WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface emission portion

  1. FTIR Emission spectroscopy of surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Woerkom, P. C. M.

    A number of vibrational spectroscopic techniques are available For the study of surfaces, such as ATR, IR reflection-absorption, IR emission, etc. Infrared emission is hardly used, although interesting applications are possible now due to the high sensitivity of Fourier transform IR (FTIR) spectrometers. Two examples, where infrared emission measurements are very fruitful, will be given. One is the investigation of the curing behaviour of organic coatings, the other is the in situ study of heterogeneously catalyzed reactions. Undoubtedly, infrared emission measurements offer a number of specific advantages in some cases. Especially the less critical demands on the sample preparation are important.

  2. Surface deformation on the west portion of the Chapala lake basin: uncertainties and facts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hernandez-Marin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study we investigate different aspects of land subsidence and ground failures occurring in the west portion of Chapala lake basin. Currently, surface discontinuities seem to be associated with subsiding bowls. In an effort to understand some of the conditioning factors to surface deformation, two sounding cores from the upper sequence (11 m depth were extracted for analyzing physical and mechanical properties. The upper subsoil showed a predominant silty composition and several lenses of pumice pyroclastic sand. Despite the relative predominance of fine soil, the subsoil shows mechanical properties with low clay content, variable water content, low plasticity and variable compressibility index, amongst some others. Some of these properties seem to be influenced by the sandy pyroclastic lenses, therefore, a potential source of the ground failure could be heterogeneities in the upper soil.

  3. Variability of emissivity and surface temperature over a sparsely vegetated surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humes, K.S.; Kustas, W.P.; Moran, M.S.; Nichols, W.D.; Weltz, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    Radiometric surface temperatures obtained from remote sensing measurements are a function of both the physical surface temperature and the effective emissivity of the surface within the band pass of the radiometric measurement. For sparsely vegetated areas, however, a sensor views significant fractions of both bare soil and various vegetation types. In this case the radiometric response of a sensor is a function of the emissivities and kinetic temperatures of various surface elements, the proportion of those surface elements within the field of view of the sensor, and the interaction of radiation emitted from the various surface components. In order to effectively utilize thermal remote sensing data to quantify energy balance components for a sparsely vegetated area, it is important to examine the typical magnitude and degree of variability of emissivity and surface temperature for such surfaces. Surface emissivity measurements and ground and low-altitude-aircraft-based surface temperature measurements (8-13 micrometer band pass) made in conjunction with the Monsoon '90 field experiment were used to evaluate the typical variability of those quantities during the summer rainy season in a semiarid watershed. The average value for thermal band emissivity of the exposed bare soil portions of the surface was found to be approximately 0.96; the average value measured for most of the varieties of desert shrubs present was approximately 0.99. Surface composite emissivity was estimated to be approximately 0.98 for both the grass-dominated and shrub-dominated portions of the watershed. The spatial variability of surface temperature was found to be highly dependent on the spatial scale of integration for the instantaneous field of view (IFOV) of the instrument, the spatial scale of the total area under evaluation, and the time of day

  4. Electron emission at the rail surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornhill, L.; Battech, J.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the authors examine the processes by which current is transferred from the cathode rail to the plasma armature in an arc-driven railgun. Three electron emission mechanisms are considered, namely thermionic emission, field-enhanced thermionic emission (or Schottky emission), and photoemission. The author's calculations show that the dominant electron emission mechanism depends, to a great extent, on the work function of the rail surface, the rail surface temperature, the electric field at the rail surface, and the effective radiation temperature of the plasma. For conditions that are considered to be typical of a railgun armature, Schottky emission is the dominant electron emission mechanism, providing current densities on the order of 10 9 A/m 2

  5. Secondary electron emission from textured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta, C. E.; Patino, M. I.; Wirz, R. E.

    2018-04-01

    In this work, a Monte Carlo model is used to investigate electron induced secondary electron emission for varying effects of complex surfaces by using simple geometric constructs. Geometries used in the model include: vertical fibers for velvet-like surfaces, tapered pillars for carpet-like surfaces, and a cage-like configuration of interlaced horizontal and vertical fibers for nano-structured fuzz. The model accurately captures the secondary electron emission yield dependence on incidence angle. The model shows that unlike other structured surfaces previously studied, tungsten fuzz exhibits secondary electron emission yield that is independent of primary electron incidence angle, due to the prevalence of horizontally-oriented fibers in the fuzz geometry. This is confirmed with new data presented herein of the secondary electron emission yield of tungsten fuzz at incidence angles from 0-60°.

  6. Heavy metals in the surface sediments of the northern portion of the South China Sea shelf: distribution, contamination, and sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fangjian; Tian, Xu; Yin, Feng; Zhao, Yongfang; Yin, Xuebo

    2016-05-01

    The concentrations of seven heavy metals (Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, and Pb) in the surface sediments of the northern portion of the South China Sea (SCS) shelf collected between 2012 and 2014 were measured to assess the potential contamination levels and determine the environmental risks that are associated with heavy metals in the area. The measured concentrations in the sediments were 12.4-72.5 mg kg(-1) for Cr, 4.4-29.2 mg kg(-1) for Ni, 7.1-38.1 mg kg(-1) for Cu, 19.3-92.5 mg kg(-1) for Zn, 1.3-12.1 mg kg(-1) for As, 0.03-0.24 mg kg(-1) for Cd, and 8.5-24.4 mg kg(-1) for Pb. These results indicate that the heavy metal concentrations in the sediments generally meet the China Marine Sediment Quality criteria and suggest that the overall sediment quality of the northern portion of the SCS shelf has not been significantly impacted by heavy metal pollution. However, the enrichment factor (EF) and geoaccumulation index (I geo) clearly show that elevated concentrations of Cd occur in the region. A Pearson's correlation analysis was performed, and the results suggest that Cr, Ni, Cu, and Zn have a natural origin; Cd is primarily sourced from anthropogenic activities, with partial lithogenic components, and As and Pb may be affected by factors such as varying input sources or pathways (i.e., coal burning activities and aerosol precipitation). Heavy metal contamination mostly occurred to the east of Hainan Island, mainly because of the rapid economic and social developments in the Hainan Island. The results of this study will be useful for marine environment managers for the remediation of pollution sources.

  7. Surface spectral emissivity derived from MODIS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Sun-Mack, Sunny; Minnis, Patrick; Smith, William L.; Young, David F.

    2003-04-01

    Surface emissivity is essential for many remote sensing applications including the retrieval of the surface skin temperature from satellite-based infrared measurements, determining thresholds for cloud detection and for estimating the emission of longwave radiation from the surface, an important component of the energy budget of the surface-atmosphere interface. In this paper, data from the Terra MODIS (MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) taken at 3.7, 8.5, 10.8, 12.0 micron are used to simultaneously derive the skin temperature and the surface emissivities at the same wavelengths. The methodology uses separate measurements of the clear-sky temperatures that are determined by the CERES (Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System) scene classification in each channel during the daytime and at night. The relationships between the various channels at night are used during the day when solar reflectance affects the 3.7 micron data. A set of simultaneous equations is then solved to derive the emissivities. Global results are derived from MODIS. Numerical weather analyses are used to provide soundings for correcting the observed radiances for atmospheric absorption. These results are verified and will be available for remote sensing applications.

  8. Spectral emissivity of surface blackbody calibrators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Sønnik

    2007-01-01

    The normal spectral emissivity of commercial infrared calibrators is compared with measurements of anodized aluminum samples and grooved aluminum surfaces coated with Pyromark. Measurements performed by FTIR spectroscopy in the wavelength interval from 2 to 20 mu m and at temperatures between 5...

  9. Rough surface mitigates electron and gas emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molvik, A.

    2004-01-01

    Heavy-ion beams impinging on surfaces near grazing incidence (to simulate the loss of halo ions) generate copious amounts of electrons and gas that can degrade the beam. We measured emission coefficients of η e (le) 130 and η 0 ∼ 10 4 respectively, with 1 MeV K + incident on stainless steel. Electron emission scales as η e ∝ 1/cos(θ), where θ is the ion angle of incidence relative to normal. If we were to roughen a surface by blasting it with glass beads, then ions that were near grazing incidence (90 o ) on smooth surface would strike the rims of the micro-craters at angles closer to normal incidence. This should reduce the electron emission: the factor of 10 reduction, Fig. 1(a), implies an average angle of incidence of 62 o . Gas desorption varies more slowly with θ (Fig. 1(b)) decreasing a factor of ∼2, and along with the electron emission is independent of the angle of incidence on a rough surface. In a quadrupole magnet, electrons emitted by lost primary ions are trapped near the wall by the magnetic field, but grazing incidence ions can backscatter and strike the wall a second time at an azimuth where magnetic field lines intercept the beam. Then, electrons can exist throughout the beam (see the simulations of Cohen, HIF News 1-2/04). The SRIM (TRIM) Monte Carlo code predicts that 60-70% of 1 MeV K + ions backscatter when incident at 88-89 o from normal on a smooth surface. The scattered ions are mostly within ∼10 o of the initial direction but a few scatter by up to 90 o . Ion scattering decreases rapidly away from grazing incidence, Fig. 1(c ). At 62 deg. the predicted ion backscattering (from a rough surface) is 3%, down a factor of 20 from the peak, which should significantly reduce electrons in the beam from lost halo ions. These results are published in Phys. Rev. ST - Accelerators and Beams

  10. Negative secondary ion emission from oxidized surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnaser, H.; Kernforschungsanlage Juelich G.m.b.H.

    1984-01-01

    The emission of negative secondary ions from 23 elements was studied for 10 keV O 2 + and 10 keV In + impact at an angle of incidence of 45 0 . Partial oxidation of the sample surfaces was achieved by oxygen bombardment and/or by working at a high oxygen partial pressure. It was found that the emission of oxide ions shows an element-characteristic pattern. For the majority of the elements investigated these features are largely invariant against changes of the surface concentration of oxygen. For the others admission of oxygen strongly changes the relative intensities of oxide ions: a strong increase of MO 3 - signals (M stands for the respective element) is accompanied by a decrease of MO - and M - intensities. Different primary species frequently induce changes of both the relative and the absolute negative ion intensities. Carbon - in contrast to all other elements - does not show any detectable oxide ion emission but rather intense cluster ions Csub(n) - (detected up to n=12) whose intensities oscillate in dependence on n. (orig./RK)

  11. Field Measurements of PCB emissions from Building Surfaces Using a New Portable Emission Test Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyng, Nadja; Haven, Rune; Gunnarsen, Lars Bo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to measure PCB-emission rates from indoor surfaces on-site in contaminated buildings using a newly developed portable emission test cell. Emission rates were measured from six different surfaces; three untreated surfaces and three remediated surfaces in a contaminated...

  12. Development of a uniform eddy current multi-probe for flaw inspection on a curved surface shape portion and estimation of crack shape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuoka, Katsuhiro; Hashimoto, Mitsuo

    2009-01-01

    The establishment of non-destructive inspection technology for plant structures is necessary, since the occurrence of cracks has been reported in some nuclear power plants. In this research, a uniform eddy current multi-probe to inspect cracks on a curved structure was developed. We designed exciting coils of this probe, considering the shape of the curved structure, so that the eddy current flows uniformly. Pick-up coils were arranged on a flexible printed circuit board to fit on the curved surface shape portion. The detection characteristics for EDM (electrical discharge machining) slits provided on the curved surface shape portion of the specimen were evaluated. The clear signals for the EDM slits provided on the curved surface which had a curvature radius of 25 mm were obtained by this probe. We confirmed that the crack shape could be estimated by detecting the signals from the developed probe. (author)

  13. Surface renewal as a significant mechanism for dust emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zhang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Wind tunnel experiments of dust emissions from different soil surfaces are carried out to better understand dust emission mechanisms. The effects of surface renewal on aerodynamic entrainment and saltation bombardment are analyzed in detail. It is found that flow conditions, surface particle motions (saltation and creep, soil dust content and ground obstacles all strongly affect dust emission, causing its rate to vary over orders of magnitude. Aerodynamic entrainment is highly effective, if dust supply is unlimited, as in the first 2–3 min of our wind tunnel runs. While aerodynamic entrainment is suppressed by dust supply limits, surface renewal through the motion of surface particles appears to be an effective pathway to remove the supply limit. Surface renewal is also found to be important to the efficiency of saltation bombardment. We demonstrate that surface renewal is a significant mechanism affecting dust emission and recommend that this mechanism be included in future dust models.

  14. A portion of the Pf155/RESA antigen of Plasmodium falciparum is accessible on the surface of infected erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saul, A.; Maloy, W.L.; Howard, R.J.; Rock, E.P.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation of antigens accessible to lactoperoxidase-catalysed cell surface iodination on intact Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells (RBC) has identified a 125 I-labelled antigen with an apparent size of about 155 kD. This labelled protein was specifically immunoprecipitated by the following antibodies: a rabbit antiserum and a mouse monoclonal antibody raised against a synthetic peptide comprising the 3',8-mer repeat EENVEHDA of the Pf155/RESA protein; a rabbit antiserum raised against a synthetic octapeptide comprising two copies of the 3',4-mer repeat EENV of the Pf155/RESA protein; and rabbit antisera against another synthetic peptide C(MYSNNNVED) 2 . The last antibody shows a strong reaction in asexual blood state parasites with the Pf155/RESA antigen. While this antigen has been described previously as a submembrane component of the outer membrane of infected RBC, this report shows that at least part of it is accessible to the surface of both ring and late trophozoite-infected erythrocytes. 21 refs., 4 figs

  15. Field emission from the surface of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knápek, Alexandr, E-mail: knapek@isibrno.cz [Institute of Scientific Instruments of the ASCR, v.v.i., Královopolská 147, Brno (Czech Republic); Sobola, Dinara; Tománek, Pavel [Department of Physics, FEEC, Brno University of Technology, Technická 8, Brno (Czech Republic); Pokorná, Zuzana; Urbánek, Michal [Institute of Scientific Instruments of the ASCR, v.v.i., Královopolská 147, Brno (Czech Republic)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • HOPG shreds were created and analyzed in the UHV conditions. • Current-voltage measurements have been done to confirm electron tunneling, based on the Fowler-Nordheim theory. • Surface was characterized by other surface evaluation methods, in particular by: SNOM, SEM and AFM. - Abstract: This paper deals with the electrical characterization of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface based on field emission of electrons. The effect of field emission occurs only at disrupted surface, i.e. surface containing ripped and warped shreds of the uppermost layers of graphite. These deformations provide the necessary field gradients which are required for measuring tunneling current caused by field electron emission. Results of the field emission measurements are correlated with other surface characterization methods such as scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) or atomic force microscopy.

  16. Field emission from the surface of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knápek, Alexandr; Sobola, Dinara; Tománek, Pavel; Pokorná, Zuzana; Urbánek, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • HOPG shreds were created and analyzed in the UHV conditions. • Current-voltage measurements have been done to confirm electron tunneling, based on the Fowler-Nordheim theory. • Surface was characterized by other surface evaluation methods, in particular by: SNOM, SEM and AFM. - Abstract: This paper deals with the electrical characterization of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface based on field emission of electrons. The effect of field emission occurs only at disrupted surface, i.e. surface containing ripped and warped shreds of the uppermost layers of graphite. These deformations provide the necessary field gradients which are required for measuring tunneling current caused by field electron emission. Results of the field emission measurements are correlated with other surface characterization methods such as scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) or atomic force microscopy.

  17. Electron emission during multicharged ion-metal surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P.A.; Havener, C.C.; Hughes, I.G.; Overbury, S.H.; Robinson, M.T.; Zehner, D.M.; Meyer, F.W.

    1992-01-01

    The electron emission during multicharged ion-metal surface interactions will be discussed. The interactions lead to the emission of a significant number of electrons. Most of these electrons have energies below 30 eV. For incident ions with innershell vacancies the emission of Auger electrons that fill these vacancies has been found to occur mainly below the surface. We will present recently measured electron energy distributions which will be used to discuss the mechanisms that lead to the emission of Auger and of low-energy electrons

  18. Spectral characterization of surface emissivities in the thermal infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niclòs, Raquel; Mira, Maria; Valor, Enric; Caselles, Diego; García-Santos, Vicente; Caselles, Vicente; Sánchez, Juan M.

    2015-04-01

    Thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing trends to hyperspectral sensors on board satellites in the last decades, e.g., the current EOS-MODIS and EOS-ASTER and future missions like HyspIRI, ECOSTRESS, THIRSTY and MISTIGRI. This study aims to characterize spectrally the emissive properties of several surfaces, mostly soils. A spectrometer ranging from 2 to 16 μm, D&P Model 102, has been used to measure samples with singular spectral features, e.g. a sandy soil rich in gypsum sampled in White Sands (New Mexico, USA), salt samples, powdered quartz, and powdered calcite. These samples were chosen for their role in the assessment of thermal emissivity of soils, e.g., the calcite and quartz contents are key variables for modeling TIR emissivities of bare soils, along with soil moisture and organic matter. Additionally, the existence of large areas in the world with abundance of these materials, some of them used for calibration/validation activities of satellite sensors and products, makes the chosen samples interesting. White Sands is the world's largest gypsum dune field encompassing 400 km^2; the salt samples characterize the Salar of Uyuni (Bolivia), the largest salt flat in the world (up to 10,000 km^2), as well as the Jordanian and Israeli salt evaporation ponds at the south end of the Dead Sea, or the evaporation lagoons in Aigües-Mortes (France); and quartz is omnipresent in most of the arid regions of the world such as the Algodones Dunes or Kelso Dunes (California, USA), with areas around 700 km2 and 120 km^2, respectively. Measurements of target leaving radiance, hemispherical radiance reflected by a diffuse reflectance panel, and the radiance from a black body at different temperatures were taken to obtain thermal spectra with the D&P spectrometer. The good consistency observed between our measurements and laboratory spectra of similar samples (ASTER and MODIS spectral libraries) indicated the validity of the measurement protocol. Further, our study showed the

  19. The Boston Methane Project: Mapping Surface Emissions to Inform Atmospheric Estimation of Urban Methane Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, N.; Crosson, E.; Down, A.; Hutyra, L.; Jackson, R. B.; McKain, K.; Rella, C.; Raciti, S. M.; Wofsy, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    Lost and unaccounted natural gas can amount to over 6% of Massachusetts' total annual greenhouse gas inventory (expressed as equivalent CO2 tonnage). An unknown portion of this loss is due to natural gas leaks in pipeline distribution systems. The objective of the Boston Methane Project is to estimate the overall leak rate from natural gas systems in metropolitan Boston, and to compare this flux with fluxes from the other primary methane emissions sources. Companion talks at this meeting describe the atmospheric measurement and modeling framework, and chemical and isotopic tracers that can partition total atmospheric methane flux into natural gas and non-natural gas components. This talk focuses on estimation of surface emissions that inform the atmospheric modeling and partitioning. These surface emissions include over 3,300 pipeline natural gas leaks in Boston. For the state of Massachusetts as a whole, the amount of natural gas reported as lost and unaccounted for by utility companies was greater than estimated landfill emissions by an order of magnitude. Moreover, these landfill emissions were overwhelmingly located outside of metro Boston, while gas leaks are concentrated in exactly the opposite pattern, increasing from suburban Boston toward the urban core. Work is in progress to estimate spatial distribution of methane emissions from wetlands and sewer systems. We conclude with a description of how these spatial data sets will be combined and represented for application in atmospheric modeling.

  20. SURFACE FILMS TO SUPPRESS FIELD EMISSION IN HIGH-POWER MICROWAVE COMPONENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirshfield, Jay l

    2014-02-07

    Results are reported on attempts to reduce the RF breakdown probability on copper accelerator structures by applying thin surface films that could suppress field emission of electrons. Techniques for application and testing of copper samples with films of metals with work functions higher than copper are described, principally for application of platinum films, since platinum has the second highest work function of any metal. Techniques for application of insulating films are also described, since these can suppress field emission and damage on account of dielectric shielding of fields at the copper surface, and on account of the greater hardness of insulating films, as compared with copper. In particular, application of zirconium oxide films on high-field portions of a 11.424 GHz SLAC cavity structure for breakdown tests are described.

  1. Surface magnetism studied by polarized light emission after He+ scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manske, J; Dirska, M; Lubinski, G; Schleberger, M; Narmann, A; Hoekstra, R

    Surface magnetism is studied by means of an ion beam of low energy (2-15 keV) scattered off the surface under grazing incidence conditions. During the scattering, a small fraction of the ions is neutralized into excited states which decay subsequently by light emission. The circular polarization of

  2. Photoelectron emission from metal surfaces by ultrashort laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faraggi, M. N.; Gravielle, M. S.; Silkin, V. M.

    2006-01-01

    Electron emission from metal surfaces produced by short laser pulses is studied within the framework of the distorted-wave formulation. The proposed approach, named surface-Volkov (SV) approximation, makes use of the band-structure based (BSB) model and the Volkov phase to describe the interaction of the emitted electron with the surface and the external electric field, respectively. The BSB model provides a realistic representation of the surface, based on a model potential that includes the main features of the surface band structure. The SV method is applied to evaluate the photoelectron emission from the valence band of Al(111). Angular and energy distributions are investigated for different parameters of the laser pulse, keeping in all cases the carrier frequency larger than the plasmon one

  3. Surface charge compensation for a highly charged ion emission microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, J.W.; Hamza, A.V.; Newman, M.W.; Holder, J.P.; Schneider, D.H.G.; Schenkel, T.

    2003-01-01

    A surface charge compensation electron flood gun has been added to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) highly charged ion (HCI) emission microscope. HCI surface interaction results in a significant charge residue being left on the surface of insulators and semiconductors. This residual charge causes undesirable aberrations in the microscope images and a reduction of the Time-Of-Flight (TOF) mass resolution when studying the surfaces of insulators and semiconductors. The benefits and problems associated with HCI microscopy and recent results of the electron flood gun enhanced HCI microscope are discussed

  4. Ion induced optical emission for surface and depth profile analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, C.W.

    1977-01-01

    Low-energy ion bombardment of solid surfaces results in the emission of infrared, visible, and ultraviolet radiation produced by inelastic ion-solid collision processes. The emitted optical radiation provides important insight into low-energy particle-solid interactions and provides the basis for an analysis technique which can be used for surface and depth profile analysis with high sensitivity. The different kinds of collision induced optical radiation emitted as a result of low-energy particle-solid collisions are reviewed. Line radiation arising from excited states of sputtered atoms or molecules is shown to provide the basis for surface and depth profile analysis. The spectral characteristics of this type of radiation are discussed and applications of the ion induced optical emission technique are presented. These applications include measurements of ion implant profiles, detection sensitivities for submonolayer quantities of impurities on elemental surfaces, and the detection of elemental impurities on complex organic substrates

  5. Global Occurrence and Emission of Rotaviruses to Surface Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas M. Kiulia

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Group A rotaviruses (RV are the major cause of acute gastroenteritis in infants and young children globally. Waterborne transmission of RV and the presence of RV in water sources are of major public health importance. In this paper, we present the Global Waterborne Pathogen model for RV (GloWPa-Rota model to estimate the global distribution of RV emissions to surface water. To our knowledge, this is the first model to do so. We review the literature to estimate three RV specific variables for the model: incidence, excretion rate and removal during wastewater treatment. We estimate total global RV emissions to be 2 × 1018 viral particles/grid/year, of which 87% is produced by the urban population. Hotspot regions with high RV emissions are urban areas in densely populated parts of the world, such as Bangladesh and Nigeria, while low emissions are found in rural areas in North Russia and the Australian desert. Even for industrialized regions with high population density and without tertiary treatment, such as the UK, substantial emissions are estimated. Modeling exercises like the one presented in this paper provide unique opportunities to further study these emissions to surface water, their sources and scenarios for improved management.

  6. Surface-electronic-state effects in electron emission from the Be(0001) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archubi, C. D.; Gravielle, M. S.; Silkin, V. M.

    2011-01-01

    We study the electron emission produced by swift protons impinging grazingly on a Be(0001) surface. The process is described within a collisional formalism using the band-structure-based (BSB) approximation to represent the electron-surface interaction. The BSB model provides an accurate description of the electronic band structure of the solid and the surface-induced potential. Within this approach we derive both bulk and surface electronic states, with these latter characterized by a strong localization at the crystal surface. We found that such surface electronic states play an important role in double-differential energy- and angle-resolved electron emission probabilities, producing noticeable structures in the electron emission spectra.

  7. Surface-electronic-state effects in electron emission from the Be(0001) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archubi, C. D. [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, casilla de correo 67, sucursal 28, C1428EGA, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gravielle, M. S. [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, casilla de correo 67, sucursal 28, C1428EGA, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Silkin, V. M. [Donostia International Physics Center, E-20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apartado 1072, E-20080 San Sebastian (Spain); IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, E-48011 Bilbao (Spain)

    2011-07-15

    We study the electron emission produced by swift protons impinging grazingly on a Be(0001) surface. The process is described within a collisional formalism using the band-structure-based (BSB) approximation to represent the electron-surface interaction. The BSB model provides an accurate description of the electronic band structure of the solid and the surface-induced potential. Within this approach we derive both bulk and surface electronic states, with these latter characterized by a strong localization at the crystal surface. We found that such surface electronic states play an important role in double-differential energy- and angle-resolved electron emission probabilities, producing noticeable structures in the electron emission spectra.

  8. Mechanism of negative ion emission from surfaces of ferroelectrics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šroubek, Zdeněk

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 606, 15-16 (2012), s. 1327-1330 ISSN 0039-6028 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Surface of ferroelectrics * Ion emission Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.838, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0039602812001525#gts0005

  9. Electron emission from tungsten surface induced by neon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Zhongfeng; Zeng, Lixia; Zhao, Yongtao; Liu, Xueliang; Xiao, Guoqing; Li, Fuli; Cheng, Rui; Zhang, Xiaoan; Ren, Jieru; Zhou, Xianming; Wang, Xing; Lei, Yu; Li, Yongfeng; Yu, Yang

    2014-01-01

    The electron emission from W surface induced by Ne q+ has been measured. For the same charge state, the electron yield gradually increases with the projectile velocity. Meanwhile, the effect of the potential energy of projectile has been found obviously. Our results give the critical condition for ''trampoline effect''

  10. Electron emission from tungsten surface induced by neon ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhongfeng; Zeng, Lixia; Zhao, Yongtao; Cheng, Rui; Zhang, Xiaoan; Ren, Jieru; Zhou, Xianming; Wang, Xing; Lei, Yu; Li, Yongfeng; Yu, Yang; Liu, Xueliang; Xiao, Guoqing; Li, Fuli

    2014-04-01

    The electron emission from W surface induced by Neq+ has been measured. For the same charge state, the electron yield gradually increases with the projectile velocity. Meanwhile, the effect of the potential energy of projectile has been found obviously. Our results give the critical condition for "trampoline effect".

  11. Laser method of acoustical emission control from vibrating surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motyka, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    For limitation of the noise in environment, the necessity occurs of determining and location of sources of sounds emitted from surfaces of many machines and devices, assuring in effect the possibility of suitable constructional changes implementation, targeted at decreasing of their nuisance. In the paper, the results of tests and calculations are presented for plane surface sources emitting acoustic waves. The tests were realized with the use of scanning laser vibrometer which enabled remote registration and the spectral analysis of the surfaces vibrations. The known hybrid digital method developed for determination of sound wave emission from such surfaces divided into small finite elements was slightly modified by distinguishing the phase correlations between such vibrating elements. The final method being developed may find use in wide range of applications for different forms of vibrations of plane surfaces.

  12. Is X-ray emissivity constant on magnetic flux surfaces?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granetz, R.S.; Borras, M.C.

    1997-01-01

    Knowledge of the elongations and shifts of internal magnetic flux surfaces can be used to determine the q profile in elongated tokamak plasmas. X-ray tomography is thought to be a reasonable technique for independently measuring internal flux surface shapes, because it is widely believed that X-ray emissivity should be constant on a magnetic flux surface. In the Alcator C-Mod tokamak, the X-ray tomography diagnostic system consists of four arrays of 38 chords each. A comparison of reconstructed X-ray contours with magnetic flux surfaces shows a small but consistent discrepancy in the radial profile of elongation. Numerous computational tests have been performed to verify these findings, including tests of the sensitivity to calibration and viewing geometry errors, the accuracy of the tomography reconstruction algorithms, and other subtler effects. We conclude that the discrepancy between the X-ray contours and the magnetic flux surfaces is real, leading to the conclusion that X-ray emissivity is not exactly constant on a flux surface. (orig.)

  13. Diminished Mercury Emission From Water Surfaces by Duckweed (Lemna minor)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollenberg, J. L.; Peters, S. C.

    2007-12-01

    Aquatic plants of the family Lemnaceae (generally referred to as duckweeds) are a widely distributed type of floating vegetation in freshwater systems. Under suitable conditions, duckweeds form a dense vegetative mat on the water surface, which reduces light penetration into the water column and decreases the amount of exposed water surface. These two factors would be expected to reduce mercury emission by limiting a) direct photoreduction of Hg(II), b) indirect reduction via coupled DOC photooxidation-Hg(II) reduction, and c) gas diffusion across the water-air interface. Conversely, previous studies have demonstrated transpiration of Hg(0) by plants, so it is therefore possible that the floating vegetative mat would enhance emission via transpiration of mercury vapor. The purpose of this experiment was to determine whether duckweed limits mercury flux to the atmosphere by shading and the formation of a physical barrier to diffusion, or whether it enhances emission from aquatic systems via transpiration of Hg(0). Deionized water was amended with mercury to achieve a final concentration of approximately 35 ng/L and allowed to equilibrate prior to the experiment. Experiments were conducted in rectangular polystyrene flux chambers with measured UV-B transmittance greater than 60% (spectral cutoff approximately 290 nm). Light was able to penetrate the flux chamber from the sides as well as the top throughout the experiment, limiting the effect of shading by duckweed on the water surface. Flux chambers contained 8L of water with varying percent duckweed cover, and perforated plastic sheeting was used as an abiotic control. Exposures were conducted outside on days with little to no cloud cover. Real time mercury flux was measured using atomic absorption (Mercury Instruments UT-3000). Total solar and ultraviolet radiation, as well as a suite of meteorological parameters, were also measured. Results indicate that duckweed diminishes mercury emission from the water surface

  14. Analytical solution for the normal emission portion of the averaged Yarkovsky-O'Keefe-Radzvieskii-Paddack coefficient for a single facet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuja, Antonella A.; Scheeres, Daniel J.

    2015-02-01

    The Yarkovsky-O'Keefe-Radzvieskii-Paddack (YORP) effect has been well studied for asteroids. This paper develops an analytic solution to find the normal emission YORP component for a single facet. The solution presented here does not account for self-shadowing or self-heating. The YORP coefficient for all facets can be summed together to find the total coefficient of the asteroid. The normal emission component of YORP has been shown to be the most important for asteroids and it directly affects the rate of change of the asteroid's spin period. The analytical solution found is a sole function of the facet's geometry and the obliquity of the asteroid. This solution is universal for any facet and its orientation. The behaviour of the coefficient is analysed with this analytical solution. The closed-form solution is used to find the total YORP coefficient for the asteroids Apollo and 1998 ML14 whose shape models are composed of different numbers of facets. The results are then compared to published results and those obtained through numerical quadrature for validation.

  15. Carbon dioxide emission from raised bog surface after peat extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turbiak Janusz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Research on CO2 emission from a raised bog after completion of peat extraction was performed in 2011–2013. CO2 emissions were determined by the chamber method. Twenty years after the termination of peat extraction, the bog surface was almost entirely devoid of plants. CO2 emission from the bog varied depending on temperature and water conditions and was 418 mg·m−2·h−1 on average during the research period. CO2 losses on the raised bog were on average 19.7 Mg·ha−1·year−1 during the research period which corresponded to a carbon loss of 5.37 Mg·ha−1·year−1 or mineralisation of 9.6 Mg·ha−1·year−1 of organic mass of 56% carbon content. It is possible to reduce organic mass losses and CO2 emission to the atmosphere from the bog surface after peat extraction has been terminated by reconstruction of initial water conditions, i.e. retaining a high ground water level and restoration of aquatic plant communities.

  16. Photon emission produced by particle-surface collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, C.W.; Tolk, N.H.

    1976-02-01

    Visible, ultraviolet, and infrared optical emission results from low-energy (20 eV-10 keV) particle-surface collisions. Several distinct kinds of collision induced optical radiation are discussed which provide fundamental information on particle-solid collision processes. Line radiation arises from excited states of sputtered surface constituents and backscattered beam particles. This radiation uniquely identifies the quantum state of sputtered or reflected particles, provides a method for identifying neutral atoms sputtered from the surface, and serves as the basis for a sensitive surface analysis technique. Broadband radiation from the bulk of the solid is attributed to the transfer of projectile energy to the electrons in the solid. Continuum emission observed well in front of transition metal targets is believed to arise from excited atom clusters (diatomic, triatomic, etc.) ejected from the solid in the sputtering process. Application of sputtered atom optical radiation for surface and depth profile analysis is demonstrated for the case of submonolayer quantities of chromium on silicon and aluminum implanted in SiO 2

  17. Electron emission during multicharged ion-surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P.A.; Havener, C.C.; Meyer, F.W.; Zehner, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    Recent measurements of electron spectra for slow multicharged N ion-surface collisions are presented. The emphasis is on potential emission, i.e. the electron emission related to the neutralization of the ions. When using N ions that carry a K shell vacancy into the collision, characteristic K Auger electron emission from the projectiles is observed, as well as, for specific surfaces, target atom Auger transitions (resulting from vacancy transfer). Measurements of the intensity of these Auger transitions as a function of the time the ions spend above the surface can serve as a useful probe of the timescales characterizing the relevant neutralization processes. This technique is elucidated with the help of some computer simulations. It is shown that neutralization timescales required in the atomic ladder picture, in which neutralization takes place by resonant capture followed by purely intra-atomic Auger transitions, are too long to explain our experimental results. The introduction of additional neutralization/de-excitation mechanisms in the simulations leads to much better agreement with the experiments

  18. Salt Efflorescence Effects on Soil Surface Erodibility and Dust Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Pelt, R. S.; Zhang, G.

    2017-12-01

    Soluble salts resulting from weathering of geological materials often form surface crusts or efflorescences in areas with shallow saline groundwater. In many cases, the affected areas are susceptible to wind erosion due to their lack of protective vegetation and their flat topography. Fugitive dusts containing soluble salts affect the biogeochemistry of deposition regions and may result in respiratory irritation during transport. We created efflorescent crusts on soil trays by surface evaporation of single salt solutions and bombarded the resultant efflorescences with quartz abrader sand in a laboratory wind tunnel. Four replicate trays containing a Torrifluvent soil affected by one of nine salts commonly found in arid and semiarid streams were tested and the emissions were captured by an aspirated multi-stage deposition and filtering system. We found that in most cases the efflorescent crust reduced the soil surface erodibility but also resulted in the emission of salt rich dust. Two of the salts, sodium thiosulfate and calcium chloride, resulted in increased soil volume and erodibility. However, one of the calcium chloride replicates was tested after an outbreak of humid air caused hygroscopic wetting of the soil and it became indurated upon drying greatly decreasing the erodibility. Although saline affected soils are not used for agricultural production and degradation is not a great concern, the release of salt rich dust is an area of environmental concern and steps to control the dust emissions from affected soils should be developed. Future testing will utilize suites of salts found in streams of arid and semiarid regions.

  19. Tunable surface plasmon instability leading to emission of radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gumbs, Godfrey [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Hunter College of the City University of New York, 695 Park Avenue, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), P de Manuel Lardizabal, 4, 20018 San Sebastian, Basque Country (Spain); Iurov, Andrii, E-mail: aiurov@chtm.unm.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Hunter College of the City University of New York, 695 Park Avenue, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Center for High Technology Materials, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 (United States); Huang, Danhong [Air Force Research Laboratory, Space Vehicles Directorate, Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico 87117 (United States); Pan, Wei [Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2015-08-07

    We propose a new approach for energy conversion from a dc electric field to tunable terahertz emission based on hybrid semiconductors by combining two-dimensional (2D) crystalline layers and a thick conducting material with possible applications for chemical analysis, security scanning, medical (single-molecule) imaging, and telecommunications. The hybrid nano-structure may consist of a single or pair of sheets of graphene, silicene, or a 2D electron gas. When an electric current is passed through a 2D layer, we discover that two low-energy plasmon branches exhibit a characteristic loop in their dispersion before they merge into an unstable region beyond a critical wave vector q{sub c}. This finite q{sub c} gives rise to a wavenumber cutoff in the emission dispersion of the surface plasmon induced instability and emission of radiation (spiler). However, there is no instability for a single driven layer far from the conductor, and the instability of an isolated pair of 2D layers occurs without a wavenumber cutoff. The wavenumber cutoff is found to depend on the conductor electron density, layer separation, distances of layers from the conductor surface, and the driving-current strength.

  20. Emissions of Photonic Crystal Waveguides with Discretely Modulated Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong-Hua, Tang; Li-Xue, Chen; Yan, Liu; Xiu-Dong, Sun; Wei-Qiang, Ding

    2009-01-01

    Transmission properties of photonic crystal (PC) waveguides with discretely modulated exit surfaces are investigated numerically using the unite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. Unlike the case of periodically modulated surfaces, where the transmission beam tends to be a single and directional beam, when the exit surfaces are modulated only at several discrete points, the emission power tends to split into multiple and directional beams. We explain this phenomenon using a multiple point source interference model. Based on these results, we propose a 1-to-N beam splitter, and numerically realized high efficiency coupling between a PC sub-wavelength waveguide and three traditional dielectric waveguides with a total efficiency larger than 92%. This simple, easy fabrication, and controllable mechanism may find more potential applications in integrated optical circuits. (fundamental areas of phenomenology(including applications))

  1. Inverse compton emission of gamma rays near the pulsar surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morini, M.

    1981-01-01

    The physical conditions near pulsar surface that might give rise to gamma ray emission from Crab and Vela pulsars are not yet well understood. Here I suggest that, in the context of the vacuum discharge mechanism proposed by Ruderman and Sutherland (1975), gamma rays are produced by inverse Compton scattering of secondary electrons with the thermal radiation of the star surface as well as for curvature and synchotron radiation. It is found that inverse Compton scattering is relevant if the neutron star surface temperature is greater than 10 6 K or of the polar cap temperature is of the order of 5 x 10 6 K. Inverse Compton scattering in anisotropic photon fields and Klein-Nishina regime is here carefully considered. (orig.)

  2. Trace moisture emissions from heated metal surfaces in hydrogen service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funke, Hans H.; Yao Jianlong; Raynor, Mark W.

    2004-01-01

    The formation of trace moisture by exposure of dry heated surfaces of 316 L stainless-steel, Restek Silcosteel registered , and nickel 1/8 in. outer diameter line segments to purified Ar and H 2 was studied using atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry at flow rates of 2 slpm. Prior to H 2 exposure, adsorbed moisture was removed by heating incrementally to 500 deg. C in an argon matrix, where the Restek Silcosteel registered material released a maximum of 50 ppb moisture at 300 deg. C and moisture spikes from the Ni and stainless-steel surfaces reached several 100 ppb. Upon exposure to H 2 , persistent low ppb moisture emissions due to the reduction of surface oxide species were observed at temperatures as low as 100 deg. C. Spikes at 300-500 deg. C ranged from ∼100 ppb for the stainless-steel lines to 400 ppb for the Restek Silcosteel registered material. The observed moisture emissions have to be considered as a potential contamination source for high-purity processes utilizing H 2 purge at elevated temperatures

  3. Optical emission from low-energy ion-surface collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, C.W.; Thomas, E.W.; Van der Weg, W.F.; Tolk, N.H.

    1977-01-01

    Impact of energetic heavy particles on surfaces gives rise to emission of optical radiation from reflected particles, sputtered particles and also from excited states of the solid. The present status of research in this area is reviewed with emphasis on understanding the basic mechanisms which give rise to formation of excited states. The spectral line shape from ejected atoms may be analyzed to provide information on the distribution of speeds and directions of the excited species; the line intensity provides a measure of the probability for creating the state. Formation of excited species is related both to the collision processes within the solid and also to the interaction of the recoiling ejected species with the target surface. Most ejected species are atomic but important examples of ejected molecules are also discussed. Luminescence induced in the solid itself is related to recombination of electron hole pairs and is related significantly to the presence of defects

  4. Qualitative internal surface roughness classification using acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Hafizi Zohari; Mohd Hanif Saad

    2009-04-01

    This paper describes a novel new nondestructive method of qualitative internal surface roughness classification for pipes utilizing Acoustic Emission (AE) signal. Two different flowrate are introduced in a pipe obstructed using normally available components (e.g.: valve). The AE signal at suitable location from the obstruction are obtained and the peak amplitudes, RMS amplitude and energy of the AE signal are obtained. A dimensionless number, the Bangi Number, AB, is then calculated as a ratio of the AE parameters (peak amplitude, RMS amplitude or energy) in low flowrate measurement compared to the AE parameters in high flowrate measurement. It was observed that the Bangi Number, AB obtained can then be used to successfully discriminate between rough and smooth internal surface roughness. (author)

  5. Penetration portion shielding structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Katsumi; Narita, Hitoshi; Handa, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Jun; Tozuka, Fumio.

    1994-01-01

    Openings of a plurality of shieldings for penetration members are aligned to each other, and penetration members are inserted from the openings. Then, the openings of the plurality of shielding members are slightly displaced with each other to make the penetration portions into a helical configuration, so that leakage of radiation is reduced. Upon removal of the members, reverse operation is conducted. When a flowable shielding material is used, the penetration portions are constituted with two plates having previously formed openings and pipes for connecting the openings with each other and a vessel covering the entire of them. After passing the penetration members such as a cable, the relative position of the two plates is changed by twisting, to form a helical configuration which reduces radiation leakage. Since they are bent into the helical configuration, shielding performance is extremely improved compared with a case that radiation leakage is caused from an opening of a straight pipe. In addition, since they can be returned to straight pipes, attachment, detachment and maintenance can be conducted easily. (N.H.)

  6. Seasonal Surface Spectral Emissivity Derived from Terra MODIS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun-Mack, Sunny; Chen, Yan; Minnis, Patrick; Young, DavidF.; Smith, William J., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    The CERES (Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System) Project is measuring broadband shortwave and longwave radiances and deriving cloud properties form various images to produce a combined global radiation and cloud property data set. In this paper, simultaneous data from Terra MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) taken at 3.7, 8.5, 11.0, and 12.0 m are used to derive the skin temperature and the surface emissivities at the same wavelengths. The methodology uses separate measurements of clear sky temperature in each channel determined by scene classification during the daytime and at night. The relationships between the various channels at night are used during the day when solar reflectance affects the 3.7- m radiances. A set of simultaneous equations is then solved to derive the emissivities. Global monthly emissivity maps are derived from Terra MODIS data while numerical weather analyses provide soundings for correcting the observed radiances for atmospheric absorption. These maps are used by CERES and other cloud retrieval algorithms.

  7. Surface emission of quark gluon plasma at RHIC and LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang Wenchang; Wan Renzhou; Zhou Daicui

    2008-01-01

    Within the framework of a factorization model, we study the behaviour of nuclear modification factor in Au-Au collisions at RHIC and Pb-Pb collisions at LHC. We find that the nuclear modification factor is inversely proportional to the radius of the quark-gluon plasma and is dominated by the surface emission of hard jets. We predict the nuclear modification factor P AALHS ∼0.15 in central Pb-Pb collisions at LHC. The study shows that the factorization model can be used to describe the centrality dependence of nuclear modification factor of the high transverse momentum particles produced in heavy ion collisions at both RHIC and LHC. (authors)

  8. Photoelectric emission from negative-electron-affinity diamond (111) surfaces: Exciton breakup versus conduction-band emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandis, C.; Pate, B.B.

    1995-01-01

    We have recently reported that bound electron-hole pairs (Mott-Wannier excitons) are the dominant source of photoelectron emission from specially prepared [''as-polished'' C(111)-(1x1):H] negative-electron-affinity diamond surfaces for near-band-gap excitation up to 0.5 eV above threshold [C. Bandis and B. B. Pate, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 777 (1995)]. It was found that photoexcited excitons transport to the surface, break up, and emit their electron. In this paper, we extend the study of exciton-derived emission to include partial yield (constant final-state) analysis as well as angular distribution measurements of the photoelectric emission. In addition, we find that exciton-derived emission does not always dominate. Photoelectric emission properties of the in situ ''rehydrogenated'' (111)-(1x1):H diamond surface are characteristically different than emission observed from the as-polished (111)-(1x1):H surface. The rehydrogenated surface has additional downward band bending as compared to the as-polished surface. In confirmation of the assignment of photoelectric yield to exciton breakup emission, we find a significant enhancement of the total electron yield when the downward band bending of the hydrogenated surface is increased. The functional form of the observed total electron yield demonstrates that, in contrast to the as-polished surface, conduction-band electrons are a significant component of the observed photoelectric yield from the in situ hydrogenated (111)-(1x1):H surface. Furthermore, electron emission characteristics of the rehydrogenated surface confirms our assignment of a Fan phonon-cascade mechanism for thermalization of excitons

  9. Spatial variability in nitrous oxide and methane emissions from beef cattle feedyard pen surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhouse gas emissions from beef cattle feedlots include enteric carbon dioxide and methane, and manure-derived methane, nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide. Enteric methane comprises the largest portion of the greenhouse gas footprint of beef cattle feedyards. For the manure component, methane is th...

  10. Transcontinental methane measurements: Part 2. Mobile surface investigation of fossil fuel industrial fugitive emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leifer, Ira; Culling, Daniel; Schneising, Oliver; Farrell, Paige; Buchwitz, Michael; Burrows, John P.

    2013-08-01

    The potent greenhouse gas, methane, CH4, has a wide variety of anthropogenic and natural sources. Fall, continental-scale (Florida to California) surface CH4 data were collected to investigate the importance of fossil fuel industrial (FFI) emissions in the South US. A total of 6600 measurements along 7020-km of roadways were made by flame ion detection gas chromatography onboard a nearly continuously moving recreational vehicle in 2010. A second, winter survey in Southern California measured CH4 at 2 Hz with a cavity ring-down spectrometer in 2012. Data revealed strong and persistent FFI CH4 sources associated with refining, oil/gas production, a presumed major pipeline leak, and a coal loading plant. Nocturnal CH4 mixing ratios tended to be higher than daytime values for similar sources, sometimes significantly, which was attributed to day/night meteorological differences, primarily changes in the boundary layer height. The highest CH4 mixing ratio (39 ppm) was observed near the Kern River Oil Field, California, which uses steam reinjection. FFI CH4 plume signatures were distinguished as stronger than other sources on local scales. On large (4°) scales, the CH4 trend was better matched spatially with FFI activity than wetland spatial patterns. Qualitative comparison of surface data with SCIAMACHY and GOSAT satellite retrievals showed agreement of the large-scale CH4 spatial patterns. Comparison with inventory models and seasonal winds suggests for some seasons and some portions of the Gulf of Mexico a non-negligible underestimation of FFI emissions. For other seasons and locations, qualitative interpretation is not feasible. Unambiguous quantitative source attribution is more complex, requiring transport modeling.

  11. Portion distortion: typical portion sizes selected by young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Jaime; Byrd-Bredbenner, Carol

    2006-09-01

    The incidence of obesity has increased in parallel with increasing portion sizes of individually packaged and ready-to-eat prepared foods as well as foods served at restaurants. Portion distortion (perceiving large portion sizes as appropriate amounts to eat at a single eating occasion) may contribute to increasing energy intakes and expanding waistlines. The purpose of this study was to determine typical portion sizes that young adults select, how typical portion sizes compare with reference portion sizes (based in this study on the Nutrition Labeling and Education Act's quantities of food customarily eaten per eating occasion), and whether the size of typical portions has changed over time. Young adults (n=177, 75% female, age range 16 to 26 years) at a major northeastern university. Participants served themselves typical portion sizes of eight foods at breakfast (n=63) or six foods at lunch or dinner (n=62, n=52, respectively). Typical portion-size selections were unobtrusively weighed. A unit score was calculated by awarding 1 point for each food with a typical portion size that was within 25% larger or smaller than the reference portion; larger or smaller portions were given 0 points. Thus, each participant's unit score could range from 0 to 8 at breakfast or 0 to 6 at lunch and dinner. Analysis of variance or t tests were used to determine whether typical and reference portion sizes differed, and whether typical portion sizes changed over time. Mean unit scores (+/-standard deviation) were 3.63+/-1.27 and 1.89+/-1.14, for breakfast and lunch/dinner, respectively, indicating little agreement between typical and reference portion sizes. Typical portions sizes in this study tended to be significantly different from those selected by young adults in a similar study conducted 2 decades ago. Portion distortion seems to affect the portion sizes selected by young adults for some foods. This phenomenon has the potential to hinder weight loss, weight maintenance, and

  12. Revised-Confirmatory Survey Report for Portions of the Auxiliary Building Structural Surfaces and Turbine Building Embedded Piping, Rancho Seco Nuclear Generating Station, Herald, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    W. C. Adams

    2007-01-01

    During the period of October 15 and 18, 2007, ORISE performed confirmatory radiological survey activities which included beta and gamma structural surface scans and beta activity direct measurements within the Auxiliary Building, beta or gamma scans within Turbine Building embedded piping, beta activity determinations within Turbine Building Drain 3-1-27, and gamma scans and the collection of a soil sample from the clay soils adjacent to the Lower Mixing Box

  13. Impacts of global, regional, and sectoral black carbon emission reductions on surface air quality and human mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. C. Anenberg

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available As a component of fine particulate matter (PM2.5, black carbon (BC is associated with premature human mortality. BC also affects climate by absorbing solar radiation and reducing planetary albedo. Several studies have examined the climate impacts of BC emissions, but the associated health impacts have been studied less extensively. Here, we examine the surface PM2.5 and premature mortality impacts of halving anthropogenic BC emissions globally and individually from eight world regions and three major economic sectors. We use a global chemical transport model, MOZART-4, to simulate PM2.5 concentrations and a health impact function to calculate premature cardiopulmonary and lung cancer deaths. We estimate that halving global anthropogenic BC emissions reduces outdoor population-weighted average PM2.5 by 542 ng m−3 (1.8 % and avoids 157 000 (95 % confidence interval, 120 000–194 000 annual premature deaths globally, with the vast majority occurring within the source region. Most of these avoided deaths can be achieved by halving emissions in East Asia (China; 54 %, followed by South Asia (India; 31 %, however South Asian emissions have 50 % greater mortality impacts per unit BC emitted than East Asian emissions. Globally, halving residential, industrial, and transportation emissions contributes 47 %, 35 %, and 15 % to the avoided deaths from halving all anthropogenic BC emissions. These contributions are 1.2, 1.2, and 0.6 times each sector's portion of global BC emissions, owing to the degree of co-location with population globally. We find that reducing BC emissions increases regional SO4 concentrations by up to 28 % of the magnitude of the regional BC concentration reductions, due to reduced absorption of radiation that drives photochemistry. Impacts of residential BC emissions are likely underestimated since indoor PM2.5 exposure is excluded. We estimate ∼8 times

  14. Impacts of global, regional, and sectoral black carbon emission reductions on surface air quality and human mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anenberg, S. C.; Talgo, K.; Arunachalam, S.; Dolwick, P.; Jang, C.; West, J. J.

    2011-07-01

    As a component of fine particulate matter (PM2.5), black carbon (BC) is associated with premature human mortality. BC also affects climate by absorbing solar radiation and reducing planetary albedo. Several studies have examined the climate impacts of BC emissions, but the associated health impacts have been studied less extensively. Here, we examine the surface PM2.5 and premature mortality impacts of halving anthropogenic BC emissions globally and individually from eight world regions and three major economic sectors. We use a global chemical transport model, MOZART-4, to simulate PM2.5 concentrations and a health impact function to calculate premature cardiopulmonary and lung cancer deaths. We estimate that halving global anthropogenic BC emissions reduces outdoor population-weighted average PM2.5 by 542 ng m-3 (1.8 %) and avoids 157 000 (95 % confidence interval, 120 000-194 000) annual premature deaths globally, with the vast majority occurring within the source region. Most of these avoided deaths can be achieved by halving emissions in East Asia (China; 54 %), followed by South Asia (India; 31 %), however South Asian emissions have 50 % greater mortality impacts per unit BC emitted than East Asian emissions. Globally, halving residential, industrial, and transportation emissions contributes 47 %, 35 %, and 15 % to the avoided deaths from halving all anthropogenic BC emissions. These contributions are 1.2, 1.2, and 0.6 times each sector's portion of global BC emissions, owing to the degree of co-location with population globally. We find that reducing BC emissions increases regional SO4 concentrations by up to 28 % of the magnitude of the regional BC concentration reductions, due to reduced absorption of radiation that drives photochemistry. Impacts of residential BC emissions are likely underestimated since indoor PM2.5 exposure is excluded. We estimate ∼8 times more avoided deaths when BC and organic carbon (OC) emissions are halved together, suggesting

  15. Antigen processing of glycoconjugate vaccines; the polysaccharide portion of the pneumococcal CRM(197) conjugate vaccine co-localizes with MHC II on the antigen processing cell surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zengzu; Schreiber, John R

    2009-05-21

    Pneumococcal (Pn) polysaccharides (PS) are T-independent (TI) antigens and do not induce immunological memory or antibodies in infants. Conjugation of PnPS to the carrier protein CRM(197) induces PS-specific antibody in infants, and memory similar to T-dependent (Td) antigens. Conjugates have improved immunogenicity via antigen processing and presentation of carrier protein with MHC II and recruitment of T cell help, but the fate of the PS attached to the carrier is unknown. To determine the location of the PS component of PnPS-CRM(197) in the APC, we separately labeled PS and protein and tracked their location. The PS of types 14-CRM(197) and 19F-CRM(197) was specifically labeled by Alexa Fluor 594 hydrazide (red). The CRM(197) was separately labeled red in a reaction that did not label PS. Labeled antigens were incubated with APC which were fixed, permeabilized and incubated with anti-MHC II antibody labeled green by Alexa Fluor 488, followed by confocal microscopy. Labeled CRM(197) was presented on APC surface and co-localized with MHC II (yellow). Labeled unconjugated 14 or 19F PS did not go to the APC surface, but PS labeled 14-CRM(197) and 19F-CRM(197) was internalized and co-localized with MHC II. Monoclonal antibody to type 14 PS bound to intracellular type 14 PS and PS-CRM(197). Brefeldin A and chloroquine blocked both CRM(197) and PS labeled 14-CRM(197) and 19F-CRM(197) from co-localizing with MHC II. These data suggest that the PS component of the CRM(197) glycoconjugate enters the endosome, travels with CRM(197) peptides to the APC surface and co-localizes with MHC II.

  16. Predamage threshold electron emission from insulator and semiconductor surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siekhaus, W.J.; Kinney, J.H.; Milam, D.

    1985-01-01

    Predamage electron emission shows a dependence on fluence, bandgap and wavelength consistent with multiphoton excitation across the bandgap and inconsistent with avalanche ionization and thermionic emission models. The electron emission scales with pulselength as 1/√T. 6 references, 8 figures, 1 table

  17. Changes in summer sea ice, albedo, and portioning of surface solar radiation in the Pacific sector of Arctic Ocean during 1982-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Ruibo; Tian-Kunze, Xiangshan; Leppäranta, Matti; Wang, Jia; Kaleschke, Lars; Zhang, Zhanhai

    2016-08-01

    SSM/I sea ice concentration and CLARA black-sky composite albedo were used to estimate sea ice albedo in the region 70°N-82°N, 130°W-180°W. The long-term trends and seasonal evolutions of ice concentration, composite albedo, and ice albedo were then obtained. In July-August 1982-2009, the linear trend of the composite albedo and the ice albedo was -0.069 and -0.046 units per decade, respectively. During 1 June to 19 August, melting of sea ice resulted in an increase of solar heat input to the ice-ocean system by 282 MJ·m-2 from 1982 to 2009. However, because of the counter-balancing effects of the loss of sea ice area and the enhanced ice surface melting, the trend of solar heat input to the ice was insignificant. The summer evolution of ice albedo matched the ice surface melting and ponding well at basin scale. The ice albedo showed a large difference between the multiyear and first-year ice because the latter melted completely by the end of a melt season. At the SHEBA geolocations, a distinct change in the ice albedo has occurred since 2007, because most of the multiyear ice has been replaced by first-year ice. A positive polarity in the Arctic Dipole Anomaly could be partly responsible for the rapid loss of summer ice within the study region in the recent years by bringing warmer air masses from the south and advecting more ice toward the north. Both these effects would enhance ice-albedo feedback.

  18. Auger emission from solid surfaces bombarded with ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grizzi, Oscar.

    1986-01-01

    The Auger electron emission from Be, Na, Mg, Al and Si bombarded with 0,5-20 KeV noble gas ions is studied. Sharp structures of the Auger electron spectra of Na and Be were identified. A Monte Carlo program was adapted to simulate the colision cascade in the solid, inner shell excitations and Auger decays. From the comparision of experimental and simulated Auger intensities, the relative role of symmetric and asymmetric collisions in Be K- and Al L-shell excitation were evaluated. In the case of Be, the discussion of the exciting processes to higher projectile energies was extended. To this end, the simulation to early measurements of Be K X-ray yields was applied. From this analysis, information about the variations of the fluorescence yield and outer-shell occupation numbers of Be with projectile energy was obtained. The study of the shape of the sharp Auger structures and their dependence with the energy and incidence projectile angle gives information about the collisional processes, inner hole lifetimes and Auger decays. From the evaluation of the energy and angular distribution of the excited sputtered atoms and the interaction between them and the metallic-surface, the energy shift distributions in the Auger energies were obtained. From the comparison of these distributions with the experimental atomic peaks, the main causes of the broadening of these peaks were determined. (M.E.L.) [es

  19. Effect of metallic and hyperbolic metamaterial surface on electric and magnetic dipole emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ni, Xingjie; Naik, Gururaj V.; Kildishev, Alexander V.

    2010-01-01

    Spontaneous emission patterns of electric and magnetic dipoles on different material surfaces were studied numerically and experimentally. The results show the modified behavior of electric and magnetic dipoles on metallic and HMM surfaces.......Spontaneous emission patterns of electric and magnetic dipoles on different material surfaces were studied numerically and experimentally. The results show the modified behavior of electric and magnetic dipoles on metallic and HMM surfaces....

  20. Current in heavy-current planar diode with discrete emission surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belomyttsev, S.Ya.; Korovin, S.D.; Pegel', I.V

    1999-01-01

    Dependence of current in a high-current planar diode on the size of emission centres was studied. Essential effect of emission surface microstructure on the current value in the planar diode was demonstrated. It was determined that if the distance between the emitter essentially exceeded their size then current dependence on the ratio of size to the value of the diode gap was an exponential function with 3/2 index. Current dependence on voltage obeyed the exponential law with 3/2 index up to higher voltage values in the planar diode with discrete emission surface in contrast to the case of a planar diode with homogeneous emission surface [ru

  1. AMSR-E/Aqua Monthly Global Microwave Land Surface Emissivity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set is a global land emissivity product using passive microwave observations from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observing System...

  2. The surface emissions trap: a new approach in indoor air purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowicz, Pawel; Larsson, Lennart

    2012-11-01

    A new device for stopping or reducing potentially irritating or harmful emissions from surfaces indoors is described. The device is a surface emissions trap prototype and consists of an adsorbent sheet with a semipermeable barrier surrounded by two thin nonwoven layers. The trap may be applied directly at the source of the emissions e.g. at moisture-affected floors and walls, surfaces contaminated by chemical spills etc. This results in an immediate stop or reduction of the emitting pollutants. The trap has a very low water vapor resistance thus allowing drying of wet surfaces. In laboratory experiments typically 98% reduction of air concentrations of volatile organic compounds and a virtually total reduction of mold particle-associated mycotoxins was observed. The surface emissions trap may represent a convenient and efficient way of restoring indoor environments polluted by microbial and other moisture-associated emissions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Missing portion sizes in FFQ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køster-Rasmussen, Rasmus; Siersma, Volkert Dirk; Halldorson, Thorhallur I.

    2015-01-01

    -nearest neighbours (KNN) were compared with a reference based on self-reported portion sizes (quantified by a photographic food atlas embedded in the FFQ). Setting: The Danish Health Examination Survey 2007–2008. Subjects: The study included 3728 adults with complete portion size data. Results: Compared...

  4. Enhancement of blurred image portions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2008-01-01

    This invention relates to a method for image enhancement, comprising a first step ( 41 ) of distinguishing blurred and non-blurred image portions of an input image, and a second step ( 42 ) of enhancing at least one of said blurred image portions of said input image to produce an output image. Said

  5. Quantifying consumer portion control practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spence, M.; Lähteenmäki, Liisa; Stancu, Violeta

    2015-01-01

    of Ireland. Three factors were extracted and named: measurement-strategy scale, eating-strategy scale, and purchasing-strategy scale. The eating-strategy scale score was the highest, while the measurement-strategy scale carried the lowest frequency score. For each strategy scale score, the strongest...... predictor was GHI, followed by gender. Having higher GHI and being female were independently associated with more frequent portion control. Both the eating-strategy scale score and the purchasing-strategy scale score were negatively associated with pizza portion size consumption estimates. In conclusion......, while this study demonstrates that the reported use of portion control practices is low, the findings provide preliminary evidence for their validity. Further studies are needed to explore how portion control practices are used in different kinds of portion size decisions and what their contribution...

  6. Electron emission from insulator surfaces by ultra-short laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acuna, M; Gravielle, M S, E-mail: mario@iafe.uba.a, E-mail: msilvia@iafe.uba.a [Institutes de AstronomIa y Fisica del Espacio, Casilla de Correo 67, Sucursal 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2009-11-01

    Photoelectron emission from insulator surfaces induced by ultra-short laser pulses is studied within a time-dependent distorted wave method. The proposed approach combines the Volkov phase, which takes into account the laser interaction, with a simple representation of the unperturbed surface states, given by the Tight-binding method. The model is applied to evaluate the photoelectron emission from a LiF(001) surface, finding effects of interference produced by the crystal lattice.

  7. Effect of metallic and hyperbolic metamaterial surfaces on electric and magnetic dipole emission transitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ni, X.; Naik, G. V.; Kildishev, A. V.

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous emission patterns of electric and magnetic dipoles on different metallic surfaces and a hyperbolic metamaterial (HMM) surface were simulated using the dyadic Green’s function technique. The theoretical approach was verified by experimental results obtained by measuring angular......-dependent emission spectra of europium ions on top of different films. The results show the modified behavior of electric and magnetic dipoles on metallic and HMM surfaces. The results of numerical calculations agree well with experimental data....

  8. Influence of Local Airflow on the Pollutant Emission from Indoor Building Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topp, Claus; Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm; Heiselberg, Per Kvols

    2001-01-01

    This article reports the results of an investigation, based on fundamental fluid dynamics and mass transfer theory, carried out to obtain a general understanding of the mechanisms involved in the emissions from building materials in ventilated rooms. In addition, a generally applicable method...... for the prediction of surface emissions is proposed. The work focused on the emission of vapours and gases and no particulate emissions were considered. The methods used were numerical calculations by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and full-scale laboratory experiments. It was found that the emissions...

  9. An experimental study of electron transfer and emission during particle-surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGrath, C.T.

    2000-09-01

    A new coincidence technique has been developed and used to study the secondary electron emission that arises during the interaction of ions with surfaces. This coincidence technique allows the secondary electron emission statistics due to the impact of singly, doubly and multiply charged ions on surfaces to be measured in coincidence with reflected particles, in specific charge states and with specific post-collision trajectories. This system has been used to study the impact of 8 keV H + ions on polycrystalline copper and aluminium targets. Under these conditions the potential emission contribution is negligible and the electron emission is almost entirely due to kinetic emission processes. The sub-surface contribution to the observed electron emission has been isolated using two newly developed models. These models provide valuable information about the depth and amount of surface penetration and on the probability for subsequent electron transport to the surface. The impact of 2 - 100 keV Xe q+ (q = 1 - 10) ions on polycrystalline copper has also been studied using this system. From the subsequent data the potential and kinetic contributions to secondary electron emission have been separated using a previously established model for potential emission. The resulting kinetic emission yield increases with increasing ion impact energy, consistent with current concepts on quasimolecular ionisation. For ions impacting at large incident angles evidence for sub-surface emission has also been observed. The degree of penetration increases with ion impact energy, consistent with current concepts on this effect. The formation of H - ions from incident H + ions has also been studied by measuring the secondary electron emission statistics in coincidence with reflected particles in specific final charge states. This preliminary data is consistent with a two-step process of Auger neutralisation followed by resonant electron capture to the affinity level. However this mechanism

  10. Effect of surface morphology and densification on the infrared emissivity of C/SiC composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Fuyuan; Cheng, Laifei; Zhang, Qing; Zhang, Litong

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The cauliflower-like microstructure improved the infrared emissivity multiply. • The infrared emissivity decreased continually with the improving surface flatness. • The densification process boosted the infrared emissivity. - Abstract: The effects of surface morphology and densification on the infrared emissivity of 2D C/SiC composites were investigated in 6–16 μm from 1000 °C to 1600 °C. As the sample surface was polished, the reflection and scattering for the electromagnetic waves of thermal radiation were reduced, causing a sustained decrease in the infrared emissivity. The space-variant polarizations caused by the cauliflower-like microstructure were enervated in the smooth surface, which enhanced the reduction trendy in the infrared emissivity. In densification process, the increasing SiC content and the growing amount of the cauliflower-like microstructure on sample surface improved the infrared emissivity of C/SiC composites, while the decreasing porosity decreased it. Due to the greater positive effects on the thermal radiation during the densification process, the infrared emissivity of C/SiC composites increased successively with density

  11. Effect of surface morphology and densification on the infrared emissivity of C/SiC composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Fuyuan, E-mail: wangfy1986@gmail.com; Cheng, Laifei; Zhang, Qing, E-mail: zhangqing@nwpu.edu.cn; Zhang, Litong

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • The cauliflower-like microstructure improved the infrared emissivity multiply. • The infrared emissivity decreased continually with the improving surface flatness. • The densification process boosted the infrared emissivity. - Abstract: The effects of surface morphology and densification on the infrared emissivity of 2D C/SiC composites were investigated in 6–16 μm from 1000 °C to 1600 °C. As the sample surface was polished, the reflection and scattering for the electromagnetic waves of thermal radiation were reduced, causing a sustained decrease in the infrared emissivity. The space-variant polarizations caused by the cauliflower-like microstructure were enervated in the smooth surface, which enhanced the reduction trendy in the infrared emissivity. In densification process, the increasing SiC content and the growing amount of the cauliflower-like microstructure on sample surface improved the infrared emissivity of C/SiC composites, while the decreasing porosity decreased it. Due to the greater positive effects on the thermal radiation during the densification process, the infrared emissivity of C/SiC composites increased successively with density.

