalt binuclear phthalocyanines exhibited more enhanced electrocatalytic properties in terms of stability, detection peak current and reduction of the electrocatalytic over potential.

  10. Influence of the surface finishing on the corrosion behaviour of AISI 316L stainless steel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dundeková, S.; Zatkalíková, V.; Fintová, Stanislava; Hadzima, B.; Škorík, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 1 (2015), s. 48-53 ISSN 1335-0803 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0063 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : AISI 316L stainless steel * Corrosion * Immersion test * Corrosion rate Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials http://ojs.mateng.sk/index.php/Mateng/article/view/166/251

  11. Correlation between the wear behaviour and the mechanical properties of several surface treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lelait, L.; Lina, A.; Rezakhanlou, R.; Duysen, J.C. van; Stebut, J. von

    1993-01-01

    Surface mechanical strength of chromium base (electrolytic and plasma sprayed) coatings is studied for friction and wear applications in nuclear environment. Indentation, scratch, and wear testing results are compared. In particular intrinsic coating brittleness is investigated as a mechanism responsible for impact wear. Electrolytic, hard chromium plate has a wear resistance well below that of the spray coated specimens studied. Acoustic emission level and brittle damage features are shown to be correlated. (orig.)

  12. Extreme diving behaviour in devil rays links surface waters and the deep ocean

    KAUST Repository

    Thorrold, Simon R.

    2014-07-01

    Ecological connections between surface waters and the deep ocean remain poorly studied despite the high biomass of fishes and squids residing at depths beyond the euphotic zone. These animals likely support pelagic food webs containing a suite of predators that include commercially important fishes and marine mammals. Here we deploy pop-up satellite archival transmitting tags on 15 Chilean devil rays (Mobula tarapacana) in the central North Atlantic Ocean, which provide movement patterns of individuals for up to 9 months. Devil rays were considered surface dwellers but our data reveal individuals descending at speeds up to 6.0 ms-1 to depths of almost 2,000 m and water temperatures <4 C. The shape of the dive profiles suggests that the rays are foraging at these depths in deep scattering layers. Our results provide evidence of an important link between predators in the surface ocean and forage species occupying pelagic habitats below the euphotic zone in ocean ecosystems. 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  13. Transport behaviour of xenobiotic micropollutants in surface waters - an experimental assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwientek, Marc; Kuch, Bertram; Rügner, Hermann; Dobramysl, Lorenz; Grathwohl, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Xenobiotics are substances that do not exist in natural systems but are increasingly produced by industrial processes and introduced into the environment. While many of these compounds are eliminated in waste water treatment plants, some are only barely degraded and are discharged into receiving water bodies. Often little is known about their acute or chronic toxicity and even less about their persistence or transport behaviour in aquatic systems. In the present study, the stability and turnover of selected micropollutants along a 7.5 km long segment of the River Ammer in Southwest Germany was investigated (catchment area 134 km²). This stream carries a proportion of treated wastewater which is clearly above the average in German rivers, mainly supplied by a major waste water treatment plant at the upstream end of the studied stream segment. An experimental mass balance approach was chosen where in- and outflow of water and target compounds into and out of the balanced stream segment was measured during base flow conditions. To cover a complete diurnal cycle of wastewater input, pooled samples were collected every 2 h over a sampling period of 24 h. A comparison of bulk mass fluxes showed that carbamazepine, a pharmaceutical, and phosphorous flame retardants, such as TCPP, behave conservative under the given conditions. Some retention was observed for the disinfectant product Triclosan and some polycyclic musk fragrances (e.g., HHCB). TAED, a bleaching activator used in detergents, was completely eliminated along the stream segment. The outcome of the experiment demonstrates the very different persistence of some widely-used micropollutants in aquatic systems. However, the mechanisms involved in their attenuation as well as the fate of the most persistent compounds still remain subject to further research.

  14. Fire investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomberg, A.

    There was considerable progress made on several fronts of fire investigation in the United States in recent years. Progress was made in increasing the quantity of fire investigation and reporting, through efforts to develop the National Fire Incident Reporting System. Improving overall quality of fire investigation is the objective of efforts such as the Fire Investigation Handbook, which was developed and published by the National Bureau of Standards, and the upgrading and expanding of the ""dictionary'' of fire investigation and reporting, the NFPA 901, Uniform Coding for Fire Protection, system. The science of fire investigation as furthered also by new approaches to post fire interviews being developed at the University of Washington, and by in-depth research into factors involved in several large loss fires, including the MGM Grand Hotel in Las Vegas. Finally, the use of special study fire investigations - in-depth investigations concentrating on specific fire problems - is producing new glimpses into the nature of the national fire problem. A brief description of the status of efforts in each of these areas is discussed.

  15. Heterogeneous catalytic materials solid state chemistry, surface chemistry and catalytic behaviour

    CERN Document Server

    Busca, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneous Catalytic Materials discusses experimental methods and the latest developments in three areas of research: heterogeneous catalysis; surface chemistry; and the chemistry of catalysts. Catalytic materials are those solids that allow the chemical reaction to occur efficiently and cost-effectively. This book provides you with all necessary information to synthesize, characterize, and relate the properties of a catalyst to its behavior, enabling you to select the appropriate catalyst for the process and reactor system. Oxides (used both as catalysts and as supports for cata

  16. Fire Stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Fire Stations in the United States Any location where fire fighters are stationed or based out of, or where equipment that such personnel use in carrying out their...

  17. US Fire Administration Fire Statistics

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The U.S. Fire Administration collects data from a variety of sources to provide information and analyses on the status and scope of the fire problem in the United...

  18. Estimation of the friction coefficient between wheel and rail surface using traction motor behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Y; Liang, B; Iwnicki, S

    2012-01-01

    The friction coefficient between a railway wheel and rail surface is a crucial factor in maintaining high acceleration and braking performance of railway vehicles thus monitoring this friction coefficient is important. Restricted by the difficulty in directly measuring the friction coefficient, the creep force or creepage, indirect methods using state observers are used more frequently. This paper presents an approach using a Kalman filter to estimate the creep force and creepage between the wheel and rail and then to identify the friction coefficient using the estimated creep force-creepage relationship. A mathematic model including an AC motor, wheel and roller is built to simulate the driving system. The parameters are based on a test rig at Manchester Metropolitan University. The Kalman filter is designed to estimate the friction coefficient based on the measurements of the simulation model. Series of residuals are calculated through the comparison between the estimated creep force and theoretical values of different friction coefficient. Root mean square values of the residuals are used in the friction coefficient identification.

  19. Measurement of sub-surface strata behaviour in bord and pillar mining: a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishna, R.

    1991-01-01

    Ranigunj coalfield (India) has been facing significant problems due to subsidence as a result of underground mining of coal seams. The occurrence of the thick seams in close proximity, shallow depth, great variation in the nature of superincumbent strata from site to site, followed by the slow rate of extraction, has aggravated subsidence problems. In the recent past, many such workings have collapsed, damaging a large number of surface structures. In view of the aforesaid need, a comprehensive project financed by the Ministry of Energy (Coal), was undertaken by the Department of Mining Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, at a Colliery in Ranigunj Coalfield. This investigation revealed that the caving horizon occurred at 4 times the extracted seam height, which differs from the findings in the UK, USA, and Australia. Also, it appears possible to estimate strata displacements from geological and physicomechanical information from the overlying rocks using the bending moment principle. Further, it was observed that the shallow workings could give rise to a sink hole type of subsidence, which is dangerous and could adversely affect the environment, safety of the public and properties. 11 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab

  20. Deposition of potassium salts on heat transfer surfaces in straw-fired boilers: a pilot-scale study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, H.P.; Baxter, L.L.; Sclippab, G.; Morey, C.; Frandsen, F.J.; Dam-Johansen, K. [Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2000-01-01

    The fate of inorganic salts in straw-fired combustion system was studied in Sandia's Multifuel Combustor. Special attention was drawn to the deposition of potassium, chlorine, and sulphur and the sulphation of potassium chloride to potassium sulphate. The experiments included wheat straw-firing under different combustion conditions and with elevated sulphur levels. Investigations of deposit formation on a simulated superheater tube placed in cross flow with the gas revealed that the deposit was ellipse-shaped and had an inner layer of white condensed salts. The inner layer had a dendritic structure and consisted of potassium chloride and potassium sulphate. Part of the water-soluble potassium in the straw was transformed into potassium silicates and a mixed mineral of potassium, calcium, and silicon. A novel probe was designed to investigate condensation phenomena. SEM-analyses revealed that the structure of the potassium salts consisted of individual angular particles of primarily KCl(1-2{mu}m) and a sponge-like matrix of sub-micron particles consisting primarily of K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, which may represent vapour condensate agglomerates. Mechanisms of deposit formation and the fate of chlorine, potassium, and sulphur in the system are discussed. 23 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. The role of the skin microrelief in the contact behaviour of human skin: contact between the human finger and regular surface textures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kuilenburg, Julien; Masen, Marc Arthur; van der Heide, Emile

    2013-01-01

    The friction behaviour of the human fingerpad as a function of asperity geometry was investigated experimentally. Surface textures consisting of evenly distributed spherically tipped asperities were used for in vivo testing. Using analytical expressions, a multi-scale model was developed to explain

  2. Forest fires in Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald A. Haines; William A. Main; Eugene F. McNamara

    1978-01-01

    Describes factors that contribute to forest fires in Pennsylvania. Includes an analysis of basic statistics; distribution of fires during normal, drought, and wet years; fire cause, fire activity by day-of-week; multiple-fire day; and fire climatology.

  3. Temperature of Steel Columns under Natural Fire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Wald

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Current fire design models for time-temperature development within structural elements as well as for structural behaviour are based on isolated member tests subjected to standard fire regimes, which serve as a reference heating, but do not model natural fire. Only tests on a real structure under a natural fire can evaluate future models of the temperature developments in a fire compartment, of the transfer of heat into the structure and of the overall structural behaviour under fire.To study overall structural behaviour, a research project was conducted on an eight storey steel frame building at the  Cardington Building Research Establishment laboratory on January 16, 2003. A fire compartment 11×7 m was prepared on the fourth floor. A fire load of 40 kg/m2 was applied with 100 % permanent mechanical load and 65 % of imposed load. The paper summarises the experimental programme and shows the temperature development of the gas in the fire compartment and of the fire protected columns bearing the unprotected floors.

  4. Deposition Assessment Of Anthropogenic Airborne 210Po And 210Pb In The Mosses And Surface Soil At The Vicinity Of A Coal-Fired Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zal U'yun Wan Mahmood; Nita Salina Abu Bakar; Abdul Kadir Ishak

    2014-01-01

    Anthropogenic airborne depositions of 210 Po and 210 Pb in the mosses and surface soil collected at the vicinity of a coal-fired power plant were assessed. The purpose of the study was to determine activity concentrations of 210 Po, 210 Pb and its activity ratio ( 210 Po/ 210 Pb). Other purposes were to determine their concentration factor (CF) in relation to track the potential source of those radionuclides and to identify most suitable moss species as a biological indicator for atmospheric deposition contaminants. In this study, different species of mosses Leucobryum aduncum, Campylopus serratus, Syrrhopodon ciliates and Vesicularia montagnei were collected in May 2011 at the area around 30 km radius from Tanjung Bin coal-fired power plant located in Pontian, Johor. The activity concentrations of 210 Po 210 Pb and 210 Po/ 210 Pb in mosses were in the range of 76.81 ± 4.94 - 251.33 ± 16.33 Bqkg -1 dry wt., 54.37 ± 3.38 - 164.63 ± 11.64 Bqkg -1 dry wt. and 1.10 - 2.00, respectively. Meanwhile the ranges for those radionuclides in the surface soil were 33.53 ± 2.10 - 183.93 ± 12.01 Bqkg -1 dry wt., 17.92 ± 1.18 - 298.60 ± 23.70 Bqkg -1 dry wt. and 1.57 - 2.44, respectively. Corresponding high ability of Leucobryum aduncum to accumulate more 210 Po and 210 Pb, wide geographical distribution, most abundant and high CF, therefore, the findings can be concluded this species was the most suitable as a biological indicator for atmospheric deposition contaminants such as 210 Po and 210 Pb. Furthermore, it is clear the accumulation of 210 Po and 210 Pb in mosses might be supplied from various sources of atmospheric deposition such as coal-fired power plant operation, industrial, agriculture and fertilizer activities, burned fuel fossil and forest; and other potential sources. Meanwhile, the main source of 210 Po and 210 Pb in surface soil is supplied from the in situ decay of radon and radium. (author)

  5. Fire risk related to the use of PV systems in building facades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazziotti Lamberto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays the use of photovoltaic (PV systems in buildings is not only related to the solar energy conversion into electrical one, but these PV modules or panels could also be used with aesthetic features or, even more, as thermal protection systems in building facades. Thanks to the technical development of the photovoltaic industry, PV system can easily be architectonically integrated into building construction elements such as roofs, vertical façade components, both with opaque or transparent surfaces. Furthermore, PV construction facades elements could also be provided by openings like doors or windows. Accident analysis show that the use of PV systems as construction elements could increase the risk of fire in buildings. In fact, international and National data report a growing number of fire caused by PV system applied or integrated in buildings. The Italian National Fire Service, that is the Authority having jurisdiction for fire safety in buildings (in Italy, in 2012 has released a Guideline in order to asses and mitigate the risk of fire when a PV system is put in place on a building as a façade or as a roof. The Guideline addresses not only the reduction of the PV fire ignitions causes and the aspects related to the fire spread due to the combustible parts that constitute PV modules or panels, but also take into account the safety of both the maintenance personnel and the rescue teams. This paper focuses on the fire safety aspects related to the use of fire PV panels and systems in building facades, showing some interesting experimental data related to the fire behaviour of these components and underlining the factors that promote the spread of fire, like the high operating temperature of the PV system itself.

  6. X-Ray Fluorescence to Estimate the Maximum Temperature Reached at Soil Surface during Experimental Slash-and-Burn Fires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melquiades, Fábio L; Thomaz, Edivaldo L

    2016-05-01

    An important aspect for the evaluation of fire effects in slash-and-burn agricultural system, as well as in wildfire, is the soil burn severity. The objective of this study is to estimate the maximum temperature reached in real soil burn events using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) as an analytical tool, combined with partial least square (PLS) regression. Muffle-heated soil samples were used for PLS regression model calibration and two real slash-and-burn soils were tested as external samples in the model. It was possible to associate EDXRF spectra alterations to the maximum temperature reached in the heat affected soils with about 17% relative standard deviation. The results are promising since the analysis is fast, nondestructive, and conducted after the burn event, although local calibration for each type of burned soil is necessary. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  7. Wildland fire limits subsequent fire occurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sean A. Parks; Carol Miller; Lisa M. Holsinger; Scott Baggett; Benjamin J. Bird

    2016-01-01

    Several aspects of wildland fire are moderated by site- and landscape-level vegetation changes caused by previous fire, thereby creating a dynamic where one fire exerts a regulatory control on subsequent fire. For example, wildland fire has been shown to regulate the size and severity of subsequent fire. However, wildland fire has the potential to influence...

  8. Obtention and evaluation of the fatigue behaviour of aluminium matrix composites subjected to different mechanical surface treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jesus Filho, Edson Souza de

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this work was the evaluation of the fatigue behaviour of aluminium metal matrix composites (MMC) obtained by powder metallurgy. The testing variables were the volumetric fraction of reinforcements and the type of mechanical surface treatment used. Initially, the composite materials were obtained from aluminium AA 1100 matrix, reinforced with silicon carbide (SiC) particles in the volumetric fraction of 5, 10 and 15%. An amount of control material (unreinforced) was produced for comparison purposes. The obtained materials were physically, mechanically and microstructurally characterised. The results showed a homogeneous distribution of the reinforcement particles and an improvement of the ultimate tensile strength of the composites with relation to the control material. However, some defects such as porosity and streaks of pure aluminium were detected. In a second stage, the fatigue tests of the composites were accomplished. The types of surface treatments used in the fabrication of the fatigue test specimens were machining and shot peening. For machining the variables were feed rate and tool type. The shot peened materials did not present a significant fatigue life improvement when compared to the control material. The coarse machined materials presented the worst fatigue life and the machining marks worked as strong stress concentrators. The material reinforced with 5% of SiC, differently of those reinforced with 10 and 15% showed inferior fatigue life when compared to the control material, probably because of a lower yielding strength, or lower reinforcement volumetric fraction. The material machined with hard metal (MD) did not present differences of fatigue life with relation to the machined with PCD, probably due to the class of the hard metal used. The material reinforced with 5% of SiC and shot peened, presented fatigue results with the largest standard deviations. The materials reinforced with 5% of SiC presented the smallest fatigue

  9. Effects of dormant and growing season burning on surface fuels and potential fire behavior in northern Florida longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) flatwoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    James B. Cronan; Clinton S. Wright; Maria Petrova

    2015-01-01

    Prescribed fire is widely used to manage fuels in high-frequency, low-severity fire regimes including pine flatwoods of the southeastern USA where prescribed burning during the growing season (the frost-free period during the calendar year) has become more common in recent decades. Growing season prescribed fires address ecological management objectives that focus on...

  10. Atmosphere-fire simulation of effects of low-level jets on pyro-convective plume dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin C. Simpson; Marwan Katurji; Michael T. Kiefer; Shiyuan Zhong; Joseph J. Charney; Warren E. Heilman; Xindi. Bian

    2013-01-01

    Blow-up fire behaviour can be broadly defined as a rapid escalation in the intensity or forward rate of spread of a wildland fire, and is often accompanied by extreme pyro-convection associated with rapid smoke release and dispersion. Blow-up fire behaviour is difficult to predict and has been linked to firefighter fatalities, making it an important fire management...

  11. Modern fire regime resembles historical fire regime in a ponderosa pine forest on Native American land

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amanda B. Stan; Peter Z. Fule; Kathryn B. Ireland; Jamie S. Sanderlin

    2014-01-01

    Forests on tribal lands in the western United States have seen the return of low-intensity surface fires for several decades longer than forests on non-tribal lands. We examined the surface fire regime in a ponderosa pinedominated (Pinus ponderosa) forest on the Hualapai tribal lands in the south-western United States. Using fire-scarred trees, we inferred temporal (...

  12. Human behaviour in tunnels: what further steps to take?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, Marieke Hendrikje; Jenssen, G.D.; Ingason, Haukur; Lönnermark, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Tunnel safety, especially in case of fires, has received a lot of attention due to heavy disasters. However, much attention is paid to controlling and extinguishing the fire, and not so much on the role of human behaviour. In this case, human behaviour includes the behaviour of road users, rail

  13. Measurements in high intensity fires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keltner, N.R.; Bainbridge, B.L.; Kent, L.A.; Schneider, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories utilizes fire test facilities to subject military components and nuclear material shipping containers to postulated accident environments. Understanding and simulating the fire environment found in a severe accident is a complex problem. While there is no concensus as to the appropriate definition of the fire environment, there are two general approaches for defining the minimum thermal exposure. One that is typically used with furnaces involves defining a fire temperature history, e.g., ASTM E-119; the other is to define the heat transfer rate to a surface in terms of the relative temperatures of the surface and the fire. Measurements of heat transfer in a fire and to an object engulfed by the fire are very difficult to make. In general, heat flux sensors are more expensive and less robust than temperature sensors. In the fire test facilities operated by Sandia National Laboratories, a variety of heat flux measurements have been made. These measurements have used circular foil heat flux gages for both total and radiative fluxes, transpiration radiometers, and thermal capacitance calorimeters of several designs. Because the physical size and the thermal mass of the test unit affects the heat transfer to the unit, some of the calorimeters have been designed to represent the physical size and shape of a proposed test item and to have a similar thermal capacitance. This approach provides data for direct comparison with fire test specifications. It can be used to make direct performance comparisons of thermal protection materials

  14. Multi-storey steel framed buildings under natural fire conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, G. van den; Fellinger, J.H.H.; Soetens, F.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, a methodology is presented by which the structural behaviour of composite steel framed building under natural fire conditions can be analysed. As a first step, a fire model is employed in order to predict the temperature development in the fire compartment. Secondly, a thermal

  15. Fire Whirls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohidi, Ali; Gollner, Michael J.; Xiao, Huahua

    2018-01-01

    Fire whirls present a powerful intensification of combustion, long studied in the fire research community because of the dangers they present during large urban and wildland fires. However, their destructive power has hidden many features of their formation, growth, and propagation. Therefore, most of what is known about fire whirls comes from scale modeling experiments in the laboratory. Both the methods of formation, which are dominated by wind and geometry, and the inner structure of the whirl, including velocity and temperature fields, have been studied at this scale. Quasi-steady fire whirls directly over a fuel source form the bulk of current experimental knowledge, although many other cases exist in nature. The structure of fire whirls has yet to be reliably measured at large scales; however, scaling laws have been relatively successful in modeling the conditions for formation from small to large scales. This review surveys the state of knowledge concerning the fluid dynamics of fire whirls, including the conditions for their formation, their structure, and the mechanisms that control their unique state. We highlight recent discoveries and survey potential avenues for future research, including using the properties of fire whirls for efficient remediation and energy generation.

  16. On fire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Helle Rabøl

    The title of this paper: “On fire”, refers to two (maybe three) aspects: firstly as a metaphor of having engagement in a community of practice according to Lave & Wenger (1991), and secondly it refers to the concrete element “fire” in the work of the fire fighters – and thirdly fire as a signifie...... of frustrations and riots...

  17. Fire Synthesis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1000ºC or special infrastructure which require careful maintenance. In such a situation fire synthesis is a simpler method that can be adopted for the bulk production of high purity alumina and related oxides. Fire Synthesis. Preparation of Alumina ...

  18. Fire Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denker, Deb; West, Lee

    2009-01-01

    For education administrators, campus fires are not only a distressing loss, but also a stark reminder that a campus faces risks that require special vigilance. In many ways, campuses resemble small communities, with areas for living, working and relaxing. A residence hall fire may raise the specter of careless youth, often with the complication of…

  19. On fire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Helle Rabøl

    The title of this paper: “On fire”, refers to two (maybe three) aspects: firstly as a metaphor of having engagement in a community of practice according to Lave & Wenger (1991), and secondly it refers to the concrete element “fire” in the work of the fire fighters – and thirdly fire as a signifie...

  20. Forest-fire models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haiganoush Preisler; Alan Ager

    2013-01-01

    For applied mathematicians forest fire models refer mainly to a non-linear dynamic system often used to simulate spread of fire. For forest managers forest fire models may pertain to any of the three phases of fire management: prefire planning (fire risk models), fire suppression (fire behavior models), and postfire evaluation (fire effects and economic models). In...