  12. Effects of fibre-form nanostructures on particle emissions from a tungsten surface in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamura, S.; Miyamoto, T.; Ohno, N.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of fibre-form nanostructure of a tungsten surface on both electron emission and sputtering in helium/argon plasmas are represented. Generally, a nano-fibre forest, the so-called ‘fuzz’, made of tungsten with helium gas inside is found to have the tendency of suppressing the particle emission substantially. The electron emission comes from the impact of high-energy primary electrons. In addition, a deeply biased tungsten target, which inhibits the influx of even energetic primary electrons, seems to produce an electron emission, and it may be suppressed on the way to nanostructure formation on the surface of the W target. Such an emission process is discussed here. The sputtering yield of the He-damaged tungsten surface with the fibre-form nanostructure depends on the surface morphology while the sputtering itself changes the surface morphology, so that the time evolutions of sputtering yield from the W surface with an originally well-developed nanostructure are found to show a minimum in sputtering yield, which is about a half for the fresh nanostructured tungsten and roughly one-fifth of the yield for the original flat normal tungsten surface. The surface morphology at that time is, for the first time, made clear with field emission scanning electron microscopy observation. The physical mechanism for the appearance of such a minimum in sputtering yield is discussed. (paper)

  13. Application of Gauss's theorem to quantify localized surface emissions from airborne measurements of wind and trace gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Stephen; Faloona, Ian; Mehrotra, Shobhit; Suard, Maxime; Lenschow, Donald H.; Sweeney, Colm; Herndon, Scott; Schwietzke, Stefan; Pétron, Gabrielle; Pifer, Justin; Kort, Eric A.; Schnell, Russell

    2017-09-01

    Airborne estimates of greenhouse gas emissions are becoming more prevalent with the advent of rapid commercial development of trace gas instrumentation featuring increased measurement accuracy, precision, and frequency, and the swelling interest in the verification of current emission inventories. Multiple airborne studies have indicated that emission inventories may underestimate some hydrocarbon emission sources in US oil- and gas-producing basins. Consequently, a proper assessment of the accuracy of these airborne methods is crucial to interpreting the meaning of such discrepancies. We present a new method of sampling surface sources of any trace gas for which fast and precise measurements can be made and apply it to methane, ethane, and carbon dioxide on spatial scales of ˜ 1000 m, where consecutive loops are flown around a targeted source region at multiple altitudes. Using Reynolds decomposition for the scalar concentrations, along with Gauss's theorem, we show that the method accurately accounts for the smaller-scale turbulent dispersion of the local plume, which is often ignored in other average mass balance methods. With the help of large eddy simulations (LES) we further show how the circling radius can be optimized for the micrometeorological conditions encountered during any flight. Furthermore, by sampling controlled releases of methane and ethane on the ground we can ascertain that the accuracy of the method, in appropriate meteorological conditions, is often better than 10 %, with limits of detection below 5 kg h-1 for both methane and ethane. Because of the FAA-mandated minimum flight safe altitude of 150 m, placement of the aircraft is critical to preventing a large portion of the emission plume from flowing underneath the lowest aircraft sampling altitude, which is generally the leading source of uncertainty in these measurements. Finally, we show how the accuracy of the method is strongly dependent on the number of sampling loops and/or time

  14. Study of land surface temperature and spectral emissivity using multi ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tral emissivities over a hard rock terrain using multi-sensor satellite data. The study area, of .... Georeferenced MODIS level 1B data (bands 31 and. 32) and Landsat ETM+ data .... the optical properties of the atmosphere. In the present study ...

  15. Measurement of PCB emissions from building surfaces using a novel portable emission test cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyng, Nadja; Gunnarsen, Lars Bo; Andersen, Helle Vibeke

    2016-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were used in building materials like caulks and paints from 1930 e1970s and in some cases that caused elevated PCB concentrations in the indoor air at levels considered harmful to occupant health. PCBs are semivolatile organic compounds and capable of spreading from...... and there is a need to prioritise remediation measures on different materials. An inexpensive and portable emission test cell was developed to resemble indoor conditions in relation to the area specific ventilation rate. Emissions were measured using the test cell in the laboratory on freshly made PCB paint. Further......, the chamber was used for determining emissions from PCB-containing building materials in the field as well as remediated walls. The measurements showed that sorption of PCBs to chamber walls was insignificant after 2-4 days of exposure to the source. Over a period of two weeks emission rates did not change...

  16. Emissions of nitrous oxide and methane from surface and ground waters in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiessl, H.

    1993-01-01

    The paper provides a first estimation of the contribution of inland freshwater systems (surface waters and ground waters) to the emission of the greenhouse gases nitrous oxide and methane in Germany. These amounts are compared to other main sources for the emission of nitrous oxide and methane. (orig.) [de

  17. Structural dynamics of fore-crisis area on a heat emission surface of a fuel element's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharaevskij, I.G.; Fialko, N.M.; Sharaevskaya, E.I.

    2011-01-01

    The known theoretical and experimental data regarding the nature of dry spots evolution are reviewed and the idea regarding the mechanism of heat emission from the heated surface in fore-crisis area are defined more precisely.

  18. Dynamic Inversion of Global Surface Microwave Emissivity Using a 1DVAR Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sid-Ahmed Boukabara

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A variational inversion scheme is used to extract microwave emissivity spectra from brightness temperatures over a multitude of surface types. The scheme is called the Microwave Integrated Retrieval System and has been implemented operationally since 2007 at NOAA. This study focuses on the Advance Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU/MHS pair onboard the NOAA-18 platform, but the algorithm is applied routinely to multiple microwave sensors, including the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS on Suomi-National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP, Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMI/S on the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP flight units, as well as to the Global Precipitation Mission (GPM Microwave Imager (GMI, to name a few. The emissivity spectrum retrieval is entirely based on a physical approach. To optimize the use of information content from the measurements, the emissivity is extracted simultaneously with other parameters impacting the measurements, namely, the vertical profiles of temperature, moisture and cloud, as well as the skin temperature and hydrometeor parameters when rain or ice are present. The final solution is therefore a consistent set of parameters that fit the measured brightness temperatures within the instrument noise level. No ancillary data are needed to perform this dynamic emissivity inversion. By allowing the emissivity to be part of the retrieved state vector, it becomes easy to handle the pixel-to-pixel variation in the emissivity over non-oceanic surfaces. This is particularly important in highly variable surface backgrounds. The retrieved emissivity spectrum by itself is of value (as a wetness index for instance, but it is also post-processed to determine surface geophysical parameters. Among the parameters retrieved from the emissivity using this approach are snow cover, snow water equivalent and effective grain size over snow-covered surfaces, sea-ice concentration and age from ice

  19. Investigation of sandwich material surface created by abrasive water jet (AWJ via vibration emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Hreha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents research a of abrasive waterjet cutting of heterogeneous “sandwich“ material with different Young modulus of elasticity of the cutted surface geometry by means of vibration emission. In order to confirm hypothetical assumptions about direct relation between vibration emission and surface quality an experiment in heterogeneous material consisting of stainless steel (DIN 1.4006 / AISI 410 and alloy AlCuMg2 has been provided.

  20. Surface influence on convoy electron emission at low energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, E.A.

    1988-01-01

    It is studied the dependence of the production of convoy electrons induced by H + - 60 KeV with surface conditions of Al targets by in situ deposition of Na and O. The conclusion is that convoy electron production increases with the work function of the surface. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  1. Field emission from the surface of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Knápek, Alexandr; Sobola, D.; Tománek, P.; Pokorná, Zuzana; Urbánek, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 395, FEB 15 (2017), s. 157-161 ISSN 0169-4332 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020118 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : field emission * HOPG * scanning electron microscopy * scanning near-field optical microscopy Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering OBOR OECD: Nano-processes (applications on nano-scale) Impact factor: 3.387, year: 2016

  2. Application of a sawtooth surface to accelerator beam chambers with low electron emission rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suetsugu, Y.; Tsuchiya, M.; Nishidono, T.; Kato, N.; Satoh, N.; Endo, S.; Yokoyama, T.

    2003-01-01

    One of the latest problems in positron or proton accelerators is a single-beam instability due to an electron cloud around the beam. The instability, for an example, causes a beam size blow up of the positron beam and deteriorates the performance of the electron-positron collider. the seed of the electron cloud is the electrons emitted from the surface of the beam chamber, which consists of electrons due to the synchrotron radiation (photoelectrons) and sometimes those multiplied by the multipactoring. Suppressing the electron emission from the surface is, therefore, an essential way to cure the instability. Here a rough surface with a sawtooth structure (sawtooth surface) is proposed to reduce the electron emission from the surface of the beam chamber. A new rolling-tap method is developed for this study to make the sawtooth surface in a circular beam chamber with a length of several meters. The first experiment using a test chamber at a photon beam line of the KEK Photon Factory verifies its validity. The photoelectron emission from the sawtooth surface reduces by one order of magnitude compared to the usual smooth surface. In the second experiment under a bunched positron beam in the KEK B-Factory, however, the electron emission is comparable to that of a smooth surface and the behavior is quite different from the previous one. The reason is that the beam field excites the multipactoring of electrons and the decrease of the photoelectron emission by the sawtooth surface is wiped out. The sawtooth surface will be effective to reduce the electron emission under the situation with external magnetic fields or without strong beam fields where the electron multipactoring hardly occurs

  3. Effect of surface contaminants on the light emission spectrum of LiF TLDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abhold, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    Recent results show the differences between the light emissions spectra from LiF Thermoluminescent Dosimeters (TLDs) for gamma vs. alpha irradiations to be due to contaminants on the surface of the TLD. The light emission spectrum for thermal neutron irradiations was observed to be identical to that for a Cs-137 gamma irradiation in Harshaw TLD-100. Further experiments with surface treatments on TLD-100 indicate trace contaminants introduced by the standard methanol cleansing rinse in reagent grade methanol to have a substantial effect on the light emission spectrum for Am-241 alpha irradiations

  4. Field emission and high voltage cleaning of particulate contaminants on extended metallic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, J.; Bonin, B.; Safa, H.

    1996-01-01

    The vacuum insulation properties of extended metallic surfaces depends strongly on their cleanliness. The usual technique to reduce electronic field emission from such surfaces consists in exposing them to very high electric fields during limited periods of time. This kind of processing also reduces the occurrence of vacuum breakdown. The processing of the surface is generally believed to be due to a thermomechanical destruction of the emitting sites, initiated by the emission itself. Comparison of the electric forces vs adherence forces which act on dust particles lying on the surface shows that the processing could also be due simply to the mechanical removal of the dust particles, with a subsequent reduction of field emission from the contaminated surface. (author)

  5. Temporal Arctic longwave surface emissivity feedbacks in the Community Earth System Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, C.; Feldman, D.; Huang, X.; Flanner, M.; Yang, P.; Chen, X.

    2017-12-01

    We have investigated how the inclusion of realistic and consistent surface emissivity in both land-surface and atmospheric components of the CESM coupled-climate model affects a wide range of climate variables. We did this by replacing the unit emissivity values in RRTMG_LW for water, fine-grained snow, and desert scenes with spectral emissivity values, and by replacing broadband emissivity values in surface components with the Planck-curve weighted counterparts. We find that this harmonized treatment of surface emissivity within CESM can be important for reducing high-latitude temperature biases. We also find that short-term effects of atmospheric dynamics and spectral information need to be considered to understand radiative effects in higher detail, and are possible with radiative kernels computed for every grid and time point for the entire model integration period. We find that conventional climatological feedback calculations indicate that sea-ice emissivity feedback is positive in sign, but that the radiative effects of the difference in emissivity between frozen and unfrozen surfaces exhibit seasonal dependence. Furthermore, this seasonality itself exhibits meridional asymmetry due to differences in sea-ice response to climate forcing between the Arctic and the Antarctic. In the Arctic, this seasonal, temporally higher order analysis exhibits increasing outgoing surface emissivity radiative response in a warming climate. While the sea-ice emissivity feedback and seasonal sea-ice emissivity radiative response amplitudes are a few percent of surface albedo feedbacks, the feedback analysis methods outlined in this work demonstrate that spatially and temporally localized feedback analysis can give insight into the mechanisms at work on those scales which differ in amplitude and sign from conventional climatological analyses. We note that the inclusion of this realistic physics leads to improved agreement between CESM model results and Arctic surface

  6. Electron emission and energy loss in grazing collisions of protons with insulator surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gravielle, M. S.; Miraglia, J. E.; Aldazabal, I.; Arnau, A.; Ponce, V. H.; Aumayr, F.; Lederer, S.; Winter, H.

    2007-01-01

    Electron emission from LiF, KCl, and KI crystal surfaces during grazing collisions of swift protons is studied using a first-order distorted-wave formalism. Owing to the localized character of the electronic structure of these surfaces, we propose a model that allows us to describe the process as a sequence of atomic transitions from different target ions. Experimental results are presented for electron emission from LiF and KI and energy loss from KI surfaces. Calculations show reasonable agreement with these experimental data. The role played by the charge of the incident particle is also investigated

  7. Electron emission from MOS electron emitters with clean and cesium covered gold surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Gunver; Thomsen, Lasse Bjørchmar; Johansson, Martin

    2009-01-01

    MOS (metal-oxide-semiconductor) electron emitters consisting of a Si substrate, a SiO2 tunnel barrier and a Ti (1 nm)/Au(7 nm) top-electrode, with an active area of 1 cm(2) have been produced and studied with surface science techniques under UHV (ultra high vacuum) conditions and their emission...... characteristics have been investigated. It is known, that deposition of an alkali metal on the emitting surface lowers the work function and increases the emission efficiency. For increasing Cs coverages the surface has been characterized by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Ion Scattering Spectroscopy (ISS...

  8. Emission of positive oxygen ions from ion bombardment of adsorbate-covered metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaurin, M.G.

    1989-01-01

    During ion bombardment of metal surfaces, collision cascades can result in the emission of sputtered secondary ions. Recent experiments, however, have suggested that the emission of positive ions of electronegative adsorbates can result from electronic processes rather than from processes involving elastic collisions. This dissertation presents the results of experiments studying the emission of positive oxygen ions from oxygen- and carbon-monoxide-covered transition metal surfaces during bombardment by 25-250 keV ions of neon, argon, and krypton. The systems studied may be grouped into four categories. For a nickel substrate with adsorbed oxygen, the emission of positive oxygen ions proceeds through collision cascades. For titanium and niobium with adsorbed oxygen, the emission of positive oxygen ions is proportional to the primary ion velocity, consistent with emission from electronic processes; for a given primary ion velocity, the oxygen ion yield is independent of primary ion species. For substrates of molybdenum and tungsten, the oxygen yield is proportional to primary ion velocity, but the yield also depends on the primary ion species for a given primary ion velocity in a manner that is consistent with emission resulting from electronic processes. For these two groups, except for titanium, the yields during neon ion bombardment do not extrapolate (assuming linearity with primary ion velocity) to a nonzero value at zero beam velocity. The magnitude of the oxygen ion yields from these targets is not consistent with that expected if the emission were induced by secondary electrons emitted during the ion bombardment

  9. Multimodel Surface Temperature Responses to Removal of U.S. Sulfur Dioxide Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, A. J.; Westervelt, D. M.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Fiore, A. M.; Shindell, D.; Correa, G.; Faluvegi, G.; Horowitz, L. W.

    2018-03-01

    Three Earth System models are used to derive surface temperature responses to removal of U.S. anthropogenic SO2 emissions. Using multicentury perturbation runs with and without U.S. anthropogenic SO2 emissions, the local and remote surface temperature changes are estimated. In spite of a temperature drift in the control and large internal variability, 200 year simulations yield statistically significant regional surface temperature responses to the removal of U.S. SO2 emissions. Both local and remote surface temperature changes occur in all models, and the patterns of changes are similar between models for northern hemisphere land regions. We find a global average temperature sensitivity to U.S. SO2 emissions of 0.0055 K per Tg(SO2) per year with a range of (0.0036, 0.0078). We examine global and regional responses in SO4 burdens, aerosol optical depths (AODs), and effective radiative forcing (ERF). While changes in AOD and ERF are concentrated near the source region (United States), the temperature response is spread over the northern hemisphere with amplification of the temperature increase toward the Arctic. In all models, we find a significant response of dust concentrations, which affects the AOD but has no obvious effect on surface temperature. Temperature sensitivity to the ERF of U.S. SO2 emissions is found to differ from the models' sensitivity to radiative forcing of doubled CO2.

  10. Acoustic emission-based in-process monitoring of surface generation in robot-assisted polishing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilny, Lukas; Bissacco, Giuliano; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    The applicability of acoustic emission (AE) measurements for in-process monitoring of surface generation in the robot-assisted polishing (RAP) was investigated. Surface roughness measurements require interruption of the process, proper surface cleaning and measurements that sometimes necessitate...... automatic detection of optimal process endpoint allow intelligent process control, creating fundamental elements in development of robust fully automated RAP process for its widespread industrial application....... removal of the part from the machine tool. In this study, stabilisation of surface roughness during polishing rotational symmetric surfaces by the RAP process was monitored by AE measurements. An AE sensor was placed on a polishing arm in direct contact with a bonded abrasive polishing tool...

  11. Study of electronic field emission from large surfaces under static operating conditions and hyper-frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luong, M.

    1997-09-01

    The enhanced electronic field emission from large area metallic surfaces lowers performances of industrial devices that have to sustain high electric field under vacuum. Despite of numerous investigations in the past, the mechanisms of such an emission have never been well clarified. Recently, research in our laboratory has pointed out the importance played by conducting sites (particles and protrusions). A refined geometrical model, called superposed protrusions model has been proposed to explain the enhanced emission by local field enhancement. As a logical continuation, the present work aims at testing this model and, in the same time, investigating the means to suppress the emission where it is undesirable. Thus, we have showed: the cause of current fluctuations in a continuous field regime (DC), the identity of emission characteristics (β, A e ) in both radiofrequency (RF) and DC regimes, the effectiveness of a thermal treatment by extern high density electronic bombardment, the effectiveness of a mechanical treatment by high pressure rinsing with ultra pure water, the mechanisms and limits of an in situ RF processing. Furthermore, the electronic emission from insulating particles has also been studied concurrently with a spectral analysis of the associated luminous emission. Finally, the refined geometrical model for conducting sites is reinforced while another model is proposed for some insulating sites. Several emission suppressing treatments has been explored and validated. At last, the characteristic of a RF pulsed field emitted electron beam has been checked for the first time as a possible application of such a field emission. (author)

  12. Synthesis of Carbon Dots with Multiple Color Emission by Controlled Graphitization and Surface Functionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Xiang; Qu, Dan; Yang, Dongxue; Nie, Bing; Zhao, Yikang; Fan, Hongyou; Sun, Zaicheng

    2018-01-01

    Multiple-color-emissive carbon dots (CDots) have potential applications in various fields such as bioimaging, light-emitting devices, and photocatalysis. The majority of the current CDots to date exhibit excitation-wavelength-dependent emissions with their maximum emission limited at the blue-light region. Here, a synthesis of multiple-color-emission CDots by controlled graphitization and surface function is reported. The CDots are synthesized through controlled thermal pyrolysis of citric acid and urea. By regulating the thermal-pyrolysis temperature and ratio of reactants, the maximum emission of the resulting CDots gradually shifts from blue to red light, covering the entire light spectrum. Specifically, the emission position of the CDots can be tuned from 430 to 630 nm through controlling the extent of graphitization and the amount of surface functional groups, COOH. The relative photoluminescence quantum yields of the CDots with blue, green, and red emission reach up to 52.6%, 35.1%, and 12.9%, respectively. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the CDots can be uniformly dispersed into epoxy resins and be fabricated as transparent CDots/epoxy composites for multiple-color- and white-light-emitting devices. This research opens a door for developing low-cost CDots as alternative phosphors for light-emitting devices. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Terahertz emission from semi-insulating GaAs with octadecanthiol-passivated surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Xiaojun; Xu, Xinlong; Lu, Xinchao; Wang, Li

    2013-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) emission from octadecanthiol (ODT) passivated (1 0 0) surface of the semi-insulating GaAs was measured, and compared with those from the native oxidized and the fresh surfaces. It was shown that the self-assembled ODT monolayer can stabilize the GaAs (1 0 0) surface, and maintain a THz surface emission 1.4 times as efficient as the native oxidized surface under equal conditions. Surface passivation can reduce the built-in electric field in the depletion region of the GaAs (1 0 0), resulting in the suppression of the THz radiation to a different extent. Oxidation of GaAs surface reduces the THz amplitude mainly in the low-frequency region. These results indicate that GaAs can be made a more effective THz source by choosing molecular passivation technique. Conversely, the THz emission features such as polarity, amplitude, and phase from molecule-passivated surfaces may be used to characterize the attached molecules.

  14. Keeping Portions Under Control (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it possible to bring portion sizes back to earth? Yes. But first we have to understand how ... recommend for a portion of pasta, rice, cereal, vegetables, and fruit. A meat portion should be about ...

  15. Inverse modelling estimates of N2O surface emissions and stratospheric losses using a global dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, R. L.; Bousquet, P.; Chevallier, F.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Vermeulen, A. T.; Aalto, T.; Haszpra, L.; Meinhardt, F.; O'Doherty, S.; Moncrieff, J. B.; Popa, M.; Steinbacher, M.; Jordan, A.; Schuck, T. J.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A.; Wofsy, S. C.; Kort, E. A.

    2010-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) levels have been steadily increasing in the atmosphere over the past few decades at a rate of approximately 0.3% per year. This trend is of major concern as N2O is both a long-lived Greenhouse Gas (GHG) and an Ozone Depleting Substance (ODS), as it is a precursor of NO and NO2, which catalytically destroy ozone in the stratosphere. Recently, N2O emissions have been recognised as the most important ODS emissions and are now of greater importance than emissions of CFC's. The growth in atmospheric N2O is predominantly due to the enhancement of surface emissions by human activities. Most notably, the intensification and proliferation of agriculture since the mid-19th century, which has been accompanied by the increased input of reactive nitrogen to soils and has resulted in significant perturbations to the natural N-cycle and emissions of N2O. There exist two approaches for estimating N2O emissions, the so-called 'bottom-up' and 'top-down' approaches. Top-down approaches, based on the inversion of atmospheric measurements, require an estimate of the loss of N2O via photolysis and oxidation in the stratosphere. Uncertainties in the loss magnitude contribute uncertainties of 15 to 20% to the global annual surface emissions, complicating direct comparisons between bottom-up and top-down estimates. In this study, we present a novel inversion framework for the simultaneous optimization of N2O surface emissions and the magnitude of the loss, which avoids errors in the emissions due to incorrect assumptions about the lifetime of N2O. We use a Bayesian inversion with a variational formulation (based on 4D-Var) in order to handle very large datasets. N2O fluxes are retrieved at 4-weekly resolution over a global domain with a spatial resolution of 3.75° x 2.5° longitude by latitude. The efficacy of the simultaneous optimization of emissions and losses is tested using a global synthetic dataset, which mimics the available atmospheric data. Lastly, using real

  16. Leakage detection device for weld portion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinkawa, Toshio; Setokuchi, Sadayuki.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention concerns leakage detection device for weld portions, for example, in a nuclear reactor cavity, which can rapidly detect by remote control. That is, a detection device capable of self running and stopping on a guide rail along a weld line is disposed. The detection device comprises a coating mechanism for automatically coating soap water to the weld portion, a vacuum box capable of evacuating the coated surface and a camera for detecting the presence or absence of the soap bubbles generated under the evacuation. Such a device can conduct, by remote control, self running/stopping along with the weld line, coating of the soap water, settling of the vacuum box and confirmation and recording of foaming by using a television monitor. Accordingly, leakage in the weld portion in the reactor cavity or the like can be inspected. As a result, it greatly contributes to improvement of danger upon worker's operation at high place, detection accuracy and reliability of detection and shortening of operation period. (I.S.)

  17. The impact of anthropogenic and biogenic emissions on surface ozone concentrations in Istanbul.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Ulas; Poupkou, Anastasia; Incecik, Selahattin; Markakis, Konstantinos; Kindap, Tayfun; Unal, Alper; Melas, Dimitros; Yenigun, Orhan; Topcu, Sema; Odman, M Talat; Tayanc, Mete; Guler, Meltem

    2011-03-01

    Surface ozone concentrations at Istanbul during a summer episode in June 2008 were simulated using a high resolution and urban scale modeling system coupling MM5 and CMAQ models with a recently developed anthropogenic emission inventory for the region. Two sets of base runs were performed in order to investigate for the first time the impact of biogenic emissions on ozone concentrations in the Greater Istanbul Area (GIA). The first simulation was performed using only the anthropogenic emissions whereas the second simulation was performed using both anthropogenic and biogenic emissions. Biogenic NMVOC emissions were comparable with anthropogenic NMVOC emissions in terms of magnitude. The inclusion of biogenic emissions significantly improved the performance of the model, particularly in reproducing the low night time values as well as the temporal variation of ozone concentrations. Terpene emissions contributed significantly to the destruction of the ozone during nighttime. Biogenic NMVOCs emissions enhanced ozone concentrations in the downwind regions of GIA up to 25ppb. The VOC/NO(x) ratio almost doubled due to the addition of biogenic NMVOCs. Anthropogenic NO(x) and NMVOCs were perturbed by ±30% in another set of simulations to quantify the sensitivity of ozone concentrations to the precursor emissions in the region. The sensitivity runs, as along with the model-calculated ozone-to-reactive nitrogen ratios, pointed NO(x)-sensitive chemistry, particularly in the downwind areas. On the other hand, urban parts of the city responded more to changes in NO(x) due to very high anthropogenic emissions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Land Surface Microwave Emissivities Derived from AMSR-E and MODIS Measurements with Advanced Quality Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncet, Jean-Luc; Liang, Pan; Galantowicz, John F.; Lipton, Alan E.; Uymin, Gennady; Prigent, Catherine; Grassotti, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    A microwave emissivity database has been developed with data from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-EOS (AMSR-E) and with ancillary land surface temperature (LST) data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the same Aqua spacecraft. The primary intended application of the database is to provide surface emissivity constraints in atmospheric and surface property retrieval or assimilation. An additional application is to serve as a dynamic indicator of land surface properties relevant to climate change monitoring. The precision of the emissivity data is estimated to be significantly better than in prior databases from other sensors due to the precise collocation with high-quality MODIS LST data and due to the quality control features of our data analysis system. The accuracy of the emissivities in deserts and semi-arid regions is enhanced by applying, in those regions, a version of the emissivity retrieval algorithm that accounts for the penetration of microwave radiation through dry soil with diurnally varying vertical temperature gradients. These results suggest that this penetration effect is more widespread and more significant to interpretation of passive microwave measurements than had been previously established. Emissivity coverage in areas where persistent cloudiness interferes with the availability of MODIS LST data is achieved using a classification-based method to spread emissivity data from less-cloudy areas that have similar microwave surface properties. Evaluations and analyses of the emissivity products over homogeneous snow-free areas are presented, including application to retrieval of soil temperature profiles. Spatial inhomogeneities are the largest in the vicinity of large water bodies due to the large water/land emissivity contrast and give rise to large apparent temporal variability in the retrieved emissivities when satellite footprint locations vary over time. This issue will be dealt with in the future by

  19. Space-Based Diagnosis of Surface Ozone Sensitivity to Anthropogenic Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Randall V.; Fiore, Arlene M.; VanDonkelaar, Aaron

    2004-01-01

    We present a novel capability in satellite remote sensing with implications for air pollution control strategy. We show that the ratio of formaldehyde columns to tropospheric nitrogen dioxide columns is an indicator of the relative sensitivity of surface ozone to emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO(x) = NO + NO2) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The diagnosis from these space-based observations is highly consistent with current understanding of surface ozone chemistry based on in situ observations. The satellite-derived ratios indicate that surface ozone is more sensitive to emissions of NO(x) than of VOCs throughout most continental regions of the Northern Hemisphere during summer. Exceptions include Los Angeles and industrial areas of Germany. A seasonal transition occurs in the fall when surface ozone becomes less sensitive to NOx and more sensitive to VOCs.

  20. Nanometer-scale discernment of field emission from tungsten surface with single carbon monoxide molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Soichiro; Suwa, Yuji; Katagiri, Souichi

    2017-12-01

    Unusual quantized beam fluctuations were found in the emission current from a cold-field emitter (CFE) operating in an extremely high vacuum of 10-10 Pa. To clarify the microscopic mechanism behind these fluctuations, we developed a new calculation method to evaluate the field emission from a heterogeneous surface under a strong electric field of 4 × 109 V/m by using the local potential distribution obtained by a first-principles calculation, instead of by using the work function. As a result of the first-principles calculations of a single molecule adsorbed on a tungsten surface, we found that dissociative adsorption of a carbon monoxide (CO) molecule enhances the emission current by changing the potential barrier in the area surrounding the C and O adatoms when these two atoms are placed at their most stable positions. It is also found that the migration of the O atom from the most stable position reduces the emission current. These types of enhancement and reduction of the emission current quantitatively explain the observed quantized fluctuations of the CFE emission current.

  1. White light emission from fluorescent SiC with porous surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Weifang; Ou, Yiyu; Fiordaliso, Elisabetta Maria

    2017-01-01

    We report for the frst time a NUV light to white light conversion in a N-B co-doped 6H-SiC (fuorescent SiC) layer containing a hybrid structure. The surface of fuorescent SiC sample contains porous structures fabricated by anodic oxidation method. After passivation by 20nm thick Al2O3, the photol......We report for the frst time a NUV light to white light conversion in a N-B co-doped 6H-SiC (fuorescent SiC) layer containing a hybrid structure. The surface of fuorescent SiC sample contains porous structures fabricated by anodic oxidation method. After passivation by 20nm thick Al2O3...... the bulk fuorescent SiC layer. A high color rendering index of 81.1 has been achieved. Photoluminescence spectra in porous layers fabricated in both commercial n-type and lab grown N-B co-doped 6H-SiC show two emission peaks centered approximately at 460nm and 530nm. Such bluegreen emission phenomenon can......, the photoluminescence intensity from the porous layer was signifcant enhanced by a factor of more than 12. Using a porous layer of moderate thickness (~10µm), high-quality white light emission was realized by combining the independent emissions of blue-green emission from the porous layer and yellow emission from...

  2. Estimating NOx emissions and surface concentrations at high spatial resolution using OMI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, D. L.; Lamsal, L. N.; Loughner, C.; Swartz, W. H.; Saide, P. E.; Carmichael, G. R.; Henze, D. K.; Lu, Z.; Streets, D. G.

    2017-12-01

    In many instances, NOx emissions are not measured at the source. In these cases, remote sensing techniques are extremely useful in quantifying NOx emissions. Using an exponential modified Gaussian (EMG) fitting of oversampled Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) NO2 data, we estimate NOx emissions and lifetimes in regions where these emissions are uncertain. This work also presents a new high-resolution OMI NO2 dataset derived from the NASA retrieval that can be used to estimate surface level concentrations in the eastern United States and South Korea. To better estimate vertical profile shape factors, we use high-resolution model simulations (Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) and WRF-Chem) constrained by in situ aircraft observations to re-calculate tropospheric air mass factors and tropospheric NO2 vertical columns during summertime. The correlation between our satellite product and ground NO2 monitors in urban areas has improved dramatically: r2 = 0.60 in new product, r2 = 0.39 in operational product, signifying that this new product is a better indicator of surface concentrations than the operational product. Our work emphasizes the need to use both high-resolution and high-fidelity models in order to re-calculate vertical column data in areas with large spatial heterogeneities in NOx emissions. The methodologies developed in this work can be applied to other world regions and other satellite data sets to produce high-quality region-specific emissions estimates.

  3. Particulate Matter from the Road Surface Abrasion as a Problem of Non-Exhaust Emission Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Penkała

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Along with house heating and industry, emissions from road traffic (exhaust and tire, brake, car body or road surface abrasions are one of the primary sources of particulate matter (PM in the atmosphere in urban areas. Though numerous regulations and vehicle-control mechanisms have led to a significant decline of PM emissions from vehicle exhaust gases, other sources of PM remain related to road and car abrasion are responsible for non-exhaust emissions. Quantifying these emissions is a hard problem in both laboratory and field conditions. First, we must recognize the physicochemical properties of the PM that is emitted by various non-exhaust sources. In this paper, we underline the problem of information accessibility with regards to the properties and qualities of PM from non-exhaust sources. We also indicate why scarce information is available in order to find the possible solution to this ongoing issue.

  4. Monte Carlo calculation of secondary electron emission from carbon-surface by obliquely incident particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohya, Kaoru; Kawata, Jun; Mori, Ichiro

    1990-01-01

    Incidence angle dependences of secondary electron emission from a carbon surface by low energy electron and hydrogen atom are calculated using Monte Carlo simulations on the kinetic emission model. The calculation shows very small increase or rather decrease of the secondary electron yield with oblique incidence. It is explained in terms of not only multiple elastic collisions of incident particles with the carbon atoms but also small penetration depth of the particles comparable with the escape depth of secondary electrons. In addition, the two types of secondary electron emission are distinguished by using the secondary electron yield statistics; one is the emission due to trapped particles in the carbon, and the other is that due to backscattered particles. The high-yield component of the statistics on oblique incidence is more suppressed than those on normal incidence. (author)

  5. Modification of spontaneous emission from nanodiamond colour centres on a structured surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inam, F A; Gaebel, T; Bradac, C; Withford, M J; Rabeau, J R; Steel, M J; Stewart, L; Dawes, J M

    2011-01-01

    Colour centres in diamond are promising candidates as a platform for quantum technologies and biomedical imaging based on spins and/or photons. Controlling the emission properties of colour centres in diamond is a key requirement for the development of efficient single-photon sources having high collection efficiency. A number of groups have achieved an enhancement in the emission rate over narrow wavelength ranges by coupling single emitters in nanodiamond crystals to resonant electromagnetic structures. In this paper, we characterize in detail the spontaneous emission rates of nitrogen-vacancy centres at various locations on a structured substrate. We found a factor of 1.5 average enhancement of the total emission rate when nanodiamonds are on an opal photonic crystal surface, and observed changes in the lifetime distribution. We present a model for explaining these observations and associate the lifetime properties with dipole orientation and polarization effects.

  6. Modification of spontaneous emission from nanodiamond colour centres on a structured surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inam, F A; Gaebel, T; Bradac, C; Withford, M J; Rabeau, J R; Steel, M J [Centre for Quantum Science and Technology, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Stewart, L; Dawes, J M, E-mail: james.rabeau@mq.edu.au, E-mail: michael.steel@mq.edu.au [MQ Photonics Research Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia)

    2011-07-15

    Colour centres in diamond are promising candidates as a platform for quantum technologies and biomedical imaging based on spins and/or photons. Controlling the emission properties of colour centres in diamond is a key requirement for the development of efficient single-photon sources having high collection efficiency. A number of groups have achieved an enhancement in the emission rate over narrow wavelength ranges by coupling single emitters in nanodiamond crystals to resonant electromagnetic structures. In this paper, we characterize in detail the spontaneous emission rates of nitrogen-vacancy centres at various locations on a structured substrate. We found a factor of 1.5 average enhancement of the total emission rate when nanodiamonds are on an opal photonic crystal surface, and observed changes in the lifetime distribution. We present a model for explaining these observations and associate the lifetime properties with dipole orientation and polarization effects.

  7. Characterization of Emissions and Residues from Simulations of the Deepwater Horizon Surface Oil Burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    The surface oil burns conducted by the U.S. Coast Guard from April to July 2010 during the Deepwater Horizon disaster in the Gulf of Mexico were simulated by small scale burns to characterize the pollutants, determine emission factors, and gather particulate matter for subsequent...

  8. Electron emission induced by resonant coherent interaction in ion-surface scattering at grazing incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia de Abajo, F.J.; Ponce, V.H.; Echenique, P.M.

    1994-01-01

    The resonant coherent interaction of an ion with an oriented crystal surface, under grazing-incidence conditions with respect to a special direction of the crystal, gives rise to electron loss to the continuum from electronic bound states of the ion. The calculations presented below predict large probabilities for electron emission due to this mechanism. The electrons are emitted with well defined energies, expressed in terms of the condition of resonance. Furthermore, the emission takes place around certain preferential directions, which are determined by both the latter condition and the symmetry of the surface lattice. Our calculations for MeV He + ions scattered at a W(001) surface along the left-angle 100 right-angle direction with glancing angle of 0--2 mrad indicate a yield of emission close to 1. Using heavier projectiles, one obtains smaller yields, but still large enough to be measurable in some cases (e.g., ∼0.9 for 53 MeV B 4+ and an angle of incidence of 1 mrad). Besides, the initial bound state is energy shifted due to the interaction with both the crystal potential and the velocity-dependent image potential. This results in a slight shift of the peaks of emission, which suggests a possible spectroscopy for analyzing the dynamical interaction of electronic bound states with solid surfaces

  9. Gases Emission From Surface Layers of Sand Moulds and Cores Stored Under the Humid Air Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaźnica N.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A large number of defects of castings made in sand moulds is caused by gases. There are several sources of gases: gases emitted from moulds, cores or protective coatings during pouring and casting solidification; water in moulding sands; moisture adsorbed from surroundings due to atmospheric conditions changes. In investigations of gas volumetric emissions of moulding sands amounts of gases emitted from moulding sand were determined - up to now - in dependence of the applied binders, sand grains, protective coatings or alloys used for moulds pouring. The results of investigating gas volumetric emissions of thin-walled sand cores poured with liquid metal are presented in the hereby paper. They correspond to the surface layer in the mould work part, which is decisive for the surface quality of the obtained castings. In addition, cores were stored under conditions of a high air humidity, where due to large differences in humidity, the moisture - from surroundings - was adsorbed into the surface layer of the sand mould. Due to that, it was possible to asses the influence of the adsorbed moisture on the gas volumetric emission from moulds and cores surface layers by means of the new method of investigating the gas emission kinetics from thin moulding sand layers heated by liquid metal. The results of investigations of kinetics of the gas emission from moulding sands with furan and alkyd resins as well as with hydrated sodium silicate (water glass are presented. Kinetics of gases emissions from these kinds of moulding sands poured with Al-Si alloy were compared.

  10. MODIS/Aqua Land Surface Temperature/3-Band Emissivity Daily L3 Global 1km SIN Grid Day V006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MODIS/Aqua Land Surface Temperature/3-Band Emissivity Daily L3 Global 1km SIN Grid Day (MYD21A1D.006). A new suite of MODIS Land Surface Temperature (LST) and...

  11. MODIS/Terra Land Surface Temperature/3-Band Emissivity Daily L3 Global 1km SIN Grid Night V006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MODIS/Terra Land Surface Temperature/3-Band Emissivity Daily L3 Global 1km SIN Grid Night (MOD21A1N.006). A new suite of MODIS Land Surface Temperature (LST) and...

  12. MODIS/Aqua Land Surface Temperature/3-Band Emissivity Daily L3 Global 1km SIN Grid Night V006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MODIS/Aqua Land Surface Temperature/3-Band Emissivity Daily L3 Global 1km SIN Grid Night (MYD21A1N.006). A new suite of MODIS Land Surface Temperature (LST) and...

  13. MODIS/Terra Land Surface Temperature/3-Band Emissivity Daily L3 Global 1km SIN Grid Day V006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MODIS/Terra Land Surface Temperature/3-Band Emissivity Daily L3 Global 1km SIN Grid Day (MOD21A1D.006). A new suite of MODIS Land Surface Temperature (LST) and...

  14. Effect of the local morphology in the field emission properties of conducting polymer surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Assis, T A; Borondo, F; Benito, R M; Losada, J C; Andrade, R F S; Miranda, J G V; De Souza, Nara C; De Castilho, C M C; De B Mota, F

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we present systematic theoretical evidence of a relationship between the point local roughness exponent (PLRE) (which quantifies the heterogeneity of an irregular surface) and the cold field emission properties (indicated by the local current density and the macroscopic current density) of real polyaniline (PANI) surfaces, considered nowadays as very good candidates in the design of field emission devices. The latter are obtained from atomic force microscopy data. The electric field and potential are calculated in a region bounded by the rough PANI surface and a distant plane, both boundaries held at distinct potential values. We numerically solve Laplace’s equation subject to appropriate Dirichlet’s condition. Our results show that local roughness reveals the presence of specific sharp emitting spots with a smooth geometry, which are the main ones responsible (but not the only) for the emission efficiency of such surfaces for larger deposition times. Moreover, we have found, with a proper choice of a scale interval encompassing the experimentally measurable average grain length, a highly structured dependence of local current density on PLRE, considering different ticks of PANI surfaces. (paper)

  15. X-ray emission in slow highly charged ion-surface collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, H; Abe, T; Fujita, Y; Sun, J; Takahashi, S; Tona, M; Yoshiyasu, N; Nakamura, N; Sakurai, M; Yamada, C; Ohtani, S

    2007-01-01

    X-rays emitted in the collisions of highly charged ions with a surface have been measured to investigate dissipation schemes of their potential energies. While 8.1% of the potential energy was dissipated in the collisions of He-like I ions with a W surface, 29.1% has been dissipated in the case of He-like Bi ions. The x-ray emissions play significant roles in the dissipation of the potential energies in the interaction of highly charged heavy ions with the surface

  16. Frequency splitter based on the directional emission from surface modes in dielectric photonic crystal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasolamprou, Anna C; Zhang, Lei; Kafesaki, Maria; Koschny, Thomas; Soukoulis, Costas M

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate the numerical design and the experimental validation of frequency dependent directional emission from a dielectric photonic crystal structure. The wave propagates through a photonic crystal line-defect waveguide, while a surface layer at the termination of the photonic crystal enables the excitation of surface modes and a subsequent grating layer transforms the surface energy into outgoing propagating waves of the form of a directional beam. The angle of the beam is controlled by the frequency and the structure operates as a frequency splitter in the intermediate and far field region.

  17. Hydrothermal alteration of sediments associated with surface emissions from the Cerro Prieto geothermal field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valette-Silver, J.N.; Esquer P., I.; Elders, W.A.; Collier, P.C.; Hoagland, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    A study of the mineralogical changes associated with these hydrothermal vents was initiated with the aim of developing possible exploration tools for geothermal resources. The Cerro Prieto reservoir has already been explored by extensive deep drilling so that relationships between surface manifestations and deeper hydrothermal processes could be established directly. Approximately 120 samples of surface sediments were collected both inside and outside of the vents. The mineralogy of the altered sediments studied appears to be controlled by the type of emission. A comparison between the changes in mineralogy due to low temperature hydrothermal activity in the reservoir, seen in samples from boreholes, and mineralogical changes in the surface emission samples shows similar general trends below 180 C: increase of quartz, feldspar and illite, with subsequent disappearance of kaolinite, montmorillonite, calcite and dolomite. These mineral assemblages seem to be characteristic products of the discharge from high intensity geothermal fields.

  18. Multicharged ion-induced emission from metal- and insulator surfaces related to magnetic fusion research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winter, H.P. [Technische Univ., Vienna (Austria). Inst. fuer Allgemeine Physik

    1997-01-01

    The edge region of magnetically confined plasmas in thermonuclear fusion experiments couples the hot plasma core with the cold first wall. We consider the dependence of plasma-wall interaction processes on edge plasma properties, with particular emphasis on the role of slow multicharged ions (MCI). After a short survey on the physics of slow MCI-surface interaction we discuss recent extensive studies on MCI-induced electron emission from clean metal surfaces conducted at impact velocities << 1 a.u., from which generally reliable total electron yields can be obtained. We then demonstrate the essentially different role of the MCI charge for electron emission from metallic and insulator surfaces, respectively. Furthermore, we present recent results on slow MCI-induced `potential sputtering` of insulators which, in contrast to the well established kinetic sputtering, already occurs at very low ion impact energy and strongly increases with the MCI charge state. (J.P.N.). 55 refs.

  19. Fluxon induced surface resistance and field emission in niobium films at 1.5 GHz

    CERN Document Server

    Benvenuti, Cristoforo; Darriulat, Pierre; Peck, M A; Valente, A M; Van't Hof, C A

    2001-01-01

    The surface resistance of superconducting niobium films induced by the presence of trapped magnetic flux, presumably in the form of a pinned fluxon lattice, is shown to be modified by the presence of a field emitting impurity or defect. The modification takes the form of an additional surface resistance proportional to the density of the fluxon lattice and increasing linearly with the amplitude of the microwave above a threshold significantly lower than the field emission threshold. Such an effect, a precursor of electron emission, is observed for the first time in a study using radiofrequency cavities operating at their fundamental 1.5 GHz frequency. The measured properties of the additional surface resistance severely constrain possible explanations of the observed effect. (23 refs).

  20. Modelling CO2 emissions from water surface of a boreal hydroelectric reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weifeng; Roulet, Nigel T; Kim, Youngil; Strachan, Ian B; Del Giorgio, Paul; Prairie, Yves T; Tremblay, Alain

    2018-01-15

    To quantify CO 2 emissions from water surface of a reservoir that was shaped by flooding the boreal landscape, we developed a daily time-step reservoir biogeochemistry model. We calibrated the model using the measured concentrations of dissolved organic and inorganic carbon (C) in a young boreal hydroelectric reservoir, Eastmain-1 (EM-1), in northern Quebec, Canada. We validated the model against observed CO 2 fluxes from an eddy covariance tower in the middle of EM-1. The model predicted the variability of CO 2 emissions reasonably well compared to the observations (root mean square error: 0.4-1.3gCm -2 day -1 , revised Willmott index: 0.16-0.55). In particular, we demonstrated that the annual reservoir surface effluxes were initially high, steeply declined in the first three years, and then steadily decreased to ~115gCm -2 yr -1 with increasing reservoir age over the estimated "engineering" reservoir lifetime (i.e., 100years). Sensitivity analyses revealed that increasing air temperature stimulated CO 2 emissions by enhancing CO 2 production in the water column and sediment, and extending the duration of open water period over which emissions occur. Increasing the amount of terrestrial organic C flooded can enhance benthic CO 2 fluxes and CO 2 emissions from the reservoir water surface, but the effects were not significant over the simulation period. The model is useful for the understanding of the mechanism of C dynamics in reservoirs and could be used to assist the hydro-power industry and others interested in the role of boreal hydroelectric reservoirs as sources of greenhouse gas emissions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Surface-plasmon-enhanced lasing emission based on polymer distributed feedback laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Dingke, E-mail: dingke.zhang@gmail.com, E-mail: shijianchen@gmail.com [School of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Chongqing Normal University, Chongqing 401331 (China); Chen, Shijian, E-mail: dingke.zhang@gmail.com, E-mail: shijianchen@gmail.com; Huang, Yingzhou; Zhang, Zhen [School of Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 401331 (China); Wang, Yanping; Ma, Dongge [State Key Laboratory of Polymer Physics and Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China)

    2015-01-14

    Optical losses associated with the metallic contacts necessary for charge injection are an obstacle to the development of electrically pumped organic lasers. In this work, we show that it is possible to overcome these losses by introducing surface plasmons (SPs) in a distributed feedback laser to enhance the lasing emission. We perform a detailed study of the SPs influence on the lasing emission. We experimentally show that enhanced lasing emission has been successfully achieved in the presence of a metal electrode. The laser emission is strongly dependent on the thickness of Ag layer. By optimizing the thickness of Ag layer, surface-plasmon-enhanced lasing emission has been achieved with much reduced thresholds and higher intensity. When the thickness of the Ag layer increases to 50 nm, the device exhibits ten-fold emission intensity and a fifth of excitation threshold comparing with Ag-free one. The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) results show that large field intensity is built at the 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-i-propyl-6-(1,1,7,7-tetramethyljulolidyl-9-enyl) -4H-pyran:/poly(9-vinylcarbazole)Ag interface, which could lead to a strong coupling between lasing and SPs, and consequently a much enhanced laser emission at the photon energy of around 2.02 eV (615 nm). Our FDTD simulations gave an explanation of the effects of the SPs on lasing operation in the periodic structures. The use of SPs would lead to a new class of highly efficient solid-state laser sources and provide a new path to achieve electrically pumped organic lasers.

  2. Enhanced biogenic emissions of nitric oxide and nitrous oxide following surface biomass burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Iris C.; Levine, Joel S.; Poth, Mark A.; Riggan, Philip J.

    1988-01-01

    Recent measurements indicate significantly enhanced biogenic soil emissions of both nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O) following surface burning. These enhanced fluxes persisted for at least six months following the burn. Simultaneous measurements indicate enhanced levels of exchangeable ammonium in the soil following the burn. Biomass burning is known to be an instantaneous source of NO and N2O resulting from high-temperature combustion. Now it is found that biomass burning also results in significantly enhanced biogenic emissions of these gases, which persist for months following the burn.

  3. Chefs' opinions of restaurant portion sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condrasky, Marge; Ledikwe, Jenny H; Flood, Julie E; Rolls, Barbara J

    2007-08-01

    The objectives were to determine who establishes restaurant portion sizes and factors that influence these decisions, and to examine chefs' opinions regarding portion size, nutrition information, and weight management. A survey was distributed to chefs to obtain information about who is responsible for determining restaurant portion sizes, factors influencing restaurant portion sizes, what food portion sizes are being served in restaurants, and chefs' opinions regarding nutrition information, health, and body weight. The final sample consisted of 300 chefs attending various culinary meetings. Executive chefs were identified as being primarily responsible for establishing portion sizes served in restaurants. Factors reported to have a strong influence on restaurant portion sizes included presentation of foods, food cost, and customer expectations. While 76% of chefs thought that they served "regular" portions, the actual portions of steak and pasta they reported serving were 2 to 4 times larger than serving sizes recommended by the U.S government. Chefs indicated that they believe that the amount of food served influences how much patrons consume and that large portions are a problem for weight control, but their opinions were mixed regarding whether it is the customer's responsibility to eat an appropriate amount when served a large portion of food. Portion size is a key determinant of energy intake, and the results from this study suggest that cultural norms and economic value strongly influence the determination of restaurant portion sizes. Strategies are needed to encourage chefs to provide and promote portions that are appropriate for customers' energy requirements.

  4. MODIS/Aqua Land Surface Temperature/3-Band Emissivity 8-Day L3 Global 1km SIN Grid V006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MODIS/Aqua Land Surface Temperature/3-Band Emissivity 8-Day L3 Global 1km SIN Grid (MYD21A2.006). A new suite of MODIS Land Surface Temperature (LST) and Emissivity...

  5. MODIS/Terra Land Surface Temperature/3-Band Emissivity 8-Day L3 Global 1km SIN Grid V006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MODIS/Terra Land Surface Temperature/3-Band Emissivity 8-Day L3 Global 1km SIN Grid (MOD21A2.006). A new suite of MODIS Land Surface Temperature (LST) and Emissivity...

  6. Greenhouse gas emissions from beef cattle pen surfaces in North Dakota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Shafiqur; Borhan, Md Saidul; Swanson, Kendall

    2013-01-01

    There is a global interest to quantify and mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) (e.g. methane-CH4, nitrous oxide-N2O and carbon dioxide-CO2) emissions in animal feeding operations. The goal of this study was to quantify GHG emissions from the feedlot pen surface under North Dakota climatic conditions. In this study gaseous flux from the pen surfaces was generated using a custom-made wind tunnel at different times of the year (summer, fall, winter and spring). Gaseous fluxes (air samples) were drawn in the Tedlar bags using a vacuum chamber and gas concentrations were measured using a gas chromatograph within 24 h of sampling. The CH4 concentrations and flux rates (FRs) or flux among the months were not significantly different. Overall CH4, CO2 and N2O concentrations over a 7-month period were 2.66, 452 and 0.67 ppm, respectively. Estimated overall CH4, CO and N2O FRs were 1.32, 602 and 0.90 g m(-2) d(-1), respectively. Estimated emission rates using the wind tunnel were 38 g hd(-1) d(-1), 17 kg hd(-1) d(-1) and 26 g hd(-1) d(-1) for CH4, CO2 and N2O, respectively. The emission factors for GHG estimated in the research for North Dakota climate were the first of its kind, and these emission estimates can be used as a basis for planning and implementing management practices to minimize GHG emissions.

  7. IRAS surface brightness maps of visible reflection nebulae: evidence for non-equilibrium infrared emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castelaz, M.W.; Werner, M.W.; Sellgren, K.

    1986-01-01

    Surface brightness maps at 12, 25, 60, and 100 microns of 16 visible reflection nebulae were extracted from the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) database. The maps were produced by coadding IRAS survey scans over areas centered on the illuminating stars, and have spatial resolutions of 0.9' x 4' at 12 and 25 microns, 1.8' x 4.5' at 60 microns, and 3.6' x 5' at 100 microns. Extended emission in the four IRAS bandpasses was detected in fourteen of the reflection nebulae. The IRAS data were used to measure the flux of the infrared emission associated with each source. The energy distributions show that the 12 micron flux is greater than the 25 micron flux in 11 of the nebulae, and the peak flux occurs in the 60 or 100 micron bandpass in all 16 nebular. The 60 and 100 micron flux can be approximated by blackbodies with temperatures between 30 and 50 K, consistent with temperatures expected from extrapolation of greybody fits to the 60 and 100 micron data. The excess 12 and 25 micron emission is attributed to a nonequilibrium process such as emission from thermal fluctuations of very small grains excited by single ultraviolet photons, or emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) excited by ultraviolet radiation. The common features of the energy distributions of the 16 reflection nebulae, also seen in the reflection nebulae associated with the Pleiades, suggest that PAHs or very small grains may be found in most reflection nebulae

  8. Silver-graphene oxide based plasmonic spacer for surface plasmon-coupled fluorescence emission enhancements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badiya, Pradeep Kumar; Srinivasan, Venkatesh; Sathish Ramamurthy, Sai

    2017-06-01

    We report the application of single layered graphene oxide (SLGO) and silver decorated SLGO (Ag-SLGO) as plasmonic spacer material for obtaining enhanced fluorescence from a Rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) radiating dipole in a surface plasmon-coupled emission platform. To this end, we have decorated SLGO with biphasic silver nanoparticles using an in situ deposition technique to achieve 112-fold fluorescence enhancements.

  9. Transition absorption as a mechanism of surface photoelectron emission from metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhukovsky, Sergei; Protsenko, Igor E.; Ikhsanov, Renat Sh

    2015-01-01

    Transition absorption of a photon by an electron passingthrough a boundary between two media with different permit-tivities is described both classically and quantum mechani-cally. Transition absorption is shown to make a substantialcontribution to photoelectron emission at a metal....../semicon-ductor interface in nanoplasmonic systems, and is put forth asa possible microscopic mechanism of the surface photoelec-tric effect in photodetectors and solar cells containing plas-monic nanoparticles....

  10. Prevention of the Portion Size Effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Versluis (Iris)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractAn increase in the portion size leads to an increase in energy intake, a phenomenon which is also referred to as the portion size effect. The increase in portion sizes in recent years is regarded as an important contributor to the increase in the prevalence of obesity. Hence, the aim

  11. 6 Tips for Managing Portion Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eating healthy is about enjoying your food while also managing portion size. Most people eat and drink more than their bodies need especially when they are served larger portions. So, choosing smaller portions to begin with is important for maintaining your overall health and well-being.

  12. Analytical Retrieval of Global Land Surface Emissivity Maps at AMSR-E passive microwave frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norouzi, H.; Temimi, M.; Khanbilvardi, R.

    2009-12-01

    Land emissivity is a crucial boundary condition in Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) modeling. Land emissivity is also a key indicator of land surface and subsurface properties. The objective of this study, supported by NOAA-NESDIS, is to develop global land emissivity maps using AMSR-E passive microwave measurements along with several ancillary data. The International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) database has been used to obtain several inputs for the proposed approach such as land surface temperature, cloud mask and atmosphere profile. The Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM) has been used to estimate upwelling and downwelling atmospheric contributions. Although it is well known that correction of the atmospheric effect on brightness temperature is required at higher frequencies (over 19 GHz), our preliminary results have shown that a correction at 10.7 GHz is also necessary over specific areas. The proposed approach is based on three main steps. First, all necessary data have been collected and processed. Second, a global cloud free composite of AMSR-E data and corresponding ancillary images is created. Finally, monthly composting of emissivity maps has been performed. AMSR-E frequencies at 6.9, 10.7, 18.7, 36.5 and 89.0 GHz have been used to retrieve the emissivity. Water vapor information obtained from ISCCP (TOVS data) was used to calculate upwelling, downwelling temperatures and atmospheric transmission in order to assess the consistency of those derived from the CRTM model. The frequent land surface temperature (LST) determination (8 times a day) in the ISCCP database has allowed us to assess the diurnal cycle effect on emissivity retrieval. Differences in magnitude and phase between thermal temperature and low frequencies microwave brightness temperature have been noticed. These differences seem to vary in space and time. They also depend on soil texture and thermal inertia. The proposed methodology accounts for these factors and

  13. Kinetic electron emission from highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surfaces induced by singly charged ions

    CERN Document Server

    Cernusca, S; Winter, H; Aumayr, F; Loerincik, J; Sroubek, Z

    2002-01-01

    We present total electron yields determined by current measurements for normal impact of H sup + , H sub 2 sup + , H sub 3 sup + , C sup + , N sup + and O sup + ions (E<=10 keV) on a clean highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surface. The kinetic energy of the projectiles has been varied from near threshold up to 10 keV. By comparing the results to similar data obtained for a polycrystalline Au surface the role of different target properties for kinetic electron emission can be analysed.

  14. Surface effects during exoelectron-emission of BeO ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegel, V.; Kirchner, H.H.

    1979-01-01

    Studying the behaviour of the two thermally stimulated exoelectron emission (TSEE) maxima of BeO ceramics at about 270 0 C und 325 0 C it can be shown that the TSEE maximum at 270 0 C is closely connected with adsorption and desorption processes occuring on the surface of the samples. In particular, this TSEE maximum is strongly influenced as well by donor-like behaviour of adsorbed hydrogen and lithium as by acceptor-like behaviour of alcohols and nitrides of the lithium. The detailed surface processes leading to the apperance or disapperance of the TSEE maximum at 270 0 C are discussed. (orig.) [de

  15. Surface trapping phenomena in thermionic emission generating l/f noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanescu, A.

    1975-01-01

    A general expression of the power spectrum of''flicker noise'', involving stochastic trapping phenomena and calculated on the basis of a two parameter model, is applied in the case of thermoionic emission from cathode surface. The fluctuation of the work function over the cathode surface is interpreted as being due to a trapping process of foreign atoms by the cathode. Taking into account the very physical nature of the trapping mechanism, under self-consistent assumptions, a 1/f power spectrum is obtained in a certain range of frequency. The two parameter model removes some discrepancies involved in the preceding theories. (author)

  16. Photoelectron emission from LiF surfaces by ultrashort electromagnetic pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acuna, M. A.; Gravielle, M. S.

    2011-01-01

    Energy- and angle-resolved electron emission spectra produced by incidence of ultrashort electromagnetic pulses on a LiF(001) surface are studied by employing a distorted-wave method named the crystal surface-Volkov (CSV) approximation. The theory makes use of the Volkov phase to describe the action of the external electric field on the emitted electron, while the electron-surface interaction is represented within the tight-binding model. The CSV approach is applied to investigate the effects introduced by the crystal lattice when the electric field is oriented parallel to the surface plane. These effects are essentially governed by the vector potential of the external field, while the influence of the crystal orientation was found to be negligible.

  17. Improving the indoor air quality by using a surface emissions trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowicz, Pawel; Larsson, Lennart

    2015-04-01

    The surface emissions trap, an adsorption cloth developed for reducing emissions of volatile organic compounds and particulate matter from surfaces while allowing evaporation of moisture, was used to improve the indoor air quality of a school building with elevated air concentrations of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol. An improvement of the perceived air quality was noticed a few days after the device had been attached on the PVC flooring. In parallel, decreased air concentrations of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol were found as well as a linear increase of the amounts of the same compound adsorbed on the installed cloth as observed up to 13 months after installation. Laboratory studies revealed that the performance of the device is not affected by differences in RH (35-85%), temperature (30-40 °C) or by accelerated aging simulating up to 10 years product lifetime, and, from a blinded exposure test, that the device efficiently blocks chemical odors. This study suggests that the device may represent a fast and efficient means of restoring the indoor air quality in a building e.g. after water damage leading to irritating and potentially harmful emissions from building material surfaces indoors.

  18. Field and laboratory emission cell automation and control system for investigating surface chemistry reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemmer, Michael M.; Ham, Jason E.; Wells, J. R.

    2007-01-01

    A novel system [field and laboratory emission cell (FLEC) automation and control system] has been developed to deliver ozone to a surface utilizing the FLEC to simulate indoor surface chemistry. Ozone, humidity, and air flow rate to the surface were continuously monitored using an ultraviolet ozone monitor, humidity, and flow sensors. Data from these sensors were used as feedback for system control to maintain predetermined experimental parameters. The system was used to investigate the chemistry of ozone with α-terpineol on a vinyl surface over 72h. Keeping all other experimental parameters the same, volatile organic compound emissions from the vinyl tile with α-terpineol were collected from both zero and 100ppb(partsper109) ozone exposures. System stability profiles collected from sensor data indicated experimental parameters were maintained to within a few percent of initial settings. Ozone data from eight experiments at 100ppb (over 339h) provided a pooled standard deviation of 1.65ppb and a 95% tolerance of 3.3ppb. Humidity data from 17 experiments at 50% relative humidity (over 664h) provided a pooled standard deviation of 1.38% and a 95% tolerance of 2.77%. Data of the flow rate of air flowing through the FLEC from 14 experiments at 300ml/min (over 548h) provided a pooled standard deviation of 3.02ml/min and a 95% tolerance range of 6.03ml/min. Initial experimental results yielded long term emissions of ozone/α-terpineol reaction products, suggesting that surface chemistry could play an important role in indoor environments.

  19. VNIR Reflectance and MIR Emissivity Spectra of Ordinary Chondrite Meteorites Under Simulated Asteroid Surface Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemma, M.; Shirley, K.; Glotch, T. D.; Ebel, D. S. S.

    2017-12-01

    Recent missions have revealed much about the nature of many Near-Earth asteroids, including the NEAR-Shoemaker target 433 Eros and Hayabusa target 25142 Itokawa. Both asteroids appear to have mineralogy consistent with ordinary chondrite meteorites. Laboratory spectral analysis of well-constrained meteorite samples can be employed as a reference tool to characterize and constrain data from current and future asteroid studies. A sample set of ordinary chondrite meteorites was chosen from the collection at the American Museum of Natural History. Six meteorites, spanning groups H, L, and LL, were prepared at four different size fractions (25-63 μm, 63-90 μm, 90-125 μm, 125-250 μm) in an attempt to mimic regolith known to exist on asteroids such as 433 Eros and 25142 Itokawa. At the Center for Planetary Exploration at Stony Brook University, spectra of the ordinary chondrite material were measured under simulated asteroid surface conditions ( 10-6 mbar, 150 K chamber temperature, low intensity illumination). The samples were used in two experiments: one measuring visible and near-infrared (VNIR) reflectance spectra at a series of temperatures, and the other measuring mid-infrared (MIR) emissivity spectra. The emissivity measurements require accurate simulation of the thermal environment within asteroid regolith, achieved by inducing a thermal gradient within the sample that results in a surface brightness temperature around 323 K (similar to the surface of 25142 Itokawa). Mid-IR emissivity spectra were collected for each sample at a surface temperature of 323 K, and reflectance spectra were collected in increments of 10 K, over the range 283 K to 373 K. Preliminary VNIR spectra show spreads similar to those seen in Hinrichs and Lucey (2002). Preliminary MIR emissivity spectra suggest that under asteroid surface conditions, the position of the Christiansen feature shifts to shorter wavelengths and emissivity is lower in the Reststrahlen bands when compared to

  20. N2O emission from plant surfaces - light stimulated and a global phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, Teis; Bruhn, Dan; Ambus, Per

    2017-04-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important long-lived greenhouse gas and precursor of stratospheric ozone depleting mono-nitrogen oxides. The atmospheric concentration of N2O is persistently increasing; however, large uncertainties are associated with the distinct source strengths. Here we investigate for the first time N2O emission from terrestrial vegetation in response to natural solar ultra violet radiation. We conducted field site measurements to investigate N2O atmosphere exchange from grass vegetation exposed to solar irradiance with and without UV-screening. Further laboratory tests were conducted with a range of species to study the controls and possible loci of UV-induced N2O emission from plants. Plants released N2O in response to natural sunlight at rates of c. 20-50 nmol m-2 h-1, mostly due to the UV component. The emission rate is temperature dependent with a rather high activation energy indicative for an abiotic process. The prevailing zone for the N2O formation appears to be at the very surface of leaves. However, only c. 26% of the UV-induced N2O appears to originate from plant-N. Further, the process is dependent on atmospheric oxygen concentration. Our work demonstrates that ecosystem emission of the important greenhouse gas, N2O, may be up to c. 30% higher than hitherto assumed. Literature: Mikkelsen TN, Bruhn D & Ambus P. (2016). Solar UV Irradiation-Induced Production of Greenhouse Gases from Plant Surfaces: From Leaf to Earth. Progress in Botany, DOI 10.1007/124_2016_10. Bruhn D, Albert KR, Mikkelsen TN & Ambus P. (2014). UV-induced N2O emission from plants. Atmospheric Environment 99, 206-214.

  1. SECONDARY EMISSION FROM NON-SPHERICAL DUST GRAINS WITH ROUGH SURFACES: APPLICATION TO LUNAR DUST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richterová, I.; Němeček, Z.; Beránek, M.; Šafránková, J.; Pavlů, J.

    2012-01-01

    Electrons impinging on a target can release secondary electrons and/or they can be scattered out of the target. It is well established that the number of escaping electrons per primary electron depends on the target composition and dimensions, the energy, and incidence angle of the primary electrons, but there are suggestions that the target's shape and surface roughness also influence the secondary emission. We present a further modification of the model of secondary electron emission from dust grains which is applied to non-spherical grains and grains with defined surface roughness. It is shown that the non-spherical grains give rise to a larger secondary electron yield, whereas the surface roughness leads to a decrease in the yield. Moreover, these effects can be distinguished: the shape effect is prominent for high primary energies, whereas the surface roughness predominantly affects the yield at the low-energy range. The calculations use the Lunar Highlands Type NU-LHT-2M simulant as a grain material and the results are compared with previously published laboratory and in situ measurements.