  1. Angora Fire, Lake Tahoe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    On the weekend of June 23, 2007, a wildfire broke out south of Lake Tahoe, which stretches across the California-Nevada border. By June 28, the Angora Fire had burned more than 200 homes and forced some 2,000 residents to evacuate, according to The Seattle Times and the Central Valley Business Times. On June 27, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite captured this image of the burn scar left by the Angora fire. The burn scar is dark gray, or charcoal. Water bodies, including the southern tip of Lake Tahoe and Fallen Leaf Lake, are pale silvery blue, the silver color a result of sunlight reflecting off the surface of the water. Vegetation ranges in color from dark to bright green. Streets are light gray, and the customary pattern of meandering residential streets and cul-de-sacs appears throughout the image, including the area that burned. The burn scar shows where the fire obliterated some of the residential areas just east of Fallen Leaf Lake. According to news reports, the U.S. Forest Service had expressed optimism about containing the fire within a week of the outbreak, but a few days after the fire started, it jumped a defense, forcing the evacuation of hundreds more residents. Strong winds that had been forecast for June 27, however, did not materialize, allowing firefighters to regain ground in controlling the blaze. On June 27, authorities hoped that the fire would be completely contained by July 3. According to estimates provided in the daily report from the National Interagency Fire Center, the fire had burned 3,100 acres (about 12.5 square kilometers) and was about 55 percent contained as of June 28. Some mandatory evacuations remained in effect. NASA image by Jesse Allen, using data provided courtesy of the NASA/GSFC/MITI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team.

  2. Numerical analysis of three-dimensional flow and thermal behaviour in a scraped-surface heat exchanger; Analyse numerique tridimensionnelle des comportements hydrodynamique et thermique d`un echangeur de chaleur a surface raclee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baccar, M.; Salah Abid, M. [Ecole Nationale d`ingenieurs de Sfax (Tunisia)

    1997-11-01

    In the present work, heat transfer from a jacketed wall of a scraped-surface heat exchanger (SSHE) is numerically simulated. With the purpose to analyse the hydrodynamic and thermal behaviour under various operating and geometrical conditions, the three-dimensional form of the Navier-Stockes and energy equations are discretized using the controlled-volume method. The hydrodynamic and thermal behaviour can take a variety of possible configurations depending on the number, shape, size of the scrapers and the ratio of rotation to the axial Reynolds numbers. The rate of heat transfer is also numerically determined in order to optimize operating and geometrical conditions. (authors) 20 refs.

  3. Late Holocene geomorphic record of fire in ponderosa pine and mixed-conifer forests, Kendrick Mountain, northern Arizona, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sara E. Jenkins; Carolyn Hull Sieg; Diana E. Anderson; Darrell S. Kaufman; Philip A. Pearthree

    2011-01-01

    Long-term fire history reconstructions enhance our understanding of fire behaviour and associated geomorphic hazards in forested ecosystems. We used 14C ages on charcoal from fire-induced debris-flow deposits to date prehistoric fires on Kendrick Mountain, northern Arizona, USA. Fire-related debris-flow sedimentation dominates Holocene fan deposition in the study area...

  4. FIRE_AX_SOF_BUOY_DFT

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) Surface of the Ocean, Fluxes and Interaction with the Atmosphere (SOFIA)...

  5. Bistable firing properties of soleus motor units in unrestrained rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    EKEN, T.; KIEHN, O.

    1989-01-01

    of the motoneuron pool by stimulation of la afferents, or inhibition by stimulation of skin afferents. The shifts were not related to gross limb movements. This phenomenon is referred to as a bistable firing pattern. Bistable firing also occurred spontaneously during quiet standing. Typically the firing frequency...... was unchanged or only phasically influenced. These results demonstrate for the first time a bistable firing pattern during postural activity in the intact animal. The firing pattern closely resembles the bistable behaviour described in spinal motoneurons in reduced preparations, where it is due to the presence...... of a plateau potential. This suggests that the bistable firing is unexplained by plateau potentials also in the intact animal....

  6. Development of a model to predict ash transport and water pollution risk in fire-affected environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neris, Jonay; Elliot, William J.; Doerr, Stefan H.; Robichaud, Peter R.

    2017-04-01

    An estimated that 15% of the world's population lives in volcanic areas. Recent catastrophic erosion events following wildfires in volcanic terrain have highlighted the geomorphological instability of this soil type under disturbed conditions and steep slopes. Predicting the hydrological and erosional response of this soils in the post-fire period is the first step to design and develop adequate actions to minimize risks in the post-fire period. In this work we apply, for the first time, the Water Erosion Prediction Project model for predicting erosion and runoff events in fire-affected volcanic soils in Europe. Two areas affected by wildfires in 2015 were selected in Tenerife (Spain) representative of different fire behaviour (downhill surface fire with long residence time vs uphill crown fire with short residence time), severity (moderate soil burn severity vs light soil burn severity) and climatic conditions (average annual precipitation of 750 and 210 mm respectively). The actual erosion processes were monitored in the field using silt fences. Rainfall and rill simulations were conducted to determine hydrologic, interrill and rill erosion parameters. The soils were sampled and key properties used as model input, evaluated. During the first 18 months after the fire 7 storms produced runoff and erosion in the selected areas. Sediment delivery reached 5.4 and 2.5 Mg ha-1 respectively in the first rainfall event monitored after the fire, figures comparable to those reported for fire-affected areas of the western USA with similar climatic conditions but lower than those showed by wetter environments. The validation of the WEPP model using field data showed reasonable estimates of hillslope sediment delivery in the post-fire period and, therefore, it is suggested that this model can support land managers in volcanic areas in Europe in predicting post-fire hydrological and erosional risks and designing suitable mitigation treatments.

  7. First application of the WEPP model to predict runoff and erosion risk in fire-affected volcanic areas in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neris, Jonay; Robichaud, Peter R.; Elliot, William J.; Doerr, Stefan H.; Notario del Pino, Jesús S.; Lado, Marcos

    2017-04-01

    An estimated that 15% of the world's population lives in volcanic areas. Recent catastrophic erosion events following wildfires in volcanic terrain have highlighted the geomorphological instability of this soil type under disturbed conditions and steep slopes. Predicting the hydrological and erosional response of this soils in the post-fire period is the first step to design and develop adequate actions to minimize risks in the post-fire period. In this work we apply, for the first time, the Water Erosion Prediction Project model for predicting erosion and runoff events in fire-affected volcanic soils in Europe. Two areas affected by wildfires in 2015 were selected in Tenerife (Spain) representative of different fire behaviour (downhill surface fire with long residence time vs uphill crown fire with short residence time), severity (moderate soil burn severity vs light soil burn severity) and climatic conditions (average annual precipitation of 750 and 210 mm respectively). The actual erosion processes were monitored in the field using silt fences. Rainfall and rill simulations were conducted to determine hydrologic, interrill and rill erosion parameters. The soils were sampled and key properties used as model input, evaluated. During the first 18 months after the fire 7 storms produced runoff and erosion in the selected areas. Sediment delivery reached 5.4 and 2.5 Mg ha-1 respectively in the first rainfall event monitored after the fire, figures comparable to those reported for fire-affected areas of the western USA with similar climatic conditions but lower than those showed by wetter environments. The validation of the WEPP model using field data showed reasonable estimates of hillslope sediment delivery in the post-fire period and, therefore, it is suggested that this model can support land managers in volcanic areas in Europe in predicting post-fire hydrological and erosional risks and designing suitable mitigation treatments.

  8. Description of a fire and its effects in the Nylsvley Nature Reserve: a synthesis report

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gandar, MV

    1982-10-01

    Full Text Available immediately before the main fire so that the behaviour of the fire could be more readily assessed. This also provided an opportunity to study the effects of different rates of spread of the fire (and thus, indirectly, different fire intensities) on the woody...

  9. Fire ants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 222-1222) from anywhere in the United States. Poisonous Ingredient Fire ant venom contains a chemical called ... Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap 140. Otten EJ. Venomous animal injuries. In: Walls RM, Hockberger RS, Gausche-Hill ...

  10. Coal fire mapping of East Basuria Colliery, Jharia coalfield using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Coal fire mapping of East Basuria Colliery, Jharia coalfield. 167 and the surface area was sealed with soil. Later on, blazing fire was reported in three different galleries of V/VI coal seam. Again in 1995, a blazing fire was noticed on the eastern edge of the quarry. To prevent further advance of fire towards the adjoin- ing area ...

  11. Fossils and fire: a study on the effects of fire on paleontological resources at Badlands National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachel Benton; James Reardon

    2006-01-01

    National Park Service policies stipulate that each park with vegetation capable of burning will prepare a fire management plan. Badlands National Park completed its fire management plan in 2004. Fossils are a principle resource of the park and the fire sensitivity of fossils is the focus of this study. The surface temperatures of fossil specimens and fire behavior...

  12. The national Fire and Fire Surrogate study: effects of fuel reduction methods on forest vegetation structure and fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dylan W. Schwilk; Jon E. Keeley; Eric E. Knapp; James Mciver; John D. Bailey; Christopher J. Fettig; Carl E. Fiedler; Richy J. Harrod; Jason J. Moghaddas; Kenneth W. Outcalt; Carl N. Skinner; Scott L. Stephens; Thomas A. Waldrop; Daniel A. Yaussy; Andrew Youngblood

    2009-01-01

    Changes in vegetation and fuels were evaluated from measurements taken before and after fuel reduction treatments (prescribed fire, mechanical treatments, and the combination of the two) at 12 Fire and Fire Surrogate (FFS) sites located in forests with a surface fire regime across the conterminous United States. To test the relative effectiveness of fuel reduction...

  13. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; forest structure and fire hazard fact sheet 02: fire hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocky Mountain Research Station USDA Forest Service

    2004-01-01

    Fire hazard reflects the potential fire behavior and magnitude of effects as a function of fuel conditions. This fact sheet discusses crown fuels, surface fuels, and ground fuels and their contribution and involvement in wildland fire.Other publications in this series...

  14. Modeling impacts of fire severity on successional trajectories and future fire behavior in Alaskan boreal forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jill F. Johnstone; T. Scott Rupp; Mark Olson; David. Verbyla

    2011-01-01

    Much of the boreal forest in western North America and Alaska experiences frequent, stand-replacing wildfires. Secondary succession after fire initiates most forest stands and variations in fire characteristics can have strong effects on pathways of succession. Variations in surface fire severity that influence whether regenerating forests are dominated by coniferous...

  15. Model of large pool fires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fay, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    A two zone entrainment model of pool fires is proposed to depict the fluid flow and flame properties of the fire. Consisting of combustion and plume zones, it provides a consistent scheme for developing non-dimensional scaling parameters for correlating and extrapolating pool fire visible flame length, flame tilt, surface emissive power, and fuel evaporation rate. The model is extended to include grey gas thermal radiation from soot particles in the flame zone, accounting for emission and absorption in both optically thin and thick regions. A model of convective heat transfer from the combustion zone to the liquid fuel pool, and from a water substrate to cryogenic fuel pools spreading on water, provides evaporation rates for both adiabatic and non-adiabatic fires. The model is tested against field measurements of large scale pool fires, principally of LNG, and is generally in agreement with experimental values of all variables

  16. The relationship between the acoustic behaviour and surface activity of killer whales (Orcinus orca) that feed on herring (Clupea harengus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simon, M.; McGregor, P.K.; Ugarte, F.

    2007-01-01

    We describe the acoustic behaviour of piscivorous killer whales in Norwegian and Icelandic waters. Whales were assigned to one of three activities (feeding, travelling or other), and sound recordings were made in their proximity with a single hydrophone and a digital audiotape (DAT) recorder. A q...

  17. Noise characteristics of resistors buried in low-temperature co-fired ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolek, A; Ptak, P; Dziedzic, A

    2003-01-01

    The comparison of noise properties of conventional thick film resistors prepared on alumina substrates and resistors embedded in low-temperature co-fired ceramics (LTCCs) is presented. Both types of resistors were prepared from commercially available resistive inks. Noise measurements of LTCC resistors below 1 kHz show Gaussian 1/f noise. This is concluded from the calculations of the second spectra as well as from studying the volume dependence of noise intensity. It has occurred that noise index of LTCC resistors on average is not worse than that of conventional resistors. A detailed study of co-fired surface resistors and co-fired buried resistors show that burying a resistor within LTCC substrate usually leads to (significant) enhancement of resistance but not of noise intensity. We interpret this behaviour as another argument in favour of tunnelling as the dominant conduction mechanism in LTCC resistors

  18. Noise characteristics of resistors buried in low-temperature co-fired ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Kolek, A; Dziedzic, A

    2003-01-01

    The comparison of noise properties of conventional thick film resistors prepared on alumina substrates and resistors embedded in low-temperature co-fired ceramics (LTCCs) is presented. Both types of resistors were prepared from commercially available resistive inks. Noise measurements of LTCC resistors below 1 kHz show Gaussian 1/f noise. This is concluded from the calculations of the second spectra as well as from studying the volume dependence of noise intensity. It has occurred that noise index of LTCC resistors on average is not worse than that of conventional resistors. A detailed study of co-fired surface resistors and co-fired buried resistors show that burying a resistor within LTCC substrate usually leads to (significant) enhancement of resistance but not of noise intensity. We interpret this behaviour as another argument in favour of tunnelling as the dominant conduction mechanism in LTCC resistors.

  19. Coupled atmosphere-wildland fire modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Henri Balbi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Simulating the interaction between fire and atmosphere is critical to the estimation of the rate of spread of the fire. Wildfire’s convection (i.e., entire plume can modify the local meteorology throughout the atmospheric boundary layer and consequently affect the fire propagation speed and behaviour. In this study, we use for the first time the Méso-NH meso-scale numerical model coupled to the point functional ForeFire simplified physical front-tracking wildfire model to investigate the differences introduced by the atmospheric feedback in propagation speed and behaviour. Both numerical models have been developed as research tools for operational models and are currently used to forecast localized extreme events. These models have been selected because they can be run coupled and support decisions in wildfire management in France and Europe. The main originalities of this combination reside in the fact that Méso-NH is run in a Large Eddy Simulation (LES configuration and that the rate of spread model used in ForeFire provides a physical formulation to take into account the effect of wind and slope. Simulations of typical experimental configurations show that the numerical atmospheric model is able to reproduce plausible convective effects of the heat produced by the fire. Numerical results are comparable to estimated values for fire-induced winds and present behaviour similar to other existing numerical approaches.

  20. Fire management of California shrubland landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, Jon E.

    2002-01-01

    Fire management of California shrublands has been heavily influenced by policies designed for coniferous forests, however, fire suppression has not effectively excluded fire from chaparral and coastal sage scrub landscapes and catastrophic wildfires are not the result of unnatural fuel accumulation. There is no evidence that prescribed burning in these shrublands provides any resource benefit and in some areas may negatively impact shrublands by increasing fire frequency. Therefore, fire hazard reduction is the primary justification for prescription burning, but it is doubtful that rotational burning to create landscape age mosaics is a cost effective method of controlling catastrophic wildfires. There are problems with prescription burning in this crown-fire ecosystem that are not shared by forests with a natural surface-fire regime. Prescription weather conditions preclude burning at rotation intervals sufficient to effect the control of fires ignited under severe weather conditions. Fire management should focus on strategic placement of prescription burns to both insure the most efficient fire hazard reduction and to minimize the amount of landscape exposed to unnaturally high fire frequency. A major contributor to increased fire suppression costs and increased loss of property and lives is the continued urban sprawl into wildlands naturally subjected to high intensity crown fires. Differences in shrubland fire history suggest there may be a need for different fire management tactics between central coastal and southern California. Much less is known about shrubland fire history in the Sierra Nevada foothills and interior North Coast Ranges, and thus it would be prudent to not transfer these ideas too broadly across the range of chaparral until we have a clearer understanding of the extent of regional variation in shrubland fire regimes.

  1. A novel test method for evaluation of the abrasive wear behaviour of total hip stems at the interface between implant surface and bone cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, R; Steinhauser, E; Holzwarth, U; Schmitt, M; Mittelmeier, W

    2004-01-01

    After total hip replacement, some cemented titanium stems show above-average early loosening rates. Increased release of wear particles and resulting reaction of the peri-prosthetic tissue were considered responsible. The objective was to develop a test method for analysing the abrasive wear behaviour of cemented stems and for generating wear particles at the interface with the bone cement. By means of the novel test device, cemented hip stems with different designs, surface topographies and material compositions using various bone cements could be investigated. Before testing, the cemented stems were disconnected from the cement mantle to simulate the situation of stem loosening (debonding). Subsequently, constant radial contact pressures were applied on to the stem surface by a force-controlled hydraulic cylinder. Oscillating micromotions of the stem (+/- 250 microm; 3 x 10(6)cycles; 5 Hz) were carried out at the cement interface initiating the wear process. The usability of the method was demonstrated by testing geometrically identical Ti-6A1-7Nb and Co-28Cr-6Mo hip stems (n= 12) with definite rough and smooth surfaces, combined with commercially available bone cement containing zirconium oxide particles. Under identical frictional conditions with the rough shot-blasted stems, clearly more wear particles were generated than with the smooth stems, whereas the material composition of the hip stems had less impact on the wear behaviour.

  2. Advanced analysis and design for fire safety of steel structures

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Guoqiang

    2013-01-01

    Advanced Analysis and Design for Fire Safety of Steel Structures systematically presents the latest findings on behaviours of steel structural components in a fire, such as the catenary actions of restrained steel beams, the design methods for restrained steel columns, and the membrane actions of concrete floor slabs with steel decks. Using a systematic description of structural fire safety engineering principles, the authors illustrate the important difference between behaviours of an isolated structural element and the restrained component in a complete structure under fire conditions. The book will be an essential resource for structural engineers who wish to improve their understanding of steel buildings exposed to fires. It is also an ideal textbook for introductory courses in fire safety for master’s degree programs in structural engineering, and is excellent reading material for final-year undergraduate students in civil engineering and fire safety engineering. Furthermore, it successfully bridges th...

  3. Fire and forest history at Mount Rushmore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Peter M; Wienk, Cody L; Symstad, Amy J

    2008-12-01

    Mount Rushmore National Memorial in the Black Hills of South Dakota is known worldwide for its massive sculpture of four of the United States' most respected presidents. The Memorial landscape also is covered by extensive ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forest that has not burned in over a century. We compiled dendroecological and forest structural data from 29 plots across the 517-ha Memorial and used fire behavior modeling to reconstruct the historical fire regime and forest structure and compare them to current conditions. The historical fire regime is best characterized as one of low-severity surface fires with occasional (> 100 years) patches (fire. We estimate that only approximately 3.3% of the landscape burned as crown fire during 22 landscape fire years (recorded at > or = 25% of plots) between 1529 and 1893. The last landscape fire was in 1893. Mean fire intervals before 1893 varied depending on spatial scale, from 34 years based on scar-to-scar intervals on individual trees to 16 years between landscape fire years. Modal fire intervals were 11-15 years and did not vary with scale. Fire rotation (the time to burn an area the size of the study area) was estimated to be 30 years for surface fire and 800+ years for crown fire. The current forest is denser and contains more small trees, fewer large trees, lower canopy base heights, and greater canopy bulk density than a reconstructed historical (1870) forest. Fire behavior modeling using the NEXUS program suggests that surface fires would have dominated fire behavior in the 1870 forest during both moderate and severe weather conditions, while crown fire would dominate in the current forest especially under severe weather. Changes in the fire regime and forest structure at Mount Rushmore parallel those seen in ponderosa pine forests from the southwestern United States. Shifts from historical to current forest structure and the increased likelihood of crown fire justify the need for forest restoration before a

  4. 46 CFR 28.820 - Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses... REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Aleutian Trade Act Vessels § 28.820 Fire pumps, fire mains... pump connected to a fixed piping system. This pump must be capable of delivering an effective stream of...

  5. 46 CFR 28.315 - Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses... After September 15, 1991, and That Operate With More Than 16 Individuals on Board § 28.315 Fire pumps... be equipped with a self-priming, power driven fire pump connected to a fixed piping system. (1) A...

  6. FireStem2D — A two-dimensional heat transfer model for simulating tree stem injury in fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efthalia K. Chatziefstratiou; Gil Bohrer; Anthony S. Bova; Ravishankar Subramanian; Renato P.M. Frasson; Amy Scherzer; Bret W. Butler; Matthew B. Dickinson

    2013-01-01

    FireStem2D, a software tool for predicting tree stem heating and injury in forest fires, is a physically-based, two-dimensional model of stem thermodynamics that results from heating at the bark surface. It builds on an earlier one-dimensional model (FireStem) and provides improved capabilities for predicting fire-induced mortality and injury before a fire occurs by...

  7. Forecasting distribution of numbers of large fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidenshink, Jeffery C.; Preisler, Haiganoush K.; Howard, Stephen; Burgan, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Systems to estimate forest fire potential commonly utilize one or more indexes that relate to expected fire behavior; however they indicate neither the chance that a large fire will occur, nor the expected number of large fires. That is, they do not quantify the probabilistic nature of fire danger. In this work we use large fire occurrence information from the Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity project, and satellite and surface observations of fuel conditions in the form of the Fire Potential Index, to estimate two aspects of fire danger: 1) the probability that a 1 acre ignition will result in a 100+ acre fire, and 2) the probabilities of having at least 1, 2, 3, or 4 large fires within a Predictive Services Area in the forthcoming week. These statistical processes are the main thrust of the paper and are used to produce two daily national forecasts that are available from the U.S. Geological Survey, Earth Resources Observation and Science Center and via the Wildland Fire Assessment System. A validation study of our forecasts for the 2013 fire season demonstrated good agreement between observed and forecasted values.

  8. Biscuit Fire, OR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    In southwest Oregon, the Biscuit Fire continues to grow. This image, acquired from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite on August 14, 2002, shows the pillars of smoke arising from the fires. Active fire areas are in red. More than 6,000 fire personnel are assigned to the Biscuit Fire alone, which was 390,276 acres as of Thursday morning, August 15, and only 26 percent contained. Among the resources threatened are thousands of homes, three nationally designated wild and scenic rivers, and habitat for several categories of plants and animals at risk of extinction. Firefighters currently have no estimate as to when the fire might be contained.With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next six years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission

  9. BUSHFIRE BEHAVIOUR MODELLING USING FARSITE WITH GIS INTEGRATION FOR THE MITCHAM HILLS, SOUTH AUSTRALIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SAAD ALSHARRAH

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Bushfire behaviour modelling using FARSITE with GIS integration for the Mitcham Hills, South Australia. Bushfires are now becoming of serious concern as they can have devastating effects on the natural and human ecosystems. An important element of bushfires is fire behaviour. Fire behaviour describes the mode in which a fire reacts to the influences of fuel, weather, topography and fire fighting. In order to understand and predict fire growth and the behaviour of fires, decision makers use fire models to simulate fire behaviour. Fire behaviour modelling can assist forest managers and environmental decision makers in the understanding of how a fire will behave with the influences of environmental factors such as fuels, weather and topography. This study models (spatially and temporally the behaviour of a hypothetical fire for the Mitcham Hills in South Australia using FARSITE (Fire Area Simulator. FARSITE, a two-dimensional deterministic model, takes into account the factors that influence fire behaviour (fuels, weather and topography and simulates the spread and behaviours of fires based on the parameters inputted. Geographic Information Systems (GIS and Remote Sensing (RS techniques were utilised for data preparation and the mapping of parameters that are needed and welcomed by FARSITE. The results are a simulation of spread of fire, fireline intensity, flame length and time of arrival for the area of interest. The simulation confirmed that it can be used for predicting how a fire will spread and how long it will take which can be very beneficial for fire suppression and control and risk assessment.