  2. An assessment of surface emissivity variation effects on plasma uniformity analysis using IR cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhalgh, Abigail; Showers, Melissa; Biewer, Theodore

    2017-10-01

    The Prototype-Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (Proto-MPEX) is a linear plasma device operating at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Its purpose is to test plasma source and heating concepts for the planned Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX), which has the mission to test the plasma-material interactions under fusion reactor conditions. In this device material targets will be exposed to high heat fluxes (>10 MW/m2). To characterize the heat fluxes to the target a IR thermography system is used taking up to 432 frames per second videos. The data is analyzed to determine the surface temperature on the target in specific regions of interest. The IR analysis has indicated a low level of plasma uniformity; the plasma often deposits more heat to the edge of the plate than the center. An essential parameter for IR temperature calculation is the surface emissivity of the plate (stainless steel). A study has been performed to characterize the variation in the surface emissivity of the plate as its temperature changes and its surface finish is modified by plasma exposure.

  3. Climate change impact of livestock CH4 emission in India: Global temperature change potential (GTP) and surface temperature response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Shilpi; Hiloidhari, Moonmoon; Kumari, Nisha; Naik, S N; Dahiya, R P

    2018-01-01

    Two climate metrics, Global surface Temperature Change Potential (GTP) and the Absolute GTP (AGTP) are used for studying the global surface temperature impact of CH 4 emission from livestock in India. The impact on global surface temperature is estimated for 20 and 100 year time frames due to CH 4 emission. The results show that the CH 4 emission from livestock, worked out to 15.3 Tg in 2012. In terms of climate metrics GTP of livestock-related CH 4 emission in India in 2012 were 1030 Tg CO 2 e (GTP 20 ) and 62 Tg CO 2 e (GTP 100 ) at the 20 and 100 year time horizon, respectively. The study also illustrates that livestock-related CH 4 emissions in India can cause a surface temperature increase of up to 0.7mK and 0.036mK over the 20 and 100 year time periods, respectively. The surface temperature response to a year of Indian livestock emission peaks at 0.9mK in the year 2021 (9 years after the time of emission). The AGTP gives important information in terms of temperature change due to annual CH 4 emissions, which is useful when comparing policies that address multiple gases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Impact of Future Emissions and Climate Change on Surface Ozone over China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, C. T.; Westervelt, D. M.; Fiore, A. M.; Rieder, H. E.; Kinney, P.; Wang, S.; Correa, G. J. P.

    2017-12-01

    China's immense ambient air pollution problem and world-leading greenhouse gas emissions place it at the forefront of global efforts to address these related environmental concerns. Here, we analyze the impact of ECLIPSE (Evaluating the Climate and Air Quality Impacts of Short-Lived Pollutants) future emissions scenarios representative of current legislation (CLE) and maximum technically feasible emissions reductions (MFR) on surface ozone (O3) concentrations over China in the 2030s and 2050s, in the context of a changing climate. We use a suite of simulations performed with the NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory's AM3 global chemistry-climate model. To estimate the impact of climate change in isolation on Chinese air quality, we hold emissions of air pollutants including O3 precursors fixed at 2015 levels but allow climate (global sea surface temperatures and sea ice cover) to change according to decadal averages for the years 2026-2035 and 2046-2055 from a three-member ensemble of GFDL-CM3 simulations under the RCP8.5 high warming scenario. Evaluation of the present-day simulation (2015 CLE) with observations from 1497 chiefly urban air quality monitoring stations shows that simulated surface O3 is positively biased by 26 ppb on average over the domain of China. Previous studies, however, have shown that the modeled ozone response to changes in NOx emissions over the Eastern United States mirrors the magnitude and structure of observed changes in maximum daily average 8-hour (MDA8) O3 distributions. Therefore, we use the model's simulated changes for the 2030s and 2050s to project changes in policy-relevant MDA8 O3 concentrations. We find an overall increase in MDA8 O3 for CLE scenarios in which emissions of NOx precursors are projected to increase, and under MFR scenarios, an overall decrease, with the highest changes occurring in summertime for both 2030 and 2050 MFR. Under climate change alone, the model simulates a mean summertime decrease of 1.3 ppb

  5. Using satellite data to guide emission control strategies for surface ozone pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, X.; Fiore, A. M.

    2017-12-01

    Surface ozone (O3) has adverse effects on public health, agriculture and ecosystems. As a secondary pollutant, ozone is not emitted directly. Ozone forms from two classes of precursors: NOx and VOCs. We use satellite observations of formaldehyde (a marker of VOCs) and NO2 (a marker of NOx) to identify areas which would benefit more from reducing NOx emissions (NOx-limited) versus areas where reducing VOC emissions would lead to lower ozone (VOC-limited). We use a global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) to develop a set of threshold values that separate the NOx-limited and VOC-limited conditions. Combining these threshold values with a decadal record of satellite observations, we find that U.S. cities (e.g. New York, Chicago) have shifted from VOC-limited to NOx-limited ozone production regimes in the warm season. This transition reflects the NOx emission controls implemented over the past decade. Increasing NOx sensitivity implies that regional NOx emission control programs will improve O3 air quality more now than it would have a decade ago.

  6. Enhanced Field Emission Studies on Niobium Surfaces Relevant to High Field Superconducting Radio-Frequency Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong Wang

    2002-01-01

    Enhanced field emission (EFE) presents the main impediment to higher acceleration gradients in superconducting niobium (Nb) radio frequency cavities for particle accelerators. The strength, number and sources of EFE sites strongly depend on surface preparation and handling. The main objective of this thesis project is to systematically investigate the sources of EFE from Nb, to evaluate the best available surface preparation techniques with respect to resulting field emission, and to establish an optimized process to minimize or eliminate EFE. To achieve these goals, a scanning field emission microscope (SFEM) was designed and built as an extension to an existing commercial scanning electron microscope (SEM). In the SFEM chamber of ultra high vacuum, a sample is moved laterally in a raster pattern under a high voltage anode tip for EFE detection and localization. The sample is then transferred under vacuum to the SEM chamber equipped with an energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometer for individual emitting site characterization. Compared to other systems built for similar purposes, this apparatus has low cost and maintenance, high operational flexibility, considerably bigger scan area, as well as reliable performance. EFE sources from planar Nb have been studied after various surface preparation, including chemical etching and electropolishing, combined with ultrasonic or high-pressure water rinse. Emitters have been identified, analyzed and the preparation process has been examined and improved based on EFE results. As a result, field-emission-free or near field-emission-free surfaces at ∼140 MV/m have been consistently achieved with the above techniques. Characterization on the remaining emitters leads to the conclusion that no evidence of intrinsic emitters, i.e., no fundamental electric field limit induced by EFE, has been observed up to ∼140 MV/m. Chemically etched and electropolished Nb are compared and no significant difference is observed up to ∼140 MV

  7. Enhanced Field Emission Studies on Niobium Surfaces Relevant to High Field Superconducting Radio-Frequency Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Tong [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2002-09-18

    Enhanced field emission (EFE) presents the main impediment to higher acceleration gradients in superconducting niobium (Nb) radiofrequency cavities for particle accelerators. The strength, number and sources of EFE sites strongly depend on surface preparation and handling. The main objective of this thesis project is to systematically investigate the sources of EFE from Nb, to evaluate the best available surface preparation techniques with respect to resulting field emission, and to establish an optimized process to minimize or eliminate EFE. To achieve these goals, a scanning field emission microscope (SFEM) was designed and built as an extension to an existing commercial scanning electron microscope (SEM). In the SFEM chamber of ultra high vacuum, a sample is moved laterally in a raster pattern under a high voltage anode tip for EFE detection and localization. The sample is then transferred under vacuum to the SEM chamber equipped with an energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometer for individual emitting site characterization. Compared to other systems built for similar purposes, this apparatus has low cost and maintenance, high operational flexibility, considerably bigger scan area, as well as reliable performance. EFE sources from planar Nb have been studied after various surface preparation, including chemical etching and electropolishing, combined with ultrasonic or high-pressure water rinse. Emitters have been identified, analyzed and the preparation process has been examined and improved based on EFE results. As a result, field-emission-free or near field-emission-free surfaces at ~140 MV/m have been consistently achieved with the above techniques. Characterization on the remaining emitters leads to the conclusion that no evidence of intrinsic emitters, i.e., no fundamental electric field limit induced by EFE, has been observed up to ~140 MV/m. Chemically etched and electropolished Nb are compared and no significant difference is observed up to ~140 MV/m. To

  8. Experimental study of a high-efficiency low-emission surface combustor-heater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong, Tian-yu; Khinkis, M.J.; Fish, F.F.

    1991-01-01

    The surface combustor-heater is a combined combustion/heat-transfer device in which the heat-exchange surfaces are embedded in a stationary bed of refractory material where gaseous fuel is burned. Because of intensive heat radiation from the hot solid particles and enhanced heat convection from the gas flow to the heat-exchange tubes, heat transfer is significantly intensified. Removing heat simultaneously with the combustion process has the benefit of reducing the combustion temperature, which suppresses NO x formation. A basic experimental study was conducted on a 60-kW bench-scale surface combustor-heater with two rows of water-cooled tube coils to evaluate its performance and explore the mechanism of combined convective-radiative heat transfer and its interaction with combustion in the porous matrix. Combustion stability in the porous matrix, heat-transfer rates, emissions, and pressure drop through the unit have been investigated for the variable parameters of operation and unit configurations. Experimental results have demonstrated that high combustion intensity (up to 2.5 MW/m 2 ), high heat-transfer rates (up to 310 kW/m 2 ), high density of energy conversion (up to 8 MW/m 3 ), as well as ultra-low emissions (NO x and CO as low as 15 vppm*) have been achieved. The excellent performance of the test unit and the extensive data obtained from the present experimental study provide the basis for further development of high-efficiency and ultra low-emission water heaters, boilers, and process heaters based on the surface combustor-heater concept. 4 refs., 16 figs

  9. Measurement of surface temperature and emissivity by a multitemperature method for Fourier-transform infrared spectrometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Sønnik; Morgenstjerne, Axel; Rathmann, Ole

    1996-01-01

    Surface temperatures are estimated with high precision based on a multitemperature method for Fourier-transform spectrometers. The method is based on Planck's radiation law and a nonlinear least-squares fitting algorithm applied to two or more spectra at different sample temperatures and a single...... of blackbody sources are estimated with an uncertainty of 0.2-2 K. The method is demonstrated for measuring the spectral emissivity of a brass specimen and an oxidized nickel specimen. (C) 1996 Optical Society of America...... measurement at a known sample temperature, for example, at ambient temperature. The temperature of the sample surface can be measured rather easily at ambient temperature. The spectrum at ambient temperature is used to eliminate background effects from spectra as measured at other surface temperatures...

  10. Relative impacts of worldwide tropospheric ozone changes and regional emission modifications on European surface-ozone levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szopa, S.; Hauglustaine, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Multi-scale models were applied to assess the surface ozone changes in 2030. Several emission scenarios are considered, ranging from (a) a pessimistic anthropogenic emission increase to (b) an optimistic decrease of emissions, and including (c) a realistic scenario that assumes the implementation of control legislations [CLE]. The two extreme scenarios lead respectively to homogeneous global increase and decrease of surface ozone, whereas low and inhomogeneous changes associated with a slight global increase of ozone are found for the CLE scenario. Over western Europe, for the CLE scenario, the benefit of European emission reduction is significantly counterbalanced by increasing global ozone levels. Considering warmer conditions over Europe and future emission modifications, the human health exposure to surface ozone is found to be significantly worsened. (authors)

  11. The Venus Emissivity Mapper - gaining a global perspective on the surface composition of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbert, Joern; Dyar, Melinda; Widemann, Thomas; Marcq, Emmanuel; Maturilli, Alessandro; Mueller, Nils; Kappel, David; Ferrari, Sabrina; D'Amore, Mario; Tsang, Constantine; Arnold, Gabriele; Smrekar, Suzanne; VEM Team

    2017-10-01

    The permanent cloud cover of Venus prohibits observations of the surface with traditional imaging techniques over much of the EM spectral range, leading to the false notion that information about the composition of Venus’ surface could only be derived from lander missions. However, harsh environmental conditions on the surface cause landed missions to be sole site, highly complex, and riskier than orbiting missions.It is now known that 5 transparency windows occur in the Venus atmosphere, ranging from 0.86 µm to 1.18 µm. Recent advances in high temperature laboratory spectroscopy at the PSL at DLR these windows are highly diagnostic for surface mineralogy. Mapping of the southern hemisphere of Venus with VIRTIS on VEX in the 1.02 µm band was a proof-of-concept for an orbital remote sensing approach to surface composition and weathering studies[1-3]. The Venus Emissivity Mapper [4] proposed for the NASA’s Venus Origins Explorer (VOX) and the ESA EnVision proposal builds on these recent advances. It is the first flight instrument specially designed with a sole focus on mapping the surface of Venus using the narrow atmospheric windows around 1 µm. Operating in situ from Venus orbit, VEM will provide a global map of surface composition as well as redox state of the surface, providing a comprehensive picture of surface-atmosphere interaction and support for landing site selection. Continuous observation of the thermal emission of the Venus will provide tight constraints on the current day volcanic activity[5]. This is complemented by measurements of atmospheric water vapor abundance as well as cloud microphysics and dynamics. These data will allow for accurate correction of atmospheric interference on the surface measurements, which provide highly valuable science on their own. A mission combining VEM with a high-resolution radar mapper such as VOX or EnVision in a low circular orbit will provide key insights into the divergent evolution of Venus.1. Smrekar, S

  12. Fourier emission infrared microspectrophotometer for surface analysis. I - Application to lubrication problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, J. L.; King, V. W.

    1979-01-01

    A far-infrared interferometer was converted into an emission microspectrophotometer for surface analysis. To cover the mid-infrared as well as the far-infrared the Mylar beamsplitter was made replaceable by a germanium-coated salt plate, and the Moire fringe counting system used to locate the moveable Michelson mirror was improved to read 0.5 micron of mirror displacement. Digital electronics and a dedicated minicomputer were installed for data collection and processing. The most critical element for the recording of weak emission spectra from small areas was, however, a reflecting microscope objective and phase-locked signal detection with simultaneous referencing to a blackbody source. An application of the technique to lubrication problems is shown.

  13. Electrom emission from slow highly charged ions interacting with a metal surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aumayr, F.; Kurz, H.; Toeglhofer, K.; Winter, H.

    1992-01-01

    Recent progress in investigating electron emission from slow highly charged ions approaching a metal surface is discussed. In particular, new informations on generation and decay of transient multiply excited ''hollow atoms'' developing during these processes have been gained from measurement of the statistics of emitted electrons (ES). ES and precise total electron yields derived from the former have been measured for normal incidence of slow (impact velocity 1/15.10 4 ms -1 ) multicharged ions N q+ (q≤6), Ne q+ (q≤10), Ar q+ (q≤16), Kr q+ (q≤10), Xe q+ (q≤10) and I q+ (q≤25) on clean polycrystalline gold. A classical over-barrier approach as recently introduced by Burgdoerfer et al. 1991 has been extended and successfully applied to model the measured impact-velocity dependences of total electron yields. In this way contributions from different electron emission mechanisms could be identified. (orig.)

  14. Investigation of Influence of Surface Nanoparticle on Emission Properties of Scandia-Doped Dispenser Cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xizhu; Wang, Jinshu; Wang, Yiman; Liu, Wei; Zhou, Meiling; Gao, Zhiyuan

    2013-06-01

    The microstructure of a fully activated scandia doped dispenser (SDD) cathode has been studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The observation results display that nanoparticles appear at the growth steps and the surface of tungsten grains of the fully activated SDD cathode. To study the influence of the nanoparticles on the emission, the local electric field strengths around the nanoparticles have been calculated by Maxwell 2D code and Comsol. The calculation results show that the local electric field strengths are enhanced by 1.1 to 3.8 times to average value based on different model conditions. The highest field strength is about 1.54 × 105 V/cm at an average field strength of 40 KV/cm, which is related to a space-charge limited (SCL) current density of 100 A/cm2 in the experimental configuration. This implies the field strength is not high enough to cause field emission.

  15. Atmospheric emissions of methyl isothiocyanate and chloropicrin following soil fumigation and surface containment treatment in bare-root forest nurseries

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. Wang; J. Juzwik; S.W. Fraedrich; K. Spokas; Y. Zhang; W.C. Koskinen

    2005-01-01

    Methylisothiocyanate (MITC) and chloropicrin (CP) are alternatives to methyl bromide for soil fumigation. However, surface transport of MITC emission has been cited as the cause for seedling damage in adjacent fields at several bare-root forest-tree nurseries. Field experiments were conducted at nurseries to measure air emissions of MITC and CP after fumigation....

  16. MODIS/Aqua Land Surface Temperature/Emissivity 8-Day L3 Global 0.05Deg CMG V041

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MYD11C2.041 dataset was decommissioned as of March 1, 2018. Users are encouraged to use Version 6 of MODIS/Aqua Land Surface Temperature and Emissivity Daily L3...

  17. Surface emission of InxGa1-xN epilayers under strong optical excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, H.X.; Lin, J.Y.; Khan, M.A.; Chen, Q.; Yang, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    Effects of strong optical excitation on the properties of surface emission from an InGaN/GaN heterostructure grown by metal-organic chemical-vapor deposition have been investigated. An intriguing feature observed was that as the excitation intensity increased the surface emission spectrum evolved abruptly from a single dominating band to two dominating bands at a critical intensity. This phenomenon has a sharp phase transition or a switching character and can be accounted for by (i) the formation of an electron endash hole plasma state in the InGaN vertical cavity under strong optical excitation, (ii) the photoreflectance effect (variation of index of refraction with excitation intensity), and (c) the Fabry endash Pacute erot interference effect in the InGaN vertical cavity. These findings are expected to have impact on the design of the laser structures, in particular on the design of the vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser diodes based on III-nitride wide-band-gap semiconductors. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  18. Local emission spectroscopy of surface micrograins in A{sup III}B{sup V} semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhukov, N. D., E-mail: ndzhukov@rambler.ru; Gluhovskoy, E. G.; Mosiyash, D. S. [Saratov State University (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-15

    The density-of-states spectra and the parameters of levels of electron states in locally chosen surface micrograins of indium antimonide and arsenide and gallium arsenide are studied with a tunneling electron microscope in the field-emission mode of measurements. By correlating the current–voltage characteristics with the formula for the probability of emission via levels, the activation energies of the levels (ψ) and the lifetimes of electrons at the levels (τ) are determined. Two types of levels for electron localization are identified. These are levels in the micrograin bulk (ψ ≈ 0.75, 1.15, and 1.59 eV for n-InSb, n-InAs, and n-GaAs, respectively; τ ~ 10{sup –8}–10{sup –7} s) and in the surface region of an i-InSb micrograin (ψ ~ 0.73, 1.33, 1.85, 2.15, 5.1 eV; τ ≈ 5 × 10{sup –8}–3 × 10{sup –7} s). A physical model involving the Coulomb-interaction-induced localization of light electrons and their size quantization determined by the electron effective mass, energy, and concentration and by the surface curvature of the micrograin is proposed.

  19. Emissivity Measurements of Foam-Covered Water Surface at L-Band for Low Water Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    En-Bo Wei

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available For a foam-covered sea surface, it is difficult to retrieve sea surface salinity (SSS with L-band brightness temperature (1.4 GHz because of the effect of a foam layer with wind speeds stronger than 7 m/s, especially at low sea surface temperature (SST. With foam-controlled experiments, emissivities of a foam-covered water surface at low SST (−1.4 °C to 1.7 °C are measured for varying SSS, foam thickness, incidence angle, and polarization. Furthermore, a theoretical model of emissivity is introduced by combining wave approach theory with the effective medium approximation method. Good agreement is obtained upon comparing theoretical emissivities with those of experiments. The results indicate that foam parameters have a strong influence on increasing emissivity of a foam-covered water surface. Increments of experimental emissivities caused by foam thickness of 1 cm increase from about 0.014 to 0.131 for horizontal polarization and 0.022 to 0.150 for vertical polarization with SSS increase and SST decrease. Contributions of the interface between the foam layer and water surface to the foam layer emissivity increments are discussed for frequencies between 1 and 37 GHz.

  20. Apparatus and method for transient thermal infrared emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, John F.; Jones, Roger W.

    1991-12-24

    A method and apparatus for enabling analysis of a solid material (16, 42) by applying energy from an energy source (20, 70) top a surface region of the solid material sufficient to cause transient heating in a thin surface layer portion of the solid material (16, 42) so as to enable transient thermal emission of infrared radiation from the thin surface layer portion, and by detecting with a spectrometer/detector (28, 58) substantially only the transient thermal emission of infrared radiation from the thin surface layer portion of the solid material. The detected transient thermal emission of infrared radiation is sufficiently free of self-absorption by the solid material of emitted infrared radiation, so as to be indicative of characteristics relating to molecular composition of the solid material.

  1. Microscopic work function anisotropy and surface chemistry of 316L stainless steel using photoelectron emission microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, N., E-mail: nick.barrett@cea.fr [CEA, IRAMIS, SPEC, LENSIS, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Renault, O. [CEA, LETI, Minatec Campus, F-38054 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); Lemaître, H. [Université de Cergy-Pontoise, Rue d’Eragny, Neuville sur Oise, 95 031 Cergy-Pontoise (France); Surface Dynamics Laboratory, Institut for Fysik og Astronomi Aarhus Universitet, Ny Munkegade 120, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Bonnaillie, P. [CEA, DEN, DANS, DMN, SRMP, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Barcelo, F. [CEA, DEN, DANS, DMN, SRMA, LA2M, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Miserque, F. [CEA, DEN, DANS, DPC, SCCME, LECA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Wang, M.; Corbel, C. [Laboratoire des Solides Irradis, Ecole Polytechnique, route de Saclay, F-91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • PEEM and EBSD study of spatial variations in local work function of 316L steel. • Correlation between work function and crystal grain orientation at the surface of 316L steel. • Spatially resolved chemistry of residual oxide layer. - Abstract: We have studied the variation in the work function of the surface of sputtered cleaned 316L stainless steel with only a very thin residual oxide surface layer as a function of grain orientation using X-ray photoelectron emission microscopy (XPEEM) and Electron Backscattering Diffraction. The grains are mainly oriented [1 1 1] and [1 0 1]. Four distinct work function values spanning a 150 meV energy window are measured. Grains oriented [1 1 1] have a higher work function than those oriented [1 0 1]. From core level XPEEM we deduce that all grain surfaces are Cr enriched and Ni depleted whereas the Cr/Fe ratio is similar for all grains. The [1 1 1] oriented grains show evidence for a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface oxide and a higher concentration of defective oxygen sites.

  2. Some studies of lead and iron adsorption on the W(100) surface by field emission microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, J.P.; Roberts, E.W.

    1978-01-01

    The behaviour of lead and iron adsorbed on the W(100) surface has been studied by probe hole field emission microscopy, field desorption, and by measurement of the total energy distribution (TED) of field-emitted electrons. Lead adsorbed at 300 K which reduces the work function of W(100) can be completely removed at 78 K by field desorption below 3.2 V A -1 and the resulting surface has both the work function and TED, which are characteristic of the clean plane. Condensation at 800 K followed by field desorption, results in a plane surface of work function 4.17 eV and an altered TED. This effect is attributed to the microfacetting, which is observed by LEED. The Swanson peak in the W(100) TED which is removed by submonolayer amounts of lead re-emerges at monolayer coverage when lead adopts the (1 X 1) structure. Such behaviour is consistent with the model proposed by Kar and Soven. A spectral peak observed when lead is adsorbed on the reconstructed W(100) surface is thought to derive for the atomic 1 D state. Adsorption of iron on a W(100) surface reduces phi considerably due to dipole formation and efficiently quenches the Swanson peak. (Auth.)

  3. An assessment of the land surface emissivity in the 8 - 12 micrometer window determined from ASTER and MODIS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmugge, T.; Hulley, G.; Hook, S.

    2009-04-01

    The land surface emissivity is often overlooked when considering surface properties that effect the energy balance. However, knowledge of the emissivity in the window region is important for determining the longwave radiation balance and its subsequent effect on surface temperature. The net longwave radiation (NLR) is strongly affected by the difference between the temperature of the emitting surface and the sky brightness temperature, this difference will be the greatest in the window region. Outside the window region any changes in the emitted radiation by emissivity variability are mostly compensated for by changes in the reflected sky brightness. The emissivity variability is typically greatest in arid regions where the exposed soil and rock surfaces display the widest range of emissivity. For example, the dune regions of North Africa have emissivities of 0.7 or less in the 8 to 9 micrometer wavelength band due to the quartz sands of the region, which can produce changes in NLR of more than 10 w/m*m compared to assuming a constant emissivity. The errors in retrievals of atmospheric temperature and moisture profiles from hyperspectral infrared radiances, such as those from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the NASA Aqua satellite result from using constant or inaccurate surface emissivities, particularly over arid and semi-arid regions here the variation in emissivity is large, both spatially and spectrally. The multispectral thermal infrared data obtained from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection (ASTER) radiometer and MODerate resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) sensors on NASA's Terra satellite have been shown to be of good quality and provide a unique new tool for studying the emissivity of the land surface. ASTER has 5 channels in the 8 to 12 micrometer waveband with 90 m spatial resolution, when the data are combined with the Temperature Emissivity Separation (TES) algorithm the surface emissivity over this wavelength region

  4. X-ray emission in collisions of highly charged I, Pr, Ho, and Bi ions with a W surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, H.; Tona, M.; Ohtani, S.; Sun, J.; Nakamura, N.; Yamada, C.; Yoshiyasu, N.; Sakurai, M.

    2007-01-01

    X-ray emission yields, which are defined as the total number of emitted x-ray photons per incident ion, and dissipated fractions of potential energies through x-ray emission have been measured for slow highly charged ions of I, Pr, Ho, and Bi colliding with a W surface. A larger amount of potential energy was consumed for the x-ray emission with increasing the atomic number and the charge state. The present measurements show that x-ray emission is one of the main decay channels of hollow atoms produced in collisions of very highly charged ions of heavy elements

  5. Color-tunable mixed photoluminescence emission from Alq3 organic layer in metal-Alq3-metal surface plasmon structure

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Nai-Chuan; Liao, Chung-Chi; Chen, Cheng-Chang; Fan, Wan-Ting; Wu, Jin-Han; Li, Jung-Yu; Chen, Shih-Pu; Huang, Bohr-Ran; Lee, Li-Ling

    2014-01-01

    This work reports the color-tunable mixed photoluminescence (PL) emission from an Alq3 organic layer in an Au-Alq3-Au plasmonic structure through the combination of organic fluorescence emission and another form of emission that is enabled by the surface plasmons in the plasmonic structure. The emission wavelength of the latter depends on the Alq3 thickness and can be tuned within the Alq3 fluorescent spectra. Therefore, a two-color broadband, color-tunable mixed PL structure was obtained. Ob...

  6. Monte Carlo simulation of heavy ion induced kinetic electron emission from an Al surface

    CERN Document Server

    Ohya, K

    2002-01-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation is performed in order to study heavy ion induced kinetic electron emission from an Al surface. In the simulation, excitation of conduction band electrons by the projectile ion and recoiling target atoms is treated on the basis of the partial wave expansion method, and the cascade multiplication process of the excited electrons is simulated as well as collision cascade of the recoiling target atoms. Experimental electron yields near conventional threshold energies of heavy ions are simulated by an assumption of a lowering in the apparent surface barrier for the electrons. The present calculation derives components for electron excitations by the projectile ion, the recoiling target atoms and the electron cascades, from the calculated total electron yield. The component from the recoiling target atoms increases with increasing projectile mass, whereas the component from the electron cascade decreases. Although the components from the projectile ion and the electron cascade increase with...

  7. Impact of surface morphology on the properties of light emission in InGaN epilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristijonas Uždavinys, Tomas; Marcinkevičius, Saulius; Mensi, Mounir; Lahourcade, Lise; Carlin, Jean-François; Martin, Denis; Butté, Raphaël; Grandjean, Nicolas

    2018-05-01

    Scanning near-field optical microscopy was used to study the influence of the surface morphology on the properties of light emission and alloy composition in InGaN epitaxial layers grown on GaN substrates. A strong correlation between the maps of the photoluminescence (PL) peak energy and the gradient of the surface morphology was observed. This correlation demonstrates that the In incorporation strongly depends on the geometry of the monolayer step edges that form during growth in the step-flow mode. The spatial distribution of nonradiative recombination centers — evaluated from PL intensity maps — was found to strongly anticorrelate with the local content of In atoms in the InGaN alloy.

  8. The Diagnosis of Plasma Parameters in Surface Alloying Technique by Optical Emission Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Yabo; Zhang Yuefei; Chen Qiang; Zhang Guangqiu; Gao Yuan; Wang Jianzhong; Kui Xiaoyun

    2006-01-01

    Electron density (Ne) in a glow discharge plasma for the surface alloying technique is diagnosed by optical emission spectrometry (OES). With CH 4 as the feeding gas, Ne is obtained by comparing the Hβ spectrum according to the Stark broadening effect. It is noticed that Ne varies with the working pressures (30 Pa to 70 Pa) and cathode voltages (500 V to 1000 V), respectively. Due to an abnormal glow discharge, Ne is between 1.71x10 15 /cm 3 to 6.64x10 15 /cm 3 and increases rapidly with working gas pressures and cathode voltages. The results show that OES is a useful method to measure the plasma parameters in a surface alloying glow discharge plasma

  9. Modulating emission polarization of semiconductor quantum dots through surface plasmon of metal nanorod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Mu-Tian; Liu, Shao-Ding; Wang, Qu-Quan

    2008-04-01

    We theoretically investigated the dynamics of exciton populations [ρyy(t ) and ρxx(t )] on two orthogonal polarization eigenstates (∣x⟩ and ∣y⟩) and the polarization ratio P(t )=[ρyy(t )-ρxx(t )]/[ρyy(t )+ρxx(t )] of an anisotropic InGaAs quantum dot modulated by the surface plasmon of an Au nanorod (NR). In the resonance of longitudinal surface plasmon of AuNR, the polarization ratio P(t ) increases from 0.22 to 0.99 during the excitation due to the efficient enhancement of Rabi frequency of the transition between the ∣y⟩ and vacuum states, and decreases from 0.02 to -0.92 after the excitation pulse due to the enhancement of decay rate of the ∣y⟩ state. This offers an approach to modulate the dynamic polarization ratio of radiative emissions.

  10. Two-dimensional simulation research of secondary electron emission avalanche discharge on vacuum insulator surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Libing; Wang, Jianguo; Zhu, Xiangqin; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Dianhui

    2015-01-01

    Based on the secondary electron emission avalanche (SEEA) model, the SEEA discharge on the vacuum insulator surface is simulated by using a 2D PIC-MCC code developed by ourselves. The evolutions of the number of discharge electrons, insulator surface charge, current, and 2D particle distribution are obtained. The effects of the strength of the applied electric field, secondary electron yield coefficient, rise time of the pulse, length of the insulator on the discharge are investigated. The results show that the number of the SEEA electrons presents a quadratic dependence upon the applied field strength. The SEEA current, which is on the order of Ampere, is directly proportional to the field strength and secondary electron yield coefficient. Finally, the electron-stimulated outgassing is included in the simulation code, and a three-phase discharge curve is presented by the simulation, which agrees with the experimental data.

  11. Two-dimensional simulation research of secondary electron emission avalanche discharge on vacuum insulator surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Libing; Wang, Jianguo; Zhu, Xiangqin; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Dianhui

    2015-01-01

    Based on the secondary electron emission avalanche (SEEA) model, the SEEA discharge on the vacuum insulator surface is simulated by using a 2D PIC-MCC code developed by ourselves. The evolutions of the number of discharge electrons, insulator surface charge, current, and 2D particle distribution are obtained. The effects of the strength of the applied electric field, secondary electron yield coefficient, rise time of the pulse, length of the insulator on the discharge are investigated. The results show that the number of the SEEA electrons presents a quadratic dependence upon the applied field strength. The SEEA current, which is on the order of Ampere, is directly proportional to the field strength and secondary electron yield coefficient. Finally, the electron-stimulated outgassing is included in the simulation code, and a three-phase discharge curve is presented by the simulation, which agrees with the experimental data

  12. [Study on plasma temperature of a large area surface discharge by optical emission spectrum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Li-Fang; Tong, Guo-Liang; Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Bin

    2014-04-01

    A large area surface discharge was realized in air/argon gas mixture by designing a discharge device with water electrodes. By using optical emission spectrum, the variations of the molecular vibrational temperature, the mean energy of electron, and the electronic excitation temperature as a function of the gas pressure were studied. The nitrogen molecular vibrational temperature was calculated according to the emission line of the second positive band system of the nitrogen molecule (C3 pi(u) --> B 3 pi(g)). The electronic excitation temperature was obtained by using the intensity ratio of Ar I 763.51 nm (2P(6) --> 1S(5)) to Ar I 772.42 nm (2P(2) --> 1S(3)). The changes in the mean energy of electron were studied by the relative intensity ratio of the nitrogen molecular ion 391.4 nm to nitrogen 337.1 nm. It was found that the intensity of emission spectral line increases with the increase in the gas pressure, meanwhile, the outline and the ratios of different spectral lines intensity also change. The molecular vibrational temperature, the mean energy of electron, and the electronic excitation temperature decrease as the gas pressure increases from 0.75 x 10(5) Pa to 1 x 10(5) Pa.

  13. Effect of localized surface-plasmon mode on exciton transport and radiation emission in carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roslyak, Oleksiy; Cherqui, Charles; Dunlap, David H; Piryatinski, Andrei

    2014-07-17

    We report on a general theoretical approach to study exciton transport and emission in a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) in the presence of a localized surface-plasmon (SP) mode within a metal nanoparticle interacting via near-field coupling. We derive a set of quantum mechanical equations of motion and approximate rate equations that account for the exciton, SP, and the environmental degrees of freedom. The material equations are complemented by an expression for the radiated power that depends on the exciton and SP populations and coherences, allowing for an examination of the angular distribution of the emitted radiation that would be measured in experiment. Numerical simulations for a (6,5) SWNT and cone-shaped Ag metal tip (MT) have been performed using this methodology. Comparison with physical parameters shows that the near-field interaction between the exciton-SP occurs in a weak coupling regime, with the diffusion processes being much faster than the exciton-SP population exchange. In such a case, the effect of the exciton population transfer to the MT with its subsequent dissipation (i.e., the Förster energy transfer) is to modify the exciton steady state distribution while reducing the equilibration time for excitons to reach a steady sate distribution. We find that the radiation distribution is dominated by SP emission for a SWNT-MT separation of a few tens of nanometers due to the fast SP emission rate, whereas the exciton-SP coherences can cause its rotation.

  14. Effect of sequential surface irrigations on field-scale emissions of 1,3-dichloropropene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, S R; Knuteson, J; Ernst, F F; Zheng, W; Wang, Q

    2008-12-01

    A field experiment was conducted to measure subsurface movement and volatilization of 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D) after shank injection to an agricultural soil. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of sprinkler irrigation on the emissions of 1,3-D to the atmosphere and is based on recent research that has shown that saturating the soil pore space reduces gas-phase diffusion and leads to reduced volatilization rates. Aerodynamic, integrated horizontal flux, and theoretical profile shape methods were used to estimate fumigant volatilization rates and total emission losses. These methods provide estimates of the volatilization rate based on measurements of wind speed, temperature, and 1,3-D concentration in the atmosphere. The volatilization rate was measured continuously for 16 days, and the daily peak volatilization rates for the three methods ranged from 18 to 60 microg m(-2) s(-1). The total 13-D mass entering the atmosphere was approximately 44-68 kg ha(-1), or 10-15% of the applied active ingredient This represents approximately 30-50% reduction in the total emission losses compared to conventional fumigant applications in field and field-plot studies. Significant reduction in volatilization of 1,3-D was observed when five surface irrigations were applied to the field, one immediately after fumigation followed by daily irrigations.

  15. Multi-source SO2 emission retrievals and consistency of satellite and surface measurements with reported emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fioletov, V.; McLinden, C.A.; Kharol, S.K.; Krotkov, N.A.; Li, C.; Joiner, J.; Moran, M.D.; Vet, R.; Visschedijk, A.J.H.; Denier Van Der Gon, H.A.C.

    2017-01-01

    Reported sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions from US and Canadian sources have declined dramatically since the 1990s as a result of emission control measures. Observations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on NASA's Aura satellite and ground-based in situ measurements are examined to verify

  16. Nitrous oxide emissions from sugarcane straw left on the soil surface in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdos, M. V.; Cerri, C. E.; Carvalho, J. L.; Cerri, C. C.

    2012-12-01

    In Brazil, the largest exporter of ethanol from sugarcane in the world, burning the dry leaves and tops in order to facilitate the harvest and transportation of the stalks is still a common practice. Burning plant residues causes emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) such as CO2, CH4 and N2O, besides the release of charcoal particles into the atmosphere. Due to a combination of pressure from changes in the public opinion and economical reasons, in Brazil sugarcane harvest is changing from a burned into an unburned system. Since manual harvest of sugarcane without burning is not economically feasible, mechanical harvesters have been developed that can take the stalk and leave the residues on the field, forming a mulch, in a system called green cane management. It is expected that 80% of the cane harvested in the main producing regions in Brazil will be harvested without burning by 2014. The conversion from burning sugarcane to green management of sugarcane will have impacts on the biogeochemical cycling of carbon and nitrogen in the plant soil system. The green cane management results in the deposition of large amounts of plant litter on the soil surface after harvest, ranging from 10 to 20 tons per hectare, which impact the whole production process of sugarcane, influencing yields, fertilizer management and application, soil erosion, soil organic matter dynamics as well as greenhouse gas emissions (CO2, N2O, CH4). From a GHG perspective, the conservation of sugarcane residues prevents emissions from the burning process, may promote carbon sequestration in soils and releases nitrogen during the decomposition process replacing the need for, and GHG emissions from, fossil fuel based nitrogen fertilizer sources. Measurements of soil C and N stocks and associated greenhouse gas emissions from the burned and unburned sugarcane systems and in the sugarcane expansion areas are still scarce. Therefore, the main objective of this work was to quantify the nitrous oxide

  17. Surprisingly small HONO emissions from snow surfaces at Browning Pass, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. Beine

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Measured Fluxes of nitrous acid at Browning Pass, Antarctica were very low, despite conditions that are generally understood as favorable for HONO emissions, including: acidic snow surfaces, an abundance of NO3- anions in the snow surface, and abundant UV light for NO3- photolysis. Photochemical modeling suggests noon time HONO fluxes of 5–10 nmol m-2 h-1; the measured fluxes, however, were close to zero throughout the campaign. The location and state of NO3- in snow is crucial to its reactivity. The analysis of soluble mineral ions in snow reveals that the NO3- ion is probably present in aged snows as NaNO3. This is peculiar to our study site, and we suggest that this may affect the photochemical reactivity of NO3-, by preventing the release of products, or providing a reactive medium for newly formed HONO. In fresh snow, the NO3- ion is probably present as dissolved or adsorbed HNO3 and yet, no HONO emissions were observed. We speculate that HONO formation from NO3- photolysis may involve electron transfer reactions of NO2 from photosensitized organics and that fresh snows at our site had insufficient concentrations of adequate organic compounds to favor this reaction.

  18. Laboratory Measured Emission Losses of Methyl Isothiocyanate at Pacific Northwest Soil Surface Fumigation Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhou; Hebert, Vincent R; Miller, Glenn C

    2017-02-01

    Temperature is a major environmental factor influencing land surface volatilization at the time of agricultural field fumigation. Cooler fumigation soil temperatures relevant to Pacific Northwest (PNW) application practices with metam sodium/potassium should result in appreciably reduced methyl isothiocyanate (MITC) emission rates, thus minimizing off target movement and bystander inhalation exposure. Herein, a series of laboratory controlled flow-through soil column assessments were performed evaluating MITC emissions over the range of cooler temperatures (2-13°C). Assessments were also conducted at the maximum allowed label application temperature of 32°C. All assessments were conducted at registration label-specified field moisture capacity, and no more than 50% cumulative MITC loss was observed over the 2-day post-fumigation timeframe. Three-fold reductions in MITC peak fluxes at cooler PNW application temperatures were observed compared to the label maximum temperature. This study supports current EPA metam sodium/potassium label language that indicates surface fumigations during warmer soil conditions should be discouraged.

  19. Laser induced surface structuring of Cu for enhancement of field emission properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Mahreen; Bashir, Shazia; Jalil, Sohail Abdul; Shahid Rafique, Muhammad; Hayat, Asma; Mahmood, Khaliq

    2018-02-01

    The effect of Nd:YAG (1064 nm, 10 ns, 10 Hz) laser induced surface structuring of copper (Cu) for enhancement of field emission (FE) properties has been investigated. X-ray diffraction analysis was employed to investigate the surface structural and compositional modifications. The surface structuring was explored by scanning electron microscope investigation. FE properties were studied under UHV conditions in a parallel plate configuration of planar un-irradiated Cu anode and laser irradiated Cu cathode. The Fowler-Nordheim plots were drawn to confirm the dominance of FE behavior of the measured I-V characteristics. The obtained values of turn-on field ‘E o’, field enhancement factor ‘β’ and maximum current density ‘J max’ come out to be to be in the range of 5.5-8.5 V μm-1, 1380-2730 and 147-375 μA cm-2 respectively for the Cu samples irradiated at laser irradiance ranging from 13 to 50 GW cm-2. The observed enhancement in the FE properties has been correlated with the growth of various surface structures such as ridged protrusions, cones and pores/tiny holes. The porous morphology is found to be responsible for a significant enhancement in the FE parameters.

  20. Light emission from sputtered or backscattered atoms on tungsten surfaces under ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Yasuhiro; Nogami, Keisuke; Kato, Daiji; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Kenmotsu, Takahiko; Furuya, Kenji; Motohashi, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    We measured the intensity of light emission from sputtered atoms on tungsten surfaces under the irradiations of Kr"+ ion and Ar"+ ion, as a function of the perpendicular distance from the surface. Using the analysis of decay curve, we estimated the mean vertical velocity component in direction normal to the surface. We found that the estimated mean velocity had much differences according to the excited state. For example, although the estimated mean vertical velocity component normal to the surface from the 400.9 nm line((5d"5(6S)6p "7p_4→(5d"5(6S)6s "7S_3 transition) was 5.6±1.7 km/sec, that from the 386.8 nm line((5d"4(6S)6p "7D_4→(5d"5(6S)6s "7S_4 transition) was 2.8±1.0 km/sec. However, for different projectiles and energies, we found no remarkable changes in the velocity. (author)

  1. Control of formaldehyde and TVOC emission from wood-based flooring composites at various manufacturing processes by surface finishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sumin

    2010-04-15

    This paper assesses the reproducibility of testing formaldehyde and TVOC emission behavior from wood flooring composites bonded by urea-formaldehyde resin at various manufacturing steps for surface finishing materials. The surface adhesion step of laminate flooring for this research was divided into two steps; HDF only and HDF with LPMs. In the case of engineered flooring, the manufacturing steps were divided into three steps; plywood only, fancy veneer bonded on plywood and UV coated on fancy veneer with plywood. Formaldehyde and VOCs emission decreased at the process of final surface finishing materials; LPMs were applied on the surface of HDF for laminate flooring. Although emissions increased when fancy veneer was bonded onto plywood in the case of engineered flooring, emission was dramatically reduced up to similar level with plywood only when final surface finishing; UV-curable coating was applied on fancy veneer. This study suggests that formaldehyde and VOCs emission from floorings can be controlled at manufacturing steps for surface finishing. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Directional and dynamic modulation of the optical emission of an individual GaAs nanowire using surface acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzel, Jörg B; Rudolph, Daniel; Bichler, Max; Abstreiter, Gerhard; Finley, Jonathan J; Koblmüller, Gregor; Wixforth, Achim; Krenner, Hubert J

    2011-04-13

    We report on optical experiments performed on individual GaAs nanowires and the manipulation of their temporal emission characteristics using a surface acoustic wave. We find a pronounced, characteristic suppression of the emission intensity for the surface acoustic wave propagation aligned with the axis of the nanowire. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this quenching is dynamical as it shows a pronounced modulation as the local phase of the surface acoustic wave is tuned. These effects are strongly reduced for a surface acoustic wave applied in the direction perpendicular to the axis of the nanowire due to their inherent one-dimensional geometry. We resolve a fully dynamic modulation of the nanowire emission up to 678 MHz not limited by the physical properties of the nanowires.

  3. Fate factors and emission flux estimates for emerging contaminants in surface waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoa T. Trinh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pharmaceuticals, personal care products, hormones, and wastewater products are emerging environmental concerns for manifold reasons, including the potential of some compounds found in these products for endocrine disruption at a very low chronic exposure level. The environmental occurrences and sources of these contaminants in the water, soil, sediment and biota in European nations and the United States are well documented. This work reports a screening-level emission and fate assessment of thirty compounds, listed in the National Reconnaissance of the United States Geological Survey (USGS, 1999–2000 as the most frequently detected organic wastewater contaminants in U.S. streams and rivers. Estimations of the surface water fate factors were based on Level II and Level III multimedia fugacity models for a 1000 km2 model environment, the size of a typical county in the eastern United States. The compounds are categorized into three groups based upon the sensitivity of their predicted surface water fate factors to uncertainties in their physicochemical property values and the landscape parameters. The environmental fate factors, mass distributions, and loss pathways of all of the compounds are strongly affected by their assumed modes of entry into the environment. It is observed that for thirteen of the thirty organic wastewater contaminants most commonly detected in surface waters, conventional treatment strategies may be ineffective for their removal from wastewater effluents. The surface water fate factors predicted by the fugacity models were used in conjunction with the surface water concentrations measured in the USGS reconnaissance to obtain emission flux estimates for the compounds into U.S. streams and rivers. These include estimated fluxes of 6.8 × 10−5 to 0.30 kg/h km2 for the biomarker coprostanol; 1.7 × 10−5 to 6.5 × 10−5 kg/h km2 for the insect repellent N,N-diethyltoluamide; and 4.3 × 10−6 to 3.1 × 10−5 kg/h km2 for

  4. A new setup for the investigation of swift heavy ion induced particle emission and surface modifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinerzhagen, F.; Breuer, L.; Bukowska, H.; Herder, M.; Schleberger, M.; Wucher, A. [Fakultät für Physik, Universität Duisburg-Essen and Cenide, 47057 Duisburg (Germany); Bender, M.; Severin, D. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Lebius, H. [CIMAP (CEA-CNRS-ENSICAEN-UCN), 14070 Caen Cedex 5 (France)

    2016-01-15

    The irradiation with fast ions with kinetic energies of >10 MeV leads to the deposition of a high amount of energy along their trajectory (up to several ten keV/nm). The energy is mainly transferred to the electronic subsystem and induces different secondary processes of excitations, which result in significant material modifications. A new setup to study these ion induced effects on surfaces will be described in this paper. The setup combines a variable irradiation chamber with different techniques of surface characterizations like scanning probe microscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion, and neutral mass spectrometry, as well as low energy electron diffraction under ultra high vacuum conditions, and is mounted at a beamline of the universal linear accelerator (UNILAC) of the GSI facility in Darmstadt, Germany. Here, samples can be irradiated with high-energy ions with a total kinetic energy up to several GeVs under different angles of incidence. Our setup enables the preparation and in situ analysis of different types of sample systems ranging from metals to insulators. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry enables us to study the chemical composition of the surface, while scanning probe microscopy allows a detailed view into the local electrical and morphological conditions of the sample surface down to atomic scales. With the new setup, particle emission during irradiation as well as persistent modifications of the surface after irradiation can thus be studied. We present first data obtained with the new setup, including a novel measuring protocol for time-of-flight mass spectrometry with the GSI UNILAC accelerator.

  5. Apparatus for measuring radioactive emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohme, R.C.; Lazerson, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    Apparatus for measuring radioactive emissions from moving radioactive material comprises at least one radiation detector in a housing serving as a first radiation shield and in which at least one groove is formed to expose at least a portion of a receptor surface of the detector. The groove extends transverse to the direction of movement of the material over the detector. A second radiation shield may be located between at least a portion of the first shield and the detector. The material of the second shield is inherently less contaminated and emits secondary excitation radiation of lower energy than the first material. (author)

  6. Surface emissions of heat, water and GHGs from a NYC greenroof

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillis, W. R.; Jacobson, G.; Culligan, P.; Gaffin, S.; Carson, T.; Marasco, D.; Hsueh, D.; Rella, C.

    2012-04-01

    The budgets of heat, water, and GHGs from greenroofs in New York City, needed for adaptation and sustainable policy and infrastructure strategies, requires an accurate measure of their surface emissions. A high speed, Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) based analyzer for measuring carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and water (H2O) and an ultrasonic wind and temperature anemometer for measuring heat and momentum is used to assess greenroof performance during seasonal, diurnal, and episodic weather conditions. The flux instrument has proven capable of raw 10 Hz precision (one standard deviation) better than 110 parts-per-billion (ppbv) for carbon dioxide, better than 3 ppbv for methane and better than 6 ppmv +0.3% of reading for water vapor. In the water and heat budget, comparison and reconciliation of greenroof evapotranspiration (ET) using micrometeorological techniques, water balance, and heat balance was conducted. The water balance (month timescales), the heat balance (week timescale) show agreement to the micrometeorological surface ET (hour timescale). By using boundary layer flux measurements of ET, the fundamental performance of greenroofs on climate and weather conditions can be explored. These boundary layer measured surface fluxes provide critical information on the physiology of the built environment in New York City. Faced with sewage failures due to water management and exacerbated heating, the accurate assessment of greenroof performance on high spatial and temporal scales in required for the urban environment. Results will be presented and discussed.

  7. Microwave emission measurements of sea surface roughness, soil moisture, and sea ice structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloersen, P.; Wilheit, T. T.; Schmugge, T. J.

    1972-01-01

    In order to demonstrate the feasibility of the microwave radiometers to be carried aboard the Nimbus 5 and 6 satellites and proposed for one of the earth observatory satellites, remote measurements of microwave radiation at wavelengths ranging from 0.8 to 21 cm have been made of a variety of the earth's surfaces from the NASA CV-990 A/C. Brightness temperatures of sea water surfaces of varying roughness, of terrain with varying soil moisture, and of sea ice of varying structure were observed. In each case, around truth information was available for correlation with the microwave brightness temperature. The utility of passive microwave radiometry in determining ocean surface wind speeds, at least for values higher than 7 meters/second has been demonstrated. In addition, it was shown that radiometric signatures can be used to determine soil moisture in unvegetated terrain to within five percentage points by weight. Finally, it was demonstrated that first year thick, multi-year, and first year thin sea ice can be distinguished by observing their differing microwave emissivities at various wavelengths.

  8. Gaseous elemental mercury (GEM emissions from snow surfaces in northern New York.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Alexander Maxwell

    Full Text Available Snow surface-to-air exchange of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM was measured using a modified Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP dynamic flux chamber (DFC in a remote, open site in Potsdam, New York. Sampling was conducted during the winter months of 2011. The inlet and outlet of the DFC were coupled with a Tekran Model 2537A mercury (Hg vapor analyzer using a Tekran Model 1110 two port synchronized sampler. The surface GEM flux ranged from -4.47 ng m(-2 hr(-1 to 9.89 ng m(-2 hr(-1. For most sample periods, daytime GEM flux was strongly correlated with solar radiation. The average nighttime GEM flux was slightly negative and was not well correlated with any of the measured meteorological variables. Preliminary, empirical models were developed to estimate GEM emissions from snow surfaces in northern New York. These models suggest that most, if not all, of the Hg deposited with and to snow is reemitted to the atmosphere.

  9. Gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) emissions from snow surfaces in northern New York.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, J Alexander; Holsen, Thomas M; Mondal, Sumona

    2013-01-01

    Snow surface-to-air exchange of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) was measured using a modified Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) dynamic flux chamber (DFC) in a remote, open site in Potsdam, New York. Sampling was conducted during the winter months of 2011. The inlet and outlet of the DFC were coupled with a Tekran Model 2537A mercury (Hg) vapor analyzer using a Tekran Model 1110 two port synchronized sampler. The surface GEM flux ranged from -4.47 ng m(-2) hr(-1) to 9.89 ng m(-2) hr(-1). For most sample periods, daytime GEM flux was strongly correlated with solar radiation. The average nighttime GEM flux was slightly negative and was not well correlated with any of the measured meteorological variables. Preliminary, empirical models were developed to estimate GEM emissions from snow surfaces in northern New York. These models suggest that most, if not all, of the Hg deposited with and to snow is reemitted to the atmosphere.

  10. NOx removal from vehicle emissions by functionality surface of asphalt road

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Meng; Liu Yanhua

    2010-01-01

    This paper reported the potential of heterogeneous photocatalysis as an advanced oxidation technology for NO x removal from vehicle emissions by using TiO 2 as a photocatalyst immobilized on the surface of asphalt road. Based on asphalt road material porous characteristic, we utilized permeability technology to make asphalt nano-TiO 2 to be environmental protection materials. And then using scanning electron microscope, we observed the penetrating effect of TiO 2 . The effect of surface friction, humidity and light intensity on NO x removal had been systematically investigated by the use of TiO 2 immobilized on the surface of asphalt road as photocatalytic environmental protection materials. In addition, the decontaminating effect was tested by contrast test in TiO 2 spraying section with non-spraying section, while the productions were used in road environment. Results of experiment revealed that decontaminating rate of the productions ranged from 6% to 12% this kind of photochemical catalysis environmental protection material has good environment purification function.

  11. Surface and electron emission properties of hydrogen-free diamond-like carbon films investigated by atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Dongping; Zhang, Sam; Ong, S.-E.; Benstetter, Guenther; Du Hejun

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we have deposited hydrogen-free diamond-like carbon (DLC) films by using DC magnetron sputtering of graphite target at various r.f. bias voltages. Surface and nanoscale emission properties of these DLC films have been investigated using a combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanowear tests and conducting-AFM, by simultaneously measuring the topography and the conductivity of the samples. Nanowear tests show that these DLC films are covered with the thin (1.5-2.0 nm) graphite-like layers at surfaces. Compared to the film bulk structure, the graphite-like surface layers are more conductive. The graphite-like surface layers significantly influence the electron emission properties of these films. Low-energy carbon species can be responsible for the formation of graphite-like surface layers. Nanoscale electron emission measurements have revealed the inhomogeneous emission nature of these films. The low-field emission from these films can be attributed to the existence of sp 2 -configured nanoclusters inside the films

  12. Field emission study from an array of hierarchical micro protrusions on stainless steel surface generated by femtosecond pulsed laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, A.K., E-mail: anilks@barc.gov.in [Laser & Plasma Technology Division, BARC, Mumbai, 400085 (India); Suryawanshi, Sachin R.; More, M.A. [Department of Physics, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune, 411007 (India); Basu, S. [Solid State Physics Division, BARC, Mumbai, 40085 (India); Sinha, Sucharita [Laser & Plasma Technology Division, BARC, Mumbai, 400085 (India)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Array of self assembled micro-protrusions have been generated on stainless steel surfaces by femtosecond pulsed laser irradiation. • Density of the formed micro-protrusions is ∼5.6 × 105 protrusions/cm{sup 2}. • Laser treated surface is mainly composed of iron oxide and cementite phases. • Micro-structured sample has shown good field emission properties – low turn on field, high field enhancement factor and stable emission current. - Abstract: This paper reports our results on femtosecond (fs) pulsed laser induced surface micro/nano structuring of stainless steel 304 (SS 304) samples and their characterization in terms of surface morphology, formed material phases on laser irradiation and field emission studies. Our investigations reveal that nearly uniform and dense array of hierarchical micro-protrusions (density: ∼5.6 × 10{sup 5} protrusions/cm{sup 2}) is formed upon laser treatment. Typical tip diameters of the generated protrusions are in the range of 2–5 μm and these protrusions are covered with submicron sized features. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) analysis of the laser irradiated sample surface has shown formation mainly of iron oxides and cementite (Fe{sub 3}C) phases in the treated region. These laser micro-structured samples have shown good field emission properties such as low turn on field (∼4.1 V/μm), high macroscopic field enhancement factor (1830) and stable field emission current under ultra high vacuum conditions.

  13. Synergistic impacts of anthropogenic and biogenic emissions on summer surface O3 in East Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yu; An, Junling; Li, Jian

    2013-03-01

    A factor separation technique and an improved regional air quality model (RAQM) were applied to calculate synergistic contributions of anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (AVOCs), biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) to daily maximum surface 03 (O3DM) concentrations in East Asia in summer (June to August 2000). The summer averaged synergistic impacts of AVOCs and NOx are dominant in most areas of North China, with a maximum of 60 ppbv, while those of BVOCs and NOx are notable only in some limited areas with high BVOC emissions in South China, with a maximum of 25 ppbv. This result implies that BVOCs contribute much less to summer averaged O3DM concentrations than AVOCs in most areas of East Asia at a coarse spatial resolution (1 degree x 1 degree) although global emissions of BVOCs are much greater than those of AVOCs. Daily maximum total contributions of BVOCs can approach 20 ppbv in North China, but they can reach 40 ppbv in South China, approaching or exceeding those in some developed countries in Europe and North America. BVOC emissions in such special areas should be considered when 03 control measures are taken. Synergistic contributions among AVOCs, BVOCs and NOx significantly enhance O3 concentrations in the Beijing-Tianjin-Tangshan region and decrease them in some areas in South China. Thus, the total contributions of BVOCs to O3DM vary significantly from day to day and from location to location. This result suggests that 03 control measures obtained from episodic studies could be limited for long-term applications.

  14. Experimental Investigation of Convective Heat Transfer during Night Cooling with Different Ventilation Systems and Surface Emissivities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Dreau, Jerome; Heiselberg, Per; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    2013-01-01

    models for convection. In a full-scale test room, the heat transfer was investigated during 12 h of discharge by night-time ventilation. A total of 34 experiments have been performed, with different ventilation types (mixing and displacement), air change rates, temperature differences between the inlet...... air and the room, and floor emissivities. This extensive experimental study enabled a detailed analysis of the convective and radiative flow at the different surfaces of the room. The experimentally derived convective heat transfer coefficients (CHTC) have been compared to existing correlations....... For mixing ventilation, existing correlations did not predict accurately the convective heat transfer at the ceiling due to differences in the experimental conditions. But the use of local parameters of the air flow showed interesting results to obtain more adaptive CHTC correlations. For displacement...

  15. Surface structures for enhancement of quantum yield in broad spectrum emission nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreuder, Michael A.; McBride, James R.; Rosenthal, Sandra J.

    2014-07-22

    Disclosed are inorganic nanoparticles comprising a body comprising cadmium and/or zinc crystallized with selenium, sulfur, and/or tellurium; a multiplicity of phosphonic acid ligands comprising at least about 20% of the total surface ligand coverage; wherein the nanocrystal is capable of absorbing energy from a first electromagnetic region and capable of emitting light in a second electromagnetic region, wherein the maximum absorbance wavelength of the first electromagnetic region is different from the maximum emission wavelength of the second electromagnetic region, thereby providing a Stokes shift of at least about 20 nm, wherein the second electromagnetic region comprises an at least about 100 nm wide band of wavelengths, and wherein the nanoparticle exhibits has a quantum yield of at least about 10%. This abstract is intended as a scanning tool for purposes of searching in the particular art and is not intended to be limiting of the present invention.

  16. An updated climatology of surface dimethlysulfide concentrations and emission fluxes in the global ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lana, A.; Bell, T. G.; Simó, R.; Vallina, S. M.; Ballabrera-Poy, J.; Kettle, A. J.; Dachs, J.; Bopp, L.; Saltzman, E. S.; Stefels, J.; Johnson, J. E.; Liss, P. S.

    2011-03-01

    The potentially significant role of the biogenic trace gas dimethylsulfide (DMS) in determining the Earth's radiation budget makes it necessary to accurately reproduce seawater DMS distribution and quantify its global flux across the sea/air interface. Following a threefold increase of data (from 15,000 to over 47,000) in the global surface ocean DMS database over the last decade, new global monthly climatologies of surface ocean DMS concentration and sea-to-air emission flux are presented as updates of those constructed 10 years ago. Interpolation/extrapolation techniques were applied to project the discrete concentration data onto a first guess field based on Longhurst's biogeographic provinces. Further objective analysis allowed us to obtain the final monthly maps. The new climatology projects DMS concentrations typically in the range of 1-7 nM, with higher levels occurring in the high latitudes, and with a general trend toward increasing concentration in summer. The increased size and distribution of the observations in the DMS database have produced in the new climatology substantially lower DMS concentrations in the polar latitudes and generally higher DMS concentrations in regions that were severely undersampled 10 years ago, such as the southern Indian Ocean. Using the new DMS concentration climatology in conjunction with state-of-the-art parameterizations for the sea/air gas transfer velocity and climatological wind fields, we estimate that 28.1 (17.6-34.4) Tg of sulfur are transferred from the oceans into the atmosphere annually in the form of DMS. This represents a global emission increase of 17% with respect to the equivalent calculation using the previous climatology. This new DMS climatology represents a valuable tool for atmospheric chemistry, climate, and Earth System models.

  17. Soil surface Hg emission flux in coalfield in Wuda, Inner Mongolia, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunhui; Liang, Handong; Liang, Ming; Chen, Yang; Zhou, Yi

    2018-03-30

    Hg emission flux from various land covers, such as forests, wetlands, and urban areas, have been investigated. China has the largest area of coalfield in the world, but data of Hg flux of coalfields, especially, those with coal fires, are seriously limited. In this study, Hg fluxes of a coalfield were measured using the dynamic flux chamber (DFC) method, coupled with a Lumex multifunctional Hg analyzer RA-915+ (Lumex Ltd., Russia). The results show that the Hg flux in Wuda coalfield ranged from 4 to 318 ng m -2  h -1 , and the average value for different areas varied, e.g., coal-fire area 99 and 177 ng m -2  h -1 ; no coal-fire area 19 and 32 ng m -2  h -1 ; and backfilling area 53 ng m -2  h -1 . Hg continued to be emitted from an underground coal seam, even if there were no phenomena, such as vents, cracks, and smog, of coal fire on the soil surface. This phenomenon occurred in all area types, i.e., coal-fire area, no coal-fire area, and backfilling area, which is universal in Wuda coalfield. Considering that many coalfields in northern China are similar to Wuda coalfield, they may be large sources of atmospheric Hg. The correlations of Hg emission flux with influence factors, such as sunlight intensity, soil surface temperature, and atmospheric Hg content, were also investigated for Wuda coalfield. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  18. Color-tunable mixed photoluminescence emission from Alq3 organic layer in metal-Alq3-metal surface plasmon structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nai-Chuan; Liao, Chung-Chi; Chen, Cheng-Chang; Fan, Wan-Ting; Wu, Jin-Han; Li, Jung-Yu; Chen, Shih-Pu; Huang, Bohr-Ran; Lee, Li-Ling

    2014-01-01

    This work reports the color-tunable mixed photoluminescence (PL) emission from an Alq3 organic layer in an Au-Alq3-Au plasmonic structure through the combination of organic fluorescence emission and another form of emission that is enabled by the surface plasmons in the plasmonic structure. The emission wavelength of the latter depends on the Alq3 thickness and can be tuned within the Alq3 fluorescent spectra. Therefore, a two-color broadband, color-tunable mixed PL structure was obtained. Obvious changes in the Commission Internationale d'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates and the corresponding emission colors of Au-Alq3-Au samples clearly varied with the Alq3 thickness (90, 130, and 156 nm).

  19. Localized-Surface-Plasmon Enhanced the 357 nm Forward Emission from ZnMgO Films Capped by Pt Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song XM

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Pt nanoparticles (NPs, which posses the wider tunable localized-surface-plasmon (LSP energy varying from deep ultraviolet to visible region depending on their morphology, were prepared by annealing Pt thin films with different initial mass-thicknesses. A sixfold enhancement of the 357 nm forward emission of ZnMgO was observed after capping with Pt NPs, which is due to the resonance coupling between the LSP of Pt NPs and the band-gap emission of ZnMgO. The other factors affecting the ultraviolet emission of ZnMgO, such as emission from Pt itself and light multi-scattering at the interface, were also discussed. These results indicate that Pt NPs can be used to enhance the ultraviolet emission through the LSP coupling for various wide band-gap semiconductors.

  20. A physics-based algorithm for retrieving land-surface emissivity and temperature from EOS/MODIS data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, Z.; Li, Z.L.

    1997-01-01

    The authors have developed a physics-based land-surface temperature (LST) algorithm for simultaneously retrieving surface band-averaged emissivities and temperatures from day/night pairs of MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) data in seven thermal infrared bands. The set of 14 nonlinear equations in the algorithm is solved with the statistical regression method and the least-squares fit method. This new LST algorithm was tested with simulated MODIS data for 80 sets of band-averaged emissivities calculated from published spectral data of terrestrial materials in wide ranges of atmospheric and surface temperature conditions. Comprehensive sensitivity and error analysis has been made to evaluate the performance of the new LST algorithm and its dependence on variations in surface emissivity and temperature, upon atmospheric conditions, as well as the noise-equivalent temperature difference (NEΔT) and calibration accuracy specifications of the MODIS instrument. In cases with a systematic calibration error of 0.5%, the standard deviations of errors in retrieved surface daytime and nighttime temperatures fall between 0.4--0.5 K over a wide range of surface temperatures for mid-latitude summer conditions. The standard deviations of errors in retrieved emissivities in bands 31 and 32 (in the 10--12.5 microm IR spectral window region) are 0.009, and the maximum error in retrieved LST values falls between 2--3 K

  1. The Role of Meteorology and Surface Condition to Multi-Decadal Variations of Dust Emission in Sahara and Sahel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D.; Chin, M.; Diehl, T. L.; Bian, H.; Brown, M. E.; Remer, L. A.; Stockwell, W. R.

    2014-12-01

    North Africa is the world's largest dust source region influencing regional and global climate, human health, and even the local economy. However North Africa as a dust source is not uniform but it consists of the arid region (Sahara) and the semi-arid region (Sahel) with emission rates depending on meteorological and surface conditions. Several recent studies have shown that dust from North Africa seems to have a decreasing trend in the past three decades. The goal of this study is to better understand the controlling factors that determine the change of dust in North Africa using observational data and model simulations. First we analyze surface bareness conditions determined from a long-term satellite observed Normalized Difference Vegetation Index for 1980-2008. Then we examine the key meteorological variables of precipitation and surface winds. Modeling experiments were conducted using the NASA Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model, which has been recently updated with a dynamic dust source function. Using the method we separate the dust originating from the Sahel from that of the Sahara desert. We find that the surface wind speed is the most dominant factor affecting Sahelian dust emission while vegetation has a modulating effect. We will show regional differences in meteorological variables, surface conditions, dust emission, and dust distribution and address the relationships among meteorology, surface conditions, and dust emission/loading in the past three decades (1980-2008).

  2. Atom-specific look at the surface chemical bond using x-ray emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, A.; Wassdahl, N.; Weinelt, M. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    CO and N{sub 2} adsorbed on the late transition metals have become prototype systems regarding the general understanding of molecular adsorption. It is in general assumed that the bonding of molecules to transition metals can be explained in terms of the interaction of the frontier HOMO and LUMO molecular orbitals with the d-orbitals. In such a picture the other molecular orbitals should remain essentially the same as in the free molecule. For the adsorption of the isoelectronic molecules CO and N{sub 2} this has led to the so called Blyholder model i.e., a synergetic {sigma} (HOMO) donor and {pi} (LUMO) backdonation bond. The authors results at the ALS show that such a picture is oversimplified. The direct observation and identification of the states related to the surface chemical bond is an experimental challenge. For noble and transition metal surfaces, the adsorption induced states overlap with the metal d valence band. Their signature is therefore often obscured by bulk substrate states. This complication has made it difficult for techniques such as photoemission and inverse photoemission to provide reliable information on the energy of chemisorption induced states and has left questions unanswered regarding the validity of the frontier orbitals concept. Here the authors show how x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), in spite of its inherent bulk sensitivity, can be used to investigate adsorbed molecules. Due to the localization of the core-excited intermediate state, XE spectroscopy allows an atomic specific separation of the valence electronic states. Thus the molecular contributions to the surface measurements make it possible to determine the symmetry of the molecular states, i.e., the separation of {pi} and {sigma} type states. In all the authors can obtain an atomic view of the electronic states involved in the formation of the chemical bond to the surface.

  3. Staircase and saw-tooth field emission steps from nanopatterned n-type GaSb surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Kildemo, M.; Le Roy, S.; Søndergård, E.

    2009-01-01

    High resolution field emission experiments from nanopatterned GaSb surfaces consisting of densely packed nanocones prepared by low ion-beam-energy sputtering are presented. Both uncovered and metal-covered nanopatterned surfaces were studied. Surprisingly, the field emission takes place by regular steps in the field emitted current. Depending on the field, the steps are either regular, flat, plateaus, or saw-tooth shaped. To the author’s knowledge, this is the first time that such results have been reported. Each discrete jump in the field emission may be understood in terms of resonant tunneling through an extended surface space charge region in an n-type, high aspect ratio, single GaSb nanocone. The staircase shape may be understood from the spatial distribution of the aspect ratio of the cones.

  4. Staircase and saw-tooth field emission steps from nanopatterned n-type GaSb surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kildemo, M.; Levinsen, Y. Inntjore; Le Roy, S.; Soenderga ring rd, E. [Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), NO-7491 Trondlieim (Norway); Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), NO-7491 Trondlieim, Norway and AB CERN, CH- 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Laboratoire Surface du Verre et Interfaces, UMR 125 Unite Mixte de Recherche CNRS/Saint-Gobain Laboratoire, 39 Quai Lucien Lefranc, F-93303 Aubervilliers Cedex (France)

    2009-09-15

    High resolution field emission experiments from nanopatterned GaSb surfaces consisting of densely packed nanocones prepared by low ion-beam-energy sputtering are presented. Both uncovered and metal-covered nanopatterned surfaces were studied. Surprisingly, the field emission takes place by regular steps in the field emitted current. Depending on the field, the steps are either regular, flat, plateaus, or saw-tooth shaped. To the author's knowledge, this is the first time that such results have been reported. Each discrete jump in the field emission may be understood in terms of resonant tunneling through an extended surface space charge region in an n-type, high aspect ratio, single GaSb nanocone. The staircase shape may be understood from the spatial distribution of the aspect ratio of the cones.

  5. Rear surface light emission measurements from laser-produced shock waves in clear and Al-coated polystyrene targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, E. A.; Deniz, A. V.; Schmitt, A. J.; Stamper, J. A.; Obenschain, S. P.; Lehecka, T.; Mostovych, A. N.; Seely, J.

    1999-08-01

    The Nike KrF laser, with its very uniform focal distributions, has been used at intensities near 10 14 W/cm 2 to launch shock waves in polystyrene targets. The rear surface visible light emission differed between clear polystyrene (CH) targets and targets with a thin (125 nm) Al coating on the rear side. The uncoated CH targets showed a relatively slowly rising emission followed by a sudden fall when the shock emerges, while the Al-coated targets showed a rapid rise in emission when the shock emerges followed by a slower fall, allowing an unambiguous determination of the time the shock arrived at the rear surface. A half-aluminized target allowed us to observe this difference in a single shot. The brightness temperature of both the aluminized targets and the non-aluminized targets was slightly below but close to rear surface temperature predictions of a hydrodynamic code. A discussion of preheat effects is given.

  6. Mass transfer inside a flux hood for the sampling of gaseous emissions from liquid surfaces - Experimental assessment and emission rate rescaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prata, Ademir A.; Lucernoni, Federico; Santos, Jane M.; Capelli, Laura; Sironi, Selena; Le-Minh, Nhat; Stuetz, Richard M.

    2018-04-01

    This study assesses the mass transfer of compounds inside the US EPA flux hood, one of the enclosure devices most commonly employed for the direct measurement of atmospheric emissions from liquid surfaces in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Experiments comprised the evaporation of water and the volatilisation of a range of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Special attention was given to the evaluation of the mass transfer coefficients in the microenvironment created by the flux hood and the effects of concentration build up in the hood's headspace. The VOCs emission rates and the water evaporation rates generally increased with the sweep air flow rate, as did the mass transfer coefficients for all compounds. The emission of compounds whose volatilisation is significantly influenced by the gas phase was greatly affected by concentration build up, whereas this effect was not significant for liquid phase-controlled compounds. The gas-film mass transfer coefficient (kG) estimated inside the US EPA flux hood was of the same order as the respective kG reported in the literature for wind tunnel-type devices, but the emission rates measured by the flux hood can be expected to be lower, due to the concentration build-up. Compared against an emission model for the passive surfaces in WWTPs, the mass transfer of acetic acid (representing a gas phase-dominated compound) inside the US EPA flux hood was equivalent to conditions of wind speeds at 10 m height (U10) of 0.27, 0.51 and 0.99 m s-1, respectively, for sweep air flow rates of 2, 5 and 10 L min-1. On the other hand, for higher wind speeds, the emission rates of gas phase-controlled compounds obtained with the flux hood can be considerably underestimated: for instance, at U10 = 5 m s-1, the emission rates of acetic acid inside the flux hood would be approximately 23, 12 and 6 times lower than the emission rates in the field, for sweep air flow rates of 2, 5 and 10 L min-1, respectively. A procedure is presented in

  7. Electron Emission by N6+ Ions Scattered at a Magnetized Iron Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solleder, B.; Lemell, C.; Burgdoerfer, J.; Tokesi, K.

    2006-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Magnetized materials are of considerable interest in the electronics industry (hard discs, spintronics, etc.). A detailed understanding of the properties of magnetized surfaces is therefore important to optimize technical applications. In the last decades, different experimental techniques have been developed to probe spin effects in magnetized materials. In this work the spin polarization of electrons emitted during the impact of N 6+ ions on a magnetized Fe surface is investigated. We study potential emission (PE) of electrons as well as secondary electron (SE) production and transport in the target with the help of Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Spin dependence of electron transfer processes and of transport in the solid are included. Fig. 1 shows the results of our simulation for the energy distribution and spin polarization of emitted electrons in comparison with experimental data of Pfandzelter et al. [1] for the interaction of N 6+ ions with magnetized Fe. Electrons with energies higher than 200 eV are predominantly PE electrons, emitted close to the surface via autoionization (AI), Auger capture (AC) and Auger deexcitation (AD) channels. Low energy electrons are dominated by promoted, autoionized, and secondary electrons. The polarization of above surface electrons is determined by the high of the potential barrier separating projectile and target. At large distances, the barrier drops only slightly below the Fermi edge and enables transitions of electrons from this part of the band structure which has about 50% polarization. These electrons are transferred to high n states feeding promotion and AI processes between high lying states. Electrons emitted by these processes therefore reflect the polarization near the Fermi edge. Close to the surface, the barrier is low enough to allow for electron capture from the entire conduction band. K-Auger electrons are emitted in immediate vicinity of the surface and therefore mirror

  8. Analytical modelling of acoustic emission from buried or surface-breaking cracks under stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Khalifa, W; Jezzine, K; Hello, G; Grondel, S

    2012-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) is a non-destructive testing method used in various industries (aerospace, petrochemical and pressure-vessel industries in general, power generation, civil engineering, mechanical engineering, etc...) for the examination of large structures subjected to various stresses (e.g. mechanical loading).The energy released by a defect under stress (the AE phenomenon) can propagate as guided waves in thin structures or as surface Rayleigh waves in thick ones. Sensors (possibly permanently) are positioned at various locations on the structure under examination and are assumed to be sensitive to these waves. Then, post-processing tools typically based on signal processing and triangulation algorithms can be used to inverse these data, allowing one to estimate the position of the defect from which emanates the waves measured. The French Atomic Energy Commission is engaged in the development of tools for simulating AE examinations. These tools are based on specific models for the AE sources, for the propagation of guided or Rayleigh waves and for the behaviour of AE sensors. Here, the coupling of a fracture mechanics based model for AE source and surface/guided wave propagation models is achieved through an integral formulation relying on the elastodynamic reciprocity principle. As a first approximation, a simple piston-like model is used to predict the sensitivity of AE sensors. Predictions computed by our simulation tool are compared to results from the literature for validation purpose.

  9. Linking seasonal surface water dynamics with methane emissions and export from small, forested wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hondula, K. L.; Palmer, M.

    2017-12-01

    One of the biggest uncertainties about global methane sources and sinks is attributed to uncertainties regarding wetland area and its dynamics. This is exacerbated by confusion over the role of small, shallow water bodies like Delmarva bay wetlands that could be categorized as both wetlands and ponds. These small inland water bodies are often poorly quantified due to their size, closed forest canopies, and inter- and intra-annual variability in surface water extent. We are studying wetland-rich areas on the Delmarva Peninsula in the U.S. mid-Atlantic to address this uncertainty at the scale of individual wetland ecosystems ( 1m depth). We estimated the size and temporal variability of the methane emissions source area by combining these measurements with daily estimates of the extent of surface water inundation derived from water level monitoring and a high-resolution digital elevation model. This knowledge is critical for informing land use decisions (e.g. restoring wetlands specifically for climate mitigation), the jurisdiction of environmental policies in the US, and for resolving major outstanding discrepancies in our understanding of the global methane budget.

  10. Spontaneous acoustic emission of a corrugated shock wave in the presence of a reflecting surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wouchuk, J.G.; Lopez Cavada, J.

    2004-01-01

    An analytic model to study perturbation evolution in the space between a corrugated shock and a piston surface is presented. The conditions for stable oscillation patterns are obtained by looking at the poles of the exact Laplace transform. It is seen that besides the standard D'yakov-Kontorovich (DK) mode of oscillation, the shock surface can exhibit an additional finite set of discrete frequencies, due to the interaction with the piston which reflects sound waves from behind. The additional eigenmodes are excited when the shock is launched at t=0 + . The first eigenmode (the DK mode) is always present, if the Hugoniot curve has the correct slope in the V-p plane. However, the additional frequencies could be excited for strong enough shocks. The predictions of the model are verified for particular cases by studying a van der Waals gas, as in the work of Bates and Montgomery [Phys. Fluids 11, 462 (1999); Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 1180 (2000)]. Only acoustic emission modes are considered

  11. On application of ion-photon emission method in spectral analysis of surface of different materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazhin, A.I.; Buravlev, Yu.M.; Ryzhov, V.N.

    1983-01-01

    Possibilities of application of ion-photom emission (IPE) method for determining element composition of the aluminium bronzes surface and profiles of distribution of hydrogen and helium implanted in metals (Mon Wn Cun Aln OKh18N10T steel) by ion bombardment have been studied. As ion source duoplasmatron which permits to obtain ions of inert (helium, argon) and active (hydrogenn oxygen) gases with current density 0.1-1 mA/cm 2 in the beam and energy from 5 to 25 keV has been applied. The photomultiplier PEM-79 has been used as a detector of optical radiation arising in the course of ion bombardment of the sample. For spectra recording the two-coordinate recorder has been used. Calibration charts which permit to determine the concentration of the investigated elements with 3-5% accuracy are obtained. The method sensitivity depends on excitation energy of transition observed in the spectrum. By known volumetric element concentration in the sample one can determine its concentration on a sUrface without resorting to a calibration chart in the coUrse of target sputtering. It has been found that the target impurity sputtering coefficient becomes nonselective to their relatiVe content. At wide incidence angles of ion beam. In contrast to other excitation methods (arc, spark) the IPE method possesses locality which constitutes 1 μm at a quite simple method of ion beam focussing (single lens)

  12. Ag-protein plasmonic architectures for surface plasmon-coupled emission enhancements and Fabry-Perot mode-coupled directional fluorescence emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badiya, Pradeep Kumar; Patnaik, Sai Gourang; Srinivasan, Venkatesh; Reddy, Narendra; Manohar, Chelli Sai; Vedarajan, Raman; Mastumi, Noriyoshi; Belliraj, Siva Kumar; Ramamurthy, Sai Sathish

    2017-10-01

    We report the use of silver decorated plant proteins as spacer material for augmented surface plasmon-coupled emission (120-fold enhancement) and plasmon-enhanced Raman scattering. We extracted several proteins from different plant sources [Triticum aestivum (TA), Aegle marmelos (AM), Ricinus communis (RC), Jatropha curcas (JC) and Simarouba glauca (SG)] followed by evaluation of their optical properties and simulations to rationalize observed surface plasmon resonance. Since the properties exhibited by protein thin films is currently gaining research interest, we have also carried out simulation studies with Ag-protein biocomposites as spacer materials in metal-dielectric-metal planar microcavity architecture for guided emission of Fabry-Perot mode-coupled fluorescence.

  13. Portion size and intended consumption. Evidence for a pre-consumption portion size effect in males?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Eric; te Raa, Wesselien; Hardman, Charlotte A

    2015-08-01

    Larger portions increase energy intake (the 'portion size effect'); however, the mechanisms behind this effect are unclear. Although pre-meal intentions are thought to be an important determinant of energy intake, little research has examined how much of a meal individuals intend to eat when served standard versus larger portion sizes. Three studies examined the effect of manipulating portion size on intended food consumption. In Studies 1 (spaghetti bolognese) and 2 (curry and rice) male participants were shown an image of either a standard or a larger meal and indicated how much of the meal they intended to consume. In Study 3 male and female participants were served either a standard or a larger portion of ice cream for dessert, they indicated how much they intended to consume and then ate as much of the ice cream as they desired. Regardless of being shown standard or large portion sizes, in Studies 1 and 2 participants reported that they intended to eat the majority of the meal, equating to a large difference in intended energy consumption between portion size conditions (a 'pre-consumption portion size effect'). This finding was replicated in male participants in Study 3, although females intended to eat a smaller proportion of the larger portion of ice cream, compared to the standard portion. Both male and female participants tended to eat in accordance with their pre-meal intentions and a portion size effect on actual consumption was subsequently observed in males, but not in females. The portion size effect may be observed when measuring pre-meal intended consumption in males. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. The Use of Satellite Data to Relate Waterbody Surface Area and Temperature to Greenhouse Gas Emissions Across a Subarctic Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick, C.; Palace, M. W.; Wik, M.; Burke, S. A.; Varner, R. K.

    2017-12-01

    High latitude lakes and ponds are significant sources of methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) emission. Increased near-surface air temperature has linked these water bodies to large increases in methane emissions due to longer ice-free seasons, impacting climate change and further changing air temperature as a feedback mechanism. The impacts of changes in lake surface temperatures cannot be assessed until we know more about the baseline mechanistic biogeochemical controls that influence these emissions. Using a combination of image-based atmospheric corrections and image fusion models, thermal data from Landsat and MODIS satellites were used to characterize the temperature regimes of artic lakes in northern Sweden. This analysis provides insight into the temporal attributes of individual lakes in regard to temperature shifts and variability, as well as provides a rich temporal dataset where in situ temperature data is unavailable. Field-based measurements of temperature and associated methane release were used for calibration and correlation. This enabled the creation of emissions estimates over the broader pan-arctic landscape, including inter-seasonal and inter-annual variabilities. The result is a multi-year snapshot of temperature and emissions, allowing for future estimates of greenhouse gas emissions.

  15. A close look to subthreshold kinetic emission from clean metal surfaces: "Surface-assisted kinetic emission" and "potential excitation of plasmons"

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Winter, H. P.; Aumayr, F.; Lörinčík, Jan; Šroubek, Zdeněk

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 4 (2002), s. 548-550 ISSN 0367-6765 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/99/0881 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : electron-emission * slow ions * Al(111) Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.088, year: 2001

  16. Commentary Relative to the Emission Spectrum of the Solar Atmosphere: Further Evidence for a Distinct Solar Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The chromosphere and corona of the Sun represent tenuous regions which are characterized by numerous optically thin emission lines in the ultraviolet and X-ray bands. When observed from the center of the solar disk outward, these emission lines experience modest brightening as the limb is approached. The intensity of many ultraviolet and X-ray emission lines nearly doubles when observation is extended just beyond the edge of the disk. These findings indicate that the solar body is opaque in this frequency range and that an approximately two fold greater region of the solar atmosphere is being sampled outside the limb. These observations provide strong support for the presence of a distinct solar surface. Therefore, the behavior of the emission lines in this frequency range constitutes the twenty fifth line of evidence that the Sun is comprised of condensed matter

  17. Surface modification by vacuum annealing for field emission from heavily phosphorus-doped homoepitaxial (1 1 1) diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Takatoshi; Nebel, Christoph E.; Somu, Kumaragurubaran; Shikata, Shin-ichi

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between field emission properties and C 1s core level shifts of heavily phosphorus-doped homoepitaxial (1 1 1) diamond is investigated as a function of annealing temperature in order to optimize surface carbon bonding configurations for device applications. A low field emission threshold voltage is observed from surfaces annealed at 800 deg. C for hydrogen-plasma treated surface, while a low field emission threshold voltage of wet-chemical oxidized surface is observed after annealing at 900 deg. C. The C 1s core level by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) showed a shoulder peak at 1 eV below the main peak over 800 and 900 deg. C annealing temperature for hydrogen-plasma treated and wet-chemical oxidized surfaces, respectively. When the shoulder peak intensity is less than 10% of the main peak intensity, lower threshold voltages are observed. This is due to the carbon-reconstruction which gives rise to a small positive electron affinity. By increasing annealing temperature, the shoulder peak ratios also increase, which indicates that a surface graphitization takes place. This leads to higher threshold voltages

  18. Legal Portion in Russian Inheritance Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inshina, Roza; Murzalimova, Lyudmila

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the authors describe the right to inherit as one of the basic human rights guaranteed by the Constitution of the Russian Federation. The state has set rules according to which after a person's death, his or her property is inherited by other persons. The Russian civil legislation establishes the institution of legal portions that is…

  19. Carving up Word Meaning: Portioning and Grinding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisson, S.; Frazier, L.

    2005-01-01

    Two eye-tracking experiments investigated the processing of mass nouns used as count nouns and count nouns used as mass nouns. Following Copestake and Briscoe (1995), the basic or underived sense of a word was treated as the input to a derivational rule (''grinding'' or ''portioning'') which produced the derived sense as output. It was…

  20. Hardware compression using common portions of data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jichuan; Viswanathan, Krishnamurthy

    2015-03-24

    Methods and devices are provided for data compression. Data compression can include receiving a plurality of data chunks, sampling at least some of the plurality of data chunks extracting a common portion from a number of the plurality of data chunks based on the sampling, and storing a remainder of the plurality of data chunks in memory.

  1. Surface properties and field emission characteristics of chemical vapor deposition diamond grown on Fe/Si substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirakuri, Kenji; Yokoyama, Takahiro; Enomoto, Hirofumi; Mutsukura, Nobuki; Friedbacher, Gernot

    2001-01-01

    Electron field emission characteristics of diamond grains fabricated on iron dot-patterned silicon (Fe/Si) substrates at different methane concentrations have been investigated. The characteristics of the samples could be improved by control of the methane concentration during diamond fabrication. Etching treatment of the as-grown diamond has enhanced the emission properties both with respect to current and threshold voltage. In order to study the influence of etching effects on the field emission characteristics, the respective surfaces were studied by Raman spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA). ESCA revealed intensive graphite and FeO x peaks on the sample surface grown at high methane concentration. For the etched samples, the peaks of diamond and silicon carbide were observed, and the peaks of nondiamond carbon disappeared. The experimental results show that the etching process removes graphitic and nondiamond carbon components. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  2. Onset of surface stimulated emission at 260 nm from AlGaN multiple quantum wells

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Xiaohang; Xie, Hongen; Ponce, Fernando A.; Ryou, Jae-Hyun; Detchprohm, Theeradetch; Dupuis, Russell D.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated onset of deep-ultraviolet (DUV) surface stimulated emission (SE) from c-plane AlGaNmultiple-quantum well(MQW)heterostructuresgrown on a sapphire substrate by optical pumping at room temperature. The onset of SE became observable at a

  3. Method for measurement of emissivity and absorptivity of highly reflective surfaces from 20 K to room temperatures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Králík, Tomáš; Musilová, Věra; Hanzelka, Pavel; Frolec, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 2 (2016), s. 743-753 ISSN 0026-1394 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-07397S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : absorptivity * emissivity * radiative heat transfer * metallic surfaces * cryogenics * uncertainty evaluation Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 3.411, year: 2016

  4. Stimulated emission of surface plasmon polaritons by lead-sulphide quantum dots at near infra-red wavelengths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radko, Ilya P.; Nielsen, Michael Grøndahl; Albrektsen, Ole

    2010-01-01

    Amplification of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) in planar metal-dielectric structure through stimulated emission is investigated using leakage-radiation microscopy configuration. The gain medium is a thin polymethylmethacrylate layer doped with lead-sulphide nanocrystals emitting at near-infrared...

  5. Effects of piston surface treatments on performance and emissions of a methanol-fueled, direct injection, stratified charge engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, B.; Green, J.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of thermal barrier coatings and/or surface treatments on the performance and emissions of a methanol-fueled, direct-injection, stratified-charge (DISC) engine. A Ricardo Hydra Mark III engine was used for this work and in previous experiments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The primary focus of the study was to examine the effects of various piston insert surface treatments on hydrocarbon (HC) and oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) emissions. Previous studies have shown that engines of this class have a tendency to perform poorly at low loads and have high unburned fuel emissions. A blank aluminum piston was modified to employ removable piston bowl inserts. Four different inserts were tested in the experiment: aluminum, stainless steel with a 1.27-mm (0.050-in.) air gap (to act as a thermal barrier), and two stainless steel/air-gap inserts with coatings. Two stainless steel inserts were dimensionally modified to account for the coating thickness (1.27-mm) and coated identically with partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ). One of the coated inserts then had an additional seal-coat applied. The coated inserts were otherwise identical to the stainless steel/air-gap insert (i.e., they employed the same 1.27-mm air gap). Thermal barrier coatings were employed in an attempt to increase combustion chamber surface temperatures, thereby reducing wall quenching and promoting more complete combustion of the fuel in the quench zone. The seal-coat was applied to the zirconia to reduce the surface porosity; previous research suggested that despite the possibly higher surface temperatures obtainable with a ceramic coating, the high surface area of a plasma-sprayed coating may actually allow fuel to adhere to the surface and increase the unburned fuel emissions and fuel consumption.

  6. A Climatology of dust emission in northern Africa using surface observations from 1984-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, Sophie; Knippertz, Peter; Marsham, John

    2014-05-01

    The huge quantity of mineral dust emitted annually from northern Africa makes this area crucial to the global dust cycle. Once in the atmosphere, dust aerosols have a significant impact on the global radiation budget, clouds, the carbon cycle and can even act as a fertilizer to rain forests in South America. Current model estimates of dust production from northern Africa are uncertain. At the heart of this problem is insufficient understanding of key dust emitting processes such as haboobs (cold pools generated through evaporation of convective precipitation), low-level jets (LLJs) and dry convection (dust devils and dust plumes). Scarce observations in this region, in particular in the Sahara, make model evaluation difficult. This work uses long-term surface observations from 70 stations situated in the Sahara and Sahel to explore the diurnal, seasonal and geographical variations in dust emission events and thresholds. Quality flags are applied to each station to indicate a day-time bias or gaps in the time period 1984-2012. The frequency of dust emission (FDE) is calculated using the present weather codes (WW) of SYNOP reports, where WW = 07,08,09,30-35 and 98. Thresholds are investigated by estimating the wind speeds for which there is a 25%, 50% and 75% probability of dust emission. The 50% threshold is used to calculate strong wind frequency (SWF) and the diagnostic parameter dust uplift potential (DUP); a thresholded cubic function of wind-speed which quantifies the dust generating power of winds. Stations are grouped into 6 areas (North Algeria, Central Sahara, Egypt, West Sahel, Central Sahel and Sudan) for more in-depth analysis of these parameters. Spatially, thresholds are highest in northern Algeria and lowest in the Sahel around the latitude band 16N-21N. Annual mean FDE is anti-correlated with the threshold, showing the importance of spatial variations in thresholds for mean dust emission. The annual cycles of FDE and SWF for the 6 grouped areas are

  7. Scenarios for global emissions from air traffic. The development of regional and gridded (5 degrees x 5 degrees) emissions scenarios for aircraft and for surface sources, based on CPB scenarios and existing emission inventories for aircraft and surface sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olivier JGJ; LAE

    1995-01-01

    An estimate was made of present global emissions from air traffic using statistical information on fuel consumption, aircraft types and applying emission factors for various compounds. To generate scenarios for future emissions from air traffic, assumptions were used regarding the development of the

  8. Enhancing Optically Pumped Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Perovskite Amplified Spontaneous Emission via Compound Surface Plasmon Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Wu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite has attracted intensive attention from researchers as the gain medium in lasing devices. However, achieving electrically driven lasing remains a significant challenge. Modifying the devices’ structure to enhance the optically pumped amplified spontaneous emission (ASE is the key issue. In this work, gold nanoparticles (Au NPs are first doped into PEDOT: PSS buffer layer in a slab waveguide device structure: Quartz/PEDOT: PSS (with or w/o Au NPs/CH3NH3PbBr3. As a result, the facile device shows a significantly enhanced ASE intensity and a narrowed full width at half maximum. Based on experiments and theoretical simulation data, the improvement is mainly a result of the compound surface plasmon resonance, including simultaneous near- and far-field effects, both of which could increase the density of excitons excited state and accelerate the radiative decay process. This method is highly significant for the design and development and fabrication of high-performance organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite lasing diodes.

  9. Natural emissions under future climate condition and their effects on surface ozone in the Yangtze River Delta region, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Min; Shu, Lei; Wang, Ti-jian; Liu, Qian; Gao, Da; Li, Shu; Zhuang, Bing-liang; Han, Yong; Li, Meng-meng; Chen, Pu-long

    2017-02-01

    The natural emissions of ozone precursors (NOx and VOCs) are sensitive to climate. Future climate change can impact O3 concentrations by perturbing these emissions. To better estimate the variation of natural emissions under different climate conditions and understand its effect on surface O3, we model the present and the future air quality over the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) region by running different simulations with the aid of the WRF-CALGRID model system that contains a natural emission module. Firstly, we estimate the natural emissions at present and in IPCC A1B scenario. The results show that biogenic VOC emission and soil NOx emission over YRD in 2008 is 657 Gg C and 19.1 Gg N, respectively. According to climate change, these emissions in 2050 will increase by 25.5% and 11.5%, respectively. Secondly, the effects of future natural emissions and meteorology on surface O3 are investigated and compared. It is found that the variations in meteorological fields can significantly alter the spatial distribution of O3 over YRD, with the increases of 5-15 ppb in the north and the decreases of -5 to -15 ppb in the south. However, only approximately 20% of the surface O3 increases caused by climate change can be attributed to the natural emissions, with the highest increment up to 2.4 ppb. Finally, Ra (the ratio of impacts from NOx and VOCs on O3 formation) and H2O2/HNO3 (the ratio between the concentrations of H2O2 and HNO3) are applied to study the O3 sensitivity in YRD. The results show that the transition value of H2O2/HNO3 will turn from 0.3 to 0.5 in 2008 to 0.4-0.8 in 2050. O3 formation in the YRD region will be insensitive to VOCs under future climate condition, implying more NOx need to be cut down. Our findings can help us understand O3 variation trend and put forward the reasonable and effective pollution control policies in these famous polluted areas.

  10. Atmospheric characterization through fused mobile airborne and surface in situ surveys: methane emissions quantification from a producing oil field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leifer, Ira; Melton, Christopher; Fischer, Marc L.; Fladeland, Matthew; Frash, Jason; Gore, Warren; Iraci, Laura T.; Marrero, Josette E.; Ryoo, Ju-Mee; Tanaka, Tomoaki; Yates, Emma L.

    2018-03-01

    Methane (CH4) inventory uncertainties are large, requiring robust emission derivation approaches. We report on a fused airborne-surface data collection approach to derive emissions from an active oil field near Bakersfield, central California. The approach characterizes the atmosphere from the surface to above the planetary boundary layer (PBL) and combines downwind trace gas concentration anomaly (plume) above background with normal winds to derive flux. This approach does not require a well-mixed PBL; allows explicit, data-based, uncertainty evaluation; and was applied to complex topography and wind flows. In situ airborne (collected by AJAX - the Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment) and mobile surface (collected by AMOG - the AutoMObile trace Gas - Surveyor) data were collected on 19 August 2015 to assess source strength. Data included an AMOG and AJAX intercomparison transect profiling from the San Joaquin Valley (SJV) floor into the Sierra Nevada (0.1-2.2 km altitude), validating a novel surface approach for atmospheric profiling by leveraging topography. The profile intercomparison found good agreement in multiple parameters for the overlapping altitude range from 500 to 1500 m for the upper 5 % of surface winds, which accounts for wind-impeding structures, i.e., terrain, trees, buildings, etc. Annualized emissions from the active oil fields were 31.3 ± 16 Gg methane and 2.4 ± 1.2 Tg carbon dioxide. Data showed the PBL was not well mixed at distances of 10-20 km downwind, highlighting the importance of the experimental design.

  11. Microwave remote sensing: Active and passive. Volume 2 - Radar remote sensing and surface scattering and emission theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Moore, R. K.; Fung, A. K.

    1982-01-01

    The fundamental principles of radar backscattering measurements are presented, including measurement statistics, Doppler and pulse discrimination techniques, and associated ambiguity functions. The operation of real and synthetic aperture sidelooking airborne radar systems is described, along with the internal and external calibration techniques employed in scattering measurements. Attention is given to the physical mechanisms responsible for the scattering emission behavior of homogeneous and inhomogeneous media, through a discussion of surface roughness, dielectric properties and inhomogeneity, and penetration depth. Simple semiempirical models are presented. Theoretical models involving greater mathematical sophistication are also given for extended ocean and bare soil surfaces, and the more general case of a vegetation canopy over a rough surface.

  12. Nanoparticle Enhanced Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy: Effect of nanoparticles deposited on sample surface on laser ablation and plasma emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Giacomo, A.; Gaudiuso, R.; Koral, C.; Dell'Aglio, M.; De Pascale, O.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the use of metallic nanoparticles (NPs) for improving Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is discussed. In the case of conductors an emission signal enhancement up to 1–2 orders of magnitude was obtained depositing NPs on the sample surface by drying a micro-drop of colloidal solution. The basic mechanisms of Nanoparticle Enhanced LIBS (NELIBS) were studied and the main causes of this significantly large enhancement were found to be related to the effect of NPs on the laser ablation process, in terms of a faster and more efficient production of seed electrons with respect to conventional LIBS. The characteristics of NELIBS-produced plasma were investigated by emission spectroscopy and spectrally resolved images. In spite of similar plasma parameters, the NELIBS plasma was found to have larger emission volume and longer persistence than the LIBS one. A method to determine NP concentration and size was also proposed, which involved depositing NPs on non-interacting substrates, and proved the feasibility of LIBS as a fast detection tool for a preliminary characterization of NPs. - Highlights: • Effect of NPs on sample surface enables instantaneous field emission. • More efficient ablation • LIBS emission enhancement up to 1–2 orders of magnitude • Possibility of NP characterization in terms of concentration and size

  13. Low-Computation Strategies for Extracting CO2 Emission Trends from Surface-Level Mixing Ratio Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shusterman, A.; Kim, J.; Lieschke, K.; Newman, C.; Cohen, R. C.

    2017-12-01

    Global momentum is building for drastic, regulated reductions in greenhouse gas emissions over the coming decade. With this increasing regulation comes a clear need for increasingly sophisticated monitoring, reporting, and verification (MRV) strategies capable of enforcing and optimizing emissions-related policy, particularly as it applies to urban areas. Remote sensing and/or activity-based emission inventories can offer MRV insights for entire sectors or regions, but are not yet sophisticated enough to resolve unexpected trends in specific emitters. Urban surface monitors can offer the desired proximity to individual greenhouse gas sources, but due to the densely-packed nature of typical urban landscapes, surface observations are rarely representative of a single source. Most previous efforts to decompose these complex signals into their contributing emission processes have involved inverse atmospheric modeling techniques, which are computationally intensive and believed to depend heavily on poorly understood a priori estimates of error covariance. Here we present a number of transparent, low-computation approaches for extracting source-specific emissions estimates from signals with a variety of nearfield influences. Using observations from the first several years of the BErkeley Atmospheric CO2 Observation Network (BEACO2N), we demonstrate how to exploit strategic pairings of monitoring "nodes," anomalous wind conditions, and well-understood temporal variations to hone in on specific CO2 sources of interest. When evaluated against conventional, activity-based bottom-up emission inventories, these strategies are seen to generate quantitatively rigorous emission estimates. With continued application as the BEACO2N data set grows in time and space, these approaches offer a promising avenue for optimizing greenhouse gas mitigation strategies into the future.

  14. Role of Surface Wind and Vegetation Cover in Multi-decadal Variations of Dust Emission in the Sahara and Sahel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong; Chin, Mian; Remer, Lorraine A.; Diehl, Thomas L.; Bian, Huisheng; Yu, Hongbin; Brown, Molly E.; Stockwell, William R.

    2016-01-01

    North Africa, the world's largest dust source, is non-uniform, consisting of a permanently arid region (Sahara), a semi-arid region (Sahel), and a relatively moist vegetated region (Savanna), each with very different rainfall patterns and surface conditions. This study aims to better understand the controlling factors that determine the variation of dust emission in North Africa over a 27-year period from 1982 to 2008, using observational data and model simulations. The results show that the model-derived Saharan dust emission is only correlated with the 10-m winds (W10m) obtained from reanalysis data, but the model-derived Sahel dust emission is correlated with both W10m and the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) that is obtained from satellite. While the Saharan dust accounts for 82 of the continental North Africa dust emission (1340-1570 Tg year(exp -1) in the 27-year average, the Sahel accounts for 17 with a larger seasonal and inter-annual variation (230-380 Tg year(exp -1), contributing about a quarter of the transatlantic dust transported to the northern part of South America. The decreasing dust emission trend over the 27-year period is highly correlated with W10m over the Sahara (R equals 0.92). Over the Sahel, the dust emission is correlated with W10m (R 0.69) but is also anti-correlated with the trend of NDVI (R equals 0.65). W10m is decreasing over both the Sahara and the Sahel between 1982 and 2008, and the trends are correlated (R equals 0.53), suggesting that Saharan Sahelian surface winds are a coupled system, driving the inter-annual variation of dust emission.

  15. AMSR-E/Aqua Monthly Global Microwave Land Surface Emissivity, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set is a global land emissivity product using passive microwave observations from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observing System...

  16. Field investigation to assess nutrient emission from paddy field to surface water in river catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogure, Kanami; Aichi, Masaatsu; Zessner, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    In order to maintain good river environment, it is remarkably important to understand and to control nutrient behavior such as Nitrogen and Phosphorus. Our former research dealing with nutrient emission analysis in the Tone River basin area in Japan, in addition to urban and industrial waste water, nutrient emission from agricultural activity is dominant pollution source into the river system. Japanese style agriculture produces large amount of rice and paddy field occupies large areas in Japanese river basin areas. While paddy field can deteriorate river water quality by outflow of fertilizer, it is also suggested that paddy field has water purification function. As we carried out investigation in the Tone River Basin area, data were obtained which dissolved nitrogen concentration is lower in discharging water from paddy field than inflowing water into the field. Regarding to nutrient emission impact from paddy field, sufficient data are required to discuss quantitatively seasonal change of material behavior including flooding season and dry season, difference of climate condition, soil type, and rice species, to evaluate year round comprehensive impact from paddy field to the river system. In this research, field survey in paddy field and data collection relating rice production were carried out as a preliminary investigation to assess how Japanese style paddy field contributes year round on surface water quality. Study sites are three paddy fields located in upper reach of the Tone River basin area. The fields are flooded from June to September. In 2014, field investigations were carried out three times in flooding period and twice in dry period. To understand characteristics of each paddy field and seasonal tendency accompanying weather of agricultural event, short term investigations were conducted and we prepare for further long term investigation. Each study site has irrigation water inflow and outflow. Two sites have tile drainage system under the field and

  17. Temperature dependence of photon-enhanced thermionic emission from GaAs surface with nonequilibrium Cs overlayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuravlev, A.G. [Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Pr. Lavrentieva, 13, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova, 2, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Alperovich, V.L., E-mail: alper@isp.nsc.ru [Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Pr. Lavrentieva, 13, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova, 2, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Electronic properties of Cs/GaAs surface are studied at elevated temperatures. • Heating to ∼100 °C strongly affects photoemission current and surface band bending. • For θ < 0.4 ML photoemission current relaxation is due to band bending. • A spectral proof of the PETE process is obtained at Cs/GaAs thermal cycling. - Abstract: The temperature influence on the Cs/GaAs surface electronic properties, which determine the photon-enhanced thermionic emission (PETE), is studied. It was found that heating to moderate temperatures of about 100 °C leads to substantial changes in the magnitude and shape of Cs coverage dependences of photoemission current and surface band bending, along with the changes of relaxation kinetics after Cs deposition. A spectral proof of the PETE process is obtained under thermal cycling of the Cs/GaAs surface with 0.45 monolayer (ML) of Cs.

  18. Husbandry Emissions Estimation: Fusion of Mobile Surface and Airborne Remote Sensing and Mobile Surface In Situ Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leifer, I.; Hall, J. L.; Melton, C.; Tratt, D. M.; Chang, C. S.; Buckland, K. N.; Frash, J.; Leen, J. B.; Van Damme, M.; Clarisse, L.

    2017-12-01

    Emissions of methane and ammonia from intensive animal husbandry are important drivers of climate and photochemical and aerosol pollution. Husbandry emission estimates are somewhat uncertain because of their dependence on practices, temperature, micro-climate, and other factors, leading to variations in emission factors up to an order-of-magnitude. Mobile in situ measurements are increasingly being applied to derive trace gas emissions by Gaussian plume inversion; however, inversion with incomplete information can lead to erroneous emissions and incorrect source location. Mobile in situ concentration and wind data and mobile remote sensing column data from the Chino Dairy Complex in the Los Angeles Basin were collected near simultaneously (within 1-10 s, depending on speed) while transecting plumes, approximately orthogonal to winds. This analysis included airborne remote sensing trace gas information. MISTIR collected vertical column FTIR data simultaneously with in situ concentration data acquired by the AMOG-Surveyor while both vehicles traveled in convoy. The column measurements are insensitive to the turbulence characterization needed in Gaussian plume inversion of concentration data and thus provide a flux reference for evaluating in situ data inversions. Four different approaches were used on inversions for a single dairy, and also for the aggregate dairy complex plume. Approaches were based on differing levels of "knowledge" used in the inversion from solely the in situ platform and a single gas to a combination of information from all platforms and multiple gases. Derived dairy complex fluxes differed significantly from those estimated by other studies of the Chino complex. Analysis of long term satellite data showed that this most likely results from seasonality effects, highlighting the pitfalls of applying annualized extensions of flux measurements to a single campaign instantiation.

  19. Decadal changes in global surface NOx emissions from multi-constituent satellite data assimilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Miyazaki

    2017-01-01

    underestimation of soil NOx sources in the emission inventories. Despite the large trends observed for individual regions, the global total emission is almost constant between 2005 (47.9 Tg N yr−1 and 2014 (47.5 Tg N yr−1.

  20. Tunable emission in surface passivated Mn-ZnS nanophosphors and its application for Glucose sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Sharma

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The present work describes the tunable emission in inorganic-organic hybrid NPs which can be useful for optoelectronic and biosensing applications. In this work, Mn- ZnS nanoparticles emitting various colors, including blue and orange, were synthesized by simple chemical precipitation method using chitosan as a capping agent. Earlier reports describe that emission color characteristics in nanoparticles are tuned by varying particle size and with doping concentration. Here in this article tunable emission has been achieved by varying excitation wavelength in a single sample. This tunable emission property with high emission intensity was further achieved by changing capping concentration keeping host Mn-ZnS concentration same. Tunable emission is explained by FRET mechanism. Commission Internationale de l’Eclairage (CIE chromaticity coordinates shifts from (0.273, 0.20 and (0.344, 0.275 for same naocrystals by suitably tuning excitation energy from higher and lower ultra-violet (UV range. Synthesized nanoparticles have been characterized by X-ray diffraction, SEM, HRTEM, UV- Visible absorption and PL spectroscopy for structural and optical studies. Using tunable emission property, these highly emissive nanoparticles functionalized with biocompatible polymer chitosan were further used for glucose sensing applications.

  1. Selective enhancement of surface-state emission and simultaneous quenching of interband transition in white-luminophor CdS nanocrystals using localized plasmon coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozel, Tuncay; Soganci, Ibrahim Murat; Nizamoglu, Sedat; Huyal, Ilkem Ozge; Mutlugun, Evren; Demir, Hilmi Volkan [Department of Physics, Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Nanotechnology Research Center and Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Sapra, Sameer; Gaponik, Nikolai; Eychmueller, Alexander [Physical Chemistry/Electrochemistry Group, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Bergstr. 66b, Dresden 01062 (Germany)], E-mail: volkan@bilkent.edu.tr

    2008-08-15

    We propose and demonstrate the controlled modification and selective enhancement of surface-state emission in white-luminophor CdS nanocrystals (NCs) by plasmon-coupling them with proximal metal nanostructures. By carefully designing nano-Ag films to match their localized plasmon resonance spectrally with the surface-state emission peak of CdS NCs, we experimentally show that the surface-state emission is substantially enhanced in the visible wavelength, while the interband (band-edge) transition at the shorter wavelength far away from the plasmon resonance is simultaneously significantly suppressed. With such plasmon tuning and consequent strong plasmon coupling specifically for the surface-state transitions, the surface-state emission is made stronger than the band-edge emission. This corresponds to an enhancement factor of 12.7-fold in the ratio of the surface-state peak emission to the band-edge peak emission of the plasmon-coupled film sample compared with that in solution. Such a plasmonic engineering of surface-state emission in trap-rich CdS white nanoluminophors holds great promise for future solid-state lighting.

  2. Selective enhancement of surface-state emission and simultaneous quenching of interband transition in white-luminophor CdS nanocrystals using localized plasmon coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozel, Tuncay; Soganci, Ibrahim Murat; Nizamoglu, Sedat; Huyal, Ilkem Ozge; Mutlugun, Evren; Demir, Hilmi Volkan; Sapra, Sameer; Gaponik, Nikolai; Eychmueller, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate the controlled modification and selective enhancement of surface-state emission in white-luminophor CdS nanocrystals (NCs) by plasmon-coupling them with proximal metal nanostructures. By carefully designing nano-Ag films to match their localized plasmon resonance spectrally with the surface-state emission peak of CdS NCs, we experimentally show that the surface-state emission is substantially enhanced in the visible wavelength, while the interband (band-edge) transition at the shorter wavelength far away from the plasmon resonance is simultaneously significantly suppressed. With such plasmon tuning and consequent strong plasmon coupling specifically for the surface-state transitions, the surface-state emission is made stronger than the band-edge emission. This corresponds to an enhancement factor of 12.7-fold in the ratio of the surface-state peak emission to the band-edge peak emission of the plasmon-coupled film sample compared with that in solution. Such a plasmonic engineering of surface-state emission in trap-rich CdS white nanoluminophors holds great promise for future solid-state lighting

  3. Surface ozone seasonality under global change: Influence from dry deposition and isoprene emissions at northern mid-latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, O.; Paulot, F.; Fiore, A. M.; Horowitz, L. W.; Malyshev, S.; Shevliakova, E.; Correa, G. J. P.; Lin, M.

    2017-12-01

    Identifying the contributions of nonlinear chemistry and transport to observed surface ozone seasonal cycles over land using global models relies on an accurate representation of ozone uptake by vegetation (dry deposition). It is well established that in the absence of ozone precursor emission changes, a warming climate will increase surface ozone in polluted regions, and that a rise in temperature-dependent isoprene emissions would exacerbate this "climate penalty". However, the influence of changes in ozone dry deposition, expected to evolve with climate and land use, is often overlooked in air quality projections. With a new scheme that represents dry deposition within the NOAA GFDL dynamic vegetation land model (LM3) coupled to the NOAA GFDL atmospheric chemistry-climate model (AM3), we simulate the impact of 21st century climate and land use on ozone dry deposition and isoprene emissions. This dry deposition parameterization is a version of the Wesely scheme, but uses parameters explicitly calculated by LM3 that respond to climate and land use (e.g., stomatal conductance, canopy interception of water, leaf area index). The parameterization includes a nonstomatal deposition dependence on humidity. We evaluate climatological present-day seasonal cycles of ozone deposition velocities and abundances with those observed at northern mid-latitude sites. With a set of 2010s and 2090s decadal simulations under a high climate warming scenario (RCP8.5) and a sensitivity simulation with well-mixed greenhouse gases following RCP8.5 but air pollutants held at 2010 levels (RCP8.5_WMGG), we examine changes in surface ozone seasonal cycles. We build on our previous findings, which indicate that strong reductions in anthropogenic NOx emissions under RCP8.5 cause the surface ozone seasonal cycle over the NE USA to reverse, shifting from a summer peak at present to a winter peak by 2100. Under RCP8.5_WMGG, we parse the separate effects of climate and land use on ozone dry

  4. Surface defect assisted broad spectra emission from CdSe quantum dots for white LED application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Boni; Mathew, S.; Anand, V. R.; Correya, Adrine Antony; Nampoori, V. P. N.; Mujeeb, A.

    2018-02-01

    This paper reports, broadband photoluminescence from CdSe quantum dots (QDs) under the excitation of 403 nm using fluorimeter and 403 nm CW laser excitation. The broad spectrum obtained from the colloidal quantum dots was ranges from 450 nm to 800 nm. The broadness of the spectra was attributed to the merging of band edge and defect driven emissions from the QDs. Six different sizes of particles were prepared via kinetic growth method by using CdO and elemental Se as sources of Cd and Se respectively. The particle sizes were measured from TEM images. The size dependent effect on broad emission was also studied and the defect state emission was found to be predominant in very small QDs. The defect driven emission was also observed to be redshifted, similar to the band edge emission, due to quantum confinement effect. The emission corresponding to different laser power was also studied and a linear relation was obtained. In order to study the colour characteristics of the emission, CIE chromaticity coordinate, CRI and CCT of the prepared samples were measured. It is observed that, these values were tunable by the addition of suitable intensity of blue light from the excitation source to yield white light of various colour temperatures. The broad photoluminescence spectrum of the QDs, were compared with that of a commercially available white LED. It was found that the prepared QDs are good alternatives for the phosphor in phosphor converted white LEDs, to provide good spectral tunability.

  5. Denitrifiers in the surface zone are primarily responsible for the nitrous oxide emission of dairy manure compost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, Koki, E-mail: k_maeda@affrc.go.jp [Dairy Research Division, National Agricultural Research Center for Hokkaido Region, National Agricultural and Food Research Organization, 1 Hitsujigaoka, Sapporo 062-8555 (Japan); Department of Environmental Chemistry and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Toyoda, Sakae [Department of Environmental Chemistry and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Hanajima, Dai [Dairy Research Division, National Agricultural Research Center for Hokkaido Region, National Agricultural and Food Research Organization, 1 Hitsujigaoka, Sapporo 062-8555 (Japan); Yoshida, Naohiro [Department of Environmental Chemistry and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan)

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) productions of each compost zones were compared. ► The pile surface emitted significant fluxes of N{sub 2}O. ► The isotopic signature of N{sub 2}O from surface and NO{sub 2}{sup −} amended core were different. ► The denitrifying gene abundance was significantly higher in pile surface than the pile core. -- Abstract: During the dairy manure composting process, significant nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) emissions occur just after the pile turnings. To understand the characteristics of this N{sub 2}O emission, samples were taken from the compost surface and core independently, and the N{sub 2}O production was monitored in laboratory incubation experiments. Equal amounts of surface and core samples were mixed to simulate the turning, and the {sup 15}N isotope ratios within the molecules of produced N{sub 2}O were analyzed by isotopomer analysis. The results showed that the surface samples emitted significant levels of N{sub 2}O, and these emissions were correlated with NO{sub x}{sup −}-N accumulation. Moreover, the surface samples and surface-core mixed samples incubated at 30 °C produced N{sub 2}O with a low site preference (SP) value (−0.9 to 7.0‰) that was close to bacteria denitrification (0‰), indicating that denitrifiers in the surface samples are responsible for this N{sub 2}O production. On the other hand, N{sub 2}O produced by NO{sub 2}{sup −}-amended core samples and surface samples incubated at 60 °C showed unrecognized isotopic signatures (SP = 11.4–20.3‰). From these results, it was revealed that the N{sub 2}O production occurring just after the turnings was mainly derived from bacterial denitrification (including nitrifier denitrification) of NO{sub x}{sup −}-N under mesophilic conditions, and surface denitrifying bacteria appeared to be the main contributor to this process.

  6. N2O emission from plant surfaces – light stimulated and a global phenomenon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Bruhn, Dan; Ambus, Per

    2017-01-01

    for the first time N2O emission fromterrestrial vegetation in response to natural solar ultra violet radiation. We conducted field site measurementsto investigate N2O atmosphere exchange from grass vegetation exposed to solar irradiance with and withoutUV-screening. Further laboratory tests were conducted...... with a range of species to study the controls and possibleloci of UV-induced N2O emission from plants. Plants released N2O in response to natural sunlight at rates of c.20-50 nmol m-2 h-1, mostly due to the UV component. The emission rate is temperature dependent with a ratherhigh activation energy indicative...

  7. Incident ion charge state dependence of electron emission during slow multicharged ion-surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, I.G.; Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P.A.; Havener, C.C.; Overbury, S.H.; Robinson, M.T.; Zehner, D.M.; Meyer, F.W.

    1992-01-01

    Characteristic variations in the total electron yield γ as a function of crystal azimuthal orientation are reported for slow N 2+ , N 5+ and N 6+ ions incident on a Au(011) single crystal, together with measurements of γ as a function of incident ion velocity. Kinetic electron emission is shown to arise predominantly in close collisions between incident ions and target atoms, and potential electron emission is found to be essentially constant within our present velocity range. The incident ion charge state is shown to play no role in kinetic electron emission. Extremely fast neutralization times of the order of 10 - 15 secs are needed to explain the observations

  8. Estimation of nocturnal CO2 and N2O soil emissions from changes in surface boundary layer mass storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Richard H.; Omonode, Rex A.

    2018-04-01

    Annual budgets of greenhouse and other trace gases require knowledge of the emissions throughout the year. Unfortunately, emissions into the surface boundary layer during stable, calm nocturnal periods are not measurable using most micrometeorological methods due to non-stationarity and uncoupled flow. However, during nocturnal periods with very light winds, carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) frequently accumulate near the surface and this mass accumulation can be used to determine emissions. Gas concentrations were measured at four heights (one within and three above canopy) and turbulence was measured at three heights above a mature 2.5 m maize canopy from 23 July to 10 September 2015. Nocturnal CO2 and N2O fluxes from the canopy were determined using the accumulation of mass within a 6.3 m control volume and out the top of the control volume within the nocturnal surface boundary layer. Diffusive fluxes were estimated by flux gradient method. The total accumulative and diffusive fluxes during near-calm nights (friction velocities CO2 and 0.53 nmol m-2 s-1 N2O. Fluxes were also measured using chambers. Daily mean CO2 fluxes determined by the accumulation method were 90 to 130 % of those determined using soil chambers. Daily mean N2O fluxes determined by the accumulation method were 60 to 80 % of that determined using soil chambers. The better signal-to-noise ratios of the chamber method for CO2 over N2O, non-stationary flow, assumed Schmidt numbers, and anemometer tilt were likely contributing reasons for the differences in chambers versus accumulated nocturnal mass flux estimates. Near-surface N2O accumulative flux measurements in more homogeneous regions and with greater depth are needed to confirm the conclusion that mass accumulation can be effectively used to estimate soil emissions during nearly calm nights.

  9. Local secondary-electron emission spectra of graphite and gold surfaces obtained using the Scanning Probe Energy Loss Spectrometer (SPELS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawton, J J; Pulisciano, A; Palmer, R E

    2009-01-01

    Secondary-electron emission (SEE) spectra have been obtained with the Scanning Probe Energy Loss Spectrometer at a tip-sample distance of only 50 nm. Such short working distances are required for the best theoretical spatial resolution (<10 nm). The SEE spectra of graphite, obtained as a function of tip bias voltage, are shown to correspond to unoccupied states in the electronic band structure. The SEE spectra of thin gold films demonstrate the capability of identifying (carbonaceous) surface contamination with this technique.

  10. Local secondary-electron emission spectra of graphite and gold surfaces obtained using the Scanning Probe Energy Loss Spectrometer (SPELS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawton, J J; Pulisciano, A; Palmer, R E, E-mail: R.E.Palmer@bham.ac.u [Nanoscale Physics Research Laboratory, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2009-11-25

    Secondary-electron emission (SEE) spectra have been obtained with the Scanning Probe Energy Loss Spectrometer at a tip-sample distance of only 50 nm. Such short working distances are required for the best theoretical spatial resolution (<10 nm). The SEE spectra of graphite, obtained as a function of tip bias voltage, are shown to correspond to unoccupied states in the electronic band structure. The SEE spectra of thin gold films demonstrate the capability of identifying (carbonaceous) surface contamination with this technique.

  11. Tailoring of quantum dot emission efficiency by localized surface plasmon polaritons in self-organized mesoscopic rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margapoti, Emanuela; Gentili, Denis; Amelia, Matteo; Credi, Alberto; Morandi, Vittorio; Cavallini, Massimiliano

    2014-01-21

    We report on the tailoring of quantum dot (QD) emission efficiency by localized surface plasmon polaritons in self-organized mesoscopic rings. Ag nanoparticles (NPs) with CdSe QDs embedded in a polymeric matrix are spatially organised in mesoscopic rings and coupled in a tuneable fashion by breath figure formation. The mean distance between NPs and QDs and consequently the intensity of QD photoluminescence, which is enhanced by the coupling of surface plasmons and excitons, are tuned by acting on the NP concentration.

  12. Total vertical sediment flux and PM10 emissions from disturbed Chihuahuan Desert Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desert surfaces are typically stable and represent some of the oldest landforms on Earth. For surfaces without vegetation, the evolution of a desert pavements of gravel protects the surface from erosive forces and vegetation further protects the surface in arid and semi-arid rangelands. The suscep...

  13. Visual exposure to large and small portion sizes and perceptions of portion size normality: Three experimental studies

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Eric; Oldham, Melissa; Cuckson, Imogen; Brunstrom, Jeffrey M.; Rogers, Peter J.; Hardman, Charlotte A.

    2016-01-01

    Portion sizes of many foods have increased in recent times. In three studies we examined the effect that repeated visual exposure to larger versus smaller food portion sizes has on perceptions of what constitutes a normal-sized food portion and measures of portion size selection. In studies 1 and 2 participants were visually exposed to images of large or small portions of spaghetti bolognese, before making evaluations about an image of an intermediate sized portion of the same food. In study ...

  14. Land Surface Temperature and Emissivity Separation from Cross-Track Infrared Sounder Data with Atmospheric Reanalysis Data and ISSTES Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ze Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS is one of the most advanced hyperspectral instruments and has been used for various atmospheric applications such as atmospheric retrievals and weather forecast modeling. However, because of the specific design purpose of CrIS, little attention has been paid to retrieving land surface parameters from CrIS data. To take full advantage of the rich spectral information in CrIS data to improve the land surface retrievals, particularly the acquisition of a continuous Land Surface Emissivity (LSE spectrum, this paper attempts to simultaneously retrieve a continuous LSE spectrum and the Land Surface Temperature (LST from CrIS data with the atmospheric reanalysis data and the Iterative Spectrally Smooth Temperature and Emissivity Separation (ISSTES algorithm. The results show that the accuracy of the retrieved LSEs and LST is comparable with the current land products. The overall differences of the LST and LSE retrievals are approximately 1.3 K and 1.48%, respectively. However, the LSEs in our study can be provided as a continuum spectrum instead of the single-channel values in traditional products. The retrieved LST and LSEs now can be better used to further analyze the surface properties or improve the retrieval of atmospheric parameters.

  15. Electron emission during interactions of multicharged N and Ar ions with Au(110) and Cu(001) surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, F.W.; Overbury, S.H.; Havener, C.C.; Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P.A.; Burgdoerfer, J.; Zehner, D.M.

    1991-01-01

    We report measurements of energy distributions of electrons emitted during interactions 10q-keV N 6+ , and Ar q+ (q=7,8,9) ions with Au(110) and Cu(001) surfaces at grazing angles. The electron energy distributions have been measured as a function of angle of incidence, observation angle, and target-crystal azimuth. For both Au and Cu targets, the projectile KLL Auger peak observed for the case of the N 6+ projectiles is seen to consist of two components whose intensities have strikingly different dependences on incident perpendicular velocity. The main component of the KLL peak is attributed to subsurface electron emission and is modeled using a Monte Carlo simulation of the projectile trajectories in the bulk. The second component, observed only for the smallest incident perpendicular velocities, is attributed to above-surface KLL Auger electron emission and is modeled using computer simulations of the resonance neutralization-autoionization cascade that occurs prior to projectile penetration of the surface. In the case of the Au target, NNV and NVV transitions, attributed to vacancy transfer from the projectile K shell to the N shell of Au, are also observed. The Monte Carlo simulation of the subsurface contribution to the electron emission is able to reproduce the observed angle-of-incidence dependence of both the projectile and the target Auger electron intensities. In addition, it shows reasonable agreement with the observed dependences of the projectile KLL intensity on observation angle and crystal azimuth

  16. The influence of surface stress on dislocation emission from sharp and blunt cracks in f.c.c. metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiøtz, Jakob

    2000-01-01

    We use computer simulations to study the behaviour of atomically sharp and blunted cracks in various fee metals. The simulations use effective medium potentials which contain many-body interactions. We find that when using potentials representing platinum and gold a sharp crack is stable with res......We use computer simulations to study the behaviour of atomically sharp and blunted cracks in various fee metals. The simulations use effective medium potentials which contain many-body interactions. We find that when using potentials representing platinum and gold a sharp crack is stable...... with respect to the emission of a dislocation from the crack tip, whereas for all other metals studied the sharp crack is unstable. This result cannot be explained by existing criteria for the intrinsic ductile/brittle behaviour of crack tips, but is probably caused by surface stresses. When the crack...... is no longer atomically sharp dislocation emission becomes easier in all the studied metals. The effect is relatively strong; the critical stress intensity factor for emission to occur is reduced by up to 20%. This behaviour appears to be caused by the surface stress near the crack tip. The surface stress...

  17. Greenhouse gas emissions from reservoir water surfaces: A new global synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collectively, reservoirs created by dams are thought to be an important source ofgreenhouse gases (GHGs) to the atmosphere. So far, efforts to quantify, model, andmanage these emissions have been limited by data availability and inconsistenciesin methodological approach. Here we ...

  18. Atmospheric characterization through fused mobile airborne and surface in situ surveys: methane emissions quantification from a producing oil field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Leifer

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Methane (CH4 inventory uncertainties are large, requiring robust emission derivation approaches. We report on a fused airborne–surface data collection approach to derive emissions from an active oil field near Bakersfield, central California. The approach characterizes the atmosphere from the surface to above the planetary boundary layer (PBL and combines downwind trace gas concentration anomaly (plume above background with normal winds to derive flux. This approach does not require a well-mixed PBL; allows explicit, data-based, uncertainty evaluation; and was applied to complex topography and wind flows. In situ airborne (collected by AJAX – the Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment and mobile surface (collected by AMOG – the AutoMObile trace Gas – Surveyor data were collected on 19 August 2015 to assess source strength. Data included an AMOG and AJAX intercomparison transect profiling from the San Joaquin Valley (SJV floor into the Sierra Nevada (0.1–2.2 km altitude, validating a novel surface approach for atmospheric profiling by leveraging topography. The profile intercomparison found good agreement in multiple parameters for the overlapping altitude range from 500 to 1500 m for the upper 5 % of surface winds, which accounts for wind-impeding structures, i.e., terrain, trees, buildings, etc. Annualized emissions from the active oil fields were 31.3 ± 16 Gg methane and 2.4 ± 1.2 Tg carbon dioxide. Data showed the PBL was not well mixed at distances of 10–20 km downwind, highlighting the importance of the experimental design.

  19. A theoretical and numerical study of polarimetric scattering and emission from random rough surfaces with anisotropic directional spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yueh, S. H.; Kwok, R.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, theoretical and numerical results of the polarimetric scattering and emission from random rough surfaces with anisotropic directional spectrum are presented for the remote sensing of ocean and soil surfaces. The polarimetric scattered field for rough dielectric surfaces is derived to the second order by the small perturbation method (SPM). It is found that the second-order scattered field is coherent in nature, and its coefficients for different polarizations present the lowest-order corrections to the Fresnel reflection coefficients of the surfaces. In addition, the cross-polarized (HV and VH) components of the coherent fields are reciprocal and not zero for surfaces with anisotropic directional spectrum when the azimuth angle of the incident direction is not aligned with the symmetry directions of surfaces. In order to verify the energy conservation condition of the theoretical results, which is important if the theory is to be applied to the passive polarimetry of rough surfaces, a Monte Carlo simulation is performed to numerically calculate the polarimetric reflectivities of one-dimensional random rough surfaces which are generated with a prescribed power-law spectrum in the spectral domain and transformed to the spatial domain by the FFT. The surfaces simulated by this approach are periodic with the period corresponding to the low-wavenumber cutoff. To calculate the scattering from periodic dielectric surfaces, the authors present a new numerical technique which applies the Floquet theorem to reduce the problem to one period and does not require the evaluation of one-dimensional periodic Green's function used in the conventional method of moment formulation. Once the scattering coefficients are obtained, the polarimetric Stokes vectors for the emission from the random surfaces are then calculated according to the Kirchhoff's law and are illustrated as functions of relative azimuth observation and row directions. The second-order SPM is also

  20. Onset of surface stimulated emission at 260 nm from AlGaN multiple quantum wells

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Xiaohang

    2015-12-14

    We demonstrated onset of deep-ultraviolet (DUV) surface stimulated emission (SE) from c-plane AlGaNmultiple-quantum well(MQW)heterostructuresgrown on a sapphire substrate by optical pumping at room temperature. The onset of SE became observable at a pumping power density of 630 kW/cm2. Spectral deconvolution revealed superposition of a linearly amplified spontaneous emission peak at λ ∼ 257.0 nm with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of ∼12 nm and a superlinearly amplified SE peak at λ ∼ 260 nm with a narrow FWHM of less than 2 nm. In particular, the wavelength of ∼260 nm is the shortest wavelength of surface SE from III-nitride MQWheterostructures to date. Atomic force microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy measurements were employed to investigate the material and structural quality of the AlGaNheterostructures, showing smooth surface and sharp layer interfaces. This study offers promising results for AlGaNheterostructuresgrown on sapphire substrates for the development of DUV vertical cavity surface emitting lasers(VCSELs).

  1. Onset of surface stimulated emission at 260 nm from AlGaN multiple quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xiaohang; Xie, Hongen; Ponce, Fernando A.; Ryou, Jae-Hyun; Detchprohm, Theeradetch; Dupuis, Russell D.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated onset of deep-ultraviolet (DUV) surface stimulated emission (SE) from c-plane AlGaN multiple-quantum well (MQW) heterostructures grown on a sapphire substrate by optical pumping at room temperature. The onset of SE became observable at a pumping power density of 630 kW/cm 2 . Spectral deconvolution revealed superposition of a linearly amplified spontaneous emission peak at λ ∼ 257.0 nm with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of ∼12 nm and a superlinearly amplified SE peak at λ ∼ 260 nm with a narrow FWHM of less than 2 nm. In particular, the wavelength of ∼260 nm is the shortest wavelength of surface SE from III-nitride MQW heterostructures to date. Atomic force microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy measurements were employed to investigate the material and structural quality of the AlGaN heterostructures, showing smooth surface and sharp layer interfaces. This study offers promising results for AlGaN heterostructures grown on sapphire substrates for the development of DUV vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs)

  2. On the capability of IASI measurements to inform about CO surface emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Szopa

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Between July and November 2008, simultaneous observations were conducted by several orbiting instruments that monitor carbon monoxide in the atmosphere, among them the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Instrument (IASI and Measurements Of Pollution In The Troposphere (MOPITT. In this paper, the concentration retrievals at about 700 hPa from these two instruments are successively used in a variational Bayesian system to infer the global distribution of CO emissions. Starting from a global emission budget of 479 Tg for the considered period, the posterior estimate of CO emissions using IASI retrievals gives a total of 643 Tg, which is in close agreement with the budget calculated with version 3 of the MOPITT data (649 Tg. The regional totals are also broadly consistent between the two inversions. Even though our theoretical error budget indicates that IASI constrains the emissions slightly less than MOPITT, because of lesser sensitivity in the lower troposphere, these first results indicate that IASI may play a major role in the quantification of the emissions of CO.

  3. Enhanced electron emission from coated metal targets: Effect of surface thickness on performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madas, Saibabu; Mishra, S. K.; Upadhyay Kahaly, Mousumi

    2018-03-01

    In this work, we establish an analytical formalism to address the temperature dependent electron emission from a metallic target with thin coating, operating at a finite temperature. Taking into account three dimensional parabolic energy dispersion for the target (base) material and suitable thickness dependent energy dispersion for the coating layer, Fermi Dirac statistics of electron energy distribution and Fowler's mechanism of the electron emission, we discuss the dependence of the emission flux on the physical properties such as the Fermi level, work function, thickness of the coating material, and operating temperature. Our systematic estimation of how the thickness of coating affects the emission current demonstrates superior emission characteristics for thin coating layer at high temperature (above 1000 K), whereas in low temperature regime, a better response is expected from thicker coating layer. This underlying fundamental behavior appears to be essentially identical for all configurations when work function of the coating layer is lower than that of the bulk target work function. The analysis and predictions could be useful in designing new coated materials with suitable thickness for applications in the field of thin film devices and field emitters.