  10. Fire Synthesis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    special infrastructure which require careful maintenance. In such situation fire synthesis is a simpler method that can be adopted for the bulk production of high purity .... reaction between Ti and B to form titanium boride. The reaction between titanium (fuel- electron donor) and boron (oxidiser-electron acceptor) once initiated ...

  11. Forest Fires

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 11. Forest Fires - Origins and Ecological Paradoxes. K Narendran. General Article Volume 6 Issue 11 November 2001 pp 34-41. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/006/11/0034-0041 ...

  12. Fire Synthesis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 12. Fire Synthesis - Preparation of Alumina Products. Tanu Mimani. Volume 16 Issue 12 December 2011 pp 1324-1332. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/016/12/1324-1332 ...

  13. Fire Synthesis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 2. Fire Synthesis - Preparation of Alumina Products. Tanu Mimani. General Article Volume 5 Issue 2 February 2000 pp 50-57. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/005/02/0050-0057 ...

  14. Connection Temperatures during the Mokrsko Fire Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Chlouba

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Mokrsko fire test focused on the overall behaviour of the structure, which cannot be observed on the separate elements, and also on the temperature of connections with improved fire resistance. During the test, measurements were made of the temperature of the gas and of the elements, the overall and relative deformations, gas pressure, humidity, the radiation of the compartment to structural element and the external steel column, transport of the moisture through the walls, and also the climatic conditions. The results of the test show the differences between the behaviour of the element and the behaviour of the structure exposed to high temperatures during a fire. The collapse of the composite slab was reached. The results of the numerical simulations using the SAFIR program compared well with the measured temperature values in the structure and also in the connections. 

  15. Investigations on particle surface characteristics vs. dispersion behaviour of L-leucine coated carrier-free inhalable powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raula, Janne; Thielmann, Frank; Naderi, Majid; Lehto, Vesa-Pekka; Kauppinen, Esko I

    2010-01-29

    Aerosol microparticles of salbutamol sulphate are gas-phase coated with an amino acid L-leucine. Depending of the saturated state of L-leucine, the coating is formed by the surface diffusion of L-leucine molecules within a droplet or by the physical vapour deposition (PVD) of L-leucine or by the combination thereof. The PVD coated particles showed excellent aerosolization characteristics in a carrier-free powder delivery from an inhaler. The aerosolization of the fine powders is compared with surface energy parameters analysed by inverse gas chromatography (IGC). The dispersion testing is conducted by a Inhalation Simulator using a fast inhalation profile with inhalation flow rate of 67 l min(-1). It is found that the powder emission is affected by the morphology, surface roughness (asperity size and density) of the particles and acidity of particle surface. The latter affects the dispersion and dose repeatability of fine powder in a case if L-leucine content is high enough. However, there is no direct correlation between dispersive surface energies and aerosolization performances of the powders. Crucial factors for the improved aerosolization rely weakly on surface acid-base properties but strongly on particle morphology and fine-scale surface roughness. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Potential climate change impacts on fire intensity and key wildfire suppression thresholds in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wotton, B. M.; Flannigan, M. D.; Marshall, G. A.

    2017-09-01

    Much research has been carried out on the potential impacts of climate change on forest fire activity in the boreal forest. Indeed, there is a general consensus that, while change will vary regionally across the vast extent of the boreal, in general the fire environment will become more conducive to fire. Land management agencies must consider ways to adapt to these new conditions. This paper examines the impact of that changed fire environment on overall wildfire suppression capability. We use multiple General Circulation Models and carbon emission pathways to generate future fire environment scenarios for Canada’s forested region. We then use these scenarios with the Canadian Forest Fire Behaviour Prediction System and spatial coverages of the current forest fuel composition across the landscape to examine potential variation in key fire behaviour outputs that influence whether fire management resources can effectively suppress fire. Specifically, we evaluate how the potential for crown fire occurrence and active growth of fires changes with the changing climate. We also examine future fire behaviour through the lens of operational fire intensity thresholds used to guide decisions about resources effectiveness. Results indicate that the proportion of days in fire seasons with the potential for unmanageable fire will increase across Canada’s forest, more than doubling in some regions in northern and eastern boreal forest.

  17. Spatial variability of surface fuels in treated and untreated ponderosa pine forests of the southern Rocky Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emma Vakili; Chad M. Hoffman; Robert E. Keane; Wade T. Tinkham; Yvette Dickinson

    2016-01-01

    There is growing consensus that spatial variability in fuel loading at scales down to 0.5 m may govern fire behaviour and effects. However, there remains a lack of understanding of how fuels vary through space in wildland settings. This study quantifies surface fuel loading and its spatial variability in ponderosa pine sites before and after fuels treatment in the...

  18. Fire Behavior (FB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Keane

    2006-01-01

    The Fire Behavior (FB) method is used to describe the behavior of the fire and the ambient weather and fuel conditions that influence the fire behavior. Fire behavior methods are not plot based and are collected by fire event and time-date. In general, the fire behavior data are used to interpret the fire effects documented in the plot-level sampling. Unlike the other...

  19. From acid etching treatments to tribocorrosive properties of dental implants: do some experimental results on surface treatments have an influence on the tribocorrosion behaviour of dental implants?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geringer, Jean; Demanget, Nicolas; Pellier, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Surface treatments of dental implants aim at promoting osseointegration, i.e. the anchorage of the metallic part. Titanium-, grade II–V, based material is used as a bulk material for dental implants. For promoting the anchorage of this metallic biomaterial in human jaw, some strategies have been applied for improving the surface state, i.e. roughness, topography and coatings. A case study, experimental study, is described with the method of acid etching on titanium grade 4, CpTi. The main goal is to find the right proportion in a mixture of two acids in order to obtain the best surface state. Finally, a pure theoretical prediction is quite impossible and some experimental investigations are necessary to improve the surface state. The described acid etching is compared with some other acid etching treatments and some coatings available on dental implants. Thus, the discussion is focused on the tribocorrosion behaviour of titanium-based materials. The purpose of the coating is that the lifetime under tribocorrosion is limited. Moreover, the surgery related to the implantation has a huge impact on the stability of dental implants. Thus, the performance of dental implants depends on factors related to surgery (implantation) that are difficult to predict from the biomaterial characteristics. From the tribocorrosion point of view, i.e. during the mastication step, the titanium material is submitted to some deleterious factors that cause the performance of dental implants to decrease. (paper)

  20. From acid etching treatments to tribocorrosive properties of dental implants: do some experimental results on surface treatments have an influence on the tribocorrosion behaviour of dental implants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geringer, Jean; Demanget, Nicolas; Pellier, Julie

    2013-10-01

    Surface treatments of dental implants aim at promoting osseointegration, i.e. the anchorage of the metallic part. Titanium-, grade II-V, based material is used as a bulk material for dental implants. For promoting the anchorage of this metallic biomaterial in human jaw, some strategies have been applied for improving the surface state, i.e. roughness, topography and coatings. A case study, experimental study, is described with the method of acid etching on titanium grade 4, CpTi. The main goal is to find the right proportion in a mixture of two acids in order to obtain the best surface state. Finally, a pure theoretical prediction is quite impossible and some experimental investigations are necessary to improve the surface state. The described acid etching is compared with some other acid etching treatments and some coatings available on dental implants. Thus, the discussion is focused on the tribocorrosion behaviour of titanium-based materials. The purpose of the coating is that the lifetime under tribocorrosion is limited. Moreover, the surgery related to the implantation has a huge impact on the stability of dental implants. Thus, the performance of dental implants depends on factors related to surgery (implantation) that are difficult to predict from the biomaterial characteristics. From the tribocorrosion point of view, i.e. during the mastication step, the titanium material is submitted to some deleterious factors that cause the performance of dental implants to decrease.

  1. Fire Symfonier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Svend Hvidtfelt

    2009-01-01

    sidste fire symfonier. Den er måske snarere at opfatte som et præludium til disse. At påstå, at symfonierne fra Holmboes side er planlagt til at være beslægtede, ville være at gå for vidt. Alene de 26 år, der skiller den 10. fra den 13., gør påstanden - i bedste fald - dubiøs. Når deres udformning...... udkrystallisering som i de sidste små 30 år af hans virke har afkastet disse fire variationer over en grundlæggende central holmboesk fornemmelse for form, melodi, klang og rytme. Denne oplevelse har fået mig til at udforske symfonierne, for at finde til bunds i dette holmboeske fællestræk, som jeg mener her står...

  2. A field experiment on microwave forest radiometry: L-band signal behaviour for varying conditions of surface wetness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grant, J. P.; Wigneron, J. P.; Van de Grind, A. A.

    2007-01-01

    France, using a multi-angle L-band (1.4 GHz) radiometer to measure from above the forest at horizontal polarization. At the same time, ground measurements were taken of soil and litter moisture content, while precipitation was also permanently monitored. This experiment was done in the context...... of the upcoming SMOS mission in order to improve our understanding of the behaviour of the L-band signal from forested areas for different wetness conditions and viewing angles. This is especially relevant for solving the problem of heterogeneity since a large fraction of SMOS pixels (~30x30 km²) is partially...... covered by forest. This paper describes the objectives and the overall set-up of the Bray-2004 experiment and shows some first results. The greater part of the horizontally polarized L-band signal is found to be dominated by the influence of physical temperature. Variations in soil and/or litter moisture...

  3. The relationship between the acoustic behaviour and surface activity of killer whales (Orcinus orca) that feed on herring (Clupea harengus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simon, Malene Juul; McGregor, Peter K.; Ugarte, Fernando

    2007-01-01

    We describe the acoustic behaviour of piscivorous killer whales in Norwegian and Icelandic waters. Whales were assigned to one of three activities (feeding, travelling or other), and sound recordings were made in their proximity with a single hydrophone and a digital audiotape (DAT) recorder....... A quantitative analysis of the production of pulsed calls, whistles and echolocation clicks in the three activities revealed that there was a significant effect of activity on the production of these sound types. Both killer whales in Icelandic and Norwegian waters produced high rates of clicks and calls during...... feeding and low rates of click, calls and whistles during travelling. The differences can be used as acoustical markers and provides new possibilities for acoustic monitoring of killer whales in these areas. Based on the similarity between their prey choice, hunting strategies, phenotype and acoustic...

  4. UK position paper on sodium fires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaughan, G.J.; Glass, D.; Newman, R.N.; Ramsdale, S.A.; Snelling, K.W.

    1989-01-01

    The UK has over several years developed a philosophy for the prevention, mitigation and extinguishment of sodium fires. The systems which were developed for PFR have been continuously revised and modified and from these considerations systems were proposed for CDFR. The latest phases of this development are described with reference to the CDFR plant. The current analytical and experimental work on fires, aerosols and sodium concrete reactions is also discussed. The UK are developing codes to analyse the effects of a sodium fire in a building and to model aerosol behaviour following a fire. Experimental work on small scale fires, aerosol behaviour, filtration devices and sodium concrete reaction is being carried out on a laboratory scale. Techniques for aerosol measurement and characterisation have also been developed and used both In the laboratory and large scale tests. Larger scale tests of sodium fire extinguishment techniques have also been performed. Currently a programme of tests (SOFA) of large scale fires in the open to investigate the chemical and physical changes in the aerosol and its dispersion in the atmosphere are just beginning. The UK studies are intended to both assist in the development of prevention and mitigation systems for design base and beyond design base accidents in any building which contains sodium (or sodium potassium alloy) and also to provide methods for assessing the risks from such accidents. (author)

  5. Transport fire safety engineering in the European Union - project TRANSFEU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Maria RADZISZEWSKA-WOLIŃSKA

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Article presents European Research project (of FP7-SST-2008-RTD-1 for Surface transportation TRANSFEU. Projects undertakes to deliver both a reliable toxicity measurement methodology and a holistic fire safety approach for all kind of surface transport. It bases on a harmonized Fire Safety Engineering methodology which link passive fire security with active fire security mode. This all embracing system is the key to attain optimum design solutions in respect to fire safety objectives as an alternative to the prescriptive approach. It will help in the development of innovative solutions (design and products used for the building of the surface transport which will better respect the environment.In order to reach these objectives new toxicity measurement methodology and related classification of materials, new numerical fire simulation tools, fire test methodology (laboratory and full scale and a decisive tool to optimize or explore new design in accordance to the fire safety requirements will be developed.

  6. Boreal Forest Fire Cools Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randerson, J. T.; Liu, H.; Flanner, M.; Chambers, S. D.; Harden, J. W.; Hess, P. G.; Jin, Y.; Mack, M. C.; Pfister, G.; Schuur, E. A.; Treseder, K. K.; Welp, L. R.; Zender, C. S.

    2005-12-01

    We report measurements, modeling, and analysis of carbon and energy fluxes from a boreal forest fire that occurred in interior Alaska during 1999. In the first year after the fire, ozone production, atmospheric aerosol loading, greenhouse gas emissions, soot deposition, and decreases in summer albedo contributed to a positive annual radiative forcing (RF). These effects were partly offset by an increase in fall, winter, and spring albedo from reduced canopy cover and increased exposure of snow-covered surfaces. The atmospheric lifetime of aerosols and ozone and are relatively short (days to months). The radiative effects of soot on snow are also attenuated rapidly from the deposition of fresh snow. As a result, a year after the fire, only two classes of RF mechanisms remained: greenhouse gas emissions and post-fire changes in surface albedo. Summer albedo increased rapidly in subsequent years and was substantially higher than unburned control areas (by more than 0.03) after 4 years as a result of grass and shrub establishment. Satellite measurements from MODIS of other interior Alaska burn scars provided evidence that elevated levels of spring and summer albedo (relative to unburned control areas) persisted for at least 4 decades after fire. In parallel, our chamber, eddy covariance, and biomass measurements indicated that the post-fire ecosystems switch from a source to a sink within the first decade. Taken together, the extended period of increased spring and summer albedo and carbon uptake of intermediate-aged stands appears to more than offset the initial warming pulse caused by fire emissions, when compared using the RF concept. This result suggests that management of forests in northern countries to suppress fire and preserve carbon sinks may have the opposite effect on climate as that intended.

  7. Large scale fire experiments in the HDR containment as a basis for fire code development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosser, D.; Dobbernack, R.

    1993-01-01

    Between 1984 and 1991 7 different series of large scale fire experiments and related numerical and theoretical investigations have been performed in the containment of a high pressure reactor in Germany (known as HDR plant). The experimental part included: gas burner tests for checking the containment behaviour; naturally ventilated fires with wood cribs; naturally and forced ventilated oil pool fires; naturally and forced ventilated cable fires. Many results of the oil pool and cable fires can directly be applied to predict the impact of real fires at different locations in a containment on mechanical or structural components as well as on plant personnel. But the main advantage of the measurements and observations was to serve as a basis for fire code development and validation. Different types of fire codes have been used to predict in advance or evaluate afterwards the test results: zone models for single room and multiple room configurations; system codes for multiple room configurations; field models for complex single room configurations. Finally, there exist codes of varying degree of specialization which have proven their power and sufficient exactness to predict fire effects as a basis for optimum fire protection design. (author)

  8. Leachate analysis of green and fired-clay bricks incorporated with biosolids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukwatta, Aruna; Mohajerani, Abbas

    2017-08-01

    The substantial increase in biosolids production throughout the world requires sustainable routes for reuse. This study describes the leaching behaviour of potentially hazardous metals from the green and fired bricks incorporating four different biosolids samples from the Eastern treatment plant (ETP) and Western treatment plant (WTP) in Melbourne. The biosolids samples were characterized by XRD, XRF, TGA, particle size distribution, and organic content. The leaching of As, Ag, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, and Zn was evaluated for both the green and the fired bricks according to the Toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and the Australian bottle leaching procedure (ABLP). The leaching of heavy metals from both the green and the fired bricks was compared to investigate the effect of firing on the leaching capability of bricks. The results showed that the leaching of heavy metals from fired bricks was significantly lower than that for the green bricks. The ABLP concentrations of heavy metals were higher than those found using the TCLP method, mainly due to the higher specific surface area of the particles used in the ABLP method. Moreover, bricks were evaluated by the technological properties, such as compressive strength, density and water absorption. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Fire Models and Design Fires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Annemarie

    The aim of this project is to perform an experimental study on the influence of the thermal feedback on the burning behavior of well ventilated pre-flashover fires. For the purpose an experimental method has been developed. Here the same identical objects are tested under free burn conditions...... documented a simple relation that can be used for estimating the impact of thermal feedback for pre-flashover design fires. A rapid increase of the heat release rate commenced after the incipient phase. This is seen as thermal runaway caused by the energy gain in the smoke layer exceeding the energy that can...... and in two different rooms, which only are varied by linings of significantly different thermal inertia. As all linings were non-combustible the heat release rate could be found without the influence of thermal feedback and for two different levels of thermal feedback. The ISO 9705 Room Corner Test facility...

  10. FIRE ALARM SYSTEM OUTDATED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHANDLER, L.T.

    AN EFFICIENT FIRE ALARM SYSTEM SHOULD--(1) PROVIDE WARNING OF FIRES THAT START IN HIDDEN OR UNOCCUPIED LOCATIONS, (2) INDICATE WHERE THE FIRE IS, (3) GIVE ADVANCE WARNING TO FACULTY AND ADMINISTRATION SO THAT PANIC AND CONFUSION CAN BE AVOIDED AND ORDERLY EVACUATION OCCUR, (4) AUTOMATICALLY NOTIFY CITY FIRE HEADQUARTERS OF THE FIRE, (5) OPERATE BY…

  11. Corrosion behaviour and structure of the surface layer formed on austempered ductile iron in concentrated sulphuric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krawiec, H. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Department of Foundry Engineering, ul. Reymonta 23, 30-059 Cracow (Poland)]. E-mail: krawiec@uci.agh.edu.pl; Stypula, B. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Department of Foundry Engineering, ul. Reymonta 23, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Stoch, J. [Institute of Catalysis and Surface Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences (PAS), ul. Niezapominajek 8, 30-239 Cracow (Poland); Mikolajczyk, M. [Institute of Catalysis and Surface Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences (PAS), ul. Niezapominajek 8, 30-239 Cracow (Poland)

    2006-03-15

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the structure of the surface layer formed on austempered ductile iron (ADI) after exposure to hot concentrated sulphuric acid at the open circuit potential value (OCP). The results derived from polarization measurements carried out in sulphuric acid at a temperature of 90 deg. C show that anodic dissolution of ADI is divided into three stages (corresponding to three anodic dissolution peaks). The structure of the layer formed on alloys at 90 deg. C at OCP was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). SEM analysis shows that the main elements of the surface layer are iron, silicon, oxygen, sulphur, and carbon. The binding energy recorded in individual bands indicates that the surface layer includes mainly SiO{sub 2} and FeOOH. The presence of sulphur at the lower oxidation state (S{sup 2-}) indicates that sulphuric acid undergoes reduction during this process. The corrosion resistance of these alloys is connected with the presence of SiO{sub 2} in the surface layer.

  12. Dew-worms in white nights: High latitude light constrains earthworm (Lumbricus terrestris) behaviour at the soil surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil is an effective barrier to light penetration that limits the direct influence of light on belowground organisms. Variation in aboveground light conditions, however, is important to soil-dwelling animals that are periodically active on the soil surface. A prime example is the earthworm Lumbricus...

  13. Friction stir processed Al–TiO2 surface composites: Anodising behaviour and optical appearance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudla, Visweswara Chakravarthy; Jensen, Flemming; Simar, Aude

    2015-01-01

    was investigated. Microstructural and morphological characterization was performed using scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The surface appearance was analysed using an integrating sphere-spectrophotometer setup which measures the diffuse and total reflectance...

  14. Attachment behaviour of Escherichia coli K12 and Salmonella Typhimurium P6on food contact surfaces for food transportation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abban, Stephen; Jakobsen, Mogens; Jespersen, Lene

    2012-01-01

    material sections of the same surfaces. We report these observations for the first time for aluminium and the FRP material and in part for stainless steel. The S. Typhimurium P6 strain also had significantly higher level of attachment than the E. coli K12 strain. Our findings show that food residue...

  15. Interactions of the Calcite {10.4} Surface with Organic Compounds: Structure and Behaviour at Mineral – Organic Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hakim, S. S.; Olsson, M. H. M.; Sørensen, H. O.

    2017-01-01

    The structure and the strength of organic compound adsorption on mineral surfaces are of interest for a number of industrial and environmental applications, oil recovery, CO2 storage and contamination remediation. Biomineralised calcite plays an essential role in the function of many organisms...

  16. Identifying individual fires from satellite-derived burned area data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nogueira, Joana M.P.; Ruffault, Julien; Chuvieco, Emilio; Mouillot, Florent; Frantz, David; Stellmes, Marion; Röder, Achim; Hill, Joachim; Veraverbeke, Sander; Sedano, Fernando; Hook, Simon J.; Randerson, James T.; Jin, Yufang; Rogers, Brendan M.; Oom, Duarte; Silva, Pedro C; Bistinas, Ioannis; Pereira, José M C; Hantson, Stijn; Pueyo, Salvador; Chuvieco, Emilio; Archibald, S; Roy, D. P.

    2016-01-01

    High temporal resolution information on burnt area is needed to improve fire behaviour and emissions models.Weused the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) thermal anomaly and active fire product (MO(Y)D14) as input to a kriging interpolation to derive continuous maps of the timing

  17. Medium-range fire weather forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.O. Roads; K. Ueyoshi; S.C. Chen; J. Alpert; F. Fujioka

    1991-01-01

    The forecast skill of theNational Meteorological Center's medium range forecast (MRF) numerical forecasts of fire weather variables is assessed for the period June 1,1988 to May 31,1990. Near-surface virtual temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and a derived fire weather index (FWI) are forecast well by the MRF model. However, forecast relative humidity has...

  18. Fire and explosion hazards of oil shale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    The US Bureau of Mines publication presents the results of investigations into the fire and explosion hazards of oil shale rocks and dust. Three areas have been examined: the explosibility and ignitability of oil shale dust clouds, the fire hazards of oil shale dust layers on hot surfaces, and the ignitability and extinguishment of oil shale rubble piles. 10 refs., 54 figs., 29 tabs.

  19. Investigations of the corrosion behaviour of the Si-containing stainless steel 1.4361 with combined surface analysis, electrochemistry and radionuclide technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maar-Stumm, M.

    1990-03-01

    The present work aimed at detailed information on the corrosion behaviour and particularly the corrosion mechanism of the steel 1.4361 in concentrated nitric acid by use of a combination of electrochemical methods, radionuclide technique and surface analysis. For comparison steel samples corroded by other methods were investigated by surface analysis, too. At the beginning of the corrosion in nitric acid Fe and Ni are dissolved preferentially. Cr and Si are enriched in the surface region. A primary corrosion layer is formed which is equivalent to the oxidic overlayer of atmospherically oxidized samples. It consists of the oxides of chromium and iron mixed up with glass-like SiO 2 . Ni does not contribute to the formation of the oxidic overlayer. On top of this primary corrosion layer there is an isolating gel-like SiO 2 -layer with a thickness depending on strength and duration of the corrosive attack. Its mechanical stability decreases with increasing layer thickness. At the boundary to the primary corrosion layer this gel-like SiO 2 -layer is closed, mechanically stable and conducting. Samples corroded under the standardized conditions of the Huey-test show a similar structure of the overlayer with the exception that the primary corrosion layer consists only of glass-like SiO 2 . The combination of several methods revealed detailed information about mass loss and structure of the overlayer at different electrode potentials. (orig./MM) [de

  20. The effect of boron implantation on the corrosion behaviour, microhardness and contact resistance of copper and silver surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriksen, O.; Johnson, E.; Johansen, A.; Sarholt-Kristensen, L.

    1986-01-01

    In order to investigate the influence of boron implantation on the corrosion resistance of electrical contacts, a number of pure copper, pure silver and copper edge connector samples have been implanted with boron (40 keV) to fluences of 5.10 20 m -2 and 2.10 21 m -2 . Atmospheric corrosion tests of the implanted species were conducted using the following exposures: H 2 S (12.5 ppm, 4 days), SO 2 (25 ppm, 21 days), saltfog (5% NaCl, 1 day), moist air (93% RH, 56 days), and hot/dry air (70 C, 56 days). The boron implantations lead to a significant reduction in the sulphidation rate of copper and silver. The corrosive film formed during exposure in H 2 S and SO 2 atmospheres is confined to pitted regions on the implanted areas, while a thick and relatively uniform film formation is observed on the unimplanted samples. The corrosion resistance of copper and silver in saltfog atmosphere is somewhat improved by boron implantation, whilst the results from exposures to moist air or hot/dry air are inconclusive. The improved corrosion behaviour is accompanied by an increase in the contact resistance and in the microhardness of the implanted samples. (orig.)

  1. Physico-chemical behaviour of a metal/polymer contact subject to a low amplitude friction in a chlorinated medium. Effect of ionitriding and ion implantation surface treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabbe, L.M.

    1993-10-01

    The fretting-corrosion behaviour of two tribological couples (TA6V/PMMA and 316L/PMMA) had been studied in order to better understand the degradation mechanisms observed on pivot prosthesis sealed in bones. Pressure appears to have a major role; at high contact pressure, the PMMA wear is the main degradation mechanism with PMMA debris acting as a metal surface protecting agent; at low contact pressure, both material deterioration is involved, and titanium has a corrosion-dominated degradation. An optimal resistance to fretting is achieved when TA6V is coated with Ti N (ion implantation) and Ti N, Ti 2 N (ionitriding). When nitriding, processing temperature appears as a critical factor to ensure thickness and homogeneity of the nitride coatings. 181 p., 106 figs., 110 refs

  2. Influence of surface state of titanium alloy products after annealing in variuos environments on their service behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisova, E.A.; Shashenkova, I.I.; Zakharova, M.V.

    1986-01-01

    The paper ir aimed at investigation of the effect of the furnace atmosphere during annealing on the survice properties of VT6 alloy (5.5% Al; 4.3% V; 0.06% Si; 0.2% Fe; 0.09% O; 0.02% N; 0.008% H). It is stated that in vacuum furnaces and also in the firnaces with argon and air atmosphere the surface layers are saturated with oxygen and carbon that increases their microhardness and as a consequence decreases the VT6 alloy durability and fatigue strength. Removal of gas-saturated surface layers by etching or sandblasting of VT6 alloy samples makes it possible to increase their durability at cyclic test by a factor of 10 and fatigue strength-by 30%

  3. Combined radiometric and electrochemical study of the behaviour of Tc (VII) ions at gold and platinized surfaces in acidic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horanyi, G.; Bakos, I.

    1993-01-01

    The sorption and deposition of technetium species formed from TcO 4 - at gold and platinized surfaces was followed by a coupled in situ radiometric and electrochemical technique. It was found: (i) that a layer of TcO 2 species is formed preceding the massive deposition of technetium species, and (ii) that the deposition process is not connected with hydrogen evolution or reaction with adsorbed hydrogen as has been assumed in the literature. An important new finding, the electrocatalytic reduction of ClO 4 - ions at surfaces covered by technetium species, was demonstrated on the basis of a comparative study of the phenomena observed in H 2 SO 4 and HClO 4 supporting electrolytes. (Author)

  4. Fire Ant Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Favorite Name: Category: Share: Yes No, Keep Private Fire Ant Bites Share | Fire ants are aggressive, venomous insects that have pinching ... across the United States, even into Puerto Rico. Fire ant stings usually occur on the feet or ...

  5. Crown Fire Potential

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Crown fire potential was modeled using FlamMap, an interagency fire behavior mapping and analysis program that computes potential fire behavior characteristics. The...

  6. Monitoring the near-surface pH to probe the role of nitrogen in corrosion behaviour of low-temperature plasma nitrided 316L stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flis-Kabulska, I.; Sun, Y.; Flis, J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Nitrided steel is pitting resistant but in acidic solution anodic current is high. • Sb electrode showed a rise of pH at nitrided surface during anodic dissolution. • In cathodic sweeps nitrided steel showed reactivation indicating poor passivity. • Improvement of passivity after injection of NH 4 OH is ascribed to oxides and NO 2 − . • Pitting resistance is ascribed to oxides and NO 2 − following the formation of NH 4 + . -- Abstract: Low temperature plasma nitriding of stainless steels improves tribological properties and pitting resistance, but it can activate anodic dissolution in acidic solutions. This work aimed at determining how anodic behaviour can be affected by nitrogen present in the steel. The electrochemical behaviour of AISI 316L steel after nitriding at 415 °C (with up to 17 at.% N) was examined in solutions of 0.1 M Na 2 SO 4 + 0.4 M NaCl acidified down to pH 2.4. An antimony microelectrode was used to measure pH close to the sample surface. It was found that the nitrided layer was resistant to pitting corrosion at all pH's, but at pH below about 3.5 anodic currents were higher than those on untreated steel. For nitrided steel the near-surface pH was increasing when anodic current was rising in the active region, evidently due to binding of protons into NH 4 + . Nitrided steel underwent reactivation during reverse cathodic sweeps which is characteristic of low content of chromium oxide in surface film. Injection of NH 4 OH into the solution improved the passivation. Thermodynamic data indicated that the accompanying pH rise enabled the formation of Fe 3 O 4 , Fe 2 O 3 , Cr 2 O 3 , FeCr 2 O 4 , NiFe 2 O 4 , MoO 4 2− and NO 2 − . It is suggested that the pitting resistance of nitrided steel results from an easy repassivation of incipient pits due to the formation of the above species

  7. The effect of past fire activity on soil erosional processes in two subalpine sediment records from Rodna Mountains, Northern Romanian Carpathians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aritina HALIUC

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Fire is an important disturbance factor across a variety of vegetation zones and one of the major causes of geomorphological and ecological changes (Shakesby&Doerr, 2006. In the context of current and anticipated climate change, fire severity and frequency is expected to increase. The impact of fire in shaping the physical, chemical, biological characteristics of a soil surface is mediated by the interaction between climate factors, vegetation attributes and human activities. Depending on the size, duration and temperature reached, fire usually consumes the litter and vegetation cover. It consequently changes soil stability by enhancing rain-splash detachment, modifying infiltration and promoting soil erosion. Nonetheless, the long-term geomorphological effects of fire activity revealed by lake sediment records have been sparsely investigated in terms of both geographical coverage and range of environmental characteristics. Therefore, a better understanding of fire activity in a future warmer climate will be crucial in assessing and predicting landscape dynamics, feedback mechanisms and sensitivity to soil erosion with different fire behaviour

  8. Post-fire vegetative recruitment of the alien grass Glyceria maxima at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An accidental fire at a site where the reproductive behaviour of Glyceria maxima was being investigated provided an opportunity to measure its effect on G. maxima vegetative recruitment. The fire burned G. maxima growing along the water's edge and down to a water depth of 10 cm. Post-fire tiller densities in these zones ...

  9. The assessment of fire safety of cast iron structures in historical buildings: Theory and practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Twilt, L.; Hunen, M. van

    2000-01-01

    The assessment of structural fire safety of cast iron structures in historical buildings is difficult because the available information on the fire behaviour is limited, whilst the fire design assumptions (if any) often are not well docu-mented. A complicating factor with regard to protective

  10. Climate change impact on fire probability and severity in Mediterranean areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachisio Arca; Grazia Pellizzaro; Pierpaolo Duce; Michele Salis; Valentina Bacciu; Donatella Spano; Alan Ager; Mark Finney

    2010-01-01

    Fire is one of the most significant threats for the Mediterranean forested areas. Global change may increase the wildland fire risk due to the combined effect of air temperature and humidity on fuel status, and the effect of wind speed on fire behaviour. This paper investigated the potential effect of the climate changes predicted for the Mediterranean basin by a...

  11. Coal fire interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Genderen, J.L.; Prakash, A.; Gens, R.; Van Veen, B.; Liding, Chen; Tao, Tang Xiao; Feng, Guan

    2000-07-01

    This BCRS project demonstrates the use of SAR interferometry for measuring and monitoring land subsidence caused by underground coal fires and underground mining in a remote area of north west China. China is the largest producer and consumer of coal in the world. Throughout the N.W., N. and N.E. of China, the coal-seams are very susceptible to spontaneous combustion, causing underground coal fires. As the thick coal seams are burned out, the overburden collapses, causing land subsidence, and producing new cracks and fissures, which allow more air to penetrate and continue the fire to spread. SAR interferometry, especially differential interferometry has been shown to be able to measure small differences in surface height caused by such land subsidence. This report describes the problems, the test area, the procedures and techniques used and the results obtained. It concludes with a description of some of the problems encountered during the project plus provides some general conclusions and recommendations. 127 refs

  12. Monitoring subsurface coal fires in Jharia coalfield using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... of coal fire. Further, the study highlighted on the capability of the methodology for predicting potential coal fire zones on the basis of land surface subsidence only. The results from this study have major implications for demarcating the hazardous coal fire areas as well as effective implementation of public safety measures.

  13. The degradation behaviour of nine diverse contaminants in urban surface water and wastewater prior to water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, Guillaume; Barbeau, Benoit; Arp, Hans Peter H; Sauvé, Sébastien

    2015-12-01

    An increasing diversity of emerging contaminants are entering urban surface water and wastewater, posing unknown risks for the environment. One of the main contemporary challenges in ensuring water quality is to design efficient strategies for minimizing such risks. As a first step in such strategies, it is important to establish the fate and degradation behavior of contaminants prior to any engineered secondary water treatment. Such information is relevant for assessing treatment solutions by simple storage, or to assess the impacts of contaminant spreading in the absence of water treatment, such as during times of flooding or in areas of poor infrastructure. Therefore in this study we examined the degradation behavior of a broad array of water contaminants in actual urban surface water and wastewater, in the presence and absence of naturally occurring bacteria and at two temperatures. The chemicals included caffeine, sulfamethoxazole, carbamazepine, atrazine, 17β-estradiol, ethinylestradiol, diclofenac, desethylatrazine and norethindrone. Little information on the degradation behavior of these pollutants in actual influent wastewater exist, nor in general in water for desethylatrazine (a transformation product of atrazine) and the synthetic hormone norethindrone. Investigations were done in aerobic conditions, in the absence of sunlight. The results suggest that all chemicals except estradiol are stable in urban surface water, and in waste water neither abiotic nor biological degradation in the absence of sunlight contribute significantly to the disappearance of desethylatrazine, atrazine, carbamazepine and diclofenac. Biological degradation in wastewater was effective at transforming norethindrone, 17β-estradiol, ethinylestradiol, caffeine and sulfamethoxazole, with measured degradation rate constants k and half-lives ranging respectively from 0.0082-0.52 d(-1) and 1.3-85 days. The obtained degradation data generally followed a pseudo-first-order-kinetic model

  14. The aspects of fire safety at landfills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleshina Tat'yana Anatol'evna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Starting with 2008 and till 2013 there have been alarm messages about fires occurring at landfill places in Russia. Landfill fires are especially dangerous as they emit dangerous fumes from the combustion of the wide range of materials within the landfill. Subsurface landfill fires, unlike typical fires, cannot be put out with water. The article includes the analysis of the sources and causes of conflagrations at landfills. There maintains the necessity to eliminate the reasons, which cause the fires. There are quantification indices of environmental, social and economic effects of fires at landfills all over Russia. Surface fires generally burn at relatively low temperatures and are characterized by the emission of dense white smoke and the products of incomplete combustion. The smoke includes irritating agents, such as organic acids and other compounds. Higher temperature fires can cause the breakdown of volatile compounds, which emit dense black smoke. Surface fires are classified as either accidental or deliberate. For the ecologic security there is a need in the execution of proper hygienic requirements to the content of the places as well as international recommendations. In addition to the burning and explosion hazards posed by landfill fires, smoke and other by-products of landfill fires also present a health risk to firefighters and others exposed to them. Smoke from landfill fires generally contains particulate matter (the products of incomplete combustion of the fuel source, which can aggravate pre-existing pulmonary conditions or cause respiratory distress and damage ecosystem. The monitoring of conducting preventive inflamings and transition to alternative, environment friendly methods of waste disposal is needed.

  15. Fire, hypogeous fungi and mycophagous marsupials

    Science.gov (United States)

    James M. Trappe; Andrew W. Claridge; Ari Jumpponen

    2005-01-01

    In their interesting research on post-fire foraging behaviour of northern bettongs (Bettongia tropica) in tropical Queensland, Australia, Vernes et al. (2004) used forage-diggings of their study animals to locate plots for estimating biomass of hypogeous fungi on prescribed-burnt sites in comparison with unburnt control sites. They concluded that...

  16. Microgravity Flammability Experiments for Spacecraft Fire Safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legros, Guillaume; Minster, Olivier; Tóth, Balazs

    2012-01-01

    As fire behaviour in manned spacecraft still remains poorly understood, an international topical team has been created to design a validation experiment that has an unprecedented large scale for a microgravity flammability experiment. While the validation experiment is being designed for a re...

  17. Suspension-Firing of Biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bashir, Muhammad Shafique; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Frandsen, Flemming

    2012-01-01

    This paper is Part 1 in a series of two describing probe measurements of deposit build-up and removal (shedding) in a 350 MWth suspension boiler, firing straw and wood. The influence of fuel type (straw share in wood), probe exposure time, probe surface temperature (500, 550, and 600 °C), and flu...

  18. FIRE_AX_SOF_ARAT_FLT

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) ASTEX Surface of the Ocean, Fluxes and Interaction with the Atmosphere (SOFIA) Avion de Recherche Atmospherique (ARAT) Fokker...

  19. FIRE_AX_SOF_ARAT_TRB

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) ASTEX Surface of the Ocean, Fluxes and Interaction with the Atmosphere (SOFIA) Avion de Recherche Atmospherique (ARAT) Fokker...

  20. Model of hydrological behaviour of the anthropized semiarid wetland of Las Tablas de Daimiel National Park (Spain) based on surface water-groundwater interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, H.; Castaño, S.; Moreno, L.; Jiménez-Hernández, M. E.; de la Losa, A.

    2013-05-01

    Las Tablas de Daimiel National Park (TDNP) in Spain is one of the most important semiarid wetlands of the Mediterranean area. The inversion of the regional groundwater flow, primarily due to overexploitation and inadequate aquifer management, has led to degradation. The system has turned from a groundwater discharge zone into a recharge zone, and has remained mostly dry since the 1980s. High heterogeneity and complexity, enhanced by anthropogenic management action, hampers prediction of the surface-groundwater system response to flooding events. This study analyses these interactions and provides empirical evidence to define a conceptual model of flooding-infiltration-groundwater dynamics through the application of a few simple analysis tools to basic hydrological data. Relevant surface water-groundwater interactions are mainly localized in the left (west) margin of TDNP, as confirmed by the fast responses to flooding observed in the hydrochemic, hydrodynamic and isotopic data. During drying periods, small artificial and/or low-flow natural floods are followed by infiltration of evaporated poor-quality ponding water into saline low-permeability layers. The results allow an improved understanding of the hydrological behaviour essential to support efficient management practices. The relative simplicity of the methodology allows for its application in other similar complex groundwater-linked wetlands where detailed knowledge of local geology is still absent.

  1. Fire and fire ecology: Concepts and principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark A. Cochrane; Kevin C. Ryan

    2009-01-01

    Fire has been central to terrestrial life ever since early anaerobic microorganisms poisoned the atmosphere with oxygen and multicellular plant life moved onto land. The combination of fuels, oxygen, and heat gave birth to fire on Earth. Fire is not just another evolutionary challenge that life needed to overcome, it is, in fact, a core ecological process across much...

  2. Surface potential based modeling of charge, current, and capacitances in DGTFET including mobile channel charge and ambipolar behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Prateek; Yadav, Chandan; Agarwal, Amit; Chauhan, Yogesh Singh

    2017-08-01

    We present a surface potential based analytical model for double gate tunnel field effect transistor (DGTFET) for the current, terminal charges, and terminal capacitances. The model accounts for the effect of the mobile charge in the channel and captures the device physics in depletion as well as in the strong inversion regime. The narrowing of the tunnel barrier in the presence of mobile charges in the channel is incorporated via modeling of the inverse decay length, which is constant under channel depletion condition and bias dependent under inversion condition. To capture the ambipolar current behavior in the model, tunneling at the drain junction is also included. The proposed model is validated against TCAD simulation data and it shows close match with the simulation data.

  3. New tendencies in wildland fire simulation for understanding fire phenomena: An overview of the WFDS system capabilities in Mediterranean ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, E.; Tarragó, D.; Planas, E.

    2012-04-01

    Wildfire theoretical modeling endeavors predicting fire behavior characteristics, such as the rate of spread, the flames geometry and the energy released by the fire front by applying the physics and the chemistry laws that govern fire phenomena. Its ultimate aim is to help fire managers to improve fire prevention and suppression and hence reducing damage to population and protecting ecosystems. WFDS is a 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of a fire-driven flow. It is particularly appropriate for predicting the fire behaviour burning through the wildland-urban interface, since it is able to predict the fire behaviour in the intermix of vegetative and structural fuels that comprise the wildland urban interface. This model is not suitable for operational fire management yet due to computational costs constrains, but given the fact that it is open-source and that it has a detailed description of the fuels and of the combustion and heat transfer mechanisms it is currently a suitable system for research purposes. In this paper we present the most important characteristics of the WFDS simulation tool in terms of the models implemented, the input information required and the outputs that the simulator gives useful for understanding fire phenomena. We briefly discuss its advantages and opportunities through some simulation exercises of Mediterranean ecosystems.

  4. Recovery and Behaviour of Stressed Escherichia coli O157:H7 Cells on Rocket Leaf Surfaces Inoculated by Different Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANAS A. AL-NABULSI

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available E. coli O157:H7 is an emerging public health concern worldwide because of its low infectious dose and ability to survive under adverse conditions. Tests were conducted to determine the abilityof unstressed E. coli O157:H7 cells or those stressed by acid, cold, salt exposure or starvation to survive on the surfaces of rocket leaves after contamination by three methods (dip, spray or spot inoculation and following storage at 10 or 25ºC. E. coli O157:H7 numbers recovered from rocket leaves contaminated by the different techniques were in the order of dip > spot > spray inoculation.Numbers of stressed E. coli O157:H7 recovered after inoculation by all three methods increased significantly over 7d storage at 10 or 25ºC, while unstressed E. coli O157:H7 only grew following dip inoculation. Exposure to adverse environmental conditions may increase the risk of E. coli O157:H7 survival and spread on leafy green vegetables.

  5. Ignition and combustion of sodium, fire consequences, extinguishment and prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malet, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    This document presents the results of work carried out at the IPSN on: sodium inflammation, sodium combustion (pool fires and sprayed jet fires), extinguishment (passive means and extinguishing powder), the physico-chemical behaviour of aerosols and their filtration, the protection means of concretes, intervention during and after a fire, treatment of residues, intervention equipment. The calculation codes developed during these studies are described. The experimental basis which allowed the qualification of these codes and the technological means aimed at prevention and sodium fire fighting, was obtained using programmes carried out in the experimental facilities existing in Cadarache or in collaboration with the German teams of Karlsruhe

  6. Studying the effect of fire retardant coating on the fire hazard characteristics of wood using infrared thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasymov, Denis; Agafontsev, Mikhail

    2017-10-01

    This paper represents a study concerning the effect of fire retardant treatment «FUKAM» on the fire hazard characteristics of pine, aspen and larch. The front of model ground fire was investigated to estimate its effect on the surface of wood samples. Infrared thermography was used as a diagnostic method. The surface temperature distribution was obtained for the test wood samples after exposure to a fire front that was modeled using pine needles. The probability of ignition was estimated for the chosen experimental parameters for each kind of wood. The fire hazard characteristics of wood after fire retardant treatment showed a significant reduction in the surface temperature and the resistance to fire for the chosen parameters of the experiment compared to the same untreated samples.

  7. Fires, ecological effects of

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. J. Bond; Robert Keane

    2017-01-01

    Fire is both a natural and anthropogenic disturbance influencing the distribution, structure, and functioning of terrestrial ecosystems around the world. Many plants and animals depend on fire for their continued existence. Others species, such as rainforest plants species, are extremely intolerant of burning and need protection from fire. The properties of a fire...

  8. Fire, safety and ventilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hindle, D.

    1999-02-01

    Correct ventilation in tunnel environments is vital for the comfort and safety of the people passing through. This article gives details of products from several manufacturers of safety rescue and fire fighting equipment, fire and fume detection equipment, special fire resistant materials, fire resistant hydraulic oils and fire dampers, and ventilation systems. Company addresses and fax numbers are supplied. 4 refs., 5 tabs., 10 photos.