  4. Enhanced electron emission from coated metal targets: Effect of surface thickness on performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saibabu Madas

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we establish an analytical formalism to address the temperature dependent electron emission from a metallic target with thin coating, operating at a finite temperature. Taking into account three dimensional parabolic energy dispersion for the target (base material and suitable thickness dependent energy dispersion for the coating layer, Fermi Dirac statistics of electron energy distribution and Fowler’s mechanism of the electron emission, we discuss the dependence of the emission flux on the physical properties such as the Fermi level, work function, thickness of the coating material, and operating temperature. Our systematic estimation of how the thickness of coating affects the emission current demonstrates superior emission characteristics for thin coating layer at high temperature (above 1000 K, whereas in low temperature regime, a better response is expected from thicker coating layer. This underlying fundamental behavior appears to be essentially identical for all configurations when work function of the coating layer is lower than that of the bulk target work function. The analysis and predictions could be useful in designing new coated materials with suitable thickness for applications in the field of thin film devices and field emitters.

  5. Apparatus and procedure to characterize the surface quality of conductors by measuring the rate of cathode emission as a function of surface electric field strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestayer, Mac; Christo, Steve; Taylor, Mark

    2014-10-21

    A device and method for characterizing quality of a conducting surface. The device including a gaseous ionizing chamber having centrally located inside the chamber a conducting sample to be tested to which a negative potential is applied, a plurality of anode or "sense" wires spaced regularly about the central test wire, a plurality of "field wires" at a negative potential are spaced regularly around the sense, and a plurality of "guard wires" at a positive potential are spaced regularly around the field wires in the chamber. The method utilizing the device to measure emission currents from the conductor.

  6. The role of surface and deep-level defects on the emission of tin oxide quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Vinod; Kumar, Vijay; Som, S; Ntwaeaborwa, O M; Swart, H C; Neethling, J H; Lee, Mike

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the role of surface and deep-level defects on the blue emission of tin oxide quantum dots (SnO 2 QDs) synthesized by the solution-combustion method at different combustion temperatures. X-ray diffraction studies showed the formation of a single rutile SnO 2 phase with a tetragonal lattice structure. High resolution transmission electron microscopy studies revealed an increase in the average dot size from 2.2 to 3.6 nm with an increase of the combustion temperature from 350 to 550 °C. A decrease in the band gap value from 3.37 to 2.76 eV was observed with the increase in dot size due to the quantum confinement effect. The photoluminescence emission was measured for excitation at 325 nm and it showed a broad blue emission band for all the combustion temperatures studied. This was due to the creation of various oxygen and tin vacancies/defects as confirmed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data. The origin of the blue emission in the SnO 2 QDs is discussed with the help of an energy band diagram. (paper)

  7. Flexible Ag-C60 nano-biosensors based on surface plasmon coupled emission for clinical and forensic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulpur, Pradyumna; Yadavilli, Sairam; Mulpur, Praharsha; Kondiparthi, Neeharika; Sengupta, Bishwambhar; Rao, Apparao M; Podila, Ramakrishna; Kamisetti, Venkataramaniah

    2015-10-14

    The relatively low sensitivity of fluorescence detection schemes, which are mainly limited by the isotropic nature of fluorophore emission, can be overcome by utilizing surface plasmon coupled emission (SPCE). In this study, we demonstrate directional emission from fluorophores on flexible Ag-C60 SPCE sensor platforms for point-of-care sensing, in healthcare and forensic sensing scenarios, with at least 10 times higher sensitivity than traditional fluorescence sensing schemes. Adopting the highly sensitive Ag-C60 SPCE platform based on glass and novel low-cost flexible substrates, we report the unambiguous detection of acid-fast Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) bacteria at densities as low as 20 Mtb mm(-2); from non-acid-fast bacteria (e.g., E. coli and S. aureus), and the specific on-site detection of acid-fast sperm cells in human semen samples. In combination with the directional emission and high-sensitivity of SPCE platforms, we also demonstrate the utility of smartphones that can replace expensive and cumbersome detectors to enable rapid hand-held detection of analytes in resource-limited settings; a much needed critical advance to biosensors, for developing countries.

  8. Studying the Impacts of Environmental Factors and Agricultural Management on Methane Emissions from Rice Paddies Using a Land Surface Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, T. S.; Gahlot, S.; Shu, S.; Jain, A. K.; Kheshgi, H. S.

    2017-12-01

    Continued growth in population is projected to drive increased future demand for rice and the methane emissions associated with its production. However, observational studies of methane emissions from rice have reported seemingly conflicting results and do not all support this projection. In this study we couple an ecophysiological process-based rice paddy module and a methane emission module with a land surface model, Integrated Science Assessment Model (ISAM), to study the impacts of various environmental factors and agricultural management practices on rice production and methane emissions from rice fields. This coupled modeling framework accounts for dynamic rice growth processes with adaptation of photosynthesis, rice-specific phenology, biomass accumulation, leaf area development and structures responses to water, temperature, light and nutrient stresses. The coupled model is calibrated and validated with observations from various rice cultivation fields. We find that the differing results of observational studies can be caused by the interactions of environmental factors, including climate, atmospheric CO2 concentration, and N deposition, and agricultural management practices, such as irrigation and N fertilizer applications, with rice production at spatial and temporal scales.

  9. The zonal structure of tropical O3 and CO as observed by the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer in November 2004 – Part 2: Impact of surface emissions on O3 and its precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Osterman

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The impact of surface emissions on the zonal structure of tropical tropospheric ozone and carbon monoxide is investigated for November 2004 using satellite observations, in-situ measurements, and chemical transport models in conjunction with inverse-estimated surface emissions.Vertical ozone profiles from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES and ozone sonde measurements from the Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ network show elevated concentrations of ozone over Indonesia and Australia (60–70 ppb in the lower troposphere against the backdrop of the well-known zonal "wave-one" pattern with ozone concentrations of (70–80 ppb centered over the Atlantic . Observational evidence from TES CO vertical profiles and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI NO2 columns point to regional surface emissions as an important contributor to the elevated ozone over Indonesia. This contribution is investigated with the GEOS-Chem chemistry and transport model using surface emission estimates derived from an optimal inverse model, which was constrained by TES and Measurements Of Pollution In The Troposphere (MOPITT CO profiles (Jones et al., 2009. These a posteriori estimates, which were over a factor of 2 greater than climatological emissions, reduced differences between GEOS-Chem and TES ozone observations by 30–40% over Indonesia. The response of the free tropospheric chemical state to the changes in these emissions is investigated for ozone, CO, NOx, and PAN. Model simulations indicate that ozone over Indonesian/Australian is sensitive to regional changes in surface emissions of NOx but relatively insensitive to lightning NOx. Over sub-equatorial Africa and South America, free tropospheric NOx was reduced in response to increased surface emissions potentially muting ozone production.

  10. NASA's MODIS/VIIRS Land Surface Temperature and Emissivity Products: Asssessment of Accuracy, Continuity and Science Uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulley, G. C.; Malakar, N.; Islam, T.

    2017-12-01

    Land Surface Temperature and Emissivity (LST&E) are an important Earth System Data Record (ESDR) and Environmental Climate Variable (ECV) defined by NASA and GCOS respectively. LST&E data are key variables used in land cover/land use change studies, in surface energy balance and atmospheric water vapor retrieval models and retrievals, and in climate research. LST&E products are currently produced on a routine basis using data from the MODIS instruments on the NASA EOS platforms and by the VIIRS instrument on the Suomi-NPP platform that serves as a bridge between NASA EOS and the next-generation JPSS platforms. Two new NASA LST&E products for MODIS (MxD21) and VIIRS (VNP21) are being produced during 2017 using a new approach that addresses discrepancies in accuracy and consistency between the current suite of split-window based LST products. The new approach uses a Temperature Emissivity Separation (TES) algorithm, originally developed for the ASTER instrument, to physically retrieve both LST and spectral emissivity consistently for both sensors with high accuracy and well defined uncertainties. This study provides a rigorous assessment of accuracy of the MxD21/VNP21 products using temperature- and radiance-based validation strategies and demonstrates continuity between the products using collocated matchups over CONUS. We will further demonstrate potential science use of the new products with studies related to heat waves, monitoring snow melt dynamics, and land cover/land use change.

  11. Analysis of Field Emission of Fabricated Nanogap in Pd Strips for Surface Conduction Electron-Emitter Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Hsiang-Yu; Li, Yiming; Tsai, Chih-Hao; Pan, Fu-Ming

    2008-04-01

    We study the field emission (FE) property of a nanometer-scale gap structure in a palladium strip, which was fabricated by hydrogen absorption under high-pressure treatment. A vigorous cracking process could be accompanied by extensive atomic migration during the hydrogen treatment. A three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain particle-in-cell method is adopted to simulate the electron emission in a surface-conduction electron-emitter display (SED) device. Examinations of conducting characteristics, FE efficiency, the local field around the emitter, and the current density on the anode plate with one FE emitter are conducted. The image of a light spot is successfully produced on a phosphor plate, which implies that the explored electrode with nanometer separation possesses a potential SED application. Experimental observation and numerical simulation show that the proposed structure can be used as a surface conduction electron emitter and has a high FE efficiency with low turn-on voltage and a different electron emission mechanism. This study benefits the advanced SED design for a new type of electron source.

  12. Visual exposure to large and small portion sizes and perceptions of portion size normality: Three experimental studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Eric; Oldham, Melissa; Cuckson, Imogen; Brunstrom, Jeffrey M; Rogers, Peter J; Hardman, Charlotte A

    2016-03-01

    Portion sizes of many foods have increased in recent times. In three studies we examined the effect that repeated visual exposure to larger versus smaller food portion sizes has on perceptions of what constitutes a normal-sized food portion and measures of portion size selection. In studies 1 and 2 participants were visually exposed to images of large or small portions of spaghetti bolognese, before making evaluations about an image of an intermediate sized portion of the same food. In study 3 participants were exposed to images of large or small portions of a snack food before selecting a portion size of snack food to consume. Across the three studies, visual exposure to larger as opposed to smaller portion sizes resulted in participants considering a normal portion of food to be larger than a reference intermediate sized portion. In studies 1 and 2 visual exposure to larger portion sizes also increased the size of self-reported ideal meal size. In study 3 visual exposure to larger portion sizes of a snack food did not affect how much of that food participants subsequently served themselves and ate. Visual exposure to larger portion sizes may adjust visual perceptions of what constitutes a 'normal' sized portion. However, we did not find evidence that visual exposure to larger portions altered snack food intake. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of the environmental impact of portion bag for food packaging: a case study of Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruangrit, Chaniporn; Usapein, Parnuwat; Limphitakphong, Nantamol; Chavalparit, Orathai

    2017-05-01

    This study applied life cycle assessment methodology in evaluating environmental impact of portion bag. The objective of this study was to identify the hotspot of environmental impact through life cycle of portion bag. The options were proposed for improving environmental performance of the product. The system boundary was defined as cradle-to-grave which included the ethylene production, LDPE and LLDPE resins production, portion bag production, disposal, and transportation. All materials and emissions were calculated based on 1 piece of portion bag which weighed 2.49 g. IMPACT 2002+ was used for assessing environmental impact on SimaPro V8.2 software. The result found that the most of environmental impact was generated from LDPE and LLDPE resins which was used as raw material for producing portion bag. After normalization, non-renewable energy showed the highest potential to concern. This impact related directly to the natural gas drilling, ethane production, ethylene production, resin productions, and energy in all process. In conclusion, it should be suggested that the selection of bio-material for producing portion bag can play an important role to reduce the environmental impact. The research demonstrates the possible way and benefits in improving cleaner raw material and suitable way of product's end-of-life for producing green portion bag in the future.

  14. [Study on Square Super-Lattice Pattern with Surface Discharge in Dielectric Barrier Discharge by Optical Emission Spectra].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xue-jiao; Dong, Li-fang; Liu, Ying; Wang, Qian; Feng, Jian-yu

    2016-02-01

    Square super-lattice pattern with surface discharge consisting of central spots and dim spots is firstly observed in the mixture of argon and air by using a dielectric barrier discharge device with water electrodes. By observing the image, it is found that the central spot is located at the centriod of its surrounding four dim spots. The short-exposure image recorded by a high speed video camera shows that the dim spot results from the surface discharges (SDs). The brightness of the central spot and is quite different from that of the dim spot, which indicates that the plasma states of the central spot and the dim spot may be differentiated. The optical emission spectrum method is used to further study the several plasma parameters of the central spot and the dim spot in different argon content. The emission spectra of the N₂ second positive band (C³IIu --> B³ IIg) are measured, from which the molecule vibration temperatures of the central spot and the dim spot are calculated respectively. The broadening of spectral line 696.57 nm (2P₂-->1S₅) is used to study the electron densities of the central spot and the dim spot. It is found that the molecule vibration temperature and electron density of the dim spot are higher than those of the central spot in the same argon content The molecule vibration temperature and electron density of the central spot and the dim spot increase with the argon content increasing from 90% to 99.9%. The surface discharge induced by the volume discharge (VD) has the determinative effect on the formation of the dim spot The experimental results above play an important role in studying the formation mechanism of surface discharg&of square super-lattice pattern with surface discharge. In addition, the studies exert an influence on the application of surface discharge and volume discharge in different fields.

  15. Work function and surface stability of tungsten-based thermionic electron emission cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Ryan; Morgan, Dane; Booske, John

    2017-11-01

    Materials that exhibit a low work function and therefore easily emit electrons into vacuum form the basis of electronic devices used in applications ranging from satellite communications to thermionic energy conversion. W-Ba-O is the canonical materials system that functions as the thermionic electron emitter commercially used in a range of high-power electron devices. However, the work functions, surface stability, and kinetic characteristics of a polycrystalline W emitter surface are still not well understood or characterized. In this study, we examined the work function and surface stability of the eight lowest index surfaces of the W-Ba-O system using density functional theory methods. We found that under the typical thermionic cathode operating conditions of high temperature and low oxygen partial pressure, the most stable surface adsorbates are Ba-O species with compositions in the range of Ba0.125O-Ba0.25O per surface W atom, with O passivating all dangling W bonds and Ba creating work function-lowering surface dipoles. Wulff construction analysis reveals that the presence of O and Ba significantly alters the surface energetics and changes the proportions of surface facets present under equilibrium conditions. Analysis of previously published data on W sintering kinetics suggests that fine W particles in the size range of 100-500 nm may be at or near equilibrium during cathode synthesis and thus may exhibit surface orientation fractions well described by the calculated Wulff construction.

  16. Molecular effects in ion-electron emission from clean metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baragiola, R.A.; Alonso, E.V.; Auciello, O.; Ferron, J.; Lantschner, G.; Oliva Florio, A.

    1978-01-01

    The authors have measured electron emission yields from clean Al, Cu and Ag under 2-50 keV H + , D + , H 2 + impact. It is found that molecular ion yields are lower than twice the yield of atomic ions. No isotope effects are observed for equal-velocity ions. (Auth.)

  17. Kinetic electron emission from metal surfaces induced by impact of slow ions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šroubek, Zdeněk; Lorinčík, Jan

    -, č. 625 (2014), s. 7-9 ISSN 0039-6028 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ME10086 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Ion induced kinetic electron emission * Electronic excitation Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.925, year: 2014

  18. The effect of MAO processing time on surface properties and low temperature infrared emissivity of ceramic coating on aluminium 6061 alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Bosta, Mohannad M. S.; Ma, Keng-Jeng; Chien, Hsi-Hsin

    2013-09-01

    MAO ceramic coatings were prepared on aluminium 6061 surfaces at different treating durations (10, 20, ... 60 min), using alkali silicate electrolyte and pulsed bipolar current mode. The surface microstructures and properties were studied using SEM, XRD, EDX and a surface roughness tester. Image-Pro Plus and MATCH! softwares were used to analyze SEM micrographs and XRD results, respectively. The infrared emissivities of the ceramic coatings were measured at the 70 °C using FTIR spectrometer. We found a linear correlation between the volcano-like area and the surface roughness. The compositions and phases were associated with the volcano-like population and area. The curve of IR spectral emissivity was influenced by surface roughness, γ-alumina, sillimanite and cristobalite phases. The emissivity was enhanced by the surface roughness in the ranges 4.0-9.6 μm and 10.5-14.8 μm. In the range 7.0-8.0 μm, α-alumina and sillimanite phases enhanced the emissivity, while the cristobalite has a negative impact to the emissivity. A negative contributions were found for α-alumina in the region 9.6-16.0 μm and for the surface thickness in the region 15.0-16.0 μm. Overall, the average of long wave infrared (LWIR) emissivity ranged from 87.05% to 91.65%.

  19. Transparent organic light-emitting diodes with balanced white emission by minimizing waveguide and surface plasmonic loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Bo; Ou, Qing-Dong; Li, Yan-Qing; Chen, Jing-De; Zhao, Xin-Dong; Wei, Jian; Xie, Zhong-Zhi; Tang, Jian-Xin

    2017-07-10

    It is challenging in realizing high-performance transparent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with symmetrical light emission to both sides. Herein, an efficient transparent OLED with highly balanced white emission to both sides is demonstrated by integrating quasi-periodic nanostructures into the organic emitter and the metal-dielectric composite top electrode, which can simultaneously suppressing waveguide and surface plasmonic loss. The power efficiency and external quantum efficiency are raised to 83.5 lm W -1 and 38.8%, respectively, along with a bi-directional luminance ratio of 1.26. The proposed scheme provides a facile route for extending application scope of transparent OLEDs for future transparent displays and lightings.

  20. Localization of burn mark under an abnormal topography on MOSFET chip surface using liquid crystal and emission microscopy tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, C K; Sim, K S; Tso, C P

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on the localization of burn mark in MOSFET and the scanning electron microscope (SEM) inspection on the defect location. When a suspect abnormal topography is shown on the die surface, further methods to pin-point the defect location is necessary. Fault localization analysis becomes important because an abnormal spot on the chip surface may and may not have a defect underneath it. The chip surface topography can change due to the catastrophic damage occurred at layers under the chip surface, but it could also be due to inconsistency during metal deposition in the wafer fabrication process. Two localization techniques, liquid crystal thermography and emission microscopy, were performed to confirm that the abnormal topography spot is the actual defect location. The tiny burn mark was surfaced by performing a surface decoration at the defect location using hot hydrochloric acid. SEM imaging, which has the high magnification and three-dimensional capabilities, was used to capture the images of the burn mark. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Particle emission induced by the interaction of highly charged slow Xe-ions with a SiO2 surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiwietz, G.; Skogvall, B.; Schneider, D.; Clark, M.; DeWitt, D.; McDonald, J.

    1991-01-01

    Sputtering of surface atoms by low energy (a few keV) heavy ions is a commonly used technique in material science and applied physics. In general, sputtering occurs via nuclear energy transfer processes and is determined mainly by the atom-atom interaction potentials. In the energy range of interest these potentials depend only slightly on the charge state of one collision partner if the other is neutral. The development of new ion-sources, however, allows for the use of ions with charged states of q > 50. For these highly charged ions it is conceivable that electronic processes come into play as well. If, for example, the density of charged surface atoms exceeds a certain limit, then particle emission can occur via the electrostatic repulsion of target atoms, the so-called Coulomb explosion. Indications for such electronic effects have been found in a few investigations of ion-induced sputtering Si (q q+ ). However, the order of magnitude of this effect is not clear until now. In this work we present preliminary data on sputtering, ion backscattering, electron and photon emission from SiO 2 surface induced by incident Xe ions of very high charge states (q=30--50). The experiment was performed at the electron beam ion trap (EBIT) of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory using a time-of-flight (TOF) ion analyzer-system from the Hahn-Meitner-Institute, Berlin

  2. Process for forming a chromium diffusion portion and articles made therefrom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmick, David Andrew; Cavanaugh, Dennis William; Feng, Ganjiang; Bucci, David Vincent

    2012-09-11

    In one embodiment, a method for forming an article with a diffusion portion comprises: forming a slurry comprising chromium and silicon, applying the slurry to the article, and heating the article to a sufficient temperature and for a sufficient period of time to diffuse chromium and silicon into the article and form a diffusion portion comprising silicon and a microstructure comprising .alpha.-chromium. In one embodiment, a gas turbine component comprises: a superalloy and a diffusion portion having a depth of less than or equal to 60 .mu.m measured from the superalloy surface into the gas turbine component. The diffusion portion has a diffusion surface having a microstructure comprising greater than or equal to 40% by volume .alpha.-chromium.

  3. MODELING THE ANOMALY OF SURFACE NUMBER DENSITIES OF GALAXIES ON THE GALACTIC EXTINCTION MAP DUE TO THEIR FIR EMISSION CONTAMINATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashiwagi, Toshiya; Suto, Yasushi; Taruya, Atsushi; Yahata, Kazuhiro [Department of Physics, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Kayo, Issha [Department of Physics, Toho University, Funabashi, Chiba 274-8510 (Japan); Nishimichi, Takahiro, E-mail: kashiwagi@utap.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8568 (Japan)

    2015-02-01

    The most widely used Galactic extinction map is constructed assuming that the observed far-infrared (FIR) fluxes come entirely from Galactic dust. According to the earlier suggestion by Yahata et al., we consider how FIR emission of galaxies affects the SFD map. We first compute the surface number density of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR7 galaxies as a function of the r-band extinction, A {sub r,} {sub SFD}. We confirm that the surface densities of those galaxies positively correlate with A {sub r,} {sub SFD} for A {sub r,} {sub SFD} < 0.1, as first discovered by Yahata et al. for SDSS DR4 galaxies. Next we construct an analytical model to compute the surface density of galaxies, taking into account the contamination of their FIR emission. We adopt a log-normal probability distribution for the ratio of 100 μm and r-band luminosities of each galaxy, y ≡ (νL){sub 100} {sub μm}/(νL) {sub r}. Then we search for the mean and rms values of y that fit the observed anomaly, using the analytical model. The required values to reproduce the anomaly are roughly consistent with those measured from the stacking analysis of SDSS galaxies. Due to the limitation of our statistical modeling, we are not yet able to remove the FIR contamination of galaxies from the extinction map. Nevertheless, the agreement with the model prediction suggests that the FIR emission of galaxies is mainly responsible for the observed anomaly. Whereas the corresponding systematic error in the Galactic extinction map is 0.1-1 mmag, it is directly correlated with galaxy clustering and thus needs to be carefully examined in precision cosmology.

  4. Ocean Surface Emissivity at L-band (1.4 GHz): The Dependence on Salinity and Roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeVine, D. M.; Lang, R.; Wentz, F.; Messiner, T.

    2012-01-01

    A characterization of the emissivity of sea water at L-band is important for the remote sensing of sea surface salinity. Measurements of salinity are currently being made in the radio astronomy band at 1.413 GHz by ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission and NASA's Aquarius instrument aboard the Aquarius/SAC-D observatory. The goal of both missions is accuracy on the order of 0.1 psu. This requires accurate knowledge of the dielectric constant of sea water as a function of salinity and temperature and also the effect of waves (roughness). The former determines the emissivity of an ideal (i.e. flat) surface and the later is the major source of error from predictions based on a flat surface. These two aspects of the problem of characterizing the emissivity are being addressed in the context of the Aquarius mission. First, laboratory measurements are being made of the dielectric constant of sea water. This is being done at the George Washington University using a resonant cavity. In this technique, sea water of known salinity and temperature is fed into the cavity along its axis through a narrow tube. The sea water changes the resonant frequency and Q of the cavity which, if the sample is small enough, can be related to the dielectric constant of the sample. An extensive set of measurements have been conducted at 1.413 GHz to develop a model for the real and imaginary part of the dielectric constant as a function of salinity and temperature. The results are compared to the predictions of models based on parameterization of the Debye resonance of the water molecule. The models and measurements are close; however, the differences are significant for remote sensing of salinity. This is especially true at low temperatures where the sensitivity to salinity is lowest.

  5. Impacts of population growth, urbanisation and sanitation changes on global human Cryptosporidium emissions to surface water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstra, Nynke; Vermeulen-Henstra, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is a pathogenic protozoan parasite and is a leading cause of diarrhoea worldwide. The concentration of Cryptosporidium in the surface water is a determinant for probability of exposure and the risk of disease. Surface water concentrations are expected to change with population

  6. Characterization of leached surface layers on simulated high-level waste glasses by sputter-induced optical emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houser, C.; Tsong, I.S.T.; White, W.B.

    1979-01-01

    The leaching process in simulated waste encapsulant glasses was studied by measuring the compositional depth-profiles of H (from water), the glass framework formers Si and B, the alkalis Na and Cs, the alkaline earths Ca and Sr, the transition metals Mo and Fe, the rare-earths La, Ce, and Nd, using the technique of sputter-induced optical emission. The leaching process of these glasses is highly complex. In addition to alkali/hydrogen exchange, there is breakdown of the glass framework, build-up of barrier layers on the surface, and formation of layered reaction zones of distinctly different chemistry all within the outer micrometer of the glass

  7. Application of homotopy perturbation method for a conductive–radiative fin with temperature dependent thermal conductivity and surface emissivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranab Kanti Roy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed at studying the effects of environmental temperature and surface emissivity parameter on the temperature distribution, efficiency and heat transfer rate of a conductive–radiative fin. The Homotopy Perturbation Method (HPM being one of the semi-numerical methods for highly nonlinear and inhomogeneous equations, the local temperature distribution efficiencies and heat transfer rates are obtained using HPM in which Newton–Raphson method is used for the insulated boundary condition. It is found that the results of the present works are in good agreement with results available in the literature.

  8. Dominant role of dielectron satellites in emission spectra of laser plasma near target surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozmej, F.; Faenov, A.Ya.; Pikuz, T.A.

    1997-01-01

    It is shown that satellite structures of resonance lines may become more intensive than resonance lines themselves. The experimental and theoretical studies show that the conditions whereby the satellite structures become predominant in the plasma emission spectrum, are sufficiently easily realized in the experiment and moreover they obviously will present typical cases by studies on the plasma condensed areas in the experiments on inertial thermonuclear synthesis and by investigation of plasma, created through pico- and femtosecond laser pulses of high contrast

  9. Emissivity of Candidate Materials for VHTR Applicationbs: Role of Oxidation and Surface Modification Treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sridharan, Kumar; Allen, Todd; Anderson, Mark; Cao, Guoping; Kulcinski, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    The Generation IV (GEN IV) Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative was instituted by the Department of Energy (DOE) with the goal of researching and developing technologies and materials necessary for various types of future reactors. These GEN IV reactors will employ advanced fuel cycles, passive safety systems, and other innovative systems, leading to significant differences between these future reactors and current water-cooled reactors. The leading candidate for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) to be built at Idaho National Lab (INL) in the United States is the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). Due to the high operating temperatures of the VHTR, the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) will partially rely on heat transfer by radiation for cooling. Heat expulsion by radiation will become all the more important during high temperature excursions during off-normal accident scenarios. Radiant power is dictated by emissivity, a material property. The NGNP Materials Research and Development Program Plan (1) has identified emissivity and the effects of high temperature oxide formation on emissivity as an area of research towards the development of the VHTR.

  10. Investigation on surface-plasmon-enhanced light emission of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhenzhong; Li, Qiang; Fan, Qigao; Zhu, Yixin

    2018-05-01

    We demonstrate surface-plasmon (SP) enhanced light emission from InGaN/GaN near ultraviolet (NUV) multiple quantum wells (MQWs) using Ag thin films and nano-particles (NPs). Two types of Ag NP arrays are fabricated on the NUV-MQWs, one is fabricated on p-GaN layer with three different sizes of about 120, 160 and 240 nm formed by self-assembled process, while the other is embedded close to the MQWs. In addition, the influence of the surface plasmon polariton (SPP) and localized surface plasmon (LSP) in NUV-MQWs has been investigated by photoluminescence (PL) measurement. Both PL measurements and theoretical simulation results show that the NUV light would be extracted more effectively under LSP mode than that of SPP mode. The highest enhancement of PL intensity is increased by 324% for the sample with NPs embedded in etched p-GaN near the MQWs as compared with the bare MQWs, also is about 1.24 times higher than the MQW sample covered with Ag NPs on the surface, indicating strong surface scattering and SP coupling between Ag NPs and NUV-MQWs.

  11. Secondary ion emission from cleaned surfaces bombarded by 100 MeV accelerator beams at the GSI Darmstadt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wien, K.; Becker, O.; Guthier, W.; Knippelberg, W.; Koczon, P.

    1988-01-01

    The 1.4 MeV/n beam facility for the UNILAC/GSI has been used to study secondary ion emission from surfaces cleaned under UHV conditions by ion etching or cleaving of crystals. The desorption phenomena observed by means of TOF mass spectrometry can be classified as follows: (1) Clean metal surfaces emit metal ions being ejected by atomic collisions cascades. Electronic excitation of surface states seems to support ionization. (2) The desorption of contaminants adsorbed at the metal surface is strongly correlated with the electronic energy loss of the projectiles - even, if the content of impurities is very low. (3) Ion formation at the epitaxial surface of fluoride crystals as CaF 2 , MgF 2 and NaF is initiated by the electronic excitation of the crystal. At high beam energies the mass spectrum is dominated by a series of cluster ions. These cluster ions disappear below a certain energy deposit threshold, whereas small atomic ions are observed over the whole energy range

  12. The impact of climate and composition on playa surface roughness: Investigation of atmospheric mineral dust emission mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollerud, H. J.; Fantle, M. S.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric mineral dust has a wide range of impacts, including the transport of elements in geochemical cycles, health hazards from small particles, and climate forcing via the reflection of sunlight from dust particles. In particular, the mineral dust component of climate forcing is one of the most uncertain elements in the IPCC climate forcing summary. Mineral dust is also an important component of geochemical cycles. For instance, dust inputs to the ocean potentially affect the iron cycle by stimulating natural iron fertilization, which could then modify climate via the biological pump. Also dust can transport nutrients over long distances and fertilize nutrient-poor regions, such as island ecosystems or the Amazon rain forest. However, there are still many uncertainties in quantifying dust emissions from source regions. One factor that influences dust emission is surface roughness and texture, since a weak, unconsolidated surface texture is more easily ablated by wind than a strong, hard crust. We are investigating the impact of processes such as precipitation, groundwater evaporation, and wind on surface roughness in a playa dust source region. We find that water has a significant influence on surface roughness. We utilize ESA's Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) instrument to measure roughness in the playa. A map of roughness indicates where the playa surface is smooth (on the scale of centimeters) and potentially very strong, and where it is rough and might be more sensitive to disturbance. We have analyzed approximately 40 ASAR observations of the Black Rock Desert from 2007-2011. In general, the playa is smoother and more variable over time relative to nearby areas. There is also considerable variation within the playa. While the playa roughness maps changed significantly between summers and between observations during the winters, over the course of each summer, the playa surface maintained essentially the same roughness pattern. This suggests that

  13. Electron emission induced by resonant coherent ion-surface interaction at grazing incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia de Abajo, F.J.; Ponce, V.H.; Echenique, P.M.

    1992-01-01

    A new spectroscopy based on the resonant coherently induced electron loss to the continuum in ion-surface scattering under grazing incidence is proposed. A series of peaks, corresponding to the energy differences determined by the resonant interaction with the rows of atoms in the surface, is predicted to appear in the energy distribution of electrons emitted from electronic states bound to the probe. Calculations for MeV He + ions scattered at a W(001) surface along the left-angle 100 right-angle direction with a glancing angle of 0--2 mrad show a total yield close to 1

  14. Surface Coating of Wood Building Products: National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn about the NESHAP for surface coating of wood building products by reading the rule summary and history, with links to the federal register notices, additional documents, related rules and compliance information

  15. Simultaneous and multi-point measurement of ammonia emanating from human skin surface for the estimation of whole body dermal emission rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Shota; Sekine, Yoshika; Kimura, Keita; Umezawa, Kazuo; Asai, Satomi; Miyachi, Hayato

    2017-05-15

    Ammonia is one of the members of odor gases and a possible source of odor in indoor environment. However, little has been known on the actual emission rate of ammonia from the human skin surface. Then, this study aimed to estimate the whole-body dermal emission rate of ammonia by simultaneous and multi-point measurement of emission fluxes of ammonia employing a passive flux sampler - ion chromatography system. Firstly, the emission fluxes of ammonia were non-invasively measured for ten volunteers at 13 sampling positions set in 13 anatomical regions classified by Kurazumi et al. The measured emission fluxes were then converted to partial emission rates using the surface body areas estimated by weights and heights of volunteers and partial rates of 13 body regions. Subsequent summation of the partial emission rates provided the whole body dermal emission rate of ammonia. The results ranged from 2.9 to 12mgh -1 with an average of 5.9±3.2mgh -1 per person for the ten healthy young volunteers. The values were much greater than those from human breath, and thus the dermal emission of ammonia was found more significant odor source than the breath exhalation in indoor environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Exoelectron emission from surface layer of Li2B4O7 glass ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamoto, Takamichi; Katsube, Shizuko; Yanagisawa, Hideo; Kikuchi, Riichi; Kawanishi, Masaharu.

    1984-01-01

    The thermally stimulated exoelectron emission (TESS) of Li 2 B 4 O 7 glass ceramics was investigated for its application to the dosimetric use. It has been found the TSEE glow patterns of Li 2 B 4 O 7 glass ceramics and of the thin layer of LiF evaporated on Li 2 B 4 O 7 glass ceramics depend on the kind of radiations irradiated. The TSEE glow pattern of the duplicated structure sample indicated a possibility of determining the dose of each kind of radiation separately in the mixed radiation field. (author)

  17. Sensitivity analysis of surface ozone to emission controls in Beijing and its neighboring area during the 2008 Olympic Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yi; Zhang, Meigen

    2012-01-01

    The regional air quality modeling system RAMS (regional atmospheric modeling system)-CMAQ (community multi-scale air quality modeling system) is applied to analyze temporal and spatial variations in surface ozone concentration over Beijing and its surrounding region from July to October 2008. Comparison of simulated and observed meteorological elements and concentration of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and ozone at one urban site and three rural sites during Olympic Games show that model can generally reproduce the main observed feature of wind, temperature and ozone, but NOx concentration is overestimated. Although ozone concentration decreased during Olympics, high ozone episodes occurred on 24 July and 24 August with concentration of 360 and 245 microg/m3 at Aoyuncun site, respectively. The analysis of sensitive test, with and without emission controls, shows that emission controls could reduce ozone concentration in the afternoon when ozone concentration was highest but increase it at night and in the morning. The evolution of the weather system during the ozone episodes (24 July and 24 August) indicates that hot and dry air and a stable weak pressure field intensified the production of ozone and allowed it to accumulate. Process analysis at the urban site and rural site shows that under favorable weather condition on 24 August, horizontal transport was the main contributor of the rural place and the pollution from the higher layer would be transported to the surface layer. On 24 July, as the wind velocity was smaller, the impact of transport on the rural place was not obvious.

  18. Deconvolution of Thermal Emissivity Spectra of Mercury to their Endmember Counterparts measured in Simulated Mercury Surface Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varatharajan, I.; D'Amore, M.; Maturilli, A.; Helbert, J.; Hiesinger, H.

    2017-12-01

    The Mercury Radiometer and Thermal Imaging Spectrometer (MERTIS) payload of ESA/JAXA Bepicolombo mission to Mercury will map the thermal emissivity at wavelength range of 7-14 μm and spatial resolution of 500 m/pixel [1]. Mercury was also imaged at the same wavelength range using the Boston University's Mid-Infrared Spectrometer and Imager (MIRSI) mounted on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) on Mauna Kea, Hawaii with the minimum spatial coverage of 400-600km/spectra which blends all rocks, minerals, and soil types [2]. Therefore, the study [2] used quantitative deconvolution algorithm developed by [3] for spectral unmixing of this composite thermal emissivity spectrum from telescope to their respective areal fractions of endmember spectra; however, the thermal emissivity of endmembers used in [2] is the inverted reflectance measurements (Kirchhoff's law) of various samples measured at room temperature and pressure. Over a decade, the Planetary Spectroscopy Laboratory (PSL) at the Institute of Planetary Research (PF) at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) facilitates the thermal emissivity measurements under controlled and simulated surface conditions of Mercury by taking emissivity measurements at varying temperatures from 100-500°C under vacuum conditions supporting MERTIS payload. The measured thermal emissivity endmember spectral library therefore includes major silicates such as bytownite, anorthoclase, synthetic glass, olivine, enstatite, nepheline basanite, rocks like komatiite, tektite, Johnson Space Center lunar simulant (1A), and synthetic powdered sulfides which includes MgS, FeS, CaS, CrS, TiS, NaS, and MnS. Using such specialized endmember spectral library created under Mercury's conditions significantly increases the accuracy of the deconvolution model results. In this study, we revisited the available telescope spectra and redeveloped the algorithm by [3] by only choosing the endmember spectral library created at PSL for unbiased model

  19. Surface behavior based on ion-induced secondary electron emission from semi-insulating materials in breakdown evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koc, Emrah; Karakoese, Sema [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Gazi University, 06500 Ankara (Turkey); Salamov, Bahtiyar G. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Gazi University, 06500 Ankara (Turkey); Institute of Physics, National Academy of Science, 1143 Baku (Azerbaijan)

    2013-09-15

    This study focuses on analyses of secondary electron emission (SEE) at semiconductor surfaces when the sufficient conditions of space-time distribution occur. Experimental measurements and calculations with the approach of Townsend coefficients, which include the evaluations of ionization coefficient ({alpha}) and SEE coefficient ({gamma}) were performed in high-ohmic InP, GaAs, and Si semiconductor cathodes with argon and air environments in a wide range of E/N (300-10 000 Td). The direct calculations of {gamma} were carried out to determine the behavior of cold-semiconductor cathode current in a wide range of microgaps (45-525 {mu}m). Paschen curves are interpreted in the dependence of large pd range on breakdown voltage through {gamma} and {alpha}/N. Ion-induced secondary electrons exhibit the direct behaviors affecting the timescale of breakdown evolution in the vicinity of the Paschen minimum during the natural bombardment process with ions of semiconductor cathodes. Also, when {alpha}/N rapidly drops and the excitations of gas atoms densely occupy the gas volume, we determined that the photoelectric effect provides a growth for electron emission from semiconductor surfaces at the breakdown stage at the reduced values of E/N. At all pressures, the emission magnitudes of electrons liberated by semiconductor cathodes into vacuum are found as {gamma}{sub InP} > {gamma}{sub GaAs} > {gamma}{sub Si} in breakdown evolution. (copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Two-step excitation structure changes of luminescence centers and strong tunable blue emission on surface of silica nanospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Lei, E-mail: nanoyang@qq.com; Jiang, Zhongcheng; Dong, Jiazhang; Zhang, Liuqian [Hunan University, College of Materials Science and Engineering (China); Pan, Anlian, E-mail: anlian.pan@gmail.com; Zhuang, Xiujuan [Hunan University, Key Laboratory for Micro-Nano Physics and Technology of Hunan Province (China)

    2015-10-15

    We report a scheme for investigating two-step stimulated structure change of luminescence centers. Amorphous silica nanospheres with uniform diameter of 9–15 nm have been synthesized by Stöber method. Strong hydroxyl-related infrared-absorption band is observed in infrared spectrum. The surface hydroxyl groups exert great influence on the luminescent behavior of silica. They provide stable and intermediate energy states to accommodate excitation electrons. The existence of these surface states reduces the energy barrier of photochemical reactions, creating conditions for two-step excitation process. By carefully examining excitation and emission process, the nearest excitation band is absent in both optical absorption spectrum and excitation spectrum. This later generated state confirms the generation of new luminescence centers as well as the existence of photochemical reactions. Stimulated by different energies, two-step excitation process impels different photochemical reactions, prompting generation of different lattice defects on surface area of silica. Thereby, tunable luminescence is achieved. After thermal treatment, strong gap excitation band appears with the disappearance of strong surface excitation band. Strong blue luminescence also disappears. The research is significance to precise introducing structural defects and controlling position of luminescence peaks.

  1. Discrepancies between soft x-ray emissivity contours and magnetic flux surfaces in Alcator C-Mod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borras, M.C.; Granetz, R.S.

    1996-01-01

    The soft x-ray diagnostic system of Alcator C-Mod, equipped with 152 detectors distributed in four arrays, is used to obtain iso-emissivity surfaces. These surfaces have been characterized by giving their elongation and relative shift from the centre of the tokamak as functions of plasma radius. Flux surfaces, provided by magnetic diagnostics, have also been described with elongation and shift. Results from the comparison of the two sets of geometric parameters obtained from magnetic and x-ray diagnostics are presented. We find that, whereas the shifts obtained from these two diagnostic methods are always in good agreement, the corresponding elongation curves show different patterns. An agreement between elongations better than 2% is only found in a range of about 2 cm in minor radius. On the other hand, the elongations can differ by 10% towards the plasma edge and the plasma centre. Error bars for the x-ray diagnostic are obtained by propagating the effect of ± 1% random errors at the detector signals, and can amount to ± 1-2% of the estimated values near the edge and the centre of the plasma. The estimated uncertainties in the determination of elongation from magnetic flux surfaces are of the order of 4%. A series of tests and simulations performed to verify the accuracy of the X-ray diagnostic system is presented. The discrepancies found could imply the existence of asymmetries in impurity concentration. (Author)

  2. Vicinage effects in energy loss and electron emission during grazing scattering of heavy molecular ions from a solid surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Yuanhong; Wang Younian; Miskovic, Z.L.

    2005-01-01

    Vicinage effects in the energy loss and the electron emission spectra are studied in the presence of Coulomb explosion of swift, heavy molecular ions, during their grazing scattering from a solid surface. The dynamic response of the surface is treated by means of the dielectric theory within the specular reflection model using the plasmon pole approximation for the bulk dielectric function, whereas the angle-resolved energy spectra of the electrons emitted from the surface are obtained on the basis of the first-order, time-dependent perturbation theory. The evolution of the charge states of the constituent ions in the molecule during scattering is described by a nonequilibrium extension of the Brandt-Kitagawa model. The molecule scattering trajectories and the corresponding Coulomb explosion dynamics are evaluated for the cases of the internuclear axis being either aligned in the beam direction or randomly oriented in the directions parallel to the surface. Our calculations show that the vicinage effect in the energy loss is generally weaker for heavy molecules than for light molecules. In addition, there is clear evidence of the negative vicinage effect in both the energy loss and the energy spectra of the emitted electrons for molecular ions at lower speeds and with the axis aligned in the direction of motion

  3. Volume and surface photoemission from tungsten. I. Calculation of band structure and emission spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, N. Egede; Feuerbacher, B.

    1974-01-01

    is obtained from an ad hoc potential based on a Dirac-Slater atomic calculation for the ground-state configuration and with full Slater exchange in the atomic as well as in the crystal potential. The selection of this best potential is justified by comparing the calculated band structure to Fermi...... of states. The present work includes a crude estimate of this surface density of states, which is derived from the bulk band structure by narrowing the d bands according to an effective number of neighbors per surface atom. Estimates of surface relaxation effects are also included.......The electronic energy-band structure of tungsten has been calculated by means of the relativistic-augmented-plane-wave method. A series of mutually related potentials are constructed by varying the electronic configuration and the amount of Slater exchange included. The best band structure...

  4. Modelling the impact of sanitation, population growth and urbanization on human emissions of Cryptosporidium to surface waters—a case study for Bangladesh and India

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, L.C.; Kraker, Dummy; Hofstra, N.; Kroeze, C.; Medema, G.J.

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is a protozoan parasite that can cause diarrhoea. Human faeces are an important source of Cryptosporidium in surface waters. We present a model to study the impact of sanitation, urbanization and population growth on human emissions of Cryptosporidium to surface waters. We build on a

  5. Modelling the impact of sanitation, population growth and urbanization on human emissions of cryptosporidium to surface waters : A case study for Bangladesh and India

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, L.C.; Kraker, J.; Hofstra, N.; Kroeze, C.; Medema, G.

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is a protozoan parasite that can cause diarrhoea. Human faeces are an important source of Cryptosporidium in surface waters. We present a model to study the impact of sanitation, urbanization and population growth on human emissions of Cryptosporidium to surface waters. We build on a

  6. Explaining global surface aerosol number concentrations in terms of primary emissions and particle formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Spracklen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available We synthesised observations of total particle number (CN concentration from 36 sites around the world. We found that annual mean CN concentrations are typically 300–2000 cm−3 in the marine boundary layer and free troposphere (FT and 1000–10 000 cm−3 in the continental boundary layer (BL. Many sites exhibit pronounced seasonality with summer time concentrations a factor of 2–10 greater than wintertime concentrations. We used these CN observations to evaluate primary and secondary sources of particle number in a global aerosol microphysics model. We found that emissions of primary particles can reasonably reproduce the spatial pattern of observed CN concentration (R2=0.46 but fail to explain the observed seasonal cycle (R2=0.1. The modeled CN concentration in the FT was biased low (normalised mean bias, NMB=−88% unless a secondary source of particles was included, for example from binary homogeneous nucleation of sulfuric acid and water (NMB=−25%. Simulated CN concentrations in the continental BL were also biased low (NMB=−74% unless the number emission of anthropogenic primary particles was increased or a mechanism that results in particle formation in the BL was included. We ran a number of simulations where we included an empirical BL nucleation mechanism either using the activation-type mechanism (nucleation rate, J, proportional to gas-phase sulfuric acid concentration to the power one or kinetic-type mechanism (J proportional to sulfuric acid to the power two with a range of nucleation coefficients. We found that the seasonal CN cycle observed at continental BL sites was better simulated by BL particle formation (R2=0.3 than by increasing the number emission from primary anthropogenic sources (R2=0.18. The nucleation constants that resulted in best overall match between model and observed CN concentrations were

  7. Explaining global surface aerosol number concentrations in terms of primary emissions and particle formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spracklen, D. V.; Carslaw, K. S.; Merikanto, J.; Mann, G. W.; Reddington, C. L.; Pickering, S.; Ogren, J. A.; Andrews, E.; Baltensperger, U.; Weingartner, E.; Boy, M.; Kulmala, M.; Laakso, L.; Lihavainen, H.; Kivekäs, N.; Komppula, M.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Kouvarakis, G.; Jennings, S. G.; O'Dowd, C.; Birmili, W.; Wiedensohler, A.; Weller, R.; Gras, J.; Laj, P.; Sellegri, K.; Bonn, B.; Krejci, R.; Laaksonen, A.; Hamed, A.; Minikin, A.; Harrison, R. M.; Talbot, R.; Sun, J.

    2010-05-01

    We synthesised observations of total particle number (CN) concentration from 36 sites around the world. We found that annual mean CN concentrations are typically 300-2000 cm-3 in the marine boundary layer and free troposphere (FT) and 1000-10 000 cm-3 in the continental boundary layer (BL). Many sites exhibit pronounced seasonality with summer time concentrations a factor of 2-10 greater than wintertime concentrations. We used these CN observations to evaluate primary and secondary sources of particle number in a global aerosol microphysics model. We found that emissions of primary particles can reasonably reproduce the spatial pattern of observed CN concentration (R2=0.46) but fail to explain the observed seasonal cycle (R2=0.1). The modeled CN concentration in the FT was biased low (normalised mean bias, NMB=-88%) unless a secondary source of particles was included, for example from binary homogeneous nucleation of sulfuric acid and water (NMB=-25%). Simulated CN concentrations in the continental BL were also biased low (NMB=-74%) unless the number emission of anthropogenic primary particles was increased or a mechanism that results in particle formation in the BL was included. We ran a number of simulations where we included an empirical BL nucleation mechanism either using the activation-type mechanism (nucleation rate, J, proportional to gas-phase sulfuric acid concentration to the power one) or kinetic-type mechanism (J proportional to sulfuric acid to the power two) with a range of nucleation coefficients. We found that the seasonal CN cycle observed at continental BL sites was better simulated by BL particle formation (R2=0.3) than by increasing the number emission from primary anthropogenic sources (R2=0.18). The nucleation constants that resulted in best overall match between model and observed CN concentrations were consistent with values derived in previous studies from detailed case studies at individual sites. In our model, kinetic and activation

  8. Kinetic Electron Emission from Higly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite Surfaces Induced by Singly Charged Ions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cernusca, S.; Diem, A.; Winter, H. P.; Aumayr, F.; Lörinčík, Jan; Šroubek, Zdeněk

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 193, - (2002), s. 616-620 ISSN 0168-583X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : clean metal-surface * slow * polycrystalline gold Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.158, year: 2002

  9. Tunable band gap emission and surface passivation of germanium nanocrystals synthesized in the gas phase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wheeler, LM; Levij, L.M.; Kortshagen, U.R.

    2013-01-01

    The narrow bulk band gap and large exciton Bohr radius of germanium (Ge) make it an attractive material for optoelectronics utilizing band-gap-tunable photoluminescence (PL). However, realization of PL due to quantum confinement remains scarcely reported. Instead, PL is often observed from surface

  10. Measuring ammonia concentrations and emissions from agricultural land and liquid surfaces: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sanjay B; Westerman, Philip W; Arogo, Jactone

    2006-07-01

    Aerial ammonia concentrations (Cg) are measured using acid scrubbers, filter packs, denuders, or optical methods. Using Cg and wind speed or airflow rate, ammonia emission rate or flux can be directly estimated using enclosures or micrometeorological methods. Using nitrogen (N) recovery is not recommended, mainly because the different gaseous N components cannot be separated. Although low cost and replicable, chambers modify environmental conditions and are suitable only for comparing treatments. Wind tunnels do not modify environmental conditions as much as chambers, but they may not be appropriate for determining ammonia fluxes; however, they can be used to compare emissions and test models. Larger wind tunnels that also simulate natural wind profiles may be more useful for comparing treatments than micrometeorological methods because the latter require larger plots and are, thus, difficult to replicate. For determining absolute ammonia flux, the micrometeorological methods are the most suitable because they are nonintrusive. For use with micrometeorological methods, both the passive denuders and optical methods give comparable accuracies, although the latter give real-time Cg but at a higher cost. The passive denuder is wind weighted and also costs less than forced-air Cg measurement methods, but it requires calibration. When ammonia contamination during sample preparation and handling is a concern and separating the gas-phase ammonia and aerosol ammonium is not required, the scrubber is preferred over the passive denuder. The photothermal interferometer, because of its low detection limit and robustness, may hold potential for use in agriculture, but it requires evaluation. With its simpler theoretical basis and fewer restrictions, the integrated horizontal flux (IHF) method is preferable over other micrometeorological methods, particularly for lagoons, where berms and land-lagoon boundaries modify wind flow and flux gradients. With uniform wind flow, the ZINST

  11. Effects of hot electron emission on a low-conductivity tetracyanoethylene polymer layer including studies of the corrugation of the film surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, K.L.; Mousa, M.S.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of strong field electron emission (FEE) on a tetracyanoethylene (TCNE) polymer layer was studied by Field Ion Microscopy (FIM) using TCNE and Ne as the imaging gases. The TCNE polymer was formed on each tungsten tip by radical polymerisation before FEE. The FIM images show field emission spots all over the surface of the tip. The FEM images show a random distribution of several field emission areas at the onset of FEE. After sometime at a current of about 1 μA, there is a transition to higher currents at the same voltage, in which the electron emission pattern changes to have only one emitting area. After this transition, two different types of FIM images were observed, depending on the imaging gas that was used. Neon FIM images at low tip voltages show spots in the areas where the electron emission current was greatest, and at much higher voltages these images show emission from other areas with lower surface corrugation. However, the FIM images with TCNE as the imaging gas do not show any differences between the areas with and without electron emission. The FIM images remain as before FEE, which can be explained by the formation of a new polymer by the reaction of the surface layer with the imaging gas. It is assumed that chemically reactive fragments at the polymer/vacuum interface, which are needed for the polymerisation reaction, are formed by pyrolysis and sputtering processes during FEE

  12. 3 MeV proton irradiation effects on surface, structural, field emission and electrical properties of brass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mian Ahsan; Bashir, Shazia; Akram, Mahreen; Mahmood, Khaliq; Faizan-ul-Haq; Hayat, Asma; Mutaza, G.; Chishti, Naveed Ahmed; Khan, M. Asad; Ahmad, Shahbaz

    2018-05-01

    Ion-induced modifications of brass in terms of surface morphology, elemental composition, phase changes, field emission properties and electrical conductivity have been investigated. Brass targets were irradiated by proton beam at constant energy of 3 MeV for various doses ranges from 1 × 1012 ions/cm2 to 1.5 × 1014 ions/cm2 using Pelletron Linear Accelerator. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM) analysis reveals the formation of randomly distributed clusters, particulates, droplets and agglomers for lower ion doses which are explainable on the basis of cascade collisional process and thermal spike model. Whereas, at moderate ion doses, fiber like structures are formed due to incomplete melting. The formation of cellular like structure is observed at the maximum ion dose and is attributed to intense heating, melting and re-solidification. SRIM software analysis reveals that the penetration depth of 3 MeV protons in brass comes out to be 38 μm, whereas electronic and nuclear energy losses come out to be 5 × 10-1 and 3.1 × 10-4 eV/Å respectively. The evaluated values of energy deposited per atom vary from 0.01 to 1.5 eV with the variation of ion doses from 1 × 1012 ions/cm2 to 1.5 × 1014 ions/cm2. Both elemental analysis i.e. Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) supports each other and no new element or phase is identified. However, slight change in peak intensity and angle shifting is observed. Field emission properties of ion-structured brass are explored by measuring I-V characteristics of targets under UHV condition in diode-configuration using self designed and fabricated setup. Improvement in field enhancement factor (β) is estimated from the slope of Fowler-Nordheim (F-N) plots and it shows significant increase from 5 to 1911, whereas a reduction in turn on field (Eo) from 65 V/μm to 30 V/μm and increment in maximum current density (Jmax) from 12 μA/cm2 to 3821 μA/cm2 is observed. These enhancements

  13. Discovery of megaparsec-scale, low surface brightness nonthermal emission in merging galaxy clusters using the green bank telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farnsworth, Damon; Rudnick, Lawrence [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street S.E., Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Brown, Shea [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, 203 Van Allen Hall, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Brunetti, Gianfranco [INAF/Istituto di Radioastronomia, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy)

    2013-12-20

    We present results from a study of 12 X-ray bright clusters at 1.4 GHz with the 100 m Green Bank Telescope. After subtraction of point sources using existing interferometer data, we reach a median (best) 1σ rms sensitivity level of 0.01 (0.006) μJy arcsec{sup –2}, and find a significant excess of diffuse, low surface brightness emission in 11 of 12 Abell clusters observed. We also present initial results at 1.4 GHz of A2319 from the Very Large Array. In particular, we find: (1) four new detections of diffuse structures tentatively classified as two halos (A2065, A2069) and two relics (A2067, A2073); (2) the first detection of the radio halo in A2061 at 1.4 GHz, which qualifies this as a possible ultra-steep spectrum halo source with a synchrotron spectral index of α ∼ 1.8 between 327 MHz and 1.4 GHz; (3) a ∼2 Mpc radio halo in the sloshing, minor-merger cluster A2142; (4) a >2× increase of the giant radio halo extent and luminosity in the merging cluster A2319; (5) a ∼7× increase to the integrated radio flux and >4× increase to the observed extent of the peripheral radio relic in A1367 to ∼600 kpc, which we also observe to be polarized on a similar scale; (6) significant excess emission of ambiguous nature in three clusters with embedded tailed radio galaxies (A119, A400, A3744). Our radio halo detections agree with the well-known X-ray/radio luminosity correlation, but they are larger and fainter than current radio power correlation studies would predict. The corresponding volume-averaged synchrotron emissivities are 1-2 orders of magnitude below the characteristic value found in previous studies. Some of the halo-like detections may be some type of previously unseen, low surface brightness radio halo or blend of unresolved shock structures and sub-Mpc-scale turbulent regions associated with their respective cluster merging activity. Four of the five tentative halos contain one or more X-ray cold fronts, suggesting a possible connection between gas

  14. Further evaluation of wetland emission estimates from the JULES land surface model using SCIAMACHY and GOSAT atmospheric column methane measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayman, Garry; Comyn-Platt, Edward; McNorton, Joey; Chipperfield, Martyn; Gedney, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    The atmospheric concentration of methane began rising again in 2007 after a period of near-zero growth [1,2], with the largest increases observed over polar northern latitudes and the Southern Hemisphere in 2007 and in the tropics since then. The observed inter-annual variability in atmospheric methane concentrations and the associated changes in growth rates have variously been attributed to changes in different methane sources and sinks [2,3]. Wetlands are generally accepted as being the largest, but least well quantified, single natural source of CH4, with global emission estimates ranging from 142-284 Tg yr-1 [3]. The modelling of wetlands and their associated emissions of CH4 has become the subject of much current interest [4]. We have previously used the HadGEM2 chemistry-climate model to evaluate the wetland emission estimates derived using the UK community land surface model (JULES, the Joint UK Land Earth Simulator) against atmospheric observations of methane, including SCIAMACHY total methane columns [5] up to 2007. We have undertaken a series of new HadGEM2 runs using new JULES emission estimates extended in time to the end of 2012, thereby allowing comparison with both SCIAMACHY and GOSAT atmospheric column methane measurements. We will describe the results of these runs and the implications for methane wetland emissions. References [1] Rigby, M., et al.: Renewed growth of atmospheric methane. Geophys. Res. Lett., 35, L22805, 2008; [2] Nisbet, E.G., et al.: Methane on the Rise-Again, Science 343, 493, 2014; [3] Kirschke, S., et al.,: Three decades of global methane sources and sinks, Nature Geosciences, 6, 813-823, 2013; [4] Melton, J. R., et al.: Present state of global wetland extent and wetland methane modelling: conclusions from a model inter-comparison project (WETCHIMP), Biogeosciences, 10, 753-788, 2013; [5] Hayman, G.D., et al.: Comparison of the HadGEM2 climate-chemistry model against in situ and SCIAMACHY atmospheric methane data, Atmos. Chem

  15. Surface emission determination of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from a closed industrial waste landfill using a self-designed static flux chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego, E; Perales, J F; Roca, F J; Guardino, X

    2014-02-01

    Closed landfills can be a source of VOC and odorous nuisances to their atmospheric surroundings. A self-designed cylindrical air flux chamber was used to measure VOC surface emissions in a closed industrial landfill located in Cerdanyola del Vallès, Catalonia, Spain. The two main objectives of the study were the evaluation of the performance of the chamber setup in typical measurement conditions and the determination of the emission rates of 60 different VOC from that industrial landfill, generating a valuable database that can be useful in future studies related to industrial landfill management. Triplicate samples were taken in five selected sampling points. VOC were sampled dynamically using multi-sorbent bed tubes (Carbotrap, Carbopack X, Carboxen 569) connected to SKC AirCheck 2000 pumps. The analysis was performed by automatic thermal desorption coupled with a capillary gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry detector. The emission rates of sixty VOC were calculated for each sampling point in an effort to characterize surface emissions. To calculate average, minimum and maximum emission values for each VOC, the results were analyzed by three different methods: Global, Kriging and Tributary area. Global and Tributary area methodologies presented similar values, with total VOC emissions of 237 ± 48 and 222 ± 46 g day(-1), respectively; however, Kriging values were lower, 77 ± 17 gd ay(-1). The main contributors to the total emission rate were aldehydes (nonanal and decanal), acetic acid, ketones (acetone), aromatic hydrocarbons and alcohols. Most aromatic hydrocarbon (except benzene, naphthalene and methylnaphthalenes) and aldehyde emission rates exhibited strong correlations with the rest of VOC of their family, indicating a possible common source of these compounds. B:T ratio obtained from the emission rates of the studied landfill suggested that the factors that regulate aromatic hydrocarbon distributions in the landfill emissions are different from the ones

  16. Stochastic dislocation kinetics and fractal structures in deforming metals probed by acoustic emission and surface topography measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinogradov, A. [Laboratory for the Physics of Strength of Materials and Intelligent Diagnostic Systems, Togliatti State University, Togliatti 445667 (Russian Federation); Laboratory of Hybrid Nanostructured Materials, NITU MISiS, Moscow 119490 (Russian Federation); Yasnikov, I. S. [Laboratory for the Physics of Strength of Materials and Intelligent Diagnostic Systems, Togliatti State University, Togliatti 445667 (Russian Federation); Estrin, Y. [Laboratory of Hybrid Nanostructured Materials, NITU MISiS, Moscow 119490 (Russian Federation); Centre for Advanced Hybrid Materials, Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800 (Australia)

    2014-06-21

    We demonstrate that the fractal dimension (FD) of the dislocation population in a deforming material is an important quantitative characteristic of the evolution of the dislocation structure. Thus, we show that peaking of FD signifies a nearing loss of uniformity of plastic flow and the onset of strain localization. Two techniques were employed to determine FD: (i) inspection of surface morphology of the deforming crystal by white light interferometry and (ii) monitoring of acoustic emission (AE) during uniaxial tensile deformation. A connection between the AE characteristics and the fractal dimension determined from surface topography measurements was established. As a common platform for the two methods, the dislocation density evolution in the bulk was used. The relations found made it possible to identify the occurrence of a peak in the median frequency of AE as a harbinger of plastic instability leading to necking. It is suggested that access to the fractal dimension provided by AE measurements and by surface topography analysis makes these techniques important tools for monitoring the evolution of the dislocation structure during plastic deformation—both as stand-alone methods and especially when used in tandem.

  17. Experimental investigation of slow-positron emission from 4H-SiC and 6H-SiC surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, C.C.; Beling, C.D.; Fung, S.; Weng, H.M.

    2002-01-01

    Slow-positron emission from the surfaces of as-grown n-type 4H-SiC and 6H-SiC (silicon carbide) with a conversion efficiency of ∼10 -4 has been observed. After 30 min of 1000 deg. C annealing in forming gas, the conversion efficiency of the n-type 6H-SiC sample was observed to be enhanced by 75% to 1.9x10 -4 , but it then dropped to ∼10 -5 upon a further 30 min annealing at 1400 deg. C. The positron work function of the n-type 6H-SiC was found to increase by 29% upon 1000 deg. C annealing. For both p-type 4H-SiC and p-type 6H-SiC materials, the conversion efficiency was of the order of ∼10 -5 , some ten times lower than that for the n-type materials. This was attributed to the band bending at the p-type material surface which caused positrons to drift away from the positron emitting surface. (author)

  18. Repairing method and apparatus for weld portion of reactor core shroud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsujimura, Hiroshi; Tamai, Yasukata; Kurosawa, Koichi (Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)); Toyota, Seiichi; Kikuchi, Toshikazu.

    1993-12-07

    A method of repairing a weld portion in a cylindrical reactor core shroud comprises a first step of inspecting a weld portion by an ultrasonic flow testing device from the surface of the reactor core shroud, a second step of applying repairing fabrication for cracked portion if it is discovered by the test and a third step of applying a surface modification to the fabricated portion after the repairing fabrication. As a result, repairing fabrication for the crack caused by stress corrosion crack or the like is enabled and reoccurrence of the stress corrosion crack in the repair fabrication portion can be prevented. Operator's exposure dose is minimized by shielding with reactor water or shielding plate. In a case of using the shielding plate, welding and surface improvement can be practiced in atmospheric air instead of water-submerged welding. Water does not intrude from the outside of the shroud and occurrence of penetration crack can be coped with. Further, it is possible to reduce cost and save labors for parts exchange by using the parts in common, to improve the operation efficiency. (N.H.).

  19. Repairing method and apparatus for weld portion of reactor core shroud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimura, Hiroshi; Tamai, Yasukata; Kurosawa, Koichi; Toyota, Seiichi; Kikuchi, Toshikazu.

    1993-01-01

    A method of repairing a weld portion in a cylindrical reactor core shroud comprises a first step of inspecting a weld portion by an ultrasonic flow testing device from the surface of the reactor core shroud, a second step of applying repairing fabrication for cracked portion if it is discovered by the test and a third step of applying a surface modification to the fabricated portion after the repairing fabrication. As a result, repairing fabrication for the crack caused by stress corrosion crack or the like is enabled and reoccurrence of the stress corrosion crack in the repair fabrication portion can be prevented. Operator's exposure dose is minimized by shielding with reactor water or shielding plate. In a case of using the shielding plate, welding and surface improvement can be practiced in atmospheric air instead of water-submerged welding. Water does not intrude from the outside of the shroud and occurrence of penetration crack can be coped with. Further, it is possible to reduce cost and save labors for parts exchange by using the parts in common, to improve the operation efficiency. (N.H.)

  20. VUV/XUV measurements of impurity emission in plasmas with liquid lithium surfaces on LTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritz, Kevin; Finkenthal, Michael; Stutman, Dan; Bell, Ronald E; Boyle, Dennis; Kaita, Robert; Kozub, Tom; Lucia, Matthew; Majeski, Richard; Merino, Enrique; Schmitt, John; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Clementson, Joel; Kubota, Shigeyuki

    2014-01-01

    The VUV/XUV spectrum has been measured on the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX) using a transmission grating imaging spectrometer (TGIS) coupled to a direct-detection x-ray charge-coupled device camera. TGIS data show significant changes in the ratios between the lithium and oxygen impurity line emission during discharges with varying lithium wall conditions. Lithium coatings that have been passivated by lengthy exposure to significant levels of impurities contribute to a large O/Li ratio measured during LTX plasma discharges. Furthermore, previous results have indicated that a passivated lithium film on the plasma facing components will function as a stronger impurity source when in the form of a hot liquid layer compared to a solid lithium layer. However, recent TGIS measurements of plasma discharges in LTX with hot stainless steel boundary shells and a fresh liquid lithium coating show lower O/Li impurity line ratios when compared to discharges with a solid lithium film on cool shells. These new measurements help elucidate the somewhat contradictory results of the effects of solid and liquid lithium on plasma confinement observed in previous experiments. (paper)

  1. Removal of portions of tubes from steam generator of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkins, R.L.; Williams, C.F.

    1983-01-01

    After the tube portion to be removed is severed from the remainder of the U-tube and its weld to the header is machined off, the internal surface of the portion is engaged internally by an ID gripper and pulled out of the header. Then the external surface is engaged by an OD gripper and pulled further out of the header. The first tube length is pulled out as far as the space under the header permits and is then cut off. Successive lengths are likewise pulled out and cut off. The apparatus for accomplishing this object includes a base secured to the header by expanded mandrel mechanisms. A carriage is suspended from the base on screws which are driven by a motor to move the carriage away from and towards the base. An OD gripper assembly is suspended from the carriage and is movable by fluoroactuated piston rods away from and towards the carriage. An ID gripper assembly extends through the OD gripper assembly. The gripper of the ID assembly is actuable to engage the internal surface of the tube portion. With its gripper so engaged the ID assembly is engaged by the gripper of the OD assembly and the engaged tube portion is pulled out of the header by the OD assembly. The ID gripper is then disengaged and the OD gripper is engaged with the tube portion in the same way that it engages the ID assembly and the tube portion is pulled out further. The apparatus also includes a tube cutter having an abrasive wheel. The wheel cuts the lengths of the tube portion at an angle so that for examination and testing the tube lengths can be matched and the orientation of any defect with respect to the plate in the steam generator which separates the inlet and outlet ends of the tubes and the U-tube supports can be identified

  2. Molecular projectile effects for kinetic electron emission from carbon- and metal-surfaces bombarded by slow hydrogen ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cernusca, S.; Winter, H.P.; Aumayr, F.; Diez Muino, R.; Juaristi, J.I.

    2003-01-01

    Total yields for kinetic electron emission (KE) have been determined for impact of hydrogen monomer-, dimer- and trimer-ions (impact energy <10 keV) on atomically clean surfaces of carbon-fiber inforced graphite used as first-wall armour in magnetic fusion devices. The data are compared with KE yields for impact of same projectile ions on atomically clean highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and polycrystalline gold. We discuss KE yields for the different targets if bombarded by equally fast molecular and atomic ions in view to 'projectile molecular effects' (different yields per proton for equally fast atomic and molecular ions), which are expected from calculated electronic projectile energy losses in these target materials

  3. Molecular projectile effects for kinetic electron emission from carbon- and metal-surfaces bombarded by slow hydrogen ions

    CERN Document Server

    Cernusca, S; Aumayr, F; Diez-Muino, R; Juaristi, J I

    2003-01-01

    Total yields for kinetic electron emission (KE) have been determined for impact of hydrogen monomer-, dimer- and trimer-ions (impact energy <10 keV) on atomically clean surfaces of carbon-fiber inforced graphite used as first-wall armour in magnetic fusion devices. The data are compared with KE yields for impact of same projectile ions on atomically clean highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and polycrystalline gold. We discuss KE yields for the different targets if bombarded by equally fast molecular and atomic ions in view to 'projectile molecular effects' (different yields per proton for equally fast atomic and molecular ions), which are expected from calculated electronic projectile energy losses in these target materials.

  4. Sensitivity analysis of surface ozone to emission controls in Beijing and its neighboring area during the 2008 Olympic Games

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Gao; Meigen Zhang

    2012-01-01

    The regional air quality modeling system RAMS (Regional Atmospheric Modeling System)-CMAQ (Community Multi-scale Air Quality modeling system) is applied to analyze temporal and spatial variations in surface ozone concentration over Beijing and its surrounding region from July to October 2008.Comparison of simulated and observed meteorological elements and concentration of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and ozone at one urban site and three rural sites during Olympic Games show that model can generally reproduce the main observed feature of wind,temperature and ozone,but NOx concentration is overestimated.Although ozone concentration decreased during Olympics,high ozone episodes occurred on 24 July and 24 August with concentration of 360 and 245 μg/m3 at Aoyuncun site,respectively.The analysis of sensitive test,with and without emission controls,shows that emission controls could reduce ozone concentration in the afternoon when ozone concentration was highest but increase it at night and in the morning.The evolution of the weather system during the ozone episodes (24 July and 24 August) indicates that hot and dry air and a stable weak pressure field intensified the production of ozone and allowed it to accumulate.Process analysis at the urban site and rural site shows that under favorable weather condition on 24 August,horizontal transport was the main contributor of the rural place and the pollution from the higher layer would be transported to the surface layer.On 24 July,as the wind velocity was smaller,the impact of transport on the rural place was not obvious.

  5. Triple layered core–shell structure with surface fluorinated ZnO-carbon nanotube composites and its electron emission properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H.Y.; Chua, Daniel H.C.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The effects of CF 4 plasma on ZnO-CNT core–shell structures were studied. ► ZnO was effective in protecting the aligned CNTs core for as long as 30 min of plasma etching. ► SEM showed the surface morphology was nearly similar between pristine, 2 min and 30 min plasma etched specimens. ► F was observed to displace O in ZnO. ► This is the first report of an ultra long plasma etch of fluorine onto ZnO surface. - Abstract: Core-shelled structures such as zinc oxide (ZnO) on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) give rise to interesting material properties. In this work, a triple-layered core–shell–shell structure is presented where the effects of fluorine (F) incorporation on the outmost shell of the ZnO-CNT structure are studied. The samples prepared ranged from a short 2 min to a 30 min immersion in carbon tetraflouride (CF 4 ) plasma. In addition, its effects on the electron emission properties also studied and it is shown that the plasma immersions create thinner field emitters with sharp tiny wrinkles giving rise to more electron emission sites and higher enhancement factor. In addition, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements showed that F ions replace O in ZnO coatings during immersion process, thus increasing the electrical conductivity and shifts the Fermi level of ZnO upwards. Both physical and electronic effects further contribute to a lower threshold field.

  6. Passive wireless surface acoustic wave sensors for monitoring sequestration sites CO2 emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yizhong [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Chyu, Minking [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Wang, Qing-Ming [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2013-02-14

    University of Pittsburgh’s Transducer lab has teamed with the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) to conduct a comprehensive study to develop/evaluate low-cost, efficient CO2 measuring technologies for geological sequestration sites leakage monitoring. A passive wireless CO2 sensing system based on surface acoustic wave technology and carbon nanotube nanocomposite was developed. Surface acoustic wave device was studied to determine the optimum parameters. Delay line structure was adopted as basic sensor structure. CNT polymer nanocomposite was fabricated and tested under different temperature and strain condition for natural environment impact evaluation. Nanocomposite resistance increased for 5 times under pure strain, while the temperature dependence of resistance for CNT solely was -1375ppm/°C. The overall effect of temperature on nanocomposite resistance was -1000ppm/°C. The gas response of the nanocomposite was about 10% resistance increase under pure CO2 . The sensor frequency change was around 300ppm for pure CO2 . With paralyne packaging, the sensor frequency change from relative humidity of 0% to 100% at room temperature decreased from over 1000ppm to less than 100ppm. The lowest detection limit of the sensor is 1% gas concentration, with 36ppm frequency change. Wireless module was tested and showed over one foot transmission distance at preferred parallel orientation.

  7. Normal emission photoelectron diffraction: a new technique for determining surface structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kevan, S.D.

    1980-05-01

    One technique, photoelectron diffraction (PhD) is characterized. It has some promise in surmounting some of the problems of LEED. In PhD, the differential (angle-resolved) photoemission cross-section of a core level localized on an adsorbate atom is measured as a function of some final state parameter. The photoemission final state consists of two components, one of which propagates directly to the detector and another which scatters off the surface and then propagates to the detector. These are added coherently, and interference between the two manifests itself as cross-section oscillations which are sensitive to the local structure around the absorbing atom. We have shown that PhD deals effectively with two- and probably also three-dimensionally disordered systems. Its non-damaging and localized, atom-specific nature gives PhD a good deal of promise in dealing with molecular overlayer systems. It is concluded that while PhD will never replace LEED, it may provide useful, complementary and possibly also more accurate surface structural information

  8. Mapping of upper electronic reaction surfaces by tuned laser photolysis and by absorption and emission spectroscopies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, M.A.

    1989-07-01

    Potential energy surfaces for photorotamerization of two intramolecularly hydrogen-bonded molecules, o-hydroxybenzaldehyde (OHBA) and methyl salicylate (MS), isolated in cryogenic matrices have been spectroscopically mapped. In addition, the external heavy atom effect of krypton and xenon matrices on the coupling between the S 1 and T 1 surfaces of 4-(dimethylamino)benzonitrile has been examined. Heavy atom matrices are known to increase rates of spin-forbidden processes. The phosphorescence intensity of DMABN increases in krypton and xenon matrices, while the fluorescence intensity, and phosphorescence and fluorescence lifetimes, decrease. These effects are interpreted in terms of a model in which the phosphorescence rate constant increases 300-fold in xenon compared to argon, while the rate constants for intersystem crossing and nonradiative relaxation from the triplet state increase by factors of less than 5. Lifetime measurements in argon matrices doped with heavy atoms indicate that even one heavy atom neighbor has a significant effect on both singlet and triplet lifetimes. 78 refs., 35 figs., 15 tabs

  9. Indirect global warming effects of ozone and stratospheric water vapor induced by surface methane emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuebbles, D.J.; Grossman, A.S.; Tamaresis, J.S.; Patten, K.O. Jr.; Jain, A.; Grant, K.A.

    1994-07-01

    Methane has indirect effects on climate due to chemical interactions as well as direct radiative forcing effects as a greenhouse gas. We have calculated the indirect, time-varying tropospheric radiative forcing and GWP of O 3 and stratospheric H 2 O due to an impulse of CH 4 . This impulse, applied to the lowest layer of the atmosphere, is the increase of the atmospheric mass of CH 4 resulting from a 25 percent steady state increase in the current emissions as a function of latitude. The direct CH 4 radiative forcing and GWP are also calculated. The LLNL 2-D radiative-chemistry-transport model is used to evaluate the resulting changes in the O 3 , H 2 O and CH 4 atmospheric profiles as a function of time. A correlated k-distribution radiative transfer model is used to calculate the radiative forcing at the tropopause of the globally-averaged atmosphere profiles. The O 3 indirect GWPs vary from ∼27 after a 20 yr integration to ∼4 after 500 years, agreeing with the previous estimates to within about 10 percent. The H 2 O indirect GWPs vary from ∼2 after a 20 yr integration to ∼0.3 after 500 years, and are in close agreement with other estimates. The CH 4 GWPs vary from ∼53 at 20 yrs to ∼7 at 500 yrs. The 20 year CH 4 GWP is ∼20% larger than previous estimates of the direct CH 4 GWP due to a CH 4 response time (∼17 yrs) that is much longer than the overall lifetime (10 yrs). The increased CH 4 response time results from changes in the OH abundances caused by the CH 4 impulse. The CH 4 radiative forcing results are consistent with IPCC values. Estimates are made of latitude effects in the radiative forcing calculations, and UV effects on the O 3 radiative forcing calculations (10%)

  10. Estimating source-attributable health impacts of ambient fine particulate matter exposure: global premature mortality from surface transportation emissions in 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambliss, S E; Zeinali, M; Minjares, R; Silva, R; West, J J

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to ambient fine particular matter (PM 2.5 ) was responsible for 3.2 million premature deaths in 2010 and is among the top ten leading risk factors for early death. Surface transportation is a significant global source of PM 2.5 emissions and a target for new actions. The objective of this study is to estimate the global and national health burden of ambient PM 2.5 exposure attributable to surface transportation emissions. This share of health burden is called the transportation attributable fraction (TAF), and is assumed equal to the proportional decrease in modeled ambient particulate matter concentrations when surface transportation emissions are removed. National population-weighted TAFs for 190 countries are modeled for 2005 using the MOZART-4 global chemical transport model. Changes in annual average concentration of PM 2.5 at 0.5 × 0.67 degree horizontal resolution are based on a global emissions inventory and removal of all surface transportation emissions. Global population-weighted average TAF was 8.5 percent or 1.75 μg m −3 in 2005. Approximately 242 000 annual premature deaths were attributable to surface transportation emissions, dominated by China, the United States, the European Union and India. This application of TAF allows future Global Burden of Disease studies to estimate the sector-specific burden of ambient PM 2.5 exposure. Additional research is needed to capture intraurban variations in emissions and exposure, and to broaden the range of health effects considered, including the effects of other pollutants. (letter)

  11. Surface heat flow and CO2 emissions within the Ohaaki hydrothermal field, Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissmann, C.; Christenson, B.; Werner, C.; Leybourne, M.; Cole, J.; Gravley, D.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon dioxide emissions and heat flow have been determined from the Ohaaki hydrothermal field, Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ), New Zealand following 20a of production (116MW e). Soil CO2 degassing was quantified with 2663 CO2 flux measurements using the accumulation chamber method, and 2563 soil temperatures were measured and converted to equivalent heat flow (Wm -2) using published soil temperature heat flow functions. Both CO2 flux and heat flow were analysed statistically and then modelled using 500 sequential Gaussian simulations. Forty subsoil CO 2 gas samples were also analysed for stable C isotopes. Following 20a of production, current CO2 emissions equated to 111??6.7T/d. Observed heat flow was 70??6.4MW, compared with a pre-production value of 122MW. This 52MW reduction in surface heat flow is due to production-induced drying up of all alkali-Cl outflows (61.5MW) and steam-heated pools (8.6MW) within the Ohaaki West thermal area (OHW). The drying up of all alkali-Cl outflows at Ohaaki means that the soil zone is now the major natural pathway of heat release from the high-temperature reservoir. On the other hand, a net gain in thermal ground heat flow of 18MW (from 25MW to 43.3??5MW) at OHW is associated with permeability increases resulting from surface unit fracturing by production-induced ground subsidence. The Ohaaki East (OHE) thermal area showed no change in distribution of shallow and deep soil temperature contours despite 20a of production, with an observed heat flow of 26.7??3MW and a CO 2 emission rate of 39??3T/d. The negligible change in the thermal status of the OHE thermal area is attributed to the low permeability of the reservoir beneath this area, which has limited production (mass extraction) and sheltered the area from the pressure decline within the main reservoir. Chemistry suggests that although alkali-Cl outflows once contributed significantly to the natural surface heat flow (~50%) they contributed little (99% of the original CO 2

  12. Surface-Plasmon-Enhanced Emissions of Phosphors with Au Nanoparticles Embedded in ITO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ja-Yeon [Korea Photonics Technology Institute (KOPTI), Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Seung Jong; Park, Hyun-Sun; Kim, Min-Woo; Cho, Yoo-Hyun; Kwon, Min-Ki [Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Au nanoparticles were embedded in a transparent conducting layer of indium tin oxide in order to evaluate the feasibility of applying a surface-plasmon (SP)-enhanced phosphor to light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The efficiency of the phosphor was improved by energy matching between the phosphor and the SP of the Au nanoparticles. After the density of the Au nanoparticles and the thickness of the spacer layer had been optimized, the efficiency of a green phosphor was improved by 64% compared to that of an isolated green phosphor. This work provides a way to fabricate high-efficiency LEDs with high color-rendering indices and wide color gamuts in white LEDs.

  13. Study of electronic field emission from large surfaces under static operating conditions and hyper-frequency; Etude de l'emision electronique par effet de champ sur des surfaces larges en regime statique et hyperfrequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luong, M

    1997-09-01

    The enhanced electronic field emission from large area metallic surfaces lowers performances of industrial devices that have to sustain high electric field under vacuum. Despite of numerous investigations in the past, the mechanisms of such an emission have never been well clarified. Recently, research in our laboratory has pointed out the importance played by conducting sites (particles and protrusions). A refined geometrical model, called superposed protrusions model has been proposed to explain the enhanced emission by local field enhancement. As a logical continuation, the present work aims at testing this model and, in the same time, investigating the means to suppress the emission where it is undesirable. Thus, we have showed: the cause of current fluctuations in a continuous field regime (DC), the identity of emission characteristics ({beta}, A{sub e}) in both radiofrequency (RF) and DC regimes, the effectiveness of a thermal treatment by extern high density electronic bombardment, the effectiveness of a mechanical treatment by high pressure rinsing with ultra pure water, the mechanisms and limits of an in situ RF processing. Furthermore, the electronic emission from insulating particles has also been studied concurrently with a spectral analysis of the associated luminous emission. Finally, the refined geometrical model for conducting sites is reinforced while another model is proposed for some insulating sites. Several emission suppressing treatments has been explored and validated. At last, the characteristic of a RF pulsed field emitted electron beam has been checked for the first time as a possible application of such a field emission. (author)

  14. Study of electronic field emission from large surfaces under static operating conditions and hyper-frequency; Etude de l'emision electronique par effet de champ sur des surfaces larges en regime statique et hyperfrequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luong, M

    1997-09-01

    The enhanced electronic field emission from large area metallic surfaces lowers performances of industrial devices that have to sustain high electric field under vacuum. Despite of numerous investigations in the past, the mechanisms of such an emission have never been well clarified. Recently, research in our laboratory has pointed out the importance played by conducting sites (particles and protrusions). A refined geometrical model, called superposed protrusions model has been proposed to explain the enhanced emission by local field enhancement. As a logical continuation, the present work aims at testing this model and, in the same time, investigating the means to suppress the emission where it is undesirable. Thus, we have showed: the cause of current fluctuations in a continuous field regime (DC), the identity of emission characteristics ({beta}, A{sub e}) in both radiofrequency (RF) and DC regimes, the effectiveness of a thermal treatment by extern high density electronic bombardment, the effectiveness of a mechanical treatment by high pressure rinsing with ultra pure water, the mechanisms and limits of an in situ RF processing. Furthermore, the electronic emission from insulating particles has also been studied concurrently with a spectral analysis of the associated luminous emission. Finally, the refined geometrical model for conducting sites is reinforced while another model is proposed for some insulating sites. Several emission suppressing treatments has been explored and validated. At last, the characteristic of a RF pulsed field emitted electron beam has been checked for the first time as a possible application of such a field emission. (author)

  15. A Climatology of Dust-Emission Events over North Africa Based on 27 Years of Surface Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, S.; Knippertz, P.; Schepanski, K.

    2012-04-01

    The huge quantity of mineral dust emitted annually from North Africa makes this area crucial to the global dust cycle. Once in the atmosphere, dust aerosols have a significant impact on the global radiation budget, clouds, the carbon cycle and can even act as a fertilizer to rain forests in South America. Current model estimates of dust production from North Africa are uncertain. At the heart of this problem is insufficient understanding of key dust emitting processes such as haboobs (cold pools generated through evaporation of convective precipitation), low-level jets (LLJs), and dry convection (dust devils and dust plumes). Scarce observations in this region, in particular in the Sahara, make model evaluation difficult. This work uses long-term surface observations from the MIDAS data set (~120 stations in the arid part of North Africa) to explore the diurnal, seasonal, decadal and geographical variations in dust emission events and their associated wind thresholds. The threshold values are determined from probability density functions of observed 10-minute anemomenter wind speeds. Emission events are defined using the present weather codes (WW) of SYNOP reports. These codes represent events of smaller intensity such as "Dust or sand raised by wind" to severe dust storms. During the 27-year study period (1984-2011) stations are required to have a minimum of 1000 dust observations to be included in the analysis. Dust emission frequency (DEF) is calculated for different time intervals (e.g. monthly, 3-hourly) taking into account the different number of measurements available at each station. North of 25°N a maximum during March-May is evident and relatively consistent over the whole North African region. Wind-speed thresholds for dust emission north of 25°N are higher than south of 25°N in the Sahel, where station-to-station variability is larger, and enhanced DEF activity during February-March is observed. The variability in this region is closely linked to the

  16. A Comparative Study of the Monitoring of a Self Aligning Spherical Journal using Surface Vibration, Airborne Sound and Acoustic Emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raharjo, P; Tesfa, B; Gu, F; Ball, A D

    2012-01-01

    A Self aligning spherical journal bearing is a plain bearing which has spherical surface contact that can be applied in high power industrial machinery. This type of bearing can accommodate a misalignment problem. The journal bearing faults degrade machine performance, decrease life time service and cause unexpected failure which are dangerous for safety issues. Non-intrusive measurements such as surface vibration (SV), airborne sound (AS) and acoustic emission (AE) measurement are appropriate monitoring methods for early stage journal bearing fault in low, medium and high frequency. This paper focuses on the performance comparison using SV, AS and AE measurements in monitoring a self aligning spherical journal bearing for normal and faulty (scratch) conditions. It examines the signals in the time domain and frequency domain and identifies the frequency ranges for each measurement in which significant changes are observed. The results of SV, AS and AE experiments indicate that the spectrum can be used to detect the differences between normal and faulty bearing. The statistic parameter shows that RMS value and peak value for faulty bearing is higher than normal bearing.

  17. Environment-friendly adhesives for surface bonding of wood-based flooring using natural tannin to reduce formaldehyde and TVOC emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sumin

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this research was to develop environment-friendly adhesives for face fancy veneer bonding of engineered flooring using the natural tannin form bark in the wood. The natural wattle tannin adhesive were used to replace UF resin in the formaldehyde-based resin system in order to reduce formaldehyde and volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from the adhesives used between plywoods and fancy veneers. PVAc was added to the natural tannin adhesive to increase viscosity of tannin adhesive for surface bonding. For tannin/PVAc hybrid adhesives, 5%, 10%, 20% and 30% of PVAc to the natural tannin adhesives were added. tannin/PVAc hybrid adhesives showed better bonding than the commercial natural tannin adhesive with a higher level of wood penetration. The initial adhesion strength was sufficient to be maintained within the optimum initial tack range. The standard formaldehyde emission test (desiccator method), field and laboratory emission cell (FLEC) and VOC analyzer were used to determine the formaldehyde and VOC emissions from engineered flooring bonded with commercial the natural tannin adhesive and tannin/PVAc hybrid adhesives. By desiccator method and FLEC, the formaldehyde emission level of each adhesive showed the similar tendency. All adhesives satisfied the E(1) grade (below 1.5 mg/L) and E(0) grade (below 0.5 mg/L) with UV coating. VOC emission results by FLEC and VOC analyzer were different with the formaldehyde emission results. TVOC emission was slightly increased as adding PVAc.

  18. Modeled Trends in Impacts of Landing and Takeoff Aircraft Emissions on Surface Air-Quality in U.S for 2005, 2010 and 2018

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vennam, L. P.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the present-day impacts of aircraft emissions on surface air quality is essential to plan potential mitigation policies for future growth. Stringent regulation on mobile source-related emissions in the recent past coupled with anticipated rise in the growth in aviation activity can increase the relative impacts of aviation-attributable surface air quality if adequate measures for reducing aviation emissions are not implemented. Though aircraft emissions during in-flight mode (at upper altitudes) contribute a significant (70 - 80%) proportion of the total aviation emissions, landing and takeoff (LTO) related emissions can have immediate impact on surface air quality, as most of the large airports are located in urban areas, specifically those that are designated in nonattainment for O3 and/or PM2.5. In this study, we modeled impacts of aircraft emissions during LTO cycles on surface air quality using the latest version of the CMAQ model for two contemporary years (2005, 2010) and one future year (2018). For this regional scale modeling study, we used highly resolved aircraft emissions from the FAA's Aviation Environmental Design Tool (AEDT), meteorology from NASA's Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) downscaled with the WRF model, dynamically varying chemical boundary conditions from the CAM-Chem global model (which also used the same AEDT emissions but at the global scale), and spatio-temporally resolved lightning NOx emissions estimated using National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) flash density data. We evaluated our model results with air quality observations from surface-based networks and in-situ aircraft observation data for the contemporary years. We will present results from model evaluation using this enhanced modeling system, as well as the trajectories in aviation- related air quality (focusing on O3, NO2 and PM2.5) for the three modeling years considered in this study. These findings will help plan

  19. Surface and Bulk Characteristics of Cesium Iodide (CsI) coated Carbon (C) Fibers for High Power Microwave (HPM) Field Emission Cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahos, Vasilios; Morgan, Dane; Booske, John H.; Shiffler, Don

    2008-11-01

    CsI coated C fibers [1] are promising field emission cathodes for HPM applications. Ab initio computational modeling has shown that atomically-thin CsI coatings reduce the work function of C substrates by a surface dipole mechanism [2]. Characterization measurements of the composition and morphology of the CsI-coated C fibers are underway for determining the properties and characteristics of the following important regions of the fiber: (i) the surface on the tip of the fiber where the majority of electron emission is believed to occur, (ii) the surface covering the body of the fiber and its role on the emission properties of the system, and (iii) the interior volume of the fiber and its effects on the CsI surface re-supply process and rate. The results will be interpreted in terms of surface electronic properties and theoretical electron emission models. [1]D. Shiffler, et al., Phys. Plasmas 11 (2004) 1680. [2]V.Vlahos et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 91 (2007) 144102.

  20. Portion size: a qualitative study of consumers' attitudes toward point-of-purchase interventions aimed at portion size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeer, Willemijn M; Steenhuis, Ingrid H M; Seidell, Jacob C

    2010-02-01

    This qualitative study assessed consumers' opinions of food portion sizes and their attitudes toward portion-size interventions located in various point-of-purchase settings targeting overweight and obese people. Eight semi-structured focus group discussions were conducted with 49 participants. Constructs from the diffusion of innovations theory were included in the interview guide. Each focus group was recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were coded and analyzed with Atlas.ti 5.2 using the framework approach. Results showed that many participants thought that portion sizes of various products have increased during the past decades and are larger than acceptable. The majority also indicated that value for money is important when purchasing and that large portion sizes offer more value for money than small portion sizes. Furthermore, many experienced difficulties with self-regulating the consumption of large portion sizes. Among the portion-size interventions that were discussed, participants had most positive attitudes toward a larger availability of portion sizes and pricing strategies, followed by serving-size labeling. In general, reducing package serving sizes as an intervention strategy to control food intake met resistance. The study concludes that consumers consider interventions consisting of a larger variety of available portion sizes, pricing strategies and serving-size labeling as most acceptable to implement.

  1. Control of deviations and prediction of surface roughness from micro machining of THz waveguides using acoustic emission signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, James M.; Diaz, Fernanda; Geerling, Edgar; Clasing, Matias; Ponce, Vicente; Taylor, Chris; Turner, Sam; Michael, Ernest A.; Patricio Mena, F.; Bronfman, Leonardo

    2017-02-01

    By using acoustic emission (AE) it is possible to control deviations and surface quality during micro milling operations. The method of micro milling is used to manufacture a submillimetre waveguide where micro machining is employed to achieve the required superior finish and geometrical tolerances. Submillimetre waveguide technology is used in deep space signal retrieval where highest detection efficiencies are needed and therefore every possible signal loss in the receiver has to be avoided and stringent tolerances achieved. With a sub-standard surface finish the signals travelling along the waveguides dissipate away faster than with perfect surfaces where the residual roughness becomes comparable with the electromagnetic skin depth. Therefore, the higher the radio frequency the more critical this becomes. The method of time-frequency analysis (STFT) is used to transfer raw AE into more meaningful salient signal features (SF). This information was then correlated against the measured geometrical deviations and, the onset of catastrophic tool wear. Such deviations can be offset from different AE signals (different deviations from subsequent tests) and feedback for a final spring cut ensuring the geometrical accuracies are met. Geometrical differences can impact on the required transfer of AE signals (change in cut off frequencies and diminished SNR at the interface) and therefore errors have to be minimised to within 1 μm. Rules based on both Classification and Regression Trees (CART) and Neural Networks (NN) were used to implement a simulation displaying how such a control regime could be used as a real time controller, be it corrective measures (via spring cuts) over several initial machining passes or, with a micron cut introducing a level plain measure for allowing setup corrective measures (similar to a spirit level).

  2. Demonstration of Li-based alloy coatings as low-voltage stable electron-emission surfaces for field-emission devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auciello, O.; Krauss, A.R.; Gruen, D.M.; Shah, P.; Corrigan, T.; Kordesch, M.E.; Chang, R.P.; Barr, T.L.

    1999-01-01

    Alkali metals have extremely low work functions and are, therefore, expected to result in significant enhancement of the electron emission if they are used as coatings on Mo or Si microtip field-emission arrays (FEAs). However, the alkali metals are physically and chemically unstable in layers exceeding a few Angstrom in thickness. Maximum enhancement of electron emission occurs for alkali - metal layers 0.5 - 1 ML thick, but it is extremely difficult to fabricate and maintain such a thin alkali - metal coating. We present here an alternative means of producing chemically and thermally stable, self-replenishing lithium coatings approximately 1 ML thick, which results in a 13-fold reduction in the threshold voltage for electron emission compared with uncoated Si FEAs. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  3. Portion and Serving Sizes of Commonly Consumed Foods, in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Portion sizes were determined from weight equivalents of each food type consumed, average portion sizes for each food type were determined using the statistical ... Serving sizes determined: a serving of the various foods as expressed in household measures include; 1.3 slices of bread, 13.5 tablespoons of Ewedu soup, ...

  4. Impact of regional climate change and future emission scenarios on surface O3 and PM2.5 over India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommier, Matthieu; Fagerli, Hilde; Gauss, Michael; Simpson, David; Sharma, Sumit; Sinha, Vinay; Ghude, Sachin D.; Landgren, Oskar; Nyiri, Agnes; Wind, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Eleven of the world's 20 most polluted cities are located in India and poor air quality is already a major public health issue. However, anthropogenic emissions are predicted to increase substantially in the short-term (2030) and medium-term (2050) futures in India, especially if no further policy efforts are made. In this study, the EMEP/MSC-W chemical transport model has been used to predict changes in surface ozone (O3) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) for India in a world of changing emissions and climate. The reference scenario (for present-day) is evaluated against surface-based measurements, mainly at urban stations. The evaluation has also been extended to other data sets which are publicly available on the web but without quality assurance. The evaluation shows high temporal correlation for O3 (r = 0.9) and high spatial correlation for PM2.5 (r = 0.5 and r = 0.8 depending on the data set) between the model results and observations. While the overall bias in PM2.5 is small (lower than 6 %), the model overestimates O3 by 35 %. The underestimation in NOx titration is probably the main reason for the O3 overestimation in the model. However, the level of agreement can be considered satisfactory in this case of a regional model being evaluated against mainly urban measurements, and given the inevitable uncertainties in much of the input data.For the 2050s, the model predicts that climate change will have distinct effects in India in terms of O3 pollution, with a region in the north characterized by a statistically significant increase by up to 4 % (2 ppb) and one in the south by a decrease up to -3 % (-1.4 ppb). This variation in O3 is assumed to be partly related to changes in O3 deposition velocity caused by changes in soil moisture and, over a few areas, partly also by changes in biogenic non-methane volatile organic compounds.Our calculations suggest that PM2.5 will increase by up to 6.5 % over the Indo-Gangetic Plain by the 2050s. The increase over India

  5. Impact of regional climate change and future emission scenarios on surface O3 and PM2.5 over India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pommier

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Eleven of the world's 20 most polluted cities are located in India and poor air quality is already a major public health issue. However, anthropogenic emissions are predicted to increase substantially in the short-term (2030 and medium-term (2050 futures in India, especially if no further policy efforts are made. In this study, the EMEP/MSC-W chemical transport model has been used to predict changes in surface ozone (O3 and fine particulate matter (PM2.5 for India in a world of changing emissions and climate. The reference scenario (for present-day is evaluated against surface-based measurements, mainly at urban stations. The evaluation has also been extended to other data sets which are publicly available on the web but without quality assurance. The evaluation shows high temporal correlation for O3 (r =  0.9 and high spatial correlation for PM2.5 (r =  0.5 and r =  0.8 depending on the data set between the model results and observations. While the overall bias in PM2.5 is small (lower than 6 %, the model overestimates O3 by 35 %. The underestimation in NOx titration is probably the main reason for the O3 overestimation in the model. However, the level of agreement can be considered satisfactory in this case of a regional model being evaluated against mainly urban measurements, and given the inevitable uncertainties in much of the input data.For the 2050s, the model predicts that climate change will have distinct effects in India in terms of O3 pollution, with a region in the north characterized by a statistically significant increase by up to 4 % (2 ppb and one in the south by a decrease up to −3 % (−1.4 ppb. This variation in O3 is assumed to be partly related to changes in O3 deposition velocity caused by changes in soil moisture and, over a few areas, partly also by changes in biogenic non-methane volatile organic compounds.Our calculations suggest that PM2.5 will increase by up to 6.5 % over the Indo

  6. Container size influences snack food intake independently of portion size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchiori, David; Corneille, Olivier; Klein, Olivier

    2012-06-01

    While larger containers have been found to increase food intake, it is unclear whether this effect is driven by container size, portion size, or their combination, as these variables are usually confounded. The study was advertised as examining the effects of snack food consumption on information processing and participants were served M&M's for free consumption in individual cubicles while watching a TV show. Participants were served (1) a medium portion of M&M's in a small (n=30) or (2) in a large container (n=29), or (3) a large portion in a large container (n=29). The larger container increased intake by 129% (199 kcal) despite holding portion size constant, while controlling for different confounding variables. This research suggests that larger containers stimulate food intake over and above their impact on portion size. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Impact of the 2008 Global Recession on Air Quality over the United States: Implications for Surface Ozone Levels from Changes in NOx Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Daniel; Pan, Li; Chen, Weiwei; Lamsal, Lok; Lee, Pius; Tang, Youhua; Kim, Hyuncheol; Kondragunta, Shobha; Stajner, Ivanka

    2016-01-01

    Satellite and ground observations detected large variability in nitrogen oxides (NOx) during the 2008 economic recession, but the impact of the recession on air quality has not been quantified. This study combines observed NOx trends and a regional chemical transport model to quantify the impact of the recession on surface ozone (O3) levels over the continental United States. The impact is quantified by simulating O3 concentrations under two emission scenarios: business-as-usual (BAU) and recession. In the BAU case, the emission projection from the Cross-State Air Pollution Rule is used to estimate the would-be NOx emission level in 2011. In the recession case, the actual NO2 trends observed from Air Quality System ground monitors and the Ozone Monitoring Instrument on the Aura satellite are used to obtain realistic changes in NOx emissions. The model prediction with the recession effect agrees better with ground O3 observations over time and space than the prediction with the BAU emission. The results show that the recession caused a 12ppbv decrease in surface O3 concentration over the eastern United States, a slight increase (0.51ppbv) over the Rocky Mountain region, and mixed changes in the Pacific West. The gain in air quality benefits during the recession, however, could be quickly offset by the much slower emission reduction rate during the post-recession period.

  8. What is the role of portion control in weight management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolls, B J

    2014-01-01

    Systematic studies have shown that providing individuals with larger portions of foods and beverages leads to substantial increases in energy intake. The effect is sustained over weeks, supporting the possibility that large portions have a role in the development of obesity. The challenge is to find strategies to effectively manage the effects of portion size. One approach involves teaching people to select appropriate portions and to use tools that facilitate portion control. Although tools such as portion-control plates have been shown in several randomized trials to improve weight loss, limited data are available on whether education and tools lead to long-term changes in eating behavior and body weight. Another approach is to use preportioned foods (PPFs) to add structure to meals and minimize decisions about the amount of food to eat. A number of randomized controlled trials have demonstrated the efficacy of both liquid meal replacements and solid PPFs for weight loss and weight loss maintenance, but it is not known if they lead to better understanding of appropriate portions. Although portion control is important for weight management, urging people simply to ‘eat less' of all foods may not be the best approach as high-energy-dense foods disproportionately increase energy intake compared with those lower in energy density. A more effective strategy may be to encourage people to increase the proportion of foods low in energy density in their diets while limiting portions of high-energy-dense foods. If people lower the energy density of their diet, they can eat satisfying portions while managing their body weight. PMID:25033958

  9. Surface heat flow and CO2 emissions within the Ohaaki hydrothermal field, Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rissmann, Clinton; Christenson, Bruce; Werner, Cynthia; Leybourne, Matthew; Cole, Jim; Gravley, Darren

    2012-01-01

    Carbon dioxide emissions and heat flow have been determined from the Ohaaki hydrothermal field, Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ), New Zealand following 20 a of production (116 MW e ). Soil CO 2 degassing was quantified with 2663 CO 2 flux measurements using the accumulation chamber method, and 2563 soil temperatures were measured and converted to equivalent heat flow (W m −2 ) using published soil temperature heat flow functions. Both CO 2 flux and heat flow were analysed statistically and then modelled using 500 sequential Gaussian simulations. Forty subsoil CO 2 gas samples were also analysed for stable C isotopes. Following 20 a of production, current CO 2 emissions equated to 111 ± 6.7 T/d. Observed heat flow was 70 ± 6.4 MW, compared with a pre-production value of 122 MW. This 52 MW reduction in surface heat flow is due to production-induced drying up of all alkali–Cl outflows (61.5 MW) and steam-heated pools (8.6 MW) within the Ohaaki West thermal area (OHW). The drying up of all alkali–Cl outflows at Ohaaki means that the soil zone is now the major natural pathway of heat release from the high-temperature reservoir. On the other hand, a net gain in thermal ground heat flow of 18 MW (from 25 MW to 43.3 ± 5 MW) at OHW is associated with permeability increases resulting from surface unit fracturing by production-induced ground subsidence. The Ohaaki East (OHE) thermal area showed no change in distribution of shallow and deep soil temperature contours despite 20 a of production, with an observed heat flow of 26.7 ± 3 MW and a CO 2 emission rate of 39 ± 3 T/d. The negligible change in the thermal status of the OHE thermal area is attributed to the low permeability of the reservoir beneath this area, which has limited production (mass extraction) and sheltered the area from the pressure decline within the main reservoir. Chemistry suggests that although alkali–Cl outflows once contributed significantly to the natural surface heat flow (∼50%) they

  10. The effect of feeding high fat diet to beef cattle on manure composition and gaseous emission from a feedlot pen surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhan Prasad Gautam

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dietary manipulation is a common practice to mitigate gaseous emission from livestock production facilities, and the variation of fat level in the diet has shown great influence on ruminal volatile fatty acids (VFA and enteric methane generation. The changes in dietary fat levels influence rumen chemistry that could modify manure nutrient composition along with odor and gaseous emissions from manure management facilities. Methods A field experiment was carried out on beef cattle feedlots to investigate the effect of four levels of dietary fat concentrations (3 to 5.5 % on the manure composition and gaseous emissions (methane-CH4, nitrous oxide-N2O, carbon dioxide-CO2 and hydrogen sulfide-H2S from the feedlot pen surface. The experiment was carried out over a 5-month period from June to October during North Dakota’s summer-fall climatic condition. Air and manure sampling was conducted five times at a 20–30 day intervals. Results Overall, this research indicated that fat levels in diet have no or little effect on the nutrient composition of manure and gaseous emission from the pens with cattle fed with different diet. Though significant variation of gaseous emission and manure composition were observed between different sampling periods, no effect of high fat diet was observed on manure composition and gaseous emission. Conclusions It can be concluded that addition of fat to animal diet may not have any impact on gaseous emission and manure compositions.

  11. The effect of feeding high fat diet to beef cattle on manure composition and gaseous emission from a feedlot pen surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Dhan Prasad; Rahman, Shafiqur; Borhan, Md Saidul; Engel, Chanda

    2016-01-01

    Dietary manipulation is a common practice to mitigate gaseous emission from livestock production facilities, and the variation of fat level in the diet has shown great influence on ruminal volatile fatty acids (VFA) and enteric methane generation. The changes in dietary fat levels influence rumen chemistry that could modify manure nutrient composition along with odor and gaseous emissions from manure management facilities. A field experiment was carried out on beef cattle feedlots to investigate the effect of four levels of dietary fat concentrations (3 to 5.5 %) on the manure composition and gaseous emissions (methane-CH4, nitrous oxide-N2O, carbon dioxide-CO2 and hydrogen sulfide-H2S) from the feedlot pen surface. The experiment was carried out over a 5-month period from June to October during North Dakota's summer-fall climatic condition. Air and manure sampling was conducted five times at a 20-30 day intervals. Overall, this research indicated that fat levels in diet have no or little effect on the nutrient composition of manure and gaseous emission from the pens with cattle fed with different diet. Though significant variation of gaseous emission and manure composition were observed between different sampling periods, no effect of high fat diet was observed on manure composition and gaseous emission. It can be concluded that addition of fat to animal diet may not have any impact on gaseous emission and manure compositions.

  12. Origin of surface and columnar Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) aerosols using source- and region-tagged emissions transport in a general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, S.; Venkataraman, C.; Boucher, O.

    2008-12-01

    We study the relative influence of aerosols emitted from different sectors and geographical regions on aerosol loading in south Asia. Sectors contributing aerosol emissions include biofuel and fossil fuel combustion, open biomass burning, and natural sources. Geographical regions include India (the Indo-Gangetic plain, central India, south India, and northwest India), southeast Asia, east Asia, Africa-west Asia, and the rest of the world. Simulations of the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX), from January to March 1999, are made in the general circulation model of Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique (LMD-ZT GCM) with emissions tagged by sector and geographical region. Anthropogenic emissions dominate (54-88%) the predicted aerosol optical depth (AOD) over all the receptor regions. Among the anthropogenic sectors, fossil fuel combustion has the largest overall influence on aerosol loading, primarily sulfate, with emissions from India (50-80%) and rest of the world significantly influencing surface concentrations and AOD. Biofuel combustion has a significant influence on both the surface and columnar black carbon (BC) in particular over the Indian subcontinent and Bay of Bengal with emissions largely from the Indian region (60-80%). Open biomass burning emissions influence organic matter (OM) significantly, and arise largely from Africa-west Asia. The emissions from Africa-west Asia affect the carbonaceous aerosols AOD in all receptor regions, with their largest influence (AOD-BC: 60%; and AOD-OM: 70%) over the Arabian Sea. Among Indian regions, the Indo-Gangetic Plain is the largest contributor to anthropogenic surface mass concentrations and AOD over the Bay of Bengal and India. Dust aerosols are contributed mainly through the long-range transport from Africa-west Asia over the receptor regions. Overall, the model estimates significant intercontinental incursion of aerosol, for example, BC, OM, and dust from Africa-west Asia and sulfate from distant regions (rest

  13. Implanting very low energy atomic ions into surface adsorbed cage molecules: the formation/emission of Cs/C60+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolodney, Eli; Kaplan, Andrey; Manor, Yoni; Bekkerman, Anatoly; Tsipinyuk, Boris

    2004-01-01

    Full Text: We demonstrate the formation of an endo-complex via a collision of energetic ions with molecular overlayers on a surface. An incoming atomic ion is encapsulated inside a very large molecule or cluster by implanting the primary ion into the target species, which then recovers its original structure or rearrange itself around the implanted ion in some stable configuration. Here we describe an experiment resulting in the formation and ejection of an endo-complex, within a single collision. We study the formation and emission of endohedral fullerenes, Cs/C 60 + and Cs/C 70 + , following a single collision of Cs + ion with a sub-monolayer of C 60 (steady state coverage) on gold and silicon surfaces and with a sub-monolayer of C 70 on gold. A continuous low energy (E 0 =35-220 eV) Cs + ion beam hit the Cs + covered surface and the collisional formation and ejection of the endohedral Cs/Cs 60 + complex, within a single Cs + /C 60 collision was observed and characterized. Several experimental observations clearly demonstrate the single collision nature of the combined atom penetration endo-complex ejection event. The fullerene molecule is actually being picked up off the surface by the penetrating Cs + ion. The evidence for the trapping of the Cs + ion inside the fullerene cage is given both by the appearance of the Cs/Cs (602-2n) + (n=1-5) sequence and its termination at Cs/Cs 50 + . Kinetic Energy Distributions (KEDs) of the outgoing Cs/Cs 60 + were measured for two different Cs + impact energies under field-free conditions. The most striking observation is the near independence of the KEDs on the impact energy. Both KEDs peak around 1.2 eV with similar line shapes. A simple model for the formation/ejection/fragmentation dynamics of the endohedral complex is proposed and is found to be in good agreement with the experimental results

  14. Emission of perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCA) from heated surfaces made of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) applied in food contact materials and consumer products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlummer, Martin; Sölch, Christina; Meisel, Theresa; Still, Mona; Gruber, Ludwig; Wolz, Gerd

    2015-06-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) has been widely discussed as a source of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), which has been used in the production of fluoropolymers. PTFE may also contain unintended perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs) caused by thermolysis of PTFE, which has been observed at temperatures above 300°C. Common PTFE coated food contact materials and consumer goods are operated at temperatures above 200°C. However, knowledge on possible emissions of PFCAs is limited. Therefore, it was the aim of this study to investigate and evaluate the emission of PFCAs from PTFE coated products with both, normal use and overheating scenarios. Four pans, claimed to be PFOA free, and nine consumer products were investigated. At normal use conditions (PTFE surfaces were trapped for 1h. Overheating scenarios (>260°C) recorded emissions during a 30min heating of empty pans on a stove. Emissions were analyzed by LC-ESI-MS. Results indicate the emission of PFCAs, whereas no perfluorinated sulfonic acids were traced. At normal use conditions total emissions of PFCAs accounted for 4.75ng per hour. Overheated pans, however, released far higher amounts with up to 12190ng PFCAs per hour at 370°C. Dominating contributors where PFBA and PFOA at normal use and PFBA and PFPeA during overheating. Temperature seems to be the main factor controlling the emission of PFCAs. A worst case estimation of human exposure revealed that emissions of PFCAs from heated PTFE surfaces would be far below the TDI of 1500ng PFOA per kg body weight. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Food photographs in portion size estimation among adolescent Mozambican girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkalo, Liisa; Erkkola, Maijaliisa; Fidalgo, Lourdes; Nevalainen, Jaakko; Mutanen, Marja

    2013-09-01

    To assess the validity of food photographs in portion size estimation among adolescent girls in Mozambique. The study was carried out in preparation for the larger ZANE study, which used the 24 h dietary recall method. Life-sized photographs of three portion sizes of two staple foods and three sauces were produced. Participants ate weighed portions of one staple food and one sauce. After the meal, they were asked to estimate the amount of food with the aid of the food photographs. Zambezia Province, Mozambique. Ninety-nine girls aged 13–18 years. The mean differences between estimated and actual portion sizes relative to the actual portion size ranged from 219% to 8% for different foods. The respective mean difference for all foods combined was 25% (95% CI 212, 2 %). Especially larger portions of the staple foods were often underestimated. For the staple foods, between 62% and 64% of the participants were classified into the same thirds of the distribution of estimated and actual food consumption and for sauces, the percentages ranged from 38% to 63%. Bland–Altman plots showed wide limits of agreement. Using life-sized food photographs among adolescent Mozambican girls resulted in a rather large variation in the accuracy of individuals’ estimates. The ability to rank individuals according to their consumption was, however, satisfactory for most foods. There seems to be a need to further develop and test food photographs used in different populations in Sub-Saharan Africa to improve the accuracy of portion size estimates.

  16. Influence of surface emission processes on a fast-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge in air at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechereau, François; Bonaventura, Zdeněk; Bourdon, Anne

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents simulations of an atmospheric pressure air discharge in a point-to-plane geometry with a dielectric layer parallel to the cathode plane. Experimentally, a discharge reignition in the air gap below the dielectrics has been observed. With a 2D fluid model, it is shown that due to the fast rise of the high voltage applied and the sharp point used, a first positive spherical discharge forms around the point. Then this discharge propagates axially and impacts the dielectrics. As the first discharge starts spreading on the upper dielectric surface, in the second air gap with a low preionization density of {{10}4}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3} , the 2D fluid model predicts a rapid reignition of a positive discharge. As in experiments, the discharge reignition is much slower, a discussion on physical processes to be considered in the model to increase the reignition delay is presented. The limit case with no initial seed charges in the second air gap has been studied. First, we have calculated the time to release an electron from the cathode surface by thermionic and field emission processes for a work function φ \\in ≤ft[3,4\\right] eV and an amplification factor β \\in ≤ft[100,220\\right] . Then a 3D Monte Carlo model has been used to follow the dynamics of formation of an avalanche starting from a single electron emitted at the cathode. Due to the high electric field in the second air gap, we have shown that in a few nanoseconds, a Gaussian cloud of seed charges is formed at a small distance from the cathode plane. This Gaussian cloud has been used as the initial condition of the 2D fluid model in the second air gap. In this case, the propagation of a double headed discharge in the second air gap has been observed and the reignition delay is in rather good agreement with experiments.

  17. Secondary ion emission from metal surfaces bombarded by 0.5-10 keV protons and hydrogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Akira; Yano, Syukuro

    1978-01-01

    Secondary ion emission coefficients by bombardment of 0.5 - 10 keV protons K 11 and atomic hydrogens K 01 on copper, stainless steel, molybdenum and evaporated gold surfaces have been measured in a moderate vacuum. Results are summarized as follows; 1) There is no significant difference between K 11 and K 01 . 2) Differences in K 11 and K 11 between different samples of the same material and between the sample before baking-out and the same sample after baking-out are of the order of several tens of percent. 3) The incident particle energy E sub(max) at which K 11 and K 01 have the maximum value lies in the keV region, and increases with the target mass. According to the fact that E sub(max) differs substantially from the energy at which the elastic stopping power has the maximum value, a characteristic length l is introduced and calculated to be of the order of hundreds of A; the factor exp (-x/l) represents the degree of contribution of collision at depth x to K 11 or K 01 . (author)

  18. RF Sheath-Enhanced Plasma Surface Interaction Studies using Beryllium Optical Emission Spectroscopy in JET ITER-Like Wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarici, G. [Fusion for Energy (F4E), Barcelona, Spain; Klepper, C Christopher [ORNL; Colas, L. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA); Krivska, Alena [Ecole Royale Militaire, Brussels Belgium; Bobkov, V. [Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Garching, Germany; Jacquet, P. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy (CCFE), Abingdon, UK; Delabie, Ephrem G. [ORNL; Giroud, C. [EURATOM / UKAEA, UK; Kirov, K K. [Association EURATOM-CCFE, Abingdon, UK; Lasa Esquisabel, Ane [ORNL; Lerche, E. [ERM-KMS, Association EURATOM-Belgian State, Brussels, Belgium; Dumortier, P. [ERM-KMS, Association EURATOM-Belgian State, Brussels, Belgium; Durodie, Frederic [Ecole Royale Militaire, Brussels Belgium

    2017-10-01

    A dedicated study on JET-ILW, deploying two types of ICRH antennas and spectroscopic observation spots at two outboard, beryllium limiters, has provided insight on long-range (up to 6m) RFenhanced plasma-surface interactions (RF-PSI) due to near-antenna electric fields. To aid in the interpretation of optical emission measurements of these effects, the antenna near-fields are computed using the TOPICA code, specifically run for the ITER-like antenna (ILA); similar modelling already existed for the standard JET antennas (A2). In the experiment, both antennas were operated in current drive mode, as RF-PSI tends to be higher in this phasing and at similar power (∼0.5 MW). When sweeping the edge magnetic field pitch angle, peaked RF-PSI effects, in the form of 2-4 fold increase in the local Be source,are consistently measured with the observation spots magnetically connect to regions of TOPICAL-calculated high near-fields, particularly at the near-antenna limiters. It is also found that similar RF-PSI effects are produced by the two types of antenna on similarly distant limiters. Although this mapping of calculated near-fields to enhanced RF-PSI gives only qualitative interpretion of the data, the present dataset is expected to provide a sound experimental basis for emerging RF sheath simulation model validation.

  19. Subsurface watering resulted in reduced soil N2O and CO2 emissions and their global warming potentials than surface watering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qi; Xu, Junzeng; Yang, Shihong; Liao, Linxian; Jin, Guangqiu; Li, Yawei; Hameed, Fazli

    2018-01-01

    Water management is an important practice with significant effect on greenhouse gases (GHG) emission from soils. Nitrous oxide (N2O) and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their global warming potentials (GWPs) from subsurface watering soil (SUW) were investigated, with surface watering (SW) as a control. Results indicated that the N2O and CO2 emissions from SUW soils were somewhat different to those from SW soil, with the peak N2O and CO2 fluxes from SUW soil reduced by 28.9% and 19.4%, and appeared 72 h and 168 h later compared with SW. The fluxes of N2O and CO2 from SUW soils were lower than those from SW soil in both pulse and post-pulse periods, and the reduction was significantly (p0.1) lower that from SW soil. Moreover, N2O and CO2 fluxes from both watering treatments increased exponentially with increase of soil water-filled pore space (WFPS) and temperature. Our results suggest that watering soil from subsurface could significantly reduce the integrative greenhouse effect caused by N2O and CO2 and is a promising strategy for soil greenhouse gases (GHGs) mitigation. And the pulse period, contributed most to the reduction in emissions of N2O and CO2 from soils between SW and SUW, should be a key period for mitigating GHGs emissions. Response of N2O and CO2 emissions to soil WFPS and temperature illustrated that moisture was the dominant parameters that triggering GHG pulse emissions (especially for N2O), and temperature had a greater effect on the soil microorganism activity than moisture in drier soil. Avoiding moisture and temperature are appropriate for GHG emission at the same time is essential for GHGs mitigation, because peak N2O and CO2 emission were observed only when moisture and temperature are both appropriate.

  20. Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application, general information portion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hays, C.B.

    1998-01-01

    The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document number DOE/RL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. Both the General Information and Unit-Specific portions of the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application address the content of the Part B permit application guidance prepared by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology 1996) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (40 Code of Federal Regulations 270), with additional information needed by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments and revisions of Washington Administrative Code 173-303. Documentation contained in the General Information Portion is broader in nature and could be used by multiple treatment, storage, and/or disposal units (e.g., the glossary provided in this report)

  1. Patterns and trends in food portion sizes, 1977-1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Samara Joy; Popkin, Barry M

    While general consensus holds that food portion sizes are increasing, no empirical data have documented actual increases. To determine trends in food portion sizes consumed in the United States, by eating location and food source. Nationally representative data from the Nationwide Food Consumption Survey (1977-1978) and the Continuing Survey of Food Intake by Individuals (1989-1991, 1994-1996, and 1998). The sample consists of 63 380 individuals aged 2 years and older. For each survey year, average portion size consumed from specific food items (salty snacks, desserts, soft drinks, fruit drinks, french fries, hamburgers, cheeseburgers, pizza, and Mexican food) by eating location (home, restaurant, or fast food). Portion sizes vary by food source, with the largest portions consumed at fast food establishments and the smallest at other restaurants. Between 1977 and 1996, food portion sizes increased both inside and outside the home for all categories except pizza. The energy intake and portion size of salty snacks increased by 93 kcal (from 1.0 to 1.6 oz [28.4 to 45.4 g]), soft drinks by 49 kcal (13.1 to 19.9 fl oz [387.4 to 588.4 mL]), hamburgers by 97 kcal (5.7 to 7.0 oz [161.6 to 198.4 g]), french fries by 68 kcal (3.1 to 3.6 oz [87.9 to 102.1 g]), and Mexican food by 133 kcal (6.3 to 8.0 oz [178.6 to 226.8 g]). Portion sizes and energy intake for specific food types have increased markedly with greatest increases for food consumed at fast food establishments and in the home.

  2. Estimation of portion size in children's dietary assessment: lessons learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, E; Adamson, A J; Anderson, A S; Barton, K L; Wrieden, W L

    2009-02-01

    Assessing the dietary intake of young children is challenging. In any 1 day, children may have several carers responsible for providing them with their dietary requirements, and once children reach school age, traditional methods such as weighing all items consumed become impractical. As an alternative to weighed records, food portion size assessment tools are available to assist subjects in estimating the amounts of foods consumed. Existing food photographs designed for use with adults and based on adult portion sizes have been found to be inappropriate for use with children. This article presents a review and summary of a body of work carried out to improve the estimation of portion sizes consumed by children. Feasibility work was undertaken to determine the accuracy and precision of three portion size assessment tools; food photographs, food models and a computer-based Interactive Portion Size Assessment System (IPSAS). These tools were based on portion sizes served to children during the National Diet and Nutrition Survey. As children often do not consume all of the food served to them, smaller portions were included in each tool for estimation of leftovers. The tools covered 22 foods, which children commonly consume. Children were served known amounts of each food and leftovers were recorded. They were then asked to estimate both the amount of food that they were served and the amount of any food leftover. Children were found to estimate food portion size with an accuracy approaching that of adults using both the food photographs and IPSAS. Further development is underway to increase the number of food photographs and to develop IPSAS to cover a much wider range of foods and to validate the use of these tools in a 'real life' setting.

  3. Modelling the impact of sanitation, population growth and urbanization on human emissions of Cryptosporidium to surface waters—a case study for Bangladesh and India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Lucie C.; de Kraker, Jelske; Hofstra, Nynke; Kroeze, Carolien; Medema, Gertjan

    2015-09-01

    Cryptosporidium is a protozoan parasite that can cause diarrhoea. Human faeces are an important source of Cryptosporidium in surface waters. We present a model to study the impact of sanitation, urbanization and population growth on human emissions of Cryptosporidium to surface waters. We build on a global model by Hofstra et al (2013 Sci. Total Environ. 442 10-9) and zoom into Bangladesh and India as illustrative case studies. The model is most sensitive to changes in oocyst excretion and infection rate, and to assumptions on the share of faeces reaching the surface water for different sanitation types. We find urban centres to be hotspots of human Cryptosporidium emissions. We estimate that 53% (Bangladesh) and 91% (India) of total emissions come from urban areas. 50% of oocysts come from only 8% (Bangladesh) and 3% (India) of the country area. In the future, population growth and urbanization may further deteriorate water quality in Bangladesh and India, despite improved sanitation. Under our ‘business as usual’ (‘sanitation improvements’) scenario, oocyst emissions will increase by a factor 2.0 (1.2) for India and 2.9 (1.1) for Bangladesh between 2010 and 2050. Population growth, urbanization and sanitation development are important processes to consider for large scale water quality modelling.

  4. Constraining surface emissions of air pollutants using inverse modelling: method intercomparison and a new two-step two-scale regularization approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saide, Pablo (CGRER, Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research, Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)), e-mail: pablo-saide@uiowa.edu; Bocquet, Marc (Universite Paris-Est, CEREA Joint Laboratory Ecole des Ponts ParisTech and EDF RandD, Champs-sur-Marne (France); INRIA, Paris Rocquencourt Research Center (France)); Osses, Axel (Departamento de Ingeniera Matematica, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Centro de Modelamiento Matematico, UMI 2807/Universidad de Chile-CNRS, Santiago (Chile)); Gallardo, Laura (Centro de Modelamiento Matematico, UMI 2807/Universidad de Chile-CNRS, Santiago (Chile); Departamento de Geofisica, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile))

    2011-07-15

    When constraining surface emissions of air pollutants using inverse modelling one often encounters spurious corrections to the inventory at places where emissions and observations are colocated, referred to here as the colocalization problem. Several approaches have been used to deal with this problem: coarsening the spatial resolution of emissions; adding spatial correlations to the covariance matrices; adding constraints on the spatial derivatives into the functional being minimized; and multiplying the emission error covariance matrix by weighting factors. Intercomparison of methods for a carbon monoxide inversion over a city shows that even though all methods diminish the colocalization problem and produce similar general patterns, detailed information can greatly change according to the method used ranging from smooth, isotropic and short range modifications to not so smooth, non-isotropic and long range modifications. Poisson (non-Gaussian) and Gaussian assumptions both show these patterns, but for the Poisson case the emissions are naturally restricted to be positive and changes are given by means of multiplicative correction factors, producing results closer to the true nature of emission errors. Finally, we propose and test a new two-step, two-scale, fully Bayesian approach that deals with the colocalization problem and can be implemented for any prior density distribution

  5. Creating a measure of portion control self-efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast, Lindsey C; Harman, Jennifer J; Maertens, Julie A; Burnette, Jeni L; Dreith, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Over the last few decades, food portion sizes have steadily increased by as much as 700% (Young & Nestle, 2002). Food portions are often much larger than dietary guidelines recommend, leaving individuals to manage their food consumption on their own and making it necessary to understand individual factors impacting food consumption. In the current paper, we focus on self-efficacy for portion control. Specifically, across three studies, we developed and validated a new measure of portion control self-efficacy (PCSE). The PCSE measure yielded good fit statistics and had acceptable test-retest reliability using two cross-sectional surveys (Studies 1(a) and 1(b)). Results from Study 2 demonstrated construct and predictive validity of the PCSE using the Food Amount Rating Scale (FARS; Dohm, & Striegel-Moore, 2002). Study 3 offered additional support for reliability and validity with a sample of overweight and obese adults currently trying to lose weight. Overall, findings indicate that the new PCSE measure is reliable and valid. Individuals often make inaccurate food portion estimates (Slawson & Eck, 1997; Yuhas, Bolland, & Bolland, 1989) which can lead to overeating and weight-gain. Thus, the discussion centers on the need to incorporate PCSE in future research and intervention work targeting weight loss, health, and food consumption. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Portion sizes and obesity: responses of fast-food companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Lisa R; Nestle, Marion

    2007-07-01

    Because the sizes of food portions, especially of fast food, have increased in parallel with rising rates of overweight, health authorities have called on fast-food chains to decrease the sizes of menu items. From 2002 to 2006, we examined responses of fast-food chains to such calls by determining the current sizes of sodas, French fries, and hamburgers at three leading chains and comparing them to sizes observed in 1998 and 2002. Although McDonald's recently phased out its largest offerings, current items are similar to 1998 sizes and greatly exceed those offered when the company opened in 1955. Burger King and Wendy's have increased portion sizes, even while health authorities are calling for portion size reductions. Fast-food portions in the United States are larger than in Europe. These observations suggest that voluntary efforts by fast-food companies to reduce portion sizes are unlikely to be effective, and that policy approaches are needed to reduce energy intake from fast food.

  7. Obstructing Gangliocytic Paraganglioma in the Third Portion of the Duodenum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos M. Nuño-Guzmán

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Gangliocytic paragangliomas are infrequent tumors almost exclusively found in the second portion of the duodenum. An unusual case of a gangliocytic paraganglioma in the third portion of the duodenum with obstructive symptoms is herein reported. A 16-year-old male patient presented with epigastric pain, postprandial plenitude and reflux. A barium swallow failed to demonstrate abnormalities. Endoscopy showed a pedunculated submucosal tumor, originating at the third duodenal portion and causing partial obstruction. Biopsy was not performed due to the risk of bleeding. CT scan demonstrated a polypoid lesion. Through a transmesocolic approach and an anterior duodenotomy, resection of the tumor was performed. No lymph node or other organ affection was found. Histologic examination revealed a gangliocytic paraganglioma. Immunohistochemical examination was performed. Gangliocytic paragangliomas originating in the third or fourth portion of the duodenum, as in the present case, are extremely rare. Characteristic histologic features including epithelioid cells, spindle-shaped cells and ganglion-like cells were met. The majority of cases manifest with a similar benign behavior. Local resection of the tumor is recommended for these cases. An infrequent case of a gangliocytic paraganglioma located in the third portion of the duodenum, with a less common clinical presentation, is herein reported.

  8. Energy intake and obesity: ingestive frequency outweighs portion size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattes, Richard

    2014-07-01

    Energy intake is a function of the quantity of energy consumed per ingestive event and the number of these events. The marked increase of energy intake and body weight over the past 35 years indicates that there has been poor precision in the reciprocity of these two facets of intake. With recent study of the associations between gut "satiation" peptides and energy intake, there has been an emphasis on the contribution of portion size to positive energy balance. However, this orientation may not appropriately weight the contribution of ingestive frequency. Gut peptides are not purely satiation factors and metabolic and environmental cues may more strongly guide the onset and number of ingestive events. Evidence is presented that while both portion size and ingestive frequency have increased in the population, the latter may be more problematic for weight gain. The magnitude and time course of increments in ingestive frequency map better onto energy intake and BMI trends than changes of portion size. This may occur, in part, because dietary compensation and thermogenic effects are weaker for increases in ingestive frequency than portion size. Though not to the exclusion of consideration of portion size effects, improved weight management may be achieved with greater attention to the drivers of eating and drinking frequency. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. WE-AB-303-04: A Tissue Model of Cherenkov Emission From the Skin Surface During Megavoltage X-Ray Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiles, A. N.; Loyalka, S. K. [University of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Izaguirre, E. W. [University of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Baylor Scott & White Health, Temple, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a tissue model of Cherenkov radiation emitted from the skin surface during external beam radiotherapy. Imaging Cherenkov radiation emitted from human skin allows visualization of the beam position and potentially surface dose estimates, and our goal is to characterize the optical properties of these emissions. Methods: We developed a Monte Carlo model of Cherenkov radiation generated in a semi-infinite tissue slab by megavoltage x-ray beams with optical transmission properties determined by a two-layered skin model. We separate the skin into a dermal and an epidermal layer in our model, where distinct molecular absorbers modify the Cherenkov intensity spectrum in each layer while we approximate the scattering properties with Mie and Rayleigh scattering from the highly structured molecular organization found in human skin. Results: We report on the estimated distributions of the Cherenkov wavelength spectrum, emission angles, and surface distribution for the modeled irradiated skin surface. The expected intensity distribution of Cherenkov radiation emitted from skin shows a distinct intensity peak around 475 nm, the blue region of the visible spectrum, between a pair of optical absorption bands in hemoglobin and a broad plateau beginning near 600 nm and extending to at least 700 nm where melanin and hemoglobin absorption are both low. We also find that the Cherenkov intensity decreases with increasing angle from the surface normal, the majority being emitted within 20 degrees of the surface normal. Conclusion: Our estimate of the spectral distribution of Cherenkov radiation emitted from skin indicates an advantage to using imaging devices with long wavelength spectral responsivity. We also expect the most efficient imaging to be near the surface normal where the intensity is greatest; although for contoured surfaces, the relative intensity across the surface may appear to vary due to decreasing Cherenkov intensity with increased angle from the

  10. Dependence of secondary electron emission on the incident angle and the energy of primary electrons bombarding bowl-structured beryllium surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawata, Jun; Ohya, Kaoru.

    1994-01-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation of the secondary electron emission from beryllium is combined with a model of bowl structure for surface roughness, for analyzing the difference between the electron emissions for normal and oblique incidences. At normal incidence, with increasing the roughness parameter H/W, the primary energy E pm at which the maximum electron yield occurs becomes higher, and at more than the E pm , the decrease in the yield is slower; where H and W are the depth and width of the bowl structure, respectively. The dispersion of incident angle to the microscopic surface causes a small increase in the yield at oblique incidence, whereas the blocking of primary electrons from bombarding the bottom of the structure causes an opposite trend. The strong anisotropy in the polar angular distribution with respect to the azimuthal angle is calculated at oblique incidence. (author)

  11. Children's estimates of food portion size: the development and evaluation of three portion size assessment tools for use with children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, E; Matthews, J N S; Lloyd, J; Marshall, L; Mathers, J C; Nelson, M; Barton, K L; Wrieden, W L; Cornelissen, P; Harris, J; Adamson, A J

    2008-01-01

    A number of methods have been developed to assist subjects in providing an estimate of portion size but their application in improving portion size estimation by children has not been investigated systematically. The aim was to develop portion size assessment tools for use with children and to assess the accuracy of children's estimates of portion size using the tools. The tools were food photographs, food models and an interactive portion size assessment system (IPSAS). Children (n 201), aged 4-16 years, were supplied with known quantities of food to eat, in school. Food leftovers were weighed. Children estimated the amount of each food using each tool, 24 h after consuming the food. The age-specific portion sizes represented were based on portion sizes consumed by children in a national survey. Significant differences were found between the accuracy of estimates using the three tools. Children of all ages performed well using the IPSAS and food photographs. The accuracy and precision of estimates made using the food models were poor. For all tools, estimates of the amount of food served were more accurate than estimates of the amount consumed. Issues relating to reporting of foods left over which impact on estimates of the amounts of foods actually consumed require further study. The IPSAS has shown potential for assessment of dietary intake with children. Before practical application in assessment of dietary intake of children the tool would need to be expanded to cover a wider range of foods and to be validated in a 'real-life' situation.