  9. Fire-Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willey, David

    2010-01-01

    This article gives a brief history of fire-walking and then deals with the physics behind fire-walking. The author has performed approximately 50 fire-walks, took the data for the world's hottest fire-walk and was, at one time, a world record holder for the longest fire-walk (www.dwilley.com/HDATLTW/Record_Making_Firewalks.html). He currently…

  10. Smoldering - The Fire Scenario

    OpenAIRE

    Torero, Jose L

    2000-01-01

    There are certain fire initiation scenarios that are particularly common, one of great significance is a fire initiated from the ignition of a porous fuel. Nearly 40% of the deaths due to fire can be traced to cigarette induced smolder of upholstered furniture and the mechanisms that control the process that transforms the weak smolder reaction occurring in the cigarette to a fire are still mostly unknown. A general description of this fire scenario and a discussion of its threats is pr...

  11. Climate drivers of regionally synchronous fires in the inland northwest (1651-1900)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emily K. Heyerdahl; Donald McKenzie; Lori D. Daniels; Amy E. Hessl; Jeremy S. Littell; Nathan J. Mantua

    2008-01-01

    We inferred climate drivers of regionally synchronous surface fires from 1651 to 1900 at 15 sites with existing annually accurate fire-scar chronologies from forests dominated by ponderosa pine or Douglas-fir in the inland Northwest (interior Oregon,Washington and southern British Columbia).Years with widespread fires (35 years with fire at 7 to 11 sites) had warm...

  12. Use of expert knowledge to develop fuel maps for wildland fire management [chapter 11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Keane; Matt Reeves

    2012-01-01

    Fuel maps are becoming an essential tool in fire management because they describe, in a spatial context, the one factor that fire managers can control over many scales ­ surface and canopy fuel characteristics. Coarse-resolution fuel maps are useful in global, national, and regional fire danger assessments because they help fire managers effectively plan, allocate, and...

  13. Fire resistant PV shingle assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenox, Carl J.

    2012-10-02

    A fire resistant PV shingle assembly includes a PV assembly, including PV body, a fire shield and a connection member connecting the fire shield below the PV body, and a support and inter-engagement assembly. The support and inter-engagement assembly is mounted to the PV assembly and comprises a vertical support element, supporting the PV assembly above a support surface, an upper interlock element, positioned towards the upper PV edge, and a lower interlock element, positioned towards the lower PV edge. The upper interlock element of one PV shingle assembly is inter-engageable with the lower interlock element of an adjacent PV shingle assembly. In some embodiments the PV shingle assembly may comprise a ventilation path below the PV body. The PV body may be slidably mounted to the connection member to facilitate removal of the PV body.

  14. Fire danger rating over Mediterranean Europe based on fire radiative power derived from Meteosat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Miguel M.; DaCamara, Carlos C.; Trigo, Isabel F.; Trigo, Ricardo M.; Feridun Turkman, K.

    2018-02-01

    We present a procedure that allows the operational generation of daily forecasts of fire danger over Mediterranean Europe. The procedure combines historical information about radiative energy released by fire events with daily meteorological forecasts, as provided by the Satellite Application Facility for Land Surface Analysis (LSA SAF) and the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). Fire danger is estimated based on daily probabilities of exceedance of daily energy released by fires occurring at the pixel level. Daily probability considers meteorological factors by means of the Canadian Fire Weather Index (FWI) and is estimated using a daily model based on a generalized Pareto distribution. Five classes of fire danger are then associated with daily probability estimated by the daily model. The model is calibrated using 13 years of data (2004-2016) and validated against the period of January-September 2017. Results obtained show that about 72 % of events releasing daily energy above 10 000 GJ belong to the extreme class of fire danger, a considerably high fraction that is more than 1.5 times the values obtained when using the currently operational Fire Danger Forecast module of the European Forest Fire Information System (EFFIS) or the Fire Risk Map (FRM) product disseminated by the LSA SAF. Besides assisting in wildfire management, the procedure is expected to help in decision making on prescribed burning within the framework of agricultural and forest management practices.

  15. Fire danger rating over Mediterranean Europe based on fire radiative power derived from Meteosat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Pinto

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a procedure that allows the operational generation of daily forecasts of fire danger over Mediterranean Europe. The procedure combines historical information about radiative energy released by fire events with daily meteorological forecasts, as provided by the Satellite Application Facility for Land Surface Analysis (LSA SAF and the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF. Fire danger is estimated based on daily probabilities of exceedance of daily energy released by fires occurring at the pixel level. Daily probability considers meteorological factors by means of the Canadian Fire Weather Index (FWI and is estimated using a daily model based on a generalized Pareto distribution. Five classes of fire danger are then associated with daily probability estimated by the daily model. The model is calibrated using 13 years of data (2004–2016 and validated against the period of January–September 2017. Results obtained show that about 72 % of events releasing daily energy above 10 000 GJ belong to the extreme class of fire danger, a considerably high fraction that is more than 1.5 times the values obtained when using the currently operational Fire Danger Forecast module of the European Forest Fire Information System (EFFIS or the Fire Risk Map (FRM product disseminated by the LSA SAF. Besides assisting in wildfire management, the procedure is expected to help in decision making on prescribed burning within the framework of agricultural and forest management practices.

  16. Davis Fire: Fire behavior and fire effects analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaWen T. Hollingsworth

    2010-01-01

    The Davis Fire presents an interesting example of fire behavior in subalpine fir, partially dead lodgepole pine with multiple age classes, and moist site Douglas-fir vegetation types. This has been summer of moderate temperatures and intermittent moisture that has kept live herbaceous and live woody moistures fairly high and dead fuel moistures at a moderate level....

  17. FIRES: Fire Information Retrieval and Evaluation System - A program for fire danger rating analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia L. Andrews; Larry S. Bradshaw

    1997-01-01

    A computer program, FIRES: Fire Information Retrieval and Evaluation System, provides methods for evaluating the performance of fire danger rating indexes. The relationship between fire danger indexes and historical fire occurrence and size is examined through logistic regression and percentiles. Historical seasonal trends of fire danger and fire occurrence can be...

  18. Temperature calculation in fire safety engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Wickström, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a consistent scientific background to engineering calculation methods applicable to analyses of materials reaction-to-fire, as well as fire resistance of structures. Several new and unique formulas and diagrams which facilitate calculations are presented. It focuses on problems involving high temperature conditions and, in particular, defines boundary conditions in a suitable way for calculations. A large portion of the book is devoted to boundary conditions and measurements of thermal exposure by radiation and convection. The concepts and theories of adiabatic surface temperature and measurements of temperature with plate thermometers are thoroughly explained. Also presented is a renewed method for modeling compartment fires, with the resulting simple and accurate prediction tools for both pre- and post-flashover fires. The final chapters deal with temperature calculations in steel, concrete and timber structures exposed to standard time-temperature fire curves. Useful temperature calculat...

  19. Fully predictive simulation of real-scale cable tray fire based on small-scale laboratory experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beji, Tarek; Merci, Bart [Ghent Univ. (Belgium). Dept. of Flow, Heat and Combustion Mechanics; Bonte, Frederick [Bel V, Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-12-15

    This paper presents a computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-based modelling strategy for real-scale cable tray fires. The challenge was to perform fully predictive simulations (that could be called 'blind' simulations) using solely information from laboratory-scale experiments, in addition to the geometrical arrangement of the cables. The results of the latter experiments were used (1) to construct the fuel molecule and the chemical reaction for combustion, and (2) to estimate the overall pyrolysis and burning behaviour. More particularly, the strategy regarding the second point consists of adopting a surface-based pyrolysis model. Since the burning behaviour of each cable could not be tracked individually (due to computational constraints), 'groups' of cables were modelled with an overall cable surface area equal to the actual value. The results obtained for one large-scale test (a stack of five horizontal trays) are quite encouraging, especially for the peak Heat Release Rate (HRR) that was predicted with a relative deviation of 3 %. The time to reach the peak is however overestimated by 4.7 min (i.e. 94 %). Also, the fire duration is overestimated by 5 min (i.e. 24 %). These discrepancies are mainly attributed to differences in the HRRPUA (heat release rate per unit area) profiles between the small-scale and large-scale. The latter was calculated by estimating the burning area of cables using video fire analysis (VFA).

  20. Experimental and numerical modeling of shrub crown fire initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watcharapong Tachajapong; Jesse Lozano; Shakar Mahalingam; Xiangyang Zhou; David Weise

    2009-01-01

    The transition of fire from dry surface fuels to wet shrub crown fuels was studied using laboratory experiments and a simple physical model to gain a better understanding of the transition process. In the experiments, we investigated the effects of varying vertical distances between surface and crown fuels (crown base height), and of the wind speed on crown fire...

  1. Way-finding during a fire emergency: an experimental study in a virtual environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fanxing; Zhang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    The way-finding behaviour and response during a fire emergency in a virtual environment (VE) was experimentally investigated. Forty participants, divided into two groups, were required to find the emergency exit as soon as possible in a virtual hotel building because of a fire escape demand under condition 1 (VE without virtual fire, control group) and condition 2 (VE with virtual fire, treatment group). Compared to the control group, the treatment group induced significantly higher skin conductivity and heart rate, experienced more stress, took longer time to notice the evacuation signs, had quicker visual search and had a longer escape time to find the exit. These results indicated that the treatment condition induced higher physiological and psychological stress, and had influenced the escape behaviour compared to the control group. In practice, fire evacuation education and fire evacuation system design should consider the response characteristics in a fire emergency.

  2. Survival analysis and classification methods for forest fire size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pier-Olivier Tremblay

    Full Text Available Factors affecting wildland-fire size distribution include weather, fuels, and fire suppression activities. We present a novel application of survival analysis to quantify the effects of these factors on a sample of sizes of lightning-caused fires from Alberta, Canada. Two events were observed for each fire: the size at initial assessment (by the first fire fighters to arrive at the scene and the size at "being held" (a state when no further increase in size is expected. We developed a statistical classifier to try to predict cases where there will be a growth in fire size (i.e., the size at "being held" exceeds the size at initial assessment. Logistic regression was preferred over two alternative classifiers, with covariates consistent with similar past analyses. We conducted survival analysis on the group of fires exhibiting a size increase. A screening process selected three covariates: an index of fire weather at the day the fire started, the fuel type burning at initial assessment, and a factor for the type and capabilities of the method of initial attack. The Cox proportional hazards model performed better than three accelerated failure time alternatives. Both fire weather and fuel type were highly significant, with effects consistent with known fire behaviour. The effects of initial attack method were not statistically significant, but did suggest a reverse causality that could arise if fire management agencies were to dispatch resources based on a-priori assessment of fire growth potentials. We discuss how a more sophisticated analysis of larger data sets could produce unbiased estimates of fire suppression effect under such circumstances.

  3. Survival analysis and classification methods for forest fire size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Pier-Olivier; Duchesne, Thierry; Cumming, Steven G

    2018-01-01

    Factors affecting wildland-fire size distribution include weather, fuels, and fire suppression activities. We present a novel application of survival analysis to quantify the effects of these factors on a sample of sizes of lightning-caused fires from Alberta, Canada. Two events were observed for each fire: the size at initial assessment (by the first fire fighters to arrive at the scene) and the size at "being held" (a state when no further increase in size is expected). We developed a statistical classifier to try to predict cases where there will be a growth in fire size (i.e., the size at "being held" exceeds the size at initial assessment). Logistic regression was preferred over two alternative classifiers, with covariates consistent with similar past analyses. We conducted survival analysis on the group of fires exhibiting a size increase. A screening process selected three covariates: an index of fire weather at the day the fire started, the fuel type burning at initial assessment, and a factor for the type and capabilities of the method of initial attack. The Cox proportional hazards model performed better than three accelerated failure time alternatives. Both fire weather and fuel type were highly significant, with effects consistent with known fire behaviour. The effects of initial attack method were not statistically significant, but did suggest a reverse causality that could arise if fire management agencies were to dispatch resources based on a-priori assessment of fire growth potentials. We discuss how a more sophisticated analysis of larger data sets could produce unbiased estimates of fire suppression effect under such circumstances.

  4. Wildland fire in ecosystems: effects of fire on flora

    Science.gov (United States)

    James K. Brown; Jane Kapler Smith

    2000-01-01

    VOLUME 2: This state-of-knowledge review about the effects of fire on flora and fuels can assist land managers with ecosystem and fire management planning and in their efforts to inform others about the ecological role of fire. Chapter topics include fire regime classification, autecological effects of fire, fire regime characteristics and postfire plant community...

  5. A METHOD FOR MEASURING THE SENSITIVITY OF BUILDING STRUCTURAL MEMBERS TO FIRE DECAY PHASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Gernay

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Firefighters face a major threat when intervening in a building during a fire: the possibility of structural collapse during the cooling phase of the fire, or soon thereafter. At present, this threat is amplified by the fact that the behaviour of structures after the time of peak gas temperature is not well understood, and is not taken into account in the design. This work presents an analysis of the behaviour of different structural members under natural fires, and develops a method for characterizing their sensitivity to fire decay phases. Thermo-mechanical numerical simulations based on the non-linear finite element method are conducted using the parametric fire model of the Eurocode to represent natural fires. The results show that, for all the members (a column, a beam and materials (reinforced concrete, steel and timber that are studied here, structural failure during or after the cooling phase of a fire is a possible event. The major factors that promote delayed structural failure are thermal inertia and the constituting material of the member. A method, based on a new indicator, is proposed for quantifying the propensity to delayed failure for structural members under natural fire. This work enhances the understanding of the behaviour of structures under natural fires, and has important implications for the safety of fire brigades and of people responsible for making a building inspection after a fire.

  6. Fire spread in chaparral – a comparison of laboratory data and model predictions in burning live fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    David R. Weise; Eunmo Koo; Xiangyang Zhou; Shankar Mahalingam; Frédéric Morandini; Jacques-Henri Balbi

    2016-01-01

    Fire behaviour data from 240 laboratory fires in high-density live chaparral fuel beds were compared with model predictions. Logistic regression was used to develop a model to predict fire spread success in the fuel beds and linear regression was used to predict rate of spread. Predictions from the Rothermel equation and three proposed changes as well as two physically...

  7. Modeling Urban Fire Growth,

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear explosion damage, *Explosion effects, *Fires, *Flame propagation, Growth (General), Area coverage, Ignition, Combustion, Casualties...Computerized simulation, Predictions, Countermeasures, Fire suppression, Damage assessment, Urban areas, Vulnerability, Data acquisition, Methodology, Symposia

  8. Fire Stations - 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — Fire Stations in Kansas Any location where fire fighters are stationed or based out of, or where equipment that such personnel use in carrying out their jobs is...

  9. Fire Stations - 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — Fire Station Locations in Kansas Any location where fire fighters are stationed at or based out of, or where equipment that such personnel use in carrying out their...

  10. Filosofiens historiografi: Fire genrer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rorty, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Oversættelse af Richard Rortys artikel "Filosofiens historiografi: Fire genrer" Udgivelsesdato: 26 Oktober......Oversættelse af Richard Rortys artikel "Filosofiens historiografi: Fire genrer" Udgivelsesdato: 26 Oktober...

  11. Spacecraft Fire Safety Demonstration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the Spacecraft Fire Safety Demonstration project is to develop and conduct large-scale fire safety experiments on an International Space Station...

  12. Fire Making, Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kathryn R.

    2002-04-01

    In the late 1930's and early 1940's, JCE published several historical accounts on methods for igniting fires. This "From Past Issues" summarizes an article by Warren N. Watson on the fire making arts of primitive peoples.

  13. Fires and Food Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Forms FSIS United States Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service About FSIS District Offices Careers ... JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... Fires and Food Safety Fire! Few words can strike such terror. Residential ...

  14. Interagency Wildland Fire Cooperation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2004-01-01

    Wildlife Fire Assistance includes training personnel, forms partnerships for prescribed burns, state and regional data for fire management plans, develops agreements for DoD civilians to be reimbursed...

  15. Tunnel fire dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ingason, Haukur; Lönnermark, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This book covers a wide range of issues in fire safety engineering in tunnels, describes the phenomena related to tunnel fire dynamics, presents state-of-the-art research, and gives detailed solutions to these major issues. Examples for calculations are provided. The aim is to significantly improve the understanding of fire safety engineering in tunnels. Chapters on fuel and ventilation control, combustion products, gas temperatures, heat fluxes, smoke stratification, visibility, tenability, design fire curves, heat release, fire suppression and detection, CFD modeling, and scaling techniques all equip readers to create their own fire safety plans for tunnels. This book should be purchased by any engineer or public official with responsibility for tunnels. It would also be of interest to many fire protection engineers as an application of evolving technical principles of fire safety.

  16. Charcoal in Organic Horizon and Surface Mineral Soil in a Boreal Forest Fire Chronosequence of Western Quebec: Stocks, Depth Distribution, Chemical Properties and a Synthesis of Related Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline M. Preston

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Wildfires are a major driver of carbon stocks and ecosystem development in Canadian boreal forests, but there is little information on amounts and properties of the charcoal produced. Using data and samples available from a previous study, we determined amounts, depth distribution and chemical properties of visually-determined charcoal (>2 mm in a boreal chronosequence in the Abitibi region of Quebec, Canada. Sites ranged from 24 to 2,355 years since fire (ysf and originated from low- and high-severity soil burns (>5 or <5 cm organic horizon unburned, respectively. Two or three pits were sampled at 1-cm depth intervals from 20 jack pine (Pinus banksiana sites (one low severity and 19 high severity and 31 black spruce (Picea mariana sites (12 low severity and 19 high severity. Site-level charcoal stocks ranged from 50 to 5,527 kg ha−1 with high within-site variability and lower stocks for the oldest sites. Depth distributions typically peaked around the organic-mineral interface, but some low-severity sites also had charcoal layers within the organic horizon. Means from 30 charcoal samples were 569 mg g−1 total C, 4.1 mg g−1 total N and 140 C/N (molar, with total C and C/N showing a trend of decline with time since fire, and total N showing an increase. Solid-state 13C CPMAS NMR spectra of nine samples showed high variability among the younger samples, but a trend to higher aromaticity for the older ones. A literature survey focusing on boreal forests similarly showed highly variable stocks and chemical properties of charcoal in organic horizon and upper mineral soil, with reduction of variance and lower stocks after several hundred years. This initial variation was also consistent with reports of highly variable temperatures and duration of charring in wildfires. Adding reports available for char production, and considering that most studies of char stocks and production are limited to the organic horizon (forest floor, suggests that

  17. FIRE CHARACTERISTICS FOR ADVANCED MODELLING OF FIRES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto Dvořák

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the material and fire properties of solid flammable/combustible materials /substances /products, which are used as inputs for the computer numerical fire models. At the same time it gives the test standards for their determination.

  18. Mass Fire Model Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-31

    done by several investigators, the theoretical work of Nielsen (Reference 12) and Nielsen and Tao (Refer- ence 13) specifically models the global...which are approximately equal. This procedure permits computation of the fire..induced wind by a superpositlon of effects from each usub -fire." Outsid...Storm Analysis, ITT Research Institute, Janu- ary 1970. .324 13. Nielsen , H.J. and L.N. Tao, "The Fire Plume Above a Large Free- Burning Fire,’ Tenth S

  19. Biological and geophysical feedbacks with fire in the Earth system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archibald, S.; Lehmann, C. E. R.; Belcher, C. M.; Bond, W. J.; Bradstock, R. A.; Daniau, A.-L.; Dexter, K. G.; Forrestel, E. J.; Greve, M.; He, T.; Higgins, S. I.; Hoffmann, W. A.; Lamont, B. B.; McGlinn, D. J.; Moncrieff, G. R.; Osborne, C. P.; Pausas, J. G.; Price, O.; Ripley, B. S.; Rogers, B. M.; Schwilk, D. W.; Simon, M. F.; Turetsky, M. R.; Van der Werf, G. R.; Zanne, A. E.

    2018-03-01

    Roughly 3% of the Earth’s land surface burns annually, representing a critical exchange of energy and matter between the land and atmosphere via combustion. Fires range from slow smouldering peat fires, to low-intensity surface fires, to intense crown fires, depending on vegetation structure, fuel moisture, prevailing climate, and weather conditions. While the links between biogeochemistry, climate and fire are widely studied within Earth system science, these relationships are also mediated by fuels—namely plants and their litter—that are the product of evolutionary and ecological processes. Fire is a powerful selective force and, over their evolutionary history, plants have evolved traits that both tolerate and promote fire numerous times and across diverse clades. Here we outline a conceptual framework of how plant traits determine the flammability of ecosystems and interact with climate and weather to influence fire regimes. We explore how these evolutionary and ecological processes scale to impact biogeochemical and Earth system processes. Finally, we outline several research challenges that, when resolved, will improve our understanding of the role of plant evolution in mediating the fire feedbacks driving Earth system processes. Understanding current patterns of fire and vegetation, as well as patterns of fire over geological time, requires research that incorporates evolutionary biology, ecology, biogeography, and the biogeosciences.

  20. Emissions from Coal Fires and Their Impact on the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolker, Allan; Engle, Mark; Stracher, Glenn; Hower, James; Prakash, Anupma; Radke, Lawrence; ter Schure, Arnout; Heffern, Ed

    2009-01-01

    Self-ignited, naturally occurring coal fires and fires resulting from human activities persist for decades in underground coal mines, coal waste piles, and unmined coal beds. These uncontrolled coal fires occur in all coal-bearing parts of the world (Stracher, 2007) and pose multiple threats to the global environment because they emit greenhouse gases - carbon dioxide (CO2), and methane (CH4) - as well as mercury (Hg), carbon monoxide (CO), and other toxic substances (fig. 1). The contribution of coal fires to the global pool of atmospheric CO2 is little known but potentially significant. For China, the world's largest coal producer, it is estimated that anywhere between 10 million and 200 million metric tons (Mt) of coal reserves (about 0.5 to 10 percent of production) is consumed annually by coal fires or made inaccessible owing to fires that hinder mining operations (Rosema and others, 1999; Voigt and others, 2004). At this proportion of production, coal amounts lost to coal fires worldwide would be two to three times that for China. Assuming this coal has mercury concentrations similar to those in U.S. coals, a preliminary estimate of annual Hg emissions from coal fires worldwide is comparable in magnitude to the 48 tons of annual Hg emissions from all U.S. coal-fired power-generating stations combined (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2002). In the United States, the combined cost of coal-fire remediation projects, completed, budgeted, or projected by the U.S. Department of the Interior's Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement (OSM), exceeds $1 billion, with about 90% of that in two States - Pennsylvania and West Virginia (Office of Surface Mining Enforcement and Reclamation, 2008; fig. 2). Altogether, 15 States have combined cumulative OSM coal-fire project costs exceeding $1 million, with the greatest overall expense occurring in States where underground coal fires are predominant over surface fires, reflecting the greater cost of

  1. Autonomous Forest Fire Detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breejen, E. den; Breuers, M.; Cremer, F.; Kemp, R.A.W.; Roos, M.; Schutte, K.; Vries, J.S. de

    1998-01-01

    Forest fire detection is a very important issue in the pre-suppression process. Timely detection allows the suppression units to reach the fire in its initial stages and this will reduce the suppression costs considerably. The autonomous forest fire detection principle is based on temporal contrast

  2. Fire Department Emergency Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Bell, K.; Kelly, J.; Hudson, J.

    1997-09-01

    In 1995 the SRS Fire Department published the initial Operations Basis Document (OBD). This document was one of the first of its kind in the DOE complex and was widely distributed and reviewed. This plan described a multi-mission Fire Department which provided fire, emergency medical, hazardous material spill, and technical rescue services.