  12. Nitrogen removal and nitrous oxide emission in surface flow constructed wetlands for treating sewage treatment plant effluent: Effect of C/N ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Wu, Haiming; Zhang, Jian; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan; Kong, Qiang

    2017-09-01

    In order to design treatment wetlands with maximal nitrogen removal and minimal nitrous oxide (N 2 O) emission, the effect of influent C/N ratios on nitrogen removal and N 2 O emission in surface flow constructed wetlands (SF CWs) for sewage treatment plant effluent treatment was investigated in this study. The results showed that nitrogen removal and N 2 O emission in CWs were significantly affected by C/N ratio of influent. Much higher removal efficiency of NH 4 + -N (98%) and TN (90%) was obtained simultaneously in SF CWs at C/N ratios of 12:1, and low N 2 O emission (8.2mg/m 2 /d) and the percentage of N 2 O-N emission in TN removal (1.44%) were also observed. These results obtained in this study would be utilized to determine how N 2 O fluxes respond to variations in C/N ratios and to improve the sustainability of CWs for wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The role of drainage ditches in greenhouse gas emissions and surface leaching losses from a cutaway peatland cultivated with a perennial bioenergy crop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyvonen, N.P.; Huttunen, J.T.; Shurpali, N.J.; Lind, S.E.; Marushchak, M.E.; Martikainen, P.J. [University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio (Finland). Dept. of Environmental Science], E-mail: niina.hyvonen@uef.fi; Heitto, L. [Environmental Research of Savo-Karjala Ltd, Kuopio (Finland)

    2013-06-01

    We studied greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from drainage ditches and leaching losses in a boreal cutaway peatland cultivated with reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea) for bioenergy. The objectives of the study were to assess to what extent GHG emissions from drainage ditches and leaching of carbon and nutrients via surface drainage contribute to the total losses of carbon and nitrogen from the site. The emissions of CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} were measured with static chamber methods for three years and leaching losses for seven years. On average, the drainage ditches (covering 6% of the study site area) released 10% of the total CH{sub 4} emission (0.33 g m{sup -2} a{sup -1}), and 1% and 5% of the total N{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} emissions, respectively. Leaching of total nitrogen and phosphorous were 0.31 and 0.03 g m{sup -2} a{sup -1}, respectively. Leaching values were lower than those reported for agricultural catchments in general. (orig.)

  14. Effects of portion size on chronic energy intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pentel Paul R

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study experimentally examined the effects of repeated exposure to different meal portion sizes on energy intake. Methods Nineteen employees of a county medical center were given free box lunches for two months, one month each of 1528 and 767 average kcal. Foods were identical in the two conditions, but differed in portion size. Meals averaged 44% calories from fat. Participants self-reported how much of each lunch was eaten. Unannounced 24-hour dietary recalls were also conducted by phone twice per week during each exposure period. Results Mean energy intake at the lunch meal was 332 kcal/day higher in large lunch than in small lunch periods (p Conclusion This study suggests that chronic exposure to large portion size meals can result in sustained increases in energy intake and may contribute to body weight increases over time.

  15. US surface ozone trends and extremes from 1980 to 2014: quantifying the roles of rising Asian emissions, domestic controls, wildfires, and climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Meiyun; Horowitz, Larry W.; Payton, Richard; Fiore, Arlene M.; Tonnesen, Gail

    2017-03-01

    US surface O3 responds to varying global-to-regional precursor emissions, climate, and extreme weather, with implications for designing effective air quality control policies. We examine these conjoined processes with observations and global chemistry-climate model (GFDL-AM3) hindcasts over 1980-2014. The model captures the salient features of observed trends in daily maximum 8 h average O3: (1) increases over East Asia (up to 2 ppb yr-1), (2) springtime increases at western US (WUS) rural sites (0.2-0.5 ppb yr-1) with a baseline sampling approach, and (3) summertime decreases, largest at the 95th percentile, and wintertime increases in the 50th to 5th percentiles over the eastern US (EUS). Asian NOx emissions have tripled since 1990, contributing as much as 65 % to modeled springtime background O3 increases (0.3-0.5 ppb yr-1) over the WUS, outpacing O3 decreases attained via 50 % US NOx emission controls. Methane increases over this period contribute only 15 % of the WUS background O3 increase. Springtime O3 observed in Denver has increased at a rate similar to remote rural sites. During summer, increasing Asian emissions approximately offset the benefits of US emission reductions, leading to weak or insignificant observed O3 trends at WUS rural sites. Mean springtime WUS O3 is projected to increase by ˜ 10 ppb from 2010 to 2030 under the RCP8.5 global change scenario. While historical wildfire emissions can enhance summertime monthly mean O3 at individual sites by 2-8 ppb, high temperatures and the associated buildup of O3 produced from regional anthropogenic emissions contribute most to elevating observed summertime O3 throughout the USA. GFDL-AM3 captures the observed interannual variability of summertime EUS O3. However, O3 deposition sink to vegetation must be reduced by 35 % for the model to accurately simulate observed high-O3 anomalies during the severe drought of 1988. Regional NOx reductions alleviated the O3 buildup during the recent heat waves of 2011

  16. The Role of Intrinsic and Surface States on the Emission Properties of Colloidal CdSe and CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morello Giovanni

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractTime Resolved Photoluminescence (TRPL measurements on the picosecond time scale (temporal resolution of 17 ps on colloidal CdSe and CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots (QDs were performed. Transient PL spectra reveal three emission peaks with different lifetimes (60 ps, 460 ps and 9–10 ns, from the bluest to the reddest peak. By considering the characteristic decay times and by comparing the energetic separations among the states with those theoretically expected, we attribute the two higher energy peaks to ± 1Uand ± 1L bright states of the fine structure picture of spherical CdSe QDs, and the third one to surface states emission. We show that the contribution of surface emission to the PL results to be different for the two samples studied (67% in the CdSe QDs and 32% in CdSe/ZnS QDs, confirming the decisive role of the ZnS shell in the improvement of the surface passivation.

  17. The effect of insulated combustion chamber surfaces on direct-injected diesel engine performance, emissions, and combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Daniel W.; Vinyard, Shannon; Keribar, Rifat

    1988-01-01

    The combustion chamber of a single-cylinder, direct-injected diesel engine was insulated with ceramic coatings to determine the effect of low heat rejection (LHR) operation on engine performance, emissions, and combustion. In comparison to the baseline cooled engine, the LHR engine had lower thermal efficiency, with higher smoke, particulate, and full load carbon monoxide emissions. The unburned hydrocarbon emissions were reduced across the load range. The nitrous oxide emissions increased at some part-load conditions and were reduced slightly at full loads. The poor LHR engine performance was attributed to degraded combustion characterized by less premixed burning, lower heat release rates, and longer combustion duration compared to the baseline cooled engine.

  18. 36 CFR 1275.58 - Deletion of restricted portions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Deletion of restricted... HISTORICAL MATERIALS OF THE NIXON ADMINISTRATION Access by the Public § 1275.58 Deletion of restricted... materials after the deletion of the portions which are restricted under this § 1275.50 or § 1275.52. ...

  19. Stress and Strain State Analysis of Defective Pipeline Portion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkov, P. V.; Burkova, S. P.; Knaub, S. A.

    2015-09-01

    The paper presents computer simulation results of the pipeline having defects in a welded joint. Autodesk Inventor software is used for simulation of the stress and strain state of the pipeline. Places of the possible failure and stress concentrators are predicted on the defective portion of the pipeline.

  20. Application of response surface methodology in optimization of performance and exhaust emissions of secondary butyl alcohol-gasoline blends in SI engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusri, I.M.; Mamat, R.; Azmi, W.H.; Omar, A.I.; Obed, M.A.; Shaiful, A.I.M.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Adding 2-butanol in gasoline fuel can improve engine performance. • 2-Butanol addition reduced NO x , CO, and HC but produced higher CO 2 . • RSM was applied to optimize the engine performance and exhaust emissions. - Abstract: Producing an optimal balance between engine performance and exhaust emissions has always been one of the main challenges in automotive technology. This paper examines the use of RSM (response surface methodology) to optimize the engine performance, and exhaust emissions of a spark-ignition (SI) engine which operates with 2-butanol–gasoline blends of 5%, 10%, and 15% called GBu5, GBu10, and GBu15. In the experiments, the engine ran at various speeds for each test fuel and 13 different conditions were constructed. The optimization of the independent variables was performed by means of a statistical tool known as DoE (design of experiments). The desirability approach by RSM was employed with the aim of minimizing emissions and maximizing of performance parameters. Based on the RSM model, performance characteristics revealed that increments of 2-butanol in the blended fuels lead to increasing trends of brake power, brake mean effective pressure and brake thermal efficiency. Nonetheless, marginal higher brake specific fuel consumption was observed. Furthermore, the RSM model suggests that the presence of 2-butanol exhibits a decreasing trend of nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxides, and unburnt hydrocarbon, however, a higher trend was observed for carbon dioxides exhaust emissions. It was established from the study that the GBu15 blend with an engine speed of 3205 rpm was found to be optimal to provide the best performance and emissions characteristics as compared to the other tested blends.

  1. High Resolution CH4 Emissions and Dissolved CH4 Measurements Elucidate Surface Gas Exchange Processes in Toolik Lake, Arctic Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Sontro, T.; Sollberger, S.; Kling, G. W.; Shaver, G. R.; Eugster, W.

    2013-12-01

    Approximately 14% of the Alaskan North Slope is covered in lakes of various sizes and depths. Diffusive carbon emissions (CH4 and CO2) from these lakes offset the tundra sink by ~20 %, but the offset would substantially increase if ebullitive CH4 emissions were also considered. Ultimately, arctic lake CH4 emissions are not insignificant in the global CH4 budget and their contribution is bound to increase due to impacts from climate change. Here we present high resolution CH4 emission data as measured via eddy covariance and a Los Gatos gas analyzer during the ice free period from Toolik Lake, a deep (20 m) Arctic lake located on the Alaskan North Slope, over the last few summers. Emissions are relatively low (Gatos gas analyzer. Thus, having both the flux and the CH4 gradient across the air-water interface measured directly, we can calculate k and investigate the processes influencing CH4 gas exchange in this lake. Preliminary results indicate that there are two regimes in wind speed that impact k - one at low wind speeds up to ~5 m s-1 and another at higher wind speeds (max ~10 m s-1). The differential wind speeds during night and day may compound the effect of convective mixing and cause the diurnal variation in observed fluxes.

  2. Solar UV irradiation-induced production of N2O from plant surfaces - low emissions rates but all over the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, T. N.; Bruhn, D.; Ambus, P.

    2016-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important long-lived greenhouse gas and precursor of stratospheric ozone depleting mono-nitrogen oxides. The atmospheric concentration of N2O is persistently increasing; however, large uncertainties are associated with the distinct source strengths. Here we investigate for the first time N2O emission from terrestrial vegetation in response to natural solar ultra violet radiation. We conducted field site measurements to investigate N2O atmosphere exchange from grass vegetation exposed to solar irradiance with and without UV-screening. Further laboratory tests were conducted with a range of species to study the controls and possible loci of UV-induced N2O emission from plants. Plants released N2O in response to natural sunlight at rates of c. 20-50 nmol m-2 h-1, mostly due to the UV component. The emission rate is temperature dependent with a rather high activation energy indicative for an abiotic process. The prevailing zone for the N2O formation appears to be at the very surface of leaves. However, only c. 26% of the UV-induced N2O appears to originate from plant-N. Further, the process is dependent on atmospheric oxygen concentration. Our work demonstrates that ecosystem emission of the important greenhouse gas, N2O, may be up to c. 30% higher than hitherto assumed.

  3. Dependence of secondary electron emission on surface charging in sapphire and polycrystalline alumina: Evaluation of the effective cross sections for recombination and trapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Said, K.; Damamme, G.; Si Ahmed, A.; Moya, G.; Kallel, A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel approach for the analysis of the secondary electron emission in connection with the surface density of trapped charges. • Experimental estimation of the effective cross section for electron–hole recombination and electron trapping in defects. • A simplified charge transport and trapping model which corroborates qualitatively the interpretation of the results. - Abstract: The evolution of the secondary electron emission from sapphire and polycrystalline alumina during electron irradiation, achieved in a scanning electron microscope at room temperature, is derived from the measurement of the induced and the secondary electron currents. The semi-logarithmic plot of the secondary electron emission yield versus the surface density of trapped charges displays a plateau followed by a linear variation. For positive charging, the slope of the linear part, whose value is of about 10 −9 cm 2 , is independent of the primary electron energy, the microstructure and the impurities. It is interpreted as an effective microscopic cross section for electron–hole recombination. For negative charging of sapphire, the slope is associated with an effective electron trapping cross section close to 10 −11 cm 2 , which can be assigned to the dominant impurity trap. These effective values reflect the multiple interactions leading to the accumulation of charges. The yield corresponding to the plateau is controlled by the initial density of impurity traps. A charge transport and trapping >model, based on simplifying assumptions, confirms qualitatively these inferences

  4. Husbandry Emissions at the Sub-Facility Scale by Fused Mobile Surface In Situ and Airborne Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leifer, I.; Melton, C.; Tratt, D. M.; Hall, J. L.; Buckland, K. N.; Frash, J.; Leen, J. B.; Lundquist, T.; Vigil, S. A.

    2017-12-01

    Husbandry methane (CH4) and ammonia (NH3) are strong climate and air pollution drivers. Husbandry emission factors have significant uncertainty and can differ from lab estimates as real-world practices affect emissions including where and how husbandry activities occur, their spatial and temporal relationship to micro-climate (winds, temperature, insolation, rain, and lagoon levels, which vary diurnally and seasonally), and animal care. Research dairies provide a unique opportunity to combine insights on sub-facility scale emissions to identify best practices. Two approaches with significant promise for quantifying husbandry emissions are airborne remote sensing and mobile in situ trace gas with meteorological measurements. Both capture snapshot data to allow deconvolution of temporal and spatial variability, which challenges stationary measurements, while also capturing micro-scale processes, allowing connection of real-world practices to emissions. Mobile in situ concentration data on trace gases and meteorology were collected by AMOG (AutoMObile trace Gas) Surveyor on 10 days spanning 31 months at the California Polytechnic State University Research Dairy, San Luis Obispo, CA. AMOG Surveyor is a commuter vehicle modified for atmospheric science. CH4, NH3, H2O, COS, CO, CO2, H2S, O3, NO, NO2, SO2, NOX, solar spectra, temperature, and winds were measured. The airborne hyperspectral thermal infrared sensor, Mako, collected data on 28 Sept. 2015. Research dairies allow combining insights on sub-facility scale emissions to identify best practices holistically - i.e., considering multiple trace gases. In situ data were collected while transecting plumes, approximately orthogonal to winds. Emission strength and source location were estimated by Gaussian plume inversion, validated by airborne data. Good agreement was found on source strength and location at meter length-scales. Data revealed different activities produced unique emissions with distinct trace gas

  5. PLD synthesis of GaN nanowires and nanodots on patterned catalyst surface for field emission study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, D.K.T.; Hong, M.H. [National University of Singapore (Singapore). Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Data Storage Institute, Singapore (Singapore); Tan, L.S. [National University of Singapore (Singapore). Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Zhu, Y.W.; Sow, C.H. [National University of Singapore (Singapore). Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative; National University of Singapore (Singapore). Department of Physics

    2008-11-15

    Patterned gallium nitride nanowires and nanodots have been grown on n-Si(100) substrates by pulsed laser deposition. The nanostructures are patterned using a physical mask, resulting in regions of nanowire growth of different densities. The field emission (FE) characteristics of the patterned gallium nitride nanowires show a turn-on field of 9.06 V/{mu}m to achieve a current density of 0.01 mA/cm{sup 2} and an enhanced field emission current density as high as 0.156 mA/cm{sup 2} at an applied field of 11 V/{mu}m. Comparing the peak FE current densities of both the nanowires and nanodots, the peak FE current density of nanowires is around 700 times higher than that of the peak FE current density of nanodots since nanodots have a lower aspect ratio compared to nanowires. The field emission results indicate that, besides density difference, crystalline quality as well as the low electron affinity of gallium nitride, high aspect ratio of gallium nitride nanostructures will greatly enhance their field emission properties. (orig.)

  6. Earthworm-induced N2O emissions in a sandy soil with surface-applied crop residues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giannopoulos, G.; Groenigen, van J.W.; Pulleman, M.M.

    2011-01-01

    Earlier research with endogeic and epigeic earthworm species in loamy arable soil has shown that both earthworm groups can increase nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, provided that crop residue placement matches the feeding strategy of the earthworm ecological group(s). However, it is not yet clear

  7. Investigation on the extractability of melanoidins in portioned espresso coffee

    OpenAIRE

    Bartel, C.; Mesías, Marta; Morales, F. J.

    2015-01-01

    © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. Coffee melanoidins have attracted interest as a result of its potential health benefits. This investigation aims to elucidate the extraction behavior of melanoidins and their populations during the preparation of portioned espresso coffee and its relationship with the antioxidant activity of the coffee brew. Filter-paper pods, FAP capsule, and clone capsule containing light roasted coffee have been investigated. An accumulative fractionation approach has applied to model ...

  8. PortionControl@HOME: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial Evaluating the Effect of a Multi-Component Portion Size Intervention on Portion Control Behavior and Body Mass Index

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poelman, M.P.; Vet, de E.; Velema, E.; Boer, de M.R.; Seidell, J.C.; Steenhuis, I.H.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Food portion sizes influence energy intake. Purpose The purpose of this paper is to determine effectiveness of the “PortionControl@HOME” intervention on body mass index and portion control behavior. Methods A randomized controlled trial among 278 overweight and obese participants was

  9. Semi-automated technique for the separation and determination of barium and strontium in surface waters by ion exchange chromatography and atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, F.D.; Brown, H.R.

    1977-01-01

    A semi-automated method for the separation and the analysis of barium and strontium in surface waters by atomic emission spectrometry is described. The method employs a semi-automated separation technique using ion exchange and an automated aspiration-analysis procedure. Forty specimens can be prepared in approximately 90 min and can be analyzed for barium and strontium content in 20 min. The detection limits and sensitivities provided by the described technique are 0.003 mg/l and 0.01 mg/l respectively for barium and 0.00045 mg/l and 0.003 mg/l respectively for strontium

  10. Influence of a single lightning discharge on the intensity of an air electric field and acoustic emission of near-surface rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Smirnov

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The effect was observed as a sharp fall of the electric potential gradient from +80 V m−1 down to –21 V m−1. After that the field returned to its normal level according to the formula of the capacitor discharge with 17 s characteristic time. Simultaneously, the response of the acoustic emission of surface rocks in the range of frequencies between 6.5 kHz and 11 kHz was evaluated.

  11. Probabilistic estimation of future emissions of isoprene and surface oxidant chemistry associated with land-use change in response to growing food needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Hardacre

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We quantify the impact of land-use change, determined by our growing demand for food and biofuel production, on isoprene emissions and subsequent atmospheric oxidant chemistry in 2015 and 2030, relative to 1990, ignoring compound climate change effects over that period. We estimate isoprene emissions from an ensemble (n = 1000 of land-use change realizations from 1990–2050, broadly guided by the IPCC AR4/SRES scenarios A1 and B1. We also superimpose land-use change required to address projected biofuel usage using two scenarios: (1 assuming that world governments make no changes to biofuel policy after 2009, and (2 assuming that world governments develop biofuel policy with the aim of keeping equivalent atmospheric CO2 at 450 ppm. We present the median and interquartile range (IQR statistics of the ensemble and show that land-use change between −1.50 × 1012 m2 to +6.06 × 1012 m2 was found to drive changes in the global isoprene burden of −3.5 to +2.8 Tg yr−1 in 2015 and −7.7 to +6.4 Tg yr−1 in 2030. We use land-use change realizations corresponding to the median and IQR of these emission estimates to drive the GEOS-Chem global 3-D chemistry transport model to investigate the perturbation to global and regional surface concentrations of isoprene, nitrogen oxides (NO+NO2, and the atmospheric concentration and deposition of ozone (O3. We show that across subcontinental regions the monthly surface O3 increases by 0.1–0.8 ppb, relative to a zero land-use change calculation, driven by increases (decreases in surface isoprene in high (low NOx environments. At the local scale (4° × 5° we find that surface O3 increases by 5–12 ppb over temperate North America, China and boreal Eurasia, driven by large increases in isoprene emissions from short-rotation coppice crop cultivation for biofuel production.

  12. Surface-plasmon-induced modification on the spontaneous emission spectrum via subwavelength-confined anisotropic Purcell factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ying; Wang, Luojia; Ren, Pan; Zhang, Junxiang; Zhang, Tiancai; Martin, Olivier J F; Gong, Qihuang

    2012-05-09

    The mechanism of using the anisotropic Purcell factor to control the spontaneous emission linewidths in a four-level atom is theoretically demonstrated; if the polarization angle bisector of the two dipole moments lies along the axis of large/small Purcell factor, destructive/constructive interference narrows/widens the fluorescence center spectral lines. Large anisotropy of the Purcell factor, confined in the subwavelength optical mode volume, leads to rapid spectral line narrowing of atom approaching a metallic nanowire, nanoscale line width pulsing following periodically varying decay rates near a periodic metallic nanostructure, and dramatic modification on the spontaneous emission spectrum near a custom-designed resonant plasmon nanostructure. The combined system opens a good perspective for applications in ultracompact active quantum devices.

  13. A non-destructive surface burn detection method for ferrous metals based on acoustic emission and ensemble empirical mode decomposition: from laser simulation to grinding process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Zhensheng; Wu, Haixi; Yu, Zhonghua; Huang, Youfang

    2014-01-01

    Grinding is usually done in the final finishing of a component. As a result, the surface quality of finished products, e.g., surface roughness, hardness and residual stress, are affected by the grinding procedure. However, the lack of methods for monitoring of grinding makes it difficult to control the quality of the process. This paper focuses on the monitoring approaches for the surface burn phenomenon in grinding. A non-destructive burn detection method based on acoustic emission (AE) and ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) was proposed for this purpose. To precisely extract the AE features caused by phase transformation during burn formation, artificial burn was produced to mimic grinding burn by means of laser irradiation, since laser-induced burn involves less mechanical and electrical noise. The burn formation process was monitored by an AE sensor. The frequency band ranging from 150 to 400 kHz was believed to be related to surface burn formation in the laser irradiation process. The burn-sensitive frequency band was further used to instruct feature extraction during the grinding process based on EEMD. Linear classification results evidenced a distinct margin between samples with and without surface burn. This work provides a practical means for grinding burn detection. (paper)

  14. Surface-plasmon resonance-enhanced multiphoton emission of high-brightness electron beams from a nanostructured copper cathode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, R K; To, H; Andonian, G; Feng, J; Polyakov, A; Scoby, C M; Thompson, K; Wan, W; Padmore, H A; Musumeci, P

    2013-02-15

    We experimentally investigate surface-plasmon assisted photoemission to enhance the efficiency of metallic photocathodes for high-brightness electron sources. A nanohole array-based copper surface was designed to exhibit a plasmonic response at 800 nm, fabricated using the focused ion beam milling technique, optically characterized and tested as a photocathode in a high power radio frequency photoinjector. Because of the larger absorption and localization of the optical field intensity, the charge yield observed under ultrashort laser pulse illumination is increased by more than 100 times compared to a flat surface. We also present the first beam characterization results (intrinsic emittance and bunch length) from a nanostructured photocathode.

  15. Radiation damages of material surfaces by plasma emission in thermonuclear devices. Methods of study of surface phenomena and simulation effect of thermonuclear plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rybalko, V.F.

    1978-01-01

    Phenomena that can introduce a controlling contribution into the erosion of the first wall surface in thermonuclear reactor are reviewed. Considered are the main characteristics of the physical disintegration: dependence of the disintegration coefficient upon the energy and the incidence angle of the bombarding particles, upon the atomic number of the material of the target and the type of bombarding particles. Stressed is the lack of reliable data on the disintegration of materials by light ions, which are of a maximum interest in relation to the controlled thermonuclear synthesis. The chemical disintegration and some regularities of it for the carbon-hydrogen and carbon-oxygen systems are discussed briefly. Listed are the main properties of blistering and its contribution to the erosion of crystalline surfaces

  16. Molecular projectile effects for kinetic electron emission from carbon- and metal-surfaces bombarded by slow hydrogen ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernusca, S.; Winter, HP.; Aumayr, F.; Díez Muiño, R.; Juaristi, J. I.

    2003-04-01

    Total yields for kinetic electron emission (KE) have been determined for impact of hydrogen monomer-, dimer- and trimer-ions (impact energy armour in magnetic fusion devices. The data are compared with KE yields for impact of same projectile ions on atomically clean highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and polycrystalline gold. We discuss KE yields for the different targets if bombarded by equally fast molecular and atomic ions in view to "projectile molecular effects" (different yields per proton for equally fast atomic and molecular ions), which are expected from calculated electronic projectile energy losses in these target materials.

  17. Response surface methodology based optimization of diesel–n-butanol –cotton oil ternary blend ratios to improve engine performance and exhaust emission characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmanlı, Alpaslan; Yüksel, Bedri; İleri, Erol; Deniz Karaoglan, A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • RSM based optimization for optimum blend ratio of diesel fuel, n-butanol and cotton oil was done. • 65.5 vol.% diesel fuel, 23.1 vol.% n-butanol and 11.4 vol.% cotton oil (DnBC) was determined. • DnBC decreased brake torque, brake power, BTE and BMEP, while increased BSFC. • DnBC decreased NO x , CO and HC emissions. - Abstract: Many studies declare that 20% biodiesel is the optimum concentration for biodiesel–diesel fuel blends to improve performance. The present work focuses on finding diesel fuel, n-butanol, and cotton oil optimum blend ratios for diesel engine applications by using the response surface method (RSM). Experimental test fuels were prepared by choosing 7 different concentrations, where phase decomposition did not occur in the phase diagram of −10 °C. Experiments were carried out at full load conditions and the constant speed (2200 rpm) of maximum brake torque to determine engine performance and emission parameters. According to the test results of the engine, optimization was done by using RSM considering engine performance and exhaust emissions parameters, to identify the rates of concentrations of components in the optimum blend of three. Confirmation tests were employed to compare the output values of concentrations that were identified by optimization. The real experiment results and the R 2 actual values that show the relation between the outputs from the optimizations and real experiments were determined in high accordance. The optimum component concentration was determined as 65.5 vol.% diesel, 23.1 vol.% n-butanol and 11.4 vol.% cotton oil (DnBC). According to engine performance tests brake torque, brake power, BTE and BMEP of DnBC decreased while BSFC increased compared to those of diesel fuel. NO x , CO and HC emissions of DnBC drastically decreased as 11.33%, 45.17% and 81.45%, respectively

  18. WRF-Chem simulated surface ozone over south Asia during the pre-monsoon: effects of emission inventories and chemical mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sharma

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We evaluate numerical simulations of surface ozone mixing ratios over the south Asian region during the pre-monsoon season, employing three different emission inventories in the Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem with the second-generation Regional Acid Deposition Model (RADM2 chemical mechanism: the Emissions Database for Global Atmospheric Research – Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution (EDGAR-HTAP, the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment phase B (INTEX-B and the Southeast Asia Composition, Cloud, Climate Coupling Regional Study (SEAC4RS. Evaluation of diurnal variability in modelled ozone compared to observational data from 15 monitoring stations across south Asia shows the model ability to reproduce the clean, rural and polluted urban conditions over this region. In contrast to the diurnal average, the modelled ozone mixing ratios during noontime, i.e. hours of intense photochemistry (11:30–16:30 IST – Indian Standard Time – UTC +5:30, are found to differ among the three inventories. This suggests that evaluations of the modelled ozone limited to 24 h average are insufficient to assess uncertainties associated with ozone buildup. HTAP generally shows 10–30 ppbv higher noontime ozone mixing ratios than SEAC4RS and INTEX-B, especially over the north-west Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP, central India and southern India. The HTAP simulation repeated with the alternative Model for Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers (MOZART chemical mechanism showed even more strongly enhanced surface ozone mixing ratios due to vertical mixing of enhanced ozone that has been produced aloft. Our study indicates the need to also evaluate the O3 precursors across a network of stations and the development of high-resolution regional inventories for the anthropogenic emissions over south Asia accounting for year-to-year changes to further reduce uncertainties in modelled ozone over this region.

  19. WRF-Chem simulated surface ozone over south Asia during the pre-monsoon: effects of emission inventories and chemical mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Amit; Ojha, Narendra; Pozzer, Andrea; Mar, Kathleen A.; Beig, Gufran; Lelieveld, Jos; Gunthe, Sachin S.

    2017-12-01

    We evaluate numerical simulations of surface ozone mixing ratios over the south Asian region during the pre-monsoon season, employing three different emission inventories in the Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) with the second-generation Regional Acid Deposition Model (RADM2) chemical mechanism: the Emissions Database for Global Atmospheric Research - Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution (EDGAR-HTAP), the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment phase B (INTEX-B) and the Southeast Asia Composition, Cloud, Climate Coupling Regional Study (SEAC4RS). Evaluation of diurnal variability in modelled ozone compared to observational data from 15 monitoring stations across south Asia shows the model ability to reproduce the clean, rural and polluted urban conditions over this region. In contrast to the diurnal average, the modelled ozone mixing ratios during noontime, i.e. hours of intense photochemistry (11:30-16:30 IST - Indian Standard Time - UTC +5:30), are found to differ among the three inventories. This suggests that evaluations of the modelled ozone limited to 24 h average are insufficient to assess uncertainties associated with ozone buildup. HTAP generally shows 10-30 ppbv higher noontime ozone mixing ratios than SEAC4RS and INTEX-B, especially over the north-west Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP), central India and southern India. The HTAP simulation repeated with the alternative Model for Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers (MOZART) chemical mechanism showed even more strongly enhanced surface ozone mixing ratios due to vertical mixing of enhanced ozone that has been produced aloft. Our study indicates the need to also evaluate the O3 precursors across a network of stations and the development of high-resolution regional inventories for the anthropogenic emissions over south Asia accounting for year-to-year changes to further reduce uncertainties in modelled ozone over this region.

  20. Influence of nutrition labelling on food portion size consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Mary T; Wallace, Julie M W; Robson, Paula J; Rennie, Kirsten L; McCaffrey, Tracy A; Welch, Robert W; Livingstone, M Barbara E

    2013-06-01

    Nutrition labelling is an important strategic approach for encouraging consumers to make healthier food choices. The availability of highly palatable foods labelled as 'low fat or reduced calorie' may encourage the over-consumption of these products. This study aimed to determine whether the manipulation of nutrition labelling information can influence food portion size consumption. Normal and overweight men (n=24) and women (n=23) were served an identical lunch meal on three separate days, but the information they received prior to consuming the lunch meal was manipulated as follows: "baseline", "high fat/energy" and "low fat/energy". Food and energy intake was significantly increased in the low fat/energy condition compared with both baseline and the high fat/energy condition. An additional 3% (162 kJ) energy was consumed by subjects under the low fat/energy condition compared to baseline. No differences were observed between the baseline and high fat/energy condition. Subjects who consumed most in the low fat/energy condition were found to be mostly men, to have a higher BMI and to be overweight. Low fat/energy information can positively influence food and energy intake, suggesting that foods labelled as 'low fat' or 'low calorie' may be one factor promoting the consumption of large food portions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. 129I/127I ratios in Scottish coastal surface sea water: Geographical and temporal responses to changing emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnabel, Christoph; Olive, Valerie; Atarashi-Andoh, Mariko; Dougans, Andrew; Ellam, Robert M.; Freeman, Stewart; Maden, Colin; Stocker, Martin; Synal, Hans-Arno; Wacker, Lukas; Xu Sheng

    2007-01-01

    This work constitutes the first survey of I isotope ratios for Scottish sea water including the first data for the west of Scotland. These data are of importance because of the proximity to the world's second largest emission source of 129 I to the sea, the Sellafield nuclear reprocessing plant, because of the increasing importance of the sea to land transfer of 129 I and also as input data for dose estimates based on this pathway of 129 I. 129 I/ 127 I ratios in SW Scotland reached 3 x 10 -6 in 2004. No strong variation of I isotope ratios was found from 2003 to 2005 in Scottish sea waters. Iodine isotope ratios increased by about a factor of 6 from 1992 to 2003 in NE Scotland, in agreement with the increase of liquid 129 I emissions from Sellafield over that time period. It is demonstrated that 129 I/ 127 I ratios agree better than 129 I concentrations for samples from similar locations taken in very close temporal proximity, indicating that this ratio is more appropriate to interpret than the radionuclide concentration

  2. Physical modeling of emergency emission in the atmosphere (experimental investigation of Lagrangian turbulence characteristics in the surface and boundary layer of the atmosphere)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garger, E.K.

    2013-01-01

    Results of diffusion experiments simulating emergency emission in the surface and boundary layers of the atmosphere are presented. Interpretation of measurements in the surface layer of the atmosphere had been conducted on the basis of the Lagrangian similarity hypothesis., Results of measurements in the boundary layer of the atmosphere are interpreted with use of the homogeneous turbulence theory. Regimes of turbulent diffusion from land and low sources of admixtures predicted by the Lagrangian similarity hypothesis for various conditions of thermal stratification in the surface layer of the atmosphere are experimentally confirmed. Universal empirical constants for these regimes are received that allows to use their in practice. Calculation diffusion parameters and concentrations of an admixture from various sources in the surface layer of the atmosphere by model is presented. Results of calculation on this model are compared to independent measurements of mass concentration of a admixture in horizontal and vertical planes. Results of simultaneous measurements Eulerian and Lagrangian turbulence characteristics for various diffusion times in the boundary layer of the atmosphere have allowed to estimate turbulence time scales in Lagrangian variables for conditions close to neutral thermal stratification. The monograph is intended for scientists and students engaged in the field of meteorology, physics of the atmosphere and pollution air control, services of radiation and ecological safety

  3. Brain response to food cues varying in portion size is associated with individual differences in the portion size effect in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keller, Kathleen L.; English, Laural K.; Fearnbach, S.N.; Lasschuijt, Marlou; Anderson, Kaitlin; Bermudez, Maria; Fisher, Jennifer O.; Rolls, Barbara J.; Wilson, Stephen J.

    2018-01-01

    Large portions promote intake of energy dense foods (i.e., the portion size effect–PSE), but the neurobiological drivers of this effect are not known. We tested the association between blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) brain response to food images varied by portion size (PS) and energy density

  4. Photoluminescence effects of graphitic core size and surface functional groups in carbon dots: COO− induced red-shift emission

    KAUST Repository

    Hola, Katerina

    2014-04-01

    We present a simple molecular approach to control the lipophilic/ hydrophilic nature of photoluminescent carbon dots (CDs) based on pyrolysis of alkyl gallate precursors. Depending on the gallic acid derivative used, CDs with different alkyl groups (methyl, propyl, lauryl) on the surface can be obtained by isothermal heating at 270 C. This precursor-derived approach allows not only the control of lipophilicity but also the length of the particular alkyl chain enables the control over both the size and photoluminescence (PL) of the prepared CDs. Moreover, the alkyl chains on the CDs surface can be readily converted to carboxylate groups via a mild base hydrolysis to obtain water dispersible CDs with a record biocompatibility. The observed differences in PL properties of CDs and time-resolved PL data, including contributions from carbogenic cores and surface functional group, are rationalized and discussed in detail using time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Photoluminescence effects of graphitic core size and surface functional groups in carbon dots: COO− induced red-shift emission

    KAUST Repository

    Hola, Katerina; Bourlinos, Athanasios B.; Kozak, Ondrej; Berka, Karel; Siskova, Karolina M.; Havrdova, Marketa; Tucek, Jiri; Safarova, Klara; Otyepka, Michal; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.; Zboril, Radek

    2014-01-01

    We present a simple molecular approach to control the lipophilic/ hydrophilic nature of photoluminescent carbon dots (CDs) based on pyrolysis of alkyl gallate precursors. Depending on the gallic acid derivative used, CDs with different alkyl groups (methyl, propyl, lauryl) on the surface can be obtained by isothermal heating at 270 C. This precursor-derived approach allows not only the control of lipophilicity but also the length of the particular alkyl chain enables the control over both the size and photoluminescence (PL) of the prepared CDs. Moreover, the alkyl chains on the CDs surface can be readily converted to carboxylate groups via a mild base hydrolysis to obtain water dispersible CDs with a record biocompatibility. The observed differences in PL properties of CDs and time-resolved PL data, including contributions from carbogenic cores and surface functional group, are rationalized and discussed in detail using time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The Role of Social Norms in the Portion Size Effect: Reducing normative relevance reduces the effect of portion size on consumption decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris eVersluis

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available People typically eat more from large portions of food than from small portions. An explanation that has often been given for this so-called portion size effect is that the portion size acts as a social norm and as such communicates how much is appropriate to eat. In this paper, we tested this explanation by examining whether manipulating the relevance of the portion size as a social norm changes the portion size effect, as assessed by prospective consumption decisions. We conducted one pilot experiment and one full experiment in which participants respectively indicated how much they would eat or serve themselves from a given amount of different foods. In the pilot (N = 63, we manipulated normative relevance by allegedly basing the portion size on the behavior of either students of the own university (in-group or of another university (out-group. In the main experiment (N = 321, we told participants that either a minority or majority of people similar to them approved of the portion size. Results show that in both experiments, participants expected to serve themselves and to eat more from larger than from smaller portions. As expected, however, the portion size effect was less pronounced when the reference portions were allegedly based on the behavior of an out-group (pilot or approved only by a minority (main experiment. These findings suggest that the portion size indeed provides normative information, because participants were less influenced by it if it communicated the behaviors or values of a less relevant social group. In addition, in the main experiment, the relation between portion size and the expected amount served was partially mediated by the amount that was considered appropriate, suggesting that concerns about eating an appropriate amount indeed play a role in the portion size effect. However, since the portion size effect was weakened but not eliminated by the normative relevance manipulations and since mediation was only partial

  7. The influence of surface contamination on the ion emission from nanosecond-pulsed laser ablation of Al and Cu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, S.; Dogar, A. H.; Qayyum, H.; Rehman, Z. U.; Qayyum, A.

    2018-04-01

    Ions emitted from planar Al and Cu targets irradiated with a 1064 nm pulsed laser were investigated with the help of a time-resolving Langmuir probe. It was found that the intensity of the ions emitted from a target area rapidly decreases with the increasing number of laser shots, and seems to reach saturation after about 10 laser shots. The saturated intensity of Al and Cu ions was approximately 0.1 and 0.3 times the intensity of the respective ions measured at the first laser shot, respectively. The higher target ion intensity for the first few shots is thought to be due to the enhanced ionization of target atoms by vacuum-ultraviolet radiations emitted from the thermally excited/ionized surface contaminants. The reduction of target ion intensity with an increasing number of laser shots thus indicates the removal of contaminants from the irradiated surface area. Laser-cleaned Al and Cu surfaces were then allowed to be recontaminated with residual vacuum gases and the ion intensity was measured at various time delays. The prolonged exposure of the cleaned target to vacuum residual gases completely restores the ion intensity. Regarding surface contaminants removal, laser shots of higher intensities were found to be more effective than a higher number of laser shots having lower intensities.

  8. Effect of calcium hydroxide application to feedlot pen surface material on ammonia, odor, and greenhouse gas emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium hydroxide (lime) is used to reduce microorganisms and odors in human biosolids, animal and poultry manures, and abattoir wastes. In the cattle industry, lime has been used as a disinfectant and is spread on the pen surface to control infections such as diarrhea and foot rot. The increase in ...

  9. Identification of a Methane Oxidation Intermediate on Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Anode Surfaces with Fourier Transform Infrared Emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomfret, Michael B; Steinhurst, Daniel A; Owrutsky, Jeffrey C

    2013-04-18

    Fuel interactions on solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anodes are studied with in situ Fourier transform infrared emission spectroscopy (FTIRES). SOFCs are operated at 800 °C with CH4 as a representative hydrocarbon fuel. IR signatures of gas-phase oxidation products, CO2(g) and CO(g), are observed while cells are under load. A broad feature at 2295 cm(-1) is assigned to CO2 adsorbed on Ni as a CH4 oxidation intermediate during cell operation and while carbon deposits are electrochemically oxidized after CH4 operation. Electrochemical control provides confirmation of the assignment of adsorbed CO2. FTIRES has been demonstrated as a viable technique for the identification of fuel oxidation intermediates and products in working SOFCs, allowing for the elucidation of the mechanisms of fuel chemistry.

  10. Toxinotyping of Clostridium perfringens strains isolated from packed chicken portions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Poursoltani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Clostridium perfringens are classified into five toxin types A to E, on the basis of production of Alpha, Beta, Epsilon and Iota toxins. Some strains are able to produce enterotoxin, can cause food poisoning in human. The bacteria are able to produce NetB and TpeL toxins which are virulence factors in necrotic enteritis in poultry. The aim of this study was to determine the toxin profile of C. perfringens strains isolated from packed chicken portions using Single and Multiplex PCR assays. Materials and Methods: In a crossectional study, 180 sample of chicken portions including wing (n=50, liver (n=50, neck (n=50 and gizzard (n=30 were collected randomly and examined for C. perfringens contamination. For this purpose all of samples were cultured on the 7% sheep defibrinated blood agar, TSN and TSC culture media. All of the isolates were investigated for the presence of alpha, beta, epsilon, iota toxin and virulence (tpeL and netB genes. Results: In the present study, 6 isolates out of 180 samples, were confirmed as C. perfringens by culture and molecular methods. All of the isolates (100% were confirmed as cpa and cpb positive strains and belong to type C of C. perfringens. The netB gene was detected in 5 isolates (83.33% and tpeL gene in three isolates (50%. Conclusions: Our findings show the majority of C. perfringens in broilers are belong to type C which produce necrotic enteritis in poultry and may be transmitted to human through poultry products.

  11. Localization of CO2 Leakage from a Circular Hole on a Flat-Surface Structure Using a Circular Acoustic Emission Sensor Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiwang Cui

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Leak localization is essential for the safety and maintenance of storage vessels. This study proposes a novel circular acoustic emission sensor array to realize the continuous CO2 leak localization from a circular hole on the surface of a large storage vessel in a carbon capture and storage system. Advantages of the proposed array are analyzed and compared with the common sparse arrays. Experiments were carried out on a laboratory-scale stainless steel plate and leak signals were obtained from a circular hole in the center of this flat-surface structure. In order to reduce the influence of the ambient noise and dispersion of the acoustic wave on the localization accuracy, ensemble empirical mode decomposition is deployed to extract the useful leak signal. The time differences between the signals from the adjacent sensors in the array are calculated through correlation signal processing before estimating the corresponding distance differences between the sensors. A hyperbolic positioning algorithm is used to identify the location of the circular leak hole. Results show that the circular sensor array has very good directivity toward the circular leak hole. Furthermore, an optimized method is proposed by changing the position of the circular sensor array on the flat-surface structure or adding another circular sensor array to identify the direction of the circular leak hole. Experiential results obtained on a 100 cm × 100 cm stainless steel plate demonstrate that the full-scale error in the leak localization is within 0.6%.

  12. Effects of emission reductions at the Hayden powerplant on precipitation, snowpack, and surface-water chemistry in the Mount Zirkel Wilderness Area, Colorado, 1995-2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mast, M. Alisa; Campbell, Donald H.; Ingersoll, George P.

    2005-01-01

    Precipitation, snowpack, and surface-water samples collected during 1995-2003 were analyzed to evaluate the effects of emission reductions at the Hayden powerplant on water chemistry in the Mount Zirkel Wilderness Area. The Hayden powerplant, one of two large coal-fired powerplants in the Yampa Valley, was retrofitted with control systems during late 1998 and 1999 to reduce emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide--the primary precursors of haze and acidic precipitation. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, evaluated three water-chemistry data sets: wet-only precipitation chemistry from the National Atmospheric Deposition Program, snowpack chemistry from the Rocky Mountain snowpack network, and surface-water chemistry from a U.S. Geological Survey long-term lakes monitoring program. Concentrations and deposition rates of selected constituents were compared for the periods before and after emission reductions at the Hayden powerplant. Data collected during 1995-98 were used to represent the pre-control period, and data collected during 2000-2003 were used to represent the post-control period. Ten stations in the National Atmospheric Deposition Program were evaluated including two that were directly downwind from the Hayden powerplant (Dry Lake and Buffalo Pass) and eight that were upwind or more distant (more than 100 kilometers) from the powerplant. Precipitation amount at all 10 precipitation stations was lower in the post-control period than the pre-control period as a result of a regional drought that persisted during the post-control period. In contrast to precipitation amount, there was no consistent pattern of change in sulfate concentrations between periods, indicating that the drought did not have a concentrating effect on sulfate or that trends in regional sulfur dioxide emissions masked its influence. Sulfate concentrations increased at three stations between periods, remained the

  13. Visible light emission induced by Krq+ (4 ≤ q ≤ 9) ions colliding with the Cu surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yipan; Yang, Zhihu; Xu, Qiumei; Ren, Jieru; Zhao, Hongyun; Zhao, Yongtao

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we report visible light emission from 320 keV Krq+ (4 ≤ q ≤ 9) ions on the Cu target. The wavelength range measured is from 300 nm to 656 nm. Two Cu I spectra deriving from different initial states and one Kr I line are detected. Specifically, the two Cu I lines belong to transitions 3d104p(2P03/2) - 3d104s (2S1/2) at 324.78 nm (A) and 3d104p(2P01/2) - 3d104s(2S1/2) at 327.42 nm (B), respectively, and the photon yield ratio of spectra lines (A) and (B) are about 2:1. The Kr I line belongs to transition 4s24p5(2P03/2)11d 2[3/2]0 - 4s24p5(2P03/2)5p 2[1/2] at 486.12 nm (C). In addition, the experimental results show that the photon yields of all lines are increasing with the charge state increase.

  14. Different emissive states in the bulk and at the surface of methylammonium lead bromide perovskite revealed by two-photon micro-spectroscopy and lifetime measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadga Jung Karki

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Two photon photoluminescence (2PPL from single crystals of methyl ammonium lead bromide (CH3NH3PbBr3, MAPbBr3 is studied. We observe two components in the 2PPL spectra, which we assign to the photoluminescence (PL from the carrier recombination at the band edge and the recombination due to self-trapping of excitons. The PL Stokes shift of self-trapped excitons is about 100 meV from the band-gap energy. Our measurements show that about 15% of the total PL from regions about 40 μm deep inside the crystal is due to the emission from self-trapped exciton. This contribution increases to about 20% in the PL from the regions close to the surface. Time resolved measurements of 2PPL show that the PL due to band-edge recombination has a life time of about 8 ns while the PL lifetime of self-trapped excitons is in the order of 100 ns. Quantification of self-trapped excitons in the materials used in photovoltaics is important as such excitons hinder charge separation. As our results also show that an appreciable fraction of photo-generated carriers get trapped, the results are important in rational design of photovoltaics. On the other hand, our results also show that the self-trapped excitons broaden the emission spectrum, which may be useful in designing broadband light emitting devices.

  15. Test calculations of photoneutrons emission from surface of uranium sphere irradiated by 28 MeV electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blokhin, A.I.; Degtyarev, I.I.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper the results of physical verification for the BOFOD photonuclear data files are reported, available for the uranium isotopes U 235 , U 238 . These results were compared with calculated data by the parameterization driven model of photonuclear reaction and experimental data. Experimental data of photoneutron yields from surface of uranium sphere irradiated by 28 MeV electrons are used for a verification. Both calculations have been carried out with the RTS and T general purpose Monte Carlo code with detailed electron-photon-nucleon transport simulation using the ENDF/B-VI and EPDL evaluated data libraries

  16. Few-mode vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser: Optional emission of transverse modes with different polarizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Chuyu; Zhang, Xing; Hofmann, Werner; Yu, Lijuan; Liu, Jianguo; Ning, Yongqiang; Wang, Lijun

    2018-05-01

    Few-mode vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers that can be controlled to emit certain modes and polarization states simply by changing the biased contacts are proposed and fabricated. By directly etching trenches in the p-doped distributed Bragg reflector, the upper mesa is separated into several submesas above the oxide layer. Individual contacts are then deposited. Each contact is used to control certain transverse modes with different polarization directions emitted from the corresponding submesa. These new devices can be seen as a prototype of compact laser sources in mode division multiplexing communications systems.

  17. Secondary-electron-emission losses in multistage depressed collectors and traveling-wave-tube efficiency improvements with carbon collector electrode surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramins, P.; Ebihara, B. T.

    1986-01-01

    Secondary-electron-emission losses in multistage depressed collectors (MDC's) and their effects on overall traveling-wave-tube (TWT) efficiency were investigated. Two representative TWT's and several computer-modeled MDC's were used. The experimental techniques provide the measurement of both the TWT overall and the collector efficiencies. The TWT-MDC performance was optimized and measured over a wide range of operating conditions, with geometrically identical collectors, which utilized different electrode surface materials. Comparisons of the performance of copper electrodes to that of various forms of carbon, including pyrolytic and iisotropic graphites, were stressed. The results indicate that: (1) a significant improvement in the TWT overall efficiency was obtained in all cases by the use of carbon, rather than copper electrodes, and (2) that the extent of this efficiency enhancement depended on the characteristics of the TWT, the TWT operating point, the MDC design, and collector voltages. Ion textured graphite was found to be particularly effective in minimizing the secondary-electron-emission losses. Experimental and analytical results, however, indicate that it is at least as important to provide a maximum amount of electrostatic suppression of secondary electrons by proper MDC design. Such suppression, which is obtained by ensuring that a substantial suppressing electric field exists over the regions of the electrodes where most of the current is incident, was found to be very effective. Experimental results indicate that, with proper MDC design and the use of electrode surfaces with low secondary-electron yield, degradation of the collector efficiency can be limited to a few percent.

  18. Endovascular Embolization of Bronchial Artery Originating from the Upper Portion of Aortic Arch in Patients with Massive Hemoptysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Sen; Sun, Xi-Wen; Yu, Dong; Jie, Bing

    2014-01-01

    PurposeOur experience with endovascular embolization (EVE) of the bronchial artery (BA) originating from the upper portion of the aortic arch (AA) in six patients is described.MethodsAltogether, 818 patients with hemoptysis underwent multidetector row computed tomography angiography (MDCTA) before EVE or AA angiography during EVE. Aberrant BAs originating from the upper portion of the AA were the source of massive hemoptysis in six patients (0.73 %). MDCT angiograms and/or Digital subtraction angiograms were retrospectively reviewed. Selective catheterization and embolization were performed.ResultsThe ostia of the BAs were located on the superior surface of the AA between the brachiocephalic trunk and left common carotid artery in three patients, the junction of the aorta and medial surface of the left subclavian artery in two, and the posterior wall of the upper portion of the AA in one. The six BAs comprised two common trunks, three single right sides, and one single left side. The targeted vessels were successfully catheterized and embolized by a coaxial microcatheter system using polyvinyl alcohol particles. Other pathologic BAs and nonbronchial systemic arteries also were embolized. Bleeding was immediately controlled in all patients with no recurrence of hemoptysis. No procedure-related complications occurred.ConclusionsApplication of EVE of anomalous origin of BAs in patients with hemoptysis is important, as demonstrated in the six reported patients. MDCTA before EVE or AA angiography during EVE is critical to avoid missing a rare aberrant BA originating from the upper portion of the AA

  19. A plan to reduce volatile organic compound emissions from consumer products in Canada (excluding windshield washer fluid and surface coatings) : final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-12-01

    This report highlights the recommendations made by the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment for the development of a guideline to provide a means by which to reduce (VOC) emissions from consumer products (excluding windshield washer fluid and surface coatings) in Canada. VOCs and nitrogen oxides react photochemically in the presence of sunlight to create ground-level ozone, a primary component of urban smog which has a detrimental effect on human health, agricultural crops and building materials. In recent years, most urban areas of Canada have shown an annual increase in the maximum acceptable air quality levels for ground level ozone. Reducing emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from consumer products was first suggested in 1990 by the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment in phase one of their program entitled the 'Management plan for nitrogen oxides and volatile organic compounds'. Phase 2 of the program was implemented in 1997 to harmonize the emissions reduction program with the United States Environmental Protection Agency regulations. The Canadian Environmental Protection Agency (CEPA) recommended the following control options: (1) a CEPA guideline should be developed which states the maximum VOC and high-volatility organic compound (HVOC) content in Canadian consumer products including hair care products, herbicides, insecticides, air fresheners, deodorants, fungicides, surface cleaners, fragrance products, anti-microbial agents, laundry products and automotive detailing products. These limits should be identical to those found in the 1998 U.S. Final Rule for Consumer Products, (2) the CEPA guideline should require that records specifying VOC content in weight-per cent be maintained for a period of three years, (3) the CEPA guideline should include a declaration procedure for Canadian importers and manufacturers of consumer products to report to Environment Canada regarding the VOC content of their products, and

  20. Secondary electron emission influenced by oxidation on the aluminum surface: the roles of the chemisorbed oxygen and the oxide layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiangtao; Hoekstra, Bart; Wang, Zhen-Bin; Qiu, Jie; Pu, Yi-Kang

    2018-04-01

    A relationship between the apparent secondary electron yield ({γ }{{se}}) and the oxygen coverage/oxide layer thickness on an aluminum cathode is obtained in an experiment under a controlled environment. The apparent secondary electron yield ({γ }{{se}}) is deduced from the breakdown voltage between two parallel plate electrodes in a 360 mTorr argon environment using a simple Townsend breakdown model with the assumption that the variation of the apparent secondary electron yield is dominated by the variation of the argon ion induced processes. The oxygen coverage/oxide layer thickness on the aluminum cathode is measured by a semi in situ x-ray photoemission spectroscopy equipment which is directly attached to the discharge chamber. It is found that three phases exist: (1) in the monomonolayer regime, as the oxygen coverage increases from 0 to 0.3, {γ }{{se}} decreases by nearly 40 % , (2) as the oxygen coverage increases from 0.3 to 1, {γ }{{se}} keeps nearly constant, (3) as the oxide layer thickness increases from about 0.3 nm to about 1.1 nm, {γ }{{se}} increases by 150 % . We propose that, in the submonolayer regime, the chemisorbed oxygen on the aluminum surface causes the decrease of {γ }{{se}} by creating a local potential barrier, which reduces the Auger neutralization rate and the energy gained by the Auger electrons. In the multilayer regime, as the oxide layer grows in thickness, there are three proposed mechanisms which cause the increase of {γ }{{se}}: (1) the work function decreases; (2) resonance neutralization and Auger de-excitation may exist. This is served as another channel for secondary electron production; (3) the kinetic energy of Auger electrons is increased on average, leading to a higher probability for electrons to overcome the surface potential barrier.

  1. Cryogenic Selective Surfaces

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Selective surfaces have wavelength dependent emissivity/absorption. These surfaces can be designed to reflect solar radiation, while maximizing infrared emittance,...

  2. A study of SO2 emissions and ground surface displacements at Lastarria volcano, Antofagasta Region, Northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krewcun, Lucie G.

    Lastarria volcano (Chile) is located at the North-West margin of the 'Lazufre' ground inflation signal (37x45 km2), constantly uplifting at a rate of ˜2.5 cm/year since 1996 (Pritchard and Simons 2002; Froger et al. 2007). The Lastarria volcano has the double interest to be superimposed on a second, smaller-scale inflation signal and to be the only degassing area of the Lazufre signal. In this project, we compared daily SO2 burdens recorded by AURA's OMI mission for 2005-2010 with Ground Surface Displacements (GSD) calculated from the Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) images for 2003-2010. We found a constant maximum displacement rate of 2.44 cm/year for the period 2003-2007 and 0.80- 0.95 cm/year for the period 2007-2010. Total SO 2 emitted is 67.0 kT for the period 2005-2010, but detection of weak SO2 degassing signals in the Andes remains challenging owing to increased noise in the South Atlantic radiation Anomaly region.

  3. How much should I eat? A comparison of suggested portion sizes in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Hannah B; Ahern, Amy L; Jebb, Susan A

    2012-11-01

    To identify and compare suggested food portion sizes in UK schemes. The study collated and compared suggested portion sizes from selected UK schemes intended both for general advice and weight-loss advice. Portion size schemes were included if they were relevant to the UK, provided actual portion size information, were intended for adults and were obtainable from the public domain in November 2010. Included schemes were from the food industry, non-governmental organisations and health-care professionals. Suggested portion sizes of foods occurring in at least one scheme for general advice and at least one scheme for weight loss were included. Own brand on-pack portion size labelling from a large UK-wide supermarket was added to represent portion size advice from UK food retailers. Not applicable. The suggested portion sizes in the weight-loss advice schemes were often concordant, as were the general advice schemes, except one general advice scheme from a non-governmental organisation which was more closely aligned with the portion sizes for weight loss. Overall there were substantial discrepancies between suggested portion sizes for muesli and crunchy breakfast cereals, rice, pasta and potatoes, meat, fish and pulses, whereas portion sizes for cooked vegetables, dried fruit, some breakfast cereals and cheese were broadly consistent. There is a lack of consistency in the portion sizes communicated to the public. An independent and authoritative scheme of suggested portion sizes for all foods, with distinct recommendations for general advice and for weight-loss advice, could be of benefit.

  4. Portion Sizes from 24-Hour Dietary Recalls Differed by Sex among Those Who Selected the Same Portion Size Category on a Food Frequency Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Minji; Park, Song-Yi; Boushey, Carol J; Wilkens, Lynne R; Monroe, Kristine R; Le Marchand, Loïc; Kolonel, Laurence N; Murphy, Suzanne P; Paik, Hee-Young

    2018-05-08

    Accounting for sex differences in food portions may improve dietary measurement; however, this factor has not been well examined. The aim of this study was to examine sex differences in reported food portions from 24-hour dietary recalls (24HDRs) among those who selected the same portion size category on a quantitative food frequency questionnaire (QFFQ). This study was conducted with a cross-sectional design. Participants (n=319) were members of the Hawaii-Los Angeles Multiethnic Cohort who completed three 24HDRs and a QFFQ in a calibration study conducted in 2010 and 2011. Portions of individual foods reported from 24HDRs served as the outcome measures. Mean food portions from 24HDRs were compared between men and women who reported the same portion size on the QFFQ, after adjustment for race/ethnicity using a linear regression model. Actual amount and the assigned amount of the selected portion size in the QFFQ were compared using one-sample t test for men and women separately. Of 163 food items with portion size options listed in the QFFQ, 32 were reported in 24HDRs by ≥20 men and ≥20 women who selected the same portion size in the QFFQ. Although they chose the same portion size on the QFFQ, mean intake amounts from 24HDRs were significantly higher for men than for women for "beef/lamb/veal," "white rice," "brown/wild rice," "lettuce/tossed salad," "eggs cooked/raw," "whole wheat/rye bread," "buns/rolls," and "mayonnaise in sandwiches." For men, mean portions of 14 items from the 24HDRs were significantly different from the assigned amounts for QFFQ items (seven higher and seven lower), whereas for women, mean portions of 14 items were significantly lower from the assigned amounts (with five significantly higher). These sex differences in reported 24HDR food portions-even among participants who selected the same portion size on the QFFQ-suggest that the use of methods that account for differences in the portions consumed by men and women when QFFQs are

  5. Quantification of Transfer of Salmonella from Citrus Fruits to Peel, Edible Portion, and Gloved Hands during Hand Peeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jiin; Friedrich, Loretta M; Danyluk, Michelle D; Schaffner, Donald W

    2017-06-01

    Although studies have quantified bacterial transfer between hands and various materials, cross-contamination between the surface of fresh citrus fruit and the edible portions during hand peeling has not been reported. This study quantifies transfer of Salmonella to the edible portion of citrus fruit from a contaminated peel during hand peeling. Citrus fruits used for this study were Citrus sinensis (sweet orange) cultivars 'Valencia' and 'Navel', Citrus unshiu (Satsuma mandarins), Citrus reticulata × Citrus paradisi ('Minneola' tangelo or 'Honeybell'), and C. paradisi (grapefruit) cultivar 'Marsh'. An avirulent Salmonella Typhimurium LT2 (ATCC 700720) resistant to rifampin was used for all experiments. The inoculum containing approximately 9 log CFU/mL (50 μL) was spot inoculated onto the equator, stem, or styler of each fruit and allowed to dry for 24 h. Six volunteers put on single-use latex gloves and peeled inoculated fruit. Peel, edible fruit portion, and gloves were collected and enumerated separately. Three replicates of the study were performed in which each volunteer peeled two inoculated fruit of each variety (n = 36 fruit per variety). Cross-contamination from contaminated surface of citrus fruits to edible portion or gloved hands during peeling was affected by inoculation sites. Average Salmonella transfer to the edible portion ranged from 0.16% (Valencia inoculated at the equator) to 5.41% (navel inoculated at the stem). Average Salmonella transfer to gloved hands ranged from 0.41% (grapefruit inoculated at the stem) to 8.97% (navel inoculated at the stem). Most Salmonella remained on the peel of citrus fruits. The average level of Salmonella remaining on the peel ranged from 5.37% (Minneola inoculated at the equator) to 66.3% (Satsuma inoculated at the styler). When grapefruit was inoculated, the Salmonella that remained on the peel showed a bimodal pattern in which some individuals left almost all Salmonella on the peel, while others left

  6. How much should I eat? A comparison of suggested portion sizes in the UK

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Hannah B; Ahern, Amy L; Jebb, Susan A

    2012-01-01

    Objective To identify and compare suggested food portion sizes in UK schemes. Design The study collated and compared suggested portion sizes from selected UK schemes intended both for general advice and weight-loss advice. Setting Portion size schemes were included if they were relevant to the UK, provided actual portion size information, were intended for adults and were obtainable from the public domain in November 2010. Included schemes were from the food industry, non-governmental organis...

  7. 21 CFR 14.27 - Determination to close portions of advisory committee meetings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... with the policy in this section. (2) A portion of a meeting may be closed only if the Commissioner... matters to be discussed in the closed portion. (c) Attendance at a closed portion of a meeting is governed... and unauthorized attendance does not enable other unauthorized persons to attend, nor does it, of...

  8. 13 CFR 120.521 - What interest rate applies after SBA purchases its guaranteed portion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What interest rate applies after... 504 Loans Sba's Purchase of A Guaranteed Portion § 120.521 What interest rate applies after SBA purchases its guaranteed portion? When SBA purchases the guaranteed portion of a fixed interest rate loan...

  9. The pack size effect: Influence on consumer perceptions of portion sizes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hieke, Sophie; Palascha, Aikaterini; Jola, Corinne; Wills, Josephine; Raats, Monique M.

    2016-01-01

    Larger portions as well as larger packs can lead to larger prospective consumption estimates, larger servings and increased consumption, described as 'portion-size effects' and 'pack size effects'. Although related, the effects of pack sizes on portion estimates have received less attention. While

  10. Sensitivity of Satellite-Based Skin Temperature to Different Surface Emissivity and NWP Reanalysis Sources Demonstrated Using a Single-Channel, Viewing-Angle-Corrected Retrieval Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarino, B. R.; Minnis, P.; Yost, C. R.; Chee, T.; Palikonda, R.

    2015-12-01

    Single-channel algorithms for satellite thermal-infrared- (TIR-) derived land and sea surface skin temperature (LST and SST) are advantageous in that they can be easily applied to a variety of satellite sensors. They can also accommodate decade-spanning instrument series, particularly for periods when split-window capabilities are not available. However, the benefit of one unified retrieval methodology for all sensors comes at the cost of critical sensitivity to surface emissivity (ɛs) and atmospheric transmittance estimation. It has been demonstrated that as little as 0.01 variance in ɛs can amount to more than a 0.5-K adjustment in retrieved LST values. Atmospheric transmittance requires calculations that employ vertical profiles of temperature and humidity from numerical weather prediction (NWP) models. Selection of a given NWP model can significantly affect LST and SST agreement relative to their respective validation sources. Thus, it is necessary to understand the accuracies of the retrievals for various NWP models to ensure the best LST/SST retrievals. The sensitivities of the single-channel retrievals to surface emittance and NWP profiles are investigated using NASA Langley historic land and ocean clear-sky skin temperature (Ts) values derived from high-resolution 11-μm TIR brightness temperature measured from geostationary satellites (GEOSat) and Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometers (AVHRR). It is shown that mean GEOSat-derived, anisotropy-corrected LST can vary by up to ±0.8 K depending on whether CERES or MODIS ɛs sources are used. Furthermore, the use of either NOAA Global Forecast System (GFS) or NASA Goddard Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) for the radiative transfer model initial atmospheric state can account for more than 0.5-K variation in mean Ts. The results are compared to measurements from the Surface Radiation Budget Network (SURFRAD), an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program ground

  11. The effect of portion size on food intake is robust to brief education and mindfulness exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Karen; Vartanian, Lenny R; Herman, C Peter; Polivy, Janet

    2014-06-01

    We examined whether a brief education and a brief mindfulness exercise would reduce the effect of portion size on food intake. Participants were randomly assigned to one of the three information conditions (education, mindfulness, or control) and then received a small or large portion of pasta for lunch. Neither education nor mindfulness was effective in reducing the effect of portion size: Overall, participants served a large portion consumed 34 percent more pasta than did those served a small portion. Participants in the mindfulness condition tended to eat less overall than participants did in the two other conditions, but this trend was not significant. © The Author(s) 2013.