  3. Fire as Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Robert N.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a project that deals with fire production as an aspect of technology. The project challenges students to be survivors in a five-day classroom activity. Students research various materials and methods to produce fire without the use of matches or other modern combustion devices, then must create "fire" to keep…

  4. Fire and forest meteorology

    Science.gov (United States)

    SA Ferguson; T.J. Brown; M. Flannigan

    2005-01-01

    The American Meteorological Society symposia series on Fire and Forest Meteorology provides biennial forums for atmospheric and fire scientists to introduce and discuss the latest and most relevant research on weather, climate and fire. This special issue highlights significant work that was presented at the Fifth Symposium in Orlando, Florida during 16-20 November...

  5. The effect of fire frequency on local cembra pine populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genries, A; Mercier, L; Lavoie, M; Muller, S D; Radakovitch, O; Carcaillet, C

    2009-02-01

    It has been predicted that global climate change will lead to increasing drought in the Alps during the 21st century, as well as an increased fire risk, fires being currently rare in these mountains. Herein we describe fire frequency reconstruction using high-resolution analyses of macroscopic sedimentary charcoal, pollen, and plant macrofossils. Sediments were sampled from a subalpine pond within the dry western French Alps. Results show that the early-Holocene expansion of Pinus cembra (7200 calibrated years BP) occurred in Acer/Alnus incana/Betula woodlands, which were affected by fires with moderate mean fire-free intervals (MFFI = 173 +/- 61 yr [mean +/- SE]). Superposed Epoch Analyses show that the abundance of P. cembra macroremains decreased significantly after burning, although they never disappeared entirely. Statistics suggest that fires spread through cembra pine communities; they were not stand-replacing fires but mainly surface fires, probably killing nonreproductive pines. An increase in fire frequency occurred 6740 years ago, when four fires appear to have occurred within 140 years. These fires may have been associated with a regional drought and could have affected the composition of the subalpine forest by depleting the local P. cembra population in the short-term. The predicted increase in drought in the future could, therefore, affect the cembra pine ecosystem in the Alps if fire frequency is reduced to intervals of less than 80 years.

  6. Adapting fire management to future fire regimes: impacts on boreal forest composition and carbon balance in Canadian National Parks

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, W. J.; Flannigan, M. D.; Cantin, A.

    2009-04-01

    other areas where recent fire suppression history has been very successful, prescribed fire will be an important fire management activity to maintain current forest, shrubland, and grassland ecosystems. The model simulations showed that total fire exclusion would effectively lead to the loss of jack pine, and cause a sharp decline in aspen and birch stands. Increased future fire activity caused a general decrease in total carbon storage, but this impact was moderated by two other related impacts. Shorter fire cycles created a younger age-class distribution, which was represented by more fast-growing, high density stands with high detrital output. The second factor was a general forest composition shift towards faster growing species. Increased fire suppression caused an increase in long-term total biomass storage, but prescribed burning could also have a similar impact if controlled fires were used to replace wildfires and conducted during periods of reduced fire behaviour.

  7. The impact of boreal forest fire on climate warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randerson, J T; Liu, H; Flanner, M G; Chambers, S D; Jin, Y; Hess, P G; Pfister, G; Mack, M C; Treseder, K K; Welp, L R; Chapin, F S; Harden, J W; Goulden, M L; Lyons, E; Neff, J C; Schuur, E A G; Zender, C S

    2006-11-17

    We report measurements and analysis of a boreal forest fire, integrating the effects of greenhouse gases, aerosols, black carbon deposition on snow and sea ice, and postfire changes in surface albedo. The net effect of all agents was to increase radiative forcing during the first year (34 +/- 31 Watts per square meter of burned area), but to decrease radiative forcing when averaged over an 80-year fire cycle (-2.3 +/- 2.2 Watts per square meter) because multidecadal increases in surface albedo had a larger impact than fire-emitted greenhouse gases. This result implies that future increases in boreal fire may not accelerate climate warming.

  8. Effects of fire on woody vegetation structure in African savanna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Izak P J; Asner, Gregory P; Govender, Navashni; Kennedy-Bowdoin, Ty; Knapp, David E; Jacobson, James

    2010-10-01

    Despite the importance of fire in shaping savannas, it remains poorly understood how the frequency, seasonality, and intensity of fire interact to influence woody vegetation structure, which is a key determinant of savanna biodiversity. We provide a comprehensive analysis of vertical and horizontal woody vegetation structure across one of the oldest savanna fire experiments, using new airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) technology. We developed and compared high-resolution woody vegetation height surfaces for a series of large experimental burn plots in the Kruger National Park, South Africa. These 7-ha plots (total area approximately 1500 ha) have been subjected to fire in different seasons and at different frequencies, as well as no-burn areas, for 54 years. Long-term exposure to fire caused a reduction in woody vegetation up to the 5.0-7.5 m height class, although most reduction was observed up to 4 m. Average fire intensity was positively correlated with changes in woody vegetation structure. More frequent fires reduced woody vegetation cover more than less frequent fires, and dry-season fires reduced woody vegetation more than wet-season fires. Spring fires from the late dry season reduced woody vegetation cover the most, and summer fires from the wet season reduced it the least. Fire had a large effect on structure in the densely wooded granitic landscapes as compared to the more open basaltic landscapes, although proportionally, the woody vegetation was more reduced in the drier than in the wetter landscapes. We show that fire frequency and fire season influence patterns of vegetation three-dimensional structure, which may have cascading consequences for biodiversity. Managers of savannas can therefore use fire frequency and season in concert to achieve specific vegetation structural objectives.

  9. Intumescent Coatings as Fire Retardants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, J. A.; Fohlen, G. M.; Sawko, P. M.; Fish, R. H.

    1970-01-01

    The development of fire-retardant coatings to protect surfaces which may be exposed to fire or extreme heat is a subject of intense interest to many industries. A fire-retardant paint has been developed which represents a new chemical approach for preparing intumescent coatings, and potentially, is very important to fire-prevention authorities. The requirements for a superior coating include ease of application, suitability to a wide variety of surfaces and finishes, and stability over an extended period of time within a broad range of ambient temperature and humidity conditions. These innovative coatings, when activated by the heat of a fire, react to form a thick, low-density, polymeric coating or char layer. Water vapor and sulphur dioxide are released during the intumescent reaction. Two fire-protection mechanisms thus become available: (1) the char layer retards the flow of heat, due to the extremely low thermal conductivity; and (2) water vapor and sulfur dioxide are released, providing fire quenching properties. Still another mechanism functions in cases where the char, by virtue of its high oxidation resistance and low thermal conductivity, reaches a sufficiently high temperature to re-radiate much of the incident heat load. The coatings consist of dispersions of selective salts of a nitro-amino-arornatic compound. Specifically, para-nitroaniline bisulfate and the ammonium salt of para-nitroaniline-ortho sulphuric acid (2-amino-5-nitrobenzenesulphuric acid) are used. Suitable vehicles are cellulose nitrate of lacquer grade, a nitrite-phenolic modified rubber, or epoxy-polysulfide copolymer. Three separate formulations have been developed. A solvent is usually employed, such as methylethyl ketone, butyl acetate, or toluene, which renders the coatings suitably thin and which evaporates after the coatings are applied. Generally, the intumescent material is treated as insoluble in the vehicle, and is ground and dispersed in the vehicle and solvent like an

  10. Emergent Behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, H.A.P.; Everdij, M.H.C.; Bouarfa, S.; Cook, A; Rivas, D

    2016-01-01

    In complexity science a property or behaviour of a system is called emergent if it is not a property or behaviour of the constituting elements of the system, though results from the interactions between its constituting elements. In the socio-technical air transportation system these interactions

  11. The principles for creation of fire-prevention forest belts with barriers of deciduous species for protection from crown fires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Sannikov

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The article discuss one of the priority security problems in Russia, which is elaboration of the strategic system of the forest and society safeguards from catastrophic forest crown fires in connection with rapid climate warming. It is postulated, that a most effective and reliable barrier for the dispersal of the intensive crown fire in a coniferous forest massive can be a sufficiently wide strip of deciduous tree species – «deciduous forest barrier», which has phytomass capable of absorbing crown fire energy and transforming them to surface fire, which may be extinguished by technical means. The actuality of the natural study of the transition parameters from the crown fire to surface fire has been noted, depending on climate, fire intensity and the deciduous barrier structure. The results of the quantitative natural investigation of the consequences of catastrophic crown fires of 2004 in the island pine forests of forest-steppe zone in Kurgan Oblast, which passed through the belt of 50–70 year-old birch stands of middle density, has been cited and formalized mathematically. It has been shown, that 150 m width of deciduous forest barrier is necessary as a minimum for the reliable transition of the high intensive front crown fire to surface fire in the forest-steppe conditions of the Western Siberia, but this width reduces with a decreasing heating effect. It has been proposed to create the complex fire-prevention forest belts of different construction for the protection of forests, industrial objects and settlements. Besides a basic deciduous barrier, their structure should include technologically necessary buffer zones and zones for the localization and extinguishing surface fire, which stop a crown fire. It has been recommended to use natural regeneration of deciduous tree species, as a most effective and non-deficient method for the creation of deciduous forest barriers in the predominant forest types, except the lichen pine forests

  12. A comparison of geospatially modeled fire behavior and potential application to fire and fuels management for the Savannah River Site.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurth, Laurie; Hollingsworth, LaWen; Shea, Dan

    2011-12-20

    This study evaluates modeled fire behavior for the Savannah River Site in the Atlantic Coastal Plain of the southeastern U.S. using three data sources: FCCS, LANDFIRE, and SWRA. The Fuel Characteristic Classification System (FCCS) was used to build fuelbeds from intensive field sampling of 629 plots. Custom fire behavior fuel models were derived from these fuelbeds. LANDFIRE developed surface fire behavior fuel models and canopy attributes for the U.S. using satellite imagery informed by field data. The Southern Wildfire Risk Assessment (SWRA) developed surface fire behavior fuel models and canopy cover for the southeastern U.S. using satellite imagery.

  13. Simulation of Quaking Aspen Potential Fire Behavior in Northern Utah, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Justin DeRose

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Current understanding of aspen fire ecology in western North America includes the paradoxical characterization that aspen-dominated stands, although often regenerated following fire, are “fire-proof”. We tested this idea by predicting potential fire behavior across a gradient of aspen dominance in northern Utah using the Forest Vegetation Simulator and the Fire and Fuels Extension. The wind speeds necessary for crowning (crown-to-crown fire spread and torching (surface to crown fire spread were evaluated to test the hypothesis that predicted fire behavior is influenced by the proportion of aspen in the stand. Results showed a strong effect of species composition on crowning, but only under moderate fire weather, where aspen-dominated stands were unlikely to crown or torch. Although rarely observed in actual fires, conifer-dominated stands were likely to crown but not to torch, an example of “hysteresis” in crown fire behavior. Results support the hypothesis that potential crown fire behavior varies across a gradient of aspen dominance and fire weather, where it was likely under extreme and severe fire weather, and unlikely under moderate and high fire weather. Furthermore, the “fire-proof” nature of aspen stands broke down across the gradient of aspen dominance and fire weather.

  14. Fire Protection Program Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharry, J A

    2012-05-18

    This manual documents the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Fire Protection Program. Department of Energy (DOE) Orders 420.1B, Facility Safety, requires LLNL to have a comprehensive and effective fire protection program that protects LLNL personnel and property, the public and the environment. The manual provides LLNL and its facilities with general information and guidance for meeting DOE 420.1B requirements. The recommended readers for this manual are: fire protection officers, fire protection engineers, fire fighters, facility managers, directorage assurance managers, facility coordinators, and ES and H team members.

  15. Durability of fired clay bricks containing granite powder

    OpenAIRE

    Xavier, G. C.; Saboya, F.; Maia, P. C.; Alexandre, J.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past few decades, hundreds of papers have been published on the benefits of including rock powder as a raw material in fired clay brick manufacture. Very little has been written, however, about the durability and long-term behaviour of the final product. As a rule, the ceramic bricks used in construction in developing countries are fired at low temperatures, which detracts from their mechanical performance. This is particularly visible in harsh environmental conditions, where weather...

  16. Estimating live fuel status by drought indices: an approach for assessing local impact of climate change on fire danger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellizzaro, Grazia; Dubrovsky, Martin; Bortolu, Sara; Ventura, Andrea; Arca, Bachisio; Masia, Pierpaolo; Duce, Pierpaolo

    2014-05-01

    Mediterranean shrubs are an important component of both Mediterranean vegetation communities and understorey vegetation. They also constitute the surface fuels primarily responsible for the ignition and the spread of wildland fires in Mediterranean forests. Although fire spread and behaviour are dependent on several factors, the water content of live fuel plays an important role in determining fire occurrence and spread, especially in the Mediterranean shrubland, where live fuel is often the main component of the available fuel which catches fire. According to projections on future climate, an increase in risk of summer droughts is likely to take place in Southern Europe. More prolonged drought seasons induced by climatic changes are likely to influence general flammability characteristics of fuel, affecting load distribution in vegetation strata, floristic composition, and live and dead fuel ratio. In addition, variations in precipitation and mean temperature could directly affect fuel water status, and consequently flammability, and length of critical periods of high ignition danger for Mediterranean ecosystems. The main aim of this work was to propose a methodology for evaluating possible impacts of future climate change on moisture dynamic and length of fire danger period at local scale. Specific objectives were: i) evaluating performances of meteorological drought indices in describing seasonal pattern of live fuel moisture content (LFMC), and ii) simulating the potential impacts of future climate changes on the duration of fire danger period. Measurements of LFMC seasonal pattern of three Mediterranean shrub species were performed in North Western Sardinia (Italy) for 8 years. Seasonal patterns of LFMC were compared with the Drought Code of the Canadian Forest Fire Weather Index and the Keetch-Byram Drought Index. Analysis of frequency distribution and cumulative distribution curves were carried out in order to evaluate performance of codes and to identify

  17. Fire retardant formulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    The present invention relates to compositions where a substrate is liable to catch fire such as bituminous products, paints, carpets or the like. The invention relates to a composition comprising 40-95 weight % of a substrate to be rendered fire resistant such as bituminous material or paint......, carpets which substrate is mixed with 5-60 weight % of a fire retardant component. The invention relates to a fire retardant component comprising or being constituted of attapulgite, and a salt being a source of a blowing or expanding agent, where the attapulgite and the salt are electrostatically...... connected by mixing and subjecting the mixture of the two components to agitation. Also, the invention relates to compositions comprising 40-95 weight % of a substrate to be rendered fire resistant mixed with 5-60 weight % of a fire retardant according to claim 1 or 2, which fire retardant component...

  18. Experimental Studies on the Flammability and Fire Hazards of Photovoltaic Modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Yun Yang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Many of the photovoltaic (PV systems on buildings are of sufficiently high voltages, with potential to cause or promote fires. However, research about photovoltaic fires is insufficient. This paper focuses on the flammability and fire hazards of photovoltaic modules. Bench-scale experiments based on polycrystalline silicon PV modules have been conducted using a cone calorimeter. Several parameters including ignition time (tig, mass loss, heat release rate (HRR, carbon monoxide (CO and carbon dioxide (CO2 concentration, were investigated. The fire behaviours, fire hazards and toxicity of gases released by PV modules are assessed based on experimental results. The results show that PV modules under tests are inflammable with the critical heat flux of 26 kW/m2. This work will lead to better understanding on photovoltaic fires and how to help authorities determine the appropriate fire safety provisions for controlling photovoltaic fires.

  19. Experimental Studies on the Flammability and Fire Hazards of Photovoltaic Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hong-Yun; Zhou, Xiao-Dong; Yang, Li-Zhong; Zhang, Tao-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Many of the photovoltaic (PV) systems on buildings are of sufficiently high voltages, with potential to cause or promote fires. However, research about photovoltaic fires is insufficient. This paper focuses on the flammability and fire hazards of photovoltaic modules. Bench-scale experiments based on polycrystalline silicon PV modules have been conducted using a cone calorimeter. Several parameters including ignition time (tig), mass loss, heat release rate (HRR), carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration, were investigated. The fire behaviours, fire hazards and toxicity of gases released by PV modules are assessed based on experimental results. The results show that PV modules under tests are inflammable with the critical heat flux of 26 kW/m2. This work will lead to better understanding on photovoltaic fires and how to help authorities determine the appropriate fire safety provisions for controlling photovoltaic fires. PMID:28793434

  20. The influence of surface microstructure and chemical composition on corrosion behaviour in fuel-grade bio-ethanol of low-alloy steel modified by plasma nitro-carburizing and post-oxidizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boniatti, Rosiana; Bandeira, Aline L.; Crespi, Ângela E.; Aguzzoli, Cesar; Baumvol, Israel J. R.; Figueroa, Carlos A.

    2013-09-01

    The interaction of bio-ethanol on steel surfaces modified by plasma-assisted diffusion technologies is studied for the first time. The influence of surface microstructure and chemical composition on corrosion behaviour of AISI 4140 low-alloy steel in fuel-grade bio-ethanol was investigated. The steel surfaces were modified by plasma nitro-carburizing followed plasma oxidizing. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, X-ray dispersive spectroscopy, and glow-discharge optical emission spectroscopy were used to characterize the modified surface before and after immersion tests in bio-ethanol up to 77 days. The main corrosion mechanism is pit formation. The pit density and pit size were measured in order to quantify the corrosion resistance which was found to depend more strongly on microstructure and morphology of the oxide layer than on its thickness. The best corrosion protection was observed for samples post-oxidized at 480 °C and 90 min.

  1. Development of a modeling approach to predict ash formation during co-firing of coal and biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doshi, V. [School of Engineering, Monash University Sunway Campus, Jalan Lagoon Selatan, Bandar Sunway, Selangor (Malaysia); Vuthaluru, H.B. [Curtin University of Technology, Kent Street, Bentley 6104, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Korbee, R. [HRL Technology, Ipswich, Queensland (Australia); Kiel, J.H.A. [ECN Biomass, Coal and Environmental Research, P.O. Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2009-09-15

    The scope of this paper includes the development of a modelling approach to predict the ash release behaviour and chemical composition of inorganics during co-firing of coal and biomass. In the present work, an advanced analytical method was developed and introduced to determine the speciation of biomass using pH extraction analysis. Biomass samples considered for the study include wood chips, wood bark and straw. The speciation data was used as an input to the chemical speciation model to predict the behaviour and release of ash. It was found that the main gaseous species formed during the combustion of biomass are KCl, NaCl, K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. Calculations of gas-to-particle formation were also carried out to determine the chemical composition of coal and biomass during cooling which takes place in the boiler. It was found that the heterogeneous condensation occurring on heat exchange surfaces of boilers is much more than homogeneous condensation. Preliminary studies of interaction between coal and biomass during ash formation process showed that Al, Si and S elements in coal may have a 'buffering' effect on biomass alkali metals, thus reducing the release of alkali-gases which act as precursors to ash deposition and corrosion during co-firing. The results obtained in this work are considered to be valuable and form the basis for accurately determining the ash deposition during co-firing. (author)

  2. Parametric study for the fire safety design of steel structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aiuti, Riccardo; Giuliani, Luisa

    2013-01-01

    Despite the increasing knowledge on the behaviour of structures in fire and the development of new design tools for fire safety, current prescriptive regulations and design procedures present several shortcomings. These are mostly due to an oversimplification of the problem, in order to allow...... for a simple integration of the fire design procedures in the common practice. In this view, the structural fire safety of a building can be accomplished by verifying that single elements can resist a standard fire exposure for a required time, without taking into consideration the effect of restrained...... temperatures. Different parameters, as the grade of restrain, the loading resistance ratio and the slenderness of the elements are varied, thus a parametric study of the phenomenon is realized....

  3. Testing the potential of multi-spectral remote sensing for retrospectively estimating fire severity in African savannahs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alistair M.S. Smith; Martin J. Wooster; Nick A. Drake; Frederick M. Dipotso; Michael J. Falkowski; Andrew T. Hudak

    2005-01-01

    The remote sensing of fire severity is a noted goal in studies of forest and grassland wildfires. Experiments were conducted to discover and evaluate potential relationships between the characteristics of African savannah fires and post-fire surface spectral reflectance in the visible to shortwave infrared spectral region. Nine instrumented experimental fires were...

  4. Developing custom fire behavior fuel models from ecologically complex fuel structures for upper Atlantic Coastal Plain forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard R. Parresol; Joe H. Scott; Anne Andreu; Susan Prichard; Laurie Kurth

    2012-01-01

    Currently geospatial fire behavior analyses are performed with an array of fire behavior modeling systems such as FARSITE, FlamMap, and the Large Fire Simulation System. These systems currently require standard or customized surface fire behavior fuel models as inputs that are often assigned through remote sensing information. The ability to handle hundreds or...

  5. Fire Danger and Fire Weather Records

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Weather Service (formerly Weather Bureau) and Forest Service developed a program to track meteorological conditions conducive to forest fires, resulting...

  6. Using the Canadian Forest Fire Weather Index (FWI) System to assess the performance of fire management in Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, P. M.; Pereira, M. G.

    2009-04-01

    The success of fire management policies can be gauged by changes on the fire regime characteristics. Climate, vegetation (fuel) and topography determine the fire regime, and exert their influences at distinct temporal and spatial scales whose relative importance is quite debated. Climate factors are expected to prevail at the regional scale, while the local control of fire behaviour is determined by fuel and terrain. Recent modifications - 2001-2005 versus 2006-2008 - in wildfire incidence in Portugal are quantified by eliminating the noise associated to fire weather conditions. The following indicators of fire management performance are used, each reflecting a distinct fire management activity: number of fires, proportion of fires larger than 1 ha, proportion of fires larger than 100 ha, and median size of wildfires larger than 100 ha. The performance indicators calculated on a daily basis were examined as a function of the Canadian Forest Fire Weather Index (FWI) System components. Analysis of covariance was used to identify differences in performance between the two study periods, and non-linear regression analysis was employed to model performance indicators from FWI components for 2001-2005. The resulting models were then applied to 2006-2008 and the deviation between observed and predicted values was determined. Least square means (adjusted for neutral weather conditions) revealed statistically significant differences between the two periods for all indicators but the median size of wildfires > 100 ha. The remaining indicators were in 2006-2008 reduced by 21% (no. fires), 37% (proportion of fires >1 ha) and 63% (proportion of fires >100 ha) in comparison with 2001-2005. The results indicate that the combined performance of fire prevention, fire detection, first intervention and initial attack have improved after 2005. Reduction in the number of large fires is especially relevant, given their impact and weight in total burned area. However, no evidences were

  7. All fired up

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2013-01-01

    Members of the Directorate and their support staff took part in a fire-fighting course organised by the CERN Fire Brigade just before the end-of-year break.  The Bulletin takes a look at the fire-fighting training on offer at CERN.   At CERN the risk of fire can never be under-estimated. In order to train personnel in the use of fire extinguishers, CERN's fire training centre in Prévessin acquired a fire-simulation platform in 2012. On the morning of 17 December 2012, ten members of the CERN directorate and their support staff tried out the platform, following in the footsteps of 400 other members of the CERN community who had already attended the course. The participants were welcomed to the training centre by Gilles Colin, a fire-fighter and instructor, who gave them a 30-minute introduction to general safety and the different types of fire and fire extinguishers, followed by an hour of practical instruction in the simulation facility. There they were able to pract...