  12. Long-term trends of surface ozone and its influencing factors at the Mt Waliguan GAW station, China - Part 2: The roles of anthropogenic emissions and climate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wanyun; Xu, Xiaobin; Lin, Meiyun; Lin, Weili; Tarasick, David; Tang, Jie; Ma, Jianzhong; Zheng, Xiangdong

    2018-01-01

    Inter-annual variability and long-term trends in tropospheric ozone are both environmental and climate concerns. Ozone measured at Mt Waliguan Observatory (WLG, 3816 m a.s.l.) on the Tibetan Plateau over the period of 1994-2013 has increased significantly by 0.2-0.3 ppbv yr-1 during spring and autumn but shows a much smaller trend in winter and no significant trend in summer. Here we explore the factors driving the observed ozone changes at WLG using backward trajectory analysis, chemistry-climate model hindcast simulations (GFDL AM3), a trajectory-mapped ozonesonde data set, and several climate indices. A stratospheric ozone tracer implemented in GFDL AM3 indicates that stratosphere-to-troposphere transport (STT) can explain ˜ 60 % of the simulated springtime ozone increase at WLG, consistent with an increase in the NW air-mass frequency inferred from the trajectory analysis. Enhanced STT associated with the strengthening of the mid-latitude jet stream contributes to the observed high ozone anomalies at WLG during the springs of 1999 and 2012. During autumn, observations at WLG are more heavily influenced by polluted air masses originating from South East Asia than in the other seasons. Rising Asian anthropogenic emissions of ozone precursors are the key driver of increasing autumnal ozone observed at WLG, as supported by the GFDL AM3 model with time-varying emissions, which captures the observed ozone increase (0.26 ± 0.11 ppbv yr-1). AM3 simulates a greater ozone increase of 0.38 ± 0.11 ppbv yr-1 at WLG in autumn under conditions with strong transport from South East Asia and shows no significant ozone trend in autumn when anthropogenic emissions are held constant in time. During summer, WLG is mostly influenced by easterly air masses, but these trajectories do not extend to the polluted regions of eastern China and have decreased significantly over the last 2 decades, which likely explains why summertime ozone measured at WLG shows no significant trend

  13. Chemical waves in the O2 + H2 reaction on a Rh(111) surface alloyed with nickel. I. Photoelectron emission microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolinsky, Tim; von Boehn, Bernhard; Imbihl, Ronald

    2018-04-01

    Chemical waves that arise in the H2 + O2 reaction on a bimetallic Rh(111)/Ni surface have been studied in the 10-6 and 10-5 mbar range at T = 773 K with photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM), low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Nickel coverages of 0.3, 0.6, and 1.0 monolayers were investigated. Coadsorbed with some oxygen, Ni starts to penetrate the Rh bulk region substantially only beyond 900 K. In the 10-5 mbar range, chemical waves are characterized by three distinct gray levels in PEEM. This number reduces to only two levels in the 10-6 mbar range. In situ LEED showed the periodic appearance of a (n × 1) (n = 8, 10) pattern during chemical waves which was assigned to a 2D-Ni oxide. With in situ AES, one observes that the bright phase in PEEM correlates with a high Ni coverage and the dark phase with a low Ni coverage.

  14. Comparison of known food weights with image-based portion-size automated estimation and adolescents' self-reported portion size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Christina D; Chae, Junghoon; Schap, TusaRebecca E; Kerr, Deborah A; Delp, Edward J; Ebert, David S; Boushey, Carol J

    2012-03-01

    Diet is a critical element of diabetes self-management. An emerging area of research is the use of images for dietary records using mobile telephones with embedded cameras. These tools are being designed to reduce user burden and to improve accuracy of portion-size estimation through automation. The objectives of this study were to (1) assess the error of automatically determined portion weights compared to known portion weights of foods and (2) to compare the error between automation and human. Adolescents (n = 15) captured images of their eating occasions over a 24 h period. All foods and beverages served were weighed. Adolescents self-reported portion sizes for one meal. Image analysis was used to estimate portion weights. Data analysis compared known weights, automated weights, and self-reported portions. For the 19 foods, the mean ratio of automated weight estimate to known weight ranged from 0.89 to 4.61, and 9 foods were within 0.80 to 1.20. The largest error was for lettuce and the most accurate was strawberry jam. The children were fairly accurate with portion estimates for two foods (sausage links, toast) using one type of estimation aid and two foods (sausage links, scrambled eggs) using another aid. The automated method was fairly accurate for two foods (sausage links, jam); however, the 95% confidence intervals for the automated estimates were consistently narrower than human estimates. The ability of humans to estimate portion sizes of foods remains a problem and a perceived burden. Errors in automated portion-size estimation can be systematically addressed while minimizing the burden on people. Future applications that take over the burden of these processes may translate to better diabetes self-management. © 2012 Diabetes Technology Society.

  15. Methane and nitrous oxide cycling microbial communities in soils above septic leach fields: Abundances with depth and correlations with net surface emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Baca, Cristina P; Truhlar, Allison M; Omar, Amir-Eldin H; Rahm, Brian G; Walter, M Todd; Richardson, Ruth E

    2018-05-31

    Onsite septic systems use soil microbial communities to treat wastewater, in the process creating potent greenhouse gases (GHGs): methane (CH 4 ) and nitrous oxide (N 2 O). Subsurface soil dispersal systems of septic tank overflow, known as leach fields, are an important part of wastewater treatment and have the potential to contribute significantly to GHG cycling. This study aimed to characterize soil microbial communities associated with leach field systems and quantify the abundance and distribution of microbial populations involved in CH 4 and N 2 O cycling. Functional genes were used to target populations producing and consuming GHGs, specifically methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) and particulate methane monooxygenase (pmoA) for CH 4 and nitric oxide reductase (cnorB) and nitrous oxide reductase (nosZ) for N 2 O. All biomarker genes were found in all soil samples regardless of treatment (leach field, sand filter, or control) or depth (surface or subsurface). In general, biomarker genes were more abundant in surface soils than subsurface soils suggesting the majority of GHG cycling is occurring in near-surface soils. Ratios of production to consumption gene abundances showed a positive relationship with CH 4 emissions (mcrA:pmoA, p  0.05). Of the three measured soil parameters (volumetric water content (VWC), temperature, and conductivity), only VWC was significantly correlated to a biomarker gene, mcrA (p = 0.0398) but not pmoA or either of the N 2 O cycling genes (p > 0.05 for cnorB and nosZ). 16S rRNA amplicon library sequencing results revealed soil VWC, CH 4 flux and N 2 O flux together explained 64% of the microbial community diversity between samples. Sequencing of mcrA and pmoA amplicon libraries revealed treatment had little effect on diversity of CH 4 cycling organisms. Overall, these results suggest GHG cycling occurs in all soils regardless of whether or not they are associated with a leach field system. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B

  16. Small, medium, large or supersize? The development and evaluation of interventions targeted at portion size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeer, W M; Steenhuis, I H M; Poelman, M P

    2014-01-01

    In the past decades, portion sizes of high-caloric foods and drinks have increased and can be considered an important environmental obesogenic factor. This paper describes a research project in which the feasibility and effectiveness of environmental interventions targeted at portion size was evaluated. The studies that we conducted revealed that portion size labeling, offering a larger variety of portion sizes, and proportional pricing (that is, a comparable price per unit regardless of the size) were considered feasible to implement according to both consumers and point-of-purchase representatives. Studies into the effectiveness of these interventions demonstrated that the impact of portion size labeling on the (intended) consumption of soft drinks was, at most, modest. Furthermore, the introduction of smaller portion sizes of hot meals in worksite cafeterias in addition to the existing size stimulated a moderate number of consumers to replace their large meals by a small meal. Elaborating on these findings, we advocate further research into communication and marketing strategies related to portion size interventions; the development of environmental portion size interventions as well as educational interventions that improve people's ability to deal with a ‘super-sized' environment; the implementation of regulation with respect to portion size labeling, and the use of nudges to stimulate consumers to select healthier portion sizes. PMID:25033959

  17. Working group report: methane emissions from coal mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, D.

    1993-01-01

    The process of coalification inherently generates methane and other byproducts. The amount of methane released during coal mining is a function of coal rank and depth, gas content, and mining methods, as well as other factors such as moisture. In most underground mines, methane is removed by drawing large quantities of air through the mine releasing the air into the atmosphere. In surface mines, exposed coal faces and surfaces, as well as areas of coal rubble created by blasting operations are believed to be the major sources of methane. A portion of the methane emitted from coal mining comes from post-mining activities such as coal processing, transportation, and utilisation. Some methane is also released from coal waste piles and abandoned mines. This paper highlights difficulties with previous methane emission studies namely: absence of data on which to base estimates; use of national data to develop global estimates; failure to include all possible emission sources; overreliance on statistical estimation methodologies. It recommends a 'tiered' approach for the estimation of emissions from underground mines, surface mines and post-mining activities. For each source, two or more approaches (or 'tiers') are presented, with the first tier requiring basic and readily available data and higher tiers requiring additional data. 29 refs., 3 tabs

  18. Waste-based biomass to power plants with high portions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aho, M.; Taipale, R. (VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)); Hupa, M.; Yrjas, P. (Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland)); Jokiniemi, J.; Sippula, O. (Univ. of Kuopio (Finland))

    2009-07-01

    Recycling of chemicals back to processes as effectively as possible is sustainable development. Landfilling and agricultural use of sewage sludge (SWS) produces methane which is a strong greenhouse gas. Our earlier project 'Corraway' funded by Tekes ClimBus programme and Finnish industry indicated that iron and aluminium sulphates can destroy effectively alkali chlorides at furnace conditions preventing Cl deposition to heat transfer surfaces. Cl in the deposits is the main reason to superheater corrosion with biomass- containing feedstocks. These sulphates have been used as process chemicals in wastewater treatment, and therefore they are present in SWS. SWS-originated combustion products will pass the whole furnace when SWS is mixed to the main fuel. The furnace includes oxidising and reducing zones. Therefore it is not clear if the SWS-originated sulphur remains in an effective form in the point view of alkali chlorides destruction. The project work included thorough fuel analysis, pilot-scale combustion tests with blends of risky biomass and SWS and research of sampling techniques to detect alkali compounds. The combustion experiments proved the power of SWS originated sulphur to destroy alkali chlorides in the furnace and suggest strongly to continue this research. The order of power of the two SWS tested was different than expected indicating need to produce more thorough results. SWS may contain much minerals which lowers its value as a fuel. It can be possible to increase sulphur content and to decrease ash content in the sludge during SWS processing and dry and pelletise the sludge to strengthen further its value as a protective and as a fuel. (orig.)

  19. Removing traffic emissions from CO2 time series measured at a tall tower using mobile measurements and transport modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Andres; Rella, Chris W.; Göckede, Mathias; Hanson, Chad; Yang, Zhenlin; Law, Beverly E.

    2014-11-01

    In recent years, measurements of atmospheric carbon dioxide with high precision and accuracy have become increasingly important for climate change research, in particular to inform terrestrial biosphere models. Anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel burning have long been recognized to contribute a significant portion of the carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Here, we present an approach to remove the traffic related carbon dioxide emissions from mole fractions measured at a tall tower by using the corresponding carbon monoxide measurements in combination with footprint analyses and transport modeling. This technique improves the suitability of the CO2 data to be used in inverse modeling approaches of atmosphere-biosphere exchange that do not account for non-biotic portions of CO2. In our study region in Oregon, road traffic emissions are the biggest source of anthropogenic carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide. A three-day mobile campaign covering 1700 km of roads in northwestern Oregon was performed during summer of 2012 using a laser-based Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer. The mobile measurements incorporated different roads including main highways, urban streets, and back-roads, largely within the typical footprint of a tall CO/CO2 observation tower in Oregon's Willamette Valley. For the first time, traffic related CO:CO2 emission ratios were measured directly at the sources during an on-road campaign under a variety of different driving conditions. An average emission ratio of 7.43 (±1.80) ppb CO per ppm CO2 was obtained for the study region and applied to separate the traffic related portion of CO2 from the mole fraction time series. The road traffic related portion of the CO2 mole fractions measured at the tower site reached maximum values ranging from 9.8 to 12 ppm, depending on the height above the surface, during summer 2012.

  20. Acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, R.W.

    1976-01-01

    The volume contains six papers which together provide an overall review of the inspection technique known as acoustic emission or stress wave emission. The titles are: a welder's introduction to acoustic emission technology; use of acoustic emission for detection of defects as they arise during fabrication; examples of laboratory application and assessment of acoustic emission in the United Kingdom; (Part I: acoustic emission behaviour of low alloy steels; Part II: fatigue crack assessment from proof testing and continuous monitoring); inspection of selected areas of engineering structures by acoustic emission; Japanese experience in laboratory and practical applications of acoustic emission to welded structures; and ASME acoustic emission code status. (U.K.)

  1. How food marketers can sell smaller portions: Consumer insights and product innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riis, J; Fisher, J O; Rowe, S

    2016-08-01

    Food portion size has been shown to be an important driver of energy intake. Despite the well acknowledged role of portion control in weight management, large portion sizes remain ubiquitous in the marketplace. Moving consumers towards consumption of smaller portion sizes will require changes in consumer behavior as well as changes in products available to consumers in a variety of settings. This special supplement presents cutting edge research aimed at understanding consumer behavior around portion size and innovations in product design that may promote the selection and consumption of smaller portion sizes. We identify further research that will be needed to translate basic behavioral findings into real world settings and to viable product development. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. In-situ Monitoring of Sub-cooled Nucleate Boiling on Fuel Cladding Surface in Water at 1 bar and 130 bars using Acoustic Emission Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Seung Heon; Wu, Kaige; Shim, Hee-Sang; Lee, Deok Hyun; Hur, Do Haeng [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Crud deposition increases through a sufficient corrosion product supply around the steam-liquid interface of a boiling bubble. Therefore, the understanding of this SNB phenomenon is important for effective and safe operation of nuclear plants. The experimental SNB studies have been performed in visible conditions at a low pressure using a high speed video camera. Meanwhile, an acoustic emission (AE) method is an on-line non-destructive evaluation method to sense transient elastic wave resulting from a rapid release of energy within a dynamic process. Some researchers have investigated boiling phenomena using the AE method. However, their works were performed at atmospheric pressure conditions. Therefore, the objective of this work is for the first time to detect and monitor SNB on fuel cladding surface in simulated PWR primary water at 325 .deg. C and 130 bars using an AE technique. We successfully observed the boiling AE signals in primary water at 1 bar and 130 bars using AE technique. Visualization test was performed effectively to identify a correlation between water boiling phenomenon and AE signals in a transparent glass cell at 1 bar, and the boiling AE signals were in good agreement with the boiling behavior. Based on the obtained correlations at 1 bar, the AE signals obtained at 130 bars were analyzed. The boiling density and size of the AE signals at 130 bars were decreased by the flow parameters. However, overall AE signals showed characteristics and a trend similar to the AE signals at 1 bar. This indicates that boiling AE signals are detected successfully at 130 bars, and the AE technique can be effectively implemented in non-visualized condition at high pressures.

  3. Food photography. I: The perception of food portion size from photographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, M; Atkinson, M; Darbyshire, S

    1994-11-01

    Fifty-one male and female volunteers aged 18-90 years from a wide variety of social and occupational backgrounds completed 7284 assessments of portion size in relation to food photographs. Subjects were shown six portion sizes (two small, two medium and two large) for each of six foods, and asked to compare the amount on the plate in front of them to (a) a series of eight photographs showing weights of portions from the 5th to the 95th centile of portion size (British Adult Dietary Survey), or (b) a single photograph of the average (median) portion size. Photographs were prepared either in colour or in black and white, and in two different sizes. The order of presentation of foods; use of black and white or colour; the size of photographs; and presentation of eight or average photographs were each randomized independently. On average, the mean differences between the portion size presented and the estimate of portion size using the photographs varied from -8 to +6 g (-4 to +5%) for the series of eight photographs, and from -34 to -1 g (-23 to +9%) for the single average photograph. Large portion sizes tended to be underestimated more than medium or small portion sizes, especially when using the average photograph (from -79 to -14 g, -37 to -13%). Being female, 65 years and over, or retired, or seeing photographs in colour, were all associated with small but statistically significant overestimations of portion size. Having a body mass index > or = 30 kg/m2 was associated with an 8% underestimate of portion size. We conclude that use of a series of eight photographs is associated with relatively small errors in portion size perception, whereas use of an average photograph is consistently associated with substantial underestimation across a variety of foods.

  4. Large Portions Encourage the Selection of Palatable Rather Than Filling Foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunstrom, Jeffrey M; Jarvstad, Andreas; Griggs, Rebecca L; Potter, Christina; Evans, Natalie R; Martin, Ashley A; Brooks, Jon Cw; Rogers, Peter J

    2016-10-01

    Portion size is an important driver of larger meals. However, effects on food choice remain unclear. Our aim was to identify how portion size influences the effect of palatability and expected satiety on choice. In Study 1, adult participants (n = 24, 87.5% women) evaluated the palatability and expected satiety of 5 lunchtime meals and ranked them in order of preference. Separate ranks were elicited for equicaloric portions from 100 to 800 kcal (100-kcal steps). In Study 2, adult participants (n = 24, 75% women) evaluated 9 meals and ranked 100-600 kcal portions in 3 contexts (scenarios), believing that 1) the next meal would be at 1900, 2) they would receive only a bite of one food, and 3) a favorite dish would be offered immediately afterwards. Regression analysis was used to quantify predictors of choice. In Study 1, the extent to which expected satiety and palatability predicted choice was highly dependent on portion size (P palatability (100-kcal portions: expected satiety, β: 0.42; palatability, β: 0.46). With larger portions, palatability was a strong predictor (600-kcal portions: β: 0.53), and expected satiety was a poor or negative predictor (600-kcal portions: β: -0.42). In Study 2, this pattern was moderated by context (P = 0.024). Results from scenario 1 replicated Study 1. However, expected satiety was a poor predictor in both scenario 2 (expected satiety was irrelevant) and scenario 3 (satiety was guaranteed), and palatability was the primary driver of choice across all portions. In adults, expected satiety influences food choice, but only when small equicaloric portions are compared. Larger portions not only promote the consumption of larger meals, but they encourage the adoption of food choice strategies motivated solely by palatability. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  5. Big hearts, small hands: a focus group study exploring parental food portion behaviours

    OpenAIRE

    Curtis, Kristina; Atkins, Louise; Brown, Katherine

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background The development of healthy food portion sizes among families is deemed critical to childhood weight management; yet little is known about the interacting factors influencing parents’ portion control behaviours. This study aimed to use two synergistic theoretical models of behaviour: the COM-B model (Capability, Opportunity, Motivation – Behaviour) and Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF) to identify a broad spectrum of theoretically derived influences on parents’ portion co...

  6. Image portion identification methods, image parsing methods, image parsing systems, and articles of manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassahn, Gordon D.; Lancaster, Gregory D.; Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.

    2013-01-08

    Image portion identification methods, image parsing methods, image parsing systems, and articles of manufacture are described. According to one embodiment, an image portion identification method includes accessing data regarding an image depicting a plurality of biological substrates corresponding to at least one biological sample and indicating presence of at least one biological indicator within the biological sample and, using processing circuitry, automatically identifying a portion of the image depicting one of the biological substrates but not others of the biological substrates.

  7. Evaluation of aluminum sulfate (alum) as a feedlot surface amendment to reduce ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, and greenhouse gas emissions from beef feedlots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammonia (NH3) and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from concentrated feeding operations are a concern. The poultry industry has successfully used aluminum sulfate (Alum) as a litter amendment to reduce NH3 emissions from poultry barns. Alum has not been eval­uated for similar uses on cattle feedlot su...

  8. Waveguide module comprising a first plate with a waveguide channel and a second plate with a raised portion in which a sealing layer is forced into the waveguide channel by the raised portion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strassner, II, Bernd H.; Liedtke, Richard; McDonald, Jacob Jeremiah; Halligan, Matthew

    2018-04-17

    The various technologies presented herein relate to utilizing a sealing layer of malleable material to seal gaps, etc., at a joint between edges of a waveguide channel formed in a first plate and a surface of a clamping plate. A compression pad is included in the surface of the clamping plate and is dimensioned such that the upper surface of the pad is less than the area of the waveguide channel opening on the first plate. The sealing layer is placed between the waveguide plate and the clamping plate, and during assembly of the waveguide module, the compression pad deforms a portion of the sealing layer such that it ingresses into the waveguide channel opening. Deformation of the sealing layer results in the gaps, etc., to be filled, improving the operational integrity of the joint.

  9. A qualitative study of parents' perceptions and use of portion size strategies for preschool children's snacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Christine E; Fisher, Jennifer Orlet; Ganter, Claudia; Younginer, Nicholas; Orloski, Alexandria; Blaine, Rachel E; Bruton, Yasmeen; Davison, Kirsten K

    2015-05-01

    Increases in childhood obesity correspond with shifts in children's snacking behaviors and food portion sizes. This study examined parents' conceptualizations of portion size and the strategies they use to portion snacks in the context of preschool-aged children's snacking. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with non-Hispanic white (W), African American (AA), and Hispanic (H) low-income parents (n = 60) of preschool-aged children living in Philadelphia and Boston. The interview examined parents' child snacking definitions, purposes, contexts, and frequency. Verbatim transcripts were analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Coding matrices compared responses by race/ethnicity, parent education, and household food security status. Parents' commonly referenced portion sizes when describing children's snacks with phrases like "something small." Snack portion sizes were guided by considerations including healthfulness, location, hunger, and timing. Six strategies for portioning snacks were presented including use of small containers, subdividing large portions, buying prepackaged snacks, use of hand measurement, measuring cups, scales, and letting children determine portion size. Differences in considerations and strategies were seen between race/ethnic groups and by household food security status. Low-income parents of preschool-aged children described a diverse set of considerations and strategies related to portion sizes of snack foods offered to their children. Future studies should examine how these considerations and strategies influence child dietary quality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Summary of Available Hydrogeologic Data for the Northeast Portion of the Alluvial Aquifer at Louisville, Kentucky

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Unthank, Michael D; Nelson, Jr., Hugh L

    2006-01-01

    The hydrogeologic characteristics of the unconsolidated glacial outwash sand and gravel deposits that compose the northeast portion of the alluvial aquifer at Louisville, Kentucky, indicate a prolific...

  11. A qualitative study of psychological, social and behavioral barriers to appropriate food portion size control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Michelle; Livingstone, M Barbara E; Hollywood, Lynsey E; Gibney, Eileen R; O'Brien, Sinéad A; Pourshahidi, L Kirsty; Dean, Moira

    2013-08-01

    Given the worldwide prevalence of overweight and obesity, there is a clear need for meaningful practical healthy eating advice - not only in relation to food choice, but also on appropriate food portion sizes. As the majority of portion size research to date has been overwhelmingly quantitative in design, there is a clear need to qualitatively explore consumers' views in order to fully understand how food portion size decisions are made. Using qualitative methodology this present study aimed to explore consumers' views about factors influencing their portion size selection and consumption and to identify barriers to appropriate portion size control. Ten focus groups with four to nine participants in each were formed with a total of 66 persons (aged 19-64 years) living on the island of Ireland. The semi-structured discussions elicited participants' perceptions of suggested serving size guidance and explored the influence of personal, social and environmental factors on their food portion size consumption. Audiotapes of the discussions were professionally transcribed verbatim, loaded into NVivo 9, and analysed using an inductive thematic analysis procedure. The rich descriptive data derived from participants highlight that unhealthy portion size behaviors emanate from various psychological, social and behavioral factors. These bypass reflective and deliberative control, and converge to constitute significant barriers to healthy portion size control. Seven significant barriers to healthy portion size control were apparent: (1) lack of clarity and irrelevance of suggested serving size guidance; (2) guiltless eating; (3) lack of self-control over food cues; (4) distracted eating; (5) social pressures; (6) emotional eating rewards; and (7) quantification habits ingrained from childhood. Portion size control strategies should empower consumers to overcome these effects so that the consumption of appropriate food portion sizes becomes automatic and habitual.

  12. Portion control for the treatment of obesity in the primary care setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris Katherine I

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasing prevalence of obesity is a significant health threat and a major public health challenge. A critical need exists to develop and evaluate practical methods for the treatment of obesity in the clinical setting. One of the factors contributing to the obesity epidemic is food portion sizes. Limited data are available on the efficacy of visual or tactile devices designed to enhance patient understanding and control of portion sizes. A portion control plate is a commercially-available product that can provide visual cues of portion size and potentially contribute to weight loss by enhancing portion size control among obese patients. This tool holds promise as a useful adjunct to dietary counseling. Our objective was to evaluate a portion control intervention including dietary counseling and a portion control plate to facilitate weight loss among obese patients in a primary care practice. Findings We randomized 65 obese patients [body mass index (BMI ≥ 30 and vs. -0.5% ± 2.2%; p = 0.041 and a non significant trend in weight change from baseline at 6 months (-2.1% ± 3.8% vs. -0.7% ± 3.7%; p = 0.232 compared with usual care. Nearly one-half of patients assigned to the portion control intervention who completed the study reported the overall intervention was helpful and the majority would recommend it to others. Conclusions Our findings suggest that a portion control intervention incorporating dietary counseling and a portion control plate may be effective for enhancing weight loss among obese subjects. A portion control intervention deserves further evaluation as a weight control strategy in the primary care setting. Trial registration Current controlled trials NCT01451554

  13. Single-photon emission at a rate of 143 MHz from a deterministic quantum-dot microlens triggered by a mode-locked vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlehahn, A.; Gschrey, M.; Schnauber, P.; Schulze, J.-H.; Rodt, S.; Strittmatter, A.; Heindel, T., E-mail: tobias.heindel@tu-berlin.de; Reitzenstein, S. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Berlin, Berlin 10623 (Germany); Gaafar, M.; Vaupel, M.; Stolz, W.; Rahimi-Iman, A.; Koch, M. [Department of Physics and Materials Science Center, Philipps-Universität Marburg, 35032 Marburg (Germany)

    2015-07-27

    We report on the realization of a quantum dot (QD) based single-photon source with a record-high single-photon emission rate. The quantum light source consists of an InGaAs QD which is deterministically integrated within a monolithic microlens with a distributed Bragg reflector as back-side mirror, which is triggered using the frequency-doubled emission of a mode-locked vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser (ML-VECSEL). The utilized compact and stable laser system allows us to excite the single-QD microlens at a wavelength of 508 nm with a pulse repetition rate close to 500 MHz at a pulse width of 4.2 ps. Probing the photon statistics of the emission from a single QD state at saturation, we demonstrate single-photon emission of the QD-microlens chip with g{sup (2)}(0) < 0.03 at a record-high single-photon flux of (143 ± 16) MHz collected by the first lens of the detection system. Our approach is fully compatible with resonant excitation schemes using wavelength tunable ML-VECSELs, which will optimize the quantum optical properties of the single-photon emission in terms of photon indistinguishability.

  14. Theoretical study of the thermal radiation of rough surfaces. Development of a device for the measurement of emissivity, and application to AISI 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinisch, Bruno

    1982-01-01

    Within the frame of the study of heat transfers by radiation, this research thesis addresses the theoretical and experimental determination of the directional monochromatic emissivity. After some theoretical recalls, the author presents models for a direct calculation of emissivity, which in fact calculate bidirectional reflectivity by using laws of physical optics. An experimental device has been developed for the direct measurement of directional monochromatic emissivity of materials in the infrared (wavelength from 2 to 15 microns) in a polarised radiation. This device uses double beam with double modulation. Experimental results are presented for the 316 stainless steel [fr

  15. Investigations in the field electron emission at the Siemens research laboratory directed by Gustav Hertz between 1935 and 1945 and their significance for the present-day surface physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haefer, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    The author, who was a co-worker of Gustav Hertz, describes briefly the early history of field emission research and the fundamental results, i.e. the invention of the field electron microscope by E. W. Mueller and the first confirmation of the quantum mechanical Fowler-Nordheim theory by R. A. Haefer, and points out their significance for present-day surface physics and technology. (author)

  16. Formation of ZnO-Cd(OH){sub 2} core-shell nanoparticles by sol-gel method: An approach to modify surface chemistry for stable and enhanced green emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Rupali, E-mail: rupalimishra@rediffmail.co [Department of Physics, University of Allahabad, Allahabad-211002 (India); Nanophosphor Application Centre, University of Allahabad, Allahabad-211002 (India); Yadav, Raghvendra S.; Pandey, Avinash C. [Department of Physics, University of Allahabad, Allahabad-211002 (India); Nanophosphor Application Centre, University of Allahabad, Allahabad-211002 (India); Sanjay, Sharda. S. [Department of Chemistry, Ewing Christian College, Allahabad (India); Dar, Chitra [Department of Physics, University of Allahabad, Allahabad-211002 (India)

    2010-03-15

    We report the formation of highly stable and luminescent ZnO-Cd(OH){sub 2} core-shell nanoparticles by simple introduction of cadmium salt in the initial precursor solution, used to synthesize ZnO nanoparticles by sol-gel route. The cadmium to zinc salt concentration ratio has been also varied to control the growth of ZnO nanoparticles at the smaller particle size. Formation of ZnO-Cd(OH){sub 2} core-shell nanostructure has been confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). UV-vis absorption spectroscopy exhibits blue-shift in absorption edge on increasing cadmium concentrations. The photoluminescence emission spectra showed the remarkably stable and enhanced visible (green) emission from suspended ZnO-Cd(OH){sub 2} nanoparticles in comparison to bare ZnO nanoparticles. It is postulated that Cd(OH){sub 2} layer at the surface of ZnO nanoparticles prevents the agglomeration of nanoparticles and efficiently assists the trapping of hole at the surface site, a first step necessary for visible emission. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) also supports our assumption about surface chemistry.

  17. Menu-engineering in restaurants - adapting portion sizes on plates to enhance vegetable consumption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, Machiel J.; Huitink, Marlijn; Dijkstra, S.C.; Maaskant, Anna J.; Heijnen, Joris

    2017-01-01

    Background: The aim of this research was to investigate whether increased portion sizes of vegetables and decreased portion sizes of meat on main dishes increased the amount of vegetables consumed in a real-life restaurant setting without affecting customer satisfaction. The participants were

  18. Portion Size Labeling and Intended Soft Drink Consumption: The Impact of Labeling Format and Size Portfolio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeer, Willemijn M.; Steenhuis, Ingrid H. M.; Leeuwis, Franca H.; Bos, Arjan E. R.; de Boer, Michiel; Seidell, Jacob C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess what portion size labeling "format" is most promising in helping consumers selecting appropriate soft drink sizes, and whether labeling impact depends on the size portfolio. Methods: An experimental study was conducted in fast-food restaurants in which 2 labeling formats (ie, reference portion size and small/medium/large…

  19. 24 CFR 902.47 - Management operations portion of total PHAS points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Management operations portion of... Operations § 902.47 Management operations portion of total PHAS points. Of the total 100 points available for a PHAS score, a PHA may receive up to 30 points based on the Management Operations Indicator. ...

  20. 21 CFR 102.45 - Fish sticks or portions made from minced fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fish sticks or portions made from minced fish. 102... for Specific Nonstandardized Foods § 102.45 Fish sticks or portions made from minced fish. (a) The common or usual name of the food product that resembles and is of the same composition as fish sticks or...

  1. Technical note: preservation of tissues and gastrointestinal tract portions by plastic coating or plastination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pond, K R; Holladay, S D; Luginbuhl, J M

    1992-04-01

    Two methods to preserve gastrointestinal tract (GIT) organs and tissues, plastic coating (PC) and plastination (PN), were investigated and compared. Specimens to be preserved were removed from animals within 2 h of death and immediately cleaned with water. Digesta contents were removed by flushing desired portions of GIT with water until the exiting water was clear. In the PC method, cleaned specimens were dehydrated by immersion in an isopropanol solution, dried with forced air after positioning and orientation as in situ, and finally coated on the outer and inner surfaces with a clear plastic material. In the PN procedure, specimens were filled with, and submerged in, a low-formaldehyde fixative, then dehydrated by immersion in a cold acetone solution. Dehydrated specimens were immersed in silicone and placed in a freeze drier for impregnation under low vacuum, followed by overnight gas curing with a silicone crosslinker. Finally, viewing windows were cut out with a scalpel in GIT preserved by both methods. Preserved GIT and tissues had an appearance similar to their appearance in vivo. The PC method was simple and inexpensive. Plastinated specimens were more flexible, durable, and lifelike than those preserved by the PC method. In addition, many body parts, such as muscles, nerves, bones, ligaments, and central nervous system specimens, were preserved by PN. Both methods were found to be useful tools for postmortem studies of tissues and GIT organs.

  2. Carbon dioxide emission from bamboo culms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariah, E J; Sabulal, B; Nair, D N K; Johnson, A J; Kumar, C S P

    2016-05-01

    Bamboos are one of the fastest growing plants on Earth, and are widely considered to have high ability to capture and sequester atmospheric carbon, and consequently to mitigate climate change. We tested this hypothesis by measuring carbon dioxide (CO2 ) emissions from bamboo culms and comparing them with their biomass sequestration potential. We analysed diurnal effluxes from Bambusa vulgaris culm surface and gas mixtures inside hollow sections of various bamboos using gas chromatography. Corresponding variations in gas pressure inside the bamboo section and culm surface temperature were measured. SEM micrographs of rhizome and bud portions of bamboo culms were also recorded. We found very high CO2 effluxes from culm surface, nodes and buds of bamboos. Positive gas pressure and very high concentrations of CO2 were observed inside hollow sections of bamboos. The CO2 effluxes observed from bamboos were very high compared to their carbon sequestration potential. Our measurements suggest that bamboos are net emitters of CO2 during their lifespan. © 2016 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  3. Redeposition of etch products on sidewalls during SiO2 etching in a fluorocarbon plasma. I. Effect of particle emission from the bottom surface in a CF4 plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Jae-Ho; Hwang, Sung-Wook; Lee, Gyeo-Re; Moon, Sang Heup

    2002-01-01

    The effect of etch-product redeposition on sidewall properties during the etching of step-shaped SiO 2 patterns in a CF 4 plasma was examined using a Faraday cage located in a transformer coupled plasma etcher. Sidewall properties were observed for two cases: with and without particles emitted from the bottom surface in normal contact with the sidewall. Particles sputtered from the bottom surface were redeposited on the sidewall, which contributes to the formation of a passivation layer on the surface of the latter. The passivation layer consisted of silicon oxide, Si x O y , and fluorocarbon, C x F y , the latter comprising the major species. Ar plasma experiments confirmed that C x F y or a fluorocarbon polymer must be present on the sidewall in order for the Si x O y species to be deposited on the surface. The redeposited particles, which were largely F-deficient fluorocarbon species, as evidenced by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses, functioned as precursors for fluorocarbon polymerization, resulting in a rough sidewall surface. The chemical etch rates of SiO 2 were retarded by the redeposition of particles, which eventually formed a thick layer, eventually covering the bulk SiO 2 . Auger electron spectroscopy analyses of the sidewall surface affected by the emission from the bottom suggest that the surface consists of three distinct layers: a surface-carbon layer, a redeposition-etch combined layer, and bulk SiO 2

  4. Development of an online database of typical food portion sizes in Irish population groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Jacqueline; Walton, Janette; Flynn, Albert

    2013-01-01

    The Irish Food Portion Sizes Database (available at www.iuna.net) describes typical portion weights for an extensive range of foods and beverages for Irish children, adolescents and adults. The present paper describes the methodologies used to develop the database and some key characteristics of the portion weight data contained therein. The data are derived from three large, cross-sectional food consumption surveys carried out in Ireland over the last decade: the National Children's Food Survey (2003-2004), National Teens' Food Survey (2005-2006) and National Adult Nutrition Survey (2008-2010). Median, 25th and 75th percentile portion weights are described for a total of 545 items across the three survey groups, split by age group or sex as appropriate. The typical (median) portion weights reported for adolescents and adults are similar for many foods, while those reported for children are notably smaller. Adolescent and adult males generally consume larger portions than their female counterparts, though similar portion weights may be consumed where foods are packaged in unit amounts (for example, pots of yoghurt). The inclusion of energy under-reporters makes little difference to the estimation of typical portion weights in adults. The data have wide-ranging applications in dietary assessment and food labelling, and will serve as a useful reference against which to compare future portion size data from the Irish population. The present paper provides a useful context for researchers and others wishing to use the Irish Food Portion Sizes Database, and may guide researchers in other countries in establishing similar databases of their own.

  5. Estimation of Leaf Area Index and its Sunlit Portion from DSCOVR EPIC data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knyazikhin, Y.; Yang, B.; Mottus, M.; Rautiainen, M.; Stenberg, P.; Yan, L.; Chen, C.; Yan, K.; Park, T.; Myneni, R. B.; Song, W.

    2016-12-01

    The NASA's Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) onboard NOAA's Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) mission was launched on February 11, 2015 to the Sun-Earth Lagrangian L1 point where it began to collect radiance data of the entire sunlit Earth at 16 km resolution (in equatorial zone) every 65 to 110 min in June 2015. It provides imageries in near backscattering directions with the scattering angle between 168o and 176o at ten UV to Near-IR narrow spectral bands centered at 317.5 (band width 1.0) nm, 325.0 (1.0) nm, 340.0 (3.0) nm, 388.0 (3.0) nm, 433.0 (3.0) nm, 551.0 (3.0) nm, 680.0 (1.7) nm, 687.8 (0.6) nm, 764.0 (1.7) nm and 779.5 (2.0) nm. This poster presents the theoretical basis of the algorithm designed for the generation of leaf area index (LAI) and diurnal course of sunlit leaf area index (SLAI) from EPIC Bidirectional Reflectance Factor of vegetated land. LAI and SLAI are defined as the total hemi-surface and sunlit leaf semi-surface per unit ground area. Whereas LAI is a standard product of many satellite the SLAI is a new satellite-derived parameter. Sunlit and shaded leaves exhibit different radiative response to incident Photosynthetically Active Radiation (400-700 nm), which in turn triggers various physiological and physical processes required for the functioning of plants. Leaf area and its sunlit portion are key state parameters in most ecosystem productivity and carbon/nitrogen cycle. Status of the EPIC LAI/SLAI product and its validation strategy are also discussed in this poster.

  6. Impact of shipping emissions on ozone levels over Europe: assessing the relative importance of the Standard Nomenclature for Air Pollution (SNAP) categories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagaris, Efthimios; Stergiou, Ioannis; Sotiropoulou, Rafaella-Eleni P

    2017-06-01

    The impact of shipping emissions on ozone mixing ratio over Europe is assessed for July 2006 using the Community Multiscale Air Quality modeling system and the Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research anthropogenic emission inventory. Results suggest that ship-induced ozone contribution to the total surface ozone exceeds 5% over the sea and near the coastline, while an increase up to 5% is simulated over a large portion of the European land. The largest impact (i.e., an increase up to 30%) is simulated over the Mediterranean Sea. In addition, shipping emissions are simulated to increase NO 2 mixing ratio more than 90%, locally, and to modify the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere through hydroxyl radical formation (increase by 20-60% over the sea along the European coasts and near the coastal zone). Therefore, emissions from ships may counteract the benefits derived from the anthropogenic emissions reduction strategies over the continent. Simulations suggest regions where shipping emissions have a major impact on ozone mixing ratio compared to individual anthropogenic emission sector categories. Shipping emissions are estimated to play an important role on ozone levels compared to road transport sector near the coastal zone. The impact of shipping emissions on ozone formation is also profound over a great part of the European land compared to the rest of anthropogenic emission categories.

  7. Portion size

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of cards One 3-ounce (84 grams) serving of fish is a checkbook One-half cup (40 grams) ... for the smallest size. By eating a small hamburger instead of a large, you will save about 150 calories. ...

  8. Predicting the emissive power of hydrocarbon pool fires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz, Miguel; Planas, Eulalia; Ferrero, Fabio; Casal, Joaquim

    2007-01-01

    The emissive power (E) of a flame depends on the size of the fire and the type of fuel. In fact, it changes significantly over the flame surface: the zones of luminous flame have high emittance, while those covered by smoke have low E values. The emissive power of each zone (that is, the luminous or clear flame and the non-luminous or smoky flame) and the portion of total flame area they occupy must be assessed when a two-zone model is used. In this study, data obtained from an experimental set-up were used to estimate the emissive power of fires and its behaviour as a function of pool size. The experiments were performed using gasoline and diesel oil as fuel. Five concentric circular pools (1.5, 3, 4, 5 and 6 m in diameter) were used. Appropriate instruments were employed to determine the main features of the fires. By superimposing IR and VHS images it was possible to accurately identify the luminous and non-luminous zones of the fire. Mathematical expressions were obtained that give a more accurate prediction of E lum , E soot and the average emissive power of a fire as a function of its luminous and smoky zones. These expressions can be used in a two-zone model to obtain a better prediction of the thermal radiation. The value of the radiative fraction was determined from the thermal flux measured with radiometers. An expression is also proposed for estimating the radiative fraction

  9. Impacts of future climate change and effects of biogenic emissions on surface ozone and particulate matter concentrations in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. F. Lam

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Simulations of present and future average regional ozone and PM2.5 concentrations over the United States were performed to investigate the potential impacts of global climate change and emissions on regional air quality using CMAQ. Various emissions and climate conditions with different biogenic emissions and domain resolutions were implemented to study the sensitivity of future air quality trends from the impacts of changing biogenic emissions. A comparison of GEOS-Chem and CMAQ was performed to investigate the effect of downscaling on the prediction of future air quality trends. For ozone, the impacts of global climate change are relatively smaller when compared to the impacts of anticipated future emissions reduction, except for the Northeast area, where increasing biogenic emissions due to climate change have stronger positive effects (increases to the regional ozone air quality. The combination effect from both climate change and emission reductions leads to approximately a 10 % or 5 ppbv decrease of the maximum daily average eight-hour ozone (MDA8 over the Eastern United States. For PM2.5, the impacts of global climate change have shown insignificant effect, where as the impacts of anticipated future emissions reduction account for the majority of overall PM2.5 reductions. The annual average 24-h PM2.5 of the future-year condition was found to be about 40 % lower than the one from the present-year condition, of which 60 % of its overall reductions are contributed to by the decrease of SO4 and NO3 particulate matters. Changing the biogenic emissions model increases the MDA8 ozone by about 5–10 % or 3–5 ppbv in the Northeast area. Conversely, it reduces the annual average PM2.5 by 5 % or 1.0 μg m−3 in the Southeast region.

  10. How much should I eat? Estimation of meal portions in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milos, Gabriella; Kuenzli, Cornelia; Soelch, Chantal Martin; Schumacher, Sonja; Moergeli, Hanspeter; Mueller-Pfeiffer, Christoph

    2013-04-01

    Pathological concern regarding one's weight and weight gain is a crucial feature of anorexia nervosa. Consequently, anorexia nervosa patients often claim that they are uncertain regarding the amount of food they should eat. The present study investigated whether individuals with anorexia nervosa show an altered estimation of meal portion sizes and whether this estimation is modulated by an intent-to-eat instruction (where patients are asked to imagine having to eat the presented meal), meal type and meal portion size. Twenty-four women with anorexia nervosa and 27 healthy women estimated, using a visual analogue scale, the size of six different portions of three different meals, with and without intent-to-eat instructions. Subjects with anorexia nervosa estimated the size of small and medium meal portions (but not large meal servings) as being significantly larger, compared to estimates of healthy controls. The overestimation of small meal portions by anorexia nervosa subjects was significantly greater in the intent-to-eat, compared to general, condition. These findings suggest that disturbed perceptions associated with anorexia nervosa not only include interoceptive awareness (i.e., body weight and shape), but also extend to external disorder-related objects such as meal portion size. Specific therapeutic interventions, such as training regarding meal portion evaluation, could address these difficulties. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. The influence of front-of-pack nutrition information on consumers' portion size perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Hannah May; de Vlieger, Nienke; Collins, Clare; Bucher, Tamara

    2017-08-01

    Issue addressed Portion size guidance strategies have been suggested as an important component of weight management; therefore, the Health Star Rating (HSR) front-of-pack labels could influence consumers' portion-size decisions. However, this has not been investigated to date. This study aims to evaluate whether presenting energy content information and HSRs influences portion size self-selection of specific foods and meals. Methods Adults were randomly assigned to one of three experimental groups in this randomised controlled experiment. Each participant was given either a kJ/100g food label or a HSR label, or was given no information on nutrient composition. They were then asked to serve themselves an adequate portion of breakfast cereal (Kellogg's Nutri-Grain), fruit salad and chocolate, plus a three-component meal (chicken, fries and mixed vegetables). Portion serves and meal weights were compared between each experimental group using ANOVA and the discretionary foods were also compared with the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating (AGHE). Results Neither the kilojoule nor HSR information influenced the self-served portion size of foods or meal components. Mean self-served portion size of the discretionary foods were significantly greater than the standard serving sizes as specified in the AGHE. Conclusion Although food labels have the potential to assist consumers in making product choices, this study indicates that presenting nutrition information does not affect portion size decisions in young adults. So what? Strategies that assist consumers to choose appropriate portion sizes should be developed as a weight management tool.

  12. How big is a food portion? A pilot study in Australian families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Clare E; Bucher, Tamara; Taylor, Aimee; Pezdirc, Kristine; Lucas, Hannah; Watson, Jane; Rollo, Megan; Duncanson, Kerith; Hutchesson, Melinda J; Burrows, Tracy

    2015-08-01

    It is not known whether individuals can accurately estimate the portion size of foods usually consumed relative to standard serving sizes in national food selection guides. The aim of the present cross-sectional pilot study was to quantify what adults and children deem a typical portion for a variety of foods and compare these with the serving sizes specified in the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating (AGHE). Adults and children were independently asked to serve out their typical portion of 10 common foods (rice, pasta, breakfast cereal, chocolate, confectionary, ice cream, meat, vegetables, soft drink and milk). They were also asked to serve what they perceived a small, medium and large portion of each food to be. Each portion was weighed and recorded by an assessor and compared with the standard AGHE serving sizes. Twenty-one individuals (nine mothers, one father, 11 children) participated in the study. There was a large degree of variability in portion sizes measured out by both parents and children, with means exceeding the standard AGHE serving size for all items, except for soft drink and milk, where mean portion sizes were less than the AGHE serving size. The greatest mean overestimations were for pasta (155%; mean 116 g; range 94-139 g) and chocolate (151%; mean 38 g; range 25-50 g), each of which represented approximately 1.5 standard AGHE servings. The findings of the present study indicate that there is variability between parents' and children's estimation of typical portion sizes compared with national recommendations. SO WHAT? Dietary interventions to improve individuals' dietary patterns should target education regarding portion size.

  13. Association between excess weight and beverage portion size consumed in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilana Nogueira Bezerra

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To describe the beverage portion size consumed and to evaluate their association with excess weight in Brazil. METHODS We used data from the National Dietary Survey, which included individuals with two days of food record aged over 20 years (n = 24,527 individuals. The beverages were categorized into six groups: soft drink, 100% fruit juice, fruit drink, alcoholic beverage, milk, and coffee or tea. We estimated the average portion consumed for each group and we evaluated, using linear regression, the association between portion size per group and the variables of age, sex, income, and nutritional status. We tested the association between portion size and excess weight using Poisson regression, adjusted for age, sex, income, and total energy intake. RESULTS The most frequently consumed beverages in Brazil were coffee and tea, followed by 100% fruit juices, soft drinks, and milk. Alcoholic beverages presented the highest average in the portion size consumed, followed by soft drinks, 100% fruit juice, fruit drink, and milk. Portion size showed positive association with excess weight only in the soft drink (PR = 1.19, 95%CI 1.10–1.27 and alcoholic beverage groups (PR = 1.20, 95%CI, 1.11–1.29, regardless of age, sex, income, and total energy intake. CONCLUSIONS Alcoholic beverages and soft drinks presented the highest averages in portion size and positive association with excess weight. Public health interventions should address the issue of portion sizes offered to consumers by discouraging the consumption of large portions, especially sweetened and low nutritional beverages.

  14. Novel Cavities in Vertical External Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers for Emission in Broad Spectral Region by Means of Nonlinear Frequency Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukowski, Michal L.

    Optically pumped semiconductor vertical external cavity surface emitting lasers (VECSEL) were first demonstrated in the mid 1990's. Due to the unique design properties of extended cavity lasers VECSELs have been able to provide tunable, high-output powers while maintaining excellent beam quality. These features offer a wide range of possible applications in areas such as medicine, spectroscopy, defense, imaging, communications and entertainment. Nowadays, newly developed VECSELs, cover the spectral regions from red (600 nm) to around 5 microm. By taking the advantage of the open cavity design, the emission can be further expanded to UV or THz regions by the means of intracavity nonlinear frequency generation. The objective of this dissertation is to investigate and extend the capabilities of high-power VECSELs by utilizing novel nonlinear conversion techniques. Optically pumped VECSELs based on GaAs semiconductor heterostructures have been demonstrated to provide exceptionally high output powers covering the 900 to 1200 nm spectral region with diffraction limited beam quality. The free space cavity design allows for access to the high intracavity circulating powers where high efficiency nonlinear frequency conversions and wavelength tuning can be obtained. As an introduction, this dissertation consists of a brief history of the development of VECSELs as well as wafer design, chip fabrication and resonator cavity design for optimal frequency conversion. Specifically, the different types of laser cavities such as: linear cavity, V-shaped cavity and patented T-shaped cavity are described, since their optimization is crucial for transverse mode quality, stability, tunability and efficient frequency conversion. All types of nonlinear conversions such as second harmonic, sum frequency and difference frequency generation are discussed in extensive detail. The theoretical simulation and the development of the high-power, tunable blue and green VECSEL by the means of type I

  15. Removing Traffic Emissions from CO2 Time Series Measured at a Tall Tower Using on-Road Measurements and WRF-Stilt Transport Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, A.; Rella, C.; Goeckede, M.; Hanson, C. V.; Yang, Z.; Law, B. E.

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, measurements of atmospheric carbon dioxide with high precision and accuracy have become increasingly important for climate change research, in particular to inform terrestrial biosphere models. Anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel burning have long been recognized to contribute a significant portion of the carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Here, we present an approach to remove the traffic related carbon dioxide emissions from mole fractions measured at a tall tower by using the corresponding carbon monoxide measurements in combination with footprint analyses and transport modeling. This technique improves the suitability of the CO2 data to be used in inverse modeling approaches of atmosphere-biosphere exchange that do not account for non-biotic portions of CO2. In our study region in Oregon, road traffic emissions are the biggest source of anthropogenic carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide. A three-day mobile campaign covering 1700 km of roads in northwestern Oregon was performed during summer of 2012 using a laser-based Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer. The mobile measurements incorporated different roads including main highways, urban streets, and back-roads, largely within the typical footprint of a tall CO2 observation tower in Oregon's Willamette Valley. For the first time, traffic related CO:CO2 emission ratios were measured directly at the sources during an on-road campaign under a variety of different driving conditions. An average emission ratio of 7.43 (±1.80) ppb CO per ppm CO2 was obtained for the study region and applied to separate the traffic related portion of CO2 from the mole fraction time series. The road traffic related portion of the CO2 mole fractions measured at the tower site reached maximum values from 9.8 to 12 ppm, depending on the height above the surface, during summer 2012.

  16. Validation of a food quantification picture book and portion sizes estimation applying perception and memory methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szenczi-Cseh, J; Horváth, Zs; Ambrus, Á

    2017-12-01

    We tested the applicability of EPIC-SOFT food picture series used in the context of a Hungarian food consumption survey gathering data for exposure assessment, and investigated errors in food portion estimation resulted from the visual perception and conceptualisation-memory. Sixty-two participants in three age groups (10 to foods. The results were considered acceptable if the relative difference between average estimated and actual weight obtained through the perception method was ≤25%, and the relative standard deviation of the individual weight estimates was food items were rated acceptable. Small portion sizes were tended to be overestimated, large ones were tended to be underestimated. Portions of boiled potato and creamed spinach were all over- and underestimated, respectively. Recalling the portion sizes resulted in overestimation with larger differences (up to 60.7%).

  17. A Qualitative Study of Soldier Perceptions of the Relative Importance of MRE Portion Size and Variety

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bell, R

    1999-01-01

    .... Bliss, Biggs Army Airfield, and Fort Leonard Wood during 1997 to understand how soldiers perceive Meal, Ready-to-Eat portion size and MRE variety and to begin to determine what types of trade offs...

  18. Opportunities and barriers for smaller portions in food service: lessons from marketing and behavioral economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riis, J

    2014-07-01

    This paper uses the frameworks and evidence from marketing and behavioral economics to highlight the opportunities and barriers for portion control in food service environments. Applying Kahneman's 'thinking fast and slow' concepts, it describes 10 strategies that can be effective in 'tricking' the consumer's fast cognitive system to make better decisions and in triggering the slow cognitive system to help prevent the fast system from making bad decisions. These strategies include shrinking defaults, elongating packages, increasing the visibility of small portions, offering more mixed virtue options, adding more small sizes, offering 'right-sized' standard portions, using meaningful size labels, adopting linear pricing, using temporal landmarks to push smaller portions and facilitating pre-commitment. For each of these strategies, I discuss the specific cost and revenue barriers that a food service operator would face if the strategy were adopted.

  19. 2009 St. Johns River Water Management District (SJRWMD) Lidar: Portions of Orange and Seminole Counties, Florida

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The project area covers 318 square miles in the eastern half of Seminole County plus portions of north central and northeast Orange County in the state of Florida....

  20. Opportunities and barriers for smaller portions in food service: lessons from marketing and behavioral economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riis, J

    2014-01-01

    This paper uses the frameworks and evidence from marketing and behavioral economics to highlight the opportunities and barriers for portion control in food service environments. Applying Kahneman's ‘thinking fast and slow' concepts, it describes 10 strategies that can be effective in ‘tricking' the consumer's fast cognitive system to make better decisions and in triggering the slow cognitive system to help prevent the fast system from making bad decisions. These strategies include shrinking defaults, elongating packages, increasing the visibility of small portions, offering more mixed virtue options, adding more small sizes, offering ‘right-sized' standard portions, using meaningful size labels, adopting linear pricing, using temporal landmarks to push smaller portions and facilitating pre-commitment. For each of these strategies, I discuss the specific cost and revenue barriers that a food service operator would face if the strategy were adopted. PMID:25033960

  1. Digital data for the Hazens Notch and a portion of the Lowell quadrangles, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Digital Data from VG03-3B Digital data for the Hazens Notch and a portion of the Lowell quadrangles, Vermont: Vermont Geological Survey Open File Report VG03-3B, The...

  2. The role of perceived stress and gender on portion selection patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, E X; Sim, A Y; Forde, C G; Cheon, B K

    2018-06-01

    Stress is linked to increased preferences and consumption of palatable energy dense foods, particularly among females. Despite the role of stress on potentially obesogenic eating habits, its effect on pre-meal planning, such as the selection of portion sizes, remain unknown. Here, we investigated the relationship between perceived stress, gender, and intended portion sizes for diverse foods. Across two studies, increased perceived stress predicted larger (higher energy) intended portion sizes across a variety of food items among females, but not males. Additionally, for females, increased perceived stress was associated with lowered expectations of the satiety of foods presented, suggesting a potential mechanism by which stress may influence decisions about portion size. These findings reveal that the potentially obesogenic effects of stress on food judgments and behaviours (particularly among females) are not only expressed within meals, but also during more deliberate stages of planning that precedes meals. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Association of Overweight with Food Portion Size among Adults of São Paulo - Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline Lopes Pereira

    Full Text Available Although studies show that portion size affects energy intake, few have demonstrated a link between portion size and weight status, especially in free-living populations. The objective of the present study was to assess the relationship between food portion sizes and overweight in a representative population of adults of São Paulo, Brazil.Cross-sectional population-based study with 1005 adults from São Paulo, Brazil. Dietary data were obtained from two 24-hour recalls. Reported foods were classified into groups and energy contribution, prevalence of consumers and portion sizes were calculated. Individuals were classified according to BMI in with and without overweight. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate the association between food portion sizes and being overweight.The most consumed food groups were: beans, breads/rolls, coffee/tea, milk, rice, and sugar. Rice, red meat, breads/rolls, and white meat were the groups with the highest percentage of contribution to total energy intake. Butter/margarine, toasts/biscuits, sugar, and cakes were the groups with the highest energy density. After adjustment for confounding variables, overweight was associated with larger portions of pizza (OR = 1.052; p = 0.048, red meat (OR = 1.025; p = 0.043, rice (OR = 1.033; p<0.001, salted snacks (OR = 1.078; p = 0.022, and soft drinks (OR = 1.016; p = 0.007.Larger portions of few food groups with different energy densities were associated with being overweight, suggesting that overweight may be related to the consumption of larger portion sizes of a series of food groups, not a food group alone. Additionally, we highlight the importance of considering underreporting as a confounding factor in these associations.

  4. Mutagenicity and oxidative damage induced by an organic extract of the particulate emissions from a simulation of the deepwater horizon surface oil burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMarini, David M; Warren, Sarah H; Lavrich, Katelyn; Flen, Alexis; Aurell, Johanna; Mitchell, William; Greenwell, Dale; Preston, William; Schmid, Judith E; Linak, William P; Hays, Michael D; Samet, James M; Gullett, Brian K

    2017-04-01

    Emissions from oil fires associated with the "Deepwater Horizon" explosion and oil discharge that began on April 20, 2010 in the Gulf of Mexico were analyzed chemically to only a limited extent at the time but were shown to induce oxidative damage in vitro and in mice. To extend this work, we burned oil floating on sea water and performed extensive chemical analyses of the emissions (Gullett et al., Marine Pollut Bull, in press, ). Here, we examine the ability of a dichloromethane extract of the particulate material with an aerodynamic size ≤ 2.5 µm (PM 2.5 ) from those emissions to induce oxidative damage in human lung cells in vitro and mutagenicity in 6 strains of Salmonella. The extract had a percentage of extractable organic material (EOM) of 7.0% and increased expression of the heme oxygenase (HMOX1) gene in BEAS-2B cells after exposure for 4 hr at 20 µg of EOM/ml. However, the extract did not alter mitochondrial respiration rate as measured by extracellular flux analysis. The extract was most mutagenic in TA100 +S9, indicative of a role for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), reflective of the high concentrations of PAHs in the emissions (1 g/kg of oil consumed). The extract had a mutagenicity emission factor of 1.8 ± 0.1 × 10 5 revertants/megajoule thermal in TA98 +S9, which was greater than that of diesel exhaust and within an order of magnitude of open burning of wood and plastic. Thus, organics from PM 2.5 of burning oil can induce oxidative responses in human airway epithelial cells and are highly mutagenic. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 58:162-171, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Effects of cooling portions of the head on human thermoregulatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuura, T; Tomioka, K; Harada, H; Iwanaga, K; Kikuchi, Y

    1996-03-01

    Seven healthy young male students participated in this study. Each subject sat on a chair in an anteroom at 25 degrees C for 30 min and then entered a climatic chamber, controlled at 40 degrees C and R.H. 50%, and sat on a chair for 90 min. Cooling of frontal portion including the region around the eyes (FC), occipital portion (OC), and temporal portion (TC) began after 50 min of entering. An experiment without head cooling (NC) was also made for the control measurement. Thermal comfort and thermal sensation were improved by head cooling, but response was the same regardless of portion cooled. Although rectal temperature, mean skin temperature and heart rate showed no significant effect due to head cooling, forearm skin blood flow (FBF), sweat rate (SR), and body weight loss (delta Wt) had a tendency to be depressed. FBF in FC and TC decreased during head cooling, but that in OC and NC did not change significantly, while SR in FC was depressed. delta Wt showed total sweating to decrease by FC and TC, and FC to have greater inhibitory effect on sweating than OC. Thermal strain was evaluated by the modified Craig Index (I(s)). I(s) in FC decreased significantly more than in NC. Cooling of other portions of the head had no significant effect on I(s). Cooling of the frontal portion of the head may thus be concluded to have the most effect on thermoregulatory response in a hot environment.

  6. Formative evaluation of a mobile liquid portion size estimation interface for people with varying literacy skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudry, Beenish Moalla; Connelly, Kay; Siek, Katie A; Welch, Janet L

    2013-12-01

    Chronically ill people, especially those with low literacy skills, often have difficulty estimating portion sizes of liquids to help them stay within their recommended fluid limits. There is a plethora of mobile applications that can help people monitor their nutritional intake but unfortunately these applications require the user to have high literacy and numeracy skills for portion size recording. In this paper, we present two studies in which the low- and the high-fidelity versions of a portion size estimation interface, designed using the cognitive strategies adults employ for portion size estimation during diet recall studies, was evaluated by a chronically ill population with varying literacy skills. The low fidelity interface was evaluated by ten patients who were all able to accurately estimate portion sizes of various liquids with the interface. Eighteen participants did an in situ evaluation of the high-fidelity version incorporated in a diet and fluid monitoring mobile application for 6 weeks. Although the accuracy of the estimation cannot be confirmed in the second study but the participants who actively interacted with the interface showed better health outcomes by the end of the study. Based on these findings, we provide recommendations for designing the next iteration of an accurate and low literacy-accessible liquid portion size estimation mobile interface.

  7. Improving accuracy of portion-size estimations through a stimulus equivalence paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausman, Nicole L; Borrero, John C; Fisher, Alyssa; Kahng, SungWoo

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity continues to increase in the United States (Gordon-Larsen, The, & Adair, 2010). Obesity can be attributed, in part, to overconsumption of energy-dense foods. Given that overeating plays a role in the development of obesity, interventions that teach individuals to identify and consume appropriate portion sizes are warranted. Specifically, interventions that teach individuals to estimate portion sizes correctly without the use of aids may be critical to the success of nutrition education programs. The current study evaluated the use of a stimulus equivalence paradigm to teach 9 undergraduate students to estimate portion size accurately. Results suggested that the stimulus equivalence paradigm was effective in teaching participants to make accurate portion size estimations without aids, and improved accuracy was observed in maintenance sessions that were conducted 1 week after training. Furthermore, 5 of 7 participants estimated the target portion size of novel foods during extension sessions. These data extend existing research on teaching accurate portion-size estimations and may be applicable to populations who seek treatment (e.g., overweight or obese children and adults) to teach healthier eating habits. © Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  8. Enhancement of single particle rare earth doped NaYF4: Yb, Er emission with a gold shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ling; Green, Kory; Hallen, Hans; Lim, Shuang Fang

    2015-01-01

    Upconversion of infrared light to visible light has important implications for bioimaging. However, the small absorption cross-section of rare earth dopants has limited the efficiency of these anti-Stokes nanomaterials. We present enhanced excitation absorption and single particle fluorescent emission of sodium yttrium fluoride, NaYF 4 : Yb, Er based upconverting nanoparticles coated with a gold nanoshell through surface plasmon resonance. The single gold-shell coated nanoparticles show enhanced absorption in the near infrared, enhanced total emission intensity, and increased green relative to red emission. We also show differences in enhancement between single and aggregated gold shell nanoparticles. The surface plasmon resonance of the gold-shell coated nanoparticle is shown to be dependent on the shell thickness. In contrast to other reported results, our single particle experimental observations are corroborated by finite element calculations that show where the green/red emission enhancement occurs, and what portion of the enhancement is due to electromagnetic effects. We find that the excitation enhancement and green/red emission ratio enhancement occurs at the corners and edges of the doped emissive core. (paper)

  9. Presence of a Temperature Gradient Among Genital Tract Portions and the Thermal Changes Within These Portions Over the Estrous Cycle in Beef Cows

    OpenAIRE

    EL-SHEIKH ALI, Hossam; KITAHARA, Go; TAMURA, Youji; KOBAYASHI, Ikuo; HEMMI, Koichiro; TORISU, Shidow; SAMESHIMA, Hiroshi; HORII, Yoichiro; ZAABEL, Samy; KAMIMURA, Shunichi

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the present study was to describe the temperature of the different portions of the female genital tract and their relation to rectal temperature and to investigate the effect of steroid hormones profiles on these variables over the estrous cycle in cattle. Four nonpregnant Japanese Black cows were investigated daily over two successive estrous cycles using a digital thermometer with a long probe and rounded-end sensor to record the temperature of the rectum (RT), vagina (V...

  10. Emissions Trading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woerdman, Edwin; Backhaus, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    Emissions trading is a market-based instrument to achieve environmental targets in a cost-effective way by allowing legal entities to buy and sell emission rights. The current international dissemination and intended linking of emissions trading schemes underlines the growing relevance of this

  11. Utilizing TEMPO surface estimates to determine changes in emissions, community exposure and environmental impacts from cement kilns across North America using alternative fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegg, M. J.; Gibson, M. D.; Asamany, E.

    2015-12-01

    A major problem faced by all North American (NA) Governments is managing solid waste from residential and non-residential sources. One way to mitigate the need to expand landfill sites across NA is waste diversion for use as alternative fuel in industries such as cement manufacture. Currently, waste plastic, tires, waste shingles and other high carbon content waste destined for landfill are being explored, or currently used, as an alternative supplemental fuels for use in cement kilns across NA. While this is an attractive, environmentally sustainable solution, significant knowledge gaps remain in our fundamental understanding of whether these alternative fuels may lead to increased air pollution emissions from cement kilns across NA. The long-term objective of using TEMPO is to advance fundamental understanding of uncharacterized air pollution emissions and to assess the actual or potential environmental and health impacts of these emissions from cement kilns across NA. TEMPO measurements will be made in concert with in-situ observations augmented by air dispersion, land-use regression and receptor modelling. This application of TEMPO follows on from current research on a series of bench scale and pilot studies for Lafarge Canada Inc., that investigated the change in combustion emissions from various mixtures of coal (C), petroleum coke (PC) and non-recyclable alternative fuels. From our work we demonstrated that using an alternative fuel mixture in a cement kiln has potential to reduce emissions of CO2 by 34%; reduce NOx by 80%, and reduce fuel SO2 emissions by 98%. We also provided evidence that there would be a significant reduction in the formation of secondary ground-level ozone (O3) and secondary PM2.5 in downwind stack plumes if alternative waste derived fuels are used. The application of air dispersion, source apportionment, land use regression; together with remote sensing offers a powerful set of tools with the potential to improve air pollution

  12. Surface and interface states of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} thin films investigated by optical second-harmonic generation and terahertz emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamh, S. Y.; Park, S.-H.; Lee, J. S., E-mail: jsl@gist.ac.kr [Department of Physics and Photon Science, School of Physics and Chemistry, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Jerng, S.-K.; Jeon, J. H.; Chun, S. H. [Department of Physics and Graphene Research Institute, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, J. H.; Kahng, S. J. [Department of Physics, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yu, K.; Choi, E. J. [Department of Physics, University or Seoul, Seoul 130-743 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, S.; Choi, S.-H. [Department of Applied Physics, College of Applied Science, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Bansal, N. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rutgers, The state University of New Jersey, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Oh, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, The state University of New Jersey, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Park, Joonbum; Kho, Byung-Woo; Kim, Jun Sung [Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the surface and interface states of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} thin films by using the second-harmonic generation technique. Distinct from the surface of bulk crystals, the film surface and interface show the isotropic azimuth dependence of second-harmonic intensity, which is attributed to the formation of randomly oriented domains on the in-plane. Based on the nonlinear susceptibility deduced from the model fitting, we determine that the surface band bending induced in a space charge region occurs more strongly at the film interface facing the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate or capping layer compared with the interface facing the air. We demonstrate that distinct behavior of the terahertz electric field emitted from the samples can provide further information about the surface electronic state of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}.

  13. Emission Facilities - Air Emission Plants

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — Represents the Primary Facility type Air Emission Plant (AEP) point features. Air Emissions Plant is a DEP primary facility type related to the Air Quality Program....

  14. Emission inventory; Inventaire des emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontelle, J.P. [CITEPA, Centre Interprofessionnel Technique d`Etudes de la Pollution Atmospherique, 75 - Paris (France)

    1997-12-31

    Statistics on air pollutant (sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides and ammonium) emissions, acid equivalent emissions and their evolution since 1990 in the various countries of Europe and the USA, are presented.