  8. Glovebox fire experiment, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kono, Keiichi; Sunaoshi, Mitsugu; Mishima, Tsuyoshi; Endo, Koichi.

    1979-01-01

    The gloveboxes used for plutonium facilities in Japan and foreign countries have considerable combustibles as their components, so that the fire resistivity of the gloveboxes is a serious problem in the safety evaluation of the facilities. Actually, a big fire having burned gloveboxes occurred in a foreign weapon facility. But the fire in the weapon facility should be distinguished from that in nuclear fuel facilities, since the former handles quite combustible plutonium metal, while the latter handle quite stable plutonium oxide. The countermeasures to fires should be decided, considering the properties and quantity of combustibles around gloveboxes and ventilation systems, as the probability and scale of fires can be presumed from them. From the viewpoint of safety, the experiment on glovebox fires was carried out by the Plutonium Fuel Division, PNC. The experimental conditions are explained. The samples were the acrylic resin panels with four glove ports and a small glovebox currently used. The glovebox showed the considerable fire resistance, and the panel hardly burned. The weakest component of the glovebox against fire was the gloves. The countermeasure to curtain the gloves with an insulating material seemed to be effective. The ventilation of the room and the glovebox worked as fire preventer at least in the first stage of fire. (Kako, I.)

  9. Managing wildland fires: integrating weather models into fire projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anne M. Rosenthal; Francis Fujioka

    2004-01-01

    Flames from the Old Fire sweep through lands north of San Bernardino during late fall of 2003. Like many Southern California fires, the Old Fire consumed susceptible forests at the urban-wildland interface and spread to nearby city neighborhoods. By incorporating weather models into fire perimeter projections, scientist Francis Fujioka is improving fire modeling as a...

  10. Reconstructing Fire Records from Ground-Based Routine Aerosol Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongmei Zhao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Long-term fire records are important to understanding the trend of biomass burning and its interactions with air quality and climate at regional and global scales. Traditionally, such data have been compiled from ground surveys or satellite remote sensing. To obtain aerosol information during a fire event to use in analyzing air quality, we propose a new method of developing a long-term fire record for the contiguous United States using an unconventional data source: ground-based aerosol monitoring. Assisted by satellite fire detection, the mass concentration, size distribution, and chemical composition data of surface aerosols collected from the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE network are examined to identify distinct aerosol characteristics during satellite-detected fire and non-fire periods. During a fire episode, elevated aerosol concentrations and heavy smoke are usually recorded by ground monitors and satellite sensors. Based on the unique physical and chemical characteristics of fire-dominated aerosols reported in the literature, we analyzed the surface aerosol observations from the IMPROVE network during satellite-detected fire events to establish a set of indicators to identify fire events from routine aerosol monitoring data. Five fire identification criteria were chosen: (1 high concentrations of PM2.5 and PM10 (particles smaller than 2.5 and 10 in diameters, respectively; (2 a high PM2.5/PM10 ratio; (3 high organic carbon (OC/PM2.5 and elemental carbon (EC/PM2.5 ratios; (4 a high potassium (K/PM2.5 ratio; and (5 a low soil/PM2.5 ratio. Using these criteria, we are able to identify a number of fire episodes close to 15 IMPROVE monitors from 2001 to 2011. Most of these monitors are located in the Western and Central United States. In any given year within the study period fire events often occurred between April and September, especially in the two months of April and September. This ground-based fire

  11. Hydrocarbon characterization experiments in fully turbulent fires.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricks, Allen; Blanchat, Thomas K.

    2007-05-01

    As the capabilities of numerical simulations increase, decision makers are increasingly relying upon simulations rather than experiments to assess risks across a wide variety of accident scenarios including fires. There are still, however, many aspects of fires that are either not well understood or are difficult to treat from first principles due to the computational expense. For a simulation to be truly predictive and to provide decision makers with information which can be reliably used for risk assessment the remaining physical processes must be studied and suitable models developed for the effects of the physics. The model for the fuel evaporation rate in a liquid fuel pool fire is significant because in well-ventilated fires the evaporation rate largely controls the total heat release rate from the fire. A set of experiments are outlined in this report which will provide data for the development and validation of models for the fuel regression rates in liquid hydrocarbon fuel fires. The experiments will be performed on fires in the fully turbulent scale range (> 1 m diameter) and with a number of hydrocarbon fuels ranging from lightly sooting to heavily sooting. The importance of spectral absorption in the liquid fuels and the vapor dome above the pool will be investigated and the total heat flux to the pool surface will be measured. The importance of convection within the liquid fuel will be assessed by restricting large scale liquid motion in some tests. These data sets will provide a sound, experimentally proven basis for assessing how much of the liquid fuel needs to be modeled to enable a predictive simulation of a fuel fire given the couplings between evaporation of fuel from the pool and the heat release from the fire which drives the evaporation.

  12. Fire impacts on European Boreal soils: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Paulo; Oliva, Marc; Cerda, Artemi

    2016-04-01

    , Engineering and Management, 1(59), 52-62. Pereira, P., Ubeda, X., Mataix-Solera, J., Oliva, M., Novara, A. (2014) Short-term spatio-temporal spring grassland fire effects on soil colour,organic matter and water repellency in Lithuania, Solid Earth, 5, 209-225. Ryan KC. 2002. Dynamic Interactions between forest structure and fire behavioural in boreal ecosystems. Silva Fennica 36: 13-39 Toivanen T, Kotiaho JS. 2007. Mimicking natural disturbances of boreal forests: the effects of controlled burning and creating dead wood on beetle diversity. Biodiversity Conservation 16: 3193-3211.

  13. Little Bear Fire Summary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarah McCaffrey; Melanie Stidham; Hannah. Brenkert-Smith

    2013-01-01

    In June 2012, immediately after the Little Bear Fire burned outside Ruidoso, New Mexico, a team of researchers interviewed fire managers, local personnel, and residents to understand perceptions of the event itself, communication, evacuation, and pre-fire preparedness. The intensity of fire behavior and resulting loss of 242 homes made this a complex fire with a...

  14. The human and fire connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theresa B. Jain

    2014-01-01

    We refer to fire as a natural disturbance, but unlike other disturbances such as forest insects and diseases, fire has had an intimate relationship with humans. Fire facilitated human evolution over two million years ago when our ancestors began to use fire to cook. Fire empowered our furbearers to adapt to cold climates, allowing humans to disperse and settle into...

  15. Global Burned Area and Biomass Burning Emissions from Small Fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randerson, J. T.; Chen, Y.; vanderWerf, G. R.; Rogers, B. M.; Morton, D. C.

    2012-01-01

    In several biomes, including croplands, wooded savannas, and tropical forests, many small fires occur each year that are well below the detection limit of the current generation of global burned area products derived from moderate resolution surface reflectance imagery. Although these fires often generate thermal anomalies that can be detected by satellites, their contributions to burned area and carbon fluxes have not been systematically quantified across different regions and continents. Here we developed a preliminary method for combining 1-km thermal anomalies (active fires) and 500 m burned area observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to estimate the influence of these fires. In our approach, we calculated the number of active fires inside and outside of 500 m burn scars derived from reflectance data. We estimated small fire burned area by computing the difference normalized burn ratio (dNBR) for these two sets of active fires and then combining these observations with other information. In a final step, we used the Global Fire Emissions Database version 3 (GFED3) biogeochemical model to estimate the impact of these fires on biomass burning emissions. We found that the spatial distribution of active fires and 500 m burned areas were in close agreement in ecosystems that experience large fires, including savannas across southern Africa and Australia and boreal forests in North America and Eurasia. In other areas, however, we observed many active fires outside of burned area perimeters. Fire radiative power was lower for this class of active fires. Small fires substantially increased burned area in several continental-scale regions, including Equatorial Asia (157%), Central America (143%), and Southeast Asia (90%) during 2001-2010. Globally, accounting for small fires increased total burned area by approximately by 35%, from 345 Mha/yr to 464 Mha/yr. A formal quantification of uncertainties was not possible, but sensitivity

  16. Wildland Fire Management Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwager, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-09-30

    The Wildland Fire Management Plan (FMP) for Brookhaven National Lab (BNL) is written to comply with Department of Energy (DOE) Integrated Safety Management Policy; Federal Wildland Fire Management Policy and Program Review; and Wildland and Prescribed Fire Management Policy and Implementation Procedures Reference Guide. This current plan incorporates changes resulting from new policies on the national level as well as significant changes to available resources and other emerging issues, and replaces BNL's Wildland FMP dated 2014.

  17. Error associated with model predictions of wildland fire rate of spread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguel G. Cruz; Martin E. Alexander

    2015-01-01

    How well can we expect to predict the spread rate of wildfires and prescribed fires? The degree of accuracy in model predictions of wildland fire behaviour characteristics are dependent on the model's applicability to a given situation, the validity of the model's relationships, and the reliability of the model input data (Alexander and Cruz 2013b#. We...

  18. Sodium pool fires consequences on a confined vessel and on the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rzekiecki, R.; Charpenel, J.; Malet, J.C.; Cucinotta, A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the PYROS I Code used in France to calculate the effects of a sodium pool fire on a vessel and his validation range. The results or the atmospheric behaviour of the aerosol are given. Predicting the consequences of large sodium fires in large cells from the results of small scaled experiments, claim attention on scale effects. (author)

  19. Fire safety engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.N.

    1989-01-01

    The periodic occurrence of large-scale, potentially disastrous industrial accidents involving fire in hazardous environments such as oilwell blowouts, petrochemical explosions and nuclear installations highlights the need for an integrated approach to fire safety engineering. Risk reduction 'by design' and rapid response are of equal importance in the saving of life and property in such situations. This volume of papers covers the subject thoroughly, touching on such topics as hazard analysis, safety design and testing, fire detection and control, and includes studies of fire hazard in the context of environment protection. (author)

  20. WebFIRE

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Factor Information Retrieval (FIRE) Data System is a database management system containing EPA's recommended emission estimation factors for criteria and...

  1. Time-clustering investigation of fire temporal fluctuations in Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Telesca

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Temporal clustering structures were identified and quantified in fire sequences recorded from 1980 to 2005 in Continental Portugal, by using the Allan Factor statistics, a statistical tool suited to reveal clustering behaviour in point processes. The obtained results show the presence of daily and annual periodicities, superimposed onto a scaling behaviour, which features the sequence of wildfires as a fractal time process with a rather high degree of time-clusterization of the events.

  2. Global burned area and biomass burning emissions from small fires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Randerson, J.T; Chen, Y.; van der Werf, G.R.; Rogers, B.M.; Morton, D.C.

    2012-01-01

    In several biomes, including croplands, wooded savannas, and tropical forests, many small fires occur each year that are well below the detection limit of the current generation of global burned area products derived from moderate resolution surface reflectance imagery. Although these fires often

  3. Coal fire mapping of East Basuria Colliery, Jharia coalfield using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2007) using satellite remote sensing methods only. So far, only a few surface geophysical methods have been applied for coal fire research in India. In the present study, magnetic method of geophysical investigation has been used for coal fire mapping of. East Basuria Colliery, Jharia coalfield, India. Ini- tially, a brief history ...

  4. The role of fire in management of watershed responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm J. Zwolinski

    2000-01-01

    Hydrologic responses of watersheds are strongly related to vegetation and soil disturbances. Many of the storage and transfer components of the global hydrologic cycle are altered by the occurrence of fire. The major effect of fire on the hydrologic functioning of watersheds is the removal of vegetation and litter materials that protect the soil surface. Reductions in...

  5. What kind of cutting and thinning can prevent crown fires?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mick Harrington

    2008-01-01

    Many land managers are attempting to lessen the probability of severe wildfire behavior and impacts, especially near communities, by manipulating canopy and surface fuel characteristics. Various interest groups have questioned the value of fuels treatments. In reality, apart from fire exposure when a real fire went through a treated stand, effectiveness of fuel...

  6. Pressure cylinders under fire condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Hora

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The presence of pressure cylinders under fire conditions significantly increases the risk rate for the intervening persons. It is considerably problematic to predict the pressure cylinders behaviour during heat exposition, its destruction progress and possible following explosion of the produced air–gas mixture because pressure cylinders and its environment generate a highly complicated dynamic system during an uncontrolled destruction. The large scale tests carried out by the Pilsen Fire and Rescue Department and the Rapid Response Unit of the Czech Republic Police in October 2012 and in May 2014 in the Military area Brdy and in the area of the former Lachema factory in Kaznějov had several objectives, namely, to record, qualify and quantify some of the aspects of an uncontrolled heat destruction procedure of an exposed pressure cylinder in an enclosed space and to qualify and describe the process of a controlled destruction of a pressure cylinder by shooting through it including basic tactical concepts. The article describes the experiments that were carried out.

  7. A Vision-Based Approach to Fire Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Gomes

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a vision-based method for fire detection from fixed surveillance smart cameras. The method integrates several well-known techniques properly adapted to cope with the challenges related to the actual deployment of the vision system. Concretely, background subtraction is performed with a context-based learning mechanism so as to attain higher accuracy and robustness. The computational cost of a frequency analysis of potential fire regions is reduced by means of focusing its operation with an attentive mechanism. For fast discrimination between fire regions and fire-coloured moving objects, a new colour-based model of fire's appearance and a new wavelet-based model of fire's frequency signature are proposed. To reduce the false alarm rate due to the presence of fire-coloured moving objects, the category and behaviour of each moving object is taken into account in the decision-making. To estimate the expected object's size in the image plane and to generate geo-referenced alarms, the camera-world mapping is approximated with a GPS-based calibration process. Experimental results demonstrate the ability of the proposed method to detect fires with an average success rate of 93.1% at a processing rate of 10 Hz, which is often sufficient for real-life applications.

  8. A stand-replacing fire history in upper montane forests of the southern Rocky Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, E.Q.; Swetnam, T.W.; Allen, Craig D.

    2007-01-01

    Dendroecological techniques were applied to reconstruct stand-replacing fire history in upper montane forests in northern New Mexico and southern Colorado. Fourteen stand-replacing fires were dated to 8 unique fire years (1842–1901) using four lines of evidence at each of 12 sites within the upper Rio Grande Basin. The four lines of evidence were (i) quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) inner-ring dates, (ii) fire-killed conifer bark-ring dates, (iii) tree-ring width changes or other morphological indicators of injury, and (iv) fire scars. The annual precision of dating allowed the identification of synchronous stand-replacing fire years among the sites, and co-occurrence with regional surface fire events previously reconstructed from a network of fire scar collections in lower elevation pine forests across the southwestern United States. Nearly all of the synchronous stand-replacing and surface fire years coincided with severe droughts, because climate variability created regional conditions where stand-replacing fires and surface fires burned across ecosystems. Reconstructed stand-replacing fires that predate substantial Anglo-American settlement in this region provide direct evidence that stand-replacing fires were a feature of high-elevation forests before extensive and intensive land-use practices (e.g., logging, railroad, and mining) began in the late 19th century.

  9. National Fire News- Current Wildfires

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1 to 5) Current hours for the National Fire Information Center are (MST) 8:00 am - 4: ... information. March 9, 2018 Nationally, 35 new large fires were reported. Fire activity picked up in the ...

  10. Duration of fuels reduction following prescribed fire in coniferous forests of U.S. national parks in California and the Colorado Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mantgem, Phillip J.; Lalemand, Laura; Keifer, MaryBeth; Kane, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    Prescribed fire is a widely used forest management tool, yet the long-term effectiveness of prescribed fire in reducing fuels and fire hazards in many vegetation types is not well documented. We assessed the magnitude and duration of reductions in surface fuels and modeled fire hazards in coniferous forests across nine U.S. national parks in California and the Colorado Plateau. We used observations from a prescribed fire effects monitoring program that feature standard forest and surface fuels inventories conducted pre-fire, immediately following an initial (first-entry) prescribed fire and at varying intervals up to >20 years post-fire. A subset of these plots was subjected to prescribed fire again (second-entry) with continued monitoring. Prescribed fire effects were highly variable among plots, but we found on average first-entry fires resulted in a significant post-fire reduction in surface fuels, with litter and duff fuels not returning to pre-fire levels over the length of our observations. Fine and coarse woody fuels often took a decade or longer to return to pre-fire levels. For second-entry fires we found continued fuels reductions, without strong evidence of fuel loads returning to levels observed immediately prior to second-entry fire. Following both first- and second-entry fire there were increases in estimated canopy base heights, along with reductions in estimated canopy bulk density and modeled flame lengths. We did not find evidence of return to pre-fire conditions during our observation intervals for these measures of fire hazard. Our results show that prescribed fire can be a valuable tool to reduce fire hazards and, depending on forest conditions and the measurement used, reductions in fire hazard can last for decades. Second-entry prescribed fire appeared to reinforce the reduction in fuels and fire hazard from first-entry fires.

  11. Forest Fires 3

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    heat from within the Earth could be transferred to the charcoal layers above, from there onto the peat and other vegetation in the soil and finally when it comes in contact with forest litter it would develop into a natural forest fire. Ironically, in regions usually thought of as cool and wet, forest fires do occur naturally frop1 time to ...

  12. Fire research issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard E. McArdle; Donald N. Matthews

    1934-01-01

    This number of Forest Research Motes is primarily for the forest fire protectionist. It consists of a number of very short articles, each of which gives the essence of the results of a study made recently by this Forest Experiment Station. These so-called fire studies which are represented herein by brief fragments are all part of an organized research program, having...

  13. Biomass co-firing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen

    2013-01-01

    Co-firing biomass with fossil fuels in existing power plants is an attractive option for significantly increasing renewable energy resource utilization and reducing CO2 emissions. This chapter mainly discusses three direct co-firing technologies: pulverized-fuel (PF) boilers, fluidized-bed combus...

  14. Fire forum 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    The conference contains 18 presentations on various aspects of fire prevention and protection within the power production plants and industry, safety of building constructions, cable and transformer problems, risk and safety evaluation methods, management aspects, relevant Norwegian and Icelandic laws and regulations and oil analysis. Some examples of fires and explosions are also presented. (tk)

  15. Hot fire, cool soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoof, C.R.; Moore, D.; Fernandes, P.; Stoorvogel, J.J.; Fernandes, R.; Ferreira, A.J.D.; Ritsema, C.J.

    2013-01-01

    Wildfires greatly increase a landscape's vulnerability to flooding and erosion events by removing vegetation and changing soils. Fire damage to soil increases with increasing soil temperature, and, for fires where smoldering combustion is absent, the current understanding is that soil temperatures

  16. The fire brigade renovates

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The new fire engine at CERN's Fire Station. A shiny brand-new fire engine is now attracting all the attention of the members of CERN's fire brigade. Since the beginning of last week this engine has taken over from an 18-year-old one, which has now been 'retired' from service. This modern vehicle, built in Brescia, Italy, is much lighter and more powerful than the old one and is equipped to allow the fire service to tackle most call-outs without the support of at least one other vehicle, as is currently necessary. The new fire engine is designed to transport six fire-fighters, 2000 litres of water, and is equipped not only for fire fighting actions but also to respond initially to any other kind of call-out, such as traffic accidents, chemical incidents, pollution, lightning, etc. It goes almost without saying that it is provided with the most modern safety measures, a low centre of gravity, as well as a special chassis and a combination pump (low and high pressure), which improve the safety and performance ...

  17. Advanced fire information system

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Frost, PE

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The South African Advanced Fire Information System (AFIS) is the first near real-time satellite-based fire monitoring system in Africa. It was originally developed for, and funded by, the electrical power utility Eskom, to reduce the impact of wild...

  18. FIRE_AX_MALBAL_SONDE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) Malcolm Baldridge Radiosonde Data in native format (FIRE_AX_MALBAL_SONDE)

  19. FIRE_AX_VALDIV_SONDE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) Malcolm Baldridge Radiosonde Data in Native format (FIRE_AX_VALDIV_SONDE)

  20. Sodium fire protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raju, C.; Kale, R.D.

    1979-01-01

    Results of experiments carried out with sodium fires to develop extinguishment techniques are presented. Characteristics, ignition temperature, heat evolution and other aspects of sodium fires are described. Out of the powders tested for extinguishment of 10 Kg sodium fires, sodium bi-carbonate based dry chemical powder has been found to be the best extinguisher followed by large sized vermiculite and then calcium carbonate powders distributed by spray nozzles. Powders, however, do not extinguish large fires effectively due to sodium-concrete reaction. To control large scale fires in a LMFBR, collection trays with protective cover have been found to cause oxygen starvation better than flooding with inert gas. This system has an added advantage in that there is no damage to the sodium facilities as has been in the case of powders which often contain chlorine compounds and cause stress corrosion cracking. (M.G.B.)

  1. The effectiveness and limitations of fuel modeling using the fire and fuels extension to the Forest Vegetation Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erin K. Noonan-Wright; Nicole M. Vaillant; Alicia L. Reiner

    2014-01-01

    Fuel treatment effectiveness is often evaluated with fire behavior modeling systems that use fuel models to generate fire behavior outputs. How surface fuels are assigned, either using one of the 53 stylized fuel models or developing custom fuel models, can affect predicted fire behavior. We collected surface and canopy fuels data before and 1, 2, 5, and 8 years after...

  2. Ice & Fire: the Burning Question

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Gelderen, Laurens; Jomaas, Grunde

    2017-01-01

    With the Arctic opening up to new shipping routes and increased oil exploration and production due to climate change, the risk of an Arctic oil spill is increasing. Of the classic oil spill response methods (mechanical recovery, dispersants and in-situ burning), in-situ burning is considered...... to be particularly a suitable response method in the Arctic. In-situ burning aims to remove the oil from the marine environment by burning it from the water surface. A recent Ph.D. thesis from the Technical University of Denmark has provided some new insights with respect to the fire science behind this response...

  3. An examination of fire spread thresholds in discontinuous fuel beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark A. Finney; Jack D. Cohen; Isaac C. Grenfell; Kara M. Yedinak

    2010-01-01

    Many fuel beds, especially live vegetation canopies (conifer forests, shrub fields, bunch-grasses) contain gaps between vegetation clumps. Fires burning in these fuel types often display thresholds for spread that are observed to depend on environmental factors like wind, slope, and fuel moisture content. To investigate threshold spread behaviours, we conducted a set...

  4. Modeling the performance of coated LPG tanks engulfes in fires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cozzani, V.; Landucci, G.; Molag, M. (Menso)

    2009-01-01

    The improvement of passive fire protection of storage vessels is a key factor to enhance safety among the LPG distribution chain. A thermal and mechanical model based on finite elements simulations was developed to assess the behaviour of full size tanks used for LPG storage and transportation in

  5. Modeling the performance of coated LPG tanks engulfed in fires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landucci, G.; Molag, M.; Cozzani, V.

    2009-01-01

    The improvement of passive fire protection of storage vessels is a key factor to enhance safety among the LPG distribution chain. A thermal and mechanical model based on finite elements simulations was developed to assess the behaviour of full size tanks used for LPG storage and transportation in

  6. Microgravity Flammability Experiments for Spacecraft Fire Safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legros, Guillaume; Minster, Olivier; Tóth, Balazs

    2012-01-01

    As fire behaviour in manned spacecraft still remains poorly understood, an international topical team has been created to design a validation experiment that has an unprecedented large scale for a microgravity flammability experiment. While the validation experiment is being designed for a re-sup...... validation experiment are crucial to the ultimate goal of the project, which is the development of predictive tools that should be capable of selecting an adaptive response to fire spread in any manned spacecraft.......As fire behaviour in manned spacecraft still remains poorly understood, an international topical team has been created to design a validation experiment that has an unprecedented large scale for a microgravity flammability experiment. While the validation experiment is being designed for a re...... spread, and thus also the modeling thereof, in realistic conditions is described. Some of the parameters governing the flame spread are also identified and their scaling against the dimensions of the test specimen is briefly questioned. Then several of the current and scheduled efforts are presented...

  7. Water quality impacts of forest fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tecle Aregai; Daniel Neary

    2015-01-01

    Forest fires have been serious menace, many times resulting in tremendous economic, cultural and ecological damage to many parts of the United States. One particular area that has been significantly affected is the water quality of streams and lakes in the water thirsty southwestern United States. This is because the surface water coming off burned areas has resulted...

  8. 30 CFR 56.6405 - Firing devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Electric Blasting § 56... all electric detonators to be fired with the type of circuits used. Storage or dry cell batteries are not permitted as power sources. (b) Blasting machines shall be tested, repaired, and maintained in...

  9. Fire and fire-adapted vegetation promoted C4 expansion in the late Miocene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiter, Simon; Higgins, Steven I; Osborne, Colin P; Bradshaw, Catherine; Lunt, Dan; Ripley, Brad S; Taylor, Lyla L; Beerling, David J

    2012-08-01

    Large proportions of the Earth's land surface are covered by biomes dominated by C(4) grasses. These C(4)-dominated biomes originated during the late Miocene, 3-8 million years ago (Ma), but there is evidence that C(4) grasses evolved some 20 Ma earlier during the early Miocene/Oligocene. Explanations for this lag between evolution and expansion invoke changes in atmospheric CO(2), seasonality of climate and fire. However, there is still no consensus about which of these factors triggered C(4) grassland expansion. We use a vegetation model, the adaptive dynamic global vegetation model (aDGVM), to test how CO(2), temperature, precipitation, fire and the tolerance of vegetation to fire influence C(4) grassland expansion. Simulations are forced with late Miocene climates generated with the Hadley Centre coupled ocean-atmosphere-vegetation general circulation model. We show that physiological differences between the C(3) and C(4) photosynthetic pathways cannot explain C(4) grass invasion into forests, but that fire is a crucial driver. Fire-promoting plant traits serve to expand the climate space in which C(4)-dominated biomes can persist. We propose that three mechanisms were involved in C(4) expansion: the physiological advantage of C(4) grasses under low atmospheric CO(2) allowed them to invade C(3) grasslands; fire allowed grasses to invade forests; and the evolution of fire-resistant savanna trees expanded the climate space that savannas can invade. © 2012 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  10. Consumer behaviours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønhøj, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Energy-saving programmes are increasingly targeted at children to encourage household energy conservation. A study involving the assignment of energy-saving interventions to Girl Scouts shows that a child-focused intervention can improve energy-saving behaviours among children and their parents....

  11. Behaviour Questionnaire

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    symptoms signifying a hostile-aggressive dimension, factor 2 an anxious-fearful dimension, and factor 3 emerged as a ... Objective. This paper examines the factor structure of the. Yoruba translation of the Children's Behaviour Questionnaire .... Twitches/mannerisms/tics. Sucks thumb/finger. Bites nails. Often disobedient.

  12. Global sensitivity analysis using emulators, with an example analysis of large fire plumes based on FDS simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelsey, Adrian [Health and Safety Laboratory, Harpur Hill, Buxton (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-15

    Laboratory (SNL) in 2009. At the largest LNG release rate the flames did not cover the entire area of the LNG spill, this behaviour had not been observed in previous large-scale experiments. Also the height of the flames was also greater than expected from previous large-scale tests. One possible explanation for the observed behaviour is that in this very large-scale release the speed at which air and fuel vapour was drawn into the fire exceeded the flame speed. Therefore the flames could not propagate upwind to ignite the whole surface of the LNG pool. Fuel vapour from the unignited region, drawn into the fire, may also account for the higher flame height. A global sensitivity analysis allows the influence of uncertain parameters on the quantities of interest to be examined. This publication and the work it describes were funded by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE). Its contents, including any opinions and/or conclusions expressed, are those of the authors alone and do not necessarily reflect HSE policy.

  13. Global sensitivity analysis using emulators, with an example analysis of large fire plumes based on FDS simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelsey, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory (SNL) in 2009. At the largest LNG release rate the flames did not cover the entire area of the LNG spill, this behaviour had not been observed in previous large-scale experiments. Also the height of the flames was also greater than expected from previous large-scale tests. One possible explanation for the observed behaviour is that in this very large-scale release the speed at which air and fuel vapour was drawn into the fire exceeded the flame speed. Therefore the flames could not propagate upwind to ignite the whole surface of the LNG pool. Fuel vapour from the unignited region, drawn into the fire, may also account for the higher flame height. A global sensitivity analysis allows the influence of uncertain parameters on the quantities of interest to be examined. This publication and the work it describes were funded by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE). Its contents, including any opinions and/or conclusions expressed, are those of the authors alone and do not necessarily reflect HSE policy.

  14. USFA NFIRS 2000 Basic Fire Incident Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The 2000 US Fire Administration Fire (USFA) Fire Incident & Cause Data was provided by the U.S. Fire Administration's (USFA) National Fire Data Center's (NFDC's)...

  15. USFA NFIRS 2002 Basic Fire Incident Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The 2002 US Fire Administration Fire (USFA) Fire Incident & Cause Data was provided by the U.S. Fire Administration's (USFA) National Fire Data Center's (NFDC's)...

  16. USFA NFIRS 2004 Basic Fire Incident Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The 2004 US Fire Administration Fire (USFA) Fire Incident & Cause Data was provided by the U.S. Fire Administration's (USFA) National Fire Data Center's (NFDC's)...

  17. USFA NFIRS 2009 Basic Fire Incident Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The 2009 US Fire Administration Fire (USFA) Fire Incident & Cause Data was provided by the U.S. Fire Administration's (USFA) National Fire Data Center's (NFDC's)...

  18. USFA NFIRS 2001 Basic Fire Incident Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The 2001 US Fire Administration Fire (USFA) Fire Incident & Cause Data was provided by the U.S. Fire Administration's (USFA) National Fire Data Center's (NFDC's)...

  19. Fire science at LLNL: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, H.K. (ed.)

    1990-03-01

    This fire sciences report from LLNL includes topics on: fire spread in trailer complexes, properties of welding blankets, validation of sprinkler systems, fire and smoke detectors, fire modeling, and other fire engineering and safety issues. (JEF)

  20. USFA NFIRS 2003 Basic Fire Incident Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The 2003 US Fire Administration Fire (USFA) Fire Incident & Cause Data was provided by the U.S. Fire Administration's (USFA) National Fire Data Center's (NFDC's)...

  1. USFA NFIRS 1999 Basic Fire Incident Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The 1999 US Fire Administration Fire (USFA) Fire Incident & Cause Data was provided by the U.S. Fire Administration's (USFA) National Fire Data Center's (NFDC's)...

  2. Characterization of indoor and outdoor pool fires with active calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koski, J.A.; Gill, W.; Gritzo, L.A.; Kent, L.A.; Wix, S.D.

    1994-01-01

    A water cooled, 1 m x 1 m, vertical calorimeter panel has been used in conjunction with other fire diagnostics to characterize a 6 m x 6 m outdoor and three 3 m x 3 m indoor JP-4 pool fires. Measurements reported include calorimeter surface heat flux and surface temperatures, flame temperatures, and gas flow velocities in the fire. From the data, effective radiative absorption coefficients for various zones in the fires have been estimated. The outdoor test was conducted at Sandia's Coyote Canyon test facility, while indoor tests were conducted at the indoor SMokE Reduction Facility (SMERF) at the same location. The measurements provide data useful in calibrating simple analytic fire models intended for the analysis of packages containing hazardous materials

  3. Humans, Fires, and Forests - Social science applied to fire management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna J. Cortner; Donald R. Field; Pam Jakes; James D. Buthman

    2003-01-01

    The 2000 and 2002 fire seasons resulted in increased political scrutiny of the nation's wildland fire threats, and given the fact that millions of acres of lands are still at high risk for future catastrophic fire events, the issues highlighted by the recent fire seasons are not likely to go away any time soon. Recognizing the magnitude of the problem, the...

  4. The contribution of natural fire management to wilderness fire science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carol Miller

    2014-01-01

    When the federal agencies established policies in the late 1960s and early 1970s to allow the use of natural fires in wilderness, they launched a natural fire management experiment in a handful of wilderness areas. As a result, wildland fire has played more of its natural role in wilderness than anywhere else. Much of what we understand about fire ecology comes from...

  5. Mapping landscape fire frequency for fire regime condition class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale A. Hamilton; Wendel J. Hann

    2015-01-01

    Fire Regime Condition Class (FRCC) is a departure index that compares the current amounts of the different vegetation succession classes, fire frequency, and fire severity to historic reference conditions. FRCC assessments have been widely used for evaluating ecosystem status in many areas of the U.S. in reports such as land use plans, fire management plans, project...

  6. Developing a Global, Short-Term Fire Weather Forecasting Tool Using NWP Input Meteorology and Satellite Fire Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, D. A.; Hyer, E. J.; Wang, J.

    2011-12-01

    In order to meet the emerging need for better estimates of biomass burning emissions in air quality and climate models, a statistical model is developed to characterize the effect of a given set of meteorological conditions on the following day's fire activity, including ignition and spread potential. Preliminary tests are conducted within several spatial domains of the North American boreal forest by investigating a wide range of meteorological information, including operational fire weather forecasting indices, such as the Canadian Forest Fire Danger Rating System (CFFDRS). However, rather than using local noon surface station data, the six components of the CFFDRS are modified to use inputs from the North America Regional Reanalysis (NARR) and the Navy's Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System Model (NOGAPS). The Initial Spread Index (ISI) and the Fire Weather Index (FWI) are shown to be the most relevant components of the CFFDRS for short-term changes in fire activity. However, both components are found to be highly sensitive to variations in relative humidity and wind speed input data. Several variables related to fire ignition from dry lighting, such as instability and the synoptic pattern, are also incorporated. Cases of fire ignition, growth, decay, and extinction are stratified using satellite fire observations from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) and the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and compared to the available suite of meteorological information. These comparisons reveal that combinations of meteorological variables, such as the FWI, ISI, and additional indices developed for this study, produce the greatest separability between major fire growth and decay cases, which are defined by the observed change in fire counts and fire radiative power. This information is used to derive statistical relationships affecting the short-term changes in fire activity and subsequently applied to other

  7. Technologies of monitoring, alerting and controlling for coal fires in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jun; Xiao, Yang; Luo, Zhen-Min; Zhang, Yan-Ni; Zheng, Xue-Zhao

    2017-04-01

    Coalfield fire has become a global disaster, especially in China, which lost a large number of coal resources every year, and caused serious destruction of ecological environment. Coalfield fire area has become urgent to solve the problem for the complex, combustion long-time, wide range, fire source hidden, and controlling difficultly in the formed evolution process. At present, surface coal fire areas prospecting technology mainly have visible light on surface, surface radar remote sensing technology, air ground integration technology. Detecting hidden fire source technology are infrared thermal imaging technology, method of radon-test. The technologies of monitoring and early warning for fire areas with ad-hoc, intelligent monitoring for infrared thermal imaging real time networks are applied. The idea of district controlling as "prevention-control-extinguishing" is established and in-site applications, which the technologies and equipment of fire prevention and extinguishment include the inorganic filling plugging, liquid carbon dioxide, and series of colloidal materials.

  8. Electronic firing systems and methods for firing a device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frickey, Steven J [Boise, ID; Svoboda, John M [Idaho Falls, ID

    2012-04-24

    An electronic firing system comprising a control system, a charging system, an electrical energy storage device, a shock tube firing circuit, a shock tube connector, a blasting cap firing circuit, and a blasting cap connector. The control system controls the charging system, which charges the electrical energy storage device. The control system also controls the shock tube firing circuit and the blasting cap firing circuit. When desired, the control system signals the shock tube firing circuit or blasting cap firing circuit to electrically connect the electrical energy storage device to the shock tube connector or the blasting cap connector respectively.

  9. Fire simulation of the canister transfer and installation vehicle; Kapselin siirto- ja asennusajoneuvon palosimulointi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peltokorpi, L. [Fortum Power and Heat Oy, Espoo (Finland)

    2012-12-15

    A pyrolysis model of the canister transfer and installation vehicle was developed and vehicle fires in the final disposal tunnel and in the central tunnel were simulated using the fire simulation program FDS (Fire Dynamics Simulator). For comparison, same vehicle fire was also simulated at conditions in which the fire remained as a fuel controlled during the whole simulation. The purpose of the fire simulations was to simulate the fire behaviour realistically taking into account for example the limitations coming from the lack of oxygen. The material parameters for the rubber were defined and the simulation models for the tyres developed by simulating the fire test of a front wheel loader rubber tyre done by SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden. In these simulations the most important phenomena were successfully brought out but the timing of the phenomena was difficult. The final values for the rubber material parameters were chosen so that the simulated fire behaviour was at least as intense as the measured one. In the vehicle fire simulations a hydraulic oil or diesel leak causing a pool fire size of 2 MW and 2 m{sup 2} was assumed. The pool fire was assumed to be located under the tyres of the SPMT (Self Propelled Modular Transporters) transporter. In each of the vehicle fire simulations only the tyres of the SPMT transporter were observed to be burning whereas the tyres of the trailer remained untouched. In the fuel controlled fire the maximum power was slightly under 10 MW which was reached in about 18 minutes. In the final disposal tunnel the growth of the fire was limited due to the lack of oxygen and the relatively fast air flows existing in the tunnel. Fast air flows caused the flame spreading to be limited to the certain directions. In the final disposal tunnel fire the maximum power was slightly over 7 MW which was reached about 8 minutes after the ignition. In the central tunnel there was no shortage of oxygen but the spread of the fire was limited

  10. Cable tray fire tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klamerus, L.J.

    1978-01-01

    Funds were authorized by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to provide data needed for confirmation of the suitability of current design standards and regulatory guides for fire protection and control in water reactor power plants. The activities of this program through August 1978 are summarized. A survey of industry to determine current design practices and a screening test to select two cable constructions which were used in small scale and full scale testing are described. Both small and full scale tests to assess the adequacy of fire retardant coatings and full scale tests on fire shields to determine their effectiveness are outlined

  11. Coal-fired generation

    CERN Document Server

    Breeze, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Coal-Fired Generation is a concise, up-to-date and readable guide providing an introduction to this traditional power generation technology. It includes detailed descriptions of coal fired generation systems, demystifies the coal fired technology functions in practice as well as exploring the economic and environmental risk factors. Engineers, managers, policymakers and those involved in planning and delivering energy resources will find this reference a valuable guide, to help establish a reliable power supply address social and economic objectives. Focuses on the evolution of the traditio

  12. Fire influences the structure of plant-bee networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Guadalupe; Stevani, Erica L; Chacoff, Natacha P; Dorado, Jimena; Vázquez, Diego P

    2017-10-01

    Fire represents a frequent disturbance in many ecosystems, which can affect plant-pollinator assemblages and hence the services they provide. Furthermore, fire events could affect the architecture of plant-pollinator interaction networks, modifying the structure and function of communities. Some pollinators, such as wood-nesting bees, may be particularly affected by fire events due to damage to the nesting material and its long regeneration time. However, it remains unclear whether fire influences the structure of bee-plant interactions. Here, we used quantitative plant-wood-nesting bee interaction networks sampled across four different post-fire age categories (from freshly-burnt to unburnt sites) in an arid ecosystem to test whether the abundance of wood-nesting bees, the breadth of resource use and the plant-bee community structure change along a post-fire age gradient. We demonstrate that freshly-burnt sites present higher abundances of generalist than specialist wood-nesting bees and that this translates into lower network modularity than that of sites with greater post-fire ages. Bees do not seem to change their feeding behaviour across the post-fire age gradient despite changes in floral resource availability. Despite the effects of fire on plant-bee interaction network structure, these mutualistic networks seem to be able to recover a few years after the fire event. This result suggests that these interactions might be highly resilient to this type of disturbance. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2017 British Ecological Society.

  13. Ames T-3 fire test facility - Aircraft crash fire simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, R. H.

    1976-01-01

    There is a need to characterize the thermal response of materials exposed to aircraft fuel fires. Large scale open fire tests are costly and pollute the local environment. This paper describes the construction and operation of a subscale fire test that simulates the heat flux levels and thermochemistry of typical open pool fires. It has been termed the Ames T-3 Test and has been used extensively by NASA since 1969 to observe the behavior of materials exposed to JP-4 fuel fires.

  14. Laboratory fire behavior measurements of chaparral crown fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. Sanpakit; S. Omodan; D. Weise; M Princevac

    2015-01-01

    In 2013, there was an estimated 9,900 wildland fires that claimed more than 577,000 acres of land. That same year, about 542 prescribed fires were used to treat 48,554 acres by several agencies in California. Being able to understand fires using laboratory models can better prepare individuals to combat or use fires. Our research focused on chaparral crown fires....

  15. Theoretical modelling of the movement of sodium fire fumes in a building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaughan, G.J.; Simpson, C.P.; Smith, A.G.

    1989-01-01

    The important effect that the thermal hydraulic behaviour in a containment can have on the burning rate of a sodium fire is discussed. To explore the nature of the convective motion induced y the fire and how these might be affected by the containment morphology, calculations with a thermal hydraulic code, PHOENICS, were carried out. This code has also been used to investigate the movement of the smoke cloud produced by a fire to support a study of the use of a venting system. Both studies are reported and some conclusions on the role of thermal hydraulic phenomena on sodium fire investigations are made. (author)

  16. Prediction and validation of pool fire development in enclosures by means of CFD (Poolfire) Report - Year 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Hees, P.; Wahlqvist, J.; Hostikka, S.; Sikanen, T.; Husted, B.; Magnusson, T.; Joerud, F.

    2012-01-01

    Fires in nuclear power plants can be an important hazard for the overall safety of the facility. One of the typical fire sources is a pool fire. It is therefore important to have good knowledge on the fire behaviour of pool fire and be able to predict the heat release rate by prediction of the mass loss rate. This project envisages developing a pyrolysis model to be used in CFD models. In the this first year report the literature review conducted within the project is reported as well as the first tasks in the evaluation and modelling of the new model. (Author)

  17. Magnetic soft mode behaviour investigated via multi-spin flip Raman spectroscopy on near surface Cd{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}Te/Cd{sub 1-y}Mg{sub y}Te quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kehl, Christian

    2011-03-28

    The main motivation for this thesis was the experimental confirmation of the theoretically predicted magnetic soft mode and the analysis of its dependence on the hole-concentration and external B-field, as well as its disappearance with increasing sample temperature. For that purpose, CdMnTe/CdMgTe QWs (Mn: 0.6%, 1.0%) positioned close to the sample surface (13-19 nm) were investigated in an in-plane applied external magnetic field (up to 4.5 T in Voigt-geometry) via a two-colour experiment i.e. using two light sources. This allows the spin excitation of Mn-ions by simultaneously tuning the hole-concentration towards the ferromagnetic phase transition by photo-generated carriers. Thus, one tuneable laser is responsible for resonant below-barrier excitation as a probe for Multi-SF Raman scattering. The other laser excites photo-generated carriers from above barrier (2.41 eV) for tuning the hole concentration in the QW. Positioning the QW close to the sample surface causes a surface-induced p-doping of the QW (intrinsic hole concentration in the QW) and enables the active tuning of the hole concentration by photo-generated carriers due to different tunnelling behaviour of electrons and holes from the QW to the surface. The Mn-g-factor was decreased by quasi-continuously increasing the above-barrier illumination, while the below-barrier excitation was kept at a constant low power. This results in a Mn-g-factor reduction starting from its atomic value g=2.01 to lowest evaluated Mn-g-factor in this thesis g=1.77. This is a magnetic softening of 12%. Apart from the general magnetic soft mode behaviour at low temperatures, one of the main experimental results in this thesis is the confirmation of the theoretical prediction that the magnetic soft mode behaviour in the external B-field does not only depend on the carrier concentration but also on the B-field strength itself. An additional aspect is the temperature dependence of the magnetic soft mode. The Mn

  18. East bay fire chiefs' consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael Bradley

    1995-01-01

    The traditional approach to planning for public fire protection has been based on independent actions by each fire department or district. The county fire chiefs’ associations, while providing interagency communication, were not adequate to deal with the regional nature of the wildland urban interface problem. The formation of the East Bay Fire Chiefs’ Consortium grew...

  19. Fire safety of wood construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert H. White; Mark A. Dietenberger

    2010-01-01

    Fire safety is an important concern in all types of construction. The high level of national concern for fire safety is reflected in limitations and design requirements in building codes. These code requirements and related fire performance data are discussed in the context of fire safety design and evaluation in the initial section of this chapter. Because basic data...

  20. An 800-year fire history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley G. Kitchen

    2010-01-01

    "Fire in the woods!" The words are a real heart stopper. Yet in spite of its capacity to destroy, fire plays an essential role in shaping plant communities. Knowledge of the patterns of fire over long time periods is critical for understanding this role. Trees often retain evidence of nonlethal fires in the form of injuries or scars in the annual growth rings...